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Sample records for physiologic oxygen tensions

  1. Macromolecular crowding meets oxygen tension in human mesenchymal stem cell culture - A step closer to physiologically relevant in vitro organogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigognini, Daniela; Gaspar, Diana; Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Alagesan, Senthilkumar; Sanz-Nogués, Clara; Griffin, Matthew; O’Brien, Timothy; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2016-01-01

    Modular tissue engineering is based on the cells’ innate ability to create bottom-up supramolecular assemblies with efficiency and efficacy still unmatched by man-made devices. Although the regenerative potential of such tissue substitutes has been documented in preclinical and clinical setting, the prolonged culture time required to develop an implantable device is associated with phenotypic drift and/or cell senescence. Herein, we demonstrate that macromolecular crowding significantly enhances extracellular matrix deposition in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell culture at both 20% and 2% oxygen tension. Although hypoxia inducible factor - 1α was activated at 2% oxygen tension, increased extracellular matrix synthesis was not observed. The expression of surface markers and transcription factors was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. The multilineage potential was also maintained, albeit adipogenic differentiation was significantly reduced in low oxygen tension cultures, chondrogenic differentiation was significantly increased in macromolecularly crowded cultures and osteogenic differentiation was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. Collectively, these data pave the way for the development of bottom-up tissue equivalents based on physiologically relevant developmental processes. PMID:27478033

  2. Macromolecular crowding meets oxygen tension in human mesenchymal stem cell culture - A step closer to physiologically relevant in vitro organogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigognini, Daniela; Gaspar, Diana; Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Alagesan, Senthilkumar; Sanz-Nogués, Clara; Griffin, Matthew; O'Brien, Timothy; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2016-08-01

    Modular tissue engineering is based on the cells’ innate ability to create bottom-up supramolecular assemblies with efficiency and efficacy still unmatched by man-made devices. Although the regenerative potential of such tissue substitutes has been documented in preclinical and clinical setting, the prolonged culture time required to develop an implantable device is associated with phenotypic drift and/or cell senescence. Herein, we demonstrate that macromolecular crowding significantly enhances extracellular matrix deposition in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell culture at both 20% and 2% oxygen tension. Although hypoxia inducible factor - 1α was activated at 2% oxygen tension, increased extracellular matrix synthesis was not observed. The expression of surface markers and transcription factors was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. The multilineage potential was also maintained, albeit adipogenic differentiation was significantly reduced in low oxygen tension cultures, chondrogenic differentiation was significantly increased in macromolecularly crowded cultures and osteogenic differentiation was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. Collectively, these data pave the way for the development of bottom-up tissue equivalents based on physiologically relevant developmental processes.

  3. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  4. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta...

  5. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta block...

  6. Brain tissue oxygen tension and its response to physiological manipulations: influence of distance from injury site in a swine model of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawryluk, Gregory W J; Phan, Nicolas; Ferguson, Adam R; Morabito, Diane; Derugin, Nikita; Stewart, Campbell L; Knudson, M Margaret; Manley, Geoffrey; Rosenthal, Guy

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE The optimal site for placement of tissue oxygen probes following traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains unresolved. The authors used a previously described swine model of focal TBI and studied brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) at the sites of contusion, proximal and distal to contusion, and in the contralateral hemisphere to determine the effect of probe location on PbtO2 and to assess the effects of physiological interventions on PbtO2 at these different sites. METHODS A controlled cortical impact device was used to generate a focal lesion in the right frontal lobe in 12 anesthetized swine. PbtO2 was measured using Licox brain tissue oxygen probes placed at the site of contusion, in pericontusional tissue (proximal probe), in the right parietal region (distal probe), and in the contralateral hemisphere. PbtO2 was measured during normoxia, hyperoxia, hypoventilation, and hyperventilation. RESULTS Physiological interventions led to expected changes, including a large increase in partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood with hyperoxia, increased intracranial pressure (ICP) with hypoventilation, and decreased ICP with hyperventilation. Importantly, PbtO2 decreased substantially with proximity to the focal injury (contusion and proximal probes), and this difference was maintained at different levels of fraction of inspired oxygen and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood. In the distal and contralateral probes, hypoventilation and hyperventilation were associated with expected increased and decreased PbtO2 values, respectively. However, in the contusion and proximal probes, these effects were diminished, consistent with loss of cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity at and near the injury site. Similarly, hyperoxia led to the expected rise in PbtO2 only in the distal and contralateral probes, with little or no effect in the proximal and contusion probes, respectively. CONCLUSIONS PbtO2 measurements are strongly influenced by the distance from the

  7. Changes in arterial oxygen tension and physiological status in resting, unrestrained Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus (L.) exposed to mild hypoxia and hyperoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, A; Rosseland, B O; Thorarensen, H; Kiessling, A

    2011-03-01

    In arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus, arterial blood partial pressures of oxygen (PaO2) and carbon dioxide increased with increasing water oxygen tension (PwO2), while the water to arterial PO2 difference (PwO2-PaO2) did not change in relation to PwO2.

  8. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinet, Frédéric; Casetti, Luana; François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude; Pillet, Sylvie

    2013-09-01

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morinet, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.morinet@sls.aphp.fr [Centre des Innovations Thérapeutiques en Oncologie et Hématologie (CITOH), CHU Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité Paris, Paris (France); Casetti, Luana [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); Laboratoire d' Hématologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Boulogne (France); Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin en Yvelynes, Versailles (France); Pillet, Sylvie [Laboratoire de Bactériologie-Virologie-Hygiène, CHU de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne (France); Université de Lyon et Université de Saint-Etienne, Jean Monnet, GIMAP EA3064, F-42023 Saint-Etienne, Lyon (France)

    2013-09-15

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition. - Highlights: • Oxygen tension level regulates viral replication in vitro and possibly in vivo. • Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) is the principal factor involved in Oxygen tension level. • HIF-1α upregulates gene expression for example of HIV, JC and Kaposi sarcoma viruses. • In addition to classical chemotherapy inhibition of HIF-1α may constitute a new track to treat human viral infections.

  10. Transcutaneous Determination of Arterial Oxygen Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, A.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Evaluated were two techniques (the conventional method and the new transcutaneous method) of measuring arterial oxygen tension in 20 severely ill preterm and term infants and in 70 healthy infants. (Author/CL)

  11. Oxygen tension affects lubricin expression in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, Taku; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Okuno, Hiroshi; Itoi, Eiji

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the effects of oxygen tension on lubricin expression in bovine chondrocytes and cartilage explants and a role for hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α in regulating lubricin expression was investigated using a murine chondroprogenitor cell line, ATDC5, and bovine chondrocytes isolated from superficial and middle/deep zones of femoral cartilage. ATDC5 cells and bovine chondrocytes were cultured in micromass under different oxygen tensions (21%, 5%, and 1%). ATDC5 cells and middle/deep zone chondrocytes that initially had low lubricin expression levels were also cultured with or without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to determine lubricin and chondrogenic marker gene mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry was used to assess lubricin protein expression. Explant cartilage plugs cultured under different oxygen tensions were also subjected to immunohistological analysis for lubricin. HIF-1α gene silencing was achieved by electroporatic transfer into ATDC5 cells. A low oxygen tension reduced lubricin gene expression levels in bovine superficial chondrocytes, TGF-β1-treated middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and TGF-β1-treated ATDC5 cells. Lubricin expression in explant cartilage was also suppressed under hypoxia. HIF-1α gene silencing in ATDC5 cells attenuated the lubricin expression response to the oxygen tension. These results corroborate with previous studies that the oxygen tension regulates lubricin gene expression and suggest that HIF-1α plays an important role in this regulation. The normal distribution of lubricin in articular cartilage may be due to the hypoxic oxygen environment of cartilage as it is an avascular tissue. An oxygen tension gradient may be a key factor for engineering cartilage tissue with a layered morphology.

  12. Transcutaneous oxygen tension in imminent foot gangrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, K H

    1978-01-01

    Transcutaneous oxygen tension at 44 degree C and maximal isotope clearance (90m Tc-pretechnetate + histramine) just proximal to the 1st toe and systolic toe blood pressure (strain gauge) were studied on a tilt table in patients with various degrees of obstructive arteriosclerotic disease. In legs...... the arterioles into the tissue sink and counter current gas shunting. The hypoxia in spite of a positive perfusion pressure up to 50 mmHg explains our experience that ischemic ulcers in feet such low pressures never heal.......Transcutaneous oxygen tension at 44 degree C and maximal isotope clearance (90m Tc-pretechnetate + histramine) just proximal to the 1st toe and systolic toe blood pressure (strain gauge) were studied on a tilt table in patients with various degrees of obstructive arteriosclerotic disease. In legs...... with moderate obstruction, the oxygen tension reached zero at a toe systolic blood pressure of 5--10 mmHg (tilt toe up) and reached arterial oxygen tension at about 50 to 70 mmHg (tilt toe down). In legs withsevere arterial obstruction and ischaemic rest pain, oxygen tension rose from zero not before systolic...

  13. Dorzolamide increases retinal oxygen tension after branch retinal vein occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noergaard, Michael Hove; Bach-Holm, Daniella; Scherfig, Erik;

    2008-01-01

    To study the effect of dorzolamide on the preretinal oxygen tension (RPO(2)) in retinal areas affected by experimental branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) in pigs.......To study the effect of dorzolamide on the preretinal oxygen tension (RPO(2)) in retinal areas affected by experimental branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) in pigs....

  14. Low oxygen tension enhances hepatitis C virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilaki, N; Kalliampakou, K I; Kotta-Loizou, I; Befani, C; Liakos, P; Simos, G; Mentis, A F; Kalliaropoulos, A; Doumba, P P; Smirlis, D; Foka, P; Bauhofer, O; Poenisch, M; Windisch, M P; Lee, M E; Koskinas, J; Bartenschlager, R; Mavromara, P

    2013-03-01

    Low oxygen tension exerts a significant effect on the replication of several DNA and RNA viruses in cultured cells. In vitro propagation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has thus far been studied under atmospheric oxygen levels despite the fact that the liver tissue microenvironment is hypoxic. In this study, we investigated the efficiency of HCV production in actively dividing or differentiating human hepatoma cells cultured under low or atmospheric oxygen tensions. By using both HCV replicons and infection-based assays, low oxygen was found to enhance HCV RNA replication whereas virus entry and RNA translation were not affected. Hypoxia signaling pathway-focused DNA microarray and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed an upregulation of genes related to hypoxic stress, glycolytic metabolism, cell growth, and proliferation when cells were kept under low (3% [vol/vol]) oxygen tension, likely reflecting cell adaptation to anaerobic conditions. Interestingly, hypoxia-mediated enhancement of HCV replication correlated directly with the increase in anaerobic glycolysis and creatine kinase B (CKB) activity that leads to elevated ATP production. Surprisingly, activation of hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-α) was not involved in the elevation of HCV replication. Instead, a number of oncogenes known to be associated with glycolysis were upregulated and evidence that these oncogenes contribute to hypoxia-mediated enhancement of HCV replication was obtained. Finally, in liver biopsy specimens of HCV-infected patients, the levels of hypoxia and anaerobic metabolism markers correlated with HCV RNA levels. These results provide new insights into the impact of oxygen tension on the intricate HCV-host cell interaction.

  15. Multiple oxygen tension environments reveal diverse patterns of transcriptional regulation in primary astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Chadwick

    Full Text Available The central nervous system normally functions at O(2 levels which would be regarded as hypoxic by most other tissues. However, most in vitro studies of neurons and astrocytes are conducted under hyperoxic conditions without consideration of O(2-dependent cellular adaptation. We analyzed the reactivity of astrocytes to 1, 4 and 9% O(2 tensions compared to the cell culture standard of 20% O(2, to investigate their ability to sense and translate this O(2 information to transcriptional activity. Variance of ambient O(2 tension for rat astrocytes resulted in profound changes in ribosomal activity, cytoskeletal and energy-regulatory mechanisms and cytokine-related signaling. Clustering of transcriptional regulation patterns revealed four distinct response pattern groups that directionally pivoted around the 4% O(2 tension, or demonstrated coherent ascending/decreasing gene expression patterns in response to diverse oxygen tensions. Immune response and cell cycle/cancer-related signaling pathway transcriptomic subsets were significantly activated with increasing hypoxia, whilst hemostatic and cardiovascular signaling mechanisms were attenuated with increasing hypoxia. Our data indicate that variant O(2 tensions induce specific and physiologically-focused transcript regulation patterns that may underpin important physiological mechanisms that connect higher neurological activity to astrocytic function and ambient oxygen environments. These strongly defined patterns demonstrate a strong bias for physiological transcript programs to pivot around the 4% O(2 tension, while uni-modal programs that do not, appear more related to pathological actions. The functional interaction of these transcriptional 'programs' may serve to regulate the dynamic vascular responsivity of the central nervous system during periods of stress or heightened activity.

  16. The impact of arterial oxygen tension on venous oxygen saturation in circulatory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kwok Ming; Harding, Richard; Chamberlain, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    Central and mixed venous oxygen saturations have been used to guide resuscitation in circulatory failure, but the impact of arterial oxygen tension on venous oxygen saturation has not been thoroughly evaluated. This observational study investigated the impact of arterial oxygen tension on venous oxygen saturation in circulatory failure. Twenty critically ill patients with circulatory failure requiring mechanical ventilation and a pulmonary artery catheter in an intensive care unit in a tertiary hospital in Western Australia were recruited. Samples of arterial blood, central venous blood, and mixed venous blood were simultaneously and slowly drawn from the arterial, central venous, and pulmonary artery catheter, respectively, at baseline and after the patient was ventilated with 100% inspired oxygen for 5 min. The blood samples were redrawn after a significant change in cardiac index (>or =10%) from the baseline, occurring within 24 h of study enrollment while the patient was ventilated with the same baseline inspired oxygen concentration, was detected. An increase in inspired oxygen concentration significantly increased the arterial oxygen tension from 12.5 to 38.4 kPa (93.8-288 mmHg) (mean difference, 25.9 kPa; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.5-31.9 kPa; P arterial oxygen tension on venous oxygen saturation was more significant than the effect associated with changes in cardiac index (mean difference, 2.8%; 95% CI, -0.2% to 5.8%; P = 0.063). In conclusion, arterial oxygen tension has a significant effect on venous oxygen saturation, and this effect is more significant and consistent than the effect associated with changes in cardiac index.

  17. Hemodynamic parameters change earlier than tissue oxygen tension in hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, Gunther J; Fukui, Kimiko; Kimberger, Oliver; Hager, Helmut; Kurz, Andrea; Hiltebrand, Luzius B

    2010-05-15

    Untreated hypovolemia results in impaired outcome. This study tests our hypothesis whether general hemodynamic parameters detect acute blood loss earlier than monitoring parameters of regional tissue beds. Eight pigs (23-25 kg) were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. A pulmonary artery catheter and an arterial catheter were inserted. Tissue oxygen tension was measured with Clark-type electrodes in the jejunal and colonic wall, in the liver, and subcutaneously. Jejunal microcirculation was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Intravascular volume was optimized using difference in pulse pressure (dPP) to keep dPP below 13%. Sixty minutes after preparation, baseline measurements were taken. At first, 5% of total blood volume was withdrawn, followed by another 5% increment, and then in 10% increments until death. After withdrawal of 5% of estimated blood volume, dPP increased from 6.1% +/- 3.0% to 20.8% +/- 2.7% (P < 0.01). Mean arterial pressure (MAP), mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP) decreased with a blood loss of 10% (P < 0.01). Cardiac output (CO) changed after a blood loss of 20% (P < 0.05). Tissue oxygen tension in central organs, and blood flow in the jejunal muscularis decreased (P < 0.05) after a blood loss of 20%. Tissue oxygen tension in the skin, and jejunal mucosa blood flow decreased (P < 0.05) after a blood loss of 40% and 50%, respectively. In this hemorrhagic pig model systemic hemodynamic parameters were more sensitive to detect acute hypovolemia than tissue oxygen tension measurements or jejunal LDF measurements. Acute blood loss was detected first by dPP. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Oxygen Tension Regulates the Expression of Angiogenesis Factor by Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knighton, David R.; Hunt, Thomas K.; Scheuenstuhl, Heinz; Halliday, Betty J.; Werb, Zena; Banda, Michael J.

    1983-09-01

    When cultured in a hypoxic environment similar to that found in the center of a wound, macrophages secreted active angiogenesis factor into the medium. Under conditions similar to those of well-oxygenated tissue, macrophages did not secrete active angiogenesis factor. Macrophages that secreted the factor at hypoxic conditions stopped secreting it when returned to room air. Thus the control of angiogenesis in wound healing may be the result of macrophages responding to tissue oxygen tension without the necessity of interacting with other cell types or biochemical signals.

  19. Oxygen tension regulates the expression angiogenesis factor by macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knighton, D.R.; Hunt, T.K.; Scheuenstuhl, H.; Halliday, B.J.; Werb, Z.; Banda, M.J.

    1983-09-23

    When cultured in a hypoxic environment similar to that found in the center of a wound, macrophages secreted active angiogenesis factor into the medium. Under conditions similar to those of well-oxygenated tissue, macrophages did not secrete active angiogenesis factor. Macrophages that secreted the factor at hyposic conditions stopped secreting it when returned to room air. Thus the control of angiogenesis in wound healing may be the result of macrophages responding to tissue oxygen tension without the necessity of interacting with other cell types or biochemical signals.

  20. Oxygen tension regulated the expression of angiogenesis factor by macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knighton, D.R.; Hunt, T.K.; Scheuenstuhl, H.; Halliday, B.J.; Werb, Z.; Banda, M.J.

    1983-09-23

    When cultured in a hypoxic environment similar to that found in the center of a wound, macrophages secreted active angiogenesis factor into the medium. Under conditions similar to those of well-oxygenated tissue, macrophages did not secrete active angiogenesis factor. Macrophages that secreted the factor at hypoxic conditions stopped secreting it when returned to room air. Thus the control of angiogenesis in wound healing may be the result of macrophages responding to tissue oxygen tension without the necessity of interacting with other cell types or biochemical signals.

  1. Effect of epidural blockade and oxygen therapy on changes in subcutaneous oxygen tension after abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Pedersen, U; Erichsen, C J

    1994-01-01

    oxygen tension, arterial oxygen saturation, heart rate, and skin temperature on the day after operation, and arterial blood for gas analysis was drawn every 15 min during the study. A fluid challenge (10 ml saline/kg body wt) did not alter any of the measured values. The epidural blockade did not change...

  2. Low oxygen tension favored expansion and hematopoietic reconstitution of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells expanded from human cord blood-derived CD34(+) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyan; Du, Zheng; Cai, Haibo; Ye, Zhaoyang; Fan, Jinli; Tan, Wen-Song

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen tension is an important factor that regulates hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in both in vivo hematopoietic microenvironment and ex vivo culture system. Although the effect of oxygen tension on ex vivo expansion of HSCs was extensively studied, there were no clear descriptions on physiological function and gene expression analysis of HSCs under different oxygen tensions. In this study, the effects of oxygen tension on ex vivo expansion characteristics of human umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived CD34(+) cells are evaluated. Moreover, the physiological function of expanded CD34(+) cells was assessed by secondary expansion ability ex vivo and hematopoietic reconstitution ability in vivo. Also, genetic profiling was applied to analyze the expression of genes related to cell function. It was found that low oxygen tension favored expansion of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells. Additionally, CD34(+) cells expanded under low oxygen tension showed better secondary expansion ability and reconstitution ability than those under atmospheric oxygen concentration. Finally, the genetic profiling of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells cultured under low oxygen tension was more akin to freshly isolated cells. These results collectively demonstrate that low oxygen tension was able to better maintain both self-renewal and hematopoietic reconstitution potential and may lay an experimental basis for clinical transplantation of HSCs.

  3. A New Approach for On-Demand Generation of Various Oxygen Tensions for In Vitro Hypoxia Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Li

    Full Text Available The development of in vitro disease models closely mimicking the functions of human disease has captured increasing attention in recent years. Oxygen tensions and gradients play essential roles in modulating biological systems in both physiologic and pathologic events. Thus, controlling oxygen tension is critical for mimicking physiologically relevant in vivo environments for cell, tissue and organ research. We present a new approach for on-demand generation of various oxygen tensions for in vitro hypoxia models. Proof-of-concept prototypes have been developed for conventional cell culture microplate by immobilizing a novel oxygen-consuming biomaterial on the 3D-printed insert. For the first time, rapid (~3.8 minutes to reach 0.5% O2 from 20.9% O2 and precisely controlled oxygen tensions/gradients (2.68 mmHg per 50 μm distance were generated by exposing the biocompatible biomaterial to the different depth of cell culture media. In addition, changing the position of 3D-printed inserts with immobilized biomaterials relative to the cultured cells resulted in controllable and rapid changes in oxygen tensions (<130 seconds. Compared to the current technologies, our approach allows enhanced spatiotemporal resolution and accuracy of the oxygen tensions. Additionally, it does not interfere with the testing environment while maintaining ease of use. The elegance of oxygen tension manipulation introduced by our new approach will drastically improve control and lower the technological barrier of entry for hypoxia studies. Since the biomaterials can be immobilized in any devices, including microfluidic devices and 3D-printed tissues or organs, it will serve as the basis for a new generation of experimental models previously impossible or very difficult to implement.

  4. New technique for servo-control of arterial oxygen tension in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddis, I R; Collins, P; Levy, N M; Godfrey, S; Silverman, M

    1979-04-01

    Equipment has been developed for the servo-control of arterial oxygen tension in sick, newborn babies. Using an indwelling umbilical arterial oxygen electrode as sensor, the equipment successfully regulated the administration of oxygen to 12 newborn babies with respiratory distress syndrome, significantly improving the stability of arterial oxygen tension and lessening the duration of episodes of hypoxia and hyperoxia.

  5. Oxygen tension during biofilm growth influences the efficacy antimicrobial agents

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    Raquel Pippi ANTONIAZZI

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To compare the antimicrobial efficacy of a 0.12% chlorhexidine (CHX and herbal green tea (Camellia sinensis solution on established biofilms formed at different oxygen tensions in an in situ model. Method Twenty-five dental students were eligible for the study. In situ devices with standardized enamel specimens (ES facing the palatal and buccal sides were inserted in the mouths of volunteers for a 7 day period. No agent was applied during the first four days. From the fifth day onward, both agents were applied to the test ES group and no agent was applied to the control ES group. After 7 days the ES fragments were removed from the devices, sonicated, plated on agar, and incubated for 24 h at 37 °C to determine and quantify the colony forming units (CFUs. Result CHX had significantly higher efficacy compared to green tea on the buccal (1330 vs. 2170 CFU/µL and palatal (2250 vs. 2520 CFU/µL ES. In addition, intragroup comparisons showed significantly higher efficacy in buccal ES over palatal ES (1330 vs. 2250 CFU/µL for CHX and 2170 vs, 2520 CFU/µL for CV for both solutions. Analysis of the ES controls showed significantly higher biofilm formation in palatal ES compared to buccal ES. Conclusion CHX has higher efficacy than green tea on 4-day biofilms. The efficacy of both agents was reduced for biofilms grown in a low oxygen tension environment. Therefore, the oxygen tension environment seems to influence the efficacy of the tested agents.

  6. Effect of oxygen tension on bioenergetics and proteostasis in young and old myoblast precursor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Konigsberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the majority of studies using primary cultures of myoblasts, the cells are maintained at ambient oxygen tension (21% O2, despite the fact that physiological O2 at the tissue level in vivo is much lower (~1–5% O2. We hypothesized that the cellular response in presence of high oxygen concentration might be particularly important in studies comparing energetic function or oxidative stress in cells isolated from young versus old animals. To test this, we asked whether oxygen tension plays a role in mitochondrial bioenergetics (oxygen consumption, glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation or oxidative damage to proteins (protein disulfides, carbonyls and aggregates in myoblast precursor cells (MPCs isolated from young (3–4 m and old (29–30 m C57BL/6 mice. MPCs were grown under physiological (3% or ambient (21% O2 for two weeks prior to exposure to an acute oxidative insult (H2O2. Our results show significantly higher basal mitochondrial respiration in young versus old MPCs, an increase in basal respiration in young MPCs maintained at 3% O2 compared to cells maintained at 21% O2, and a shift toward glycolytic metabolism in old MPCs grown at 21% O2. H2O2 treatment significantly reduced respiration in old MPCs grown at 3% O2 but did not further repress respiration at 21% O2 in old MPCs. Oxidative damage to protein was higher in cells maintained at 21% O2 and increased in response to H2O2 in old MPCs. These data underscore the importance of understanding the effect of ambient oxygen tension in cell culture studies, in particular studies measuring oxidative damage and mitochondrial function.

  7. Physiological roles of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    OpenAIRE

    Sena, Laura A.; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) were thought to exclusively cause cellular damage and lack a physiological function. Accumulation of ROS and oxidative damage have been linked to multiple pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, cancer, and premature aging. Thus, mROS were originally envisioned as a necessary evil of oxidative metabolism, a product of an imperfect system. Yet few biological systems possess such flagrant imperfections, thanks to th...

  8. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition increases retinal oxygen tension and dilates retinal vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Koch Jensen, Peter; la Cour, Morten

    2005-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) increase blood flow in the brain and probably also in the optic nerve and retina. Additionally they elevate the oxygen tension in the optic nerve in the pig. We propose that they also raise the oxygen tension in the retina. We studied the oxygen tension...... in the pig retina and optic nerve before and after dorzolamide injection. Also the retinal vessel diameters during carbonic anhydrase inhibition were studied....

  9. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition increases retinal oxygen tension and dilates retinal vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Koch Jensen, Peter; la Cour, Morten

    2005-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) increase blood flow in the brain and probably also in the optic nerve and retina. Additionally they elevate the oxygen tension in the optic nerve in the pig. We propose that they also raise the oxygen tension in the retina. We studied the oxygen tension...... in the pig retina and optic nerve before and after dorzolamide injection. Also the retinal vessel diameters during carbonic anhydrase inhibition were studied....

  10. Oxygen Tension in the Aqueous Humor of Human Eyes under Different Oxygenation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Sharifipour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To measure oxygen tension in the aqueous humor of human eyes under different oxygenation conditions. Methods: This prospective comparative interventional case series consisted of two parts. In the first part, 120 consecutive patients scheduled for cataract surgery were randomized into group I (control group in which surgery was performed under local anesthesia inhaling 21% oxygen; group II in whom general anesthesia using 50% oxygen was employed; and group III receiving general anesthesia with 100% oxygen. After aspirating 0.2 ml aqueous humor under sterile conditions, the aqueous sample and a simultaneously drawn arterial blood sample were immediately analyzed using a blood gas analyzer. In part II the same procedures were performed in 10 patients after fitting a contact lens and patching the eye for 20 minutes (group IV and in 10 patients after transcorneal delivery of oxygen at a flow rate of 5 L/min (group V. Results: Mean aqueous PO2 in groups I, II and III was 112.3±6.2, 141.1±20.4, and 170.1±27 mmHg, respectively (P values <0.001 and mean arterial PO2 was 85.7±7.9, 184.6±46, and 379.1±75.9 mmHg, respectively (P values <0.001. Aqueous PO2 was 77.2±9.2 mmHg in group IV and 152.3±10.9 mmHg in group V (P values <0.001. There was a significant correlation between aqueous and blood PO2 (r=0.537, P<0.001. The contribution of atmospheric oxygen to aqueous PO2 was 23.7%. Conclusion: Aqueous oxygen tension is mostly dependent on the systemic circulation and in part on the atmosphere. Increasing inspiratory oxygen and transcorneal oxygen delivery both increase aqueous PO2 levels.

  11. Application of a modified regularization procedure for estimating oxygen tension in large retinal blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Isa; Ansari, Rashid; Samil Yetik, I.; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2010-03-01

    Phosphorescence lifetime measurement based on a frequency domain approach is used to estimate oxygen tension in large retinal blood vessels. The classical least squares (LS) estimation was initially used to determine oxygen tension indirectly from intermediate variables. A spatial regularized least squares (RLS) method was later proposed to reduce the high variance of oxygen tension estimated by LS method. In this paper, we provide a solution using a modified RLS (MRLS) approach that utilizes prior knowledge about retinal vessels oxygenation based on expected oxygen tension values in retinal arteries and veins. The performance of MRLS method was evaluated in simulated and experimental data by determining the bias, variance, and mean absolute error (MAE) of oxygen tension measurements and comparing these parameters with those derived with the use of LS and RLS methods.

  12. Dependence of transcutaneous oxygen tension on local arteriovenous pressure gradient in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, C R; Matsen, F A; King, R V; Simmons, C W; Burgess, E M

    1981-05-01

    1. We studied the relationship between transcutaneous oxygen tension at the foot and local arteriovenous pressure difference in 15 normal men and women; arteriovenous pressure difference was varied by changing the height of the foot with respect to the heart and by applying external pressure to the foot. 2. Control transcutaneous oxygen tension was 67 +/- 9 SD mmHg (8.9 +/- 1.2 kPa) at a control arteriovenous pressure difference of 80 +/- 6 SD mmHg (10.6 +/- 0.8 kPa). 3. In every subject transcutaneous oxygen tension fell non-linearly with a decrease in arteriovenous pressure difference; transcutaneous oxygen tension was relatively insensitive to changes in arteriovenous pressure difference when arteriovenous pressure difference was high, but always fell sharply to zero at some positive arteriovenous pressure difference [range 13-34 mmHg (1.7-4.5 kPa)]. 4. An analysis of the data indicated that transcutaneous oxygen tension varied with arteriovenous pressure difference approximately as the oxygen tension of cutaneous venous blood under the sensor varied (in the absence of changes in cutaneous vascular resistance and oxygen consumption). 5. This analysis was supported by studies in three subjects in whom the oxygen tension of superficial venous drainage from a warmed hand or foot was measured along with transcutaneous oxygen tension while arteriovenous pressure difference was varied.

  13. Evolution and physiology of neural oxygen sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauê Machado Costa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Major evolutionary trends in animal physiology have been heavily influenced by atmospheric O2 levels. Amongst other important factors, the increase in atmospheric O2 which occurred in the Pre-Cambrian and the development of aerobic respiration beckoned the evolution of animal organ systems that were dedicated to the absorption and transportation of O2, e.g., the respiratory and cardiovascular systems of vertebrates. Global variations of O2 levels in post-Cambrian periods have also been correlated with evolutionary changes in animal physiology, especially cardiorespiratory function. Oxygen transportation systems are, in our view, ultimately controlled by the brain related mechanisms, which senses changes in O2 availability and regulates autonomic and respiratory responses that ensure the survival of the organism in the face of hypoxic challenges. In vertebrates, the major sensorial system for oxygen sensing and responding to hypoxia is the peripheral chemoreflex neuronal pathways, which includes the oxygen chemosensitive glomus cells and several brainstem regions involved in the autonomic regulation to the cardiovascular system and respiratory control. In this review we discuss the concept that regulating O2 homeostasis was one of the primordial roles of the nervous system. We also review the physiology of the peripheral chemoreflex, focusing on the integrative repercussions of chemoreflex activation and the evolutionary importance of this system, which is essential for the survival of complex organisms such as vertebrates. The contribution of hypoxia and peripheral chemoreflex for the development of diseases associated to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems is also discussed in an evolutionary context.

  14. Optic nerve oxygen tension in pigs and the effect of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, E; Jensen, P K; Eysteinsson, T

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate how the oxygen tension of the optic nerve (ONP(O)2) is affected by the administration of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitors dorzolamide and acetazolamide and by alterations in oxygen and carbon dioxide in the breathing mixture.......To evaluate how the oxygen tension of the optic nerve (ONP(O)2) is affected by the administration of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitors dorzolamide and acetazolamide and by alterations in oxygen and carbon dioxide in the breathing mixture....

  15. Effects of Environmental Oxygen Content and Dissolved Oxygen on the Surface Tension and Viscosity of Liquid Nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, M. P.; Rogers, J. R.; Kumar, V.; Rodriguez, J.; Xiao, X.; Matson, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory has recently added an oxygen partial pressure controller. This system allows the oxygen partial pressure within the vacuum chamber to be measured and controlled in the range from approximately 10^{-28} {to} 10^{-9} bar, while in a vacuum atmosphere. The oxygen control system installed in the ESL laboratory's main chamber consists of an oxygen sensor, oxygen pump, and a control unit. The sensor is a potentiometric device that determines the difference in oxygen activity in two gas compartments (inside the chamber and the air outside of the chamber) separated by an electrolyte. The pump utilizes coulometric titration to either add or remove oxygen. The system is controlled by a desktop control unit, which can also be accessed via a computer. The controller performs temperature control for the sensor and pump, has a PID-based current loop and a control algorithm. Oxygen partial pressure has been shown to play a significant role in the surface tension of liquid metals. Oxide films or dissolved oxygen may lead to significant changes in surface tension. The effects on surface tension and viscosity by oxygen partial pressure in the surrounding environment and the melt dissolved oxygen content will be evaluated, and the results will be presented. The surface tension and viscosity will be measured at several different oxygen partial pressures while the sample is undercooled. Surface tension and viscosity will be measured using the oscillating droplet method.

  16. Influence of extradural blockade and ephedrine on transcutaneous oxygen tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoom, J A; Sih, I L; Bovill, J G; van der Broek, B; Oosting, J

    1986-10-01

    The influence of lumbar extradural blockade with 0.5% pain bupivacaine on transcutaneous oxygen tension (PtcO2) and skin temperature was studied in 20 patients, 10 scheduled for vascular surgery and 10 for urological surgery. At the time of maximum extent of blockade, mean arterial pressure (MAP) had decreased significantly (P less than 0.001) from 96.6 +/- 18.8 mm Hg to 69.5 +/- 10.1 (mean +/- SD) in the vascular group and from 88.0 +/- 14.7 mm Hg to 71.1 +/- 12 mm Hg in the urological group. In the vascular group PtcO2 decreased significantly in the ischaemic (P less than 0.01) and non-ischaemic (P less than 0.001) limbs. In the urological group, there was a significant (P less than 0.001) decrease in PtcO2 in both limbs. There was no change in cutaneous temperature in the ischaemic limbs (vascular group), but the temperature in the non-ischaemic limbs increased significantly (P less than 0.01). In the urological group, the cutaneous temperature increased significantly (P less than 0.001) in both limbs. When ephedrine 10 mg was administered i.v., MAP increased significantly (P less than 0.001) in both groups to pre-blockade values. This was accompanied in both groups by significant increases in PtcO2' but not by a change in skin temperature. There was a significant correlation between change in MAP and change in PtcO2 in both groups after ephedrine.

  17. Influence of oxygen tension on dopaminergic differentiation of human fetal stem cells of midbrain and forebrain origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbe, Christina; Bak, Sara Thornby; Jensen, Pia; von Linstow, Christian; Martínez Serrano, Alberto; Hansen, Claus; Meyer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease (PD), but protocols for controlled dopaminergic differentiation are not yet available. Here we investigated the influence of oxygen on dopaminergic differentiation of human fetal NSCs derived from the midbrain and forebrain. Cells were differentiated for 10 days in vitro at low, physiological (3%) versus high, atmospheric (20%) oxygen tension. Low oxygen resulted in upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and increased the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) cells in both types of cultures (midbrain: 9.1 ± 0.5 and 17.1 ± 0.4 (Pcells). Regardless of oxygen levels, the content of TH-ir cells with mature neuronal morphologies was higher for midbrain as compared to forebrain cultures. Proliferative Ki67-ir cells were found in both types of cultures, but the relative proportion of these cells was significantly higher for forebrain NSCs cultured at low, as compared to high, oxygen tension. No such difference was detected for midbrain-derived cells. Western blot analysis revealed that low oxygen enhanced β-tubulin III and GFAP expression in both cultures. Up-regulation of β-tubulin III was most pronounced for midbrain cells, whereas GFAP expression was higher in forebrain as compared to midbrain cells. NSCs from both brain regions displayed less cell death when cultured at low oxygen tension. Following mictrotransplantation into mouse striatal slice cultures predifferentiated midbrain NSCs were found to proliferate and differentiate into substantial numbers of TH-ir neurons with mature neuronal morphologies, particularly at low oxygen. In contrast, predifferentiated forebrain NSCs microtransplanted using identical conditions displayed little proliferation and contained few TH-ir cells, all of which had an immature appearance. Our data may reflect differences in dopaminergic differentiation capacity and region-specific requirements

  18. Oxygen Tension Within the Neurogenic Niche Regulates Dopaminergic Neurogenesis in the Developing Midbrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenführ, Lisa; Meyer, Anne Karen; Marrone, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen tension is an important factor controlling stem cell proliferation and maintenance in various stem cell populations with a particular relevance in midbrain dopaminergic progenitors. Further studies have shown that the oxygen-dependent transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is involved in these processes. However, all available studies on oxygen effects in dopaminergic neuroprogenitors were performed in vitro and thus it remains unclear whether tissue oxygen tension in the embryonic midbrain is also relevant for the regulation of dopaminergic neurogenesis in vivo. We thus dissect here the effects of oxygen tension in combination with HIF-1α conditional knockout on dopaminergic neurogenesis by using a novel experimental design allowing for the control of oxygen tension within the microenvironment of the neurogenic niche of the murine fetal midbrain in vivo. The microenvironment of the midbrain dopaminergic neurogenic niche was detected as hypoxic with oxygen tensions below 1.1%. Maternal oxygen treatment of 10%, 21%, and 75% atmospheric oxygen tension for 48 h translates into robust changes in fetal midbrain oxygenation. Fetal midbrain hypoxia hampered the generation of dopaminergic neurons and is accompanied with restricted fetal midbrain development. In contrast, induced hyperoxia stimulated proliferation and differentiation of dopaminergic progenitors during early and late embryogenesis. Oxygen effects were not directly mediated through HIF-1α signaling. These data—in agreement with in vitro data—indicate that oxygen is a crucial regulator of developmental dopaminergic neurogenesis. Our study provides the initial framework for future studies on molecular mechanisms mediating oxygen regulation of dopaminergic neurogenesis within the fetal midbrain as its natural environment. PMID:26577812

  19. Low oxygen tension stimulates redifferentiation of dedifferentiated adult human nasal chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malda, J.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Geffen, van M.; Martens, D.E.; Tramper, J.; Riesle, J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of dissolved oxygen tension (DO) on the redifferentiation of dedifferentiated adult human nasal septum chondrocytes cultured as pellets. Design: After isolation, human nasal chondrocytes were expanded in monolayer culture, which resulted in their dedifferentiation.

  20. Low oxygen tension stimulates the redifferentiation of dedifferentiated adult human nasal chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malda, J.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Geffen, van M.; Martens, D.E.; Tramper, J.; Riesle, J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of dissolved oxygen tension (DO) on the redifferentiation of dedifferentiated adult human nasal septum chondrocytes cultured as pellets. - Design: After isolation, human nasal chondrocytes were expanded in monolayer culture, which resulted in their dedifferentiati

  1. Continuous measurement of transcutaneous oxygen tension of neonates under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welle, P; Hayden, W; Miller, T

    1980-06-01

    Neonates present unique challenges to the anesthesiologist because of their susceptibility to oxygen toxicity and because clinical assessment of the degree of an infant's hypoxia is more difficult than in the adult. Equipment is now available for the continuous noninvasive measurement of transcutaneous oxygen tension. We used this equipment to monitor nine different neonates undergoing ten surgical procedures requiring general anesthesia. We found that certain of the infants were above and below what we considered to be a safe range for the transcutaneous oxygen tension for a significant portion of the surgery. Additionally, the manipulations of the surgeon and anesthesiologists were seen to cause sudden and large fluctuations in the transcutaneous oxygen tension. By providing the anesthesiologist with continuous and immediate data on the cardiorespiratory status of the infant, transcutaneous oxygen monitoring makes itself a valuable addition to the equipment used in the intraoperative monitoring of the neonate.

  2. Simultaneous Monitoring of Vascular Oxygenation and Tissue Oxygen Tension of Breast Tumors Under Hyperbaric Oxygen Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    biological tissue, and allow for detection of specific light-absorbing chromophores in human in vivo, such as oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin...spectra from tumor tissue. Briefly, continuous wave (CW) light from a 20 W tungsten-halogen light source (HL-2000HP, ocean optics, FL) is coupled...spectrometer (USB2000, Ocean optics, FL). The broadband light diffuse spectrometer provides reflectance spectra from 400 to 900 nm. According to

  3. Observations on intrauterine oxygen tension measured by fibre-optic microsensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottosen, Lars D M; Hindkaer, Johnny; Husth, Merete; Petersen, Dorrit Elschner; Kirk, John; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob

    2006-09-01

    Understanding the biology of reproductive organs is essential for the development of assisted reproductive techniques. There is at present no direct evidence for either the concentration and dynamics of intrauterine oxygen tension at the endometrial surface, nor its importance for the receptiveness of the endometrium. In this study a new method measured mid-cycle (ranging from day 12-18) endometrial surface oxygen tension in 21 patients referred to intrauterine insemination (IUI). Time series was measured online for a period of 5-10 min. The (mean) individual oxygen tension among patients varied from 4 to 27% air saturation. Overall mean oxygen tension among all patients was 11.8% air saturation. Within the same patient, considerable time-related variations were observed. Some patients exhibited rhythmic oscillations with a frequency in the order of 1 min, whereas others did not show any regular patterns. A good description of endometrial surface oxygen concentration and dynamics was thus obtained, but given the relatively small number of participants, an association with pregnancy following insemination could not be established. Further studies using this new method could elucidate the association between individual intrauterine activity, embryo implantation and endometrial surface oxygen tension.

  4. In vivo mitochondrial oxygen tension measured by a delayed fluorescence lifetime technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G. Mik (Egbert); T. Johannes (Tanja); C.J. Zuurbier (Coert Jozef); A. Heinen (Andre); J.H.P.M. Houben-Weerts (Judith); G.M. Balestra (Gianmarco); J. Stap (Jan); J.F. Beek (Johan); C. Ince (Can)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractMitochondrial oxygen tension (mitoPO2) is a key parameter for cellular function, which is considered to be affected under various pathophysiological circumstances. Although many techniques for assessing in vivo oxygenation are available, no technique for measuring mitoPO2in vivo exists.

  5. Decreased oxygen tension lowers reactive oxygen species and apoptosis and inhibits osteoblast matrix mineralization through changes in early osteoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaije, Claudia; Koedam, Marijke; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2012-04-01

    Accumulating data show that oxygen tension can have an important effect on cell function and fate. We used the human pre-osteoblastic cell line SV-HFO, which forms a mineralizing extracellular matrix, to study the effect of low oxygen tension (2%) on osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. Mineralization was significantly reduced by 60-70% under 2% oxygen, which was paralleled by lower intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. Following this reduction in ROS the cells switched to a lower level of protection by down-regulating their antioxidant enzyme expression. The downside of this is that it left the cells more vulnerable to a subsequent oxidative challenge. Total collagen content was reduced in the 2% oxygen cultures and expression of matrix genes and matrix-metabolizing enzymes was significantly affected. Alkaline phosphatase activity and RNA expression as well as RUNX2 expression were significantly reduced under 2% oxygen. Time phase studies showed that high oxygen in the first phase of osteoblast differentiation and prior to mineralization is crucial for optimal differentiation and mineralization. Switching to 2% or 20% oxygen only during mineralization phase did not change the eventual level of mineralization. In conclusion, this study shows the significance of oxygen tension for proper osteoblast differentiation, extra cellular matrix (ECM) formation, and eventual mineralization. We demonstrated that the major impact of oxygen tension is in the early phase of osteoblast differentiation. Low oxygen in this phase leaves the cells in a premature differentiation state that cannot provide the correct signals for matrix maturation and mineralization.

  6. The Association Between Arterial Oxygen Tension and Neurological Outcome After Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas J; Dodampahala, Kalani; Rosselot, Babette; Perman, Sarah M; Mikkelsen, Mark E; Goyal, Munish; Gaieski, David F; Grossestreuer, Anne V

    2017-03-01

    A number of observational studies have evaluated the association between arterial oxygen tensions and outcome after cardiac arrest with variable results. The objective of this study is to determine the association between arterial oxygen tension and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. A retrospective cohort analysis was performed using the Penn Alliance for Therapeutic Hypothermia registry. Adult patients who experienced return of spontaneous circulation after in-hospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and had a partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) recorded within 48 hours were included. Our primary exposure of interest was PaO2. Hyperoxemia was defined as PaO2 > 300 mmHg, hypoxemia as PaO2 arterial oxygen tension measured within the first 48 hours after cardiac arrest and neurological outcome.

  7. Role of oxygen tension and genetic background during the epigenetic conversion of mouse fibroblasts into insulin secreting cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Zenobi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic cell conversion overcomes the stability of a mature cell phenotype transforming a somatic cell in an unlimited source of autologous cells of a different type. It is based on the exposure to a demethylating agent followed by an induction protocol. In our work we exposed mouse dermal fibroblasts to the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine. Cell differentiation was directed toward the endocrine pancreatic lineage with a sequential combination of Activin A, Retinoic Acid, B27 supplement, ITS and bFGF. The overall duration of the process was 10 days. Aim of this work was to evaluate the role of oxygen during differentiation of dermal fibroblasts derived from two different mouse strains, NOD and C57 BL/6J. During differentiation, both cell lines were cultured either in the standard in vitro culture 20% oxygen concentration or in the lower and more physiological 5% of oxygen. Our results show that C57 BL/6J cells are able to differentiate into insulin secreting cells in both oxygen tensions with a higher amount of insulin release in low oxygen conditions. On the other hand, cells of NOD mice, which are physiologically predisposed to the onset of diabetes, differentiate in 20% of oxygen but not in low oxygen and they died after three days of culture. However, if these cells are moved to 5% of oxygen after their differentiation in high oxygen they remain viable for up to four days. Furthermore, their capacity to release insulin remains unchanged for 24 hours. Results suggest that genetic background has a profound effect on the role of oxygen during the in vitro differentiation process, possibly reflecting the different susceptibility to the disease of the strains used in the experiment.Supported by EFSD and Carraresi Foundation

  8. Near-infrared uncaging or photosensitizing dictated by oxygen tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Erin D.; Gorka, Alexander P.; Schnermann, Martin J.

    2016-11-01

    Existing strategies that use tissue-penetrant near-infrared light for the targeted treatment of cancer typically rely on the local generation of reactive oxygen species. This approach can be impeded by hypoxia, which frequently occurs in tumour microenvironments. Here we demonstrate that axially unsymmetrical silicon phthalocyanines uncage small molecules preferentially in a low-oxygen environment, while efficiently generating reactive oxygen species in normoxic conditions. Mechanistic studies of the uncaging reaction implicate a photoredox pathway involving photoinduced electron transfer to generate a key radical anion intermediate. Cellular studies demonstrate that the biological mechanism of action is O2-dependent, with reactive oxygen species-mediated phototoxicity in normoxic conditions and small molecule uncaging in hypoxia. These studies provide a near-infrared light-targeted treatment strategy with the potential to address the complex tumour landscape through two distinct mechanisms that vary in response to the local O2 environment.

  9. Pathophysiologic classification of peripheral vascular disease by positional changes in regional transcutaneous oxygen tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, C J; Appel, P; Shoemaker, W C

    1984-06-01

    The clinical manifestations and prognosis of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) depend upon the severity of limb hypoxia. Transcutaneous oxygen tension (Ptco2) is related to tissue oxygenation, but limb Ptco2 varies with changes in systemic as well as peripheral oxygen delivery (Do2). Previously we have found that simultaneous assessment of limb and chest Ptco2 yields a ratio, or regional perfusion index (RPI), that is independent of systemic Do2 and accurately reflects the adequacy of limb perfusion. Analysis of segmental limb Ptco2, RPI, and position-induced RPI changes was performed in 24 control limbs and 14 limbs with intermittent claudication (IC), 8 limbs with rest pain (RP), and 7 limbs with gangrene (G). Control limbs had high RPI values that varied little with position. The IC group had modestly decreased RPIs in the supine position, but extremity RPIs decreased markedly during leg elevation. Patients with RP had ischemia while supine, but the RPI improved to nearly normal upon standing. Feet with G were hypoxic even in the standing position. Segmental RPI decreases correlated with the presence of significant arterial lesions. This correlation was unaffected by diabetes. Analysis of regional transcutaneous oximetry allows classification of PVD by quantitative criteria based upon the adequacy of limb perfusion under functional conditions. RPI is characteristically high in normal persons and low in persons with G. Limbs with marginally compensated perfusion may have nearly normal RPI values under some conditions, but typical ischemic changes are elicited by positional change and exercise. The ease of such provocation of RPI decreases constitutes an index of the severity of disease. Such quantitative assessments of limb hypoxia can form the basis for a physiologic approach to arterial reconstruction.

  10. Measurements of oxygen tension in native and transplanted rat pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, P O; Liss, P; Andersson, A; Jansson, L

    1998-07-01

    This study was performed to measure the oxygen tension before and after revascularization of pancreatic islets transplanted beneath the renal capsule and to investigate to what extent this was affected by acute and chronic hyperglycemia. In addition, the oxygen tension in islets within the pancreas was determined. PO2 was measured with a modified Clark electrode (tip 2-6 microm o.d.). Within native pancreatic islets, the mean PO2 was higher (31-37 mmHg) than within the exocrine pancreas (20-23 mmHg). The mean oxygen tension in the transplanted islets the day after implantation was half of that recorded in native islets (14-19 mmHg) and did not differ between normoglycemic and diabetic recipients. At 1 month after transplantation, when revascularization had occurred, the mean PO2 in the islet grafts was 9-15 mmHgf in normoglycemic animals but was lower (6-8 mmHg) in diabetic animals, whereas the blood perfusion of the transplants, as measured with laser-Doppler flowmetry (probe diameter 0.45 mm), was similar in both groups. The mean oxygen tension in the superficial renal cortex surrounding the implanted islets was similar in all groups and remained stable at 13-21 mmHg. Intravenous administration of D-glucose (1 g/kg) did not affect the oxygen tension in any of the investigated tissues. We conclude that the mean PO2 in islets implanted under the renal capsule is markedly lower than in native islets, not only in the immediate posttransplantation period but also 1 month after implantation, i.e., when revascularization has occurred. Furthermore, persistent hyperglycemia in the recipient leads to a further decrease in graft oxygen tension. To what extent this may contribute to islet graft failure is at present unknown.

  11. Wound angiogenesis as a function of tissue oxygen tension: A mathematical model

    OpenAIRE

    Schugart, Richard C.; Friedman, Avner; Zhao, Rui; Sen, Chandan K.

    2008-01-01

    Wound healing represents a well orchestrated reparative response that is induced by injuries. Angiogenesis plays a central role in wound healing. In this work, we sought to develop the first mathematical model directed at addressing the role of tissue oxygen tension on cutaneous wound healing. Key components of the developed model include capillary tips, capillary sprouts, fibroblasts, inflammatory cells, chemoattractants, oxygen, and the extracellular matrix. The model consists of a system o...

  12. Determination of oxygen tension in the subcutaneous tissue of cosmonauts during the Salyut-6 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranski, S.; Bloszczynski, R.; Hermaszewski, M.; Kubiczkowa, J.; Piorko, A.; Saganiak, R.; Sarol, Z.; Skibniewsky, F.; Stendera, J.; Walichnowski, W.

    1982-01-01

    A polarographic technique was used to measure the oxygen tension in subcutaneous tissue of the forearm of a cosmonaut prior to, after, and on the fourth day of a space mission performed by Salut-6. A drop in the oxygen exchange rate in the peripheral tissues during weightlessness was observed. The mechanisms of this change are studied, taking into consideration the blood distribution in the organism and microcirculation disorders reflected by a decreased blood flow rate in arterial-venous junctions.

  13. Indomethacin decreases optic nerve oxygen tension by a mechanism other than cyclo-oxygenase inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noergaard, M Hove; Pedersen, D Bach; Bang, K

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of several Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), on the preoptic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO2), as indomethacin previously has demonstrated a strong decreasing effect on ONPO2. We tested whether these NSAIDs, like indomethacin, also reduce the increasing effect...

  14. The effect of oxygen tension on human articular chondrocyte matrix synthesis: integration of experimental and computational approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Oreffo, R O C; Sengers, B G; Tare, R S

    2014-09-01

    Significant oxygen gradients occur within tissue engineered cartilaginous constructs. Although oxygen tension is an important limiting parameter in the development of new cartilage matrix, its precise role in matrix formation by chondrocytes remains controversial, primarily due to discrepancies in the experimental setup applied in different studies. In this study, the specific effects of oxygen tension on the synthesis of cartilaginous matrix by human articular chondrocytes were studied using a combined experimental-computational approach in a "scaffold-free" 3D pellet culture model. Key parameters including cellular oxygen uptake rate were determined experimentally and used in conjunction with a mathematical model to estimate oxygen tension profiles in 21-day cartilaginous pellets. A threshold oxygen tension (pO2 ≈ 8% atmospheric pressure) for human articular chondrocytes was estimated from these inferred oxygen profiles and histological analysis of pellet sections. Human articular chondrocytes that experienced oxygen tension below this threshold demonstrated enhanced proteoglycan deposition. Conversely, oxygen tension higher than the threshold favored collagen synthesis. This study has demonstrated a close relationship between oxygen tension and matrix synthesis by human articular chondrocytes in a "scaffold-free" 3D pellet culture model, providing valuable insight into the understanding and optimization of cartilage bioengineering approaches.

  15. Methyl sterol and cyclopropane fatty acid composition of Methylococcus capsulatus grown at low oxygen tensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Nichols, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The sterol and fatty acid concentrations for M. capsulatus grown in fed-batch cultures over a wide range of oxygen tensions (0.1-10.6 percent) and at a constant methane level are evaluated. The analyses reveal that the biomass decreases as oxygen levels are lowered; the sterol concentration increases when the oxygen range is between 0.5-1.1 percent and decreases when the oxygen range is below 0.5 percent; and the amount of monounsaturated C16 decreases and the concentration of cyclopropane fatty acids increases after oxygen is reduced. It is noted that growth and membrane synthesis occur at low oxygen concentrations and that the synthesis of membrane lipids responds to growth conditions.

  16. The effect of differing ambient oxygen tensions on wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, T K; Linsey, M; Grislis, H; Sonne, M; Jawetz, E

    1975-01-01

    Wound infections were studied in rabbits using two standard inocula (approximately equal to 10-4 and approximately equal to 10-6) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa injected into subcutaneous wound dead space made by implantation of standard wire mesh cylinders. The inoculation was done on the fourth day after implantation of the cylinders in animals kept from the day of implantation in atmospheres of 12%, 21%, or 45% oxygen content. Samples of wound fluid (0.2 ml) were removed for quantitative culture just before inoculation and 3, 7, 14, and 21 days later. No positive cultures resulted from samples taken before inoculation. One uninoculated wound served as a control in each animal. None of these control wounds became infected. Culture counts were significantly highest in the anoxic group and lowest in the hyperoxic group. Established infections were significantly lowest in the hyperoxics and highest in the hypoxics. The percent of wounds showing a significant culture count showed a similar trend. The mechanisms of this effect is not known, but a possible mechanism lies in the relative inability of leucocytes to kill this bacterium under hypoxic conditions.

  17. Microscopic Local Measurement of Blood Flow and Oxygen Tension in Brain Microcirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamitani, Haruyuki; Takahashi, Ryota; Tsukada, Kousuke

    A multi-photonic imaging system was proposed for measuring blood flow velocity, vessel diameter and blood oxygen tension pO2 simultaneously with high spatio-temporal resolution in the parenchymatous organ microcirculation, such as pial tissue, by using a closed cranial window and two light sources. FITC-stained erythrocytes was used to visualize the microcirculation, and the fluorescent image was recorded by a high-speed video camera for measuring blood flow velocity. Oxygen tension pO2 was measured by oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescent molecules, Pd-TCPP, in the microvessels after irradiation of second harmonic light of Nd:YAG pulse laser (532nm). Animal experiments were performed for investigation of blood flow dynamics and oxygen diffusion phenomenon during acute cerebral ischemia using photochemical thrombus formation in the closed cranial window of male Wistar rats. Experimental results showed specific and significant blood flow and oxygen diffusion phenomena related to the abnormal organ tissues, from those the proposed technique would contribute to the trasnlational research for the clinical medicine, concerned in the ischemic dysfunction, angiogenisis, tumorgenisis and so on.

  18. Oxygen tension regulates the osteogenic, chondrogenic and endochondral phenotype of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehy, Eamon J.; Buckley, Conor T. [Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, School of Engineering, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Kelly, Daniel J., E-mail: kellyd9@tcd.ie [Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, School of Engineering, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expansion in low oxygen enhances MSC proliferation and osteogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation in low oxygen enhances chondrogenesis and suppresses hypertrophy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen can regulate the MSC phenotype for use in tissue engineering applications. -- Abstract: The local oxygen tension is a key regulator of the fate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a low oxygen tension during expansion and differentiation on the proliferation kinetics as well as the subsequent osteogenic and chondrogenic potential of MSCs. We first hypothesised that expansion in a low oxygen tension (5% pO{sub 2}) would improve both the subsequent osteogenic and chondrogenic potential of MSCs compared to expansion in a normoxic environment (20% pO{sub 2}). Furthermore, we hypothesised that chondrogenic differentiation in a low oxygen environment would suppress hypertrophy of MSCs cultured in both pellets and hydrogels used in tissue engineering strategies. MSCs expanded at 5% pO{sub 2} proliferated faster forming larger colonies, resulting in higher cell yields. Expansion at 5% pO{sub 2} also enhanced subsequent osteogenesis of MSCs, whereas differentiation at 5% pO{sub 2} was found to be a more potent promoter of chondrogenesis than expansion at 5% pO{sub 2}. Greater collagen accumulation, and more intense staining for collagen types I and X, was observed in pellets maintained at 20% pO{sub 2} compared to 5% pO{sub 2}. Both pellets and hydrogels stained more intensely for type II collagen when undergoing chondrogenesis in a low oxygen environment. Differentiation at 5% pO{sub 2} also appeared to inhibit hypertrophy in both pellets and hydrogels, as demonstrated by reduced collagen type X and Alizarin Red staining and alkaline phosphatase activity. This study demonstrates that the local oxygen environment can be manipulated in vitro to either stabilise a

  19. Aerobic induction of respiro-fermentative growth by decreasing oxygen tensions in the respiratory yeast Pichia stipitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinner, U; Fluthgraf, S; Freese, S; Passoth, V

    2005-04-01

    The fermentative and respiratory metabolism of Pichia stipitis wild-type strain CBS 5774 and the derived auxotrophic transformation recipient PJH53 trp5-10 his3-1 were examined in differentially oxygenated glucose cultures in the hermetically sealed Sensomat system. There was a good agreement of the kinetics of gas metabolism, growth, ethanol formation and glucose utilisation, proving the suitability of the Sensomat system for rapid and inexpensive investigation of strains and mutants for their respiratory and fermentative metabolism. Our study revealed respiro-fermentative growth by the wild-type strain, although the cultures were not oxygen-limited. The induction of respiro-fermentative behaviour was obviously due to the decrease in oxygen tension but not falling below a threshold of oxygen tension. The responses differed depending on the velocity of the decrease in oxygen tension. At high oxygenation (slow decrease in oxygen tension), ethanol production was induced but glucose uptake was not influenced. At low oxygenation, glucose uptake and ethanol formation increased during the first hours of cultivation. The transformation recipient PJH53 most probably carries a mutation that influences the response to a slow decrease in oxygen tension, since almost no ethanol formation was found under these conditions.

  20. Impact of low oxygen tension on stemness, proliferation and differentiation potential of human adipose-derived stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jane Ru; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Omar, Siti Zawiah [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chua, Kien Hui [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Wan Safwani, Wan Kamarul Zaman, E-mail: wansafwani@um.edu.my [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • Hypoxia maintains the stemness of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). • ASCs show an increased proliferation rate under low oxygen tension. • Oxygen level as low as 2% enhances the chondrogenic differentiation potential of ASCs. • HIF-1α may regulate the proliferation and differentiation activities of ASCs under hypoxia. - Abstract: Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have been found adapted to a specific niche with low oxygen tension (hypoxia) in the body. As an important component of this niche, oxygen tension has been known to play a critical role in the maintenance of stem cell characteristics. However, the effect of O{sub 2} tension on their functional properties has not been well determined. In this study, we investigated the effects of O{sub 2} tension on ASCs stemness, differentiation and proliferation ability. Human ASCs were cultured under normoxia (21% O{sub 2}) and hypoxia (2% O{sub 2}). We found that hypoxia increased ASC stemness marker expression and proliferation rate without altering their morphology and surface markers. Low oxygen tension further enhances the chondrogenic differentiation ability, but reduces both adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential. These results might be correlated with the increased expression of HIF-1α under hypoxia. Taken together, we suggest that growing ASCs under 2% O{sub 2} tension may be important in expanding ASCs effectively while maintaining their functional properties for clinical therapy, particularly for the treatment of cartilage defects.

  1. Indomethacin lowers optic nerve oxygen tension and reduces the effect of carbonic anhydrase inhibition and carbon dioxide breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T; Stefánsson, E

    2004-01-01

    Prostaglandins are important in blood flow regulation. Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) breathing and carbonic anhydrase inhibition increase the oxygen tension in the retina and optic nerve. To study the mechanism of this effect and the role of cyclo-oxygenase in the regulation of optic nerve oxygen tension...... (ONPO(2)), the authors investigated how indomethacin affects ONPO(2) and the ONPO(2) increases caused by CO(2) breathing and carbonic anhydrase inhibition in the pig....

  2. Enhanced proliferation and dopaminergic differentiation of ventral mesencephalic precursor cells by synergistic effect of FGF2 and reduced oxygen tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Pia [Department of Neurobiology Research, Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Winslowparken 21, DK-5000 Odense C (Denmark); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Gramsbergen, Jan-Bert; Zimmer, Jens [Department of Neurobiology Research, Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Winslowparken 21, DK-5000 Odense C (Denmark); Widmer, Hans R. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Meyer, Morten, E-mail: MMeyer@health.sdu.dk [Department of Neurobiology Research, Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Winslowparken 21, DK-5000 Odense C (Denmark)

    2011-07-15

    Effective numerical expansion of dopaminergic precursors might overcome the limited availability of transplantable cells in replacement strategies for Parkinson's disease. Here we investigated the effect of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) and FGF8 on expansion and dopaminergic differentiation of rat embryonic ventral mesencephalic neuroblasts cultured at high (20%) and low (3%) oxygen tension. More cells incorporated bromodeoxyuridine in cultures expanded at low as compared to high oxygen tension, and after 6 days of differentiation there were significantly more neuronal cells in low than in high oxygen cultures. Low oxygen during FGF2-mediated expansion resulted also in a significant increase in tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) dopaminergic neurons as compared to high oxygen tension, but no corresponding effect was observed for dopamine release into the culture medium. However, switching FGF2-expanded cultures from low to high oxygen tension during the last two days of differentiation significantly enhanced dopamine release and intracellular dopamine levels as compared to all other treatment groups. In addition, the short-term exposure to high oxygen enhanced in situ assessed TH enzyme activity, which may explain the elevated dopamine levels. Our findings demonstrate that modulation of oxygen tension is a recognizable factor for in vitro expansion and dopaminergic differentiation of rat embryonic midbrain precursor cells.

  3. Modeling Variable Phanerozoic Oxygen Effects on Physiology and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jeffrey B; Jew, Corey J; Wegner, Nicholas C

    2016-01-01

    Geochemical approximation of Earth's atmospheric O2 level over geologic time prompts hypotheses linking hyper- and hypoxic atmospheres to transformative events in the evolutionary history of the biosphere. Such correlations, however, remain problematic due to the relative imprecision of the timing and scope of oxygen change and the looseness of its overlay on the chronology of key biotic events such as radiations, evolutionary innovation, and extinctions. There are nevertheless general attributions of atmospheric oxygen concentration to key evolutionary changes among groups having a primary dependence upon oxygen diffusion for respiration. These include the occurrence of Devonian hypoxia and the accentuation of air-breathing dependence leading to the origin of vertebrate terrestriality, the occurrence of Carboniferous-Permian hyperoxia and the major radiation of early tetrapods and the origins of insect flight and gigantism, and the Mid-Late Permian oxygen decline accompanying the Permian extinction. However, because of variability between and error within different atmospheric models, there is little basis for postulating correlations outside the Late Paleozoic. Other problems arising in the correlation of paleo-oxygen with significant biological events include tendencies to ignore the role of blood pigment affinity modulation in maintaining homeostasis, the slow rates of O2 change that would have allowed for adaptation, and significant respiratory and circulatory modifications that can and do occur without changes in atmospheric oxygen. The purpose of this paper is thus to refocus thinking about basic questions central to the biological and physiological implications of O2 change over geological time.

  4. Relative sensitivity of soluble guanylate cyclase and mitochondrial respiration to endogenous nitric oxide at physiological oxygen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Juárez, Félix; Aguirre, Enara; Cadenas, Susana

    2007-07-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a widespread biological messenger that has many physiological and pathophysiological roles. Most of the physiological actions of NO are mediated through the activation of sGC (soluble guanylate cyclase) and the subsequent production of cGMP. NO also binds to the binuclear centre of COX (cytochrome c oxidase) and inhibits mitochondrial respiration in competition with oxygen and in a reversible manner. Although sGC is more sensitive to endogenous NO than COX at atmospheric oxygen tension, the more relevant question is which enzyme is more sensitive at physiological oxygen concentration. Using a system in which NO is generated inside the cells in a finely controlled manner, we determined cGMP accumulation by immunoassay and mitochondrial oxygen consumption by high-resolution respirometry at 30 microM oxygen. In the present paper, we report that the NO EC50 of sGC was approx. 2.9 nM, whereas that required to achieve IC50 of respiration was 141 nM (the basal oxygen consumption in the absence of NO was 14+/-0.8 pmol of O2/s per 10(6) cells). In accordance with this, the NO-cGMP signalling transduction pathway was activated at lower NO concentrations than the AMPKs (AMP-activated protein kinase) pathway. We conclude that sGC is approx. 50-fold more sensitive than cellular respiration to endogenous NO under our experimental conditions. The implications of these results for cell physiology are discussed.

  5. [Stoichiometry of cytochromes and oxygen tension in skeletal muscles of marine fish].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, A A; Parfenova, I A

    2014-01-01

    The character of oxygen tension distribution and peculiarities of cytochromes stoichiometry in skeletal muscles of bottom and pelagic species of marine fish were compared. It is shown, that the limitation of muscle activity increases the number of hypoxic zones in the muscle tissue. The mitochondrial electron-transporting chain then obtain the uncompensated type of organization, expressed in the increase of the share of the terminal complex aa3 on the background of general reduction of cytochromes content in the muscles. The reaction is of an adaptive character and can be implemented by pelagic fish species in conditions of experimental hypokinesia.

  6. Influence of oxygen tension on myocardial performance. Evaluation by tissue Doppler imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulsen Steen

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low O2 tension dilates coronary arteries and high O2 tension is a coronary vasoconstrictor but reports on O2-dependent effects on ventricular performance diverge. Yet oxygen supplementation remains first line treatment in cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that hypoxia improves and hyperoxia worsens myocardial performance. Methods Seven male volunteers (mean age 38 ± 3 years were examined with echocardiography at respiratory equilibrium during: 1 normoxia (≈21% O2, 79% N2, 2 while inhaling a hypoxic gas mixture (≈11% O2, 89% N2, and 3 while inhaling 100% O2. Tissue Doppler recordings were acquired in the apical 4-chamber, 2-chamber, and long-axis views. Strain rate and tissue tracking displacement analyses were carried out in each segment of the 16-segment left ventricular model and in the basal, middle and apical portions of the right ventricle. Results Heart rate increased with hypoxia (68 ± 4 bpm at normoxia vs. 79 ± 5 bpm, P Conclusion Hypoxia improves and hyperoxia worsens systolic myocardial performance in healthy male volunteers. Tissue Doppler measures of diastolic function are unaffected by hypoxia/hyperoxia which support that the changes in myocardial performance are secondary to changes in vascular tone. It remains to be settled whether oxygen therapy to patients with heart disease is a consistent rational treatment.

  7. Influence of oxygen tension of the metabolism of vascular smooth muscle: demonstration of a Pasteur effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnqvist, H J; Lundholm, L

    1976-01-01

    The influence of variations of oxygen tension on the metabolism of bovine mesenteric arteries was studied in vitro. Glucose uptake, lactate production, glycogen content, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), creatine phosphate (CrP) and incorporation of [14C]leucine into protein were determined. The mesenteric arteries were suspended in Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer which was aerated with a gas mixture containing 5% CO2,O-95% O2 and N2 to 100%. Reduction of the O2 concentration of the gas phase from 95-20% resulted in little metabolic change. A further reduction from 20-0% O2 increased the lactate production 4-fold, indicating a marked Pasteur effect. At 0% O2 the glucose uptake was moderately increased and the glycogen content was decreased. The tissue level of CrP was reduced at a low oxygen tension and at 0% O2 the ATP content was also lowered. The incorporation of leucine into proteins was reduced at 0% O2.

  8. Effect of supplemental oxygen versus dobutamine administration on liver oxygen tension in dPP-guided normovolemic pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, G; Fukui, K; Hager, H; Kurz, A; Hiltebrand, L

    2009-01-01

    Difference in pulse pressure (dPP) confirms adequate intravascular filling as a prerequisite for tissue perfusion. We hypothesized that both oxygen and dobutamine increase liver tissue oxygen tension (ptO(2)). Eight anesthetized pigs received dPP-guided fluid management. Hepatic pO(2) was measured with Clark-type electrodes placed subcapsularly, and on the liver surface. Pigs received: (1) supplemental oxygen (F(i)O(2) 1.0); (2) dobutamine 2.5 microg/kg/min, and (3) dobutamine 5 microg/kg/min. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA followed by a Tukey post-test for multiple comparisons. ptO(2 )measured subcapsularly and at the liver surface were compared using the Bland-Altman plot. Variation in F(i)O(2) changed local hepatic tissue ptO(2) [subcapsular measurement: 39 +/- 12 (F(i)O(2) 0.3), 89 +/- 35 mm Hg (F(i)O(2) 1.0, p = 0.01 vs. F(i)O(2) 0.3), 44 +/- 10 mm Hg (F(i)O(2) 0.3, p = 0.05 vs. F(i)O(2) 1.0); surface measurement: 52 +/- 35 (F(i)O(2) 0.3), 112 +/- 24 mm Hg (F(i)O(2) 1.0, p = 0.001 vs. F(i)O(2) 0.3), 54 +/- 24 mm Hg (F(i)O(2) 0.3, p = 0.001 vs. F(i)O(2) 1.0)]. Surface measurements were widely scattered compared to subcapsular measurements (bias: -15 mm Hg, precision: 76.3 mm Hg). Dobutamine did not affect hepatic oxygenation. Supplemental oxygen increased hepatic tissue pO(2) while dobutamine did not. Although less invasive, the use of surface measurements is discouraged. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Senescent Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid Circulatory Physiology and Their Role in the Pathogenesis of Normal-tension Glaucoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wostyn, Peter; De Groot, Veva; Van Dam, Debby; Audenaert, Kurt; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the evidence supporting a role for senescent changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulatory physiology in the pathogenesis of normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). DESIGN: Literature review and personal perspective of the authors. METHODS: Analysis of selected articles in the peer-re

  10. Critical oxygen tension and the effect of hypoxia on the oxygen consumption of the striped catfish, Pangasius hypophthaimos (Pangasiidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefevre, S.; Bayley, Mark; Wang, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    consumption (VO2), measured with intermittent closed respirometry, was 67.8 ± 5.1 mLO2/kg/h when the fish were maintained without access to air at 27 °C. The critical oxygen tension (Pcrit) at these conditions was 57.9 ± 8.9 mmHg (N = 7). The metabolic response to aquatic hypoxia was studied in fish subjected...... to a PO2 10 mmHg below their individual Pcrit for 6 h. Here we found that the average VO2was 106.7 ± 10.5% of the restingVO2 measured under normoxia. VO2 did not increase significantly upon the return to normoxia, indicating that Pangasius does not rely on anaerobic metabolism under hypoxia...

  11. Enhanced proliferation and dopaminergic differentiation of ventral mesencephalic precursor cells by synergistic effect of FGF2 and reduced oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia; Gramsbergen, Jan-Bert; Zimmer, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Effective numerical expansion of dopaminergic precursors might overcome the limited availability of transplantable cells in replacement strategies for Parkinson's disease. Here we investigated the effect of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) and FGF8 on expansion and dopaminergic differentiation...... in high oxygen cultures. Low oxygen during FGF2-mediated expansion resulted also in a significant increase in tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) dopaminergic neurons as compared to high oxygen tension, but no corresponding effect was observed for dopamine release into the culture medium. However......, switching FGF2-expanded cultures from low to high oxygen tension during the last two days of differentiation significantly enhanced dopamine release and intracellular dopamine levels as compared to all other treatment groups. In addition, the short-term exposure to high oxygen enhanced in situ assessed TH...

  12. Association of muscle hardness with muscle tension dynamics: a physiological property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Mitsuyoshi; Watanabe, Kotaro; Kato, Ryoko; Uchiyama, Takanori; Yoneda, Tsugutake

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between muscle hardness and muscle tension in terms of length-tension relationship. A frog gastrocnemius muscle sample was horizontally mounted on the base plate inside a chamber and was stretched from 100 to 150% of the pre-length, in 5% increments. After each step of muscle lengthening, electrical field stimulation for induction of tetanus was applied using platinum-plate electrodes positioned on either side of the muscle submerged in Ringer's solution. The measurement of muscle hardness, i.e., applying perpendicular distortion, was performed whilst maintaining the plateau of passive and tetanic tension. The relationship between normalised tension and normalised muscle hardness was evaluated. The length-hardness diagram could be created from the modification with the length-tension diagram. It is noteworthy that muscle hardness was proportional to passive and total tension. Regression analysis revealed a significant correlation between muscle hardness and passive and total tension, with a significant positive slope (passive tension: r = 0.986, P hardness depends on muscle tension in most ranges of muscle length in the length-tension diagram.

  13. Effect of increased oxygen tension on flicker-induced vasodilatation in the human retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palkovits, Stefan; Told, Reinhard; Boltz, Agnes; Schmidl, Doreen; Popa Cherecheanu, Alina; Schmetterer, Leopold; Garhöfer, Gerhard

    2014-12-01

    In the retina, blood flow and neural activity are tightly coupled. Stimulation of the retina with flickering light is accompanied by an increase in blood flow. The current study seeks to investigate whether an increase in oxygen tension modulates flicker (FL)-induced vasodilatation in the human retina. A total of 52 healthy volunteers were included. Via a breathing mask, 100% oxygen (O(2)) was administered in one, a mixture of 8% carbon dioxide and 92% oxygen (C/O) in a second cohort. Retinal vessel diameters were measured with a Vessel Analyzer and FL responses were assessed before and during the breathing periods. At baseline, FL stimulation increased retinal vessel diameters by +3.7±2.3% in arteries and by +5.1±3.7% in veins. Breathing of C/O led to a decrease in arterial (-9.0±6.9%) and venous (-11.3±5.9%) vessel calibers. Flicker response was increased to 5.7±2.5% in arteries and to 8.6±4.1% in veins. Breathing of pure O2 induced a vasoconstriction of vessel diameters by -14.0±5.3% in arteries and -18.4±7.0% in veins and increased FL responses in arteries (+6.2±2.8%) and veins (+7.2±3.1%). Systemic hyperoxia increases FL-induced retinal vasodilatation in the retina. The mechanism by which oxygen modulates the hyperemic response to FL stimulation remains to be elucidated.

  14. The effect of oxygen tension on porcine embryonic development is dependent on embryo type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booth, Paul J; Holm, Peter; Callesen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    Reducing oxygen concentration from atmospheric levels during in vitro culture generally, but not invariably, improves embryonic development across a range of species. Since the few published reports of such an action in the pig are contradictory--perhaps a consequence of the derivation of the emb......Reducing oxygen concentration from atmospheric levels during in vitro culture generally, but not invariably, improves embryonic development across a range of species. Since the few published reports of such an action in the pig are contradictory--perhaps a consequence of the derivation...... of the embryos prior to culture--a study was performed to examine the effect of O2 tension during culture on three different types of porcine embryos, namely: in vivo flushed embryos, and in vitro matured oocytes either fertilized in vitro or parthenogenetically activated. In vivo embryos (n=208) were flushed...... at the 2-8 cell stage. Cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) destined for IVF or parthenogenetic activation were derived from 2 to 6 mm, post-pubertal ovarian follicles and matured for 48 h in TCM-199. Parthenogenones were generated by activating denuded oocytes (n=573) with 10 mM calcium ionophore, followed...

  15. DHP-derivative and low oxygen tension effectively induces human adipose stromal cell reprogramming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ki Jee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND METHODS: In this study, we utilized a combination of low oxygen tension and a novel anti-oxidant, 4-(3,4-dihydroxy-phenyl-derivative (DHP-d to directly induce adipose tissue stromal cells (ATSC to de-differentiate into more primitive stem cells. De-differentiated ATSCs was overexpress stemness genes, Rex-1, Oct-4, Sox-2, and Nanog. Additionally, demethylation of the regulatory regions of Rex-1, stemnesses, and HIF1alpha and scavenging of reactive oxygen species were finally resulted in an improved stem cell behavior of de-differentiate ATSC (de-ATSC. Proliferation activity of ATSCs after dedifferentiation was induced by REX1, Oct4, and JAK/STAT3 directly or indirectly. De-ATSCs showed increased migration activity that mediated by P38/JUNK and ERK phosphorylation. Moreover, regenerative efficacy of de-ATSC engrafted spinal cord-injured rats and chemical-induced diabetes animals were significantly restored their functions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our stem cell remodeling system may provide a good model which would provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying ATSC proliferation and transdifferentiation. Also, these multipotent stem cells can be harvested may provide us with a valuable reservoir of primitive and autologous stem cells for use in a broad spectrum of regenerative cell-based disease therapy.

  16. Stimulation of growth of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori by atmospheric level of oxygen under high carbon dioxide tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Na

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori (Hp, a human pathogen that is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer, has been considered a microaerophile, but there is no general consensus about its specific O2 requirements. A clear understanding of Hp physiology is needed to elucidate the pathogenic mechanism(s of Hp infection. Results We cultured Hp under a range of O2 levels with or without 10% CO2 and evaluated growth profiles, morphology, intracellular pH, and energy metabolism. We found that, in the presence of 10% CO2, the normal atmospheric level of O2 inhibited Hp growth at low density but stimulated growth at a higher density. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy of Hp cells cultured under 20% O2 tension revealed live spiral-shaped bacteria with outer membrane vesicles on a rugged cell surface, which became smooth during the stationary phase. Fermentation products including acetate, lactate, and succinate were detected in cell culture media grown under microaerobic conditions, but not under the aerobic condition. CO2 deprivation for less than 24 h did not markedly change cytoplasmic or periplasmic pH, suggesting that cellular pH homeostasis alone cannot account for the capnophilic nature of Hp. Further, CO2 deprivation significantly increased intracellular levels of ppGpp and ATP but significantly decreased cellular mRNA levels, suggesting induction of the stringent response. Conclusions We conclude, unlike previous reports, that H. pylori may be a capnophilic aerobe whose growth is promoted by atmospheric oxygen levels in the presence of 10% CO2. Our data also suggest that buffering of intracellular pH alone cannot account for the CO2 requirement of H. pylori and that CO2 deprivation initiates the stringent response in H. pylori. Our findings may provide new insight into the physiology of this fastidious human pathogen.

  17. Exogenous and endogenous angiotensin-II decrease renal cortical oxygen tension in conscious rats by limiting renal blood flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emans, Tonja W.; Janssen, Ben J.; Pinkham, Maximilian I.; Ow, Connie P C; Evans, Roger G.; Joles, Jaap A.; Malpas, Simon C.; Krediet, C. T Paul; Koeners, Maarten P.

    2016-01-01

    Key points: Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the role of hypoxia in the initiation and progression of renal disease remains rudimentary.  We have developed a method that allows wireless measurement of renal tissue oxygen tension in unrestrained rats.  This method provides stable and

  18. BIOELECTRIC POTENTIALS IN HALICYSTIS : VII. THE EFFECTS OF LOW OXYGEN TENSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinks, L R; Darsie, M L; Skow, R K

    1938-11-20

    The potential difference across the protoplasm of impaled cells of Halicystis is not affected by increase of oxygen tension in equilibrium with the sea water, nor with decrease down to about 1/10 its tension in the air (2 per cent O(2) in N(2)). When bubbling of 2 per cent O(2) is stopped, the P.D. drifts downward, to be restored on stirring the sea water, or rebubbling the gas. Bubbling 0.2 per cent O(2) causes the P.D. to drop to 20 mv. or less; 1.1 per cent O(2) to about 50 mv. Restoration of 2 per cent or higher O(2) causes recovery to 70 or 80 mv. often with a preliminary cusp which decreases the P.D. before it rises. Perfusion of aerated sea water through the vacuole is just as effective in restoring the P.D. as external aeration, indicating that the direction of the oxygen gradient is not significant. Low O(2) tension also inhibits the reversed, negative P.D. produced by adding NH(4)Cl to sea water, 0.2 per cent O(2) bringing this P.D. back to the same low positive values found without ammonia. Restoration of 2 per cent O(2) or air, restores this latent negativity. At slightly below the threshold for ammonia reversal, low O(2) may induce a temporary negativity when first bubbled, and a negative cusp may occur on aeration before positive P.D. is regained. This may be due to a decreased consumption of ammonia, or to intermediate pH changes. The locus of the P.D. alteration was tested by applying increased KCl concentrations to the cell exterior; the large cusps produced in aerated solutions become greatly decreased when the P.D. has fallen in 0.2 per cent O(2). This indicates that the originally high relative mobility or concentration of K(+) ion has approached that of Na(+) in the external protoplasmic surface under reduced O(2) tension. Results obtained with sulfate sea water indicate that Na(+) mobility approaches that of SO(4) (-) in 0.2 per cent O(2). P.D. measurements alone cannot tell whether this is due to an increase of the slower ion or a decrease of

  19. Membrane development in purple photosynthetic bacteria in response to alterations in light intensity and oxygen tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederman, Robert A

    2013-10-01

    Studies on membrane development in purple bacteria during adaptation to alterations in light intensity and oxygen tension are reviewed. Anoxygenic phototrophic such as the purple α-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides have served as simple, dynamic, and experimentally accessible model organisms for studies of the photosynthetic apparatus. A major landmark in photosynthesis research, which dramatically illustrates this point, was provided by the determination of the X-ray structure of the reaction center (RC) in Blastochloris viridis (Deisenhofer and Michel, EMBO J 8:2149-2170, 1989), once it was realized that this represented the general structure for the photosystem II RC present in all oxygenic phototrophs. This seminal advance, together with a considerable body of subsequent research on the light-harvesting (LH) and electron transfer components of the photosynthetic apparatus has provided a firm basis for the current understanding of how phototrophs acclimate to alterations in light intensity and quality. Oxygenic phototrophs adapt to these changes by extensive thylakoid membrane remodeling, which results in a dramatic supramolecular reordering to assure that an appropriate flow of quinone redox species occurs within the membrane bilayer for efficient and rapid electron transfer. Despite the high level of photosynthetic unit organization in Rba. sphaeroides as observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence induction/relaxation measurements have demonstrated that the addition of the peripheral LH2 antenna complex in cells adapting to low-intensity illumination results in a slowing of the rate of electron transfer turnover by the RC of up to an order of magnitude. This is ascribed to constraints in quinone redox species diffusion between the RC and cytochrome bc1 complexes arising from the increased packing density as the intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) bilayer becomes crowded with LH2 rings. In addition to downshifts in light intensity as a paradigm

  20. A Novel Teflon-membrane Gas Tension Device for Denitrification-studies in Oxygen Minimum Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, A. C.; McNeil, C. L.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Altabet, M. A.; Johnson, B.; Bourbonnais, A.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) are global hotspots for the biogeochemical transformation of biologically-available forms of nitrogen to unusable nitrogen-gas. We present a new Teflon-membrane based Gas Tension Device (GTD) for measuring the excess N2 signal generated by denitrification and anammox in OMZs, with a hydrostatic pressure-independent response and a depth range from 0 - 550 m, a significant advancement from previous GTD models. The GTD consists of a 4/1000" thick by 2" diameter Teflon-membrane with a water-side plenum connected to SeaBird 5T pump. Dissolved gases in the water equilibrate across the membrane with a low-dead-volume housing connected to a high-precision quart pressure sensor. Laboratory data characterizing the GTD will be presented. The e-folding (response) time ranges from 14 min at continuous (100%) pumping to 28 min at pulse (10%) pumping. We also demonstrate the pressure dependence of the partial pressures from Henry's Law in the laboratory for pure nitrogen, pure oxygen, and standard atmospheric ratios of gases. GTD's were field tested on two floats deployed in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) OMZ for 15 days that targeted a productive mesoscale surface eddy originating from the Mexican coast. We anticipated that high organic carbon export should stimulate denitrification within the OMZ below. The floats profiled between the surface and 400 m depth and concurrently measured T, S, PAR, O2 (SBE 43 and Optode), and nitrate (SUNA). The N2-profiles from the GTDs are validated against independently measured N2/Ar ratio data collected during the deployment.

  1. Measuring oxygen tension modulation, induced by a new pre-radiotherapy therapeutic, in a mammary window chamber mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Rachel; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2015-03-01

    Tumor regions under hypoxic or low oxygen conditions respond less effectively to many treatment strategies, including radiation therapy. A novel investigational therapeutic, NVX-108 (NuvOx Pharma), has been developed to increase delivery of oxygen through the use of a nano-emulsion of dodecofluoropentane. By raising pO2 levels prior to delivering radiation, treatment efficacy may be improved. To aid in evaluating the novel drug, oxygen tension was quantitatively measured, spatially and temporally, to record the effect of administrating NVX-108 in an orthotopic mammary window chamber mouse model of breast cancer. The oxygen tension was measured through the use of an oxygen-sensitive coating, comprised of phosphorescent platinum porphyrin dye embedded in a polystyrene matrix. The coating, applied to the surface of the coverslip of the window chamber through spin coating, is placed in contact with the mammary fat pad to record the oxygenation status of the surface tissue layer. Prior to implantation of the window chamber, a tumor is grown in the SCID mouse model by injection of MCF-7 cells into the mammary fat pad. Two-dimensional spatial distributions of the pO2 levels were obtained through conversion of measured maps of phosphorescent lifetime. The resulting information on the spatial and temporal variation of the induced oxygen modulation could provide valuable insight into the optimal timing between administration of NVX-108 and radiation treatment to provide the most effective treatment outcome.

  2. Cloned pigs derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos cultured in vitro at low oxygen tension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Pig cloning has great potential to human xenotransplantation. The present study was designed to establish a more efficient system for producing cloned pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Our approach was as follows: SCNT embryos were reconstructed by using fetal fibroblasts of Chinese miniature pig as donors and in vitro matured oocytes of prepubertal gilts as recipients. Reconstructed embryos were induced by electrical fusion/activation and cultured in BSA-containing North Carolina State University 23 medium (NCSU-23) or Porcine Zygote Medium (PZM-3) at the gas condition of 5% CO2, 7% O2, 88% N2. A total of 230 cloned embryos were transferred to three surrogate sows, producing three piglets. One of them is apparently healthy. The clonal provenance of the piglet was indicated by its coat color and confirmed by DNA microsatellite analysis. These results indicate that the use of in vitro matured oocytes from prepubertal gilts as recipient, combined with cloned embryos cultured at low oxygen tension is an effective way to produce cloned pigs.

  3. High dose Erythropoietin increases Brain Tissue Oxygen Tension in Severe Vasospasm after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helbok Raimund

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vasospasm-related delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI significantly impacts on outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Erythropoietin (EPO may reduce the severity of cerebral vasospasm and improve outcome, however, underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. In this study, the authors aimed to investigate the effect of EPO on cerebral metabolism and brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2. Methods Seven consecutive poor grade SAH patients with multimodal neuromonitoring (MM received systemic EPO therapy (30.000 IU per day for 3 consecutive days for severe cerebral vasospasm. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, intracranial pressure (ICP, PbtO2 and brain metabolic changes were analyzed during the next 24 hours after each dose given. Statistical analysis was performed with a mixed effects model. Results A total of 22 interventions were analyzed. Median age was 47 years (32–68 and 86 % were female. Three patients (38 % developed DCI. MAP decreased 2 hours after intervention (P btO2 significantly increased over time (P  Conclusions EPO increases PbtO2 in poor grade SAH patients with severe cerebral vasospasm. The effect on outcome needs further investigation.

  4. Localized increase of tissue oxygen tension by magnetic targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liong, Celine; Ortiz, Daniel; Ao-ieong, Eilleen; Navati, Mahantesh S.; Friedman, Joel M.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Hypoxia is the major hindrance to successful radiation therapy of tumors. Attempts to increase the oxygen (O2) tension (PO2) of tissue by delivering more O2 have been clinically disappointing, largely due to the way O2 is transported and released by the hemoglobin (Hb) within the red blood cells (RBCs). Systemic manipulation of O2 transport increases vascular resistance due to metabolic autoregulation of blood flow to prevent over oxygenation. This study investigates a new technology to increase O2 delivery to a target tissue by decreasing the Hb-O2 affinity of the blood circulating within the targeted tissue. As the Hb-O2 affinity decreases, the tissue PO2 to satisfy tissue O2 metabolic needs increases without increasing O2 delivery or extraction. Paramagnetic nanoparticles (PMNPs), synthetized using gadolinium oxide, were coated with the cell permeable Hb allosteric effector L35 (3,5-trichlorophenylureido-phenoxy-methylpropionic acid). L35 decreases Hb affinity for O2 and favors the release of O2. The L35-coated PMNPs (L35-PMNPs) were intravenously infused (10 mg kg-1) to hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber model. A magnetic field of 3 mT was applied to localize the effects of the L35-PMNPs to the window chamber. Systemic O2 transport characteristics and microvascular tissue oxygenation were measured after administration of L35-PMNPs with and without magnetic field. The tissue PO2 in untreated control animals was 25.2 mmHg. L35-PMNPs without magnetic field decreased tissue PO2 to 23.4 mmHg, increased blood pressure, and reduced blood flow, largely due to systemic modification of Hb-O2 affinity. L35-PMNPs with magnetic field increased tissue PO2 to 27.9 mmHg, without systemic or microhemodynamic changes. These results indicate that localized modification of Hb-O2 affinity can increase PO2 of target tissue without affecting systemic O2 delivery or triggering O2 autoregulation mechanisms. This technology can be used to treat local hypoxia and to

  5. Haemodynamic influences on kidney oxygenation : Clinical implications of integrative physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, Roger G.; Ince, Can; Joles, Jaap A.; Smith, David W.; May, Clive N.; O'Connor, Paul M.; Gardiner, Bruce S.

    2013-01-01

    Renal blood flow, local tissue perfusion and blood oxygen content are the major determinants of oxygen delivery to kidney tissue. Arterial pressure and segmental vascular resistance influence kidney oxygen consumption through effects on glomerular filtration rate and sodium reabsorption. Diffusive s

  6. Surface tension and its temperature coefficient of molten tin determined with the sessile drop method at different oxygen partial pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhang Fu; Mukai, Kusuhiro; Takagi, Katsuhiko; Ohtaka, Masahiko; Huang, Wen Lai; Liu, Qiu Sheng

    2002-10-15

    The surface tension of molten tin has been determined by the sessile drop method at temperatures ranging from 523 to 1033 K and in the oxygen partial pressure (P(O(2))) range from 2.85 x 10(-19) to 8.56 x 10(-6) MPa, and its dependence on temperature and oxygen partial pressure has been analyzed. At P(O(2))=2.85 x 10(-19) and 1.06 x 10(-15) MPa, the surface tension decreases linearly with the increase of temperature and its temperature coefficients are -0.151 and -0.094 mN m(-1) K(-1), respectively. However, at high P(O(2)) (3.17 x 10(-10), 8.56 x 10(-6) MPa), the surface tension increases with the temperature near the melting point (505 K) and decreases above 723 K. The surface tension decrease with increasing P(O(2)) is much larger near the melting point than at temperatures above 823 K. The contact angle between the molten tin and the alumina substrate is 158-173 degrees, and the wettability is poor.

  7. Enhanced dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells by synergistic effect of Bcl-xL and reduced oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Christina; Courtois, Elise; Jensen, Pia

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease, but a protocol for controlled dopaminergic differentiation is not yet available. Here we investigated the effect of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-x(L) and oxygen tension on dopaminergic...... differentiation and survival of a human ventral mesencephalic stem cell line (hVM1). hVM1 cells and a Bcl-x(L) over-expressing subline (hVMbcl-x(L)) were differentiated by sequential treatment with fibroblast growth factor-8, forskolin, sonic hedgehog, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. After 10...... was reduced in hVMbcl-x(L) cell cultures compared with control. We conclude that Bcl-x(L) and lowered oxygen tension act in concert to enhance dopaminergic differentiation and survival of human neural stem cells....

  8. Correlation of brain tissue oxygen tension with cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy and mixed venous oxygen saturation during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyree, Kreangkai; Tyree, Melissa; DiGeronimo, Robert

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this prospective, animal study was to compare brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO(2)) with cerebral near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and mixed venous oxygen saturation (SVO(2)) during venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) in a porcine model. This was accomplished using twelve immature piglets with surgically implanted catheters placed in the superficial cerebral cortex to measure brain PbtO(2) and microdialysis metabolites. The NIRS sensor was placed overlying the forehead to measure cerebral regional saturation index (rSO(2)i) while SVO(2) was measured directly from the ECMO circuit. Animals were placed on VA ECMO followed by an initial period of stabilization, after which they were subjected to graded hypoxia and recovery. Our results revealed that rSO(2)i and SVO(2) correlated only marginally with PbtO(2) (R(2)=0.32 and R(2)=0.26, respectively) while the correlation between rSO(2)i and SVO( 2) was significantly stronger (R(2)=0.59). Cerebral metabolites and rSO(2)i were significantly altered during attenuation of PbtO( 2), p<0.05). A subset of animals, following exposure to hypoxia, experienced markedly delayed recovery of both rSO(2)i and PbtO( 2) despite rapid normalization of SVO(2). Upon further analysis, these animals had significantly lower blood pressure (p=0.001), lower serum pH (p=0.01), and higher serum lactate (p=0.02). Additionally, in this subgroup, rSO(2)i correlated better with PbtO(2) (R(2)=0.76). These findings suggest that, in our ECMO model, rSO(2)i and SVO( 2) correlate reasonably well with each other, but not necessarily with brain PbtO(2) and that NIRS-derived rSO(2)i may more accurately reflect cerebral tissue hypoxia in sicker animals.

  9. Endothelial cell respiration is affected by the oxygen tension during shear exposure: role of mitochondrial peroxynitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Charles I; Han, Zhaosheng; Presley, Tennille; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Zweier, Jay L; Ilangovan, Govindasamy; Alevriadou, B Rita

    2008-07-01

    Cultured vascular endothelial cell (EC) exposure to steady laminar shear stress results in peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) formation intramitochondrially and inactivation of the electron transport chain. We examined whether the "hyperoxic state" of 21% O(2), compared with more physiological O(2) tensions (Po(2)), increases the shear-induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and mitochondrial superoxide (O(2)(*-)) generation leading to ONOO(-) formation and suppression of respiration. Electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry was used to measure O(2) consumption rates of bovine aortic ECs sheared (10 dyn/cm(2), 30 min) at 5%, 10%, or 21% O(2) or left static at 5% or 21% O(2). Respiration was inhibited to a greater extent when ECs were sheared at 21% O(2) than at lower Po(2) or left static at different Po(2). Flow in the presence of an endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) inhibitor or a ONOO(-) scavenger abolished the inhibitory effect. EC transfection with an adenovirus that expresses manganese superoxide dismutase in mitochondria, and not a control virus, blocked the inhibitory effect. Intracellular and mitochondrial O(2)(*-) production was higher in ECs sheared at 21% than at 5% O(2), as determined by dihydroethidium and MitoSOX red fluorescence, respectively, and the latter was, at least in part, NO-dependent. Accumulation of NO metabolites in media of ECs sheared at 21% O(2) was modestly increased compared with ECs sheared at lower Po(2), suggesting that eNOS activity may be higher at 21% O(2). Hence, the hyperoxia of in vitro EC flow studies, via increased NO and mitochondrial O(2)(*-) production, leads to enhanced ONOO(-) formation intramitochondrially and suppression of respiration.

  10. Cigarette smoke and decreased oxygen tension inhibit pulmonary claudin-6 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Felix R; Lewis, Josh B; Belgique, Samuel T; Milner, Dallin C; Lewis, Adam L; Dunaway, Todd M; Egbert, Kaleb M; Winden, Duane R; Arroyo, Juan A; Reynolds, Paul R

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a condition involving perturbed barrier integrity coincident with both emphysema and inflammation of the airways, and smoking is considered a major risk factor. Claudins (Cldns) stabilize barriers and contribute to tight junctions by preventing paracellular transport of extracellular fluid constituents. To determine Cldn6 was differentially influenced by tobacco smoke, Cldn6 was evaluated in cells and tissues by q-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry following exposure. Cldn6 transcriptional regulation was also assessed using luciferase reporter constructs. Q-PCR and immunoblotting revealed that Cldn6 was decreased in alveolar type II-like epithelial cells (A549) and primary small airway epithelial cells when exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Cldn6 was also markedly decreased in the lungs of mice exposed to acute tobacco smoke delivered by a nose-only automated smoke machine compared to controls. Luciferase reporter assays incorporating 0.5-kb, 1.0-kb, or 2.0-kb of the Cldn6 promoter revealed decreased transcription of Cldn6 following exposure to CSE. Cldn6 transcriptional regulation was also assessed in hypoxic conditions due to low oxygen tension observed during smoking. Hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha caused decreased transcription of the Cldn6 gene via interactions with putative response elements in the proximal promoter sequence. These data reveal that tight junctional proteins such as Cldn6 are differentially regulated by tobacco-smoke exposure and that Cldns are potentially targeted when epithelial cells respond to tobacco smoke. Further research may show that Cldns expressed in tight junctions between parenchymal cells contribute to impaired structural integrity of the lung coincident with smoking.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of the surface tension of oxygen-supersaturated water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jain

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, non-reactive molecular dynamic simulations were conducted to determine the surface tension of water as a function of the concentration of the dissolved gaseous molecules (O2, which would in turn help to predict the pressure inside the nanobubbles under supersaturation conditions. Knowing the bubble pressure is a prerequisite for understanding the mechanisms behind the spontaneous combustion of the H2/O2 gases inside the nanobubbles. First, the surface tension of pure water was determined using the planar interface method and the Irving and Kirkwood formula. Next, the surface tension of water containing four different supersaturation concentrations (S of O2 gas molecules was computed considering the curved interface of a nanobubble. The surface tension of water was found to decrease with an increase in the supersaturation ratio or the concentration of the dissolved O2 gas molecules.

  12. Postocclusive Hyperemia Measured with Laser Doppler Flowmetry and Transcutaneous Oxygen Tension in the Diagnosis of Primary Raynaud's Phenomenon: A Prospective, Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Paweł; Henry, Brandon Michael; Kmiotek, Elizabeth K.; Gregorczyk-Maga, Iwona; Kaczmarczyk, Paweł; Niżankowski, Rafał

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the sensitivity and specificity of transcutaneous oxygen tension and postocclusive hyperemia testing using laser Doppler flowmetry in patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon. One hundred patients and one hundred controls were included in the study. Baseline microvascular blood flow and then time to peak flow following occlusion were measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. Afterwards, the transcutaneous oxygen tension was recorded. The sensitivities of baseline microvascular blood flow, postocclusive time to peak flow, and transcutaneous oxygen tension were 79%, 79%, and 77%, respectively. The postocclusive time peak flow had a superior specificity of 90% and area under the curve of 0.92 as compared to 66% and 0.80 for baseline microvascular flow and 64% and 0.76 for transcutaneous oxygen tension. Time to postocclusive peak blood flow measured by laser Doppler flowmetry is a highly accurate test for differentiating patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon from healthy controls. PMID:28101516

  13. Postocclusive Hyperemia Measured with Laser Doppler Flowmetry and Transcutaneous Oxygen Tension in the Diagnosis of Primary Raynaud's Phenomenon: A Prospective, Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Paweł; Henry, Brandon Michael; Kmiotek, Elizabeth K; Gregorczyk-Maga, Iwona; Kaczmarczyk, Paweł; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Niżankowski, Rafał

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the sensitivity and specificity of transcutaneous oxygen tension and postocclusive hyperemia testing using laser Doppler flowmetry in patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon. One hundred patients and one hundred controls were included in the study. Baseline microvascular blood flow and then time to peak flow following occlusion were measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. Afterwards, the transcutaneous oxygen tension was recorded. The sensitivities of baseline microvascular blood flow, postocclusive time to peak flow, and transcutaneous oxygen tension were 79%, 79%, and 77%, respectively. The postocclusive time peak flow had a superior specificity of 90% and area under the curve of 0.92 as compared to 66% and 0.80 for baseline microvascular flow and 64% and 0.76 for transcutaneous oxygen tension. Time to postocclusive peak blood flow measured by laser Doppler flowmetry is a highly accurate test for differentiating patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon from healthy controls.

  14. Modelling of L-valine Repeated Fed-batch Fermentation Process Taking into Account the Dissolved Oxygen Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzanko Georgiev

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with synthesis of dynamic unstructured model of variable volume fed-batch fermentation process with intensive droppings for L-valine production. The presented approach of the investigation includes the following main procedures: description of the process by generalized stoichiometric equations; preliminary data processing and calculation of specific rates for main kinetic variables; identification of the specific rates takes into account the dissolved oxygen tension; establishment and optimisation of dynamic model of the process; simulation researches. MATLAB is used as a research environment.

  15. Butler-Sugimoto monomolecular bilayer interface model: the effect of oxygen on the surface tension of a liquid metal and its wetting of a ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Pei-Shan; Datta, Ravindra

    2014-07-15

    The influence of oxygen on liquid-gas surface tension of molten metals has been well-investigated experimentally and modeled theoretically via the Szyszkowski equation, derivable from the Butler molecular monolayer interface model. However, there is no corresponding model describing the experimentally observed profound effect of oxygen partial pressure on solid-liquid surface tension as well as on contact angle of molten metals on ceramic substrates. Here, we utilize the Butler-Sugimoto thermodynamic approach based on a monomolecular bilayer interface model to investigate the effect of oxygen partial pressure on liquid-gas as well as solid-liquid surface tension of molten Cu/Al2O3 and molten Ag/Al2O3 systems. It is shown that both liquid-gas and solid-liquid surface tension are a strong function of oxygen activity in the melt, which, in turn, depends on gas-phase oxygen partial pressure, in conformity with experiments. The change in solid-liquid surface tension and wetting is also greatly affected by the change in liquid-gas surface tension. This improved understanding is of practical significance in many applications.

  16. Anatomy of the biceps tendon: implications for restoring physiological length-tension relation during biceps tenodesis with interference screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denard, Patrick J; Dai, Xuesong; Hanypsiak, Brian T; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the normal length and diameter of the long head of the biceps tendon (BT) to provide guidelines for interference screw tenodesis. Twenty-one cadaveric shoulders were dissected. The BT length was measured from its origin to the humeral head articular margin (AM), lower subscapularis, upper pectoralis major, musculotendinous junction of the biceps (MTJ), and lower pectoralis major (LPM). Tendon diameter was measured at levels corresponding to tenodesis: (1) at the AM, (2) suprapectorally, and (3) subpectorally. The mean tendon length was 24.9 mm from the origin to the AM, 56.1 mm to the lower subscapularis, 73.8 mm to the upper pectoralis major, 98.5 mm to the MTJ, and 118.4 mm to the LPM. The mean tendon diameter was 6.6 mm for tenodesis at the AM, 5.1 mm for suprapectoral tenodesis, and 5.3 mm for subpectoral tenodesis. During biceps tenodesis with interference screw fixation, restoring the normal length-tension relation of the BT depends on the site of tenodesis and the depth of the bone socket. At the AM, a 25-mm bone socket on average will maintain the length-tension relation. For tenodesis more distally, the length of tendon resection varies with bone socket length. Because the MTJ is above the LPM, subpectoral tenodesis should be performed proximal to the LPM. This study provides guidelines for restoring the normal length-tension relation during biceps tenodesis with interference screw fixation. The simplest way to restore this relation is with tenodesis adjacent to the humeral head AM and a bone socket of 25 mm in depth. For tenodesis at more distal locations, both the length of the BT and the depth of the bone socket must be considered. Information about the normal BT may be useful in preserving the physiological length-tension relation during biceps tenodesis. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiological and Physiopathological Effects on Synaptic Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is counterbalanced by antioxidant defenses. When large amounts of ROS accumulate, antioxidant mechanisms become overwhelmed and oxidative cellular stress may occur. Therefore, ROS are typically characterized as toxic molecules, oxidizing membrane lipids, changing the conformation of proteins, damaging nucleic acids, and causing deficits in synaptic plasticity. High ROS concentrations are associated with a declin...

  18. History of developments in sport and exercise physiology: A. V. Hill, maximal oxygen uptake, and oxygen debt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Tudor

    2008-02-15

    This paper provides a thumb-nail sketch of some of the key issues that have been instrumental in the development of the scientific study of exercise, and more particularly sports, physiology. Those who have had the pleasure of reading the American Physiological Society's publication Exercise Physiology in its "People and Ideas" series, will know the breadth and depth of the extant material in this field. In an attempt at some form of coherence, the present paper focuses on the concepts of maximal oxygen uptake and oxygen debt introduced by the British physiologist Archibald Vivian Hill in 1922. The Introduction provides a contextual framework for the paper, and is followed by a description of the work undertaken by Hill and his colleagues in the development of these concepts over a three-year period. Credit is given to scientists from the eighteenth century onwards who provided the scientific foundations that led to the measurement of oxygen uptake, and those who went on to elaborate the physiological mechanisms of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism. The problems in what constitutes a plateau and how to get it are discussed, along with attempts to predict maximal oxygen uptake from sub-maximal--or even no--exercise. The debate surrounding the limiting factor in the oxygen uptake chain started by Hill is brought up to date rather than resolved. The ecological validity of applied sports physiology is explored in terms of sport-specific ergometry and test protocols. Finally, Hill's interest in the production and removal of lactic acid re-emerges in the recent attempts to establish the threshold at which accumulation of lactic acid in the blood leads to cessation of exercise, and also the means of validly measuring an individual's anaerobic power and capacity. Wherever possible and appropriate, counter-arguments are introduced to demonstrate the transient and uncertain nature of what is often regarded as true knowledge.

  19. Defining the Role of Oxygen Tension in Human Neural Progenitor Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Xie

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia augments human embryonic stem cell (hESC self-renewal via hypoxia-inducible factor 2α-activated OCT4 transcription. Hypoxia also increases the efficiency of reprogramming differentiated cells to a pluripotent-like state. Combined, these findings suggest that low O2 tension would impair the purposeful differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Here, we show that low O2 tension and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF activity instead promote appropriate hESC differentiation. Through gain- and loss-of-function studies, we implicate O2 tension as a modifier of a key cell fate decision, namely whether neural progenitors differentiate toward neurons or glia. Furthermore, our data show that even transient changes in O2 concentration can affect cell fate through HIF by regulating the activity of MYC, a regulator of LIN28/let-7 that is critical for fate decisions in the neural lineage. We also identify key small molecules that can take advantage of this pathway to quickly and efficiently promote the development of mature cell types.

  20. Oxygen tension and normalisation pressure modulate nifedipine-sensitive relaxation of human placental chorionic plate arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, E J; Wareing, M; Greenwood, S L; Baker, P N

    2006-01-01

    Fetoplacental blood vessel constriction in response to reduced oxygenation has been demonstrated in placenta perfused in vitro. In pulmonary vessels, hypoxic vasoconstriction involves Ca2+ influx into smooth muscle through membrane ion channels including voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs). We hypothesised that VGCCs are involved in agonist-induced constriction of fetoplacental resistance vessels and that their contribution is modulated by oxygen. Chorionic plate small arteries were studied using wire myography. Arteries were normalised at high (0.9 of L(13.3 kPa)) or low (0.9 of L(5.1 kPa)) stretch and experiments performed at 156, 38 or 15 mmHg oxygen. At low stretch, U46619 (thromboxane-mimetic) or KCl (smooth muscle depolarisation) constriction was greater at 38 than 156 or 15 mmHg oxygen. An L-type VGCC blocker nifedipine, inhibited KCl constriction by >85% but was less effective in U46619 constrictions (43-67%). At high stretch, nifedipine inhibition of KCl- and U46619-induced constriction was less at 15 than 38 or 156 mmHg oxygen. Oxygen did not affect constriction to U46619 or nifedipine-induced relaxation when vessels were normalised at high stretch. In conclusion, oxygen modulates chorionic plate arterial constriction at low stretch but regulation is lost at high stretch. U46619 constriction is underlain by VGCCs and nifedipine-insensitive processes; their relative contribution is influenced by oxygen.

  1. Mitochondria and Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiology and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhashini Bolisetty

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The air that we breathe contains nearly 21% oxygen, most of which is utilized by mitochondria during respiration. While we cannot live without it, it was perceived as a bane to aerobic organisms due to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites by mitochondria and other cellular compartments. However, this dogma was challenged when these species were demonstrated to modulate cellular responses through altering signaling pathways. In fact, since this discovery of a dichotomous role of reactive species in immune function and signal transduction, research in this field grew at an exponential pace and the pursuit for mechanisms involved began. Due to a significant number of review articles present on the reactive species mediated cell death, we have focused on emerging novel pathways such as autophagy, signaling and maintenance of the mitochondrial network. Despite its role in several processes, increased reactive species generation has been associated with the origin and pathogenesis of a plethora of diseases. While it is tempting to speculate that anti-oxidant therapy would protect against these disorders, growing evidence suggests that this may not be true. This further supports our belief that these reactive species play a fundamental role in maintenance of cellular and tissue homeostasis.

  2. Concise review: the role of oxygen in hematopoietic stem cell physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jež, Mojca; Rožman, Primož; Ivanović, Zoran; Bas, Tuba

    2015-09-01

    Molecular dioxygen, O(2), is an important element in cellular microenvironment in vivo, and often overlooked in standard in vitro and ex vivo cell culture systems. Molecular oxygen is the ultimate electron acceptor in oxidative cellular respiration, and also a signal that regulates cell fate through concentration gradients. Recent advances in physiology of oxygen and adult stem cell research have shown that apart from being important for oxidative phosphorylation, thus energy metabolism, oxygen is also important as a signaling molecule and an integral part of the stem cell niche. This review article covers the influence of physiologically relevant oxygen levels on adult stem cells through highlighting the research on the effect of oxygen concentration on hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, proliferation and differentiation. This is important particularly to understand the embryonic and adult stem cell biology and physiology. The new discoveries in this field will help to further improve current tissue engineering and clinical applications. In addition, understanding the relationship between oxygen and stemness is invaluable for the advanced treatments of neoplastic diseases. Authors believe that in the future, active and programmed dynamic of oxygen levels will be routinely used for the programmed in vitro and ex vivo expansion of different adult stem cell types and tissue regeneration purposes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The effect of ageing on ocular blood flow, oxygen tension and retinal function during and after intraocular pressure elevation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah K H Lim

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of ageing on the recovery of ocular blood flow, intravitreal oxygen tension and retinal function during and after intraocular pressure (IOP elevation. METHODS: Long Evans rats (3- and 14-month-old underwent acute stepwise IOP elevation from 10 to 120 mmHg (5 mmHg steps each 3 minutes. IOP was then returned to baseline and recovery was monitored for 2 hours. Photopic electroretinograms (ERG were recorded at each IOP step during stress and at each minute during recovery. Ocular blood flow and vitreal oxygen tension (pO2 were assayed continuously and simultaneously using a combined laser Doppler flow meter (LDF and an oxygen sensitive fibre-optic probe, respectively. The combined sensor was placed in the vitreous chamber, proximal to the retina. Data were binned into 3 minute intervals during stress and 1 min intervals during recovery. Recovery data was described using a bi-logistic function. RESULTS: Rats of both ages showed similar susceptibility to IOP elevation, with pO2 showing a closer relationship to ERG than LDF. During recovery, both ages showed a distinctive two-phased recovery for all three measures with the exception of the LDF in 3-month-old rats, which showed only 1 phase. In all animals, LDF recovered fastest (1 hour. 14-month-old rats showed surprisingly faster and greater LDF recovery compared to the younger group, with similar levels of pO2 recovery. However, the ERG in these middle-aged animals did not fully recover after two hours, despite showing no difference in susceptibility to IOP during stress compared to the young group. CONCLUSIONS: Young and middle-aged eyes showed similar susceptibility to IOP elevation in terms of pO2, LDF and ERG. Despite this lack of difference during stress, older eyes did not completely recover function, suggesting a more subtle age-related susceptibility to IOP.

  4. Effects of oxygen tension and pH on the respiratory burst of human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, T G; Bearman, S I; Babior, B M

    1979-06-01

    The respiratory burst of human neutrophils was measured under conditions of hypoxia and low pH. O2 -- production by neutrophils activated with opsonized zymosan fell slowly as the oxygen concentration declined to 1%, then dropped more sharply, reaching negligible levels at oxygen concentrations less than 0.25%. Production was half maximal at an oxygen concentration of 0.35% (equivalent to approximately 10-microM dissolved oxygen). O2- production by the cell-free O2- -forming system prepared from zymosan-activated neutrophils showed a similar dependence on oxygen concentration. A drop in pH caused decreases in both oxygen consumption and O2-- production by zymosan-treated neutrophils, values at PH 6.0 being 10%--20% of those observed at pH 7.5. Experiments with the cell-free O2-- -forming system suggested that this decline in respiratory burst activity at low pH was due to inefficient activation of the O2-- -forming enzyme under acidic conditions.

  5. Low oxygen tension induces positive inotropy and decreases a(i)Na in isolated guinea-pig cardiac ventricular papillary muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, M J; Yang, J M

    1998-06-30

    Effects of low oxygen on contractile force, intracellular Na+ activity (aiNa), and action potential were simultaneously measured in isolated guinea-pig ventricular papillary muscles. Reduction of oxygen from control 488 to 150 mmHg biphasically increased and decreased the twitch tension, and decreased aiNa in muscles driven at 60 beats/min. The action potential duration (APD) was decreased but the maximum rate of upstroke (Vmax) was increased. In control, 1 microM epinephrine significantly increased the the action potential amplitude and twitch tension with decreases in the time to twitch peak (TTP), time for 50% relaxation (RT50), and aiNa. After exposure to low oxygen for 10 min, with twitch tension elevated and TTP and RT90 increased, 1 microM epinephrine significantly increased the twitch tension and Vmax, and decreased the APD and aiNa. Pretreatment with reserpine inhibited the twitch tension, both at control and in the presence of epinephrine. But changes of action potential and aiNa in response to low oxygen and epinephrine were similar to those in control. Our results indicate that the isolated guinea-pig ventricular muscle needs a high oxygen tension to maintain a normal contractile function. Reduction of oxygen deteriorates the electrical and mechanical activities, most likely, by a coaxial graded hypoxia. The decreased aiNa, not associated with endogenous catecholamines, suggests that the activity of the Na(+)-K+ pump can be maintained in the superficial muscle cells despite of core-central hypoxia.

  6. The effect of oxygen tension on porcine embryonic development is dependent on embryo type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booth, Paul; Holm, Peter; Callesen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    of the embryos prior to culture--a study was performed to examine the effect of O2 tension during culture on three different types of porcine embryos, namely: in vivo flushed embryos, and in vitro matured oocytes either fertilized in vitro or parthenogenetically activated. In vivo embryos (n=208) were flushed...... by 2 mM DMAP prior to culture. The IVF embryos (n=971) were produced by fertilizing COCs (day 0) with fresh ejaculated semen in modified tris-based medium for 6 h before cumulus removal. All embryos were cultured in BECM-3 containing 12 mg/mL fatty-acid-free BSA up to day 4, followed by BECM-3...

  7. Effect of oxygen tension on adult articular chondrocytes in microcarrier bioreactor culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malda, J.; Brink, van den P.; Meeuwse, P.; Grojec, M.; Martens, D.E.; Tramper, J.; Riesle, J.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Tissue-engineering approaches for cartilage repair hold promise for the treatment of cartilage defects. Various methods to prevent or reduce dedifferentiation during chondrocyte expansion are currently under investigation. In the present study we evaluated the effect of oxygen on chondrocyte prolife

  8. Oxygen-tension measurements - The first step towards prevention and early detection of anastomotic leakage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanase, D.; French, P.J.; Komen, N.; Kleinrensink, G.J.; Jeekel, J.; Lange, J.F.; Draaijer, A.

    2007-01-01

    Many patients still die every year as a result of anastomotic leakage after surgery. The medical world needs an objective aid to detect leakage during surgery and during the critical recovery period. We propose a miniature measurement system to detect adequate tissue oxygenation pre- and

  9. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON BIODEGRADATION AS A FUNCTION OF OXYGEN TENSION IN CONTAMINATED SOIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the effect of soil gas oxygen concentration on the degradation and mineralization of spiked 14C-pyrene and nonspiked 16 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) present in the soil. The soil used for the evaluation was...

  10. Use of transcutaneous oxygen and carbon dioxide tensions for assessing indices of gas exchange during exercise testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, R; Banham, S W

    2000-04-01

    The slow response characteristics of the combined transcutaneous electrode have been viewed as a major disadvantage when compared with other types of non-invasive assessment of gas exchange during exercise testing. We have previously shown that by using the highest recommended temperature of 45 degrees C to reduce response times, and combining this with an exercise protocol of gradual work load increments, that this allows changes in arterial blood gases to be closely followed by transcutaneous values. In the present study we have validated the use of a transcutaneous electrode for estimation of alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (AaO2) and dead space to tidal volume ratio (V(D)/V(T)) during exercise, against values calculated from direct arterial blood gas analysis. One hundred measurements were made in 20 patients with various cardiopulmonary disorders who underwent exercise testing. Exercise testing was performed by bicycle ergometry with a specific protocol involving gradual work load increments at 2 min intervals. Transcutaneous gas tensions were measured by a heated combined O2 and CO2 electrode. Arterial blood was sampled at the midpoint of each stage of exercise and transcutaneous tensions noted at the end of each stage. The mean difference of the AaO2 gradient calculated from blood gas tensions obtained by the two methods was 0.14 kPa. The limits of agreement were -0.26 and 0.63 kPa. The same values for V(D)/V(T) calculated from gas tensions measured by the two methods were: mean difference 0001; limits of agreement -0.0242 and 0.0252. For both these parameters there was an even scatter around the mean value on Bland and Altman analysis. The findings of this study suggest that estimation of parameters of gas exchange using transcutaneous values during exercise testing is reliable, provided the electrode is heated to a slightly higher temperature than usual and the work load increments are gradual, allowing for the latency in the response time of the system

  11. Expression of carotenogenic genes and astaxanthin production in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous as a function of oxygen tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Lu, Mingbo; Yu, Longjiang

    2011-01-01

    This report gives an insight into the specific changes in the transcription of four key carotenogenic genes [encoding geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (crtE), phytoene desaturase (crtI), phytoene synthase lycopene cyclase (crtYB), and astaxanthin synthase (ast), respectively] in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous cultures, with regard to dissolved oxygen (DO) contents of 10%, 25%, and 40% air saturation, respectively. 25% DO proved to be the most beneficial for yeast growth, transcription of carotenogenic genes, and astaxanthin content.

  12. Effect of oocyte maturation time, sperm selection method and oxygen tension on in vitro embryo development in alpacas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Jaime; Paulo Santayana, R; José Mendoza, M; Leandra Landeo, J; Huamán, Elizabeth; Ticllacuri, Flamel; Fidel Mujica, L; Silva, Mauricio; Ratto, Marcelo H

    2017-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of in vitro maturation time, sperm selection and oxygen tension on alpaca embryo development. In Experiment I, Cumulus Oocyte- Complexes (COCs) were obtained from abattoir ovaries and in vitro matured in TCM-199 for 24 (n = 217), 28 (215), or 32 h (223) at 38.5 °C, high humidity and 5% CO2 in air. Oocytes from 24 (n = 392), 28 (n = 456) or 32 (n = 368) h groups were in vitro fertilized with epididymal sperm and cultured in SOFaa at 38.5 °C, high humidity and 5% CO2, 5% O2 and 90% N2 for 7 days. Embryo development was evaluated on Day 2, 5 and Day 7 of in vitro culture (Day 0 = in vitro fertilization). In Experiment II, a 2 by 2-factorial design was used to determine the effect of sperm selection (Swim-up vs Percoll) and oxygen tension (20% vs 5%) during embryo culture and their interaction on embryo development. COCs were in vitro matured for 32 h at 38.5 °C and 5% CO2 in air and then in vitro inseminated with epididymal sperm processed by swim-up or Percoll. Zygotes were cultured in SOFaa + cumulus cells at 38.5 °C under 20 or 5% of O2 tension and high humidity for 7 days. A total of 235, 235, 253 and 240 oocytes were assigned to: swim-up+20 O2, swim-up+5 O2 or Percoll+20 O2, Percoll+5 O2, groups respectively. The proportion of oocytes reaching MII stage was highest after 32 h of in vitro maturation (P < 0.05). Blastocyst rate (29.1 ± 2.7%) was also highest for COCs matured for 32 h (Exp I). In Experiment II, Blastocysts rate (26.03 ± 4.7; 27.7 ± 4.3; 29.7 ± 3.8 and 27.6 ± 4.2% for swim-up+20 O2, swim-up+5 O2 or Percoll+20 O2, Percoll+5 O2, respectively) was not affected by sperm selection method (P = 0.8), oxygen tension (P = 0.9) or their interaction (P = 0.5). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Synoviocyte Derived-Extracellular Matrix Enhances Human Articular Chondrocyte Proliferation and Maintains Re-Differentiation Capacity at Both Low and Atmospheric Oxygen Tensions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Kean

    Full Text Available Current tissue engineering methods are insufficient for total joint resurfacing, and chondrocytes undergo de-differentiation when expanded on tissue culture plastic. De-differentiated chondrocytes show poor re-differentiation in culture, giving reduced glycosaminoglycan (GAG and collagen matrix accumulation. To address this, porcine synoviocyte-derived extracellular matrix and low (5% oxygen tension were assessed for their ability to enhance human articular chondrocyte expansion and maintain re-differentiation potential.Porcine synoviocyte matrices were devitalized using 3 non-detergent methods. These devitalized synoviocyte matrices were compared against tissue culture plastic for their ability to support human chondrocyte expansion. Expansion was further compared at both low (5%, and atmospheric (20% oxygen tension on all surfaces. Expanded cells then underwent chondrogenic re-differentiation in aggregate culture at both low and atmospheric oxygen tension. Aggregates were assessed for their GAG and collagen content both biochemically and histologically.Human chondrocytes expanded twice as fast on devitalized synoviocyte matrix vs. tissue culture plastic, and cells retained their re-differentiation capacity for twice the number of population doublings. There was no significant difference in growth rate between low and atmospheric oxygen tension. There was significantly less collagen type I, collagen type II, aggrecan and more MMP13 expression in cells expanded on synoviocyte matrix vs. tissue culture plastic. There were also significant effects due to oxygen tension on gene expression, wherein there was greater collagen type I, collagen type II, SOX9 and less MMP13 expression on tissue culture plastic compared to synoviocyte matrix. There was a significant increase in GAG, but not collagen, accumulation in chondrocyte aggregates re-differentiated at low oxygen tension over that achieved in atmospheric oxygen conditions

  14. Cell physiology regulation by hypoxia inducible factor-1: Targeting oxygen-related nanomachineries of hypoxic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandani, Morteza; Vandghanooni, Somayeh; Barar, Jaleh; Nazemiyeh, Hossein; Omidi, Yadollah

    2017-06-01

    Any dysfunctionality in maintaining the oxygen homeostasis by mammalian cells may elicit hypoxia/anoxia, which results in inescapable oxidative stress and possible subsequent detrimental impacts on certain cells/tissues with high demands to oxygen molecules. The ischemic damage in turn can trigger initiation of a number of diseases including organs ischemia, metabolic disorders, inflammatory diseases, different types of malignancies, and alteration in wound healing process. Thus, full comprehension of molecular mechanism(s) and cellular physiology of the oxygen homeostasis is the cornerstone of the mammalian cells metabolism, energetic pathways and health and disease conditions. An imbalance in oxygen content within the cellular microenvironment activates a cascade of molecular events that are often compensated, otherwise pathologic condition occurs through a complexed network of biomolecules. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) plays a key transcriptional role in the adaptation of cell physiology in relation with the oxygen content within a cell. In this current study, we provide a comprehensive review on the molecular mechanisms of oxygen sensing and homeostasis and the impacts of HIF-1 in hypoxic/anoxic conditions. Moreover, different molecular and biochemical responses of the cells to the surrounding environment are discussed in details. Finally, modern technological approaches for targeting the hypoxia related proteins are articulated. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Environmental oxygen tension regulates the energy metabolism and self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Forristal

    Full Text Available Energy metabolism is intrinsic to cell viability but surprisingly has been little studied in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. The current study aims to investigate the effect of environmental O2 tension on carbohydrate utilisation of hESCs. Highly pluripotent hESCs cultured at 5% O2 consumed significantly more glucose, less pyruvate and produced more lactate compared to those maintained at 20% O2. Moreover, hESCs cultured at atmospheric O2 levels expressed significantly less OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG than those maintained at 5% O2. To determine whether this difference in metabolism was a reflection of the pluripotent state, hESCs were cultured at 5% O2 in the absence of FGF2 for 16 hours leading to a significant reduction in the expression of SOX2. In addition, these cells consumed less glucose and produced significantly less lactate compared to those cultured in the presence of FGF2. hESCs maintained at 5% O2 were found to consume significantly less O2 than those cultured in the absence of FGF2, or at 20% O2. GLUT1 expression correlated with glucose consumption and using siRNA and chromatin immunoprecipitation was found to be directly regulated by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-2α at 5% O2. In conclusion, highly pluripotent cells associated with hypoxic culture consume low levels of O2, high levels of glucose and produce large amounts of lactate, while at atmospheric conditions glucose consumption and lactate production are reduced and there is an increase in oxidative metabolism. These data suggest that environmental O2 regulates energy metabolism and is intrinsic to the self-renewal of hESCs.

  16. Oxygen tension-independent protection against hypoxic cell killing in rat liver by low sodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ferrigno

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of Na+ in hypoxic injury was evaluated by a time-course analysis of damage in isolated livers perfused with N2-saturated buffer containing standard (143 mM or low (25 mM Na+ levels. Trypan blue uptake was used to detect non-viable cells. Under hypoxia with standard-Na+, trypan blue uptake began at the border between pericentral areas and periportal regions and increased in the latter zone; using a low-Na+ buffer, no trypan blue zonation occurred but a homogenous distribution of dye was found associated with sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC staining. A decrease in hyaluronic acid (HA uptake, index of SEC damage, was observed using a low-Na+ buffer. A time dependent injury was confirmed by an increase in LDH and TBARS levels with standard-Na+ buffer. Using low-Na+ buffer, SEC susceptibility appears elevated under hypoxia and hepatocytes was protected, in an oxygen independent manner.

  17. Oxygen tension-independent protection against hypoxic cell killing in rat liver by low sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrigno, Andrea; Di Pasqua, Laura G; Berardo, Clarissa; Siciliano, Veronica; Richelmi, Plinio; Vairetti, Mariapia

    2017-05-30

    The role of Na+ in hypoxic injury was evaluated by a time-course analysis of damage in isolated livers perfused with N2-saturated buffer containing standard (143 mM) or low (25 mM) Na+ levels. Trypan blue uptake was used to detect non-viable cells. Under hypoxia with standard-Na+, trypan blue uptake began at the border between pericentral areas and periportal regions and increased in the latter zone; using a low-Na+ buffer, no trypan blue zonation occurred but a homogenous distribution of dye was found associated with sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC) staining. A decrease in hyaluronic acid (HA) uptake, index of SEC damage, was observed using a low-Na+ buffer. A time dependent injury was confirmed by an increase in LDH and TBARS levels with standard-Na+ buffer. Using low-Na+ buffer, SEC susceptibility appears elevated under hypoxia and hepatocytes was protected, in an oxygen independent manner.

  18. Exercise capacity in the Bidirectional Glenn physiology: Coupling cardiac index, ventricular function and oxygen extraction ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecilla, Carolina; Khiabani, Reza H; Trusty, Phillip; Sandoval, Néstor; Fogel, Mark; Briceño, Juan Carlos; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2015-07-16

    In Bi-directional Glenn (BDG) physiology, the superior systemic circulation and pulmonary circulation are in series. Consequently, only blood from the superior vena cava is oxygenated in the lungs. Oxygenated blood then travels to the ventricle where it is mixed with blood returning from the lower body. Therefore, incremental changes in oxygen extraction ratio (OER) could compromise exercise tolerance. In this study, the effect of exercise on the hemodynamic and ventricular performance of BDG physiology was investigated using clinical patient data as inputs for a lumped parameter model coupled with oxygenation equations. Changes in cardiac index, Qp/Qs, systemic pressure, oxygen extraction ratio and ventricular/vascular coupling ratio were calculated for three different exercise levels. The patient cohort (n=29) was sub-grouped by age and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at rest. It was observed that the changes in exercise tolerance are significant in both comparisons, but most significant when sub-grouped by PVR at rest. Results showed that patients over 2 years old with high PVR are above or close to the upper tolerable limit of OER (0.32) at baseline. Patients with high PVR at rest had very poor exercise tolerance while patients with low PVR at rest could tolerate low exercise conditions. In general, ventricular function of SV patients is too poor to increase CI and fulfill exercise requirements. The presented mathematical model provides a framework to estimate the hemodynamic performance of BDG patients at different exercise levels according to patient specific data.

  19. Physiological meaning of cerebral oxygen saturation for piglet with hypoxia-ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Haishu; Huang, Lan; Jen, Chungchien; Hwang, Betau; Lee, Zhiguang; Teng, Yichao; Zheng, Meizhi

    2005-01-01

    The physiological meaning of cerebral oxygen saturation absolute values and the oxygen metabolism of piglet with hypoxia-ischemia (HIE) were researched. The subjects were two piglets. During the total experiment of hypoxia then recovery, the regional cerebral tissue oxygen (rScO2), pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2) were detected non-invasively and the jugular oxygen saturation (SjO2), arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) were given invasively. The results show that because SjO2 was equal to or larger than rScO2 and SaO2 > ScO2, rScO2 cannot be determined by the weighted sum of SjO2 and SaO2 which had been presented in some papers. According to above-mentioned analysis, the ecchymoma and pathological changes of the vessels due to HIE may be another contribution of rScO2. SjO2 was correlated with SaO2 (R=0.996 and 0.962 for two piglets) and the values of (SaO2-SjO2) are close to constants (29.3+/-8% and 30.3+/-8%).It means that because the subjects were under anesthesia, the oxygen consumption of cerebral tissue kept constants.

  20. Subcutaneous oxygen tension in the fetal scalp during labour continuous monitoring with a needle electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnoudse, J G; Huisjes, H J; Oeseburg, B; Zijlstra, W G

    1981-05-01

    Continuous intrapartum PO2 recordings were made in 25 fetuses, using a needle electrode that measures PO2 in the subcutaneous (sc) tissue of the scalp or the breech. This small electrode is combined with a spiral ECG electrode and can be easily applied in early labour. One hour after application of the electrode in the early first stage, a mean fetal scPO2 of 29.4 +/- 7.5 mm Hg was found. In the course of labour, scPO2 gradually fell to a mean value of 22.2 +/- 5.6 mm Hg, recorded just before the onset of bearing down contractions, and stabilised in the second stage of labour. ScPO2 values of less than 20 mm Hg were not recorded for a longer period except in one case of severe fetal distress. The relation between scPO2 just before delivery and cord arterial PO2 revealed a coefficient of correlation of 0.85. In general, scPO2 appeared higher than tcPO2 as described in the literature. This is ascribed to the different technique of measurement: the needle electrode measures in the deeper layers of the scalp, whereas the tc electrode is supplied with oxygen form the more superficial capillaries, where blood flow is more liable to be affected by mechanical factors.

  1. Monitoring the conjunctiva for carbon dioxide and oxygen tensions and pH during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Irwin K; Isenberg, Sherwin J; McArthur, David L; Del Signore, Madeline; McDonald, John S

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure, for the first time, multiple physiologic parameters of perfusion (pH, PCO2, PO2, and temperature) from the conjunctiva of adult patients during cardiopulmonary bypass while undergoing cardiothoracic surgery. Ten patients who underwent either intracardiac valve repair, atrial septal defect repair, or coronary artery bypass graft surgery had placement of a sensor which directly measured pH, PCO2, PO2, and temperature from the conjunctiva. Data were stratified into seven phases (0-5 minutes prior to bypass; 0-5, 6-10, and 11-15 minutes after initiation of bypass; 0-5 minutes prior to conclusion of bypass; and 0-5 and 6-10 minutes after bypass) and analyzed using a mixed model analysis.The change in conjunctival pH over the course of measurement was not statistically significant (p = .56). The PCO2 level followed a quadratic pattern, decreasing from a mean pre-bypass level of 37.7 mmHg at baseline prior to the initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass to a nadir of 33.2 mmHg, then increasing to a high of 39.4 mmHg at 6-10 minutes post bypass (p level of 79.5 mmHg to 31.3 mmHg by 6-10 minutes post bypass and even post-bypass, it never returned to baseline values (p levels as the patient was re-warmed following bypass (p < .01). There was no evidence of any eye injury or inflammation following the removal of the sensor. In the subjects studied, the conjunctival sensor yielded reproducible measurements during the various phases of cardiopulmonary bypass without ocular injury. Further study is necessary to determine the role of conjunctival measurements in critical settings.

  2. Effects of air bubbles and tube transportation on blood oxygen tension in arterial blood gas analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jin Ying; Kao, Jau Tsuen; Chien, Tzu I; Lee, Tai Fen; Tsai, Keh Sung

    2003-04-01

    Pneumatic tube transport has been reported to aggravate the error in partial pressure of oxygen (PO(2)) measurements caused by air bubbles. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of manual and pneumatic tube methods of sample transportation and different amounts of air bubbles on arterial blood gas analysis. Blood gas samples from 15 patients and a pooled wasted blood mixture with 3 different levels of PO(2) were analyzed to determine the effects of air bubbles and manual versus pneumatic tube transportation on PO(2) levels. PO(2) increased significantly in samples containing 10% air bubbles and was exaggerated by pneumatic tube transport (from 115.63 +/- 9.31 mm Hg to 180.51 +/- 11.29 mm Hg, p transportation or the amount of air bubbles contained in the specimen. However, in samples with medium and high PO(2) (> 70 mm Hg), aberrances in measurements were noted even with only 0.5% air bubbles and regardless of whether the sample was transported by manual methods or pressurized tube. The increments of PO(2) correlated positively with the amount of air introduced into the specimens. Thus, the measured PO(2) increased 8.13 and 31.77 mm Hg when 0.5% and 10% air bubbles were introduced, respectively, to samples with medium PO(2) (p transportation was significant (p gas analysis should be carried in ambient pressure to the laboratory because pneumatic tube delivery systems significantly aggravate the air bubble-related aberrance in PO(2) measurement.

  3. Effects of intracellular pH, blood, and tissue oxygen tension on T1rho relaxation in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Mikko I; Gröhn, Olli H J; Silvennoinen, M Johanna; Penttonen, Markku; Kauppinen, Risto A

    2002-09-01

    The effects of intracellular pH (pH(i)), paramagnetic macroscopic, and microscopic susceptibility on T(1) in the rotating frame (T(1rho)) were studied in rat brain. Intracellular acidosis was induced by hypercapnia and pH(i), T(1rho), T(2), diffusion, and cerebral blood volume (CBV) were quantified. Taking into account the CBV contribution, a prolongation of parenchymal T(1rho) by 4.5% was ascribed to a change in tissue water relaxation caused by a one unit drop in pH(i). Blood T(1rho) was found to prolong linearly with blood oxygenation saturation (Y). The macroscopic susceptibility contribution to parenchymal T(1rho) was assessed both through BOLD and an iron oxide contrast agent, AMI-227. The T(1rho) data from these experiments could be described by intravascular effects with insignificant effects of susceptibility gradients on tissue water. Tissue oxygen tension (PtO(2)) was manipulated and monitored with microelectrodes to assess its plausible contribution to microscopic susceptibility and relaxation. Parenchymal T(1rho) was virtually unaffected by variations in the PtO(2), but T(1) was shortened in hyperoxia and T(2) showed a negative BOLD effect in hypoxia. It is demonstrated that pH(i) directly modulates tissue T(1rho), possibly through its effect on proton exchange; however, neither BOLD nor PtO(2) directly influence tissue T(1rho). The observations are discussed in the light of physicochemical mechanisms contributing to the ischemic T(1rho) changes. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Comparison of bacterial inoculation and transcutaneous oxygen tension in the rabbit S1 perforator and latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Aldo Benjamin; Gill, Paul Singh; Trahan, Chris G; Ruiz, Bernardo; Lund, Kerstin M; Delaune, Christie L; Thibodeaux, Brett A; Metzinger, Stephen Eric

    2005-02-01

    Muscle and musculocutaneous flaps have been used reliably in reconstruction of soft-tissue defects for many years. Previous experimental studies have shown musculocutaneous flaps to be superior to the random pattern and fasciocutaneous flaps in the management of infected wounds. Over the past decade, perforator flaps have gained acceptance as alternative methods of reconstruction in the clinical setting that can decrease donor-site morbidity and hospital stay, and increase patient satisfaction. The authors theorized that perforator flaps may be able to handle infected wounds better than random pattern and fasciocutaneous flaps because their blood supply is essentially the same as many of their musculocutaneous counterparts. The goal of this study was to compare the S1 perforator-based skin flap and latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap in the dorsal flank of the rabbit with the introduction of bacteria to simulate both superficial and deep wound infection. Measurements of oxygen tension and regional perfusion index were performed on both types of flaps to ascertain their viability and capacity to heal. The authors found no statistical significance between latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous and S1 perforator flaps in the rabbit with respect to superficial and deep wound infections. The regional perfusion index was calculated for postoperative days 1, 2, and 4. No statistically significant difference between the two flaps using the regional perfusion index could be identified. Additionally, regional perfusion for both types of flaps was greater than 0.6, indicating that their capacity to heal wounds is similar.

  5. Effects of Dissolved Oxygen Tension and Ammonium Concentration on Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthesis from Cassava Starch by Bacillus cereus IFO 13690

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margono .

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available generated by an Adobe application 11.5606 Attempting to get low price of raw material for producing polyhydroxybutyrate is always studied. Tapioca starch is one of the raw material with low price. The objective of this research was to study the effects of initial ammonium concentration and dissolved oxygen tension (doT on producing PHB by Bacillus cereus IFO 13690 with tapioca starch as the carbon source. This fermentation was carried out in 5 L fementors with a 2 L working volume, temperature of 30 oC, and agitation of 500 rpm. The pH medium was controlled at 5.6 after it came down from the initial pH of 6.8. Meanwhile, the initial doT was 100 % air saturation and also came down to and maintained at doT of experiment, i.e. 1 , 5 , or 10 % air saturation. The best result was obtained when the initial ammonium concentration was 5 g/L and the doT value maintained at 5 % air saturation. By this conditions, the cell growth reached 5,457 g cell dry weight/L containing PHB of 2.42 % cell dry weigh after 29 hours fermentation. Normal 0 36 false false false

  6. Physiological closed-loop control in intelligent oxygen therapy: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Morillo, Daniel; Olaby, Osama; Fernandez-Granero, Miguel Angel; Leon-Jimenez, Antonio

    2017-07-01

    Oxygen therapy has become a standard care for the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and other hypoxemic chronic lung diseases. In current systems, manually continuous adjustment of O2 flow rate is a time-consuming task, often unsuccessful, that requires experienced staff. The primary aim of this systematic review is to collate and report on the principles, algorithms and accuracy of autonomous physiological close-loop controlled oxygen devices as well to present recommendations for future research and studies in this area. A literature search was performed on medical database MEDLINE, engineering database IEEE-Xplore and wide-raging scientific databases Scopus and Web of Science. A narrative synthesis of the results was carried out. A summary of the findings of this review suggests that when compared to the conventional manual practice, the closed-loop controllers maintain higher saturation levels, spend less time below the target saturation, and save oxygen resources. Nonetheless, despite of their potential, autonomous oxygen therapy devices are scarce in real clinical applications. Robustness of control algorithms, fail-safe mechanisms, limited reliability of sensors, usability issues and the need for standardized evaluating methods of assessing risks can be among the reasons for this lack of matureness and need to be addressed before the wide spreading of a new generation of automatic oxygen devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Emerging technologies for non-invasive quantification of physiological oxygen transport in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, P; Taguchi, M; Burrs, S L; Hauser, B A; Salim, W W A W; Claussen, J C; McLamore, E S

    2013-09-01

    Oxygen plays a critical role in plant metabolism, stress response/signaling, and adaptation to environmental changes (Lambers and Colmer, Plant Soil 274:7-15, 2005; Pitzschke et al., Antioxid Redox Signal 8:1757-1764, 2006; Van Breusegem et al., Plant Sci 161:405-414, 2001). Reactive oxygen species (ROS), by-products of various metabolic pathways in which oxygen is a key molecule, are produced during adaptation responses to environmental stress. While much is known about plant adaptation to stress (e.g., detoxifying enzymes, antioxidant production), the link between ROS metabolism, O2 transport, and stress response mechanisms is unknown. Thus, non-invasive technologies for measuring O2 are critical for understanding the link between physiological O2 transport and ROS signaling. New non-invasive technologies allow real-time measurement of O2 at the single cell and even organelle levels. This review briefly summarizes currently available (i.e., mainstream) technologies for measuring O2 and then introduces emerging technologies for measuring O2. Advanced techniques that provide the ability to non-invasively (i.e., non-destructively) measure O2 are highlighted. In the near future, these non-invasive sensors will facilitate novel experimentation that will allow plant physiologists to ask new hypothesis-driven research questions aimed at improving our understanding of physiological O2 transport.

  8. Impact of physiological noise correction on detecting blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast in the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Tess E.; Manavaki, Roido; Graves, Martin J.; Patterson, Andrew J.; Gilbert, Fiona J.

    2017-01-01

    Physiological fluctuations are expected to be a dominant source of noise in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments to assess tumour oxygenation and angiogenesis. This work investigates the impact of various physiological noise regressors: retrospective image correction (RETROICOR), heart rate (HR) and respiratory volume per unit time (RVT), on signal variance and the detection of BOLD contrast in the breast in response to a modulated respiratory stimulus. BOLD MRI was performed at 3 T in ten volunteers at rest and during cycles of oxygen and carbogen gas breathing. RETROICOR was optimized using F-tests to determine which cardiac and respiratory phase terms accounted for a significant amount of signal variance. A nested regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of RETROICOR, HR and RVT on the model fit residuals, temporal signal-to-noise ratio, and BOLD activation parameters. The optimized RETROICOR model accounted for the largest amount of signal variance ( Δ R\\text{adj}2   =  3.3  ±  2.1%) and improved the detection of BOLD activation (P  =  0.002). Inclusion of HR and RVT regressors explained additional signal variance, but had a negative impact on activation parameter estimation (P  <  0.001). Fluctuations in HR and RVT appeared to be correlated with the stimulus and may contribute to apparent BOLD signal reactivity.

  9. Prediction of inspired oxygen fraction for targeted arterial oxygen tension following open heart surgery in non-smoking and smoking patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Khalil, Pierre; Zeineldine, Salah; Chatburn, Robert; Ayyoub, Chakib; Elkhatib, Farouk; Bou-Akl, Imad; El-Khatib, Mohamad

    2016-10-24

    Simple and accurate expressions describing the PaO2-FiO2 relationship in mechanically ventilated patients are lacking. The current study aims to validate a novel mathematical expression for accurate prediction of the fraction of inspired oxygen that will result in a targeted arterial oxygen tension in non-smoking and smoking patients receiving mechanical ventilation following open heart surgeries. One hundred PaO2-FiO2 data pairs were obtained from 25 non-smoking patients mechanically ventilated following open heart surgeries. One data pair was collected at each of FiO2 of 40, 60, 80, and 100% while maintaining same mechanical ventilation support settings. Similarly, another 100 hundred PaO2-FiO2 data pairs were obtained from 25 smoking patients mechanically ventilated following open heart surgeries. The utility of the new mathematical expression in accurately describing the PaO2-FiO2 relationship in these patients was assessed by the regression and Bland-Altman analyses. Significant correlations were seen between the true and estimated FiO2 values in non-smoking (r(2) = 0.9424; p < 0.05) and smoking (r(2) = 0.9466; p < 0.05) patients. Tight biases between the true and estimated FiO2 values for non-smoking (3.1%) and smoking (4.1%) patients were observed. Also, significant correlations were seen between the true and estimated PaO2/FiO2 ratios in non-smoking (r(2) = 0.9530; p < 0.05) and smoking (r(2) = 0.9675; p < 0.05) patients. Tight biases between the true and estimated PaO2/FiO2 ratios for non-smoking (-18 mmHg) and smoking (-16 mmHg) patients were also observed. The new mathematical expression for the description of the PaO2-FiO2 relationship is valid and accurate in non-smoking and smoking patients who are receiving mechanical ventilation for post cardiac surgery.

  10. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, an anesthesiologist′s perspective: Physiology and principles. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauhan Sandeep

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO is an adaptation of conventional cardiopulmonary bypass techniques to provide cardiopulmonary support. ECMO provides physiologic cardiopulmonary support to aid reversible aspects of the disease process and to allow recovery. ECMO does not provide treatment of the underlying disease. The indications for ECMO support have expanded from acute respiratory failure to acute cardiac failure refractory to conventional treatments from wide patient subsets involving neonates to adults. Vascular access for ECMO support is either percutaneous through a single-site, dual-lumen bicaval cannula or transthoracic via separate cannulas. The modes of support are either veno-venous or veno-arterial ECMO. In this article, the physiologic aspects of ECMO support are outlined.

  11. [Development of physiological monitors based on the Zigbee technology for hyperbaric oxygen chambers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jin-Nuan; Wu, Bao-Ming; Lin, Jin-Zhao; Wang, Qiang

    2008-05-01

    This paper introduces a monitor that can monitor five physiological parameters (ECG, blood pressure, spo2, respiration and temperature) based on Wireless Sensor Networks. The monitor will be applied to hyperbaric oxygen chambers. After acquisition, the signal will be displayed on the LCD screen of the monitor terminal in the cabin. At the same time, the Zigbee RF module will send the signal to the extravehicular guardianship PC terminals. This monitor equipment can realize synchronous real-time monitoring both inside and outside. What's more? A host can also display monitoring data the three monitor terminals collected. Preliminary clinical tests show that the monitors are safe and the monitoring results are satisfactory.

  12. Preservation of high glycolytic phenotype by establishing new acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines at physiologic oxygen concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheard, Michael A., E-mail: msheard@chla.usc.edu [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Ghent, Matthew V., E-mail: mattghent@gmail.com [Department of Pathology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Health Sciences Campus, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Cabral, Daniel J., E-mail: dcabral14@gmail.com [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); Lee, Joanne C., E-mail: joannebarnhart@gmail.com [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); Khankaldyyan, Vazgen, E-mail: khangaldian@yahoo.com [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Ji, Lingyun, E-mail: lingyun.ji@med.usc.edu [Developmental Therapeutics Program, USC-CHLA Institute for Pediatric Clinical Research, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Wu, Samuel Q., E-mail: swu@chla.usc.edu [Medical Genetics, Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Kang, Min H., E-mail: min.kang@ttuhsc.edu [Cancer Center and Departments of Cell Biology & Biochemistry, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Cancer cells typically exhibit increased glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and they continue to exhibit some elevation in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. However, it is unclear whether cancer cell lines employ a high level of glycolysis comparable to that of the original cancers from which they were derived, even if their culture conditions are changed to physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations. From three childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients we established three new pairs of cell lines in both atmospheric (20%) and physiologic (bone marrow level, 5%) oxygen concentrations. Cell lines established in 20% oxygen exhibited lower proliferation, survival, expression of glycolysis genes, glucose consumption, and lactate production. Interestingly, the effects of oxygen concentration used during cell line initiation were only partially reversible when established cell cultures were switched from one oxygen concentration to another for eight weeks. These observations indicate that ALL cell lines established at atmospheric oxygen concentration can exhibit relatively low levels of glycolysis and these levels are semi-permanent, suggesting that physiologic oxygen concentrations may be needed from the time of cell line initiation to preserve the high level of glycolysis commonly exhibited by leukemias in vivo. - Highlights: • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher glycolytic expression and function. • Establishing new ALL cell lines in 5% oxygen resulted in higher proliferation and lower cell death. • The divergent metabolic phenotypes selected in 5% and 20% oxygen are semi-permanent.

  13. Assessing the effects of a short-term green tea intervention in skin microvascular function and oxygen tension in older and younger adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Rebecca; Ubara, Emmanuel O; Klonizakis, Markos

    2016-09-01

    Green tea consumption has been associated with a reduction in cardiovascular disease risk factors. However, there is little evidence examining its potential differing effect between younger and older populations, whilst little is known on its effect on the circulatory system when oxygen demand is higher. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term effects of green tea consumption on microvascular functioning in both an older and younger population. Fifteen young [24 (4.0)] and fifteen older [61 (4.0)] participants, consumed two cups of green tea daily for 14days. We used Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) to assess cutaneous microvascular function and Transcutaneous Oxygen monitoring (TcPO2) to assess skin oxygen tension. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were also assessed on both visits. We observed significant improvements in axon-mediated microvascular vasodilation for the younger group [1.6 (0.59) vs 2.05 (0.72), p<0.05] and the older group [1.25 (0.58) vs 1.65 (0.5) p<0.05]. Improvements in skin oxygen tension were also noted for both groups in both noted TcPO2 measures (i.e. 1.25 (0.58) vs 1.65 (0.5) (p<0.05), for ΔTcPO2max for the older group, between visits) respectively. Improvements were also observed for systolic blood pressure in both the younger [120 (10) vs 112 (10), p<0.05] and older group [129 (12) v 124 (11), p<0.001]. In conclusion, we observed statistically-significant improvements in microvascular function and skin oxygen tension. Our results suggest that green tea may prove beneficial as a dietary element in lifestyle interventions aiming to lower cardiovascular disease risk, in both older and younger populations.

  14. Oxygen tension regulates the miRNA profile and bioactivity of exosomes released from extravillous trophoblast cells - Liquid biopsies for monitoring complications of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Grace; Guanzon, Dominic; Kinhal, Vyjayanthi; Elfeky, Omar; Lai, Andrew; Longo, Sherri; Nuzhat, Zarin; Palma, Carlos; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Menon, Ramkumar; Mol, Ben W; Rice, Gregory E; Salomon, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of how cells communicate has undergone a paradigm shift since the recent recognition of the role of exosomes in intercellular signaling. In this study, we investigated whether oxygen tension alters the exosome release and miRNA profile from extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells, modifying their bioactivity on endothelial cells (EC). Furthermore, we have established the exosomal miRNA profile at early gestation in women who develop pre-eclampsia (PE) and spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB). HTR-8/SVneo cells were used as an EVT model. The effect of oxygen tension (i.e. 8% and 1% oxygen) on exosome release was quantified using nanocrystals (Qdot®) coupled to CD63 by fluorescence NTA. A real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™) was used to establish the effect of exosomes on EC. Plasma samples were obtained at early gestation (<18 weeks) and classified according to pregnancy outcomes. An Illumina TrueSeq Small RNA kit was used to construct a small RNA library from exosomal RNA obtained from EVT and plasma samples. The number of exosomes was significantly higher in EVT cultured under 1% compared to 8% oxygen. In total, 741 miRNA were identified in exosomes from EVT. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that these miRNA were associated with cell migration and cytokine production. Interestingly, exosomes isolated from EVT cultured at 8% oxygen increased EC migration, whilst exosomes cultured at 1% oxygen decreased EC migration. These changes were inversely proportional to TNF-α released from EC. Finally, we have identified a set of unique miRNAs in exosomes from EVT cultured at 1% oxygen and exosomes isolated from the circulation of mothers at early gestation, who later developed PE and SPTB. We suggest that aberrant exosomal signalling by placental cells is a common aetiological factor in pregnancy complications characterised by incomplete SpA remodeling and is therefore a clinically relevant biomarker of pregnancy complications.

  15. Oxygen tension regulates the miRNA profile and bioactivity of exosomes released from extravillous trophoblast cells – Liquid biopsies for monitoring complications of pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Grace; Guanzon, Dominic; Kinhal, Vyjayanthi; Elfeky, Omar; Lai, Andrew; Longo, Sherri; Nuzhat, Zarin; Palma, Carlos; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Menon, Ramkumar; Mol, Ben W.; Rice, Gregory E.; Salomon, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of how cells communicate has undergone a paradigm shift since the recent recognition of the role of exosomes in intercellular signaling. In this study, we investigated whether oxygen tension alters the exosome release and miRNA profile from extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells, modifying their bioactivity on endothelial cells (EC). Furthermore, we have established the exosomal miRNA profile at early gestation in women who develop pre-eclampsia (PE) and spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB). HTR-8/SVneo cells were used as an EVT model. The effect of oxygen tension (i.e. 8% and 1% oxygen) on exosome release was quantified using nanocrystals (Qdot®) coupled to CD63 by fluorescence NTA. A real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™) was used to establish the effect of exosomes on EC. Plasma samples were obtained at early gestation (<18 weeks) and classified according to pregnancy outcomes. An Illumina TrueSeq Small RNA kit was used to construct a small RNA library from exosomal RNA obtained from EVT and plasma samples. The number of exosomes was significantly higher in EVT cultured under 1% compared to 8% oxygen. In total, 741 miRNA were identified in exosomes from EVT. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that these miRNA were associated with cell migration and cytokine production. Interestingly, exosomes isolated from EVT cultured at 8% oxygen increased EC migration, whilst exosomes cultured at 1% oxygen decreased EC migration. These changes were inversely proportional to TNF-α released from EC. Finally, we have identified a set of unique miRNAs in exosomes from EVT cultured at 1% oxygen and exosomes isolated from the circulation of mothers at early gestation, who later developed PE and SPTB. We suggest that aberrant exosomal signalling by placental cells is a common aetiological factor in pregnancy complications characterised by incomplete SpA remodeling and is therefore a clinically relevant biomarker of pregnancy complications. PMID:28350871

  16. Calculating alveolar capillary conductance and pulmonary capillary blood volume: comparing the multiple- and single-inspired oxygen tension methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceridon, Maile L; Beck, Kenneth C; Olson, Thomas P; Bilezikian, Jordan A; Johnson, Bruce D

    2010-09-01

    Key elements for determining alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (Dm) and pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc) from the lung diffusing capacity (Dl) for carbon monoxide (DlCO) or for nitric oxide (DlNO) are the reaction rate of carbon monoxide with hemoglobin (thetaCO) and the DmCO/DlNO relationship (alpha-ratio). Although a range of values have been reported, currently there is no consensus regarding these parameters. The study purpose was to define optimal parameters (thetaCO, alpha-ratio) that would experimentally substantiate calculations of Dm and Vc from the single-inspired O2 tension [inspired fraction of O2 (FiO2)] method relative to the multiple-FiO2 method. Eight healthy men were studied at rest and during moderate exercise (80-W cycle). Dm and Vc were determined by the multiple-FiO2 and single-FiO2 methods (rebreathe technique) and were tabulated by applying previously reported thetaCO equations (both methods) and by varying the alpha-ratio (single-FiO2 method) from 1.90 to 2.50. Values were then compared between methods throughout the examined alpha-ratios. Dm and Vc were critically dependent on the applied thetaCO equation. For the multiple-FiO2 method, Dm was highly variable between thetaCO equations (rest and exercise); the range of Vc was less widespread. For the single-FiO2 method, the thetaCO equation by Reeves and Park (1992) combined with an alpha-ratio between 2.08 and 2.26 gave values for Dm and Vc that most closely matched those from the multiple-FiO2 method and were also physiologically plausible compared with predicted values. We conclude that the parameters used to calculate Dm and Vc values from the single-FiO2 method (using DlCO and DlNO) can significantly influence results and should be evaluated within individual laboratories to obtain optimal values.

  17. The influence of nitrate on the physiology of the yeast Dekkera bruxellensis grown under oxygen limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros Pita, Will; Tiukova, Ievgeniia; Leite, Fernanda Cristina Bezerra; Passoth, Volkmar; Simões, Diogo Ardaillon; de Morais, Marcos Antonio

    2013-03-01

    A previous study showed that the use of nitrate by Dekkera bruxellensis might be an advantageous trait when ammonium is limited in sugarcane substrate for ethanol fermentation. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the influence of nitrate on the yeast physiology during cell growth in different carbon sources under oxygen limitation. If nitrate was the sole source of nitrogen, D. bruxellensis cells presented slower growth, diminished sugar consumption and growth-associated ethanol production, when compared to ammonium. These results were corroborated by the increased expression of genes involved in the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and ATP synthesis. The presence of ammonium in the mixed medium restored most parameters to the standard conditions. This work may open up a line of investigation to establish the connection between nitrate assimilation and energetic metabolism in D. bruxellensis and their influence on its fermentative capacity in oxygen-limited or oxygen-depleted conditions. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Box-modeling of bone and tooth phosphate oxygen isotope compositions as a function of environmental and physiological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, C; Simon, L; Lécuyer, Ch

    2003-12-01

    A time-dependent box model is developed to calculate oxygen isotope compositions of bone phosphate as a function of environmental and physiological parameters. Input and output oxygen fluxes related to body water and bone reservoirs are scaled to the body mass. The oxygen fluxes are evaluated by stoichiometric scaling to the calcium accretion and resorption rates, assuming a pure hydroxylapatite composition for the bone and tooth mineral. The model shows how the diet composition, body mass, ambient relative humidity and temperature may control the oxygen isotope composition of bone phosphate. The model also computes how bones and teeth record short-term variations in relative humidity, air temperature and delta18O of drinking water, depending on body mass. The documented diversity of oxygen isotope fractionation equations for vertebrates is accounted for by our model when for each specimen the physiological and diet parameters are adjusted in the living range of environmental conditions.

  19. Physiological response in the European flounder (Platichthys flesus) to variable salinity and oxygen conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgreen, Kim; Kiilerich, Pia; Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk

    2008-01-01

    Physiological mechanisms involved in acclimation to variable salinity and oxygen levels and their interaction were studied in European flounder. The fish were acclimated for two weeks to freshwater (1 ‰ salinity), brackish water (11 ‰) or full strength seawater (35 ‰) under normoxic conditions...... (water Po2 = 158 mmHg) and then subjected to 48 h of continued normoxia or hypoxia at a level (Po2 = 54 mmHg) close to but above the critical Po2. Plasma osmolality, [Na+] and [Cl-] increased with increasing salinity, but the rises were limited, reflecting an effective extracellular osmoregulation....... Muscle water content was the same at all three salinities, indicating complete cell volume regulation. Gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity did not change with salinity, but hypoxia caused a 25 % decrease in branchial Na+/K+-ATPase activity at all three salinities. Furthermore, hypoxia induced a significant...

  20. Biological and physiological role of reactive oxygen species--the good, the bad and the ugly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, L; Zhou, T; Pannell, B K; Ziegler, A C; Best, T M

    2015-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are chemically reactive molecules that are naturally produced within biological systems. Research has focused extensively on revealing the multi-faceted and complex roles that ROS play in living tissues. In regard to the good side of ROS, this article explores the effects of ROS on signalling, immune response and other physiological responses. To review the potentially bad side of ROS, we explain the consequences of high concentrations of molecules that lead to the disruption of redox homeostasis, which induces oxidative stress damaging intracellular components. The ugly effects of ROS can be observed in devastating cardiac, pulmonary, neurodegenerative and other disorders. Furthermore, this article covers the regulatory enzymes that mitigate the effects of ROS. Glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase are discussed in particular detail. The current understanding of ROS is incomplete, and it is imperative that future research be performed to understand the implications of ROS in various therapeutic interventions.

  1. A modified Larson’s method of posterolateral corner reconstruction of the knee reproducing the physiological tensioning pattern of the lateral collateral and popliteofibular ligaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niki Yasuo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consensus has been lacking as to how to reconstruct the posterolateral corner (PLC of the knee in patients with posterolateral instability. We describe a new reconstructive technique for PLC based on Larson's method, which reflects the physiological load-sharing pattern of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL and popliteofibular ligament (PFL. Findings Semitendinosus graft is harvested, and one limb of the graft comprises PFL and the other comprises LCL. Femoral bone tunnels for the LCL and popliteus tendon are made at their anatomical insertions. Fibular bone tunnel is prepared from the anatomical insertion of the LCL to the proximal posteromedial portion of the fibular head, which corresponds to the insertion of the PFL. The graft end for popliteus tendon is delivered into the femoral bone tunnel and secured on the medial femoral condyle. The other end for LCL is passed through the fibular tunnel from posterior to anterior. While the knee is held in 90 of flexion, the graft is secured in the fibular tunnel using a 5 mm interference screw. Then, the LCL end is passed into the femoral bone tunnel and secured at the knee in extension. Conclusions Differential tension patterns between LCL and PFL is critical when securing these graft limbs. Intrafibular fixation of the graft using a small interference screw allows us to secure these two graft limbs independently with intended tension at the intended flexion angle of the knee.

  2. Oxygen Tension and Riboflavin Gradients Cooperatively Regulate the Migration of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Revealed by a Hydrogel-Based Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beum Jun; Chu, Injun; Jusuf, Sebastian; Kuo, Tiffany; TerAvest, Michaela A.; Angenent, Largus T.; Wu, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a model bacterial strain for studies of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). It has two extracellular electron transfer pathways: (1) shuttling electrons via an excreted mediator riboflavin; and (2) direct contact between the c-type cytochromes at the cell membrane and the electrode. Despite the extensive use of S. oneidensis in BESs such as microbial fuel cells and biosensors, many basic microbiology questions about S. oneidensis in the context of BES remain unanswered. Here, we present studies of motility and chemotaxis of S. oneidensis under well controlled concentration gradients of two electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized form of riboflavin (flavin+), using a newly developed microfluidic platform. Experimental results demonstrate that either oxygen or flavin+ is a chemoattractant to S. oneidensis. The chemotactic tendency of S. oneidensis in a flavin+ concentration gradient is significantly enhanced in an anaerobic in contrast to an aerobic condition. Furthermore, either a low oxygen tension or a high flavin+ concentration considerably enhances the speed of S. oneidensis. This work presents a robust microfluidic platform for generating oxygen and/or flavin+ gradients in an aqueous environment, and demonstrates that two important electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized riboflavin, cooperatively regulate S. oneidensis migration patterns. The microfluidic tools presented as well as the knowledge gained in this work can be used to guide the future design of BESs for efficient electron production. PMID:27703448

  3. Oxygen tension and riboflavin gradients cooperatively regulate the migration of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 revealed by a hydrogel-based microfluidic device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beum Jun Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis (S. oneidensis is a model bacterial strain for studies of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs. It has two extracellular electron transfer pathways: 1 shuttling electrons via an excreted mediator riboflavin; and 2 direct contact between the c-type cytochromes at the cell membrane and the electrode. Despite the extensive use of S. oneidensis in bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells and biosensors, many basic microbiology questions about S. oneidensis in the context of BES remain unanswered. Here, we present studies of motility and chemotaxis of S. oneidensis under well controlled concentration gradients of two electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized form of riboflavin (flavin+ using a newly developed microfluidic platform. Experimental results demonstrate that either oxygen or flavin+ is a chemoattractant to S. oneidensis. The chemotactic tendency of S. oneidensis in a flavin+ concentration gradient is significantly enhanced in an anaerobic in contrast to an aerobic condition. Furthermore, either a low oxygen tension or a high flavin+ concentration considerably enhances the speed of S. oneidensis. This work presents a robust microfluidic platform for generating oxygen and/or flavin+ gradients in an aqueous environment, and demonstrates that two important electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized riboflavin, cooperatively regulate S. oneidensis migration patterns. The microfluidic tools presented as well as the knowledge gained in this work can be used to guide the future design of BESs for efficient electron production.

  4. Oxygen tension and nutrient starvation are major signals that regulate agfD promoter activity and expression of the multicellular morphotype in Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstel, U; Römling, U

    2001-10-01

    Expression of multicellular behaviour (rdar morphotype) is a characteristic of wild-type Salmonella typhimurium strains. The key target for the regulation of rdar morphotype expression is the agfD promoter. The regulation of two rdar morphotypes, regulated and semi-constitutive (the latter differs from the former by the insertion of A after position -17), by various environmental conditions was studied using transcriptional fusions to the regulated and semi-constitutive agfD promoters by Western blot analysis and phenotypic analysis of the rdar morphotype. AgfD promoter activities were strongly dependent on oxygen tension. Expression maxima were observed in rich medium under microaerophilic conditions and in minimal medium under aerobic conditions. The regulated rdar morphotype was only expressed under conditions of maximal promoter activity. Glucose did not influence rdar morphotype expression, and the two promoters showed no consistent response to pH. In the stationary phase of growth, nitrogen and phosphate depletion were found to be signals that switch on the agfD promoters. In the logarithmic phase of growth, ethanol was the stress signal that enhanced rdar morphotype expression. The results indicate that, although the regulated and semi-constitutive agfD promoters are key factors in the grade of expression of the multicellular behaviour, common signals such as oxygen tension, depletion of nutrients and ethanol vary their levels of expression significantly.

  5. Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  6. Assessment of Renal Hemodynamics and Oxygenation by Simultaneous Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Quantitative Invasive Physiological Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantow, Kathleen; Arakelyan, Karen; Seeliger, Erdmann; Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In vivo assessment of renal perfusion and oxygenation under (patho)physiological conditions by means of noninvasive diagnostic imaging is conceptually appealing. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitative parametric mapping of the magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation times T 2* and T 2 are thought to provide surrogates of renal tissue oxygenation. The validity and efficacy of this technique for quantitative characterization of local tissue oxygenation and its changes under different functional conditions have not been systematically examined yet and remain to be established. For this purpose, the development of an integrative multimodality approaches is essential. Here we describe an integrated hybrid approach (MR-PHYSIOL) that combines established quantitative physiological measurements with T 2* (T 2) mapping and MR-based kidney size measurements. Standardized reversible (patho)physiologically relevant interventions, such as brief periods of aortic occlusion, hypoxia, and hyperoxia, are used for detailing the relation between the MR-PHYSIOL parameters, in particular between renal T 2* and tissue oxygenation.

  7. Artefactual effects of oxygen on cell culture models of cellular senescence and stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Olivier; Weemaels, Geoffroy; Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Wlaschek, Meinhard

    2011-02-01

    In life sciences, modelling of the in vivo conditions using in vitro models is an important tool to generate knowledge. Although aerobic organisms including mammals depend on accurate oxygen tension, mimicking physiological conditions in cell culture experiments is not very common. Due to the need for simple technical and experimental design, the requirement for simulating the in vivo oxygen tension parameters has been neglected over long time. Fortunately, due to increasing knowledge in recent years the attention has shifted towards this scientific demand. In this short review, we summarize data substantiating the necessity to adequately mimic physiological oxygen tension using cell culture models in life science research. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. The role of tissue oxygen tension in the control of local blood flow in the microcirculation of skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Thuc Anh

    2010-01-01

    /or NO in response to hypoxia, which acts on the vascular wall causing vasodilatation. In cremaster arterioles devoid of RBCs, achieved by buffer perfusion via a cannula in the abdominal aorta of the animals, the cremaster arterioles showed the same degree of dilatation and constriction to low and high oxygen...

  9. Effect of oxygen tension on the quantities of procollagenase-activating angiogenic factor present in the developing kitten retina.

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, C. M.; Weiss, J B; Kissun, R D; Garner, A

    1986-01-01

    Maintenance of newborn kittens in an oxygen rich atmosphere followed by a recovery period in a normal atmosphere mimicked the effects of the human disease retrolental fibroplasia. The retinas of such kittens contained significantly raised levels of low molecular weight angiogenic material (as measured by procollagenase activation) when compared with those of a control group of kittens.

  10. Near-infrared spectroscopy assessed cerebral oxygenation during open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: relation to end-tidal CO2 tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, H; Nielsen, H B; Secher, N H

    2016-08-01

    During open abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) repair cerebral blood flow is challenged. Clamping of the aorta may lead to unintended hyperventilation as metabolism is reduced by perfusion of a smaller part of the body and reperfusion of the aorta releases vasodilatory substances including CO2. We intend to adjust ventilation according end-tidal CO2 tension (EtCO2) and here evaluated to what extent that strategy maintains frontal lobe oxygenation (ScO2) as determined by near infrared spectroscopy. For 44 patients [5 women, aged 70 (48-83) years] ScO2, mean arterial pressure (MAP), EtCO2, and ventilation were obtained retrospectively from the anesthetic charts. By clamping the aorta, ScO2 and EtCO2 were kept stable by reducing ventilation (median, -0.8 l min(-1); interquartile range, -1.1 to -0.4; P body is reperfused.

  11. Changes in the metabolic footprint of placental explant-conditioned medium cultured in different oxygen tensions from placentas of small for gestational age and normal pregnancies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Horgan, R P

    2012-01-31

    Being born small for gestational age (SGA) confers significantly increased risks of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Accumulating evidence suggests that an SGA fetus results from a poorly perfused and abnormally developed placenta. Some of the placental features seen in SGA, such as abnormal cell turnover and impaired nutrient transport, can be reproduced by culture of placental explants in hypoxic conditions. Metabolic footprinting offers a hypothesis-generating strategy to investigate factors absorbed by and released from this tissue in vitro. Previously, metabolic footprinting of the conditioned culture media has identified differences in placental explants cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions and between normal pregnancies and those complicated by pre-eclampsia. In this study we aimed to examine the differences in the metabolic footprint of placental villous explants cultured at different oxygen (O(2)) tensions between women who deliver an SGA baby (n = 9) and those from normal controls (n = 8). Placental villous explants from cases and controls were cultured for 96 h in 1% (hypoxic), 6% (normoxic) and 20% (hyperoxic) O(2). Metabolic footprints were analysed by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to an electrospray hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-MS). 574 metabolite features showed significant difference between SGA and normal at one or more of the oxygen tensions. SGA explant media cultured under hypoxic conditions was observed, on a univariate level, to exhibit the same metabolic signature as controls cultured under normoxic conditions in 49% of the metabolites of interest, suggesting that SGA tissue is acclimatised to hypoxic conditions in vivo. No such behaviour was observed under hyperoxic culture conditions. Glycerophospholipid and tryptophan metabolism were highlighted as areas of particular interest.

  12. Effects of oxygen concentration and flow rate on cognitive ability and physiological responses in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyun-Jun Kim; Soon-Cheol Chung; Hyun-Kyung Park; Dae-Woon Lim; Mi-Hyun Choi; Hyun-Joo Kim; In-Hwa Lee; Hyung-Sik Kim; Jin-Seung Choi; Gye-Rae Tack

    2013-01-01

    The supply of highly concentrated oxygen positively affects cognitive processing in normal young adults. However, there have been few reports on changes in cognitive ability in elderly subjects following highly concentrated oxygen administration. This study investigated changes in cognitive ability, blood oxygen saturation (%), and heart rate (beats/min) in normal elderly subjects at three different levels of oxygen [21% (1 L/min), 93% (1 L/min), and 93% (5 L/min)] administered during a 1-back task. Eight elderly male (75.3 ± 4.3 years old) and 10 female (71.1 ± 3.9 years old) subjects, who were normal in cognitive ability as shown by a score of more than 24 points in the Mini-Mental State Examination-Korea, participated in the experiment. The experiment consisted of an adaptation phase after the start of oxygen administration (3 minutes), a control phase to obtain stable baseline measurements of heart rate and blood oxygen saturation before the task (2 minutes), and a task phase during which the 1-back task was performed (2 minutes). Three levels of oxygen were administered throughout the three phases (7 minutes). Blood oxygen saturation and heart rate were measured during each phase. Our results show that blood oxygen saturation increased, heart rate decreased, and response time in the 1-back task decreased as the concentration and amount of administered oxygen increased. This shows that administration of sufficient oxygen for optimal cognitive functioning increases blood oxygen saturation and decreases heart rate.

  13. Metabolic physiology of the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas: Implications for vertical migration in a pronounced oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rui; Seibel, Brad A.

    2010-07-01

    The Humboldt (or jumbo) squid, Dosidicus gigas, is an active predator endemic to the Eastern Pacific that undergoes diel vertical migrations into a pronounced oxygen minimum layer (OML). Here, we investigate the physiological mechanisms that facilitate these migrations and assess the associated costs and benefits. Exposure to hypoxic conditions equivalent to those found in the OML (∼10 μM O 2 at 10 °C) led to a significant reduction in the squid’s routine metabolic rate (RMR), from 8.9 to 1.6 μmol O 2 g -1 h -1 ( p gigas may repay any oxygen debt accumulated during the daytime. The dive to deeper water may minimize exposure to stressful surface temperatures when most prey have migrated to depth during the daytime. The physiological and ecological strategies demonstrated here may have facilitated the recent range expansion of this species into northern waters where expanding hypoxic zones prohibit competing top predators.

  14. Effect of epidural tramadol and lignocaine on physiological and behavioural changes in goats subjected to castration with a high tension band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajadi, R A; Owanikin, A O; Martins, M M; Gazal, O S

    2012-11-01

    To compare the effect of a single epidural injection of either lignocaine or tramadol on behavioural changes, anaesthetic indices, leucocyte parameters, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and concentration of cortisol in plasma in goats subjected to castration by high tension band. Ten male goats weighing 14.4 (SD 0.7) kg were randomly allocated to anaesthesia with epidural injections of tramadol (3 mg/kg), or lignocaine (4 mg/kg). Following anaesthesia, a rubber ring was applied and tensioned to the scrotal neck of each goat. Behavioural changes were noted as they occurred, and the onset of drug action (time between epidural injection and loss of pedal reflex) and duration of antinociception (time interval between disappearance and reappearance of pedal withdrawal reflex) were determined. Hearts rates, respiratory rates and rectal temperatures were determined every 15 minutes for a 90-minute period, while blood was obtained for determination of white cell counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and concentrations of cortisol. Anaesthetic indices were compared using Student's t-test, while physiological parameters were compared using an ANOVA for repeated measurements. Goats treated with epidural tramadol were not recumbent and continued rumination while goats treated with epidural lignocaine were recumbent and did not continue rumination. The onset of analgesia was longer (p=0.01) in goats treated with epidural tramadol (5.0 minutes; SD 1.2) than goats treated with epidural lignocaine (3.0 minutes; SD 1.1), while duration of analgesia was shorter (p=0.003) in goats treated with epidural tramadol (47.2 minutes; SD 13.1) than goats treated with epidural lignocaine (89.8 minutes; SD 23.1). There was no significant difference in heart rates, respiratory rates and erythrocyte sedimentation rates, while the concentration of cortisol in plasma differed (pinjection produced longer duration of antinociception with lower frequency of pain-associated behavioural changes; while

  15. Ventilation onset prior to umbilical cord clamping (physiological-based cord clamping) improves systemic and cerebral oxygenation in preterm lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polglase, Graeme R; Dawson, Jennifer A; Kluckow, Martin; Gill, Andrew W; Davis, Peter G; Te Pas, Arjan B; Crossley, Kelly J; McDougall, Annie; Wallace, Euan M; Hooper, Stuart B

    2015-01-01

    As measurement of arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) is common in the delivery room, target SpO2 ranges allow clinicians to titrate oxygen therapy for preterm infants in order to achieve saturation levels similar to those seen in normal term infants in the first minutes of life. However, the influence of the onset of ventilation and the timing of cord clamping on systemic and cerebral oxygenation is not known. We investigated whether the initiation of ventilation, prior to, or after umbilical cord clamping, altered systemic and cerebral oxygenation in preterm lambs. Systemic and cerebral blood-flows, pressures and peripheral SpO2 and regional cerebral tissue oxygenation (SctO2) were measured continuously in apnoeic preterm lambs (126±1 day gestation). Positive pressure ventilation was initiated either 1) prior to umbilical cord clamping, or 2) after umbilical cord clamping. Lambs were monitored intensively prior to intervention, and for 10 minutes following umbilical cord clamping. Clamping the umbilical cord prior to ventilation resulted in a rapid decrease in SpO2 and SctO2, and an increase in arterial pressure, cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen extraction. Ventilation restored oxygenation and haemodynamics by 5-6 minutes. No such disturbances in peripheral or cerebral oxygenation and haemodynamics were observed when ventilation was initiated prior to cord clamping. The establishment of ventilation prior to umbilical cord clamping facilitated a smooth transition to systemic and cerebral oxygenation following birth. SpO2 nomograms may need to be re-evaluated to reflect physiological management of preterm infants in the delivery room.

  16. Ventilation onset prior to umbilical cord clamping (physiological-based cord clamping improves systemic and cerebral oxygenation in preterm lambs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme R Polglase

    Full Text Available As measurement of arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2 is common in the delivery room, target SpO2 ranges allow clinicians to titrate oxygen therapy for preterm infants in order to achieve saturation levels similar to those seen in normal term infants in the first minutes of life. However, the influence of the onset of ventilation and the timing of cord clamping on systemic and cerebral oxygenation is not known.We investigated whether the initiation of ventilation, prior to, or after umbilical cord clamping, altered systemic and cerebral oxygenation in preterm lambs.Systemic and cerebral blood-flows, pressures and peripheral SpO2 and regional cerebral tissue oxygenation (SctO2 were measured continuously in apnoeic preterm lambs (126±1 day gestation. Positive pressure ventilation was initiated either 1 prior to umbilical cord clamping, or 2 after umbilical cord clamping. Lambs were monitored intensively prior to intervention, and for 10 minutes following umbilical cord clamping.Clamping the umbilical cord prior to ventilation resulted in a rapid decrease in SpO2 and SctO2, and an increase in arterial pressure, cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen extraction. Ventilation restored oxygenation and haemodynamics by 5-6 minutes. No such disturbances in peripheral or cerebral oxygenation and haemodynamics were observed when ventilation was initiated prior to cord clamping.The establishment of ventilation prior to umbilical cord clamping facilitated a smooth transition to systemic and cerebral oxygenation following birth. SpO2 nomograms may need to be re-evaluated to reflect physiological management of preterm infants in the delivery room.

  17. Changes of blood flow, oxygen tension, action potential and vascular permeability induced by arterial ischemia or venous congestion on the spinal cord in canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Yoshizawa, Hidezo; Shimada, Seiichiro; Guerrero, Alexander Rodríguez; Miyachi, Masaya

    2013-01-01

    It is generally considered that the genesis of myelopathy associated with the degenerative conditions of the spine may result from both mechanical compression and circulatory disturbance. Many references about spinal cord tissue ischemic damage can be found in the literature, but not detailed studies about spinal cord microvasculature damage related to congestion or blood permeability. This study investigates the effect of ischemia and congestion on the spinal cord using an in vivo model. The aorta was clamped as an ischemia model of the spinal cord and the inferior vena cava was clamped as a congestion model at the 6th costal level for 30 min using forceps transpleurally. Measurements of blood flow, partial oxygen pressure, and conduction velocity in the spinal cord were repeated over a period of 1 h after release of clamping. Finally, we examined the status of blood-spinal cord barrier under fluorescence and transmission electron microscope. Immediately after clamping of the inferior vena cava, the central venous pressure increased by about four times. Blood flow, oxygen tension and action potential were more severely affected by the aorta clamping; but this ischemic model did not show any changes of blood permeability in the spinal cord. The intramedullar edema was more easily produced by venous congestion than by arterial ischemia. In conclusions, venous congestion may be a preceding and essential factor of circulatory disturbance in the compressed spinal cord inducing myelopathy.

  18. Integrated Measurements of Electrical Activity, Oxygen Tension, Blood Flow, and Ca2+ -Signaling in Rodents In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Claus; Thomsen, Kirsten; Lauritzen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    in rodent preparation. We also describe methods for recording of cerebral blood flow (CBF), tissue partial pressure of oxygen (tpO2), and cytosolic calcium transients. We finally give examples where electrophysiology, blood flow, metabolism, and calcium transients have been studied together.......In order to assess perfusion and metabolic responses in relation to neural function we need to know the cellular signaling network, which types of neurons and astrocytes are involved, and the timing of their activation. We here present the basic electrophysiological indicators of neuronal function......, short description of the methods commonly used for recording of electrophysiological signals, examples of data analysis and limitations of the methods. This chapter describes the origin of the extracellularly recorded electrical signal, with special regard to the EEG, local field potentials, and spikes...

  19. Gene expression and physiological changes of different populations of the long-lived bivalve Arctica islandica under low oxygen conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva E R Philipp

    Full Text Available The bivalve Arctica islandica is extremely long lived (>400 years and can tolerate long periods of hypoxia and anoxia. European populations differ in maximum life spans (MLSP from 40 years in the Baltic to >400 years around Iceland. Characteristic behavior of A. islandica involves phases of metabolic rate depression (MRD during which the animals burry into the sediment for several days. During these phases the shell water oxygen concentrations reaches hypoxic to anoxic levels, which possibly support the long life span of some populations. We investigated gene regulation in A. islandica from a long-lived (MLSP 150 years German Bight population and the short-lived Baltic Sea population, experimentally exposed to different oxygen levels. A new A. islandica transcriptome enabled the identification of genes important during hypoxia/anoxia events and, more generally, gene mining for putative stress response and (anti- aging genes. Expression changes of a antioxidant defense: Catalase, Glutathione peroxidase, manganese and copper-zinc Superoxide dismutase; b oxygen sensing and general stress response: Hypoxia inducible factor alpha, Prolyl hydroxylase and Heat-shock protein 70; and c anaerobic capacity: Malate dehydrogenase and Octopine dehydrogenase, related transcripts were investigated. Exposed to low oxygen, German Bight individuals suppressed transcription of all investigated genes, whereas Baltic Sea bivalves enhanced gene transcription under anoxic incubation (0 kPa and, further, decreased these transcription levels again during 6 h of re-oxygenation. Hypoxic and anoxic exposure and subsequent re-oxygenation in Baltic Sea animals did not lead to increased protein oxidation or induction of apoptosis, emphasizing considerable hypoxia/re-oxygenation tolerance in this species. The data suggest that the energy saving effect of MRD may not be an attribute of Baltic Sea A. islandica chronically exposed to high environmental variability (oxygenation

  20. Non-invasive measurement of oxygen saturation in the spinal vein using SWI: quantitative evaluation under conditions of physiological and caffeine load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujima, Noriyuki; Kudo, Kohsuke; Terae, Satoshi; Ishizaka, Kinya; Yazu, Rie; Zaitsu, Yuri; Tha, Khin Khin; Yoshida, Daisuke; Tsukahara, Akiko; Haacke, Mark E; Sasaki, Makoto; Shirato, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) has been used for quantitative and non-invasive measurement of blood oxygen saturation in the brain. In this study, we used SWI for quantitative measurement of oxygen saturation in the spinal vein to look for physiological- or caffeine-induced changes in venous oxygenation. SWI measurements were obtained for 5 healthy volunteers using 1.5-T MR units, under 1) 3 kinds of physiological load (breath holding, Bh; hyperventilation, Hv; and inspiration of highly concentrated oxygen, Ox) and 2) caffeine load. Oxygen saturation in the anterior spinal vein (ASV) was calculated. We evaluated changes in oxygen saturation induced by physiological load. We also evaluated the time-course of oxygen saturation after caffeine intake. For the physiological load measurements, the average oxygen saturation for the 5 subjects was significantly lower in Hv (0.75) and significantly higher in Bh (0.84) when compared with control (0.80). There was no significant difference between Ox (0.81) and control. Oxygen saturation gradually decreased after caffeine intake. The average values of oxygen saturation were 0.79 (0 min), 0.76 (20 min), 0.74 (40 min), and 0.73 (60 min), respectively. We demonstrated a significant difference in oxygen saturation at 40 and 60 min after caffeine intake when compared with 0 min. In conclusion, we demonstrated the feasibility of using SWI for non-invasive measurement of oxygen saturation in the spinal vein. We showed changes in oxygen saturation under physiological as well as caffeine load and suggest that this method is a useful tool for the clinical evaluation of spinal cord oxygenation.

  1. Dynamic and selective HERV RNA expression in neuroblastoma cells subjected to variation in oxygen tension and demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lijuan; Uzhameckis, Dmitrijs; Hedborg, Fredrik; Blomberg, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    We studied HERV expression in cell lines after hypoxia, mitogenic stimulation, and demethylation, to better understand if hypoxia may play a role in ERV activation also within the nervous system, as represented by neuroblastoma cell lines. The level of RNA of four human ERV groups (HERVs) (HERVE, I/T, H, and W), and three housekeeping genes, of different cell lines including A549, COS-1, Namalwa, RD-L and Vero-E6, as well as human neuroblastoma cell lines SH-SY5Y, SK-N-DZ, and SK-N-AS were studied using reverse transcription and real-time quantitative PCR (QPCR). During the course of recovery from hypoxia a pronounced and selective activation of RNA expression of HERVW-like sequences, but not of HERVE, I/T, H, and three housekeeping genes, was found in the neuroblastoma cell lines, most pronounced in SK-N-DZ. In the SK-N-DZ cell line, we also tested the expression of HERVs after chemical treatments. HERVW-like sequences were selectively upregulated by 5-azacytidine, a demethylating agent. Some HERVW loci seem especially responsive to hypoxia and demethylation. HERV expression in neuroblastoma cells is selectively and profoundly influenced by some physiological and chemical stimuli.

  2. Precambrian oxygen levels estimated from the biochemistry and physiology of early eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnegar, Bruce

    1991-12-01

    Recent work on the biochemistry of living organisms has shown that the organelles which eukaryotic cells use for photosynthesis and aerobic respiration are of bacterial origin, and that they were imported by eubacterial endosymbionts some time after the existence of the last common ancestor of all modern eukaryotes. However, all living eukaryotes need a certain amount of molecular oxygen for the biosynthesis of vital compounds such as the sterols that are used to stiffen cell membranes. It follows that some dissolved oxygen must have been available to the ancestral "anaerobic" eukaryotes before they acquired their organelles. A minimum age for the first occurrence of such organisms is given by the discovery of modified sterols (steranes) in organic-rich sedimentary rocks about 1.7 Ga old from the McArthur Basin of northern Australia. Fully organelled eukaryotes need even more oxygen if they are to use their mitochondria for aerobic respiration. Some of the oldest fossils that are likely to be the remains of photosynthetic eukaryotes are also from the McArthur Basin. If these sizeable, unicellular algae had functional mitochondria as well as chloroplasts, the oxygen concentration of surface waters some 1.6-1.8 Ga ago is unlikely to have been less than that required for aerobic respiration (> - 0.01 PAL). The oldest convincing megascopic eukaryote, Grypania spiralis, is found ˜1.4 Ga-old strata in China, India, and the U.S.A. Grypania was a corkscrew-shaped "alga" up to 2 mm in diameter and 0.6 m in length which seems to have lived attached to the sea floor. Unless Grypania used oxygen produced by its own chloroplasts, it should have needed between a hundredth and tenth of the present atmospheric level of oxygen (0.01-0.1 PAL O 2) to survive. A similar atmospheric oxygen concentration may have been more than enough to sustain the sheet-like animals of the Ediacara fauna. However, it is possible that their extraordinary geometry was an adaptation to low oxygen levels

  3. The effects of graded changes in oxygen and carbon dioxide tension on coronary blood velocity independent of myocardial energy demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Lindsey M; Stembridge, Mike; Tymko, Michael M; Tremblay, Joshua C; Foster, Glen E

    2016-08-01

    In humans, coronary blood flow is tightly regulated by microvessels within the myocardium to match myocardial energy demand. However, evidence regarding inherent sensitivity of the microvessels to changes in arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide and oxygen is conflicting because of the accompanied changes in myocardial energy requirements. This study aimed to investigate the changes in coronary blood velocity while manipulating partial pressures of end-tidal CO2 (Petco2) and O2 (Peto2). It was hypothesized that an increase in Petco2 (hypercapnia) or decrease in Peto2 (hypoxia) would result in a significant increase in mean blood velocity in the left anterior descending artery (LADVmean) due to an increase in both blood gases and energy demand associated with the concomitant cardiovascular response. Cardiac energy demand was assessed through noninvasive measurement of the total left ventricular mechanical energy. Healthy subjects (n = 13) underwent a euoxic CO2 test (Petco2 = -8, -4, 0, +4, and +8 mmHg from baseline) and an isocapnic hypoxia test (Peto2 = 64, 52, and 45 mmHg). LADVmean was assessed using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. Hypercapnia evoked a 34.6 ± 8.5% (mean ± SE; P < 0.01) increase in mean LADVmean, whereas hypoxia increased LADVmean by 51.4 ± 8.8% (P < 0.05). Multiple stepwise regressions revealed that both mechanical energy and changes in arterial blood gases are important contributors to the observed changes in LADVmean (P < 0.01). In summary, regulation of the coronary vasculature in humans is mediated by metabolic changes within the heart and an inherent sensitivity to arterial blood gases.

  4. Analysis of Cap-binding Proteins in Human Cells Exposed to Physiological Oxygen Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpano, Sara; Melanson, Gaelan; Evagelou, Sonia L; Guild, Brianna D; Specker, Erin J; Uniacke, James

    2016-12-28

    Translational control is a focal point of gene regulation, especially during periods of cellular stress. Cap-dependent translation via the eIF4F complex is by far the most common pathway to initiate protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells, but stress-specific variations of this complex are now emerging. Purifying cap-binding proteins with an affinity resin composed of Agarose-linked m(7)GTP (a 5' mRNA cap analog) is a useful tool to identify factors involved in the regulation of translation initiation. Hypoxia (low oxygen) is a cellular stress encountered during fetal development and tumor progression, and is highly dependent on translation regulation. Furthermore, it was recently reported that human adult organs have a lower oxygen content (physioxia 1-9% oxygen) that is closer to hypoxia than the ambient air where cells are routinely cultured. With the ongoing characterization of a hypoxic eIF4F complex (eIF4F(H)), there is increasing interest in understanding oxygen-dependent translation initiation through the 5' mRNA cap. We have recently developed a human cell culture method to analyze cap-binding proteins that are regulated by oxygen availability. This protocol emphasizes that cell culture and lysis be performed in a hypoxia workstation to eliminate exposure to oxygen. Cells must be incubated for at least 24 hr for the liquid media to equilibrate with the atmosphere within the workstation. To avoid this limitation, pre-conditioned media (de-oxygenated) can be added to cells if shorter time points are required. Certain cap-binding proteins require interactions with a second base or can hydrolyze the m(7)GTP, therefore some cap interactors may be missed in the purification process. Agarose-linked to enzymatically resistant cap analogs may be substituted in this protocol. This method allows the user to identify novel oxygen-regulated translation factors involved in cap-dependent translation.

  5. Do oxygen isotope values in collagen reflect the ecology and physiology of neotropical mammals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke eCrowley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stable isotope data provide insight into the foraging ecology of animals. Traditionally, carbon and nitrogen isotope values have been used to infer dietary and habitat preferences. Oxygen isotopes are used less frequently but may complement the ecological information provided by carbon and nitrogen, particularly in densely forested or arid environments. Additionally, because oxygen is preserved in both bioapatite and collagen, it is useful for paleoecological studies. To investigate the suitability of oxygen isotopes for complementing and building on ecological applications of carbon and nitrogen isotopes, we analyze all three isotopes in bone collagen for nearly identical assemblages of Costa Rican mammals in two ecologically distinct habitats - a evergreen rainforest and a seasonal dry forest. We assess the degree to which differences in habitat, activity pattern, diet, arboreality, and thermoregulation are revealed by each of the isotope systems. Our results highlight the potential of oxygen isotopes in modern and paleoecological contexts. In addition to reflecting habitat type, oxygen isotope values in collagen distinguish species on the basis of vertical habitat stratification and drinking behavior. Within a locality, individuals with low oxygen isotope values likely track meteoric water, whereas those with elevated values most likely consume evaporatively-enriched plant tissues, such as canopy leaves. These patterns will be useful in reconstructing paleoenvironments and interpreting ecological differences among taxa both extant and extinct.

  6. The Tension Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, A. B.

    This is a bibliography of literature on the subject of tension. Books, films, and periodicals with a bearing on stress, relaxation, anxiety, and/or methods of controlling stress are listed from the fields of physiology, psychology, and philosophy. New methods such as transcendental meditation and biofeedback are analyzed briefly and criteria are…

  7. End-Tidal CO2 Tension Is Predictive of Effective Nocturnal Oxygen Therapy in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure and Central Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Koichiro; Shinozaki, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Shigefumi; Ogawa, Hiromasa; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is characterized by recurring cycles of crescendo-decrescendo ventilation during sleep, and enhances sympathetic nerve activity. Thus CSA has a prognostic impact in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Although nocturnal oxygen (O2) therapy decreases frequency of CSA and improves functional exercise capacity, it is also known that some non-responders to the therapy exist. We thus aimed to identify predictors of responders to nocturnal O2 therapy in CHF patients with CSA. In 12 CHF patients with CSA hospitalized at our department, sleep study was performed at 2 consecutive nights. Patients nasally inhaled O2 at either the first or second night in a randomized manner. To predict the percentage reduction in apnea-hypopnea index (%ΔAHI) in response to the nocturnal O2 therapy, we performed multiple regression analysis with a stepwise method with variables including age, brain-natriuretic peptide, circulation time, baseline AHI, hypercapnic ventilatory response and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PETCO2). Nocturnal O2 therapy significantly decreased AHI (from 32 ± 13 /h to 12 ± 10 /h, P 50% reduction of AHI), with 88.9% of sensitivity and 66.7% of specificity. In conclusion, PETCO2 is useful to predict the efficacy of O2 therapy in CHF patients with CSA, providing important information to the current nocturnal O2 therapy.

  8. Effects of Hyperoxia on Brain Tissue Oxygen Tension in Non-Sedated, Non- Anesthetized Arctic Ground Squirrels: An Animal Model of Hyperoxic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arctic Ground Squirrels (AGS are classic hibernators known for their tolerance to hypoxia. AGS have been studied as a model of hypoxia with potential as a medical research model. Problem statement: Their unique resistance to the stressors of low oxygen led us to hypothesize that AGS might also be adaptable to hyperoxia. Approach: This study examined the physiological pattern associated with hyperoxia in response to brain tissue oxygen partial pressure (PtO2, brain temperature (Tbrain, global oxygen consumption (VO2 and respiratory frequency (fR using non-sedated and nonanesthetized Arctic Ground Squirrels (AGS and rats. Results: We found that 1 100% inspired oxygen (FiO2 increased the baseline values of brain PtO2 significantly in both summer euthermic AGS (24.4 ± 3.6-87.3 ± 3.6 mmHg, n=6 and in rats (18.2 ± 5.2-73.3 ± 5.2 mmHg, n = 3; PtO2 was significantly higher in AGS than in rats during hyperoxic exposure; 2 hyperoxic exposure had no effect on brain temperature in either AGS or rats, with the brain temperatures maintaining constancy before, during and after 100% O2 exposure; 3 systemic metabolic rates increased significantly during hyperoxic exposure in both euthermic AGS and rats; moreover, VO2 were significantly lower in AGS than in rats during hyperoxic exposure; 4 the respiratory rates for rats were maintained before, during and after 100% O2 exposure, while the respiratory responding patterns to hyperoxic exposure changed after exposure in AGS. AGS fR was significantly lower after hyperoxic exposure than before the exposure. Conclusion: These results suggest that hyperoxic ventilation induced PtO2 and VO2 differences between AGS and rats and led to altered respiratory patterns between these species. AGS and the rat serves as an excellent comparative model for hypoxic and hyperoxic stress studies of the brain.

  9. [Study of the surface tear tension and evaluation of its importance for the retinal physiology and pathology in contact correction and in adaptation to soft contact lenses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepnin, A I; Smoliakova, G P; Sorokin, E L

    2003-01-01

    The surface lachrymal-fluid (LF) tension was investigated by teardrop dissection in 115 patients with myopia before they were prescribed soft contact lenses (SCL). Such tension was found to be of clinical importance for the development of SCL adaptation disorders. A longer adaptation period in patients with myopia was associated with a low surface LF tension. A high surface LF tension concurrent with the teardrop dissection mode of the destruction type was typical of the pathological nature of SCL adaptation (12.1% of patients). The obtained data are needed to detect timely the risk of dysadaptation disorders and corneal complications before SCL prescription for the purpose of undertaking the pathogenetically substantiated medication to prevent such complications.

  10. A human-like senescence-associated secretory phenotype is conserved in mouse cells dependent on physiological oxygen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Coppé

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence irreversibly arrests cell proliferation in response to oncogenic stimuli. Human cells develop a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP, which increases the secretion of cytokines and other factors that alter the behavior of neighboring cells. We show here that "senescent" mouse fibroblasts, which arrested growth after repeated passage under standard culture conditions (20% oxygen, do not express a human-like SASP, and differ from similarly cultured human cells in other respects. However, when cultured in physiological (3% oxygen and induced to senesce by radiation, mouse cells more closely resemble human cells, including expression of a robust SASP. We describe two new aspects of the human and mouse SASPs. First, cells from both species upregulated the expression and secretion of several matrix metalloproteinases, which comprise a conserved genomic cluster. Second, for both species, the ability to promote the growth of premalignant epithelial cells was due primarily to the conserved SASP factor CXCL-1/KC/GRO-alpha. Further, mouse fibroblasts made senescent in 3%, but not 20%, oxygen promoted epithelial tumorigenesis in mouse xenographs. Our findings underscore critical mouse-human differences in oxygen sensitivity, identify conditions to use mouse cells to model human cellular senescence, and reveal novel conserved features of the SASP.

  11. Laser-induced generation of singlet oxygen and its role in the cerebrovascular physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.; Sokolovski, S. G.; Goltsov, A.; Gekaluyk, A. S.; Saranceva, E. I.; Bragina, O. A.; Tuchin, V. V.; Rafailov, E. U.

    2017-09-01

    For over 55 years, laser technology has expanded from laboratory research to widespread fields, for example telecommunication and data storage amongst others. Recently application of lasers in biology and medicine presents itself as one of the emerging areas. In this review, we will outline the recent advances in using lasers for the generation of singlet oxygen, traditionally used to kill tumour cells or induce thrombotic stroke model due to damage vascular effects. Over the last two decade, completely new results on cerebrovascular effects of singlet oxygen generated during photodynamic therapy (PDT) have been shown alongside promising applications for delivery of drugs and nanoparticles into the brain for therapy of brain cancer. Furthermore, a ;gold key; has been found to overcome the limitations of PDT, such as low light penetration and high toxicity of photosensitizers, by direct generation of singlet oxygen using quantum-dot laser diodes emitting in the near infrared (NIR) spectral range. It is our motivation to highlight these pioneering results in this review, to improve understanding of the biological role of singlet oxygen and to provide new perspectives for improving clinical application of laser based therapy in further research.

  12. Physiological requirements for growth and competitiveness of Dekkera bruxellensis under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Johanna; Nogué, Violeta Sànchez; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie; Passoth, Volkmar

    2012-07-01

    The effect of glucose and oxygen limitation on the growth and fermentation performances of Dekkera bruxellensis was investigated in order to understand which factors favour its propagation in ethanol or wine plants. Although D. bruxellensis has been described as a facultative anaerobe, no growth was observed in mineral medium under complete anaerobiosis while growth was retarded under severe oxygen limitation. In a continuous culture with no gas inflow, glucose was not completely consumed, most probably due to oxygen limitation. When an air/nitrogen mixture (O(2)-content ca. 5%) was sparged to the culture, growth became glucose-limited. In co-cultivations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol yields/g consumed sugar were not affected by the co-cultures as compared to the pure cultures. However, different population responses were observed in both systems. In oxygen-limited cultivation, glucose was depleted within 24 h after challenging with S. cerevisiae and both yeast populations were maintained at a stable level. In contrast, the S. cerevisiae population constantly decreased to about 1% of its initial cell number in the sparged glucose-limited fermentation, whereas the D. bruxellensis population remained constant. To identify the requirements of D. bruxellensis for anaerobic growth, the yeast was cultivated in several nitrogen sources and with the addition of amino acids. Yeast extract and most of the supplied amino acids supported anaerobic growth, which points towards a higher nutrient demand for D. bruxellensis compared to S. cerevisiae in anaerobic conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Effect of controlled oxygen limitation on Candida shehatae physiology for ethanol production from xylose and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromanger, Romain; Guillouet, S E; Uribelarrea, J L; Molina-Jouve, C; Cameleyre, X

    2010-05-01

    Carbon distribution and kinetics of Candida shehatae were studied in fed-batch fermentation with xylose or glucose (separately) as the carbon source in mineral medium. The fermentations were carried out in two phases, an aerobic phase dedicated to growth followed by an oxygen limitation phase dedicated to ethanol production. Oxygen limitation was quantified with an average specific oxygen uptake rate (OUR) varying between 0.30 and 2.48 mmolO(2) g dry cell weight (DCW)(-1) h(-1), the maximum value before the aerobic shift. The relations among respiration, growth, ethanol production and polyol production were investigated. It appeared that ethanol was produced to provide energy, and polyols (arabitol, ribitol, glycerol and xylitol) were produced to reoxidize NADH from assimilatory reactions and from the co-factor imbalance of the two-first enzymatic steps of xylose uptake. Hence, to manage carbon flux to ethanol production, oxygen limitation was a major controlled parameter; an oxygen limitation corresponding to an average specific OUR of 1.19 mmolO(2) g DCW(-1) h(-1) allowed maximization of the ethanol yield over xylose (0.327 g g(-1)), the average productivity (2.2 g l(-1) h(-1)) and the ethanol final titer (48.81 g l(-1)). For glucose fermentation, the ethanol yield over glucose was the highest (0.411 g g(-1)) when the specific OUR was low, corresponding to an average specific OUR of 0.30 mmolO(2) g DCW(-1) h(-1), whereas the average ethanol productivity and ethanol final titer reached the maximum values of 1.81 g l(-1) h(-1) and 54.19 g l(-1) when the specific OUR was the highest.

  14. Anaemia adjusts the aerobic physiology of snapper (Pagrus auratus) and modulates hypoxia avoidance behaviour during oxygen choice presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Denham G; Wells, Rufus M G; Herbert, Neill A

    2011-09-01

    The effect of altered oxygen transport potential on behavioural responses to environmental hypoxia was tested experimentally in snapper, Pagrus auratus, treated with a haemolytic agent (phenylhydrazine) or a sham protocol. Standard metabolic rate was not different between anaemic and normocythaemic snapper (Hct=6.7 and 25.7 g dl(-1), respectively), whereas maximum metabolic rate, and hence aerobic scope (AS), was consistently reduced in anaemic groups at all levels of water P(O(2)) investigated (Pspeed. Despite differences in physiological and behavioural parameters, both groups avoided low P(O(2)) just below their P(crit), indicating that avoidance was triggered consistently when AS limits were reached and anaerobic metabolism was unavoidable. This was confirmed by high levels of plasma lactate in both treatments at the point of avoidance. This is the first experimental demonstration of avoidance behaviour being modulated by internal physiological state. From an ecological perspective, fish with disturbed oxygen delivery potential arising from anaemia, pollution or stress are likely to avoid environmental hypoxia at a higher P(O(2)) than normal fish.

  15. Human Cells Cultured under Physiological Oxygen Utilize Two Cap-binding Proteins to recruit Distinct mRNAs for Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpano, Sara; Uniacke, James

    2016-05-13

    Translation initiation is a focal point of translational control and requires the binding of eIF4E to the 5' cap of mRNA. Under conditions of extreme oxygen depletion (hypoxia), human cells repress eIF4E and switch to an alternative cap-dependent translation mediated by a homolog of eIF4E, eIF4E2. This homolog forms a complex with the oxygen-regulated hypoxia-inducible factor 2α and can escape translation repression. This complex mediates cap-dependent translation under cell culture conditions of 1% oxygen (to mimic tumor microenvironments), whereas eIF4E mediates cap-dependent translation at 21% oxygen (ambient air). However, emerging evidence suggests that culturing cells in ambient air, or "normoxia," is far from physiological or "normal." In fact, oxygen in human tissues ranges from 1-11% or "physioxia." Here we show that two distinct modes of cap-dependent translation initiation are active during physioxia and act on separate pools of mRNAs. The oxygen-dependent activities of eIF4E and eIF4E2 are elucidated by observing their polysome association and the status of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (eIF4E-dependent) or hypoxia-inducible factor 2α expression (eIF4E2-dependent). We have identified oxygen conditions where eIF4E is the dominant cap-binding protein (21% normoxia or standard cell culture conditions), where eIF4E2 is the dominant cap-binding protein (1% hypoxia or ischemic diseases and cancerous tumors), and where both cap-binding proteins act simultaneously to initiate the translation of distinct mRNAs (1-11% physioxia or during development and stem cell differentiation). These data suggest that the physioxic proteome is generated by initiating translation of mRNAs via two distinct but complementary cap-binding proteins.

  16. Transcriptional and functional adaptations of human endothelial cells to physiological chronic low oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi-Zhou; Wang, Kai; Li, Yan; Dai, Cai-Feng; Wang, Ping; Kendziorski, Christina; Chen, Dong-Bao; Zheng, Jing

    2013-05-01

    Endothelial cells chronically reside in low-O2 environments in vivo (2%-13% O2), which are believed to be critical for cell homeostasis. To elucidate the roles of this physiological chronic normoxia in human endothelial cells, we examined transcriptomes of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), proliferation and migration of HUVECs in response to fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), and underlying signaling mechanisms under physiological chronic normoxia. Immediately after isolation, HUVECs were cultured steadily under standard cell culture normoxia (SCN; 21% O2) or physiological chronic normoxia (PCN; 3% O2) up to 25 days. We found that PCN up-regulated 41 genes and down-regulated 21 genes, 90% of which differed from those previously reported from HUVECs cultured under SCN and exposed to acute low O2. Gene ontology analysis indicated that PCN-regulated genes were highly related to cell proliferation and migration, consistent with the results from benchtop assays that showed that PCN significantly enhanced FGF2- and VEGFA-stimulated cell proliferation and migration. Interestingly, preexposing the PCN cells to 21% O2 up to 5 days did not completely diminish PCN-enhanced cell proliferation and migration. These PCN-enhanced cell proliferations and migrations were mediated via augmented activation of MEK1/MEK2/ERK1/ERK2 and/or PI3K/AKT1. Importantly, these PCN-enhanced cellular responses were associated with an increase in activation of VEGFR2 but not FGFR1, without altering their expression. Thus, PCN programs endothelial cells to undergo dramatic changes in transcriptomes and sensitizes cellular proliferative and migratory responses to FGF2 and VEGFA. These PCN cells may offer a unique endothelial model, more closely mimicking the in vivo states.

  17. Bilirubin activates transcription of HIF-1α in human proximal tubular cells cultured in the physiologic oxygen content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Gyun; Ahn, Shin-Young; Lee, Eun Seong; Kim, Sejoong; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Chin, Ho Jun

    2014-09-01

    The expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is influenced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Effect of bilirubin on HIF-1 expression in proximal tubular cells was investigated under physiological oxygen concentration, which is relative hypoxic condition mimicking oxygen content in the medulla of renal tissue. The human kidney (HK2) cells were cultured in 5% oxygen with or without bilirubin. HIF-1α protein expression was increased by bilirubin treatment at 0.01-0.2 mg/dL concentration. The messenger RNA expression of HIF-1α was increased by 1.69±0.05 folds in the cells cultured with 0.1 mg/dL bilirubin, compared to the control cells. The inhibitors of PI3K/mTOR, PI3K/AKT, and ERK 1/2 pathways did not attenuate increased HIF-1α expression by bilirubin. HIF-1α expression decreased by 10 µM exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2); scavenger of ROS with or without bilirubin in the HK2 cells increased HIF-1α concentration more than that in the cells without bilirubin. Exogenous H2O2 decreased the phosphorylation of P70S6 kinase, which was completely reversed by bilirubin treatment. Knockdown of NOX4 gene by small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased HIF-1α mRNA expression. In coonclusion, bilirubin enhances HIF-1α transcription as well as the up-regulation of HIF-1α protein translation through the attenuation of ROS and subunits of NADPH oxidase.

  18. Recapitulating physiological and pathological shear stress and oxygen to model vasculature in health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Shen, Yu-I.; Tan, Scott; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-05-01

    Studying human vascular disease in conventional cell cultures and in animal models does not effectively mimic the complex vascular microenvironment and may not accurately predict vascular responses in humans. We utilized a microfluidic device to recapitulate both shear stress and O2 levels in health and disease, establishing a microfluidic vascular model (μVM). Maintaining human endothelial cells (ECs) in healthy-mimicking conditions resulted in conversion to a physiological phenotype namely cell elongation, reduced proliferation, lowered angiogenic gene expression and formation of actin cortical rim and continuous barrier. We next examined the responses of the healthy μVM to a vasotoxic cancer drug, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), in comparison with an in vivo mouse model. We found that 5-FU does not induce apoptosis rather vascular hyperpermeability, which can be alleviated by Resveratrol treatment. This effect was confirmed by in vivo findings identifying a vasoprotecting strategy by the adjunct therapy of 5-FU with Resveratrol. The μVM of ischemic disease demonstrated the transition of ECs from a quiescent to an activated state, with higher proliferation rate, upregulation of angiogenic genes, and impaired barrier integrity. The μVM offers opportunities to study and predict human ECs with physiologically relevant phenotypes in healthy, pathological and drug-treated environments.

  19. A hybrid multibreath wash-in wash-out lung function quantification scheme in human subjects using hyperpolarized (3) He MRI for simultaneous assessment of specific ventilation, alveolar oxygen tension, oxygen uptake, and air trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedani, Hooman; Kadlecek, Stephen; Xin, Yi; Siddiqui, Sarmad; Gatens, Heather; Naji, Joseph; Ishii, Masaru; Cereda, Maurizio; Rossman, Milton; Rizi, Rahim

    2017-08-01

    To present a method for simultaneous acquisition of alveolar oxygen tension (PA O2 ), specific ventilation (SV), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of hyperpolarized (HP) gas in the human lung, allowing reinterpretation of the PA O2 and SV maps to produce a map of oxygen uptake (R). An imaging scheme was designed with a series of identical normoxic HP gas wash-in breaths to measure ADC, SV, PA O2 , and R in less than 2 min. Signal dynamics were fit to an iterative recursive model that regionally solved for these parameters. This measurement was successfully performed in 12 subjects classified in three healthy, smoker, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) cohorts. The overall whole lung ADC, SV, PA O2 , and R in healthy, smoker, and COPD subjects was 0.20 ± 0.03 cm(2) /s, 0.39 ± 0.06,113 ± 2 Torr, and 1.55 ± 0.35 Torr/s, respectively, in healthy subjects; 0.21 ± 0.03 cm(2) /s, 0.33 ± 0.06, 115.9 ± 4 Torr, and 0.97 ± 0.2 Torr/s, respectively, in smokers; and 0.25 ± 0.06 cm(2) /s, 0.23 ± 0.08, 114.8 ± 6.0Torr, and 0.94 ± 0.12 Torr/s, respectively, in subjects with COPD. Hetrogeneity of SV, PA O2 , and R were indicators of both smoking-related changes and disease, and the severity of the disease correlated with the degree of this heterogeneity. Subjects with symptoms showed reduced oxygen uptake and specific ventilation. High-resolution, nearly coregistered and quantitative measures of lung function and structure were obtained with less than 1 L of HP gas. This hybrid multibreath technique produced measures of lung function that revealed clear differences among the cohorts and subjects and were confirmed by correlations with global lung measurements. Magn Reson Med 78:611-624, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Differentiation of human adipocytes at physiological oxygen levels results in increased adiponectin secretion and isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famulla, Susanne; Schlich, Raphaela; Sell, Henrike; Eckel, Jürgen

    2012-07-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) hypoxia occurs in obese humans and mice. Acute hypoxia in adipocytes causes dysregulation of adipokine secretion with an increase in inflammatory factors and diminished adiponectin release. O2 levels in humans range between 3 and 11% revealing that conventional in vitro culturing at ambient air and acute hypoxia treatment (1% O2) are performed under non-physiological conditions. In this study, we mimicked physiological conditions by differentiating human primary adipocytes under 10% or 5% O2 in comparison to 21% O2. Induction of differentiation markers was comparable between all three conditions. Adipokine release by adipocytes differentiated at lower oxygen levels was altered, with a marked upregulation of adiponectin, IL-6 and DPP4 secretion, and reduced leptin levels compared with adipocytes differentiated at 21% O2. Isoproterenol-induced lipolysis was significantly elevated in adipocytes differentiated at 10% and 5% compared with 21% O2. This effect was accompanied by increased protein expression of β-1 and -2 adrenergic receptor, HSL and perilipin. Conditioned medium (CM) of adipocytes differentiated at the three different conditions was generated for stimulation of human skeletal muscle cells (SkMC) or smooth muscle cells (SMC). CM-induced insulin resistance in SkMC was comparable for the different CMs. However, the SMC proliferative effect of CM from adipocytes differentiated at 10% O2 was significantly reduced compared with 21% O2. This study demonstrates that oxygen levels during adipogenesis are important factors altering adipocyte functionality such as adipokine release, in particular adiponectin secretion, as well as the hormone-induced lipolytic pathway.

  1. Impact of microbial physiology and microbial community structure on pharmaceutical fate driven by dissolved oxygen concentration in nitrifying bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Lauren B; Love, Nancy G

    2016-11-01

    Operation at low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations (concentration can impact pharmaceutical biotransformation rates during wastewater treatment both directly and indirectly: directly by acting as a limiting substrate that slows the activity of the microorganisms involved in biotransformation; and indirectly by shaping the microbial community and selecting for a community that performs pharmaceutical biotransformation faster (or slower). In this study, nitrifying bioreactors were operated at low (∼0.3 mg/L) and high (>4 mg/L) DO concentrations to understand how DO growth conditions impacted microbial community structure. Short-term batch experiments using the biomass from the parent reactors were performed under low and high DO conditions to understand how DO concentration impacts microbial physiology. Although the low DO parent biomass had a lower specific activity with respect to ammonia oxidation than the high DO parent reactor biomass, it had faster biotransformation rates of ibuprofen, sulfamethoxazole, 17α-ethinylestradiol, acetaminophen, and atenolol in high DO batch conditions. This was likely because the low DO reactor had a 2x higher biomass concentration, was enriched for ammonia oxidizers (4x higher concentration), and harbored a more diverse microbial community (3x more unique taxa) as compared to the high DO parent reactor. Overall, the results show that there can be indirect benefits from low DO operation over high DO operation that support pharmaceutical biotransformation during wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Physiological effects of titrated oxygen via nasal high-flow cannulae in COPD exacerbations: A randomized controlled cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, Janine; Eastlake, Leonie; Richards, Michael; Power, Sharon; Cripps, Terrianne; Bibby, Susan; Braithwaite, Irene; Weatherall, Mark; Beasley, Richard

    2017-08-01

    Increased arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2 ) is an important complication of acute exacerbations of COPD. The effects of nasal high-flow cannulae (NHF) on PaCO2 in patients with COPD exacerbations, and whether this therapy should be used in this clinical situation, are less certain. We aimed to investigate the effect of NHF on PaCO2 in patients admitted to hospital with a COPD exacerbation. We performed a single-centre randomized controlled cross-over trial in 24 hospital inpatients with acute exacerbations of COPD receiving oxygen via standard nasal prongs (SNPs). Patients received both supplemental oxygen via NHF (35 L/min) and SNP for 30 min each, with oxygen titrated to maintain the patient's baseline oxygen saturation, measured by pulse oximetry (SpO2 ). Interventions were administered in random order with a minimum 15-min washout between interventions. The primary outcome was difference in transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension (PtCO2 ) at 30 min adjusted for time zero. The difference in PtCO2 adjusted for time zero was lower after 30 min for NHF compared with SNP (-1.4 mm Hg (95% CI: -2.2 to -0.6), P = 0.001). There was no difference in SpO2 at 30 min (-0.02% (95% CI: -0.8 to 0.7), P = 0.96). The reduction in respiratory rate for NHF at 30 min was not statistically significant (-2.0 breaths/min (95% CI: -4.5 to 0.4), P = 0.099). Short-term use of NHF results in a small reduction in PtCO2 compared with SNP in patients with acute exacerbations of COPD, but whether this is clinically significant is uncertain. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  3. Effect of Dissolved Oxygen on Swimming Ability and Physiological Response to Swimming Fatigue of Whiteleg Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yan; ZHANG Xiumei; LIU Xuxu; Dhanrajsingh N. Thakur

    2014-01-01

    The swimming endurance of whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei, 87.66 mm ± 0.25 mm, 7.73 g ± 0.06 g) was exam-ined at various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO, 1.9, 3.8, 6.8 and 13.6 mg L-1) in a swimming channel against one of the five flow velocities (v1, v2, v3, v4 and v5). Metabolite contents in the plasma, hepatopancreas and pleopods muscle of the shrimp were quantified before and after swimming fatigue. The results revealed that the swimming speed and DO concentration were significant factors that affected the swimming endurance of L. vannamei. The relationship between swimming endurance and swimming speed at various DO concentrations can be described by the power model (ν·tb=a). The relationship between DO concentration (mg L-1) and the swimming ability index (SAI), defined as SAI= 90000∫ vdt (cm) , can be described as SAI=27.947 DO0.137 (R2=0.9312). The level of DO concentration directly affected the physiology of shrimp, and exposure to low concentrations of DO led to the increases in lactate and energetic substrate content in the shrimp. In responding to the low DO concentration at 1.9 mg L-1 and the swimming stress, L. vannamei exhibited a mix of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism to satisfy the energetic demand, mainly characterized by the utilization of total protein and glycogen and the production of lactate and glucose. Fatigue from swimming led to severe loss of plasma triglyceride at v1, v2, and v3 with 1.9 mg L-1 DO, and at v1 with 3.8, 6.8 and 13.6 mg L-1 DO, whereas the plasma glucose con-tent increased significantly at v3, v4 and v5 with 3.8 and 6.8 mg L-1 DO, and at v5 with 13.6 mg L-1 DO. The plasma total protein and hepatopancreas glycogen were highly depleted in shrimp by swimming fatigue at various DO concentrations, whereas the plasma lactate accumulated at high levels after swimming fatigue at different velocities. These results were of particular value to under-standing the locomotory ability of whiteleg shrimp and its

  4. Enhanced reactive oxygen species scavenging by overproduction of superoxide dismutase and catalase delays postharvest physiological deterioration of cassava storage roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia; Duan, Xiaoguang; Yang, Jun; Beeching, John R; Zhang, Peng

    2013-03-01

    Postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) of cassava (Manihot esculenta) storage roots is the result of a rapid oxidative burst, which leads to discoloration of the vascular tissues due to the oxidation of phenolic compounds. In this study, coexpression of the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging enzymes copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (MeCu/ZnSOD) and catalase (MeCAT1) in transgenic cassava was used to explore the intrinsic relationship between ROS scavenging and PPD occurrence. Transgenic cassava plants integrated with the expression cassette p54::MeCu/ZnSOD-35S::MeCAT1 were confirmed by Southern-blot analysis. The expression of MeCu/ZnSOD and MeCAT1 was verified by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzymatic activity analysis both in the leaves and storage roots. Under exposure to the ROS-generating reagent methyl viologen or to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the transgenic plants showed higher enzymatic activities of SOD and CAT than the wild-type plants. Levels of malondialdehyde, chlorophyll degradation, lipid peroxidation, and H2O2 accumulation were dramatically reduced in the transgenic lines compared with the wild type. After harvest, the storage roots of transgenic cassava lines show a delay in their PPD response of at least 10 d, accompanied by less mitochondrial oxidation and H2O2 accumulation, compared with those of the wild type. We hypothesize that this is due to the combined ectopic expression of Cu/ZnSOD and CAT leading to an improved synergistic ROS-scavenging capacity of the roots. Our study not only sheds light on the mechanism of the PPD process but also develops an effective approach for delaying the occurrence of PPD in cassava.

  5. Tension Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The fabric structure pictured is the Campus Center of La Verne College, La Verne, California. Unlike the facilities shown on the preceding pages, it is not air-supported. It is a "tension structure," its multi-coned fabric membrane supported by a network of cables attached to steel columns which function like circus tent poles. The spider-web in the accompanying photo is a computer graph of the tension pattern. The designers, Geiger-Berger Associates PC, of New York City, conducted lengthy computer analysis to determine the the best placement of columns and cables. The firm also served as structural engineering consultant on the Pontiac Silverdome and a number of other large fabric structures. Built by Birdair Structures, Inc., Buffalo, New York, the La Verne Campus Center was the first permanent facility in the United States enclosed by the space-spinoff fabric made of Owens-Corning Beta fiber glass coated with Du Pont Teflon TFE. The flexible design permits rearrangement of the interior to accommodate athletic events, student activities, theatrical productions and other recreational programs. Use of fabric covering reduced building cost 30 percent below conventional construction.

  6. AUTOGENIC THERAPY IN TENSION HEADACHE

    OpenAIRE

    Amruthraj, Brunda; Mishra, H.; Kumaraiah, V.

    1987-01-01

    SUMMARY Ten subjects diagnosed as Psychalgia were taken for study. A multiple baseline design was adapted and clients were subjected to 30 sessions of autogenic training. They were assessed using physiological (EMG and thermal change) and behavioural measures (Visual analogue scale and behavioural symptom checklist). Findings revealed autogenic therapy to be effective in reducing tension headache.

  7. HIF1A and EPAS1 mRNA and protein expression during in vitro culture of human primary term cytotrophoblasts and effect of oxygen tension on their expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depoix, Christophe Louis; Flabat, Olivier; Debiève, Frédéric; Hubinont, Corinne

    2016-09-01

    During the first trimester of pregnancy, placenta formation probably occurs in a low-oxygen environment necessary to protect cytotrophoblasts from oxidative stress and to allow proper gene regulation. Transcription factors involved in gene regulation under low oxygen tension are the hypoxia-inducible factors, mainly HIF1A, EPAS1 and their dimerization partner HIF1B. Little is known about their expression during in vitro culture of cytotrophoblasts under chronic hypoxia. We assessed HIF1A and EPAS1 expression in a 4-day in vitro culture of primary term cytotrophoblasts under 21% O2 and 2.5% O2. Copy numbers and relative mRNA expression were assessed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Protein levels were quantified by immunoblot and densitometric analysis. In undifferentiated cytotrophoblasts, EPAS1 transcripts were four times more abundant than HIF1A transcripts (2.14e(7) and 5e(6)copies/μg total RNA, respectively). During cell culture, HIF1A mRNA expression increased after 24h and then decreased to stay stable. The expression was even lower when cells were grown under 2.5% O2. EPAS1 mRNA expression increased during cytotrophoblast differentiation. The expression was higher when cells were under 21% O2 than when they were under 2.5% O2. Interestingly, HIF1A, but not EPAS1, was detected in the nuclei of undifferentiated cytotrophoblasts, and in the nuclei of cytotrophoblasts that grew under 21% O2. During cytotrophoblast differentiation, no variation in HIF1A protein levels was detected. To the contrary, EPAS1 protein level increased during differentiation, and oxygen tension had no effect on EPAS1 protein level. In conclusion, HIF1A and EPAS1 expression was not inhibited by chronic hypoxia during in vitro cytotrophoblast differentiation.

  8. Investigation of the physiological response to oxygen limited process conditions of Pichia pastoris Mut(+) strain using a two-compartment scale-down system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorantfy, Bettina; Jazini, Mohammadhadi; Herwig, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    Inhomogeneities in production-scale bioreactors influence microbial growth and product quality due to insufficient mixing and mass transfer. For this reason, lots of efforts are being made to investigate the effects of gradients that impose stress in large-scale reactors in laboratory scale. We have implemented a scale-down model which allows separating a homogeneous part, a stirred tank reactor (STR), and a plug flow reactor (PFR) which mimics the inhomogeneous regimes of the large-scale fermenters. This scale-down model shows solutions to trigger oxygen limited conditions in the PFR part of the scale-down setup for physiological analysis. The goal of the study was to investigate the scale-up relevant physiological responses of Pichia pastoris strain to oxygen limited process conditions in the above mentioned two-compartment bioreactor setup. Experimental results with non-induced cultures show that the specific growth rate significantly decreased with increasing the exposure time to oxygen limitation. In parallel more by-products were produced. Examining physiological scalable key parameters, multivariate data analyses solely using on-line data revealed that different exposures to the oxygen limitation significantly affected the culture performance. This work with the small scale-downs setup reflects new approaches for a valuable process development tool for accelerating strain characterization or for verifying CFD simulations of large-scale bioreactors. As a novel methodological achievement, the combination of the two-compartment scale-down system with the proposed multivariate techniques of solely using on-line data is a valuable tool for recognition of stress effects on the culture performance for physiological bioprocess scale-up issues.

  9. Measurements of low oxygen tension in vitro and response of macrophages to levels applicable to peri- and postoperative treatment of traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waite, G.N.; Egot-Lemaire, S.; Bouwens, M.; Owegi, H.; Narotam, P.K.; Waite, L.R.

    2013-01-01

    Established clinical guidelines for treatment of severe traumatic brain injury aim at maintaining intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Recently, it has been shown that additional regulation of cerebral oxygen delivery helps to decrease patient mortality and leads to improved 6-month

  10. Low-oxygen tensions found in Salmonella-infected gut tissue boost Salmonella replication in macrophages by impairing antimicrobial activity and augmenting Salmonella virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennewein, Jonas; Matuszak, Jasmin; Walter, Steffi; Felmy, Boas; Gendera, Kathrin; Schatz, Valentin; Nowottny, Monika; Liebsch, Gregor; Hensel, Michael; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Gerlach, Roman G; Jantsch, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    In Salmonella infection, the Salmonella pathogenicity island-2 (SPI-2)-encoded type three secretion system (T3SS2) is of key importance for systemic disease and survival in host cells. For instance, in the streptomycin-pretreated mouse model SPI-2-dependent Salmonella replication in lamina propria CD11c(-)CXCR1(-) monocytic phagocytes/macrophages (MΦ) is required for the development of colitis. In addition, containment of intracellular Salmonella in the gut critically depends on the antimicrobial effects of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX), and possibly type 2 nitric oxide synthase (NOS2). For both antimicrobial enzyme complexes, oxygen is an essential substrate. However, the amount of available oxygen upon enteroinvasive Salmonella infection in the gut tissue and its impact on Salmonella-MΦ interactions was unknown. Therefore, we measured the gut tissue oxygen levels in a model of Salmonella enterocolitis using luminescence two-dimensional in vivo oxygen imaging. We found that gut tissue oxygen levels dropped from ∼78 Torr (∼11% O2) to values of ∼16 Torr (∼2% O2) during infection. Because in vivo virulence of Salmonella depends on the Salmonella survival in MΦ, Salmonella-MΦ interaction was analysed under such low oxygen values. These experiments revealed an increased intracellular replication and survival of wild-type and t3ss2 non-expressing Salmonella. These findings were paralleled by blunted nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and reduced Salmonella ROS perception. In addition, hypoxia enhanced SPI-2 transcription and translocation of SPI-2-encoded virulence protein. Neither pharmacological blockade of PHOX and NOS2 nor impairment of T3SS2 virulence function alone mimicked the effect of hypoxia on Salmonella replication under normoxic conditions. However, if t3ss2 non-expressing Salmonella were used, hypoxia did not further enhance Salmonella recovery in a PHOX and NOS2-deficient situation. Hence, these data suggest that

  11. Physiology of Aspergillus niger in Oxygen-Limited Continuous Cultures: Influence of Aeration, Carbon Source Concentration and Dilution Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diano, Audrey; Peeters, J.; Dynesen, Jens Østergaard

    2009-01-01

    In industrial production of enzymes using the filamentous fungus Aspergilhis niger supply of sufficient oxygen is often a limitation, resulting in the formation of by-products such as polyols. In order to identify the mechanisms behind formation of the different by-products we studied the effect...... of low oxygen availability, at different carbon source concentrations and at different specific growth rates, on the metabolism of A. niger, using continuous cultures. The results show that there is an increase in the production of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates at low oxygen concentrations...

  12. On developing a thesis for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility fellowship: a case study of ultra-low (2%) oxygen tension for extended culture of human embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaser, Daniel J

    2017-03-01

    Fellows in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility training are expected to complete 18 months of clinical, basic, or epidemiological research. The goal of this research is not only to provide the basis for the thesis section of the oral board exam but also to spark interest in reproductive medicine research and to provide the next generation of physician-scientists with a foundational experience in research design and implementation. Incoming fellows often have varying degrees of training in research methodology and, likewise, different career goals. Ideally, selection of a thesis topic and mentor should be geared toward defining an "answerable" question and building a practical skill set for future investigation. This contribution to the JARG Young Investigator's Forum revisits the steps of the scientific method through the lens of one recently graduated fellow and his project aimed to test the hypothesis that "sequential oxygen exposure (5% from days 1 to 3, then 2% from days 3 to 5) improves blastocyst yield and quality compared to continuous exposure to 5% oxygen among human preimplantation embryos."

  13. Oxygen consumption, oxygen cost and physiological cost index in polio survivors: a comparison of walking without orthosis, with an ordinary or a carbon-fibre reinforced plastic knee-ankle-foot orthosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachisuka, Kenji; Makino, Kenichiro; Wada, Futoshi; Saeki, Satoru; Yoshimoto, Nami

    2007-10-01

    To examine, for polio survivors, whether walking with a carbon-fibre reinforced plastic knee-ankle-foot orthosis (carbon KAFO) is more efficient than walking with an ordinary KAFO or without an orthosis. Consecutive sample. Post-polio clinic, University Hospital of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka, Japan. Eleven polio survivors who had a carbon KAFO prescribed at the post-polio clinic. A carbon KAFO was prescribed, fabricated and inspected. Oxygen consumption, oxygen cost and physiological cost index. An ordinary KAFO weighed 1403 g (standard deviation(SD) 157 g), whereas a carbon KAFO weighed 992 g (SD 168 g). Subjects walking with a carbon KAFO showed a tendency to increase step length, and to increase speed significantly compared with walking without an orthosis and with an ordinary KAFO (paired t-test, p KAFO (-9%, -14%, -15%; paired t-test, p KAFO was objectively better than those without an orthosis or with an ordinary KAFO.

  14. Quadratic function between arterial partial oxygen pressure and mortality risk in sepsis patients: an interaction with simplified acute physiology score

    OpenAIRE

    Zhongheng Zhang; Xuqing Ji

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen therapy is widely used in emergency and critical care settings, while there is little evidence on its real therapeutic effect. The study aimed to explore the impact of arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) on clinical outcomes in patients with sepsis. A large clinical database was employed for the study. Subjects meeting the diagnostic criteria of sepsis were eligible for the study. All measurements of PaO2 were extracted. The primary endpoint was death from any causes during hospita...

  15. Intra-operative tissue oxygen tension is increased by local insufflation of humidified-warm CO2 during open abdominal surgery in a rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean K Marshall

    Full Text Available Maintenance of high tissue oxygenation (PtO2 is recommended during surgery because PtO2 is highly predictive of surgical site infection and colonic anastomotic leakage. However, surgical site perfusion is often sub-optimal, creating an obstructive hurdle for traditional, systemically applied therapies to maintain or increase surgical site PtO2. This research tested the hypothesis that insufflation of humidified-warm CO2 into the abdominal cavity would increase sub-peritoneal PtO2 during open abdominal surgery.15 Wistar rats underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia. Three sets of randomized cross-over experiments were conducted in which the abdominal cavity was subjected to alternating exposure to 1 humidified-warm CO2 & ambient air; 2 humidified-warm CO2 & dry-cold CO2; and 3 dry-cold CO2 & ambient air. Sub-peritoneal PtO2 and tissue temperature were measured with a polarographic oxygen probe.Upon insufflation of humidified-warm CO2, PtO2 increased by 29.8 mmHg (SD 13.3; p<0.001, or 96.6% (SD 51.9, and tissue temperature by 3.0°C (SD 1.7 p<0.001, in comparison with exposure to ambient air. Smaller, but significant, increases in PtO2 were seen in experiments 2 and 3. Tissue temperature decreased upon exposure to dry-cold CO2 compared with ambient air (-1.4°C, SD 0.5, p = 0.001.In a rat model, insufflation of humidified-warm CO2 into the abdominal cavity during open abdominal surgery causes an immediate and potentially clinically significant increase in PtO2. The effect is an additive result of the delivery of CO2 and avoidance of evaporative cooling via the delivery of the CO2 gas humidified at body temperature.

  16. Effect of culture at low oxygen tension on the expression of heat shock proteins in a panel of melanoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Shipp

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Tumours are commonly hypoxic and this can be associated with aggressive tumour type, metastasis and resistance to therapy. Heat shock proteins (hsps are induced in response to hypoxia, provide cancer cells with protection against tumour-associated stressors and chaperone oncoproteins that drive tumour proliferation. This study examined the effect of different oxygen concentrations on the expression of hsps in melanoma cell lines. METHODS: Melanoma cell lines were cultured in 2% and 20% O(2. Expression of Hsp90, Hsp70, Hsp60, Hsp40 and Hsp32 proteins were determined by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Growth rates and viability were reduced in the majority of cell lines by culture in 2% O(2. Hsp expression was different in 2% compared to 20% O(2 and changes in Hsp90 expression correlated with cell line generation time (P<0.005 and viability (P<0.01. Greater total hsp expression correlated with improved viability in 2% but not 20% O(2 (P<0.05. Relative expression of the different hsps was consistent across cell lines and each correlated with the others (P = 0.0001 but not with Hsp32. Hsp expression was inversely correlated with cell line adhesion to laminin as well as collagen type IV and Breslow depth of the original primary tumour tissue (P<0.05, but not with Clark level or patient survival. All five hsps were identified on the cell surface. CONCLUSION: Culture in 2% O(2 variably altered hsp expression in a panel of melanoma cell lines. Hsp expression was associated with certain cell line characteristics and clinical parameters of the originating tumour.

  17. Skin tension related to tension reduction sutures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Han Joon; Kim, Kyung Yong; Han, Seung Ho; Hwang, Se Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the skin tension of several fascial/subcutaneous tensile reduction sutures. Six upper limbs and 8 lower limbs of 4 fresh cadavers were used. At the deltoid area (10 cm below the palpable acromion) and lateral thigh (midpoint from the palpable greater trochanter to the lateral border of the patella), and within a 3 × 6-cm fusiform area of skin, subcutaneous tissue defects were created. At the midpoint of the defect, a no. 5 silk suture was passed through the dermis at a 5-mm margin of the defect, and the defect was approximated. The initial tension to approximate the margins was measured using a tensiometer.The tension needed to approximate skin without any tension reduction suture (S) was 6.5 ± 4.6 N (Newton). The tensions needed to approximate superficial fascia (SF) and deep fascia (DF) were 7.8 ± 3.4 N and 10.3 ± 5.1 N, respectively. The tension needed to approximate the skin after approximating the SF was 4.1 ± 3.4 N. The tension needed to approximate the skin after approximating the DF was 4.9 ± 4.0 N. The tension reduction effect of approximating the SF was 38.8 ± 16.4% (2.4 ± 1.5 N, P = 0.000 [ANOVA, Scheffé]). The tension reduction effect of approximating the DF was 25.2% ± 21.9% (1.5 ± 1.4 N, P = 0.001 [ANOVA, Scheffé]). The reason for this is thought to be that the SF is located closely to the skin unlike the DF. The results of this study might be a basis for tension reduction sutures.

  18. Quadratic function between arterial partial oxygen pressure and mortality risk in sepsis patients: an interaction with simplified acute physiology score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Ji, Xuqing

    2016-10-13

    Oxygen therapy is widely used in emergency and critical care settings, while there is little evidence on its real therapeutic effect. The study aimed to explore the impact of arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) on clinical outcomes in patients with sepsis. A large clinical database was employed for the study. Subjects meeting the diagnostic criteria of sepsis were eligible for the study. All measurements of PaO2 were extracted. The primary endpoint was death from any causes during hospital stay. Survey data analysis was performed by using individual ICU admission as the primary sampling unit. Quadratic function was assumed for PaO2 and its interaction with other covariates were explored. A total of 199,125 PaO2 samples were identified for 11,002 ICU admissions. Each ICU stay comprised 18 PaO2 samples in average. The fitted multivariable model supported our hypothesis that the effect of PaO2 on mortality risk was in quadratic form. There was significant interaction between PaO2 and SAPS-I (p = 0.007). Furthermore, the main effect of PaO2 on SOFA score was nonlinear. The study shows that the effect of PaO2 on mortality risk is in quadratic function form, and there is significant interaction between PaO2 and severity of illness.

  19. Lifespan and oxidative stress show a non-linear response to atmospheric oxygen in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascón, Brenda; Harrison, Jon F

    2010-10-15

    Oxygen provides the substrate for most ATP production, but also serves as a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can induce cumulative macromolecular oxidative damage and cause aging. Pure oxygen atmospheres (100 kPa) are known to strongly reduce invertebrate lifespan and induce aging-related physiological changes. However, the nature of the relationship between atmospheric oxygen, oxidative stress, and lifespan across a range of oxygen levels is poorly known. Developmental responses are likely to play a strong role, as prior research has shown strong effects of rearing oxygen level on growth, size and respiratory system morphology. In this study, we examined (1) the effect of oxygen on adult longevity and (2) the effect of the oxygen concentration experienced by larvae on adult lifespan by rearing Drosophila melanogaster in three oxygen atmospheres throughout larval development (10, 21 and 40 kPa), then measuring the lifespan of adults in five oxygen tensions (2, 10, 21, 40, 100 kPa). We also assessed the rate of protein carbonyl production for flies kept at 2, 10, 21, 40 and 100 kPa as adults (all larvae reared in normoxia). The rearing of juveniles in varying oxygen treatments affected lifespan in a complex manner, and the effect of different oxygen tensions on adult lifespan was non-linear, with reduced longevity and heightened oxidative stress at extreme high and low atmospheric oxygen levels. Moderate hypoxia (10 kPa) extended maximum, but not mean lifespan.

  20. A quantitative method to monitor reactive oxygen species production by electron paramagnetic resonance in physiological and pathological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Gussoni, Maristella; Montorsi, Michela; Porcelli, Simone; Vezzoli, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The growing interest in the role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and in the assessment of oxidative stress in health and disease clashes with the lack of consensus on reliable quantitative noninvasive methods applicable. The study aimed at demonstrating that a recently developed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance microinvasive method provides direct evidence of the "instantaneous" presence of ROS returning absolute concentration levels that correlate with "a posteriori" assays of ROS-induced damage by means of biomarkers. The reliability of the choice to measure ROS production rate in human capillary blood rather than in plasma was tested (step I). A significant (P condition, were found significantly different (range 0.0001-0.05 P level). The comparison of the results with antioxidant capacity and oxidative damage biomarkers concentrations showed that all changes indicating increased oxidative stress are directly related to ROS production increase. Therefore, the adopted method may be an automated technique for a lot of routine in clinical trials.

  1. Metabolic profiling and flux analysis of MEL-2 human embryonic stem cells during exponential growth at physiological and atmospheric oxygen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jennifer; Quek, Lake-Ee; Titmarsh, Drew; Krömer, Jens O; Kao, Li-Pin; Nielsen, Lars; Wolvetang, Ernst; Cooper-White, Justin

    2014-01-01

    As human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) steadily progress towards regenerative medicine applications there is an increasing emphasis on the development of bioreactor platforms that enable expansion of these cells to clinically relevant numbers. Surprisingly little is known about the metabolic requirements of hESCs, precluding the rational design and optimisation of such platforms. In this study, we undertook an in-depth characterisation of MEL-2 hESC metabolic behaviour during the exponential growth phase, combining metabolic profiling and flux analysis tools at physiological (hypoxic) and atmospheric (normoxic) oxygen concentrations. To overcome variability in growth profiles and the problem of closing mass balances in a complex environment, we developed protocols to accurately measure uptake and production rates of metabolites, cell density, growth rate and biomass composition, and designed a metabolic flux analysis model for estimating internal rates. hESCs are commonly considered to be highly glycolytic with inactive or immature mitochondria, however, whilst the results of this study confirmed that glycolysis is indeed highly active, we show that at least in MEL-2 hESC, it is supported by the use of oxidative phosphorylation within the mitochondria utilising carbon sources, such as glutamine to maximise ATP production. Under both conditions, glycolysis was disconnected from the mitochondria with all of the glucose being converted to lactate. No difference in the growth rates of cells cultured under physiological or atmospheric oxygen concentrations was observed nor did this cause differences in fluxes through the majority of the internal metabolic pathways associated with biogenesis. These results suggest that hESCs display the conventional Warburg effect, with high aerobic activity despite high lactate production, challenging the idea of an anaerobic metabolism with low mitochondrial activity. The results of this study provide new insight that can be used in

  2. [Apneic oxygenation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, A V; Vyzhigina, M A; Parshin, V D; Fedorov, D S

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances in thoracic and tracheal surgery make the anaesthesiologist use different respiratory techniques during the operation. Apneic oxygenation is a one of alternative techniques. This method is relatively easy in use, does not require special expensive equipment and is the only possible technique in several clinical situations when other respiratory methods are undesirable or cannot be used. However there is no enough information about apneic oxygenation in Russian. This article reviews publications about apneic oxygenation. The review deals with experiments on diffusion respiration in animals, physiological changes during apneic oxygenation in man and defines clinical cases when apneic oxygenation can be used.

  3. Lignification and tension wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilate, Gilles; Chabbert, Brigitte; Cathala, Bernard; Yoshinaga, Arata; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Laurans, Françoise; Lapierre, Catherine; Ruel, Katia

    2004-01-01

    Hardwood trees are able to reorient their axes owing to tension wood differentiation. Tension wood is characterised by important ultrastructural modifications, such as the occurrence in a number of species, of an extra secondary wall layer, named gelatinous layer or G-layer, mainly constituted of cellulose microfibrils oriented nearly parallel to the fibre axis. This G-layer appears directly involved in the definition of tension wood mechanical properties. This review gathers the data available in the literature about lignification during tension wood formation. Potential roles for lignin in tension wood formation are inferred from biochemical, anatomical and mechanical studies, from the hypotheses proposed to describe tension wood function and from data coming from new research areas such as functional genomics.

  4. Numerical model of fluid flow and oxygen transport in a radial-flow microchannel containing hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledezma, G A; Folch, A; Bhatia, S N; Balis, U J; Yarmush, M L; Toner, M

    1999-02-01

    The incorporation of monolayers of cultured hepatocytes into an extracorporeal perfusion system has become a promising approach for the development of a temporary bioartificial liver (BAL) support system. In this paper we present a numerical investigation of the oxygen tension, shear stress, and pressure drop in a bioreactor for a BAL composed of plasma-perfused chambers containing monolayers of porcine hepatocytes. The chambers consist of microfabricated parallel disks with center-to-edge radial flow. The oxygen uptake rate (OUR), measured in vitro for porcine hepatocytes, was curve-fitted using Michaelis-Menten kinetics for simulation of the oxygen concentration profile. The effect of different parameters that may influence the oxygen transport inside the chambers, such as the plasma flow rate, the chamber height, the initial oxygen tension in the perfused plasma, the OUR, and K(m) was investigated. We found that both the plasma flow rate and the initial oxygen tension may have an important effect upon oxygen transport. Increasing the flow rate and/or the inlet oxygen tension resulted in improved oxygen transport to cells in the radial-flow microchannels, and allowed significantly greater diameter reactor without oxygen limitation to the hepatocytes. In the range investigated in this paper (10 microns < H < 100 microns), and for a constant plasma flow rate, the chamber height, H, had a negligible effect on the oxygen transport to hepatocytes. On the contrary, it strongly affected the mechanical stress on the cells that is also crucial for the successful design of the BAL reactors. A twofold decrease in chamber height from 50 to 25 microns produced approximately a fivefold increase in maximal shear stress at the inlet of the reactor from 2 to 10 dyn/cm2. Further decrease in chamber height resulted in shear stress values that are physiologically unrealistic. Therefore, the channel height needs to be carefully chosen in a BAL design to avoid deleterious hydrodynamic

  5. Surface Tensions and Their Variations with Temperature and Impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, S. C.; Fine, J.

    1985-01-01

    The surface tensions in this work were determined using the sessile drop technique. This method is based on a comparison of the profile of a liquid drop with the profile calculated by solving the Young-Laplace equation. The comparison can be made in several ways; the traditional Bashforth-Adams procedure was used in conjunction with recently calculated drop shape tables which virtually eliminate interpolation errors. Although previous study has found little difference in measurements with pure and oxygen doped silicon, there is other evidence suggesting that oxygen in dilute concentrations severely depresses the surface tension of silicon. The surface tension of liquid silicon in purified argon atmospheres was measured. A temperature coefficient near -0.28 mJ/square meters K was found. The experiments show a high sensitivity of the surface tension to what is believed are low concentrations of oxygen. Thus one cannot rule out some effect of low levels of oxygen in the results. However, the highest surface tension values obtained in conditions which minimized the residual oxygen pressure are in good agreement with a previous measurement in pure hydrogen. Therefore, depression of the surface tension by oxygen is insignificant in these measurements.

  6. Surface tension of molten tin investigated with sessile drop method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; YUAN Zhang-fu; FAN Jian-feng; KE Jia-jun

    2005-01-01

    The surface tension of molten tin was determined by a set of self-developed digital equipment with sessile drop method at oxygen partial pressure of 1.0 × 10-6 MPa under different temperatures, and the dependence of surface tension of molten tin on temperature was also discussed. The emphasis was placed on the comparison of surface tension of the same molten tin sample measured by using different equipments with sessile drop method. Results of the comparison indicate that the measurement results with sessile drop method under the approximate experimental conditions are coincident, and the self-developed digital equipment for surface tension measurement has higher stability and accuracy. The relationships of surface tension of molten tin and its temperature coefficient with temperature and oxygen partial pressure were also elucidated from the thermodynamic equilibrium analysis.

  7. Tension chylothorax following pneumonectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemang Yadav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-pneumonectomy chylothorax is an uncommon complication following surgery, with an estimated incidence of less than 0.7%. Post-pneumonectomy tension chylothorax, where rapid accumulation of chyle in the post-pneumonectomy space results in hemodynamic compromise, is exceedingly rare, with just 7 cases previously reported. All prior cases of tension chylothorax were managed operatively with decompressive chest tube placement followed by open thoracic duct repair. Our case is the first reported tension chylothorax to be managed conservatively by thoracostomy drainage coupled with a period of parenteral nutrition followed by a medium chain triglyceride-restricted diet.

  8. Enhanced Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging by Overproduction of Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Delays Postharvest Physiological Deterioration of Cassava Storage Roots1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia; Duan, Xiaoguang; Yang, Jun; Beeching, John R.; Zhang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) of cassava (Manihot esculenta) storage roots is the result of a rapid oxidative burst, which leads to discoloration of the vascular tissues due to the oxidation of phenolic compounds. In this study, coexpression of the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging enzymes copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (MeCu/ZnSOD) and catalase (MeCAT1) in transgenic cassava was used to explore the intrinsic relationship between ROS scavenging and PPD occurrence. Transgenic cassava plants integrated with the expression cassette p54::MeCu/ZnSOD-35S::MeCAT1 were confirmed by Southern-blot analysis. The expression of MeCu/ZnSOD and MeCAT1 was verified by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzymatic activity analysis both in the leaves and storage roots. Under exposure to the ROS-generating reagent methyl viologen or to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the transgenic plants showed higher enzymatic activities of SOD and CAT than the wild-type plants. Levels of malondialdehyde, chlorophyll degradation, lipid peroxidation, and H2O2 accumulation were dramatically reduced in the transgenic lines compared with the wild type. After harvest, the storage roots of transgenic cassava lines show a delay in their PPD response of at least 10 d, accompanied by less mitochondrial oxidation and H2O2 accumulation, compared with those of the wild type. We hypothesize that this is due to the combined ectopic expression of Cu/ZnSOD and CAT leading to an improved synergistic ROS-scavenging capacity of the roots. Our study not only sheds light on the mechanism of the PPD process but also develops an effective approach for delaying the occurrence of PPD in cassava. PMID:23344905

  9. Pressure Physiology: Studies of Acute and Chronic Exposures to Increased Pressures of Oxygen and Inert Gases in Diving, Decompression and Therapy of Decompression and Isobaric Gas Lesion Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-31

    Oxygen Exposures. Completion of Design for Human Studies of CNS, Pulmon - ary, and Cardiac Oxygen Tolerance Extension at 2.5 and 3.0 ATA. (Based on prior...intoxication at that pressure. Of all pulmon - ary function-indices that are known to be affected by oxygen to date, repeated post-exposure measurements of

  10. Blood Vessel Tension Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, a medical researcher is using a specially designed laboratory apparatus for measuring blood vessel tension. It was designed by Langley Research Center as a service to researchers of Norfolk General Hospital and Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. The investigators are studying how vascular smooth muscle-muscle in the walls of blood vessels-reacts to various stimulants, such as coffee, tea, alcohol or drugs. They sought help from Langley Research Center in devising a method of measuring the tension in blood vessel segments subjected to various stimuli. The task was complicated by the extremely small size of the specimens to be tested, blood vessel "loops" resembling small rubber bands, some only half a millimeter in diameter. Langley's Instrumentation Development Section responded with a miniaturized system whose key components are a "micropositioner" for stretching a length of blood vessel and a strain gage for measuring the smooth muscle tension developed. The micropositioner is a two-pronged holder. The loop of Mood vessel is hooked over the prongs and it is stretched by increasing the distance between the prongs in minute increments, fractions of a millimeter. At each increase, the tension developed is carefully measured. In some experiments, the holder and specimen are lowered into the test tubes shown, which contain a saline solution simulating body fluid; the effect of the compound on developed tension is then measured. The device has functioned well and the investigators say it has saved several months research time.

  11. 不同氧气浓度对绵羊体外受精胚胎凋亡的影响%Effect of Oxygen Tension on Apoptosis of Sheep invitro Fertilization (IVF) Embryo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈秀亮; 张春强; 赵德超; 张家新

    2013-01-01

    为了研究培养环境中的氧气浓度对绵羊体外受精胚胎发育的影响。比较了低氧环境(5%O2)和高氧环境(20%O2)中绵羊体外受精胚胎的发育能力和凋亡发生情况,同时利用Real-time PCR技术检测这两种氧气浓度下绵羊体外受精胚胎中凋亡相关基因Bax和Bcl-2的表达水平。结果表明:在这两种氧气浓度下发育的绵羊体外受精胚胎,细胞凋亡信号都起始于16-细胞期,且在胚胎各发育阶段发生凋亡的比率没有明显差异,但低氧环境组的囊胚发育率和囊胚细胞数都显著高于高氧环境组的(分别为45.9%、134;14.6%、106,P<0.05),且其囊胚细胞的凋亡指数也显著低于高氧环境组(分别为0.053、0.066,P<0.05);PCR的研究结果表明:不论是高氧环境还是低氧环境,在绵羊体外受精胚胎的各阶段都能检测到Bax和Bcl-2的表达。而且在囊胚阶段,低氧环境下的Bcl-2基因表达量明显高于高氧环境下的。低氧环境可以抑制绵羊胚胎细胞的凋亡,更有利于绵羊胚胎的发育。%To investigate the effect of O2 tension on sheep embryo development in vitro. The developmental ability and cell apoptosis of Sheep IVF (In vitro fertilization) embryo in low (5%) and high (20%) O2 tension environment were compared. The expression profiles of apoptotic related genes Bax and Bcl-2 in sheep IVF embryos were also detected by Real-time PCR. The results showed that:the apoptosis signal of the sheep IVF embryo was all commenced from the 16-cell stage under two O2 tension environment, there was no significant difference in the rate of apoptosis among respective developmental stages under two O2 tension environment, but the blastocyst development rate and cell number of blastocyst cultured in low O2 tension environment were significantly higher than those of high O2 tension environment (45.9%,134 and 14.6%,106, respectively P<0.05), and the apoptosis index of blastocyst

  12. Normal-tension glaucoma (Low-tension glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Douglas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is now considered an abnormal physiology in the optic nerve head that interacts with the level of intraocular pressure (IOP, with the degree and rate of damage depending on the IOP and presumably the degree of abnormal physiology. Diagnosis of normal-tension glaucoma (NTG, defined as glaucoma without a clearly abnormal IOP, depends on recognizing symptoms and signs associated with optic nerve vulnerability, in addition to absence of other explanations for disc abnormality and visual field loss. Among the findings are a halo or crescent of absence of retinal pigment epithelium around the disc, bilateral pre-chiasmal visual field defects, splinter hemorrhages at the disc margin, vascular dysregulation (low blood pressure, cold hands and feet, migraine headache with aura, and the like, or a family history of glaucoma. Possibly relevant, is a history of hemodynamic crisis, arterial obstructive disease, or sleep apnea. Neurological evaluation with imaging is needed only for atypical cases or ones that progress unexpectedly. Management follows the same principle of other chronic glaucomas, to lower the IOP by a substantial amount, enough to prevent disabling visual loss. However, many NTG cases are non-progressive. Therefore, it may often be wisein mild cases to determine whether the case is progressive and the rate of progression before deciding on how aggressivene to be with therapy. Efforts at neuroprotection and improvement in blood flow have not yet been shown effective.

  13. Surface Tension of Spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perko, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Concepts from physical chemistry and more specifically surface tension are introduced to spacetime. Lagrangian equations of motion for membranes of curved spacetime manifold are derived. The equations of motion in spatial directions are dispersion equations and can be rearranged to Schrodinger's equation where Plank's constant is related to membrane elastic modulus. The equation of motion in the time-direction has two immediately recognizable solutions: electromagnetic waves and corpuscles. The corpuscular membrane solution can assume different genus depending on quantized amounts of surface energy. A metric tensor that relates empty flat spacetime to energetic curved spacetime is found that satisfies general relativity. Application of the surface tension to quantum electrodynamics and implications for quantum chromodynamics are discussed. Although much work remains, it is suggested that spacetime surface tension may provide a classical explanation that combines general relativity with field theories in quantum mechanics and atomic particle physics.

  14. 运动后糖尿病患者下肢经皮氧分压变化的趋势%Post exercise trends of transcutaneous oxygen tension in lower limbs of diabetic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REGMI Nikhil; 孙子林; 杨兵全

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To study the influences of exercise on the trends of transcutaneous oxygen tension ( tcpO2 ) in lower limbs of patients with type 2 diabetes.Methods: Twelve diabetes ( test group ) and 3 healthy subjects ( control group) performed on the recumbent cycle ergometre (CE) with fixed seat.The tcpO2 was examined on the calf which represents local leg blood flow during exercise .Ankle brachial index (ABI) and quantitative sensory test ( QST) of the lower limbs were measured at resting state .According to the levels of subject's ABI, the diabetes were sub grouped into three scales (>0.9 and≤1.3, 0.7-0.9 and less 0.7).TcpO2 changes amongst the group were compared with different groups .Results:Pattern of post-exercise tcpO 2 change was unique for each sub group of diabetes in comparison to control group ( P0.9 and≤1.3 group were marked with increase in tcpO 2 at the beginning and returned to initial level soon after the exercise .Exercise resulted in early decrease with compensatory increase in ABI 0.7-0.9 diabetes and declined sharply with no compensatory phase in ABI less 0.7 group.Conclusion: The tcpO2 tested during the exercise can reveal the reserve function of the circulation of the limbs in patients with type 2 diabetes .%目的:研究运动对2型糖尿病患者下肢经皮氧分压( tcpO2)的影响,以探索运动时的tcpO2动态变化对糖尿病患者循环障碍的诊断价值。方法:用踩踏功率自行车运动干预方法观察了12例2型糖尿病患者(24条下肢)以及3名正常成人(6条下肢)腓肠肌tcpO2的变化情况,同时检测静息状态下的踝肱比( ABI)和定量振动阈值( QST)。根据患者ABI水平将患者肢体分成>0.9而≤1.3亚组、0.7~0.9亚组和<0.7亚组3组,比较分析各组tcpO2变化情况。结果:所有糖尿病患者的tcpO2水平在运动过程中均出现下降趋势,而正常组则出现上升趋势。在静息状态下,tcpO2运动前后的变化值

  15. Rein tension during canter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egenvall, Agneta; Eisersiö, Marie; Rhodin, Marie; van Weeren, P.R.; Roepstorff, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Riders generally use reins as a means for communication with the horse. At present, the signalling pattern is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to illustrate and analyse the rein tension patterns in a number of rider/horse combinations across a variety of exercises in the canter gait. Our

  16. Coulomb string tension, asymptotic string tension, and the gluon chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greensite, Jeff; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-02-01

    We compute, via numerical simulations, the nonperturbative Coulomb potential of pure SU(3) gauge theory in Coulomb gauge. We find that the Coulomb potential scales nicely in accordance with asymptotic freedom, that the Coulomb potential is linear in the infrared, and that the Coulomb string tension is about four times larger than the asymptotic string tension. We explain how it is possible that the asymptotic string tension can be lower than the Coulomb string tension by a factor of four.

  17. Obesity Decreases Perioperative Tissue Oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabon, Barbara; Nagele, Angelika; Reddy, Dayakar; Eagon, Chris; Fleshman, James W.; Sessler, Daniel I.; Kurz, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Background: Obesity is an important risk factor for surgical site infections. The incidence of surgical wound infections is directly related to tissue perfusion and oxygenation. Fat tissue mass expands without a concomitant increase in blood flow per cell, which might result in a relative hypoperfusion with decreased tissue oxygenation. Consequently, we tested the hypotheses that perioperative tissue oxygen tension is reduced in obese surgical patients. Furthermore, we compared the effect of supplemental oxygen administration on tissue oxygenation in obese and non-obese patients. Methods: Forty-six patients undergoing major abdominal surgery were assigned to one of two groups according to their body mass index (BMI): BMI < 30 kg/m2 (non-obese) and BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 (obese). Intraoperative oxygen administration was adjusted to arterial oxygen tensions of ≈150 mmHg and ≈300 mmHg in random order. Anesthesia technique and perioperative fluid management were standardized. Subcutaneous tissue oxygen tension was measured with a polarographic electrode positioned within a subcutaneous tonometer in the lateral upper arm during surgery, in the recovery room, and on the first postoperative day. Postoperative tissue oxygen was also measured adjacent to the wound. Data were compared with unpaired two tailed t-tests and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests; P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Intraoperative subcutaneous tissue oxygen tension was significantly less in the obese patients at baseline (36 vs. 57 mmHg, P = 0.002) and with supplemental oxygen administration (47 vs. 76 mmHg, P = 0.014). Immediate postoperative tissue oxygen tension was also significantly less in subcutaneous tissue of the upper arm (43 vs. 54 mmHg, P = 0.011) as well as near the incision (42 vs. 62 mmHg, P = 0.012) in obese patients. In contrast, tissue oxygen tension was comparable in each group on the first postoperative morning. Conclusion: Wound and tissue hypoxia were common in obese

  18. Precise spatial and temporal control of oxygen within in vitro brain slices via microfluidic gas channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Mauleon

    Full Text Available The acute brain slice preparation is an excellent model for studying the details of how neurons and neuronal tissue respond to a variety of different physiological conditions. But open slice chambers ideal for electrophysiological and imaging access have not allowed the precise spatiotemporal control of oxygen in a way that might realistically model stroke conditions. To address this problem, we have developed a microfluidic add-on to a commercially available perfusion chamber that diffuses oxygen throughout a thin membrane and directly to the brain slice. A microchannel enables rapid and efficient control of oxygen and can be modified to allow different regions of the slice to experience different oxygen conditions. Using this novel device, we show that we can obtain a stable and homogeneous oxygen environment throughout the brain slice and rapidly alter the oxygen tension in a hippocampal slice. We also show that we can impose different oxygen tensions on different regions of the slice preparation and measure two independent responses, which is not easily obtainable with current techniques.

  19. Evolution de la caracteristique courant-tension des varistances a base d'oxyde de zinc avec la pression partielle d'oxygene de l'atmosphere de frittage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Roger; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre; Graciet, Michel; Onillon, Marc; Hagenmuller, Paul

    1980-05-01

    In order to decrease the resistivity of zinc oxide grains which is responsible for the intensity limitation observed at high current densities, the dependence of current-voltage characteristics of zinc oxide based varistors on oxygen partial pressure has been investigated. From these studies it appears that the conductivity increases with decreasing oxygen partial pressure, this phenomenon being more significant at low voltages than at higher ones. These results can be related to a slight increase of the donor density, while the superficial trap density decreases strongly, involving a collapse of the barrier height and of the non-linearity exponent.

  20. The combined effects of oxygen availability and salinity on physiological responses and scope for growth in the green-lipped mussel Perna viridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youji; Hu, Menghong; Wong, Wai Hing; Shin, Paul K S; Cheung, Siu Gin

    2011-01-01

    Mussels were maintained for 4 weeks under different combinations of dissolved oxygen concentration (1.5, 3.0 and 6.0 mg O2 l(-1)) and salinity (15, 20, 25 and 30) in a 3×4 factorial design experiment. Clearance rate (CR), absorption efficiency (AE), respiration rate (RR) and scope for growth (SFG) decreased with decreasing salinity and dissolved oxygen concentration (DO), while excretion rate (ER) increased with decreasing salinity and increasing DO. The O:N ratio was Perna viridis in Hong Kong waters and provide guidelines for mussel culture site selection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Fermor

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO, a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O2, while the deep zone exists at less than 1% O2. Furthermore, oxygen tension can alter matrix synthesis, and the material properties of articular cartilage in vitro.The increase in nitric oxide associated with arthritis can be caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines and mechanical stress. Oxygen tension significantly alters endogenous NO production in articular cartilage, as well as the stimulation of NO in response to both mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines also increase the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. There is a complex interaction between NO and PGE2, and oxygen tension can alter this interaction. These findings suggest that the relatively low levels of oxygen within the joint may have significant influences on the metabolic activity, and inflammatory response of cartilage as compared to ambient levels. A better understanding of the role of oxygen in the production of inflammatory mediators in response to mechanical loading, or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention in arthritis.

  2. Pre-oxygenation and apnoea in pregnancy: changes during labour and with obstetric morbidity in a computational simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, S H; Bogod, D G; Hardman, J G

    2009-04-01

    Using the Nottingham Physiology Simulator, we investigated the effects on pre-oxygenation and apnoea during rapid sequence induction of labour, obesity, sepsis, pre-eclampsia, maternal haemorrhage and multiple pregnancy in term pregnancy. Pre-oxygenation with 100% oxygen was followed by simulated rapid sequence induction when end-tidal nitrogen tension was less than 1 kPa, and apnoea. Labour, morbid obesity and sepsis accelerated pre-oxygenation and de-oxygenation during apnoea. Fastest pre-oxygenation was in labour, with 95% of the maximum change in expired oxygen tension occurring in 47 s, compared to 97 s in a standard pregnant subject. The labouring subject with a body mass index of 50 kg x m(-2) demonstrated the fastest desaturation, the time taken to fall to an arterial saturation prolonged pre-oxygenation and tolerance to apnoea. Maternal haemorrhage and multiple pregnancy had minor effects. Our results inform the risk-benefit comparison of the anaesthetic options for Caesarean section.

  3. Modeling spatial distribution of oxygen in 3d culture of islet beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McReynolds, John; Wen, Yu; Li, Xiaofei; Guan, Jianjun; Jin, Sha

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) scaffold culture of pancreatic β-cell has been proven to be able to better mimic physiological conditions in the body. However, one critical issue with culturing pancreatic β-cells is that β-cells consume large amounts of oxygen, and hence insufficient oxygen supply in the culture leads to loss of β-cell mass and functions. This becomes more significant when cells are cultured in a 3D scaffold. In this study, in order to understand the effect of oxygen tension inside a cell-laden collagen culture on β-cell proliferation, a culture model with encapsulation of an oxygen-generator was established. The oxygen-generator was made by embedding hydrogen peroxide into nontoxic polydimethylsiloxane to avoid the toxicity of a chemical reaction in the β-cell culture. To examine the effectiveness of the oxygenation enabled 3D culture, the spatial-temporal distribution of oxygen tension inside a scaffold was evaluated by a mathematical modeling approach. Our simulation results indicated that an oxygenation-aided 3D culture would augment the oxygen supply required for the β-cells. Furthermore, we identified that cell seeding density and the capacity of the oxygenator are two critical parameters in the optimization of the culture. Notably, cell-laden scaffold cultures with an in situ oxygen supply significantly improved the β-cells' biological function. These β-cells possess high insulin secretion capacity. The results obtained in this work would provide valuable information for optimizing and encouraging functional β-cell cultures. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:221-228, 2017.

  4. Hypoxia Inducible Factor Pathway and Physiological Adaptation: A Cell Survival Pathway?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen homeostasis reflects the constant body requirement to generate energy. Hypoxia (0.1–1% O2, physioxia or physoxia (∼1–13%, and normoxia (∼20% are terms used to define oxygen concentration in the cellular environment. A decrease in oxygen (hypoxia or excess oxygen (hyperoxia could be deleterious for cellular adaptation and survival. Hypoxia can occur under both physiological (e.g., exercise, embryonic development, underwater diving, or high altitude and pathological conditions (e.g., inflammation, solid tumor formation, lung disease, or myocardial infarction. Hypoxia plays a key role in the pathophysiology of heart disease, cancers, stroke, and other causes of mortality. Hypoxia inducible factor(s (HIFs are key oxygen sensors that mediate the ability of the cell to cope with decreased oxygen tension. These transcription factors regulate cellular adaptation to hypoxia and protect cells by responding acutely and inducing production of endogenous metabolites and proteins to promptly regulate metabolic pathways. Here, we review the role of the HIF pathway as a metabolic adaptation pathway and how this pathway plays a role in cell survival. We emphasize the roles of the HIF pathway in physiological adaptation, cell death, pH regulation, and adaptation during exercise.

  5. Hypoxia Inducible Factor Pathway and Physiological Adaptation: A Cell Survival Pathway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hemant; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen homeostasis reflects the constant body requirement to generate energy. Hypoxia (0.1-1% O2), physioxia or physoxia (∼1-13%), and normoxia (∼20%) are terms used to define oxygen concentration in the cellular environment. A decrease in oxygen (hypoxia) or excess oxygen (hyperoxia) could be deleterious for cellular adaptation and survival. Hypoxia can occur under both physiological (e.g., exercise, embryonic development, underwater diving, or high altitude) and pathological conditions (e.g., inflammation, solid tumor formation, lung disease, or myocardial infarction). Hypoxia plays a key role in the pathophysiology of heart disease, cancers, stroke, and other causes of mortality. Hypoxia inducible factor(s) (HIFs) are key oxygen sensors that mediate the ability of the cell to cope with decreased oxygen tension. These transcription factors regulate cellular adaptation to hypoxia and protect cells by responding acutely and inducing production of endogenous metabolites and proteins to promptly regulate metabolic pathways. Here, we review the role of the HIF pathway as a metabolic adaptation pathway and how this pathway plays a role in cell survival. We emphasize the roles of the HIF pathway in physiological adaptation, cell death, pH regulation, and adaptation during exercise.

  6. Nasal Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregivers Contact ARS HOME ANATOMY Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ... Patient Education About this Website Font Size + - Home > ANATOMY > Nasal Physiology Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy ...

  7. Fragmentation in Biaxial Tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, G H; Archbold, G C; Hurricane, O A; Miller, P L

    2006-06-13

    We have carried out an experiment that places a ductile stainless steel in a state of biaxial tension at a high rate of strain. The loading of the ductile metal spherical cap is performed by the detonation of a high explosive layer with a conforming geometry to expand the metal radially outwards. Simulations of the loading and expansion of the metal predict strain rates that compare well with experimental observations. A high percentage of the HE loaded material was recovered through a soft capture process and characterization of the recovered fragments provided high quality data, including uniform strain prior to failure and fragment size. These data were used with a modified fragmentation model to determine a fragmentation energy.

  8. Tension-filled Governance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celik, Tim Holst

    Since the crisis-engrossed 1970s, and especially the 1990s, ‘governance’ has become a dominant concern and concept; notably, within particularly political science, a certain diagnosis explicitly or implicitly focused on a shift ‘from government to governance’ has become increasingly popular....... This study examines the governance phenomenon of the post-1970/1990s period from a state-situated and historically informed perspective. Specifically, taking initial analytical departure in an approach of the early 1970s associated with James O’Connor, Jürgen Habermas and Claus Offe focused...... on the statesituated tension-filled functional relationship between legitimation and accumulation, the study both historically and theoretically reworks this approach and reapplies it for the post-1970s/1990s governance period. It asks whether and to what extent governance has served as a distinctive post- 1970s/1990s...

  9. Social and environmental tensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saito, Moeko; Rutt, Rebecca Leigh; Chhetri, Bir Bahadur Khanal

    2014-01-01

    them, receive payments not only to address inequities but also for resource conservation. Drawing on a case study of a NORAD pilot project in Nepal, this paper investigates how affirmative measures adopted under the project affect different social actors and their perceptions and behaviors in relation......REDD + is a mitigation measure against global climate change that offers payments to developing countries based on the increased volume of forest carbon. It has been argued that affirmative measures should be adopted to ensure that communities, particularly the socially disadvantaged groups among...... to forests. Our case highlights the risk that the mere application of affirmative measures may give rise to difficult social and environmental tensions. Thus, this paper calls for such measures to effectively incorporate local perspectives in their designs and to be reflective, by allowing for regular...

  10. Kinetics of xylem loading, membrane potential maintenance, and sensitivity of K(+) -permeable channels to reactive oxygen species: physiological traits that differentiate salinity tolerance between pea and barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Lana; Pottosin, Igor; Zeng, Fanrong; Velarde-Buendía, Ana-Maria; Massart, Amandine; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Hariadi, Yuda; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-03-01

    Salt sensitive (pea) and salt tolerant (barley) species were used to understand the physiological basis of differential salinity tolerance in crops. Pea plants were much more efficient in restoring otherwise depolarized membrane potential thereby effectively decreasing K(+) efflux through depolarization-activated outward rectifying potassium channels. At the same time, pea root apex was 10-fold more sensitive to physiologically relevant H2 O2 concentration and accumulated larger amounts of H2 O2 under saline conditions. This resulted in a rapid loss of cell viability in the pea root apex. Barley plants rapidly loaded Na(+) into the xylem; this increase was only transient, and xylem and leaf Na(+) concentration remained at a steady level for weeks. On the contrary, pea plants restricted xylem Na(+) loading during the first few days of treatment but failed to prevent shoot Na(+) elevation in the long term. It is concluded that superior salinity tolerance of barley plants compared with pea is conferred by at least three different mechanisms: (1) efficient control of xylem Na(+) loading; (2) efficient control of H2 O2 accumulation and reduced sensitivity of non-selective cation channels to H2 O2 in the root apex; and (3) higher energy saving efficiency, with less ATP spent to maintain membrane potential under saline conditions.

  11. Research on Web Press Tension Control System

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Sheng Jiang; Zhang Chun Feng; Wang Zhong You; Li Qing Lin

    2016-01-01

    Tension control of press is a key and difficult point of the whole machine control. The stand or fall of tension is directly related to the quality of the products. According to the characteristics of the web press tension control, this paper expounds the main factors influencing tension and the purpose of tension control, researches on the tension control principle of web tape, analyzes control rule and control circuit of tension control system, illustrates the advantages of PID control law ...

  12. Estimation of the surface tension of ocular cornea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueyong; Ma, Jianguo; Lu, Rongsheng; Xia, Ruixue

    2008-12-01

    Considering the potential clinical importance, the surface tension of ocular cornea under the action of normal physiological intraocular pressure is estimated, and a novel technique and a simple mechanical model for determining the tension are also presented in this paper. An instrument embodying mainly a CCD camera, an optical staff gauge and a manometer was developed primarily to measure both the surface point displacement and intraocular pressure of the cornea. A simple theoretical model was used to characterize the tensions of the ocular corneas under the action of the intraocular pressure. Due to the difficulty in obtaining the human cornea, laboratory experiments were carried out on porcine cornea specimens. The thickness of the specimens was accurately measured by optical coherence tomography. The matrix and collagen properties within the corneal tissue were manifested in the experiment. Experimental results on porcine corneas showed that the present technique is applicable to estimate the surface tension. In the normal physiological intraocular pressure range, both meridian and circumference tensions of the porcine corneas along the radial coordinate distribute are not uniform.

  13. Research on Web Press Tension Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Sheng Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tension control of press is a key and difficult point of the whole machine control. The stand or fall of tension is directly related to the quality of the products. According to the characteristics of the web press tension control, this paper expounds the main factors influencing tension and the purpose of tension control, researches on the tension control principle of web tape, analyzes control rule and control circuit of tension control system, illustrates the advantages of PID control law adopted in the tension control system, and concludes the influencing factors of paper tape tension control system and the corresponding problems needed to solve in the control.

  14. Longwall AFC chain tension meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Lugg; Zhiqiang Guan; Bart Pienaar [CRC Mining (Australia)

    2008-02-15

    Evaluation of the downtime statistics of two longwall mines studied as part of the Landmark Automation Project showed that AFC (Armoured Face Conveyor) and BSL (Beam Stage Loader) chain related failures accounted for 27% of all downtime. A chain tension meter was designed, certified Ex ia for use in ERZ0 sections of Australian coal mines and successfully field trialled on a longwall face during production. The dynamic behaviour and unequal sharing of load between the chains were recorded and found to be significant. The changing format of tension distribution around the conveyor as it is loaded was recorded and the implications of the change in the location of the point of minimum tension from tailgate to maingate as the conveyor is unloaded emphasised. The trial was run monitoring AFC chain tensions over a few shifts. The project successfully demonstrated that the measurement of AFC chain tensions on a working face can be achieved reliably.

  15. Inadequate cerebral oxygen delivery and central fatigue during strenuous exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Rasmussen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Under resting conditions, the brain is protected against hypoxia because cerebral blood flow increases when the arterial oxygen tension becomes low. However, during strenuous exercise, hyperventilation lowers the arterial carbon dioxide tension and blunts the increase in cerebral blood flow, which...... can lead to an inadequate oxygen delivery to the brain and contribute to the development of fatigue....

  16. Cadmium-Induced Upregulation of Lipid Peroxidation and Reactive Oxygen Species Caused Physiological, Biochemical, and Ultrastructural Changes in Upland Cotton Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Daud Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd toxicity was investigated in cotton cultivar (ZMS-49 using physiological, ultrastructural, and biochemical parameters. Biomass-based tolerance index decreased, and water contents increased at 500 μM Cd. Photosynthetic efficiency determined by chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic pigments declined under Cd stress. Cd contents were more in roots than shoots. A significant decrease in nutrient levels was found in roots and stem. A significant decrease in nutrient levels was found in roots and stems. In response to Cd stress, more MDA and ROS contents were produced in leaves than in other parts of the seedlings. Total soluble proteins were reduced in all parts except in roots at 500 μM Cd. Oxidative metabolism was higher in leaves than aerial parts of the plant. There were insignificant alterations in roots and leaves ultrastructures such as a little increase in nucleoli, vacuoles, starch granules, and plastoglobuli in Cd-imposed stressful conditions. Scanning micrographs at 500 μM Cd showed a reduced number of stomata as well as near absence of closed stomata. Cd depositions were located in cell wall, vacuoles, and intracellular spaces using TEM-EDX technology. Upregulation of oxidative metabolism, less ultrastructural modification, and Cd deposition in dead parts of cells show that ZMS-49 has genetic potential to resist Cd stress, which need to be explored.

  17. Tension-related activity in the orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala: an fMRI study with music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehne, Moritz; Rohrmeier, Martin; Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Tonal music is characterized by a continuous flow of tension and resolution. This flow of tension and resolution is closely related to processes of expectancy and prediction and is a key mediator of music-evoked emotions. However, the neural correlates of subjectively experienced tension and resolution have not yet been investigated. We acquired continuous ratings of musical tension for four piano pieces. In a subsequent functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment, we identified blood oxygen level-dependent signal increases related to musical tension in the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (pars orbitalis of the inferior frontal gyrus). In addition, a region of interest analysis in bilateral amygdala showed activation in the right superficial amygdala during periods of increasing tension (compared with decreasing tension). This is the first neuroimaging study investigating the time-varying changes of the emotional experience of musical tension, revealing brain activity in key areas of affective processing.

  18. Bond Tension in Tethered Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheiko, Sergei S; Panyukov, Sergey; Rubinstein, Michael

    2011-06-14

    The paper presents scaling analysis of mechanical tension generated in densely branched macromolecules tethered to a solid substrate with a short linker. Steric repulsion between branches results in z-fold amplification of tension in the linker, where z is the number of chain-like arms. At large z ~ 100-1000, the generated tension may exceed the strength of covalent bonds and sever the linker. Two types of molecular architectures were considered: polymer stars and polymer "bottlebrushes" tethered to a solid substrate. Depending on the grafting density, one distinguishes the so-called mushroom, loose grafting, and dense grafting regimes. In isolated (mushroom) and loosely tethered bottlebrushes, the linker tension is by a factor of [Formula: see text] smaller than the tension in a tethered star with the same number of arms z. In densely tethered stars, the effect of interchain distance (d) and number of arms (z) on the magnitude of linker tension is given by f ≅ f0z(3/2)(b/d) for stars in a solvent environment and f ≅ f0z(2) (b/d)(2) for dry stars, where b is the Kuhn length and f0 ≅ kBT/b is intrinsic bond tension. These relations are also valid for tethered bottlebrushes with long side chains. However, unlike molecular stars, bottlebrushes demonstrate variation of tension along the backbone f ≅ f0s z(1/2) / d as a function of distance s from the free end of the backbone. In dense brushes [Formula: see text] with z ≅ 1000, the backbone tension increases from f ≅ f0 = 1 pN at the free end of the backbone (s ≅ b) to its maximum f ≅ zf0 ≅ 1 nN at the linker to the substrate (s ≅ zb).

  19. Nitric oxide formation from the reaction of nitrite with carp and rabbit hemoglobin at intermediate oxygen saturations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2008-01-01

    The nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin has received much recent interest because the nitric oxide produced in this reaction may participate in blood flow regulation during hypoxia. The present study used spectral deconvolution to characterize the reaction of nitrite with carp and rabbit...... hemoglobin at different constant oxygen tensions that generate the full range of physiological relevant oxygen saturations. Carp is a hypoxia-tolerant species with very high hemoglobin oxygen affinity, and the high R-state character and low redox potential of the hemoglobin is hypothesized to promote...... NO generation from nitrite. The reaction of nitrite with deoxyhemoglobin leads to a 1 : 1 formation of nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin in both species. At intermediate oxygen saturations, the reaction with deoxyhemoglobin is clearly favored over that with oxyhemoglobin, and the oxyhemoglobin reaction...

  20. Cell physiology of mortality and immortality in a Nicotiana interspecific F1 hybrid complies with the quantitative balance between reactive oxygen and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Shomura, Sachiko; Mino, Masanobu

    2017-03-01

    The cultured cell line, GTH4, of an interspecific F1 hybrid between Nicotiana gossei Domin and N. tabacum L. died after a shift in temperature from 37°C to 26°C. Fluctuations in the cellular amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) were detected in GTH4 after the temperature shift, but not in the mutant, GTH4S, which did not die at 26°C presumably due to the lack of genetic factors involved in cell death. The removal of ROS or NO suppressed cell death in GTH4, suggesting that ROS and NO both acted as mediators of cell death. However, excess amounts of the superoxide anion (O2(-)) or NO alleviated cell death. A series of experiments using generators and scavengers of ROS and NO showed that O2(-) affected the cellular levels of NO, and vice versa, indicating that a quantitative balance between O2(-) and NO was important for hybrid cell death. The combination of NO and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was necessary and sufficient to initiate cell death in GTH4 and GTH4S. Hypoxia, which suppressed cell death in GTH4 at 26°C, reduced the generation of H2O2 and NO, but allowed for the production of O2(-), which acted as a suppressor and/or modulator of cell death. The activation of MAPK was involved in the generation of H2O2 in GTG4 cells under normoxic conditions, but promoted O2(-) generation under hypoxic conditions. More protective cellular conditions against ROS, as estimated by the expression levels of genes for ROS-scavenging enzymes, may be involved in the mechanisms responsible for the low cell death rate of GTH4 under hypoxic conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Giant bullae mimicking tension pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Erbey

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Giant bullae may mimic tension pneumothorax radiologicallyso that it may expand completely to hemithorax,increase of radiolucency mediastinal shift, flattening ofdiaphragm and printing on trachea. Sixty one year oldmale patient with giant bullae misdiagnosed as tensionpneumothorax and underwent to tube thoracostomy. Thedifferential diagnosis of giant bullae and tension pneumothoraxmay be confusing. The therapeutic approaches ofthese two radiologically similar entities differ significantly.Thus proper physical assessment and radiological examinationis crucial in the differential diagnosis and computedtomography examination should be performed before theadjustment of therapy. J Clin Exp Invest 2012; 3(4: 548-551Key words: Tension pneumothorax, giant bullae, computedtomography, tube thoracostomy

  2. Do optimal prognostic thresholds in continuous physiological variables really exist? Analysis of origin of apparent thresholds, with systematic review for peak oxygen consumption, ejection fraction and BNP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Giannoni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinicians are sometimes advised to make decisions using thresholds in measured variables, derived from prognostic studies. OBJECTIVES: We studied why there are conflicting apparently-optimal prognostic thresholds, for example in exercise peak oxygen uptake (pVO2, ejection fraction (EF, and Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP in heart failure (HF. DATA SOURCES AND ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: Studies testing pVO2, EF or BNP prognostic thresholds in heart failure, published between 1990 and 2010, listed on Pubmed. METHODS: First, we examined studies testing pVO2, EF or BNP prognostic thresholds. Second, we created repeated simulations of 1500 patients to identify whether an apparently-optimal prognostic threshold indicates step change in risk. RESULTS: 33 studies (8946 patients tested a pVO2 threshold. 18 found it prognostically significant: the actual reported threshold ranged widely (10-18 ml/kg/min but was overwhelmingly controlled by the individual study population's mean pVO2 (r = 0.86, p<0.00001. In contrast, the 15 negative publications were testing thresholds 199% further from their means (p = 0.0001. Likewise, of 35 EF studies (10220 patients, the thresholds in the 22 positive reports were strongly determined by study means (r = 0.90, p<0.0001. Similarly, in the 19 positives of 20 BNP studies (9725 patients: r = 0.86 (p<0.0001. Second, survival simulations always discovered a "most significant" threshold, even when there was definitely no step change in mortality. With linear increase in risk, the apparently-optimal threshold was always near the sample mean (r = 0.99, p<0.001. LIMITATIONS: This study cannot report the best threshold for any of these variables; instead it explains how common clinical research procedures routinely produce false thresholds. KEY FINDINGS: First, shifting (and/or disappearance of an apparently-optimal prognostic threshold is strongly determined by studies' average pVO2, EF or BNP. Second

  3. Horizon Thermodynamics and Gravitational Tension

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Srivastava, Y N

    2016-01-01

    We consider the thermodynamics of a horizon surface from the viewpoint of the vacuum tension $\\tau =(c^4/4G )$. Numerically, $\\tau \\approx 3.026\\times 10^{43}$ Newton. In order of magnitude, this is the tension that has been proposed for microscopic string models of gravity. However, after decades of hard work on string theory models of gravity, there is no firm scientific evidence that such models of gravity apply empirically. Our purpose is thereby to discuss the gravitational tension in terms of the conventional Einstein general theory of relativity that apparently does explain much and maybe all of presently known experimental gravity data. The central result is that matter on the horizon surface is bound by the entropy-area law by tension in the closely analogous sense that the Wilson action-area law also describes a surface confinement.

  4. BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING AND TENSION-TYPE HEADACHE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šecić, Ana; Cvjeticanin, Timon; Kes, Vanja Bašić

    2016-03-01

    Biofeedback is a training method, which connects physiological and psychological processes in a person for the purposes of improving his/her physical, emotional, mental and spiritual health. In biofeedback treatment, an active role of the patient is stressed for him/her to be able to actively control the physiological and emotional processes. The aim of biofeedback is to improve the conscious control of the individual's involuntary physiological activity. Research has shown that biofeedback, either applied alone or in combination with other behavioral therapies (techniques), is an effective treatment for various medical and psychological disorders, from headache and hypertension to temporomandibular and attention deficit disorders. More than 90% of adults experience headache once a year, which makes headache one of the most common symptoms and diagnoses in medicine. Tension-type headaches occur in at least 40% of the population and their impact on the health insurance costs and diminished productivity is significant. Studies have shown that clinical biofeedback training is effective in treating headaches. Moreover, the authors stress the need for additional research and further development of methodology for this kind of research.

  5. Using the 64-slice Perfusion CT to Evaluate the Oxygen Tension(pO2) in the Rabbit VX2 Tumor Model: An Experimental Study%64层灌注CT评价兔VX2体部肿瘤模型氧分压的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙昌进; 肖明勇; 阴俊; 于金明; 郞锦义; 王光辉; 李超; 李涛; 罗云秀; 吕海波; 张德康; 李彦; 黄建鸣

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of the 64-slice perfusion CT in the evaluation of the oxygen tension ( pO2 ) in the rabbit VX2 tumor model. Methods: Forty-five rabbit VX2 brain tumor model established successfully were examined with 64-detector row CT. Tumor specimens were assessed for the oxygen tension ( pO2 ) , perfusion, blood volume ( BV) , peak enhancement intensity ( PEI) and time to peak (TTP) , and Pearson correlation coefficients were conducted to represent the relationships between the perfusion parameters and pO2 of the tumor. pO2was measured by oxygen-sensitive electrodes guided by perfusion CT images. Results: Mean values for perfusion,BV,PEI, TTP and pO2 of the 45 tumors were 27. 102 ± 26. 723ml/min, 22. 1 96 ± 13. 680ml/100g,43. 456 ±28.73 HU, 38.823 ±14.759 sec,and 15.981 ± 14.815mmHg, respectively. BV,PEI, TTP were not significant correlated with pO2 (r =0.271, 0. 253 、- 0. 18 , P > 0. 05 ) , whereas positively correlation was found between perfusion with pO2 ( r = 0. 673, P = 0. 00 ). Conclusion: The perfusion value from 64-slice spiral CT perfusion imaging might to have ability to evaluate the tumor pO2%目的:利用64层灌注CT评价兔VX2肿瘤模型氧分压并与氧微电极法对照.方法:对45只成功建模兔VX2脑瘤模型行灌注CT检查.测量脑瘤兴趣区灌注值(perfusion)、血容量(blood volume,BV)、达峰时间(time to peak TTP)、最大峰值(peak enhancement intensity,PEI).结果与该兴趣区氧微电极法测得氧分压(PO2)对照.结果:45例成功建模兔VX2脑瘤兴趣区灌注值范围为1.3 ml/min~127.0 ml/min,平均为27.102 ml/min±26.723 ml/min;BV为1.2 ml/100g~53.1ml/100g,平均为22.196 ml/100g±13.680ml/100g,PEI为8.7 HU~124.6HU,平均为43.456 HU±28.73 HU; TTP为8.2 sec~62.5 sec,平均为38.823 sec±14.759 sec;对应区域PO2为0.14 mmHg~46.70mmHg,平均为15.981 mmHg±14.815mmHg.灌注值与对应区域PO2相关系数为0.673,有统计学意义(P=0.00).BV

  6. Spatial Variations in Vitreous Oxygen Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Karthik; Kang, Dongyang; Nazari, Hossein; Scianmarello, Nicholas; Cadenas, Enrique; Tai, Yu-Chong; Kashani, Amir; Humayun, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the spatial variation of vitreous oxygen consumption in enucleated porcine eyes. A custom made oxygen source was fabricated that could be localized to either the mid or posterior vitreous cavity and steady state vitreous oxygen tension was measured as a function of distance from the source using a commercially available probe. The reaction rate constant of ascorbate oxidation was estimated ex vivo by measuring the change in oxygen tension over time using vitreous harvested from porcine eyes. Vitreous ascorbate from mid and posterior vitreous was measured spectrophotometrically. When the oxygen source was placed in either the mid-vitreous (N = 6) or the posterior vitreous (N = 6), we measured a statistically significant decrease in vitreous oxygen tension as a function of distance from the oxygen source when compared to control experiments without an oxygen source; (p<0.005 for mid-vitreous and p<0.018 for posterior vitreous at all distances). The mid-vitreous oxygen tension change was significantly different from the posterior vitreous oxygen tension change at 2 and 3mm distances from the respective oxygen source (p<0.001). We also found a statistically significant lower concentration of ascorbate in the mid-vitreous as compared to posterior vitreous (p = 0.02). We determined the reaction rate constant, k = 1.61 M(-1) s(-1) ± 0.708 M(-1) s(-1) (SE), of the oxidation of ascorbate which was modeled following a second order rate equation. Our data demonstrates that vitreous oxygen consumption is higher in the posterior vitreous compared to the mid-vitreous. We also show spatial variations in vitreous ascorbate concentration.

  7. Air-breathing fishes in aquaculture. What can we learn from physiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, S; Wang, T; Jensen, A; Cong, N V; Huong, D T T; Phuong, N T; Bayley, M

    2014-03-01

    During the past decade, the culture of air-breathing fish species has increased dramatically and is now a significant global source of protein for human consumption. This development has generated a need for specific information on how to maximize growth and minimize the environmental effect of culture systems. Here, the existing data on metabolism in air-breathing fishes are reviewed, with the aim of shedding new light on the oxygen requirements of air-breathing fishes in aquaculture, reaching the conclusion that aquatic oxygenation is much more important than previously assumed. In addition, the possible effects on growth of the recurrent exposure to deep hypoxia and associated elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide, ammonia and nitrite, that occurs in the culture ponds used for air-breathing fishes, are discussed. Where data on air-breathing fishes are simply lacking, data for a few water-breathing species will be reviewed, to put the physiological effects into a growth perspective. It is argued that an understanding of air-breathing fishes' respiratory physiology, including metabolic rate, partitioning of oxygen uptake from air and water in facultative air breathers, the critical oxygen tension, can provide important input for the optimization of culture practices. Given the growing importance of air breathers in aquaculture production, there is an urgent need for further data on these issues.

  8. Oxygen-induced transcriptional dynamics in human osteoblasts are most prominent at the onset of mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaije, Claudia; van de Peppel, Jeroen; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2013-09-01

    Oxygen tension plays an important role in the regulation of cellular processes. During hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation, HSCs migrate from one stem cell niche to the next, each with a different oxygen tension that determines which signaling pathways are on and off, determining the differentiation stage of the cell. Oxygen tension influences osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. Low oxygen levels inhibit matrix formation and mineralization. We were interested in the regulatory mechanisms that underlie this inhibition and wondered whether a switch in oxygen tension could have varying effects depending on the differentiation phase of the osteoblasts. We performed an oxygen tension switch phase study in which we switched osteoblasts from high to low oxygen tension during their 3 week differentiation and mineralization process. We performed microarray expression profiling on samples collected during this 3 week period and analyzed biochemical and histo-chemical endpoint parameters to determine the effect of a switch in oxygen levels on mineralization. We found that low oxygen tension has the most profound impact on mineralization when administered during the period of matrix maturation. Additionally, a large set of genes was regulated by oxygen, independent of the differentiation phase. These genes were involved in cell metabolisms and matrix formation. Our study demonstrates that variation in oxygen tension strongly affects gene expression in differentiating osteoblasts. The magnitude of this change for either expression levels or the number of regulated probes, depends on the osteoblast differentiation stage, with the phase prior to the onset of mineralization being most sensitive.

  9. Ambient oxygen promotes tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Joong Sung

    Full Text Available Oxygen serves as an essential factor for oxidative stress, and it has been shown to be a mutagen in bacteria. While it is well established that ambient oxygen can also cause genomic instability in cultured mammalian cells, its effect on de novo tumorigenesis at the organismal level is unclear. Herein, by decreasing ambient oxygen exposure, we report a ∼50% increase in the median tumor-free survival time of p53-/- mice. In the thymus, reducing oxygen exposure decreased the levels of oxidative DNA damage and RAG recombinase, both of which are known to promote lymphomagenesis in p53-/- mice. Oxygen is further shown to be associated with genomic instability in two additional cancer models involving the APC tumor suppressor gene and chemical carcinogenesis. Together, these observations represent the first report directly testing the effect of ambient oxygen on de novo tumorigenesis and provide important physiologic evidence demonstrating its critical role in increasing genomic instability in vivo.

  10. Oxygen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  11. Cosmic Strings with Small Tension

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, Edi

    2009-01-01

    We describe cosmic F--term strings with exponentially small tension which are D3 branes wrapped on deformed $A_3$ singularities. We show that brane instanton effects which can be calculated after a geometric transition give rise to an exponentially small volume for the node on which the D3 branes wrap leading to a string with small tension. We generalize our description to the case of non--Abelian cosmic strings and argue that these strings are stable against monopole--anti monopole pair creation.

  12. Physiological Networks: towards systems physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Ronny P.; Bashan, Amir; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Havlin, Shlomo; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2012-02-01

    The human organism is an integrated network where complex physiologic systems, each with its own regulatory mechanisms, continuously interact, and where failure of one system can trigger a breakdown of the entire network. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse systems with different types of interactions is a challenge. Here, we develop a framework to probe interactions among diverse systems, and we identify a physiologic network. We find that each physiologic state is characterized by a specific network structure, demonstrating a robust interplay between network topology and function. Across physiologic states the network undergoes topological transitions associated with fast reorganization of physiologic interactions on time scales of a few minutes, indicating high network flexibility in response to perturbations. The proposed system-wide integrative approach may facilitate new dimensions to the field of systems physiology.

  13. Monitoring Cerebral Oxygenation in Neonates: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Laura Marie Louise; van Bel, Frank; Lemmers, Petra Maria Anna

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral oxygenation is not always reflected by systemic arterial oxygenation. Therefore, regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2) monitoring with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is of added value in neonatal intensive care. rScO2 represents oxygen supply to the brain, while cerebral fractional tissue oxygen extraction, which is the ratio between rScO2 and systemic arterial oxygen saturation, reflects cerebral oxygen utilization. The balance between oxygen supply and utilization provides insight in neonatal cerebral (patho-)physiology. This review highlights the potential and limitations of cerebral oxygenation monitoring with NIRS in the neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:28352624

  14. Membrane tension is a key determinant of bud morphology in clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    CERN Document Server

    Hassinger, Julian E; Drubin, David G; Rangamani, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    In clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), clathrin and various adaptor proteins coat a patch of the plasma membrane, which is reshaped to form a budded vesicle. Experimental studies have demonstrated that elevated membrane tension can inhibit bud formation by a clathrin coat. In this study, we investigate the impact of membrane tension on the mechanics of membrane budding by simulating clathrin coats that either grow in area or progressively induce greater curvature. At low membrane tension, progressively increasing the area of a curvature-generating coat causes the membrane to smoothly evolve from a flat to budded morphology, whereas the membrane remains essentially flat at high membrane tensions. Interestingly, at physiologically relevant, intermediate membrane tensions, the shape evolution of the membrane undergoes a snapthrough instability in which increasing coat area causes the membrane to "snap" from an open, U-shaped bud to a closed, $\\Omega$-shaped bud. This instability is accompanied by a large energy...

  15. Molecular modelling and simulation of the surface tension of real quadrupolar fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Werth, Stephan; Klein, Peter; Küfer, Karl-Heinz; Horsch, Martin; Hasse, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Molecular modelling and simulation of the surface tension of fluids with force fields is discussed. 29 real fluids are studied, including nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, propyne, propylene, propadiene, carbon disulfide, sulfur hexafluoride, and many refrigerants. The fluids are represented by two-centre Lennard-Jones plus point quadrupole models from the literature. These models were adjusted only to experimental data of the vapour pressure and saturated liquid density so that the results for the surface tension are predictions. The deviations between the predictions and experimental data for the surface tension are of the order of 20 percent. The surface tension is usually overestimated by the models. For further improvements, data on the surface tension can be included in the model development. A suitable strategy for this is multi-criteria optimization based on Pareto sets. This is demonstrated using the model for carbon d...

  16. Tension type headaches: a review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    23. Epidemiology. A wide variation in the prevalence of tension-type headaches .... intensity tending to be less in the morning, building up after noon, and reducing ... with a change in position or the start of Valsalva-like sneezing. • Associated ...

  17. Abolishing the maximum tension principle

    CERN Document Server

    Dabrowski, Mariusz P

    2015-01-01

    We find the series of example theories for which the relativistic limit of maximum tension $F_{max} = c^2/4G$ represented by the entropic force can be abolished. Among them the varying constants theories, some generalized entropy models applied both for cosmological and black hole horizons as well as some generalized uncertainty principle models.

  18. Abolishing the maximum tension principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz P. Da̧browski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We find the series of example theories for which the relativistic limit of maximum tension Fmax=c4/4G represented by the entropic force can be abolished. Among them the varying constants theories, some generalized entropy models applied both for cosmological and black hole horizons as well as some generalized uncertainty principle models.

  19. CALCULATION OF TENSION FORCE OF BELT CONVEYOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismet Ibishi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is done the explanation on tension fashion of the belt conveyor which is employed in Kosovo Energy Corporation – KEK, for coal transportation to provide electric power plant. The aim of the paper enables to recognize tension forces not to pass with deformation of belt so that this problem will damage the workingprocess. Work principle is based on initial tension and tension during working process. The fact is known that the tension starts from the carriage on the way to tension mechanization, so forces on the rope passing through pulley there has to dominate the friction coefficient. All this process is related to economy of transportationmechanism.

  20. Physiological responses to Tai Chi in stable patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhi-Hui; Guo, Hong-Xi; Lu, Gan; Zhang, Ning; He, Bai-Ting; Zhou, Lian; Luo, Y M; Polkey, M I

    2016-01-15

    We compared the physiological work, judged by oxygen uptake, esophageal pressure swing and diaphragm electromyography, elicited by Tai Chi compared with that elicited by constant rate treadmill walking at 60% of maximal load in eleven patients with COPD (Mean FEV1 61% predicted, FEV1/FVC 47%). Dynamic hyperinflation was assessed by inspiratory capacity and twitch quadriceps tension (TwQ) elicited by supramaximal magnetic stimulation of the femoral nerve was also measured before and after both exercises. The EMGdi and esophageal pressure at the end of exercise were similar for both treadmill exercise and Tai Chi (0.109±0.047 mV vs 0.118±0.061 mV for EMGdi and 22.3±7.1 cmH2O vs 21.9±8.1 cmH2O for esophageal pressure). Moreover the mean values of oxygen uptake during Tai Chi and treadmill exercise did not differ significantly: 11.3 ml/kg/min (51.1% of maximal oxygen uptake derived from incremental exercise) and 13.4 ml/kg/min (52.5%) respectively, p>0.05. Respiratory rate during Tai Chi was significantly lower than that during treadmill exercise. Both Tai Chi and treadmill exercise elicited a fall in IC at end exercise, indicating dynamic hyperinflation, but this was statistically significant only after treadmill exercise. TwQ decreased significantly after Tai Chi but not after treadmill. We conclude that Tai Chi constitutes a physiologically similar stimulus to treadmill exercise and may therefore be an acceptable modality for pulmonary rehabilitation which may be culturally more acceptable in some parts of the world.

  1. Underwound DNA under tension: L-DNA vs. plectoneme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Anmin; Kwon, Ah-Young; Johner, Albert; Hong, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Nam-Kyung

    2014-02-01

    In many biological processes DNA experiences force in the pN range and torque that underwinds it. Magnetic tweezers experiments show that the superhelicity(\\sigma) -extension curve, the so-called bell curve, is asymmetric with respect to the inversion of σ. We study the case of underwound DNA which was not addressed theoretically before. While the case of overwound DNA is fully explained by the formation of supercoil, the extension of underwound DNA reveals non-trivial tension dependence. We show that plectonemic coils form at moderate tension, whereas left-handed DNA, so-called “L-DNA”, prevails at high tension (above \\approx 0.5\\ \\text{pN} ). In a narrow but physiologically relevant crossover range of tension, that is between 0.4 pN and 0.7 pN, extra unwinding turns are statistically distributed to either plectoneme or L-DNA. In this regime the states of a torsionally stressed DNA should be most sensitive to external mechanical stimuli.

  2. Blood oxygen content in microliter samples using an easy-to-build galvanic oxygen cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, B R; Mills, C D

    1981-02-01

    We have designed a simple, inexpensive, easy-to-build and operate apparatus for measuring blood oxygen content. The galvanic oxygen cell (fuel cell) requires as little as 1 microliter of blood and has a measuring time of 1-3 min. It is well suited for measuring oxygen content in fluids low in oxygen inasmuch as the sensitivity of the instrument is variable. Either air or water (at a known temperature and oxygen tension) can be used for calibration. No significant differences in blood oxygen content measured with our cell or the Van Slyke manometric method were found.

  3. High Oxygen Concentrations Adversely Affect the Performance of Pulmonary Surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Craig D; Boloori-Zadeh, Parnian; Silva, Maricris R; Gouldstone, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    Although effective in the neonatal population, exogenous pulmonary surfactant has not demonstrated a benefit in pediatric and adult subjects with hypoxic lung injury despite a sound physiologic rationale. Importantly, neonatal surfactant replacement therapy is administered in conjunction with low fractional FIO2 while pediatric/adult therapy is administered with high FIO2 . We suspected a connection between FIO2 and surfactant performance. Therefore, we sought to assess a possible mechanism by which the activity of pulmonary surfactant is adversely affected by direct oxygen exposure in in vitro experiments. The mechanical performance of pulmonary surfactant was evaluated using 2 methods. First, Langmuir-Wilhelmy balance was utilized to study the reduction in surface area (δA) of surfactant to achieve a low bound value of surface tension after repeated compression and expansion cycles. Second, dynamic light scattering was utilized to measure the size of pulmonary surfactant particles in aqueous suspension. For both experiments, comparisons were made between surfactant exposed to 21% and 100% oxygen. The δA of surfactant was 21.1 ± 2.0% and 35.8 ± 2.0% during exposure to 21% and 100% oxygen, respectively (P = .02). Furthermore, dynamic light-scattering experiments revealed a micelle diameter of 336.0 ± 12.5 μm and 280.2 ± 11.0 μm in 21% and 100% oxygen, respectively (P < .001), corresponding to a ∼16% decrease in micelle diameter following exposure to 100% oxygen. The characteristics of pulmonary surfactant were adversely affected by short-term exposure to oxygen. Specifically, surface tension studies revealed that short-term exposure of surfactant film to high concentrations of oxygen expedited the frangibility of pulmonary surfactant, as shown with the δA. This suggests that reductions in pulmonary compliance and associated adverse effects could begin to take effect in a very short period of time. If these findings can be demonstrated in vivo, a role for

  4. Analysis of constant tension-induced rupture of lipid membranes using activation energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karal, Mohammad Abu Sayem; Levadnyy, Victor; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-05-11

    The stretching of biomembranes and lipid membranes plays important roles in various physiological and physicochemical phenomena. Here we analyzed the rate constant kp of constant tension-induced rupture of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) as a function of tension σ using their activation energy Ua. To determine the values of kp, we applied constant tension to a GUV membrane using the micropipette aspiration method and observed the rupture of GUVs, and then analyzed these data statistically. First, we investigated the temperature dependence of kp for GUVs of charged lipid membranes composed of negatively charged dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG) and electrically neutral dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC). By analyzing this result, the values of Ua of tension-induced rupture of DOPG/DOPC-GUVs were obtained. Ua decreased with an increase in σ, supporting the classical theory of tension-induced pore formation. The analysis of the relationship between Ua and σ using the theory on the electrostatic interaction effects on the tension-induced rupture of GUVs provided the equation of Ua including electrostatic interaction effects, which well fits the experimental data of the tension dependence of Ua. A constant which does not depend on tension, U0, was also found to contribute significantly to Ua. The Arrhenius equations for kp using the equation of Ua and the parameters determined by the above analysis fit well to the experimental data of the tension dependence of kp for DOPG/DOPC-GUVs as well as for DOPC-GUVs. On the basis of these results, we discussed the possible elementary processes underlying the tension-induced rupture of GUVs of lipid membranes. These results indicate that the Arrhenius equation using the experimentally determined Ua is useful in the analysis of tension-induced rupture of GUVs.

  5. Physiology of vitreous surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefánsson, Einar

    2009-02-01

    Vitreous surgery has various physiological and clinical consequences, both beneficial and harmful. Vitrectomy reduces the risk of retinal neovascularization, while increasing the risk of iris neovascularization, reduces macular edema and stimulates cataract formation. These clinical consequences may be understood with the help of classical laws of physics and physiology. The laws of Fick, Stokes-Einstein and Hagen-Poiseuille state that molecular transport by diffusion or convection is inversely related to the viscosity of the medium. When the vitreous gel is replaced with less viscous saline, the transport of all molecules, including oxygen and cytokines, is facilitated. Oxygen transport to ischemic retinal areas is improved, as is clearance of VEGF and other cytokines from these areas, thus reducing edema and neovascularization. At the same time, oxygen is transported faster down a concentration gradient from the anterior to the posterior segment, while VEGF moves in the opposite direction, making the anterior segment less oxygenated and with more VEGF, stimulating iris neovascularization. Silicone oil is the exception that proves the rule: it is more viscous than vitreous humour, re-establishes the transport barrier to oxygen and VEGF, and reduces the risk for iris neovascularization in the vitrectomized-lentectomized eye. Modern vitreous surgery involves a variety of treatment options in addition to vitrectomy itself, such as photocoagulation, anti-VEGF drugs, intravitreal steroids and release of vitreoretinal traction. A full understanding of these treatment modalities allows sensible combination of treatment options. Retinal photocoagulation has repeatedly been shown to improve retinal oxygenation, as does vitrectomy. Oxygen naturally reduces VEGF production and improves retinal hemodynamics. The VEGF-lowering effect of photocoagulation and vitrectomy can be augmented with anti-VEGF drugs and the permeability effect of VEGF reduced with corticosteroids

  6. Tensions of Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Robert

    I engaged with the top management team (TMT) and employees of American Cafes Corporation as an action/intervention researcher in the 20 months immediately following the TMT’s decision to formalize the company’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities. This led to the establishment...... CSR agenda is considered, which brings with it a multiplicity of substantively rational ends for which the corporation could pursue. I show the CSR bureaucracy can create a space for reflection in which the multiplicity of substantively rational ends can be considered, negotiated, and selected...... for reflection within the corporation. But I also show tensions can arise from the establishment of the CSR bureaucracy itself. This suggests the CSR bureaucracy itself resides in a tension....

  7. Introducing surface tension to spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perko, H. A.

    2017-05-01

    Concepts from physical chemistry of surfaces and surface tension are applied to spacetime. More specifically, spacetime is modeled as a spatial fluid continuum bound together by a multi-dimensional membrane of time. A metric tensor that relates empty flat spacetime to energetic curved spacetime is found. Equations of motion for an infinitesimal unit of spacetime are derived. The equation of motion in a time-like direction is a Klein-Gordon type equation. The equations of motion in space-like directions take the form of Schrodinger’s equation where Plank’s constant is related to membrane elastic modulus. Although much work remains, it is suggested that the spacetime surface tension may serve as a mechanical model for many phenomena in quantum mechanics and atomic particle physics.

  8. Robust Tensioned Kevlar Suspension Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Joseph B.; Naylor, Bret J.; Holmes, Warren A.

    2012-01-01

    One common but challenging problem in cryogenic engineering is to produce a mount that has excellent thermal isolation but is also rigid. Such mounts can be achieved by suspending the load from a network of fibers or strings held in tension. Kevlar fibers are often used for this purpose owing to their high strength and low thermal conductivity. A suite of compact design elements has been developed to improve the reliability of suspension systems made of Kevlar.

  9. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen on brain-body physiological functions of immigrators of plateau%高压氧对高原移居者脑-体生理能力改善的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马勇; 马广全; 王琦; 王达文; 高亮; 王宏运; 哈振德; 李彬; 崔建华

    2008-01-01

    Oblective To investigate effects of hyperbaric oxygen(HBO)on brain-body physiological functions of immigrators who immigrated from chafnpaign to different altitude plateau.Methods Sixty-healthy young men who immigrated to 3700 metres plateau before long were selected as subjects.who was 17 to 23 years old(average age 21.3±1.3).Sixty subjects were divided into two groups:one group treated with HBO and another one not treated with HBO.The former was randomly divided into A1(n=20)and B1 groups(n=10),and the latter,A2 group(n=20)and B2 group(n=10).After5 days when the young men in A1 and A2 groups had continued ascending at over 5000 metres altitude(5 100-5380 m),all indexes were examined under the quiescent condition.After 10 minutes when the young men in B1 and B2 groups had done load exercise on the sixth day at 3700 metres altitude,all indexes were examined.DDX-200 computer-aided muhi-function psychological-physiological test machine and YZ-B6 high-light source direct funduscope were used to observe dynamic state of retina,adaptive function of darkness was tested by luminous watch in dark room,and SaO2 was measured by ASC-545 hemo-oxygen equipment.Results Compared with group A2,the correct numbers of right-hand-left-foot-cross and left-hand-right-foot-cross movements in A1 group were significantly more (P<0.01),and the dark adaptation time,significantly shorter(P<0.05),and the level of SaO2,significantly higher(P<0.05).The retinal test results indicated that hypoxia extent in A1 group was lighter than that in A2 group.Compared with B2 group,the correct numbers of right-hand-left-foot-cross and left-hand-right-foot-cross movements in B1 group were significantly more(P<0.01),the dark adaptation time was significantly shorter (P<0.05),and the level of SaO2,significantly higher(P<0.05).The retinal test results indicated that hypoxia extent in B1 group was lighter than that in B2 group.Conclusions HBO could effectively improve brain-body physiological

  10. Mathematical physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Sneyd, James

    2009-01-01

    There has been a long history of interaction between mathematics and physiology. This book looks in detail at a wide selection of mathematical models in physiology, showing how physiological problems can be formulated and studied mathematically, and how such models give rise to interesting and challenging mathematical questions. With its coverage of many recent models it gives an overview of the field, while many older models are also discussed, to put the modern work in context. In this second edition the coverage of basic principles has been expanded to include such topics as stochastic differential equations, Markov models and Gibbs free energy, and the selection of models has also been expanded to include some of the basic models of fluid transport, respiration/perfusion, blood diseases, molecular motors, smooth muscle, neuroendrocine cells, the baroreceptor loop, turboglomerular oscillations, blood clotting and the retina. Owing to this extensive coverage, the second edition is published in two volumes. ...

  11. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequier, Laurance; Horton, Stephen B; McMullan, D Michael; Bartlett, Robert H

    2013-06-01

    The extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit is made of a number of components that have been customized to provide adequate tissue oxygen delivery in patients with severe cardiac and/or respiratory failure for a prolonged period of time (days to weeks). A standard extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuit consists of a mechanical blood pump, gas-exchange device, and a heat exchanger all connected together with circuit tubing. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuits can vary from simple to complex and may include a variety of blood flow and pressure monitors, continuous oxyhemoglobin saturation monitors, circuit access sites, and a bridge connecting the venous access and arterial infusion limbs of the circuit. Significant technical advancements have been made in the equipment available for short- and long-term extracorporeal membrane oxygenation applications. Contemporary extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuits have greater biocompatibility and allow for more prolonged cardiopulmonary support time while minimizing the procedure-related complications of bleeding, thrombosis, and other physiologic derangements, which were so common with the early application of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Modern era extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuitry and components are simpler, safer, more compact, and can be used across a wide variety of patient sizes from neonates to adults.

  12. Reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Russman, S.E.; Ellis, David H.; Gee, George F.; Mirande, Claire M.

    1996-01-01

    Conclusions: Although the general pattern of avian physiology applies to cranes, we have identified many physiological mechanisms (e.g., effects of disturbance) that need further study. Studies with cranes are expensive compared to those done with domestic fowl because of the crane's larger size, low reproductive rate, and delayed sexual maturity. To summarize, the crane reproductive system is composed of physiological and anatomical elements whose function is controlled by an integrated neural-endocrine system. Males generally produce semen at a younger age than when females lay eggs. Eggs are laid in clutches of two (1 to 3), and females will lay additional clutches if the preceding clutches are removed. Both sexes build nests and incubate the eggs. Molt begins during incubation and body molt may be completed annually in breeding pairs. However, remiges are replaced sequentially over 2 to 3 years, or abruptly every 2 to 3 years in other species. Most immature birds replace their juvenal remiges over a 2 to 3 year period. Stress interferes with reproduction in cranes by reducing egg production or terminating the reproductive effort. In other birds, stress elevates corticosterone levels and decreases LHRH release. We know little about the physiological response of cranes to stress.

  13. Exercise physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    The passing of Professor Bengt Saltin on September 12, 2014 truly marks the end of an era. As editor of the Journal of Applied Physiology and one of Bengt’s many collaborators and colleagues, I wanted the Journal to celebrate his many seminal contributions by means of an Editorial. Professor Bent...

  14. Experience with Early Enteral Feeding in a Patient with Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Lomivorotov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with the pathogenesis and early diagnosis of renal dysfunction in low and extremely low birth weight (ELBW premature neonates. Objective: to study the specific features of the mechanisms responsible for the development of acute renal failure (ARF in low and ELBW neonates and to use an analysis of oxygen status parameters as a method for early diagnosis of neonatal ARF. Subjects and methods. The study included 172 neonatal infants with a birth body weight of 800 to 1500 g. The values of blood gas composition and base-acid balance, and oxygen status were daily studied in all the children, by analyzing all the indices reflecting tissue hypoxia. Results. Analysis of oxygen status parameters in relation to a baby’s body weight revealed no considerable differences. The development of renal dysfunction and ARF in low and ELBW neonates was demonstrated to be most frequently caused by the progression of respiratory failure and tissue hypoxia, which suggests secondary renal lesion in the pattern of multiple organ dysfunction. It was ascertained that edema had a direct correlation with a physiological shunt fraction and oxygenation index and a moderate inverse correlation with blood oxygen tension and respiration index. In addition, an inverse correlation was found between the serum concentration of lactate and the daily volume of diuresis. The rate of hourly diuresis had a direct correlation with respiratory index and an inverse correlation with oxygenation index. Conclusion. Dysfunction of the kidneys and acute renal failure in neonatal infants in the pattern of multiple organ syndrome are secondary and closely related to the progres– sion of respiratory failure, as suggested by the oxygen status parameters that may be used for the prediction and early diagnosis or Key words: acute renal failure, renal dysfunction, neonaQtal infants, low and extremely low birth weight, hypoxia, oxygen status, multiple organ dysfunction. neonates. Key

  15. Oxygen sensing and conducted vasomotor responses in mouse cremaster arterioles in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Thuc Anh; Jensen, Lars Jørn; Riemann, Mads Achen

    2010-01-01

    This study examines mechanisms by which changes in tissue oxygen tension elicit vasomotor responses and whether localized changes in oxygen tension initiates conducted vasomotor responses in mouse cremaster arterioles. Intravital microscopy was used to visualize the mouse cremaster microcirculation....... The cremaster was superfused with Krebs' solution with different oxygen tensions, and a gas exchange chamber was used to induce localized changes in oxygen tension. In arterioles where red blood cells were removed by buffer perfusion, arterioles responded with same magnitudes of vasodilatation (DeltaD = 16.......0 +/- 4.9 mum) when changing from high (PO(2) = 242.5 +/- 13.3 mm Hg) to low (PO(2) = 22.5 +/- 4.8 mm Hg) oxygen tension as seen in the intact cremaster circulation (DeltaD = 18.7 +/- 1.0 mum). Blockade of NO synthases by L: -NAME and adenosine receptors by DPCPX had no effects on vasomotor responses...

  16. Axelrod's Model with Surface Tension

    CERN Document Server

    Pace, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    In this work we propose a subtle change in Axelrod's model for the dissemination of culture. The mechanism consists of excluding non-interacting neighbours from the set of neighbours out of which an agent is drawn for potential cultural interactions. Although the alteration proposed does not alter topologically the configuration space, it yields significant qualitative changes, specifically the emergence of surface tension, driving the system in some cases to metastable states. The transient behaviour is considerably richer, and cultural regions have become stable leading to the formation of different spatio-temporal structures. A new metastable "glassy" phase emerges between the globalised phase and the polarised, multicultural phase.

  17. Oxygen and Cell Fate Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-27

    embryonic cells such as OCT-4 and Rex -1 by RT-PCR (D’Ippolito et al. 2006; Grayson et al. 2006), as well as cell- surface marker SSEA-4 by fl uorescence...diaphysis. An in vitro and in vivo study in rats and rabbits . J. Bone Joint Surg., 53:719–28. Brighton, C.T. and Heppenstall, R.B. 1971b. Oxygen tension of

  18. The determination of optimal initial tension in rat coronary artery using wire myography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, N-N; Cao, L; Xiao, X; Li, S; Cao, Y-X

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the optimal initial tension, i.e. initial stretch for rat coronary artery when using the multi-wire myograph system. We used the normalization procedure to mimic physiological conditions and to stretch the coronary arterial segments to normalized internal circumference (IC(1)). It is determined the internal circumference when the vessel relaxed under a transmural pressure of 100 mm Hg (IC(100)), and the IC(1) is calculated by multiplying the IC(100) by a factor k. The impact of different factor k on the initial stretch and agonist-induced tension of coronary arteries were investigated. The results showed that the maximal agonist-induced tension was achieved at the factor k value of 0.90 and the initial stretch tension was given 1.16+/-0.04 mN/mm. The most appropriate factor k value was 0.90-0.95 and the most appropriate initial tension was 1.16-1.52 mN/mm. The equilibration time of the coronary artery segments should be at least 1.0 h. In the same optimal initial tension, the agonist-induced tension increased as equilibration time lengthened.

  19. Using oxygen at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxygen - home use; COPD - home oxygen; Chronic obstructive airways disease - home oxygen; Chronic obstructive lung disease - home oxygen; Chronic bronchitis - home oxygen; Emphysema - home oxygen; Chronic respiratory ...

  20. Update on normal tension glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotiranjan Mallick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal tension glaucoma (NTG is labelled when typical glaucomatous disc changes, visual field defects and open anterior chamber angles are associated with intraocular pressure (IOP constantly below 21 mmHg. Chronic low vascular perfusion, Raynaud's phenomenon, migraine, nocturnal systemic hypotension and over-treated systemic hypertension are the main causes of normal tension glaucoma. Goldmann applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, slit lamp biomicroscopy, optical coherence tomography and visual field analysis are the main tools of investigation for the diagnosis of NTG. Management follows the same principles of treatment for other chronic glaucomas: To reduce IOP by a substantial amount, sufficient to prevent disabling visual loss. Treatment is generally aimed to lower IOP by 30% from pre-existing levels to 12-14 mmHg. Betaxolol, brimonidine, prostaglandin analogues, trabeculectomy (in refractory cases, systemic calcium channel blockers (such as nifedipine and 24-hour monitoring of blood pressure are considered in the management of NTG. The present review summarises risk factors, causes, pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of NTG.

  1. Some physical, physiological and biochemical adaptations of ruminant livestock including buffaloes to different feeds and climates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Ørskov

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Some of the adaptations of ruminant livestock to climate and feed resources are discussed. 1. Physical. Various types of coat serve to protect animals from cold and from the sun’s heat. 2. Physiological. Large rumen volumes enables animals to consume large amounts of poor roughages; fat depots in distinct regions of the body allow them to withstand regulation and fluctuating supply of nutrients, seasonality of reproduction matches requirement to seasonal variation in food supply. 3. Biochemical. There are species differences in the ability to recycle N to the rumen (buffaloes in the requirement for glucose to accommodate several days of fasting (camels, and in adaptation to low atmospheric oxygen tension (yaks. Such adaptations are important and should be considered when animals exported to areas where climates and feeds are different.

  2. Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films

    CERN Document Server

    Adami, N

    2013-01-01

    Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films are experimentally investigated. Measurements are performed introducing deformable elastic objets in the films. The shape adopted by those objects set in the film can be related to the surface tension value at a given vertical position by numerical solving of adapted elasticity equations. We show that the observed dependency of the surface tension versus the vertical position in the soap film can be reproduced by simple modeling taking into account film thickness measurements.

  3. On Surface Tension for Compact Stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Sharma; S. D. Maharaj

    2007-06-01

    In an earlier analysis it was demonstrated that general relativity gives higher values of surface tension in strange stars with quark matter than neutron stars. We generate the modified Tolman–Oppenheimer–Volkoff equation to incorporate anisotropic matter and use this to show that pressure anisotropy provides for a wide range of behaviour in the surface tension than is the case with isotropic pressures. In particular, it is possible that anisotropy drastically decreases the value of the surface tension.

  4. HILBERTIAN APPROACH FOR UNIVARIATE SPLINE WITH TENSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Bouhamidi

    2001-01-01

    In this work,a new approach is proposed for constructing splines with tension.The basic idea is in the use of distributions theory,which allows us to define suitable Hilbert spaces in which the tension spline minimizes some energy functional.Classical orthogonal conditions and characterizations of the spline in terms of a fundamental solution of a differential operator are provided.An explicit representation of the tension spline is given.The tension spline can be computed by solving a linear system.Some numerical examples are given to illustrate this approach.

  5. Surface Tension Calculation of Undercooled Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the Butler equation and extrapolated thermodynamic data of undercooled alloys from those of liquid stable alloys, a method for surface tension calculation of undercooled alloys is proposed. The surface tensions of liquid stable and undercooled Ni-Cu (xNi=0.42) and Ni-Fe (xNi=0.3 and 0.7) alloys are calculated using STCBE (Surface Tension Calculation based on Butler Equation) program. The agreement between calculated values and experimental data is good enough, and the temperature dependence of the surface tension can be reasonable down to 150-200 K under the liquid temperature of the alloys.

  6. Large deflection analysis of a tension-foil bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrod, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are as follows: rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's. CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contacts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exist for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. Recently, a new tension-foil bearing configuration has been proposed for turbomachinery applications.

  7. Occupational physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Toomingas, Allan; Tornqvist, Ewa Wigaeus

    2011-01-01

    In a clear and accessible presentation, Occupational Physiology focuses on important issues in the modern working world. Exploring major public health problems-such as musculoskeletal disorders and stress-this book explains connections between work, well-being, and health based on up-to-date research in the field. It provides useful methods for risk assessment and guidelines on arranging a good working life from the perspective of the working individual, the company, and society as a whole.The book focuses on common, stressful situations in different professions. Reviewing bodily demands and r

  8. [Tension pneumomediastinum and tension pneumothorax following tracheal perforation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, C T; Tsokos, M; Kurz, S D; Kleber, C

    2015-07-01

    Tension pneumothorax can occur at any time during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with external cardiac massage and invasive ventilation either from primary or iatrogenic rib fractures with concomitant pleural or parenchymal injury. Airway injury can also cause tension pneumothorax during CPR. This article presents the case of a 41-year-old woman who suffered cardiopulmonary arrest after undergoing elective mandibular surgery. During CPR the upper airway could not be secured by orotracheal intubation due to massive craniofacial soft tissue swelling. A surgical airway was established with obviously unrecognized iatrogenic tracheal perforation and subsequent development of tension pneumomediastinum and tension pneumothorax during ventilation. Neither the tension pneumomediastinum nor the tension pneumothorax were decompressed and accordingly resuscitation efforts remained unsuccessful. This case illustrates the need for a structured approach to resuscitate patients with ventilation problems regarding decompression of tension pneumomediastinum and/or tension pneumothorax during CPR.

  9. The Plastic Tension Field Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    . The emphasis is attached to the presentation of a design method based on the diagonal tension field theory. Also, how to determine the load-carrying capacity of a given steel plate girder with transverse web stiffeners, is briefly presented. The load-carrying capacity may be predicted by applying both...... method. The method is based on the theory of plasticity and is analogous to the so-called diagonal compression field method developed for reinforced concrete beams with transverse stirrups, which is adopted in the common European concrete code (Eurocode 2). Many other theories have been developed......, but the method presented differs from these theories by incorporating the strength of the transverse stiffeners and by the assumption that the tensile bands may pass the transverse stiffeners, which often is observed in tests. Other methods have only dealt with a single web field between two stiffeners...

  10. Concentric and eccentric time-under-tension during strengthening exercises: Validity and reliability of stretch-sensor recordings from an elastic exercise-band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas Quaade

    2013-01-01

    Total, single repetition and contraction-phase specific (concentric and eccentric) time-under-tension (TUT) are important exercise-descriptors, as they are linked to the physiological and clinical response in exercise and rehabilitation.......Total, single repetition and contraction-phase specific (concentric and eccentric) time-under-tension (TUT) are important exercise-descriptors, as they are linked to the physiological and clinical response in exercise and rehabilitation....

  11. Cerebral oxygen delivery and consumption during evoked neural activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto L Vazquez

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Increases in neural activity evoke increases in the delivery and consumption of oxygen. Beyond observations of cerebral tissue and blood oxygen, the role and properties of cerebral oxygen delivery and consumption during changes in brain function are not well understood. This work overviews the current knowledge of functional oxygen delivery and consumption and introduces recent and preliminary findings to explore the mechanisms by which oxygen is delivered to tissue as well as the temporal dynamics of oxygen metabolism. Vascular oxygen tension measurements have shown that a relatively large amount of oxygen exits pial arterioles prior to capillaries. Additionally, increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF induced by evoked neural activation are accompanied by arterial vasodilation and also by increases in arteriolar oxygenation. This increase contributes not only to the down-stream delivery of oxygen to tissue, but also to delivery of additional oxygen to extra-vascular spaces surrounding the arterioles. On the other hand, the changes in tissue oxygen tension due to functional increases in oxygen consumption have been investigated using a method to suppress the evoked CBF response. The functional decreases in tissue oxygen tension induced by increases in oxygen consumption are slow to evoked changes in CBF under control conditions. Preliminary findings obtained using flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging suggest cellular oxidative metabolism changes at a faster rate than the average changes in tissue oxygen. These issues are important in the determination of the dynamic changes in tissue oxygen metabolism from hemoglobin-based imaging techniques such as blood oxygenation-level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI.

  12. Continuous assessment of oxygen saturation and subcutaneous oxygen tension after abdominal operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Ullstad, T; Larsen, P N

    1990-01-01

    O2, but not PscO2, followed the episodic variations in SpO2. PscO2 was 58 mmHg (46-69) on the second postoperative night and 61 mmHg (48-71) on the third postoperative night. PscO2 correlated with SpO2 in all but one patient who had lower PscO2 than expected from the measured SpO2 and estimated PaO2...

  13. Traumatic tension pneumocephalus: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubaker Al-Aieb

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: These are two rare cases with posttraumatic tension pneumocephalus treated conservatively with a favorable outcome. Early diagnosis of tension pneumocephalus is a crucial step to facilitate early recovery; however, the associated injuries need attention as they could influence the hospital course.

  14. Tension and robustness in multitasking cellular networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey V Wong

    Full Text Available Cellular networks multitask by exhibiting distinct, context-dependent dynamics. However, network states (parameters that generate a particular dynamic are often sub-optimal for others, defining a source of "tension" between them. Though multitasking is pervasive, it is not clear where tension arises, what consequences it has, and how it is resolved. We developed a generic computational framework to examine the source and consequences of tension between pairs of dynamics exhibited by the well-studied RB-E2F switch regulating cell cycle entry. We found that tension arose from task-dependent shifts in parameters associated with network modules. Although parameter sets common to distinct dynamics did exist, tension reduced both their accessibility and resilience to perturbation, indicating a trade-off between "one-size-fits-all" solutions and robustness. With high tension, robustness can be preserved by dynamic shifting of modules, enabling the network to toggle between tasks, and by increasing network complexity, in this case by gene duplication. We propose that tension is a general constraint on the architecture and operation of multitasking biological networks. To this end, our work provides a framework to quantify the extent of tension between any network dynamics and how it affects network robustness. Such analysis would suggest new ways to interfere with network elements to elucidate the design principles of cellular networks.

  15. Physiological Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eric D.

    The analysis of physiological sound in the peripheral auditory system solves three important problems. First, sound energy impinging on the head must be captured and presented to the transduction apparatus in the ear as a suitable mechanical signal; second, this mechanical signal needs to be transduced into a neural representation that can be used by the brain; third, the resulting neural representation needs to be analyzed by central neurons to extract information useful to the animal. This chapter provides an overview of some aspects of the first two of these processes. The description is entirely focused on the mammalian auditory system, primarily on human hearing and on the hearing of a few commonly used laboratory animals (mainly rodents and carnivores). Useful summaries of non-mammalian hearing are available [1]. Because of the large size of the literature, review papers are referenced wherever possible.

  16. Oxygen status during haemodialysis. The Cord-Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A L; Jensen, H Æ; Hegbrant, J;

    1995-01-01

    Hypoxia during haemodialysis, mainly acetate, has been reported several times. In our study we have monitored oxygen status during 258 bicarbonate haemodialyses. A significant drop below 80 mmHg in mean oxygen tension occurred. Mean oxygen saturation reflected this drop but did not reach levels...... below 90%. The mean oxygen concentration was on the whole critical low, though slightly increasing during each haemodialysis session due to ultrafiltration. It is concluded that both hypoxia and hypoxaemia do occur during bicarbonate haemodialysis. To a group of patients generally having limited cardiac...... reserves, a poor oxygen status is a potentially serious complication to haemodialysis. Monitoring oxygen status is thus advisable....

  17. Oxygen status during haemodialysis. The Cord-Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A L; Jensen, H Æ; Hegbrant, J

    1995-01-01

    Hypoxia during haemodialysis, mainly acetate, has been reported several times. In our study we have monitored oxygen status during 258 bicarbonate haemodialyses. A significant drop below 80 mmHg in mean oxygen tension occurred. Mean oxygen saturation reflected this drop but did not reach levels...... below 90%. The mean oxygen concentration was on the whole critical low, though slightly increasing during each haemodialysis session due to ultrafiltration. It is concluded that both hypoxia and hypoxaemia do occur during bicarbonate haemodialysis. To a group of patients generally having limited cardiac...... reserves, a poor oxygen status is a potentially serious complication to haemodialysis. Monitoring oxygen status is thus advisable....

  18. Magnetic Tension of Sunspot Fine Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Venkatakrishnan, P

    2010-01-01

    The equilibrium structure of sunspots depends critically on its magnetic topology and is dominated by magnetic forces. Tension force is one component of the Lorentz force which balances the gradient of magnetic pressure in force-free configurations. We employ the tension term of the Lorentz force to clarify the structure of sunspot features like penumbral filaments, umbral light bridges and outer penumbral fine structures. We compute vertical component of tension term of Lorentz force over two active regions namely NOAA AR 10933 and NOAA AR 10930 observed on 05 January 2007 and 12 December 2006 respectively. The former is a simple while latter is a complex active region with highly sheared polarity inversion line (PIL). The vector magnetograms used are obtained from Hinode(SOT/SP). We find an inhomogeneous distribution of tension with both positive and negative signs in various features of the sunspots. The existence of positive tension at locations of lower field strength and higher inclination is compatible...

  19. Subacute Tension Hemopneumothorax with Novel Electrocardiogram Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saks, Mark A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes a patient with a subacute right-sided tension hemopneumothorax following an occult stab. The patient’s electrocardiogram (ECG, performed as part of a standardized triage process, demonstrated significant abnormalities that misguided initial resuscitation, but resolved following evacuation of the tension hemopneumothorax. Tension pneumothorax is typically regarded as an immediately life-threatening condition that requires emergent management with needle or tube thoracostomy. However, we believe that subacute tension pneumothorax may be a rarely observed clinical phenomenon and may lead to unique ECG findings. We believe that the ECG changes we observed provided an early clue to the eventual diagnosis of a subacute tension pneumothorax and have not been previously described in this setting. . [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(1:86-89].

  20. FORMULAS OF TENSION OF CONTINUOUS ROLLING PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Z. Zhang; X.P. Zhang

    2007-01-01

    The development of computer controlled continuous rolling process calls for a mathematicalexpression that can express the inequality condition of "constant flow". Tension is the link of thecontinuous rolling process. From the condition of dynamic equilibrium, a differential equation oftension is given out. On the basis of the physical rules established from the industrial practice andexperimental studies, the law of volume constancy, the linear relation of forward slip and tension,the state equation of continuous rolling, the formula of dynamic tension, and the formula of statictension have been obtained. These formulae reflect the functional relations between tensions,thickness, roll velocity, and time in the continuous rolling process. It is implied that the continuousrolling process is a gradually steady, controllable, and measurable dynamic system. An assumptionof predicting the thickness of a steel plate using these tension formulae is also put forward.

  1. Advanced Oxygen Systems for Aircraft (Systemes d’Oxygene Avances)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    son acheminement vers le convertisseur embarque, ainsi que la plus grande fiabilite de 1’OBOGS compare aux systemes ä oxygene liquide traditionnels...Standardisation Coordination Committee. Minimum Physiological Requirements for Aircrew Demand Breathing Systems. Air Standard 61/101/6A, Washington DC ...Washington DC 1981. 5. Ernsting J, and Stewart WK, Introduction to Oxygen Deprivation at Reduced Barometric Pressure in: Gilles JA, Ed., A Textbook of

  2. Surface tension phenomena in the xylem sap of three diffuse porous temperate tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Karen K; Tyree, Melvin T; Mussone, Paolo G

    2011-04-01

    In plant physiology models involving bubble nucleation, expansion or elimination, it is typically assumed that the surface tension of xylem sap is equal to that of pure water, though this has never been tested. In this study we collected xylem sap from branches of the tree species Populus tremuloides, Betula papyrifera and Sorbus aucuparia over 3 months. We measured the instantaneous surface tension and followed changes over a period of 0.5-5 h using the pendant drop technique. In all three species the instantaneous surface tension was equal to or within a few percent of that of pure water. Further, in B. papyrifera and S. aucuparia the change over time following drop establishment, although significant, was very small. In P. tremuloides, however, there was a steep decline in surface tension over time that leveled off towards values 21-27% lower than that of pure water. This indicated the presence of surfactants. The values were lower for thinner distal branch segments than for proximal ones closer to the trunk. In some species it appears valid to assume that the surface tension of xylem sap is equal to that of water. However, in branch segments of P. tremuloides close to the terminal bud and hence potentially in other species as well, it may be necessary to take into account the presence of surfactants that reduce the surface tension over time.

  3. Uniaxial tension of drying sieves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojić Nada V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the literature contains numerous studies that have been developed to describe the nonlinear behavior of drying sieves' operation, there are no papers in this which report deeper investigation of the drying sieve behavior when exposed to tension and thermo stabilization. The aim of this paper is to provide insight into the elastoplastic behavior of the thermo stabilized and not stabilized sieves subjected to the tensile force. Within this work both theoretical and experimental investigations were performed. The sieves were joined by using a spiral. In separate experiments tests of wire base and weft of the weave mesh were performed, both for thermo stabilized and not thermo stabilized sieves, sieves joining and the sieve thermo stabilization itself. It was established that the thermo stabilization of sieves provides for stability of sieves' dimensions and that open thermo stabilized drying sieve exhibits better mechanical properties and exploitation characteristics then the sieves joining. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON174004: Micromechanics criteria of damage and fracture and br. TR 32036: Development of software for solving the coupled multi-physical problems

  4. The Assessment Methods of Laryngeal Muscle Activity in Muscle Tension Dysphonia: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyedeh Maryam Khoddami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to review the methods used for the assessment of muscular tension dysphonia (MTD. The MTD is a functional voice disorder associated with abnormal laryngeal muscle activity. Various assessment methods are available in the literature to evaluate the laryngeal hyperfunction. The case history, laryngoscopy, and palpation are clinical methods for the assessment of patients with MTD. Radiography and surface electromyography (EMG are objective methods to provide physiological information about MTD. Recent studies show that surface EMG can be an effective tool for assessing muscular tension in MTD.

  5. The assessment methods of laryngeal muscle activity in muscle tension dysphonia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoddami, Seyyedeh Maryam; Nakhostin Ansari, Noureddin; Izadi, Farzad; Talebian Moghadam, Saeed

    2013-11-04

    The purpose of this paper is to review the methods used for the assessment of muscular tension dysphonia (MTD). The MTD is a functional voice disorder associated with abnormal laryngeal muscle activity. Various assessment methods are available in the literature to evaluate the laryngeal hyperfunction. The case history, laryngoscopy, and palpation are clinical methods for the assessment of patients with MTD. Radiography and surface electromyography (EMG) are objective methods to provide physiological information about MTD. Recent studies show that surface EMG can be an effective tool for assessing muscular tension in MTD.

  6. Oxygen Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    LTOT is prescribed for people with chronic lung disease in whom there is a decrease in the ability of the lungs to supply enough oxygen to the body. The heart is obliged to pump faster to meet the body's oxygen requirements. This may place undue stress on the heart, resulting in palpitations, dizziness and fatigue. A low oxygen level in arterial blood is also harmful to the heart, the brain and the pulmonary blood vessels. Oxygen therapy is used to break this cycle. A person with low blood ox...

  7. Study of Interfacial Tension between Molten Steel and Na2O-Li2O-SiO2-B2O3 Slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The interfacial tension at the Na2O-Li2O-SiO2-B2O3 slag-steel boundary has been determined in the temperature range of 1 803-1 873K by sessile drop method with the transmission X-ray technique. It was found that the variation of interfacial tension with temperature in the system of molten steel/Na2O-Li2O-SiO2-B2O3 slag in the temperature range of 1 803-1 873K is pretty little. The interfacial tension remarkably decreases with increasing the oxygen and/or sulfur content in molten steel. It suggesed that the oxygen and sulfur dissolved in molten steel act as a surface-active solute at the slag-steel interface. Consequently, the interfacial tension depends, in most part, on the oxygen content in molten steel, but the composition of the slag has a minor effect on the interfacial tension. In order to clear the effect of slag composition on the interfacial tension, the experimental results are discussed. The interfacial tension is observed to increase with increasing Na2O and Li2O contents, and decrease with increasing silica content in slag. The influence of B2O3 on the interfacial tension is pretty little.

  8. Development of oxygen supply protective equipment for future fighter pilot and the tendency of physiological study%未来战斗机飞行员供氧呼吸防护装备发展及其生理研究趋势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖华军

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the development of oxygen supply protective equipment for future fighter pilot in the world and foresee the tendency of related physiological study.Literature resource and selection References selected from publications and reports that emphatically introducing the technology development of aviation oxygen supply equipment and personal protective equipment for future fighter pilot.Literature quotation Nineteen papers, 3 monographs and 2 standard that were published in China and abroad were cited.Literature synthesis The developments of aviation oxygen supply and personal protective equipment as well as the related studies in future were foreseen by reviewing the progress of on board oxygen resource, respiratory regulator, oxygen mask, personal protective suit.Conclusion The on board oxygen generation system would be the certain choice for long-distance flight.The concerned studies of aviation physiology will mainly focus on electronic pressure regulating for carefree respiratory, pilot's protective equipment with the shield against nuclear, biological and chemical harm, and anti-suffocation for the escaped pilot in water.%目的 简要概述国内外未来战斗机飞行员供氧呼吸防护装备及其生理研究的发展趋势.资料来源与选择该领域相关的论著、综述、专著及国军标.突出介绍了未来战斗机航空供氧与防护装备技术的发展动向.资料引用国内外公开发表的文章19篇,专著3部,标准文献2篇.资料综述根据国内外未来飞机供氧氧源、呼吸调节设备、供氧面罩、个体代偿防护服装的发展,提出了飞行员航空供氧装备、个体防护装备及其生理学问题的研究设想.结论 机载制氧是远航飞行必然的选择;电子变压调节无忧虑呼吸、飞行员个体装备核生化防护、离机落水应急呼吸防窒息生理要求是航空生理学研究的重点.

  9. Space Physiology within an Exercise Physiology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jason R.; West, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Compare and contrast strategies remain common pedagogical practices within physiological education. With the support of an American Physiological Society Teaching Career Enhancement Award, we have developed a junior- or senior-level undergraduate curriculum for exercise physiology that compares and contrasts the physiological adaptations of…

  10. Potassium physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thier, S O

    1986-04-25

    Potassium is the most abundant exchangeable cation in the body. It exists predominantly in the intracellular fluid at concentrations of 140 to 150 meq/liter and in the extracellular fluid at concentrations of 3.5 to 5 meq/liter. The maintenance of the serum potassium concentration is a complex bodily function and results from the balance between intake, excretion, and distribution between intracellular and extracellular space. Ingested potassium is virtually completely absorbed from and minimally excreted through the intestine under nonpathologic circumstances. Renal excretion of potassium, which is the major chronic protective mechanism against abnormalities in potassium balance, depends on filtration, reabsorption, and a highly regulated distal nephron secretory process. Factors regulating potassium secretion include prior potassium intake, intracellular potassium, delivery of sodium chloride and poorly reabsorbable anions to the distal nephron, the urine flow rate, hormones such as aldosterone and beta-catecholamines, and the integrity of the renal tubular cell. The maintenance of distribution between the inside and outside of cells depends on the integrity of the cell membrane and its pumps, osmolality, pH, and the hormones insulin, aldosterone, beta 2-catecholamines, alpha-catecholamines, and prostaglandins. Both distribution across cell membranes and/or renal excretion of potassium may be altered by pharmacologic agents such as diuretics, alpha- and beta-catechol antagonists and agonists, depolarizing agents, and digitalis. Problems with hypokalemia and hyperkalemia can be analyzed on the basis of potassium physiology and pharmacology; proper treatment depends on an accurate analysis.

  11. The surface tension of liquid gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The surface tension of liquid gallium has been measured using the sessile drop technique in an Auger spectrometer. The experimental method is described. The surface tension in mJ/sq m is found to decrease linearly with increasing temperature and may be represented as 708-0.66(T-29.8), where T is the temperature in centigrade. This result is of interest because gallium has been suggested as a model fluid for Marangoni flow experiments. In addition, the surface tension is of technological significance in the processing of compound semiconductors involving gallium.

  12. Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, N.; Caps, H.

    2015-01-01

    Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films are experimentally investigated. Measurements are performed by introducing deformable elastic objets in the films. The shape adopted by those objects once set in the film is related to the surface tension value at a given vertical position by numerically solving the adapted elasticity equations. We show that the observed dependency of the surface tension versus the vertical position is predicted by simple modeling that takes into account the mechanical equilibrium of the films coupled to previous thickness measurements.

  13. Computer-aided design of tension structures

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, C.F.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis consists of three parts. Part I (chapters 1-4) gives a review and description of the basis for the numerical modelling of tension structures. The discussion in Part I leads to the conclusion of a need for an interactive design procedure for tension structures which is the subject under consideration in Part II (chapters 5-7). In the design of tension structures, an area which requires special attention is the dynamic response often initiated by the action of a natural wind. In Par...

  14. Appreciating Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic flora and microfauna utilize light from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen. While these carbohydrates and their derivative hydrocarbons are generally considered to be fuels, it is the thermodynamically energetic oxygen molecule that traps, stores, and provides almost all of the energy that…

  15. Vasogenic shock physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiria Gkisioti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sotiria Gkisioti, Spyros D MentzelopoulosDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Evaggelismos General Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Shock means inadequate tissue perfusion by oxygen-carrying blood. In vasogenic shock, this circulatory failure results from vasodilation and/or vasoplegia. There is vascular hyporeactivity with reduced vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to α1 adrenergic agonists. Considering vasogenic shock, one can understand its utmost importance, not only because of its association with sepsis but also because it can be the common final pathway for long-lasting, severe shock of any cause, even postresuscitation states. The effective management of any patient in shock requires the understanding of its underlying physiology and pathophysiology. Recent studies have provided new insights into vascular physiology by revealing the interaction of rather complicated and multifactorial mechanisms, which have not been fully elucidated yet. Some of these mechanisms, such as the induction of nitric oxide synthases, the activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels, and vasopressin deficiency, have gained general acceptance and are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of vasodilatory shock. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the pathogenesis of vasogenic shock.Keywords: nitric oxide synthases, KATP channels, vasopressin, H2S, vasoplegic syndrome

  16. Tension-Type and Other Primary Headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A review of the literature on tension-type and other “nonmigrainous” primary headaches is presented from Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA.

  17. The Dynamic Surface Tension of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauner, Ines M; Deblais, Antoine; Beattie, James K; Kellay, Hamid; Bonn, Daniel

    2017-03-23

    The surface tension of water is an important parameter for many biological or industrial processes, and roughly a factor of 3 higher than that of nonpolar liquids such as oils, which is usually attributed to hydrogen bonding and dipolar interactions. Here we show by studying the formation of water drops that the surface tension of a freshly created water surface is even higher (∼90 mN m(-1)) than under equilibrium conditions (∼72 mN m(-1)) with a relaxation process occurring on a long time scale (∼1 ms). Dynamic adsorption effects of protons or hydroxides may be at the origin of this dynamic surface tension. However, changing the pH does not significantly change the dynamic surface tension. It also seems unlikely that hydrogen bonding or dipole orientation effects play any role at the relatively long time scale probed in the experiments.

  18. Psychology--tensions between objectivity and subjectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klempe, Sven Hroar

    2012-09-01

    The self is often defined in terms of its presentational appearances. This may easily end up in a denial of the internal aspects of the self, which is very often related to a tendency to avoid the tension between the internal and the external, but also between subjectivity and objectivity. In this paper this ambition is regarded in a historical perspective, in which Fichte and Hegel both represent attempts at abolishing the tension, whereas Kant and Kierkegaard represent the opposite. History shows that an eradication of the tension between subjectivity and objectivity implies a deterioration of psychology as well. Thus the conclusion is that psychology is primarily to be defined in terms of the tension between subjectivity and objectivity, which requires an accurate understanding and the inclusion of both of them.

  19. Tension Hydrothorax Related to Disseminated Endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnaKate Deal, MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 34-year-old woman presenting to the emergency department (ED with dyspnea, cough, and fever. She was found to have a tension hydrothorax and was treated with ultrasound-guided thoracentesis in the ED. Subsequent inpatient evaluation showed the patient had disseminated endometriosis. Tension hydrothorax has not been previously described in the literature as a complication of this disease.

  20. The Tensions of In Situ Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    In situ visualization is the coupling of visualization software with a simulation or other data producer to process the data "in memory" before the data are offloaded to a storage system. Although in situ visualization provides superior analysis, it has implementation tradeoffs resulting from conflicts with some traditional expected requirements. Numerous conflicting requirements create tensions that lead to difficult implementation tradeoffs. This article takes a look at the most prevailing tensions of in situ visualization.

  1. Evaluation of splanchnic perfusion and oxygenation during positive end-expiratory pressure ventilation in relation to subcutaneous tissue gases and pH. An experimental study in pigs with oleic acid-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlińska, B; Mellström, A; Månsson, P; Hartmann, M; Jönsson, K

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of splanchnic perfusion and oxygenation was performed by measurements of serosal tissue oxygen tension (PserO2) and intramucosal pH (pHi) in relation to subcutaneous oxygen tension (PscO2), subcutaneous carbon dioxide tension (PscCO2) and subcutaneous pH (pHsc) in pigs subjected to oleic acid-induced lung injury during ventilation with increasing levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Lung injury resulted in a general hypoxia and redistribution of perfusion away from the subcutaneous and splanchnic tissues, illustrated by a decrease in PaO2 from 93 to 37 mm Hg (p portal vein oxygen tension (PportaO2) from 21 to 34 mm Hg (p oxygenation was better reflected by serosal oxygen tension than pHi in the colon. Changes in serosal oxygenation of the colon paralleled changes in subcutaneous tissue oxygenation. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Tension pneumothorax complicating endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: case report and systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ashaal, Yousef I; Hefny, Ashraf F; Safi, Farouk; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2011-01-01

    Perforation of the duodenum, which is usually retroperitoneal, is a known complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Association of the duodenal perforation with pneumothorax is rare and the development of tension pneumothorax is even rarer. We report a case of tension pneumothorax following an ERCP, which we successfully treated with chest tube insertion and laparotomy, and systematically review the other 10 cases reported in the literature. Four of these 10 cases had tension pneumothorax. All were to the right side of the chest. Patients were mainly female (7/10). The median (range) age was 70.5 (55-89) years. Four patients required surgery (40%) and one patient, who was not operated on, died (10%). Clinicians should be aware of this serious complication. Unexplained chest pain, dyspnoea, and oxygen desaturation with abdominal distension during ERCP must raise this possibility. Early clinical recognition and prompt management is essential to improve the outcome.

  3. Tension-oriented cell divisions limit anisotropic tissue tension in epithelial spreading during zebrafish epiboly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campinho, Pedro; Behrndt, Martin; Ranft, Jonas; Risler, Thomas; Minc, Nicolas; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2013-12-01

    Epithelial spreading is a common and fundamental aspect of various developmental and disease-related processes such as epithelial closure and wound healing. A key challenge for epithelial tissues undergoing spreading is to increase their surface area without disrupting epithelial integrity. Here we show that orienting cell divisions by tension constitutes an efficient mechanism by which the enveloping cell layer (EVL) releases anisotropic tension while undergoing spreading during zebrafish epiboly. The control of EVL cell-division orientation by tension involves cell elongation and requires myosin II activity to align the mitotic spindle with the main tension axis. We also found that in the absence of tension-oriented cell divisions and in the presence of increased tissue tension, EVL cells undergo ectopic fusions, suggesting that the reduction of tension anisotropy by oriented cell divisions is required to prevent EVL cells from fusing. We conclude that cell-division orientation by tension constitutes a key mechanism for limiting tension anisotropy and thus promoting tissue spreading during EVL epiboly.

  4. Mineralization of bone-related SaOS-2 cells under physiological hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Tolba, Emad; Diehl-Seifert, Bärbel; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is a physiological energy-rich polymer with multiple phosphoric anhydride bonds. In cells such as bone-forming osteoblasts, glycolysis is the main pathway generating metabolic energy in the form of ATP. In the present study, we show that, under hypoxic culture conditions, the growth/viability of osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells is not impaired. The addition of polyP to those cells, administered as amorphous calcium polyP nanoparticles (aCa-polyP-NP; approximate size 100 nm), significantly increased the proliferation of the cells. In the presence of polyP, the cells produce significant levels of lactate, the end product of anaerobic glycolysis. Under those conditions, an eight-fold increase in the steady-state level of the membrane-associated carbonic anhydrase IX is found, as well as a six-fold induction of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1. Consequently, biomineral formation onto the SaOS-2 cells decreases under low oxygen tension. If the polyP nanoparticles are added to the cells, the degree of mineralization is enhanced. These changes had been measured also in human mesenchymal stem cells. The assumption that the bicarbonate, generated by the carbonic anhydrase in the presence of polyP under low oxygen, is deposited as a constituent of the bioseeds formed during initial hydroxyapatite formation is corroborated by the identification of carbon besides of calcium, oxygen and phosphorus in the initial biomineral deposit onto the cells using the sensitive technology of high-resolution energy dispersive spectrometry mapping. Based on these data, we conclude that polyP is required for the supply of metabolic energy during bone mineral formation under physiological, hypoxic conditions, acting as a 'metabolic fuel' for the cells to grow.

  5. Erythrocytes Are Oxygen-Sensing Regulators of the Cerebral Microcirculation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Helen Shinru; Kang, Hongyi; Rasheed, Izad-Yar Daniel

    2016-01-01

    and neuronal activity. Since capillaries are embedded in the O2-consuming neuropil, we have here examined whether activity-dependent dips in O2 tension drive capillary hyperemia. In vivo analyses showed that transient dips in tissue O2 tension elicit capillary hyperemia. Ex vivo experiments revealed that red...... blood cells (RBCs) themselves act as O2 sensors that autonomously regulate their own deformability and thereby flow velocity through capillaries in response to physiological decreases in O2 tension. This observation has broad implications for understanding how local changes in blood flow are coupled...

  6. [Human physiology: kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natochin, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    The content of human physiology as an independent part of current physiology is discussed. Substantiated is the point that subjects of human physiology are not only special sections of physiology where functions are inherent only in human (physiology of intellectual activity, speech, labor, sport), but also in peculiarities of functions, specificity of regulation of each of physiological systems. By the example of physiology of kidney and water-salt balance there are shown borders of norm, peculiarities of regulation in human, new chapters of renal physiology which have appeared in connection with achievements of molecular physiology.

  7. Oxygen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... oxygen at very high altitudes (like in the mountains or in an airplane) even if you do ... Med Vol 171. P1-P2, 2005 ATS Patient Education Series © 2016 American Thoracic Society www. thoracic. org ...

  8. Dissolved oxygen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1981-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen concentrations in the waters of Botany Bay and Georges and Cooks Rivers vary mainly as a result of tidal water movements, algal and macrophytic growth and decay, and effects of storms...

  9. Interfacial tension studies between Fe-Cu-Ni sulfide and halo-norilsk basalt slag system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Shangguo; Jim Mungall; WANG Jian; GENG Ke

    2005-01-01

    The interfacial tension of the matte/halo-Norilsk basalt slag systems of FeS-Cu2S-Ni3S2 and FeO-FeS were investigated using the sessile drop technique. The results indicate that interfacial tension decreases with increasing copper and nickel contents in the matte of FeS-Cu2S-Ni3S2 system while it increases with increasing oxygen content in the matte of FeO-FeS system. It is inferred from these results that two conditions are critical for the formation of giant Cu-Ni sulfide deposits. One is that mafic-ultramafic parent magma of sulfide deposits should be rich in copper and nickel where due to the low interfacial tension, it is difficult to form sulfide droplet in the early stage of magma evolution. In other words, sulfide liquid conglomeration occurs more difficultly. The other condition is that the magma emplacement should be shallow; and a lot of faults occur in the magma emplacement field. Since oxygen content is high in the environment, interfacial tension is high, which helps sulfide liquid conglomeration and consequently Cu-Ni sulfide deposits form.

  10. Emergency percutaneous needle decompression for tension pneumoperitoneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Körner Markus

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tension pneumoperitoneum as a complication of iatrogenic bowel perforation during endoscopy is a dramatic condition in which intraperitoneal air under pressure causes hemodynamic and ventilatory compromise. Like tension pneumothorax, urgent intervention is required. Immediate surgical decompression though is not always possible due to the limitations of the preclinical management and sometimes to capacity constraints of medical staff and equipment in the clinic. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of cases of pneumoperitoneum and tension pneumoperitoneum due to iatrogenic bowel perforation. All patients admitted to our surgical department between January 2005 and October 2010 were included. Tension pneumoperitoneum was diagnosed in those patients presenting signs of hemodynamic and ventilatory compromise in addition to abdominal distension. Results Between January 2005 and October 2010 eleven patients with iatrogenic bowel perforation were admitted to our surgical department. The mean time between perforation and admission was 36 ± 14 hrs (range 30 min - 130 hrs, between ER admission and begin of the operation 3 hrs and 15 min ± 47 min (range 60 min - 9 hrs. Three out of eleven patients had clinical signs of tension pneumoperitoneum. In those patients emergency percutaneous needle decompression was performed with a 16G venous catheter. This improved significantly the patients' condition (stabilization of vital signs, reducing jugular vein congestion, bridging the time to the start of the operation. Conclusions Hemodynamical and respiratory compromise in addition to abdominal distension shortly after endoscopy are strongly suggestive of tension pneumoperitoneum due to iatrogenic bowel perforation. This is a rare but life threatening condition and it can be managed in a preclinical and clinical setting with emergency percutaneous needle decompression like tension pneumothorax. Emergency percutaneous decompression is no

  11. Length-tension relationships of small arteries, veins, and lymphatics from the rat mesenteric microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong-Zhen; Gashev, Anatoliy A; Zawieja, David C; Davis, Michael J

    2007-04-01

    The passive and active length-tension relationships of isolated rat mesenteric lymphatics ( approximately 150 microm ID), and adjacent small arteries ( approximately 240 microm) and veins ( approximately 275 microm) were compared under isometric conditions using a wire myograph. About 60% of the lymphatic vessels developed spontaneous contractions in physiological saline solution at nominal preload. To maximally activate smooth muscle, 145 mM K(+) + 5 x 10(-5) M norepinephrine was used for arteries, and 145 mM K(+) + 1 x 10(-6) M substance P was used for lymphatics and veins. In response, arteries exhibited monotonic force development to a plateau level, whereas lymphatics and veins showed biphasic force development, consisting of a transient force peak followed by partial relaxation to a plateau over approximately 5 min. The passive and the active length-tension curves were similar in shape among all three vessels. However, the maximal active tension of arteries (3.4 +/- 0.42 mN/mm) was significantly greater than peak active tension (0.59 +/- 0.04 mN/mm) or plateau tension (0.20 +/- 0.04 mN/mm) in small veins and greater than peak active tension (0.34 +/- 0.02 mN/mm) or plateau tension (0.21 +/- 0.02 mN/mm) in lymphatics. Maximal active medial wall stress was similar between lymphatics and veins but was approximately fivefold higher in small arteries. For lymphatics, the pressure calculated from the optimal preload was significantly higher than that found previously in isobaric studies of isolated lymphatics, suggesting the capacity to operate at higher than normal pressures for increased responsiveness. Our results represent the first mechanical comparisons of arterial, venous, and lymphatic vessels in the same vasculature.

  12. Cellular mechanotransduction relies on tension-induced and chaperone-assisted autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbricht, Anna; Eppler, Felix J; Tapia, Victor E; van der Ven, Peter F M; Hampe, Nico; Hersch, Nils; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Stadel, Daniela; Haas, Albert; Saftig, Paul; Behrends, Christian; Fürst, Dieter O; Volkmer, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Kolanus, Waldemar; Höhfeld, Jörg

    2013-03-04

    Mechanical tension is an ever-present physiological stimulus essential for the development and homeostasis of locomotory, cardiovascular, respiratory, and urogenital systems. Tension sensing contributes to stem cell differentiation, immune cell recruitment, and tumorigenesis. Yet, how mechanical signals are transduced inside cells remains poorly understood. Here, we identify chaperone-assisted selective autophagy (CASA) as a tension-induced autophagy pathway essential for mechanotransduction in muscle and immune cells. The CASA complex, comprised of the molecular chaperones Hsc70 and HspB8 and the cochaperone BAG3, senses the mechanical unfolding of the actin-crosslinking protein filamin. Together with the chaperone-associated ubiquitin ligase CHIP, the complex initiates the ubiquitin-dependent autophagic sorting of damaged filamin to lysosomes for degradation. Autophagosome formation during CASA depends on an interaction of BAG3 with synaptopodin-2 (SYNPO2). This interaction is mediated by the BAG3 WW domain and facilitates cooperation with an autophagosome membrane fusion complex. BAG3 also utilizes its WW domain to engage in YAP/TAZ signaling. Via this pathway, BAG3 stimulates filamin transcription to maintain actin anchoring and crosslinking under mechanical tension. By integrating tension sensing, autophagosome formation, and transcription regulation during mechanotransduction, the CASA machinery ensures tissue homeostasis and regulates fundamental cellular processes such as adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Membrane Tension Inhibits Deformation by Coat Proteins in Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassinger, Julian; Drubin, David; Oster, George; Rangamani, Padmini

    2016-02-01

    In clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), clathrin and various adaptor proteins coat a patch of the plasma membrane, which is reshaped to form a budded vesicle. Experimental studies have demonstrated that elevated membrane tension can inhibit bud formation by a clathrin coat. In this study, we investigate the impact of membrane tension on the mechanics of membrane budding by simulating clathrin coats that either grow in area or progressively induce greater curvature. At low membrane tension, progressively increasing the area of a curvature-generating coat causes the membrane to smoothly evolve from a flat to budded morphology, whereas the membrane remains essentially flat at high membrane tensions. Interestingly, at physiologically relevant, intermediate membrane tensions, the shape evolution of the membrane undergoes a snapthrough instability in which increasing coat area causes the membrane to "snap" from an open, U-shaped bud to a closed, $\\Omega$-shaped bud. This instability is accompanied by a large energy barrier, which could cause a developing endocytic pit to stall if the binding energy of additional coat is insufficient to overcome this barrier. Similar results were found for a coat of constant area in which the spontaneous curvature progressively increases. Additionally, a pulling force on the bud, simulating a force from actin polymerization, is sufficient to drive a transition from an open to closed bud, overcoming the energy barrier opposing this transition.

  14. Exploratory experimental investigations on post-tensioned structural glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Louter, C.; Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Belis, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses two projects on post-tensioned glass beams, performed at EPFL and DTU, respectively. In these projects small scale glass beams (length of 1.5m and 1m) are post-tensioned by means of steel threaded rods tensioned at the beam ends. The purpose of post-tensioning glass beams...

  15. Investigation of tissue oxygenation by in vivo laser-induced photodissociation of cutaneous arterial blood oxyhemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimov, M. M.; Korolevich, A. N.

    2008-06-01

    A novel method of direct control of local tissue oxygenation based on laser-induced photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin in cutaneous blood vessels is discussed. New technology in selective and local increase of the concentration of free molecular oxygen in tissue that enhances metabolism of cells is demonstrated. Direct in vivo measurements of the tissue oxygen tension are carried out on human skin. Kinetics of oxygen tension in tissue is investigated under the effect of He-Ne laser radiation at the power of 1mW relatively to initial value of tissue oxygen tension. The results of experimental study the kinetics of oxygen distribution into tissue from arterial blood is presented. Biomedical applications of proposed new technology in laser therapy of pathologies where elimination of local tissue hypoxia is critical are discussed.

  16. Tension Distribution in a Tendon-Driven Robotic Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method is provided for distributing tension among tendons of a tendon-driven finger in a robotic system, wherein the finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons. The method includes determining a maximum functional tension and a minimum functional tension of each tendon of the finger, and then using a controller to distribute tension among the tendons, such that each tendon is assigned a tension value less than the maximum functional tension and greater than or equal to the minimum functional tension. The method satisfies the minimum functional tension while minimizing the internal tension in the robotic system, and satisfies the maximum functional tension without introducing a coupled disturbance to the joint torques. A robotic system includes a robot having at least one tendon-driven finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons, and a controller having an algorithm for controlling the tendons as set forth above.

  17. INTERFACIAL DEBONDING OF COATED-FIBER-REINFORCED COMPOSITES UNDER TENSION-TENSION CYCLIC LOADING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Zhifei; Zhou Limin

    2000-01-01

    A new degradation function of the friction coefficient is used. Based on the double shear-lag model and Paris formula, the interfacial damage of coated fiber-reinforced composites under tension-tension cyclic loading is studied. The effects of strength and thickness of the coating materials on the debond stress, debond rate as well as debond length are simulated.

  18. Oxygen-Loaded Nanodroplets Effectively Abrogate Hypoxia Dysregulating Effects on Secretion of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 by Human Monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Rossana Gulino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes play a key role in the inflammatory stage of the healing process. To allow monocyte migration to injured tissues, the balances between secreted matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and their inhibitors (TIMPs must be finely modulated. However, a reduction of blood supply and local oxygen tension can modify the phenotype of immune cells. Intriguingly, hypoxia might be targeted by new effective oxygenating devices such as 2H,3H-decafluoropentane- (DFP- based oxygen-loaded nanodroplets (OLNs. Here, hypoxia effects on gelatinase/TIMP release from human peripheral monocytes were investigated, and the therapeutic potential of dextran-shelled OLNs was evaluated. Normoxic monocytes constitutively released ~500 ng/mL MMP-9, ~1.3 ng/mL TIMP-1, and ~0.6 ng/mL TIMP-2 proteins. MMP-2 was not detected. After 24 hours, hypoxia significantly altered MMP-9/TIMP-1 balance by reducing MMP-9 and increasing TIMP-1, without affecting TIMP-2 secretion. Interestingly OLNs, not displaying toxicity to human monocytes after cell internalization, effectively counteracted hypoxia, restoring a normoxia-like MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio. The action of OLNs was specifically dependent on time-sustained oxygen diffusion up to 24 h from their DFP-based core. Therefore, OLNs appear as innovative, nonconventional, cost-effective, and nontoxic therapeutic tools, to be potentially employed to restore the physiological invasive phenotype of immune cells in hypoxia-associated inflammation.

  19. Elastic properties and mechanical tension of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, R.; Herrero, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Room-temperature simulations of graphene have been performed as a function of the mechanical tension of the layer. Finite-size effects are accurately reproduced by an acoustic dispersion law for the out-of-plane vibrations that, in the long-wave limit, behaves as ρ ω2=σ k2+κ k4 . The fluctuation tension σ is finite (˜0.1 N/m) even when the external mechanical tension vanishes. Transverse vibrations imply a duplicity in the definition of the elastic constants of the layer, as observables related to the real area of the surface may differ from those related to the in-plane projected area. This duplicity explains the variability of experimental data on the Young modulus of graphene based on electron spectroscopy, interferometric profilometry, and indentation experiments.

  20. Tension Stiffened and Tendon Actuated Manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, William R. (Inventor); Dorsey, John T. (Inventor); Ganoe, George G. (Inventor); King, Bruce D. (Inventor); Jones, Thomas C. (Inventor); Mercer, Charles D. (Inventor); Corbin, Cole K. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A tension stiffened and tendon actuated manipulator is provided performing robotic-like movements when acquiring a payload. The manipulator design can be adapted for use in-space, lunar or other planetary installations as it is readily configurable for acquiring and precisely manipulating a payload in both a zero-g environment and in an environment with a gravity field. The manipulator includes a plurality of link arms, a hinge connecting adjacent link arms together to allow the adjacent link arms to rotate relative to each other and a cable actuation and tensioning system provided between adjacent link arms. The cable actuation and tensioning system includes a spreader arm and a plurality of driven and non-driven elements attached to the link arms and the spreader arm. At least one cable is routed around the driven and non-driven elements for actuating the hinge.

  1. Cosmological Spacetimes from Negative Tension Brane Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, C P; Rey, S J; Tasinato, G

    2002-01-01

    We put forward a viable nonsingular cosmology emerging out of negative-tension branes. The cosmology is based on a general class of solutions in Einstein-dilaton-Maxwell theory, presented in {\\tt hep-th/0106120}. We argue that solutions with hyperbolic or planar symmetry describe gravitational interactions due to a pair of negative-tension $q$-branes. These spacetimes are static near each brane, but become time-dependent and expanding at late times -- in some cases asymptotically approaching flat space. We interpret this expansion as being the spacetime's response to the branes presence. The time-dependent regions provide explicit realizations of cosmological spacetimes having past horizons without naked past singularities, and the past horizons are reminiscent of the S-brane solutions. We prove that the singularities in the static regions are repulsive to timelike geodesics, extract a cosmological `bounce' interpretation, compute the explicit charge and tension of the branes, analyse the classical stability ...

  2. Statistical Mechanics of Multilayer Sorption: Surface Tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Anthony S; Dutcher, Cari S

    2013-05-16

    Mathematical models of surface tension as a function of solute concentration are needed for predicting the behavior of surface processes relevant to the environment, biology, and industry. Current aqueous surface tension-activity models capture either solutions of electrolytes or those of nonelectrolytes, but a single equation has not yet been found that represents both over the full range of compositions. In prior work, we developed an accurate model of the activity-concentration relationship in solutions over the full range of compositions by extending the BET (Brunauer, Emmett, Teller) and GAB (Guggenheim, Anderson, de Boer) isotherms to multiple monolayers of solvent molecules sorbed to solutes. Here, we employ similar statistical mechanical tools to develop a simple equation for the surface tension-activity relationship that differs remarkably from prior formulations in that it (1) works equally well for nonelectrolyte and electrolyte solutes and (2) is accurate over the full range of concentrations from pure solvent to pure solute.

  3. Surface tension effects in breaking wave noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Grant B

    2012-08-01

    The role of surface active materials in the sea surface microlayer on the production of underwater noise by breaking waves is considered. Wave noise is assumed to be generated by bubbles formed within actively breaking whitecaps, driven into breathing mode oscillation at the moment of their formation by non-equilibrium, surface tension forces. Two significant effects associated with surface tension are identified-a reduction in low frequency noise (bubbles by fluid turbulence within the whitecap and a reduction in overall noise level due to a decrease in the excitation amplitude of bubbles associated with reduced surface tension. The impact of the latter effect on the accuracy of Weather Observations Through Ambient Noise estimates of wind speed is assessed and generally found to be less than ±1 m s(-1) for wind speeds less than 10 m s(-1) and typical values of surfactant film pressure within sea slicks.

  4. Fatigue In Tension Perpendicular to the Grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben;

    2004-01-01

    mechanism and a mechanism connected to damage introduced in the loading sequences. The purpose of the present study is to disentangle the effect of duration of load from the effect of load oscillation in fatigue in tension perpendicular to the grain. Fatigue experiments are made on small specimens...... and on dowel type joints with slotted in steel plates. In series of ten, the small specimens are taken to fatigue failure in uniform tension at square wave shaped load cycles at 0.01 Hz and 0.1 Hz. In arder to test the predictive validity of the result from the small tension specimens, fatigue experiments......Traditionally fatigue resistance is quantified as number of cycles to failure at a given stress level. A previous study by the authors showed that fatigue in compression parallel to the grain is governed partly by duration of load and partly by an effect of loading, i.e. a combination of a creep...

  5. Fatigue in tension perpendicular to the grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben;

    1999-01-01

    mechanism and a mechanism connected to damage introduce in the loading sequences. The purpose of the present study is to disentangle the effect of duration of load from the effect of load oscillation in fatigue in tension perpendicular to the grain. Fatigue experiments are made on small specimens...... and on dowel type joints with slotted in steel plates. In series of ten, the small specimens are taken to fatigue failure in uniform tension at square wave shaped load cycles at 0.01 Hz and 0.1 Hz. In order to test the predictive validity of the result from the small tension specimens, fatigue experiments......Traditinally fatigue resistance is quantified as number of cycles to failure at a given stress level. A previous study by the authors showed that fatigue in compression parallel to the grain is governed partly by duration of load and partly by an effect of loading, i.e. a combination of a creep...

  6. Evaluación de parámetros fisiológicos en función de la saturación de oxigeno muscular en mujeres con sobrepeso y obesidad. [Evaluation physiological parameters depending on muscle oxygen saturation in overweight and obesity].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Alfonso Vasquez-Bonilla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar parámetros fisiológicos para comparar y correlacionar en función de la saturación de oxigeno muscular y hemoglobina total medida con espectroscopia de infrarrojo cercano no invasivo. La muestra (n=17 mujeres se dividieron en 2 grupos: sobrepeso/obesidad y normopeso, se valoró la composición corporal, parámetros fisiológicos, saturación de oxigeno muscular e indicie de esfuerzo percibido durante la prueba de esfuerzo incremental máxima en un cicloergometro en base a cuatro zonas metabólicas establecidas: fatmax, umbral aeróbico, umbral anaeróbico y zona de consumo máximo de oxígeno. Los resultados se analizaron utilizando el método estadístico Anova de un factor y la correlación de pearsón. Los resultados encontrados en el grupo normopeso la saturación de oxigeno muscular tiene correlación positiva alta con el vo2max durante la zona fatmax y umbral aeróbico (r=0,72- p=0,04 (r=0,77 – p=0,02, la frecuencia cardíaca de entrenamiento (r= -0,87 – p=0,01 tiene correlación negativa muy alta en la zona umbral anaeróbico, en el grupo sobrepeso obesidad no se encontró ninguna correlación. En conclusión las mujeres con normopeso la saturación de oxigeno muscular medida con espectroscopia de infrarrojo cercano no invasivo puede ser un buen parámetro fisiológico para programar ejercicio en la zonas fatmax, umbral aeróbico y umbral anaeróbico, pero en las mujeres con sobrepeso y obesidad se necesitan más estudios. Abstract The objective of this study was to compare physiological parameters and correlate function of muscle oxygen saturation and total hemoglobin measured with near-infrared spectroscopy noninvasive. The sample (n = 17 women were divided into 2 groups: overweight / obese and normal weight, was measured body composition, physiological parameters, saturation of muscle oxygen and index of perceived exertion during testing maximum incremental exercise on a cycle ergometer

  7. Surface-tension properties of hyaluronic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knepper, P A; Covici, S; Fadel, J R; Mayanil, C S; Ritch, R

    1995-06-01

    The maintenance of flow channels in the trabecular meshwork is dependent, in part, on the patency of the trabecular spaces. Because the amount of hyaluronic acid decreases in the trabecular meshwork of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma, a change in surface tension may be one of the effects of hyaluronic acid on aqueous outflow. The surface-active properties of hyaluronic acid (concentration of 0.156-2.5 mg/ml; molecular weights of 100,000, 500,000, and 4,000,000) in deionized water, Ringer's lactate, Ringer's lactate plus 0.06 mg/ml bovine serum albumin, and mock aqueous solution were tested using the drop volume method. At a hyaluronic acid concentration of 0.312 mg/ml, surface tension decreased; at higher concentrations, a further decrease in surface tension was observed. In the presence of Ringer's lactate, the 100,000-MW hyaluronic acid was more active than the 4,000,000-MW hyaluronic acid. In the presence of Ringer's lactate plus bovine serum albumin or mock aqueous solution, the influence of surface tension of the 100,000-MW hyaluronic acid was moderated: with lower hyaluronic acid concentrations, the decline in surface tension was more than with Ringer's lactate, but with higher hyaluronic acid concentrations, the decline in surface tension was less than with Ringer's lactate. At high concentration, hyaluronic acid behaves like a non-Newtonian fluid, becomes more viscous, and may act to "seal" the trabecular space. The results of this study indicate that hyaluronic acid possesses surface-active properties, which is just one of several properties of hyaluronic acid that may influence aqueous outflow resistance.

  8. Effects of music tempo on performance, psychological, and physiological variables during 20 km cycling in well-trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Few studies have investigated the effects of music on trained athletes during high intensity endurance tasks. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of different music tempi on performance, psychological, and physiological responses of well-trained cyclists to time trial cycling. 10 male road cyclists (M age = 35 yr., SD = 7), with a minimum of three years racing experience, performed four 20-km time trials on a Computrainer Pro 3D indoor cycle trainer over a period of four weeks. The time-trials were spaced one week apart. The music conditions for each trial were randomised between fast-tempo (140 bpm), medium-tempo (120 bpm), slow-tempo (100 bpm), and no music. Performance (completion time, power output, average speed and cadence), physiological (heart rate, oxygen consumption, breathing frequency and respiratory exchange ratio), psychophysical (RPE), and psychological (mood states) data were collected for each trial. Results indicated no significant changes in performance, physiological, or psychophysical variables. Total mood disturbance and tension increased significantly in the fast-tempo trial when compared with medium and no-music conditions.

  9. Students' difficulties with tension in massless strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-García, S.; Alfaro-Avena, L. L.; Chávez-Pierce, J. E.; Luna-González, J.; González-Quezada, M. D.

    2010-12-01

    Many students enrolled in introductory mechanics courses have difficulties with understanding the concept of static equilibrium. Some of these difficulties are related to the concept of force in the context of tension in massless strings. We identify three kinds of misconceptions: Students' beliefs that the angle of the string and proximity to the object are related to the tension. Students also use incorrect compensation arguments to reason about situations where both the angle and proximity change simultaneously. These difficulties were identified during investigations conducted in laboratory and lecture sessions at three universities in the United States and Mexico.

  10. Optimal oxygen saturation in premature infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meayoung Chang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a delicate balance between too little and too much supplemental oxygen exposure in premature infants. Since underuse and overuse of supplemental oxygen can harm premature infants, oxygen saturation levels must be monitored and kept at less than 95% to prevent reactive oxygen species-related diseases, such as retinopathy of prematurity and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. At the same time, desaturation below 80 to 85% must be avoided to prevent adverse consequences, such as cerebral palsy. It is still unclear what range of oxygen saturation is appropriate for premature infants; however, until the results of further studies are available, a reasonable target for pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2 is 90 to 93% with an intermittent review of the correlation between SpO2 and the partial pressure of arterial oxygen tension (PaO2. Because optimal oxygenation depends on individuals at the bedside making ongoing adjustments, each unit must define an optimal target range and set alarm limits according to their own equipment or conditions. All staff must be aware of these values and adjust the concentration of supplemental oxygen frequently.

  11. A comparison of central venous-arterial and mixed venous-arterial carbon dioxide tension gradient in circulatory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, K M; Harding, R; Chamberlain, J

    2007-10-01

    The arterial and mixed venous carbon dioxide tension gradient has been shown to increase when there is a decrease in cardiac output. Monitoring central venous gases is an attractive alternative to monitoring mixed venous gases in circulatory failure because central venous catheterisation is a less invasive procedure than pulmonary artery catheterisation. This study aims to evaluate the agreement between central venous-arterial carbon dioxide (CVA-CO2) and mixed venous-arterial carbon dioxide (SVA-CO2) tension gradients and assess whether CVA-CO2 tension gradient can be used to predict cardiac output in circulatory failure. Samples of arterial, central venous and mixed venous blood were obtained from 16 patients with circulatory failure at different inspired oxygen concentrations and cardiac indexes within 24 hours of study enrolment. CVA-CO2 and SVA-CO2 tension gradient were not interchangeable numerically (bias = 0.14 mmHg, 95% limits of agreement: -3.0 to 3.2 mmHg). CVA-CO2 (Spearman correlation coefficient r = -0.385) and SVA-CO, (r = -0.578) tension gradient were significantly correlated with the cardiac index but the cardiac index only accounted for 21% and 32% of the variability of CVA-CO, and SVA-CO2 tension gradient, respectively. The ability of CVA-CO2 tension gradient (area under the ROC curve = 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.49-0.99; P = 0.08) to predict a low cardiac output state (cardiac index tension gradient appeared to be limited to their negative predictive value to exclude a low cardiac output state when CVA-CO, or SVA-CO, tension gradient was normal (< or =5 mmHg).

  12. A progressive reduce tension method to fabricate Bradbury-Nielsen gates with uniform tension

    CERN Document Server

    Kai, Ni; Zhou, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Bradbury-Nielsen gates (BNG) which consist of two interleaved and electrically isolated sets of wires can be used to modulate the beams of charged particles, particularly ion beams in mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry. The wires of BNG with uniform tension is critical to make sure the BNG work reliable and robust. In our previous work, we have analyzed the problem of wires tension non-uniform that exists in the traditional sequentially winding methods when the metal wire's elastic modulus is much larger than insulations substrate's and developed a template-based transfer method to solve this problem. In this study, we proposed a progressive reduce tension method which does not need template to fabricate BNG with uniform tension. First input the initial parameters to calculate the final progressive reduce tension sequence (FA(i)) through program; then sequentially adjust the weight set according to FA(i) to construct a BNG with uniform tension wires through a home-built device. Wires tension non-...

  13. Cycling Wheelchair Provides Enjoyable Pedaling Exercises with Increased Physiological Indexes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ueda, Yuya; Misu, Shogo; Sawa, Ryuichi; Nakatsu, Nobuyuki; Sugimoto, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Kazuya; Takamori, Kumi; Ono, Kumiko; Seki, Kazunori; Handa, Yasunobu; Ono, Rei

    2016-01-01

    .... Both experiments were composed of three pedaling exercise sessions (40, 60, and 80 rpm). Physiological indexes, consisting of oxygen consumption, heart rate, perceived breathlessness and leg fatigue, and salivary amylase activity...

  14. The aponeurotic tension model of craniofacial growth in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standerwick, Richard G; Roberts, W Eugene

    2009-05-22

    Craniofacial growth is a scientific crossroad for the fundamental mechanisms of musculoskeletal physiology. Better understanding of growth and development will provide new insights into repair, regeneration and adaptation to applied loads. Traditional craniofacial growth concepts are insufficient to explain the dynamics of airway/vocal tract development, cranial rotation, basicranial flexion and the role of the cranial base in expression of facial proportions. A testable hypothesis is needed to explore the physiological pressure propelling midface growth and the role of neural factors in expression of musculoskeletal adaptation after the cessation of anterior cranial base growth. A novel model for craniofacial growth is proposed for: 1. brain growth and craniofacial adaptation up to the age of 20; 2. explaining growth force vectors; 3. defining the role of muscle plasticity as a conduit for craniofacial growth forces; and 4. describing the effect of cranial rotation in the expression of facial form.Growth of the viscerocranium is believed to be influenced by the superficial musculoaponeurotic systems (SMAS) of the head through residual tension in the occipitofrontalis muscle as a result of cephalad brain growth and cranial rotation. The coordinated effects of the regional SMAS develop a craniofacial musculoaponeurotic system (CFMAS), which is believed to affect maxillary and mandibular development.

  15. Hypertension: physiology and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, John E; Granger, Joey P; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Dubinion, John; George, Eric; Hamza, Shereen; Speed, Joshua; Hall, Michael E

    2012-10-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the pathophysiology of hypertension and availability of effective and safe antihypertensive drugs, suboptimal blood pressure (BP) control is still the most important risk factor for cardiovascular mortality and is globally responsible for more than 7 million deaths annually. Short-term and long-term BP regulation involve the integrated actions of multiple cardiovascular, renal, neural, endocrine, and local tissue control systems. Clinical and experimental observations strongly support a central role for the kidneys in the long-term regulation of BP, and abnormal renal-pressure natriuresis is present in all forms of chronic hypertension. Impaired renal-pressure natriuresis and chronic hypertension can be caused by intrarenal or extrarenal factors that reduce glomerular filtration rate or increase renal tubular reabsorption of salt and water; these factors include excessive activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems, increased formation of reactive oxygen species, endothelin, and inflammatory cytokines, or decreased synthesis of nitric oxide and various natriuretic factors. In human primary (essential) hypertension, the precise causes of impaired renal function are not completely understood, although excessive weight gain and dietary factors appear to play a major role since hypertension is rare in nonobese hunter-gathers living in nonindustrialized societies. Recent advances in genetics offer opportunities to discover gene-environment interactions that may also contribute to hypertension, although success thus far has been limited mainly to identification of rare monogenic forms of hypertension. © 2012 American Physiological Society

  16. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow pot...

  17. Worldsheet electromagnetism and the superstring tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, P.K. (DAMTP, Univ. Cambridge (United Kingdom))

    1992-03-05

    A superstring action, invariant under the symmetries corresponding to a free differential N=1 superalgebra, is constructed. Its worldsheet fields include an electromagnetic gauge potential. Its equations of motion are those of the Green-Schwarz superstring but with the string tension given by the circulation of the worldsheet electric field around the string. (orig.).

  18. Tension Tests On Bored Piles In Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Sven; Clausen, Johan; Damkilde, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The lengths of the bored piles varied from 2 m to 6 m and all were of a diameter of 140 mm. The piles were tested to failure in tension and the load-displacement relations were recorded. The investigation has shown pronounced differences between the load bearing capacities obtained by different...

  19. Surface tension of evaporating nanofluid droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ruey-Hung [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Phuoc, Tran X. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Martello, Donald [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Measurements of nanofluid surface tension were made using the pendant droplet method. Three different types of nanoparticles were used - laponite, silver and Fe2O3 - with de-ionized water (DW) as the base fluid. The reported results focus on the following categories; (1) because some nanoparticles require surfactants to form stable colloids, the individual effects of the surfactant and the particles were investigated; (2) due to evaporation of the pendant droplet, the particle concentration increases, affecting the apparent surface tension; (3) because of the evaporation process, a hysteresis was found where the evaporating droplet can only achieve lower values of surface tension than that of nanofluids at the same prepared concentrations: and (4) the Stefan equation relating the apparent surface tension and heat of evaporation was found to be inapplicable for nanofluids investigated. Comparisons with findings for sessile droplets are also discussed, pointing to additional effects of nanoparticles other than the non-equilibrium evaporation process.

  20. Tension in Chemistry and Its Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Roald

    2015-01-01

    This article makes a case for a positive role of tension in the creative process in chemistry. I begin with an argument that there is an inherent tension in what makes molecules interesting—their positioning along various polar axes. One of these, the age-old differentiation between useful (to society and for personal profit) commercialization and pure understanding of molecules and their reactions is characteristic. The question of whether there are any bad molecules then leads me to ethical concerns in chemistry, and a particular working out of these in interactions of chemists in the Middle East. An analysis is made of the special tensions involved in publishing, especially in citation ethics; chemists publish a lot, so this is situation ethics worked out on a daily basis. I then find in the literature of psychology good evidence for the positive value of moderate stress in stimulating creativity. It is obvious that too much tension leads to distress, and there are some institutional aspects of chemistry that do not come out well here. But all in all, the dynamic middle is alive, and it leads to good new science. PMID:26155730

  1. Regulation of Cellular Tension in Adherent Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    Cells generate stress on their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) via myosin II motor generated forces which are transmitted through the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanisms in the cell which regulate the magnitude and spatial distribution of these stresses, however, remain unknown. Consistent with previous reports, we find that the total magnitude of traction force exerted on the ECM scales with cell size. Such scaling is observed across numerous cell types and reflects an inherent cellular tension determined by the level of myosin II activity. Surprisingly, while stiffness modulates the cellular spread area, we find this scaling relationship to be independent of ECM stiffness. To identify the biophysical mechanisms regulating the generation of tension, we utilize micro-patterning to isolate cell spread area from cell geometry and to spatially control the distribution of stress on the ECM. We find that traction stress magnitude is dependent on the local curvature of the cell. Changes in cell geometry result in a redistribution of local stresses, but little change in the total stress applied to the ECM. Finally, for a constant geometry, we find that both the total stress and the average stress exerted on the ECM increase with cell area. Together these data suggest that the cell can be modeled as a uniformly contracting mesh, where the magnitude of tension is regulated by the cell spread area, and the distribution of tension is regulated by local geometry.

  2. Study of branes with variable tension

    CERN Document Server

    Aros, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study a brane world model with variable tension which gives rise to four dimensional cosmologies. The brane worlds obtained correspond to E\\"{o}tv\\"{o}s branes whose (internal) geometry can be casted as either a four dimensional (A)dS$_{4}$ or a standard radiation period cosmology. The matter dominated period is discussed as well.

  3. Normal tension glaucoma and Alzheimer disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach-Holm, Daniella; Kessing, Svend Vedel; Mogensen, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether normal tension glaucoma (NTG) is associated with increased risk of developing dementia/Alzheimer disease (AD). METHODS: A total of 69 patients with NTG were identified in the case note files in the Glaucoma Clinic, University Hospital of Copenhagen (Rigshospitalet...

  4. Tension in Chemistry and Its Contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Roald

    2015-01-01

    This article makes a case for a positive role of tension in the creative process in chemistry. I begin with an argument that there is an inherent tension in what makes molecules interesting--their positioning along various polar axes. One of these, the age-old differentiation between useful (to society and for personal profit) commercialization and pure understanding of molecules and their reactions is characteristic. The question of whether there are any bad molecules then leads me to ethical concerns in chemistry, and a particular working out of these in interactions of chemists in the Middle East. An analysis is made of the special tensions involved in publishing, especially in citation ethics; chemists publish a lot, so this is situation ethics worked out on a daily basis. I then find in the literature of psychology good evidence for the positive value of moderate stress in stimulating creativity. It is obvious that too much tension leads to distress, and there are some institutional aspects of chemistry that do not come out well here. But all in all, the dynamic middle is alive, and it leads to good new science.

  5. Inclusion and Participation: Working with the Tensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Calder

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Democracy is crucially about inclusion: a theory of democracy must account for who is to be included in the democratic process, how, and on what terms. Inclusion, if conceived democratically, is fraught with tensions. This article identifies three such tensions, arising respectively in: (i the inauguration of the democratic public; (ii enabling equal participation; and (iii the relationship between instrumental and non-instrumental accounts of democracy’s value. In each case, I argue, rather than seeking somehow to dissolve or avoid such tensions, theories of democracy should allow us to live with their implications reflexively: to work with them. Such tensions are counter-democratic to the extent that they derail what Nancy Fraser calls “participatory parity,” under which citizens count as “full partners in social interaction.” But the extent to which they do this is not itself dependent on points of paradox in the very idea of inclusion. Such parity relies on complex factors, social and economic, which democratic institutions and procedures will not by themselves address. To achieve full democratic inclusion we must already have addressed such factors; no account of democracy itself, however finely-tuned, will do this.

  6. Dynamic Surface Tensions of Fluorous Surfactant Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高艳安; 侯万国; 王仲妮; 李干佐; 韩布兴; 张高勇; 吕锋锋

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic surface properties of aqueous solutions of cationic fluorous surfactant CF3CF2CF20(CF(CF3)CF2O)2CF(CF3)CONH(CHE)3N+(C2H5)2CH3I- (abbrev. FC-4 ) were reported. The critical micelle concentration (cmc)(3.6×10-5 mol/L) and equilibdum surface tensions γeq were measured by Krtlss K12 tension apparatus. Dynamic surface tension γ(t) was measured in the range of 15 ms to 200 s using the MBP tensiometer. The surface excess Γ,as a function of concentration, was obtained from equilibrium tensiometry using the Gibbs equation. Data from these experiments were combined to analyze the γ(t) decays according to the asymptotic Ward and Tordai equation.The results show that at the initial adsorption stage, the dynamic surface tension data were all consistent with this diffusion-controlled mechanism, and at the end of the adsorption process, there were some evidences for an adsorption barrier, suggesting a mixed diffusion-controlled adsorption mechanism. Using measured quantities, the barrier strength was estimated as between 25 and 35 kJ/mol at 25℃. The surface pressure plays an important role in contributing to the barrier.

  7. Tension and relaxation in the individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, C R

    1979-06-01

    Increasing materialism in society is resulting in more wide spread nervous tension in all age groups. While some degree of nervous tension is necessary in everyday living, its adverse effects require that we must learn to bring it under control. Total tension is shown to have two components: a controllable element arising from factors in the environment and the inbuilt uncontrollable residue which is basic in the individual temperament. The effects of excessive or uncontrolled stress can be classified as 1) emotional reactions such as neurotic behaviour (anxiety hypochondria, hysteria, phobia, depression obsessions and compulsions) or psychotic behaviour and 2) psychosomatic reactions (nervous asthma, headache, insomnia, heart attack). Nervous energy can be wastefully expended by such factors as loss of temper, wrong attitudes to work, job frustration and marital strains. Relaxation is the only positive way to control undesirable nervous tension and its techniques require to be learned. A number of techniques (progressive relaxation, differential relaxation, hypnosis, the use of biofeedback, Yoga and Transcendental Meditation) are described and their application to dental practice is discussed.

  8. Breast tumor oxygenation in response to carbogen intervention assessed simultaneously by three oxygen-sensitive parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yueqing; Bourke, Vincent; Kim, Jae Gwan; Xia, Mengna; Constantinescu, Anca; Mason, Ralph P.; Liu, Hanli

    2003-07-01

    Three oxygen-sensitive parameters (arterial hemoglobin oxygen saturation SaO2, tumor vascular oxygenated hemoglobin concentration [HbO2], and tumor oxygen tension pO2) were measured simultaneously by three different optical techniques (pulse oximeter, near infrared spectroscopy, and FOXY) to evaluate dynamic responses of breast tumors to carbogen (5% CO2 and 95% O2) intervention. All three parameters displayed similar trends in dynamic response to carbogen challenge, but with different response times. These response times were quantified by the time constants of the exponential fitting curves, revealing the immediate and the fastest response from the arterial SaO2, followed by changes in global tumor vascular [HbO2], and delayed responses for pO2. The consistency of the three oxygen-sensitive parameters demonstrated the ability of NIRS to monitor therapeutic interventions for rat breast tumors in-vivo in real time.

  9. The Extended Oxygen Window Concept for Programming Saturation Decompressions Using Air and Nitrox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kot, Jacek; Sicko, Zdzislaw; Doboszynski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Saturation decompression is a physiological process of transition from one steady state, full saturation with inert gas at pressure, to another one: standard conditions at surface. It is defined by the borderline condition for time spent at a particular depth (pressure) and inert gas in the breathing mixture (nitrogen, helium). It is a delicate and long lasting process during which single milliliters of inert gas are eliminated every minute, and any disturbance can lead to the creation of gas bubbles leading to decompression sickness (DCS). Most operational procedures rely on experimentally found parameters describing a continuous slow decompression rate. In Poland, the system for programming of continuous decompression after saturation with compressed air and nitrox has been developed as based on the concept of the Extended Oxygen Window (EOW). EOW mainly depends on the physiology of the metabolic oxygen window--also called inherent unsaturation or partial pressure vacancy--but also on metabolism of carbon dioxide, the existence of water vapor, as well as tissue tension. Initially, ambient pressure can be reduced at a higher rate allowing the elimination of inert gas from faster compartments using the EOW concept, and maximum outflow of nitrogen. Then, keeping a driving force for long decompression not exceeding the EOW allows optimal elimination of nitrogen from the limiting compartment with half-time of 360 min. The model has been theoretically verified through its application for estimation of risk of decompression sickness in published systems of air and nitrox saturation decompressions, where DCS cases were observed. Clear dose-reaction relation exists, and this confirms that any supersaturation over the EOW creates a risk for DCS. Using the concept of the EOW, 76 man-decompressions were conducted after air and nitrox saturations in depth range between 18 and 45 meters with no single case of DCS. In summary, the EOW concept describes physiology of

  10. 急性生理与慢性健康状况评分系统Ⅲ及氧合指数与老年重症肺炎预后的关系分析%Relationships between acute physiology and chronic health evaluation system Ⅲ, oxygenation index and prognosis of senile severe pneumonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄克刚

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the relationships between acute physiology and chronic health evaluation system Ⅲ (APACHEⅢ ), oxygenation index and prognosis of senile severe pneumonia. Methods Sixty - four senile patients with severe pneumonia in our hospital were divided into survival group and death group according to different prognosis. Patients in both groups received the same treatment, and the APACHE Ⅲ scoring, arterial blood gas analysis and oxygenation index calculation were carried during treatment. The relationships between APACHEⅢ , oxygenation index and prognosis of senile severe pneumonia were analyzed. Results Compared with the levels when diagnosed, the oxygenation indexes significantly increased from the fifth day after patients in survival group were hospitalized, and the APACHE Ⅲ scoring significantly decreased. While the oxygenation indexes significantly decreased from the fifth day after patients in death group were hospitalized, and the APACHE Ⅲ scoring significantly increased. The oxygenation index at each point in death group was significantly lower than that in survival group, while the APACHE Ⅲ scoring was significantly higher. Conclusion There is a close relationship between APACHE Ⅲ, oxygenation index and prognosis of senile severe pneumonia. It can be used as a reference to evaluate the critical degree of patients, and is important for prognosis evaluation.%目的 分析急性生理与慢性健康状况评分系统Ⅲ(APACHEⅢ)及氧合指数与老年重症肺炎预后的关系.方法 将本院收治的64例老年重症肺炎患者按照预后不同分为存活组和死亡组,2组均接受相同治疗方法,在治疗过程中进行A-PACHEⅢ评分、动脉血气分析,并计算氧合指数,分析APACHEⅢ评分及氧合指数与老年重症肺炎预后的关系.结果 存活组患者从入院第5天开始氧合指数较确诊时显著升高,APACHEⅢ评分显著降低;死亡组患者从入院第5天开始氧合指数较确诊

  11. Parametric Instability Analysis of Deepwater Top-Tensioned Risers Considering Variable Tension Along the Length

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jie; TANG Yougang

    2015-01-01

    Parametric instability of a riser is caused by fluctuation of its tension in time due to the heave motion of floating plat-form. Many studies have tackled the problem of parametric instability of a riser with constant tension. However, tension in the riser actually varies linearly from the top to the bottom due to the effect of gravity. This paper presents the parametric instability analysis of deepwater top-tensioned risers (TTR) considering the linearly varying tension along the length. Firstly, the governing equation of transverse motion of TTR under parametric excitation is established. This equation is reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations by using the Galerkin method. Then the parametric instability of TTR for three calculation models are investigated by ap-plying the Floquet theory. The results show that the natural frequencies of TTR with variable tension are evidently reduced, the pa-rametric instability zones are significantly increased and the maximum allowable amplitude of platform heave is much smaller under the same damping; The nodes and antinodes of mode shape are no longer uniformly distributed along the axial direction and the am-plitude also changes with depth, which leads to coupling between the modes. The combination resonance phenomenon occurs as a result of mode coupling, which causes more serious damage.

  12. Static tensioning promotes hamstring tendons force relaxation more reliably than cycling tensioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedade, Sérgio Rocha; Dal Fabbro, Inácio Maria; Mischan, Martha Maria; Piedade, Cezar; Maffulli, Nicola

    2017-08-01

    Graft elongation might be a major reason for increased anterior laxity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. This study analyzed the force relaxation values and their stabilization when single strands of the gracilis and semitendinosus tendons underwent cyclic and static tensioning at 2.5% strain level, and compared the efficiency of static and cyclic tensioning in promoting force relaxation. Eighteen gracilis tendons and 18 semitendinosus tendons from nine male cadavers (mean age: 22.44years) were subjected to 10 in vitro cyclic loads at 2.5% strain level, or to a static load at 2.5% strain level. During cyclic loading, the reduction in force values tended to stabilize after the sixth cyclic load, while, in the case of static loading, this stabilization occurred by the second minute. Comparing static and cyclic loading, the gracilis tendon had similar mechanical responses in both conditions, while the semitendinosus tendon showed greater force relaxation in static compared with cyclic loading. Considering that the semitendinosus tendon is the main component of the hamstring graft, its biomechanical response to loading should guide the tensioning protocol. Therefore, static tensioning seems more effective for promoting force relaxation of the semitendinosus tendon than cyclic tensioning. The gracilis tendon showed a similar mechanical response to either tensioning protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Physiological responses to environmental factors related to space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, N.; Grunbaum, B. W.; Kodama, A. M.; Mains, R. C.; Rahlmann, D. F.

    1975-01-01

    Physiological procedures and instrumentation developed for the measurement of hemodynamic and metabolic parameters during prolonged periods of weightlessness are described along with the physiological response of monkeys to weightlessness. Specific areas examined include: cardiovascular studies; thyroid function; blood oxygen transport; growth and reproduction; excreta analysis for metabolic balance studies; and electrophoretic separation of creatine phosphokinase isoenzymes in human blood.

  14. Studies on sensitivity to tension and gating pathway of MscL by molecular dynamic simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Yu Xie; Guang-Hong Ding

    2013-01-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels play an important role in various physiological processes.Although the determination of the structure of mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) makes the simulation study possible,it has not so far been possible to directly simulate the gating mechanism of MscL in atomic detail.In this article,MscL has been studied via molecular dynamic (MD)simulations to gain a detailed description of the sensitivity to lateral tension and the gating pathway.MscL undergoes conformational rearrangement in sustaining lateral tension,and the open state is obtained when 2.0 MPa lateral tension is directly applied on the pure protein.During the opening process,Loop region responds to tension first,and the mechanical sensitivity is followed by S1 domain.Transmembrane (TM) bundle is the key position for channel opening,and the motion of TM1 helices finally realizes the significant expansion of the constricted gating pore.C-terminus domain presents expansion later during the TM opening.In our study,return of the whole protein to the initial closed state is achieved only in the early opening stage.During the relaxation from the open state,the TM helices are the most mobile domain,which is different from the opening process.

  15. Dietary Antioxidants as Modifiers of Physiologic Adaptations to Exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.T. Mankowski (Robert T.); S.D. Anton (Stephen D.); T.W. Buford (Thomas W.); C. Leeuwenburgh (Christiaan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction Adaptive responses to exercise training (ET) are crucial in maintaining physiologic homeostasis and health span. Exercise-induced aerobic bioenergetic reactions in the mitochondria and cytosol increase production of reactive oxygen species, where excess of reactive oxygen sp

  16. Simulation Analysis of Standard Metal Specimen Tension Experiment by Fem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Some standard metal rod-shaped, plate-shaped or pipe-shaped specimens usually are used to be tensioned to acquire the material properties such as tensional ductility, contractibility ratio on breaking section,

  17. Reversible Oxygenation of Oxygen Transport Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drain, C. M.; Corden, Barry B.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration which illustrates changes in the visible spectra of oxygen transport proteins upon reversible oxygen binding. Provides a comparison of the physical characteristics of oxygen storage and transport proteins. Reviews essentials for preparation of the materials. (ML)

  18. Surface and interfacial tension measurement, theory, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hartland, Stanley

    2004-01-01

    This edited volume offers complete coverage of the latest theoretical, experimental, and computer-based data as summarized by leading international researchers. It promotes full understanding of the physical phenomena and mechanisms at work in surface and interfacial tensions and gradients, their direct impact on interface shape and movement, and their significance to numerous applications. Assessing methods for the accurate measurement of surface tension, interfacial tension, and contact angles, Surface and Interfacial Tension presents modern simulations of complex interfacial motions, such a

  19. Girdin/GIV is upregulated by cyclic tension, propagates mechanical signal transduction, and is required for the cellular proliferation and migration of MG-63 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jiang-Tian; Li, Yan; Yu, Bing; Gao, Guo-Jie; Zhou, Ting; Li, Song, E-mail: song_li59@126.com

    2015-08-21

    To explore how Girdin/GIV is regulated by cyclic tension and propagates downstream signals to affect cell proliferation and migration. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were exposed to cyclic tension force at 4000 μstrain and 0.5 Hz for 6 h, produced by a four-point bending system. Cyclic tension force upregulated Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation in cultured MG-63 cells. Girdin and Akt each promoted the phosphorylation of the other under stimulated tension. In vitro MTT and transwell assays showed that Girdin and Akt are required for cell proliferation and migration during cellular quiescence. Moreover, STAT3 was determined to be essential for Girdin expression under stimulated tension force in the physiological condition, as well as for osteoblast proliferation and migration during quiescence. These findings suggest that the STAT3/Girdin/Akt pathway activates in osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and may play a significant role in triggering osteoblast proliferation and migration during orthodontic treatment. - Highlights: • Tension force upregulates Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation. • Girdin and Akt promotes the phosphorylation of each other under tension stimulation. • Girdin and Akt are required for MG-63 cell proliferation and migration. • STAT3 is essential for Girdin expression after application of the tension forces.

  20. Physiological Information Database (PID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has developed a physiological information database (created using Microsoft ACCESS) intended to be used in PBPK modeling. The database contains physiological parameter values for humans from early childhood through senescence as well as similar data for laboratory animal spec...

  1. Modelling Tension Stiffening in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Bo; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1997-01-01

    flexure.In the first model, the yield zone model, it is assumed that the mean crack distance is a descending function of the reinforcement stress in a crack. Furthermore it is assumed that in certain zones between the cracks the concrete is carrying its full effective tensile strength, i.e. the concrete...... with deformations in reinforced concrete disks subjected to pure shear.A physical model for the shear stress-shear strain behaviour of disks, including tension stiffening, is proposed.In the disk model it is assumed that the tensile principal stress in the concrete decreases linearly from the initiation of cracking...... until a certain load level. At any load level the model can predict the shear strains of the disk and the inclination of the crack system. When regarding tension stiffening this latter parameter will be a function of the load level.The model is compared with experimental data, and in the light...

  2. Scaling for interfacial tensions near critical endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, Shun-Yong; Fisher, Michael E

    2005-01-01

    Parametric scaling representations are obtained and studied for the asymptotic behavior of interfacial tensions in the full neighborhood of a fluid (or Ising-type) critical endpoint, i.e., as a function both of temperature and of density/order parameter or chemical potential/ordering field. Accurate nonclassical critical exponents and reliable estimates for the universal amplitude ratios are included naturally on the basis of the "extended de Gennes-Fisher" local-functional theory. Serious defects in previous scaling treatments are rectified and complete wetting behavior is represented; however, quantitatively small, but unphysical residual nonanalyticities on the wetting side of the critical isotherm are smoothed out "manually." Comparisons with the limited available observations are presented elsewhere but the theory invites new, searching experiments and simulations, e.g., for the vapor-liquid interfacial tension on the two sides of the critical endpoint isotherm for which an amplitude ratio -3.25+/-0.05 is predicted.

  3. Thermal Analysis of Bending Under Tension Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceron, Ermanno; Martins, Paulo A.F.; Bay, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The tribological conditions in deep drawing can be simulated in the Bending Under Tension test to evaluate the performance of new lubricants, tool materials, etc. Deep drawing production with automatic handling runs normally at high rate. This implies considerable heating of the tools, which...... sometimes can cause lubricant film breakdown and galling. In order to replicate the production conditions in bending under tension testing it is thus important to control the tool/workpiece interface temperature. This can be done by pre-heating the tool, but it is essential that the interface temperature...... during testing is similar to the one in the production tool. A universal sheet tribo-tester has been developed, which can run multiple tests automatically from coil. This allows emulating the temperature increase as in production. The present work performs finite element analysis of the evolution...

  4. Separation anxiety: Stress, tension and cytokinesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, Krithika [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Iglesias, Pablo A., E-mail: pi@jhu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Robinson, Douglas N., E-mail: dnr@jhmi.edu [Department of Cell Biology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Cytokinesis, the physical separation of a mother cell into two daughter cells, progresses through a series of well-defined changes in morphology. These changes involve distinct biochemical and mechanical processes. Here, we review the mechanical features of cells during cytokinesis, discussing both the material properties as well as sources of stresses, both active and passive, which lead to the observed changes in morphology. We also describe a mechanosensory feedback control system that regulates protein localization and shape progression during cytokinesis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytokinesis progresses through three distinct mechanical phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cortical tension initially resists deformation of mother cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Late in cytokinesis, cortical tension provides stress, enabling furrow ingression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mechanosensory feedback control system regulates cytokinesis.

  5. Bending Under Tension Test with Direct Friction Measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Olsson, David Dam; Chodnikiewicz, K.

    2004-01-01

    A special BUT-transducer has been developed in which friction around the tool radius can be directly measured when drawing a plane sheet strip around a cylindrical tool-pin under constant back tension. The front tension, back tension and torque on the tool-pin are all measured directly, thus enab...

  6. Tensions of Teaching Media Literacy in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngomba-Westbrook, Nalova Elaine

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the tensions a teacher educator faces in facilitating a media literacy teacher education course at the university level. Teaching tensions are conceptualized as a three-tier framework. At the first level, tensions may arise in the selection and application of pedagogies associated with critical and new/21st century…

  7. Oxygenation of the portal vein by intraperitoneal administration of oxygenated perfluorochemical improves the engraftment and function of intraportally transplanted islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tetsuya; Li, Shiri; Kuroda, Yoshikazu; Tanioka, Yasuki; Fujino, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Yasuyuki

    2011-04-01

    One of the major obstacles for successful intraportal islet transplantation (IPIT) is early graft loss due to hypoxia. We therefore examined the effect of intraperitoneal oxygenated perfluorochemical (PFC) on oxygenation of the portal vein with respect to islet engraftment and function after IPIT in a rat model. First, we measured the oxygen tension and saturation in the portal vein of Lewis rats before and after intraperitoneal injection of oxygenated PFC. Second, blood glucose levels, glucose tolerance, and the number of surviving islets were measured after IPIT with oxygenated PFC (group 1), with PFC saturated by nitrogen (group 2), and without any PFC (control). Both oxygen tension and saturation in the portal vein significantly increased after injection of oxygenated PFC. In IPIT, the functional success rate in group 1 was 83.3%, compared with 16.7% in group 2 and 16.7% in the control. On the 28th posttransplantation day, the number of engrafted islets in the liver in group 1 (12.8 [SD, 3.3]) was significantly higher than that in group 2 (4.7 [SD, 3.0]) and in the control group (6.5 [SD, 3.3]). We clearly demonstrated the effect of intraperitoneal oxygenated PFC on oxygenation of the portal vein, resulting in better IPIT outcomes.

  8. A microprocessor based portable bolt tension monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perey, D. F.

    1991-01-01

    A bolt tension monitor (BTM) which uses ultrasonics and a pulsed phase locked loop circuit to measure load-induced acoustic phase shifts which are independent of friction is described. The BTM makes it possible to measure the load in a bolt that was tightened at some time in the past. This capability to recertify a load after-the-fact will help to insure the integrity of a bolted joint.

  9. 2-rational Cubic Spline Involving Tension Parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Shrivastava; J Joseph

    2000-08-01

    In the present paper, 1-piecewise rational cubic spline function involving tension parameters is considered which produces a monotonic interpolant to a given monotonic data set. It is observed that under certain conditions the interpolant preserves the convexity property of the data set. The existence and uniqueness of a 2-rational cubic spline interpolant are established. The error analysis of the spline interpolant is also given.

  10. Tension-induced binding of semiflexible biopolymers

    CERN Document Server

    Benetatos, Panayotis; Zippelius, Annette

    2014-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the effect of polymer tension on the collective behavior of reversibly binding cross-links. For this purpose, we employ a model of two weakly bending wormlike chains aligned in parallel by a tensile force, with a sequence of inter-chain binding sites regularly spaced along the contours. Reversible cross-links attach and detach at the sites with an affinity controlled by a chemical potential. In a mean-field approach, we calculate the free energy of the system and find the emergence of a free-energy barrier which controls the reversible (un)binding. The tension affects the conformational entropy of the chains which competes with the binding energy of the cross-links. This competition gives rise to a sudden increase in the fraction of bound sites as the tension increases. We show that this transition is related to the cross-over between weak and strong localization of a directed polymer in a pinning potential. The cross-over to the strongly bound state can be interpreted as a mechan...

  11. Chewing Over Physiology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkader, Fernando; Azevedo-Martins, Anna Karenina; de Arcisio Miranda, Manoel; Brunaldi, Kellen

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge for both students and teachers of physiology is to integrate the differentareas in which physiological knowledge is didactically divided. In developing countries, such an issue is even more demanding, because budget restrictions often affect the physiology program with laboratory classes being the first on the list when it…

  12. Chewing Over Physiology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkader, Fernando; Azevedo-Martins, Anna Karenina; de Arcisio Miranda, Manoel; Brunaldi, Kellen

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge for both students and teachers of physiology is to integrate the differentareas in which physiological knowledge is didactically divided. In developing countries, such an issue is even more demanding, because budget restrictions often affect the physiology program with laboratory classes being the first on the list when it…

  13. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos eKagias

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. Physiological stress can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner chemistry during normal development. For example, conditions such as intrinsic hypoxia and oxidative stress, which result from an increase in tissue mass, have to be confronted by developing embryos in order to complete their development. Finally, organisms face the challenge of stochastic accumulation of molecular damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level.

  14. Physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ippei; Minamino, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The heart must continuously pump blood to supply the body with oxygen and nutrients. To maintain the high energy consumption required by this role, the heart is equipped with multiple complex biological systems that allow adaptation to changes of systemic demand. The processes of growth (hypertrophy), angiogenesis, and metabolic plasticity are critically involved in maintenance of cardiac homeostasis. Cardiac hypertrophy is classified as physiological when it is associated with normal cardiac function or as pathological when associated with cardiac dysfunction. Physiological hypertrophy of the heart occurs in response to normal growth of children or during pregnancy, as well as in athletes. In contrast, pathological hypertrophy is induced by factors such as prolonged and abnormal hemodynamic stress, due to hypertension, myocardial infarction etc. Pathological hypertrophy is associated with fibrosis, capillary rarefaction, increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and cellular dysfunction (impairment of signaling, suppression of autophagy, and abnormal cardiomyocyte/non-cardiomyocyte interactions), as well as undesirable epigenetic changes, with these complex responses leading to maladaptive cardiac remodeling and heart failure. This review describes the key molecules and cellular responses involved in physiological/pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Matrix stiffness reverses the effect of actomyosin tension on cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mih, Justin D.; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Liu, Fei; Sharif, Asma S.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The stiffness of the extracellular matrix exerts powerful effects on cell proliferation and differentiation, but the mechanisms transducing matrix stiffness into cellular fate decisions remain poorly understood. Two widely reported responses to matrix stiffening are increases in actomyosin contractility and cell proliferation. To delineate their relationship, we modulated cytoskeletal tension in cells grown across a physiological range of matrix stiffnesses. On both synthetic and naturally derived soft matrices, and across a panel of cell types, we observed a striking reversal of the effect of inhibiting actomyosin contractility, switching from the attenuation of proliferation on rigid substrates to the robust promotion of proliferation on soft matrices. Inhibiting contractility on soft matrices decoupled proliferation from cytoskeletal tension and focal adhesion organization, but not from cell spread area. Our results demonstrate that matrix stiffness and actomyosin contractility converge on cell spreading in an unexpected fashion to control a key aspect of cell fate. PMID:23097048

  16. Macrophages Under Low Oxygen Culture Conditions Respond to Ion Parametric Resonance Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrophages, when entering inflamed tissue, encounter low oxygen tension due to the impairment of blood supply and/or the massive infiltration of cells that consume oxygen. Previously, we showed that such macrophages release more bacteriotoxic hydrogen peroxide (H202) when expose...

  17. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapanee Hongratanaworakit

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow potential brain waves (contingent negativevariation, and eye blink rate or pupil functions, are used as indices for the measurement of the aroma effects

  18. Doppler radar physiological sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lubecke, Victor M; Droitcour, Amy D; Park, Byung-Kwon; Singh, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive description of the theory and practical implementation of Doppler radar-based physiological monitoring. This book includes an overview of current physiological monitoring techniques and explains the fundamental technology used in remote non-contact monitoring methods. Basic radio wave propagation and radar principles are introduced along with the fundamentals of physiological motion and measurement. Specific design and implementation considerations for physiological monitoring radar systems are then discussed in detail. The authors address current research and commercial development of Doppler radar based physiological monitoring for healthcare and other applications.

  19. Toward a general psychological model of tension and suspense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz eLehne

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Tension and suspense are powerful emotional experiences that occur in a wide variety of contexts (e.g., in music, film, literature, and everyday life. The omnipresence of tension experiences suggests that they build on very basic cognitive and affective mechanisms. However, the psychological underpinnings of tension experiences remain largely unexplained, and tension and suspense are rarely discussed from a general, domain-independent perspective. In this paper, we argue that tension experiences in different contexts (e.g., musical tension or suspense in a movie build on the same underlying psychological processes. We discuss key components of tension experiences and propose a domain-independent model of tension and suspense. According to this model, tension experiences originate from states of conflict, instability, dissonance, or uncertainty that trigger predictive processes directed at future events of emotional significance. We also discuss possible neural mechanisms underlying experiences of tension. The model provides a theoretical framework that can inform future empirical research on tension phenomena.

  20. Thin Film Morphology of Block Copolymers Containing Polydimethylsiloxane as a Function of the Surface Tension of the Opposing Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadley, Maurice; Cavicchi, Kevin

    2008-03-01

    The self-assembly of block copolymers into ordered nanostructures such as spheres, cylinders, and lamellae in the range of 10-100 nm makes them interesting materials for patterning surfaces. Thin films of block copolymers containing poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) are attractive for patterning due to their high oxygen etch resistance compared to other polymers. The main disadvantage of these polymers for patterning is the low surface tension of PDMS. This causes the preferential migration of PDMS to the air/film interface driving the formation of domains parallel to the interface and surface wetting layers. In this work a series of AB block copolymers containing PDMS have been prepared where the surface tension of the opposing block was varied. The effect of changing the surface tension mismatch between the blocks on the thin film morphology will be discussed.

  1. NaHCO(3) does not affect arterial O(2) tension but attenuates desaturation of hemoglobin in maximally exercising Thoroughbreds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Goetz, Thomas E; Hassan, Aslam S

    2004-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of preexercise NaHCO(3) administration to induce metabolic alkalosis on the arterial oxygenation in racehorses performing maximal exercise. Two sets of experiments, intravenous physiological saline and NaHCO(3) (250 mg/kg i.v.), were carried out on 13 healthy, sound Thoroughbred horses in random order, 7 days apart. Blood-gas variables were examined at rest and during incremental exercise, leading to 120 s of galloping at 14 m/s on a 3.5% uphill grade, which elicited maximal heart rate and induced pulmonary hemorrhage in all horses in both treatments. NaHCO(3) administration caused alkalosis and hemodilution in standing horses, but arterial O(2) tension and hemoglobin-O(2) saturation were unaffected. Thus NaHCO(3) administration caused a reduction in arterial O(2) content at rest, although the arterial-to-mixed venous blood O(2) content gradient was unaffected. During maximal exercise in both treatments, arterial hypoxemia, desaturation, hypercapnia, acidosis, hyperthermia, and hemoconcentration developed. Although the extent of exercise-induced arterial hypoxemia was similar, there was an attenuation of the desaturation of arterial hemoglobin in the NaHCO(3)-treated horses, which had higher arterial pH. Despite these observations, the arterial blood O(2) content of exercising horses was less in the NaHCO(3) experiments because of the hemodilution, and an attenuation of the exercise-induced expansion of the arterial-to-mixed venous blood O(2) content gradient was observed. It was concluded that preexercise NaHCO(3) administration does not affect the development and/or severity of arterial hypoxemia in Thoroughbreds performing short-term, high-intensity exercise.

  2. How to use venous oxygen saturations and lactate in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beest, P.A.; Scheeren, T.W.L.

    Mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) and central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) contain much information of the (patho-) physiologic balance between a patient’s oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption. Also, they are influenced by many factors, which makes them as appealing as complex: in contrast

  3. Tension pneumoperitoneum complicated with tension pneumothorax in a patient with diaphragmatic eventration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoglu, Haldun; Coban, Erkan; Guneysel, Ozlem

    2012-01-01

    Tension pneumothorax complicating a pneumoperitoneum is a rare but known entity. However, all previously published articles report an air leak through defects in the diaphragm connecting the pneumoperitoneum and the pneumothorax. Here, the case of a 36-year-old man in whom the pneumoperitoneum acted like a tension pneumothorax because of a congenital eventration of the left diaphragm without penetration is presented. Emergency needle decompression of the abdomen was performed. A gastric ulcer that had passed through the diaphragm to the right lung was diagnosed intraoperatively. Unfortunately, the patient developed a ventricular fibrillation that remained resistant to all resuscitative efforts, and the patient died shortly afterwards. PMID:22604199

  4. Pediatric Oxygen Therapy: A Review and Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brian K; Smallwood, Craig D

    2017-06-01

    Oxygen is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that is utilized by the body for respiration. Oxygen has played a major role in respiratory care. Oxygen therapy is useful in treating hypoxemia but is often thought of as a benign therapy. After many years of study, we have learned a great deal of the benefits and potential risk of this powerful drug. Today oxygen gas is cheap, widely available, and easy to administer. Oxygen delivery devices vary in cost from a few cents for a simple nasal cannula to $25-$50 for some humidified systems. Undoubtedly, oxygen therapy is an important tool and has saved many lives and improved others. However, oxygen therapy risk, cost, and benefits should be considered in the same way as other drugs and titrated to a measured end point to avoid excessive or inadequate dosing. Withholding oxygen can have a detrimental effect, yet continuing to provide oxygen therapy when it is no longer indicated can prolong hospitalization and increase the cost of care. This comprehensive review begins with an assessment of need and a review of physiologic effects, potential toxicities, and common delivery devices, and it ends with advances in oxygen therapy with a focus on the pediatric patient. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  5. Divergence of the point tension at wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, D. B.; Latrémolière, F.; Upton, P. J.

    1993-07-01

    To determine the behavior of the line-point tension τ^ at the wetting transition, we consider a two-dimensional Ising model with appropriate boundary conditions and investigate suitable definitions of τ^ associated with the junction of an interface tilted with average angle θc and another lying along the substrate. Size-dependent fluctuations in the point of contact require that τ^ be defined through a convolution sum. Hence τ^~=ln(1/θc) as θc-->0 (wetting transition), which can be understood as a consequence of the entropic repulsion of the tilted part of the interface against the substrate.

  6. Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment Completed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Thomas P.; Sedlak, Deborah A.

    1997-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) was designed to study basic fluid mechanics and heat transfer on thermocapillary flows generated by temperature variations along the free surfaces of liquids in microgravity. STDCE first flew on the USML-1 mission in July 1992 and was rebuilt for the USML-2 mission that was launched in October 1995. This was a collaborative project with principal investigators from Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), Professors Simon Ostrach and Yasuhiro Kamotani, along with a team from the NASA Lewis Research Center composed of civil servants and contractors from Aerospace Design & Fabrication, Inc. (ADF), Analex, and NYMA, Inc.

  7. Tissue physiology and the response to heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael Robert

    2006-01-01

    heating is terminated, perfusion and oxygenation commonly recover, although how quickly this occurs appears to be tumour-specific. While these effects are unlikely to have any anti-tumour activity they can be exploited to improve the combination of heat with other therapies. However, since similar......The most important physiological parameter influencing tissue response to heat is blood flow. At mild hyperthermia temperatures blood perfusion increases in many tumours and this effect is heating time-, temperature- and tumour-dependent. These flow increases can improve tumour oxygenation. When...... physiological effects should occur in normal tissues, such combination therapies must be carefully applied. Heating tumours to higher temperatures typically causes a transient increase in perfusion during heating, followed by vascular collapse which if sufficient will increase tumour necrosis. The speed...

  8. Tissue physiology and the response to heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael Robert

    2006-01-01

    The most important physiological parameter influencing tissue response to heat is blood flow. At mild hyperthermia temperatures blood perfusion increases in many tumours and this effect is heating time-, temperature- and tumour-dependent. These flow increases can improve tumour oxygenation. When...... heating is terminated, perfusion and oxygenation commonly recover, although how quickly this occurs appears to be tumour-specific. While these effects are unlikely to have any anti-tumour activity they can be exploited to improve the combination of heat with other therapies. However, since similar...... physiological effects should occur in normal tissues, such combination therapies must be carefully applied. Heating tumours to higher temperatures typically causes a transient increase in perfusion during heating, followed by vascular collapse which if sufficient will increase tumour necrosis. The speed...

  9. Oxygen measurements to improve singlet oxygen dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Ong, Yi Hong; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2017-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves interactions between the three main components of light fluence, photosensitizer concentration, and oxygenation. Currently, singlet oxygen explicit dosimetry (SOED) has focused on the first two of these components. The macroscopic model to calculate reacted singlet oxygen has previously involved a fixed initial ground state oxygen concentration. A phosphorescence-based oxygen probe was used to measure ground state oxygen concentration throughout treatments for mice bearing radioactively induced fibroscarcoma tumors. Photofrin-, BPD-, and HPPH-mediated PDT was performed on mice. Model-calculated oxygen and measured oxygen was compared to evaluate the macroscopic model as well as the photochemical parameters involved. Oxygen measurements at various depths were compared to calculated values. Furthermore, we explored the use of noninvasive diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) to measure tumor blood flow changes in response to PDT to improve the model calculation of reacted singlet oxygen. Mice were monitored after treatment to see the effect of oxygenation on long-term recurrence-free survival as well as the efficacy of using reacted singlet oxygen as a predictive measure of outcome. Measurement of oxygenation during treatment helps to improve SOED as well as confirm the photochemical parameters involved in the macroscopic model. Use of DCS in predicting oxygenation changes was also investigated.

  10. Oxygen - A Four Billion Year History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene

    guides readers through the various lines of scientific evidence, considers some of the wrong turns and dead ends along the way, and highlights the scientists and researchers who have made key discoveries in the field. Showing how Earth's atmosphere developed over time, Oxygen takes readers...... of fields, including geology, paleontology, geochemistry, biochemistry, animal physiology, and microbiology, to explain why our oxygenated Earth became the ideal place for life. Describing which processes, both biological and geological, act to control oxygen levels in the atmosphere, Canfield traces...

  11. Herpetological diversity along Andean elevational gradients: links with physiological ecology and evolutionary physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Carlos A

    2002-11-01

    A well-defined macroecological pattern is the decline in biodiversity with altitude. However, this decline is taxa-specific. For example, amphibians are more diverse than squamates at extreme elevations in the tropical Andes, but this pattern is reversed at extreme elevations in the southern latitudes. Several ecophysiological and evolutionary factors may be related to this difference. At high-elevations in southern latitudes temperature differs dramatically among seasons and dry soils dominate, characteristics that appear to favor lizard physiological ecology. Tropical high altitudes, in contrast, are humid and offer abundant and diverse water resources. These characteristics allow for a richer anuran community but might complicate lizard egg development through temperature and oxygen constrains. Differences in strategies of thermal adaptation might also modulate diversity patterns. The thermal physiology of anurans is extremely labile so that behavioral and physiological performance is maintained despite an altitudinal decrease in field body temperature. Lizards, in contrast, exhibit a conservative thermal physiology and rely on behavioral thermoregulation to face cold and variable temperatures. Both, lizard behavioral strategies and anuran physiological adjustments seem equally efficient in allowing ecological success and diversification for both groups in the tropics up to approximately 3000 m. At higher elevations physiological thermal adaptation is required, and lizards are ecologically constrained, perhaps at various ontogenetic stages. Patterns of biodiversity along environmental clines can be better understood through a physiological approach, and can help to refine and propose hypotheses in evolutionary physiology.

  12. Status of Research in Underwater Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1956-03-01

    9 2.3.1 Individual Differences in Susceptibility to Nitrogen Narcosis ...................... 9 2.3.2 Central Nervous System Effects...oxygen toxicity and nitrogen narcosis at higher pressures should be investigated. This report describing problems not yet solved in the broad field of...even convulsions, but also to the pharmacology of oxygeu toxicity and nitrogen narcosis , the physiology of respira- tory resistance and exercise, and

  13. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger David John

    2012-01-01

    by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature, and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive, and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner...... include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review......Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. It can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress, and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged...

  14. Applied physiology of swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, J M; Montpetit, R R

    1986-01-01

    Scientific research in swimming over the past 10 to 15 years has been oriented toward multiple aspects that relate to applied and basic physiology, metabolism, biochemistry, and endocrinology. This review considers recent findings on: 1) specific physical characteristics of swimmers; 2) the energetics of swimming; 3) the evaluation of aerobic fitness in swimming; and 4) some metabolic and hormonal aspects related to swimmers. Firstly, the age of finalists in Olympic swimming is not much different from that of the participants from other sports. They are taller and heavier than a reference population of the same age. The height bias in swimming may be the reason for lack of success from some Asian and African countries. Experimental data point toward greater leanness, particularly in female swimmers, than was seen 10 years ago. Overall, female swimmers present a range of 14 to 19% body fat whereas males are much lower (5 to 10%). Secondly, the relationship between O2 uptake and crawl swimming velocity (at training and competitive speeds) is thought to be linear. The energy cost varies between strokes with a dichotomy between the 2 symmetrical and the 2 asymmetrical strokes. Energy expenditure in swimming is represented by the sum of the cost of translational motion (drag) and maintenance of horizontal motion (gravity). The cost of the latter decreases as speed increases. Examination of the question of size-associated effects on the cost of swimming using Huxley's allometric equation (Y = axb) shows an almost direct relationship with passive drag. Expressing energy cost in litres of O2/m/kg is proposed as a better index of technical swimming ability than the traditional expression of VO2/distance in L/km. Thirdly, maximal direct conventional techniques used to evaluate maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) in swimming include free swimming, tethered swimming, and flume swimming. Despite the individual peculiarities of each method, with similar experimental conditions

  15. Thermally Insulating, Kinematic Tensioned-Fiber Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voellmer, George M.

    2004-01-01

    A salt pill and some parts of a thermally insulating, kinematic suspension system that holds the salt pill rigidly in an adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) is presented. "Salt pill" in this context denotes a unit comprising a cylindrical container, a matrix of gold wires in the container, and a cylinder of ferric ammonium alum (a paramagnetic salt) that has been deposited on the wires. The structural members used in this system for both thermal insulation and positioning are aromatic polyamide fibers (Kevlar(R) or equivalent) under tension. This suspension system is designed to satisfy several special requirements to ensure the proper operation of the ADR. These requirements are to (1) maintain the salt pill at a specified position within the cylindrical bore of an electromagnet; (2) prevent vibrations, which would cause dissipation of heat in the salt pill; and (3) minimize the conduction of heat from the electromagnet bore and other neighboring objects to the salt pill; all while (4) protecting the salt pill (which is fragile) against all tensile and bending loads other than those attributable to its own weight. In addition, the system is required to consist of two subsystems -- one for the top end and one for the bottom end of the salt pill -- that can be assembled and tensioned separately from each other and from the salt pill, then later attached to the salt pill.

  16. Theoretical and experimental study on surface tension and dynamic surface tension of aqueous lithium bromide and water with additive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程文龙; 陈则韶; 秋泽淳; 胡芃; 柏木孝夫

    2003-01-01

    The surface tensions of water and aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr) with 2-ethyl-1-hexa- nol (2EH) and 1-octanol were measured using Wilhelmy plate method, and the oscillation of surface tension under the open condition for LiBr solution was observed. The dynamic surface tensions of water and LiBr solution in the presence of the 2EH and 1-octanol vapor were measured in this paper. The results showed that the additives vapor could obviously affect surface tension. For water, the dynamic surface tension was also affected by the mass of the tested liquid; however, for LiBr solution, the dynamic surface tension was not related to the mass of the tested solution. According to the experimental results, the hypothesis that surface tension varies linearly with the surface excess concentration is advanced, which could overcome the limit of Gibbs equation. The equations of surface absorption and desorption are modified, the units of the adsorption coefficient and desorption coefficient are unified; the effects of the liquid and vapor of additive on the surface tension are unified; the theoretical relations of the static surface tension and dynamic surface tension with the relative contents of the liquid and vapor of additive are obtained under the combined actions of them; the theoretical equations are validated by the experiments results.

  17. Tension-type headache: pain, fatigue, tension, and EMG responses to mental activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansevicius, D; Westgaard, R H; Sjaastad, O M

    1999-06-01

    Twenty patients with tension-type headache (14 chronic and 6 episodic) and 20 group-matched controls were selected for this study. They participated in a 1-hour, complex, two-choice, reaction-time test, as well as 5-minute pretest and 20-minute posttest periods. Subjects reported any pain in the forehead, temples, neck, and shoulders, as well as any feelings of fatigue and tension during the pretest, and every 10 minutes during the test and posttest by visual analog scales. Superficial electromyography was recorded simultaneously from positions representing the frontal and temporal muscles, neck (mostly splenius), and trapezius muscles. The location of pain corresponded to the position of the electrodes, but extended over a larger area. The test provoked pain in the forehead, neck, and shoulders of patients, i.e., pain scores from these regions increased significantly during the test. The pain scores continued to increase posttest. In patients, the EMG response of the trapezius (first 10 minutes of the test) was elevated relative to pretest. In controls, only the frontal muscles showed an EMG test response. Patients showed significantly higher EMG responses than controls in the neck (whole test period) and trapezius (first 10 minutes of the test period). There were significant differences in pain and fatigue scoring between patients and controls in all three periods and in tension scoring posttest. Fatigue correlated with pain, with increasing significance for all locations examined, while tension was mainly associated with the neck pain. The meaning of the variables "tension" and "fatigue" in headache, and their association with recorded muscle activity in various regions is discussed. The EMG response of the trapezius muscle to the test is discussed in comparison with similar responses observed in patients with other pain syndromes.

  18. Compression or tension? The stress distribution in the proximal femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meakin JR

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Questions regarding the distribution of stress in the proximal human femur have never been adequately resolved. Traditionally, by considering the femur in isolation, it has been believed that the effect of body weight on the projecting neck and head places the superior aspect of the neck in tension. A minority view has proposed that this region is in compression because of muscular forces pulling the femur into the pelvis. Little has been done to study stress distributions in the proximal femur. We hypothesise that under physiological loading the majority of the proximal femur is in compression and that the internal trabecular structure functions as an arch, transferring compressive stresses to the femoral shaft. Methods To demonstrate the principle, we have developed a 2D finite element model of the femur in which body weight, a representation of the pelvis, and ligamentous forces were included. The regions of higher trabecular bone density in the proximal femur (the principal trabecular systems were assigned a higher modulus than the surrounding trabecular bone. Two-legged and one-legged stances, the latter including an abductor force, were investigated. Results The inclusion of ligamentous forces in two-legged stance generated compressive stresses in the proximal femur. The increased modulus in areas of greater structural density focuses the stresses through the arch-like internal structure. Including an abductor muscle force in simulated one-legged stance also produced compression, but with a different distribution. Conclusion This 2D model shows, in principle, that including ligamentous and muscular forces has the effect of generating compressive stresses across most of the proximal femur. The arch-like trabecular structure transmits the compressive loads to the shaft. The greater strength of bone in compression than in tension is then used to advantage. These results support the hypothesis presented. If correct, a

  19. Advances in physiological computing

    CERN Document Server

    Fairclough, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    This edited collection will provide an overview of the field of physiological computing, i.e. the use of physiological signals as input for computer control. It will cover a breadth of current research, from brain-computer interfaces to telemedicine.

  20. Phun Week: Understanding Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limson, Mel; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2009-01-01

    Topics such as sports, exercise, health, and nutrition can make the science of physiology relevant and engaging for students. In addition, many lessons on these topics, such as those on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems, align with national and state life science education standards. Physiology Understanding Week (PhUn…

  1. Physiology of sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Ron

    2007-07-01

    The elite athlete represents the extreme of the human gene pool, where genetic endowment is developed by an intensive training programme. Sport encompasses many different activities, calling for different physical and mental attributes. Understanding the physiology of exercise provides insights into normal physiological function.

  2. Physiological changes in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    SOMA-PILLAY, Priya; Catherine, Nelson-Piercy; Tolppanen, Heli; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Physiological changes occur in pregnancy to nurture the developing foetus and prepare the mother for labour and delivery. Some of these changes influence normal biochemical values while others may mimic symptoms of medical disease. It is important to differentiate between normal physiological changes and disease pathology. This review highlights the important changes that take place during normal pregnancy.

  3. Narrative tension analysis: reader`s and text aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Анна Вениаминовна Лещенко

    2016-01-01

    In this article narrative tension is conceptualized as a complex cognitive and affective phenomenon being analysed in two dimensions: psychological and textological. In the receptive and psychological framework narrative tension is considered as reader`s psychological response to the fictional events of the storyworld. In modern text theory narrative tension is thought as a specific narrative strategy represented by definite narrative structures inducing the particular emotional state of the ...

  4. Narrative tension analysis: reader`s and text aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анна Вениаминовна Лещенко

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article narrative tension is conceptualized as a complex cognitive and affective phenomenon being analysed in two dimensions: psychological and textological. In the receptive and psychological framework narrative tension is considered as reader`s psychological response to the fictional events of the storyworld. In modern text theory narrative tension is thought as a specific narrative strategy represented by definite narrative structures inducing the particular emotional state of the reader

  5. Precision Tension Control System Using Magnetic Particle Clutch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春香; 杨汝清; 王永章; 路华

    2004-01-01

    The control of the stability of the filament tension is one of the crucial techniques ensuring the component quality of the composite materials. The open-loop tension control system, with industrial control computer as the core,magnetic particle clutch as the actuator, equipped with compensation technique is researched and manufactured.It can assure the tension control stability of the yarn in filament winding process and increase the control precision of the whole system.

  6. Physiological demands of competitive basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narazaki, K; Berg, K; Stergiou, N; Chen, B

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess physiological demands of competitive basketball by measuring oxygen consumption (VO2) and other variables during practice games. Each of 12 players (20.4 +/- 1.1 years) was monitored in a 20-min practice game, which was conducted in the same way as actual games with the presence of referees and coaches. VO2 was measured by a portable system during the game and blood lactate concentration (LA) was measured in brief breaks. Subjects were also videotaped for time-motion analysis. Female and male players demonstrated respective VO2 of 33.4 +/- 4.0 and 36.9 +/- 2.6 mL/kg/min and LA of 3.2 +/- 0.9 and 4.2 +/- 1.3 mmol/L in the practice games (P>0.05). They spent 34.1% of play time running and jumping, 56.8% walking, and 9.0% standing. Pre-obtained VO(2max) was correlated to VO(2) during play (r=0.673) and to percent of duration for running and jumping (r=0.935 and 0.962 for females and males, respectively). This study demonstrated a greater oxygen uptake for competitive basketball than that estimated based on a previous compendium. The correlation between aerobic capacity and activity level suggests the potential benefit of aerobic conditioning in basketball.

  7. Oxygen requirements of the earliest animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Daniel B.; Ward, Lewis M.; Jones, CarriAyne; Sweeten, Brittany; Forth, Michael; Treusch, Alexander H.; Canfield, Donald E.

    2014-03-01

    A rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans is one of the most popular explanations for the relatively late and abrupt appearance of animal life on Earth. In this scenario, Earth's surface environment failed to meet the high oxygen requirements of animals up until the middle to late Neoproterozoic Era (850-542 million years ago), when oxygen concentrations sufficiently rose to permit the existence of animal life for the first time. Although multiple lines of geochemical evidence support an oxygenation of the Ediacaran oceans (635-542 million years ago), roughly corresponding with the first appearance of metazoans in the fossil record, the oxygen requirements of basal animals remain unclear. Here we show that modern demosponges, serving as analogs for early animals, can survive under low-oxygen conditions of 0.5-4.0% present atmospheric levels. Because the last common ancestor of metazoans likely exhibited a physiology and morphology similar to that of a modern sponge, its oxygen demands may have been met well before the enhanced oxygenation of the Ediacaran Period. Therefore, the origin of animals may not have been triggered by a contemporaneous rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans. Instead, other ecological and developmental processes are needed to adequately explain the origin and earliest evolution of animal life on Earth.

  8. Oxygen consumption dynamics in steady-state tumour models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, David Robert; Fletcher, Alexander G; Partridge, Mike

    2014-09-01

    Oxygen levels in cancerous tissue can have a significant effect on treatment response: hypoxic tissue is both more radioresistant and more chemoresistant than well-oxygenated tissue. While recent advances in medical imaging have facilitated real-time observation of macroscopic oxygenation, the underlying physics limits the resolution to the millimetre domain, whereas oxygen tension varies over a micrometre scale. If the distribution of oxygen in the tumour micro-environment can be accurately estimated, then the effect of potential dose escalation to these hypoxic regions could be better modelled, allowing more realistic simulation of biologically adaptive treatments. Reaction-diffusion models are commonly used for modelling oxygen dynamics, with a variety of functional forms assumed for the dependence of oxygen consumption rate (OCR) on cellular status and local oxygen availability. In this work, we examine reaction-diffusion models of oxygen consumption in spherically and cylindrically symmetric geometries. We consider two different descriptions of oxygen consumption: one in which the rate of consumption is constant and one in which it varies with oxygen tension in a hyperbolic manner. In each case, we derive analytic approximations to the steady-state oxygen distribution, which are shown to closely match the numerical solutions of the equations and accurately predict the extent to which oxygen can diffuse. The derived expressions relate the limit to which oxygen can diffuse into a tissue to the OCR of that tissue. We also demonstrate that differences between these functional forms are likely to be negligible within the range of literature estimates of the hyperbolic oxygen constant, suggesting that the constant consumption rate approximation suffices for modelling oxygen dynamics for most values of OCR. These approximations also allow the rapid identification of situations where hyperbolic consumption forms can result in significant differences from constant

  9. Effect of Ageing on the Passive and Active Tension and Pharmacodynamic Characteristics of Rat Coronary Arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheykhzade, Majid; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Boonen, Harrie C.M.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of ageing on the passive and active tension and pharmacodynamic characteristics of intramural coronary arteries from 3-month-old and 2-year-old male Wistar rats was investigated using an isometric myograph. The passive vessel wall tension measured in Ca2+-free physiological salt...... solution at L0 was significantly greater in arteries from old rats (1.46 ± 0.10 Nm–1, n = 7) than in young rats (1.13 ± 0.13 Nm–1, n = 6). However, the maximal active tension at L0 was similar. The spontaneous myogenic tone was increased by age and the vasorelaxation induced by extracellular K......+ was significantly higher in coronary arteries of old rats. The sensitivity (pD2) to 5-HT was significantly higher in arteries from old (6.43 ± 0.11, n = 22) than from young rats (6.16 ± 0.08, n = 29). Ketanserin induced a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the 5-HT concentration-response curve in arteries...

  10. Size Effect for Normal Strength Concrete in Uniaxial Tension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李庆斌; 尹玉先

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a new size effect model for normal strength concrete subjected to uniaxial tension. The model is based on two extremes, sand cement paste in uniaxial tension and a sand-cement-paste/rock interface in uniaxial tension. Uniaxial tension tests with normal strength concrete measuring the tensile strength of normal strength concrete specimens with different geometrical shapes and different ratios of the aggregate size to the characteristic dimension of the concrete specimen show a significant size effect. The theoretical size effect law prediction agrees well with the experimental data.

  11. Bending Under Tension Test with Direct Friction Measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Olsson, David Dam; Chodnikiewicz, K.

    2006-01-01

    A special Bending-Under-Tension (BUT) transducer has been developed in which friction around the tool radius can be directly measured when drawing a plane sheet strip around a cylindrical tool-pin under constant back tension. The front tension, back tension and torque on the tool-pin are all...... measured directly, thus enabling accurate measurement of friction and direct determination of lubricant film breakdown for varying normal pressure, sliding speed, tool radius and tool preheat temperature. The transducer is applied in an experimental investigation focusing on limits of lubrication...... in drawing of stainless steel showing the influence of varying process conditions and the performance of different lubricants....

  12. Evolving spacetimes with purely radial tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Nasre Esfahani

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available   In this study time-dependent and spherically symmetric solutions of the Einstein field equations in an anisotropic background with a purely radial tension are presented. There exist three classes of solutions,1 An open spacetime with a wormhole at its center. 2 A conical spacetime. 3 A closed spacetime. These inhomogeneous solutions are reduced to FRW spacetimes in matter-dominated era, asymptotically. Therefore, they can be used to describe local inhomogeneities that are not considered in the standard model. For the wormhole solution. it is explicity shown that the considered matter is non-exotic, that is, it does not violate the energy conditions. Also, static solutions are studied. There is only one static solution,a conical spacetime. In this case, the matter satisfies the energy condition critically.

  13. The Curriculum. Conceptual and Practical Tensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Díaz Barriga

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this essay is to analyze the formation of two currents in the field of curriculum. These currents, over the last century, were visualized in different ways: one which considers the educational project as linked to a system or an educational institution, a perspective expressed in the various proposals to develop study plans and programs; the other, which links it with concepts like everyday life, curriculum as educational practice and curricular reality, which vindicate what is happening in the educational environment, particularly in the classroom. This paper recognizes a meeting of both currents in the origins of the curriculum field in the early twentieth century; at the same time we analyze its evolution marked by mutual discrediting and ignorance that have generated tensions. It reflects on the need to identify the limitations of each current, but also to recognize their successes.

  14. Shell tension forces propel Dictyostelium slugs forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieu, Jean-Paul; Delanoë-Ayari, Hélène

    2012-12-01

    The Dictyostelium slug is an excellent model system for studying collective movements, as it is comprised of about 10(5) cells all moving together in the same direction. It still remains unclear how this movement occurs and what the physical mechanisms behind it are. By applying our recently developed 3D traction force microscopy, we propose a simple explanation for slug propulsion. Most of the forces are exerted by the sheath surrounding the slug. This secreted shell is under a rather uniform tension (around 50 mN m(-1)) and will give rise to a tissue under pressure. Finally, we propose that this pressure will naturally push the slug tip forwards if a gradient of shell mechanical properties takes place in the very anterior part of the raised tip.

  15. Biaxial tension on polymer in thermoforming range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, S.; Combeaud, C.; Fournier, F.; Rodriguez, J.; Billon, N.

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental characterization of mechanical properties of a polyethylene terephtalate (PET) resin classically used in stretch blow moulding process. We have applied on such a material a well established experimental protocol at CEMEF, including new and relevant biaxial tensile tests. The experimental set-up relative to biaxial tension will be presented and described in a first part of the paper. Furthermore, we will focus on the experimental DMTA preliminary tests which are required to estimate the resin sensibility to temperature and strain rate in linear viscoelasticity domain. Finally, we will be interested in the material large strain behaviour: biaxial tensile results are presented and discussed. Finally, such an experimental approach should allow a relevant modelling of polymer physics and mechanics; this point will not be discussed here because of a lack of time.

  16. Biaxial tension on polymer in thermoforming range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billon N.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental characterization of mechanical properties of a polyethylene terephtalate (PET resin classically used in stretch blow moulding process. We have applied on such a material a well established experimental protocol at CEMEF, including new and relevant biaxial tensile tests. The experimental set-up relative to biaxial tension will be presented and described in a first part of the paper. Furthermore, we will focus on the experimental DMTA preliminary tests which are required to estimate the resin sensibility to temperature and strain rate in linear viscoelasticity domain. Finally, we will be interested in the material large strain behaviour: biaxial tensile results are presented and discussed. Finally, such an experimental approach should allow a relevant modelling of polymer physics and mechanics; this point will not be discussed here because of a lack of time.

  17. Steady periodic gravity waves with surface tension

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider two-dimensional, stratified, steady water waves propagating over an impermeable flat bed and with a free surface. The motion is assumed to be driven by capillarity (that is, surface tension) on the surface and a gravitational force acting on the body of the fluid. We prove the existence of global continua of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. This is accomplished by first constructing a 1-parameter family of laminar flow solutions, $\\mathcal{T}$, then applying bifurcation theory methods to obtain local curves of small amplitude solutions branching from $\\mathcal{T}$ at an eigenvalue of the linearized problem. Each solution curve is then continued globally by means of a degree theoretic theorem in the spirit of Rabinowitz. Finally, we complement the degree theoretic picture by proving an alternate global bifurcation theorem via the analytic continuation method of Dancer.

  18. Shell tension forces propel Dictyostelium slugs forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieu, Jean-Paul; Delanoë-Ayari, Hélène

    2012-12-01

    The Dictyostelium slug is an excellent model system for studying collective movements, as it is comprised of about 105 cells all moving together in the same direction. It still remains unclear how this movement occurs and what the physical mechanisms behind it are. By applying our recently developed 3D traction force microscopy, we propose a simple explanation for slug propulsion. Most of the forces are exerted by the sheath surrounding the slug. This secreted shell is under a rather uniform tension (around 50 mN m-1) and will give rise to a tissue under pressure. Finally, we propose that this pressure will naturally push the slug tip forwards if a gradient of shell mechanical properties takes place in the very anterior part of the raised tip.

  19. Modifying horizon thermodynamics by surface tensions

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Deyou

    2016-01-01

    The modified first laws of thermodynamics at the black hole horizon and the cosmological horizon of the Schwarzschild de Sitter black hole and the apparent horizon of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology are derived by the surface tensions, respectively. The corresponding Smarr relations are obeyed. For the black hole, the cosmological constant is first treated as a fixed constant, and then as a variable associated to the pressure. The law at the apparent horizon takes the same form as that at the cosmological horizon, but is different from that at the black hole horizon. The positive temperatures guarantee the appearance of the worked terms in the modified laws at the cosmological and apparent horizons. While they can disappear at the black hole horizon.

  20. Neurotrophic factors in tension-type headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan B. Domingues

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophic factors (NF are involved in pain regulation and a few studies have suggested that they may play a pathophysiological role in primary headaches. The aim of this study was to investigate NF levels in patients with tension type headache (TTH. We carried out a cross sectional study including 48 TTH patients and 48 age and gender matched controls. Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories, and Headache Impact Test were recorded. Serum levels of NF were determined by ELISA. There were not significant differences between NF levels between TTH patients and controls. Patients with chronic and episodic TTH had not significant differences in NF levels. The presence of headache at the time of evaluation did not significantly alter the levels of NF. Depression and anxiety scores as well as headache impact did not correlate with NF levels. Our study suggest that the serum levels of NF are not altered in TTH.

  1. Surface tension propulsion of fungal spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblin, Xavier; Yang, Sylvia; Dumais, Jacques

    2009-09-01

    Most basidiomycete fungi actively eject their spores. The process begins with the condensation of a water droplet at the base of the spore. The fusion of the droplet onto the spore creates a momentum that propels the spore forward. The use of surface tension for spore ejection offers a new paradigm to perform work at small length scales. However, this mechanism of force generation remains poorly understood. To elucidate how fungal spores make effective use of surface tension, we performed a detailed mechanical analysis of the three stages of spore ejection: the transfer of energy from the drop to the spore, the work of fracture required to release the spore from its supporting structure and the kinetic energy of the spore after ejection. High-speed video imaging of spore ejection in Auricularia auricula and Sporobolomyces yeasts revealed that drop coalescence takes place over a short distance ( approximately 5 microm) and energy transfer is completed in less than 4 mus. Based on these observations, we developed an explicit relation for the conversion of surface energy into kinetic energy during the coalescence process. The relation was validated with a simple artificial system and shown to predict the initial spore velocity accurately (predicted velocity: 1.2 m s(-1); observed velocity: 0.8 m s(-1) for A. auricula). Using calibrated microcantilevers, we also demonstrate that the work required to detach the spore from the supporting sterigma represents only a small fraction of the total energy available for spore ejection. Finally, our observations of this unique discharge mechanism reveal a surprising similarity with the mechanics of jumping in animals.

  2. Multiple antioxidant proteins protect Chlorobaculum tepidum against oxygen and reactive oxygen species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hui; Jubelirer, Sara; Garcia Costas, Amaya M

    2009-01-01

    The genome of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum (Cba.) tepidum, a strictly anaerobic photolithoautotroph, is predicted to encode more than ten genes whose products are potentially involved in protection from reactive oxygen species and an oxidative stress response. The encoded proteins...... include cytochrome bd quinol oxidase, NADH oxidase, rubredoxin oxygen oxidoreductase, several thiol peroxidases, alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, superoxide dismutase, methionine sulfoxide reductase, and rubrerythrin. To test the physiological functions of some of these proteins, ten genes were...

  3. Oxygen transfer rate during the production of alginate by Azotobacter vinelandii under oxygen-limited and non oxygen-limited conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peña Carlos F

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oxygen transfer rate (OTR and dissolved oxygen tension (DOT play an important role in determining alginate production and its composition; however, no systematic study has been reported about the independent influence of the OTR and DOT. In this paper, we report a study about alginate production and the evolution of the molecular mass of the polymer produced by a wild-type A. vinelandii strain ATCC 9046, in terms of the maximum oxygen transfer rate (OTRmax in cultures where the dissolved oxygen tension (DOT was kept constant. Results The results revealed that in the two dissolved oxygen conditions evaluated, strictly controlled by gas blending at 0.5 and 5% DOT, an increase in the agitation rate (from 300 to 700 rpm caused a significant increase in the OTRmax (from 17 to 100 mmol L-1 h-1 for DOT of 5% and from 6 to 70 mmol L-1 h-1 for DOT of 0.5%. This increase in the OTRmax improved alginate production, as well as the specific alginate production rate (SAPR, reaching a maximal alginate concentration of 3.1 g L-1 and a SAPR of 0.031 g alg g biom-1 h-1 in the cultures at OTRmax of 100 mmol L-1 h-1. In contrast, the mean molecular mass (MMM of the alginate isolated from cultures developed under non-oxygen limited conditions increased by decreasing the OTRmax, reaching a maximal of 550 kDa at an OTRmax of 17 mmol L-1 h-1 . However, in the cultures developed under oxygen limitation (0.5% DOT, the MMM of the polymer was practically the same (around 200 kDa at 300 and 700 rpm, and this remained constant throughout the cultivation. Conclusions Overall, our results showed that under oxygen-limited and non oxygen-limited conditions, alginate production and its molecular mass are linked to the OTRmax, independently of the DOT of the culture.

  4. Using measures of single-cell physiology and physiological state to understand organismic aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Alexander; Driscoll, Monica; Brent, Roger

    2016-02-01

    Genetically identical organisms in homogeneous environments have different lifespans and healthspans. These differences are often attributed to stochastic events, such as mutations and 'epimutations', changes in DNA methylation and chromatin that change gene function and expression. But work in the last 10 years has revealed differences in lifespan- and health-related phenotypes that are not caused by lasting changes in DNA or identified by modifications to DNA or chromatin. This work has demonstrated persistent differences in single-cell and whole-organism physiological states operationally defined by values of reporter gene signals in living cells. While some single-cell states, for example, responses to oxygen deprivation, were defined previously, others, such as a generally heightened ability to make proteins, were, revealed by direct experiment only recently, and are not well understood. Here, we review technical progress that promises to greatly increase the number of these measurable single-cell physiological variables and measureable states. We discuss concepts that facilitate use of single-cell measurements to provide insight into physiological states and state transitions. We assert that researchers will use this information to relate cell level physiological readouts to whole-organism outcomes, to stratify aging populations into groups based on different physiologies, to define biomarkers predictive of outcomes, and to shed light on the molecular processes that bring about different individual physiologies. For these reasons, quantitative study of single-cell physiological variables and state transitions should provide a valuable complement to genetic and molecular explanations of how organisms age.

  5. John Scott Haldane: The father of oxygen therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available John Scott Haldane was a versatile genius who solved several problems of great practical significance. His ability to look beyond the laboratory and investigate theory added crucial findings in the field of respiratory physiology. His work on high altitude physiology, diving physiology, oxygen therapy, and carbon monoxide poisoning led to a sea change in clinical medicine and improved safety and reduced mortality and morbidity in many high risk situations.

  6. Mechanical evaluation of anastomotic tension and patency in arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F; Lineaweaver, W C; Buntic, R; Walker, R

    1996-02-01

    This study quantified arterial anastomotic tension, evaluated subsequent patency rates, and examined the degree of tension reduction with vessel mobilization. The study was divided into two components. In part I, a mechanical analysis was undertaken to evaluate tension, based on the determination of the force required to deflect a cable (vessel) laterally, and its resulting lateral displacement. Six Sprague-Dawley rats with 12 femoral arteries were divided into two subgroups: 1) no mobilization; and 2) axial mobilization by ligation and transection of superficial epigastric and gracilis muscular branches. The tension of femoral arterial anastomoses was calculated in vessels with no segmental defect and with 1.5-, 3-, 4.5-, 6-, and 7.5-mm defects. In part II, patency was evaluated. Fifty-five rats with 110 femoral arteries were divided into two sub-groups as defined in part I: 1) no mobilization; and 2) axial mobilization by ligation and transection of superficial epigastric and gracilis muscular branches. Microvascular anastomoses were performed with no segmental defect and with 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, 6-, 7-, 8-, 9-, and 10-mm segmental vessel defects. Patency was evaluated 24 hr postoperatively. Part I of the study revealed that anastomotic tension gradually increased along with an increase in the length of the vessel defect, from 1.9 to 11.34 g in the no-mobilization group and from 1.97 to 8.44 g in the axial-mobilization group. Comparison of tension linear regression coefficient showed a significant difference between the two groups (p tension approximately 6 g) in the no-mobilization group and 6 mm in the axial-mobilization group (tension approximately 6.48 g). Microanastomotic tension was related to the size of the vessel defect, with increasing tension leading to thrombosis. Axial mobilization significantly reduced the tension in vessels with segmental defects and decreased thrombosis rates.

  7. Fetal cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychik, J

    2004-01-01

    The cardiovascular system of the fetus is physiologically different than the adult, mature system. Unique characteristics of the myocardium and specific channels of blood flow differentitate the physiology of the fetus from the newborn. Conditions of increased preload and afterload in the fetus, such as sacrococcygeal teratoma and twin-twin transfusion syndrome, result in unique and complex pathophysiological states. Echocardiography has improved our understanding of human fetal cadiovasvular physiology in the normal and diseased states, and has expanded our capability to more effectively treat these disease processes.

  8. Necessary Tension in Marine Risers (Continued Tension des colonnes montantes en mer (suite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubinski A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A simple, first approximation method for calculating the necessary tension in a marine riser, is presented. This article is a practical supplement ta the one published under the same title in the March-April 1977 issue of Revue de l'Institut Français du Pétrole. On présente dans cet article une méthode simple permettant de calculer en première approximation la tension d'une colonne montante en mer. Cet article est le complément pratique de celui publié sous le même titre dans le numéro mars-avril 1977 de la Revue de l'Institut Français du Pétrole.

  9. Fatigue Behaviour and Life Assessment of Jute-epoxy Composites under Tension-Tension Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmaraj, N. H.; Chethan, K. N.; Pavan; Onkar, Anand

    2017-08-01

    The present study involves fabrication and fatigue life assessment of multi-layered, woven jute fibres with epoxy matrix composites. Jute fabric were treated with 1N sodium hydroxidesolution for a duration of 6 hours. Alkali treatment was done to modify internal structure as well as surface properties of fibre. Laminates were fabricated by laying up multi layered woven jute fabric at varying angle [0-900/ (±450)2/0-900]. Vacuum bagging method was used to reduce the void content and thus increase the quality of composites. Tension-Tension fatigue tests were performed with a constant fatigue stress ratio (R=0.1) and results obtained from the tests were used to plot S-N Curve. A model based on power law equation was used for curve fitting.

  10. Oxidative stress in marine environments: biochemistry and physiological ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress-the production and accumulation of reduced oxygen intermediates such as superoxide radicals, singlet oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals-can damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. Many disease processes of clinical interest and the aging process involve oxidative stress in their underlying etiology. The production of reactive oxygen species is also prevalent in the world's oceans, and oxidative stress is an important component of the stress response in marine organisms exposed to a variety of insults as a result of changes in environmental conditions such as thermal stress, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, or exposure to pollution. As in the clinical setting, reactive oxygen species are also important signal transduction molecules and mediators of damage in cellular processes, such as apoptosis and cell necrosis, for marine organisms. This review brings together the voluminous literature on the biochemistry and physiology of oxidative stress from the clinical and plant physiology disciplines with the fast-increasing interest in oxidative stress in marine environments.

  11. Reproduction, physiology and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter summarizes fundamental knowledge and recent discoveries about the reproduction, physiology and biochemistry of plant-parasitic nematodes. Various types of reproduction are reviewed, including sexual reproduction and mitotic and meiotic parthenogenesis. Although much is known about the p...

  12. Tensions in the Biology Laboratory: What Are They?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Aik-Ling

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify tensions in teacher-student interaction in a high school biology laboratory. Using micro-analytic analysis of classroom talk, the interaction between the students and a teacher working in the biology laboratory session on "Reproduction in Plants" is studied. The two tensions highlighted here are…

  13. Contingent muscular tension during a choice reaction task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Masanobu; Choshi, Koji

    2006-06-01

    This study examined the effects of contingent muscular tension on a choice reaction task, and especially, the effects various amounts of muscular tension have on the information processing of choice reaction time. The reactive movement task included a choice reaction task. Ten right-handed healthy men (ages 18 to 19 years) underwent trials with stimulus presentation probabilities of 50% and 20% on the muscular tension task and choice reaction tasks. The conditions for the muscular tension tasks were divided into seven different conditions: 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, and 60% of maximum voluntary contraction. On these tasks, subjects performed isometric contraction of the biceps brachii. The choice reaction task was a rapid extension of the left or right knee as a choice reaction. Measures were choice reaction time, movement time, and total reaction time. Analysis indicated that shortening choice reaction time of the left and right feet was observed under 10% muscular tension of maximum strength. Muscular tension appreciably influenced information processing, including choice reaction time. Muscular tension did not affect movement time. Results are discussed with respect to previous research and the optimal muscular tension for best performance.

  14. Tension pneumothorax following an accidental kerosene poisoning: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G M Ashir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tension pneumothorax is a rare complication following an accidental kerosene poisoning. In such situation, a bed-side needle thoracocentesis is performed because of its potential of becoming fatal; hence its clinical importance. A case of 15 month old boy with tension pneumothorax following accidental kerosene poisioning that responded to needle thoracocentesis is presented.

  15. Surface tension and long range corrections of cylindrical interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourasseau, E. [CEA/DAM DIF, F-91297 Arpajon Cedex (France); Malfreyt, P. [Université Clermont Auvergne, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Ghoufi, A., E-mail: aziz.ghoufi@univ-rennes1.fr [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS, Université de Rennes 1, 263 avenue Général Leclerc, 35042 Rennes (France)

    2015-12-21

    The calculation of the surface tension of curved interfaces has been deeply investigated from molecular simulation during this last past decade. Recently, the thermodynamic Test-Area (TA) approach has been extended to the calculation of surface tension of curved interfaces. In the case of the cylindrical vapour-liquid interfaces of water and Lennard-Jones fluids, it was shown that the surface tension was independent of the curvature of the interface. In addition, the surface tension of the cylindrical interface is higher than that of the planar interface. Molecular simulations of cylindrical interfaces have been so far performed (i) by using a shifted potential, (ii) by means of large cutoff without periodic boundary conditions, or (iii) by ignoring the long range corrections to the surface tension due to the difficulty to estimate them. Indeed, unlike the planar interfaces there are no available operational expressions to consider the tail corrections to the surface tension of cylindrical interfaces. We propose here to develop the long range corrections of the surface tension for cylindrical interfaces by using the non-exponential TA (TA2) method. We also extend the formulation of the Mecke-Winkelmann corrections initially developed for planar surfaces to cylindrical interfaces. We complete this study by the calculation of the surface tension of cylindrical surfaces of liquid tin and copper using the embedded atom model potentials.

  16. Design of Tension Controller with Electronic Gearing for Rapier Looms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭帅; 何永义; 周其洪; 方明伦

    2004-01-01

    The declining cost of precision motion controls allows economical replacement of mechanical drives with electronic versions in weaving processes. This paper describes the design of tension controller with electronic gearing. A control algorithm of PID is also introduced in order to improve performance of the tension controller. Finally, experimental results and conclusions are given.

  17. Negotiating Narrative Inquiries: Living in a Tension-Filled Midst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clandinin, D. Jean; Murphy, M. Shaun; Huber, Janice; Orr, Anne Murray

    2010-01-01

    The authors explore the place of tension in understanding narrative inquiry as a relational research methodology. Drawing on a narrative inquiry into children's, teachers', and families' experiences in schools shaped by achievement testing practices that flow from accountability policies, the authors show how attending to tensions is central to…

  18. Rapid cable tension estimation using dynamic and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Castro, Rosana E.; Jang, Shinae; Christenson, Richard E.

    2016-04-01

    Main tension elements are critical to the overall stability of cable-supported bridges. A dependable and rapid determination of cable tension is desired to assess the state of a cable-supported bridge and evaluate its operability. A portable smart sensor setup is presented to reduce post-processing time and deployment complexity while reliably determining cable tension using dynamic characteristics extracted from spectral analysis. A self-recording accelerometer is coupled with a single-board microcomputer that communicates wirelessly with a remote host computer. The portable smart sensing device is designed such that additional algorithms, sensors and controlling devices for various monitoring applications can be installed and operated for additional structural assessment. The tension-estimating algorithms are based on taut string theory and expand to consider bending stiffness. The successful combination of cable properties allows the use of a cable's dynamic behavior to determine tension force. The tension-estimating algorithms are experimentally validated on a through-arch steel bridge subject to ambient vibration induced by passing traffic. The tension estimation is determined in well agreement with previously determined tension values for the structure.

  19. Conducting Qualitative Data Analysis: Managing Dynamic Tensions within

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenail, Ronald J.

    2012-01-01

    In the third of a series of "how-to" essays on conducting qualitative data analysis, Ron Chenail examines the dynamic tensions within the process of qualitative data analysis that qualitative researchers must manage in order to produce credible and creative results. These tensions include (a) the qualities of the data and the qualitative data…

  20. Note About Unstable D-Brane with Dynamical Tension

    CERN Document Server

    Kluson, J

    2016-01-01

    We propose an action for unstable Dp-brane with dynamical tension. We show that the equations of motion are equivalent to the equations of motion derived from DBI and WZ actions for non-BPS Dp-brane. We also find Hamiltonian formulation of this action and analyze properties of the solutions corresponding to the tachyon vacuum and zero tension solution.

  1. Giant prolactinoma mimicking low-tension glaucoma at presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, David; Gillan, Stewart Neil; Goudie, Colin; Sanders, Roshini

    2015-02-06

    We describe a case of a 68-year-old man, referred by his optometrist with suspected low-tension glaucoma, who presented with advanced cupped optic discs and field of vision loss that were subsequently found to be due to a giant prolactinoma. Failing vision in low-tension glaucoma suspects should have a low threshold for neuroimaging.

  2. Exploring the inhibitory effect of membrane tension on cell polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weikang; Tao, Kuan; Wang, Jing; Yang, Gen; Ouyang, Qi; Wang, Yugang; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Cell polarization toward an attractant is influenced by both physical and chemical factors. Most existing mathematical models are based on reaction-diffusion systems and only focus on the chemical process occurring during cell polarization. However, membrane tension has been shown to act as a long-range inhibitor of cell polarization. Here, we present a cell polarization model incorporating the interplay between Rac GTPase, filamentous actin (F-actin), and cell membrane tension. We further test the predictions of this model by performing single cell measurements of the spontaneous polarization of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and non-stem cancer cells (NSCCs), as the former have lower cell membrane tension. Based on both our model and the experimental results, cell polarization is more sensitive to stimuli under low membrane tension, and high membrane tension improves the robustness and stability of cell polarization such that polarization persists under random perturbations. Furthermore, our simulations are the first to recapitulate the experimental results described by Houk et al., revealing that aspiration (elevation of tension) and release (reduction of tension) result in a decrease in and recovery of the activity of Rac-GTP, respectively, and that the relaxation of tension induces new polarity of the cell body when a cell with the pseudopod-neck-body morphology is severed.

  3. Tension pneumothorax following an accidental kerosene poisoning: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Tension pneumothorax is a rare complication following an accidental kerosene poisoning. In such situation, a bed-side needle thoracocentesis is performed because of its potential of becoming fatal; hence its clinical importance. A case of 15 month old boy with tension pneumothorax following accidental kerosene poisioning that responded to needle thoracocentesis is presented.

  4. Surface tension of ionic liquids and ionic liquid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Mohammad; Freire, Mara G; Saramago, Benilde; Coutinho, João A P; Lopes, José N Canongia; Rebelo, Luís Paulo N

    2012-01-21

    Some of the most active scientific research fronts of the past decade are centered on ionic liquids. These fluids present characteristic surface behavior and distinctive trends of their surface tension versus temperature. One way to explore and understand their unique nature is to study their surface properties. This critical review analyses most of the surface tension data reported between 2001 and 2010 (187 references).

  5. Hypoxia Inducible Factor Pathway and Physiological Adaptation: A Cell Survival Pathway?

    OpenAIRE

    Hemant Kumar; Dong-Kug Choi

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen homeostasis reflects the constant body requirement to generate energy. Hypoxia (0.1–1% O2), physioxia or physoxia (∼1–13%), and normoxia (∼20%) are terms used to define oxygen concentration in the cellular environment. A decrease in oxygen (hypoxia) or excess oxygen (hyperoxia) could be deleterious for cellular adaptation and survival. Hypoxia can occur under both physiological (e.g., exercise, embryonic development, underwater diving, or high altitude) and pathological conditions (e.g...

  6. Modeling Oxygen Transport in the Human Placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serov, Alexander; Filoche, Marcel; Salafia, Carolyn; Grebenkov, Denis

    Efficient functioning of the human placenta is crucial for the favorable pregnancy outcome. We construct a 3D model of oxygen transport in the placenta based on its histological cross-sections. The model accounts for both diffusion and convention of oxygen in the intervillous space and allows one to estimate oxygen uptake of a placentone. We demonstrate the existence of an optimal villi density maximizing the uptake and explain it as a trade-off between the incoming oxygen flow and the absorbing villous surface. Calculations performed for arbitrary shapes of fetal villi show that only two geometrical characteristics - villi density and the effective villi radius - are required to predict fetal oxygen uptake. Two combinations of physiological parameters that determine oxygen uptake are also identified: maximal oxygen inflow of a placentone and the Damköhler number. An automatic image analysis method is developed and applied to 22 healthy placental cross-sections demonstrating that villi density of a healthy human placenta lies within 10% of the optimal value, while overall geometry efficiency is rather low (around 30-40%). In a perspective, the model can constitute the base of a reliable tool of post partum oxygen exchange efficiency assessment in the human placenta. Also affiliated with Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

  7. Physiology and methodology of intermittent resistance training for acyclic sports

    OpenAIRE

    Casas, Adrián

    2008-01-01

    Resistance training for acyclic sports has traditionally been carried out using training methods developed for cyclic sports. These methods were developed from the study of the physiological bases of maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), prioritising “central” cardiovascular factors (cardiac) above “peripheral” factors (muscular) and omitting in-depth analysis of muscular behaviour during acyclic resistance. This article intends to: a) analyse certain physiological aspects needed to understand...

  8. Physiological mechanisms of prosociality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonas G

    2017-08-12

    Psychophysiological perspectives can provide unique insights into the nature and motivations of children's prosociality and inform our understanding of individual differences. Here, I review current research on prosociality involving some of the most common physiological measures in developmental psychology, including cortisol, various sympathetic nervous system measures, and high-frequency heart rate variability. The literature has been quite mixed, in part because the link between physiology and prosociality is context-dependent and person-dependent. However, recent advances are refining our understanding of the basic physiological mechanisms of prosociality. Resting physiology that contributes to a balance of regulation and vigilance prepares children to effectively cope with future social challenges, like noticing and attending to the needs of others. Experiencing some arousal is an important aspect of empathy-related responding, but physiological patterns of both heightened and hypoarousal can undermine prosociality. Physiological flexibility in response to others' needs may support emotional and behavioral flexibility important for prosociality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Tension-Based Model Distinguishes Hypertrophic versus Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jennifer; Davis, L Craig; Correll, Robert N; Makarewich, Catherine A; Schwanekamp, Jennifer A; Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Wang, Dan; York, Allen J; Wu, Haodi; Houser, Steven R; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Regnier, Michael; Metzger, Joseph M; Wu, Joseph C; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2016-05-19

    The heart either hypertrophies or dilates in response to familial mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins, which are responsible for contraction and pumping. These mutations typically alter calcium-dependent tension generation within the sarcomeres, but how this translates into the spectrum of hypertrophic versus dilated cardiomyopathy is unknown. By generating a series of cardiac-specific mouse models that permit the systematic tuning of sarcomeric tension generation and calcium fluxing, we identify a significant relationship between the magnitude of tension developed over time and heart growth. When formulated into a computational model, the integral of myofilament tension development predicts hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies in mice associated with essentially any sarcomeric gene mutations, but also accurately predicts human cardiac phenotypes from data generated in induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived myocytes from familial cardiomyopathy patients. This tension-based model also has the potential to inform pharmacologic treatment options in cardiomyopathy patients.

  10. Design of tension control system for fiber placement equipments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjie CHANG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the tension control requirements of automatic fiber placement equipments and the problems of traditional tension control system, the hammer tension control system is designed. The hammer is used as a buffer unit in the system, and the tension can be indirectly controlled by the position of the hammer. The system adopts the motion controller as the core element of the system, the AC servo motor as the actuator and the laser position sensor as the detector. The fuzzy PID control algorithm is used for the position control of hammer, which can avoid tension fluctuation by full consideration of the acceleration of the hammer. Prototype experimental results show that this system can avoid the problems of disconnection and relaxation of fiber, meanwhile, the static difference ratio and fluctuation ratio can meet the requirements of engineering practice.

  11. Maximum sustainable xylem sap tensions in Rhododendron and other species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombie, D S; Milburn, J A; Hipkins, M F

    1985-01-01

    The acoustic technique was used in conjunction with the pressure chamber to determine the tensions causing cavitation of xylem sap in leaves of five woody angiosperms (Acer pseudoplatanus L., Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn., Eucalyptus globulus Labill., Fraxinus excelsior L. and Rhododendron ponticum L.) and three species of herbs (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill., Plantago major L. and Ricinus communis L.). The results showed leaves of most species to suffer considerably from cavitation at sap tensions of 1.6-3 MPa. Two of the herbs, Lycopersicum and Ricinus, cavitated extensively at sap tensions below 1 MPa. Additional evidence is presented that clicks, detected by acoustic amplification, are caused by cavitation of sap in the xylem conduits. A rapid method is suggested for the determination of sap tensions in cavitating leaves and which is suitable for surveys of the critical sap tension in a large number of species.

  12. Maximizing aesthetics in lateral-tension abdominoplasty and body lifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Ted E

    2004-10-01

    The high-lateral-tension abdominoplasty addresses the practical and theoretic faults of standard abdominoplasty design. Key features include limited direct undermining, increased lateral skin resection with highest-tension wound closure along lateral limbs, two-layer superficial fascial system repair, and significant truncal liposuction when needed. The high-lateral-tension design limits the unfavorable features of standard abdominoplasty and produces balanced natural aesthetic contours. The high-lateral-tension abdominoplasty is the foundation for treatment of more generalized relaxation problems in the circumferential trunk and thighs. For more significant thigh laxity and buttock ptosis, the lateral-tension abdominoplasty is combined with the transverse thigh/buttock lift to produce the lower body lift #2.

  13. Exploratory experimental investigations on post-tensioned structural glass beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Louter

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical response of post-tensioned glass beams is explored in this paper. This is done through bending experiments on post-tensioned glass beam specimens with either mechanically anchored or adhesively bonded steel tendons by which a beneficial pre-stress is inflicted on the glass beams. In addition, reference beams with identical geometry but without tendons are tested. From the results of the bending experiments it can be seen that the post-tensioned glass beams reach higher initial fracture loads than the reference glass beams. Furthermore, the post-tensioned glass beams develop a significant post-fracture reserve. From this it is concluded that post-tensioning a glass beam is a feasible concept, which provides increased initial fracture strength and enhanced post-fracture performance.

  14. No oxygen delivery limitation in hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Albert; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a condition of reduced brain functioning in which both blood flow and brain energy metabolism declined. It is not known whether blood flow or metabolism is the primary limiting factor of brain function in this condition. We used calculations of mitochondrial oxygen tension...... to choose between cause and effect in three groups of volunteers, including healthy control subjects (HC), patients with cirrhosis of the liver without hepatic encephalopathy (CL), and patients with cirrhosis with acute hepatic encephalopathy. Compared to HC subjects, blood flow and energy metabolism had...... declined in all gray matter regions of the brain in patients with HE but not significantly in patients with CL. Analysis of flow-metabolism coupling indicated that blood flow declined in HE as a consequence of reduced brain energy metabolism implied by the calculation of increased mitochondrial oxygen...

  15. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  16. Characterization of optimal resting tension in human pulmonary arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azar; Bennett, Robert T; Chaudhry, Mubarak A; Qadri, Syed S; Cowen, Mike; Morice, Alyn H; Loubani, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the optimum resting tension (ORT) for in vitro human pulmonary artery (PA) ring preparations. METHODS Pulmonary arteries were dissected from disease free sections of the resected lung in the operating theatre and tissue samples were directly sent to the laboratory in Krebs-Henseleit solution (Krebs). The pulmonary arteries were then cut into 2 mm long rings. PA rings were mounted in 25 mL organ baths or 8 mL myograph chambers containing Krebs compound (37 °C, bubbled with 21% O2: 5% CO2) to measure changes in isometric tension. The resting tension was set at 1-gram force (gf) with vessels being left static to equilibrate for duration of one hour. Baseline contractile reactions to 40 mmol/L KCl were obtained from a resting tension of 1 gf. Contractile reactions to 40 mmol/L KCl were then obtained from stepwise increases in resting tension (1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 gf). RESULTS Twenty PA rings of internal diameter between 2-4 mm were prepared from 4 patients. In human PA rings incrementing the tension during rest stance by 0.6 gf, up to 1.6 gf significantly augmented the 40 mmol/L KCl stimulated tension. Further enhancement of active tension by 0.4 gf, up to 2.0 gf mitigate the 40 mmol/L KCl stimulated reaction. Both Myograph and the organ bath demonstrated identical conclusions, supporting that the radial optimal resting tension for human PA ring was 1.61 g. CONCLUSION The radial optimal resting tension in our experiment is 1.61 gf (15.78 mN) for human PA rings. PMID:27721938

  17. Oxygen sensing and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Joost T; Licausi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an indispensable substrate for many biochemical reactions in plants, including energy metabolism (respiration). Despite its importance, plants lack an active transport mechanism to distribute oxygen to all cells. Therefore, steep oxygen gradients occur within most plant tissues, which can be exacerbated by environmental perturbations that further reduce oxygen availability. Plants possess various responses to cope with spatial and temporal variations in oxygen availability, many of which involve metabolic adaptations to deal with energy crises induced by low oxygen. Responses are induced gradually when oxygen concentrations decrease and are rapidly reversed upon reoxygenation. A direct effect of the oxygen level can be observed in the stability, and thus activity, of various transcription factors that control the expression of hypoxia-induced genes. Additional signaling pathways are activated by the impact of oxygen deficiency on mitochondrial and chloroplast functioning. Here, we describe the molecular components of the oxygen-sensing pathway.

  18. Oximetry: A Reflective Tool for the Detection of Physiological Expression of Emotions in a Science Education Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The pulse oximeter is a device that measures the oxygen concentration (or oxygen saturation--SpO[subscript 2]); heart rate, and heartbeat of a person at any given time. This instrument is commonly used in medical and aerospace fields to monitor physiological outputs of a patient according to health conditions or physiological yields of a flying…

  19. Imaging oxygen metabolism with hyperpolarized magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, Marie; Laustsen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    Every tissue in the body critically depends on meeting its energetic demands with sufficient oxygen supply. Oxygen supply/demand imbalances underlie the diseases that inflict the greatest socioeconomic burden globally. The purpose of this review is to examine how hyperpolarized contrast media, used...... in combination with MR data acquisition methods, may advance our ability to assess oxygen metabolism non-invasively and thus improve management of clinical disease. We first introduce the concept of hyperpolarization and how hyperpolarized contrast media have been practically implemented to achieve translational...... and clinical research. We will then analyze how incorporating hyperpolarized contrast media could enable realization of unmet technical needs in clinical practice. We will focus on imaging cardiac and renal oxygen metabolism, as both organs have unique physiological demands to satisfy their requirements...

  20. Oxygen-enhanced combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Baukal, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    Combustion technology has traditionally been dominated by air/fuel combustion. However, two developments have increased the significance of oxygen-enhanced combustion-new technologies that produce oxygen less expensively and the increased importance of environmental regulations. Advantages of oxygen-enhanced combustion include less pollutant emissions as well as increased energy efficiency and productivity. Oxygen-Enhanced Combustion, Second Edition compiles information about using oxygen to enhance industrial heating and melting processes. It integrates fundamental principles, applications, a

  1. Decreased mucosal oxygen tension in the maxillary sinuses in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanæs, Kasper; Rickelt, Lars Fledelius; Johansen, Helle Krogh;

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the sinuses plays a role in the lungs in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, but little is known about the sinus environment where the bacteria adapt. Anoxic areas are found in the lower respiratory airways but it is unknown if the same conditions exist in the sinuses....

  2. Bone Formation and Skeletal Aging - The effects of oxygen tension and DNA repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Nicolaije (Claudia)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAging is a process that affects everybody and importantly, affects all cells and therefore all the tissues in our body. In the worst cases, tissue aging leads to organ failure and death; in other cases, the effects of aging are more subtle and less dramatic. In our tissue of choice – bon

  3. Metabolic programming of mesenchymal stromal cells by oxygen tension directs chondrogenic cell fate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Georgi, Nicole; Moreira Teixeira, Liliana; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Post, Janine Nicole; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Actively steering the chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) into either permanent cartilage or hypertrophic cartilage destined to be replaced by bone has not yet been possible. During limb development, the developing long bone is exposed to a concentration gradient of

  4. Bone Formation and Skeletal Aging - The effects of oxygen tension and DNA repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Nicolaije (Claudia)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAging is a process that affects everybody and importantly, affects all cells and therefore all the tissues in our body. In the worst cases, tissue aging leads to organ failure and death; in other cases, the effects of aging are more subtle and less dramatic. In our tissue of choice – bon

  5. Neuropeptide physiology in helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousley, Angela; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Kimber, Michael J; Day, Tim A

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic worms come from two distinct, distant phyla, Nematoda (roundworms) and Platyhelminthes (flatworms). The nervous systems of worms from both phyla are replete with neuropeptides and there is ample physiological evidence that these neuropeptides control vital aspects of worm biology. In each phyla, the physiological evidence for critical roles for helminth neuropeptides is derived from both parasitic and free-living members. In the nematodes, the intestinal parasite Ascaris suum and the free-living Caenorhabditis elegans have yielded most of the data; in the platyhelminths, the most physiological data has come from the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs) have many varied effects (excitation, relaxation, or a combination) on somatic musculature, reproductive musculature, the pharynx and motor neurons in nematodes. Insulin-like peptides (INSs) play an essential role in nematode dauer formation and other developmental processes. There is also some evidence for a role in somatic muscle control for the somewhat heterogeneous grouping ofpeptides known as neuropeptide-like proteins (NLPs). In platyhelminths, as in nematodes, FLPs have a central role in somatic muscle function. Reports of FLP physiological action in platyhelminths are limited to a potent excitation of the somatic musculature. Platyhelminths are also abundantly endowed with neuropeptide Fs (NPFs), which appear absent from nematodes. There is not yet any data linking platyhelminth NPF to any particular physiological outcome, but this neuropeptide does potently and specifically inhibit cAMP accumulation in schistosomes. In nematodes and platyhelminths, there is an abundance of physiological evidence demonstrating that neuropeptides play critical roles in the biology of both free-living and parasitic helminths. While it is certainly true that there remains a great deal to learn about the biology of neuropeptides in both phyla, physiological evidence presently available points

  6. Ocular Blood Flow and Normal Tension Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal tension glaucoma (NTG is known as a multifactorial optic neuropathy characterized by progressive retinal ganglion cell death and glaucomatous visual field loss, even though the intraocular pressure (IOP does not exceed the normal range. The pathophysiology of NTG remains largely undetermined. It is hypothesized that the abnormal ocular blood flow is involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. A number of evidences suggested that the vascular factors played a significant role in the development of NTG. In recent years, the new imaging techniques, fluorescein angiography, color Doppler imaging (CDI, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG, have been used to evaluate the ocular blood flow and blood vessels, and the impaired vascular autoregulation was found in patients with NTG. Previous studies showed that NTG was associated with a variety of systemic diseases, including migraine, Alzheimer’s disease, primary vascular dysregulation, and Flammer syndrome. The vascular factors were involved in these diseases. The mechanisms underlying the abnormal ocular blood flow in NTG are still not clear, but the risk factors for glaucomatous optic neuropathy likely included oxidative stress, vasospasm, and endothelial dysfunction.

  7. Ethnography in community psychology: promises and tensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Andrew D; Todd, Nathan R; Kral, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Community psychology recognizes the need for research methods that illuminate context, culture, diversity, and process. One such method, ethnography, has crossed into multiple disciplines from anthropology, and indeed, community psychologists are becoming community ethnographers. Ethnographic work stands at the intersection of bridging universal questions with the particularities of people and groups bounded in time, geographic location, and social location. Ethnography is thus historical and deeply contextual, enabling a rich, in-depth understanding of communities that is aligned with the values and goals of community psychology. The purpose of this paper is to elucidate the potential of ethnography for community psychology and to encourage its use within the field as a method to capture culture and context, to document process, and to reveal how social change and action occur within and through communities. We discuss the method of ethnography, draw connections to community psychology values and goals, and identify tensions from our experiences doing ethnography. Overall, we assert that ethnography is a method that resonates with community psychology and present this paper as a resource for those interested in using this method in their research or community activism.

  8. Tension free femoral hernia repair with plug

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milivoje Vukovi; Neboja Moljevi; Sinia Crnogorac

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the conventional technique involves treatment of femoral hernia an approximation inguinal ligament to pectineal ligament. In technique which uses mesh closure for femoral canal without tissue tension. Method: A prospective study from January 01. 2007-May 30. 2009. We analyzed 1 042 patients with inguinal hernia, of which there were 83 patients with 86 femoral hernia. Result: Femoral hernias were present in 7.96% of cases. Males were 13 (15.66%) and 70 women (84.34%). The gender distribution of men: women is 1:5.38. Urgent underwent 69 (83%), and the 14 election (17%) patients. Average age was 63 years, the youngest patient was a 24 and the oldest 86 years. Ratio of right: left hernias was 3.4:1. With bilateral femoral hernias was 3.61% of cases. In 7 patients (8.43%) underwent femoral hernia repair with 9 Prolene plug. Conclusions: The technique of closing the femoral canal with plug a simple. The plug is made from monofilament material and is easily formed. This technique allows the reduction of recurrence and can be used safely, quickly and easily in elective and emergency situations.

  9. Role of extracellular and intracellular acidosis for hypercapnia-induced inhibition of tension of isolated rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, R; Vogel, P; Lassen, N A

    1995-01-01

    The importance of smooth muscle cell pHi and pHo for the hypercapnic vasodilation of rat cerebral arteries was evaluated in vitro. Vessel segments were mounted in a myograph for isometric tension recording; pHi was measured by loading the smooth muscle cells with the fluorescent dye BCECF, and p......Ho was measured with a glass electrode. In all studies, Ca(2+)-dependent basal tension (in the absence of any agonist) and tension in the presence of arginine vasopressin were investigated. Control solution was physiological saline bubbled with 5% CO2 and containing 25 mmol/L HCO3- (pH 7.45 to 7.50). Induction...... of hypercapnic acidosis (10% CO2) or normocapnic acidosis (15 mmol/L HCO3-) caused significant inhibition of smooth muscle tension, and both conditions reduced pHi as well as pHo. N-Nitro-L-arginine significantly inhibited the relaxation to hypercapnic acidosis but had no significant effect on relaxation...

  10. Ventricular hypertrophy--physiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1986-01-01

    Adult cardiac myocytes are incapable of mitosis. Dead cells are replaced by connective tissue so that after myocardial infarction (MI), function can only be restored by compensatory hypertrophy of the surviving myocardium. In physiological hypertrophy in response to exercise, high altitude, or mild hypertension, additional myoplasm expands cell diameter in an orderly fashion; Z-lines are in register and the normal ratio of volume densities of contractile elements, mitochondria, and capillaries is conserved. In hypertrophy induced by aortic or pulmonary artery banding or by experimental or congenital hypertension, the borderline between physiological and pathological hypertrophy may be crossed, causing disorganization of fibers and an unfavourable contractile element to capillary ratio. There was, therefore, a need for a graded model of hypertrophy, which involves simulating an altitude of 6,000 m at sea level by supplying rabbits with appropriate nitrogen/oxygen mixtures. In this environment, 50% right ventricular hypertrophy can be achieved without alteration of left ventricular weight or hematocrit. Longer exposures produced 100% right ventricular hypertrophy, with only moderate increases in hematocrit and left ventricular weight. It is well known that adrenergic stimulation causes cardiac hypertrophy, and it has been suggested that release of a trophic factor from sympathetic nerves, either noradrenaline or a protein, might be a necessary stimulus for growth. If so, long-term treatment of post-MI patients with beta-adrenergic blocking agents could inhibit a desirable compensatory hypertrophy of the surviving myocardium. In the above model it has been found, however, that neither beta-blockade nor chemical sympathectomy with guanethidine or 6-hydroxydopamine had any effect on the hypertrophy, nor did treatment with verapamil or nifedipine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Physiological factors influencing capillary growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egginton, S

    2011-07-01

    (1) Angiogenesis (growth of new capillaries from an existing capillary bed) may result from a mismatch in microvascular supply and metabolic demand (metabolic error signal). Krogh examined the distribution and number of capillaries to explore the correlation between O(2) delivery and O(2) consumption. Subsequently, the heterogeneity in angiogenic response within a muscle has been shown to reflect either differences in fibre type composition or mechanical load. However, local control leads to targetted angiogenesis in the vicinity of glycolytic fibre types following muscle stimulation, or oxidative fibres following endurance training, while heterogeneity of capillary spacing is maintained during ontogenetic growth. (2) Despite limited microscopy resolution and lack of specific markers, Krogh's interest in the structure of the capillary wall paved the way for understanding the mechanisms of capillary growth. Angiogenesis may be influenced by the response of perivascular or stromal cells (fibroblasts, macrophages and pericytes) to altered activity, likely acting as a source for chemical signals modulating capillary growth such as vascular endothelial growth factor. In addition, haemodynamic factors such as shear stress and muscle stretch play a significant role in adaptive remodelling of the microcirculation. (3) Most indices of capillarity are highly dependent on fibre size, resulting in possible bias because of scaling. To examine the consequences of capillary distribution, it is therefore helpful to quantify the area of tissue supplied by individual capillaries. This allows the spatial limitations inherent in most models of tissue oxygenation to be overcome generating an alternative approach to Krogh's tissue cylinder, the capillary domain, to improve descriptions of intracellular oxygen diffusion. © 2010 The Author. Acta Physiologica © 2010 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  12. The specificity of training prescription and physiological assessment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Thomas; Morris, Tessa; Whyte, Greg

    2009-04-01

    The aims in this review are: (1) to identify physiological determinants of performance; (2) to consider training specificity by examining aerobic, team and racket sports, strength and power activities, and cross-training and concurrent training methods; and (3) to evaluate the role of specificity in the physiological assessment of performance determinants. Assessment of the physiological determinants of performance is an integral part of sports science support for elite athletes. Laboratory and field-based physiological assessments are fundamental elements in profiling athletes, assessing training adaptations, and interrogating programme efficacy. The relatively small and highly specific adaptations associated with high-performance training call for valid, reliable, and sensitive methods of assessment. Recent advances in the physiological assessment of athletes have led to the development of a plethora of laboratory and field-based procedures. In the assessment of the athlete, there is a tension between the high reliability and low ecological validity of laboratory assessments and the low reliability and high validity of field-based methods. In an attempt to enhance ecological validity of training and physiological assessment, various sports-specific ergometers have been designed. This development has helped to match fitness assessment procedures to the demands of the sport concerned.

  13. Coarse-Grained Simulations of Membranes under Tension

    CERN Document Server

    Neder, Jörg; Nielaba, Peter; Schmid, Friederike

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the properties of membranes under tension by Monte-Carlo simulations of a generic coarse-grained model for lipid bilayers. We give a comprising overview of the behavior of several membrane characteristics, such as the area per lipid, the monolayer overlap, the nematic order, and pressure profiles. Both the low-temperature regime, where the membranes are in a gel phase, and the high-temperature regime, where they are in the fluid phase, are considered. In the gel state, the membrane is hardly influenced by tension. In the fluid state, high tensions lead to structural changes in the membrane, which result in different compressibility regimes. The ripple state, which is found at tension zero in the transition regime between the fluid and the gel phase, disappears under tension and gives way to an interdigitated phase. We also study the membrane fluctuations in the fluid phase. In the low tension regime the data can be fitted nicely to a suitably extended elastic theory. At higher tensions the elas...

  14. Oxygen uptake, energy expenditure and oxygen supply dependency : physical, physiological and clinical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.G. Vermeij

    1990-01-01

    textabstractIn the first part of this thesis, the assessment of aerobic energy metabolism as a means to guide caloric supply to spontaneously breathing and mechanically ventilated subjects is studied (chapters 2 and 3). In the second part of this thesis the relation between aerobic energy metabolism

  15. Muscular factors are of importance in tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R; Bendtsen, L; Olesen, J

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that muscular disorders may be of importance for the development of increased pain sensitivity in patients with chronic tension-type headache. The objective of the present study was to investigate this hypothesis by examining the pain perception in tension-type headache with and without muscular disorders defined as increased tenderness. We examined 28 patients with episodic tension-type headache, 28 patients with chronic tension-type headache, and 30 healthy controls. Pericranial myofascial tenderness was recorded with manual palpation, and pressure pain detection and tolerances in cephalic and extracephalic locations with an electronic pressure algometer. In addition, thermal pain sensitivity and electromyographic activity were recorded. The main result was significantly lower pressure pain detection thresholds and tolerances in all the examined locations in patients with chronic tension-type headache with a muscular disorder compared to those without a muscular disorder. There were no such differences in any of the examined locations when the two subgroups of patients with episodic tension-type headache were compared. Thermal pain sensitivity did not differ between patients with and without a muscular disorder, while electromyographic activity levels were significantly higher in patients with chronic tension-type headache with than in those without a muscular disorder. Our results strongly indicate that prolonged nociceptive stimuli from the pericranial myofascial tissue sensitize the central nervous system and, thereby, lead to an increased general pain sensitivity. Muscular factors may, therefore, be of major importance for the conversion of episodic into chronic tension-type headache. The present study complements the understanding of the important interactions between peripheral and central factors in tension-type headache and may lead to a better prevention and treatment of the most prevalent type of headache.

  16. Human physiology in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernikos, J.

    1996-01-01

    The universality of gravity (1 g) in our daily lives makes it difficult to appreciate its importance in morphology and physiology. Bone and muscle support systems were created, cellular pumps developed, neurons organised and receptors and transducers of gravitational force to biologically relevant signals evolved under 1g gravity. Spaceflight provides the only microgravity environment where systematic experimentation can expand our basic understanding of gravitational physiology and perhaps provide new insights into normal physiology and disease processes. These include the surprising extent of our body's dependence on perceptual information, and understanding the effect and importance of forces generated within the body's weightbearing structures such as muscle and bones. Beyond this exciting prospect is the importance of this work towards opening the solar system for human exploration. Although both appear promising, we are only just beginning to taste what lies ahead.

  17. Circadian physiology of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-11-25

    A majority of mammalian genes exhibit daily fluctuations in expression levels, making circadian expression rhythms the largest known regulatory network in normal physiology. Cell-autonomous circadian clocks interact with daily light-dark and feeding-fasting cycles to generate approximately 24-hour oscillations in the function of thousands of genes. Circadian expression of secreted molecules and signaling components transmits timing information between cells and tissues. Such intra- and intercellular daily rhythms optimize physiology both by managing energy use and by temporally segregating incompatible processes. Experimental animal models and epidemiological data indicate that chronic circadian rhythm disruption increases the risk of metabolic diseases. Conversely, time-restricted feeding, which imposes daily cycles of feeding and fasting without caloric reduction, sustains robust diurnal rhythms and can alleviate metabolic diseases. These findings highlight an integrative role of circadian rhythms in physiology and offer a new perspective for treating chronic diseases in which metabolic disruption is a hallmark.

  18. Plant Physiology and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taiz, Lincoln; Zeiger, Eduardo; Møller, Ian Max

    Physiology and Development. As before, Unit III begins with updated chapters on Cell Walls and Signals and Signal Transduction. The latter chapter has been expanded to include a discussion of major signaling molecules, such as calcium ions and plant hormones. A new, unified chapter entitled Signals from......Throughout its twenty-two year history, the authors of Plant Physiology have continually updated the book to incorporate the latest advances in plant biology and implement pedagogical improvements requested by adopters. This has made Plant Physiology the most authoritative, comprehensive......, and widely used upper-division plant biology textbook. In the Sixth Edition, the Growth and Development section (Unit III) has been reorganized and expanded to present the complete life cycle of seed plants from germination to senescence. In recognition of this enhancement, the text has been renamed Plant...

  19. Tension-free procedures in the treatment of groin hernias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milić Dragan J.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hernia repair is one of the most common surgical procedures performed in the United States, with 700,000 operations performed each year. Improvements in surgical technique, together with the development of new prosthetic materials and a better understanding of how to use them, have significantly improved outcomes for many patients. These improvements have occurred most notably in centers specializing in hernia surgery, with some institutions reporting failure rates of less than 1%. In contrast, failure rates for general surgeons, who perform most hernia repairs, remain significantly higher. This has important socioeconomic implications, adding an estimated $28 billion or more to the cost of treating the condition, based on calculations utilizing conservative estimates of failure rates and the average cost of a hernia repair. Success of groin hernia repair is measured primarily by the permanence of the operation, fewest complications, minimal costs, and earliest return to normal activities. This success depends largely on the surgeon's understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the surgical area as well as a knowledge of how to use most effectively the currently available techniques and materials. The most important advance in hernia surgery has been the development of tension-free repairs. In 1958, Usher described a hernia repair using Marlex mesh. The benefit of that repair he described as being "tension-eliminating", or what we now call "tension-free". Usher opened the posterior wall and sutured a swatch of Marlex mesh to the undersurface of the medial margin of the defect and to the shelving edge of the inguinal ligament. He created tails from the mesh that encircled the spermatic cord and secured them to the inguinal ligament. Every type of tension-free repair requires a mesh, whether it is done through an open anterior, open posterior, or laparoscopic route. The most common prosthetic open repairs done today are the Lichtenstein onlay

  20. Transabdominal oxygenation using perfluorocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, T; Harrison, M R; Ohkubo, T; Rollins, M D; Albanese, C T; Jennings, R W

    1999-05-01

    Evaluation of the intraabdominal (intraperitoneal and intraluminal) administration of oxygen-saturated perfluorocarbon on both portal and arterial blood oxygenation. Eight male rabbits were divided into the test (n = 5) and control (n = 3) groups. Each underwent intrajejunal, intraperitoneal, and intravascular (artery, portal vein) catheter placements along with ligation of the duodenum and the terminal ileum under general anesthesia. The test group received oxygen-saturated perfluorotripropylamine (FTPA), and the control group received oxygen desaturated FTPA. The oxygen delivery was assessed by serial blood gas measurements before and after the administration of FTPA. The administration of oxygen-saturated FTPA significantly increased the partial pressure of oxygen within both the arterial and the portal venous blood (PaO2, PpVO2) without significant changes in PCO2 values. Oxygen desaturated FTPA failed to show any effects on blood gas values. Compared with oxygen desaturated FTPA, oxygen-saturated FTPA increased PaO2, PpVO2, and oxygen saturation (artery, portal vein) significantly at some, but not all of the time-points measured. The intraabdominal administration of saturated FTPA improved both the portal venous and the arterial oxygenation. This new mode of oxygenation may be helpful as an adjunct to conventional oxygen delivery systems.