WorldWideScience

Sample records for physics summer term

  1. Technical Training: ELEC-2005 - Electronics in High Energy Physics: Summer Term (May 2005)

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    ELEC-2005 is a new course series on modern electronics, given by CERN physicists and engineers within the framework of the 2005 Technical Training Programme, in an extended format of the successful ELEC-2002 course series. This comprehensive course series is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. ELEC-2005 is composed of four Terms. The Winter (Introduction to electronics in HEP) and Spring (Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics) Terms already took place; the next two Terms will run with the following schedule: Summer Term: System electronics for physics: Issues (May, 7 lectures) - now open for registration Autumn Term: Electronics applications in HEP experiments (November-December, 10 lectures) Lectures within each Term will take place on Tuesday...

  2. Technical Training: ELEC-2005 - Electronics in High Energy Physics: Summer Term (May 2005)

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    ELEC-2005 is a new course series on modern electronics, given by CERN physicists and engineers within the framework of the 2005 Technical Training Programme, in an extended format of the successful ELEC-2002 course series.This comprehensive course series is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. ELEC-2005 is composed of four Terms. The last two Terms will run with the following schedule: Summer Term: System electronics for physics: Issues (May, 7 lectures) - now open for registration Autumn Term: Electronics applications in HEP experiments (November-December, 10 lectures) Lectures within each Term will take place on Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 10h00 to 12h30. The course will be in English, with questions and answers also possible in French. Separate registrati...

  3. Technical Training: ELEC-2005 - Electronics in High Energy Physics: Summer Term (May 2005)

    CERN Document Server

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    ELEC-2005 is a new course series on modern electronics, given by CERN physicists and engineers within the framework of the 2005 Technical Training Programme. It is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. The next ELEC-2005 Summer Term, System electronics for physics: Issues, is now open for online registration, and will start on May 10th. Lectures will take place on Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 10h00 to 12h30. The course will be in English, with questions and answers also possible in French. Separate registration to each Term is required: attendance costs will be of 10.- CHF per lecture (Summer Term: 70.- CHF). If you are interested in attending, please discuss with your supervisor and/or your DTO, and apply electronically via EDH. Participation to all sessions in a...

  4. Chemical Physics Summer School

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-06-28

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Chemical Physics Summer School was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  5. National Nuclear Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 National Nuclear Physics Summer School (NNPSS) will be held from Monday July 18 through Friday July 29, 2016, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The summer school is open to graduate students and postdocs within a few years of their PhD (on either side) with a strong interest in experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. The program will include the following speakers: Accelerators and Detectors - Elke-Caroline Aschenauer, Brookhaven National Laboratory Data Analysis - Michael Williams, MIT Double Beta Decay - Lindley Winslow, MIT Electron-Ion Collider - Abhay Deshpande, Stony Brook University Fundamental Symmetries - Vincenzo Cirigliano, Los Alamos National Laboratory Hadronic Spectroscopy - Matthew Shepherd, Indiana University Hadronic Structure - Jianwei Qiu, Brookhaven National Laboratory Hot Dense Nuclear Matter 1 - Jamie Nagle, Colorado University Hot Dense Nuclear Matter 2 - Wilke van der Schee, MIT Lattice QCD - Sinead Ryan, Trinity College Dublin Neutrino Theory - Cecil...

  6. Summer School on Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the school is to give a detailed overview of particle physics from the basics of Standard Model phenomenology to the most important areas where significant progress has been achieved recently. This year the school will cover both the energy and the intensity frontiers, including lectures on experimental techniques for small scale experiments and on formal developments in quantum field theory.

  7. Eleventh Modave Summer School in Mathematical Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Modave Summer School in Mathematical Physics is organized by Belgian PhD students. The aim is to study tools useful for research in theoretical physics of fundamental interactions, generally supposed to be known but too seldom explained in details. The school consists of a series of courses (in English) delivered in an informal and relaxed atmosphere, encouraging the participants to interact with the speakers. The courses are aimed at young graduate students and therefore begin with the basics, are synthetic and overall self-contained.

  8. Summer Workshop on Physics, Mathematics, and All That Quantum Jazz

    CERN Document Server

    Bando, Masamitsu; Güngördü, Utkan; Physics, Mathematics, and All That Quantum Jazz

    2014-01-01

    This book is a collection of contributions from a Summer Workshop on Physics, Mathematics, and All That Quantum Jazz . Subjects of the symposium include quantum information theory, quantum annealing, Bose gases, and thermodynamics from a viewpoint of quantum physics. Contributions to this book are prepared in a self-contained manner so that readers with a modest background may understand the subjects.

  9. The Physics of Quidditch Summer Camp: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Donna; Uher, Tim

    The University of Maryland Physics Department has developed an innovative summer camp program that takes an interdisciplinary approach to engaging and teaching physics. The Physics of Quidditch Camp uniquely sits at the intersection of physics, sports, and literature, utilizing the real-life sport of quidditch adapted from the Harry Potter novels to stimulate critical thinking about real laws of physics and leaps of imagination, while actively engaging students in learning the sport and discussing the literature. Throughout the camp, middle school participants become immersed in fun physics experiments and exciting physical activities, which aim to build and enhance skills in problem-solving, analytical thinking, and teamwork. This camp has pioneered new ways of teaching physics to pre-college students, successfully engaged middle school students in learning physics, and grown a large demand for such activities.

  10. Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2004-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its first annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2004. During this period, fourteen PNNL scientists hosted sixteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the sixteen participants, fourteen were graduate students; one was transitioning to graduate school; and one was a university faculty member.

  11. CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Applications are now open for the 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School, which will take place at CERN from 6 to 15 June 2007. The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic program and application procedure. The application deadline is 9 March 2007. The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, covered extensively the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be given on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be  supported by in-depth discussion sess...

  12. 12th CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the twelfth edition, from 28th August to 6th September 2017. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school targeted particularly at young postdocs and senior PhD students working towards the completion of their thesis project, in both Experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) and phenomenology. Other schools, such as the CERN European School of High Energy Physics, may provide more appropriate training for students in experimental HEP who are still working towards their PhDs. Mark your calendar for 28 August - 6 September 2017, when CERN will welcome students to the twelfth CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School. The School will include nine days of lectures and discussions, and one free day in the middle of the period. Limited scholarship ...

  13. 2nd International Summer School in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pak, N K; Serin, M; The Standard Model and Beyond

    2008-01-01

    This volume collects the edited tutorial lectures given at The Second International Summer School in High Energy Physics in Mgla, Turkey, in September 2006 - an annual event with international participation and a special focus on work done in the regions of central Asia. With emphasis on the standard model and beyond, lectures were devoted to presenting an introduction and update to many of the relevant topics, such as chiral perturbation theory, the Higgs mechanism, heavy flavour and b physics, CP violation, the AdS/CFT correspondence, ideas on grand unification and neutrino physics and astrophysics

  14. Advanced Summer School in Physics 2005 : Frontiers in Contemporary Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Carbajal, Mauricio; Miranda, Omar; EAV05; Frontiers in Contemporary Physics

    2006-01-01

    These proceedings include lecture notes from eleven courses in modern physics, including astrophysics and mathematical, statistical, medical, and solid state physics. The coherent states of Glauber (Nobel Prize 2005), for instance, are shown to have a clear physical meaning by themselves (with applications in quantum optics, optoelectronics, and communication devices), while they can also be used as an excellent tool to solve many problems in theoretical physics. Lectures on astroparticle physics include descriptions of the construction and implementation of detectors, telescopes, and instruments designed to help explain the origin of the Universe. Cosmic rays and neutrinos are discussed as a motivation for searching for dark matter and for learning about the nature of dark energy. The reader will also find lecture notes on the use of semiconductor solid-state detectors in medical imaging. A lecture on the fundamentals of spintronics in semiconductors discusses the design of semiconductor devices for the inve...

  15. 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    June 6-15, 2007, CERN The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 9 MARCH 2007 The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, extensively covered the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school, to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be placed on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be supported by in-depth discussion sessions and will include the theory and phenomenology of hadron collisions, discovery physics topics, detector and analysis t...

  16. 3rd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    August 12-22, 2008, Fermilab The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 29 FEBRUARY 2008. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high-energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The third session of the summer school will focus on exposing young post-docs and advanced graduate students to broader theories and real data beyond what they’ve learned at their home institutions. Experts from across the globe will lecture on the theoretical and experimental foundations of hadron collider physics, host parallel discussion sessions and answer students’ questions. This year’s school will also have a greater focus on physics beyond the Standard Model, as well as more time for questions at the end of each lecture. The 2008 School will be held at ...

  17. Long-term summer temperature variations in the Pyrenees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buentgen, Ulf; Frank, David; Esper, Jan [Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Dendro Sciences Unit, Birmensdorf (Switzerland); Grudd, Haakan [Stockholm University, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-11-15

    Two hundred and sixty one newly measured tree-ring width and density series from living and dry-dead conifers from two timberline sites in the Spanish Pyrenees were compiled. Application of the regional curve standardization method for tree-ring detrending allowed the preservation of inter-annual to multi-centennial scale variability. The new density record correlates at 0.53 (0.68 in the higher frequency domain) with May-September maximum temperatures over the 1944-2005 period. Reconstructed warmth in the fourteenth to fifteenth and twentieth century is separated by a prolonged cooling from {proportional_to}1450 to 1850. Six of the ten warmest decades fall into the twentieth century, whereas the remaining four are reconstructed for the 1360-1440 interval. Comparison with novel density-based summer temperature reconstructions from the Swiss Alps and northern Sweden indicates decadal to longer-term similarity between the Pyrenees and Alps, but disagreement with northern Sweden. Spatial field correlations with instrumental data support the regional differentiation of the proxy records. While twentieth century warmth is evident in the Alps and Pyrenees, recent temperatures in Scandinavia are relatively cold in comparison to earlier warmth centered around medieval times, {proportional_to}1450, and the late eighteenth century. While coldest summers in the Alps and Pyrenees were in-phase with the Maunder and Dalton solar minima, lowest temperatures in Scandinavia occurred later at the onset of the twentieth century. However, fairly cold summers at the end of the fifteenth century, between {proportional_to}1600-1700, and {proportional_to}1820 were synchronized over Europe, and larger areas of the Northern Hemisphere. (orig.)

  18. PREFACE: First International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, Evgenia; Zhelyazkov, Ivan; Atanassov, Vladimir

    2006-07-01

    The First International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'05) organized by The Faculty of Physics, University of Sofia and the Foundation `Theoretical and Computational Physics and Astrophysics' was dedicated to the World Year of Physics 2005 and held in Kiten, Bulgaria, on the Black Sea Coast, from 8--12 June 2005. The aim of the workshop was to bring together scientists from various branches of plasma physics in order to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations. Another important task was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for the further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 31 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion research, kinetics and transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, MHD waves and instabilities in the solar atmosphere, dc and microwave discharge modelling, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are Masters or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will stimulate readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee. We greatly appreciate the financial support from the sponsors: the Department for Language Teaching and International Students at Sofia University, Dr Ivan Bogorov Publishing house, and Artgraph2 Publishing house. We would like to express our gratitude to the invited lecturers who were willing to pay the participation fee. In this way, in addition to the intellectual support they provided by means of their excellent lectures, they also supported the school

  19. PREFACE: Second International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, Evgeniya; Atanassov, Vladimir

    2007-04-01

    The Second International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'06) organized by St. Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and the Bulgarian Nuclear Society, was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, on the Black Sea Coast, from 3-9 July 2006. As with the first of these scientific meetings (IWSSPP'05 Journal of Physics: Conference Series 44 (2006)), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 33 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma research, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of these papers were presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the participants who sent their manuscripts and passed through the (sometimes heavy and troublesome) refereeing and editing procedure and our referees for their patience and considerable effort to improve the manuscripts. We greatly appreciate the financial support from the sponsors: the Department for Language Teaching and International Students at the University of Sofia and Natsionalna Elektricheska Kompania EAD. We would like to express our gratitude to the invited

  20. Proceedings of the summer school on physics with neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locher, M.P. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    The Summer School on physics with neutrinos concentrated on a particularly rewarding topic on the intersection between particle and astrophysics. Although the neutrino has been postulated as early as 1930 in the famous letter by Pauli the intriguing particle poses challenging problems to the present day. The speakers did not spare any effort in creating an atmosphere of stimulating scientific exchange. The participating young and old enjoyed the presence of Jack Steinberger who presented a talk on the history of the neutrino and contributed in many other ways to the meeting. Apart from the lectures and seminars that are mostly reflected in these proceedings there were also a number of extra seminars on topics ranging from special nuclear reactions to the extinction of life in the universe, adding to the breadth of the presentations. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  1. International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi" : Summer Courses 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Betev, L; Grigoras, A; Course 192 : Grid and Cloud Computing : Concepts and Practical Applications

    2016-01-01

    The distributed computing infrastructure known as ‘the Grid’ has undoubtedly been one of the most successful science-oriented large- scale IT projects of the past 20 years. It is now a fully operational international entity, encompassing several hundred computing sites on all continents and giving access to hundreds of thousands of CPU (central processing unit) cores and hundreds of petabytes of storage, all connected by robust national and international scientific networks. It has evolved to become the main computational platform many scientific communities. This book presents lectures from the Enrico Fermi International School of Physics summer school Grid and Cloud computing: Concepts and Practical Applications, held in Varenna, Italy, in July 2014. The school aimed to cover the conceptual and practical aspects of both the Grid and Cloud computing. The proceedings included here are divided into eight chapters, with chapters 1, 2, 3 and 8 covering general applications of Grid and Cloud computing in var...

  2. PREFACE: Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Lebedev, Yu

    2010-01-01

    The Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'08) organized by St Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, with co-organizers TCPA Foundation, Association EURATOM/IRNRE, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, and the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, at the Black Sea Coast, from 30 June to 5 July 2008. A Special Session on Plasmas for Environmental Issues was co-organised by the Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Lisbon, Portugal and the Laboratory of Plasmas and Energy Conversion, University of Toulouse, France. That puts the beginning of a series in Workshops on Plasmas for Environmental Issues, now as a satellite meeting of the European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. As the previous issues of this scientific meeting (IWSSPP'05, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 44 (2006) and IWSSPP'06, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 63 (2007)), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 38 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma and materials, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the

  3. Neuroscience study abroad: developing a short-term summer course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscio, Michael G; Korey, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative and international scientific efforts continue to be of increasing importance in the development of successful educational and research programs. The goal of our study abroad program, Neuroscience Seminar in Germany, is to bring this fact to light for undergraduates and make them aware of the global opportunities that exist in the neurosciences and related biological sciences. Here we discuss our experience of conducting a four-week summer study abroad course in collaboration with two universities associated with the German Graduate Schools of Neuroscience: Munich Center for Neurosciences - Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (MCN-LMU) and Charité - Universitätsmedizin, Berlin (a joint institution of the Freie Universität and the Humboldt-Universität). This course combined the historical foundations of neuroscience in Germany with current research programs at these two prominent German research universities. Two weeks were spent at each location and faculty members from the participating universities provided seminars, laboratory exercises, demonstrations and tours. Students were presented with background reading and lecture material prior to the seminars and activities. Additionally, they were responsible for leading seminar-style class discussions through brief presentations and submitting written critical analyses of primary research papers associated with the laboratory exercises. These assignments provided a means to assess learning outcomes, coupled with course evaluations. Overall, this experience may serve as a template for those interested in study abroad course development and research opportunities in the neurosciences.

  4. P24 Plasma Physics Summer School 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory Summer lecture series for students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, Thomas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bauer, Bruno [Univ Nevada, Reno; Fernandez, Juan C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daughton, William S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Flippo, Kirk A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weber, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Awe, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Yong Ho [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-07

    This report covers the 2012 LANL summer lecture series for students. The lectures were: (1) Tom Intrator, P24 LANL: Kick off, Introduction - What is a plasma; (2) Bruno Bauer, Univ. Nevada-Reno: Derivation of plasma fluid equations; (3) Juan Fernandez, P24 LANL Overview of research being done in p-24; (4) Tom Intrator, P24 LANL: Intro to dynamo, reconnection, shocks; (5) Bill Daughton X-CP6 LANL: Intro to computational particle in cell methods; (6) Kirk Flippo, P24 LANL: High energy density plasmas; (7) Thom Weber, P24 LANL: Energy crisis, fission, fusion, non carbon fuel cycles; (8) Tom Awe, Sandia National Laboratory: Magneto Inertial Fusion; and (9) Yongho Kim, P24 LANL: Industrial technologies.

  5. Effects of a recreational physical activity summer camp on body composition, metabolic syndrome and physical fitness in obese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roriz DE Oliveira, Mafalda S; Teixeira Seabra, André F; Ribeiro Maia, José A

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to examine the effects of a recreational physical activity summer camp on body composition, metabolic syndrome, and physical fitness in obese children. Forty-eight children (8-10 years; Body Mass Index ≥85th percentile) completed 4-weeks of a structured recreational physical activity program summer camp (5 hours/day, 5 days/week). Over the 4-weeks, significant reductions (Psummer camp yields several body-composition, metabolic-syndrome, and physical fitness benefits in obese children and should represent an effective support for their health development.

  6. Contemporary physics in simple terms

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, Victor Frederick

    1973-01-01

    With a view to emphasizing the basic principles involved, various topics in atomic and molecular physics are given a simple quantitative treatment using wave mechanics. Amongst the topics discussed are the size and energy of He, H and Ne atoms and Pauli's exclusion principle. Related subjects of discussion dealt with include binding energy of solids, lattice vibrations and the evaporation of solids.

  7. History of Physical Terms: "Pressure"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontali, Clara

    2013-01-01

    Scientific terms drawn from common language are often charged with suggestions that may even be inconsistent with their restricted scientific meaning, thus posing didactic problems. The (non-linear) historical journey of the word "pressure" is illustrated here through original quotations from Stevinus, Torricelli, Pascal, Boyle,…

  8. History of Physical Terms: "Pressure"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontali, Clara

    2013-01-01

    Scientific terms drawn from common language are often charged with suggestions that may even be inconsistent with their restricted scientific meaning, thus posing didactic problems. The (non-linear) historical journey of the word "pressure" is illustrated here through original quotations from Stevinus, Torricelli, Pascal, Boyle,…

  9. 2005 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2005-11-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its second annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2005. During this period, sixteen PNNL scientists hosted fourteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the fourteen participants, twelve were graduate students; one was a postdoctoral fellow; and one was a university faculty member.

  10. Long-term changes of South China Sea surface temperatures in winter and summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Gyu; Choi, Ara

    2017-07-01

    Utilizing available atmospheric and oceanographic reanalysis data sets, the long-term trend in South China Sea (SCS) sea surface temperature (SST) between 1950 and 2008 and the governing processes are investigated. Both winter and summer SST increased by comparable amounts, but the warming patterns and the governing processes were different. Strong warming in winter occurred in a deep central area, and during summer in the southern region. In winter the net heat flux into the sea increased, contributing to the warming. The spatial pattern of the heat flux, however, was different from that of the warming. Heat flux increased over the coastal area where warming was weaker, but decreased over the deeper area where warming was stronger. The northeasterly monsoon wind weakened lowering the shoreward Ekman transport and the sea surface height gradient. The cyclonic gyre which transports cold northern water to the south weakened, thereby warming the ocean. The effect was manifested more strongly along the southward western boundary current inducing warming in the deep central part. In summer however, the net surface heat flux decreased and could not contribute to the warming. Over the southern part of the SCS, the weakening of the southwesterly summer monsoon reduced southeastward Ekman transport, which is parallel to the mean SST gradient. Southeastward cold advection due to Ekman transport was reduced, thereby warming the surface near the southeastern boundary of the SCS. Upwelling southeast of Vietnam was also weakened, raising the SST east of Vietnam contributing to the southern summer warming secondarily. The weakening of the winds in each season was the ultimate cause of the warming, but the responses of the ocean that lead to the warming were different in winter and summer.

  11. 2015 Final Reports from the Los Alamos National Laboratory Computational Physics Student Summer Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runnels, Scott Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Caldwell, Wendy [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States); Brown, Barton Jed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pederson, Clark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Justin [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Burrill, Daniel [Univ. of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States); Feinblum, David [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Hyde, David [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science (SIMES); Levick, Nathan [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lyngaas, Isaac [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Maeng, Brad [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Reed, Richard LeRoy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sarno-Smith, Lois [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Shohet, Gil [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Skarda, Jinhie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stevens, Josey [Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Zeppetello, Lucas [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Grossman-Ponemon, Benjamin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Bottini, Joseph Larkin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Loudon, Tyson Shane [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); VanGessel, Francis Gilbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nagaraj, Sriram [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Price, Jacob [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The two primary purposes of LANL’s Computational Physics Student Summer Workshop are (1) To educate graduate and exceptional undergraduate students in the challenges and applications of computational physics of interest to LANL, and (2) Entice their interest toward those challenges. Computational physics is emerging as a discipline in its own right, combining expertise in mathematics, physics, and computer science. The mathematical aspects focus on numerical methods for solving equations on the computer as well as developing test problems with analytical solutions. The physics aspects are very broad, ranging from low-temperature material modeling to extremely high temperature plasma physics, radiation transport and neutron transport. The computer science issues are concerned with matching numerical algorithms to emerging architectures and maintaining the quality of extremely large codes built to perform multi-physics calculations. Although graduate programs associated with computational physics are emerging, it is apparent that the pool of U.S. citizens in this multi-disciplinary field is relatively small and is typically not focused on the aspects that are of primary interest to LANL. Furthermore, more structured foundations for LANL interaction with universities in computational physics is needed; historically interactions rely heavily on individuals’ personalities and personal contacts. Thus a tertiary purpose of the Summer Workshop is to build an educational network of LANL researchers, university professors, and emerging students to advance the field and LANL’s involvement in it. This report includes both the background for the program and the reports from the students.

  12. 2016 Final Reports from the Los Alamos National Laboratory Computational Physics Student Summer Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runnels, Scott Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bachrach, Harrison Ian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carlson, Nils [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Collier, Angela [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dumas, William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fankell, Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ferris, Natalie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gonzalez, Francisco [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Griffith, Alec [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Guston, Brandon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kenyon, Connor [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Li, Benson [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mookerjee, Adaleena [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parkinson, Christian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Peck, Hailee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Peters, Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Poondla, Yasvanth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rogers, Brandon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shaffer, Nathaniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trettel, Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Valaitis, Sonata Mae [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Venzke, Joel Aaron [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Black, Mason [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Demircan, Samet [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Holladay, Robert Tyler [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-22

    The two primary purposes of LANL’s Computational Physics Student Summer Workshop are (1) To educate graduate and exceptional undergraduate students in the challenges and applications of computational physics of interest to LANL, and (2) Entice their interest toward those challenges. Computational physics is emerging as a discipline in its own right, combining expertise in mathematics, physics, and computer science. The mathematical aspects focus on numerical methods for solving equations on the computer as well as developing test problems with analytical solutions. The physics aspects are very broad, ranging from low-temperature material modeling to extremely high temperature plasma physics, radiation transport and neutron transport. The computer science issues are concerned with matching numerical algorithms to emerging architectures and maintaining the quality of extremely large codes built to perform multi-physics calculations. Although graduate programs associated with computational physics are emerging, it is apparent that the pool of U.S. citizens in this multi-disciplinary field is relatively small and is typically not focused on the aspects that are of primary interest to LANL. Furthermore, more structured foundations for LANL interaction with universities in computational physics is needed; historically interactions rely heavily on individuals’ personalities and personal contacts. Thus a tertiary purpose of the Summer Workshop is to build an educational network of LANL researchers, university professors, and emerging students to advance the field and LANL’s involvement in it.

  13. Reappraisal of Asian Summer Monsoon Indices and the Long-Term Variation of Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Webster and Yang monsoon index (WYI)-the zonal wind shear between 850 and 200 hPa was calculated and modified on the basis of NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data. After analyzing the circulation and divergence fields of 150-100 and 200 hPa, however, we found that the 200-hPa level could not reflect the real change of the upper-tropospheric circulation of Asian summer monsoon, especially the characteristics and variation of the tropical easterly jet which is the most important feature of the upper-tropospheric circulation. The zonal wind shear U850-U(150+100) is much larger than U850-U200, and thus it can reflect the strength of monsoon more appropriately. In addition, divergence is the largest at 150 hPa rather than 200 hPa, so 150 hPa in the upper-troposphere can reflect the coupling of the monsoon system. Therefore,WYI is redefined as DHI, i.e., IDH=U*850 - U*(150+100), which is able to characterize the variability of not only the intensity of the center of zonal wind shear in Asia, but also the monsoon system in the upper and lower troposphere. DHI is superior to WYI in featuring the long-term variation of Asian summer monsoon as it indicates there is obvious interdecadal variation in the Asian summer monsoon and the climate abrupt change occurred in 1980. The Asian summer monsoon was stronger before 1980 and it weakened after then due to the weakening of the easterly in the layer of 150-100 hPa, while easterly at 200 hPa did not weaken significantly. After the climate jump year in general, easterly in the upper troposphere weakened in Asia, indicating the weakening of summer monsoon; the land-sea pressure difference and thermal difference reduced, resulting in the weakening of monsoon; the corresponding upper divergence as well as the water vapor transport decreased in Indian Peninsula, central Indo-China Peninsula, North China, and Northeast China, indicating the weakening of summer monsoon as well. The difference between NCEP/NCAR and ERA-40 reanalysis data in

  14. CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School 2013 open for applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Mark your calendar for 28 August - 6 September 2013, when CERN will welcome students to the eighth CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School.   Experiments at hadron colliders will continue to provide our best tools for exploring physics at the TeV scale for some time. With the completion of the 7-8 TeV runs of the LHC, and the final results from the full Tevatron data sample becoming available, a new era in particle physics is beginning, heralded by the Higgs-like particle recently discovered at 125 GeV. To realize the full potential of these developments, CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the eighth edition, from 28 August to 6 September 2013. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school which particularly targets young postdocs in exper...

  15. Theoretical-research summer: For a new generation of experts on high energy physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Sánchez, Saúl

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by the need to strengthen the comprehensive training of young Mexican physicists interested in theoretical high energy physics, the Theoretical-research summer on high energy physics program was conceived. This program, that celebrates its sixth anniversary, consists in a yearly, nationwide challenging contest in which a board of experts identify the best undergraduate contestants to support them during short research stays in high-energy- theory groups of prestigious international institutions. Out of 80 contestants, the eight awarded students have demonstrated their skills, producing highly advanced (and publicly available) reviews on particle physics, field theory, cosmology and string theory, and a published paper.

  16. 2007 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Kenneth M.

    2007-10-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its fourth annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from April through September 2007. During this time, 21 PNNL scientists hosted 23 participants from 20 different universities. Of the 23 participants, 20 were graduate students, 1 was a postdoctoral fellow, and 2 were university faculty members. This report covers the essense of the program and the research the participants performed.

  17. 2006 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, Nikki B.; Barlow, Stephan E.

    2006-11-10

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its third annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2006. During this period, twenty PNNL scientists hosted twenty-seven scientists from twenty-five different universities. Of the twenty-seven participants, one was a graduating senior; twenty-one were graduate students; one was a postdoctoral fellow; and four were university faculty members.

  18. 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School, June 6-15, 2007, CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 9 MARCH 2007. The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, covered extensively the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school, to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be placed on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be supported by in-depth discussion sessions and will include the theory and phenomenology of hadron collisions, discovery physics topics, detector and analysis techniques and tools...

  19. Proceedings of Summer Institute of Particle Physics, July 27-August 7, 1981: the strong interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, A. (ed.)

    1982-01-01

    The ninth SLAC Summer Institute on Particle Physics was held in the period July 27 to August 7, 1981. The central topic was the strong interactions with the first seven days spent in a pedagogic mode and the last three in a topical conference. In addition to the morning lectures on experimental and theoretical aspects of the strong interactions, three were lectures on machine physics; this year it was electron-positron colliding beam machines, both storage rings and linear colliders. Twenty-three individual items from the meeting were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  20. For Information: CERN-Fermilab2006 Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Applications are Now Open for the CERN-Fermilab2006 Hadron Collider Physics Summer School August 9-18, 2006 Please go to the school web site http://hcpss.fnal.gov/ and follow the links to the Application process. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS APRIL 8, 2006. Successful applicants and support awards will be announced shortly thereafter. Also available on the web is the tentative academic program of the school. The main goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers a broad picture of both the theoretical and experimental aspects of hadron collider physics. The emphasis of the first school will be on the physics potential of the first years of data taking at the LHC, and on the experimental and theoretical tools needed to exploit that potential. A series of lectures and informal discussions will include an introduction to the theoretical and phenomenological framework of hadron collisions, and current theoretical models of frontier physics, as...

  1. 3rd CERN-Fermilab HadronCollider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    EP Department

    2008-01-01

    August 12-22, 2008, Fermilab The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 29 FEBRUARY 2008. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high-energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The third session of the summer school will focus on exposing young post-docs and advanced graduate students to broader theories and real data beyond what they’ve learned at their home institutions. Experts from across the globe will lecture on the theoretical and experimental foundations of hadron collider physics, host parallel discussion sessions and answer students’ questions. This year’s school will also have a greater focus on physics beyond the Standard Model, as well as more time for questions at the end of each lecture. The 2008 School will be held at Fermilab. Further enquiries should ...

  2. Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Areas – CETUP*2016 Summer Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczerbinska, Barbara [Texas A& M University Corpus Christi, Madison, SD (United States)

    2017-02-15

    For last six years Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Areas (CETUP*) successfully provided a stimulating environment for creative thinking and open communication between researches of varying ages and nationalities in dynamic atmosphere of intense scientific interactions. Ongoing and proposed Neutrino and Dark Matter experiments are expected to unveil the answers to fundamental questions about the Universe. CETUP*2016 was focused exactly on these subjects bringing together experts in dark matter, neutrino physics, particle and nuclear physics, astrophysics and cosmology from around the world. Scientists invited to participate in the program not only provided theoretical support to the underground science, but they also examined core questions including: What is the nature of dark matter?, What is the origin of the neutrino masses?, How well do we know the neutrino parameters?, How have neutrinos shaped the evolution of the universe?, , What are the fundamental underlying symmetries of the Universe? Is there a Grand Unified Theory of the Universe? and many others. The 2016 CETUP* summer program consisted of three sessions (June 6 – July 16, 2016) covering various aspects of theoretical and experimental neutrino physics, unification and dark matter. The two week long session on Physics and Instrumentation of the Near Detector for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiments (June 6 – June 16) was followed by the two week long Neutrino Physics/Unification session: “From Grand Unification to String Theory and Back” (June 20 – July 2). The program ended with two week long session on Dark Matter Physics (July 4 – July 16). This six-week long program allowed for thorough discussions and an effective and comprehensive analysis of topics related to Dark Matter, Dark Energy, Neutrino Physics including astrophysical neutrinos, near and far detector physics, neutrino interactions, Higgs Boson, Inflation, Leptogenesis and many others that will advance

  3. Long-term changes of polar mesosphere summer echoes at 69°N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteck, R.; Bremer, J.

    2013-09-01

    Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) are strong enhancements of received signal power at very high radar frequencies occurring at altitudes between about 80 and 95km at polar latitudes during summer. PMSE are caused by inhomogeneities in the electron density of the radar Bragg scale within the plasma of the cold summer mesopause region in the presence of negatively charged ice particles. Thus, the occurrence of PMSE contains information about mesospheric temperature and water vapor content but also depends on the ionization due to solar electromagnetic radiation and precipitating high energetic particles. Continuous and homogeneous observations of PMSE have been done on the North-Norwegian Island Andøya (69.3°N, 16.0°E) from 1994 until 2008 using the ALOMAR SOUSY and the ALWIN radar at 53.5MHz. In 2009, the Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Kühlungsborn, Germany started the installation of the Middle Atmosphere ALOMAR Radar System (MAARSY) at the same location. The observation of mesospheric echoes could be continued in spring 2010 starting with an initial stage of expansion of MAARSY and is carried out with the completed installation of the radar since May 2011. Since both the ALWIN radar and MAARSY are calibrated, the received echo strength of PMSE from 14 years of mesospheric observations (1999-2012) could be converted into absolute signal power. This data series could be extended to the years 1994 until 1997 on the basis of signal-to-noise ratio values derived during the years between 1994 and 2008. The PMSE occurrence rate is positively correlated with the geomagnetic Ap index (significance level χ=85-95%), however, is not correlated with the solar Lyman α radiation. Using different regression analysis methods, the PMSE occurrence rates show a significant positive trend during the time interval from 1994 until 2012 (χ=95-99%).

  4. Physical mechanisms of the summer precipitation variations in the Taklimakan and Gobi Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W.; Feng, S.; Chen, J.; Chen, F.

    2013-12-01

    The Taklimakan and the adjacent Gobi Desert (TD in short) in northwestern China is one of the most arid regions in the middle latitudes, where water is scarce year round. Using observational precipitation and the reanalysis data, this study investigated the variations of summer precipitation in TD and their association with water vapor flux and atmospheric circulation. Though the long-term mean water vapor is mostly comes from the west, the variations of summer precipitation in TD is dominated by the water vapor flux from the south, originated from the Arabian Sea. The anomalous water vapor flux is closely associated with the meridional teleconnection pattern around 50-80°E and the zonal teleconection pattern along the Asian westerly jet in summer. The meridional teleconnection connecting the Central Asia and the tropical Indian Ocean, and the zonal pattern resembles the ';Silk Road pattern'. The two wave trains connected in Central Asia. The anomalous pressure gradient force between negative height anomalies in Central Asia and the positive height anomalies in Arabian Sea/India and North Central China lead to anomalous ascending motion in TD and bring more water vapor from the Arabian Sea to pass over the Tibetan Plateau to fuel the precipitation development in the study region. These mechanisms lead to out-of-phase relationship between TD precipitation and Indian summer monsoon in the instrumental period and the past 2000 years. The vertically integrated summer water vapor flux (arrows) and 300hPa geopotential height (contour) regressed against the summer precipitation in TD during 1960-2010. Shadings (blue arrows) indicate the correlations between the geopotential height (water vapor flux) and the TD precipitation are significant at the 95% confidence level. The Guliya ice core is marked as star and the proxy monsoon records in Arabian Sea (box cores 723A and RC2730) are marked as triangles. Summer climatological water vapor budget and the correaltion between

  5. Active and Cooperative Learning Paths in the Pigelleto's Summer School of Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetti, Roberto; Montalbano, Vera; Porri, Antonella

    2012-01-01

    Since 2006, the Pigelleto's Summer School of Physics is an important appointment for orienting students toward physics. It is organized as a full immersion school on actual topics in physics or in fields rarely pursued in high school, i.e. quantum mechanics, new materials, energy resources. The students, usually forty, are engaged in many activities in laboratory and forced to become active participants. Furthermore, they are encouraged in cooperating in small groups in order to present and share the achieved results. In the last years, the school became a training opportunity for younger teachers which are involved in programming and realization of selected activities. The laboratory activities with students are usually supervised by a young and an expert teacher in order to fix the correct methodology.

  6. Topological Aspects of Condensed Matter Physics : Lecture Notes of the Les Houches Summer School : Session CIII

    CERN Document Server

    Chamon, Claudio; Goerbig, Mark O; Moessner, Roderich; Cugliandolo, Leticia F

    2017-01-01

    Topological condensed matter physics is a recent arrival among the disciplines of modern physics of a distinctive and substantive nature. Its roots reach far back, but much of its current importance derives from exciting developments in the last half-century. The field is advancing rapidly, growing explosively, and diversifying greatly. There is now a zoo of topological phenomena–the quantum spin Hall effect, topological insulators, Coulomb spin liquids, non-Abelian anyonic statistics and their potential application in topological quantum computing, to name but a few–as well as an increasingly sophisticated set of concepts and methods underpinning their understanding. The aim of this Les Houches Summer School was to present an overview of this field, along with a sense of its origins and its place on the map of advances in fundamental physics. The school comprised a set of basic lectures (Part I) aimed at a pedagogical introduction to the fundamental concepts, which was accompanied by more advanced lectur...

  7. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, A.; Qiu, Jianwei; Vogelsang, W.; Yuan, F.

    2011-08-02

    Understanding the structure of the nucleon is of fundamental importance in sub-atomic physics. Already the experimental studies on the electro-magnetic form factors in the 1950s showed that the nucleon has a nontrivial internal structure, and the deep inelastic scattering experiments in the 1970s revealed the partonic substructure of the nucleon. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin and the gluonic structure of the nucleon. Experiments using deep inelastic scattering or polarized p-p collisions are carried out in the US at the CEBAF and RHIC facilities, respectively, and there are other experimental facilities around the world. More than twenty years ago, the European Muon Collaboration published their first experimental results on the proton spin structure as revealed in polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and concluded that quarks contribute very little to the proton's spin. With additional experimental and theoretical investigations and progress in the following years, it is now established that, contrary to naive quark model expectations, quarks and anti-quarks carry only about 30% of the total spin of the proton. Twenty years later, the discovery from the polarized hadron collider at RHIC was equally surprising. For the phase space probed by existing RHIC experiments, gluons do not seem to contribute any to the proton's spin. To find out what carries the remaining part of proton's spin is a key focus in current hadronic physics and also a major driving force for the new generation of spin experiments at RHIC and Jefferson Lab and at a future Electron Ion Collider. It is therefore very important and timely to organize a series of annual spin physics meetings to summarize the status of proton spin physics, to focus the effort, and to layout the future perspectives. This summer program on 'Nucleon Spin Physics' held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on July 14-27, 2010 [http://www.bnl.gov/spnsp/] is the

  8. Short-Term Summer Inundation as a Measure to Counteract Acidification in Rich Fens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan S Mettrop

    Full Text Available In regions with intensive agriculture, water level fluctuation in wetlands has generally become constricted within narrow limits. Water authorities are, however, considering the re-establishment of fluctuating water levels as a management tool in biodiverse, base-rich fens ('rich fens'. This includes temporary inundation with surface water from ditches, which may play an important role in counteracting acidification in order to conserve and restore biodiversity. Inundation may result in an increased acid neutralizing capacity (ANC for two reasons: infiltration of base-rich inundation water into peat soils, and microbial alkalinity generation under anaerobic conditions. The main objectives of this study were to test whether short-term (2 weeks summer inundation is more effective than short-term winter inundation to restore the ANC in the upper 10 cm of non-floating peat soils, and to explain potential differences. Large-scale field experiments were conducted for five years in base-rich fens and Sphagnum-dominated poor fens. Winter inundation did not result in increased porewater ANC, because infiltration was inhibited in the waterlogged peat and evapotranspiration rates were relatively low. Also, low temperatures limit microbial alkalinity generation. In summer, however, when temperature and evapotranspiration rates are higher, inundation resulted in increased porewater Ca and HCO3- concentrations, but only in areas with characteristic rich fen bryophytes. This increase was not only due to stronger infiltration into the soil, but also to higher microbial alkalinity generation under anaerobic conditions. In contrast, porewater ANC did not increase in Sphagnum-plots as a result of the ability of Sphagnum spp. to acidify their environment. In both rich and poor fens, flooding-induced P-mobilization remained sufficiently low to safeguard P-limited vegetation. NO3(- and NH4(+ dynamics showed no considerable changes either. In conclusion, short-term

  9. Physical performance and environmental conditions: 2014 World Soccer Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneroso, Christiano E; Ramos, Guilherme P; Mendes, Thiago T; Silami-Garcia, Emerson

    2015-01-01

    This editorial is for the special issue "Temperature sciences in Brazil" of the journal Temperature. It focuses on the physical performance and environmental conditions during the 2014 World Cup and the coming 2016 Summer Olympics. It emphasizes that a hot and humid environment imposes a great challenge to the human thermoregulation system, can lead to performance decrements, and increases the risk of developing hyperthermia. Adequate hydration, acclimatization, and body cooling strategies are effective interventions to minimize the risks associated with exercise in the heat.

  10. A comparison of suit dresses and summer clothes in the terms of thermal comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Fanger’s PMV equation is the result of the combined quantitative effects of the air temperature, mean radiant temperature, relative air velocity, humidity, activity level and clothing insulation. Methods This paper contains a comparison of suit dresses and summer clothes in terms of thermal comfort, Fanger’s PMV equation. Studies were processed in the winter for an office, which locates in Ankara, Turkey. The office was partitioned to fifty square cells. Humidity, relative air velocity, air temperature and mean radiant temperature were measured on the centre points of these cells. Thermal comfort analyses were processed for suit dressing (Icl = 1 clo) and summer clothing (Icl = 0.5 clo). Results Discomfort/comfort in an environment for different clothing types can be seen in this study. The relationship between indoor thermal comfort distribution and clothing type was discussed. Graphics about thermal comfort were sketched according to cells. Conclusions Conclusions about the thermal comfort of occupants were given by PMV graphics. PMID:24355097

  11. "Rotten Ice": Characterizing the Physical Properties of Arctic Sea Ice Under Conditions of Extreme Summer Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, B.; Frantz, C. M.; Junge, K.; Orellana, M. V.; Carpenter, S.; Farley, S. M.; Lieb-Lappen, R.; Courville, Z.

    2016-12-01

    The microstructural properties of sea ice are central to understanding the mechanical, thermal, electrical, and optical properties of a sea ice cover. Over the course of an annual cycle, this small scale structure routinely evolves from a network of mostly isolated brine and gas inclusions prevalent in cold ice, to a more connected, more permeable structure as the ice endures summer melt processes. In the case of extreme summer melt, sea ice can become "rotten", and it is expected that such rotten ice may become more prevalent as melt seasons lengthen. Rotten ice is approximately isothermal, largely drained of brine, and is typified by the presence of large multi-cm-scale void spaces that contribute to its high permeability and low structural integrity. These properties are expected to alter the ice cover response to dynamic forcing, ability to backscatter incident light, and its melt rate. An interdisciplinary effort to characterize the physical properties of rotten first-year ice, in concert with some of its chemical and biological properties, is being carried out both in the field and in the laboratory. Time-series samples focusing on the evolution of ice microstructure were acquired and analyzed for shore-fast first-year sea ice near Barrow, Alaska in May - July of 2015. Laboratory studies have focused on assessing the seasonal evolution of optical properties of this ice, as well as the measurement of melt rates of ice grown under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. Preliminary results from these studies illuminate some of the physical and biophysical controls on late summer ice melt.

  12. A multipurpose action for learning-teaching process: The Pigelleto's Summer School of Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Montalbano, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Since 2006, forty students from high school are selected to attend a full immersion summer school of physics in the Pigelleto Natural Reserve, on the south east side of Mount Amiata in the province of Siena. Topics are chosen so that students are involved in activities rarely pursued in high school, aspects and relationship with society are underlined and discussed. Our purpose is offering to really motivated students an opportunity of testing the scientific method, the laboratory experience in a stimulating context, by deepening an interesting and relevant topic in order to orienting them towards physics. Students are encouraged in cooperating in small groups in order to present and share the achieved results. Starting from the third edition of the school, the school became a training opportunity for younger teachers which are involved in programming and realization of selected activities. The laboratory activities with students are usually supervised by a young and an expert teacher in order to fix the corr...

  13. Effects of physical constraints on the lability of POM during summer in the Ross Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misic, Cristina; Covazzi Harriague, Anabella; Mangoni, Olga; Aulicino, Giuseppe; Castagno, Pasquale; Cotroneo, Yuri

    2017-02-01

    The 0-200 m surface layer of the Ross Sea was studied during summer 2014 to investigate the lability of the particulate organic matter (POM) in response to physical parameters. With the use of satellite information, we selected three zones, characterised by different physical setting: a northern offshore area, crossing the summer-polynya area of the Ross Sea (hereafter called ROME 1), a more coastal area next to the Terra Nova Bay polynya (ROME 2); a southern offshore area, towards the Ross Ice Shelf (ROME 3). Ice-maps showed that the seasonal ice retreat had already occurred in early December for most of the stations. Statistical analysis of the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the POM pointed to significant differences between the stations, especially in the upper mixed layer (UML). A comparison with previous studies showed that the localised pulses of POM accumulation in the UML were similar to those recorded at the highly productive marginal ice zones, providing notable trophic support to the ecosystem. The UML, although rather thin and easily subjected to alterations, confirmed its pivotal role in the ecosystem dynamics. A POM quality favourable to consumers was highlighted at several stations in ROME 1 and ROME 3. Reduced trophic support was, instead, found in ROME 2. Limited POM consumption where deep-water formation takes place would increase the POM role in the transfer of C to the depths.

  14. Physical traits of male Japanese bush warblers (Cettia diphone) in summer and winter: hyperactive aspects of the vocal system and leg muscles in summer males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Akira; Uchida, Hiroshi; Imanishi, Sadao

    2014-11-01

    The Japanese bush warbler has a very distinctive song, shows marked sexual size dimorphism, and has a polygynous mating system. However, the physical traits of males and seasonal variation in such traits have remained unknown. Twenty-five anatomical measurements representing physical traits of males in the breeding (summer, n = 5) and non-breeding (winter, n = 5) seasons were examined morphologically and compared statistically. Differences were evident between summer and winter (P < 0.05, t test) in the following seven items: body mass (19.8 ± 0.7 g vs. 15.6 ± 1.2 g [mean ± SD]), mass of male reproductive organs (184.0 ± 25.7 mg vs. 6.0 ± 1.4 mg), hind limb (3789.2 ± 346.2 mg vs. 3003.4 ± 226.8 mg), leg muscles (883.0 ± 63.5 mg vs. 581.4 ± 33.2 mg in either side), skin around the neck/throat (1280 ± 34.9 mg vs. 287.2 ± 84.7 mg), and syrinx (35.8 ± 2.39 mg vs. 25.0 ± 3.24 mg), and circumference of the neck/throat (52.1 ± 2.3 mm vs. 38.3 ± 2.6 mm). In contrast to winter males, summer males had thickened flabby skin prominently in the neck/throat area and an inflatable esophagus, perhaps a morphological basis for the throat sac as a vocal resonator. Also, the remarkable development of the flexor muscles of the legs of summer males suggests that perching and movement using the legs increases during the breeding season. These distinct characteristics of summer males may be related to the polygynous mating system of this species.

  15. Summer half-year hailstorms in South Moravia, Czech Republic: a long-term chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromá, Kateřina; Brázdil, Rudolf; Valášek, Hubert; Dolák, Lukáš; Řezníčková, Ladislava; Zahradníček, Pavel; Dobrovolný, Petr

    2017-04-01

    Hailstorms are natural phenomena of local or regional significance causing great material damage in present time, similarly as it was in the past. In Moravia (eastern part of the Czech Republic), systematic meteorological observations started generally in the latter half of the 19th century. Therefore, it is necessary to search for other sources of information in order to create long-term series of hailstorms. Documentary evidence is used in this study to extend the hailstorm information before the period of systematic observations and to complement existing systematic data. It allowed to compile a long-term series of summer half-year hailstorms in South Moravia using various types of documentary evidence (out of them taxation records, family archives, chronicles and newspapers are the most important) and systematic meteorological observations in the station network. Although available hailstorm data cover the 1435-2015 period, incomplete documentary evidence allows reasonable analysis of fluctuations in hailstorm frequency only since the 18th century (the frequency of hailstorms increases with the number of surviving documents). The long-term series compiled from documentary data and systematic meteorological observations is used to identify periods of lower and higher hailstorm frequency. The best temporal coverage of summer half-year hailstorm days in South Moravia starts in 1925 with a general decreasing trend of -0.05 days per 10 years up to 2015, more evident after 1961 (-1.4 days per 10 years). Existing data may also be used for the study of spatial hailstorm variability which is demonstrated on four particularly damaging hailstorms (on 20 June 1848, 1 July 1902, 10 July 1902 and 19 July 1903). Finally, uncertainties in the hailstorm chronology are discussed and differences related to various aspects of hailstorms detected from documentary and meteorological data in three 40 year periods are analysed. Despite some bias in hailstorm data, South

  16. Short Term Inlfuence of Organic and Inorganic Fertilizer on Soil Microbial Biomass and DNA in Summer and Spring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erinle Kehinda Olajide

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to see the short term impact of organic and inorganic fertilizers on soil microbial biomass both in spring and summer. Also aimed to observe the correlation between soil microbial biomass and soil DNA. The study concluded that type of fertilizer might alter the soil microbial biomass and DNA contents. In soil treated with organic fertilizers resulted in higher concentrations of microbial biomass and DNA contents in summer as compared to spring dute to increase in temperature. Correspondingly, in case of inorganic fertilizer, concentrations of soil microbial biomass and DNA detected higher in summer instead of spring. The statistical correlation between soil microbial biomass, DNA and ODR in spring and summer along with organic and inorganic fertilizers were calculated highly significant (p>0.01). This study demonstrated the impact of fertilizers and seasonal variations on soil microbial biomass and also revealed significant correlation between soil microbial biomass and soil DNA.

  17. At-Risk Boys' Social Self-Efficacy and Physical Activity Self-Efficacy in a Summer Sports Camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoxia; Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron E.; Liu, Jiling; Thornton, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined at-risk boys' social self-efficacy and physical activity self-efficacy within Bandura's self-efficacy framework. A total of 97 boys, aged between 10 and 13 years, attending a summer sports camp completed questionnaires assessing their social self-efficacy, physical activity self- efficacy, prosocial behaviors, and effort.…

  18. Proceedings of the Summer institute on particle physics: The top quark and the electroweak interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, D.; Dixon, L.; Leith, D.W.G.S.

    1997-01-01

    The XXIII SLAC Summer Institute on Particle Physics addressed the physics of the recently discovered top quark, and its connection to the electroweak interaction and to physics beyond the Standard Model. The seven-day school portion of the Institute covered many avenues for studying the top quark, from its direct production at hadron colliders and at future electron-positron colliders, to its virtual effects in precision electroweak quantities, in heavy flavor physics, and in the renormalization of supersymmetric theories, Vertex detectors - critical for identifying the b quark decay products of the top - and Cherenkov techniques for particle identification were also reviewed. The Institute concluded with a three-day topical conference covering recent developments in theory and experiment; this year, the highlights were the CDF and D0 top quark discovery. Also featured were updated precision electroweak measurements from SLC, LEP, and the Tevatron, heavy quark results from these facilities as well as CLEO, and new photoproduction and deep-inelastic scattering data from HERA. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the energy database for articles from this proceedings.

  19. Physical and biological characteristics of the winter-summer transition in the Central Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Zarokanellos, Nikolaos

    2017-07-25

    The Central Red Sea (CRS) lies between two distinct hydrographic and atmospheric regimes. In the southern Red Sea, seasonal monsoon reversal regulates the exchange of water between the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean. In the northern Red Sea, intermediate and occasionally deep water are formed during winter to sustain the basin\\'s overturning circulation. Highly variable mesoscale eddies and the northward flowing eastern boundary current (EBC) determine the physical and biogeochemical characteristics of the CRS. Ship-based and glider observations in the CRS between March and June 2013 capture key features of the transition from winter to summer and depict the impact of the eddy activity on the EBC flow. Less saline and relatively warmer water of Indian Ocean origin reaches the CRS via the EBC. Initially, an anticyclonic eddy with diameter of 140 km penetrating to 150m depth with maximum velocities up to 30–35 cm s prevails in the CRS. This anticyclonic eddy appears to block or at least redirect the northward flow of the EBC. Dissipation of the eddy permits the near-coastal, northward flow of the EBC and gives place to a smaller cyclonic eddy with a diameter of about 50 km penetrating to 200 m depth. By the end of May, as the northerly winds become stronger and persistent throughout the basin, characteristic of the summer southwest monsoon wind regime, the EBC, and its associated lower salinity water became less evident, replaced by the saltier surface water that characterizes the onset of the summer stratification in the CRS.

  20. PREFACE: 4th International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Fourth International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2010 The Fourth International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'10) is organized by St. Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, with co-organizers TCPA Foundation, Association EURATOM/IRNRE, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, and the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. It was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, at the Black Sea Coast, from July 5 to July 10, 2010. The scientific programme covers the topics Fusion Plasma and Materials; Plasma Modeling and Fundamentals; Plasma Sources, Diagnostics and Technology. As the previous issues of this scientific meeting (IWSSPP'05, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 44 (2006) and IWSSPP'06, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 63 (2007), IWSSPP'08, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 207 (2010), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 34 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma and materials, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the participants who sent their manuscripts and passed through the (sometimes heavy and troublesome) refereeing and editing

  1. Promoting Scientist Communications Through Graduate Summer School in Heliophysics and Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, N. A.; Schrijver, K.; Bagenal, F.; Sojka, J. J.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    edagogical tools that promote student interaction can be applied successfully during graduate workshops to enhance community and communication among the participants and instructors. The NASA/LWS funded Heliophysics Summer School and the NSF funded Space Weather Summer School provide graduate students starting research in the field, and others who are involved in space physics, an opportunity to learn from and interact with leaders in the field and each other. These interactions can happen casually, but there are a number of programatic aspects that foster the interaction so that they can be as fruitful as possible during the short period. These include: specific "ice-breaker" activities, practicing "elevator speeches", embedded lecture questions, question cards, discussion questions, interactive lab activities, structured lab groups, and use of social media. We are continuing to develop new ways to foster profession interaction during these short courses. Along with enhancing their own learning, the inclusion of these strategies provides both the participants and the instructors with models of good pedagogical tools and builds community among the students. Our specific implementation of these strategies and evidence of success will be presented.

  2. Evaluating the Effect of Physics Schemes in WRF Simulations of Summer Rainfall in North West Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Zeyaeyan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The numerical weather forecast model Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF has a range of applications because it offers multiple physical options, enabling the users to optimizing WRF for specific scales, geographical locations and applications. Summer rainfall cannot be predicted well in North West of Iran (NWI. Most of them are convective. Sometimes rainfall is heavy, so that it causes flash flood. In this research, some configurations of WRF were tested with four summer rainfall events in NWI to find the best configuration. Five cumulus, four planetary boundary layers (PBL and two microphysical schemes were combined. Twenty-six different configurations (models were implemented at two resolutions of 5 and 15 km for duration of 48 h. Four events, with over 20 mm convective daily rainfall total, were selected at NWI during summer season between 2010 and 2015. These events were tested by developing 26 unique models. Results were verified using several methods. The aim was to find the best results during the first 24 h. Although no single configuration can be introduced for all times, thresholds, and atmospheric system to provide reliable and accurate forecast, the best configuration for WRF can be identified. Kain-Fritsch (new Eta, Betts-Miller-Janjic, Modified Kain-Fritsch, Multi-scale Kain-Fritsch and newer Tiedtke cumulus schemes and Mellor-Yamada-Janjic, Shin-Hong ‘scale-aware’, Medium Range Forecast (MRF and Yonsei University (YSU Planetary Boundary Layer schemes and Kessler, WRF Single Moment 3 class simple ice (WSM3 microphysics schemes were selected. The result show that Cumulus schemes are the most sensitive and Microphysics schemes are the less sensitive. The comparison of 15 km and 5 km resolution simulations do not show obvious advantages in downscaling the results. Configuration with newer Tiedtke cumulus, Mellor-Yamada-Janjic PBL, WSM3 and Kessler microphysics schemes give the best results for the 5 and 15 km resolutions. The

  3. Equation for Consciousness in terms of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodukula, Siva Prasad

    2012-11-01

    Based on the concepts 'Double Relativity Effectí. 'Film theory of the Universe ','Heart of the God model of the universeí and'Space time equivalenceí, it is concluded that consciousness is defined in terms of physics as Çthe electromagnetic field containing electromagnetic waves of velocity greater than that of light velocity.? Also it is concluded that because of this high velocity the cell or any living organism will get the perception of events before their happenings. This phenomenon is one of the properties of feeling which is a constituent of consciousness. The degree or strength of consciousness can be measured and defined as the distance of point of generation of conscious wave from the center of space time fluid related to consciousness (d). It can be measured by the equation VCW3.d2= Constant. Where 'VCWí is the velocity of consciousness wave observed. The unit of measurement for degree or strength of consciousness is 'conscious meterí.

  4. The Development and Assessment of Particle Physics Summer Program for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prefontaine, Brean; Kurahashi Neilson, Naoko, , Dr.; Love, Christina, , Dr.

    2017-01-01

    A four week immersive summer program for high school students was developed and implemented to promote awareness of university level research. The program was completely directed by an undergraduate physics major and included a hands-on and student-led capstone project for the high school students. The goal was to create an adaptive and shareable curriculum in order to influence high school students' views of university level research and what it means to be a scientist. The program was assessed through various methods including a survey developed for this program, a scientific attitudes survey, weekly blog posts, and an oral exit interview. The curriculum included visits to local laboratories, an introduction to particle physics and the IceCube collaboration, an introduction to electronics and computer programming, and their capstone project: planning and building a scale model of the IceCube detector. At the conclusion of the program, the students participated an informal outreach event for the general public and gave an oral presentation to the Department of Physics at Drexel University. Assessment results and details concerning the curriculum and its development will be discussed.

  5. PREFACE: 26th Summer School and International Symposium on the Physics of Ionized Gases (SPIG 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraica, Milorad; Mijatovic, Zoran

    2012-11-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains the general invited lectures, topical invited lectures and progress reports presented at the 26th Summer School and International Symposium on the Physics of Ionized Gases - SPIG 2012. The conference was held in Zrenjanin, Serbia, from 27-31 August. The SPIG conference has a 52 year long tradition. The structure of the papers in this volume cover the following sections: atomic collision processes, particle and laser beam interactions with solids, low temperature plasmas and general plasmas. As these four topics often overlap and merge in numerous fundamental studies and, more importantly applications, SPIG in general serves as a venue for exchanging ideas in the related fields. We hope that this volume will be an important source of information about progress in plasma physics and will be useful, first of all, for students, but also for plasma physics scientists. The Editors would like to thank the invited speakers for their participation at SPIG 2012 and for their efforts writing contributions for this volume. We also express our gratitude to the members of Scientific and Organizing committees for their efforts in organizing this SPIG. Especially we would like to thank the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of Republic of Serbia, Provincial Secretariat for Science and Techonological Development, Province of Vojvodina, Institute Français de Serbie and Biser Zrenjanin for financial support as well as the European Physical Society (EPS) for supporting the award for the best poster of a young scientist and American Elements, USA. Milorad Kuraica Zoran Mijatovic October 2012 Editors

  6. PREFACE: 24th Summer School and International Symposium on the Physics of Ionized Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malović, Gordana; Popović, Luka Č.; Dimitrijević, Milan S.

    2008-02-01

    This volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains the Invited lectures, Topical invited lectures and Progress reports presented at the 24th Summer School and International Symposium on the Physics of Ionized Gases - SPIG 2008. The conference was held in Novi Sad, Serbia, 25-29 August 2008. Throughout the history of scientific discovery, one can see repeatedly how fundamental sciences have solved basic questions and opened new frontiers. In the field of physics, there are many key discoveries, resulting in their useful applications for the benefit of the mankind. It is very important to have meetings to discuss actual problems in particular fields of physics. This Conference provided a forum for 160 active researchers from 25 countries to discuss current advances in the physics of ionized gases and related fields. The Conference has a long tradition. Let us remember that the first SPIG was organized in 1968. The decay of former Yugoslavia in 1991, caused a disturbance in SPIG meetings, but fortunately, in 1993, SPIG meetings were successfully revitalized. During recent years we have met successively in Belgrade, Kotor, Zlatibor, Soko Banja, Tara, Kopaonik and finally this time in Novi Sad. The structure of the papers in this Proceedings is as follows: Atomic Collision Processes, Particle and Laser Beam Interactions with Solids, Low Temperature Plasmas and General Plasmas. We hope that this Proceedings will be an important source of information, first of all to students, and also to plasma physics scientists. First of all, we would like to thank to the invited speakers for participating at the SPIG 2008 and for their efforts writing contributions for this Proceedings. We also express our gratitude to the members of the Scientific and Organizing committees for their efforts in organizing the Conference. Especially we would like to thank the Ministry of Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia for financial support. Also, this

  7. 2008 Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, Bruce C.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Avery, Nachael B.

    2008-11-01

    For the fifth year, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, invited graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, university faculty, and students entering graduate students from around the world to participate in the Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics. The institute offers participants the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in top-notch research laboratories while working along internationally respected mentors. Of the 38 applicants, 20 were accepted for the 8- to 10-week program. The participants came from universities as close as Seattle and Portland and as far away as Germany and Singapore. At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the 20 participants were mentored by 13 scientists. These mentors help tailor the participant’s experience to the needs of that person. Further, the mentors provide guidance on experimental and theoretical techniques, research design and completion, and other aspects of scientific careers in interfacial and condensed phase chemical physics. The research conducted at the institute can result in tangible benefits for the participants. For example, many have co-authored papers that have been published in peer-reviewed journals, including top-rated journals such as Science. Also, they have presented their research at conferences, such as the Gordon Research Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces and the AVS national meeting. Beyond that, many of the participants have started building professional connections with researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, connections that will serve them well during their careers.

  8. EDITORIAL: The Fifth International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    , Russia, the US, China, South Korea and India (as of March 2006). It will take several years to accomplish this important task. There is no doubt that the success depends not only on funding but also on enthusiastic people willing to contribute with their skills and knowledge. Young scientists and engineers must be enrolled to the programme and trained in various disciplines of fusion science and technology. There are various education schemes and work programmes. Organization of summer schools on fusion-related plasma physics is an important part of the training process. Several schools are organized annually or every second year in Europe. Fusion-related science is so vast that it is impossible to cover all topics during an event lasting for one or two weeks. Therefore, each school has its distinctive features and focuses on a selected group of issues to be addressed in depth. This also applies to the Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics in Kudowa Zdrój (Poland) that, has been organised annually since 2001. It was initiated by Dr Marek Scholz with the help of his colleagues from the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM) in Warsaw. The idea was to create a forum for students mainly from Eastern Europe to learn and discuss subjects in general plasma physics and dense magnetized media, predominantly in plasma focus devices. Over the years the school has matured and created a clear profile. A unique feature has always been to accommodate in the programme not only tutorials delivered by invited senior scientists but also presentations prepared by the students. In June 2005 the 5th Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics was held under the heading 'Towards Fusion Energy: Plasma Physics, Diagnostics, Applications'. There were 59 participants, including 44 students, coming from plasma physics and material research laboratories in 17 countries: Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Georgia, Iran, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Russia

  9. History of physical terms: ‘pressure’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontali, Clara

    2013-07-01

    Scientific terms drawn from common language are often charged with suggestions that may even be inconsistent with their restricted scientific meaning, thus posing didactic problems. The (non-linear) historical journey of the word ‘pressure’ is illustrated here through original quotations from Stevinus, Torricelli, Pascal, Boyle, Magalotti, Bernoulli and Dalton, in an attempt to follow the shift from the idea of a force to the modern understanding of the term as a state variable. The latter appears to have prevailed as a consequence of technological advances of the industrial revolution (Watt’s steam engine and indicator diagram) in their 19th century re-elaboration.

  10. Physical terms and leisure time activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovičová, Ľubomíra; Siptáková, Mária; ŠtubÅa, Martin

    2017-01-01

    People have to educate not only in school but also outside it. One approach to acquire new knowledge are leisure activities such as hobby groups or camps. Leisure activities, more and more seem to be the appropriate form for informal learning of physics concepts. Within leisure activities pupils have the possibility to acquire new concepts in unusual and interesting way. It is possible to inspire their intrinsic motivation on the matter or the phenomenon which is the aim of all teachers. This article deals with the description of and insights on acquisition of the concept of uniform and non-uniform rectilinear movement during a physics camp where pupils had the opportunity to use modern technologies which are despite of modernization of education still unconventional teaching methods in our schools.

  11. Collaboration, Pedagogy, and Media: Short-Term Summer Programs Emphasize Project Based and Social Emotional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Summer programs that experiment with combining media literacy and social-emotional learning can potentially affect students' academic performance. Based on a six-week program, working with rising eighth grade students in a low-income school district, this program allowed students to work on media projects while trying to develop stronger…

  12. ELEC-2005 - Electronics in High Energy Physics: Autumn Term (November-December 2005)

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2005-01-01

    ELEC-2005 is a new course series on modern electronics, given by CERN physicists and engineers within the framework of the 2005 Technical Training Programme, in an extended format of the ELEC-2002 course series. This new, comprehensive course series is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. ELEC-2005 is composed of four Terms. The Winter (Introduction to electronics in HEP), Spring (Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics), and Summer (System electronics for physics: Issues) Terms already took place. The Autumn Term - Electronics applications in HEP experiments (November-December, 10 lectures) is still open for registration, and has started on November 8th with the following programme: Tuesday 8.11 - Tracking (Geoff Hall). Thursday 10.11 - Calorimetr...

  13. Effects of a Competency-Based Professional Development Training on Children's Physical Activity and Staff Physical Activity Promotion in Summer Day Camps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Webster, Collin A.; Moore, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The YMCA of the USA serves more than nine million youth in its summer day camping programs nationwide. In spring 2011, the YMCA of Columbia, SC, with support from the University of South Carolina, adopted a competency-based staff-level training approach in an attempt to align staff behaviors with the YMCA of the USA new physical activity standards…

  14. Effects of a Competency-Based Professional Development Training on Children's Physical Activity and Staff Physical Activity Promotion in Summer Day Camps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Webster, Collin A.; Moore, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The YMCA of the USA serves more than nine million youth in its summer day camping programs nationwide. In spring 2011, the YMCA of Columbia, SC, with support from the University of South Carolina, adopted a competency-based staff-level training approach in an attempt to align staff behaviors with the YMCA of the USA new physical activity standards…

  15. PREFACE: 27th Summer School and International Symposium on the Physics of Ionized Gases (SPIG 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marić, Dragana; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.; Mijatović, Zoran

    2014-12-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains a selection of papers presented at the 27th Summer School and International Symposium on the Physics of Ionized Gases - SPIG 2014, as General Invited Lectures, Topical Invited Lectures, Progress Reports and associated Workshop Lectures. The conference was held in Belgrade, Serbia, from 26-29 August 2014 at the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts. It was organized by the Institute of Physics Belgrade, University of Belgrade and Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, under the auspices of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Republic of Serbia. A rare virtue of a SPIG conference is that it covers a wide range of topics, bringing together leading scientists worldwide to present and discuss state-of-the art research and the most recent applications, thus stimulating a modern approach of interdisciplinary science. The Invited lectures and Contributed papers are related to the following research fields: 1. Atomic Collision Processes (Electron and Photon Interactions with Atomic Particles, Heavy Particle Collisions, Swarms and Transport Phenomena) 2. Particle and Laser Beam Interactions with Solids (Atomic Collisions in Solids, Sputtering and Deposition, Laser and Plasma Interaction with Surfaces) 3. Low Temperature Plasmas (Plasma Spectroscopy and other Diagnostic Methods, Gas Discharges, Plasma Applications and Devices) 4. General Plasmas (Fusion Plasmas, Astrophysical Plasmas and Collective Phenomena) Additionally, the 27th SPIG encompassed three workshops that are closely related to the scope of the conference: • The Workshop on Dissociative Electron Attachment (DEA) - Chaired by Prof. Nigel J Mason, OBE, The Open University, United Kingdom • The Workshop on X-ray Interaction with Biomolecules in Gas Phase (XiBiGP), Chaired by Dr. Christophe Nicolas, Synchrotron SOLEIL, France • The 3rd International Workshop on Non-Equilibrium Processes (NonEqProc) - Chaired by Prof

  16. PREFACE: 10th Summer School on Theoretical Physics 'Symmetry and Structural Properties of Condensed Matter'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulek, Tadeusz; Wal, Andrzej; Lulek, Barbara

    2010-03-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the Tenth Summer School on Theoretical Physics under the banner title 'Symmetry and Structural Properties of Condensed Matter' (SSPCM 2009). The School was organized by Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland, in cooperation with AGH University of Science and Technology, Cracow, Poland, and took place on 2-9 September 2009 in Myczkowce, Poland. With this meeting we have reached the round number ten of the series of biannual SSPCM schools, which started in 1990 and were focused on some advanced mathematical methods of condensed matter physics. The first five meetings were held in Zajaczkowo near Poznan, under the auspices of The Institute of Physics of Adam Mickiewicz University, and the last five in Myczkowce near Rzeszów, in the south-eastern part of Poland. Within these two decades several young workers who started at kindergarten lectures at SSPCM, have now reached their PhD degrees, professorships and authority. Proceedings of the first seven SSPCM meetings were published as separate volumes by World Scientific, and the last two as volumes 30 and 104 of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The present meeting is also the third of the last schools which put the emphasis on quantum informatics. The main topics of our jubilee SSPCM'09 are the following: Information processing, entanglement, and tensor calculus, Integrable models and unitary symmetry, Finite systems and nanophysics. The Proceedings are divided into three parts accordingly. The school gathered together 55 participants from seven countries and several scientific centers in Poland, accommodating again advanced research with young collaborators and students. Acknowledgements The Organizing Committee would like to express its gratitude to all participants for their many activities during the School and for creating a friendly and inspiring atmosphere within our SSPCM society. Special thanks are due to all lecturers for preparing and presenting their talks and

  17. Long-term summer temperature reconstruction inferred from tree-ring records from the Eastern Carpathians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popa, Ionel [Forest Research and Management Institute, Research Station for Norway Spruce Silviculture, Campulung Moldovenesc (Romania); Kern, Zoltan [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Geochemical Research, Budapest (Hungary)

    2009-06-15

    The first 1,000 year long Carpathian tree-ring width chronology was established based on living and subfossil stone pine (Pinus cembra L.) samples from an upper timberline forest located in Calimani Mts. (Romania). Tree-ring data were standardized using the regional curve standardization method in order to preserve the low and medium frequency climate signals. The de-trended index strongly correlates with summer mean temperature both at annual and decadal scales. The Calimani summer mean temperature anomalies were reconstructed for the period ad 1163-2005 applying the rescaling method. This new climate proxy from the Carpathians shows similar fluctuations to other North Hemispheric temperature reconstructions, but with periods of distinct differences. The fingerprint of Little Ice Age in the Calimani area is visible between ad 1370 and 1630 followed by lagged cold decades in ad 1820 and 1840. The recent warming is evident only after the 1980s in our reconstruction. (orig.)

  18. History of physical terms: ‘energy’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontali, Clara

    2014-09-01

    Difficulties encountered by teachers in giving a definition of the term ‘energy’, and by students in grasping its actual meaning, reflect the lengthy process through which the concept eventually came to maturity around 1850. Tracing the history of this process illuminates the different aspects covered by the term and shows the important role played by advancements in animal physiology in the concept’s elaboration. A unique example of cross-fertilization between historically separate fields, the history of the studies on animal heat, is recounted here. The recount starts from the early experiments by Boyle and Hooke on the effect of void on living beings and from Lavoisier’s revolutionary interpretation of respiration as a ‘slow combustion’ process, touching on the contributions by Spallanzani, von Humboldt and Liebig. It ends with the first enunciation of an energy conservation law by two German physicians, Meyer and Helmholtz, in advance of the elaboration of a coherent thermodynamic framework by Kelvin.

  19. Downlink and Uplink Physical Channels in Long Term Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Z. Yonis

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Long Term Evolution (LTE defines a number of physical channels to carry information blocks received from the MAC and higher layers. This paper presents two types of Physical channels: the first type is downlink physical channels which consist of Physical Broadcast Channel (PBCH, Physical Downlink Shared Channel (PDSCH, Physical Multicast Channel (PMCH, Physical Downlink Control Channel (PDCCH, Physical Control Format Indicator Channel (PCFICH and Physical Hybrid ARQ Indicator Channel (PHICH. The second type of Physical channels is uplink physical channels which consist of Physical Uplink Shared Channel (PUSCH, Physical Uplink Control Channel (PUCCH and Physical Random Access Channel (PRACH. This paper also highlights the structure of PDSCH and PUSCH, discuss the algorithms of the two types of physical channel and each of its features. The aim of this paper is to discuss the well-designed PHY Channels which provide high cell-edge performance with specific features, such as dynamic bandwidth allocation to users, the design of reference signals and control channels. These channels take into account a more challenging path loss and interference environment at the cell edge.

  20. Understanding of Statistical Terms Routinely Used in Presentations: A Survey among Residents who participate at a Summer School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmina-Ioana BONDOR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of our study was to investigate the understanding of statistical terms commonly used in lectures presented at summer schools for residents and young specialists. Material and Method: A survey was distributed to all the participants at the “Diabetic neuropathy from theory to practice” Summer School, 2014. The program was addressed to residents or young specialists in diabetes, neurology, surgery, and orthopedic from Romania. The survey consists of 6 multiple-choice questions and the first four questions evaluate the understanding of statistical terms. Results: There were 51 (42.5% participants who completed the questionnaires. From 204 total questions 81 (39.7% had correct answers. At the question 1, where relative risk was evaluated, only 3 (5.9% respondents answered correctly while at the question 2 (number need to treat about 78.4% (40 of answers were correct. At the question 3 (sensitivity, 22 (43.1% respondents answer correct while at the question 4 (Receiver Operating Characteristic curves only 16 (31.4% respondents provided a correct answer. The overall mean score of correct answers was 1.56±0.91. Conclusion: Our study showed that young specialists who participated to the survey were not familiarized with simple statistical terms commonly used in presentations.

  1. Long term patterns in the late summer trophic niche of the invasive pumpkinseed sunfish Lepomis gibbosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gkenas C.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying the trophic dynamics of invasive species in novel habitats is important for predicting the success of potential invaders and evaluating their ecological effects. The North American pumpkinseed sunfish Lepomis gibbosus is a successful invader in Europe, where it has caused negative ecological effects primarily through trophic interactions. Here, we quantified variations in the late summer trophic niche of pumpkinseed during establishment and integration in the mainstem of the Guadiana river, using stomach content analyses over a period of 40 years. Pumpkinseed showed a shift from trophic specialization during establishment to trophic generalism during integration. These results were concomitant with an increase in diet breadth that was accompanied by higher individual diet specialization particularly in large individuals. Irrespective of their drivers, these changes in trophic niche suggest that the potential ecological effects of pumpkinseed on recipient ecosystems can vary temporally along the invasion process.

  2. An Exploratory Study of 4th, 5th, and 6th Grade Summer Camp Participants’ Attitudes and Intentions Towards Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Cater

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical inactivity is a growing problem among children, particularly school-aged youth. Research suggests children are especially prone to inactivity in the summer months when access to structured school-time and extra-curricular activities is reduced. Community programs like residential summer camps offer an excellent environment for engaging children in enjoyable physical activities while also helping them learn to be more physically active when they return home. Pre-existing attitudes often influence how much change a program inspires in an individual. The purpose of this study was to explore 4th, 5th, and 6th grade summer camp participants’ attitudes towards physical activity. Results of this study indicate that youth have a fairly neutral, though positive, attitude towards physical activity and that parental support of physical activity is still extremely important, even at this age. Campers also indicated relatively high intentions to remain physically active in the two weeks after the camp ended

  3. Biogeochemistry of the Bay of Bengal: Physical, chemical and primary productivity characteristics of the central and western Bay of Bengal during summer monsoon 2001

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; Gauns, M.; Ramaiah, N.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Muraleedharan, P.M.; DeSousa, S.N.; Sardessai, S.; Muraleedharan, U.D.

    Reliable data on biological characteristics from the Bay of Bengal are elusive. In this paper, we present results on physics, chemistry and biology simultaneously measured during the summer monsoon, 2001 from open ocean and coastal areas...

  4. A Summer Math and Physics Program for High School Students: Student Performance and Lessons Learned in the Second Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timme, Nicholas; Baird, Michael; Bennett, Jake; Fry, Jason; Garrison, Lance; Maltese, Adam

    2013-05-01

    For the past two years, the Foundations in Physics and Mathematics (FPM) summer program has been held at Indiana University in order to fulfill two goals: provide additional physics and mathematics instruction at the high school level, and provide physics graduate students with experience and autonomy in designing curricula and teaching courses. In this paper we will detail changes made to the program for its second year and the motivation for these changes, as well as implications for future iterations of the program. We gauge the impact of the changes on student performance using pre-/post-test scores, student evaluations, and anecdotal evidence. These data show that the program has a positive impact on student knowledge and this impact was greater in magnitude in the second year of the program. We attribute this improvement primarily to the inclusion of more inquiry-driven activities. All activities, worksheets, and lesson plans used in the program are available online.

  5. Probing physics students' conceptual knowledge structures through term association

    CERN Document Server

    Beatty, I D; Beatty, Ian D.; Gerace, William J.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional tests are not effective tools for diagnosing the content and structure of students' knowledge of physics. As a possible alternative, a set of term-association tasks (the "ConMap" tasks) was developed to probe the interconnections within students' store of conceptual knowledge. The tasks have students respond spontaneously to a term or problem or topic area with a sequence of associated terms; the response terms and timeof- entry data are captured. The tasks were tried on introductory physics students, and preliminary investigations show that the tasks are capable of eliciting information about the stucture of their knowledge. Specifically, data gathered through the tasks is similar to that produced by a hand-drawn concept map task, has measures that correlate with inclass exam performance, and is sensitive to learning produced by topic coverage in class. Although the results are preliminary and only suggestive, the tasks warrant further study as student-knowledge assessment instruments and sources...

  6. Fingerprinting the Impacts of Aerosols on Long-Term Trends of the Indian Summer Monsoon Regional Rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laul, K. M.; Kim, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present corroborative observational evidences from satellites, in-situ observations, and re-analysis data showing possible impacts of absorbing aerosols (black carbon and dust) on subseasonal and regional summer monsoon rainfall over India. We find that increased absorbing aerosols in the Indo-Gangetic Plain in recent decades may have lead to long-term warming of the upper troposphere over northern India and the Tibetan Plateau, enhanced rainfall in northern India and the Himalayas foothill regions in the early part (may-June) of the monsoon season, followed by diminished rainfall over central and southern India in the latter part (July-August) of the monsoon season. These signals which are consistent with current theories of atmospheric heating and solar dimming by aerosol and induced cloudiness in modulating the Indian monsoon, would have been masked by conventional method of using al-India rainfall averaged over the entire monsoon season.

  7. Physical approach to short-term wind power prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Offers an approach to the ultimate goal of the short-term prediction of the power output of winds farms. This book addresses scientists and engineers working in wind energy related R and D and industry, as well as graduate students and nonspecialists researchers in the fields of atmospheric physics and meteorology.

  8. Theoretical Physics to Face the Challenge of LHC : Lecture Notes of the Les Houches Summer School : 97th Session

    CERN Document Server

    Benakli, Karim; Douglas, Michael R; Mansoulie, Bruno; Rabinovici, Eliezer; Cugliandolo, Leticia F

    2015-01-01

    This book is based on lectures at the Les Houches Summer School held in August 2011 for an audience of advanced graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in particle physics, theoretical physics, and cosmology—areas where new experimental results were on the verge of being discovered at CERN. The school was held during a summer of great anticipation that at any moment contact might be made with the most recent theories of the nature of the fundamental forces and the structure of spacetime. In fact, during the session, the long anticipated discovery of the Higgs particle was announced. The book vividly describes the creative diversity and tension within the community of theoreticians who have split into several components—those doing phenomenology and those dealing with highly theoretical problems—with a few trying to bridge both domains. The theoreticians covered many directions in the theory of elementary particles, from classics such as the supersymmetric Standard Model to very recent ideas such as t...

  9. Formation of summer phytoplankton bloom in the northwestern Bay of Bengal in a coupled physical-ecosystem model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thushara, V.; Vinayachandran, P. N.

    2016-12-01

    The Bay of Bengal (BoB) is considered to be a region of low biological productivity, owing to nutrient limitation, caused by strong salinity stratification induced by the freshwater influx from rivers and precipitation. Satellite and in situ observations, however, reveal the presence of prominent regional blooms in the bay in response to monsoonal forcings. Bloom dynamics of the BoB are presumably determined by freshwater as well as the local and remote effect of winds and remain to be explored in detail. Using a coupled physical-ecosystem model, we have examined the oceanic processes controlling productivity in the northwestern BoB during the summer monsoon. The region exhibits a prominent bloom lasting for a period of about 2 months, supporting major fishing zones along the northeast coast of India. The ecosystem model simulates the spatial and temporal evolution of the surface bloom in good agreement with Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) observations. Vertical distribution of upper ocean physical and biological tracers and a nitrate budget analysis reveal the dominant role of coastal upwelling induced by alongshore winds in triggering the bloom. Horizontal advection plays a secondary role by supplying nutrients from coastal to offshore regions. The bloom decays with the weakening of winds and upwelling by the end of summer monsoon. The simulated bloom in the northwestern bay remains largely unaffected by the freshwater effects, since the peak bloom occurs before the arrival of river plumes.

  10. Redox proteomics and physiological responses in Cistus albidus shrubs subjected to long-term summer drought followed by recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossa, Ricard; Pintó-Marijuan, Marta; Francisco, Rita; López-Carbonell, Marta; Chaves, Maria Manuela; Alegre, Leonor

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, endogenous levels of ABA and ABA-GE, the rapid recuperation of photosynthetic proteins under re-watering as well the high level of antioxidant proteins in previously drought-stressed plants under re-watering conditions, will contribute to drought resistance in plants subjected to a long-term drought stress under Mediterranean field conditions. This work provides an overview of the mechanisms of Cistus albidus acclimation to long-term summer drought followed by re-watering in Mediterranean field conditions. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of drought resistance in these plants, a proteomic study using 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS was performed on leaves from these shrubs. The analysis identified 57 differentially expressed proteins in water-stressed plants when contrasted to well watered. Water-stressed plants showed an increase, both qualitatively and quantitatively, in HSPs, and downregulation of photosynthesis and carbon metabolism enzymes. Under drought conditions, there was considerable upregulation of enzymes related to redox homeostasis, DHA reductase, Glyoxalase, SOD and isoflavone reductase. However, upregulation of catalase was not observed until after re-watering was carried out. Drought treatment caused an enhancement in antioxidant defense responses that can be modulated by ABA, and its catabolites, ABA-GE, as well as JA. Furthermore, quantification of protein carbonylation was shown to be a useful marker of the relationship between water and oxidative stress, and showed that there was only moderate oxidative stress in C. albidus plants subjected to water stress. After re-watering plants recovered although the levels of ABA-GE and antioxidant enzymes still remain higher than in well-watered plants. We expect that our results will provide new data on summer acclimation to drought stress in Mediterranean shrubs.

  11. Gauge bosons and heavy quarks: Proceedings of Summer Institute on Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Z decays and tests of the standard model; future possibilities for LEP; studies of the interactions of electroweak gauge bosons; top quark topics; the next linear collider; electroweak processes in hadron colliders; theoretical topics in B-physics; experimental aspects of B-physics; B-factory storage ring design; rare kaon decays; CP violation in K(sup 0) decays at CERN; recent K(sup 0) decay results from Fermilab E-731; results from LEP on heavy quark physics; review of recent results on heavy flavor production; weak matrix elements and the determination of the weak mixing angles; recent results from CLEO I and a glance at CLEO II data; recent results from ARGUS; neutrino lepton physics with the CHARM 2 detector; recent results from the three TRISTAN experiments; baryon number violation at high energy in the standard model: fact or fiction? New particle searches at LEP; review of QCD at LEP; electroweak interactions at LEP; recent results on W physics from the UA2 experiment at the CERN rho(bar rho) collider; B physics at CDF; and review of particle astrophysics.

  12. Gauge bosons and heavy quarks: Proceedings of Summer Institute on Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, J.F. (ed.)

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Z decays and tests of the standard model; future possibilities for LEP; studies of the interactions of electroweak gauge bosons; top quark topics; the next linear collider; electroweak processes in hadron colliders; theoretical topics in B-physics; experimental aspects of B-physics; B-factory storage ring design; rare kaon decays; CP violation in K{sup 0} decays at CERN; recent K{sup 0} decay results from Fermilab E-731; results from LEP on heavy quark physics; review of recent results on heavy flavor production; weak matrix elements and the determination of the weak mixing angles; recent results from CLEO I and a glance at CLEO II data; recent results from ARGUS; neutrino lepton physics with the CHARM 2 detector; recent results from the three TRISTAN experiments; baryon number violation at high energy in the standard model: fact or fiction New particle searches at LEP; review of QCD at LEP; electroweak interactions at LEP; recent results on W physics from the UA2 experiment at the CERN {rho}{bar {rho}} collider; B physics at CDF; and review of particle astrophysics.

  13. Short term and long term effects of pulmonary rehabilitation on physical activity in COPD.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Egan, Claire

    2012-12-01

    The central purpose of pulmonary rehabilitation is to reduce morbidity by improving functional capacity through exercise. It is still unknown if improvements in functional capacity are maintained in the long-term and if this leads to increased physical activity levels as measured by a free-living activity monitor. The hypothesis of this study was that pulmonary rehabilitation would lead to a sustained increase in standard outcome measures and in daily physical activity.

  14. Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Areas - CETUP*2013 Summer Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczerbinska, Barbara

    2014-06-01

    In response to an increasing interest in experiments conducted at deep underground facilities around the world, in 2010 the theory community has proposed a new initiative - a Center for Theoretical Underground Physics and Related Areas (CETUP*). The main goal of CETUP* is to bring together people with different talents and skills to address the most exciting questions in particle and nuclear physics, astrophysics, geosciences, and geomicrobiology. Scientists invited to participate in the program do not only provide theoretical support to the underground science, they also examine underlying universal questions of the 21st century including: What is dark matter?, What are the masses of neutrinos?, How have neutrinos shaped the evolution of the universe?, How were the elements from iron to uranium made?, What is the origin and thermal history of the Earth? The mission of the CETUP* is to promote an organized research in physics, astrophysics, geoscience, geomicrobiology and other fields related to the underground science via individual and collaborative research in dynamic atmosphere of intense scientific interactions. Our main goal is to bring together scientists scattered around the world, promote the deep underground science and provide a stimulating environment for creative thinking and open communication between researches of varying ages and nationalities. CETUP*2014 included 5 week long program (June 24 – July 26, 2013) covering various theoretical and experimental aspects of Dark Matter, Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics. Two week long session focused on Dark Matter (June 24-July 6) was followed by two week long program on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (July 15-26). The VIIth International Conference on Interconnections between Particle Physics and Cosmology (PPC) was sandwiched between these sessions (July 8-13) covering the subjects of dark matter, neutrino physics, gravitational waves, collider physics and other from both theoretical end experimental

  15. Building Enrollment in Summer Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Presents suggestions from 17 day-care center directors on ways to improve summer enrollment. Suggestions include marketing summer programs early; offering reasonable fees, with reduced fees for low-income families; organizing new or different summer programs; creating a summer camp atmosphere; offering short-term summer programs; and including…

  16. Chern-Simons terms and cocycles in physics and mathematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackiw, R.

    1984-12-01

    Contemporary topological research in Yang-Mills theory is reviewed, emphasizing the Chern-Simons terms and their relatives. Three applications of the Chern-Simons terms in physical theory are described: to help understanding gauge theories in even dimensional space-time; gauge field dynamics in odd dimensional space-time; and mathematically coherent description of even-dimensional gauge theories with chiral fermions that are apparently inconsistent due to chiral anomalies. Discussion of these applications is preceded by explanation of the mathematical preliminaries and examples in simple quantum mechanical settings. 24 refs. (LEW)

  17. Level of development of the physical components of social activity schoolchildren 10-11 years children summer camp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chovgan R.Ya.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine the level of physical health of schoolchildren. Material : the study involved 146 children aged 10-11 years. Results : the questions of children's health issues such: the state of development of physical qualities, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, the ratio of children to their own health, interest in physical education means in terms of the Camp. The characteristic of the state of physical health and adaptive capacity of the organism respondents. Found that 50.7 % of children had low, 42.5% - the average, 6.8% - a high level of physical activity. Daily physical fitness - 11.0 % 2-3 times a week - 26.0 % once a week, 18.5%, and sometimes - 44.5%. The health camp prefer morning gymnastics 89.0 % of students ; hiking 67.1 % physical training on interest - 63.7%. Conclusions : the identified leading and lagging physical qualities in children studied age group. Dominant over the other physical properties were agility and strength of the abdominal muscles. By lagging physical qualities include strength of arm and leg flexibility. A significant amount of children surveyed are not able to fulfill the standards of the State tests of Ukraine for its age-sex groups on a positive assessment.

  18. The long-term variability of Changma in the East Asian summer monsoon system: A review and revisit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, June-Yi; Kwon, MinHo; Yun, Kyung-Sook; Min, Seung-Ki; Park, In-Hong; Ham, Yoo-Geun; Jin, Emilia Kyung; Kim, Joo-Hong; Seo, Kyong-Hwan; Kim, WonMoo; Yim, So-Young; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2017-05-01

    Changma, which is a vital part of East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) system, plays a critical role in modulating water and energy cycles in Korea. Better understanding of its long-term variability and change is therefore a matter of scientific and societal importance. It has been indicated that characteristics of Changma have undergone significant interdecadal changes in association with the mid-1970s global-scale climate shift and the mid-1990s EASM shift. This paper reviews and revisits the characteristics on the long-term changes of Changma focusing on the underlying mechanisms for the changes. The four important features are manifested mainly during the last few decades: 1) mean and extreme rainfalls during Changma period from June to September have been increased with the amplification of diurnal cycle of rainfall, 2) the dry spell between the first and second rainy periods has become shorter, 3) the rainfall amount as well as the number of rainy days during August have significantly increased, probably due to the increase in typhoon landfalls, and 4) the relationship between the Changma rainfall and Western Pacific Subtropical High on interannual time scale has been enhanced. The typhoon contribution to the increase in heavy rainfall is attributable to enhanced interaction between typhoons and midlatitude baroclinic environment. It is noted that the change in the relationship between Changma and the tropical sea surface temperature (SST) over the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic Oceans is a key factor in the long-term changes of Changma and EASM. Possible sources for the recent mid-1990s change include 1) the tropical dipole-like SST pattern between the central Pacific and Indo-Pacific region (the global warming hiatus pattern), 2) the recent intensification of tropical SST gradients among the Indian Ocean, the western Pacific, and the eastern Pacific, and 3) the tropical Atlantic SST warming.

  19. Short-term effect of American summer treatment program for Japanese children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Yushiro; Mukasa, Akiko; Honda, Yuko; Anai, Chizuru; Kunisaki, Chie; Koutaki, Jun-ichi; Motoyama, Satoko; Miura, Naoki; Sugimoto, Ami; Ohya, Takashi; Nakashima, Masayuki; Nagamitsu, Shin-ichiro; Gnagy, Elizabeth M; Greiner, Andrew R; Pelham, William E; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2010-02-01

    We reported the results of the 3-week summer treatment program (STP) for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in 2006. The STP was based on methods established by Professor Pelham in Buffalo, NY and has been used in a number of studies and at a number of sites in the U.S. This is the first STP outside North America. Thirty-six children age 6-12 years with ADHD participated. The collection of evidence-based behavioral modification techniques that comprises the STP's behavioral program (e.g., point system, daily report card, positive reinforcement, time out) was used. Most children showed positive behavioral changes in multiple domains of functioning, demonstrated by significant improvement in points earned daily, which reflect behavior frequencies. Only one child with ADHD co-morbid with pervasive developmental disorder required an individualized program for excessive time outs. The ADHD rating scale, symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder, and hyperactivity/inattention in Strength and Difficulties Questionnaires evaluated by parents significantly improved after STP. Although the 3-week STP was much shorter than most STPs run in the U.S., the program is more intensive than typical outpatient treatment, providing 105h of intervenion in 3 weeks. The short-term effect of the STP was demonstrated for Japanese children with ADHD.

  20. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 6 July 09:15 - 10:00 F. CERUTTI (CERN) Presentation of the Summer Student Programme D. Heagerty (CERN) Computer rules O. ULLALAND (CERN) Workshops presentation 10:15 - 11:00 D. SCHLATTER (CERN) Introduction to CERN 11:15 Film on CERN Thursday 7 July 09:15 - 11:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (1-2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Introduction to Nuclear Physics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session 14:00 - 14:45 M. Lindroos (CERN) ISOLDE Facility 15:00 M. Lindroos (CERN) ISOLDE Visit Friday 8 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (3/4) 10:15 - 11:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Introduction to Nuclear Physics (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 G. ROLANDI (CERN) How an experiment is designed (1/2) 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 11 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physi...

  1. Data Preservation and Long Term Analysis in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    South, David M

    2012-01-01

    Several important and unique experimental high-energy physics programmes at a variety of facilities are coming to an end, including those at HERA, the B-factories and the Tevatron. The wealth of physics data from these experiments is the result of a significant financial and human effort, and yet until recently no coherent strategy existed for data preservation and re-use. To address this issue, an inter-experimental study group on data preservation and long-term analysis in high-energy physics was convened at the end of 2008, publishing an interim report in 2009. The membership of the study group has since expanded, including the addition of the LHC experiments, and a full status report has now been released. This report greatly expands on the ideas contained in the original publication and provides a more solid set of recommendations, not only concerning data preservation and its implementation in high-energy physics, but also the future direction and organisational model of the study group. The main messag...

  2. RU SciTech: Weaving Astronomy and Physics into a University-sponsored Summer Camp for Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Quyen N.

    2015-01-01

    We present a successful model for organizing a small University-sponsored summer camp that integrates astronomy and physics content with other science disciplines and computer programming content. The aim of our science and technology camp is to engage middle school students in a wide array of critical thinking tasks and hands-on activities centered on science and technology. Additionally, our program seeks to increase and maintain STEM interest among children, particularly in under-represented populations (e.g., Hispanic, African-American, women, and lower socioeconomic individuals) with hopes of decreasing disparities in diversity across many STEM fields.During this four-day camp, organized and facilitated by faculty volunteers, activities rotated through many STEM modules, including optics, telescopes, circuit building, computer hardware, and programming. Specifically, we scaffold camp activities to build upon similar ideas and content if possible. Using knowledge and skills gained through the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors program, we were able to integrate several astronomy activities into the camp, leading students through engaging activities, and conduct educational research. We present best practices on piloting a similar program in a university environment, our efforts to connect the learning outcomes common across all the modules, specifically in astronomy and physics, outline future camp activities, and the survey results on the impact of camp activities on attitudes toward science, technology, and science careers.

  3. Les Houches Summer School of Theoretical Physics : Session 72, Coherent Atomic Matter Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Westbrook, C; David, F; Coherent Atomic Matter Waves

    2001-01-01

    Progress in atomic physics has been so vigorous during the past decade that one is hard pressed to follow all the new developments. In the early 1990s the first atom interferometers opened a new field in which we have been able to use the wave nature of atoms to probe fundamental quantum me chanics questions as well as to make precision measurements. Coming fast on the heels of this development was the demonstration of Bose Einstein condensation in dilute atomic vapors which intensified research interest in studying the wave nature of matter, especially in a domain in which "macro scopic" quantum effects (vortices, stimulated scattering of atomic beams) are visible. At the same time there has been much progress in our understanding of the behavior of waves (notably electromagnetic) in complex media, both periodic and disordered. An obvious topic of speculation and probably of future research is whether any new insight or applications will develop if one examines the behavior of de Broglie waves in ana...

  4. Long-term summer sunshine/moisture stress reconstruction from tree-ring widths from Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Poljanšek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the first summer sunshine reconstruction from tree-ring data for the western part of the Balkan Peninsula. Summer sunshine is tightly connected with moisture stress in trees, because the moisture stress and therefore the width of annual tree-rings is under the influence of the direct and interactive effects of sunshine duration (temperature, precipitation, cloud cover and evapotranspiration. The reconstruction is based on a calibrated z-scored mean chronology, calculated from tree-ring width measurements from 7 representative black pine (Pinus nigra Arnold sites in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH. A combined regression and scaling approach was used for the reconstruction of the summer sunshine. We found a significant negative correlation (r = −0.54, p < 0.0001 with mean June–July sunshine hours from Osijek meteorological station (Croatia. The developed model was used for reconstruction of summer sunshine for the time period 1660–2010. We identified extreme summer events and compared them to available documentary historical sources of drought, volcanic eruptions and other reconstructions from the broader region. All extreme summers with low sunshine hours (1712, 1810, 1815, 1843, 1899 and 1966 are connected with volcanic eruptions.

  5. Summer Appendicitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    diet, during summer months could be contribute to the higher incidence of appendicitis ... To examine the global trends in the seasonality of appendicitis, .... Iran. Summer. [11]. 1998-2004. 1331. Italy. Summer. [12]. 1991-1998. 65,675. Canada.

  6. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 18 July 09:15 - 11:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (1-2/6) 11:15 - 12:00 N. PALANQUE-DELABROUILLE Astroparticle Physics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 19 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (3/6) 10:15 - 12:00 N. PALANQUE-DELABROUILLE Astroparticle Physics (2-3/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 20 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (4/6) 10:15 - 11:00 F. RADEMAKERS ROOT 11:15 - 12:00 L. ROSSI Super-conducting magnet technology for particle accelerators and detectors 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 21 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (5/6) 10:15 - 12:00 C. DE LA TAILLE Introduction to Electronics (1-2/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 C. DE LA TAILLE Introduction to Electronics (3/3) 10:15 -...

  7. Can morphogenesis be understood in terms of physical rules?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ryuji Takaki

    2005-02-01

    Because the morphogenesis of biological systems is not fully understood, researches from various points of view are necessary. The present author has recently made computer simulations with his colleagues to construct branching systems of human organs, such as the lung airway and the liver blood vessels. In the simulations certain rules are assumed to govern bifurcating processes of the systems. These rules are expressed in terms of physical and geometrical concepts, such as minimum energy consumption and uniform filling of branches in the space of organs. Results of computer simulation are quite similar to real structures. However, actual mechanisms of morphogenesis, i.e. effects of genes or proteins, are not considered in these studies. In this article, the present work is discussed in relation to the concept of biological pattern formation by Meinhardt and a recent study by Miura and Shiota on lung growth.

  8. Long-term physical outcome in patients with septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, J B; Møller, K; Kehlet, H

    2009-01-01

    Limited information is available on physical function after septic shock. The aim of the present study was to assess the physical outcome in survivors 1 year after septic shock.......Limited information is available on physical function after septic shock. The aim of the present study was to assess the physical outcome in survivors 1 year after septic shock....

  9. Long-Term Physical Stability of Plasticized Hemicellulose Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna L. Heikkinen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Oat spelt arabinoxylan (OsAX and spruce galactoglucomannan (GGM are hemicelluloses that can be extracted in large quantities from side-streams of the agriculture and forest industries. They both form self-standing films, making them potential future packaging materials. This systematic study focuses on the effect of long-term storage on the physical stability of hemicellulose-based films. OsAX and GGM films were plasticized with 40% (w/w of the polysaccharide of glycerol, sorbitol, or their blends, and their stability was followed for four months. Ageing especially affected the glycerol-containing films, in which the tensile strength and Young’s modulus increased and elongation at break decreased. Although the mechanical properties were altered, storage did not affect crystallinity of the films. Oxygen gas permeability (OP and water vapor permeability (WVP properties were monitored in OsAX films. Interestingly WVP decreased during storage; more than a 40% decrease was seen when plasticizer blends contained 50% or more glycerol. In contrast, there were no drastic changes in the OP during storage; all the OPs obtained were between 3.7 and 8.9 [cm3 µm/ (m2 d kPa].

  10. A numerical analysis of biogeochemical controls with physical modulation on hypoxia during summer in the Pearl River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Hu, Jiatang; Li, Shiyu; Liu, Dehong

    2017-06-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) physical-biogeochemical coupled model was applied to explore the mechanisms controlling the dissolved oxygen (DO) dynamics and bottom hypoxia during summer in the Pearl River estuary (PRE). By using the numerical oxygen tracers, we proposed a new method (namely the physical modulation method) to quantify the contributions of boundary conditions and each source and sink process occurring in local and adjacent waters to the DO conditions. A mass balance analysis of DO based on the physical modulation method indicated that the DO conditions at the bottom layer were mainly controlled by the source and sink processes, among which the sediment oxygen demand (SOD) at the water-sediment interface and the re-aeration at the air-sea interface were the two primary processes determining the spatial extent and duration of bottom hypoxia in the PRE. The SOD could cause a significant decrease in the bottom DO concentrations (averaged over July-August 2006) by over 4 mg L-1 on the shelf off the Modaomen sub-estuary, leading to the formation of a high-frequency zone of hypoxia (HFZ). However, the hypoxia that occurred in the HFZ was intermittent and distributed in a small area due to the combined effects of re-aeration and photosynthesis, which behaved as sources for DO and offset a portion of the DO consumed by SOD. The bottom DO concentrations to the west of the lower Lingdingyang Bay (i.e. the western shoal near Qi'ao Island) were also largely affected by high SOD, but there was no hypoxia occurring there because of the influence of re-aeration. Specifically, re-aeration could lead to an increase in the bottom DO concentrations by ˜ 4.8 mg L-1 to the west of the lower Lingdingyang Bay. The re-aeration led to a strong vertical DO gradient between the surface and the lower layers. As a result, the majority (˜ 89 %) of DO supplemented by re-aeration was transported to the lower layers through vertical diffusion and ˜ 28 % reached the bottom eventually

  11. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Monday 8 August 09:15 - 10:00 A. Höcker CP Violation (3/4) 10:15 - 12:00 J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS Neutrino Physics (1-2/4) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 9 August 09:15 - 10:00 A. Höcker CP Violation (4/4) 10:15 - 11:00 J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS Neutrino Physics (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. GREY The GRID 12:00 Discussion Session 14:15 - 17:00 Student Sessions Wednesday 10 August 09:15 - 10:00 J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS Neutrino Physics (4/4) 10:15 - 12:00 J. LESGOURGUES Introduction to Cosmology (1-2/5) 12:00 Discussion Session 14:15 - 17:00 Student Sessions Thursday 11 August 09:15 - 11:00 J. LESGOURGUES Introduction to Cosmology (3-4/5) 11:15 - 12:00 G. KALMUS The ILC Story 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 12 August 09:15 - 10:00 J. LESGOURGUES Introduction to Cosmology (5/5) 10:15 - 11:00 G. VENEZIANO String theory: has Einstein's dream come true? 11:00  Discussion...

  12. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 25 July 09:15 - 11:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (2-3/8) 11:15 - 12:00 J. STACHEL Quark Gluon Plasma Physics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 26 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (4/8) 10:15 - 12:00 J. STACHEL Quark Gluon Plasma Physics (2-3/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 27 July 09:15 - 11:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (5-6/8) 11:15 - 12:00 J-P. DELAHAYE The CLIC Concept and Technology for an e+e-Collider at the Energy Frontier 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 28 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (7/8) 10:15 - 11:00 P. SPHICAS Data Acquisition Systems (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw data to Physics Results (1/2) 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (8/8) 10:15 - 11:00 P. SPHICAS Data Acquisition Systems (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 R. JACOBSEN Fr...

  13. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 1 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. WELLS The Higgs Saga at LEP 10:15 - 11:00 E. KIRITSIS Beyond the Standard Model (1/4) 11:15 - 12:00 G. COWAN Introduction to Statistics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 2 August 09:15 - 11:00 E. KIRITSIS Beyond the Standard Model (2-3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 G. COWAN Introduction to Statistics (2/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 3 August 09:15 - 10:00 G. COWAN Introduction to Statistics (3/3) 10:15 - 11:00 E. KIRITSIS Beyond the Standard Model (4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 K. JAKOBS Physics at Hadronic Colliders (1/4) 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 4 August 09:15 - 11:00 K. JAKOBS Physics at Hadronic Colliders (2-3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 A. WEINSTEIN Gravitation Waves 12:00 Discussion Session 16:30 - 18:00 Poster Session Friday 5 August 09:15 - 11:00 A. Höcker CP Violation (1-2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 K. JA...

  14. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 11 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (4/4) 10:15 - 11:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Introduction to Nuclear Physics (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 G. ROLANDI (CERN) How an experiment is designed (2/2) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 12 July  09:15 - 11:00 O. BrÜning (CERN) Accelerators (1-2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (1/5) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 13 July 09:15 - 10:00 O. BrÜning (CERN) Accelerators (3/5) 10:15 - 11:00 R. LANDUA (CERN) Antimatter in the Lab (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (2/5) 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 14 July 09:15 - 10:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (3/5) 10:15 - 11:00 G. ROLANDI (CERN) Antimatter in the Lab (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 O. BrÜning (CERN) Accelerators (4/5) 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 1...

  15. The Impacts of Microphysics and Planetary Boundary Layer Physics on Model Simulations of U.S. Deep South Summer Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaul, Eugene W., Jr.; Case, Jonathan L.; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Medlin, Jeffrey; Wood, Lance

    2014-01-01

    Convection-allowing numerical weather simula- tions have often been shown to produce convective storms that have significant sensitivity to choices of model physical parameterizations. Among the most important of these sensitivities are those related to cloud microphysics, but planetary boundary layer parameterizations also have a significant impact on the evolution of the convection. Aspects of the simulated convection that display sensitivity to these physics schemes include updraft size and intensity, simulated radar reflectivity, timing and placement of storm initi- ation and decay, total storm rainfall, and other storm features derived from storm structure and hydrometeor fields, such as predicted lightning flash rates. In addition to the basic parameters listed above, the simulated storms may also exhibit sensitivity to im- posed initial conditions, such as the fields of soil temper- ature and moisture, vegetation cover and health, and sea and lake water surface temperatures. Some of these sensitivities may rival those of the basic physics sensi- tivities mentioned earlier. These sensitivities have the potential to disrupt the accuracy of short-term forecast simulations of convective storms, and thereby pose sig- nificant difficulties for weather forecasters. To make a systematic study of the quantitative impacts of each of these sensitivities, a matrix of simulations has been performed using all combinations of eight separate microphysics schemes, three boundary layer schemes, and two sets of initial conditions. The first version of initial conditions consists of the default data from large-scale operational model fields, while the second features specialized higher- resolution soil conditions, vegetation conditions and water surface temperatures derived from datasets created at NASA's Short-term Prediction and Operational Research Tran- sition (SPoRT) Center at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC) in Huntsville, AL. Simulations as

  16. News Conference: The Big Bangor Day Meeting Lecture: Charterhouse plays host to a physics day Festival: Science on Stage festival 2013 arrives in Poland Event: Scottish Physics Teachers' Summer School Meeting: Researchers and educators meet at Lund University Conference: Exeter marks the spot Recognition: European Physical Society uncovers an historic site Education: Initial teacher education undergoes big changes Forthcoming events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Conference: The Big Bangor Day Meeting Lecture: Charterhouse plays host to a physics day Festival: Science on Stage festival 2013 arrives in Poland Event: Scottish Physics Teachers' Summer School Meeting: Researchers and educators meet at Lund University Conference: Exeter marks the spot Recognition: European Physical Society uncovers an historic site Education: Initial teacher education undergoes big changes Forthcoming events

  17. Sexuality and Physical Intimacy in Long Term Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Sexuality and sexual needs in older adults remains a neglected area of clinical intervention, particularly so in long term care settings. Because older adults in medical rehabilitation and long term care beds present with significant frailties, and often significant neurocognitive disorders it makes it difficult for occupational therapists and other staff to evaluate the capacity of an older adult resident to participate in sexual relationships. The current paper reviews the current literature on sexuality and aging, examines some of the clinical practices and guidelines regarding sexual expression in long term care and presents two case examples. A semi-structured interview and decision tree is presented to assist therapists in making careful and informed decisions and thereby balancing needs for protection with needs for autonomy. PMID:24354331

  18. Improving the physical health of long-term psychiatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Peter; Davidsen, Annette S; Kilian, Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    programme to improve physical health is effective. METHODS: An extension of the European Network for Promoting the Health of Residents in Psychiatric and Social Care Institutions (HELPS) project further developed as a 12-month controlled cluster-randomized intervention study in the Danish centre. Waist......, but not significant, reduction in waist circumference, while participants in the control group showed a significant increase in waist circumference. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention had a positive effect on the physical health of the patients measured by a reduction in the increase of waist circumference....... circumference was a proxy of unhealthy body fat in view of the increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: Waist circumference was 108 cm for men and 108 cm for women. Controlled for cluster randomization, sex, age, and body fat, the intervention group showed a small...

  19. Effect of Long-Term Physical Activity Practice after Cardiac Rehabilitation on Some Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyssin, Celine, Jr.; Blanc, Philippe; Verkindt, Chantal; Maunier, Sebastien; Prieur, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term physical activity practice after a cardiac rehabilitation program on weight, physical capacity and arterial compliance. The Dijon Physical Activity Score was used to identify two groups: sedentary and active. Weight, distance at the 6-min walk test and the small artery elasticity…

  20. Features of physical oceanography in the oceans near the Prydz Bay during the 1998/1999 austral summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PU Shuzhen; HU Xiaomin; DONG Zhaoqian; XIANG Baoqiang; YU Weidong

    2006-01-01

    Thermohaline features, spatial extensions, and depths of the antarctic circumpolar deep water, the antarctic bottom water, and the upper layer water near the Prydz Bay (including the Prydz Bay summer surface water, the antarctic winter water, and the Prydz Bay shelf water) are analyzed and studied by use of the full depth CTD data obtained in the Southern Ocean near the Prydz Bay during the 1998/1999 austral summer. The northward extension of the shelf water, the thickness of the temperature inversion layer, the minima in the vertical temperature profile and the vertical temperature gradient are interpreted. On the basis of analysis of gravitational potential field, the geostrophic current and the geostrophic volume transport are calculated to determine the location of the strongest current in the zonal circulation near the Prydz Bay and to find the spatial variability of the volume transport in the 64°~66.5°S zone. In addition, the central location, the frontal strength, the vertical depth and thickness of the continental water boundary (CWB) are estimated from the CTD data to expound the spatial variability of CWB in the study area (64°~66.5°S,70°~75°E).

  1. Motivational readiness for physical activity and quality of life in long-term lung cancer survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Matthew M.; Novotny, Paul J.; Patten, Christi A.; Rausch, Sarah M.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Jatoi, Aminah; Sloan, Jeff A.; Yang, Ping

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship between motivational readiness for physical activity and quality of life (QOL) in long-term lung cancer survivors. Long-term survivors are considered those who are living 5 years or more following a cancer diagnosis. This project examined the relationship between a self-report measure of motivational readiness for physical activity and QOL in a sample of 272 long-term lung cancer survivors. Participants (54% male, average age 70 years old) completed the ...

  2. Summer Vacation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鲁静

    2008-01-01

    @@ For teachers: Summer Camp in the USA by Jerilyn Watson Millions of American children attend all kinds of summer camps.Some play sports.Others make music,learn to use a computer or take part in other activities.Traditional American summer camps offer young people a chance to play many sports.These camps may be in the mountains.Or they may be in the woods,or at a lake.Other camps teach activities like painting or music.Or they teach computer programming or foreign languages.Children at all kinds of camps meet new friends.They learn new skills and develop independence.

  3. Impact of long-term drainage on summer groundwater flow patterns in the Mer Bleue peatland, Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Kopp

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Long-term impacts of drier conditions on the hydrology of northern peatlands are poorly understood. We used long-term drainage near a historic drainage ditch, separating an area from the main peatland, as an analogue for long-term drying in a northern temperate bog. The objective was to identify the impact of drier conditions on ecohydrological processes and groundwater flow patterns in an area now forested and an area that maintained a bog-like character. Groundwater flow patterns alternated between mostly downward flow and occasionally upward flow in the bog area and were mostly upward-orientated in the forested area, which suggested that there the flow pattern had shifted from bog- to fen-like conditions. Flow patterns were in agreement with changes in post-drainage hydraulic conductivities, storage capacity of the peat and water table levels. Compared to the bog, hydraulic conductivities in the forested area were one to three orders of magnitude lower in the uppermost 0.75 m of peat (paired t test, p < 0.05. Bulk density had increased and the water table level was lower and more strongly fluctuating in the forested area. Our findings suggest hydraulic gradients and flow patterns have changed due to increased evapotranspiration and interception with the emergence of a tree cover. The smaller size of the now-forested area relative to the remaining bog area appeared to be important for the hydrological change. With the main Mer Bleue bog as hinterland, enhanced runoff to the drainage channel had little effect on hydrologic and vegetation patterns. In the cut-off, smaller, now forested area pervasive changes in vegetation and hydrologic processes occurred. The difference in response to local drainage raises questions about tipping points with respect to the impact of drying on peatland ecosystems that need to be addressed in future research.

  4. Impact of long-term drainage on summer groundwater flow patterns in the Mer Bleue peatland, Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Kopp

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term impacts of a drier climate on coupled hydrology and carbon cycling in northern peatlands are poorly understood. We used a historic drainage ditch, separating an area from the main peatland, as an analogue for long-term drying in a northern temperate bog. The objective was to identify the impact of drier conditions on ecohydrological processes and groundwater flow patterns in an area now wooded and an area that maintained bog character. Groundwater flow patterns alternated between downward flow and upward flow in the bog area and were mostly upward orientated in the wooded area. Flow patterns were in agreement with changes in post-drainage hydraulic conductivities, storage capacity of the peat and hydraulic gradients. Compared to the bog, hydraulic conductivities in the wooded area were one to three orders of magnitude lower in the uppermost 0.75 m (paired t-test, p<0.05 of peat but partly higher below. Bulk density had increased and the water table level was lower and more strongly fluctuating. Our findings suggest hydraulic gradients and flow patterns have changed due to increased evapotranspiration and interception with the emergence of a tree cover. The smaller size of the now-forested area relative to the remaining bog area appeared to be important for the hydrological change. When water supply from undisturbed areas was large, enhanced runoff to the drainage channel had little effect on hydrologic patterns and vegetation pattern, whereas in the smaller, now forested area pervasive changes in vegetation and hydrologic processes occurred. This finding raises questions about tipping points with respect to the impact of drying on bog ecosystems that need to be addressed in future research.

  5. Turning points in physics, a series of lectures given at Oxford University in Trinity Term 1958

    CERN Document Server

    Blin-Stoyle, Roger John; Mendelssohn, Kurt; Temple, G; Waismann, F; Wilkinson, Denys Haigh; De Boer, J; Brinkman, H; Casimir, H B G

    1959-01-01

    Turning Points in Physics is a series of 1958 lectures presented at the Oxford University in Trinity Term. This six-chapter book highlights the interplay between assumptions, theories, and experimental discoveries in physics. The first chapter provides a brief introduction to the physical theory and field physics. The following two chapters cover the basic principles of quantum nature of matter and radiation, as well as the introduction of the probability concept in the field physics. The discussion then shifts to the theory of relativity and the fundamentals of cause and effect. The last chap

  6. Short term memory, physical fitness, and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor in obese adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rini Rossanti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Obesity in adolescents is a major health problem and has been associated with low academic achievement. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a neurotrophin, plays a role in appetite suppression and memory, and its secretion is enhanced by physical activity. This neurotrophin may be associated with academic achievement in obese. Objective To compare physical fitness and serum BDNF levels to short term memory levels in obese adolescents aged 10–14 years. Methods This comparative, cross-sectional, analytic study was carried out on 40 elementary and high school students in Bandung, West Java, who were recruited by stratified random sampling. Short term memory was assessed by a psychologist using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III Digit Span test (WISC-III Digit Span. Physical fitness was assessed by a clinical exercise physiologist using the Asian Committee on the Standardization of Physical Fitness Test (ACSPFT. Serum BDNF levels were measured by ELISA test in a certified laboratory. ANOVA test was used to assess for a correlation between serum BDNF concentration and short term memory, as well as between physical fitness level and short term memory. Pearson’s correlation test was used to analyze for a correlation between serum BDNF and physical fitness levels. Results The majority of subjects were in the physical fitness categories of moderate or poor. Subjects had a mean BDNF level of 44,227.8 (SD 10,359 pg/mL. There was no statistically significant difference in physical fitness with either serum BDNF or with short term memory levels (P=0.139 and P=0.383, respectively. Also, no correlation was determined between serum BDNF and physical fitness levels (r=0.222; P=0.169. Conclusion In obese adolescents, short term memory levels are not significantly different between physical fitness levels nor between serum BDNF levels.

  7. Short term memory, physical fitness, and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor in obese adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rini Rossanti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Obesity in adolescents is a major health problem and has been associated with low academic achievement. Brainderived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a neurotrophin, plays a role in appetite suppression and memory, and its secretion is enhanced by physical activity. This neurotrophin may be associated with academic achievement in obese. Objective To compare physical fitness and serum BDNF levels to short term memory levels in obese adolescents aged 10–14 years. Methods This comparative, cross-sectional, analytic study was carried out on 40 elementary and high school students in Bandung, West Java, who were recruited by stratified random sampling. Short term memory was assessed by a psychologist using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III Digit Span test (WISC-III Digit Span. Physical fitness was assessed by a clinical exercise physiologist using the Asian Committee on the Standardization of Physical Fitness Test (ACSPFT. Serum BDNF levels were measured by ELISA test in a certified laboratory. ANOVA test was used to assess for a correlation between serum BDNF concentration and short term memory, as well as between physical fitness level and short term memory. Pearson’s correlation test was used to analyze for a correlation between serum BDNF and physical fitness levels. Results The majority of subjects were in the physical fitness categories of moderate or poor. Subjects had a mean BDNF level of 44,227.8 (SD 10,359 pg/mL. There was no statistically significant difference in physical fitness with either serum BDNF or with short term memory levels (P=0.139 and P=0.383, respectively. Also, no correlation was determined between serum BDNF and physical fitness levels (r=0.222; P=0.169. Conclusion In obese adolescents, short term memory levels are not significantly different between physical fitness levels nor between serum BDNF levels.

  8. Analysis of High School Physics, Chemistry and Biology Curriculums in Terms of Scientific Literacy Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Melek Nur; Koseoglu, Fitnat

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze 9th grade physics, chemistry and biology curriculums, which were implemented by the Ministry of Education since the academic year 2008-2009, in terms of scientific literacy themes and the balance of these themes and also to examine the quality of statements about objectives. Physics, chemistry, and biology…

  9. Long-term health benefits of physical activity – a systematic review of longitudinal studies

    OpenAIRE

    Reiner, Miriam; Niermann, Christina; Jekauc, Darko; Woll, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundThe treatment of noncommunicable diseases (NCD), like coronary heart disease or type 2 diabetes mellitus, causes rising costs for the health system. Physical activity is supposed to reduce the risk for these diseases. Results of cross-sectional studies showed that physical activity is associated with better health, and that physical activity could prevent the development of these diseases. The purpose of this review is to summarize existing evidence for the long-term (>5 years) rela...

  10. Long-term health benefits of physical activity – a systematic review of longitudinal studies

    OpenAIRE

    Reiner, Miriam; Niermann, Christina; Jekauc, Darko; Woll, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Background The treatment of noncommunicable diseases (NCD), like coronary heart disease or type 2 diabetes mellitus, causes rising costs for the health system. Physical activity is supposed to reduce the risk for these diseases. Results of cross-sectional studies showed that physical activity is associated with better health, and that physical activity could prevent the development of these diseases. The purpose of this review is to summarize existing evidence for the long-term (>5 years) rel...

  11. Physical properties of the arctic summer aerosol particles in relation to sources at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C G Deshpande; A K Kamra

    2014-02-01

    Measurements of the number concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles in the size range of 0.5–20 m diameter were made with an aerodynamic particle sizer at an Arctic site at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard in August–September 2007 during the International Polar Year 2007–2008. Data are analyzed to study the aerosol number concentration–wind speed relationships. The sea-salt particles of marine origin generated within the Arctic circle are identified as the main source of the Arctic summer aerosols. Total number concentration of aerosol particles increases with increase in wind speed, the increase being more when winds from open leads over the oceanic sector are reaching the station as compared to when winds from pack ice in other directions are reaching the station. The larger increase with winds from the oceanic sector is attributed to the enhanced bubble-breaking activity and increased entrainment of dimethyl sulphide particles at the sea surface. Although, the increase in total aerosol number concentration associated with the winds from the oceanic sector is spread over the whole range of particle sizes, the increase in coarse mode particles is more prominent than that in the accumulation mode particles. The age of airmass over pack ice is also an important factor to determine the aerosol concentration over the Arctic region. The process of rainout/washout of the aerosol particles due to drizzle/snowfall is an effective sink mechanism in the Arctic environment. The aerosol particle concentration starts decreasing within a few minutes from the start of these events but requires a few hours to restore to the normal background aerosol level after the end of event.

  12. Summer School organized by the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, and the Institute for Information Sciences, University of Tübingen

    CERN Document Server

    Güttinger, Werner; Cin, Mario

    1974-01-01

    This volume is the record and product of the Summer School on the Physics and Mathematics of the Nervous System, held at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste from August 21-31, 1973, and jointly organized by the Institute for Information Sciences, University of Tlibingen and by the Centre. The school served to bring biologists, physicists and mathemati­ cians together to exchange ideas about the nervous system and brain, and also to introduce young scientists to the field. The program, attended by more than a hundred scientists, was interdisciplinary both in character and participation. The primary support for the school was provided by the Volkswagen Foundation of West Germany. We are particularly indebted to Drs. G. Gambke, M. -L Zarnitz, and H. Penschuck of the Foundation for their in­ terest in and help with the project. The school also received major support from the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste and its sponsoring agencies, including the use of its exce...

  13. Motivational readiness for physical activity and quality of life in long-term lung cancer survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Matthew M.; Novotny, Paul J.; Patten, Christi A.; Rausch, Sarah M.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Jatoi, Aminah; Sloan, Jeff A.; Yang, Ping

    2010-01-01

    Summary Little is known about the relationship between motivational readiness for physical activity and quality of life (QOL) in long-term lung cancer survivors. Long-term survivors are considered those who are living 5 years or more following a cancer diagnosis. This project examined the relationship between a self-report measure of motivational readiness for physical activity and QOL in a sample of 272 long-term lung cancer survivors. Participants (54% male, average age 70 years old) completed the mailed survey an average of 6 years after being diagnosed with lung cancer. Survey measures included the stage of change for physical activity and a set of single item QOL and symptom scales. Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported they currently engaged in regular physical activity (a total of 30 min or more per day, at least 5 days per week). Kruskal–Wallis tests revealed that those who reported engaging in regular physical activity reported a better overall QOL, better QOL on all five domains of QOL functioning (mental, physical, social, emotional, and spiritual), and fewer symptoms compared to those with a sedentary lifestyle. Physical activity level may have important QOL and symptom management benefits for long-term lung cancer survivors. PMID:18243406

  14. Motivational readiness for physical activity and quality of life in long-term lung cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Matthew M; Novotny, Paul J; Patten, Christi A; Rausch, Sarah M; Garces, Yolanda I; Jatoi, Aminah; Sloan, Jeff A; Yang, Ping

    2008-07-01

    Little is known about the relationship between motivational readiness for physical activity and quality of life (QOL) in long-term lung cancer survivors. Long-term survivors are considered those who are living 5 years or more following a cancer diagnosis. This project examined the relationship between a self-report measure of motivational readiness for physical activity and QOL in a sample of 272 long-term lung cancer survivors. Participants (54% male, average age 70 years old) completed the mailed survey an average of 6 years after being diagnosed with lung cancer. Survey measures included the stage of change for physical activity and a set of single item QOL and symptom scales. Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported they currently engaged in regular physical activity (a total of 30 min or more per day, at least 5 days per week). Kruskal-Wallis tests revealed that those who reported engaging in regular physical activity reported a better overall QOL, better QOL on all five domains of QOL functioning (mental, physical, social, emotional, and spiritual), and fewer symptoms compared to those with a sedentary lifestyle. Physical activity level may have important QOL and symptom management benefits for long-term lung cancer survivors.

  15. Measuring and modeling physics students' conceptual knowledge structures through term association times

    CERN Document Server

    Beatty, I D; Gerace, W J; Beatty, Ian D.; Dufresne, Robert J.; Gerace, William J.

    2007-01-01

    Traditional problem-based exams are not efficient instruments for assessing the "structure" of physics students' conceptual knowledge or for providing diagnostically detailed feedback to students and teachers. We present the Free Term Entry task, a candidate assessment instrument for exploring the connections between concepts in a student's understanding of a subject. In this task, a student is given a general topic area and asked to respond with as many terms from the topic area as possible in a given time; the "thinking time" between each term-entry event is recorded along with the response terms. The task was given to students from two different introductory physics classes. Response term thinking times were found to correlate with the strength of the association between two concepts. In addition, sets of thinking times from the task show distinct, characteristic patterns which might prove valuable for student assessment. We propose a quantitative dynamical model named the Matrix Walk Model which is able t...

  16. Chemical and physical-hydric characterisation of a red latosol after five years of management during the summer between-crop season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fausto Guimarães Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural production systems that include the production of mulch for no-tillage farming and structural improvement of the soil can be considered key measures for agricultural activity in the Cerrado region without causing environmental degradation. In this respect, our work aimed to evaluate the chemical and physical-hydric properties of a dystrophic Red Latosol (Oxisol in the municipality of Rio Verde, Goias, Brazil, under different soil management systems in the between-crop season of soybean cultivation five years after first planting. The following conditions were evaluated: Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu as a cover crop during the between-crop season; Second crop of maize intercropped with Brachiaria ruziziensis; Second crop of grain alone in a no-tillage system; Fallow soil after the soybean harvest; and Forest (natural vegetation located in an adjacent area. Soil samples up to a depth of 40 cm were taken and used in the assessment of chemical properties and soil structure diagnostics. The results demonstrated that the conversion of native vegetation areas into agricultural fields altered the chemical and physical-hydric properties of the soil at all the depths evaluated, especially up to 10 cm, due to the activity of root systems in the soil structure. Cultivation of B. brizantha as a cover crop during the summer between-crop season increased soil water availability, which is important for agricultural activities in the region under study.

  17. Short-term captivity influences maximal cold-induced metabolic rates and their repeatability in summer-acclimatized American goldfinches Spinus tristis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David L.SWANSON; Marisa O.KING

    2013-01-01

    Studies of metabolic variation in birds have involved both wild and captive individuals,but few studies have investigated whether captivity directly influences metabolic rates,despite such variation potentially confounding conclusions regarding how metabolic rates respond to the conditions under study.In addition,whether short-term captivity influences metabolic rate repeatability in birds is currently uninvestigated.In this study,we measured Msum (maximal cold-induced metabolic rates) in summer acclimatized American goldfinches Spinus tristis directly after capture from wild populations,after approximately 2 weeks of indoor captivity (Captive 1),and again after an additional 1-2 weeks of captivity (Captive 2).Msum increased significantly (16.9%) following the initial captive period,but remained stable thereafter.Body mass (Mb) also increased significantly (9.2%) during the initial captive period but remained stable thereafter,suggesting that muscle growth and/or remodeling of body composition produced the observed metabolic variation.Mb and Msum were not significantly repeatable between wild and Captive 1 birds,but were significantly repeatable between Captive 1 and Captive 2 groups.These data suggest that caution must be exercised when extrapolating metabolic rates from short-term captive to wild populations.In addition,Msum was a repeatable trait for birds under conditions where mean metabolic rates remained stable,but Msum repeatability disappeared during acclimation to conditions promoting phenotypically flexible metabolic responses.This suggests that the capacity for phenotypic flexibility varies among individuals,and such variation could have fitness consequences.

  18. The Standardized Aspect of the Dictionaries of Lithuanian Terms of Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelė Kaulakienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Single physical terms, words which became terms, can be found in the papers of our standard language founders J. Bretkūnas, M. Daukša, D. Kleinas, J. Rėza, S. Vaišnoras, B. Vilentas in the 16th–17th cc. K. Sirvydas’ trilingual (Polish-Latin-Lithuanian dictionary “Dictionarium trium linguarum”, the first edition of which appeared in1620, had a great influence on the development of standard language lexis. However, the terminology of physics began to develop much later. Its evolution can be divided in three stages:1 the middle of the 19th c – the end of the 19th c, when the first articles, published in Keleivis (1849–1880 and Aušra (1883–1886, and the first Lithuanian physics textbook of P. Vileišis “Populiariszkas rankvedis fyzikos” (1899 appeared; 2 the beginning of the 20th c – the middle of the 20th c, when the terminology of this stage was influenced by Ig. Končius’ manuscript of physics textbook for gymnasia, during preparation of which he consulted with K. Būga and J. Jablonskis in 1916–1919, Ig. Končius’ dictionary “Terminai fizikos reikalams”, published in Lithuania (1923–1924, K. Šakenis’ “Fizika” (1920, V. Čepinskis’ “Fizikos paskaitos” (1923–1926; 3 the middle of the 20th c – the beginning of the 21st c, when the majority of physical terms, which are still in use, were fixed. P. Brazdžiūnas’ normative work, which was performed by preparing the textbook for higher schools and colleges “Bendroji fizika” (1960–1965 and preparing and editing with his colleagues FTŽ1, FTŽ2, which became the basis of the newest FTŽ3, had influenced it. FTŽ3 terms are standardized most strongly of all terminographic physical publications. It was influenced by the normative aspect of previous dictionaries of physical terms, which changed at the same time, because the conceptions of different notions and terms changed, there were a lot of fixed terms. Consequently, it can be concluded that

  19. Physical and biological forcing of mesoscale variability in the carbonate system of the Ross Sea (Antarctica) during summer 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivaro, Paola; Ianni, Carmela; Langone, Leonardo; Ori, Carlo; Aulicino, Giuseppe; Cotroneo, Yuri; Saggiomo, Maria; Mangoni, Olga

    2017-02-01

    Water samples (0-200 m) were collected in a coastal area of the Ross Sea in January 2014 to evaluate the physical and biological forcing on the carbonate system at the mesoscale (distance between stations of 5-10 km). Remote sensing supported the determination of the sampling strategy and helped positioning each sampling station. Total alkalinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, phytoplankton pigments and composition were investigated in combination with measurements of temperature, salinity and current speed. Total inorganic carbon, sea water CO2 partial pressure and the saturation state (Ω) for calcite and aragonite were calculated from the measured total alkalinity and pH. In addition, continuous measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration were completed. LADCP measurements revealed the presence of a significant change in current speed and direction that corresponded to a clearly defined front characterized by gradients in both temperature and salinity. Phytoplankton biomass was relatively high at all stations and the highest values of chlorophyll-a were found between 20 to 50 m, with the dominant taxonomic group being haptophyceae. The carbonate system properties in surface waters exhibited mesoscale variability with a horizontal length scale of about 10 km. Sea-ice melt, through the input of low salinity water, results in a dilution of the total alkalinity and inorganic carbon, but our observations suggest that phytoplankton activity was the major forcing of the distribution of the carbonate system variables. Higher CO3-, Ω and pH in the surface layer were found where the highest values of chlorophyll-a were observed. The calculated ΔpCO2 pattern follows both MODIS data and in situ chlorophyll-a measurements, and the estimated CO2 fluxes ranged from -0.5 ± 0.4 to -31.0 ± 6.4 mmol m- 2 d- 1. The large range observed in the fluxes is due to both the spatial variability of sea water pCO2 and to the episodic winds experienced.

  20. Summer season and long-term drought increase the richness of bacteria and fungi in the foliar phyllosphere of Quercus ilex in a mixed Mediterranean forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuelas, J; Rico, L; Ogaya, R; Jump, A S; Terradas, J

    2012-07-01

    We explored the changes in richness, diversity and evenness of epiphytic (on the leaf surface) and endophytic (within leaf tissues) bacteria and fungi in the foliar phyllosphere of Quercus ilex, the dominant tree species of Mediterranean forests. Bacteria and fungi were assessed during ontogenic development of the leaves, from the wet spring to the dry summer season in control plots and in plots subjected to drought conditions mimicking those projected for future decades. Our aim was to monitor succession in microbiota during the colonisation of plant leaves and its response to climate change. Ontogeny and seasonality exerted a strong influence on richness and diversity of the microbial phyllosphere community, which decreased in summer in the whole leaf and increased in summer in the epiphytic phyllosphere. Drought precluded the decrease in whole leaf phyllosphere diversity and increased the rise in the epiphytic phyllosphere. Both whole leaf bacterial and fungal richness decreased with the decrease in physiological activity and productivity of the summer season in control trees. As expected, the richness of epiphytic bacteria and fungi increased in summer after increasing time of colonisation. Under summer dry conditions, there was a positive relationship between TRF (terminal restriction fragments) richness and drought, both for whole leaf and epiphytic phyllosphere, and especially for fungal communities. These results demonstrate that changes in climate are likely to significantly alter microbial abundance and composition of the phyllosphere. Given the diverse functions and large number of phyllospheric microbes, the potential functional implications of such community shifts warrant exploration.

  1. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.   Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish (we hoped) the readiness of CMS to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the...

  2. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.  Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish how ready we are to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the week was thus pac...

  3. Further Studies on the Physical and Biogeochemical Causes for Large Interannual Changes in the Patagonian Shelf Spring-Summer Phytoplankton Bloom Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorini, Sergio R.; Garcia, Virginia M.T.; Piola, Alberto R.; Evangelista, Heitor; McClain, Charles R.; Garcia, Carlos A.E.; Mata, Mauricio M.

    2009-01-01

    A very strong and persistent phytoplankton bloom was observed by ocean color satellites during September - December 2003 along the northern Patagonian shelf. The 2003 bloom had the highest extent and chlorophyll a (Chl-a) concentrations of the entire Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) period (1997 to present). SeaWiFS-derived Chl-a exceeded 20 mg/cu m in November at the bloom center. The bloom was most extensive in December when it spanned more than 300 km across the shelf and nearly 900 km north-south (35degS to 43degS). The northward reach and the deep penetration on the shelf of the 2003 bloom were quite anomalous when compared with other years, which showed the bloom more confined to the Patagonian shelf break (PSB). The PSB bloom is a conspicuous austral spring-summer feature detected by ocean color satellites and its timing can be explained using the Sverdrup critical depth theory. Based on high-resolution numerical simulations, in situ and remote sensing data, we provide some suggestions for the probable mechanisms responsible for that large interannual change of biomass as seen by ocean color satellites. Potential sources of macro and micro (e.g., Fe) nutrients that sustain the high phytoplankton productivity of the Patagonian shelf waters are identified, and the most likely physical processes that maintain the nutrient balance in the region are discussed.

  4. Short-term effects of an educational intervention on physical restraint use: a cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulpers Math JM

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical restraints are still frequently used in nursing home residents despite growing evidence for the ineffectiveness and negative consequences of these methods. Therefore, reduction in the use of physical restraints in psycho-geriatric nursing home residents is very important. The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of an educational intervention on the use of physical restraints in psycho-geriatric nursing home residents. Methods A cluster randomized trial was applied to 5 psycho-geriatric nursing home wards (n = 167 residents with dementia. The wards were assigned at random to either educational intervention (3 wards or control status (2 wards. The restraint status was observed and residents' characteristics, such as cognitive status, were determined by using the Minimum Data Set (MDS at baseline and 1 month after intervention. Results Restraint use did not change significantly over time in the experimental group (55%–56%, compared to a significant increased use (P Conclusion An educational programme for nurses combined with consultation with a nurse specialist did not decrease the use of physical restraints in psycho-geriatric nursing home residents in the short term. However, the residents in the control group experienced more restraint use during the study period compared to the residents in the experimental group. Whether the intervention will reduce restraint use in the long term could not be inferred from these results. Further research is necessary to gain insight into the long-term effects of this educational intervention.

  5. Physical activity history and end-of-life hospital and long-term care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B; Rantanen, Taina; Leinonen, Raija

    2009-01-01

    persons aged 66-98 years at death, who, on average 5.8 years prior to death, had participated in an interview about their current and earlier physical activity. Data on the use of care in the last year of life are register-based data and complete. RESULTS: Men needed on average 96 days (SD 7.0) and women...... had been consistently physically active, whereas use of long-term care did not correlate with physical activity history. Among women, the risk for long-term care was higher for those who had been sedentary (IRR 2.03, 95% CI 1.28-3.21) or only occasionally physically active (IRR 1.60, 95% CI 1.......06-2.43), than for those who had been consistently active from midlife onward, whereas use of hospital care did not correlate with physical activity history. CONCLUSION: People who had been physically active since midlife needed less end-of-life inpatient care but patterns differed between men and women....

  6. Summer Workshop on Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Chamseddine, A H; Nath, Pran

    1984-01-01

    These lectures give an elementary introduction to the important recent developments of the applications of N=1 supergravity to the construction of unified models of elementary particle interactions. Topics covered include couplings of supergravity with matter, spontaneous symmetry breaking and the super-higgs effect, construction of supergravity unified models, and the phenomenon of SU(2) x U(1) electroweak-symmetry breaking by supergravity. Experimental consequences of N-1 supergravity unified theory, in particular, the possible supersymmetric decays of the W ± and Z 0 bosons, are also discus

  7. Summer 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric G. Strauss

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cities and the Environment Editor, Eric Strauss, provides an introduction to the Summer 2011 issue. He discusses the journal's transition to its new home at Loyola Marymount University and the creation of the Center for Urban Resilience and Ecological Solution, while underscoring highlights of the special topics section on Urban Predators. The contributors to this section participated in the International Symposium on Urban Wildlife and the Environment hosted by the Wildlife Society at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in June of 2009. Finally, Dr. Strauss notes the breadth of our issue by mentioning the additional articles' focus on rain gardens, water quality, arthropod diversity, green roofs, and socio-ecological dynamics.

  8. Physical activity and late effects in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia long-term survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertorello, N; Manicone, R; Galletto, C; Barisone, E; Fagioli, F

    2011-08-01

    In the present study the authors evaluated therapy-related long-term adverse effects and physical activity in a cohort of long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), diagnosed in their center between March 1991 and August 2000, treated according to the AIEOP (Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica) ALL 91 or 95 study protocol and regularly seen in the authors' long-term follow-up unit. The authors analyzed the long-term sequelae of major body systems in this cohort of subjects and administered an "ad hoc" questionnaire concerning sport. The authors found that 70 patients out of 102 (68.5%) showed no late effects, 10% presented only instrumental or neuropsychological test abnormalities, and 21.5% had 1 or more clinical late sequelae. None of the evidenced late effects represented a contraindication to do physical activity. Sixty-one percent of survivors do physical activity, most of them regularly. Sixty-one percent of males and 18.5% of females (P < .005) do competitive sport (sports rates are similar to those of the general age-matched population). Nearly all subjects spontaneously choose to do sport and think physical exercise is an important and useful resource for their health. The authors conclude that the more recent therapy regimens for leukemia treatment, excluding bone marrow transplantation, do not seem to cause such late effects as to prevent survivors from doing sport. Therefore, in the care of ALL survivors, physical activity is not only not contraindicated, but should also be promoted as much as possible. The development of specific educational programs is warranted as part of the care of cancer survivors.

  9. Identifying Feasible Physical Activity Programs for Long-Term Care Homes in the Ontario Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Saad; Newhouse, Ian; Malik, Ali; Heckman, George

    2015-01-01

    Background Structured exercise programs for frail institutionalized seniors have shown improvement in physical, functional, and psychological health of this population. However, the ‘feasibility’ of implementation of such programs in real settings is seldom discussed. The purpose of this systematic review was to gauge feasibility of exercise and falls prevention programs from the perspective of long-term care homes in Ontario, given the recent changes in funding for publically funded physiotherapy services. Method Six electronic databases were searched by two independent researchers for randomized controlled trials that targeted long-term care residents and included exercise as an independent component of the intervention. Results A total of 39 studies were included in this review. A majority of these interventions were led by physiotherapist(s), carried out three times per week for 30–45 minutes per session. However, a few group-based interventions that were led by long-term care staff, volunteers, or trained non-exercise specialists were identified that also required minimal equipment. Conclusion This systematic review has identified ‘feasible’ physical activity and falls prevention programs that required minimal investment in staff and equipment, and demonstrated positive outcomes. Implementation of such programs represents cost-effective means of providing long-term care residents with meaningful gains in physical, psychological, and social health. PMID:26180563

  10. EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ON CARDIAC STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION: A TWIN STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urho M.Kujala

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that athletic training or other physical activity causes structural and functional adaptations in the heart, but less is known how long-term physical activity affects heart when genetic liability and childhood environment are taken into account. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term physical activity vs. inactivity on cardiac structure and function in twin pairs discordant for physical activity for 32 years. Twelve same-sex twin pairs (five monozygotic and seven dizygotic, 50-67 years were studied as a part of the TWINACTIVE study. Discordance in physical activity was initially determined in 1975 and it remained significant throughout the follow-up. At the end of the follow-up in 2007, resting echocardiographic and electrocardiographic measurements were performed. During the follow-up period, the active co-twins were on average 8.2 (SD 4.0 MET hours/day more active than their inactive co-twins (p < 0.001. At the end of the follow-up, resting heart rate was lower in the active than inactive co-twins [59 (SD 5 vs. 68 (SD 10 bpm, p=0.03]. The heart rate-corrected QT interval was similar between the co-twins. Also, there was a tendency for left ventricular mass per body weight to be greater and T wave amplitude in lead II to be higher in the active co-twins (18% and 15%, respectively, p=0.08 for both. Similar trends were found for both monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs. In conclusion, the main adaptation to long- term physical activity is lowered resting heart rate, even after partially or fully controlling for genetic liability and childhood environment

  11. Physics Courses X-Rayed - A Comparative Analysis of High School Physics Courses in Terms of Basic Assumptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, E. D.

    1974-01-01

    Reports an attempt to infer from official statements and from course materials some of the assumptions and theoretical positions which underlie four high school physics courses: Nuffield Physics, ECCP's "The Man Made World," Harvard Project Physics, and PSSC Physics. (PEB)

  12. Indian Summer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, E. [Sho-Ban High School, Fort Hall, ID (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This paper focuses on preserving and strengthening two resources culturally and socially important to the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribe on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho; their young people and the Pacific-Northwest Salmon. After learning that salmon were not returning in significant numbers to ancestral fishing waters at headwater spawning sites, tribal youth wanted to know why. As a result, the Indian Summer project was conceived to give Shoshone-Bannock High School students the opportunity to develop hands-on, workable solutions to improve future Indian fishing and help make the river healthy again. The project goals were to increase the number of fry introduced into the streams, teach the Shoshone-Bannock students how to use scientific methodologies, and get students, parents, community members, and Indian and non-Indian mentors excited about learning. The students chose an egg incubation experiment to help increase self-sustaining, natural production of steelhead trout, and formulated and carried out a three step plan to increase the hatch-rate of steelhead trout in Idaho waters. With the help of local companies, governmental agencies, scientists, and mentors students have been able to meet their project goals, and at the same time, have learned how to use scientific methods to solve real life problems, how to return what they have used to the water and land, and how to have fun and enjoy life while learning.

  13. Physical therapy in Parkinson's disease: an open long-term rehabilitation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellecchia, M T; Grasso, A; Biancardi, L G; Squillante, M; Bonavita, V; Barone, P

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of prolonged physical therapy on disability in patients with Parkinson's disease. The study was designed as an open long-term trial over 20 weeks. Twenty slightly to moderately affected parkinsonian patients were included (Hoehn & Yahr stages: 1.5-3). A comprehensive rehabilitation program was applied three times a week in all patients. Pharmacological treatment was kept stable. Evaluations were performed at baseline, at the end of treatment and after 3 months. Following physical rehabilitation, there was a significant improvement in UPDRS (ADL and motor sections) scores, Self-assessment Parkinson's disease Disability Scale, Ten-Meter Walk test and Zung scale for depression. At 3-month follow-up clinical improvements were largely maintained. A sustained improvement of motor skills in PD patients can be achieved with a long-term comprehensive rehabilitation program.

  14. Short-term effects of an educational intervention on physical restraint use: a cluster randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizing, Anna R; Hamers, Jan PH; Gulpers, Math JM; Berger, Martijn PF

    2006-01-01

    Background Physical restraints are still frequently used in nursing home residents despite growing evidence for the ineffectiveness and negative consequences of these methods. Therefore, reduction in the use of physical restraints in psycho-geriatric nursing home residents is very important. The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of an educational intervention on the use of physical restraints in psycho-geriatric nursing home residents. Methods A cluster randomized trial was applied to 5 psycho-geriatric nursing home wards (n = 167 residents with dementia). The wards were assigned at random to either educational intervention (3 wards) or control status (2 wards). The restraint status was observed and residents' characteristics, such as cognitive status, were determined by using the Minimum Data Set (MDS) at baseline and 1 month after intervention. Results Restraint use did not change significantly over time in the experimental group (55%–56%), compared to a significant increased use (P < 0.05) in the control group (56%–70%). The mean restraint intensity and mean multiple restraint use in residents increased in the control group but no changes were shown in the experimental group. Logistic regression analysis showed that residents in the control group were more likely to experience increased restraint use than residents in the experimental group. Conclusion An educational programme for nurses combined with consultation with a nurse specialist did not decrease the use of physical restraints in psycho-geriatric nursing home residents in the short term. However, the residents in the control group experienced more restraint use during the study period compared to the residents in the experimental group. Whether the intervention will reduce restraint use in the long term could not be inferred from these results. Further research is necessary to gain insight into the long-term effects of this educational intervention. PMID:17067376

  15. Fractional Calculus of Variations in Terms of a Generalized Fractional Integral with Applications to Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana Odzijewicz; Malinowska, Agnieszka B.; Torres, Delfim F. M.

    2012-01-01

    We study fractional variational problems in terms of a generalized fractional integral with Lagrangians depending on classical derivatives, generalized fractional integrals and derivatives. We obtain necessary optimality conditions for the basic and isoperimetric problems, as well as natural boundary conditions for free-boundary value problems. The fractional action-like variational approach (FALVA) is extended and some applications to physics discussed. Copyright 2012 Tatiana Odzijewicz et al.

  16. SNOWMASS (DPF Community Summer Study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronin-Hennessy, et al, Daniel

    2013-08-06

    The 2013 Community Summer Study, known as Snowmass," brought together nearly 700 physicists to identify the critical research directions for the United States particle physics program. Commissioned by the American Physical Society, this meeting was the culmination of intense work over the past year by more than 1000 physicists that defined the most important questions for this field and identified the most promising opportunities to address them. This Snowmass study report is a key resource for setting priorities in particle physics.

  17. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    the PAG conveners

    2011-01-01

    The delivered LHC integrated luminosity of more than 1 inverse femtobarn by summer and more than 5 by the end of 2011 has been a gold mine for the physics groups. With 2011 data, we have submitted or published 14 papers, 7 others are in collaboration-wide review, and 75 Physics Analysis Summaries have been approved already. They add to the 73 papers already published based on the 2010 and 2009 datasets. Highlights from each physics analysis group are described below. Heavy ions Many important results have been obtained from the first lead-ion collision run in 2010. The published measurements include the first ever indications of Υ excited state suppression (PRL synopsis), long-range correlation in PbPb, and track multiplicity over a wide η range. Preliminary results include the first ever measurement of isolated photons (showing no modification), J/ψ suppression including the separation of the non-prompt component, further study of jet fragmentation, nuclear modification factor...

  18. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    The Physics Groups are actively engaged on analyses of the first data from the LHC at 7 TeV, targeting many results for the ICHEP conference taking place in Paris this summer. The first large batch of physics approvals is scheduled for this CMS Week, to be followed by four more weeks of approvals and analysis updates leading to the start of the conference in July. Several high priority analysis areas were organized into task forces to ensure sufficient coverage from the relevant detector, object, and analysis groups in the preparation of these analyses. Already some results on charged particle correlations and multiplicities in 7 TeV minimum bias collisions have been approved. Only one small detail remains before ICHEP: further integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC! Beyond the Standard Model measurements that can be done with these data, the focus changes to the search for new physics at the TeV scale and for the Higgs boson in the period after ICHEP. Particle Flow The PFT group is focusing on the ...

  19. Summer and Autumn activities

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Time to recharge the batteries, and much more… The summer holidays are an ideal opportunity to spend more time with the family, to discover new countries, make new friends, in other words to take time away from the daily grind. This recharging is essential to your work-life balance, and CERN, as a modern and socially responsible employer, has recognized this as a central part of its human resources policy.Nevertheless we should not forget that, while many of you enjoy a well-deserved summer break, some of our colleagues are hard at work making LS1 (first Long Shutdown) a success in order to guarantee that at the beginning of 2015 the LHC will be able to start physics in an energy range never before reached by mankind. Preparing the questionnaire and the elections to the Staff Council During this summer your delegates in the Staff Council are hard at work preparing for the upcoming five-yearly review whose content will be decided by CERN Council in June 2014. Therefore, as every five years, to ...

  20. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    There have been numerous developments in the physics area since the September CMS week. The biggest single event was the Physics/Trigger week in the end of Octo¬ber, whereas in terms of ongoing activities the “2007 analyses” went into high gear. This was in parallel with participation in CSA07 by the physics groups. On the or¬ganizational side, the new conveners of the physics groups have been selected, and a new database for man¬aging physics analyses has been deployed. Physics/Trigger week The second Physics-Trigger week of 2007 took place during the week of October 22-26. The first half of the week was dedicated to working group meetings. The ple¬nary Joint Physics-Trigger meeting took place on Wednesday afternoon and focused on the activities of the new Trigger Studies Group (TSG) and trigger monitoring. Both the Physics and Trigger organizations are now focused on readiness for early data-taking. Thus, early trigger tables and preparations for calibr...

  1. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 3 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. FAYARD, O. ULLALAND Presentation of the Summer Student Programm 10:15 - 12:00 L. MAIANI Introduction to CERN (1&2/2) 14:00 - 15:00 G. Stevenson Radiation Protection (Council Chamber, bldg.503) Thursday 4 July 09:15 - 11:00 F. CLOSE Introduction to Particle Physics for non Physics Students (1&2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (1/5) Friday 5 July 09:15 - 11:00 F. CLOSE Introduction to Particle Physics for non Physics Students (3&4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 8 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 M. FRANKLIN Classic Experiments (1/3) 14:00 - 15:00 M. LINDROOS Isolde 15:30 - 16:30 M. LINDROOS Visit of the Experiment Tuesday 9 july 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (2/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Part...

  2. Influence of Physical Activity on Human Sensory Long-Term Potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Nicola; Spriggs, Meg J; Thompson, Christopher S; Wu, Carolyn C; Hamm, Jeff P; Moreau, David; Kirk, Ian J

    2015-11-01

    A growing body of literature has explored the influence of physical activity on brain structure and function. While the mechanisms of this relationship remain largely speculative, recent research suggests that one of the effects of physical exercise is an increase in synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP). This has not yet been explored directly in humans due to the difficulty of measuring LTP non-invasively. However, we have previously established that LTP-like changes in visual-evoked potentials (VEPs) can be measured in humans. Here, we investigated whether physical fitness status affects the degree of visual sensory LTP. Using a self-report measure of physical activity, participants were split into two groups: a high-activity group, and a low-activity group. LTP was measured and compared between the two groups using the previously established electroencephalography-LTP paradigm, which assesses the degree to which the N1b component of the VEP elicited by a sine grating is potentiated (enhanced) following a rapid "tetanic" presentation of that grating. Both groups demonstrated increased negativity in the amplitude of the N1b component of the VEP immediately after presentation of the visual "tetanus," indicating potentiation. However, after a 30-min rest period, the N1b for the high-activity group remained potentiated while the N1b for the low-activity group returned to baseline. This study presents the first evidence for the impact of self-reported levels of physical activity on LTP in humans, and sheds light on potential neurological mechanisms underlying the relationship between physical fitness and cognition.

  3. Leisure time physical activity and long-term cardiovascular and cancer outcomes: the Busselton Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnell, Anthony S; Knuiman, Matthew W; Divitini, Mark L; Cormie, Prue

    2014-11-01

    The study aimed to investigate whether meeting leisure time physical activity recommendations was associated with reduced incident and fatal cancer or cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a community-based cohort of middle- to late-aged adults with long-term follow-up. At baseline, 2,320 individuals were assessed on a large number of lifestyle and clinical parameters including their level of physical activity per week, other risk factors (e.g. smoking and alcohol use) various anthropometric measures, blood tests and medical history. Individuals were linked to hospital and mortality registry data to identify future cancer and cardiovascular events (fatal and non-fatal) out to 15 years of follow-up. Cox regression analyses adjusted for relevant confounders identified a priori were used to estimate risk for all-cause, cancer-specific and CVD-specific mortality. In the full cohort an estimated 21 % decreased risk for all-cause mortality (HR 0.79; 95 % CI 0.66-0.96) and 22 % decreased risk for fatal/non-fatal CVD events (HR 0.78; 95 % CI 0.66-0.92) was associated with baseline self-reported physical activity levels of 150 min or more. After exclusion of those with chronic co-morbidities (CVD, cancer, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension treatment) at baseline, lower risk for fatal/non-fatal CVD events remained significantly associated with 150 min or more of physical activity (HR 0.77; 95 % CI 0.62-0.96). Results from this well established prospective community-based cohort study support the role of leisure time physical activity in reducing all-cause mortality and CVD events (fatal/nonfatal) in the broader population studied. The data also suggest that physical activity associated reductions in risk for CVD events (fatal/nonfatal) were not overly impacted by prevalent key non-communicable diseases.

  4. Long-term effects of daily postprandial physical activity on blood glucose: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Håvard; Grindaker, Eirik; Rønnestad, Bent Ronny; Holmboe-Ottesen, Gerd; Høstmark, Arne Torbjørn

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that a bout of moderate or light postprandial physical activity effectively blunts the postprandial increase in blood glucose. The objective of this study was to test whether regular light postprandial physical activity can improve glycemia in persons with hyperglycemia or with a high risk of hyperglycemia. We randomized 56 participants to an intervention or a control group. They were diagnosed as hyperglycemic, not using antidiabetics, or were categorized as high-risk individuals for type 2 diabetes. The intervention group was instructed to undertake a minimum 30 min of daily light physical activity, starting a maximum of 30 min after a meal in addition to their usual physical activity for 12 weeks. The control group maintained their usual lifestyle. Blood samples were taken pre- and post-test. Forty participants completed the study and are included in the results. The self-reported increase in daily physical activity from before to within the study period was higher in the intervention group compared with control (41 ± 25 vs. 2 ± 16 min, p < 0.001). Activity diaries and accelerometer recordings supported this observation. The activity in the intervention group started earlier after the last meal compared with control (30 ± 13 vs. 100 ± 57 min, p = 0.001). There were no within- or between-group differences in any glycemic variable from pre- to post-test. In conclusion, the present study does not seem to support the notion that regular light postprandial physical activity improves blood glucose in the long term in persons with hyperglycemia or with high risk of hyperglycemia.

  5. 20{sup th} Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School on nuclear reactors 'physics, fuels and systems'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Espinoza, V.H. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR)

    2014-12-15

    This year, the 20{sup th} anniversary of the Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn Summer School was celebrated in Aix-en-Provence, France from August 20{sup th} to 29{sup th} 2014. The topic was 'Nuclear reactors - bridging the gap between science and industry'. This summer school is organized by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) since twenty years. Experts from internationally recognized organizations (Universities, research centres, regulators, industry) from USA, Japan, Asia and Europe presented during the 10 days of sessions the newest trends and challenges on the related fields.

  6. Integrated marketing sphere of physical culture and sports in terms of European integration Regional Center Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr Popov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: exposure of conceptual and strategic positions of the complex marketing of sphere of physical culture and sport in the conditions of European integration of regional center. Material and Methods: analysis of literary sources, analysis of documents of legislative, normatively-legal and programmatic maintenance, analysis of the systems, questioning as a questionnaire. Results: the analysis of the systems of terms of development of sphere of physical culture and sport is carried out by the study of modern tendencies, interests of young people and habitants of regional center; complex description of conceptual and strategic positions of the relatively complex marketing of sphere of physical culture and sport is presented in the conditions of European integration of regional center. Conclusions: it is set that the decision of tasks in relation to conditioning for development of sphere of physical culture and sport must come true with the observance of certain principles; got founding in relation to development of marketing plan of forming of sporting image Kharkiv.

  7. Shape Accuracy of Iron Precision Castings in Terms of Ceramic Moulds Physical Properties Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biernacki R.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available While analyzing shape accuracy of ferroalloy precision castings in terms of ceramic moulds physical anisotropy, low-alloy steel castings ("cover" and cast iron ("plate" were included. The basic parameters in addition to the product linear shape accuracy are flatness deviations, especially due to the expanded flat surface which is cast plate. For mentioned castings surface micro-geometry analysis was also carried, favoring surface load capacity tp50 for Rmax = 50%. Surface load capacity tp50 obtained for the cast cover was compared with machined product, and casting plate surface was compared with wear part of the conveyor belt. The results were referred to anisotropy of ceramic moulds physical properties, which was evaluated by studying ceramic moulds samples in computer tomography equipment Metrotom 800

  8. English/Russian and Russian/English glossary of physical protection terms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soo Hoo, M.S. [ed.

    1995-07-01

    This glossary was prepared in fulfillment of the Glossary Preparation Task identified in the Program Plan for providing Assistance to the Russian Federation in Nuclear Material Control and Accounting and Physical Protection. The Program Plan is part of the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program as provided for under House Resolution (H.R.) 3807 (Title II, as referenced under Public Law (P.L.) 102-229. The terms in this glossary were derived from physical protection training material prepared at Sandia. The training material, and thus refinements to the glossary, has undergone years of development in presentation to both domestic and international audiences. Also, Russian Colleagues and interpreters have reviewed the translations for accuracy.

  9. Long-term physical ageing in As-Se glasses with short chalcogen chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovchak, R; Shpotyuk, O [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202, Stryjska street, Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Kozdras, A [Faculty of Physics of Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska street, Opole, 45370 (Poland); Vlcek, M [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Pardubice, 532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Bureau, B [Verres et Ceramiques, UMR CNRS 6226 Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, University of Rennes, 1, Campus de Beaulieu, Rennes, 35042 (France); Kovalskiy, A; Jain, H [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, 5, East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States)

    2008-06-18

    Long-term physical ageing of chalcogenide glasses, which occurs over tens of years, is much less understood than the short-term ageing. With Se-rich underconstrained As{sub 30}Se{sub 70} glass as a model composition (consisting of Se{sub n} chains with n{<=}3 on average), a microscopic model is developed for this phenomenon by combining information from differential scanning calorimetry, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, Raman, and {sup 77}Se solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. The accompanying changes in the electronic structure of these glasses are investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The data suggest ageing from cooperative relaxation, presumably involving bond switching or reconfiguration of As-Se-Se-As fragments.

  10. Physical and biological controls on DMS,P dynamics in ice shelf-influenced fast ice during a winter-spring and a spring-summer transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carnat, G.; Zhou, J.; Papakyriakou, T.; Delille, B.; Goossens, T.; Haskell, T.; Schoemann, V.; Fripiat, F.; Rintala, J.-M.; Tison, J.-L.

    2014-01-01

    We report the seasonal and vertical variations of dimethylsulfide (DMS) and its precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) in fast ice at Cape Evans, McMurdo Sound (Antarctica) during the spring-summer transition in 2011 and winter-spring transition in 2012. We compare the variations of DMS,P obser

  11. Physical and biological controls on DMS,P dynamics in ice shelf-influenced fast ice during a winter-spring and a spring-summer transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carnat, G.; Zhou, J.; Papakyriakou, T.; Delille, B.; Goossens, T.; Haskell, T.; Schoemann, V.; Fripiat, F.; Rintala, J.-M.; Tison, J.-L.

    2014-01-01

    We report the seasonal and vertical variations of dimethylsulfide (DMS) and its precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) in fast ice at Cape Evans, McMurdo Sound (Antarctica) during the spring-summer transition in 2011 and winter-spring transition in 2012. We compare the variations of DMS,P obser

  12. Long-term health-enhancing physical activity in rheumatoid arthritis - the PARA 2010 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordgren Birgitta

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA suffer increased risk of disability andpremature mortality. Health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA could be one importantfactor to reduce this risk. Rising health care costs call for the development and evaluation ofnew modes of rehabilitation, including physical activity in settings outside the health caresystem. Methods/Design This cohort study targets 450 patients with RA that do not currently meet HEPA recommendations, recruited from six hospitals reporting to the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Registers (SRQ. We have developed a two-year real-life intervention program including a minimum of twice-weekly circuit training, moderately intense physical activity the remaining days of the week and group meetings to support behavior change every other week. Our hypothesis is that increased physical activity and exercise will improve perceived health, reduce pain and fatigue, increase muscle function and aerobic capacity, impact psychosocial factors and prevent future cardiovascular events. Research questions regard outcomes, retention rates, dose–response matters and the exploration of responder characteristics. This protocol outlines recruitment procedure, design, assessment methods and the intervention program of the study. Discussion The PARA 2010 project is designed to expand the knowledge on HEPA in RA by a progressive approach regarding population, setting, intervention, time frames and outcome measures. To our knowledge this is the first long-term HEPA program based on Social Cognitive Theory, and performed in a real life environment to demonstrate if this new setting can promote increased and maintained physical activity in people with RA. Trial registration number ISRCTN25539102

  13. Arctic Summer Ice Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Benjamin

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to estimate the flux of heat and freshwater resulting from sea ice melt in the polar seas. The approach taken is to examine the decay of sea ice in the summer months primarily through the use of spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery. The improved understanding of the dynamics of the melt process can be usefully combined with ice thermodynamic and upper ocean models to form more complete models of ice melt. Models indicate that more heat is absorbed in the upper ocean when the ice cover is composed of smaller rather than larger floes and when there is more open water. Over the course of the summer, floes disintegrate by physical forcing and heating, melting into smaller and smaller sizes. By measuring the change in distribution of floes together with open water over a summer period, we can make estimates of the amount of heating by region and time. In a climatic sense, these studies are intended to improve the understanding of the Arctic heat budget which can then be eventually incorporated into improved global climate models. This work has two focus areas. The first is examining the detailed effect of storms on floe size and open water. A strong Arctic low pressure storm has been shown to loosen up the pack ice, increase the open water concentration well into the pack ice, and change the distribution of floes toward fewer and smaller floes. This suggests episodic melting and the increased importance of horizontal (lateral) melt during storms. The second focus area is related to an extensive ship-based experiment that recently took place in the Arctic called Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA). An icebreaker was placed purposely into the older pack ice north of Alaska in September 1997. The ship served as the base for experimenters who deployed extensive instrumentation to measure the atmosphere, ocean, and ice during a one-year period. My experiment will be to derive similar measurements (floe size, open

  14. A national survey of the use of physical restraint in long-term care hospitals in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Yumi; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Kawasaki, Maki

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the prevalence of physical restraints in the long-term care hospitals in Japan and to examine the factors of physical restraint use, including the specific skills/techniques that the staff use to minimise the restraints. Background.  Despite the national efforts to nullify physical restraint, it is still prevalent in long-term care facilities in and out of Japan. More detailed information regarding what affects physical restraint is needed. Cross-sectional mail survey. A questionnaire was sent to a nursing ward manager of the random sample of long-term care facilities in Japan. The average rate of physical restraint was 25·5%. Altogether, 81·0% of the restrained clients were under restraint for more than one month. The most prevalent method of restraint was bilateral bedrails, followed by the use of coveralls and gloves. Factors of restraint were different depending on the type of restraint, suggesting specific approaches are needed for specific type of restraint. Physical restraint is still prevalent in Japanese long-term care hospitals, and nurses need to develop effective intervention approach to redesigning practice related to physical restraints. Specialised intervention approach seems needed depending on the types of restraint. Specific approach should be developed to minimise the physical restraint in long-term care hospitals in Japan. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Patterns of New Physical Problems Emerging in Long-Term Care Residents With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Christine R; Ellis, Julie; Evans, Crystal-Rae

    2017-04-11

    Individuals receiving skilled nursing care have multiple comorbid conditions that impact comfort and resource use. The current study describes variations in the trajectories of new physical problems emerging over 8 weeks and the predictive value for future health and behavior in a sample of 72 residents with dementia. Residents had two to 37 new physical problems occurring over 8 weeks. Sixty-five percent of the sample had five or more new problems and were identified by three unstable trajectories. Common problems, illnesses, and symptoms accounted for 28.2% of the variance in subsequent new physical problems (p < 0.001) and 25.7% of the variance in subsequent agitation (p < 0.001). This study found more new problems than earlier studies that only examined new acute illness. Findings suggest a higher intensity of need for skilled assessment and treatment than may be available in many long-term care organizations. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Long-term physical health consequences of perceived inequality: Results from a twin comparison design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joseph A

    2017-08-01

    Previous research has identified long-term exposure to stress as a risk factor for negative mental and physical health outcomes. This pattern of findings suggests that environmental stimuli that evoke feelings of stress or strain may also result in physiological responses, which may accumulate over the life course and ultimately increase the overall risk of various physical health conditions. This physiological "wear and tear" resulting from sustained levels of stress or strain has been previously operationalized as allostatic load (AL), a comprehensive indicator of stress exposure. The current study examines the association between one potential environmental stressor-perceived inequality-and AL with a research design aimed at addressing both observed and unobserved sources of confounding; it also employs a more comprehensive AL measure (comprised of 24 biomarkers tapping seven physiological systems) than previous studies. The biomarker twin sample from the Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS) study was used to estimate a series of twin comparison models, which include controls for latent sources of influence that cluster within families. The sibling comparison models also included additional controls for lifestyle choices, overall physical health, and demographics which may confound the examined associations. The results revealed significant associations between greater perceptions of inequality and greater overall levels of AL. The association persisted even after including controls for both observed and unobserved influences that may confound the examined associations but was limited to more recent measures of perceived inequality. Associations involving earlier measures of perceived inequality, along with a lifetime measure, failed to reach conventional levels of significance. Perceived inequality appears to be a robust predictor of AL and potentially contributes to subsequent physical health problems, particularly for more proximate forms of

  17. 1998 Complex Systems Summer School

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-15

    For the past eleven years a group of institutes, centers, and universities throughout the country have sponsored a summer school in Santa Fe, New Mexico as part of an interdisciplinary effort to promote the understanding of complex systems. The goal of these summer schools is to provide graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and active research scientists with an introduction to the study of complex behavior in mathematical, physical, and living systems. The Center for Nonlinear Studies supported the eleventh in this series of highly successful schools in Santa Fe in June, 1998.

  18. The social basis of the development of physical activity of students in terms of their quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyfa A.V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to study the theoretical foundations of social development, physical activity of students in terms of the promotion to enhance their quality of life. The social basis of the phenomenon of physical activity of students in terms of improving their quality of life is shown. It is established that the problem of the formation of students’ physical activity should take into account features of mental and physical condition, their future careers. The conditions and the sequence of the formation of the physical activity of students are found out. It is substantiated the feasibility of higher education in the practice of modern educational technology to improve the quality of life of students. It is proved that the formation of the physical activity of students must pass from the external to the internal plan of the mind.

  19. Physical characteristics and fish assemblage composition at site and mesohabitat scales over a range of streamflows in the Middle Rio Grande, New Mexico, winter 2011-12, summer 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Christopher L.; Pearson, Daniel K.; Porter, Michael D.; Moring, J. Bruce

    2015-01-01

    In winter 2011–12 and summer 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Albuquerque District and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service New Mexico Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office in Albuquerque, New Mexico, evaluated the physical characteristics and fish assemblage composition of available mesohabitats over a range of streamflows at 15 sites on the Middle Rio Grande in New Mexico. The fish assemblage of the Middle Rio Grande includes several minnow species adapted to hydrologically variable but seasonably predictable rivers, including theHybognathus amarus (Rio Grande silvery minnow), a federally listed endangered species. Gaining a better understanding of habitat usage by the Rio Grande silvery minnow was the impetus for studying physical characteristics and fish assemblages in the Middle Rio Grande during different streamflow conditions. Data were collected at all 15 sites during winter 2011–12 (moderate streamflow), and a subset was collected at the 13 most downstream sites in summer 2012 (low streamflow). Sites were grouped into four river reaches separated by diversion dams listed in downstream order (names of the diversion dams are followed by short names of the sites nearest each dam in parentheses, listed in downstream order): (1) Cochiti (Peña Blanca), (2) Angostura (Bernalillo, La Orilla, Barelas, Los Padillas), (3) Isleta (Los Lunas I, Los Lunas II, Abeytas, La Joya, Rio Salado), and (4) San Acacia (Lemitar, Arroyo del Tajo, San Pedro, Bosque del Apache I, and Bosque del Apache II). Stream habitat was mapped in the field by using a geographic information system in conjunction with a Global Positioning System. Fish assemblage composition was determined during both streamflow regimes, and fish were collected by seining in each mesohabitat where physical characteristic data (depth, velocity, dominant substrate type and size, and percent embeddedness) and water-quality properties (temperature

  20. Application of rheology for assessment and prediction of the long-term physical stability of emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Tharwat

    2004-05-20

    This review deals with the use of rheology for assessment and prediction of the long-term physical stability of emulsions. It starts with an introduction, highlighting the importance of having accelerated test to predict emulsion stability. This is followed by a section on the stability/instability of emulsion systems, giving a brief summary of the driving force of each instability process and its prevention. The classical techniques that can be applied for assessment of creaming or sedimentation, flocculation, Ostwald ripening, coalescence and phase inversion are briefly described. This is followed by several sections on the application of rheological techniques to assess and predict each of these instabilities. This involves the use of steady state shear stress-shear rate measurements, constant stress (creep) measurements and dynamic (oscillatory) techniques. The last section gives an example of model emulsions to illustrate the correlation between the various break-down processes with the rheological characteristics of the system.

  1. Neural Networks Based Physical Cell Identity Assignment for Self Organized 3GPP Long Term Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Basit Shahab

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes neural networks based graph coloring technique to assign Physical Cell Identities throughout the self-organized 3GPP Long Term Evolution Networks. PCIs are allocated such that no two cells in the vicinity of each other or with a common neighbor get the same identity. Efficiency of proposed methodology resides in the fact that minimum number of identities is utilized in the network wise assignment. Simulations are performed on a very large scale network, where initially all the cells are without any PCIs assigned. Results of simulations are demonstrated to analyze the performance of the proposed technique. Discussions about the presence of femto cells and PCI assignment in them are also presented at the end.

  2. CERN openlab summer student programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    CERN openlab is currently taking applications for its summer student programme. The closing date for applications is 31 March 2013.   The openlab summer student programme is open for applications from bachelor, master and PhD students in computer science and physics. Successful applicants will spend 9 weeks at CERN, during the period from June to September 2013, working with some of the latest hardware and software technologies. The programme is more than just a summer at CERN: it can lead to follow-on projects at the home institute and may even inspire students to become entrepreneurs in cutting-edge computing technologies. A series of lectures will be given by experts in various domains of CERN-related high-throughput computing. Study tours of external companies and universities as well as of CERN facilities are also part of the programme. Please visit the CERN openlab website for more information.

  3. CERN openlab Summer Student Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    CERN openlab is currently taking applications for its summer student programme. The closing date for applications is 30 March 2012.   The openlab Summer Student Programme is open for applications from bachelor, master and PhD students in computer science and physics. Successful applicants will spend 8 weeks at CERN, during the period June to September 2012, to work with some of the latest hardware and software technologies. The programme is more than just a summer at CERN: it can lead to follow-on projects at the home institute and may even inspire the students to become entrepreneurs in cutting-edge computing technologies. A series of lectures will be given by experts in various domains of CERN related high-throughput computing. Study tours to external companies and universities as well as to CERN facilities are also part of the programme. Please visit www.cern.ch/openlab-students for more information.

  4. Long-Term Effects of Physically Active Academic Lessons on Physical Fitness and Executive Functions in Primary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Greeff, J. W.; Hartman, E.; Mullender-Wijnsma, M. J.; Bosker, R. J.; Doolaard, S.; Visscher, C.

    2016-01-01

    Integrating physical activity into the curriculum has potential health and cognitive benefits in primary school children. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of physically active academic lessons on cardiovascular fitness, muscular fitness and executive functions. In the current randomized controlled trial, 499 second and third…

  5. Next Generation Summer School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenia, Marcu

    2013-04-01

    On 21.06.2010 the "Next Generation" Summer School has opened the doors for its first students. They were introduced in the astronomy world by astronomical observations, astronomy and radio-astronomy lectures, laboratory projects meant to initiate them into modern radio astronomy and radio communications. The didactic programme was structure as fallowing: 1) Astronomical elements from the visible spectrum (lectures + practical projects) 2) Radio astronomy elements (lectures + practical projects) 3) Radio communication base (didactic- recreative games) The students and professors accommodation was at the Agroturistic Pension "Popasul Iancului" situated at 800m from the Marisel Observatory. First day (summer solstice day) began with a practical activity: determination of the meridian by measurements of the shadow (the direction of one vertical alignment, when it has the smallest length). The experiment is very instructive and interesting because combines notions of physics, spatial geometry and basic astronomy elements. Next day the activities took place in four stages: the students processed the experimental data obtained on first day (on sheets of millimetre paper they represented the length of the shadow alignments according the time), each team realised its own sun quadrant, point were given considering the design and functionality of these quadrant, the four teams had to mimic important constellations on carton boards with phosphorescent sticky stars and the students, accompanied by the professors took a hiking trip to the surroundings, marking the interest point coordinates, using a GPS to establish the geographical coronations and at the end of the day the students realised a small map of central Marisel area based on the GPS data. On the third day, the students were introduced to basic notions of radio astronomy, the principal categories of artificial Earth satellites: low orbit satellites (LEO), Medium orbit satellites (MEO) and geostationary satellites (GEO

  6. S'Cool LAB Summer CAMP 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Woithe, Julia

    2017-01-01

    The S’Cool LAB Summer CAMP is an opportunity for high-school students (aged 16-19) from all around the world to spend 2 weeks exploring the fascinating world of particle physics. The 24 selected participants spend their summer at S’Cool LAB, CERN’s hands-on particle physics learning laboratory, for an epic programme of lectures and tutorials, team research projects, visits of CERN’s research installations, and social activities.

  7. A comparison of two short-term intensive physical activity interventions: methodological considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norton Lynda H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increases in chronic illness due to sedentary lifestyles and poor metabolic fitness have led to numerous intervention strategies to promote physical activity (PA. This paper describes the methodological strategies of two short-term PA interventions. Outcome measures reported are PA adherence and compliance rates during the intervention and at 3, 6 and 12-month follow-up. Methods The 40-day interventions were: a pedometer-based walking program (n = 251 and a group-based intensive program (n = 148. There was also an active control group (n = 135. Intervention subjects were prescribed PA each day and required to record all activity sessions (pedometer steps or energy expenditure from heart rate monitors. Results Compliance (≥ 150 min/wk PA was highest post-intervention (81.1% and 64.5% for the group and pedometer subjects, respectively and then progressively decreased across the 12-month follow-up period (final compliance rates were 53.5% and 46.6%, respectively although they remained significantly higher than pre-intervention rates (zero %. There was significantly higher adherence to 6 months (75.0% and 64.9%, and compliance to 3 months (64.9% and 51.0%, for group versus pedometer subjects. The active control group maintained the highest adherence and compliance rates across the study. Conclusions The group-based program resulted in higher adherence and compliance rates post-intervention although both types of interventions showed long-term effectiveness to increase activity patterns.

  8. Summer Student Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Date Time Title Speaker 05/07/2006 09:15 - 10:00 Presentation of the Summer Student Programme F. CERUTTI Information on Computing Rules D. HEAGERTY Workshops presentation O. ULLALAND 10:15 - 11:00 Introduction to CERN J. ENGELEN 11:15 Film on CERN 11:00 Introduction to Particle Physics F. CLOSE 11:15 - 12:00 Accelerators (1/5) S. GILARDONI / E. METRAL 12:00 Discussion Session 7/07/2006 09:15 - 11:00 Introduction to Particle Physics F. CLOSE 11:15 - 12:00 Accelerators (2/5) S. GILARDONI / E. METRAL 12:00 Discussion Session 09:15 - 10:00 Accelerators (3/5) S. GILARDONI / E. METRAL 10:15 - 12:00 Detectors (1-2/5) O. ULLALAND 12:00 Discussion Session 11/07/2006 09:15 - 10:00 Accelerators (4/5) S. GILARDONI / E. METRAL 10:15 - 11:00 Detectors (3/5) O. ULLALAND 11:15 - 12:00 Introduction to Nuclear Physics (1/4) P. CHOMAZ P. CHOMAZ 10:15 - 11:00 Accelerators (5/5) S. GILARDONI / E. METRAL 11:15 - 12:00 Detectors (4/5) O. ULLALAND 12:00 Discus...

  9. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 P. WELLS Discussion Session 14:00 - 16:00 R. ASSMANN The CLIC Concept for a Future Particle Collider at the Energy Frontier Tuesday 30 July 09:15 - 10:00 F. ANTINORI Heavy Ions (1/2) 10:15 - 12:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (1&2/4) Wednesday 31 July  09:15 - 10:00 F. ANTINORI Heavy Ions (2/2) 10:15 - 11:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. DYDAK / F. ANTINORI Discussion Session Thursday 1 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (1/4) 10:15 - 11:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. BEDESCHI Experimental test of the SM Tevatron (1/2) Friday 2 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (2/4) 10:15 ? 11:00 F. BEDESCHI Experimental test of the SM Tevatron (2/2) 11:15 ? 12:00 F. BEDESCHI / T. NAKADA Di...

  10. Good-bye Summer Students 2009!

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    In its 47th edition, the CERN Summer Student programme has welcomed almost 200 young students from around the world. As it proves to do each year, the programme has provided a unique experience for all participants. CERN Summer Students 2009 in the Microcosm garden.During the summer months between June and August, your normal lunchtime routine is inevitably disrupted by the small stampede of students that leaves the Main Auditorium just around midday and starts queuing in Restaurant 1. When this happens, you can’t help but notice that the CERN Summer Students have arrived! With its rich lecture series, inspirational visits and actual work experience, the Summer Student programme provides a real chance to get acquainted with a career in particle physics, engineering and computation. The programme includes a morning lecture series that covers a large variety of topics, from particle physics to engineering, information technology and ...

  11. Moral Judgments on Short-Term Sexual Behaviors among Chinese College Students: Exploring the Roles of Gender and Physical Attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qianguo; Li, Aijuan; Zhu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    This study primarily investigated the effects of gender and physical attractiveness on moral judgments on three typical kinds of short-term sexual behaviors (short-term fling, one-night stand, and hookup) in the Chinese culture context. A total of 120 university student subjects were presented with a series of stereotypically physically attractive (versus physically unattractive) photos before they rated the extent to which each of the three short-term sexual behaviors are morally acceptable. The results showed that male students judged all three behaviors to be more morally acceptable than female students did. Further analyses showed that this gender difference was moderated by the level of physical attractiveness. Under the high attractiveness condition, short-term flings and hookups were judged more morally acceptable by male students than by female students, but this gender difference was not significant under the low attractiveness condition. However, with regard to one-night stands, the data showed that male students judged this type of behavior to be more morally acceptable than did female students under the low attractiveness condition, while this gender difference was not significant under the high attractiveness condition. Thus, these findings further our understanding of how Chinese young people view different types of short-term sexual behaviors, and provide novel evidence regarding how physical attractiveness influences people's moral judgments on short-term sexual behaviors.

  12. Moral Judgments on Short-Term Sexual Behaviors among Chinese College Students: Exploring the Roles of Gender and Physical Attractiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qianguo; Li, Aijuan; Zhu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    This study primarily investigated the effects of gender and physical attractiveness on moral judgments on three typical kinds of short-term sexual behaviors (short-term fling, one-night stand, and hookup) in the Chinese culture context. A total of 120 university student subjects were presented with a series of stereotypically physically attractive (versus physically unattractive) photos before they rated the extent to which each of the three short-term sexual behaviors are morally acceptable. The results showed that male students judged all three behaviors to be more morally acceptable than female students did. Further analyses showed that this gender difference was moderated by the level of physical attractiveness. Under the high attractiveness condition, short-term flings and hookups were judged more morally acceptable by male students than by female students, but this gender difference was not significant under the low attractiveness condition. However, with regard to one-night stands, the data showed that male students judged this type of behavior to be more morally acceptable than did female students under the low attractiveness condition, while this gender difference was not significant under the high attractiveness condition. Thus, these findings further our understanding of how Chinese young people view different types of short-term sexual behaviors, and provide novel evidence regarding how physical attractiveness influences people’s moral judgments on short-term sexual behaviors. PMID:28243218

  13. Prestroke physical activity is associated with severity and long-term outcome from first-ever stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, L.H.; Truelsen, T.; Gluud, C.;

    2008-01-01

    (PASE) questionnaire. The PASE questionnaire quantifies the amount of physical activity done during a 7-day period. In this prospectively collected patient population initial stroke severity was measured using the Scandinavian Stroke Scale and long-term outcome was assessed after 2 years using......OBJECTIVE: To determine whether prestroke level of physical activity influenced stroke severity and long-term outcome. METHODS: Patients included into the present analyses represent a subset of patients with first-ever stroke enrolled into the ExStroke Pilot Trial. Patients with ischemic stroke...... were randomized in the ExStroke Pilot Trial to an intervention of repeated instructions and encouragement to increase the level of physical activity or to a control group. Prestroke level of physical activity was assessed retrospectively by interview using the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly...

  14. The role of biophysical indicators in the reconstruction of long-term late-spring - summer temperatures for the region of Western Hungary and Eastern Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Andrea; Wilson, Rob; Holawe, Franz; Strömmer, Elisabeth; Bariska, István.

    2010-05-01

    , Sopron and Bratislava series and all presented analyses were developed within the framework of the EU project 'Millenium'. The Austrian series are partly based on published series (Pribram 1938, Lauscher 1985, Strömmer 2003) although in some cases modified and extended for this study, as well as newly developed data. The present work is a continuation of the 'Analysis of late spring-summer temperatures for Western Hungary based on vine, grain tithes and harvest records', presented at the annual congress of EGU in 2009 (Kiss and Wilson 2009). References Böhm, R., Jones, P.D., Hiebl, J., Frank, D., Brunetti, M., Maugeri and M. 2009: The early instrumental warm-bias: a solution for long central European temperature series 1760-2007. Climatic Change, doi: 10.1007/s10584-009-9649-4. Kiss, A. and Wilson, R. 2009: Analysis of late spring-summer temperatures for Western Hungary based on vine, grain tithes and harvest records. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol 11, EGU2009-10945-1. Lauscher, F. 1985: Beiträge zur Wetterchronik seit dem Mittelalter. In: Sitzungsberichte, Abtheilung II, Mathematische, Physikalische und Technische Wissenschaften, Band 194, Heft 1-3. pp. 93-131. Leijonhufvud, L., Wilson, R., Möberg, A., Söderberg, J., Retső, D. and Söderlind, U. 2009: Five centuries of Stockholm winter/spring temperatures reconstructed from documentary evidence and instrumental observations. Climatic Change, doi: 10.1007/s10584-009-9650-y. Pribram, A. F. 1938: Materialien zur Geschichte der Preise und Löhne in Österreich. Band. I. Carl Ueberreuters Verlag, Wien. pp. 364-370. Strömmer, E. 2003: Klima-Geschichte. Methoden der Rekonstruction und historische Perspektive. Ostösterreich 1700 bis 1830. Forschungen und Beiträge zur Wiener Stadtgescichte 39. Franz Deuticke, Wien. pp. 59-71.

  15. Summer Meal Capacity Builder

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Agriculture — Allows users to search for summer meal sites from the previous summer by zip code, adding “layers” of information, such as free and reduced-price lunch participation...

  16. Long-Term Effects of Individually Tailored Physical Training and Activity on Physical Function, Well-Being and Cognition in Scandinavian Nursing Home Residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frändin, Kerstin; Grönstedt, Helena; Helbostad, Jorunn L

    2016-01-01

    Background: The preservation of physical functions such as muscle strength, balance and mobility is fundamental to maintaining independence in activities of daily living (ADL). The physical activity level of most nursing home residents is very low, which implies that they are often subject...... to a decline in health, mobility, autonomy and social contacts and are also at risk of suffering a decline in mental well-being. In a previous study, we demonstrated that transfers, balance and physical activity level improved after 3 months of individually tailored intervention in nursing home residents....... Objective: To evaluate the long-term effects on ADL, balance function, physical activity level, physical performance, falls-related self-efficacy, well-being and cognitive function 3 months after the completion of our intervention in nursing home residents. Methods: The study was a multicenter randomized...

  17. Long-term effects of 4-year longitudinal school-based physical activity intervention on the physical fitness of children and youth during 7-year followup assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurak, Gregor; Cooper, Ashley; Leskosek, Bojan; Kovac, Marjeta

    2013-12-01

    Many school-based physical activity (PA) interventions have been developed, but only a few have assessed their long-term effects. A PA intervention taking place in the first four years of some Slovenian primary schools entails an enhanced physical education (PE) curriculum, including two extra lessons of PE per week, a wider selection of PE content, and additional outdoor education delivered by both a specialist PE teacher and a general teacher. The effects of the intervention on children's physical fitness (motor tasks and anthropometry) were evaluated within a quasi-experimental study. In total, 324 children from nine Slovenian primary schools either received the enhanced curriculum (intervention (n=160)) or standard PE (control (n=164)), and were followed for a four-year intervention period and seven years post intervention. Data from the SLOFIT database were used to compare differences in the physical fitness of children each year. Linear Mixed Models were used to test the influence of the PA intervention. Over an 11-year period, the PA intervention group significantly differed in all motor tasks, but not in anthropometric measures or body mass index, after controlling for year of measurement and sex. Differences between the control and intervention groups decreased with time. This study highlights the importance of tracking the long term effects of PA interventions. PA intervention in the first four years of Slovenian primary school offers the possibility of improving physical performance in children; initiatives aiming to increase their performance (physical fitness, physical activity) and health outcomes are warranted.

  18. NEWS: AAPT Summer Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellema, Steve

    2000-11-01

    The 2000 Summer Meeting of the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) was held from 28~July-2~August at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. Despite somewhat rainy weather throughout the week, the annual gathering was an enjoyable one, filled with interesting talks on the state of physics education in North America. Using a new scheduling format for the summer meeting, all of the paid workshops and tutorials were held on Saturday and Sunday 29-30 July. The invited and contributed papers for the main AAPT meeting were then presented on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. As had been done in 1999 in San Antonio, a two-day tandem meeting dedicated to Physics Education Research (PER) was held on Wednesday and Thursday 2-3 August, immediately after the main AAPT meeting. Over the three days of the main meeting, 60 sessions were held under the sponsorship of various AAPT committees. These included sessions (numbers in parentheses) organized by the committees on Apparatus (1), Astronomy Education (3), Awards (2), Computers (5), Graduate Education (2), High Schools (1), History and Philosophy (1), Instructional Media (3), International Education (1), Laboratories (2), Pre-High School Education (2), Programs (4), Professional Concerns (6), Research in Physics Education (8), Science Education for the Public (2), Two-Year Colleges (5), Undergraduate Education (7) and Women in Physics (4). Figure 1. Guelph Church of Our Lady. The main meeting opened on Sunday evening with an invited lecture by Dr John J Simpson from the host institution, the University of Guelph, describing the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. At the ceremonial session that began the activities on Monday morning, recognition was given to Clifford Swartz for his almost 30 years of service as Editor of the AAPT journal, The Physics Teacher. This was followed by an invited talk by Jim Nelson from Seminole County Public School in Florida, who received the Excellence in Pre-College Teaching Award. The

  19. Examination in terms of content of physics 9 textbook suitable to the 2013 Secondary School Physics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavcar, Nevzat; Karateke, Ayşen

    2017-02-01

    The study aimed at unit-based determining the physics teacher candidates' views on Physics 9 textbook' content suitable to the 2013 Secondary School Physics Curriculum. 21 teacher candidates enrolled in the final year of the university at 2013-2014 school year constituted the sampling of the study in which scanning model based on qualitative research technique was used by performing document analysis. Data collection tool of the research was teacher candidate files prepared with 51open ended questions including the subject content of the textbook. It was concluded that although the textbook had experimental - application activities and presentation of the subject content was sufficient for knowledge gains of the Curriculum, there are significant insufficiencies in relation to the subject content. It was also concluded that it is necessary to improve the textbook by asking the opinion of the physics teachers and by making use of the research data. Relevant opinion and recommendations were put forward.

  20. Kamp K’aana, a 2-week residential weight management summer camp, shows long-term improvement in body mass index z scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-term effects of Kamp K'aana, a 2-week residential weight management camp, on body mass index (BMI) measures were evaluated on 71 of 108 (66%) obese youth 10 to 14 years of age. Measures were obtained at 11-month study follow-up (n=38) or extracted from medical record (n=33). Compared with basel...

  1. Physical activity enhances long-term quality of life in older adults: efficacy, esteem, and affective influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavsky, Steriani; McAuley, Edward; Motl, Robert W; Konopack, James F; Marquez, David X; Hu, Liang; Jerome, Gerald J; Diener, Ed

    2005-10-01

    Physical activity has been effective in enhancing quality of life (QOL) of older adults over relatively short periods of time. However, little is known about the long-term effects of physical activity and even less about the possible mediators of this relationship. We examined the mediating effects of psychological variables on the relationship between physical activity and global QOL (satisfaction with life) in older adults over a 4-year period. Participants (N = 174, M age = 66.7 years) completed a battery of psychosocial measures at 1 and 5 years following enrollment in a 6-month randomized controlled exercise trial. Panel analysis conducted within a covariance modeling framework indicated that physical activity was related to self-efficacy, physical self-esteem, and positive affect at 1 year, and in turn, greater levels of self-efficacy and positive affect were associated with higher levels of QOL. Analyses indicated that changes in physical activity over the 4-year period were related to increases in physical self-esteem and positive affect, but only positive affect directly influenced improvements in QOL. The findings lend support to the position that physical activity effects on QOL are in part mediated by intermediate psychological outcomes and that physical activity can have long-term effects on well-being.

  2. [Effect of long-term shallow tillage and straw returning on soil potassium content and stratification ratio in winter wheat/summer maize rotation system in Guanzhong Plain, Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiang-lan; Li, Xiu-shuang; Wang, Shu-juan; Li, Shuo; Li, You-bing; Tian, Xiao-hong

    2015-11-01

    Soil stratified sampling method and potassium chemical fractionation analysis were used to investigate effects of long-term shallow tillage and straw returning on soil K contents and stratification ratios in winter wheat/summer maize rotation system in Guanzhong Plain of Northwest China. The results showed that after 13-year continuous shallow tillage and straw returning, surface accumulation and stratification effect obviously occurred for soil available K (SAK) and non-exchangeable K (NEK), which was particularly remarkable for SAK and its fractions. Serious depletion of SAK occurred in 15-30 cm soil layer, and the SAK value was lower than the critical value of soil potassium deficiency. Meanwhile, significant differences were found between SR1 and SR2 values of SAK and its fractions, SR was obtained by values of topsoil layer (0-5 cm) divided by corresponding values of lower soil layers (5-15 cm layer, SR1, or 15-30 cm layer, SR2). However, no significant difference was observed between SR values of NEK and mineral K. In conclusion, returning of all straw over 10 years in the winter wheat/summer maize rotation system contributed greatly to maintaining soil K pool balance, while special attention should be paid to the negative effects of surface accumulation and stratification of SAK on soil K fertility.

  3. Evaluating the soil physical quality under long-term field experiments in Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellini, Mirko; Stellacci, Anna Maria; Iovino, Massimo; Rinaldi, Michele; Ventrella, Domenico

    2017-04-01

    Long-term field experiments performed in experimental farms are important research tools to assess the soil physical quality (SPQ) given that relatively stable conditions can be expected in these soils. However, different SPQ indicators may sometimes provide redundant or conflicting results, making difficult an SPQ evaluation (Castellini et al., 2014). As a consequence, it is necessary to apply appropriate statistical procedures to obtain a minimum set of key indicators. The study was carried out at the Experimental Farm of CREA-SCA (Foggia) in two long-term field experiments performed on durum wheat. The first long-term experiment is aiming at evaluating the effects of two residue management systems (burning, B or soil incorporation of crop residues, I) while the second at comparing the effect of tillage (conventional tillage, CT) and sod-seeding (direct drilling, DD). In order to take into account both optimal and non-optimal soil conditions, five SPQ indicators were monitored at 5-6 sampling dates during the crop season (i.e., between November and June): soil bulk density (BD), macroporosity (PMAC), air capacity (AC), plant available water capacity (PAWC) and relative field capacity (RFC). Two additional data sets, collected on DD plot in different cropping seasons and in Sicilian soils differing for texture, depth and land use (N=140), were also used with the aim to check the correlation among indicators. Impact of soil management was assessed by comparing SPQ evaluated under different management systems with optimal reference values reported in literature. Two techniques of multivariate analysis (principal component analysis, PCA and stepwise discriminant analysis, SDA) were applied to select the most suitable indicator to facilitate the judgment on SPQ. Regardless of the considered management system, sampling date or auxiliary data set, correlation matrices always showed significant negative relationships between RFC and AC. Decreasing RFC at increasing AC is

  4. Staff perceptions of barriers to physical restraint-reduction in long-term care: a meta-synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Eun-Hi; Choi, Heeseung; Evans, Lois K

    2017-01-01

    To critically review the existing qualitative studies to identify, from the perspective of staff, the barriers to physical restraint reduction in long-term geriatric care facilities. Despite the adverse physical and psychosocial effects, physical restraints are still used frequently in many geriatric long-term care facilities around the world. There is, however, no study that synthesises the existing qualitative literature regarding the barriers to the restraint reduction from the perspective of facility staff. The metastudy research process guided this qualitative synthesis. Five electronic databases were searched, and ten studies were included in this metastudy. Five themes were identified through metasynthesis of the findings: concern about and responsibility for safety, unclear and inconsistent definitions of restraint and restraint-free care, difficulties in the transition from acceptance to removal, noninvolvement in decision-making to remove restraint and insufficient resources and education. A concept analysis of physical restraint is sorely needed, and future studies should explore the prevalence of restraint, the effects of education for staff and family on restraint reduction, and success stories related to restraint-free care. More research is needed regarding the restraint reduction effectiveness and cost issues. Physical restraints, commonly used in many geriatric long-term care facilities, result in many negative effects and ethical issues. To achieve success in reducing physical restraint use, governmental policies and long-term care institutions should underpin staff efforts with legal, educational and practical support. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Influence of basin-scale and mesoscale physical processes on biological productivity in the Bay of Bengal during the summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, K.R.; Jasmine, P.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Revichandran, C.; DineshKumar, P.K.; Anand, P.; Rejomon, G.

    Physical forcing plays a major role in determining biological processes in the ocean across the full spectrum of spatial and temporal scales. Variability of biological production in the Bay of Bengal (BoB) based on basin-scale and mesoscale physical...

  6. Long-term insecticidal activity and physical integrity of Olyset nets in Tafea Province, Vanuatu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Shurajit N; Amon, James; Iata, Harry; Cooper, Robert D; Russell, Tanya L

    2014-01-01

    The long-term efficacy of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) depends on both the physical condition of the net and the residual activity of the insecticide. This study focused on monitoring these parameters in Olyset nets (Sumitomo Chemical Co., Osaka, Japan) (n = 101) that had been used for 1-3 yr in Tafea Province, Vanuatu. Net usage and frequency of washing was ascertained by questionnaire; the nets were assessed with regards to cleanliness and damage owing to holes. Insecticide efficacy was determined with cone bioassays using Anophelesfarauti Laveran. Net usage was high and 86.1% (87 of 101) of villages stated that they used the net every night. Washing of nets was low (11.9%, 12 of 101), and most nets (79.2%, 80 of 101) were considered dirty. Most nets were damaged (73.4% had holes), and 22.8% (23 of 101) had large holes (>200 cm2). The 24-h mortality of An. farauti exposed to nets aged 1-2 yr was 79.4%, while the mortality for nets 3 yr of age was significantly lower at 73.7%. There was no difference in the insecticidal activity of clean compared with dirty nets (mean 24-h mortality: Clean = 76.7%, Dirty = 77.1%). Although the majority of nets had holes, the physical condition of 8.9-22.8% of nets was altered so severely to potentially affect efficacy. Although the 3-yr-old nets would still be providing significant levels of insecticidal and personal protection, consideration should be given to replacing nets >3 yr old.

  7. Mental and physical performance of dementia patients in long-term residential care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Śliwiński

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dementia syndromes are an increasing medical and social problem in today’s world. Preservation of the best possible quality of life in dementia patients relies on prolonging their independence in daily life for as long as possible. Dementia patients require increasing support as the disease progresses and will ultimately become dependent on the help of others. Aim of the research: To assess the level of mental and physical performance and nutritional status in patients with dementia syndromes in long-term residential care. Material and methods : The study group comprised 62 patients with dementia syndromes resident in a Medical and Nursing Care Facility in Pustków. Selected aspects of quality of life were investigated with the Barthel scale, GDS scale according to Reissberg, Abbreviated Mental Test Score (AMTS and Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA scale. Results: In our study men performed better than women on the Barthel scale, 58% of all patients were rated moderately severe on that scale, 36% were severe and 7% were mild. Assessment of the current severity of dementia on the GDS scale showed that 28% of the patients had very severe dementia, 27% had mild deficits, 27% had moderate deficits, 11% had moderately severe dementia and 6% had borderline dementia. In a mental state assessment according to the AMTS scale, men scored higher than women. This difference indicates less memory deficit and better psychological and physical status among men. With regard to nutritional status, our study revealed a risk of malnutrition in 65% of the patient and actual malnutrition in 7%. Conclusions : The Barthel scale, rating the performance of dementia patients with regard to activities of daily life, classified more than half of the patients as „moderately severe”. Women had lower mean scores than men in the Barthel scale, AMTS scale and GDS scale, indicating that dementia is more prevalent among women than among men. The findings of the

  8. Long-term Academic and Career Impacts of Undergraduate Research: Diverse Pathways to Geoscience Careers Following a Summer Atmospheric Science Research Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, C. D.; Sample McMeeking, L. B.; Boyd, K.; Bowker, C.

    2015-12-01

    Research experiences for undergraduates (REU) have been shown to support the success of STEM undergraduates through improving their research skills, ability to synthesize knowledge, and personal and professional development, all while socializing them into the nature of science. REUs are further intended to support STEM career choice and professional advancement, and have thus played a key role in diversity efforts. Recruiting and retaining diverse students in STEM through REUs is of particular importance in the geosciences, where women and ethnic minorities continue to be significantly underrepresented. However, few studies have examined the long-term impacts of these REUs on students' academic and career trajectories. Further, those that do exist primarily study the experiences of current graduate students, scientists, and faculty members—that is, those who have already persisted—which overlooks the multiple academic and career paths REU students might follow and may preclude a thorough examination of REUs' diversity impacts. In this long-term retrospective study of the academic and career impacts of a REU program at a large Western U.S. research university, we interviewed 17 former REU participants on their expectations prior to their REU participation, their experiences during the REU, the immediate outcomes from the experience, and its long-term impacts on their academic and career choices. To address gaps in the existing literature on REU impacts, we purposively sampled students who have taken a variety of educational and career paths, including those not engaged in science research. Despite varied trajectories, the majority of the students we interviewed have persisted in the geosciences and attest to the REU's profound impact on their career-related opportunities and choices. This presentation describes students' diverse STEM pathways and discusses how students' REU expectations, experiences, and immediate outcomes continued to make an impact long-term.

  9. Leisure-time physical activity and direct cost of short-term sickness absence among Finnish municipal employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Anu; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lahti, Jouni

    2017-03-04

    We aimed to examine the direct costs of short-term (1-14 days) sickness absence and the effect of employees' physical activity on the costs. The Finnish Helsinki Health Study survey (2007) was used in the analysis (n = 3,935). Physical activity was classified into inactive, moderately active, and vigorously active. Sickness absence (3 years follow-up) and salary data were derived from the employer's registers. On average, an employee was absent 6 days a year due to short-term sickness absence, with a production loss of 2,350 EUR during the 3 years. The vigorously active had less sickness absence than those less active. The direct cost of sickness absence of a vigorously active employee was 404 EUR less than that of an inactive employee. Promoting physical activity among employees may decrease direct cost of short-term sickness absence.

  10. Soil physical and hydrological properties as affected by long-term addition of various organic amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Marie; Völkel, Jörg; Mercier, Vincent; Labat, Christophe; Houot, Sabine

    2014-05-01

    The use of organic residues as soil amendments in agriculture not only reduces the amount of waste needing to be disposed of; it may also lead to improvements in soil properties, including physical and hydrological ones. The present study examines a long-term experiment called "Qualiagro", run jointly by INRA and Veolia Environment in Feucherolles, France (near Paris). It was initiated in 1998 on a loess-derived silt loam (787 g/kg silt, 152 g/kg clay) and includes ten treatments: four types of organic amendments and a control (CNT) each at two levels of mineral nitrogen (N) addition: minimal (Nmin) and optimal (Nopt). The amendments include three types of compost and farmyard manure (FYM), which were applied every other year at a rate of ca. 4 t carbon ha-1. The composts include municipal solid waste compost (MSW), co-compost of green wastes and sewage sludge (GWS), and biowaste compost (BIO). The plots are arranged in a randomized block design and have a size of 450 m²; each treatment is replicated four times (total of 40 plots). Ca. 15 years after the start of the experiment soil organic carbon (OC) had continuously increased in the amended plots, while it remained stable or decreased in the control plots. This compost- or manure-induced increase in OC plays a key role, affecting numerous dependant soil properties like bulk density, porosity and water retention. The water holding capacity (WHC) of a soil is of particular interest to farmers in terms of water supply for plants, but also indicates soil quality and functionality. Addition of OC may affect WHC in different ways: carbon-induced aggregation may increase larger-pore volume and hence WHC at the wet end while increased surface areas may lead to an increased retention of water at the dry end. Consequently it is difficult to predict (e.g. with pedotransfer functions) the impact on the amount of water available for plants (PAW), which was experimentally determined for the soils, along with the entire range

  11. Effect of Short-Term Swiss Ball Training on Physical Fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KULROOP KAUR BADWAL

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of short-term Swiss ball training on aerobic capacity, body composition and upper body strength & endurance. For the purpose of the present study, twenty four (N = 24 male subjects between the age group of 18-27 years (Mean 6 SD: age 23.29 6 2.15 years, height 1.62 6 0.021 m, body mass 56.75 6 4.24 kg were selected as subjects. The subjects were purposively assigned into two groups: Group-A: Experimental (N1 = 12 and Group-B: Control (N2 = 12. The subjects from Group-A were subjected to 4-week of Swiss ball training. The training consisted of a variety of exercises (i.e., Pelvic Tilt, Abdominal Crunch, Supine Bridge and Roll, Squat. It is concluded that the aerobic capacity, body composition and upper body strength and endurance significantly improved in experimental group compared with the control one. Student's t-test for independent data was used to assess the between-group differences and for dependent data to assess the Post-Pre differences. In all the analyses, the 5% critical level (p < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. The Swiss ball exercises training may be recommended to improve aerobic capacity, body composition and upper body strength and endurance to enhance physical fitness based performance.

  12. Changes in physical properties of sandy soil after long-term compost treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranyos, József Tibor; Tomócsik, Attila; Makádi, Marianna; Mészáros, József; Blaskó, Lajos

    2016-07-01

    Studying the long-term effect of composted sewage sludge application on chemical, physical and biological properties of soil, an experiment was established in 2003 at the Research Institute of Nyíregyháza in Hungary. The applied compost was prepared from sewage sludge (40%), straw (25%), bentonite (5%) and rhyolite (30%). The compost was ploughed into the 0-25 cm soil layer every 3rd year in the following amounts: 0, 9, 18 and 27 Mg ha-1 of dry matter. As expected, the compost application improved the structure of sandy soil, which is related with an increase in the organic matter content of soil. The infiltration into soil was improved significantly, reducing the water erosion under simulated high intensity rainfall. The soil compaction level was reduced in the first year after compost re-treatment. In accordance with the decrease in bulk density, the air permeability of soil increased tendentially. However, in the second year the positive effects of compost application were observed only in the plots treated with the highest compost dose because of quick degradation of the organic matter. According to the results, the sewage sludge compost seems to be an effective soil improving material for acidic sandy soils, but the beneficial effect of application lasts only for two years.

  13. Development of a Physical Environmental Observational Tool for Dining Environments in Long-Term Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Habib; Keller, Heather; Pfisterer, Kaylen; Hung, Lillian

    2017-02-20

    This paper presents the first standardized physical environmental assessment tool titled Dining Environment Audit Protocol (DEAP) specifically designed for dining spaces in care homes and reports the results of its psychometric properties. Items rated include: adequacy of lighting, glare, personal control, clutter, staff supervision support, restraint use, and seating arrangement option for social interaction. Two scales summarize the prior items and rate the overall homelikeness and functionality of the space. Ten dining rooms in three long-term care homes were selected for assessment. Data were collected over 11 days across 5 weeks. Two trained assessors completed DEAP independently on the same day. Interrater-reliability was completed for lighting, glare, space, homelike aspects, seating arrangements and the two summary scales, homelikeness and functionality of the space. For categorical measures, measure responses were dichotomized at logical points and Cohen's Kappa and concordance on ratings were determined. The two overall rating scales on homelikeness and functionality of space were found to be reliable intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (~0.7). The mean rating for homelikeness for Assessor 1 was 3.5 (SD 1.35) and for functionality of the room was 5.3. (SD 0.82; median 5.5). The findings indicate that the tool's interrater-reliability scores are promising. The high concordance on the overall scores for homelikeness and functionality is indicative of the strength of the individual items in generating a reliable global assessment score on these two important aspects of the dining space.

  14. EXAMINATION OF THE LEVELS OF BURNOUT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHERS IN TERMS OF MOBBING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FİLİZ FATMA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the levels of occupational burnout of physical education (PE teachers in terms of the mobbing variable. The research population is composed of 275 PE teachers working in the secondary and high schools affiliated to the Ministry of National Education in Ordu province (centrum and the relevant districts in the 2012-2013 school year. And a total of 163 PE teachers working in Ordu province (centrum and the relevant districts that have been selected by random sampling method constitute the research sample. Personal Information Form and Maslach Burnout Inventory-Educators Survey Form (MBI-ES were used as data collection tools. Also Kruskal Wallis test was used for comparing three or more groups and Mann Whitney U test was used to determine between which groups the significant differences were found in Kruskal Wallis test. Considering the research findings, it was determined that “personal accomplishment” and “emotional exhaustion” are not affected by PE teachers’ exposure to mobbing; while “depersonalization” level was found high.

  15. Postdivorce living arrangements, parent conflict, and long-term physical health correlates for children of divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabricius, William V; Luecken, Linda J

    2007-06-01

    The authors tested a biopsychosocial model in which young adults' long-term relationships with fathers and ongoing distress surrounding their parents' divorces mediated the relationship between disrupted parenting (i.e., exposure to parent conflict before the divorce and up to 5 years after, and amount of time with father postdivorce) and indicators of their physical health. University students whose parents divorced before they were 16 (n = 266) participated. Findings supported the model. The more time children lived with their fathers after divorce, the better their current relationships were with their fathers, independent of parent conflict. The more parent conflict they experienced, the worse their relationships were with their fathers and the more distress they currently felt about their parents' divorce, independent of time with father. Poor father-child relationships and more distress in turn predicted poorer health status. There was no interaction between exposure to parent conflict and time with father; thus, more time with father was beneficial in both high- and low-conflict families, and more exposure to parent conflict was detrimental at both high and low levels of time with father.

  16. Prevalence of physical and verbal aggressive behaviours and associated factors among older adults in long-term care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desrosiers Johanne

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Verbal and physical aggressive behaviours are among the most disturbing and distressing behaviours displayed by older patients in long-term care facilities. Aggressive behaviour (AB is often the reason for using physical or chemical restraints with nursing home residents and is a major concern for caregivers. AB is associated with increased health care costs due to staff turnover and absenteeism. Methods The goals of this secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study are to determine the prevalence of verbal and physical aggressive behaviours and to identify associated factors among older adults in long-term care facilities in the Quebec City area (n = 2 332. Results The same percentage of older adults displayed physical aggressive behaviour (21.2% or verbal aggressive behaviour (21.5%, whereas 11.2% displayed both types of aggressive behaviour. Factors associated with aggressive behaviour (both verbal and physical were male gender, neuroleptic drug use, mild and severe cognitive impairment, insomnia, psychological distress, and physical restraints. Factors associated with physical aggressive behaviour were older age, male gender, neuroleptic drug use, mild or severe cognitive impairment, insomnia and psychological distress. Finally, factors associated with verbal aggressive behaviour were benzodiazepine and neuroleptic drug use, functional dependency, mild or severe cognitive impairment and insomnia. Conclusion Cognitive impairment severity is the most significant predisposing factor for aggressive behaviour among older adults in long-term care facilities in the Quebec City area. Physical and chemical restraints were also significantly associated with AB. Based on these results, we suggest that caregivers should provide care to older adults with AB using approaches such as the progressively lowered stress threshold model and reactance theory which stress the importance of paying attention to the severity of cognitive

  17. Glossary of Terms Related to Healthy Eating, Obesity, Physical Activity, and Weight Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and turbinado sugar. Adipose tissue (add-ih-POSE) Fat tissue in the body. Aerobic physical activity Aerobic (or endurance) physical activities use large muscle groups (back, chest, and legs) to increase heart rate and breathing for an extended period ...

  18. Short-term changes in particulate fluxes measured by drifting sediment traps during end summer oligotrophic regime in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Marty

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Short-term changes in the flux of particulate matter were determined in the central north western Mediterranean Sea (near DYFAMED site using drifting sediment traps at 200 m depth in the course of the DYNAPROC 2 cruise (14 September–17 October 2004. In this period of marked water column stratification, POC fluxes varied by an order of magnitude, in the range of 0.03–0.29 mgC m−2 h−1 over the month and showed very rapid and high variations. Particulate carbon export represented less than 5% of integrated primary production, suggesting that phytoplankton production was essentially sustained by internal recycling of organic matter and retained within the photic zone. While PON and POP fluxes paralleled one another, the elemental ratios POC/PON and POC/POP, varied widely over short-term periods. Values of these ratios generally higher than the conventional Redfield ratio, together with the very low chlorophyll a flux recorded in the traps (mean 0.017 μg m−2 h−1, and the high phaeopigment and acyl lipid hydrolysis metabolite concentrations of the settling material, indicated that the organic matter reaching 200 m depth was reworked (by grazing, fecal pellets production, degradation and that algal sinking, dominated by nano- and picoplankton, made a small contribution to the downward flux. Over time, the relative abundance of individual lipid classes in organic matter (OM changed from glycolipids-dominated to neutral (wax esters, triacylglycerols and phospholipids-dominated, suggesting ecosystem maturation as well as rapid and continual exchanges between dissolved, suspended and sinking pools. Our most striking result was documenting the rapid change in fluxes of the various measured parameters. In the situation encountered here, with dominant regenerated production, a decrease of fluxes was noticed during windy periods (possibly through reduction of grazing. But fluxes increased as soon as calm

  19. Long-Term effect of smartphone-delivered Interval Walking Training on physical activity in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentiner, Laura Staun; Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Karstoft, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    exercise training supported by mobile technology and remote feedback is potentially an effective strategy. The objective of the trial is to investigate whether mobile health support using the InterWalk application for smartphones is effective in increasing physical activity levels in persons with T2D over...... time compared with standard care. We investigate whether Interval Walking Training using the InterWalk application is superior to Danish municipality-based rehabilitation in increasing moderate-And-vigorous physical activity levels in patients with T2D across 52â €..weeks. Secondary, we hypothesise......Introduction Physical activity is a cornerstone in type 2 diabetes (T2D) rehabilitation. Effective long-Term and low-cost strategies to keep these patients' physically active are needed. However, maintaining physical activity behaviour is difficult once formalised interventions end. Structured...

  20. The optical and physical properties of atmospheric aerosols over the Indian Antarctic stations during southern hemispheric summer of the International Polar Year 2007-2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaubey, Jai Prakash; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Babu, S. Suresh; Nair, Vijayakumar S. [Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram (India). Space Physics Lab.

    2011-07-01

    The properties of background aerosols and their dependence on meteorological, geographical and human influence are examined using measured spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), total mass concentration (MT) and derived number size distribution (NSD) over two distinct coastal locations of Antarctica; Maitri (70 S, 12 E, 123 m m.s.l.) and Larsemann Hills (LH; 69 S, 77 E, 48 m m.s.l.) during southern hemispheric summer of 2007-2008 as a part of the 27th Indian Scientific Expedition to Antarctica (ISEA) during International Polar Year (IPY). Our investigations showed comparable values for the mean columnar AOD at 500 nm over Maitri (0.034{+-}0.005) and LH (0.032{+-}0.006) indicating good spatial homogeneity in the columnar aerosol properties over the coastal Antarctica. Estimation of Angstrom exponent {alpha} showed accumulation mode dominance at Maitri ({alpha}{proportional_to}1.2{+-}0.3) and coarse mode dominance at LH (0.7{+-}0.2). On the other hand, mass concentration (MT) of ambient aerosols showed relatively high values ({approx}8.25{+-}2.87 {mu}g m{sup -3}) at Maitri in comparison to LH (6.03{+-}1.33 {mu}g m{sup -3}). (orig.)

  1. The optical and physical properties of atmospheric aerosols over the Indian Antarctic stations during southern hemispheric summer of the International Polar Year 2007–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Prakash Chaubey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of background aerosols and their dependence on meteorological, geographical and human influence are examined using measured spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD, total mass concentration (MT and derived number size distribution (NSD over two distinct coastal locations of Antarctica; Maitri (70° S, 12° E, 123 m m.s.l. and Larsemann Hills (LH; 69° S, 77° E, 48 m m.s.l. during southern hemispheric summer of 2007–2008 as a part of the 27th Indian Scientific Expedition to Antarctica (ISEA during International Polar Year (IPY. Our investigations showed comparable values for the mean columnar AOD at 500 nm over Maitri (0.034±0.005 and LH (0.032±0.006 indicating good spatial homogeneity in the columnar aerosol properties over the coastal Antarctica. Estimation of Angstrom exponent α showed accumulation mode dominance at Maitri (α~1.2±0.3 and coarse mode dominance at LH (0.7±0.2. On the other hand, mass concentration (MT of ambient aerosols showed relatively high values (≈8.25±2.87 μg m−3 at Maitri in comparison to LH (6.03±1.33 μg m−3.

  2. Long-Term Physical Stability of PVP- and PVPVA-Amorphous Solid Dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmkemper, Kristin; Kyeremateng, Samuel O; Heinzerling, Oliver; Degenhardt, Matthias; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2017-01-03

    The preparation of amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) formulations is a promising strategy to improve the bioavailability of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). By dissolving the API in a polymer it is stabilized in its amorphous form, which usually shows higher water solubility than its crystalline counterpart. To prevent recrystallization, the long-term physical stability of ASD formulations is of big interest. In this work, the solubility of the APIs acetaminophen and naproxen in the excipient polymers poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP K25) and poly(vinylpyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate) (PVPVA64) was calculated with three models: the Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT), the Flory-Huggins model (FH), and an empirical model (Kyeremateng et al., J. Pharm. Sci, 2014, 103, 2847-2858). PC-SAFT and FH were further used to predict the influence of relative humidity (RH) on the API solubility in the polymers. The Gordon-Taylor equation was applied to model the glass-transition temperature of dry ASD and at humid conditions. The calculations were validated by 18 months-long stability studies at standardized storage conditions, 25 °C/0% RH, 25 °C/60% RH, and 40 °C/75% RH. The results of the three modeling approaches for the API solubility in polymers agreed with the experimental solubility data, which are only accessible at high temperatures in dry polymers. However, at room temperature FH resulted in a lower solubility of the APIs in the dry polymers than PC-SAFT and the empirical model. The impact of RH on the solubility of acetaminophen was predicted to be small, but naproxen solubility in the polymers was predicted to decrease with increasing RH with both, PC-SAFT and FH. At 25 °C/60% RH and 40 °C/75% RH, PC-SAFT is in agreement with all results of the long-term stability studies, while FH underestimates the acetaminophen solubility in PVP K25 and PVPVA64.

  3. 优秀女排运动员夏训前后身体机能生化指标分析%Biochemical Analysis for Women Volleyball Players’ Physical Condition before and after Summer Training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李岩龙

    2016-01-01

    the method what we used is experimentation, biochemical indexes fromthe five elite women table tennis playersbefore and after the summe training were measuredr, and then a case analysis of individual athletes was made to, improve the accuracy of experiment. Result:after the main cycle of summer training, the value of WBC, RBC, hemoglobin, urea nitrogn, cortisol, testosterone, T\\C and other tested items changed but not significantly (P>0.05). Objective: to access their physical condition and evaluate the function of exercise training and to identify the variation by doing biochemical analysis for excellent women table tennis players in shandong province during their summer training.%本文主要采用实验法,对五名优秀女子排球运动员夏训前后进行生化指标检测,然后再对个别运动员进行个案分析,增加实验的准确性。目的是对我省优秀女子排球运动员夏训周期进行生化指标测定,旨在评定身体机能和评价运动训练的效果,了解女子运动员夏训周期机能变化的规律。

  4. Short term changes in zooplankton community during the summer-autumn transition in the open NW Mediterranean Sea: species composition, abundance and diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Raybaud

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Short term changes in zooplankton community were investigated at a fixed station in offshore waters of the Ligurian Sea (Dynaproc 2 cruise, September–October 2004. Mesozooplankton was sampled with vertical WP2 hauls (200 µm mesh-size and large mesozooplankton, macrozooplankton and micronekton with a BIONESS multinet sampler (500 µm mesh-size. Temporal variations of total biomass, species composition and abundance of major taxa were studied. Intrusions of low salinity water masses were observed two times during the cruise. The first one, which was the most important, was associated with changes in zooplankton community composition. Among copepods, the abundance of Calocalanus, Euchaeta, Heterorhabdus, Mesocalanus, Nannocalanus, Neocalanus, Pleuromamma and also calanoid copepodites increased markedly. Among non-copepod taxa, only small ostracods abundance increased. After this low salinity event, abundance of all taxa nearly returned to their initial values. The influence of salinity on each zooplankton taxon was confirmed by a statistical analysis (Perry's method. Shannon diversity index, Pielou evenness and species richness were used to describe temporal variations of large copepod (>500 µm diversity. Shannon index and Pielou evenness decreased at the beginning of the low salinity water intrusions, but not species richness. We suggest that low salinity water masses contained its own zooplankton community and passed through the sampling area, thus causing the replacement of zooplankton population.

  5. Long-Term Low Intensity Physical Exercise Attenuates Heart Failure Development in Aging Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana U. Pagan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical exercise is a strategy to control hypertension and attenuate pressure overload-induced cardiac remodeling. The influence of exercise on cardiac remodeling during uncontrolled hypertension is not established. We evaluated the effects of a long-term low intensity aerobic exercise protocol on heart failure (HF development and cardiac remodeling in aging spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. Methods: Sixteen month old SHR (n=50 and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY, n=35 rats were divided into sedentary (SED and exercised (EX groups. Rats exercised in treadmill at 12 m/min, 30 min/day, 5 days/week, for four months. The frequency of HF features was evaluated at euthanasia. Statistical analyses: ANOVA and Tukey or Mann-Whitney, and Goodman test. Results: Despite slightly higher systolic blood pressure, SHR-EX had better functional capacity and lower HF frequency than SHR-SED. Echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging showed no differences between SHR groups. In SHR-EX, however, left ventricular (LV systolic diameter, larger in SHR-SED than WKY-SED, and endocardial fractional shortening, lower in SHR-SED than WKY-SED, had values between those in WKY-EX and SHR-SED not differing from either group. Myocardial function, assessed in LV papillary muscles, showed improvement in SHR-EX over SHR-SED and WKY-EX. LV myocardial collagen fraction and type I and III collagen gene expression were increased in SHR groups. Myocardial hydroxyproline concentration was lower in SHR-EX than SHR-SED. Lysyl oxidase gene expression was higher in SHR-SED than WKY-SED. Conclusion: Exercise improves functional capacity and reduces decompensated HF in aging SHR independent of elevated arterial pressure. Improvement in functional status is combined with attenuation of LV and myocardial dysfunction and fibrosis.

  6. PR[superscript 2]EPS: Preparation, Recruitment, Retention and Excellence in the Physical Sciences, Including Engineering. A Report on the 2004, 2005 and 2006 Science Summer Camps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Nancy J.; Bischoff, Paul J.; Gallagher, Hugh; Labroo, Sunil; Schaumloffel, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Now in its fourth year, PR[superscript 2]EPS is a National Science Foundation funded initiative designed to recruit high school students to attend college majoring in the physical sciences, including engineering and secondary science education, and to help ensure their retention within the program until graduation. A central feature of the…

  7. Long-term measurements of particle number size distributions and the relationships with air mass history and source apportionment in the summer of Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. B.; Hu, M.; Wu, Z. J.; Yue, D. L.; He, L. Y.; Huang, X. F.; Liu, X. G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2013-10-01

    A series of long-term and temporary measurements were conducted to study the improvement of air quality in Beijing during the Olympic Games period (8-24 August 2008). To evaluate actions taken to improve the air quality, comparisons of particle number and volume size distributions of August 2008 and 2004-2007 were performed. The total particle number and volume concentrations were 14 000 cm-3 and 37 μm-3 cm-3 in August of 2008, respectively. These were reductions of 41% and 35% compared with mean values of August 2004-2007. A cluster analysis on air mass history and source apportionment were performed, exploring reasons for the reduction of particle concentrations. Back trajectories were classified into five major clusters. Air masses from the south direction are always associated with pollution events during the summertime in Beijing. In August 2008, the frequency of air mass arriving from the south was 1.3 times higher compared to the average of the previous years, which however did not result in elevated particle volume concentrations in Beijing. Therefore, the reduced particle number and volume concentrations during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games cannot be only explained by meteorological conditions. Four factors were found influencing particle concentrations using a positive matrix factorization (PMF) model. They were identified as local and remote traffic emissions, combustion sources as well as secondary transformation. The reductions of the four sources were calculated to 47%, 44%, 43% and 30%, respectively. The significant reductions of particle number and volume concentrations may attribute to actions taken, focusing on primary emissions, especially related to the traffic and combustion sources.

  8. Generalised additive models to investigate environmental drivers of Antarctic minke whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) spatial density in austral summer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekmans, Bas W.P.M.; Forcada, Jaume; Murphy, Eugene J.; Baar, de Hein J.W.; Bathmann, Ulrich V.; Fleming, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    There is a need to characterise the physical environment associated with Antarctic minke whale density in order to understand long-term changes in minke whale distribution and density in open waters of the Southern Ocean during austral summer months. To investigate environmental drivers of Antarctic

  9. Generalised additive models to investigate environmental drivers of Antarctic minke whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) spatial density in austral summer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekmans, Bas W.P.M.; Forcada, Jaume; Murphy, Eugene J.; Baar, de Hein J.W.; Bathmann, Ulrich V.; Fleming, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    There is a need to characterise the physical environment associated with Antarctic minke whale density in order to understand long-term changes in minke whale distribution and density in open waters of the Southern Ocean during austral summer months. To investigate environmental drivers of Antarctic

  10. Behavior Change Strategies for Successful Long-Term Weight Loss: Focusing on Dietary and Physical Activity Adherence, Not Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongu, Nobuko; Kataura, Martha P.; Block, Linda M.

    2011-01-01

    This article helps Extension professionals guide individuals in a successful long-term weight loss program. A program should focus on behavioral changes (improving eating habits and physical activity), not just weight loss. In order to do this, Extension professionals should implement behavior change strategies that motivate individuals to…

  11. Behavior Change Strategies for Successful Long-Term Weight Loss: Focusing on Dietary and Physical Activity Adherence, Not Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongu, Nobuko; Kataura, Martha P.; Block, Linda M.

    2011-01-01

    This article helps Extension professionals guide individuals in a successful long-term weight loss program. A program should focus on behavioral changes (improving eating habits and physical activity), not just weight loss. In order to do this, Extension professionals should implement behavior change strategies that motivate individuals to…

  12. A Model for the Development of Virtual Communities for People with Long-Term, Severe Physical Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, C. M.; Bruce, C. S.; Hallam, G.; Hills, A. P.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports results of an investigation into the needs of persons with disabilities wanting to participate in the use of virtual communities. The aim was to investigate "how virtual communities for persons with long-term, severe physical disabilities can best be facilitated"? Method: A Grounded Theory approach was…

  13. The Entrance test of physics and Workbook in teaching of physics at secondary vocational school within long-term pedagogical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlínová, Věra

    2017-01-01

    Within the long-term pedagogical research ongoing since the school year 2008/2009 to 2015/2016 at the secondary vocational school in Bohumín was through of Entrance test of physics, which included curriculum of the sixth to ninth year of elementary school, regularly finding out, in which parts of Entrance test - Unit conversions, International System of Units, Properties of matter, Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Electricity and Magnetism, Optics, Atoms and Universe - pupils of the 1st years of secondary vocational school, technical and non-technical, reach a higher number of correct answers, in which dominates the wrong answers and which parts of the test pupils are better left out completely. It turned out that the results of these tests are very informative not only for theoretical and practical teaching, but also technical and other science subjects. The results of the Entrance tests are also a valuable source of information for continuous innovation Workbook of Physics - Mechanics for the 1st year of secondary vocational schools [1] - whose the first version began during the school year 2007/2008 and which was tested within pre-research in school years 2008/2009, 2009/2010 and within research in school year 2010/2011. On the basis of feedbacks getting from research the Workbook is regularly expanded, innovated and updated. The Workbook consists of parts dedicated to physical concepts, physical tasks, proposals to physical experiments, pupils comments from viewed video projection and documentary films, examples from the world of science and technology, examples from practice and real life, physical terminology in English, quizzes, competitions, interesting things and links related to discussed curriculum. The Workbook is divided into thematic sections, chapters and subchapters similar as physics textbooks for pupils of the 1st years of Secondary Schools in the Czech Republic. In the Workbook there are included tasks on fill in the words, polynomial tasks with

  14. Long-Term Maintenance of Physical Function in Older Adults Following a DVD-Delivered Exercise Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sarah; Awick, Elizabeth; Fanning, Jason T; Ehlers, Diane; Motl, Robert W; McAuley, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Previous evidence suggests physical activity interventions effectively produce short-term improvements in physical function for older adults. The present study examined whether improvements in physical function after a DVD-delivered exercise intervention were maintained 18 months postintervention. Older adults (n = 153) randomized to a 6-month DVD-delivered exercise intervention or an attentional control condition were contacted 18 months postintervention. Participants completed the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and measures of flexibility, strength, and functional limitations were taken. Analyses of variance were conducted to determine if improvements in physical function as a result of the intervention were maintained at follow-up. Improvements in the SPPB, F (1,125) = 3.70, p = .06, η(2) = .03, and upper body strength, F (1,121) = 3.04, p = .08, η(2) = .03 were maintained for the intervention condition. Home-based DVD exercise training interventions may hold promise for long-term maintenance of physical function in older adults.

  15. Physical work environment risk factors for long term sickness absence: prospective findings among a cohort of 5357 employees in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Thomas; Labriola, Merete; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2006-01-01

    of onset of long term sickness absence was increased by extreme bending or twisting of the neck or back, working mainly standing or squatting, lifting or carrying loads, and pushing or pulling loads. Significant interactions were found for three combinations of physical and psychosocial work environment...... risk factors among female employees (Ppushing or pulling loads increased the risk of onset of long term sickness absence. The study shows a potential for reducing long term sickness absence through modifying work...... of long term sickness absence, defined as receiving sickness absence compensation for eight consecutive weeks or more. RESULTS: 348 participants (6.9%) developed long term sickness absence during follow-up. Of these, 194 (55.7%) were women and 154 (44.3%) were men. For both female and male employees, risk...

  16. Columnar Aerosol Optical Properties during "El Arenosillo 2004 Summer Campaign"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prats, N.; Cachorro, V. E.; Sorribas, M.; Mogo, S.; Berjon, A.; Toledano, C.; de Frutos, A. M.; de la Rosa, J.; Laulainen, Nels S.; de la Morena, B. A.

    2008-04-14

    A detailed analysis of the microphysical and radiative columnar aerosol parameters has been carried out for data collected during the “El Arenosillo 2004” summer campaign. These data are derived from a Cimel sun-photometer, as part of the PHOTONS-AERONET network at the El Arenosillo site in south-western Spain, over the period 1 June to 31 October 2004. The aim of this campaign was to obtain a more complete set of data on aerosol microphysical, optical/radiative, and chemical properties for use in closure studies. Previous papers addressed the climatology of the AOD-alpha parameters at this site. In this paper, we focus on the characterization of the particle size distribution and associated microphysical parameters, such as volume concentration, effective radius, etc., in order to define the features and ranges of these physical parameters associated with both fine and coarse particle modes. The requirement of high AOD values for using the optical inversion technique puts significant constraints on the estimation of these parameters and, thus, necessitates great care in the analysis. As a result, only the characterizations for desert dust events are considered reliable. Moreover, summer 2004 had the most frequent desert dust intrusions, including the most intense event, ever recorded at the El Arensillo site. We summarize the results for the intensive summer campaign in terms of the range of values of the physical and optical parameters of the mixed aerosol types present in this area of Spain.

  17. Thinking in Terms of Sensors: Personification of Self as an Object in Physics Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor-Morris, A. E.

    2015-01-01

    How can physics teachers help students develop consistent problem solving techniques for both simple and complicated physics problems, such as those that encompass objects undergoing multiple forces (mechanical or electrical) as individually portrayed in free-body diagrams and/or phenomenon involving multiple objects, such as Doppler effect…

  18. Daily life physical activity in long-term survivors of nephroblastoma and neuroblastoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waas, M. van; Wijnen, M.H.; Hartman, A.; Vries, A.C. de; Pieters, R.; Neggers, S.J.; Heuvel-Eibrink, M.M. van den

    2013-01-01

    The risk of metabolic late effects after childhood cancer, such as obesity, hypertension, and diabetes, can be positively influenced by a healthy lifestyle with sufficient physical activity. Nevertheless, studies on physical activity in adult survivors of childhood cancer are scarce and involve

  19. Long term effects of an innovative physics teacher education program in the Philippines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den Ed

    2012-01-01

    In 1996 innovative, double major teacher education programs for Physics & Mathematics and Physics & Chemistry were initiated at the University of San Carlos in Cebu, Philippines. Both programs require 4 years of study. From the outset the focus was on making a difference in the quality of Science an

  20. Changes in Short-Term Attitudes Toward Physical Activity and Exercise of University Personal Wellness Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Mick G.; Shaddox, Lea Ann

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the attitudes toward physical activity and exercise of university students enrolled in Personal Wellness classes. 1,625 undergraduate students completed the Attitudes Toward Exercise and Physical Activity (ATEPA) inventory on the first and last day of the class. Paired-samples t test results comparing the mean pretest ATEPA…

  1. Barriers to Physical Activity for People with Long-Term Neurological Conditions: A Review Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Hilda F.; Hale, Leigh A.; Whitehead, Lisa; Baxter, G. David

    2012-01-01

    People with disability are insufficiently physically active for health. This study identified the volume, quality, and findings of research that exposes environmental and personal barriers of physical activity participation for people with neurological conditions. CINAHL, Sport Discus, EMBASE, Medline, and AMED were systematically searched between…

  2. School Construction Summer Slam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    Every school has a list of renovations, upgrades and repairs that need attention, but many are too distracting and disruptive to carry out during the school year. Often, the best time to address these nagging construction projects is during the summer when students are on break and the campus is quieter. Although these "summer slammers" often are…

  3. Under Summer Skies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texley, Juliana

    2009-01-01

    There's no better way to celebrate 2009, the International Year of Astronomy, than by curling up with a good book under summer skies. To every civilization, in every age, the skies inspired imagination and scientific inquiry. There's no better place to start your summer reading than under their influence. Here are a few selections identified by…

  4. The Proceedings of the 28th SLAC Summer Institute on Particle Physics: Neutrinos From The Lab, The Sun, And The Cosmos (SSI 2000)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaros, J

    2004-05-17

    Interest in cosmic sources of high energy neutrinos dates back to the late 1950's. This paper outlines the interdisciplinary scientific agenda, which span the fields of astronomy, particle physics, and cosmic ray physics. While the general detection principles based on optical Cherenkov radiation have been understood for many years, the unusual geographic locations of suitable detector sites have challenged the ingenuity of experimentalists. Two high energy neutrino programs are now operating (NT200 in Lake Baikal and the AMANDA detector), with the expectation of ushering in the era of multi-messenger astronomy. Two Mediterranean-based programs have made impressive progress. These detectors are optimized to detect neutrinos with energies of the order of 1-10 TeV, although they are capable of detecting neutrinos over a much broader range of energies. For E{sub {nu}} > 10{sup 15} eV, several new ideas are being exploited to expand the effective volume of the detector. These techniques are based on the detection of neutrino-initiated cascades. We describe the ongoing worldwide efforts to develop expandable techniques and offer an assessment of their relative capabilities.

  5. A long-term intensive lifestyle intervention and physical function: the look AHEAD Movement and Memory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Denise K; Leng, Xiaoyan; Bray, George A; Hergenroeder, Andrea L; Hill, James O; Jakicic, John M; Johnson, Karen C; Neiberg, Rebecca H; Marsh, Anthony P; Rejeski, W Jack; Kritchevsky, Stephen B

    2015-01-01

    To assess the long-term effects of an intensive lifestyle intervention on physical function using a randomized post-test design in the Look AHEAD trial. Overweight and obese (BMI ≥ 25 kg m(-2)) middle-aged and older adults (aged 45-76 years at enrollment) with type 2 diabetes (n = 964) at four clinics in Look AHEAD, a trial evaluating an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) designed to achieve weight loss through caloric restriction and increased physical activity compared to diabetes support and education (DSE), underwent standardized assessments of performance-based physical function including an expanded short physical performance battery (SPPBexp ), 20-m and 400-m walk, and grip and knee extensor strength 8 years post-randomization, during the trial's weight maintenance phase. Eight years post-randomization, individuals randomized to ILI had better SPPBexp scores [adjusted mean (SE) difference: 0.055 (0.022), P = 0.01] and faster 20-m and 400-m walk speeds [0.032 (0.012) m s(-1) , P = 0.01, and 0.025 (0.011) m s(-1) , P = 0.02, respectively] compared to those randomized to DSE. Achieved weight loss greatly attenuated the group differences in physical function, and the intervention effect was no longer significant. An intensive lifestyle intervention has long-term benefits for mobility function in overweight and obese middle-aged and older individuals with type 2 diabetes. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  6. Using silver yoga exercises to promote physical and mental health of elders with dementia in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jue-Ting; Chen, Kuei-Min

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to test the effects of yoga exercises on the physical and mental health of elderly people with dementia living in long-term care facilities. A quasi-experimental, pretest-post-test design was used. A convenience sample of 68 residents in long-term care facilities in southern Taiwan, aged 60 years and above with mild to moderate dementia, was selected. An experimental group of 33 elders participated in a 12-week yoga training program of three 55-minute sessions a week; a control group of 35 elders maintained their usual daily activities. Data were collected before and after completing the 12-week study. Measurements included body composition, cardiopulmonary functions, body flexibility, muscle strength and endurance, balance, joints motion, depression, and problem behaviors. The yoga-trained participants had better physical and mental health than those who did not participate, including lowered blood pressure, reduced respiration rate, strengthened cardiopulmonary fitness, enhanced body flexibility, improved muscle strength and endurance, improved balance, and increased joints motion (all p values Yoga exercise has positive benefits for both the physical and mental health of elders with dementia living in long-term care facilities. It is recommended that yoga be included as one of the routine activities in these long-term care facilities.

  7. Glossary of Terms Related to Healthy Eating, Obesity, Physical Activity, and Weight Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or endurance) physical activities use large muscle groups (back, chest, and legs) to increase heart rate and breathing for an extended period of time. Examples include bicycling, brisk walking, running, and swimming. Federal guidelines recommend that adults get 150 to ...

  8. Long terms trends of multimorbidity and association with physical activity in older English population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhalwani, Nafeesa N; O'Donovan, Gary; Zaccardi, Francesco; Hamer, Mark; Yates, Thomas; Davies, Melanie; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2016-01-19

    Multimorbidity has become one of the main challenges in the recent years for patients, health care providers and the health care systems globally. However, literature describing the burden of multimorbidity in the elderly population, especially longitudinal trends is very limited. Physical activity is recommended as one of the main lifestyle changes in the prevention and management of multiple chronic diseases worldwide; however, the evidence on its association with multimorbidity remains inconclusive. Therefore, we aimed to assess the longitudinal trends of multimorbidity and the association between multimorbidity and physical activity in a nationally representative cohort of the English population aged ≥50 years between 2002 and 2013. We used data on 15,688 core participants from six waves of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, with complete information on physical activity. Self-reported physical activity was categorised as inactive, mild, moderate and vigorous levels of physical activity. We calculated the number of morbidities and the prevalence of multimorbidity (more than 2 chronic conditions) between 2002 and 2013 overall and by levels of self-reported physical activity. We estimated the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for multimorbidity by each category of physical activity, adjusting for potential confounders. There was a progressive decrease over time in the proportion of participants without any chronic conditions (33.9% in 2002/2003 vs. 26.8% in 2012/2013). In contrast, the prevalence of multimorbidity steadily increased over time (31.7% in 2002/2003 vs. 43.1% in 2012/2013). Compared to the physically inactive group, the OR for multimorbidity was 0.84 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.91) in mild, 0.61 (95% CI 0.56 to 0.66) in moderate and 0.45 (95% CI 0.41 to 0.49) in the vigorous physical activity group. This study demonstrated an inverse dose-response association between levels of physical activity and multimorbidity, however, given the

  9. Shorth-Term Impacts of Weed Cutting on the Physical Habitats in Lowland Rivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Lauge; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette; Rørth, Frederikke Rahbek;

    2011-01-01

    We studied the effects of weed cutting at 3 reaches in two Danish lowland rivers with the objectives of examining the response to cutting in rivers with contrasting physical conditions, macrophyte diversity, and assemblage patterns. Physical characteristics and abundance of macrophyte species wer......, as well as assemblage pattern. The analysis indicated that diverse macrophyte communities with several growth morphologies enhance the spatial variability in substratum characteristics compared to reaches with a less diverse and more homogeneous distribution of species....

  10. Educational intervention on physical restraint use in long-term care facilities - Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shao-Huan; Lu, Li-Chin; Lan, Shou-Jen; Chen, Jong-Chen; Wu, Wen-Jun; Chang, Shen-Peng; Lin, Long-Yau

    2017-08-01

    "Physical restraint" formerly used as a measure of protection for psychiatric patients is now widely used. However, existing studies showed that physical restraint not only has inadequate effect of protection but also has negative effects on residents. To analyzes the impact of educational program on the physical restraint use in long-term care facilities. A systematic review with meta-analysis and meta-regression. Eight databases, including Cochrane Library, ProQuest, PubMed, EMBASE, EBSCO, Web of Science, Ovid Medline and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), were searched up to January 2017. Eligible studies were classified by intervention and accessed for quality using the Quality Assessment Tool for quantitative studies. Sixteen research articles were eligible in the final review; 10 randomize control trail studies were included in the analysis. The meta-analysis revealed that the use of physical restraint was significantly less often in the experimental (education) group (OR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.39 to 0.78, p < 0.001) compared to the control group. Meta-regression revealed the period of post education would have decreased the effect of the restraint educational program (β: 0.08, p = 0.002); instead, the longer education period and more times of education would have a stronger effect of reducing the use of physical restraint (β: -0.07, p < 0.001; β: -0.04, p = 0.056). The educational program had an effect on the reduced use of physical restraint. The results of meta-regression suggest that long-term care facilities should provide a continuous education program of physical restraint for caregivers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  11. Educational intervention on physical restraint use in long-term care facilities – Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Huan Lan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available “Physical restraint” formerly used as a measure of protection for psychiatric patients is now widely used. However, existing studies showed that physical restraint not only has inadequate effect of protection but also has negative effects on residents. To analyzes the impact of educational program on the physical restraint use in long-term care facilities. Design: A systematic review with meta-analysis and meta-regression. Eight databases, including Cochrane Library, ProQuest, PubMed, EMBASE, EBSCO, Web of Science, Ovid Medline and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro, were searched up to January 2017. Eligible studies were classified by intervention and accessed for quality using the Quality Assessment Tool for quantitative studies. Sixteen research articles were eligible in the final review; 10 randomize control trail studies were included in the analysis. The meta-analysis revealed that the use of physical restraint was significantly less often in the experimental (education group (OR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.39 to 0.78, p < 0.001 compared to the control group. Meta-regression revealed the period of post education would have decreased the effect of the restraint educational program (β: 0.08, p = 0.002; instead, the longer education period and more times of education would have a stronger effect of reducing the use of physical restraint (β: −0.07, p < 0.001; β: −0.04, p = 0.056. The educational program had an effect on the reduced use of physical restraint. The results of meta-regression suggest that long-term care facilities should provide a continuous education program of physical restraint for caregivers.

  12. Modeling the runoff regime of the glacierised upper Aconcagua River Basin using a physically-based distributed hydrological model: the value of short term glaciological observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragettli, S.; Pellicciotti, F.; Molnar, D.; Rimkus, S.; Helbing, J.; Escobar, F.; Burlando, P.

    2010-12-01

    In the Central Andes of Chile the interactions between snow, glaciers and water resources are governed by a distinct climatological forcing. Summers are dry and stable, with precipitation close to zero, low relative humidity and intense solar radiation. During the summer months, water originates almost exclusively from snow and ice melt. Evidence of glaciers retreat and changes in the seasonal snow cover suggests that climate change might have an impact on the water resources in the area. We use the physically-based, spatially-distributed hydrological model TOPKAPI to study the processes governing the exchange between the climate, snow and ice in the upper Aconcagua River Basin. The model incorporates the melting of snow and ice based on a simplified energy-balance approach (ETI model) and the routing of melt water through the glacial system. The model has numerous empirical parameters used in the computation of the single components of the hydrological cycle, the determination of which might lead to problems of equifinality. To address this issue we set up a rigorous calibration procedure that allows calibration of the main model parameters in three different steps by separating parameters governing distinct processes. We evaluate the parameters’ transferability in time and investigate the differences in model parameters and performance that result from applying the model at different spatial scales. The model ability to simulate the relevant processes is tested against a data set of meteorological data, measurements of surface ablation and glacier runoff at the snout of the Juncal Norte Glacier during two ablation seasons. Modeled snow height is compared to snow maps derived from terrestrial photos and MODIS images. Results show that the magnitude of snow and icemelt rates on the glacier tongue is correctly reproduced, but simulations at higher elevation have a larger uncertainty. Crucial factors affecting model performance are the model ability to simulate the

  13. The long-term effect of screening and lifestyle counseling on changes in physical activity and diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumann, Sophie; Toft, Ulla; Aadahl, Mette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multi-factorial intervention studies have been found to be successful in the initiation of lifestyle changes. However, little is known about the longer-term maintenance of health behavior improvements. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether improvements in physical...... five years, all participants in the intervention group (n = 6,091) received individual lifestyle counseling; participants at high risk of ischemic heart disease - according to pre-specified criteria - were also offered group-based counseling. The control group (n = 3,324) was followed by questionnaires...... on physical activity and dietary habits five years after its discontinuation. The patterns of long-term changes in lifestyle differed across behaviors and between men and women. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov ( NCT00289237 )....

  14. Registration Summer Camp 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Reminder: registration for the CERN Staff Association Summer Camp is now open for children from 4 to 6 years old.   More information on the website: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch/. The summer camp is open to all children. The proposed cost is 480.-CHF/week, lunch included. The camp will be open weeks 27, 28, 29 and 30, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. For further questions, you are welcome to contact us by email at Summer.Camp@cern.ch. CERN Staff Association

  15. Summer Students: getting professional at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The summer season at CERN is known for the traditional visit of Summer Students coming from Member and non-Member States. This time, a total of 176 future scientists are spending part of their summer with us, learning and working in the laboratory. Summer Students enjoying a lecture on particle physics by Ronald Kleiss. Now that summer has finally arrived, you'll have noticed some changes at CERN: longer queues at the bar, faces you don't recognise in the corridors, and a breath of fresh air, but where is it coming from? The answer is easy: the Summer Students are here! Aged between 20 and 27, this group of 176 future scientists has been selected from 600 candidates to spend their summer at the Laboratory. This year, there are 24 more 'Summies' than last following a recommendation in the 2000 5-yearly review to increase the number of students. The Summies mainly come from Member States, but this year there are also 11 Americans, two Mexicans, an Armenian, a Turk, a Pakistani and two South Africans. Judith N...

  16. Physical and chemical properties of pollution aerosol particles transported from North America to Greenland as measured during the POLARCAT summer campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Quennehen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the POLARCAT-France campaign, aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties over Greenland were measured onboard the French ATR-42 research aircraft. The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was used to determine air mass origins. The study focuses particularly on the characterization of air masses transported from the North American continent. Air masses that picked up emissions from Canadian and Alaskan boreal forest fires as well as from the cities on the American east coast were identified and selected for a detailed study. Measurements of CO concentrations, aerosol chemical composition, aerosol size distributions, aerosol volatile fractions and aerosol light absorption (mainly from black carbon are used in order to study the relationship between CO enhancement, ageing of the air masses, aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions. Aerosol size distributions are in good agreement with previous studies, even though, wet scavenging potentially occurred along the pathway between the emission sources and Greenland leading to lower concentrations in the aerosol accumulation mode. The measured aerosol size distributions show a significant enhancement of Aitken mode particles. It is demonstrated that the Aitken mode is largely composed of black carbon, while the accumulation mode is more dominated by organics, as deduced from aerosol mass spectrometric AMS and aerosol volatility measurements. Overall, during the campaign rather small amounts of black carbon from the North American continent were transported towards Greenland. An important finding given the potential climate impacts of black carbon in the Arctic.

  17. Effect of the summer monsoon on aerosols at two measurement stations in Northern India – Part 2: Physical and optical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-P. Hyvärinen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol physical and optical properties were measured at two locations in Northern India during 2006–2010. The first measurement station was a background site in Mukteshwar, about 350 km northeast of New Delhi, in the foothills of the Indian Himalayas. The second measurement site was located in Gual Pahari, about 25 km south of New Delhi. At both stations, the average aerosol concentrations during the monsoon were decreased by 40–75% compared to the pre-monsoon average concentrations. The decrease varied with the total local rainfall. Also the mean aerosol size decreased during the monsoon season. The size distribution at Mukteshwar was unimodal, with a mode diameter at about 80 nm. In Gual Pahari, the ratio of Aitken and accumulation particle concentration was >1, due to wet deposition and new particle formation during the monsoon season. Aerosol concentrations during the early monsoon were found to be affected by mineral dust which in Gual Pahari was observed as an increased particle volume at around 3–4 μm. The single scattering albedo varied from 0.73 to 0.93 during the monsoon season, being slightly lower in Gual Pahari than in Mukteshwar. The aerosol columnar properties, which were measured in Gual Pahari, showed a somewhat different seasonal behavior compared to the surface measurements, with the aerosol optical depth increasing to an annual maximum in the early monsoon season.

  18. Long-Term Effects of Legacy Copper Contamination on Microbial Activity and Soil Physical Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Møldrup, Per; Holmstrup, Martin

    Soils heavily contaminated with copper (Cu) are considered unsuitable for agricultural use due to adverse impacts on microbial activity, soil physical properties, and direct toxicity to crops. This study investigated effects of Cu pollution from timber preservation activities between 1911 and 1924......, Denmark. Soil samples obtained from the fallow field were used to determine total microbial activity using fluorescein diacetate and dehydrogenase assays. The physical properties measured included water-dispersible clay, bulk density, air permeability and air-filled porosity. Significant differences...... in microbial activity (for both assays) were observed at Cu concentrations >500 mg kg-1. Although, unfavorable changes in all physical properties were obvious for Cu concentrations >500 mg kg-1, significant increases in bulk density and water dispersible-clay, together with decreases in total porosity, air...

  19. The long-term effect of screening and lifestyle counseling on changes in physical activity and diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumann, Sophie; Toft, Ulla; Aadahl, Mette

    2015-01-01

    . Both groups were followed one, three, five, and ten years after baseline. Changes in physical activity and dietary habits (intake of vegetables, fruit, fish, and saturated fat) during and after the intervention were investigated using random-coefficient models. RESULTS: Five years after...... the intervention, women in the intervention group reported greater improvements in the intake of fruit (M Δ = 90.2 g/week, p = 0.041) and less intake of saturated fat (OR = 0.30, 95% CI: 0.17-0.54) than the control group. Men in the intervention group reported greater improvements in physical activity (M Δ = 19...... on physical activity and dietary habits five years after its discontinuation. The patterns of long-term changes in lifestyle differed across behaviors and between men and women. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov ( NCT00289237 )....

  20. State adaptation reserves cardiorespiratory system first-year students with varying degrees of physical fitness in terms of treadmill test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levchenko V.A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to examine the state of the cardiorespiratory system in terms of the stress test in first-year students with different levels of fitness. Material : the study involved 43 students, of which 18 boys and 25devushek basic medical group. The study used a treadmill, a pulse oximeter, spirometer. Results : more adjustment disorders were detected in students that are not involved in physical education at school. Decreased ability of the cardiorespiratory system to maintain proper oxygen supply of the organism in the stress test. This is not observed in students who were attending school in addition sports clubs. Found that students with low tolerance to physical exercise need a separate program of physical training, the dynamic control of the teachers and the need for additional medical examination. Conclusions : the treadmill test is an ideal way of revealing hidden maladjustment cardiorespiratory system in adolescence.

  1. Effects of physical guidance on short-term learning of walking on a narrow beam

    OpenAIRE

    Domingo, Antoinette; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    Physical guidance is often used in rehabilitation when teaching patients to re-learn movements. However, the effects of guidance on motor learning of complex skills, such as walking balance, are not clear. We tested four groups of healthy subjects that practiced walking on a narrow (1.27 cm) or wide (2.5 cm) treadmill-mounted balance beam, with or without physical guidance. Assistance was given by springs attached to a hip belt that applied restoring forces towards beam center. Subjects were ...

  2. The impacts of the Indian summer rainfall on North China summer rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Renguang; Jiao, Yang

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies have indicated a connection between interannual variations of the Indian and North China summer rainfall. An atmospheric circulation wave pattern over the mid-latitude Asia plays an important role in the connection. The present study compares the influence of the above-normal and below-normal Indian summer rainfall on the North China summer rainfall variations. Composite analysis shows that the mid-latitude Asian atmospheric circulation and the North China rainfall anomalies during summer tend to be anti-symmetric in above-normal and below-normal Indian rainfall years. Analysis indicates that the Indian-North China summer rainfall relation tends to be stronger when larger Indian rainfall anomaly occurs during a higher mean rainfall period. The observed long-term change in the Indian-North China summer rainfall relationship cannot be explained by the impact of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The present study evaluates the Indian-North China summer rainfall relationship in climate models. Analysis shows that the Indian-North China summer rainfall relationship differs largely among different climate models and among different simulations of a specific model. The relationship also displays obvious temporal variations in both individual and ensemble mean model simulations. This suggests an important role of the atmospheric internal variability in the change of the Indian-North China summer rainfall relationship.

  3. The long-term association between physical activity and risk of dementia in the community: the Hisayama Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Hiro; Ohara, Tomoyuki; Hata, Jun; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Yoshida, Daigo; Mukai, Naoko; Nagata, Masaharu; Ikeda, Fumie; Fukuhara, Masayo; Kumagai, Shuzo; Kanba, Shigenobu; Kitazono, Takanari; Kiyohara, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the long-term influence of physical activity on the risk of dementia in an elderly Japanese population. A total of 803 community-dwelling elderly Japanese individuals without dementia aged ≥65 years were followed prospectively for 17 years. Physically active status was defined as engaging in exercise at least one or more times per week during leisure time, and participants were divided into an active group and an inactive group by the presence or absence of such physical activity. The risk estimates of physical activity on the development of all-cause dementia and its subtypes were computed using a Cox proportional hazards model. During the follow-up, 291 participants developed all-cause dementia. Of these, 165 had Alzheimer's disease (AD), 93 had vascular dementia (VaD), and 47 had other dementia. Compared with the inactive group, the active group showed significantly lower crude incidence of AD (21.8 vs. 14.2 per 1000 person-years, p = 0.01), but no significant differences were observed for all-cause dementia (35.6 vs. 30.5, p = 0.17), VaD (11.3 vs. 9.8, p = 049), and other dementia (4.6 vs. 7.1, p = 0.15). After adjusting for potential confounders, the relationship between physical activity and risk of AD remained significant (adjusted hazard ratio 0.59, 95% confidence interval 0.41-0.84, p = 0.003). Our findings suggest that physical activity reduces the long-term risk of dementia, especially AD, in the general Japanese population.

  4. Changes in physical health among participants in a multidisciplinary health programme for long-term unemployed persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuring Merel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between poor health and unemployment is well established. Health promotion among unemployed persons may improve their health. The aims of this study were to investigate characteristics of non-participants and drop-outs in a multidisciplinary health promotion programme for long-term unemployed persons with health complaints, to evaluate changes in physical health among participants, and to investigate determinants of improvement in physical health. Methods A longitudinal, non-controlled design was used. The programme consisted of two weekly exercise sessions and one weekly cognitive session during 12 weeks. The main outcome measures were body mass index, blood pressure, cardiorespiratory fitness, abdominal muscle strength, and low back and hamstring flexibility. Potential determinants of change in physical health were demographic variables, psychological variables (self-esteem, mastery, and kinesiophobia, and self-perceived health. Results The initial response was 73% and 252 persons had complete data collection at baseline. In total, 36 subjects were lost during follow-up. Participants were predominantly low educated, long-term unemployed, and in poor health. Participation in the programme was not influenced by demographic and psychological factors or by self-reported health. Drop-outs were younger and had a lower body mass index at baseline than subjects who completed the programme. At post-test, participants' cardiorespiratory fitness, abdominal muscle strength, and flexibility had increased by 6.8%–51.0%, whereas diastolic and systolic blood pressures had decreased by 2.2%–2.5%. The effect sizes ranges from 0.17–0.68. Conclusion Participants with the poorest physical health benefited most from the programme and gender differences in improvement were observed. Physical health of unemployed persons with health complaints improved after participation in this health promotion programme, but not

  5. Effect of the summer monsoon on aerosols at two measurement stations in Northern India – Part 2: Physical and optical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-P. Hyvärinen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol physical and optical properties were measured at two locations in northern India. The first measurement station was a background site in Mukteshwar, about 350 km northeast of New Delhi, in the foothills of the Indian Himalayas, with data from 2006 to 2009. The second measurement site was located in Gual Pahari, about 25 km south of New Delhi, with data from 2008 to 2009. At both stations, the average aerosol concentrations during the monsoon were decreased by 40–75 % compared to the pre-monsoon average concentrations. The decrease varied with the total local rainfall. In Mukteshwar, the monsoon season removed particles from all size classes, due to a combination of rain scavenging and activation to cloud and mountain fog droplets. The scavenging by rain is least effective for the size range of the accumulation mode particles. In Gual Pahari, this was the only major wet removal mechanism and, as a result, the accumulation mode particles were less effectively removed. Aerosol concentrations during the early monsoon were found to be affected by mineral dust which in Gual Pahari was observed as an increased particle volume at a diameter around 3–4 μm. The single scattering albedo varied from 0.73 to 0.93 during the monsoon season, being slightly lower in Gual Pahari than in Mukteshwar. This is due to the fact that Gual Pahari resided closer to high anthropogenic black carbon emissions. As the absorbing particles are typically in the accumulation mode, they were not effectively removed by rain scavenging. The aerosol columnar properties, which were measured in Gual Pahari, showed a somewhat different seasonal behaviour compared to the surface measurements, with the aerosol optical depth increasing to an annual maximum in the early monsoon season.

  6. GOOGLE SUMMER OF CODE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leslie Hawthorn

    2008-01-01

      This article examines the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) program, the world's first global initiative to introduce College and University students to free/libre open source software (F/LOSS) development...

  7. Summer Meal Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Information pertaining to Summer Meal Sites, as collected by Citiparks in the City of Pittsburgh Department of Parks and Recreation. This dataset includes the...

  8. FORMS OF MOVEMENT IN TERMS OF ELEMENTARY GAMES THE TEACHING OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Stanojević

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A sample of 60 respondents was drawn from the population of students of the third grade of primary school in Nis, aged nine ± 6 months, male, who attend regular physical education classes. Subsample of 30 respondents worked on speed and strength development through elementary games at additional physical education classes (experimental group, while the control group had only regular physical education classes defined by primary school curriculum. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of work on speed and strength development within the framework of extra physical education classes in the third grade. Tests for the assessment of speed implied six tests: running at 20, 40 and 60 meters, hand tapping, foot tapping and feet tapping on the wall; tests for the assessment of strength implied five tests: push-ups, back lifting, squats, trunk lifting on Swedish bench and trunk lifting for 30 seconds. For determining the effects multivariate analysis of covariance was applied. The results indicated statistically significant effect of the work on the experimental group in both motor dimensions. 

  9. The Magnetic Physical Optics Scattered Field in Terms of a Line Integral

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meincke, Peter; Breinbjerg, Olav; Jørgensen, Erik

    2000-01-01

    An exact line integral representation Is derived for the magnetic physical optics field scattered by a perfectly electrically conducting planar plate illuminated by a magnetic Hertzian dipole. A numerical example is presented to illustrate the exactness of the line integral representation...

  10. Long-Term Effects of a Physical Education Curriculum and Staff Development Program: SPARK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Thomas L.; Sallis, James F.; Faucette, F. Nell; Kolody, Bohdan

    1997-01-01

    This four-year study investigated effects of a health-related physical education program on quantity and quality of lessons in seven elementary schools. Results showed that specialists produced the best outcomes and that trained teachers were superior to controls. Part 2 of the study assessed maintenance effects 1.5 years following intervention…

  11. Physical protection of mineralizable C in aggregates from long-term pasture and arable soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulleman, M.M.; Marinissen, J.C.Y.

    2004-01-01

    Depending on agricultural management, soil aggregation can provide physical protection of organic matter against rapid decomposition. Within a given soil series, farm management affects the quality and quantity of organic inputs, soil disturbance and biological activity, and thereby the processes of

  12. Is long term creatine and glutamine supplementation effective in enhancing physical performance of military police officers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira, Celismar Lázaro; de Souza, Thiago Siqueira Paiva; Batista, Gilmário Ricarte; de Araújo, Adenilson Targino; da Silva, Júlio César Gomes; de Sousa, Maria do Socorro Cirilo; Marta, Carlos; Garrido, Nuno Domingo

    2014-09-29

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of supplementation with creatine and glutamine on physical fitness of military police officers. Therefore, an experimental double blind study was developed, with the final sample composed by 32 men randomly distributed into three groups: a group supplemented with creatine (n=10), glutamine (n=10) and a placebo group (n=12) and evaluated in three distinct moments, in an interval of three months (T1, T2 and T3). The physical training had a weekly frequency of 5 sessions × 90 min, including strength exercises, local muscular resistance, flexibility and both aerobic and anaerobic capacity. After analyzing the effect of time, group and interaction (group × time) for measures that indicated the physical capabilities of the subjects, a significant effect of time for the entire variable was identified (p0,05). In face of the results it was concluded that supplementation with creatine and glutamine showed no ergogenic effect on physical performance in military police officers.

  13. Physical Modelling of Bucket Foundation Under Long-Term Cyclic Lateral Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foglia, Aligi; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2012-01-01

    functioning. In this article a 1g physical model of bucket foundation under horizontal and moment cyclic loading is described. A testing program including four tests was carried out. Every test was conducted for at least 30000 cycles, each with different loading features. The capability of the model...

  14. Is Long Term Creatine and Glutamine Supplementation Effective in Enhancing Physical Performance of Military Police Officers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro da Silveira Celismar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of supplementation with creatine and glutamine on physical fitness of military police officers. Therefore, an experimental double blind study was developed, with the final sample composed by 32 men randomly distributed into three groups: a group supplemented with creatine (n=10, glutamine (n=10 and a placebo group (n=12 and evaluated in three distinct moments, in an interval of three months (T1, T2 and T3. The physical training had a weekly frequency of 5 sessions x 90 min, including strength exercises, local muscular resistance, flexibility and both aerobic and anaerobic capacity. After analyzing the effect of time, group and interaction (group x time for measures that indicated the physical capabilities of the subjects, a significant effect of time for the entire variable was identified (p0,05. In face of the results it was concluded that supplementation with creatine and glutamine showed no ergogenic effect on physical performance in military police officers.

  15. Coherence of Physics and Chemistry Curricula in Terms of the Electron Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena, Ivanova

    2016-08-01

    One of the major contradictions in subject teaching is the contradiction between the unity of the world and the discrete separated generalized content of natural sciences that study natural phenomena. These are physics, chemistry, biology and more. One can eliminate the conflict if opens the content's interdisciplinary links set by the events that are studied by different disciplines. The corresponding contexts of the phenomenon content arise depending on the discipline, and they are not enough coordinated. Obviously, we need a mechanism that allows establishing interdisciplinary links in the content quickly and without losing the logic of the material and assess their coherence in academic disciplines. This article uses a quantitative method of coherence assessment elaborated by T.N. Gnitetskaya. The definition of the concept of the semantic state introduced by the authors is given in this article. The method is applied to coherence assessment of physics and chemistry textbooks. The coherence of two pairs of chemistry and physics textbooks by different authors in different combinations was calculated. The most cohered pairs of textbooks (chemistry-physics) were identified. One can recommend using the pair of textbooks for eighth grade that we offered that favors the development of holistic understandings of the world around us.

  16. Physical protection of mineralizable C in aggregates from long-term pasture and arable soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulleman, M.M.; Marinissen, J.C.Y.

    2004-01-01

    Depending on agricultural management, soil aggregation can provide physical protection of organic matter against rapid decomposition. Within a given soil series, farm management affects the quality and quantity of organic inputs, soil disturbance and biological activity, and thereby the processes of

  17. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 13 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 Student Session (3/3) Course Review Course Review Tuesday 14 August 16:00 Poster Session Further information can be obtained on the web at the following URL: Summer Student Lecture ProgrammeSummer Student Lectures are available at: http://agenda.cern.ch/SSLP2001

  18. A Summer Camp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    正This summer,I had some special days.I joined Dongzhou International Educational Exchange Summer Camp. First,I will tell you about our foreign teachers,they are Shrina and Rebecca. They are friendly and beautiful.They are students at Oxford University. We talked about many things:famous people,subjects in England,different jobs, our deal days,western star signs,what can we say in a restaurant and so on.

  19. Early Pleistocene glacial cycles and the integrated summer insolation forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybers, Peter

    2006-07-28

    Long-term variations in Northern Hemisphere summer insolation are generally thought to control glaciation. But the intensity of summer insolation is primarily controlled by 20,000-year cycles in the precession of the equinoxes, whereas early Pleistocene glacial cycles occur at 40,000-year intervals, matching the period of changes in Earth's obliquity. The resolution of this 40,000-year problem is that glaciers are sensitive to insolation integrated over the duration of the summer. The integrated summer insolation is primarily controlled by obliquity and not precession because, by Kepler's second law, the duration of the summer is inversely proportional to Earth's distance from the Sun.

  20. Physical and chemical aspects of long-term biodeterioration of some polymers and composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugauskas, A; Prosychevas, I; Levinskaite, L; Jaskelevicius, B

    2004-08-01

    A biodeterioration study was performed on synthetic polymeric materials including homogenous film made from poly(tetrafluorine ethylene), copolymer film made from tetrafluorine ethylene and perfluoromethyl vinyl ether, vulcanized rubber containing natural caoutchouc, and vulcanized rubber, the main component of which was synthetic butadiene nitrile caoutchouc. The materials were exposed for 12 years to the open air, in mycological containers, and in a cellar in maritime climate conditions: air humidity 72%-90% and seasonal average temperature of 17 degrees C in summer and -2.5 degrees C in winter. The studies of optical and electron microscopy revealed that microorganisms were able to develop not only on the surface of the materials but also to penetrate inside into deeper layers. The fungi that produced the most intensive deterioration in the fluorine polymers and vulcanized rubbers belonged to the Alternaria, Aspergillus, Aureobasidium, Cladosporium, Penicillium, Oidiodendron and Trichoderma genera. The fungi Aspergillus fumigatus, A. niger, Aureobasidium pullulans, and Trichoderma viride produced the most intensive deterioration in the fluorine films, whereas Alternaria tenuissima, Cladosporium herbarum, C. sphaerospermum, and fungi of the Oidiodendron genus were widespread on vulcanized rubbers. Fungi of the Aspergillus and Penicillium genera prevailed on both fluorine films and rubbers exposed in a cellar. Infrared spectroscopy indicated that the structures of poly(tetrafluorine ethylene) and the copolymer of tetrafluorine ethylene and perfluoromethyl vinyl ether did not change after the 12-year exposure; only insignificant changes in surface morphology were observed by optical microscopy. Vulcanized rubber made both from natural and from synthetic caoutchouc exposed for the same length of time showed rather evident changes in appearance and structure. X-ray graphical analysis revealed that new crystallization of the caoutchouc and a possible change in

  1. Summer Steelhead Distribution [ds341

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Summer Steelhead Distribution October 2009 Version This dataset depicts observation-based stream-level geographic distribution of anadromous summer-run steelhead...

  2. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    There have been three physics meetings since the last CMS week: “physics days” on March 27-29, the Physics/ Trigger week on April 23-27 and the most recent physics days on May 22-24. The main purpose of the March physics days was to finalize the list of “2007 analyses”, i.e. the few topics that the physics groups will concentrate on for the rest of this calendar year. The idea is to carry out a full physics exercise, with CMSSW, for select physics channels which test key features of the physics objects, or represent potential “day 1” physics topics that need to be addressed in advance. The list of these analyses was indeed completed and presented in the plenary meetings. As always, a significant amount of time was also spent in reviewing the status of the physics objects (reconstruction) as well as their usage in the High-Level Trigger (HLT). The major event of the past three months was the first “Physics/Trigger week” in Apri...

  3. [Musculoskeletal problems and physical activity. Results from a long-term study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, K; Thom, E

    1997-11-30

    In two Norwegian industrial companies 42 employees (24 female/18 male) with shoulder, neck and back problems took part in a training programme for a period of 12 months. The programme comprised of daily relaxation exercises at work combined with training at home three times a week for about 30 minutes on each occasion. The physical therapy and training apparatus, TerapiMaster, which was constructed in Norway was used both at work and at home. The training programme was developed and monitored by an experienced physiotherapist. The observations of the training programme focused on changes in absenteeism during the training period compared with pre-study absenteeism. For employees with musculo-skeletal ailments the combination of relaxation exercises and physical training with professional instruction and follow-up significantly reduced absenteeism from 11.2 days per year (pre-study) to 0.2 days per year (at the end of the 12-month training period) (p training programme.

  4. Physical performance as long-term predictor of onset of activities of daily living (ADL) disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idland, Gro; Pettersen, Renate; Avlund, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    . The participants were followed for 9 years. Logistic regression models were fitted for each of the physical performance measurements together with the covariates in relation to ADL disability. At follow-up 25.7% were disabled in ADL. All three performance measurements were significantly associated with the onset...... of ADL disability at 9 years of follow-up, however, only walking speed remained significantly related to onset of ADL disability, when all three performance measurements were included in the same model. In conclusion all the three performance measurements were related to onset of ADL disability......Disability in ADL of aging women is an important public health concern. It is thus of interest to identify modifiable factors underlying onset of ADL disability. We assessed whether three physical performance-based measurements could predict ADL disability 9 years later. The participants were 113...

  5. Long-Term Effects of Legacy Copper Contamination on Microbial Activity and Soil Physical Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Møldrup, Per; Holmstrup, Martin

    , Denmark. Soil samples obtained from the fallow field were used to determine total microbial activity using fluorescein diacetate and dehydrogenase assays. The physical properties measured included water-dispersible clay, bulk density, air permeability and air-filled porosity. Significant differences......-filled porosity and air permeability occurred for Cu concentrations >900 mg kg-1. There was significant negative correlation between microbial activity and the susceptibility of clay dispersion by water. These results suggest that a threshold level for Cu exists (~500 mg kg-1 for this soil type) beyond which...... in microbial activity (for both assays) were observed at Cu concentrations >500 mg kg-1. Although, unfavorable changes in all physical properties were obvious for Cu concentrations >500 mg kg-1, significant increases in bulk density and water dispersible-clay, together with decreases in total porosity, air...

  6. Long Term Psychological and Physical Effects of the POW Experience: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    usually accompanied by Insomnia and by nightmares that are either simple or only slightly disguised repetitions of the traumatic experiences...political events. The survivors appeared to be suffering from poor sleep, a "vigilant" type of insomnia , in which the sleeper finds it difficult to...Adaptation was measured from several different points of view: menopausal symptomatology, the subjective sense of well-being, physical and

  7. Nucleon generalized form factors and sigma term from lattice QCD near the physical quark mass

    CERN Document Server

    Bali, G S; Gläßle, B; Göckeler, M; Najjar, J; Rödl, R; Schäfer, A; Schiel, R; Söldner, W; Sternbeck, A; Wein, P

    2013-01-01

    We present new N_f=2 data for the nucleon generalized form factors, varying volume, lattice spacing and pion mass, down to 150 MeV. We also give an update of our direct calculation of the nucleon sigma term for a range of pion mass values including the lightest one.

  8. Influence of Ocean Acidification on a Natural Winter-to-Summer Plankton Succession: First Insights from a Long-Term Mesocosm Study Draw Attention to Periods of Low Nutrient Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taucher, Jan; Boxhammer, Tim; Ludwig, Andrea; Achterberg, Eric P.; Algueró-Muñiz, María; Anderson, Leif G.; Bellworthy, Jessica; Büdenbender, Jan; Czerny, Jan; Ericson, Ylva; Esposito, Mario; Fischer, Matthias; Haunost, Mathias; Hellemann, Dana; Horn, Henriette G.; Hornick, Thomas; Meyer, Jana; Sswat, Michael; Zark, Maren; Riebesell, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Every year, the oceans absorb about 30% of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) leading to a re-equilibration of the marine carbonate system and decreasing seawater pH. Today, there is increasing awareness that these changes–summarized by the term ocean acidification (OA)–could differentially affect the competitive ability of marine organisms, thereby provoking a restructuring of marine ecosystems and biogeochemical element cycles. In winter 2013, we deployed ten pelagic mesocosms in the Gullmar Fjord at the Swedish west coast in order to study the effect of OA on plankton ecology and biogeochemistry under close to natural conditions. Five of the ten mesocosms were left unperturbed and served as controls (~380 μatm pCO2), whereas the others were enriched with CO2-saturated water to simulate realistic end-of-the-century carbonate chemistry conditions (~760 μatm pCO2). We ran the experiment for 113 days which allowed us to study the influence of high CO2 on an entire winter-to-summer plankton succession and to investigate the potential of some plankton organisms for evolutionary adaptation to OA in their natural environment. This paper is the first in a PLOS collection and provides a detailed overview on the experimental design, important events, and the key complexities of such a “long-term mesocosm” approach. Furthermore, we analyzed whether simulated end-of-the-century carbonate chemistry conditions could lead to a significant restructuring of the plankton community in the course of the succession. At the level of detail analyzed in this overview paper we found that CO2-induced differences in plankton community composition were non-detectable during most of the succession except for a period where a phytoplankton bloom was fueled by remineralized nutrients. These results indicate: (1) Long-term studies with pelagic ecosystems are necessary to uncover OA-sensitive stages of succession. (2) Plankton communities fueled by regenerated nutrients may be more

  9. Influence of Ocean Acidification on a Natural Winter-to-Summer Plankton Succession: First Insights from a Long-Term Mesocosm Study Draw Attention to Periods of Low Nutrient Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Lennart T; Taucher, Jan; Boxhammer, Tim; Ludwig, Andrea; Achterberg, Eric P; Algueró-Muñiz, María; Anderson, Leif G; Bellworthy, Jessica; Büdenbender, Jan; Czerny, Jan; Ericson, Ylva; Esposito, Mario; Fischer, Matthias; Haunost, Mathias; Hellemann, Dana; Horn, Henriette G; Hornick, Thomas; Meyer, Jana; Sswat, Michael; Zark, Maren; Riebesell, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Every year, the oceans absorb about 30% of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) leading to a re-equilibration of the marine carbonate system and decreasing seawater pH. Today, there is increasing awareness that these changes-summarized by the term ocean acidification (OA)-could differentially affect the competitive ability of marine organisms, thereby provoking a restructuring of marine ecosystems and biogeochemical element cycles. In winter 2013, we deployed ten pelagic mesocosms in the Gullmar Fjord at the Swedish west coast in order to study the effect of OA on plankton ecology and biogeochemistry under close to natural conditions. Five of the ten mesocosms were left unperturbed and served as controls (~380 μatm pCO2), whereas the others were enriched with CO2-saturated water to simulate realistic end-of-the-century carbonate chemistry conditions (~760 μatm pCO2). We ran the experiment for 113 days which allowed us to study the influence of high CO2 on an entire winter-to-summer plankton succession and to investigate the potential of some plankton organisms for evolutionary adaptation to OA in their natural environment. This paper is the first in a PLOS collection and provides a detailed overview on the experimental design, important events, and the key complexities of such a "long-term mesocosm" approach. Furthermore, we analyzed whether simulated end-of-the-century carbonate chemistry conditions could lead to a significant restructuring of the plankton community in the course of the succession. At the level of detail analyzed in this overview paper we found that CO2-induced differences in plankton community composition were non-detectable during most of the succession except for a period where a phytoplankton bloom was fueled by remineralized nutrients. These results indicate: (1) Long-term studies with pelagic ecosystems are necessary to uncover OA-sensitive stages of succession. (2) Plankton communities fueled by regenerated nutrients may be more responsive

  10. A model for the development of virtual communities for people with long-term, severe physical disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Tilley

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This paper reports results of an investigation into the needs of persons with disabilities wanting to participate in the use of virtual communities. The aim was to investigate 'how virtual communities for persons with long-term, severe physical disabilities can best be facilitated'? Method. A Grounded Theory approach was adopted to inform the investigation. In- depth interviews were conducted with twelve persons with paraplegia, quadriplegia or other severe, long-term physical or mobility disabilities and six health care professionals, service providers, information personnel and policy advisers who were involved in their well-being. Analysis. Rich explanations were derived about the information and communication technology (ICT usage and the technologies' contributions towards restoration of sense of control over their lives. Results. The primary outcome of the investigation is a theory regarding the character of virtual communities for the disabled. The theory is represented as a Virtual Community Model. The model identifies: the need for 'a sense of control' as the foundation element of virtual communities for the disabled; the key domains in which disabled people participate in virtual communities; and the barriers and enablers to their participation. Conclusion. The model provides a framework which can be used by interest groups and other organizations to facilitate the development of virtual communities for persons with severe physical disabilities. The six key types of community need to be represented in such virtual communities if a full 'sense of control' is to be achieved by disabled persons.

  11. Morning-evening difference of team-handball-related short-term maximal physical performances in female team handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhenni, Thouraya; Michalsik, Lars Bojsen; Mejri, Mohamed Arbi; Yousfi, Narimen; Chaouachi, Anis; Souissi, Nizar; Chamari, Karim

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated the two different time-of-day effect on team-handball-related short-term maximal physical performances. At two different time-of-day, fifteen young female team handball players performed different physical tests: HandGrip (HG) test, Ball-Throwing Velocity (BTV) test, Modified Agility T-test (MAT) and Repeated Shuttle-Sprint and Jump Ability (RSSJA) test. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale was determined following the termination of the last test. Measurements were performed at two separate testing sessions (i.e., in the morning (7:00-8:30 h) and in the early evening (17:00-18:30 h)) in a randomised and counter-balanced setting on non-consecutive days. The results showed that HG (P = 0.0013), BTV (P = 0.0027) and MAT (P handball players, team-handball-related short-term maximal physical performances were better in the afternoon than in the morning.

  12. Spatio-temporal analysis of aftershock sequences in terms of Non Extensive Statistical Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chochlaki, Kalliopi; Vallianatos, Filippos

    2017-04-01

    Earth's seismicity is considered as an extremely complicated process where long-range interactions and fracturing exist (Vallianatos et al., 2016). For this reason, in order to analyze it, we use an innovative methodological approach, introduced by Tsallis (Tsallis, 1988; 2009), named Non Extensive Statistical Physics. This approach introduce a generalization of the Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical mechanics and it is based on the definition of Tsallis entropy Sq, which maximized leads the the so-called q-exponential function that expresses the probability distribution function that maximizes the Sq. In the present work, we utilize the concept of Non Extensive Statistical Physics in order to analyze the spatiotemporal properties of several aftershock series. Marekova (Marekova, 2014) suggested that the probability densities of the inter-event distances between successive aftershocks follow a beta distribution. Using the same data set we analyze the inter-event distance distribution of several aftershocks sequences in different geographic regions by calculating non extensive parameters that determine the behavior of the system and by fitting the q-exponential function, which expresses the degree of non-extentivity of the investigated system. Furthermore, the inter-event times distribution of the aftershocks as well as the frequency-magnitude distribution has been analyzed. The results supports the applicability of Non Extensive Statistical Physics ideas in aftershock sequences where a strong correlation exists along with memory effects. References C. Tsallis, Possible generalization of Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics, J. Stat. Phys. 52 (1988) 479-487. doi:10.1007/BF01016429 C. Tsallis, Introduction to nonextensive statistical mechanics: Approaching a complex world, 2009. doi:10.1007/978-0-387-85359-8. E. Marekova, Analysis of the spatial distribution between successive earthquakes in aftershocks series, Annals of Geophysics, 57, 5, doi:10.4401/ag-6556, 2014 F. Vallianatos, G

  13. Few apparent short-term effects of elevated soil temperature and increased frequency of summer precipitation on the abundance and taxonomic diversity of desert soil micro- and meso-fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, B.J.; Neher, D.A.; Housman, D.C.; Belnap, J.

    2011-01-01

    Frequent hydration and drying of soils in arid systems can accelerate desert carbon and nitrogen mobilization due to respiration, microbial death, and release of intracellular solutes. Because desert microinvertebrates can mediate nutrient cycling, and the autotrophic components of crusts are known to be sensitive to rapid desiccation due to elevated temperatures after wetting events, we studied whether altered soil temperature and frequency of summer precipitation can also affect the composition of food web consumer functional groups. We conducted a two-year field study with experimentally-elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation in the Colorado Plateau desert, measuring the change in abundance of nematodes, protozoans, and microarthropods. We hypothesized that microfauna would be more adversely affected by the combination of elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation than either effect alone, as found previously for phototrophic crust biota. Microfauna experienced normal seasonal fluctuations in abundance, but the effect of elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation was statistically non-significant for most microfaunal groups, except amoebae. The seasonal increase in abundance of amoebae was reduced with combined elevated temperature and increased frequency of summer precipitation compared to either treatment alone, but comparable with control (untreated) plots. Based on our findings, we suggest that desert soil microfauna are relatively more tolerant to increases in ambient temperature and frequency of summer precipitation than the autotrophic components of biological soil crust at the surface.

  14. Physical Fitness and Functional Ability of Children with Intellectual Disability: Effects of a Short-Term Daily Treadmill Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meir Lotan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Persons with intellectual disability (ID and associated multiple disabilities have been found by many researchers to be a population with deficient physical fitness measures, which can be explained by an inactive lifestyle, a result of lack of awareness of the positive physical effects of physical exercise, or lack of motivation for any motor activity. Various plans for physical exercise have been put forward, but many are found impractical in nonresearch-based intervention. In this study, 15 children with ID on a motor functioning level of 7—14 months used a treadmill daily for 2 months. Our findings indicated a most significant improvement in the level of physical fitness of the participants (p < 0.005, as measured by pulse at rest and during effort. The improvement in physical fitness modestly (r = 0.5, but significantly (p < 0.05, correlated with a significant (p < 0.0007 improvement in functional ability of the participating children. Further examination a year after intervention terminated showed a return to preintervention pulse-at-rest values. The research examined the treadmill training method and found that it can be operated with the support of an unskilled staff person under the supervision of a physiotherapist. The research was performed under real-life conditions, enabling relatively easy implementation in the existing conditions of special education centers. This method is a type of exercise that is easy to operate without entailing long-term budgetary expenses and might improve the health status of children with ID, who are a population at risk for developing heart-related diseases at a young age.

  15. 2015 CERN-Fermilab HCP Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the tenth edition, from 24 June to 3 July 2015. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school targeted particularly at young postdocs and senior PhD students working towards the completion of their thesis project, in both Experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) and phenomenology. Lecture Topics include: Statistics in HEP, Heavy Flavour, Heavy Ion, Standard Model, Higgs searches and measurements, BSM theory, BSM searches, Top physics, QCD and Monte Carlos, Accelerators, Detectors for the future, Trigger and DAQ, Dark Matter Astroparticle, and two special lectures on Future Colliders, and 20 years after the top discovery. Calendar and Details: Mark your calendar for  24 June - 3 July 2015, when CERN will welcome students to t...

  16. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable amount of progress has been made in Physics since the last CMS Week in June given the exponential growth in the delivered LHC luminosity. The first major milestone was the delivery of a variety of results to the ICHEP international conference held in Paris this July. For this conference, CMS prepared 15 Physics Analysis Summaries on physics objects and 22 Summaries on new and interesting physics measurements that exploited the luminosity recorded by the CMS detector. The challenge was incorporating the largest batch of luminosity that was delivered only days before the conference (300 nb-1 total). The physics covered from this initial running period spanned hadron production measurements, jet production and properties, electroweak vector boson production, and even glimpses of the top quark. Since then, the accumulated integrated luminosity has increased by a factor of more than 100, and all groups have been working tremendously hard on analysing this dataset. The September Physics Week was held ...

  17. Preventing Long-Term Risk of Obesity for Two Generations: Prenatal Physical Activity Is Part of the Puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie-May Ruchat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The period surrounding pregnancy has been identified as a risk period for overweight/obesity in both mother and child because of excessive gestational weight gain (GWG. The promotion of a healthy GWG is therefore of paramount importance in the context of the prevention of obesity in the current and next generations. Objective. To provide a comprehensive overview of the effect of prenatal physical activity interventions, alone or in combination with nutritional counselling, on GWG and to address whether preventing excessive GWG decreases the incidence of infant high birth weight and/or postpartum weight retention. Method. A search of the PubMed database was conducted to identify all relevant studies. Nineteen studies were included in this review: 13 interventions combining physical activity, nutrition, and GWG counselling and 6 interventions including physical activity alone. Results. Prenatal lifestyle interventions promoting healthy eating and physical activity habits appear to be the most effective approach to prevent excessive GWG. Achievement of appropriate GWG may also decrease the incidence of high infant birth weight and postpartum weight retention. Conclusion. Healthy eating habits during pregnancy, combined with an active lifestyle, may be important elements in the prevention of long-term risk of obesity for two generations.

  18. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    The CPT project came to an end in December 2006 and its original scope is now shared among three new areas, namely Computing, Offline and Physics. In the physics area the basic change with respect to the previous system (where the PRS groups were charged with detector and physics object reconstruction and physics analysis) was the split of the detector PRS groups (the old ECAL-egamma, HCAL-jetMET, Tracker-btau and Muons) into two groups each: a Detector Performance Group (DPG) and a Physics Object Group. The DPGs are now led by the Commissioning and Run Coordinator deputy (Darin Acosta) and will appear in the correspond¬ing column in CMS bulletins. On the physics side, the physics object groups are charged with the reconstruction of physics objects, the tuning of the simulation (in collaboration with the DPGs) to reproduce the data, the provision of code for the High-Level Trigger, the optimization of the algorithms involved for the different physics analyses (in collaboration with the analysis gr...

  19. Evaluating instructional computer laboratuaries in terms of physical ergonomic criteria: Suleyman Demirel University case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Lema Tamer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate instructional computer laboratories according to the physical ergonomic criteria. A case study design with survey methodology was employed and data were collected through observation. Three computer labs were selected from various departments at the Suleyman Demirel University in Isparta, Turkey. The observation form, which was generated after reviewing the related literature, was used to gather data about computer labs’ physical characteristics, relative humidity and temperature levels, noise levels, desks and chairs, and technical features. The results reveals that the physical features of computer labs, monitor features, relative humidity and temperature levels are in agreement with the ergonomic criteria. However, desks and chairs, keyboard features, and noise levels fail to comply with the criteria, which can cause health problems and decrease the quality of students’ studies. Some suggestions are offered to improve computer labs’ study environments.Extended Abstract: There have been significant changes and innovations in every aspects of human lives. Education is one of the areas that may have been greatly influenced by these changes. Information and communication technologies changed the nature of teaching and learning. They facilitate active student participation, fast and durable learning, visualization, enjoyable learning, saving of time and so on. Therefore, educational institutions establish computer labs to support instructional activities. Although computers provide a number of opportunities, their uses in inappropriate and uncomfortable working conditions have recently caused some serious health problems. Common medical concerns include but not limited to eye strain, vision problems, headaches, pain in the lumbar region of the back, and strain on the ligaments in the back of the hand and wrist. Such problems have become the topic of many research studies and several ergonomic criteria

  20. Evaluating instructional computer laboratuaries in terms of physical ergonomic criteria: Suleyman Demirel University case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Lema Tamer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate instructional computer laboratories according to the physical ergonomic criteria. A case study design with survey methodology was employed and data were collected through observation. Three computer labs were selected from various departments at the Suleyman Demirel University in Isparta, Turkey. The observation form, which was generated after reviewing the related literature, was used to gather data about computer labs’ physical characteristics, relative humidity and temperature levels, noise levels, desks and chairs, and technical features. The results reveals that the physical features of computer labs, monitor features, relative humidity and temperature levels are in agreement with the ergonomic criteria. However, desks and chairs, keyboard features, and noise levels fail to comply with the criteria, which can cause health problems and decrease the quality of students’ studies. Some suggestions are offered to improve computer labs’ study environments.Extended Abstract: There have been significant changes and innovations in every aspects of human lives. Education is one of the areas that may have been greatly influenced by these changes. Information and communication technologies changed the nature of teaching and learning. They facilitate active student participation, fast and durable learning, visualization, enjoyable learning, saving of time and so on. Therefore, educational institutions establish computer labs to support instructional activities. Although computers provide a number of opportunities, their uses in inappropriate and uncomfortable working conditions have recently caused some serious health problems. Common medical concerns include but not limited to eye strain, vision problems, headaches, pain in the lumbar region of the back, and strain on the ligaments in the back of the hand and wrist. Such problems have become the topic of many research studies and several ergonomic criteria

  1. Weight training, aerobic physical activities, and long-term waist circumference change in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mekary, Rania A; Grøntved, Anders; Despres, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Findings on weight training and waist circumference (WC) change are controversial. This study examined prospectively whether weight training, moderate to vigorous aerobic activity (MVAA), and replacement of one activity for another were associated with favorable changes in WC and body...... weight (BW). METHODS: Physical activity, WC, and BW were reported in 1996 and 2008 in a cohort of 10,500 healthy U.S. men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Multiple linear regression models (partition/substitution) to assess these associations were used. RESULTS: After adjusting for potential...... confounders, a significant inverse dose-response relationship between weight training and WC change (P-trend training (-0.67 cm, 95% CI -0.93, -0.41) than...

  2. General relativistic radiation hydrodynamics of accretion flows - II. Treating stiff source terms and exploring physical limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedig, C.; Zanotti, O.; Alic, D.

    2012-10-01

    We present the implementation of an implicit-explicit (IMEX) Runge-Kutta numerical scheme for general relativistic (GR) hydrodynamics coupled to an optically thick radiation field in two existing GR-(magneto)hydrodynamics codes. We argue that the necessity of such an improvement arises naturally in most astrophysically relevant regimes where the optical thickness is high as the equations become stiff. By performing several simple 1D tests, we verify the codes' new ability to deal with this stiffness and show consistency. Then, still in one spatial dimension, we compute a luminosity versus accretion rate diagram for the set-up of spherical accretion on to a Schwarzschild black hole and find good agreement with previous work which included more radiation processes than we currently have available. Lastly, we revisit the supersonic Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton (BHL) accretion in two dimensions where we can now present simulations of realistic temperatures, down to T ˜ 106 K or less. Here we find that radiation pressure plays an important role, but also that these highly dynamical set-ups push our approximate treatment towards the limit of physical applicability. The main features of radiation hydrodynamics BHL flows manifest as (i) an effective adiabatic index approaching γeff ˜ 4/3; (ii) accretion rates two orders of magnitude lower than without radiation pressure, but still super-Eddington; (iii) luminosity estimates around the Eddington limit, hence with an overall radiative efficiency as small as ηBHL˜10-2; (iv) strong departures from thermal equilibrium in shocked regions; (v) no appearance of the flip-flop instability. We conclude that the current optically thick approximation to the radiation transfer does give physically substantial improvements over the pure hydro also in set-ups departing from equilibrium, and, once accompanied by an optically thin treatment, is likely to provide a fundamental tool for investigating accretion flows in a large variety of

  3. Direct determinations of the nucleon and pion $\\sigma$ terms at nearly physical quark masses

    CERN Document Server

    Bali, Gunnar S; Richtmann, Daniel; Schäfer, Andreas; Söldner, Wolfgang; Sternbeck, André

    2016-01-01

    We present a high statistics study of the pion and nucleon light and strange quark sigma terms using $N_f=2$ dynamical non-perturbatively improved clover fermions with a range of pion masses down to $m_\\pi\\sim 150$ MeV and several volumes, $Lm_\\pi=3.4$ up to $6.7$, and lattice spacings, $a=0.06-0.08$ fm, enabling a study of finite volume and discretisation effects for $m_\\pi\\gtrsim 260$ MeV. Systematics are found to be reasonably under control. For the nucleon we obtain $\\sigma_{\\pi N}=35(6)$ MeV and $\\sigma_s=35(12)$ MeV, or equivalently in terms of the quark fractions, $f_{T_u}=0.021(4)$, $f_{T_d}=0.016(4)$ and $f_{T_s}=0.037(13)$, where the errors include estimates of both the systematic and statistical uncertainties. These values, together with perturbative matching in the heavy quark limit, lead to $f_{T_c}=0.075(4)$, $f_{T_b}=0.072(2)$ and $f_{T_t}=0.070(1)$. In addition, through the use of the (inverse) Feynman-Hellmann theorem our results for $\\sigma_{\\pi N}$ are shown to be consistent with the nucleo...

  4. Physical exercise prevents short and long-term deficits on aversive and recognition memory and attenuates brain oxidative damage induced by maternal deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Ben-Hur; Menezes, Jefferson; Souza, Mauren Assis; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B

    2015-12-01

    It is known from previous research that physical exercise prevents long-term memory deficits induced by maternal deprivation in rats. But we could not assume similar effects of physical exercise on short-term memory, as short- and long-term memories are known to result from some different memory consolidation processes. Here we demonstrated that, in addition to long-term memory deficit, the short-term memory deficit resultant from maternal deprivation in object recognition and aversive memory tasks is also prevented by physical exercise. Additionally, one of the mechanisms by which the physical exercise influences the memory processes involves its effects attenuating the oxidative damage in the maternal deprived rats' hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

  5. PHYSICS

    CERN Document Server

    Submitted by

    Physics Week: plenary meeting on physics groups plans for startup (14–15 May 2008) The Physics Objects (POG) and Physics Analysis (PAG) Groups presented their latest developments at the plenary meeting during the Physics Week. In the presentations particular attention was given to startup plans and readiness for data-taking. Many results based on the recent cosmic run were shown. A special Workshop on SUSY, described in a separate section, took place the day before the plenary. At the meeting, we had also two special DPG presentations on “Tracker and Muon alignment with CRAFT” (Ernesto Migliore) and “Calorimeter studies with CRAFT” (Chiara Rovelli). We had also a report from Offline (Andrea Rizzi) and Computing (Markus Klute) on the San Diego Workshop, described elsewhere in this bulletin. Tracking group (Boris Mangano). The level of sophistication of the tracking software increased significantly over the last few months: V0 (K0 and Λ) reconstr...

  6. A STUDY IN TERMS OF SOCIAL MARKETING APPROACH: THE EFFECTS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ON QUALITY OF LIFE IN ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study which was carried out, in terms of social marketing approach, has the purpose of investigating the effects of physical exercises on aged 65 years and over people on quality of life. In this study, a campaign, in social marketing scope was organized and it was advertised by flyers aim to determine the effects of physical activities on life quality of randomly selected volunteer men, above 65 years old who stay in Mugla Abide-H.Nuri Öncüer Senior Center. Moreover, a presentation about physical activity and quality of life was submitted and informed about the programme to 57 senior center participants. The photo and slogan was used and prepared as a flyer to create an effect on participants for this campaign. These flyers were given to participants before the study and waited one week to create awareness about to study. The survey was made and the study was started a week after the flyers were given to participants. The exercises were continued during 8 weeks. The SF 36 quality of life scale, its validity and reliability studies were investigated by Pinar(1996 and Demirsoy(1996, was made under the supervisor of three trainer to randomly selected 27 person from senior center. The results of pre-test and final-test were determined by using SPSS 18 software. As a result, %47 of participants who were impressed from Social marketing programme decided to participate to this study. There were significant differences in some variances (subscales like physical function, body pain, general health, social function and physical health when compared before and after programme.

  7. Synergistic Effects of Physical Aging and Damage on Long-Term Behavior of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinson, L. Cate

    1999-01-01

    The research consisted of two major parts, first modeling and simulation of the combined effects of aging and damage on polymer composites and secondly an experimental phase examining composite response at elevated temperatures, again activating both aging and damage. For the simulation, a damage model for polymeric composite laminates operating at elevated temperatures was developed. Viscoelastic behavior of the material is accounted for via the correspondence principle and a variational approach is adopted to compute the temporal stresses within the laminate. Also, the effect of physical aging on ply level stress and on overall laminate behavior is included. An important feature of the model is that damage evolution predictions for viscoelastic laminates can be made. This allows us to track the mechanical response of the laminate up to large load levels though within the confines of linear viscoelastic constitutive behavior. An experimental investigation of microcracking and physical aging effects in polymer matrix composites was also pursued. The goal of the study was to assess the impact of aging on damage accumulation, in ten-ns of microcracking, and the impact of damage on aging and viscoelastic behavior. The testing was performed both at room and elevated temperatures on [+/- 45/903](sub s) and [02/903](sub s) laminates, both containing a set of 90 deg plies centrally located to facilitate investigation of microcracking. Edge replication and X-ray-radiography were utilized to quantify damage. Sequenced creep tests were performed to characterize viscoelastic and aging parameters. Results indicate that while the aging times studied have limited ]Influence on damage evolution, elevated temperature and viscoelastic effects have a profound effect on the damage mode seen. Some results are counterintuitive, including the lower strain to failure for elevated temperature tests and the catastrophic failure mode observed for the [+/- 45/9O3](sub s), specimens. The

  8. Direct determinations of the nucleon and pion σ terms at nearly physical quark masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Gunnar S.; Collins, Sara; Richtmann, Daniel; Schäfer, Andreas; Söldner, Wolfgang; Sternbeck, André; RQCD Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We present a high statistics study of the pion and nucleon light and strange quark sigma terms using Nf=2 dynamical nonperturbatively improved clover fermions with a range of pion masses down to mπ˜150 MeV and several volumes, L mπ=3.4 up to 6.7, and lattice spacings, a =0.06 - 0.08 fm , enabling a study of finite volume and discretization effects for mπ≳260 MeV . Systematics are found to be reasonably under control. For the nucleon we obtain σπ N=35 (6 ) MeV and σs=35 (12 ) MeV , or equivalently in terms of the quark fractions, fTu=0.021 (4 ) , fTd=0.016 (4 ) and fTs=0.037 (13 ) , where the errors include estimates of both the systematic and statistical uncertainties. These values, together with perturbative matching in the heavy quark limit, lead to fTc=0.075(4 ), fT b=0.072 (2 ) and fT t=0.070 (1 ). In addition, through the use of the (inverse) Feynman-Hellmann theorem our results for σπ N are shown to be consistent with the nucleon masses determined in the analysis. For the pion we implement a method which greatly reduces excited state contamination to the scalar matrix elements from states traveling across the temporal boundary. This enables us to demonstrate the Gell-Mann-Oakes-Renner expectation σπ=mπ/2 over our range of pion masses.

  9. Short term recovery of soil physical, chemical, micro- and mesobiological functions in a new vineyard under organic farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, E. A. C.; Agnelli, A. E.; Fabiani, A.; Gagnarli, E.; Mocali, S.; Priori, S.; Simoni, S.; Valboa, G.

    2014-12-01

    Deep earthwork activities carried out before vineyard plantation can severely upset soil profile properties. As a result, soil features in the root environment are often much more similar to those of the underlying substratum than those of the original profile. The time needed to recover the original soil functions is ecologically relevant and may strongly affect vine phenology and grape yield, particularly under organic viticulture. The general aim of this work was to investigate soil resilience after vineyard pre-planting earthworks. In particular, an old and a new vineyard, established on the same soil type, were compared over a five year period for soil chemical, physical, micro and mesobiological properties. The investigated vineyards (Vitis vinifera L., cv. Sangiovese) were located in the Chianti Classico district (Central Italy), on stony and calcareous soils and were not irrigated. The older vineyard was planted in 2000, after slope reshaping by bulldozing and back hoe ploughing down to about 0.8-1.0 m. The new vineyard was planted in 2011, after equivalent earthwork practices carried out in the summer of 2009. Both vineyards were organically managed and fertilized only with compost every autumn (1000 kg ha-1 per year). The new vineyard was cultivated by periodic tillage, while the old vineyard was managed with alternating grass-covered and tilled inter-rows. Soil samples were collected at 0-15 cm depth from the same plots of the new and old vineyards, during the springtime from 2010 to 2014. The old vineyard was sampled in both the tilled and the grass-covered swaths. According to the results from physical and chemical analyses, the new vineyard, during the whole 2010-2014 period, showed lower TOC, N, C/N and EC values, along with higher silt and total CaCO3 contents than the old vineyard, suggesting still evolving equilibrium conditions. The microarthropod analysis showed significantly different abundances and communities' structures, in relation to both

  10. General relativistic radiation hydrodynamics of accretion flows: II. Treating stiff source terms and exploring physical limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Roedig, Constanze; Alic, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    We present the implementation of an implicit-explicit (IMEX) Runge-Kutta numerical scheme for general relativistic hydrodynamics coupled to an optically thick radiation field in two existing GR-hydrodynamics codes. We argue that the necessity of such an improvement arises naturally in astrophysically relevant regimes where the optical thickness is high as the equations become stiff. By performing several 1D tests we verify the codes' new ability to deal with this stiffness and show consistency. Then, still in 1D, we compute a luminosity versus accretion rate diagram for the setup of spherical accretion onto a Schwarzschild black hole and find good agreement with previous work. Lastly, we revisit the supersonic Bondi Hoyle Lyttleton (BHL) accretion in 2D where we can now present simulations of realistic temperatures, down to T~10^6 K. Here we find that radiation pressure plays an important role, but also that these highly dynamical set-ups push our approximate treatment towards the limit of physical applicabil...

  11. Studying the physics potential of long-baseline experiments in terms of new sensitivity parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Mandip

    2016-01-01

    We investigate physics opportunities to constraint leptonic CP-violation phase $\\delta_{CP}$ through numerical analysis of working neutrino oscillation probability parameters, in the context of long base line experiments. Numerical analysis of two parameters, the " transition probability $\\delta_{CP}$ phase sensitivity parameter ($A^M$) " and " CP-violation probability $\\delta_{CP}$ phase sensitivity parameter ($A^{CP}$) ", as function of beam energy and/or base line has been preferably carried out. It is an elegant technique to broadly analyze different experiments to constraint $\\delta_{CP}$ phase and also to investigate mass hierarchy in the leptonic sector. The positive and negative values of parameter $A^{CP}$ corresponding to either of hierarchy in the specific beam energy ranges, could be a very promising way to explore mass hierarchy and $\\delta_{CP}$ phase. The keys to more robust bounds on $\\delta_{CP}$ phase are improvements of the involved detection techniques to explore bit low energy and relativ...

  12. A physically-based earthquake recurrence model for estimation of long-term earthquake probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, William L.; Matthews, Mark V.; Nadeau, Robert M.; Nishenko, Stuart P.; Reasenberg, Paul A.; Simpson, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    A physically-motivated model for earthquake recurrence based on the Brownian relaxation oscillator is introduced. The renewal process defining this point process model can be described by the steady rise of a state variable from the ground state to failure threshold as modulated by Brownian motion. Failure times in this model follow the Brownian passage time (BPT) distribution, which is specified by the mean time to failure, μ, and the aperiodicity of the mean, α (equivalent to the familiar coefficient of variation). Analysis of 37 series of recurrent earthquakes, M -0.7 to 9.2, suggests a provisional generic value of α = 0.5. For this value of α, the hazard function (instantaneous failure rate of survivors) exceeds the mean rate for times > μ⁄2, and is ~ ~ 2 ⁄ μ for all times > μ. Application of this model to the next M 6 earthquake on the San Andreas fault at Parkfield, California suggests that the annual probability of the earthquake is between 1:10 and 1:13.

  13. Adherence, Compliance, and Health Risk Factor Changes following Short-Term Physical Activity Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynda H. Norton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Low physical activity (PA levels are associated with poor health risk factor profiles. Intervention strategies to increase PA and quantify the rate and magnitude of change in risk factors are important. Methods. Interventions were conducted over 40 days to increase PA in 736 insufficiently active (<150 min/wk PA participants using either a pedometer or instructor-led group protocol. There were a further 135 active participants as controls. Major cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors, including fitness parameters, were measured before and after intervention. Results. Adherence to the interventions was higher for the group versus pedometer participants (87.1% versus 79.8% and compliance rates for achieving sufficient levels of PA (≥150 min/wk were also higher for the group participants (95.8% versus 77.6%. Total weekly PA patterns increased by 300 and 435 minutes, for the pedometer and group participants, respectively. Improvements were found for waist girth, total cholesterol, aerobic fitness, and flexibility relative to controls. The change in vigorous PA, but not moderate PA, was a significant predictor of the change in eight of 11 risk factor variables measured. Conclusions. Rapid and dramatic increases in PA among previously insufficiently active adults can result in important health benefits.

  14. ASHRAE Summer Meeting 1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudbeck, Claus Christian

    1998-01-01

    ASHRAE's (American Society for Heating, Refrigerating and Air- Condition Engineering) summer meeting was visited in June in Toronto. ASHRAE is an American organization dealing with American problems in HVAC, but many results can be used under Danish conditions. It is therefore essential that Danish...

  15. Summer Youth Forestry Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Gabrielle E.; Neuffer, Tamara; Zobrist, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The Summer Youth Forestry Institute (SYFI) was developed to inspire youth through experiential learning opportunities and early work experience in the field of natural resources. Declining enrollments in forestry and other natural resource careers has made it necessary to actively engage youth and provide them with exposure to careers in these…

  16. Books for Summer Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phi Delta Kappan, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Suggests several novels for educators' summer reading enjoyment, including classics by Robert Pirsig, Robertson Davies, John Steinbeck, Albert Camus, and Charles Dickens. Educators might also read Alex Kotlowitz's "There Are No Children Here" (Doubleday, 1991) and Sharon Quint's "Schooling Homeless Children" (Teachers College Press, 1994) to gain…

  17. Summer student report

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Conde Perez, Jose Luis

    2013-01-01

    Summer student report at EN/MME department. It consists of two parts. The first part explains the implementation of a reference manager system for the accumulated information. The second part talks about the implementation of a program to remote-control a hybrid controller. The controller is used in a prototype of the nano-stabilization system for the future Compact LInear Collider.

  18. Summer student report

    CERN Document Server

    Peedo, Kreete

    2017-01-01

    This report is an overview of the work done in the course of the summer student program. Analysing different OPC-UA stacks. Implemented and evaluated using the OPC-UA Local Discovery Server. Tested the OPC-UA software for calibration curve fitting and analog signal quality measurements.

  19. International Summer Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, June

    1979-01-01

    The article describes five summer programs for gifted and talented students offered internationally. The programs outlined are workshops in the publication arts, a study of humanistic development; computer science, writing, and photography workshops; a language study; a historical/social study of English history; and a workshop on photography,…

  20. Books for Summer Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phi Delta Kappan, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Recommends many books for summer reading enjoyment, concentrating on historical and contemporary fiction. Different cultures clash in William T. Vollman's "Fathers and Crows" and John Demos's adventuresome "Unredeemed Captive." Other suggestions: "Snow Falling on Cedar Mountain" (David Gutterman) and "Foxfire" (Joyce Carol Oates). For professional…

  1. Summer lodge residency

    OpenAIRE

    Morrad, Annie

    2015-01-01

    The summer lodge residency was based in Nottingham from June 29th to July 10th Each of the artists was given a studio space and technical facilities. There were discussion points and meals, a seminar day, open presentations and reflection time.

  2. Books for Summer Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phi Delta Kappan, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Recommends fine fiction for summer reading, including Nadine Gordimer's "My Son's Story" (1991), Lillian Smith's "Strange Fruit" (1944), Josephine Hart's "Damage" (1991), Jane Smiley's "A Thousand Acres" (1991), and George Eliot's "Middlemarch" (1874). Nonfiction suggestions include Harlan Lane's "Mask of Benevolence" (1992), Diane Ackerman's "A…

  3. Summer Learning That Sticks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    A new RAND Corporation study shows that voluntary summer programs can benefit children from low-income families, particularly those with high attendance. Programs studied in five school districts had several elements in common: a mix of academics and enrichment activities, certified teachers, small class sizes, full-day programming provided five…

  4. Summer Learning That Sticks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    A new RAND Corporation study shows that voluntary summer programs can benefit children from low-income families, particularly those with high attendance. Programs studied in five school districts had several elements in common: a mix of academics and enrichment activities, certified teachers, small class sizes, full-day programming provided five…

  5. Books for Summer Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    [Editors

    2001-01-01

    Teachers and education professors suggest various nonfiction and fiction books for summer reading enjoyment, from Robert Putnam's "Bowling Alone," C.A. Bowers's "Let Them Eat Data," and Larry McMurtry's "Roads: Driving America's Great Highways" to Kent Hauf's "Plainsong, J.M. Coetzee's "Disgrace," and Michael Cunningham's "The Hours." (MLH)

  6. School Term vs. School Holiday: Associations with Children’s Physical Activity, Screen-Time, Diet and Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda E. Staiano

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study examined differences in children’s health behaviors during school term (ST versus school holiday (SH: June–July and how associations changed when weather characteristics were considered. Children aged 5–18 years (n = 406 from a subtropical climate reported behaviors over 20 months. Multivariable regression models controlling for age, sex, race and body mass index z-score(BMIz ) were used to examine associations between SH and each behavior. A second model included heat index, precipitation and daylight hours. Strenuous activity, moderate activity, total activity and TV viewing were significantly higher during SH than ST. After adjusting for weather characteristics, total activity remained significantly higher during SH, but the association with TV viewing was attenuated. Youth surveyed during high precipitation were significantly less likely to meet physical activity guidelines. There were no significant associations between SH and meeting sleep, physical activity or screen-time guidelines. Weather characteristics influenced associations between SH and youth’s physical activity and TV viewing.

  7. T he Comparison of Turkish Folk Dancers with Sedentary People in Terms of Some Physical Fitness P aram e ters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ender ŞENEL

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study wa s to compare Turkish folk dancers with sedentary people in terms of some physical fitness p arameters . 12 women and 14 men from Turkish folk dances team, which took part in a contest in 2013 and 12 sedentary women and 14 sedentary men from Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University, totally 52 volunteers, pa rticipated in this study. Height, weight, strength, flexibility, vertical jump and anaerobic power of subjects were measured with measuring tools. Descriptive and Mann - Whitney U tests in SPSS 16.0 were used to analyze data. When physical fitness p arameters of men Turkish folk dances athletes and sedentary men were compared, while statistically significant difference was found between the right - hand grip strength, the left - hand grip strength and vertical jump (p0.05. When physical fitness p arameters of women Turkish folk dances athletes and sedentary women were compared, while statistically significant difference was found between the right - hand grip strength, the left - hand grip strength, vertical jump and a naerobic power (p0.05. Consequently, it was found that the right and left handgrip strength and vertical jump values of women and men Turkish folk da nces athletes were higher than sedentary. It can be said that these differences result from that they usually do exercises for development of these p arameters because of the nature of this sport branch.

  8. Positive effects of resistance training in frail elderly patients with dementia after long-term physical restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadore, Eduardo L; Moneo, Ana B Bays; Mensat, Marta Martinez; Muñoz, Andrea Rozas; Casas-Herrero, Alvaro; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of a multicomponent exercise intervention on muscle strength, incidence of falls and functional outcomes in frail elderly patients with dementia after long-term physical restraint, followed by 24 weeks of training cessation. Eighteen frail elderly patients with mild dementia (88.1 ± 5.1 years) performed a multicomponent exercise program, which consisted of 4 weeks of walking, balance and cognitive exercises, followed by 4 weeks of resistance exercise performed twice weekly [8-12 repetitions at 20-50 % of the one-repetition maximum (1RM)], combined with walking, balance and cognitive exercises. Before and after training, as well as after 24 weeks of training cessation, strength outcomes, Barthel Index, balance, gait ability, rise from a chair ability, dual task performance, incidence of falls and Mini-Mental State Examination were assessed. After the first 4 weeks of training, there was a significant improvement only in the balance test, whereas no additional changes were observed. However, after the second part of the training, the participants required significantly less time for the time-up-and-go test (P < 0.05), and improved the isometric hand grip, hip flexion and knee extension strength, as well as the leg press 1RM (P < 0.01). A significant reduction was also observed in the incidence of falls (P < 0.01). After 24 weeks of training cessation, abrupt decreases were observed in nearly all of the physical outcomes (P < 0.05). The exercise intervention improved strength, balance and gait ability in frail elderly patients with dementia after long-term physical restraint, and these benefits were lost after training cessation.

  9. Promoting strength and balance in adolescents during physical education: effects of a short-term resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granacher, Urs; Muehlbauer, Thomas; Doerflinger, Britta; Strohmeier, Ralf; Gollhofer, Albert

    2011-04-01

    Secular trends in strength and postural control have been reported for children and adolescents. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the impact of a short-term ballistic strength training (BST) followed by detraining on measures of strength and postural control in adolescents. Twenty-eight high-school students participated in this study and were assigned to either an intervention (n = 14, age 16.7 ± 0.6 years, body mass index [BMI] 21.1 ± 1.7 kg · m) or a control group (n = 14, age 16.8 ± 0.7 years, BMI 19.9 ± 1.7 kg · m). The intervention class participated in a short-term (8 week) lower extremity BST program 2 times a week integrated in their regular physical education lessons. Pre, post, and follow-up tests included the measurements of maximal isometric force (MIF) and rate of force development (RFD) of the leg extensors on a leg press with the feet resting on a force platform, vertical jumping height (countermovement jump [CMJ]) on a force plate and the assessment of static (1-legged stance on a balance platform), and dynamic (mediolateral perturbation impulse on a balance platform) postural control. Ballistic strength training resulted in statistically significant improvements in MIF (p = 0.001) and CMJ height (p training modality for the application in a school setting (particularly during physical education lessons) that produced transient improvements in strength variables. These results could have an impact on improving the performance level in various motor fitness skills and sports activities in physical education.

  10. Response of Long-Term Memory to Molecular Changes of BDNF in Hippocampus in Various Intensities of Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Lubis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the physiological response of long-term memory (LTM to the molecular changes of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the hippocampus by the treatment of various intensities of physical activity. Methods: Subjects were 7–8 week old male Wistar rats weighed between 201–250 grams. This study was an experimental study with pre-(day-1 and post-(day-14 design. Molecular changes reflected by the changes in the expression of mRNA and protein of BDNF in the hippocampus. Treatment of physical activity on the subjects was running on the Animal Treadmill by grouping of the physical activity: light intensity at a speed of 10 m/min, moderate intensity at a speed of 20 m/min and heavy intensity at a speed of 30 m/min. The treatment’s duration was 30 minutes.Then, analysis of data on pre (day-1 and post (day-14 which were: LTM response based on travel time swimming test, the expression of mRNA (Ct and protein (% of BDNF in hippocampus based on RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results: The results showed that moderate intensity group caused the better physiological and molecular responses than the other groups, as follows: travel time (0.6260 vs 0.7270 vs 0.9400 vs. 1.4000 seconds (p<0.05, mRNA BDNF expression (17.2320 vs 18.8800 vs 19.7540 vs 20.7750 Ct (p<0.05, and hippocampal BDNF protein expression. Conclusions: The study conclude that the moderate intensity is the best physical activity to improve LTM as showed by the BDNF mRNA expression as well as BDNF protein in hippocampus.

  11. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Joe Incandela

    There have been two plenary physics meetings since the December CMS week. The year started with two workshops, one on the measurements of the Standard Model necessary for “discovery physics” as well as one on the Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT). Meanwhile the tail of the “2007 analyses” is going through the last steps of approval. It is expected that by the end of January all analyses will have converted to using the data from CSA07 – which include the effects of miscalibration and misalignment. January Physics Days The first Physics Days of 2008 took place on January 22-24. The first two days were devoted to comprehensive re¬ports from the Detector Performance Groups (DPG) and Physics Objects Groups (POG) on their planning and readiness for early data-taking followed by approvals of several recent studies. Highlights of POG presentations are included below while the activities of the DPGs are covered elsewhere in this bulletin. January 24th was devo...

  12. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    The all-plenary format of the CMS week in Cyprus gave the opportunity to the conveners of the physics groups to present the plans of each physics analysis group for tackling early physics analyses. The presentations were complete, so all are encouraged to browse through them on the Web. There is a wealth of information on what is going on, by whom and on what basis and priority. The CMS week was followed by two CMS “physics events”, the ICHEP08 days and the physics days in July. These were two weeks dedicated to either the approval of all the results that would be presented at ICHEP08, or to the review of all the other Monte-Carlo based analyses that were carried out in the context of our preparations for analysis with the early LHC data (the so-called “2008 analyses”). All this was planned in the context of the beginning of a ramp down of these Monte Carlo efforts, in anticipation of data.  The ICHEP days are described below (agenda and talks at: http://indic...

  13. Summer Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makidi, Nitou

    2012-01-01

    The summer of 2012 has been filled with many memorable events and activities. As an intern, I had responsibilities that had to be fulfilled. My tour of duty was completed as an administrative student trainee in the Information Technology and Communications Services Business Office (IT-A). In accordance with the Business Objectives and Agreement of the Business Office and my performance plan, I was to provide business office support, improve business, project management, and technical work processes. With this being stated, I supported a project called "The Big Move Project" (TBMP), which will take course over the next several years. The Big Move Project is the planning of the Information Technology (IT) Directorate's relocation to various buildings in the course of upcoming years, when designs and the building of Central Campus have been completed. Working directly with my supervisor and the project manager, I was responsible for gathering both administrative and operational area requirements for the Information Technology (IT) Directorate, along with its outsourced support and contractors, such as IMCS, NICS, and ACES. My first action was to create rubrics that will serve as a guideline for the information that should be given by each branch of IT. After receiving that information via a few KAITS actions, I was able to start the consolidation process, and begin working on a presentation. A SharePoint was created shortly after for others to view the progression of the project, which I managed. During the consolidation ofthis information, I would occasionally present to the IT Deputy Director and IT Chiefs. The draft of this presentation was shown to employees of Center Operations (T A) and stakeholders-IT Chief Officers and contractor managers-in the relocation of IT to make them aware of what requirements must be met that will enable IT to be accommodated appropriately in the design of Central Campus Phase 11-the time in which IT and its contractors are scheduled

  14. S'Cool LAB Summer CAMP 2017 at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    The S’Cool LAB Summer CAMP is an opportunity for high-school students (aged 16-19) from all around the world to spend 2 weeks exploring the fascinating world of particle physics. The 24 selected participants spend their summer at S’Cool LAB, CERN’s hands-on particle physics learning laboratory, for an epic programme of lectures and tutorials, team research projects, visits of CERN’s research installations, and social activities.

  15. Effects of long-term compost application on carbon content and soil physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Marie; Houot, Sabine

    2013-04-01

    Biological treatment through composting of organic wastes fulfils multiple purposes: it not only reduces the amount of waste stored in landfills but can also provide agricultural soils with organic amendments, which affect physicochemical soil properties and reduce the use of mineral fertilizers. However, the impacts of different types of amendments are not yet fully understood, as quantity and quality of the exogenous organic matter (EOM) applied vary greatly and numerous other parameters are affected as well, such as pH, heavy metal content, or nutrient availability. The objective of this project was to investigate the effect of different organic amendments - via simulations - on water holding capacity (WHC) and particularly plant available water (PAW), in regard to irrigation needs. The long-term field experiment "Qualiagro" (INRA - Veolia Environment collaboration) was established in Feucherolles, France in 1998, where five treatments were designed, each with two levels of mineral nitrogen (N) addition: minimal and optimal. Farmyard manure (FYM) and three types of compost - all applied every other year at a rate of 4 t carbon ha-1 - gave rise to varying organic carbon (OC) contents and were compared to a control treatment. The treatments changed the soil's OC content from initially ~10.5 g kg-1 to a range of 9.35 to 15.58 g kg-1. An increased OC content can enhance WHC by increasing total porosity/ reducing bulk density. The PAW - the difference between field capacity (FC) and permanent wilting point (WP); predicted with pedotransfer functions related to OC - increases, if the increase at FC is larger than that at WP. With a higher amount of PAW, the need to irrigate fields - to ensure sufficient water availability for plant growth - decreases. At the same time, soil bulk density (ρd) affects root growth; denser soils can lead to reduced rooting depth. Both of these effects were considered when employing a simple soil water balance model (BUDGET; http

  16. Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cullen, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    Defined as the scientific study of matter and energy, physics explains how all matter behaves. Separated into modern and classical physics, the study attracts both experimental and theoretical physicists. From the discovery of the process of nuclear fission to an explanation of the nature of light, from the theory of special relativity to advancements made in particle physics, this volume profiles 10 pioneers who overcame tremendous odds to make significant breakthroughs in this heavily studied branch of science. Each chapter contains relevant information on the scientist''s childhood, research, discoveries, and lasting contributions to the field and concludes with a chronology and a list of print and Internet references specific to that individual.

  17. Professional burnout of personnel working in summer camps of people with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannia N.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Professional burnout constitutes a syndrome of physical and mental exhaustion occurring in working environment with symptoms that are present after frequent and long-term exposure in difficult working conditions especially in special education settings where a higher burnout in noticed due to tne nature of the profession. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine professional burnout of working personnel in summer camps for people with disabilities. Materials – Methods: The sample consisted of 35 participants (11 men and 25 women all camp personnel escorting people with disabilities in summer camps. Each participant completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory (Maslach & Jackson, 1986 comprised of 22 items that assess the variables of exhaustion, accomplishment and depersonalization. Omega total reliability analysis revealed an internal consistency ranging from good (ω total= .72 to high (ω total = .91 and a positive interaction between all factors. Independent samples t-test revealed differences personal accomplishment (t = -1.9 , df = 33, p = 0.32 και depersonalization t = -2.59 , df = 33, p = .014 according to participation in physical activity during the summer camp period. ANOVA analysis showed statistically significant differences in depersonalization (F (3, 33 = 2.81, p = .043, η2 =.076 , exhaustion (F (3, 33 = .335, p = .032, η2 =.084 , and personal accomplishment (F (3, 33 = 4.67, p = .008, η2 =.090 in relation to work satisfaction and type of disability. Conclusions: Professional burnout of personnel working in summer camps for people with disabilities appears high due to many hours and high working load that is affected by the nature of disability, participation of personnel in physical activities and their satisfaction derived from primary profession other than summer camp work.

  18. Short- and Long-Term Theory-Based Predictors of Physical Activity in Women Who Participated in a Weight-Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserkampf, A.; Silva, M. N.; Santos, I. C.; Carraça, E. V.; Meis, J. J. M.; Kremers, S. P. J.; Teixeira, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed psychosocial predictors of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Self-Determination Theory (SDT) and evaluated their associations with short- and long-term moderate plus vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and lifestyle physical activity (PA) outcomes in women who underwent a weight-management program. 221 participants (age…

  19. Relationship between Physical Disabilities or Long-Term Health Problems and Health Risk Behaviors or Conditions among US High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sherry Everett; Lollar, Donald J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study explores the relationship between self-reported physical disabilities or long-term health problems and health risk behaviors or adverse health conditions (self-reported engagement in violent behaviors, attempted suicide, cigarette smoking, alcohol and other drug use, sexual activity, physical activity, dietary behaviors,…

  20. Short- and Long-Term Theory-Based Predictors of Physical Activity in Women Who Participated in a Weight-Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserkampf, A.; Silva, M. N.; Santos, I. C.; Carraça, E. V.; Meis, J. J. M.; Kremers, S. P. J.; Teixeira, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed psychosocial predictors of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Self-Determination Theory (SDT) and evaluated their associations with short- and long-term moderate plus vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and lifestyle physical activity (PA) outcomes in women who underwent a weight-management program. 221 participants (age…

  1. Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silber, Herbert B. [San Jose State University

    2013-06-20

    The ACS Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry (herein called “Summer Schools”) were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and held at San Jose State University (SJSU) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Summer Schools offer undergraduate students with U.S. citizenship an opportunity to complete coursework through ACS accredited chemistry degree programs at SJSU or the State University of New York at Stony Brook (SBU). The courses include lecture and laboratory work on the fundamentals and applications of nuclear and radiochemistry. The number of students participating at each site is limited to 12, and the low student-to-instructor ratio is needed due to the intense nature of the six-week program. To broaden the students’ perspectives on nuclear science, prominent research scientists active in nuclear and/or radiochemical research participate in a Guest Lecture Series. Symposia emphasizing environmental chemistry, nuclear medicine, and career opportunities are conducted as a part of the program. The Department of Energy’s Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) renewed the five-year proposal for the Summer Schools starting March 1, 2007, with contributions from Biological and Environmental Remediation (BER) and Nuclear Physics (NP). This Final Technical Report covers the Summer Schools held in the years 2007-2011.

  2. The Summer School Alpbach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitsch Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty young, highly qualified European science and engineering students converge annually for stimulating 10 days of work in the Austrian Alps. Four teams are formed, each of which designs a space mission, which are then judged by a jury of experts. Students learn how to approach the design of a satellite mission and explore new and startling ideas supported by experts. The Summer School Alpbach enjoys more than 30 years of tradition in providing in-depth teaching on different topics of space science and space technology, featuring lectures and concentrated working sessions on mission studies in self-organised working groups. The Summer School is organised by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG and co-sponsored by the European Space Agency (ESA, the International Space Science Institute (ISSI, and the national space authorities of its member and cooperating states.

  3. Summer season | Cafeteria closures

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Please note the following cafeteria closures over the summer season: Bldg. 54 closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 13: closed from 13/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Restaurant No. 2, table service (brasserie and restaurant): closed from 01/08/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 864: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 865: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013.

  4. Summer season | Cafeteria closures

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Please note the following cafeteria closures over the summer season: Bldg. 54 closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 13: closed from 13/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Restaurant No. 2, table service (brasserie and restaurant): closed from 01/08/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 864: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 865: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013.

  5. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Guenther Dissertori

    The time period between the last CMS week and this June was one of intense activity with numerous get-together targeted at addressing specific issues on the road to data-taking. The two series of workshops, namely the “En route to discoveries” series and the “Vertical Integration” meetings continued.   The first meeting of the “En route to discoveries” sequence (end 2007) had covered the measurements of the Standard Model signals as necessary prerequisite to any claim of signals beyond the Standard Model. The second meeting took place during the Feb CMS week and concentrated on the commissioning of the Physics Objects, whereas the third occurred during the April Physics Week – and this time the theme was the strategy for key new physics signatures. Both of these workshops are summarized below. The vertical integration meetings also continued, with two DPG-physics get-togethers on jets and missing ET and on electrons and photons. ...

  6. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Hill

    2012-01-01

    The months that have passed since the last CMS Bulletin have been a very busy and exciting time for CMS physics. We have gone from observing the very first 8TeV collisions produced by the LHC to collecting a dataset of the collisions that already exceeds that recorded in all of 2011. All in just a few months! Meanwhile, the analysis of the 2011 dataset and publication of the subsequent results has continued. These results come from all the PAGs in CMS, including searches for the Higgs boson and other new phenomena, that have set the most stringent limits on an ever increasing number of models of physics beyond the Standard Model including dark matter, Supersymmetry, and TeV-scale gravity scenarios, top-quark physics where CMS has overtaken the Tevatron in the precision of some measurements, and bottom-quark physics where CMS made its first discovery of a new particle, the Ξ*0b baryon (candidate event pictured below). Image 2:  A Ξ*0b candidate event At the same time POGs and PAGs...

  7. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2011-01-01

    Since the last CMS Week, all physics groups have been extremely active on analyses based on the full 2010 dataset, with most aiming for a preliminary measurement in time for the winter conferences. Nearly 50 analyses were approved in a “marathon” of approval meetings during the first two weeks of March, and the total number of approved analyses reached 90. The diversity of topics is very broad, including precision QCD, Top, and electroweak measurements, the first observation of single Top production at the LHC, the first limits on Higgs production at the LHC including the di-tau final state, and comprehensive searches for new physics in a wide range of topologies (so far all with null results unfortunately). Most of the results are based on the full 2010 pp data sample, which corresponds to 36 pb-1 at √s = 7 TeV. This report can only give a few of the highlights of a very rich physics program, which is listed below by physics group...

  8. Allegheny County Summer Food Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This data set shows the Summer Food Sites located within Allegheny County for children (18 years and younger) for breakfast and lunch during summer recess. OPEN...

  9. The effect of classroom structure on verbal and physical aggression among peers: a short-term longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsmann, Evelyn M; Van De Schoot, Rens; Schober, Barbara; Finsterwald, Monika; Spiel, Christiane

    2013-04-01

    Teachers promote student learning and well-being in school by establishing a supportive classroom structure. The term classroom structure refers to how teachers design tasks, maintain authority, and evaluate student achievement. Although empirical studies have shown the relation of classroom structure to student motivation, achievement, and well-being, no prior investigations have examined the influence of classroom structure on aggression among peers. The present study examined whether a supportive classroom structure has an impact on verbal and physical aggression. At two points in time, data were collected from 1680 students in Grades 5 to 7 using self-report questionnaires. The results of structural equation modeling revealed that a supportive classroom structure at Time 1 was associated with less perpetrated verbal aggression at Time 2, 9months later. This finding has practical relevance for teacher training as well as for aggression prevention and intervention among children.

  10. Physical simulation of the long-term dynamic action of a plasma beam on a space debris object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuvalov, Valentin A.; Gorev, Nikolai. B.; Tokmak, Nikolai A.; Kochubei, Galina S.

    2017-03-01

    A methodology is developed for physical (laboratory) simulation of the long-term dynamic action of plasma beam high-energy ions on a space debris object with the aim of removing it to a lower orbit followed by its burning in the Earth's atmosphere. The methodology is based on the use of a criterion for the equivalence of two plasma beam exposure regimes (in the Earth' ionosphere and in laboratory conditions) and an accelerated test procedure in what concerns space debris object material sputtering and space debris object erosion by a plasma beam in the Earth's ionosphere. The space debris coating material (blanket thermal insulation) sputtering yield and normal and tangential momentum transfer coefficients are determined experimentally as a function of the ion energy and the ion beam incidence angle.

  11. Physics-Based Continuous Simulation of Long-Term Near-Surface Hydrologic Response for the Coos Bay Experimental Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, B. A.; Loague, K.; Montgomery, D. R.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2007-12-01

    The study reported here employed the physics-based InHM to simulate continuous hydrologic response from 1990 through 1996 for the Coos Bay (CB1) experimental catchment. InHM dynamically simulates 3D variably- saturated subsurface flow using Richards equation and 2D surface and open channel flow using the diffusion- wave approximation to the depth-integrated shallow-water equations. The uniqueness of the boundary-value problem (BVP) used in a previous study to successfully simulate three sprinkling experiments was assessed, via model performance evaluation against piezometric and discharge data, for 33 events extracted from the seven- year continuous record. The simulations conducted in this effort suggest the potential for interaction between the deeper water table and near-surface hydrologic response, which is in agreement with the detailed field observations made during the CB1 sprinkling experiments. The InHM simulations could not adequately reproduce the observed pore-water pressures, suggesting that detailed characterization of the locations and connectivities of bedrock fractures would be necessary to simulate distributed hydrologic response at locations where bedrock fracture flow is important. The results from this study suggest that uniqueness is a problem for physics-based models when employing a BVP used successfully for smaller magnitude storms to simulate larger storms. The long-term simulations conducted here, combined with previous event-based hydrologic- response simulations and field-based observations, highlight the challenges in characterizing / simulating fractured bedrock flow at small catchments like CB1.

  12. Summer Migrant Education Administrative Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    This manual helps local education agencies (LEAs) create and develop summer school programs for children of migrant workers in North Carolina. It includes models for summer programs in music, art, vocational education, reading, language arts and math. The manual includes sections on financing, planning, student transportation, summer lunch…

  13. Short-term recovery of soil physical, chemical, micro- and mesobiological functions in a new vineyard under organic farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, E. A. C.; Agnelli, A. E.; Fabiani, A.; Gagnarli, E.; Mocali, S.; Priori, S.; Simoni, S.; Valboa, G.

    2015-06-01

    Deep earthwork activities carried out before vineyard plantation can severely affect soil profile properties. As a result, soil features in the root environment are often much more similar to those of the underlying substratum than those of the original profile. The time needed to recover the original soil functions is ecologically relevant and may strongly affect vine phenology and grape yield, particularly under organic viticulture. The general aim of this work was to investigate soil resilience after vineyard pre-planting earthworks. In particular, an old and a new vineyard, established on the same soil type, were compared over a 5-year period for soil chemical, physical, micro- and mesobiological properties. The investigated vineyards (Vitis vinifera L., cv. Sangiovese) were located in the Chianti Classico district (central Italy), on stony and calcareous soils, and were not irrigated. The older vineyard was planted in 2000, after slope reshaping by bulldozing and back-hoe ploughing down to about 0.8-1.0 m. The new vineyard was planted in 2011, after equivalent earthwork practices carried out in the summer of 2009. Both vineyards were organically managed, and they were fertilized with compost only every autumn (1000 kg ha-1 per year). The new vineyard was cultivated by periodic tillage, while the old vineyard was managed with alternating grass-covered and tilled inter-rows. Soil samples were collected at 0-15 cm depth from fixed locations in each vineyard every spring from 2010 to 2014. The old vineyard was sampled in both tilled and grass-covered inter-rows. According to the results from physical and chemical analyses, the new vineyard, during the whole 2010-2014 period, showed lower total organic carbon, total nitrogen, carbon to nitrogen ratio and electrical conductivity, along with higher silt and total CaCO3 contents than the old vineyard, suggesting still-evolving equilibrium conditions. The microarthropod analysis showed significantly different

  14. Biosynthetic hydrogels--studies on chemical and physical characteristics on long-term cellular response for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thankam, Finosh Gnanaprakasam; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2014-07-01

    Biosynthetic hydrogels can meet the drawbacks caused by natural and synthetic ones for biomedical applications. In the current article we present a novel biosynthetic alginate-poly(propylene fumarate) copolymer based chemically crosslinked hydrogel scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering applications. Partially crosslinked PA hydrogel and fully cross linked PA-A hydrogel scaffolds were prepared. The influence of chemical and physical (morphology and architecture of hydrogel) characteristics on the long term cellular response was studied. Both these hydrogels were cytocompatible and showed no genotoxicity upon contact with fibroblast cells. Both PA and PA-A were able to resist deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species and sustain the viability of L929 cells. The hydrogel incubated oxidative stress induced cells were capable of maintaining the intra cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) expression to the normal level confirmed their protective effect. Relatively the PA hydrogel was found to be unstable in the cell culture medium. The PA-A hydrogel was able to withstand appreciable cyclic stretching. The cyclic stretching introduced complex macro and microarchitectural features with interconnected pores and more structured bound water which would provide long-term viability of around 250% after the 24th day of culture. All these qualities make PA-A hydrogel form a potent candidate for cardiac tissue engineering.

  15. Direct and indirect effects of nutritional status, physical function and cognitive function on activities of daily living in Japanese older adults requiring long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Tomohiko; Nishida, Yuusuke

    2014-10-01

    To identify the direct and indirect effects of nutritional status, physical function, and cognitive function on activities of daily living in Japanese older adults requiring long-term care. In total, 179 participants aged ≥ 65 years who were eligible for long-term care insurance (mean age 85.5 ± 7.8 years) were recruited for this study. Nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment, Short Form) and physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery) were examined. Activities of daily living, cognitive function and frailty were assessed using the Barthel Index, Mini-Mental State Examination and Clinical Frailty Scale, respectively. Path analysis was used to determine relationships between these factors and the activities of daily living. For Japanese older adults requiring long-term care, pathways were modeled for nutritional status, physical function and the activities of daily living. The total effect of nutritional status was 0.516 (Pnutritional status through physical function on the activities of daily living was 0.458 (Pnutritional status on activities of daily living was observed (b=0.058, P=0.258). The present study identified the complex pathway from nutritional status to the activities of daily living through physical function in aged Japanese people requiring long-term care. These findings suggest that maintaining good nutritional status and nutritional support might delay physical function decline, and prolong the activities of daily living. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  16. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2012-01-01

      The period since the last CMS Bulletin has been historic for CMS Physics. The pinnacle of our physics programme was an observation of a new particle – a strong candidate for a Higgs boson – which has captured worldwide interest and made a profound impact on the very field of particle physics. At the time of the discovery announcement on 4 July, 2012, prominent signals were observed in the high-resolution H→γγ and H→ZZ(4l) modes. Corroborating excess was observed in the H→W+W– mode as well. The fermionic channel analyses (H→bb, H→ττ), however, yielded less than the Standard Model (SM) expectation. Collectively, the five channels established the signal with a significance of five standard deviations. With the exception of the diphoton channel, these analyses have all been updated in the last months and several new channels have been added. With improved analyses and more than twice the i...

  17. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2012-01-01

      2012 has started off as a very busy year for the CMS Physics Groups. Planning for the upcoming higher luminosity/higher energy (8 TeV) operation of the LHC and relatively early Rencontres de Moriond are the high-priority activities for the group at the moment. To be ready for the coming 8-TeV data, CMS has made a concerted effort to perform and publish analyses on the 5 fb−1 dataset recorded in 2011. This has resulted in the submission of 16 papers already, including nine on the search for the Higgs boson. In addition, a number of preliminary results on the 2011 dataset have been released to the public. The Exotica and SUSY groups approved several searches for new physics in January, such as searches for W′ and exotic highly ionising particles. These were highlighted at a CERN seminar given on 24th  January. Many more analyses, from all the PAGs, including the newly formed SMP (Standard Model Physics) and FSQ (Forward and Small-x QCD), were approved in February. The ...

  18. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Darin Acosta

    2010-01-01

    The collisions last year at 900 GeV and 2.36 TeV provided the long anticipated collider data to the CMS physics groups. Quite a lot has been accomplished in a very short time. Although the delivered luminosity was small, CMS was able to publish its first physics paper (with several more in preparation), and commence the commissioning of physics objects for future analyses. Many new performance results have been approved in advance of this CMS Week. One remarkable outcome has been the amazing agreement between out-of-the-box data with simulation at these low energies so early in the commissioning of the experiment. All of this is testament to the hard work and preparation conducted beforehand by many people in CMS. These analyses could not have happened without the dedicated work of the full collaboration on building and commissioning the detector, computing, and software systems combined with the tireless work of many to collect, calibrate and understand the data and our detector. To facilitate the efficien...

  19. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Demortier

    Physics-wise, the CMS week in December was dominated by discussions of the analyses that will be carried out in the “next six months”, i.e. while waiting for the first LHC collisions.  As presented in December, analysis approvals based on Monte Carlo simulation were re-opened, with the caveat that for this work to be helpful to the goals of CMS, it should be carried out using the new software (CMSSW_2_X) and associated samples.  By the end of the week, the goal for the physics groups was set to be the porting of our physics commissioning methods and plans, as well as the early analyses (based an integrated luminosity in the range 10-100pb-1) into this new software. Since December, the large data samples from CMSSW_2_1 were completed. A big effort by the production group gave a significant number of events over the end-of-year break – but also gave out the first samples with the fast simulation. Meanwhile, as mentioned in December, the arrival of 2_2 meant that ...

  20. From a physical approach to earthquake prediction, towards long and short term warnings ahead of large earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, R.; Bonafede, M.

    2012-04-01

    For 20 years the South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) was a test site for multinational earthquake prediction research, partly bridging the gap between laboratory tests samples, and the huge transform zones of the Earth. The approach was to explore the physics of processes leading up to large earthquakes. The book Advances in Earthquake Prediction, Research and Risk Mitigation, by R. Stefansson (2011), published by Springer/PRAXIS, and an article in the August issue of the BSSA by Stefansson, M. Bonafede and G. Gudmundsson (2011) contain a good overview of the findings, and more references, as well as examples of partially successful long and short term warnings based on such an approach. Significant findings are: Earthquakes that occurred hundreds of years ago left scars in the crust, expressed in volumes of heterogeneity that demonstrate the size of their faults. Rheology and stress heterogeneity within these volumes are significantly variable in time and space. Crustal processes in and near such faults may be observed by microearthquake information decades before the sudden onset of a new large earthquake. High pressure fluids of mantle origin may in response to strain, especially near plate boundaries, migrate upward into the brittle/elastic crust to play a significant role in modifying crustal conditions on a long and short term. Preparatory processes of various earthquakes can not be expected to be the same. We learn about an impending earthquake by observing long term preparatory processes at the fault, finding a constitutive relationship that governs the processes, and then extrapolating that relationship into near space and future. This is a deterministic approach in earthquake prediction research. Such extrapolations contain many uncertainties. However the long time pattern of observations of the pre-earthquake fault process will help us to put probability constraints on our extrapolations and our warnings. The approach described is different from the usual

  1. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Wednesday 4 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 15:45 L. Maiani / CERN L. Maiani / CERN M. Franklin / CERN G. Stevenson M. Diemoz O. Ullaland Introduction to CERN & Particle Physics (1/2) Introduction to CERN & Particle Physics (2/2) Classic Experiments (1/3) CERN Radiation Protection CERN Information on Activities CERN Intro to workshops Thursday 5 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 16:30 M. Franklin / CERN M. Franklin / CERN M. Franklin / CERN F. Close F. Close   Classic Experiments (2/3) Classic Experiments (3/3) Discussion session Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (1/4) Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (2/4) Welcome Drink Friday 6 July 9:15 10:15 F. Close F. Close Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (3/4) Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (4/4) Monday 9 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN L. Rolandi / CERN L. Rolandi / CERN Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) Big Experime...

  2. Efeito de pastagens de inverno e de verão em características físicas de solo sob plantio direto Effect of annual winter and summer pastures on soil physical characteristics, under no-tillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Tulio Spera

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Algumas características físicas de solo foram avaliadas após sete anos (1995 a 2001, num Latossolo Vermelho Distrófico, em Coxilha, RS, em seis sistemas de produção de grãos integrados com pastagens anuais de inverno e de verão e em floresta subtropical. As culturas, tanto de inverno como de verão, foram estabelecidas sob plantio direto. Mediante contrastes, foram comparados os valores das características físicas do solo em cada sistema nas camadas 0-0,05 e 0,10-0,15m. Nos sistemas I e II e na floresta, a densidade de solo e a resistência à penetração foram maiores na camada superficial em relação à camada mais profunda. No sistema II, porosidade total e microporosidade foram menores na camada superficial. O mesmo comportamento das características foi verificado na floresta subtropical para porosidade total e microporosidade. A floresta apresentou densidade de solo e resistência à penetração menores do que a maioria dos sistemas estudados em ambas as camadas, indicando que o solo, sob manejo antrópico, pode sofrer alterações nas características físicas. Os solos sob diferentes sistemas de produção, integrando lavoura e pecuária, apesar de apresentarem indícios de desestruturação, não atingiram níveis considerados críticos.Soil physical characteristics were evaluated, after seven years (1995 to 2001, on a typical Dystrophic Red Latosol located in Coxilha, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Six systems integrating crop production with livestock and a subtropical forest were evaluated. Both winter and summer crops were seeded under no-tillage. Cropping systems and soil of different sampling depths were compared using the contrast procedure. In the I and II sistems and in the forest, the soil density and the resistance to penetration increased in the top layer (0-0,05m concerning the deeper layer (0,10-0,15m. In the II system, total porosity and microporosity decreased in the surface. In the subtropical forest

  3. CERN Summer Student Program 2016 Report

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2155839

    2016-01-01

    This report gives a description of the work done during my stay at CERN as a part of the Summer Student Program 2016. I was assigned to work at the NA61/SHINE collaboration which covers the search for the critical point of strongly interacting matter, study the onset of deconfinement and precise hadron production measurements in hadron–nucleus collisions for cosmic ray and neutrino physics applications.

  4. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Wednesday 4 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 15:45 L. Maiani / CERN L. Maiani / CERN M. Franklin / CERN G. Stevenson M. Diemoz O. Ullaland Introduction to CERN & Particle Physics (1/2) Introduction to CERN & Particle Physics (2/2) Classic Experiments (1/3) CERN Radiation Protection CERN Information on Activities CERN Intro to workshops Thursday 5 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 16:30 M. Franklin / CERN M. Franklin / CERN M. Franklin / CERN F. Close F. Close   Classic Experiments (2/3) Classic Experiments (3/3) Discussion session Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (1/4) Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (2/4) Welcome Drink Friday 6 July 9:15 10:15 F. Close F. Close Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (3/4) Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (4/4) Further information can be obtained on the web at the following URL: http://cern.web.cern.ch/CERN/Divisions/PE/HRS/Recruitment/sum_prog99.html

  5. Summer Student Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Date Time Title Speaker 17/07/2006 09:15 - 11:00 Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (1-2/6) G. ROSS 11:15 - 12:00 Astroparticle Physics (1/3) N. PALANQUE-DELABROUILLE 12:00 Discussion Session 18/07/2006 09:15 - 10:00 Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (3/6) G. ROSS 10:15 - 12:00 Astroparticle Physics (2-3/3) N. PALANQUE-DELABROUILLE 12:00 Discussion Session 19/07/2006 09:15 - 10:00 Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (4/6) G. ROSS 10:15 - 11:00 Neutrino Physics (1/4) J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS 11:15 - 12:00 Seminar on LHC upgrade A. DE ROECK 12:00 Discussion Session 20/07/2006 09:15 - 10:00 Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (5/6) G. ROSS 10:15 - 12:00 Neutrino Physics (2-3/4) J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS 12:00 Discussion Session 21/07/2006 09:15 - 10:00 Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (6/6) G. ROSS 10:15 - 11:00 The Standard Model (1/8) A. PICH 11:15 - 12:00 Neutrino Physics (4/4) J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS 12:00 Discussion Session Date T...

  6. Scientists and professionals from all around the world in Karlsruhe. Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn summer school 2013 on nuclear reactors 'Physics, Fuels and Systems'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Espinoza, V.H.; Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Scientific Secretariat FJOHSS

    2014-02-15

    Every 2 years the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) organizes the Frederic Joliot/Otto Hahn (FJOH) Summer School together with the Commissariat a l'-Energie Atomique (CEA) since 1999. In 2013, the FJOH Summer School took place in Karlsruhe from 21 to 30 August. The topic of this year's school was 'Advanced Nuclear Systems with Transuranium Fuels'. Experts from internationally well recognized research institutions and Universities from USA, Japan, Asia and Europe gave lectures about the current status and trends on the related fields. (orig.)

  7. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. D'Hondt

    The Electroweak and Top Quark Workshop (16-17th of July) A Workshop on Electroweak and Top Quark Physics, dedicated on early measurements, took place on 16th-17th July. We had more than 40 presentations at the Workshop, which was an important milestone for 2007 physics analyses in the EWK and TOP areas. The Standard Model has been tested empirically by many previous experiments. Observables which are nowadays known with high precision will play a major role for data-based CMS calibrations. A typical example is the use of the Z to monitor electron and muon reconstruction in di-lepton inclusive samples. Another example is the use of the W mass as a constraint for di-jets in the kinematic fitting of top-quark events, providing information on the jet energy scale. The predictions of the Standard Model, for what concerns proton collisions at the LHC, are accurate to a level that the production of W/Z and top-quark events can be used as a powerful tool to commission our experiment. On the other hand the measure...

  8. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2013-01-01

    In the period since the last CMS Bulletin, the LHC – and CMS – have entered LS1. During this time, CMS Physics Analysis Groups have performed more than 40 new analyses, many of which are based on the complete 8 TeV dataset delivered by the LHC in 2012 (and in some cases on the full Run 1 dataset). These results were shown at, and well received by, several high-profile conferences in the spring of 2013, including the inaugural meeting of the Large Hadron Collider    Physics Conference (LHCP) in Barcelona, and the 26th International Symposium on Lepton Photon Interactions at High Energies (LP) in San Francisco. In parallel, there have been significant developments in preparations for Run 2 of the LHC and on “future physics” studies for both Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrades of the CMS detector. The Higgs analysis group produced five new results for LHCP including a new H-to-bb search in VBF production (HIG-13-011), ttH with H to γ&ga...

  9. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2013-01-01

    The period since the last CMS bulletin has seen the end of proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy 8 TeV, a successful proton-lead collision run at 5 TeV/nucleon, as well as a “reference” proton run at 2.76 TeV. With these final LHC Run 1 datasets in hand, CMS Physics Analysis Groups have been busy analysing these data in preparation for the winter conferences. Moreover, despite the fact that the pp run only concluded in mid-December (and there was consequently less time to complete data analyses), CMS again made a strong showing at the Rencontres de Moriond in La Thuile (EW and QCD) where nearly 40 new results were presented. The highlight of these preliminary results was the eagerly anticipated updated studies of the properties of the Higgs boson discovered in July of last year. Meanwhile, preparations for Run 2 and physics performance studies for Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrade scenarios are ongoing. The Higgs analysis group produced updated analyses on the full Run 1 dataset (~25 f...

  10. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Christopher Hill

    2013-01-01

    Since the last CMS Bulletin, the CMS Physics Analysis Groups have completed more than 70 new analyses, many of which are based on the complete Run 1 dataset. In parallel the Snowmass whitepaper on projected discovery potential of CMS for HL-LHC has been completed, while the ECFA HL-LHC future physics studies has been summarised in a report and nine published benchmark analyses. Run 1 summary studies on b-tag and jet identification, quark-gluon discrimination and boosted topologies have been documented in BTV-13-001 and JME-13-002/005/006, respectively. The new tracking alignment and performance papers are being prepared for submission as well. The Higgs analysis group produced several new results including the search for ttH with H decaying to ZZ, WW, ττ+bb (HIG-13-019/020) where an excess of ~2.5σ is observed in the like-sign di-muon channel, and new searches for high-mass Higgs bosons (HIG-13-022). Search for invisible Higgs decays have also been performed both using the associ...

  11. Summer Camp, July 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    During the month of July, the Staff Association’s Children’s Day-Care Centre and School EVEE held a summer camp for 4- to 6-year-olds. 24 children altogether joined in on the adventures. On the summer camp, the children got to “travel” to a different continent of the world every week. Day after day, they would pass through make-believe Customs upon arrival and get their passports stamped by a “customs officer”. For the first week, we went on a trip to Africa. In the spirit of the theme, the children got to do plenty of crafts and coloring, make their own little bindles and play various games. They even had the chance to visit the Museum of Ethnography in Geneva (MEG), learn to play the balafon and make musical instruments with Sterrenlab. For the second week, we set off to discover the Americas, exploring both the South and the North. Alongside different workshops (singing, dancing, storytelling, crafts), the children could enjoy several special ac...

  12. WNS summer surveillance: DATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballmann, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Bats occupying hibernacula during summer months may play an important role in the epidemiology of white-nose syndrome (WNS). For example, bats exposed to viable Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), the causative agent of WNS, in late summer could spread the fungus by transmitting it to other bats or to other locations suitable for establishment of new environmental reservoirs. To explore risks for transmission of Pd during the non-hibernal season, we screened bats using hibernacula between July 18 to August 22, 2012 and associated environmental samples for presence of Pd. Study sites within the eastern United States included six hibernacula known to harbor Pd and two hibernacula in which bats with WNS had not been previously observed. Standard demographic and morphometric data were recorded for bats captured from inside each study site. Sample types evaluated for the presence of Pd included bat wing swabs, guano pellets from individual bats, swabs of hibernaculum walls, and sediments from the hibernaculum floor. Additionally, swabs of various trapping and processing equipment and clothing worn into study sites were evaluated for the presence of Pd.

  13. Attractiveness of employment sectors for physical therapists in Ontario, Canada (1999-2007): implication for the long term care sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Michel D; Hastie, Robyn; Oñate, Känecy; Gamble, Brenda; Deber, Raisa B; Verrier, Molly C

    2012-05-29

    Recruiting and retaining health professions remains a high priority for health system planners. Different employment sectors may vary in their appeal to providers. We used the concepts of inflow and stickiness to assess the relative attractiveness of sectors for physical therapists (PTs) in Ontario, Canada. Inflow was defined as the percentage of PTs working in a sector who were not there the previous year. Stickiness was defined as the transition probability that a physical therapist will remain in a given employment sector year-to-year. A longitudinal dataset of registered PTs in Ontario (1999-2007) was created, and primary employment sector was categorized as 'hospital', 'community', 'long term care' (LTC) or 'other.' Inflow and stickiness values were then calculated for each sector, and trends were analyzed. There were 5003 PTs in 1999, which grew to 6064 by 2007, representing a 21.2% absolute growth. Inflow grew across all sectors, but the LTC sector had the highest inflow of 32.0%. PTs practicing in hospitals had the highest stickiness, with 87.4% of those who worked in this sector remaining year-to-year. The community and other employment sectors had stickiness values of 78.2% and 86.8% respectively, while the LTC sector had the lowest stickiness of 73.4%. Among all employment sectors, LTC had highest inflow but lowest stickiness. Given expected increases in demand for services, understanding provider transitional probabilities and employment preferences may provide a useful policy and planning tool in developing a sustainable health human resource base across all employment sectors.

  14. Attractiveness of employment sectors for physical therapists in Ontario, Canada (1999-2007: implication for the long term care sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landry Michel D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recruiting and retaining health professions remains a high priority for health system planners. Different employment sectors may vary in their appeal to providers. We used the concepts of inflow and stickiness to assess the relative attractiveness of sectors for physical therapists (PTs in Ontario, Canada. Inflow was defined as the percentage of PTs working in a sector who were not there the previous year. Stickiness was defined as the transition probability that a physical therapist will remain in a given employment sector year-to-year. Methods A longitudinal dataset of registered PTs in Ontario (1999-2007 was created, and primary employment sector was categorized as ‘hospital’, ‘community’, ‘long term care’ (LTC or ‘other.’ Inflow and stickiness values were then calculated for each sector, and trends were analyzed. Results There were 5003 PTs in 1999, which grew to 6064 by 2007, representing a 21.2% absolute growth. Inflow grew across all sectors, but the LTC sector had the highest inflow of 32.0%. PTs practicing in hospitals had the highest stickiness, with 87.4% of those who worked in this sector remaining year-to-year. The community and other employment sectors had stickiness values of 78.2% and 86.8% respectively, while the LTC sector had the lowest stickiness of 73.4%. Conclusion Among all employment sectors, LTC had highest inflow but lowest stickiness. Given expected increases in demand for services, understanding provider transitional probabilities and employment preferences may provide a useful policy and planning tool in developing a sustainable health human resource base across all employment sectors.

  15. Physical origin of hydrophobicity studied in terms of cold denaturation of proteins: comparison between water and simple fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshidome, Takashi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2012-11-14

    A clue to the physical origin of the hydrophobicity is in the experimental observations, which show that it is weakened at low temperatures. By considering a solvophobic model protein immersed in water and three species of simple solvents, we analyze the temperature dependence of the changes in free energy, energy, and entropy of the solvent upon protein unfolding. The angle-dependent and radial-symmetric integral equation theories and the morphometric approach are employed in the analysis. Each of the changes is decomposed into two terms, which depend on the excluded volume and on the area and curvature of the solvent-accessible surface, respectively. The excluded-volume term of the entropy change is further decomposed into two components representing the protein-solvent pair correlation and the protein-solvent-solvent triplet and higher-order correlation, respectively. We show that water crowding in the system becomes more serious upon protein unfolding but this effect becomes weaker as the temperature is lowered. If the hydrophobicity originated from the water structuring near a nonpolar solute, it would be strengthened upon lowering of the temperature. Among the three species of simple solvents, considerable weakening of the solvophobicity at low temperatures is observed only for the solvent where the particles interact through a strong attractive potential and the particle size is as small as that of water. Even in the case of this solvent, however, cold denaturation of a protein cannot be reproduced. It would be reproducible if the attractive potential was substantially enhanced, but such enhancement causes the appearance of the metastability limit for a single liquid phase.

  16. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 6 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 F. Gianotti / CERN J. Carr / CERN E. Copeland / Centre for Theoretical Physics University of Sussex, UK LHC Physics (1/3) Astroparticle Physics (1/3) Introduction to Cosmology (1/2) Tuesday 7 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 F. Gianotti / CERN J. Carr / CERN E. Copeland / Centre for Theoretical Physics University of Sussex, UK LHC Physics (2/3) Astroparticle Physics (2/3) Introduction to Cosmology (2/2) Wednesday 8 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 F. Gianotti / CERN J. Carr / CERN J. Carr; F. Gianotti J. Carr in main auditorium F. Gianotti in TH auditorium LHC Physics (2/3) Astroparticle Physics (2/3) Discussion Session Thursday 9 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Veneziano / CERN G. Veneziano; E. Copeland G. Veneziano in main auditorium E. Copeland in TH auditorium Dreams of a Finite Theory (1/2) Student Session (1/3) Discussion Session Friday 10 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Veneziano / CERN L. Okun / CERN Student Se...

  17. Inter-decadal variations,causes and future projection of the Asian summer monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Yihui; Si Dong; Sun Ying; Liu Yanju; Song Yafang

    2014-01-01

    The present paper presents a concise summary of our recent studies on the Asian summer monsoon, with highting decadal and inter-decadal scales. The studies on the long-term variations of the Asian summer monsoon and its impacts on the change in the summer precipitation in China are reviewed. Moreover,recent changes in the Asian summer monsoon and summer precipitation in East Asia (including Meiyu precipitation) are discussed. Finally,the future changes of the Asian summer monsoon are also pointed out in this paper.

  18. Systematic Review of Screening Instruments for Psychosocial Problems in Children and Adolescents With Long-Term Physical Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabrew, Hiran; McDowell, Heather; Given, Katherine; Murrell, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Children and adolescents with long-term physical conditions (LTPCs) are at greater risk of developing psychosocial problems. Screening for such problems may be undertaken using validated psychometric instruments to facilitate early intervention. A systematic review was undertaken to identify clinically utilized and psychometrically validated instruments for identifying depression, anxiety, behavior problems, substance use problems, family problems, and multiple problems in children and adolescents with LTPCs. Comprehensive searches of articles published in English between 1994 and 2014 were completed via Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Cochrane CENTRAL databases, and by examining reference lists of identified articles and previous related reviews. Forty-four potential screening instruments were identified, described, and evaluated against predetermined clinical and psychometric criteria. Despite limitations in the evidence regarding their clinical and psychometric validity in this population, a handful of instruments, available at varying cost, in multiple languages and formats, were identified to support targeted, but not universal, screening for psychosocial problems in children and adolescents with LTPCs.

  19. A physical approach of the short-term wind power prediction based on CFD pre-calculated flow fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; LIU Yong-qian; YANG Yong-ping; HAN Shuang; WANG Yi-mei

    2013-01-01

    A physical approach of the wind power prediction based on the CFD pre-calculated flow fields is proposed in this paper.The flow fields are obtained based on a steady CFD model with the discrete inflow wind conditions as the boundary conditions,and a database is established containing the important parameters including the inflow wind conditions,the flow fields and the corresponding wind power for each wind turbine.The power is predicted via the database by taking the Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP)wind as the input data.In order to evaluate the approach,the short-term wind power prediction for an actual wind farm is conducted as an example during the period of the year 2010.Compared with the measured power,the predicted results enjoy a high accuracy with the annual Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 15.2% and the annual MAE of 10.80%.A good performance is shown in predicting the wind power's changing trend.This approach is independent of the historical data and can be widely used for all kinds of wind farms including the newly-built wind farms.At the same time,it does not take much computation time while it captures the local air flows more precisely by the CFD model.So it is especially practical for engineering projects.

  20. Poincaré plot analysis of ultra-short-term heart rate variability during recovery from exercise in physically active men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Rayana L; Marques Vanderlei, Luiz C; Garner, David M; Ramos Santana, Milana D; de Abreu, Luiz C; Valenti, Vitor E

    2017-04-26

    Recently there has been increasing interest in the study of ultra-short- term heart rate variability (HRV) in sports performance and exercise physiology. In order to improve standardization of this specific analysis, we evaluated the ultra-short-term HRV analysis through SD1Poincaré index to identify exercise induced responses. We investigated 35 physically active men aged between 18 and 35 years old. Volunteers performed physical exercise on treadmill with intensity of 6.0 km / hour + 1% slope in the first five minutes for physical "warming up." This was followed by 25 minutes with intensity equivalent to 60% of Vmax, with the same slope according to the Conconi threshold. HRV was analyzed in the following periods: the five-minute period before the exercise and the five-minute period immediately after the exercise, the five minutes were divided into five segments of 60 RR intervals. Ultra-short-term RMSSD and SD1 analysis were performed. Ultra-short-term RMSSD and SD1 were significantly (prate was significantly (pshort-term SD1 presented significant correlation with short-term (256 RR intervals) RMSSD (r=0.78; pshort-term HRV analysis through Poincaré plot identified heart rate autonomic responses induced by aerobic exercise.

  1. Summer fire predictability in a Mediterranean environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Raül; Turco, Marco; Bedía, Joaquín; Llasat, Maria Carmen; Provenzale, Antonello

    2015-04-01

    Each year approximately 500000 hectares burn in Europe. Most of them are consequence of Mediterranean summer fires that lead to damages to the natural environment causing important economic and life losses. In order to allow the preparedness of adequate prevention measures in European Mediterranean regions, a better understanding of the summer fire predictability is crucial. Climate is a primary driver of the interannual variability of fires in Mediterranean-type ecosystems, controlling fuel flammability and fuel structure [1, 2]. That is, summer fires are linked to current-year climate values (proxies for the climatic factors that affect fuel flammability) and to antecedent climate variables (proxies for the climatic factors influencing fine fuel availability and connectivity). In our contribution we explore the long-term predictability of wildfires in a Mediterranean region (NE Spain), driving a multiple linear regression model with observed antecedent climate variables and with predicted variables from the ECMWF System-4 seasonal forecast. The approaches are evaluated through a leave-one-out cross-validation over the period 1983-2010. While the ECMWF System-4 proved of limited usefulness due to its limited skill, the model driven with antecedent climate variables alone allowed for satisfactory long-term prediction of above-normal fire activity, suggesting the feasibility of successful seasonal prediction of summer fires in Mediterranean-type regions. *References [1] M. Turco, M. C. Llasat, J. von Hardenberg, and A. Provenzale. Impact of climate variability on summer fires in a mediterranean environment (northeastern iberian peninsula). Climatic Change, 116:665-678, 2013. [2] M. Turco, M. C. Llasat, J. von Hardenberg, and A. Provenzale. Climate change impacts on wildfires in a Mediterranean environment. Climatic Change, 125: 369-380, 2014.

  2. Models of organizational-pedagogical terms of physical education of students of I-IV of courses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turchina N.I.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a model of organizational-pedagogical conditions of physical education students I-IV courses and made an analysis of problems of physical education students, which relate to the organization and content of the educational process in relation to problems of professional-applied physical training and motivation for physical perfection of youth. It is proposed the basic requirements for a model of physical education. It is developed a new structure of the Department of Physical Education, which includes its divisions and refined assignments of each structural unit.

  3. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    V.Ciulli

    2011-01-01

    The main programme of the Physics Week held between 16th and 20th May was a series of topology-oriented workshops on di-leptons, di-photons, inclusive W, and all-hadronic final states. The goal of these workshops was to reach a common understanding for the set of objects (ID, cleaning...), the handling of pile-up, calibration, efficiency and purity determination, as well as to revisit critical common issues such as the trigger. Di-lepton workshop Most analysis groups use a di-lepton trigger or a combination of single and di-lepton triggers in 2011. Some groups need to collect leptons with as low PT as possible with strong isolation and identification requirements as for Higgs into WW at low mass, others with intermediate PT values as in Drell-Yan studies, or high PT as in the Exotica group. Electron and muon reconstruction, identification and isolation, was extensively described in the workshop. For electrons, VBTF selection cuts for low PT and HEEP cuts for high PT were discussed, as well as more complex d...

  4. Long-term physical workload in middle age and disability pension in men and women: a follow-up study of Swedish cohorts

    OpenAIRE

    Kjellberg, Katarina; Lundin, Andreas; Falkstedt, Daniel; Allebeck, Peter; Hemmingsson, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The study investigates the association between level of long-term physical workload in middle age and disability pension (DP) before 61?years of age with adjustments made for early life factors, level of education, and psychosocial working conditions. Associations with DP overall, DP due to musculoskeletal disorders and DP due to psychiatric disorders were examined. Methods The study is based on cohorts of 21,809 Swedish men and women born in 1948 and 1953, with data on physical workl...

  5. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 23 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich R. Jacobsen / LBLN, Berkeley (USA) T. Cass / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (6/8) From Raw Data to Physics Results (1/3) Computing at CERN (1/3) Tuesday 24 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich R. Jacobsen / LBLN, Berkeley (USA) T. Cass / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (7/8) From Raw Data to Physics Results (2/3) Computing at CERN (2/3) Wednesday 25 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich R. Jacobsen / LBLN, Berkeley (USA) A. Pich and R. Jacobsen J. Tuckmantel / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (8/8) From Raw Data to Physics Results (3/3) Discussion Session Superconducting cavities Thursday 26 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 T. Nakada / CERN P. Wells / CERN T. Cass / CERN Violation of Particle Anti-particle Symmetry (1/3) LEP Physics (1/4) Computing at CERN (3/3) Friday 27July 9:15 10:15 11:15 T. Nakada / CERN P. Wells / CERN T. Nakada; T. Cass T. Nakada in main auditorium T. Cass in TH auditorium Violati...

  6. Consideration of Experimental Approaches in the Physical and Biological Sciences in Designing Long-Term Watershed Studies in Forested Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallard, R. F.

    2011-12-01

    , thereby bridging the research needs and conceptual scales of hydrologists and biogeochemists with those of biologists. Both experiments are embedded in larger data-collection networks: the WEBB within the hydrological and meteorological monitoring programs of the USGS and other federal agencies, and the PCWE in the long-term monitoring conducted by the Panama Canal Authority (ACP), its antecedents, and STRI. Examination of landscape-scale processes in a changing world requires the development of detailed landscape-scale data sets, including a formulation of reference states that can act as surrogate experimental controls. For example, the concept of a landscape steady state provides a convenient reference in which present-day observations can be interpreted. Extreme hydrological states must also be described, and both WEBB and PCWE have successfully examined the role of droughts and large storms and their impact on geomorphology, biogeochemistry, and biology. These experiments also have provided platforms for research endeavors never contemplated in the original objectives, a testament to the importance of developing approaches that consider the needs of physical and biological sciences.

  7. Men still value physical attractiveness in a long-term mate more than women: rejoinder to Eastwick, Neff, Finkel, Luchies, and Hunt (2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Andrea L; McNulty, James K; Jackson, Grace L; Karney, Benjamin R

    2014-03-01

    Sexual selection theory and parental investment theory suggest that partner physical attractiveness should more strongly affect men's relationship outcomes than women's relationship outcomes. Nevertheless, the contextual nature of this prediction makes serious methodological demands on studies designed to evaluate it. Given these theories suggest that men value observable aspects of partner attractiveness more than women do only in the context of long-term and reproductively viable relationships, they require that studies testing this sex difference involve (a) participants in long-term relationships, (b) women of child-bearing age, and (c) measures of physical attractiveness that assess observable aspects of appearance. In our original article (Meltzer, McNulty, Jackson, & Karney, 2014), we applied 7 methodological standards that allowed us to meet these 3 criteria and demonstrated that partner physical attractiveness is more strongly associated with men's long-term relationship satisfaction than women's long-term relationship satisfaction. Eastwick, Neff, Finkel, Luchies, and Hunt (2014), in contrast, described an unfocused meta-analysis, a refocused meta-analysis, and new data that all failed to meet these criteria and, not surprisingly, failed to demonstrate such a sex difference. We continue to believe that men value physical attractiveness more than women do, that such preferences have implications for their evaluations of long-term relationships, and that studies properly calibrated to detect such differences will do so. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Impact of Amendments on the Physical Properties of Soil under Tropical Long-Term No Till Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Sacha J.

    2016-01-01

    Tropical regions have been considered the world’s primary agricultural frontier; however, some physico-chemical deficiencies, such as low soil organic matter content, poor soil structure, high erodibility, soil acidity, and aluminum toxicity, have affected their productive capacity. Lime and gypsum are commonly used to improve soil chemical fertility, but no information exists about the long-term effects of these products on the physical attributes and C protection mechanisms of highly weathered Oxisols. A field trial was conducted in a sandy clay loam (kaolinitic, thermic Typic Haplorthox) under a no-tillage system for 12 years. The trial consisted of four treatments: a control with no soil amendment application, the application of 2.1 Mg ha-1 phosphogypsum, the application of 2.0 Mg ha-1 lime, and the application of lime + phosphogypsum (2.0 + 2.1 Mg ha-1, respectively). Since the experiment was established in 2002, the rates have been applied three times (2002, 2004, and 2010). Surface liming effectively increased water-stable aggregates > 2.0 mm at a depth of up to 0.2 m; however, the association with phosphogypsum was considered a good strategy to improve the macroaggregate stability in subsoil layers (0.20 to 0.40 m). Consequently, both soil amendments applied together increased the mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometric mean diameter (GMD) in all soil layers, with increases of up to 118 and 89%, respectively, according to the soil layer. The formation and stabilization of larger aggregates contributed to a higher accumulation of total organic carbon (TOC) on these structures. In addition to TOC, the MWD and aggregate stability index were positively correlated with Ca2+ and Mg2+ levels and base saturation. Consequently, the increase observed in the aggregate size class resulted in a better organization of soil particles, increasing the macroporosity and reducing the soil bulk density and penetration resistance. Therefore, adequate soil chemical management

  9. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 30 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN T. Nakada / CERN P. Wells / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (1/3) Violation of Particle Anti-particle Symmetry (3/3) LEP Physics (3/4) Tuesday 31 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN F. Dydak / CERN P. Wells / CERN P. Lebrun / CERN P. Lebrun / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (2/3) Neutrino Physics (1/4) LEP Physics (4/4) Superconducting Technology for particle accelerators (1/2) Superconducting Technology for particle accelerators (2/2) Wednesday 1 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN F. Dydak / CERN G. Guidice; P. Wells G. Guidice in main auditorium, P. Wells in TH auditorium) O. Grobner / CERN O. Grobner / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) Neutrino Physics (2/4) Discussion Session Ultra High Vacuum Technology (1/2) Ultra High Vacuum Technology (2/2) Thursday 2 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 F. Antinori / CERN F. Dydak / CERN J. Aysto / CERN Heavy Ions (1/2) Neutrino Physics (3/4) Isolde Physics O...

  10. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 9 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN L. Rolandi / CERN L. Rolandi / CERN Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) Big Experiments Discussion Session Tuesday 10 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN R. Kleiss / CERN C. Joram Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (2/6) Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (3/6) Particle Detectors (1/5) Wednesday 11 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN C. Joram / CERN R. Kleiss / C. Joram Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (4/6) Particle Detectors (2/5) Discussion Session Thursday 12 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN C. Joram / CERN C. Joram / CERN Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (5/6) Particle Detectors (3/5) Particle Detectors (4/5) Friday 13 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN C. Joram / CERN R. Kleiss / C. Joram Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (6/6) Particle Detectors (5/5) Discussion Session Monday 16 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning C...

  11. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 5 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (1/3) 10:15-12:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (3&4/4) Tuesday 6 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (2/3) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (1/3) 11:15-12:00 R. JACOBSEN / T. NAKADA Discussion Session Wednesday 7 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (3/3) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (2/3) 11:15-12:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (1/4) 14:00-16:00 C. BENVENUTI Basic Science, Society, and Technological Innovation (Council Chamber, bldg. 503) Thursday 8 August 09:15-10:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (2/4) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (3/3) 11:15-12:00 J. CARR / J. LESGOURDES Discussion Session Friday 9 August 09:15-11:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (3&4/4) 11:15-12:00 C. JARLSKOG Historic Lecture 14:00-16:00 Course Review Monday 12 August 09:15-12:00 Students Sessi...

  12. ELEC-2005: Electronics in High Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    ELEC-2005 is a new course series on modern electronics, given by CERN physicists and engineers in the format of the successful ELEC-2002 course series, and within the framework of the 2005 Technical Training Programme. This comprehensive course series is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. ELEC-2005 will composed of four Terms throughout the year: Winter Term: Introduction to electronics in HEP (January-February, 6 lectures) Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics (March, 6 lectures) Summer Term: System electronics for physics: Issues (May, 7 lectures) Winter Term: Electronics applications in HEP experiments (November-December, 10 lectures) Lectures within each Term will take place on Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 10:00 to 12:30. The...

  13. Backbiting and bloodshed in books: short-term effects of reading physical and relational aggression in literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Sarah M; Ridge, Robert; Stevens, McKay; Callister, Mark; Stockdale, Laura

    2012-03-01

    The current research consisted of two studies examining the effects of reading physical and relational aggression in literature. In both studies, participants read one of two stories (containing physical or relational aggression), and then participated in one of two tasks to measure aggression. In Study 1, participants who read the physical aggression story were subsequently more physically aggressive than those who read the relational aggression story. Conversely, in Study 2, participants who read the relational aggression story were subsequently more relationally aggressive than those who read the physical aggression story. Combined, these results show evidence for specific effects of reading aggressive content in literature.

  14. Ventures in science status report, Summer 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    The Ventures in Science summer program is directed towards students who are from underrepresented minority groups in mathematics and science professions. The target group of 40 was drawn from eligible students who will be entering high school freshman in the fall of 1992. 450 students applied. The theme for the summer is Chicago as an Ecosystem. The students are instructed in integrated math and science (2 hours), English/ESL (1 1/2 hrs.), counseling (1 hr.) and, physical education (1 hr.) each day four days a week. Integrated math and science are team taught. Parents are invited to participate in two workshops that will be presented based on their input. Parents may also visit the program at any time and participate in any field trip.

  15. Using Long-term Millisecond Pulsar Timing to Obtain Physical Characteristics of the Bulge Globular Cluster Terzan 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Brian J.; Ransom, Scott M.; Freire, Paulo C. C.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; Arras, Phil; Cadelano, Mario

    2017-08-01

    Over the past decade, the discovery of three unique stellar populations and a large number of confirmed pulsars within the globular cluster Terzan 5 has raised questions over its classification. Using the long-term radio pulsar timing of 36 ms pulsars in the cluster core, we provide new measurements of key physical properties of the system. As Terzan 5 is located within the galactic bulge, stellar crowding and reddening make optical and near-infrared observations difficult. Pulsar accelerations, however, allow us to study the intrinsic characteristics of the cluster independent of reddening and stellar crowding and probe the mass density profile without needing to quantify the mass-to-light ratio. Relating the spin and orbital periods of each pulsar to the acceleration predicted by a King model, we find a core density of {1.58}-0.13+0.13 × 106 {M}⊙ pc-3, a core radius of {0.16}-0.01+0.01 pc, a pulsar density profile of n\\propto {r}-{3.14-0.53+0.52}, and a total mass of {M}{{T}}({R}\\perp < 1.0 pc) ≃ 3.0 × 105 {M}⊙ , assuming a cluster distance of 5.9 kpc. Using this information, we argue against Terzan 5 being a disrupted dwarf galaxy and discuss the possibility of it being a fragment of the Milky Way’s proto-bulge. We also discuss whether low-mass pulsars were formed via electron-capture supernovae or exist in a core full of heavy white dwarfs and hard binaries. Finally, we provide an upper limit for the mass of a possible black hole at the core of the cluster of {M}{BH}≃ 3× {10}4 {M}⊙ .

  16. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 16 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN C. Gaspar / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (1/8) Accelerators (1/5) Trigger and Data Acquisition (1/3) Tuesday 17 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN C. Gaspar / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (2/8) Accelerators (2/5) Trigger and Data Acquisition (2/3) Wednesday 18 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN A. Pich and O. Brüning Particle Physics: the Standard Model (3/8) Accelerators (3/5) Discussion Session Thursday 19 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN C. Gaspar / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (4/8) Accelerators (4/5) Trigger and Data Acquisition (3/3) Friday 20 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN A. Pich and O. Brüning Particle Physics: the Standard Model (5/8) Accelerators (5/5) Discussion Session Monday 23 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich R. Jacobse...

  17. Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 More Information DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 7 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Fayard, O. Ullaland, D. Heagerty (CERN) Programme Presentation Workshops presentation Information on Computing Rules 10:15 - 11:00 R. Aymar (CERN) Introduction to CERN (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 J. Engelen (CERN) Introduction to CERN (2/2) 15:00 - 16:30 H. Menzel (CERN) An Introduction to Radiation Protection DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 8 july 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (1/4) 10:15 - 11:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Fundamental questions in modern nuclear physics: The challenge of exotic nuclei (1/2) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Friday 9 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (3/4) 10:15 - 11:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Fundamental questions in modern nuclear physics: The challenge of exotic nuclei (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 P....

  18. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 8 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 M. FRANKLIN Classic Experiments (1/3) 14:00 - 15:00 M. LINDROOS Isolde 15:30 - 16:30 M. LINDROOS Visit of the Experiment Tuesday 9 july 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (2/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (3/5) 11:15 - 12:00 M. FRANKLIN Classic Experiments (2/3) Wednesday 10 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (3/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (4/5) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 11 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (4/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (5/5) 11:15 - 12:00 M. FRANKLIN Classic Experiments (3/3) Friday 12 July 09:15 - 11:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (5&6/6) 11:15 ...

  19. Technical Training: ELEC-2005: Electronics in High Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    CERN Technical Training 2005: Learning for the LHC! ELEC-2005: Electronics in High Energy Physics - Spring Term ELEC-2005 is a new course series on modern electronics, given by CERN physicists and engineers within the framework of the 2005 Technical Training Programme, in an extended format of the successful ELEC-2002 course series. This comprehensive course series is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. ELEC-2005 is composed of four Terms: the Winter Term, Introduction to electronics in HEP, already took place; the next three Terms will run throughout the year: Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics (March, 6 lectures) - now open for registration Summer Term: System electronics for physics: Issues (May, 7 lectures) Autumn Term: Ele...

  20. Special Handbook: The Summer Scholar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Pat Koch; Shapiro, Sonya

    1978-01-01

    No longer is summer ushered in with that old "no more lessons, no more books" refrain. There are plenty of vacation learning opportunities--in and around New York, at college campuses, and even abroad--for all age groups. Here is a roundup of this summer's offerings. (Editor)

  1. Low-intensity wheelchair training in inactive people with long-term spinal cord injury : A randomized controlled trial on fitness, wheelchair skill performance and physical activity levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Scheer, Jan W; de Groot, Sonja; Tepper, Marga; Faber, Willemijn; Group, Allrisc; Veeger, DirkJan H; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of low-intensity wheelchair training on wheelchair-specific fitness, wheelchair skill performance and physical activity levels in inactive people with long-term spinal cord injury. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. PARTICIPANTS: Inactive manual wheelchair use

  2. A Comparison of Students in Physical Education and Sports College and the Students in Other Departments in Terms of Problem Solving Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görücü, Alpaslan; Cantav, Erkan

    2017-01-01

    In this research, it is aimed to analyze the problem solving skills of university students in terms of different variables and to analyze the differences among the levels of perceived problem solving skill of the students of Physical Education and Sports College and other branch students. The sample consists of the university students from the…

  3. Cost-effectiveness of a long-term Internet-delivered worksite health promotion programme on physical activity and nutrition: A cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J.W. Robroek (Suzan); S. Polinder (Suzanne); F.J. Bredt (Folef); A. Burdorf (Alex)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a long-term workplace health promotion programme on physical activity (PA) and nutrition. In total, 924 participants enrolled in a 2-year cluster randomized controlled trial, with departments (n = 74) within companies (n = 6) as the u

  4. Exploring Behavioral Markers of Long-Term Physical Activity Maintenance: A Case Study of System Identification Modeling within a Behavioral Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekler, Eric B.; Buman, Matthew P.; Poothakandiyil, Nikhil; Rivera, Daniel E.; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Aiken Morgan, Adrienne; McCrae, Christina S.; Roberts, Beverly L.; Marsiske, Michael; Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Efficacious interventions to promote long-term maintenance of physical activity are not well understood. Engineers have developed methods to create dynamical system models for modeling idiographic (i.e., within-person) relationships within systems. In behavioral research, dynamical systems modeling may assist in decomposing intervention effects…

  5. Persistent angina: highly prevalent and associated with long-term anxiety, depression, low physical functioning, and quality of life in stable angina pectoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, L.; Abildstrom, S. Z.; Hvelplund, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate persistent angina in stable angina pectoris with no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to obstructive CAD and its relation to long-term anxiety, depression, quality of life (QOL), and physical functioning. We invited 357 patients (men = 191; women = 166; response rate ...

  6. Assessment of State and Trait Anxiety Level of Physical Education and Sports' Students before the Term Final Examinations: Example of Halic University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgan, Cigdem; Odabas, Hatice Ilhan; Dal, Suzan; Meçu, Elif; Aydin, Mensure

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the evaluation of state and trait anxiety levels of students in Halic University, School of Physical Education and Sports, during final exams according to their age, department and year in school. For this research, 469 students (mean age 21,17 ± 2,27) studying in 2014-2015 spring term were chosen randomly. As data…

  7. (Re)Constructions of Etymology of the Term "Electricity" in French German and Modern Greek Textbooks of Physics of 18th-19th Centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsopoulos, Dimitrios

    2005-01-01

    The different and contrasting versions of the etymology of the term "electricity" in Modern Greek textbooks of Physics of the 18th and 19th century, which are influenced by French and German textbooks, are not mere (re)constructions that serve the didactic purposes and objectives of their authors. They are (in)directly related to the social and…

  8. Low-intensity wheelchair training in inactive people with long-term spinal cord injury : A randomized controlled trial on fitness, wheelchair skill performance and physical activity levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Scheer, Jan W.; de Groot, Sonja; Tepper, Marga; Faber, Willemijn; Veeger, DirkJan H.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.

    Objective: To investigate the effects of low-intensity wheelchair training on wheelchair-specific fitness, wheelchair skill performance and physical activity levels in inactive people with long-term spinal cord injury. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Participants: Inactive manual wheelchair

  9. Teaching outside of the Box: A Short-Term International Internship for Pre-Service and In-Service Physical Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daniel B.; Barrett, Joe; Robinson, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on results from a qualitative study of a two-week international internship for pre-service and in-service physical education (PE) teachers in a developing nation (Belize). Relying upon data from questionnaires that were administered before and after the short-term international internship, participants' perspectives related to…

  10. The Lattice Compatibility Theory LCT: Physical and Chemical Arguments from the Growth Behavior of Doped Compounds in terms of Bandgap Distortion and Magnetic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Boubaker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical and chemical arguments for the recently discussed materials-related Lattice Compatibility Theory are presented. The discussed arguments are based on some differences of Mn ions incorporation kinetics inside some compounds. These differences have been evaluated and quantified in terms of alteration of bandgap edges, magnetic patterns, and Faraday effect.

  11. Summer School on Spintronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Stuart; Idzerda, Yves

    2003-01-01

    Stuart Wolf This book originated as a series of lectures that were given as part of a Summer School on Spintronics in the end of August, 1998 at Lake Tahoe, Nevada. It has taken some time to get these lectures in a form suitable for this book and so the process has been an iterative one to provide current information on the topics that are covered. There are some topics that have developed in the intervening years and we have tried to at least alert the readers to them in the Introduction where a rather complete set of references is provided to the current state of the art. The field of magnetism, once thought to be dead or dying, has seen a remarkable rebirth in the last decade and promises to get even more important as we enter the new millennium. This rebirth is due to some very new insight into how the spin degree of freedom of both electrons and nucleons can play a role in a new type of electronics that utilizes the spin in addition to or in place of the charge. For this new field to mature and prosper, ...

  12. Summer student final report

    CERN Document Server

    Guzik, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    During my time spent at CERN I worked under the Technology Department of CERN, in the Machine Protection and Electrical Integrity (MPE) Group. The MPE Group supports LHC operations and maintains state of the art technology for magnet circuit protection and interlock systems for the present and future accelerators, magnet test facilities and CERN hosted experiments[1]. As a member of Magnet Powering Interlocks & Software (TE-MPE-MS) section I was involved in three different projects and used not only CERN developed tools like FESA Framework, but also open source C++ frameworks, Google Test and Google Mock. I had a chance to work with Programmable Logic Controllers and real-time devices known as Front End Computers. I was part of a software developer team, and familiarized myself with the Scrum agile software development methodology. The description and results of my work are presented in three parts of this report. Each part describes a separate project created during my participation in the CERN Summer St...

  13. Summer music festivals

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Although July is set to be a crucial time in the working life of the Laboratory, the CERN clubs have organised musical events to make sure that there’s also a chance to chill out and relax. The group Blend at the 2007 Hardronic Festival. From left to right (on stage): Eric Pfirsch, Stephan Petit, Frédéric Lejal, Niklaus Hirt, Paulo Dos Santos with Laurent Tarrano filming.If you have a strong appetite for music the ‘Monts Jura Jazz Festival’, might tempt you this summer. Sponsored by both the CERN Administration and the Staff Association, it is an established highlight of the local arts calendar and will this year be held on 4 and 5 July in Crozet, France. For the third year running established musicians, stars of the jazz scene, and rising talent from France, Switzerland and Brazil will be joining forces to perform an exiting mixture of jazz music. A ‘master class’ in improvisation methods will also be held on Saturda...

  14. Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 2 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Wells (CERN) The Higgs Saga at LEP 10:15 - 11:00 G. Cowan (Univ. of London) Introduction to Statistics (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 G. Cowan (Univ. of London) Introduction to Statistics (3/3) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Tuesday 3 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Sphicas (CERN) Trigger and Data Acquisition Systems (1/2) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) From Raw Data to Physics Results (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) G. Cowan (University of London) Discussion Session DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 4 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Sphicas (CERN) Trigger and Data Acquisition Systems (2/2) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) From Raw Data to Physics Results (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) Astroparticle Physics (1/3) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 5 August 09:15 - 10:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) Astroparticle Physics (2/3) 10:15 - 11:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) A...

  15. Summer Student Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Date Time Title Speaker 31/07/2006 09:15 - 10:00 Beyond the Standard Model (1/5) E. KIRITSIS 10:15 - 11:00 Root R. BRUN 11:15 - 12:00 Introduction to Statistics (1/5) G. COWAN 12:00 Discussion Session Date Time Title Speaker 01/08/2006 09:15 - 10:00 Beyond the Standard Model (2/5) E. KIRITSIS 10:15 - 11:00 Physics at Hadronic Colliders (1/4) K. JAKOBS 11:15 - 12:00 Introduction to Statistics (2/5) G. COWAN 12:00 Discussion Session 02/08/2006 09:15 - 10:00 Beyond the Standard Model (3/5) E. KIRITSIS 10:15 - 11:00 Introduction to Statistics (3/5) G. COWAN 11:15 - 12:00 Physics at Hadronic Colliders (2/4) K. JAKOBS 12:00 Discussion Session 03/08/2006 09:15 - 10:00 Beyond the Standard Model (4/4) E. KIRITSIS 10:15 - 11:00 Physics at Hadronic Colliders (3/4) K. JAKOBS 11:15 - 12:00 Introduction to Statistics (4/4) G. COWAN 12:00 Discussion Session 04/08/2006 09:15 - 11:00 Data Acquisition Systems (1-2/2) P. SPHICAS 11:15 - 12:00 Physics at Hadro...

  16. C.I.M.E. Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    Manetti, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Starting in the middle of the 80s, there has been a growing and fruitful interaction between algebraic geometry and certain areas of theoretical high-energy physics, especially the various versions of string theory. Physical heuristics have provided inspiration for new mathematical definitions (such as that of Gromov-Witten invariants) leading in turn to the solution of problems in enumerative geometry. Conversely, the availability of mathematically rigorous definitions and theorems has benefited the physics research by providing the required evidence in fields where experimental testing seems problematic. The aim of this volume, a result of the CIME Summer School held in Cetraro, Italy, in 2005, is to cover part of the most recent and interesting findings in this subject.

  17. Examination of Studying Approaches of Students at School of Physical Education and Sports in Terms of Different Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereceli, Cagatay

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine studying approaches of the students of physical education and school of physical and sports according to various variables. The data of the study conducted in the general scanning model has been collected from 478 students in 2016-2017 teaching year. Studying Approaches Scale has been used to collect data. Besides…

  18. The effects of a long-term physical activity intervention on serum uric acid in older adults at risk for physical disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Kristen M; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Serra, Monica C; Yank, Veronica; Pahor, Marco; Nicklas, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Observational studies show a relationship between elevated serum uric acid (UA) and better physical performance and muscle function. The purpose of this paper was to determine whether regular participation in an exercise intervention, known to improve physical functioning, would result in increased serum UA. For this study, 424 older adults at risk for physical disability were randomized to participate in either a 12-mo moderate-intensity physical activity (PA) or a successful aging (SA) health education intervention. UA was measured at baseline, 6, and 12 mo (n = 368, 341, and 332, respectively). Baseline UA levels were 6.03 ± 1.52 mg/dl and 5.94 ± 1.55 mg/dl in the PA and SA groups, respectively. The adjusted mean UA at month 12 was 4.8% (0.24 mg/dl) higher in the PA compared with the SA group (p = .028). Compared with a health education intervention, a 1-yr PA intervention results in a modest increase in systemic concentration of UA in older adults at risk for mobility disability.

  19. Stream-piracy impact on the long-term evolution of the Meuse basin. Physical approach "modeling with GOLEM"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaichouche, A.; Stab, O.; Cojan, I.; Brulhet, J.; Tijani, M.; Tessier, B.

    2012-04-01

    Landscape evolution results of antagonistic processes. In the Paris basin (France): tectonic uplift seems to be globally balanced by river incision. But the dynamic equilibrium of the relief can be disturbed by other processes and singularities may appear. A remarkable example is observed in the Meuse basin (NE of France), where the river is actually perched at more than +50m above the surrounding valleys: the Marne valley to the west and the Moselle valley to the east. This special morphology is the result of several stream piracies (at the expense of the Meuse) which has interested numerous researchers since a long time (Davis 1895, Blache 1943, Lesson-Quinif 2001 & Le Roux Harmand 1997-2009…). The most important ones of these piracies are: 1) the well-known capture of the Haute-Moselle by a tributary of the Meurthe near Toul; 2) at the north-west, the capture of the river Aire by the Aisne. On-going evolution suggests that similar events can be expected in the long-term future. Where and when next streams piracies could occur, what consequences may be expected? Our approach is to simulate the dynamic evolution of the landscape with an improved version of GOLEM (Geomorphic / Orogenic Landscape Evolution Model - LEM), software developed by Tucker & Slingerland in 1994 (http://csdms.colorado.edu/wiki/Model:GOLEM). The LEM characterizes erosion by incorporating diffusion and advection equations whose parameters must be fixed, according to local conditions. First simulations for next millions years with « detachment-limited » mode, let us locate several potential captures of the Meuse river by tributaries of the Moselle, therefore inducing a complete reorganization of the hydrographic network. The results of the localizations agree with local topography/geometry analysis. The first capture induces the propagation of a knickpoint and a significant lowering of the upstream part of the Meuse's basin. Downstream of the capture, the orientation of the abandoned valley

  20. Fourteenth Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-07-11

    The Fourteenth Annual Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015 was held August 2nd - August 7th, 2015, and belongs to the series of summer programs aimed at educating future workforce in nuclear physics-related areas, mostly about the challenges of radioactive ion beam physics. Through these schools the research community will be able to exploit fully the opportunities created by the exotic beam facilities. These facilities in the US include CARIBU at ANL, the NSCL and the future FRIB laboratory as well as smaller-scale university laboratories. The skill set needed by the future workforce is very diverse and a fundamental understanding of theoretical, technical, computational and applied fields are all important. Therefore, the Exotic Beam Summer Schools follow a unique approach, in which the students not only receive lectures but also participate in hands-on activities. The lectures covered broad topics in both the experimental and theoretical physics of nuclei far from stability as well as radioactive ions production and applications. The afternoons provided opportunities for "hands-on" projects with experimental equipment and techniques useful in FRIB research. Five activities were performed in groups of eight students, rotating through the activities over the five afternoons of the school. The center of the activities was an experiment at the FSU tandem accelerator, measuring the angular distribution and cross section of the 12C(d,p)13C transfer reaction, measured with a silicon telescope in a scattering chamber. The experimental data were analyzed by performing a DWBA calculation with the program DWUCK, and the resulting spectroscopic factors were compared to a shell model calculation. The other activities included target preparation, digital gamma-spectroscopy and modern neutron detection methods.

  1. Cosmic vibes: CERN raves at summer festivals

    CERN Multimedia

    Connie Potter

    2016-01-01

    This summer, CERN appeared at various festivals in the UK.   The inaugural Physics Pavilion at the 2016 WOMAD festival received over 3600 visitors. (Image: CERN) This summer, CERN’s outreach efforts took a step in a completely new direction as the group participated at various festivals. Following an invitation from the European Science Open Forum 2016 held in Manchester, UK, to be part of the Bluedot Festival, we produced an hour-long musical presentation with a physics theme. This featured the “Cosmic Piano”, created by Arturo Fernandez Tellez and Guillermo Tejeda Muñoz of ALICE, and a piece created from the sonification of LHC data by Domenico Vicinanza and Genevieve Williams, of Anglia Ruskin University. On a much bigger scale, we (the outreach team) collaborated with the WOMAD Festival, to host its first World of Physics in the middle of the English countryside. The result was a three-day programme of talks including “What’s the Ma...

  2. MY SUMMER VACATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高原

    2000-01-01

    I think this holiday is the most interesting one for me. Because I got my first salary. When we finisted our last term, I found a job with my close friend. We worked in a restaurant, stood near the door and say "hello" to

  3. Physical stability and resistance to peroxidation of a range of liquid-fill hard gelatin capsule products on extreme long-term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowtle, William; Kanyowa, Lionel; Mackenzie, Mark; Higgins, Paul

    2011-06-01

    The industrial take-up of liquid-fill hard capsule technology is limited in part by lack of published long-term physical and chemical stability data which demonstrate the robustness of the system. To assess the effects of extreme long-term storage on liquid-fill capsule product quality and integrity, with respect to both the capsules per se and a standard blister-pack type (foil-film blister). Fourteen sets of stored peroxidation-sensitive liquid-fill hard gelatin capsule product samples, originating ~20 years from the current study, were examined with respect to physical and selected chemical properties, together with microbiological evaluation. All sets retained physical integrity of capsules and blister-packs. Capsules were free of leaks, gelatin cross-linking, and microbiological growth. Eight samples met a limit (anisidine value, 20) commonly used as an index of peroxidation for lipid-based products with shelf lives of 2-3 years. Foil-film blister-packs using PVC or PVC-PVdC as the thermoforming film were well-suited packaging components for the liquid-fill capsule format. The study confirms the long-term physical robustness of the liquid-fill hard capsule format, together with its manufacturing and banding processes. It also indicates that various peroxidation-sensitive products using the capsule format may be maintained satisfactorily over very prolonged storage periods.

  4. A new index to describe the tropical Asian summer monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU ZhongFeng; FU CongBin; QIAN YongFu

    2009-01-01

    We define a new monsoon index (MV) as the product of relative vorticity and equivalent potential tem-perature using the long-term NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data.The MV index provides new insights into the intraseasonal and interannual variabilities of the broad-scale tropical Asian summer monsoon (TASM),including the South Asian summer monsoon (SASM) and the South China Sea summer monsoon (SCSSM).On the intraseasonal timescale,the pentad-to-pentad MV index bears a close relationship to the broad-scale rainfall in the TASM regions.Among 29 summers from 1979 to 2007,in 23/27 summers the correlation coefficients are higher than 0.7 in the SASM/SCSSM region.However,in fewer than 9 summers,the correlations between the broad-scale rainfall and the existing circulation indices are higher than 0.7.On the interannual timescale,various existing SASM circulation indices are moderately or well correlated with all-India summer monsoon rainfall,whereas their correlations with broad-scale SASM rainfall are weak.In contrast,the summer mean MV index correlates well with the broad-scale SASM rainfall and all-India summer monsoon rainfall (correlation of 0.73 and 0.65,respectively).In the SCSSM region,the summer mean MV index also bears a close relationship to the SCSSM rainfall,al-though some discrepancies exist during certain years.The composite strong TASM shows a stronger low-tropospheric low pressure in association with the enhanced westerly winds and moisture transfer,stronger convection,and upper-tropospheric easterly winds,which indicate that the MV index can well capture the features of TASM.

  5. A new index to describe the tropical Asian summer monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    We define a new monsoon index (MV) as the product of relative vorticity and equivalent potential temperature using the long-term NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data. The MV index provides new insights into the intraseasonal and interannual variabilities of the broad-scale tropical Asian summer monsoon (TASM), including the South Asian summer monsoon (SASM) and the South China Sea summer monsoon (SCSSM). On the intraseasonal timescale, the pentad-to-pentad MV index bears a close relationship to the broad-scale rainfall in the TASM regions. Among 29 summers from 1979 to 2007, in 23/27 summers the correlation coefficients are higher than 0.7 in the SASM/SCSSM region. However, in fewer than 9 summers, the correlations between the broad-scale rainfall and the existing circulation indices are higher than 0.7. On the interannual timescale, various existing SASM circulation indices are moderately or well correlated with all-India summer monsoon rainfall, whereas their correlations with broad-scale SASM rainfall are weak. In contrast, the summer mean MV index correlates well with the broad-scale SASM rainfall and all-India summer monsoon rainfall (correlation of 0.73 and 0.65, respectively). In the SCSSM region, the summer mean MV index also bears a close relationship to the SCSSM rainfall, although some discrepancies exist during certain years. The composite strong TASM shows a stronger low-tropospheric low pressure in association with the enhanced westerly winds and moisture transfer, stronger convection, and upper-tropospheric easterly winds, which indicate that the MV index can well capture the features of TASM.

  6. Long-term effects of heart transplantation: the gap between physical performance and emotional well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunzel, B; Laederach-Hofmann, K

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess physical and emotional factors in heart transplant patients. A prospective design was used to compare patients' physical symptoms, emotional complaints, and restrictions at admission to the waiting list, immediately after, and 1 and 5 years after heart transplantation. Thirty-three patients were included (30 male, 3 female) in the study. Their mean age at admission was 48 +/- 10.2 years. Of these, 23 suffered from cardiomyopathy, 8 from coronary heart disease, and 2 from valvular insufficiency. At admission, the patients suffered from symptoms of cardiac insufficiency, and were restricted in sports, gardening, hobbies, sexual life, job, food-intake, and mobility. More than three-fourths rated their physical and emotional status as moderate to poor. Emotionally, they suffered from irritability, restlessness, depression, psychic lability, lowered drive, lack of social contact, low self-esteem, and anxiety. At the end of rehabilitation (4-8 weeks after the operation), all physical and emotional complaints, as well as restrictions had significantly decreased (p emotional status good or excellent. Five years postoperatively--in contrast to physical status, restrictions, and physical complaints--the emotional complaints had increased significantly (p emotional well-being had significantly deteriorated from 1 to 5 years postoperatively. Attention should, therefore, not only be paid to the good physical health of the survivors, but also to the worsening of their emotional status.

  7. CERN summer experience benefits US students

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, S

    2003-01-01

    Northeastern University's programme of research experience for US undergraduates at CERN is five years old. While at CERN, the US summer students work with an assigned research group, supervised by a physicist who works with them and assigns them various tasks, allowing them to see what work as a particle physicist is like. Students perform research, take measurements, write computer programs, papers and reports, learn to use specialized software, build and test equipment, and inevitably do manual work. In short, they are expected to cover the entire range of activities that makes up experimental particle physics.

  8. Summer 2017 Microfluidics Research Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcculloch, Quinn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-25

    Liquid-liquid Extraction (LLE), also known as solvent extraction, represents a large subset of chemistry where one or more solutes are transferred across an interface between two immiscible liquids. This type of chemistry is used in industrial scale processes to purify solvents, refine ore, process petroleum, treat wastewater, and much more. Although LLE has been successfully employed at the macroscale, where many liters/kgs of species are processed at large flow rates, LLE stands to benefit from lab-on-a-chip technology, where reactions take place quickly and efficiently at the microscale. A device, called a screen contactor, has been invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform solvent extraction at the microscale. This invention has been submitted to LANL’s Feynman Center for Innovation, and has been filed for provisional patent under U.S. Patent Application No. 62/483,107 1. The screen contactor consists of a housing that contains two different screen materials, flametreated stainless steel and polyether ether ketone (PEEK) thermoplastic, that are uniquely wetted by either an aqueous or an organic liquid phase, respectively. Liquids in this device flow longitudinally through the screens. The fine pore size of the screens (tens of microns) provide large capillary/adhesional forces while maintaining small hydraulic pressure drops. These physical characteristics are paramount to efficient microscale liquid phase separation. To demonstrate mass transfer using the screen contactor, a well-known chemical system 2 consisting of water and n-decane as solvents and trimethylamine (TEA) as a solute was selected. TEA is basic in water so its concentration can easily be quantified using a digital pH meter and an experimentally determined base dissociation constant. Characterization of this solvent system and its behavior in the screen contactor have been the focus of my research activities this summer. In the following sections, I have detailed

  9. Increased long-term recreational physical activity is associated with older age at natural menopause among heavy smokers: the California Teachers Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emaus, Aina; Dieli-Conwright, Christina; Xu, Xinxin; Lacey, James V.; Ingles, Sue A.; Reynolds, Peggy; Bernstein, Leslie; Henderson, Katherine D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Although physical activity modulates the hypothalamic-ovarian-pituitary axis, the few studies investigating whether physical activity is associated with age at natural menopause have had mixed results. We set out to determine whether physical activity is associated with the timing of natural menopause in a large cohort of California women, overall, and by smoking history. Methods We investigated the association between long-term physical activity (hours/week/year) and age at natural menopause among 97,945 women in the California Teachers Study. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression methods were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The impact of cigarette smoking (never smoker, former-light smoker, former-heavy smoker, current-light smoker, current-heavy smoker) as an effect modifier was evaluated. Results In a multivariable model adjusting for body mass index at age 18, age at menarche, race/ethnicity, and age at first full-term pregnancy, increased physical activity was statistically significantly associated with older age at natural menopause (ptrend=0.005). Higher body mass index at age 18 (ptrend=0.0003) and older age at menarche (ptrend=0.0003) were also associated with older age at natural menopause. Hispanic ethnicity (vs. non-Hispanic whites, HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.09–1.26), current smokers (vs. never smokers, HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.60–1.75 for current-light smokers; HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.33–1.44 for current-heavy smokers) and older age at first full-term pregnancy (HR≥29, 2+ full-term pregnancies vs. <29, 2+ full-term pregnancies 1.10, 95% CI 1.06–1.14) were associated with earlier age at natural menopause. Upon stratification by smoking history, increased physical activity was statistically significantly associated with older natural menopause among heavy smokers only (HRHighest vs. Lowest quartile 0.88, 95% CI 0.81–0.97, ptrend=0.02 for former-heavy smokers; HRHighest vs. Lowest quartile 0.89, 95

  10. Long-term effect of physical activity counseling on mobility limitation among older people: a randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna Regina; Heinonen, Ari; Leinonen, Raija

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity counseling increases physical activity among older people, but its effectiveness on mobility, that is, maintaining the ability to move independently, is unknown. We studied the effect of physical activity counseling on mobility among older people and evaluated whether...... counseling-induced benefits persist after cessation of the intervention. METHODS: In a 2-year, single-blinded, randomized controlled study, 632 sedentary participants aged 75-81 years were randomly assigned into the intervention (n = 318) or control (n = 314) group. The intervention group received a single...... individualized physical activity counseling session with a supportive telephone contact every 4 months for 2 years. The outcome measures-perceived difficulty in advanced (walking 2 km) and basic (walking 0.5 km) mobility-were gathered semiannually during the intervention and the 1.5-year postintervention follow...

  11. Boys' Cognitive Skill Formation and Physical Growth: Long-term Experimental Evidence on Critical Ages for Early Childhood Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Barham, Tania; Macours, Karen; John A Maluccio

    2013-01-01

    The effects of early life circumstances on cognitive skill formation are important for later human capital development, labor market outcomes and well-being. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that the first 1,000 days are the critical window for both cognitive skill formation and physical development by exploiting a randomized conditional cash transfer (CCT) program in Nicaragua. We find that boys exposed in utero and during the first 2 years of life, have better cognitive, but not physic...

  12. Summer Student Report - AV Workflow

    CERN Document Server

    Abramson, Jessie

    2014-01-01

    The AV Workflow is web application which allows cern users to publish, update and delete videos from cds. During my summer internship I implemented the backend of the new version of the AV Worklow in python using the django framework.

  13. CERN Summer Student Project Report

    CERN Document Server

    Parton, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    My Summer Student project was divided between two areas: work on Thin Gap Chamber (TGC) Level-1 muon triggers for the ATLAS experiment, and data acquisition (DAQ) for an RPC muon detector at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++)

  14. Occurrence of human respiratory syncytial virus in summer in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobugawa, Y; Takeuchi, T; Hibino, A; Hassan, M R; Yagami, R; Kondo, H; Odagiri, T; Saito, R

    2017-01-01

    In temperate zones, human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) outbreaks typically occur in cold weather, i.e. in late autumn and winter. However, recent outbreaks in Japan have tended to start during summer and autumn. This study examined associations of meteorological conditions with the numbers of HRSV cases reported in summer in Japan. Using data from the HRSV national surveillance system and national meteorological data for summer during the period 2007-2014, we utilized negative binomial logistic regression analysis to identify associations between meteorological conditions and reported cases of HRSV. HRSV cases increased when summer temperatures rose and when relative humidity increased. Consideration of the interaction term temperature × relative humidity enabled us to show synergistic effects of high temperature with HRSV occurrence. In particular, HRSV cases synergistically increased when relative humidity increased while the temperature was ⩾28·2 °C. Seasonal-trend decomposition analysis using the HRSV national surveillance data divided by 11 climate divisions showed that summer HRSV cases occurred in South Japan (Okinawa Island), Kyushu, and Nankai climate divisions, which are located in southwest Japan. Higher temperature and higher relative humidity were necessary conditions for HRSV occurrence in summer in Japan. Paediatricians in temperate zones should be mindful of possible HRSV cases in summer, when suitable conditions are present.

  15. Physical Function Traits of Long-term Officially Acknowledged Victims of Pollution-related Illnesses Compared with Elderly Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takako; Miyamoto, Naomi; Kozu, Ryo; Satomi, Kazuhiko; Honda, Sumihisa; Senjyu, Hideaki

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] To examine the long-term effects of air pollution on the physical functioning of a group of officially acknowledged victims of pollution-related illnesses (Victims group) who were exposed to air pollution more than 50 years ago, we compared them with age-matched patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD group). [Subjects and Methods] The Victims group comprised 34 subjects and the COPD group 24, all of whom were aged over 65 years. Respiratory function, muscle strength, exercise capacity and physical activity were measured and compared between the groups. [Results] The Victims group had significantly higher forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), proportion of predicted FEV1, proportion of predicted vital capacity (VC), and ratio of FEV1 to forced VC than the COPD group. Surprisingly, the muscle strength of the Victims group was significantly weaker, their incremental shuttle walking test distance was significantly shorter, and their physical activity was significantly less than those of the COPD group. [Conclusion] Although the pulmonary function of Victims was better than that of the COPD group, their physical functioning was worse. Exposure to air pollution 50 years ago appears to continue to adversely affect their physical function. It is particularly important to offer Victims rehabilitation to improve their exercise performance and physical activity.

  16. Late preterm birth is associated with short-term morbidity but not with adverse neurodevelopmental and physical outcomes at 1 year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, Alice; Greisen, Gorm; Arce, Joan-Carles

    2014-01-01

    . The women were part of a clinical trial to investigate the tocolytic effect of the oxytocin antagonist barusiban. Babies born late preterm (34-36(+6) weeks) had a significantly increased risk of short-term morbidity (hepatobiliary disorders, respiratory disorders, metabolic disorders, nervous system......We compared the neonatal and infant outcomes at one year (Bayley mental and psychomotor development index, and physical growth) of babies who were (n = 63) or were not (n = 100) delivered prior to 37 weeks in women admitted in threatened late preterm labor (34-35(+6) weeks) with a cervix ≤15 mm...... disorders, infection; p born at term, but there were no significant differences in the neurodevelopmental and physical outcomes at one year (p > 0.05 for both one-year outcomes)....

  17. Increased long-term recreational physical activity is associated with older age at natural menopause among heavy smokers: the California Teachers Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emaus, Aina; Dieli-Conwright, Christina; Xu, Xinxin; Lacey, James V; Ingles, Sue A; Reynolds, Peggy; Bernstein, Leslie; Henderson, Katherine D

    2013-03-01

    Although physical activity modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, the few studies that have investigated whether physical activity is associated with age at natural menopause have yielded mixed results. We set out to determine whether physical activity is associated with the timing of natural menopause in a large cohort of California women overall and by smoking history. We investigated the association between long-term physical activity (h/wk/y) and age at natural menopause among 97,945 women in the California Teachers Study. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression methods were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The impact of cigarette smoking (never smoker, former light smoker, former heavy smoker, current light smoker, and current heavy smoker) as an effect modifier was evaluated. In a multivariable model adjusted for body mass index at age 18 years, age at menarche, race/ethnicity, and age at first full-term pregnancy, increased physical activity was statistically significantly associated with older age at natural menopause (P(trend) = 0.005). Higher body mass index at age 18 years (P(trend) = 0.0003) and older age at menarche (P(trend) = 0.0003) were also associated with older age at natural menopause. Hispanic ethnicity (vs non-Hispanic whites; HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.09-1.26), current smokers (vs never smokers; HR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.60-1.75 for current light smokers; HR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.33-1.44 for current heavy smokers), and older age at first full-term pregnancy (HR(≥29, 2+ full-term pregnancies) vs HR(menopause. Upon stratification by smoking history, increased physical activity was statistically significantly associated with older age at natural menopause among heavy smokers only (HR(highest quartile) vs HR(lowest quartile), 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.97; P(trend) = 0.02 for former heavy smokers; HR(highest quartile) vs HR(lowest quartile), 0.89; 95% CI, 0.80-0.99; P(trend) = 0.04 for current heavy

  18. Summer Project Report

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, Wasikul

    2015-01-01

    In this project we mainly prepared and classified several materials, important links for understanding accelerators for different age group. Accelarators now-a-days are very much important tool for not only particle physics laboratories but also for the common people for its extended applications. So, it is very much important to make people know the basics of accelerators, its basic principles, objectives and different varieties. As different age group of people have different level of understandings, so it was necessary to develop materials differently for categories based on age group. Hence, for three different categories we have separately prepared different presentations and collected important all the useful weblinks, videos, animations, games etc. related to accelerators and put them to our new webpage : https://twiki.cern.ch/twiki/bin/view/Main/Material

  19. Long-term physical workload in middle age and disability pension in men and women: a follow-up study of Swedish cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellberg, Katarina; Lundin, Andreas; Falkstedt, Daniel; Allebeck, Peter; Hemmingsson, Tomas

    2016-11-01

    The study investigates the association between level of long-term physical workload in middle age and disability pension (DP) before 61 years of age with adjustments made for early life factors, level of education, and psychosocial working conditions. Associations with DP overall, DP due to musculoskeletal disorders and DP due to psychiatric disorders were examined. The study is based on cohorts of 21,809 Swedish men and women born in 1948 and 1953, with data on physical workload estimated with a job exposure matrix based on occupational titles in 1985 and 1990 and follow-up data on diagnosis-specific DP in the years 1991-2009. Data on paternal education and intelligence were collected in primary school. Data on level of education were taken from administrative records. Data on psychosocial working conditions were estimated with a job exposure matrix based on occupational titles in 1990. Long-term exposure to high physical workload measured 5 years apart at around age 40 was strongly associated with DP due to musculoskeletal disorders up to the age of 61 among both men (HR 5.44, 95 % CI 3.35-8.84) and women (HR 3.82, CI 95 % 2.88-5.08). For women, the association between high physical load and overall DP was also significantly increased (HR 2.33, CI 95 % 1.92-2.82). The increased risks remained but were clearly attenuated after adjustments for fathers' education, IQ in childhood, achieved education and level of control at work. Exposure to high physical workload is associated with long-term risk of DP due to musculoskeletal disorders, even though adjustments for early life factors, level of education and psychosocial working conditions clearly attenuated the risks.

  20. Developing High School Geoscientists through Summer Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, J.

    2012-12-01

    High school students in the San Francisco Bay Area have the opportunity to contribute to Earth sciences research during the summer at Stanford University. The School of Earth Sciences hosts about 25 high school students each summer to support ongoing research, through more than just washing glassware. To increase diversity in the geosciences, we select students from diverse backgrounds through an application process which lessens the burden on busy faculty. The students work for 15-20 hours per week under the supervision of graduate students or postdoctoral fellows. The supervisors come to value the interns for a few reasons: not only are they getting some extra help with their research, but they are getting teaching experience in an informal but powerful way and supervising the interns' work over the summer. Another key part of the internship is bringing all of the interns together regularly. Whether it is for career talks, lab tours or field trip, high school students find kindred spirits in the group. Another important reason for weekly gatherings is to introduce the students to the wide field of Earth sciences and the different approaches and paths that scientists take. The summer ends with a culminating event where interns make short informal presentations about their research which give them an opportunity to articulate the big questions they have been helping to answer. Some interns are also invited to present a poster in a session for high school students at the Fall AGU meeting. These experiences of working in the laboratory and communicating about the research are part of the world of Earth sciences that are absent for most youth. The high school internships foster good will between Stanford and the local communities, help develop a more Earth and environmentally knowledgeable public and may have a long-term affect on diversifying the geosciences by exposing more young people to these fields.

  1. Summer Fair in the Ice City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The 19th International China Harbin Fair for Trade and Economic Cooperation reaped a lot in terms of China-foreign trade contracts Harbin, the provincial capital of northeast China’s Heilongjiang Province, has long been well known to the world for its cold cli- mate, and especially for its annual ice festival in December. But each summer from June 15 to 19, the city has another mission: to hold an international trade fair-the International China Harbin Fair for Trade and Economic Cooperation (Harbin Trade Fair).

  2. The impact of supervised exercise intervention on short-term postprogram leisure time physical activity level in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Julie; Tveterås, Anders; Rørth, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise is becoming an important component of cancer rehabilitation programs. A consistent finding across studies is that patients experience improved physical fitness and reduced fatigue. However, sustained physical activity is essential if the benefits are to be preserved over...... the course of cancer survivorship. OBJECTIVE: This study examined self-reported short-term exercise adherence following a 6-week, supervised exercise program (muscle strength, cardiovascular fitness, relaxation, body awareness, and massage) in a heterogeneous group of 61 cancer patients (mean age 42.9 years......, 82% oncological and 18% haematological) from the Body & Cancer Project. METHODS: Semistructured interviews were used to quantitatively assess leisure time physical activity level 1 and 3 months after completion of the program. The study furthermore included 3-month follow-up assessment...

  3. Long-term association between leisure-time physical activity and changes in happiness: analysis of the Prospective National Population Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Orpana, Heather M; Morrison, Howard; de Groh, Margaret; Dai, Sulan; Luo, Wei

    2012-12-15

    Happiness is among the most fundamental of all human goals. Although the short-term association between physical activity and happiness is well known, the long-term associations are not. Data from the National Population Health Survey cycles conducted between 1994/1995 and 2008/2009 (cycles 1 through 8) were analyzed. Happy respondents were classified as physically active or inactive at baseline and then were followed up in subsequent cycles to examine their likelihood of becoming unhappy. Individuals who changed their activity level also were examined. After controlling for potential confounding factors, the authors found that leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) was associated with reduced odds of unhappiness after 2 years and 4 years. People who were inactive in 2 consecutive cycles were more than twice as likely to be unhappy as those who remained active in both cycles after 2 years. Compared with those who became active, inactive participants who remained inactive were also more likely to become unhappy. A change in LTPA from active to inactive was associated with increased odds of becoming unhappy 2 years later. This study suggests that LTPA has a long-term association with happiness. Changes in LTPA are associated with subsequent mood status.

  4. Depressive symptoms among older adults with long-term spinal cord injury: Associations with secondary health conditions, sense of coherence, coping strategies and physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Jörgensen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the presence of depressive symptoms among older adults with long-term spinal cord injury and investigate the association with sociodemographic and injury characteristics; and to determine how potentially modifiable factors, i.e. secondary health conditions, sense of coherence, coping strategies and leisure-time physical activity, are associated with depressive symptoms. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: A total of 122 individuals (70% men, injury levels C1–L5, American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale A–D, mean age 63 years, mean time since injury 24 years. Methods: Data from the Swedish Aging with Spinal Cord Injury Study, collected using the Geriatric Depression Scale-15, the 13-item Sense of Coherence Scale, the Spinal Cord Lesion-related Coping Strategies Questionnaire and the Physical Activity Recall Assessment for people with Spinal Cord Injury. Associations were analysed using multivariable linear regression. Results: A total of 29% reported clinically relevant depressive symptoms and 5% reported probable depression. Sense of coherence, the coping strategy Acceptance, neuropathic pain and leisure-time physical activity explained 53% of the variance in depressive symptoms. Conclusion: Older adults with long-term spinal cord injury report a low presence of probable depression. Mental health may be supported through rehabilitation that strengthens the ability to understand and confront life stressors, promotes acceptance of the injury, provides pain management and encourages participation in leisure-time physical activity.

  5. The long-term effectiveness of need-supportive physical activity counseling compared with a standard referral in sedentary older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoecke, Ann-Sophie; Delecluse, Christophe; Bogaerts, An; Boen, Filip

    2014-04-01

    This study compared the long-term effectiveness of three physical activity counseling strategies among sedentary older adults: a 1-contact referral (REFER), a 1-contact individualized walking program (WALK), and multiple-contact, individually tailored, and need-supportive coaching based on the self-determination theory (COACH). Participants (n = 442) completed measurements before (pretest), immediately after (posttest), and 1 yr after (follow-up test) a 10-wk intervention. Linear mixed models demonstrated significant time-by-condition interaction effects from pre- to posttest. More specifically, WALK and COACH yielded larger increases in daily steps and self-reported physical activity than REFER. Similarly, self-reported physical activity increased more from pre- to follow-up test in WALK and COACH compared with REFER. Autonomous motivation mediated the effect of perceived need-support on physical activity, irrespective of counseling strategy. These results demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of both a 1-contact individualized walking program and a more time-consuming, need-supportive coaching, especially in comparison with a standard referral to local opportunities.

  6. Summer heat waves over western Europe 1880-2003, their relationship to large-scale forcings and predictability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Della-Marta, P.M. [University of Bern, Institute of Geography, Climatology and Meteorology Research Group, Bern (Switzerland); Federal Office for Meteorology and Climatology MeteoSwiss, Zurich (Switzerland); National Climate Center, Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne (Australia); Luterbacher, J.; Xoplaki, E.; Wanner, H. [University of Bern, Institute of Geography, Climatology and Meteorology Research Group, Bern (Switzerland); NCCR Climate, Bern (Switzerland); Weissenfluh, H. von [University of Bern, Institute of Geography, Climatology and Meteorology Research Group, Bern (Switzerland); Brunet, M. [University Rovira i Virgili, Climate Change Research Group, Tarragona (Spain)

    2007-08-15

    global mean temperature is also well related to western European heat waves. Combining these results with the observed positive trends in summer continental European SLP, North Atlantic SSTs and indications of a decline in European summer precipitation then possibly these long-term changes are also related to increased heat wave occurrence and it is important that the physical processes controlling these changes be more fully understood. (orig.)

  7. Organizational Citizenship Levels of Academicians in Terms of Several Variables: The Sample of Physical Education and Sports Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ali Dursun

    2015-01-01

    This study is performed with 176 academicians working in the institutions related to physical education and sports at universities. It aims to analyze organizational citizenship behaviours of academic personnel about the institutions they have been working in. Descriptive survey model was used, along with demographic data like gender, marital…

  8. Long-Term Psychological Consequences in Women of Witnessing Parental Physical Conflict and Experiencing Abuse in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maker, Azmaira Hamid; Kemmelmeier, Markus; Peterson, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Examines how the coexisting risk factors of sexual abuse and parental substance use contribute to psychopathology in women. Results indicate that depression, trauma symptoms, antisocial behaviors, and suicidal behaviors are related to childhood experiences of sexual and physical abuse. The need for future research to examine multiple childhood…

  9. Short- and long-term effects of a physical activity counselling programme in COPD : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altenburg, Wytske A.; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Bossenbroek, Linda; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; de Greef, Mathieu H.G.; Wempe, Johan B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: We were interested in the effects of a physical activity (PA) counselling programme in three groups of COPD patients from general practice (primary care), outpatient clinic (secondary care) and pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). Methods: In this randomized controlled trial 155 COPD patients,

  10. Vascular flow reserve as a link between long-term blood pressure level and physical performance capacity in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian B; Damkjær, Mads; Hald, Bjørn O;

    2016-01-01

    Mean arterial pressure (MAP) is surprisingly similar across different species of mammals, and it is, in general, not known which factors determine the arterial pressure level. Mammals often have a pronounced capacity for sustained physical performance. This capacity depends on the vasculature...

  11. Forward physics of hadronic colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, I. P.

    2013-12-01

    These lectures were given at the Baikal Summer School on Physics of Elementary Particles and Astrophysics in July 2012. They can be viewed as a concise introduction to hadronic diffraction, to the physics of the Pomeron and related topics.

  12. Long-Term Effect of Organic and Mineral Fertilization on Soil Physical Properties Under Greenhouse and Outdoor Management Practices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. F. HERENCIA; P. A. GARC(I)A-GALAV(I)S; C. MAQUEDA

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the use of organic amendments as an alternative to conventional fertilization,a 10-year experiment on a loam soil was conducted under a crop rotation system in both greenhouse and outdoor plots applied with chemical fertilizers (NPK) and vegetal compost (organic fertilizer) in the Guadalquivir River Valley,Spain.The effect of these two different fertilization regimes on the soil physical properties was evaluated.Soil organic carbon (OC),soil bulk density (BD),soil water retention (WR),available water content (AWC),aggregate stability (AS),and soil physical quality (Dexter's index,S) were determined.The use of organic fertilizer increased OC and resulted in a significant increase in AS and a decrease in BD compared to the mineral fertilizer application in both greenhouse and outdoor plots.The outdoor plots showed the lowest BD values whereas the greenhouse plots showed the highest AS values.In the last years of the 10-year experiment the S parameter was significantly higher in organic fertilizer plots,especially for greenhouse plots.At the end of the study period,there were no significant differences in WR at field capacity (FC) between treatments in both systems; the AWC was also similar in the greenhouse plots but higher in the mineral outdoor plots.In mineral fertilizer treatments,a small improvement in the physical properties was also observed due to the utilization of less aggressive tillage compared with the previous intensive cropping system.Physical soil properties were correlated with soil OC.The sustainable management techniques such as the use of organic amendments and low or no tillage improved soil physical properties,despite the differences in management that logically significantly affected the results.

  13. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 15 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (1/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (1/5) 11:15 - 12:00 C. GASPAR Trigger and Data Acquisition (1/3) Tuesday 16 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (2/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 C. GASPAR Trigger and Data Acquisition (2/3) Wednesday 17 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (3/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (3/5) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 18 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (4/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (4/5) 11:15 - 12:00 C. GASPAR Trigger and Data Acquisition (3/3) Friday 19 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (5/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (5/5) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (6/8) 10:15 - 11:00 T. WENAUS From Raw Data to Physics ...

  14. Cell Phones + Self-Access: A Summer Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Mashinter

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This is a summary of a project whereby the author developed a summer vacation contest for the SAC in which students could participate regardless of their physical distance from the facility. This contest was centered on cell phones, photography, and writing and was platformed online.

  15. An Anglo-French Summer School for Elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Peter; Tidmarsh, Mannes

    1981-01-01

    Reports on an international program involving a bilingual summer school program for the elderly. Curriculum topics included aspects of British and French cultural and social life, the role of grandparents, self-help, and health maintenance. Topics were taught via lecture/discussion, tourist visits, and physical/recreative activities. (CT)

  16. Numerical modeling of vertical stratification of Lake Shira in summer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belolipetsky, P.; Belolipetsky, V.M.; Genova, S.N.; Mooij, W.M.

    2010-01-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model and a two-dimensional numerical model of the hydrodynamic and thermal structure of Lake Shira during summer have been developed, with several original physical and numerical features. These models are well suited to simulate the formation and dynamics of vertical st

  17. Summer Arctic sea fog

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Synchronous or quasi-synchronous sea-land-air observations were conducted using advanced sea ice, atmospheric and marine instruments during China' s First Arctic Expedition. Based on the Precious data from the expedition, it was found that in the Arctic Ocean, most part of which is covered with ice or is mixed with ice, various kinds of sea fog formed such as advection fog, radiation fog and vapor fog. Each kind has its own characteristic and mechanics of creation. In the southern part of the Arctic Ocean, due to the sufficient warm and wet flow there, it is favorable for advection fog to form,which is dense and lasts a long time. On ice cap or vast floating ice, due to the strong radiation cooling effect, stable radiating fog is likely to form. In floating ice area there forms vapor fog with the appearance of masses of vapor from a boiling pot, which is different from short-lasting land fog. The study indicates that the reason why there are many kinds of sea fog form in the Arctic Ocean is because of the complicated cushion and the consequent sea-air interaction caused by the sea ice distribution and its unique physical characteristics. Sea fog is the atmospheric phenomenon of sea-air heat exchange. Especially, due to the high albedo of ice and snow surface, it is diffcult to absorb great amount of solar radiation during the polar days. Besides, ice is a poor conductor of heat; it blocks the sea-air heat exchange.The sea-air exchange is active in floating ice area where the ice is broken. The sea sends heat to the atmosphere in form of latent heat; vapor fog is a way of sea-air heat exchange influencing the climate and an indicator of the extent of the exchange. The study also indicates that the sea also transports heat to the atmosphere in form of sensible heat when vapor fog occurs.

  18. Long-term effect of a school-based physical activity program (KISS on fitness and adiposity in children: a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursina Meyer

    Full Text Available School-based intervention studies promoting a healthy lifestyle have shown favorable immediate health effects. However, there is a striking paucity on long-term follow-ups. The aim of this study was therefore to assess the 3 yr-follow-up of a cluster-randomized controlled school-based physical activity program over nine month with beneficial immediate effects on body fat, aerobic fitness and physical activity.Initially, 28 classes from 15 elementary schools in Switzerland were grouped into an intervention (16 classes from 9 schools, n = 297 children and a control arm (12 classes from 6 schools, n = 205 children after stratification for grade (1st and 5th graders. Three years after the end of the multi-component physical activity program of nine months including daily physical education (i.e. two additional lessons per week on top of three regular lessons, short physical activity breaks during academic lessons, and daily physical activity homework, 289 (58% participated in the follow-up. Primary outcome measures included body fat (sum of four skinfolds, aerobic fitness (shuttle run test, physical activity (accelerometry, and quality of life (questionnaires. After adjustment for grade, gender, baseline value and clustering within classes, children in the intervention arm compared with controls had a significantly higher average level of aerobic fitness at follow-up (0.373 z-score units [95%-CI: 0.157 to 0.59, p = 0.001] corresponding to a shift from the 50th to the 65th percentile between baseline and follow-up, while the immediate beneficial effects on the other primary outcomes were not sustained.Apart from aerobic fitness, beneficial effects seen after one year were not maintained when the intervention was stopped. A continuous intervention seems necessary to maintain overall beneficial health effects as reached at the end of the intervention.ControlledTrials.com ISRCTN15360785.

  19. Long-term effect of a school-based physical activity program (KISS) on fitness and adiposity in children: a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Ursina; Schindler, Christian; Zahner, Lukas; Ernst, Dominique; Hebestreit, Helge; van Mechelen, Willem; Brunner-La Rocca, Hans-Peter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Puder, Jardena J; Kriemler, Susi

    2014-01-01

    School-based intervention studies promoting a healthy lifestyle have shown favorable immediate health effects. However, there is a striking paucity on long-term follow-ups. The aim of this study was therefore to assess the 3 yr-follow-up of a cluster-randomized controlled school-based physical activity program over nine month with beneficial immediate effects on body fat, aerobic fitness and physical activity. Initially, 28 classes from 15 elementary schools in Switzerland were grouped into an intervention (16 classes from 9 schools, n = 297 children) and a control arm (12 classes from 6 schools, n = 205 children) after stratification for grade (1st and 5th graders). Three years after the end of the multi-component physical activity program of nine months including daily physical education (i.e. two additional lessons per week on top of three regular lessons), short physical activity breaks during academic lessons, and daily physical activity homework, 289 (58%) participated in the follow-up. Primary outcome measures included body fat (sum of four skinfolds), aerobic fitness (shuttle run test), physical activity (accelerometry), and quality of life (questionnaires). After adjustment for grade, gender, baseline value and clustering within classes, children in the intervention arm compared with controls had a significantly higher average level of aerobic fitness at follow-up (0.373 z-score units [95%-CI: 0.157 to 0.59, p = 0.001] corresponding to a shift from the 50th to the 65th percentile between baseline and follow-up), while the immediate beneficial effects on the other primary outcomes were not sustained. Apart from aerobic fitness, beneficial effects seen after one year were not maintained when the intervention was stopped. A continuous intervention seems necessary to maintain overall beneficial health effects as reached at the end of the intervention. ControlledTrials.com ISRCTN15360785.

  20. Media violence, physical aggression, and relational aggression in school age children: a short-term longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Douglas A; Coyne, Sarah; Walsh, David A

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have shown that media violence has an effect on children's subsequent aggression. This study expands upon previous research in three directions: (1) by examining several subtypes of aggression (verbal, relational, and physical), (2) by measuring media violence exposure (MVE) across three types of media, and (3) by measuring MVE and aggressive/prosocial behaviors at two points in time during the school year. In this study, 430 3rd-5th grade children, their peers, and their teachers were surveyed. Children's consumption of media violence early in the school year predicted higher verbally aggressive behavior, higher relationally aggressive behavior, higher physically aggressive behavior, and less prosocial behavior later in the school year. Additionally, these effects were mediated by hostile attribution bias. The findings are interpreted within the theoretical framework of the General Aggression Model. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Direct and Indirect Short-term Effects of Biochar on Physical Characteristics of an Arable Sandy Loam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhencai; Moldrup, Per; Elsgaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Biochar addition to agricultural soil is reported in several studies to reduce climate gas emissions, boost carbon storage, and improve soil fertility and crop productivity. These effects may be partly related to soil physical changes resulting from biochar amendment, but knowledge of how biochar...... application mechanistically affects soil physical characteristics is limited. This study investigated the effect of biochar application on soil structural and functional properties, including specific surface area, water retention, and gas transport parameters. Intact soil cores were taken from a field...... experiment on an arable sandy loam that included four reference plots without biochar and four plots with 20 tons ha(-1) biochar incorporated into the upper 20 cm 7 months before sampling. Water retention was measured at matric potentials ranging from wet (pF 1.0) to extremely dry conditions (pF similar to 6...

  2. Long-term effects of deep soil loosening on root distribution and soil physical parameters in compacted lignite mine soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badorreck, Annika; Krümmelbein, Julia; Raab, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Soil compaction is a major problem of soils on dumped mining substrates in Lusatia, Germany. Deep ripping and cultivation of deep rooting plant species are considered to be effective ways of agricultural recultivation. Six years after experiment start, we studied the effect of initial deep soil loosening (i.e. down to 65 cm) on root systems of rye (Secale cereale) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and on soil physical parameters. We conducted a soil monolith sampling for each treatment (deep loosened and unloosened) and for each plant species (in three replicates, respectively) to determine root diameter, length density and dry mass as well as soil bulk density. Further soil physical analysis comprised water retention, hydraulic conductivity and texture in three depths. The results showed different reactions of the root systems of rye and alfalfa six years after deep ripping. In the loosened soil the root biomass of the rye was lower in depths of 20-40 cm and the root biomass of alfalfa was also decreased in depths of 20-50 cm together with a lower root diameter for both plant species. Moreover, total and fine root length density was higher for alfalfa and vice versa for rye. The soil physical parameters such as bulk density showed fewer differences, despite a higher bulk density in 30-40cm for the deep loosened rye plot which indicates a more pronounced plough pan.

  3. Cross-sectional relationship between physical fitness components and functional performance in older persons living in long-term care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Mechelen Willem

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The age-related deterioration of physiological capacities such as muscle strength and balance is associated with increased dependence. Understanding the contribution of physical fitness components to functional performance facilitates the development of adequate exercise interventions aiming at preservation of function and independence of older people. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between physical fitness components and functional performance in older people living in long-term care facilities. Methods Design cross-sectional study Subjects 226 persons living in long-term care facilities (mean age: 81.6 ± 5.6. Outcome measures Physical fitness and functional performance were measured by performance-based tests. Results Knee and elbow extension strength were significantly higher in men (difference = 44.5 and 50.0 N, respectively, whereas women were more flexible (difference sit & reach test = 7.2 cm. Functional performance was not significantly different between the genders. In men, motor coordination (eye-hand coordination and measures of strength were the main contributors to functional performance, whereas in women flexibility (sit and reach test and motor coordination (tandem stance and eye-hand coordination played a major role. Conclusion The results of this study show that besides muscle strength, fitness components such as coordination and flexibility are associated with functional performance of older people living in long-term care facilities. This suggests that men and women living in long-term care facilities, differ considerably concerning the fitness factors contributing to functional performance. Women and men may, therefore, need exercise programs emphasizing different fitness aspects in order to improve functional performance.

  4. The effect of long-term Maresha ploughing on soil physical properties in the Central Rift Valley of Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temesgen, B.B.; Stroosnijder, L.; Temesgen, M.; AdulKedir, A.; Sterk, G.

    2011-01-01

    For thousands of years, smallholder-based crop farming in Ethiopia has been practiced with oxen ploughing using the traditional Maresha ard plough where consecutive tillage operations are undertaken perpendicular to each other. Despite its wide acceptance by smallholder farmers, long-term use of the

  5. The Effect of Classroom Structure on Verbal and Physical Aggression among Peers: A Short-Term Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsmann, Evelyn M.; Van De Schoot, Rens; Schober, Barbara; Finsterwald, Monika; Spiel, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    Teachers promote student learning and well-being in school by establishing a supportive classroom structure. The term "classroom structure" refers to how teachers design tasks, maintain authority, and evaluate student achievement. Although empirical studies have shown the relation of classroom structure to student motivation, achievement, and…

  6. No Evidence That Short-Term Cognitive or Physical Training Programs or Lifestyles Are Related to Changes in White Matter Integrity in Older Adults at Risk of Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fissler, Patrick; Müller, Hans-Peter; Küster, Olivia C.; Laptinskaya, Daria; Thurm, Franka; Woll, Alexander; Elbert, Thomas; Kassubek, Jan; von Arnim, Christine A. F.; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive and physical activities can benefit cognition. However, knowledge about the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these activity-induced cognitive benefits is still limited, especially with regard to the role of white matter integrity (WMI), which is affected in cognitive aging and Alzheimer’s disease. To address this knowledge gap, we investigated the immediate and long-term effects of cognitive or physical training on WMI, as well as the association between cognitive and physical lifestyles and changes in WMI over a 6-month period. Additionally, we explored whether changes in WMI underlie activity-related cognitive changes, and estimated the potential of both trainings to improve WMI by correlating training outcomes with WMI. In an observational and interventional pretest, posttest, 3-month follow-up design, we assigned 47 community-dwelling older adults at risk of dementia to 50 sessions of auditory processing and working memory training (n = 13), 50 sessions of cardiovascular, strength, coordination, balance and flexibility exercises (n = 14), or a control group (n = 20). We measured lifestyles trough self-reports, cognitive training skills through training performance, functional physical fitness through the Senior Fitness Test, and global cognition through a cognitive test battery. WMI was assessed via a composite score of diffusion tensor imaging-based fractional anisotropy (FA) of three regions of interest shown to be affected in aging and Alzheimer’s disease: the genu of corpus callosum, the fornix, and the hippocampal cingulum. Effects for training interventions on FA outcomes, as well as associations between lifestyles and changes in FA outcomes were not significant. Additional analyses did show associations between cognitive lifestyle and global cognitive changes at the posttest and the 3-month follow-up (β ≥ 0.40, p ≤ 0.02) and accounting for changes in WMI did not affect these relationships. The targeted training outcomes were

  7. No Evidence That Short-Term Cognitive or Physical Training Programs or Lifestyles Are Related to Changes in White Matter Integrity in Older Adults at Risk of Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fissler, Patrick; Müller, Hans-Peter; Küster, Olivia C; Laptinskaya, Daria; Thurm, Franka; Woll, Alexander; Elbert, Thomas; Kassubek, Jan; von Arnim, Christine A F; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive and physical activities can benefit cognition. However, knowledge about the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these activity-induced cognitive benefits is still limited, especially with regard to the role of white matter integrity (WMI), which is affected in cognitive aging and Alzheimer's disease. To address this knowledge gap, we investigated the immediate and long-term effects of cognitive or physical training on WMI, as well as the association between cognitive and physical lifestyles and changes in WMI over a 6-month period. Additionally, we explored whether changes in WMI underlie activity-related cognitive changes, and estimated the potential of both trainings to improve WMI by correlating training outcomes with WMI. In an observational and interventional pretest, posttest, 3-month follow-up design, we assigned 47 community-dwelling older adults at risk of dementia to 50 sessions of auditory processing and working memory training (n = 13), 50 sessions of cardiovascular, strength, coordination, balance and flexibility exercises (n = 14), or a control group (n = 20). We measured lifestyles trough self-reports, cognitive training skills through training performance, functional physical fitness through the Senior Fitness Test, and global cognition through a cognitive test battery. WMI was assessed via a composite score of diffusion tensor imaging-based fractional anisotropy (FA) of three regions of interest shown to be affected in aging and Alzheimer's disease: the genu of corpus callosum, the fornix, and the hippocampal cingulum. Effects for training interventions on FA outcomes, as well as associations between lifestyles and changes in FA outcomes were not significant. Additional analyses did show associations between cognitive lifestyle and global cognitive changes at the posttest and the 3-month follow-up (β ≥ 0.40, p ≤ 0.02) and accounting for changes in WMI did not affect these relationships. The targeted training outcomes were related

  8. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Kayser, Boris

    2012-01-01

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also prov...

  9. Effects of Physical Environment on Health and Behaviors of Residents With Dementia in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook Young; Chaudhury, Habib; Hung, Lillian

    2016-01-01

    The challenges in investigating the effects of the physical environment on residents with dementia include having a sample of comparable study groups and a lack of long-term follow-up evaluation. The current study attempted to address these two challenges by carefully matching residents and analyzing long-term measurement data. The aim of the study was to examine whether residents with dementia (N = 12) living in a traditional large-scale setting or a small-scale, home-like setting exhibit any difference in health and behaviors over time. Physical environmental assessment of the two care facilities was conducted using the Therapeutic Environment Screening Survey for Nursing Homes. Residents' behavioral assessments were performed using three tools at three assessments over a period of 1 year: (a) Multidimensional Observation Scale for Elderly Subjects, (b) Minimum Data Set, and (c) Dementia Care Mapping. The results suggest that older adults with dementia can have increased social interaction and engagement with the support of an optimal physical environment.

  10. The main physical properties of planosol in maize (Zea mays L.) cultivation under different long-term reduced tillage practices in the Baltic region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kstutis Romaneckas; Egidijusarauskis; DovilAviienyt; Sidona Buragien; David Arney

    2015-01-01

    The impact of sustainable reduced til age (RT) on the physical properties of soil is wel documented worldwide;however, there is no precise information about the inlfuence of long-term RT or no-til (NT) on the soils at the boundary for grain maize-growing in the semi-humid subarctic climate conditions of the Baltic states, especial y on the formation of a hard-ened upper soil layer (10–15 cm in depth)-“loosening hardpan”. This study was carried out at the Research Station of Aleksandras Stulginskis University, Lithuania from 2009–2012. The investigations were based on a long-term (since 1988) ifeld experiment. The aim of the investigation was to ascertain the inlfuence of reduced primary til age on the main soil’s physical properties. This study examined soils that were deep ploughing (DP), shal ow ploughing (SP), deep cultivation (DC), shal ow cultivation (SC), and no-til (NT). Reducing the til age intensity to NT had no signiifcant effect on the structural soil’s composition;however, the stability of the structure of the>1 and>0.25 mm-size fractions was signiifcantly higher in the non-reversibly til ed (DC, SC) and NT plots. The penetration resistance of the DP soils was less after primary til age and wintering, and became similar to the NT plots at the end of the maize growth season. After primary til age and wintering, the soil moisture content in the upper soil layer (0–5 cm depth) of the NT plots was 17–49 and 16–18%higher than that in the DP. Long-term reduction of primary til age up to NT general y had no signiifcant effect on the moisture content and soil bulk density of the 0–10 and 10–20 cm layers. The results showed that long-term RT stabilized the physical quality of soil. Less soil penetration resistance was established in the DP plots compared to both RT and NT, however, indicators of the formation of a uniform“loosening hardpan”layer were not found. It is summarized that long-term RT or NT systems stabilize, or may increase

  11. Linking Soil Physical Parameters Along a Density Gradient in a Loess-Soil Long-Term Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eden, Marie; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    It is important to understand the impact of texture and organic carbon (OC) on soil structure development. Only few studies investigated this for silt-dominated soils. In this study, soil physical properties were determined on samples from a controlled experiment (Static Fertilization Experiment...... coefficient data; the model pore-connectivity factor was fairly constant, whereas the water blockage factor was markedly different. Water and air parameters both implied that change in bulk density was the major driver for diffusive and convective parameters in the experiment....

  12. Silicon carbide against silicon: a comparison in terms of physical properties, technology and electrical performance of power devices

    OpenAIRE

    Locatelli, M.; Gamal, S.,

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to give the state of the art of the silicon carbide technology by “photographing” it beside the unique technology used for power electronics that is the silicon one. The theoretical superiority of SiC physical properties on those of Si, together with the important technological advancements realized during the last decade, are the main reasons of the interest given to SiC nowadays. Concerning electrical performance, the voltage and power handling capabilities d...

  13. School Term vs. School Holiday: Associations with Children’s Physical Activity, Screen-Time, Diet and Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Staiano, Amanda E.; Stephanie T Broyles; Peter T. Katzmarzyk

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined differences in children’s health behaviors during school term (ST) versus school holiday (SH: June–July) and how associations changed when weather characteristics were considered. Children aged 5–18 years (n = 406) from a subtropical climate reported behaviors over 20 months. Multivariable regression models controlling for age, sex, race and body mass index z-score(BMIz ) were used to examine associations between SH and each behavior. A second model include...

  14. Long term effects of self-determination theory and motivational interviewing in a web-based physical activity intervention: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederichs, Stijn A H; Oenema, Anke; Bolman, Catherine; Lechner, Lilian

    2015-08-18

    Our main objective in the current study was to evaluate the long-term effectiveness (12 months from baseline) of I Move (a web-based computer tailored physical activity intervention, based on self-determination theory and motivational interviewing). To this end, we compared I Move to a web-based computer tailored physical activity intervention based on traditional health behavior theories (Active Plus), and to a no-intervention control group. As a secondary objective, the present study aimed to identify participant characteristics that moderate the long term effects of I Move and Active Plus. A randomized controlled trial was conducted, comparing three research conditions: 1) the I Move condition, participants in this condition received I Move; 2) the Active Plus condition, participants in this condition received Active Plus; 3) the control condition; participants in this condition received no intervention and were placed on a waiting list. Main outcome measures were weekly minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity and weekly days with minimal 30 min of physical activity. All measurements were taken by web-based questionnaires via the study website. Intervention effects were analyzed using multilevel linear regression analyses. At 12 months from baseline, I Move was found to be effective in increasing weekly minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (ES = .13), while Active Plus was not. In contrast, Active Plus was found to be effective in increasing weekly days with ≥ 30 min PA at 12 months (ES = .11), while I Move was not. No moderators of the effects of I Move were found. The results suggest that web-based computer tailored physical activity interventions might best include elements based on both self-determination theory/motivational interviewing and traditional health behavioral theories. To be more precise, it is arguable that the focus of the theoretical foundations, used in new web-based PA interventions should depend on the

  15. Short-term effect of physical activity and obesity on disability in a sample of rural elderly in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Manrique-Espinoza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To estimate the effects of physical activity (PA and obesity on the cumulative incidence of disability on the basic activities of daily living in the elderly. Materials and methods. Longitudinal study. We selected 2477 participants aged 65-74 years from the impact evaluation study of a non-contributory pension program in Mexico. Participants were without disability at baseline. Katz index was used to assess disability both at baseline and follow-up. PA, body mass index, and covariates were measured at baseline. Results. After 14-months of follow-up, the cumulative incidence of disability reached 10.1%. High PA was found to reduce disability risk (OR=0.64; 95%CI [0.43-0.95], and the association between obesity and disability was marginally significant (OR=1.36; 95%CI [0.96-1.95]. Conclusions. There is a need to perform a functional assessment of older adults in primary care to identify patients with functional dependence , and to promote physical activity to maintain muscle mass and thus reduce the incidence of disability.

  16. Long-term physical activity in leisure time and mortality from coronary heart disease, stroke, respiratory diseases, and cancer. The Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnohr, Peter; Lange, Peter; Scharling, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    , for moderate physical activity 0.71 (0.51, 0.99) and for high 0.56 (0.38, 0.82). For cancer, moderate activity 0.77 (0.61, 0.97) and high activity 0.73 (0.56, 0.95) and for all-cause mortality, moderate 0.78 (0.68, 0.89) and high 0.75 (0.64, 0.87) for both sexes combined. Using Kaplan-Meier plots we calculated......BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to describe the associations between different levels of long-term physical activity in leisure time and subsequent causes of deaths. DESIGN: The Copenhagen City Heart Study is a prospective cardiovascular population study of 19 329 men and women aged 20......-93 in 1976. Physical activity in leisure time was estimated at the examinations in 1976-78 and 1981-83. This analysis consists of 2136 healthy men and 2758 women aged 20-79 years, with unchanged physical activity at the two examinations, and with all covariates included in the multivariate analyses: smoking...

  17. Long-term physical activity in leisure time and mortality from coronary heart disease, stroke, respiratory diseases, and cancer. The Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnohr, Peter; Lange, Peter; Scharling, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to describe the associations between different levels of long-term physical activity in leisure time and subsequent causes of deaths. DESIGN: The Copenhagen City Heart Study is a prospective cardiovascular population study of 19 329 men and women aged 20......-93 in 1976. Physical activity in leisure time was estimated at the examinations in 1976-78 and 1981-83. This analysis consists of 2136 healthy men and 2758 women aged 20-79 years, with unchanged physical activity at the two examinations, and with all covariates included in the multivariate analyses: smoking......, for moderate physical activity 0.71 (0.51, 0.99) and for high 0.56 (0.38, 0.82). For cancer, moderate activity 0.77 (0.61, 0.97) and high activity 0.73 (0.56, 0.95) and for all-cause mortality, moderate 0.78 (0.68, 0.89) and high 0.75 (0.64, 0.87) for both sexes combined. Using Kaplan-Meier plots we calculated...

  18. Longer term follow-up on effects of Tailored Physical Activity or Chronic Pain Self-Management Programme on return-to-work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lotte Nygaard; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Sørensen, Thomas Lund

    2016-01-01

    the reference group as regards return-to-work. Compared with the reference group no other benefits of TPA and CPSMP were evident regarding pain, work ability, kinesiophobia or physical capacity. CONCLUSION: After 11 months TPA, the reference group, and CPSMP show similar patterns of facilitating return-to-work......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the longer term efficacy of the interventions Tailored Physical Activity (TPA) and Chronic Pain Self-management Program (CPSMP) against a reference group on return-to-work for sick-listed subjects with pain in the back or upper body. DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial...... to work and the co-primary end-point was the duration of the sickness absence period retrieved 11 months after the first day on sick leave. Secondary outcomes were pain level, body mass index, aerobic capacity, work ability and kinesiophobia. RESULTS: TPA and CPSMP were no more effective than...

  19. Formulating Policy for Summer Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriot, Helen

    1991-01-01

    Explores issues relating to the formulation of policy for summer programs for language learning, describing one university's experience with student demand, student motivation and progress, course timing and structure, academic staffing, administrative organization, student and staff evaluation, and funding. (three references) (CB)

  20. Summer Student Programme – Report

    CERN Document Server

    Bellora, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This is the report on the studies about radiation damage on silicon strips detectors I've performed during my Summer Student Programme. A parameter to describe the damage amount has been defined, as well as his behaviour over time and absorbed dose.

  1. Summer Schools for European teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Rosa M.

    The Summer Schools have been organised by the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE) for European teachers. The first was organised in La Seu d'Urgell, Spain, the second was organised in 1998 in Fregene, Italy and the third in 1999, during the week of the eclipse in Briey, France, on the line of total darkness. We had a cloudy eclipse, but fortunately we could observe it. We are preparing the 4th one next July in Tavira, Portugal. A group of 50 participants are involved in each Summer School. In the last one the participants were from 14 countries. The activities are organised in General Lectures, Working Groups and Workshops to reduced groups and day and night Observations. To increase communication, each Summer School has three official languages: the language of the host country, English and another well-known by the participants. The proceedings are published beforehand with all the contents to facilitate participation. Each paper appears in English and another language. The activities are organised in General Lectures, Working Groups and Workshops to reduced groups and day and night Observations. To increase communication, each Summer School has three official languages: the language of the host country, English and another well-known by the participants. The proceedings are published beforehand with all the contents to facilitate participation. Each paper appears in English and another language.

  2. Summer Science Camps Program (SSC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Directorate for Education and Human Resources.

    The Summer Science Camps (SSC) Program supports residential and commuter enrichment projects for seventh through ninth grade minority students who are underrepresented in science, engineering, and mathematics. Eligible organizations include school districts, museums, colleges, universities, and nonprofit youth-centered and/or community-based…

  3. Summer Student Report - Project Kryolize

    CERN Document Server

    Drozdowski, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the work and results obtained by the author during his summer student internship at CERN. The author of this document was attached to the project Kryolize as a software developer, overtaking the job from a recently departed technical student.

  4. Short and long-term lifestyle coaching approaches used to address diverse participant barriers to weight loss and physical activity adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Elizabeth M; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Delahanty, Linda M; Mele, Lisa; Hoskin, Mary A; Edelstein, Sharon L

    2014-02-12

    Individual barriers to weight loss and physical activity goals in the Diabetes Prevention Program, a randomized trial with 3.2 years average treatment duration, have not been previously reported. Evaluating barriers and the lifestyle coaching approaches used to improve adherence in a large, diverse participant cohort can inform dissemination efforts. Lifestyle coaches documented barriers and approaches after each session (mean session attendance = 50.3 ± 21.8). Subjects were 1076 intensive lifestyle participants (mean age = 50.6 years; mean BMI = 33.9 kg/m²; 68% female, 48% non-Caucasian). Barriers and approaches used to improve adherence were ranked by the percentage of the cohort for whom they applied. Barrier groupings were also analyzed in relation to baseline demographic characteristics. Top weight loss barriers reported were problems with self-monitoring (58%); social cues (58%); holidays (54%); low activity (48%); and internal cues (thought/mood) (44%). Top activity barriers were holidays (51%); time management (50%); internal cues (30%); illness (29%), and motivation (26%). The percentage of the cohort having any type of barrier increased over the long-term intervention period. A majority of the weight loss barriers were significantly associated with younger age, greater obesity, and non-Caucasian race/ethnicity (p-values vary). Physical activity barriers, particularly thought and mood cues, social cues and time management, physical injury or illness and access/weather, were most significantly associated with being female and obese (p  90% long term) and regularly reviewed self-monitoring skills. More costly approaches were used infrequently during the first 16 sessions (≤10%) but increased over 3.2 years. Behavioral problem solving approaches have short and long term dissemination potential for many kinds of participant barriers. Given minimal resources, increased attention to training lifestyle coaches in the consistent use of these

  5. Technical Training: ELEC-2005 - Electronics in High Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    Learning for the LHC! ELEC-2005 is a new course series on modern electronics, given by CERN physicists and engineers within the framework of the 2005 Technical Training Programme, in an extended format of the successful ELEC-2002 course series. This comprehensive course series is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. ELEC-2005 is composed of four Terms that will run throughout the year: Winter Term: Introduction to electronics in HEP (January-February, 6 lectures) Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics (March, 6 lectures) Summer Term: System electronics for physics: Issues (May, 7 lectures) Autumn Term: Electronics applications in HEP experiments (November-December, 10 lectures) Lectures within each Term will take place on Tuesdays an...

  6. Factors Associated With the Trend of Physical and Chemical Restraint Use Among Long-Term Care Facility Residents in Hong Kong: Data From an 11-Year Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Kuen; Kwan, Joseph S K; Wai Kwan, Chi; Chong, Alice M L; Lai, Claudia K Y; Lou, Vivian W Q; Leung, Angela Y M; Liu, Justina Y W; Bai, Xue; Chi, Iris

    2017-08-23

    Negative effects of restraint use have been well-documented. However, the prevalence of restraints use has been high in long-term care facilities in Hong Kong compared with other countries and this goes against the basic principles of ethical and compassionate care for older people. The present study aimed to review the change in the prevalence of physical and chemical restraint use in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) over a period of 11 years in Hong Kong and to identify the major factors associated with their use. This is an observational study with data obtained from the Hong Kong Longitudinal Study on LTCF Residents between 2005 and 2015. Trained assessors (nurses, social workers, and therapists) used the Minimum Data Set Resident Assessment Instrument to collect the data from 10 residential LTCFs. Physical restraint was defined as the use of any of the following: full bedside rails on all open sides of bed, other types of bedside rails used, trunk restraint, limb restraint, or the use of chair to prevent rising during the past 7 days. Chemical restraint was defined as the use of any of the following medications: antipsychotic, antianxiety, or hypnotic agents during past 7 days, excluding elder residents with a diagnosis of psychiatric illness. Annual prevalence of restraint use over 11 years and factors that were associated with the use of physical and chemical restraints. We analyzed the data for 2896 older people (978 male individuals, mean age = 83.3 years). Between 2005 and 2015, the prevalence of restraint use was as follows: physical restraint use increased from 52.7% to 70.2%; chemical restraint use increased from 15.9% to 21.78%; and either physical or chemical restraint use increased from 57.9% to 75.7%. Physical restraint use was independently associated with older age, impaired activities of daily living or cognitive function, bowel and bladder incontinence, dementia, and negative mood. Chemical restraint use was independently associated

  7. KPI Graduate Executive Summary Report, Summer 2000-Winter 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan Coll. (Ontario).

    Summarizes findings from the Key Performance Indicator Satisfaction Survey administered by Sheridan College in the summer 2000, fall 2000, and winter 2001 terms. This survey was administered in compliance with the Ontario government's efforts to increase the accountability of the Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology through the measurement of…

  8. A Thriving and Innovative Undergraduate Experiential Physics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughani, Bahram

    2013-03-01

    The thriving physics program at Kettering University has experienced a three-fold increase in the number of physics majors since 2002. Our unique physics program requires students alternate between on-campus academic terms and off-campus co-op work terms on a three months rotation format to complete their degree in 4.5 years that includes summer as either school or co-op term. Students complete a minimum of five terms (~15 months) of cooperative work terms, and two terms (~6 months) of senior thesis work. The IP of the thesis work done at a co-op site belongs to the company. This has attracted co-op sponsors for our program by removing the IP concerns. The cooperative and experiential education part of our program is required for graduation, without any credits assigned to it. At the end of every co-op term students' work performance is evaluated by their co-op supervisor, which should match expected performance standards. In addition to co-op and thesis, our programs include a senior capstone design project course, concentrations within physics (Acoustics, Optics, and Materials), a required technical sequence outside physics, as well as entrepreneurship across curriculum. The success of our student securing the highest paid jobs for undergraduate physics majors in the nation plus their success in graduate studies are the main ``Pull Factors'' that has lead to three fold increase the physics majors since 2002.

  9. Examining the Effects of Long Term Exercise Training on Some Physical and Physiological Parameters of 12 - 15 Years Old Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz ÖZVEREN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to make a determination about the case, by searching physical and physiological parameters with Eurofit tests of boy students at İzmir. The research was made on the age group of 12 - 15 years old, volunteer 1002 boy students who are studying at primary schools; those were chosen randomly in Karabağlar, Konak and Buca boroughs in İzmir. Height and weight, body fat percentage, vertical bounce, 20 m. shuttle run test test, max VO2, grip strength, leg strength, back strength, FVC and FEV1 tests were applied to these students. In conclusion, there were significant differences between test group and control group.

  10. Vascular flow reserve as a link between long-term blood pressure level and physical performance capacity in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian B; Damkjær, Mads; Hald, Bjørn O

    2016-01-01

    function producing a high precapillary resistance and thus a high vascular flow reserve is associated with an increase in network inlet pressure. Assuming that network properties are independent of body mass, and that inlet pressure of the microvascular network is a proxy for arterial pressure, the study......Mean arterial pressure (MAP) is surprisingly similar across different species of mammals, and it is, in general, not known which factors determine the arterial pressure level. Mammals often have a pronounced capacity for sustained physical performance. This capacity depends on the vasculature...... having a flow reserve that comes into play as tissue metabolism increases. We hypothesize that microvascular properties allowing for a large vascular flow reserve is linked to the level of the arterial pressure.To study the interaction between network properties and network inlet pressure, we developed...

  11. Changes in soil physical properties of forest floor horizons due to long-term deposition of lignite fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Peter; Fleige, Heiner; Horn, Rainer [Inst. for Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, Christian-Albrechts-Univ. zu Kiel (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Background, aim, and scope: From the beginning of the twentieth century until the 1990s, energy in Upper Lusatia, Saxony in Eastern Germany was produced at power plants that burnt lignite coals. As a result, alkaline fly ash and aerosols from the combustion of brown coal have accumulated in adjacent areas that are partly under forestry. We ask the question, 'how have these atmospheric depositions of fly ash influenced the soil physical properties (bulk density, particle density, saturated hydraulic conductivity, pore size distribution, and water repellency) of forest floor horizons?' Materials and methods: The experimental sites represented typical soil types and stands of the sylviculturally used areas in the region of Upper Lusatia. Three forest sites were located close to the emission sources, where high amounts of fly ashes accumulated, and three control sites were without fly ash enrichment. Pore size distribution, saturated hydraulic conductivity, and bulk density were examined with undisturbed samples (metal cylinder 100 cm{sup 3}). Disturbed samples were used for the characterization of particle density, texture, and water repellency (Wilhelmy plate method). Additionally, the carbon content was determined. Scanning electron microscopy was used to show fly ash enrichment. Results: The enrichment of mineral fly ash particles could be proven for sites close to the emission source. Using scanning electron microscopy, spherical fly ash particles could be identified. Total quantities of persistent fly ash enrichment amounted to approximately 150-280 Mg ha{sup -1}. The enrichment of fly ash affected the soil-physical characteristics. Close to the emission source (sandy fly ashes), particle density, air capacity, and saturated hydraulic conductivity were significantly increased, whereas the plant available water was significantly reduced. With increasing distance from the emission source (silty fly ashes or no ash enrichment), air capacity and saturated

  12. The Galeta oil spill: Pt. 1; Long-term effects on the physical structure of the mangrove fringe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrity, S.D.; Levings, S.C. (Coastal Zone Analysis, Sopchoppy, FL (United States)); Burns, K.A. (Bermuda Biological Station, Ferry Reach (Bermuda))

    1994-04-01

    In April 1986, more than 75 000 barrels (1.5 x 10[sup 7] l) of medium-weight crude oil spilled into Bahia las Minas on the central Caribbean coast of Panama. Changes in the physical structure of the mangrove fringe after oiling were documented over time. These included defoliation, limb loss and eventual collapse of dead trees. By 5 years after the spill, the length of shore fringed by mangroves was reduced at oiled sites relative to unoiled sites. Surviving trees at oiled sites had fewer and shorter submerged prop roots and a higher proportion of dead roots than trees at unoiled sites. These changes reduced the surface area of submerged prop roots by 33% on oiled open coast, 38% in channels and 74% in streams. (author)

  13. The long hot summer of the tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Kendl, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    What have the probability for fine weather in summer and the possibility for a future use of nuclear fusion as a practically unlimited and clean energy source got in common? The answer is in the particular nature underlying both physical systems: both the atmosphere and hot magnetized fusion plasmas are determined by similar processes of structure formation in quasi-two-dimensional periodic nonlinear dynamical systems. Self-organization of waves and vortices on small scales in both cases leads to large-scale flows, which are, depending on conditions, either stable for a long time - or can break apart intermittently and expel large vortex structures. In the case of earth's atmosphere, a potential stabilization of the polar jet stream over northern Europe by warming in early summer leads to a high probability for stable hot midsummer weather in central Europe. The efficient utilization of nuclear fusion in a power plant also depends if a stabilization of such zonal flows ("H mode") may be sustained by heating o...

  14. Planning the Future of U.S. Particle Physics (Snowmass 2013): Chapter 8: Instrumentation Frontier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demarteau, M.; et al.

    2014-01-23

    These reports present the results of the 2013 Community Summer Study of the APS Division of Particles and Fields ("Snowmass 2013") on the future program of particle physics in the U.S. Chapter 8, on the Instrumentation Frontier, discusses the instrumentation needs of future experiments in the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers, promising new technologies for particle physics research, and issues of gathering resources for long-term research in this area.

  15. Planning the Future of U.S. Particle Physics (Snowmass 2013): Chapter 8: Instrumentation Frontier

    CERN Document Server

    Demarteau, M; Nicholson, H; Shipsey, I; Akerib, D; Albayrak-Yetkin, A; Alexander, J; Anderson, J; Artuso, M; Asner, D; Ball, R; Battaglia, M; Bebek, C; Beene, J; Benhammou, Y; Bentefour, E; Bergevin, M; Bernstein, A; Bilki, B; Blucher, E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Bowden, N; Brooijmans, G; Byrum, K; Cabrera, B; Cancelo, G; Carlstrom, J; Casey, B; Chang, C; Chapman, J; Chen, C H; Childres, I; Christian, D; Convery, M; Corso, W Cooper J; Cumalat, J; Cushman, P; Da Via, C; Dazeley, S; Debbins, P; Deptuch, G; Dhawan, S; Di Benedetto, V; DiGiovene, B; Djurcic, Z; Dye, S; Elagin, A; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Etzion, E; Fast, J; Ferretti, C; Fisher, P; Fleming, B; Francis, K; Friedman, P; Frisch, H; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Gatto, C; Geronim, G; Gilchriese, G; Golwala, S; Grant, C; Grillo, A; Grünendahl, E; Gorham, P; Guan, L; Gutierrez, G; Haber, C; Hall, J; Haller, G; Hast, C; Heintz, U; Hemmick, T; Hitlin, D G; Hogan, C; Hohlmann, M; Hoppe, E; Hsu, L; Huffer, M; Irwin, K; Izraelevitch, F; Jennings, G; Johnson, M; Jung, A; Kagan, H; Kenney, C; Kettell, S; Khanna, R; Khristenko, V; Krennrich, F; Kuehn, K; Kutschke, R; Learned, J; Lee, A T; Levin, D; Liu, T; Liu, A T K; Lissauer, D; Love, J; Lynn, D; MacFarlane, D; Magill, S; Majewski, S; Mans, J; Maricic, J; Marleau, P; Mazzacane, A; McKinsey, D; Mehl, J; Mestvirisvilli, A; Meyer, S; Mokhov, N; Moshe, M; Mukherjee, A; Murat, P; Nahn, S; Narain, M; Nadel-Turonski, P; Newcomer, M; Nishimura, K; Nygren, D; Oberla, E; Onel, Y; Oreglia, M; Orrell, J; Paley, J; Para, A; Parker, S; Polychronakos, V; Pordes, S; Privitera, P; Prosser, A; Pyle, M; Raaf, J; Ramberg, E; Rameika, R; Rebel, B; Repond, J; Reyna, D; Ristori, L; Rivera, R; Ronzhin, A; Rusack, R; Russ, J; Ryd, A; Sadrozinski, H; Sahoo, H; Sanchez, M C; Sanzeni, C; Schnetzer, S; Seidel, S; Seiden, A; Schmidt, I; Shenai, A; Shutt, T; Silver, Y; Smith, W; Snowden-Ifft, D; Sonnenschein, A; Southwick, D; Spiegel, L; Stanitzki, M; Striganov, S; Su, D; Sumner, R; Svoboda, R; Sweany, M; Talaga, R; Tayloe, R; Tentindo, S; Terentiev, N; Thom-Levy, J; Thorn, C; Tiffenberg, J; Trischuk, W; Tschirhart, R; Turner, M; Underwood, D; Uplegger, L; Urheim, J; Vagins, M; Van Bibber, K; Varner, G; Varner, R; Va'vra, J; Von der Lippe, H; Wagner, R; Wagner, S; Weaverdyck, C; Wenzel, H; Weinstein, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wigman, R; Wilson, P; Winn, D; Winter, P; Woody, C; Xia, L; Xie, J Q; Ye, Z; Yeh, M F; Yetkin, T; Yoo, J H; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Zeller, S; Zhang, J L; Zhu, J J; Zhou, B; Zhu, R Y; Zitzer, B

    2014-01-01

    These reports present the results of the 2013 Community Summer Study of the APS Division of Particles and Fields ("Snowmass 2013") on the future program of particle physics in the U.S. Chapter 8, on the Instrumentation Frontier, discusses the instrumentation needs of future experiments in the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers, promising new technologies for particle physics research, and issues of gathering resources for long-term research in this area.

  16. Physical activity, sedentary behavior, and long-term cardiovascular risk in young people:A review and discussion of methodology in prospective studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jakob Tarp; Jan Christian Brønd; Lars Bo Andersen; Niels Christian Møller; Karsten Froberg; Anders Grøntved

    2016-01-01

    The long-term effects of physical activity (PA) or sedentary behavior on cardiovascular health in young people are not well understood. In this study, we use a narrative format to review the evidence for a prospective association with adiposity and other well-established biological cardiovascular risk factors in healthy young people, considering only studies with at least 2 years of follow-up. PA appears to elicit a long-term beneficial effect on adiposity and particularly markers of cardiovascular health. With adiposity, however, a few studies also reported that higher levels of PA were associated with higher levels of adiposity. Time spent sedentary does not appear to be related to adiposity or markers of cardiovascular health independent of PA. We then discuss the uncertainties in the underlying causal chain and consider a number of alternative modeling strategies, which could improve our understanding of the relationship in future studies. Finally, we consider the current methodology for assessing PA and sedentary time.

  17. Oxford Summer School "Intelligent Front-End Signal Processing for Frontier Exploitation in Research and Industry"

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Interdisciplinary Summer School on Intelligent Front-End Signal Processing for Frontier Exploitation in Research and Industry. For details about the school programme and registration, please visit: http://www.physics.ox.ac.uk/INFIERI2013/

  18. The relationship between nutritional status and physical function, admission frequency, length of hospital stay, and mortality in old people living in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sin-Jie; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Lin, Hung-Ru

    2012-06-01

    Nutrition is an important issue for elderly residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs). About 20% of elderly LTCF residents in Taiwan are malnourished. This study investigated correlations between nutritional status and physical function, admission frequency, hospitalstay duration, and mortality in elderly LTCF residents. Researchers used a retrospective study design and convenient sampling to enroll 174 subjects aged 67 to 105 years (average, 82.5 years) who were living in legally registered LTCFs in Beitou District, Taipei City, Taiwan. A review of LTCF resident files provided data on subjects' demographics, physical examination laboratory results for the most recent 1-year period, anthropometry, physical function, admission frequency, hospital stay duration, and causes of admissions. Subjects had lived in their LTCF for more than 1 year before their enrollment date. Subjects who died during and after the study period were also included in analysis. Results showed significant changes over the study year in subjects' nutritional status, physical function, and calf circumference. Physical function was found significantly correlated with calf circumference, hospitalization status was found correlated with nasal-gastric tube feeding status, and eating pattern was found correlated with calf circumference and levels of both serum albumin and cholesterol. Nutritional status, calf circumference, albumin level, and cholesterol level also correlated significantly with hospitalization status. In this study, the likelihood of hospitalization increased with age and nasal-gastric tube feeding use. Hospital stay duration for subjects receiving nasal-gastric tube feeding was longer than that for those receiving oral feeding. Also, weak nutritional status scores for calf circumference and hemoglobin levels were factors associated with increased mortality risk. Findings recommend that greater attention should be paid to the nutritional status of elderly persons living in LTCFs

  19. Phun Physics 4 Phemales: Physics Camp for High School Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Chuhee; Gu, Jiyeong; Henriquez, Laura

    2014-03-01

    The department of Physics and Astronomy with the department of Science Education at California State University, Long Beach hosted summer program of ``Phun Physics 4 Phemales (PP4P)'' during summer 2012 and summer 2013 with the support from APS public outreach program. PP4P summer camp was hosted along with a two-week summer science camp, Young Scientists Camp, which has been institutionalized for the last 14 years since 1999. More than 2,500 3rd -8th grade students and 250 teachers have participated in the program. PP4P program provided the tools and support that female high school students need to pursue careers in physics and/or science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) field. This girls-only camp created connections among the girls and built confidence. In addition PP4P program introduced students to key principles in physics by a hands-on lab environment and demonstrated the real-world social impact of physics. In summer 2012, high school girls worked on physics experimental project on electronics and in summer 2013 they worked on the mechanics. I would share our experience in this program and the impact on the female high school students. This work was supported by 2012 Public Outreach and Informing the Public Grants from American Physical Society.

  20. Analyzing the Anxiety States of Canditates Applying f or Special Talent Examination in the School of Physical Education and Sports in Terms of Several Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeşim SONGÜN

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, anxiety states of candidates who were going to attend special talent examination in the School of Physical Education and Sports were analyzed in terms of various variables such as age, gender, residence and socio - economic level of the family , parents’ educational levels and professions, active sports status, the number of exams taken, and applied training methods. Within the scope of this study, 244 candidates who applied for the special talent examination held by the School of Physical Educa tion and Sports in Gümüşhane University in 2014 - 2015 academic year volunteered to participate. Regarding the data collection tool, a personal information form and State - Trait Anxiety Scale developed by Spielberger et. al were used. For the analysis of gath ered data, for paramedic variables, t test and test of One Way Anova were applied. For non paramedic variables, Kruskal Wallis test was applied. In order to determine the source of difference between the means Post Hoc Tukey test was applied. All the analy ses during the research process were carried out by SPSS 20.00 package program. As a result, it was found out that the only significant diff erence between the anxiety scores and the stated variables was in terms of candidates’ mothers’ occupation variable (F 239 = 2,507, p<.05 whereas no other significant difference was determined concerning other variables.