WorldWideScience

Sample records for physics facility progress

  1. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility: Progress and Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Melora; Pensinger, John; Liu, Feng-Chuan; Dick, G. John

    2003-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is developing the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF). The LTMPF is a multiple user and multiple flight facility that will provide a long duration low temperature environment for performing state of the art experiments at the International Space Station (ISS). During each mission, two distinct primary experiments will be accommodated. Secondary experiments utilizing the hardware built for the primary experiments will also be accommodated during each mission. Over the past year, much progress has occurred on the LTMPF as the flight hardware has started to be built. Also, many changes have occurred. Last summer, the initial flight of the LTMPF was delayed until early 2008 by a 2-year slip in the delivery of the Japanese Experiment Module (KIBO) Exposed Facility of the ISS, where the LTMPF will be attached when it flies. Finally, the experiments that will fly as part of the first mission have been changed so that one Gravitational and Relativistic experiment and one Low Temperature Condensed Matter experiment will fly on each flight of the LTMPF. Therefore, the experiments that will fly on the initial mission of the LTMPF will be DYNAMX and the Superconducting Microwave Oscillator Experiment (SUMO).

  2. Progress at LAMPF (Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility): Progress report, January-December 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C.; Talley, B. (eds.)

    1987-05-01

    Activities at LAMPF during the year of 1986 are summarized, including brief summaries of experiments in nuclear and particle physics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science, radiation-effects studies, biomedical research and instrumentation, nuclear chemistry, radioisotope production, and theory. The status of an advanced hadron facility currently under study is reported, as well as facility development and accelerator operations. (LEW)

  3. Progress in hohlraum physics for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J. D., E-mail: moody4@llnl.gov; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Amendt, P. A.; Baker, K. L.; Bradley, D.; Celliers, P. M.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Döppner, T.; Eder, D. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Jones, O.; Haan, S. W.; Ho, D.; Hopkins, L. B.; Izumi, N.; Kalantar, D.; Kauffman, R. L.; Kilkenny, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); and others

    2014-05-15

    Advances in hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were made this past year in hohlraum efficiency, dynamic shape control, and hot electron and x-ray preheat control. Recent experiments are exploring hohlraum behavior over a large landscape of parameters by changing the hohlraum shape, gas-fill, and laser pulse. Radiation hydrodynamic modeling, which uses measured backscatter, shows that gas-filled hohlraums utilize between 60% and 75% of the laser power to match the measured bang-time, whereas near-vacuum hohlraums utilize 98%. Experiments seem to be pointing to deficiencies in the hohlraum (instead of capsule) modeling to explain most of the inefficiency in gas-filled targets. Experiments have begun quantifying the Cross Beam Energy Transfer (CBET) rate at several points in time for hohlraum experiments that utilize CBET for implosion symmetry. These measurements will allow better control of the dynamic implosion symmetry for these targets. New techniques are being developed to measure the hot electron energy and energy spectra generated at both early and late time. Rugby hohlraums offer a target which requires little to no CBET and may be less vulnerable to undesirable dynamic symmetry “swings.” A method for detecting the effect of the energetic electrons on the fuel offers a direct measure of the hot electron effects as well as a means to test energetic electron mitigation methods. At higher hohlraum radiation temperatures (including near vacuum hohlraums), the increased hard x-rays (1.8–4 keV) may pose an x-ray preheat problem. Future experiments will explore controlling these x-rays with advanced wall materials.

  4. Progress at LAMPF: Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report, July-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C. (ed.)

    1981-03-01

    Progress at LAMPF is the semiannual progress report of the MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The report also includes brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and Los Alamos divisions.

  5. Progress at LAMPF: Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report, January-June 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C. (ed.)

    1981-09-01

    Progress at LAMPF is the semiannual progress report of the MP Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The report includes brief reports on research done at LAMPF by researchers from other institutions and Los Alamos divisions.

  6. Progress at LAMPF (Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility), January--December 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poelakker, K. (ed.)

    1990-12-01

    This report contains brief papers on research conducted at the lampf facility in the following areas: nuclear and particle physics; astrophysics; atomic and molecular physics; materials science; nuclear chemistry; radiation effects and radioisotope production.

  7. Physical protection of nuclear facilities. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, L.D. (ed.)

    1977-07-01

    The physical protection of nuclear facilities program consists of four major areas--evaluation methodology development, path generation/selection methodology, facility characterization, and component functional performance characterization. Activities in each of these areas for the second quarter of FY 77 are summarized.

  8. Physical protection of nuclear facilities. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1978. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, L.D. (ed.)

    1979-01-01

    Major activities during the fourth quarter of FY78 included (1) the vital area analysis of operational reactors and characterization of the Standardized Nuclear Unit Power Plant System (SNUPPS), (2) the algorithm development of a new pathfinding computer code, (3) the completion of contractor-supported work for the component generic data base, (4) the refinement of tests related to human parameters modeling, and (5) the addition of improvements to and demonstration of the Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE), Safeguards Network Analysis Procedure (SNAP), and Fixed-Site Neutralization Model (FSNM) methodologies.

  9. Mound facility physical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

  10. Progress in physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Hempelmann, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Progress in Physical Chemistry is a collection of recent ""Review Articles"" published in the ""Zeitschrift für Physikalische Chemie"". The second volume of Progress in Physical Chemistry is a collection of thematically closely related minireview articles written by the members of the Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) 277 of the German Research Foundation (DFG). These articles are based on twelve years of intense coordinated research efforts. Central topics are the synthesis and the characterization of interface-dominated, i.e. nanostructured materials, mainly in the solid state but also as

  11. PROGRESS IN HELIOSPHERIC PHYSICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This is an overview of progresses in heliospheric physics made in China in the period of June, 2000 to May, 2002. The report is focused on theoretical studies,modelling and observational analysis of interplanetary physical phenomena, and consists of five sections: the acceleration and heating of the solar wind, corona structures, coronal mass ejections, magnetic reconnection phenomena, and in terplanetary transient phenomena. The main achievements made recently by Chinese scientists in related areas are simply listed in corresponding sections without any priority, only certain editorial consideration.

  12. Physics Division computer facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cyborski, D.R.; Teh, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    The Physics Division maintains several computer systems for data analysis, general-purpose computing, and word processing. While the VMS VAX clusters are still used, this past year saw a greater shift to the Unix Cluster with the addition of more RISC-based Unix workstations. The main Divisional VAX cluster which consists of two VAX 3300s configured as a dual-host system serves as boot nodes and disk servers to seven other satellite nodes consisting of two VAXstation 3200s, three VAXstation 3100 machines, a VAX-11/750, and a MicroVAX II. There are three 6250/1600 bpi 9-track tape drives, six 8-mm tapes and about 9.1 GB of disk storage served to the cluster by the various satellites. Also, two of the satellites (the MicroVAX and VAX-11/750) have DAPHNE front-end interfaces for data acquisition. Since the tape drives are accessible cluster-wide via a software package, they are, in addition to replay, used for tape-to-tape copies. There is however, a satellite node outfitted with two 8 mm drives available for this purpose. Although not part of the main cluster, a DEC 3000 Alpha machine obtained for data acquisition is also available for data replay. In one case, users reported a performance increase by a factor of 10 when using this machine.

  13. Physics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-11-01

    Progress is reported in detail in the following areas: Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, the UNISOR program, neutron physics, theoretical physics, the Nuclear Data Project, atomic and plasma physics, and high energy physics. Publications are listed. Separate abstracts were prepared for 34 papers. (WHK)

  14. The Progress of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Arthur

    2015-10-01

    Introduction; 1. Scope of lectures. State of physics in 1875. Science of energy. Theory of gases. Elastic solid theory of light. Maxwell's theory of electricity. Training of students. Maxwell's view. Accurate measurement and discovery of Argon. German methods. Kirchhoff's laboratory. Wilhelm Weber's laboratory. The two laboratories of Berlin. Laboratory instruction at Manchester. Position of physics in mathematical tripos at Cambridge. Todhunter's views. The Cavendish laboratory. Spectrum analysis. The radiometer. Theory of vortex atom; 2. Action at a distance. Elastic solid of theory of light. Maxwell's theory of electrical action. Electro-magnetic theory. Verification of electromagnetic theory by Hertz. Electro-magnetic waves. Wireless telegraphy. First suggestion of molecular structure of electricity. Early experiments in the electric discharge through gases. Kathode rays. Works of Goldstein and Crookes. Hittorf's investigations. Own work on the discharge through gases. Ionization of gases. Magnetic deflexion of kathode rays. J. J. Thomson's experiments. Measurement of atomic charge; 3. Roentgen's discovery. Theories of Roentgen rays. Ionizing power of Roentgen rays. Conduction of electricity through ionized gases. Discovery of radio-activity. Discovery of radium. Magnetic deflexion of rays emitted by radio-active bodies. Discovery of emanations. Theory of radio-active change. Decay of the atom. Connexion between helium and the a ray. Helium produced by radium. Strutt's researches on helium accumulated in rocks. Electric inertia. Constitution of atom. J. J. Thomson's theory of Roentgen radiation. The Michelson-Morley experiment. Principle of relativity. The Zeeman effect. Other consequences of electron theory. Contrast between old and modern school of physics; 4. Observational sciences. Judgment affected by scale. Terrestrial magnetism. Existence of potential. Separation of internal and external causes. Diurnal variation. Magnetic storms. Their causes. Solar

  15. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensinger, J. F.; Chui, T.; Croonquist, A.; Larson, M.; Liu, F.

    2002-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility currently in the design phase is a multiple user and multiple flight facility intended to provide a long duration low temperature environment onboard the International Space Station.

  16. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, T.; Holmes, W.; Lai, A.; Croonquist, A.; Eraker, J.; Abbott, R.; Mills, G.; Mohl, J.; Craig, J.; Balachandra, B.; hide

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and development of the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility, which is intended to provide a unique environment of low temperature and microgravity for the scientists to perform breakthrough investigations on board the International Space Station.

  17. Progressive wave tube facility with additional capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Paul; Bocksruker, Ron; Pilgram, Mark; Vallance, Charles

    1993-01-01

    The design and development of a new acoustic progressive wave tube facility was required to test the Titan IV rocket engine. Because of the large 6 feet diameter of the nozzle closure, circular shape, high over-all sound pressure level (OASPL), and high sound pressure levels (SPLs) above 1000 Hz, the acoustic environmental tests required consideration of a custom built facility. This paper describes a new oscillating supersonic shock generator (OSSG) for developing the high OASPL, for developing the high SPLs at above 1000 Hz, and for use with a conventional acoustic modulator. Also, the new OSSG permits impedance matching to the test volume annulus via the special geometry of the annular space between the elliptical containment domes upstream of the test volume annulus. A test annulus gap that is too small causes the test article to vibrate with a severe damping imposed by the pumping of trapped air in the annulus, and too large a gap reduces the OASPL. Consideration is given to tuning the axial and circumferential resonance frequencies of the annulus test space so that there is no coincidence with the principal resonant modes of the test structure. Also consideration is given to establishing the reverberant versus propagating modes of the test annulus.

  18. Recent progress on the LASERIX facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbaud, O.; Ros, D.; Kazamias, S.; Zielbauer, B.; Habib, J.; Pittman, M.; Farinet, M.; Zimmer, D.; Yu, T.; Klisnick, A.; de Dortan, F.; Lacombe, S.; Porcel, E.; Le Sech, C.; du Penhoat, M.-A.; Touati, A.; Marsi, M.; Joyeux, D.

    2009-08-01

    The LASERIX facility provides coherent and short soft x-ray beams for scientific applications. The beams are generated through high intensity laser interaction with matter using two different schemes, plasma based soft x-ray lasers, and high order laser harmonic generation. We describe in this communication the present status of the facility. The LASERIX beamtime has been recently opened to external users. We present two typical experiments performed in that context with the facility. The first one is dedicated to the fundamental study of the plasma based soft x-ray laser, whereas the second uses the existing beam to study irradiation induced dammage in DNA samples. We present also the development performed on the soft x-ray laser source to improve its stability and high repetition rate operation.

  19. Progressive problems higher grade physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, William

    2001-01-01

    This book fully covers all three Units studied in Scotland's Higher Grade Physics course, providing a systematic array of problems (from the simplest to the most difficult) to lead variously abled pupils to examination success.

  20. The Legacy of the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Melora; Pensinger, John; Liu, Feng-Chuan; Langford, Donald; Hahn, Inseob; Dick, G. John

    2004-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has been building the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF) as a multi-user research facility for the International Space Station. Because of the recent Presidential Exploration Initiative placed on NASA, NASA has informally told JPL to phase out the development of the LTMPF, assuming a suspension of funding at the end of fiscal year 2004. Over the last five years of development of the Facility, a tremendous legacy of both scientific and technical progress has been made, and a significant amount of flight hardware has been built. During these last few months of remaining funding, the LTMPF plans on finishing some remaining development efforts, archiving the hardware (flight and engineering models), software, and capturing the knowledge generated for possible future missions. These possible future missions could include gravitational or relativistic physics experiments (around the Earth or the Moon), charged particle physics experiments away from the Earth, possible other fundamental physics experiments in a Code U-developed free flyer orbiting the Earth, or even gravitational mapping experiments around the Moon or possibly Mars. LTMPF-developed technologies that are likely to have substantial impact on such future missions include SQUID magnetometers and thermometers, ultra-high-performance cryogenics, and high-Q superconducting resonators.

  1. Progresses on Nuclear Facilities Remediation Projects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Cun-ping; WU; Jie; LI; Mei-shan

    2012-01-01

    <正>In 2012, the engineering management department centralized the construction, through highlighting the key route, decomposing the missions and regular implement, controlled the safety, quality, budget and plan of the projects very well. Although all the projects suffered the heavy storm on the 21th July in Beijing, the projects have been pushed on and made new progresses.

  2. Physics Division progress report, January 1, 1984-September 30, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, W.E. (comp.)

    1987-10-01

    This report provides brief accounts of significant progress in development activities and research results achieved by Physics Division personnel during the period January 1, 1984, through September 31, 1986. These efforts are representative of the three main areas of experimental research and development in which the Physics Division serves Los Alamos National Laboratory's and the Nation's needs in defense and basic sciences: (1) defense physics, including the development of diagnostic methods for weapons tests, weapon-related high-energy-density physics, and programs supporting the Strategic Defense Initiative; (2) laser physics and applications, especially to high-density plasmas; and (3) fundamental research in nuclear and particle physics, condensed-matter physics, and biophysics. Throughout the report, emphasis is placed on the design, construction, and application of a variety of advanced, often unique, instruments and instrument systems that maintain the Division's position at the leading edge of research and development in the specific fields germane to its mission. A sampling of experimental systems of particular interest would include the relativistic electron-beam accelerator and its applications to high-energy-density plasmas; pulsed-power facilities; directed energy weapon devices such as free-electron lasers and neutral-particle-beam accelerators; high-intensity ultraviolet and x-ray beam lines at the National Synchrotron Light Source (at Brookhaven National Laboratory); the Aurora KrF ultraviolet laser system for projected use as an inertial fusion driver; antiproton physics facility at CERN; and several beam developments at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility for studying nuclear, condensed-matter, and biological physics, highlighted by progress in establishing the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center.

  3. Physical security and vulnerability modeling for infrasturcture facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozick, Linda Karen; Jones, Dean A.; Davis, Chad Edward; Turnquist, Mark Alan

    2006-07-01

    A model of malicious intrusions in infrastructure facilities is developed, using a network representation of the system structure together with Markov models of intruder progress and strategy. This structure provides an explicit mechanism to estimate the probability of successful breaches of physical security, and to evaluate potential improvements. Simulation is used to analyze varying levels of imperfect information on the part of the intruders in planning their attacks. An example of an intruder attempting to place an explosive device on an airplane at an airport gate illustrates the structure and potential application of the model.

  4. Progress on the VLT Adaptive Optics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, R.; Madec, P.-Y.; Paufique, J.; Ströbele, S.; Pirard, J.-F.; Vernet, É.; Hackenberg, W.; Hubin, N.; Jochum, L.; Kuntschner, H.; Glindemann, A.; Amico, P.; Lelouarn, M.; Kolb, J.; Tordo, S.; Donaldson, R.; Sã¶Nke, C.; Bonaccini Calia, D.; Conzelmann, R.; Delabre, B.; Kiekebusch, M.; Duhoux, P.; Guidolin, I.; Quattri, M.; Guzman, R.; Buzzoni, B.; Comin, M.; Dupuy, C.; Quentin, J.; Lizon, J.-L.; Silber, A.; Jolly, P.; Manescau, A.; Hammersley, P.; Reyes, J.; Jost, A.; Duchateau, M.; Heinz, V.; Bechet, C.; Stuik, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Very Large Telescope (VLT) Adaptive Optics Facility is a project that will transform one of the VLT's Unit Telescopes into an adaptive telescope that includes a deformable mirror in its optical train. For this purpose the secondary mirror is to be replaced by a thin shell deformable mirror; it will be possible to launch four laser guide stars from the centrepiece and two adaptive optics modules are being developed to feed the instruments HAWK-I and MUSE. These modules implement innovative correction modes for seeing improvement through ground layer adaptive optics and, for high Strehl ratio performance, laser tomography adaptive correction. The performance of these modes will be tested in Europe with a custom test bench called ASSIST. The project has completed its final design phase and concluded an intense phase of procurement; the year 2011 will see the beginning of assembly, integration and tests.

  5. Progress at the ESRF multilayer facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawe, Ch; Peffen, J. Ch; Friedrich, K.; Osterhoff, M.

    2013-03-01

    The ESRF multilayer (ML) deposition facility is fully operational since 2009. By the end of 2011, almost 50 ML projects were completed using the new machine, bringing the total number to 143 since 1998. Thanks to the new equipment and its improved performance the throughput could be significantly increased. The ESRF upgrade project caused strong demands for new ML optics, in particular dynamically bent KB focusing devices requiring very precise and steeply graded ML coatings. Thanks to this technology, the ESRF nano-imaging end-station ID22NI now provides the users with spot sizes of the order of 50×50 nm2 at a photon flux of 1012 ph/s. Among various in-house research and development activities the study of stress evolution during thin film and ML growth will be highlighted. Additional projects involving a PhD student and a PostDoc fellow cover the fields of wave optical simulations using curved MLs and the exposure of ML based monochromators to the white beam.

  6. Recent progress of solar physics research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Fang

    2011-01-01

    Owing to the largely improved facilities and working conditions,solar physics research in China has recently shown marked development.This paper reports on the recent progress of solar physics research in Mainland China,mainly focusing on several hot issues,including instrumentations,magnetic field observations and research,solar flares,filaments and their eruptions,coronal mass ejections and related processes,as well as active regions and the corona,small-scale phenomena,solar activity and its predictions.A vision of the future is also described.

  7. The science capability of the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, M.; Croonquist, A.; Dick, G. J.; Liu, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF) is a multiple user and multiple-flight NASA facility that will provide a low temperature environment for about 4. 5 months on board the International Space Station (ISS).

  8. Space Physics Data Facility Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candey, Robert M.; Harris, Bernard T.; Chimiak, Reine A.

    2005-01-01

    The Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) Web services provides a distributed programming interface to a portion of the SPDF software. (A general description of Web services is available at http://www.w3.org/ and in many current software-engineering texts and articles focused on distributed programming.) The SPDF Web services distributed programming interface enables additional collaboration and integration of the SPDF software system with other software systems, in furtherance of the SPDF mission to lead collaborative efforts in the collection and utilization of space physics data and mathematical models. This programming interface conforms to all applicable Web services specifications of the World Wide Web Consortium. The interface is specified by a Web Services Description Language (WSDL) file. The SPDF Web services software consists of the following components: 1) A server program for implementation of the Web services; and 2) A software developer s kit that consists of a WSDL file, a less formal description of the interface, a Java class library (which further eases development of Java-based client software), and Java source code for an example client program that illustrates the use of the interface.

  9. Environmental health physics-50 years of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Dade W

    2004-10-01

    Environmental health physics is an interdisciplinary field, involving study of the release, transport, and fate of radioactive material in the environment. Further, it addresses the interaction of humans with radioactive materials within the ambient (outdoor) environment and with the environments associated with modern technology and lifestyles. It also involves both naturally occurring and artificially produced radionuclides with the former generally being by far the highest source of exposure. In fact, doses from naturally occurring radionuclides are increasingly being used as a benchmark for the establishment of dose rate limits for people. Because of the pioneering work of early environmental health physicists, models exist today that can be used to assess the potential impacts of new nuclear facilities prior to their operation. In fact, these people represent the branch of the health physics profession who conducted environmental monitoring programs and performed the associated research studies that led to the identification of the principal radionuclides of interest, the major pathways and mechanisms through which they expose people, and the doses that may result from radioactive materials in the natural and technologically enhanced environments. One of their most important contributions was the identification and quantification of many of the key parameters that serve as input to such models. Monitoring of nuclear weapons development facilities used during and after World War II was the initial stimulus for the establishment of environmental health physics programs. Thereafter, these programs were expanded both nationally and globally, as a result of the atmospheric weapons testing programs of nations such as France, the People's Republic of China, the former Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Additional stimuli were provided by the development of the commercial nuclear power industry. Current environmental programs, particularly within

  10. Environmental health physics: 50 years of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Dade W

    2005-06-01

    Environmental health physics is an interdisciplinary field, involving study of the release, transport, and fate of radioactive material in the environment. Further, it addresses the interaction of humans with radioactive materials within the ambient (outdoor) environment and with the environments associated with modern technology and lifestyles. It also involves both naturally occurring and artificially produced radionuclides with the former generally being by far the highest source of exposure. In fact, doses from naturally occurring radionuclides are increasingly being used as a benchmark for the establishment of dose rate limits for people. Because of the pioneering work of early environmental health physicists, models exist today that can be used to assess the potential impacts of new nuclear facilities prior to their operation. In fact, these people represent the branch of the health physics profession who conducted environmental monitoring programs and performed the associated research studies that led to the identification of the principal radionuclides of interest, the major pathways and mechanisms through which they expose people, and the doses that may result from radioactive materials in the natural and technologically enhanced environments. One of their most important contributions was the identification and quantification of many of the key parameters that serve as input to such models. Monitoring of nuclear weapons development facilities used during and after World War II was the initial stimulus for the establishment of environmental health physics programs. Thereafter, these programs were expanded both nationally and globally, as a result of the atmospheric weapons testing programs of nations such as France, the People's Republic of China, the former Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Additional stimuli were provided by the development of the commercial nuclear power industry. Current environmental programs, particularly within

  11. Egyptian women in physics: Progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen, M.; Hosni, Hala; Mohamed, Hadeer; Gadalla, Afaf; Kahil, Heba; Hashem, Hassan

    2015-12-01

    The present study shows a progressive increase in the number of female physicists as undergraduates and postgraduates in several governmental universities. For instance, in Ain Shams University, the percentage of women who selected physics as a major course of study increased from 7.2% in 2012 to 10.8% in 2013 and 15.7% in 2014. The study also provides the current gender distribution in the various positions among the teaching staff in seven governmental universities. The data supports the fact that female teaching assistants are increasing in these universities.

  12. Experimental Facilities Division progress report 1996--97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the activities of the Experimental Facilities Division (XFD) in support of the users of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), primarily focusing on the past year of operations. In September 1996, the APS began operations as a national user facility serving the US community of x-ray researchers from private industry, academic institutions, and other research organizations. The start of operations was about three months ahead of the baseline date established in 1988. This report is divided into the following sections: (1) overview; (2) user operations; (3) user administration and technical support; (4) R and D in support of view operations; (5) collaborative research; and (6) long-term strategic plans for XFD.

  13. Plutonium Reclamation Facility incident response project progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, B.A.

    1997-11-25

    This report provides status of Hanford activities in response to process deficiencies highlighted during and in response to the May 14, 1997, explosion at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility. This report provides specific response to the August 4, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary which requested a progress report, in 120 days, on activities associated with reassessing the known and evaluating new vulnerabilities (chemical and radiological) at facilities that have been shut down, are in standby, are being deactivated or have otherwise changed their conventional mode of operation in the last several years. In addition, this report is intended to provide status on emergency response corrective activities as requested in the memorandum from the Secretary on August 28, 1997. Status is also included for actions requested in the second August 28, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary, regarding timely notification of emergencies.

  14. Facility Planning for Physical Education, Recreation, and Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Richard B., Ed.

    This publication reflects the composite knowledge of many professionals on the topic of the planning and construction of facilities for athletics, physical education, and recreation. The text is organized into nine chapters: (1) "Facility Planning Process: Factors To Consider" (H. R. White and J. D. Karabetsos); (2) "Indoor…

  15. Future hadron physics facilities at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    Fermilab's hadron physics research continues in all its accelerator-based programs. These efforts will be identified, and the optimization of the Fermilab schedules for physics will be described. In addition to the immediate plans, the Fermilab Long Range Plan will be cited, and the status and potential role of a new proton source, the Proton Driver, is described.

  16. Perfection of physical preparation of students by facilities of boxing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krylovskiy O.V.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The question of physical preparedness of students of the unspecialized institutes of higher of I-IV of courses is considered. Offered and grounded idea of the use of facilities of boxing in form educational trainings employments. They are used for perfection of physical preparation of students as an alternative to the lessons on physical education. For the students of experimental group more considerable increase of indexes of physical preparedness is marked by comparison to a control group.

  17. PREFACE: Progress in the ITER Physics Basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, K.

    2007-06-01

    I would firstly like to congratulate all who have contributed to the preparation of the `Progress in the ITER Physics Basis' (PIPB) on its publication and express my deep appreciation of the hard work and commitment of the many scientists involved. With the signing of the ITER Joint Implementing Agreement in November 2006, the ITER Members have now established the framework for construction of the project, and the ITER Organization has begun work at Cadarache. The review of recent progress in the physics basis for burning plasma experiments encompassed by the PIPB will be a valuable resource for the project and, in particular, for the current Design Review. The ITER design has been derived from a physics basis developed through experimental, modelling and theoretical work on the properties of tokamak plasmas and, in particular, on studies of burning plasma physics. The `ITER Physics Basis' (IPB), published in 1999, has been the reference for the projection methodologies for the design of ITER, but the IPB also highlighted several key issues which needed to be resolved to provide a robust basis for ITER operation. In the intervening period scientists of the ITER Participant Teams have addressed these issues intensively. The International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) has provided an excellent forum for scientists involved in these studies, focusing their work on the high priority physics issues for ITER. Significant progress has been made in many of the issues identified in the IPB and this progress is discussed in depth in the PIPB. In this respect, the publication of the PIPB symbolizes the strong interest and enthusiasm of the plasma physics community for the success of the ITER project, which we all recognize as one of the great scientific challenges of the 21st century. I wish to emphasize my appreciation of the work of the ITPA Coordinating Committee members, who are listed below. Their support and encouragement for the preparation of the PIPB were

  18. Science driving facilities for particle physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    This week, CERN played host to the 10th ICFA (International Committee for Future Accelerators) seminar, which brought together some 200 scientists, government agency representatives and lab directors from around the world to take the pulse of our field. ICFA seminars take place every three years, and this time the emphasis was on science as the driving force for facilities.   The theme of this year’s seminar could not have been more timely. With austerity the global norm, it is more important than ever for science to point the way to the facilities we need, and for the global community to ensure that those facilities are planned at the global level. The LHC is already a machine for the world, and although CERN’s Member States have carried the bulk of the cost, it would not have been possible without contributions from around the globe. In the US, Fermilab’s focus has moved away from the high-energy frontier to the intensity frontier, which is every bit as impor...

  19. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-12-01

    Research and development activities are summarized in the following areas: Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, the UNISOR program, accelerator-based atomic physics, theoretical physics, nuclear science applications, atomic physics and plasma diagnostics for fusion program, high-energy physics, the nuclear data project, and the relativistic heavy-ion collider study. Publications and papers presented are listed. (WHK)

  20. Physics division progress report for period ending September 30 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.B. [ed.

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in physics. The areas covered are: Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; low/medium energy nuclear physics; high energy experimental physics; the Unisor program; experimental atomic physics; laser and electro-optics lab; theoretical physics; compilations and evaluations; and radioactive ion beam development. (LSP)

  1. Physics division progress report for period ending September 30 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in physics. The areas covered are: Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; low/medium energy nuclear physics; high energy experimental physics; the Unisor program; experimental atomic physics; laser and electro-optics lab; theoretical physics; compilations and evaluations; and radioactive ion beam development. (LSP)

  2. Making Facilities Accessible to the Physically Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    State Univ. Construction Fund, Albany, NY.

    Guidelines on performance criteria for the State University of New York consider two main types of handicapped: the ambulant and semi-ambulant, including some physically handicapped, the visually and aurally handicapped, and persons with cardiac conditions; and persons confined to wheel chairs. The handicapped and planning for them are discussed.…

  3. ICStatus and progress of the National Ignition Facility as ICF and HED user facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Kauffman, R. L.; Larson, D. W.; Herrmann, M. C.

    2016-05-01

    Since its completion in 2009, the National Ignition Facility has been operated in support of NNSA's Stockpile Stewardship mission, providing unique experimental data in the high energy density regime. We will describe the progress made by the National Ignition facility in the user office and management, facility capabilities, target diagnostics and diagnostics development. We will also discuss the results of a major effort to increase the shot rate on NIF. An extensive set of projects, developed in conjunction with the HED community and drawing on best practices at other facilities, improved shot rate by over 80% and recently enabled us to deliver 356 target experiments in FY15 in support of the users. Through an updated experimental set-up and review process, computer controlled set-up of the laser and diagnostics and disciplined operations, NIF also continued to deliver experimental reliability, precision and repeatability. New and complex platforms are introduced with a high success rate. Finally we discuss how new capabilities and further efficiency improvements will enable the successful execution of ICF and HED experimental programs required to support the quest for Ignition and the broader Science Based Stockpile Stewardship mission

  4. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1988-03-01

    The activities of this Division are concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. A major activity within the Division is operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. Highlights for this year, which include a record number of beam hours provided for research, are summarized. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to be dominated by research utilizing heavy ions. These activities, while continuing to center largely on the Holifield Facility, have seen growth in the use of facilities that provide intermediate energies (GANIL) and ultrarelativistic beams (CERN). The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been intimately associated with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. The experimental nuclear structure research of this consortium is included. In addition to the Holifield Facility, the Division also operates two smaller facilities, the EN Tandem and the ECR Ion Source Facility, as /open quotes/User Resources/close quotes/. The tandem continues a long history of supporting research in accelerator-based atomic physics. During this past year, new beam lines have been added to the ECR ion source to create user opportunities for atomic physics experiments with this unique device. These two facilities and the experimental programs in atomic physics are discussed. The efforts in theoretical physics, covering both nuclear and atomic physics, are presented. Also included is the theory effort in support of the UNISOR structure program. In addition to research with multicharged heavy ions from the ECR source, the effort on atomic physics in support of the controlled fusion program includes a plasma diagnostics development program and operation of an atomic physics data center. The nuclear physics program also operates a compilation and evaluation effort; this work is also described.

  5. Progress in preliminary studies at Ottana Solar Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demontis, V.; Camerada, M.; Cau, G.; Cocco, D.; Damiano, A.; Melis, T.; Musio, M.

    2016-05-01

    The fast increasing share of distributed generation from non-programmable renewable energy sources, such as the strong penetration of photovoltaic technology in the distribution networks, has generated several problems for the management and security of the whole power grid. In order to meet the challenge of a significant share of solar energy in the electricity mix, several actions aimed at increasing the grid flexibility and its hosting capacity, as well as at improving the generation programmability, need to be investigated. This paper focuses on the ongoing preliminary studies at the Ottana Solar Facility, a new experimental power plant located in Sardinia (Italy) currently under construction, which will offer the possibility to progress in the study of solar plants integration in the power grid. The facility integrates a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant, including a thermal energy storage system and an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) unit, with a concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) plant and an electrical energy storage system. The facility has the main goal to assess in real operating conditions the small scale concentrating solar power technology and to study the integration of the two technologies and the storage systems to produce programmable and controllable power profiles. A model for the CSP plant yield was developed to assess different operational strategies that significantly influence the plant yearly yield and its global economic effectiveness. In particular, precise assumptions for the ORC module start-up operation behavior, based on discussions with the manufacturers and technical datasheets, will be described. Finally, the results of the analysis of the: "solar driven", "weather forecasts" and "combined storage state of charge (SOC)/ weather forecasts" operational strategies will be presented.

  6. Vienna progress report on the new facility PERC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konrad, Gertrud [Atominstitut, TU Wien, Vienna (Austria); Collaboration: PERC-Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    Measurements of neutron decay observables address important open questions of particle physics and are generally complementary to direct searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) in high-energy physics. Main emphasis lies on the search for evidence of possible extensions to the SM and searches for new symmetry concepts. PERC will perform high-precision measurements of neutron decay correlations at the beam facility MEPHISTO of the FRM-II in Garching. We present a) a novel spatial magnetic neutron spin resonator, MONOPOL. High-precision measurements with PERC require a perfect knowledge and control of the key parameters of the neutron beam, i.e., wavelength distribution, degree of polarization, and time structure. b) a superconducting magnet system. PERC is designed as a source of neutron decay products. The charged decay products are collected by a strong magnetic field directly from inside a neutron guide. c) a system for particle spectroscopy. Depending on the decay parameters studied, the analysis of the decay products must be performed with different and specialized detectors.

  7. Sustaining the Progress to Improve Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Razzaq, Wathiq

    2010-01-01

    One of the problems we face in teaching introductory physics courses at the college level is that about 2/3 of students never had physics prior coming to college. Thus, many students find it very difficult to learn physics for the first time at the relatively fast-paced teaching of college physics courses. Sometimes the drop/failure/withdrawal…

  8. The Development of the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, T.; Holmes, W.; Lai, A.; Croonquist, A.; Eraker, J.; Abbott, R.; Mills, G.; Mohl, J.; Craig, J.; Balachandra, B.; hide

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and development of the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility, which is intended to provide long duration (4.5 months) low temperature (1.4K) and microgravity conditions for scientists to perform breakthrough investigations on board the International Space Station.

  9. Centralization and Decentralization of Schools' Physical Facilities Management in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoya, Peter O.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to examine the difference in the availability, adequacy and functionality of physical facilities in centralized and decentralized schools districts, with a view to making appropriate recommendations to stakeholders on the reform programmes in the Nigerian education sector. Design/methodology/approach: Principals,…

  10. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division, 1995 January 1 to December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, M. (ed.)

    1996-05-01

    This document is a Progress Report for the Physical and Environmental Sciences, Physics Division, for the period 1995 January 1 to December 31, at the Chalk River nuclear Labs. The condensed matter science group continued to operate a multi-faceted program involving collaborative basic and applied research with external scientists in the fields of materials science, physics, chemistry and biology. The Applied Neutron Diffraction for Industry (And) program gained strength with ever wider applications for the nuclear, aerospace, and manufacturing programs. Steps continued towards making neutron scattering facilities at NRU reactor more user friendly. The neutrino physics group, as part of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) Institute, collaborating with scientists from Canada, USA and UK. The accelerator physics group spent considerable effort working with materials and fuels scientists to show the value of accelerators as an out-reactor source of radiation. Specific research activities have included the demonstration of laser plasma deposition of diamond coating, which has potential application for high-wear components in reactors, and the study for a Free Electron Laser upgrade for the IMPELA accelerator. As a result of funding reduction all programs of the Division were dissolved as of 1997 March 31.

  11. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1989-03-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1988 fiscal year, beginning October 1, 1987, and ending September 30, 1988. The activities of this Division are concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. Operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility continues to represent the single largest activity within the Division. This year saw the completion of the acceleration tube upgrade of the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator and the achievement of record terminal potentials, operation for an experiment with 25 million volts on terminal, and successful tests with beam at 25.5 MV. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to be dominated by research utilizing heavy ions. These activities, while continuing to center largely on the Holifield Facility, have seen significant growth in the use of facilities that provide intermediate energies and especially ultrarelativistic beams. The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been intimately associated with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. In addition to the Holifield Facility, the Division operates two smaller facilities, the EN Tandem and the ECR Ion Source Facility, as ''User Resources.'' The efforts in theoretical physics, covering both nuclear and atomic physics, are presented. In addition to research with multicharged heavy ions from the ECR source, the effort on atomic physics in support of the controlled fusion program includes a plasma diagnostics development program. The concentration of this program on optical and laser technology is marked by the change in designation to the Laser and Electro-Optics Lab. A small, continuing effort in elementary particle physics, carried out in collaboration with the University of Tennessee, is reported.

  12. Physics Experiments Planned for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, Charles P.

    1998-11-01

    This talk will review the current status and plans for high energy density physics experiments to be conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The NIF a multi-laboratory effort, presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a 192 beam solid state glass laser system designed to deliver 1.8MJ (at 351nm) in temporal shaped pulses. This review will begin by introducing the NIF in the context of its role in the overall United States Stockpile Stewardship Program. The major focus of this talk will be to describe the physics experiments planned for the NIF. By way of introduction to the experiments a short review of the NIF facility design and projected capabilities will be presented. In addition the current plans and time line for the activation of the laser and experimental facilities will also be reviewed. The majority of this talk will focus on describing the national inertial confinement fusion integrated theory and experimental target ignition plan. This national plan details the theory and experimental program required for achieving ignition and modest thermonuclear gain on the NIF. This section of the presentation will include a status of the current physics basis, ignition target designs, and target fabrication issues associated with the indirect-drive and direct-drive approaches to ignition. The NIF design provides the capabilities to support experiments for both approaches to ignition. Other uses for the NIF, including non ignition physics relevant to the national security mission, studies relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy, and basic science applications, will also be described. The NIF offers the potential to generate new basic scientific understanding about matter under extreme conditions by making available a unique facility for research into: astrophysics and space physics, hydrodynamics, condensed matter physics, material properties, plasma physics and radiation sources, and radiative properties. Examples of

  13. Future prospects in nuclear physics and the Japanese hadron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metag, V. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Giessen Univ. (Germany). 2. Physikalisches Inst.

    1998-05-01

    The Japanese Hadron Facility (JHF) will provide new perspectives for a broad research program covering nuclear and particle physics, condensed matter physics, material sciences, and life sciences. In this talk, the future prospects of nuclear physics, as they are discussed within the community, are addressed. Recommendations worked out by the study groups, evaluating the long term perspectives of GSI, have hereby been used as a guideline. Nuclear physics is considered here in a broad sense as the physics of extended structured objects bound by the strong interaction, i.e. mesons, baryons, and nuclei. Preference is given to those subfields which would benefit most from the new experimental possibilities to the JHF. Consequently, the structure of exotic nuclei and hypernuclei, the properties of compressed hadronic matter and medium modifications of hadrons, spectroscopy of mesons, glueballs and baryons, and the parton structure of the nucleon are addressed and analyzed with regard to their future physics potential. (orig.)

  14. Nuclear Physics Research at the University of Richmond progress report, November 1, 1992--October 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vineyard, M.F.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Major, R.W.

    1993-12-31

    Summarized in this report is the progress achieved during the period from November 1, 1992 to October 31, 1993 under Contract Number DE-FG05-88ER40459. The experimental work described in this report is in electromagnetic and heavy-ion nuclear physics. The effort in electromagnetic nuclear physics is in preparation for the research program at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and is focussed on the construction and use of the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The heavy-ion experiments were performed at the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility and the University of Pennsylvania.

  15. Duke University high energy physics. Progress report, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortney, L.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Walker, W.D.

    1992-07-01

    This Progress Report presents a review of the research done in 1992 by the Duke High Energy Physics Group. This is the first year of a three-year grant which was approved by the Office of High Energy Physics at DOE after an external review of our research program during the summer of 1991. Our research is centered at Fermilab where we are involved with two active experiments, one using the Tevatron collider (CDF, the Collider Detector Facility) and the other using a proton beam in the high intensity laboratory (E771, study of beauty production). In addition to these running experiments we are continuing the analysis of data from experiments E735 (collider search for a quark-gluon plasma), E705 (fixed target study of direct photon and {sub {Chi}} meson production) and E597 (particle production from hadron-nucleus collisions). Finally, this year has seen an expansion of our involvement with the design of the central tracking detector for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) and an increased role in the governance of the collaboration. Descriptions of these research activities are presented in this report.

  16. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1986-04-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1985 fiscal year. The research activities were centered on experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The experimental nuclear physics program is dominated by heavy ion research. A major part of this effort is the responsibility for operating the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. A major new activity described is the preparation for participation in an ultrarelativistic heavy ion experiment to be performed at CERN in 1986. The experimental atomic physics program has two components: the accelerator-based studies of basic collisional phenomena and the studies in support of the controlled fusion program. Also associated with the fusion-related studies are a plasma diagnostics program and the operation of an atomic physics data center. Theory efforts associated with the UNISOR program are described, as well as smaller programs in applications and high-energy physics. (LEW)

  17. Physics Detector Simulation Facility Phase II system software description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scipioni, B.; Allen, J.; Chang, C.; Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Mestad, S.; Pan, J.; Marquez, M.; Estep, P.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) Phase II system software. A key element in the design of a distributed computing environment for the PDSF has been the separation and distribution of the major functions. The facility has been designed to support batch and interactive processing, and to incorporate the file and tape storage systems. By distributing these functions, it is often possible to provide higher throughput and resource availability. Similarly, the design is intended to exploit event-level parallelism in an open distributed environment.

  18. SuperB Progress Reports - Physics

    CERN Document Server

    O'Leary, B.; Ramon, M.; Pous, E.; De Fazio, F.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Asgeirsson, D.; Cheng, C.H.; Chivukula, A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D.G.; Porter, F.; Rakitin, A.; Heinemeyer, S.; McElrath, B.; Andreassen, R.; Meadows, B.; Sokoloff, M.; Blanke, M.; Lesiak, T.; Shindou, T.; Ronga, F.; Baldini, W.; Bettoni, D.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Rama, M.; Bossi, F.; Guido, E.; Patrignani, C.; Tosi, S.; Davies, C.; Lunghi, E.; Haisch, U.; Hurth, T.; Westhoff, S.; Crivellin, A.; Hofer, L.; Goto, T.; Brown, David Nathan; Branco, G.C.; Zupan, J.; Herrero, M.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, A.; Simi, G.; Tackmann, F.J.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Lindemann, D.M.; Robertson, S.H.; Duling, B.; Gemmler, K.; Gorbahn, M.; Jager, S.; Paradisi, P.; Straub, D.M.; Bigi, I.; Asner, D.M.; Fast, J.E.; Kouzes, R.T.; Morandin, M.; Rotondo, M.; Ben-Haim, E.; Arnaud, N.; Burmistrov, L.; Kou, E.; Perez, A.; Stocchi, A.; Viaud, B.; Domingo, F.; Piccinini, F.; Manoni, E.; Batignani, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Neri, N.; Walsh, J.; Bevan, A.; Bona, M.; Walker, C.; Weiland, C.; Lenz, A.; Gonzalez-Sprinberg, G.; Faccini, R.; Renga, F.; Polosa, A.; Silvestrini, L.; Virto, J.; Ciuchini, M.; Lubicz, V.; Tarantino, C.; Wilson, F.F.; Carpinelli, M.; Huber, T.; Mannel, T.; Graham, M.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Santoro, V.; Sekula, S.; Shougaev, K.; Soffer, A.; Shimizu, Y.; Gambino, P.; Mussa, R.; Nardecchia, M.; Stal, O.; Bernabeu, J.; Botella, F.; Jung, M.; Lopez March, N.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Pich, A.; Lozano, M.A.Sanchis; Vidal, J.; Vives, O.; Banerjee, S.; Roney, J.M.; Petrov, A.A.; Flood, K.

    2010-01-01

    SuperB is a high luminosity e+e- collider that will be able to indirectly probe new physics at energy scales far beyond the reach of any man made accelerator planned or in existence. Just as detailed understanding of the Standard Model of particle physics was developed from stringent constraints imposed by flavour changing processes between quarks, the detailed structure of any new physics is severely constrained by flavour processes. In order to elucidate this structure it is necessary to perform a number of complementary studies of a set of golden channels. With these measurements in hand, the pattern of deviations from the Standard Model behavior can be used as a test of the structure of new physics. If new physics is found at the LHC, then the many golden measurements from SuperB will help decode the subtle nature of the new physics. However if no new particles are found at the LHC, SuperB will be able to search for new physics at energy scales up to 10-100 TeV. In either scenario, flavour physics measure...

  19. A Staged Muon Accelerator Facility For Neutrino and Collider Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; Brice, Stephen; Bross, Alan David; Denisov, Dmitri; Eichten, Estia; Holmes, Stephen; Lipton, Ronald; Neuffer, David; Palmer, Mark Alan; Bogacz, S Alex; Huber, Patrick; Kaplan, Daniel M; Snopok, Pavel; Kirk, Harold G; Palmer, Robert B; Ryne, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    Muon-based facilities offer unique potential to provide capabilities at both the Intensity Frontier with Neutrino Factories and the Energy Frontier with Muon Colliders. They rely on a novel technology with challenging parameters, for which the feasibility is currently being evaluated by the Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). A realistic scenario for a complementary series of staged facilities with increasing complexity and significant physics potential at each stage has been developed. It takes advantage of and leverages the capabilities already planned for Fermilab, especially the strategy for long-term improvement of the accelerator complex being initiated with the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP-II) and the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF). Each stage is designed to provide an R&D platform to validate the technologies required for subsequent stages. The rationale and sequence of the staging process and the critical issues to be addressed at each stage, are presented.

  20. Handbook on interdisciplinary use of European nuclear physics facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This handbook is intended to collect together, in an accessible way, the most pertinent information which might be needed by anyone contemplating the use of nuclear physics accelerators for research in other disciplines, or for industrial, biomedical, solid-state or other applications. Information for the publication was supplied by each laboratory represented here, and this was edited and supplemented where it was thought necessary, by additional material, often derived from the facilities' web-sites. The reader will find for each facility a technical description concerning the accelerator itself and its experimental equipment, followed by a 'what can be made there' section. 'at a glance' page contains a summary of contact names and addresses, transport, access and accommodation offered that will be of a great use for prospective user. 26 facilities in 12 European countries (Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and The Netherlands) are presented.

  1. SuperB Progress Report for Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, B.; /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch.; Matias, J.; Ramon, M.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Pous, E.; /Barcelona U.; De Fazio, F.; Palano, A.; /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; /Bergen U.; Asgeirsson, D.; /British Columbia U.; Cheng, C.H.; Chivukula, A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D.G.; Porter, F.; Rakitin, A.; /Caltech; Heinemeyer, S.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; McElrath, B.; /CERN; Andreassen, R.; Meadows, B.; Sokoloff, M.; /Cincinnati U.; Blanke, M.; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.; Lesiak, T.; /Cracow, INP /DESY /Zurich, ETH /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Glasgow U. /Indiana U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol. /KEK, Tsukuba /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Lisbon, IST /Ljubljana U. /Madrid, Autonoma U. /Maryland U. /MIT /INFN, Milan /McGill U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Notre Dame U. /PNL, Richland /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Orsay, LAL /Orsay, LPT /INFN, Pavia /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Queen Mary, U. of London /Regensburg U. /Republica U., Montevideo /Frascati /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rutherford /Sassari U. /Siegen U. /SLAC /Southern Methodist U. /Tel Aviv U. /Tohoku U. /INFN, Turin /INFN, Trieste /Uppsala U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Wayne State U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-02-14

    SuperB is a high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} collider that will be able to indirectly probe new physics at energy scales far beyond the reach of any man made accelerator planned or in existence. Just as detailed understanding of the Standard Model of particle physics was developed from stringent constraints imposed by flavour changing processes between quarks, the detailed structure of any new physics is severely constrained by flavour processes. In order to elucidate this structure it is necessary to perform a number of complementary studies of a set of golden channels. With these measurements in hand, the pattern of deviations from the Standard Model behavior can be used as a test of the structure of new physics. If new physics is found at the LHC, then the many golden measurements from SuperB will help decode the subtle nature of the new physics. However if no new particles are found at the LHC, SuperB will be able to search for new physics at energy scales up to 10-100 TeV. In either scenario, flavour physics measurements that can be made at SuperB play a pivotal role in understanding the nature of physics beyond the Standard Model. Examples for using the interplay between measurements to discriminate New Physics models are discussed in this document. SuperB is a Super Flavour Factory, in addition to studying large samples of B{sub u,d,s}, D and {tau} decays, SuperB has a broad physics programme that includes spectroscopy both in terms of the Standard Model and exotica, and precision measurements of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}. In addition to performing CP violation measurements at the {Upsilon}(4S) and {phi}(3770), SuperB will test CPT in these systems, and lepton universality in a number of different processes. The multitude of rare decay measurements possible at SuperB can be used to constrain scenarios of physics beyond the Standard Model. In terms of other precision tests of the Standard Model, this experiment will be able to perform precision over

  2. Texas Experimental Tokamak, a plasma research facility: Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1995-08-01

    In the year just past, the authors made major progress in understanding turbulence and transport in both core and edge. Development of the capability for turbulence measurements throughout the poloidal cross section and intelligent consideration of the observed asymmetries, played a critical role in this work. In their confinement studies, a limited plasma with strong, H-mode-like characteristics serendipitously appeared and received extensive study though a diverted H-mode remains elusive. In the plasma edge, they appear to be close to isolating a turbulence drive mechanism. These are major advances of benefit to the community at large, and they followed from incremental improvements in diagnostics, in the interpretation of the diagnostics, and in TEXT itself. Their general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The work here demonstrates a continuing dedication to the problems of plasma transport which continue to plague the community and are an impediment to the design of future devices. They expect to show here that they approach this problem consistently, systematically, and effectively.

  3. Physical Sciences Facility Air Emission Control Equivalency Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David M.; Belew, Shan T.

    2008-10-17

    This document presents the adequacy evaluation for the application of technology standards during design, fabrication, installation and testing of radioactive air exhaust systems at the Physical Sciences Facility (PSF), located on the Horn Rapids Triangle north of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) complex. The analysis specifically covers the exhaust portion of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems associated with emission units EP-3410-01-S, EP-3420-01-S and EP 3430-01-S.

  4. Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility Payload for the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Don; Pensinger, John

    2003-01-01

    The LTMPF Payload is a 182-liter superfluid-helium dewar that will be attached to the JEM-EF facility of the International Space Station after launch in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. The LTMPF Payload will provide a major low-temperature research laboratory for Fundamental Physics experiments on the International Space Station. The LTMPF payload will provide instrument temperatures below superfluid helium temperatures and the ISS will provide microgravity to allow the experiments to study condensed matter and gravitational physics. Each flight will be allocated to one condensed matter instrument and one gravitation instrument.

  5. Physics Division annual progress report, January 1-December 31, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trela, W.J. (comp.)

    1984-12-01

    The Physics Division is organized into three major research areas: Weapons Physics, Inertial Fusion Physics, and Basic Research. In Weapons Physics, new strategic defensive research initiatives were developed in response to President Reagan's speech in May 1983. Significant advances have been made in high-speed diagnostics including electro-optic technique, fiber-optic systems, and imaging. In Inertial Fusion, the 40-kJ Antares CO/sub 2/ laser facility was completed, and the 1- by 1- by 2-m-long large-aperture module amplifier (LAM) was constructed and operated. In Basic Research, our main emphasis was on development of the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility as a world-class pulsed neutron research facility

  6. The ELI–NP facility for nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ur, C.A., E-mail: calin.ur@eli-np.ro; Balabanski, D.; Cata-Danil, G.; Gales, S.; Morjan, I.; Tesileanu, O.; Ursescu, D.; Ursu, I.; Zamfir, N.V.

    2015-07-15

    Extreme Light Infrastructure–Nuclear Physics (ELI–NP) is aiming to use extreme electromagnetic fields for nuclear physics research. The facility, currently under construction at Magurele–Bucharest, will comprise a high power laser system and a very brilliant gamma beam system. The technology involved in the construction of both systems is at the limits of the present-day’s technological capabilities. The high power laser system will consist of two 10 PW lasers and it will produce intensities of up to 10{sup 23}–10{sup 24} W/cm{sup 2}. The gamma beam, produced via Compton backscattering of a laser beam on a relativistic electron beam, will be characterized by a narrow bandwidth (<0.5%) and tunable energy of up to almost 20 MeV. The research program of the facility covers a broad range of key topics in frontier fundamental physics and new nuclear physics. A particular attention is given to the development of innovative applications. In the present paper an overview of the project status and the overall performance characteristics of the main research equipment will be given. The main fundamental physics and applied research topics proposed to be studied at ELI–NP will also be briefly reviewed.

  7. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1991-03-01

    The activities of this Division continue to be concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility and its operation as a national user facility continued as the single largest activity within the Division. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to emphasize heavy ion studies, with much of the activity centered at the Holifield Facility. The work with heavy ions at ultrarelativistic energies continues at the CERN SPS. Studies at the Brookhaven AGS, particularly in preparation of future experiments at RHIC, have seen an increased emphasis. A major consortium has been formed to propose the design and construction of a dimuon detector as the basis for one the principal experiments for RHIC. Also included are results from the increasing effort in particle physics, including participation in the L* proposal for the SSC. The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been associated intimately with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. A major area of experimental research for the Division is atomic physics. This activity comprises two groups: one on accelerator-based atomic physics, centered primarily at the EN-tandem and the Holifield Facility, but extending this year to an experiment at ultrarelativistic energies at the CERN SPS; and one on atomic physics in support of fusion energy, based primarily at the ECR ion source facility. Included in this section is also a description of a new effort in multicharged ion-surface interactions, and details of a planned upgrade of the ECR source.

  8. Physics division. Progress report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, M.; Bacon, D.S.; Aine, C.J.; Bartsch, R.R. [eds.] [comps.] [and others

    1997-10-01

    This issue of the Physics Division Progress Report describes progress and achievements in Physics Division research during the period January 1, 1995-December 31, 1996. The report covers the five main areas of experimental research and development in which Physics Division serves the needs of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the nation in applied and basic sciences: (1) biophysics, (2) hydrodynamic physics, (3) neutron science and technology, (4) plasma physics, and (5) subatomic physics. Included in this report are a message from the Division Director, the Physics Division mission statement, an organizational chart, descriptions of the research areas of the five groups in the Division, selected research highlights, project descriptions, the Division staffing and funding levels for FY95-FY97, and a list of publications and presentations.

  9. Progress report on the Cornell Cold Neutron Beam Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D.D.; Atwood, A.G.; Spern, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    The design of the Cornell Cold Neutron Source facility at the Cornell TRIGA reactor is described. The unique features are that a mesitylene moderator and copper conductors will be used which will provide simplicity and safety.

  10. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1985-01-01

    The research activities of the Division are centered primarily in three areas: experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The largest of these efforts, experimental nuclear physics, is dominated by the heavy ion research program. A major responsibility under this program is the operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. During the period of this report, the facility has begun routine operation for the experimental program. The experimental atomic physics program has two components: the accelerator-based studies of basic collisional phenomena and the studies in support of the controlled fusion program. Also associated with the fusion-related studies are a plasma diagnostics program and the operation of an atomic physics data center. The theoretical physics program, both nuclear and atomic, is covered. This program has benefited this year from the success of the VAX-AP computer system and from the increase in manpower provided by the ORNL/University of Tennessee Distinguished Scientist Program. Smaller programs in applications and high-energy physics are summarized. During the period of this report, we continued to explore possible future extensions of the Holifield Facility. We retain a strong interest in a relativistic heavy-ion collider in the 10 x 10 GeV/nuclear energy range. The ideas for such a facility, described in last year's report, have been modified to utilize the HHIRF 25 MV tandem accelerator as the first stage. Finally, the report concludes with some general information on publications, Division activities, and personnel changes.

  11. (Medium energy particle physics): Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1985-10-01

    Investigations currently carried out by the UCLA Particle Physics Research Group can be arranged into four programs: Pion-Nucleon Scattering; Tests of Charge Symmetry and Isospin Invariance; Light Nuclei (Strong Form Factors of /sup 3/H, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He; Detailed Balance in pd /r reversible/ /gamma//sup 3/H; Interaction Dynamics); and Search for the Rare Decay /Mu//sup +/ /yields/ e/sup +/ + /gamma/ (MEGA). The general considerations which led to the choice of physics problems investigated by our group are given in the next section. We also outline the scope of the research being done which includes over a dozen experiments. The main body of this report details the research carried out in the past year, the status of various experiments, and new projects.

  12. Applied Physics Division 1998 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchini, M.; Crescentini, L; Ghezzi, L.; Kent, C.; Bottomei, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy). Applied physics Division

    1999-07-01

    This report outlines the 1998 research activities carried out by the Applied Physics Division of the Innovation Department of ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment). The fields addressed and discussed include: optical and electro-optical technologies (chaps. 1 and 2); accelerator technologies (chap. 3); diagnostic systems for science and engineering (chaps. 4 and 5); theory, modelling and computational methods (chaps. 6 and 7). The aim of the Applied Physics Division is to develop technologies and systems that can be directly applied by internal (ENEA) and external users in research (high-resolution spectroscopy, laser-generated soft-x-ray sources), production processes (laser material photoproduction, structural analysis), social, cultural and environmental sciences (laser remote sensing, modelling of ecosystems and population dynamics) and medicine (particle accelerator for radiotherapy). Most of the work in 1998 was performed by the division's laboratories at the Frascati, Casaccia and Bologna Research Centres of ENEA; some was done elsewhere in collaboration with other ENEA units, external laboratories and industries. A good share of the activities was carried out for international projects; in particular, the IV European Union Framework Program.

  13. Recent progress on the National Ignition Facility advanced radiographic capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegner, P.; Bowers, M.; Chen, H.; Heebner, J.; Hermann, M.; Kalantar, D.; Martinez, D.

    2016-01-08

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a megajoule (million-joule)-class laser and experimental facility built for Stockpile Stewardship and High Energy Density (HED) science research [1]. Up to several times a day, 192 laser pulses from NIF's 192 laser beamlines converge on a millimeter-scale target located at the center of the facility's 10-meter diameter target chamber. The carefully synchronized pulses, typically a few nanoseconds (billionths of a second) in duration and co-times to better than 20 picoseconds (trillionths of a second), a deliver a combined energy of up to 1.8 megajoules and a peak power of 500 terawatts (trillion watts). Furthermore, this drives temperatures inside the target to tens of millions of degrees and pressures to many billion times greater than Earth's atmosphere.

  14. Progress on Solar Physics Research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Yihua; AI Guoxiang

    2004-01-01

    The progress on Chinese Space Solar Telescope (SST) in 2002-2004 is introduced. The documentations on plans and outlines based on the standards of Chinese aerospace industry for SST mission has been fulfilled. The key technical problems of SST satellite platform and payloads are tackled during pre-study stage of the mission. The laboratory assembly and calibration of the main optical telescope of 1.2 m spherical mirror and 1 m plain mirror have been carried out with the accuracy of λ/40 and λ/30, respectively. The prototype at 17.1 nm for extreme ultraviolet telescope is under development and manufacture with a diameter of 13 cm. Its primary and secondary mirrors have a manufacturing error of 5 nm with a roughness degree of less than 0.5 nm and a multiplayer reflection factor of better than 20%. The on-board scientific data processing unit has been developed. Prototypes for other payloads such as H. and white light telescope, wide band spectroscopy in high energy and solar and interplanetary radio spectrometer have been developed accordingly.

  15. Work in Progress: Learner-Centered Online Learning Facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, M.; Zwitserloot, R.; De Weerdt, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a novel, learner-centered technology for authoring web lectures. Besides seamless integration of video and audio feeds, Microsoft PowerPoint slides, and web-pages, the proposed Online Learning Facility (OLF) also facilitates online interactive testing and review of covered mater

  16. Work in Progress: Learner-Centered Online Learning Facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, M.; Zwitserloot, R.; De Weerdt, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a novel, learner-centered technology for authoring web lectures. Besides seamless integration of video and audio feeds, Microsoft PowerPoint slides, and web-pages, the proposed Online Learning Facility (OLF) also facilitates online interactive testing and review of covered mater

  17. Design progress on ITER port plug test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesy, B., E-mail: bruno.levesy@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Beaumont, B. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Bruno, L.; Cerisier, T. [CNIM, Z.I de Bregaillon, 83507 La Seyne sur Mer (France); Cordier, J.J.; Dammann, A.; Giancarli, L.; Henderson, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Romannikov, A. [ITER Agency, Russian Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute' , pl. Kurchatova I., 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Rumyantsev, Y. [JSC ' Cryogenmash' , 143907 Moscow reg., Balashikha (Russian Federation); Udintsev, V.S. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2012-08-15

    To achieve the overall ITER machine availability target, the availability of diagnostics and heating port plugs shall be as high as 99.5%. To fulfill these requirements, it is mandatory to test the port plugs at operating temperature before installation on the machine and after refurbishment. The ITER port plug test facility (PPTF) provides the possibility to test upper and equatorial port plugs before installation on the machine. The port plug test facility is composed of several test stands. These test stands are first used in the domestic agencies and on the ITER Organization site to test the port plugs at the end of manufacturing. Two of these stands are installed later in the ITER hot cell facility to test the port plugs after refurbishment. The port plugs to be tested are the Ion Cyclotron (IC) heating and current drive antennas, Electron Cyclotron (EC) heating and current drive launchers, diagnostics and test blanket modules port plugs. Test stands shall be capable to perform environmental and functional tests. The test stands are composed of one vacuum tank (3.3 m in diameter, 5.6 m long) and the associated heating, vacuum and control systems. The vacuum tank shall achieve an ultimate pressure of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Pa at 100 Degree-Sign C containing a port plug. The heating system shall provide water at 240 Degree-Sign C and 4.4 MPa to heat up the port plugs. Openings are provided on the back of the vacuum tank to insert probes for the functional tests. This paper describes the tests to be performed on the port plugs and the conceptual design of the port plug test facility. The configuration of the standalone test stands and the integration in the hot cell facility are presented.

  18. Progress Report of Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility(BRIF)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI; Hui; SUN; Yang

    2015-01-01

    In 2015,the Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility(BRIF)project made progress under efforts of all employees.The significant progress was made in the construction,the main process equipment installation,shakedown test and successful completion of the task for the whole year.

  19. Progress report of the innovated KIST ion beam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonkon; Eliades, John A.; Yu, Byung-Yong; Lim, Weon Cheol; Chae, Keun Hwa; Song, Jonghan

    2017-01-01

    The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST, Seoul, Republic of (S.) Korea) ion beam facility consists of three electrostatic accelerators: a 400 kV single ended ion implanter, a 2 MV tandem accelerator system and a 6 MV tandem accelerator system. The 400 kV and 6 MV systems were purchased from High Voltage Engineering Europa (HVEE, Netherlands) and commissioned in 2013, while the 2 MV system was purchased from National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC, USA) in 1995. These systems are used to provide traditional ion beam analysis (IBA), isotope ratio analysis (ex. accelerator mass spectrometry, AMS), and ion implantation/irradiation for domestic industrial and academic users. The main facility is the 6 MV HVEE Tandetron system that has an AMS line currently used for 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36 Cl, 41Ca and 129I analyses, and three lines for IBA that are under construction. Here, these systems are introduced with their specifications and initial performance results.

  20. ESO adaptive optics facility progress and first laboratory test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Robin; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Paufique, Jérome; La Penna, Paolo; Stroebele, Stefan; Vernet, Elise; Pirard, Jean-Francois; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Kuntschner, Harald; Kolb, Johann; Muller, Nicolas; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Le Louarn, Miska; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Ridings, Rob; Haguenauer, Pierre; Abad, Jose A.; Fischer, Gerhard; Heinz, Volker; Kiekebusch, Mario; Argomedo, Javier; Conzelmann, Ralf; Tordo, Sebastien; Donaldson, Rob; Soenke, Christian; Duhoux, Philippe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Delabre, Bernard; Jost, Andrea; Duchateau, Michel; Downing, Mark; Reyes Moreno, Javier; Manescau, Antonio; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Quattri, Marco; Dupuy, Christophe; Guidolin, Ivan M.; Comin, Mauro; Guzman, Ronald; Buzzoni, Bernard; Quentin, Jutta; Lewis, Steffan; Jolley, Paul; Kraus, Max; Pfrommer, Thomas; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Stuik, Remko; Kaenders, Wilhelm; Ernstberger, Bernhard; Friedenauer, Axel

    2014-07-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility project is completing the integration of its systems at ESO Headquarters in Garching. The main test bench ASSIST and the 2nd Generation M2-Unit (hosting the Deformable Secondary Mirror) have been granted acceptance late 2012. The DSM has undergone a series of tests on ASSIST in 2013 which have validated its optical performance and launched the System Test Phase of the AOF. This has been followed by the performance evaluation of the GRAAL natural guide star mode on-axis and will continue in 2014 with its Ground Layer AO mode. The GALACSI module (for MUSE) Wide-Field-Mode (GLAO) and the more challenging Narrow-Field-Mode (LTAO) will then be tested. The AOF has also taken delivery of the second scientific thin shell mirror and the first 22 Watt Sodium laser Unit. We will report on the system tests status, the performances evaluated on the ASSIST bench and advancement of the 4Laser Guide Star Facility. We will also present the near future plans for commissioning on the telescope and some considerations on tools to ensure an efficient operation of the Facility in Paranal.

  1. European facilities for accelerator neutrino physics: perspectives for the decade to come

    CERN Document Server

    Battiston, R; Migliozzi, P; Terranova, F

    2009-01-01

    Very soon a new generation of reactor and accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments - Double Chooz, Daya Bay, Reno and T2K - will seek for oscillation signals generated by the mixing parameter theta_13. The knowledge of this angle is a fundamental milestone to optimize further experiments aimed at detecting CP violation in the neutrino sector. Leptonic CP violation is a key phenomenon that has profound implications in particle physics and cosmology but it is clearly out of reach for the aforementioned experiments. Since late 90's, a world-wide activity is in progress to design facilities that can access CP violation in neutrino oscillation and perform high precision measurements of the lepton counterpart of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. In this paper the status of these studies will be summarized, focusing on the options that are best suited to exploit existing European facilities (firstly CERN and the INFN Gran Sasso Laboratories) or technologies where Europe has a world leadership. Similar consid...

  2. Federal Facility Agreement Annual Progress Report for FY 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, E.

    1999-08-04

    This FFA Annual Progress Report has been developed to summarize the information for activities performed during the Fiscal Year 1998 (October 1, 1997, to September 30, 1998) and activities planned for Fiscal Year 1999 by U.S. EPA, SCDHEC, and SRS at those units and areas identified for remediation in the Agreement.

  3. Progress Report of Nuclear Facilities Remediation Projects in 2013

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    In 2013,five projects have been achieved a good progress through strengthening coordination and well-organization.1 Pilot project of radioactive solid waste retrieval and conditioning The hot commissioning of the project has been completed.Some radioactive solid waste was pretreated and conditioned during hot commissioning.The results of hot commissioning showed that data

  4. Recent Progresses of Magnetospheric Physics in China: 2010-2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Jinbin; LIU Zhenxing; PU Zuyin

    2012-01-01

    In the past two years, many progresses are made in magnetospheric physics by using either the data of Double Star Program, Cluster and THEMIS missions, or by computer simulations. This paper briefly reviews these works based on papers selected from the 80 publications from April 2010 to April 2011. The subjects covered various sub-branches of magnetospheric physics, including geomagnetic storm, magnetospheric substorm, etc.

  5. Associations between Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity and Neighbourhood Recreational Facilities: The Features of the Facilities Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka Yiu Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To examine the associations between objectively-assessed moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA and perceived/objective measures of neighbourhood recreational facilities categorized into indoor or outdoor, public, residential or commercial facilities. The associations between facility perceptions and objectively-assessed numbers of recreational facilities were also examined. Method: A questionnaire was used on 480 adults to measure local facility perceptions, with 154 participants wearing ActiGraph accelerometers for ≥4 days. The objectively-assessed number of neighbourhood recreational facilities were examined using direct observations and Geographical Information System data. Results: Both positive and negative associations were found between MVPA and perceived/objective measures of recreational facilities. Some associations depended on whether the recreational facilities were indoor or outdoor, public or residential facilities. The objectively-assessed number of most public recreational facilities was associated with the corresponding facility perceptions, but the size of effect was generally lower than for residential recreational facilities. Conclusions: The objectively-assessed number of residential outdoor table tennis courts and public indoor swimming pools, the objectively-assessed presence of tennis courts and swimming pools, and the perceived presence of bike lanes and swimming pools were positive determinants of MVPA. It is suggested to categorize the recreational facilities into smaller divisions in order to identify unique associations with MVPA.

  6. Nuclear Physics Programs for the Future RIBs Facility in Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Moon Chang-Bum

    2016-01-01

    We present nuclear physics programs based on the planned experiments using rare isotope beams (RIBs) for the future Korean Rare Isotope Beams Accelerator facility(KRIA). This ambitious facility has both an Isotope Separation On Line (ISOL) and fragmentation capability for producing RIBs and accelerating beams of wide range mass of nuclides with energies of a few to hundreds MeV per nucleon. Low energy RIBs at Elab = 5 to 20 MeV per nucleon are for the study of nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics toward and beyond the drip lines while higher energy RIBs produced by in-flight fragmentation with the reaccelerated ions from the ISOL enable to explore the neutron drip lines in intermediate mass regions. The planned programs have goals for investigating internal structures of the exotic nuclei toward and beyond the nucleon drip lines by addressing the following issues: how the shell structure evolves in areas of extreme proton to neutron imbalance; whether the isospin symmetry maintains in isobaric mirror nuclei at and beyond the drip lines; how two-proton radioactivity affects abundances of the elements;what the role of the continuum states including resonant states above proton-decay threshold in exotic nuclei is in astrophysical nuclear reaction processes, and how the nuclear reaction rates triggered by unbound proton-rich nuclei make an effect on rapid proton capture processes in a very hot stellar plasma.

  7. Progress and prospects for heavy flavour physics on the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Pena, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    I review recent progress in lattice computations relevant for $B$- and charm physics, focusing on decay and mixing amplitudes with a direct impact on CKM analysis. Emphasis is put on the interplay with the upcoming new generation of experimental results, and the subsequent challenges for lattice computations in the heavy quark sector.

  8. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; James I. Cole; Jeff B. Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is one of the world’s premier test reactors for studying the effects of intense neutron radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR began operation in 1967, and has operated continuously since then, averaging approximately 250 operating days per year. The combination of high flux, large test volumes, and multiple experiment configuration options provide unique testing opportunities for nuclear fuels and material researchers. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected highly-enriched uranium fueled, reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The ATR peak thermal flux can reach 1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec, and the core configuration creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) that can be operated at different powers during the same operating cycle. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. The test positions range from 0.5” to 5.0” in diameter and are all 48” in length, the active length of the fuel. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. Goals of the ATR NSUF are to define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light water reactors, and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. The ATR NSUF has developed partnerships with other universities and national laboratories to enable ATR NSUF researchers to perform research at these other facilities, when the research objectives

  9. IOTA (Integrable Optics Test Accelerator): facility and experimental beam physics program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antipov, S.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bruhwiler, D.; Edstrom, D.; Harms, E.; Lebedev, V.; Leibfritz, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; Park, C. S.; Piekarz, H.; Piot, P.; Prebys, E.; Romanov, A.; Ruan, J.; Sen, T.; Stancari, G.; Thangaraj, C.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Valishev, A.; Shiltsev, V.

    2017-03-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is a storage ring for advanced beam physics research currently being built and commissioned at Fermilab. It will operate with protons and electrons using injectors with momenta of 70 and 150 MeV/c, respectively. The research program includes the study of nonlinear focusing integrable optical beam lattices based on special magnets and electron lenses, beam dynamics of space-charge effects and their compensation, optical stochastic cooling, and several other experiments. In this article, we present the design and main parameters of the facility, outline progress to date and provide the timeline of the construction, commissioning and research. The physical principles, design, and hardware implementation plans for the major IOTA experiments are also discussed.

  10. Summary of informal workshop on state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.W.; Cocke, C.L.; Datz, S.; Kostroun, V.

    1984-11-13

    The present state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research in the United States is assessed by means of a questionnaire and informal workshop. Recommendations for future facilities are given. 3 refs.

  11. Physics division. Progress report for period ending September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, S.J. [ed.

    1997-04-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1995 and 1996 fiscal years, beginning October 1, 1994, and ending September 30, 1996. The activities of the Division continue to be concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. In addition, there are smaller programs in plasma diagnostics and data compilation and evaluation. During the period of this report, there has been considerable success in bringing the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) into routine operation. The budgets of the nuclear physics portion of the Division have increased each year in nearly all areas, and several new members have been added to the Division research and development staff. On August 30, 1996, the HRIBF successfully accelerated its first radioactive ion beams, {sup 69}As and {sup 70}As. Prior to this, the heart of the facility, the RIB injector system, was completed, including installation of a remote handling system for the target/ion source assembly. Target and ion source development is likely to be the technical key to success of the HRIBF. We have expanded our efforts in those development areas. Of special note is the development of highly permeable composite targets which have now been shown to allow release of difficult-to-produce radioactive ions such as {sup 17,18}F. A summary of the HRIBF work is provided in Chapter 1, along with supporting activities of the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research.

  12. Seismic vulnerability study Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, M. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Goen, L.K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), located at TA-53 of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), features an 800 MeV proton accelerator used for nuclear physics and materials science research. As part of the implementation of DOE Order 5480.25 and in preparation for DOE Order 5480.28, a seismic vulnerability study of the structures, systems, and components (SSCs) supporting the beam line from the accelerator building through to the ends of die various beam stops at LAMPF has been performed. The study was accomplished using the SQUG GIP methodology to assess the capability of the various SSCs to resist an evaluation basis earthquake. The evaluation basis earthquake was selected from site specific seismic hazard studies. The goals for the study were as follows: (1) identify SSCs which are vulnerable to seismic loads; and (2) ensure that those SSCs screened during die evaluation met the performance goals required for DOE Order 5480.28. The first goal was obtained by applying the SQUG GIP methodology to those SSCS represented in the experience data base. For those SSCs not represented in the data base, information was gathered and a significant amount of engineering judgment applied to determine whether to screen the SSC or to classify it as an outlier. To assure the performance goals required by DOE Order 5480.28 are met, modifications to the SQUG GIP methodology proposed by Salmon and Kennedy were used. The results of this study ire presented in this paper.

  13. Atlas Pulsed Power Facility for High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Barr, G.W.; Bowman, D.W.; Chochrane, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Elizondo, J.M.; Gribble, R.F.; Griego, J.R.; Hicks, R.D.; Hinckley, W.B.; Hosack, K.W.; Nielsen, K.E.; Parker, J.V.; Parsons, M.O.; Rickets, R.L.; Salazar, H.R.; Sanchez, P.G.; Scudder, D.W.; Shapiro, C.; Thompson, M.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Valdez, G.A.; Vigil, B.N.; Watt, R.G.; Wysock, F.J.

    1999-06-07

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. It is intended to be an international user facility, providing opportunities for researchers from national laboratories and academic institutions around the world. Emphasizing institutions around the world. Emphasizing hydrodynamic experiments, Atlas will provide the capability for achieving steady shock pressures exceeding 10-Mbar in a volume of several cubic centimeters. In addition, the kinetic energy associated with solid liner implosion velocities exceeding 12 km/s is sufficient to drive dense, hydrodynamic targets into the ionized regime, permitting the study of complex issues associated with strongly-coupled plasmas. The primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently-removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-{micro}s risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line components has been completed. A complete maintenance module and its associated transmission line (the First Article) are now under construction and testing. The current Atlas schedule calls for construction of the machine to be complete by August, 2000. Acceptance testing is scheduled to begin in November, 2000, leading to initial operations in January, 2001.

  14. PANDORA, a new facility for interdisciplinary in-plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascali, D.; Musumarra, A.; Leone, F.; Romano, F. P.; Galatà, A.; Gammino, S.; Massimi, C.

    2017-07-01

    PANDORA, Plasmas for Astrophysics, Nuclear Decays Observation and Radiation for Archaeometry, is planned as a new facility based on a state-of-the-art plasma trap confining energetic plasma for performing interdisciplinary research in the fields of Nuclear Astrophysics, Astrophysics, Plasma Physics and Applications in Material Science and Archaeometry: the plasmas become the environment for measuring, for the first time, nuclear decay rates in stellar-like condition (such as 7Be decay and beta-decay involved in s-process nucleosynthesis), especially as a function of the ionization state of the plasma ions. These studies will give important contributions for addressing several astrophysical issues in both stellar and primordial nucleosynthesis environment ( e.g., determination of solar neutrino flux and 7Li Cosmological Problem), moreover the confined energetic plasma will be a unique light source for high-performance stellar spectroscopy measurements in the visible, UV and X-ray domains, offering advancements in observational astronomy. As to magnetic fields, the experimental validation of theoretical first- and second-order Landé factors will drive the layout of next-generation polarimetric units for the high-resolution spectrograph of the future giant telescopes. In PANDORA new plasma heating methods will be explored, that will push forward the ion beam output, in terms of extracted intensity and charge states. More, advanced and optimized injection methods of ions in an ECR plasma will be experimented, with the aim to optimize its capture efficiency. This will be applied to the ECR-based Charge Breeding technique, that will improve the performances of the SPES ISOL-facility at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro-INFN. Finally, PANDORA will be suitable for energy conversion, making the plasma a source of high-intensity electromagnetic radiation, for applications in material science and archaeometry.

  15. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY MONTHLY INFORMAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT MAY 1969

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astley, E. R.; Cabell, C. P.

    1969-06-06

    This report was prepared by Battelle-Northwest under Contract No. AT(45-1)-1830 for the Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, to summarize technical progress made in the Fast Flux Test Facility Program during May 1969 .

  16. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY MONTHLY INFORMAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT SEPTEMBER 1969

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astely, E. R.; Cabell, C. P.

    1969-10-07

    This report was prepared by Battelle-Northwest under Contract No. AT(45-1)-1830 for the Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, to summarize technical progress made in the Fast Flux Test Facility Program during September 1969.

  17. Progress Report of Beijing Radioactive Ion-Beam Facility (BRIF) in 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI; Hui; SUN; Yang

    2012-01-01

    <正>The year 2012 is featured with several important events for the Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility (BRIF) project. With joint efforts from all sides, the team has made significant progress in the construction, the main equipment manufacturing, installation and assembly throughout the year.

  18. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY MONTHLY INFORMAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT FEBRUARY 1969

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astley, E. R.

    1969-03-07

    This report was prepared by Battelle-Northwest under Contract No. AT (45-1)-1830 for the Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, to summarize technical progress made in the Fast Flux Test Facility Program during February 1969.

  19. Physical Activity Prevents Progression for Cognitive Impairment and Vascular Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdelho, Ana; Madureira, Sofia; Ferro, José M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We aimed to study if physical activity could interfere with progression for cognitive impairment and dementia in older people with white matter changes living independently. METHODS: The LADIS (Leukoaraiosis and Disability) prospective multinational European study evaluates...... the impact of white matter changes on the transition of independent elderly subjects into disability. Subjects were evaluated yearly during 3 years with a comprehensive clinical protocol and cognitive assessment with classification of cognitive impairment and dementia according to usual clinical criteria....... Physical activity was recorded during the clinical interview. MRI was performed at entry and at the end of the study. RESULTS: Six hundred thirty-nine subjects were included (74.1±5 years old, 55% women, 9.6±3.8 years of schooling, 64% physically active). At the end of follow-up, 90 patients had dementia...

  20. Putting Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) Services to Good Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candey, R. M.; Bilitza, D.; Chimiak, R.; Cooper, J. F.; Garcia, L. N.; Harris, B.; Johnson, R. C.; King, J. H.; Kovalick, T.; Leckner, H.; Liu, M.; McGuire, R. E.; Papitashvili, N. E.; Roberts, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project provides heliophysics science-enabling information services and is the most widely used single access point to heliophysics science data and orbits from NASA's solar-heliospheric satellite missions. Our emphasis has been on active service of the best digital data products and key ancillary information with graphics, listings and production of subsetted or merged files (mass downloads or parameter-specific selections). Our services today include the: (1) Heliophysics Resource Gateway (HRG) data finding service (also known as the Virtual Space Physics Observatory or VSPO); (2) Data services including the Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDAWeb), OMNIweb compilation of interplanetary parameters (mapped to the Earth's bow shock) and related indices, and their large underlying collection of datasets; (3) Orbit information and display services including the Satellite Situation Center (SSCweb) and the 4D Orbit Viewer interactive Java client; and the (4) Common Data Format (CDF) software library and file format and science file format translation suite. (5) Upcoming is the Heliospheric Event List Manager (HELM) to coordinate lists of interesting events and provide a mechanism for tying together the above services and others. We describe several research projects that heavily used SPDF's services and resulted in publications. Although not actually all used at once, the following research scenario shows how SPDF and VxO services can be combined for studying solar events that produce energetic particles and effects at Earth: use the HRG/VPSO to locate data of interest, perhaps query OMNIWeb for times when energetic particle solar activity is high and query the SSCWeb orbit location service for when Cluster, Geotail, Polar/IMAGE are in position to measure the cusp, magnetotail and the Earth's aurora, respectively. Also query SSCweb for times when Polar and magnetometer ground stations are on the same field lines. Using these times

  1. Distribution of physical activity facilities in Scotland by small area measures of deprivation and urbanicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogilvie David

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of physical activity facilities by area-level deprivation in Scotland, adjusting for differences in urbanicity, and exploring differences between and within the four largest Scottish cities. Methods We obtained a list of all recreational physical activity facilities in Scotland. These were mapped and assigned to datazones. Poisson and negative binomial regression models were used to investigate associations between the number of physical activity facilities relative to population size and quintile of area-level deprivation. Results The results showed that prior to adjustment for urbanicity, the density of all facilities lessened with increasing deprivation from quintiles 2 to 5. After adjustment for urbanicity and local authority, the effect of deprivation remained significant but the pattern altered, with datazones in quintile 3 having the highest estimated mean density of facilities. Within-city associations were identified between the number of physical activity facilities and area-level deprivation in Aberdeen and Dundee, but not in Edinburgh or Glasgow. Conclusions In conclusion, area-level deprivation appears to have a significant association with the density of physical activity facilities and although overall no clear pattern was observed, affluent areas had fewer publicly owned facilities than more deprived areas but a greater number of privately owned facilities.

  2. Self-organization of progress across the century of physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perc, Matjaž

    2013-04-01

    We make use of information provided in the titles and abstracts of over half a million publications that were published by the American Physical Society during the past 119 years. By identifying all unique words and phrases and determining their monthly usage patterns, we obtain quantifiable insights into the trends of physics discovery from the end of the 19th century to today. We show that the magnitudes of upward and downward trends yield heavy-tailed distributions, and that their emergence is due to the Matthew effect. This indicates that both the rise and fall of scientific paradigms is driven by robust principles of self-organization. Data also confirm that periods of war decelerate scientific progress, and that the later is very much subject to globalisation.

  3. 34 CFR 106.43 - Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical education classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 106.43 Standards for measuring skill or progress in physical education classes. If use of a single standard of measuring skill or progress in physical education...

  4. Prevalence of physical and verbal aggressive behaviours and associated factors among older adults in long-term care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desrosiers Johanne

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Verbal and physical aggressive behaviours are among the most disturbing and distressing behaviours displayed by older patients in long-term care facilities. Aggressive behaviour (AB is often the reason for using physical or chemical restraints with nursing home residents and is a major concern for caregivers. AB is associated with increased health care costs due to staff turnover and absenteeism. Methods The goals of this secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study are to determine the prevalence of verbal and physical aggressive behaviours and to identify associated factors among older adults in long-term care facilities in the Quebec City area (n = 2 332. Results The same percentage of older adults displayed physical aggressive behaviour (21.2% or verbal aggressive behaviour (21.5%, whereas 11.2% displayed both types of aggressive behaviour. Factors associated with aggressive behaviour (both verbal and physical were male gender, neuroleptic drug use, mild and severe cognitive impairment, insomnia, psychological distress, and physical restraints. Factors associated with physical aggressive behaviour were older age, male gender, neuroleptic drug use, mild or severe cognitive impairment, insomnia and psychological distress. Finally, factors associated with verbal aggressive behaviour were benzodiazepine and neuroleptic drug use, functional dependency, mild or severe cognitive impairment and insomnia. Conclusion Cognitive impairment severity is the most significant predisposing factor for aggressive behaviour among older adults in long-term care facilities in the Quebec City area. Physical and chemical restraints were also significantly associated with AB. Based on these results, we suggest that caregivers should provide care to older adults with AB using approaches such as the progressively lowered stress threshold model and reactance theory which stress the importance of paying attention to the severity of cognitive

  5. Progress and Prospect of Physics Research and Education in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynien Kwo, J.

    2010-03-01

    Started about two decades ago, the global trend of shifting industrial manufacture power from western developed countries toward developing countries in Asia has in turn become the impetus in building up physical science and research in these areas. A very good example is the remarkable progress of physical research and education in Taiwan, in terms of quantity and quality. The continuous elevation of Taiwan's high education into graduate level plus the government's strong commitment to research and development on a level of 2.62 % GDP have led to an impressive physics program with an annual budget ˜32 million USD from National Science Council in supporting 568 PIs. The investigation scope encompasses high energy and astrophysics, nano and condensed matter, and semiconductor, optoelectronic physics, etc. The former is vigorously conducted via international collaborative efforts of LHC, KEK, ALMA, Pan-STARRS, etc. The latter is driven by vital Taiwan high tech industry mostly semiconductor IC and optoelectronics flourished during this period. The early trend of outflows of BS physics majors to western world for advanced studies has reversed dramatically. Nearly 80% of the BS students continue their MS and PhD degrees in Taiwan, attracted by lucrative job markets of high tech industry. In addition, healthy inflow of high-quality science manpower of well trained PhDs and senior scholars returning to homeland has strengthened the competitiveness. Overall, the physics community in Taiwan is thriving. The annual Physical Society meeting is expanding at a rate of 6%, reaching ˜1800 attendants and 1200 papers, and dedicated to promotions of female physicists and students. The publication quantity of Taiwan in top journals of PRs and PRL is ranked among top 20^th for all fields of physics, and ranked the 6^th in APL. Clearly Taiwan has now emerged as a strong power in applied science, not limited by its population size. Concerted efforts on scientific exchanges are being

  6. Progress Report of Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility(BRIF) in 2013

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI; Hui; SUN; Yang

    2013-01-01

    The year of 2013 is featured with several important events for the Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility(BRIF)project.In this year,the BRIF has made a significant progress in the construction,the main equipment installation,shakedown test and successful completion of the task of the whole year.1 Four units acceptance of building engineering,public engineering equipment installation completed and put into use

  7. Power systems development facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Second Quarter of the Second Budget Period, July 1 through September 30, 1993, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scaleup of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source. Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams; Combustion Gas Turbine; and Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility.

  8. Physics Division progress report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollen, G.Y.; Schappert, G.T. [comp.

    1994-07-01

    This report discusses its following topics: Recent Weapons-Physics Experiments on the Pegasus II Pulsed Power Facility; Operation of a Large-Scale Plasma Source Ion Implantation Experiment; Production of Charm and Beauty Mesons at Fermilab Sudbury Neutrino Observatory; P-Division`s Essential Role in the Redirected Inertial Confinement Fusion Program; Trident Target Physics Program; Comparative Studies of Brain Activation with Magnetocephalography and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Cellular Communication, Interaction of G-Proteins, and Single-Photon Detection; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Oxygen-doped La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4+{delta}} Thermoacoustic Engines; A Shipborne Raman Water-Vapor Lidar for the Central Pacific Experiment; Angara-5 Pinch Temperature Verification with Time-resolved Spectroscopy; Russian Collaborations on Megagauss Magnetic Fields and Pulsed-Power Applications; Studies of Energy Coupling from Underground Explosions; Trapping and Cooling Large Numbers of Antiprotons: A First Step Toward the Measurement of Gravity on Antimatter; and Nuclear-Energy Production Without a Long-Term High-Level Waste Stream.

  9. Atomic physics with highly charged ions. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, P.

    1994-08-01

    The study of inelastic collision phenomena with highly charged projectile ions and the interpretation of spectral features resulting from these collisions remain as the major focal points in the atomic physics research at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas. The title of the research project, ``Atomic Physics with Highly Charged Ions,`` speaks to these points. The experimental work in the past few years has divided into collisions at high velocity using the primary beams from the tandem and LINAC accelerators and collisions at low velocity using the CRYEBIS facility. Theoretical calculations have been performed to accurately describe inelastic scattering processes of the one-electron and many-electron type, and to accurately predict atomic transition energies and intensities for x rays and Auger electrons. Brief research summaries are given for the following: (1) electron production in ion-atom collisions; (2) role of electron-electron interactions in two-electron processes; (3) multi-electron processes; (4) collisions with excited, aligned, Rydberg targets; (5) ion-ion collisions; (6) ion-molecule collisions; (7) ion-atom collision theory; and (8) ion-surface interactions.

  10. Nuclear physics research at the University of Richmond. Progress report, November 1, 1994--October 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vineyard, M.F.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Major, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    Summarized in this report is the progress achieved during the period from November 1, 1994 to October 31, 1995. The experimental work described in this report is in electromagnetic and heavy-ion nuclear physics. The effort in electromagnetic nuclear physics is in preparation for the research program at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and is focused on the construction and use of the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The heavy-ion experiments were performed at the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility and SUNY, Stony Brook. The physics interests driving these efforts at CEBAF are in the study of the structure, interactions, and nuclear-medium modifications of mesons and baryons. This year, an extension of the experiment to measure the magnetic form factor of the neutron was approved by the CEBAF Program Advisory Committee Nine (PAC9) for beam at 6 GeV. The authors also submitted updates to PAC9 on the experiments to measure inclusive {eta} photoproduction in nuclei and electroproduction of the {Lambda}, {Lambda}*(1520), and f{sub 0}(975). In addition to these experiments, the authors collaborated on a proposal to measure rare radiative decays of the {phi} meson which was also approved by PAC9. Their contributions to the construction of the CLAS include the development of the drift-chamber gas system, drift-chamber software, and controls software. Major has been leading the effort in the construction of the gas system. In the last year, the Hall B gas shed was constructed and the installation of the gas system components built at the University of Richmond has begun. Over the last six years, the efforts in low-energy heavy-ion physics have decreased due to the change in focus to electromagnetic nuclear physics at CEBAF. Most of the heavy-ion work is completed and there are now new experiments planned. Included in this report are two papers resulting from collaborations on heavy-ion experiments.

  11. Elementary particle physics. Progress report, July 1992--October 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izen, J.M.

    1994-10-01

    The University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) is participating in two e{sup +}e{sup -}, experiments, Beijing Spectrometer (BES) and BABAR, the PEP-11 B Factory detector. The UTD group consists of Profs. Joseph M. Izen and Xinchou Lou, seven Ph.D. students. A post-doc is requested to join them in this work. BES explores the physics of the {tau}-charm threshold region. Associated production of {tau} and charmed mesons allow for absolute branching fraction measurements with good control of backgrounds. BES is uniquely positioned to study the leptonic and hadronic decays of quarkonia. The Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) delivers luminosities an order of magnitude higher than earlier facilities. BES and BEPC will be upgraded following the 1994-5 run, and will resume data taking in Fall, 1996 with an improved detector and a Three-fold increase in luminosity. The raison d`etre of BABAR is the exploration of CP violation in the B meson system. An asymmetric storage ring is required to observe the time-dependence of the CP asymmetry. Other BABAR physics includes measurements of CKM matrix elements, rare B decays, penguin diagrams, B{sub s} decays, and precision measurements of {tau} and D meson decays. The scheduled BABAR turn-on in 1999 provides the UTD group with a natural evolution with continuous physics during this period. Professors Joseph M. Izen and Xinchou Lou are leading the BES and BABAR program at UTD. Both have specialized in e{sup +}e{sup -} collider experiments and share 22 years of experience at the SPEAR, BEPC, CESR, PETRA, SLC and LEP rings.

  12. Physics studies with brilliant narrow-width -beams at the new ELI-NP Facility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dimiter L Balabanski; ELI-NP Science Team

    2014-11-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) Facility in Magurele is a European research centre for ultrahigh intensity lasers, laser–matter interaction, nuclear science and material science using laser-driven radiation beams. It is the first project within the European Strategic Forum for Research Infrastructure (ESFRI) agenda financed by the European Regional Development Fund. The nuclear physics research programme of the facility is focussed on studies with brilliant narrow-width -beams and experiments in extreme laser fields.

  13. Health physics manual of good practices for tritium facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blauvelt, R.K.; Deaton, M.R.; Gill, J.T. [and others

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide written guidance defining the generally accepted good practices in use at Department of Energy (DOE) tritium facilities. A {open_quotes}good practice{close_quotes} is an action, policy, or procedure that enhances the radiation protection program at a DOE site. The information selected for inclusion in this document should help readers achieve an understanding of the key radiation protection issues at tritium facilities and provide guidance as to what characterizes excellence from a radiation protection point of view. The ALARA (As Low as Reasonable Achievable) program at DOE sites should be based, in part, on following the good practices that apply to their operations.

  14. Quality of physical resources of health facilities in Indonesia: a panel study 1993-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Aly; Hollingworth, Samantha A; Marks, Geoffrey C

    2013-10-01

    The merits of mixed public and private health systems are debated. Although private providers have become increasingly important in the Indonesian health system, there is no comprehensive assessment of the quality of private facilities. This study examined the quality of physical resources of public and private facilities in Indonesia from 1993 to 2007. Data from the Indonesian Family Life Surveys in 1993, 1997, 2000 and 2007 were used to evaluate trends in the quality of physical resources for public and private facilities, stratified by urban/rural areas and Java-Bali/outer Java-Bali regions. The quality of six categories of resources was measured using an adapted MEASURE Evaluation framework. Overall quality was moderate, but higher in public than in private health facilities in all years regardless of the region. The higher proportion of nurses and midwives in private practice was a determinant of scope of services and facilities available. There was little improvement in quality of physical resources following decentralization. Despite significant increases in public investment in health between 2000 and 2006 and the potential benefits of decentralization (2001), the quality of both public and private health facilities in Indonesia did not improve significantly between 1993 and 2007. As consumers commonly believe the quality is better in private facilities and are increasingly using them, it is essential to improve quality in both private and public facilities. Implementation of minimum standards and effective partnerships with private practice are considered important.

  15. Power systems development facility. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the last quarter of the Second Budget Period, January 1 through March 31, 1994, entitled {open_quotes}Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.{close_quotes} The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particulate control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size.

  16. Physical modeling of the atmospheric boundary layer in the UNH Flow Physics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Power, Gregory; Gilooly, Stephanie; Wosnik, Martin; Klewicki, Joe; Turner, John

    2016-11-01

    The Flow Physics Facility (FPF) at UNH has test section dimensions W =6.0m, H =2.7m, L =72m. It can achieve high Reynolds number boundary layers, enabling turbulent boundary layer, wind energy and wind engineering research with exceptional spatial and temporal instrument resolution. We examined the FPF's ability to experimentally simulate different types of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) using upstream roughness arrays. The American Society for Civil Engineers defines standards for simulating ABLs for different terrain types, from open sea to dense city areas (ASCE 49-12). The standards require the boundary layer to match a power law shape, roughness height, and power spectral density criteria. Each boundary layer type has a corresponding power law exponent and roughness height. The exponent and roughness height both increase with increasing roughness. A suburban boundary layer was chosen for simulation and a roughness element fetch was created. Several fetch lengths were experimented with and the resulting boundary layers were measured and compared to standards in ASCE 49-12: Wind Tunnel Testing for Buildings and Other Structures. Pitot tube and hot wire anemometers were used to measure average and fluctuating flow characteristics. Velocity profiles, turbulence intensity and velocity spectra were found to compare favorably.

  17. Physics Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1978. [ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    This report contains information on the Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, nuclear physics with neutrons, theoretical physics, the Nuclear Data Project, accelerator-based atomic physics, magnetic fusion energy-applied physics research, electron spectroscopy, and high-energy physics, as well as lists of publications, papers presented at meetings, and other general information. Sixty-two items containing significant information were abstracted and indexed individually. (RWR)

  18. New progress in the principle of nonequilibrium statistical physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In recent years,a new fundamental equation of nonequilibrium statistical physics was proposed in place of the Liouville equation. That is the anomalous Langevin equation in G space or its equivalent Liouville diffusion equa-tion of time-reversal asymmetry. This equation reflects that the form of motion of particles in statistical thermodynamic systems has the drift-diffusion duality and the law of motion of statistical thermodynamics is stochastic in essence,but does not obey the Newton equation of motion,though it is also constrained by dynamics. The stochastic diffusion of the particles is the microscopic origin of macroscopic irreversi-bility. Starting from this equation,the BBGKY diffusion equation hierarchy was presented,the hydrodynamic equa-tions,such as the generalized Navier-Stokes equation,the mass drift-diffusion equation and the thermal conductivity equation have been derived succinctly. The unified descrip-tion of all three level equations of microscopic,kinetic and hydrodynamic was completed. Furthermore,a nonlinear evolution equation of Gibbs and Boltzmann nonequilibrium entropy density was constructed,and the existence of entro-py diffusion was predicted. The evolution equation shows that the change of nonequilibrium entropy density originates together from drift,diffusion and source production. Entro-py production is manifestations of the law of entropy in-crease. Entropy diffusion governs the approach to equilib-rium. All these derivations and results are unified and rigor-ous from the new fundamental equation without adding any extra assumption. In this review,an overview on the above main ideas,methods and results is given,and the interna-tional new progress in related problems of nonequilibrium statistical physics is summarized.

  19. Shared Use of Physical Activity Facilities Among North Carolina Faith Communities, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison-Moody, Annie; Edwards, Michael B; Bocarro, Jason N; Stein, Anna; Kanters, Michael A; Sherman, Danielle Marie; Rhew, Lori K; Stallings, Willona Marie; Bowen, Sarah K

    2017-02-02

    Shared use of recreational facilities is a promising strategy for increasing access to places for physical activity. Little is known about shared use in faith-based settings. This study examined shared use practices and barriers in faith communities in North Carolina. Faith communities in North Carolina (n = 234) completed an online survey (October-December 2013) designed to provide information about the extent and nature of shared use of recreational facilities. We used binary logistic regression to examine differences between congregations that shared use and those that did not share use. Most of the faith communities (82.9%) that completed the survey indicated that they share their facilities with outside individuals and organizations. Formal agreements were more common when faith communities shared indoor spaces such as gymnasiums and classroom meeting spaces than when they shared outdoor spaces such as playgrounds or athletic fields. Faith communities in the wealthiest counties were more likely to share their spaces than were faith communities in poorer counties. Faith communities in counties with the best health rankings were more likely to share facilities than faith communities in counties that had lower health rankings. The most frequently cited reasons faith communities did not share their facilities were that they did not know how to initiate the process of sharing their facilities or that no outside groups had ever asked. Most faith communities shared their facilities for physical activity. Research is needed on the relationship between shared use and physical activity levels, including the effect of formalizing shared-use policies.

  20. Physical mapping of human chromosome 16. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1993-08-01

    We aim to isolate cDNAs mapping to human chromosome 16 and localise such cDNAs on the high resolution physical map. In collaboration with LANL, PCR primers will be synthesised from cDNA sequences mapped to chromosome 16 and used as ESTs in the generation of mega-YAC contigs for this chromosome. Probing of high density cosmid grids will enable integration of the ESTs into cosmid contigs and location of the cosmid contigs on the YAC contig. A hn-cDNA library has been constructed from the hybrid CY18 which contains chromosome 16 as the only human chromosome. A modified screening protocol has been successfully developed and 15 hn-cDNA clones have been sequenced and localised on the hybrid map. Sequence analysis of four of these revealed that they were known cDNAs, which are now mapped to chromosome 16. Development of techniques to allow the isolation of longer cDNAs from the identified exons is in progress. This will depend on PCR amplification of cDNAs from a total human CDNA library.

  1. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility. Progress report, December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Experiments performed from May 1991--April 1992 are described.

  2. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993.

  3. Database design for Physical Access Control System for nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathishkumar, T., E-mail: satishkumart@igcar.gov.in; Rao, G. Prabhakara, E-mail: prg@igcar.gov.in; Arumugam, P., E-mail: aarmu@igcar.gov.in

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Database design needs to be optimized and highly efficient for real time operation. • It requires a many-to-many mapping between Employee table and Doors table. • This mapping typically contain thousands of records and redundant data. • Proposed novel database design reduces the redundancy and provides abstraction. • This design is incorporated with the access control system developed in-house. - Abstract: A (Radio Frequency IDentification) RFID cum Biometric based two level Access Control System (ACS) was designed and developed for providing access to vital areas of nuclear facilities. The system has got both hardware [Access controller] and software components [server application, the database and the web client software]. The database design proposed, enables grouping of the employees based on the hierarchy of the organization and the grouping of the doors based on Access Zones (AZ). This design also illustrates the mapping between the Employee Groups (EG) and AZ. By following this approach in database design, a higher level view can be presented to the system administrator abstracting the inner details of the individual entities and doors. This paper describes the novel approach carried out in designing the database of the ACS.

  4. High Intensity Particle Physics at PW-class laser facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, Stepan; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Esirkepov, Timur; Kando, Masaki; Rosanov, Nikolay; Korn, Georg; Bulanov, Sergey V.; Leemans, Wim P.

    2015-11-01

    The processes typical for high intensity particle physics, i.e., the interactions of charged particles with strong electromagnetic fields, have attracted considerable interest recently. Some of these processes, previously believed to be of theoretical interest only, are now becoming experimentally accessible. High intensity electromagnetic (EM) fields significantly modify the interactions of particles and EM fields, giving rise to the phenomena that are not encountered either in classical or perturbative quantum theory of these interactions. One of such phenomena is the radiation reaction, which radically influences the electron motion in an electromagnetic standing wave formed by two super-intense counter-propagating laser pulses. Depending on the laser intensity and wavelength, either classical or quantum mode of radiation reaction prevail, or both are strong. When radiation reaction dominates, electron motion evolves to limit cycles and strange attractors. This creates a new framework for high energy physics experiments on an interaction of energetic charged particle beams and colliding super-intense laser pulses. Work supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  5. Atomic physics with highly-charged heavy ions at the GSI future facility: The scientific program of the SPARC collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumberidze, A. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: a.gumberidze@gsi.de; Bosch, F. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning-Demian, A. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Hagmann, S. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kuehl, Th. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Liesen, D. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Schuch, R. [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Stoehlker, Th. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    The proposed new international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will open up exciting and far-reaching perspectives for atomic physics research in the realm of highly-charged heavy ions: it will provide the highest intensities of relativistic beams of both stable and unstable heavy nuclei. In combination with the strongest possible electromagnetic fields produced by the nuclear charge of the heaviest nuclei, this will allow to extend atomic spectroscopy up to the virtual limits of atomic matter. Based on the experience and results already achieved at the experimental storage ring (ESR), a substantial progress in atomic physics research has to be expected in this domain, due to a tremendous improvement of intensity, energy and production yield of both stable and unstable nuclei.

  6. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1990-03-01

    This report discusses topics in the following areas: Holifield heavy ion research; Experimental Nuclear physics; The Uniser program; Experimental Atomic Physics; Theoretical Physics; Laser and electro-optics lab; High Energy Physics; compilations and evaluations; and accelerator design and development. (FI)

  7. Progress in the realization of the PRIMA neutral beam test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toigo, V.; Boilson, D.; Bonicelli, T.; Piovan, R.; Hanada, M.; Chakraborty, A.; Agarici, G.; Antoni, V.; Baruah, U.; Bigi, M.; Chitarin, G.; Dal Bello, S.; Decamps, H.; Graceffa, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Hemsworth, R.; Luchetta, A.; Marcuzzi, D.; Masiello, A.; Paolucci, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Patel, H.; Pomaro, N.; Rotti, C.; Serianni, G.; Simon, M.; Singh, M.; Singh, N. P.; Svensson, L.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Zaccaria, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Andreani, R.; Aprile, D.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Barbisan, M.; Battistella, M.; Bettini, P.; Blatchford, P.; Boldrin, M.; Bonomo, F.; Bragulat, E.; Brombin, M.; Cavenago, M.; Chuilon, B.; Coniglio, A.; Croci, G.; Dalla Palma, M.; D'Arienzo, M.; Dave, R.; De Esch, H. P. L.; De Lorenzi, A.; De Muri, M.; Delogu, R.; Dhola, H.; Fantz, U.; Fellin, F.; Fellin, L.; Ferro, A.; Fiorentin, A.; Fonnesu, N.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Gaio, E.; Gambetta, G.; Gomez, G.; Gnesotto, F.; Gorini, G.; Grando, L.; Gupta, V.; Gutierrez, D.; Hanke, S.; Hardie, C.; Heinemann, B.; Kojima, A.; Kraus, W.; Maeshima, T.; Maistrello, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marconato, N.; Mico, G.; Moreno, J. F.; Moresco, M.; Muraro, A.; Muvvala, V.; Nocentini, R.; Ocello, E.; Ochoa, S.; Parmar, D.; Patel, A.; Pavei, M.; Peruzzo, S.; Pilan, N.; Pilard, V.; Recchia, M.; Riedl, R.; Rizzolo, A.; Roopesh, G.; Rostagni, G.; Sandri, S.; Sartori, E.; Sonato, P.; Sottocornola, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Taliercio, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Thakkar, A.; Umeda, N.; Valente, M.; Veltri, P.; Yadav, A.; Yamanaka, H.; Zamengo, A.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zaupa, M.

    2015-08-01

    The ITER project requires additional heating by two neutral beam injectors, each accelerating to 1 MV a 40 A beam of negative deuterium ions, to deliver to the plasma a power of about 17 MW for one hour. As these requirements have never been experimentally met, it was recognized as necessary to setup a test facility, PRIMA (Padova Research on ITER Megavolt Accelerator), in Italy, including a full-size negative ion source, SPIDER, and a prototype of the whole ITER injector, MITICA, aiming to develop the heating injectors to be installed in ITER. This realization is made with the main contribution of the European Union, through the Joint Undertaking for ITER (F4E), the ITER Organization and Consorzio RFX which hosts the Test Facility. The Japanese and the Indian ITER Domestic Agencies (JADA and INDA) participate in the PRIMA enterprise; European laboratories, such as IPP-Garching, KIT-Karlsruhe, CCFE-Culham, CEA-Cadarache and others are also cooperating. Presently, the assembly of SPIDER is on-going and the MITICA design is being completed. The paper gives a general overview of the test facility and of the status of development of the MITICA and SPIDER main components at this important stage of the overall development; then it focuses on the latest and most critical issues, regarding both physics and technology, describing the identified solutions.

  8. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Progress in High-pT Physics at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazilevsky, A.; Bland, L.; Vogelsang, W.

    2010-03-17

    This volume archives the presentations at the RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop 'Progress in High-PT Physics at RHIC', held at BNL in March 2010. Much has been learned from high-p{sub T} physics after 10 years of RHIC operations for heavy-ion collisions, polarized proton collisions and d+Au collisions. The workshop focused on recent progress in these areas by both theory and experiment. The first morning saw review talks on the theory of RHIC high-p{sub T} physics by G. Sterman and J. Soffer, and on the experimental results by M. Tannenbaum. One of the most exciting recent results from the RHIC spin program is the first observation of W bosons and their associated single-spin asymmetry. The new preliminary data were reported on the first day of our workshop, along with a theoretical perspective. There also were detailed discussions on the global analysis of polarized parton distributions, including the knowledge on gluon polarization and the impact of the W-data. The main topic of the second workshop day were single-transverse spin asymmetries and their analysis in terms of transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions. There is currently much interest in a future Drell-Yan program at RHIC, thanks to the exciting physics opportunities this would offer. This was addressed in some of the talks. There also were presentations on the latest results on transverse-spin physics from HERMES and BELLE. On the final day of the workshop, the focus shifted toward forward and small-x physics at RHIC, which has become a cornerstone of the whole RHIC program. Exciting new data were presented and discussed in terms of their possible implications for our understanding of strong color-field phenomena in QCD. In the afternoon, there were discussions of nuclear parton distributions and jet observables, among them fragmentation. The workshop was concluded with outlooks toward the near-term (LHC, JLab) and longer-term (EIC) future. The workshop has been a great success

  9. Solar heating and hot water system for the central administrative office facility. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-11-01

    Progress on the solar heating and hot water system for the central administrative office facility of the Lincoln Housing Authority, Lincoln, NE is covered. An acceptance test plan is presented and the results of the test are tabulated. A complete blueprint of the system as built is provided. The monitoring system is drawn and settings and installation are described. An operation and maintenance manual discusses procedures for start up, shut down and seasonal changeover and include a valve list and pictures and specifications of components and materials used. Photographs of the final installation are included, and technical data and performance data are given. Finally, there is a brief description of system design and operation and a discussion of major maintenance problems encountered and their solutions. (LEW)

  10. MHD Coal Fired Flow Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altstatt, M. C.; Attig, R. C.; Brosnan, D. A.

    1980-11-01

    Significant activity, task status, planned research, testing, development, and conclusions for the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) and the Energy Conversion Facility (ECF) are described. On Task 1, the first phase of the downstream quench system was completed. On Task 2, all three combustor sections were completed, hydrotested, ASME code stamped, and delivered to UTSI. The nozzle was also delivered. Fabrication of support stands and cooling water manifolds for the combustor and vitiation heater were completed, heat transfer and thermal stress analysis, along with design development, were conducted on the generator and radiant furnace and secondary combustor installation progressed as planned. Under Task 3 an Elemental Analyzer and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer/Graphite Furnace were received and installed, sites were prepared for two air monitoring stations, phytoplankton analysis began, and foliage and soil sampling was conducted using all study plots. Some 288 soil samples were combined to make 72 samples which were analyzed. Also, approval was granted to dispose of MHD flyash and slag at the Franklin County landfill. Task 4 effort consisted of completing all component test plans, and establishing the capability of displaying experimental data in graphical format. Under Task 7, a preliminary testing program for critical monitoring of the local current and voltage non-uniformities in the generator electrodes was outlined, electrode metal wear characteristics were documented, boron nitride/refrasil composite interelectrode sealing was improved, and several refractories for downstream MHD applications were evaluated with promising results.

  11. Performance-assessment progress for the Rozan low-level waste disposal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smietanski, L.; Mitrega, J.; Frankowski, Z. [Polish Geological Institute, Warsaw (Poland)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents a condensed progress report on the performance assessment of Poland`s low-level waste disposal facility which is operating since 1961. The Rozan repository is of near-surface type with facilities which are the concrete fortifications built about 1910. Site characterization activities supplied information on regional geology, geohydrology, climatic and hydrologic conditions and terrain surface evolution due to geodynamic processes. Field surveys enabled to decode lithological, hydrogeological and geochemical site specific conditions. From the laboratory tests the data on groundwater chemistry and soil geochemical and hydraulic characteristics were obtained. The site geohydrologic main vulnerable element is the upmost directly endangered unconfined aquifer which is perched in relation to the region-wide hydraulic system. Heterogeneity of this system reflects in a wide range of hydraulic conductivity and thickness variations. It strongly affects velocity and flow directions. The chemistry of groundwater is unstable due to large sensitivity to external impacts. Modeling of the migration of the critical long-lived radionuclides Tc-99, U-238 and Pu-239 showed that the nearly 20 m thick unsaturated zone plays crucial role as an effective protective barrier. These radionuclides constitute minor part of the total inventory. Modeling of the development of the H-3 plume pointed out the role the macrodispersion plays in the unsaturated zone beneath the repository.

  12. Progress on Establishing Guidelines for National Ignition Facility (NIF) Experiments to Extend Debris Shield Lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, M; Eder, D; Braun, D; MacGowan, B

    2000-07-26

    The survivability and performance of the debris shields on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are a key factor for the successful conduct and affordable operation of the facility. The improvements required over Nova debris shields are described. Estimates of debris shield lifetimes in the presence of target emissions with 4 - 5 J/cm{sup 2} laser fluences (and higher) indicate lifetimes that may contribute unacceptably to operations costs for NIF. We are developing detailed guidance for target and experiment designers for NIF to assist in minimizing the damage to, and therefore the cost of, maintaining NIF debris shields. The guidance limits the target mass that is allowed to become particulate on the debris shields (300 mg). It also limits the amount of material that can become shrapnel for any given shot (10 mg). Finally, it restricts the introduction of non-volatile residue (NVR) that is a threat to the sol-gel coatings on the debris shields to ensure that the chamber loading at any time is less than 1 pg/cm{sup 2}. We review the experimentation on the Nova chamber that included measuring quantities of particulate on debris shields by element and capturing shrapnel pieces in aerogel samples mounted in the chamber. We also describe computations of x-ray emissions from a likely NIF target and the associated ablation expected from this x-ray exposure on supporting target hardware. We describe progress in assessing the benefits of a pre-shield and the possible impact on the guidance for target experiments on NIF. Plans for possible experimentation on Omega and other facilities to improve our understanding of target emissions and their impacts are discussed. Our discussion of planned future work provides a forum to invite possible collaboration with the IFE community.

  13. Research and Discussion on Physical and Chemical Properties of Cultivating Substrate with Facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This article, by comparing the basic concepts of substrate and soil, their composition of substance and methods of measuring the indexes of physical and chemical properties, analyzes and researches ways of choosing substrate for cultivation with facilities. It indicates that the normal physical and chemical indexes of evaluating a substrate are bulk density, total porosity, non-capillary porosity, ratio of big porosity to small porosity, the pH and the electrical conductivity (EC) value of the substrate. By...

  14. Noninterceptive beam energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, J.D.; Carter, H.; Plum, M.; Power, J.F.; Rose, C.R.; Shurter, R.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, M. S. H808, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1995-05-05

    Several members of the Accelerator and Operations Technology (AOT) division beam-diagnostics team performed time-of-flight (TOF) beam-energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using developmental beam time. These measurements provided information for a final design of an on-line beam energy measurement. The following paper discusses these measurements and how they apply to the final beam energy measurement design. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  15. The physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities in the Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, J.; Bartak, L. [State Office for Nuclear Safety, Senovazne nam. 9, 110 00 Prague 1 (Czech Republic)

    2003-07-01

    The paper describes comprehensively past and present of physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials in the Czech Republic, particularly: the changes made in ensuring and legislation of physical protection following the political changes in 1989; the basic concept and regulation in physical protection and the effort made to strengthen the national regulatory programmes, as well as a brief survey of the nuclear facilities in the Czech Republic; experience in design, operation, inspection and licensing of the integrated physical protection system for nuclear power plants with WWER-440 and WWER-1000 reactors; the role of the police as a response force and the role of the new private security companies; the upgrading of the physical protection systems at the different types of the nuclear installations to fulfill the more strict requirements of the new Atomic Law No. 18/1997 Coll. and Regulation No. 144/1997 Coll., on physical protection of nuclear materials and nuclear facilities; the follow up actions in connection with IAEA IPPAS missions carried out in 1998 and 2002 are given.

  16. Informal proposal for an Atomic Physics Facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.W.; Johnson, B.M.; Meron, M.

    1986-01-01

    An Atomic Physics Facility (APF) for experiments that will use radiation from a superconducting wiggler on the NSLS X-13 port is described. The scientific justification for the APF is given and the elements of the facility are discussed. It is shown that it will be possible to conduct a uniquely varied set of experiments that can probe most aspects of atomic physics. A major component of the proposal is a heavy-ion storage ring capable of containing ions with energies of about 10 MeV/nucleon. The ring can be filled with heavy ions produced at the BNL MP Tandem Laboratory or from independent ion-source systems. A preliminary cost estimate for the facility is presented.

  17. Beta Beams: an accelerator based facility to explore Neutrino oscillation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wildner, E; Hansen, C; De Melo Mendonca, T; Stora, T; Payet, J; Chance, A; Zorin, V; Izotov, I; Rasin, S; Sidorov, A; Skalyga, V; De Angelis, G; Prete, G; Cinausero, M; Kravchuk, VL; Gramegna, F; Marchi, T; Collazuol, G; De Rosa, G; Delbar, T; Loiselet, M; Keutgen, T; Mitrofanov, S; Lamy, T; Latrasse, L; Marie-Jeanne, M; Sortais, P; Thuillier, T; Debray, F; Trophime, C; Hass, M; Hirsh, T; Berkovits, D; Stahl, A

    2011-01-01

    The discovery that the neutrino changes flavor as it travels through space has implications for the Standard Model of particle physics (SM)[1]. To know the contribution of neutrinos to the SM, needs precise measurements of the parameters governing the neutrino oscillations. This will require a high intensity beam-based neutrino oscillation facility. The EURONu Design Study will review three currently accepted methods of realizing this facility (the so-called Super-Beams, Beta Beams and Neutrino Factories) and perform a cost assessment that, coupled with the physics performance, will give means to the European research authorities to make a decision on the layout and construction of the future European neutrino oscillation facility. ”Beta Beams” produce collimated pure electron neutrino and antineutrino beams by accelerating beta active ions to high energies and letting them decay in a race-track shaped storage ring. EURONu Beta Beams are based on CERNs infrastructure and the fact that some of the already ...

  18. Physics at a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandyopadhyay, A.; Choubey, S.; Gandhi, R.; Goswami, S.; Roberts, B. L.; Bouchez, J.; Antoniadis, I.; Ellis, J.; Giudice, G. F.; Schwetz, T.; Umasankar, S.; Karagiorgi, G.; Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Conrad, J. M.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Pascoli, S.; Geer, S.; Campagne, J. E.; Rolinec, M.; Blondel, A.; Campanelli, M.; Kopp, J.; Lindner, M.; Peltoniemi, J.; Dornan, P. J.; Long, K.; Matsushita, T.; Rogers, C.; Uchida, Y.; Dracos, M.; Whisnant, K.; Casper, D.; Chen, Mu-Chun; Popov, B.; Aysto, J.; Marfatia, D.; Okada, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Jungmann, K.; Lesgourgues, J.; Zisman, M.; Tortola, M. A.; Friedland, A.; Davidson, S.; Antusch, S.; Biggio, C.; Donini, A.; Fernandez-Martinez, E.; Gavela, B.; Maltoni, M.; Lopez-Pavon, J.; Rigolin, S.; Mondal, N.; Palladino, V.; Filthaut, F.; Albright, C.; de Gouvea, A.; Kuno, Y.; Nagashima, Y.; Mezzetto, M.; Lola, S.; Langacker, P.; Baldini, A.; Nunokawa, H.; Meloni, D.; Diaz, M.; King, S. F.; Zuber, K.; Akeroyd, A. G.; Grossman, Y.; Farzan, Y.; Tobe, K.; Aoki, Mayumi; Murayama, H.; Kitazawa, N.; Yasuda, O.; Petcov, S.; Romanino, A.; Chimenti, P.; Vacchi, A.; Smirnov, A. Yu; Couce, E.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Hernandez, P.; Sorel, M.; Valle, J. W. F.; Harrison, P. F.; Lunardini, C.; Nelson, J. K.; Barger, V.; Everett, L.; Huber, P.; Winter, W.; Fetscher, W.; van der Schaaf, A.

    2009-01-01

    The conclusions of the Physics Working Group of the International Scoping Study of a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS) are presented. The ISS was carried out by the international community between NuFact05, (the 7th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Super-beams

  19. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of Category 1 fuel cycle facility physical security plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, P.A.

    1991-10-01

    This NUREG document presents criteria developed from US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for the evaluation of physical security plans submitted by Category 1 fuel facility licensees. Category 1 refers to those licensees who use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material.

  20. Making Industrial Education Facilities Accessible to the Physically Disabled. A Professional Monograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Ray; Henak, Richard

    This monograph focuses on the design of accessible industrial education facilities for individuals with physical disabilities. In chapter 1 accessibility is defined, and three significant pieces of federal legislation regarding the equality of educational opportunities for special needs populations are discussed. The role of industrial education…

  1. A METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING FUTURE PHYSICAL FACILITIES REQUIREMENTS FOR INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    YURKOVICH, JOHN V.

    A COMPUTERIZED METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING THE PHYSICAL FACILITIES REQUIREMENTS OF A LARGE UNIVERSITY WAS DEVELOPED. THE RESEARCH INCLUDED THE DEVELOPMENT, IMPLEMENTATION, AND TESTING OF SYSTEMS FOR (1) CLASSIFYING SPACE, (2) MAINTAINING A PERPETUAL SPACE INVENTORY, (3) CONDUCTING ROOM UTILIZATION STUDIES, (4) PROJECTING STUDENTS BY A SET OF…

  2. Health physics manual of good practices for plutonium facilities. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Heid, K.R.; Herrington, W.N.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Munson, L.F.; Munson, L.H.; Selby, J.M.; Soldat, K.L.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Traub, R.J.

    1988-05-01

    This manual consists of six sections: Properties of Plutonium, Siting of Plutonium Facilities, Facility Design, Radiation Protection, Emergency Preparedness, and Decontamination and Decommissioning. While not the final authority, the manual is an assemblage of information, rules of thumb, regulations, and good practices to assist those who are intimately involved in plutonium operations. An in-depth understanding of the nuclear, physical, chemical, and biological properties of plutonium is important in establishing a viable radiation protection and control program at a plutonium facility. These properties of plutonium provide the basis and perspective necessary for appreciating the quality of control needed in handling and processing the material. Guidance in selecting the location of a new plutonium facility may not be directly useful to most readers. However, it provides a perspective for the development and implementation of the environmental surveillance program and the in-plant controls required to ensure that the facility is and remains a good neighbor. The criteria, guidance, and good practices for the design of a plutonium facility are also applicable to the operation and modification of existing facilities. The design activity provides many opportunities for implementation of features to promote more effective protection and control. The application of ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principles and optimization analyses are generally most cost-effective during the design phase. 335 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs.

  3. Diet, Physical Activity, and Weight | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  4. Intervention to promote physical health in staff within mental health facilities and the impact on patients’ physical health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Peter; Davidsen, Annette Sofie; Killian, Reinhold;

    2016-01-01

    -month intervention study, and the interventionwas active awareness on physical health. Results: In the intervention group the staff reducedtheir waist circumference by 2.3 cm (95% CI: 0.3–4.4) when controlling for gender, age andcigarette consumption. In the control group, the staff changed their waist...... of an intervention programme for improving physical health in staff working in longtermpsychiatric treatment facilities. Furthermore, the paper measured the association betweenstaff’s changes in physical health and the patients’ changes in physical health. Methods: Thestudy was a cluster randomized controlled 12......’s changes in health parameters (body mass index, total body fat and qualityof life). Conclusion: The staff in the intervention group showed a significant reduction of waistcircumference, while staff in the control group showed a non-significant increase. Furthermore,a significant reduction in the diastolic...

  5. Women in physics in the Netherlands: Progress and developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Petra; de Graaf, Noortje; Koornstra, Renée-Andrée; van Tijn, Paula; Kool, Dorien

    2015-12-01

    The visibility of women and the awareness of a healthy gender balance in physics in the Netherlands have clearly improved over the last few years. Initiatives to promote women and their possibilities to pursue a career in physics are plentiful and commendable. Nevertheless, the numbers do not yet show the desired impact of all these initiatives. Although student numbers have increased, the percentage of female first-year student remains at approximately 13% of the total students in physics. Similarly, the relative numbers of female PhD candidates and postdocs have been stable over the last years at (both) approximately 20% to 25%. Despite the number of women obtaining a PhD in physics and continuing a scientific career as postdoc, the presence of women further up on the scientific ladder in physics remains strikingly low. We will here focus on the current status, ambitions, and initiatives in the Netherlands to promote women, and especially to keep them, in physics.

  6. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Sixth Quarter of the First Budget Period, January 1 through March 31, 1992, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. The major emphasis during this reporting period was expanding the test facility to address system integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced power generation systems. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include additional modules for the expansion of the test facility, which is referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSOF). A letter agreement was negotiated between Southern Company Services (SCS) and Foster Wheeler (FW) for the conceptual design of the Advanced Pressurized Fluid-Bed Combustion (APFBC)/Topping Combustor/Gas Turbine System to be added to the facility. The expanded conceptual design also included modifications to the existing conceptual design for the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility (HGCTF), facility layout and balance of plant design for the PSOF. Southern Research Institute (SRI) began investigating the sampling requirements for the expanded facility and assisted SCS in contacting Particulate Control Device (PCD) vendors for additional information. SCS also contacted the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and two molten carbonate fuel cell vendors for input on the fuel cell module for the PSDF.

  7. Progress on the Combustion Integrated Rack Component of the Fluids and Combustion Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Karen J.; Urban, Dave (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a facility-class payload planned for the International Space Station. It is designed to accommodate a wide variety of investigations encompassing most of the range of microgravity fluid physics and combustion science. The Combustion Integrated Rack component of the FCF is currently scheduled to be launched in 2003 and will operate independently until additional racks of the FCF are launched. The FCF is intended to complete between five and fifteen combustion experiments per year over its planned ten-year lifetime. Combustion arm that may be studied include laminar flames, reaction kinetics, droplet and spray combustion, flame spread, fire and fire suppressants, condensed phase organic fuel combustion, turbulent combustion, soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and flame-synthesized materials. Three different chamber inserts, one each for investigations of droplet, solid fuel, and gaseous fuel combustion, that can accommodate multiple experiments will be used initially so as to maximize the reuse of hardware. The current flight and flight-definition investigations are briefly described.

  8. Atomic physics with highly-charged ions at the future FAIR facility: A status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoehlker, Th. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany) and Institut fuer Kernphysik, University of Frankfurt (Germany)]. E-mail: t.stoehlker@gsi.de; Beyer, H.F. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning-Demian, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Brandau, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Hagmann, S. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Kozhuharov, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Kluge, H.J. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Kuehl, Th. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Liesen, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Mann, R. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Noertershaeuser, W. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Quint, W. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Schramm, U. [LMU, Munich (Germany); Schuch, R. [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-08-15

    Key features of the future international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) offer a range of new and challenging opportunities for atomic physics research in the realm of highly-charged heavy ions and exotic nuclei. Centred on use of FAIR, the Stored Particle Atomic Physics Research Collaboration (SPARC), organized in working groups, has been formed. A short report on the tasks and activities of the various SPARC working groups, devoted to the realization of experimental equipments and set-ups required to reach the physics goals is given.

  9. Atomic physics with highly-charged ions at the future FAIR facility. A status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoehlker, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Beyer, H.F.; Braeuning, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (DE)] (and others)

    2006-11-15

    The key features of the future international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) offer a range of new and challenging opportunities for atomic physics research in the realm of highly-charged heavy ions and exotic nuclei. Centred on use of FAIR, the Stored Particle Atomic Physics Research Collaboration (SPARC), organized in working groups, has been formed. A short report on the tasks and activities of the various SPARC working groups, devoted to the realization of experimental equipments and setups required to reach the physics goals is given. (orig.)

  10. Women in Physics in the Netherlands: Progress and Developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudolf, Petra; de Graaf, Noortje; Koornstra, Renée-Andrée; van Tijn, Paula; Kool, Dorien

    The visibility of women and the awareness of a healthy gender balance in physics in the Netherlands have clearly improved over the last few years. Initiatives to promote women and their possibilities to pursue a career in physics are plentiful and commendable. Nevertheless, the numbers do not yet

  11. Recent Progress in Cloud Physics Research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A review of China cloud physics research during 2003-2006 is made in this paper.The studies on cloud field experiments and observation,cloud physics and precipitation,including its theoretical applications in hail suppression and artificial rain enhancement,cloud physics and lightning,and clouds and climate change are included.Due primarily to the demand from weather modification activities,the issue of cloud Physics and weather modification has been addressed in China with many field experiments and model studies.While cloud Physics and weather modification is still an important research field,the interaction between aerosol,cloud and radiation processes,which is the key issue of current climate change research,has become a new research direction in China over the past four years.

  12. Keynote address: One hundred years of nuclear physicsProgress and prospects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Kailas

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear physics research is growing on several fronts, along energy and intensity frontiers, with exotic projectiles and targets. The nuclear physics facilities under construction and those being planned for the future make the prospects for research in this field very bright.

  13. Perspectives for photonuclear research at the Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipescu, D.; Balabanski, D.L.; Constantin, P.; Gales, S.; Tesileanu, O.; Ur, C.A.; Ursu, I.; Zamfir, N.V. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for R and D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP), Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Anzalone, A.; La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C. [INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); Belyshev, S.S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Physics Faculty, Moscow (Russian Federation); Camera, F. [Departement of Physics, University of Milano, Milano (Italy); INFN section of Milano, Milano (Italy); Csige, L.; Krasznahorkay, A. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA Atomki), Institute of Nuclear Research, Post Office Box 51, Debrecen (Hungary); Cuong, P.V. [Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Centre of Nuclear Physics, Institute of Physics, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Mazzocchi, C. [University of Warsaw, Warszawa (Poland); Derya, V.; Zilges, A. [University of Cologne, Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cologne (Germany); Gai, M. [University of Connecticut, LNS at Avery Point, Connecticut, Groton (United States); Gheorghe, I. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for R and D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP), Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); University of Bucharest, Nuclear Physics Department, Post Office Box MG-11, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Ishkhanov, B.S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Physics Faculty, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, A.A.; Orlin, V.N.; Stopani, K.A.; Varlamov, V.V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Pietralla, N. [Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Institut fur Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Sin, M. [University of Bucharest, Nuclear Physics Department, Post Office Box MG-11, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Utsunomiya, H. [Konan University, Department of Physics, Kobe (Japan); University of Tokyo, Center for Nuclear Study, Saitama (Japan); Weller, H.R. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, North Carolina, Durham (United States); Duke University, Department of Physics, North Carolina, Durham (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The perspectives for photonuclear experiments at the new Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility are discussed in view of the need to accumulate novel and more precise nuclear data. The parameters of the ELI-NP gamma beam system are presented. The emerging experimental program, which will be realized at ELI-NP, is presented. Examples of day-one experiments with the nuclear resonance fluorescence technique, photonuclear reaction measurements, photofission experiments and studies of nuclear collective excitation modes and competition between various decay channels are discussed. The advantages which ELI-NP provides for all these experiments compared to the existing facilities are discussed. (orig.)

  14. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Schietinger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measurements performed during the operation of the test facility, including the results of the test of an in-vacuum undulator prototype generating radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and optical range.

  15. Atomic physics with highly-charged heavy ions at the GSI future facility: The scientific program of the SPARC collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoehlker, Th. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: t.stoehlker@gsi.de; Beier, T. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Beyer, H.F. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Bosch, F. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning-Demian, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Gumberidze, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Hagmann, S. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Kozhuharov, C. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Kuehl, Th. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Liesen, D. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Mann, R. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Mokler, P.H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Quint, W. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Schuch, R. [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Warczak, A. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland)

    2005-07-01

    In the current report a short overview about the envisioned program of the atomic physics research collaboration SPARC (Stored Particle Atomic Research Collaboration, at the new international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI is given. In addition, a condensed description of the planned experimental areas devoted to atomic physics research at the new facility is presented.

  16. Towards an Experimental Testbed Facility for Cyber-Physical Security Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edgar, Thomas W.; Manz, David O.; Carroll, Thomas E.

    2012-01-07

    Cyber-Physical Systems (CPSs) are under great scrutiny due to large Smart Grid investments and recent high profile security vulnerabilities and attacks. Research into improved security technologies, communication models, and emergent behavior is necessary to protect these systems from sophisticated adversaries and new risks posed by the convergence of CPSs with IT equipment. However, cyber-physical security research is limited by the lack of access to universal cyber-physical testbed facilities that permit flexible, high-fidelity experiments. This paper presents a remotely-configurable and community-accessible testbed design that integrates elements from the virtual, simulated, and physical environments. Fusing data between the three environments enables the creation of realistic and scalable environments where new functionality and ideas can be exercised. This novel design will enable the research community to analyze and evaluate the security of current environments and design future, secure, cyber-physical technologies.

  17. Physics Division Argonne National Laboratory description of the programs and facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.

    1999-05-24

    The ANL Physics Division traces its roots to nuclear physics research at the University of Chicago around the time of the second world war. Following the move from the University of Chicago out to the present Argonne site and the formation of Argonne National Laboratory: the Physics Division has had a tradition of research into fundamental aspects of nuclear and atomic physics. Initially, the emphasis was on areas such as neutron physics, mass spectrometry, and theoretical studies of the nuclear shell model. Maria Goeppert Maier was an employee in the Physics Division during the time she did her Nobel-Prize-winning work on the nuclear shell model. These interests diversified and at the present time the research addresses a wide range of current problems in nuclear and atomic physics. The major emphasis of the current experimental nuclear physics research is in heavy-ion physics, centered around the ATLAS facility (Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System) with its new injector providing intense, energetic ion beams over the fill mass range up to uranium. ATLAS is a designated National User Facility and is based on superconducting radio-frequency technology developed in the Physics Division. A small program continues in accelerator development. In addition, the Division has a strong program in medium-energy nuclear physics carried out at a variety of major national and international facilities. The nuclear theory research in the Division spans a wide range of interests including nuclear dynamics with subnucleonic degrees of freedom, dynamics of many-nucleon systems, nuclear structure, and heavy-ion interactions. This research makes contact with experimental research programs in intermediate-energy and heavy-ion physics, both within the Division and on the national and international scale. The Physics Division traditionally has strong connections with the nation's universities. We have many visiting faculty members and we encourage students to participate in our

  18. Comparing perceived and objectively measured access to recreational facilities as predictors of physical activity in adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Molly M; Evenson, Kelly R; Cohen, Deborah A; Cox, Christine E

    2007-05-01

    A number of studies in recent years have identified both self-report and objectively measured accessibility of recreational facilities as important predictors of physical activity in youth. Yet, few studies have: (1) examined the relationship between the number and proximity of objectively measured neighborhood physical activity facilities and respondents' perceptions and (2) compared objective and self-report measures as predictors of physical activity. This study uses data on 1,367 6th-grade girls who participated in the Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG) to explore these issues. Girls reported whether nine different types of recreational facilities were easily accessible. These facilities included basketball courts, golf courses, martial arts studios, playing fields, tracks, skating rinks, swimming pools, tennis courts, and dance/gymnastic clubs. Next, geographic information systems (GIS) were used to identify all the parks, schools, and commercial sites for physical activity located within a mile of each girl's home. These sites were then visited to inventory the types of facilities available. Girls wore accelerometers to measure their weekly minutes of non-school metabolic equivalent weighted moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MW-MVPA). The number of facilities within a half-mile of girls' homes strongly predicted the perception of easy access to seven out of nine facility types. Both individual facility perceptions and the total number of facilities perceived were associated with increased physical activity. For each additional facility perceived, girls clocked 3% more metabolic equivalent weighted moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (p girls tended to record 3% more of this kind of physical activity (p raising the profile of existing facilities may help increase physical activity among adolescent girls.

  19. A New Way for Physical Progress Monitoring in High Tech Infrastructure Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Favari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the project of designing an agile physical progress measurement system for the construction management department of a multinational company operating in turnkey railway projects field. It has been pointed out that the classical physical progress measurement, based on Earn Value Management (EVM and so financially based, is not suitable for modern high-tech and, in one word, complex, construction projects. So it has been looked for something different, more agile, to easily fix the problem of monitoring on a weekly basis the physical progress of sites. The work starts by describing the process of choosing KPIs, defines an overall physical progress index, than discusses the choice of a baseline to measure against, and at the end it illustrates the visual management implemented.

  20. The pulsed field facility of KULeuven's Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlach, F.; Vanacken, J.; Moshchalkov, V. V.

    2006-11-01

    The pulsed field facility at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven has recently been incorporated in the new Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry. The tradition of fruitful co-operation with other research groups has been further pursued. The laboratory has a magnet testing station and five user-friendly measuring stations that can be operated in parallel. Principal measuring techniques are magneto-transport, magnetization and photoluminescence; the research topics are high temperature superconductors, molecular magnets, diluted magnetic semiconductors, low dimensional metals, quantum dots and wires. The laboratory has established close co-operation with the LNCMP at Toulouse; in the context of large European facilities it has the status of a satellite user facility.

  1. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Colorado, Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, E.R., ed.

    2004-05-12

    OAK-B135 The results and progress of research funded by DOE grant number DOE-FG03-95ER40913 at the University of Colorado at Boulder is described. Includes work performed at the HERMES experiment at DESY to study the quark structure of the nucleon and the hadronization process in nuclei, as well as hadronic reactions studied at LAMPF, KEK, and Fermilab.

  2. Design progress for the National Ignition Facility laser alignment and beam diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Boege, Steven J.; Boyd, Robert D.; Davis, Donald T.; Demaret, Robert D.; Feldman, Mark; Gates, Alan J.; Holdener, Fred R.; Knopp, Carl F.; Kyker, R. D.; Lauman, C. W.; McCarville, Tom J.; Miller, John L.; Miller-Kamm, Victoria J.; Rivera, W. E.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Severyn, J. R.; Sheem, Sang K.; Thomas, Stan W.; Thompson, Calvin E.; Wang, David Y.; Yoeman, M. F.; Zacharias, Richard A.; Chocol, Clifford J.; Hollis, J.; Whitaker, Daniel E.; Brucker, J.; Bronisz, L.; Sheridan, T.

    1999-07-01

    Earlier papers have described approaches to NIF alignment and laser diagnostics tasks. Now, detailed design of alignment and diagnostic systems for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser is in its last year. Specifications are more detailed, additional analyses have been completed, Pro- E models have been developed, and prototypes of specific items have been built. In this paper we update top level concepts, illustrate specific areas of progress, and show design implementations as represented by prototype hardware. The alignment light source network has been fully defined. It utilizes an optimized number of lasers combined with fiber optic distribution to provide the chain alignment beams, system centering references, final spatial filter pinhole references, target alignment beams, and wavefront reference beams. The input and output sensor are being prototyped. They are located respectively in the front end just before beam injection into the full aperture chain and at the transport spatial filter, where the full energy infrared beam leaves the laser. The modularity of the input sensor is improved, and each output sensor mechanical package now incorporates instrumentation for four beams.

  3. PFBC HGCU Test Facility. Technical progress report No. 24, Third quarter, CY 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This is the twenty-fourth and final Technical Progress Report submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. This report covers the work completed during the Third Quarter of CY 1995. All activity this quarter was directed toward the completion of the program final report. A draft copy of the final report was forwarded to DOE during this quarter, and DOE submitted their comments on the report to AEPSC. DOE requested that Westinghouse write an appendix to the report covering the performance of the fail-safe regenerator devices during Tad operation, and Westinghouse subsequently prepared the appendix. Additional DOE comments were incorporated into the report, and it will be issued in camera-ready form by the end of October, 1995, which is the program end date. Appendix 1 presents the results of filter candle posttest examination by Westinghouse performed on selected filter candles following final shutdown of the system.

  4. Progress in Geant4 Electromagnetic Physics Modelling and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakis, J.; Asai, M.; Bagulya, A.; Brown, J. M. C.; Burkhardt, H.; Chikuma, N.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Elles, S.; Grichine, V.; Guatelli, S.; Incerti, S.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Jacquemier, J.; Kadri, O.; Maire, M.; Pandola, L.; Sawkey, D.; Toshito, T.; Urban, L.; Yamashita, T.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we report on recent improvements in the electromagnetic (EM) physics models of Geant4 and new validations of EM physics. Improvements have been made in models of the photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, gamma conversion to electron and muon pairs, fluctuations of energy loss, multiple scattering, synchrotron radiation, and high energy positron annihilation. The results of these developments are included in the new Geant4 version 10.1 and in patches to previous versions 9.6 and 10.0 that are planned to be used for production for run-2 at LHC. The Geant4 validation suite for EM physics has been extended and new validation results are shown in this work. In particular, the effect of gamma-nuclear interactions on EM shower shape at LHC energies is discussed.

  5. Progress in Geant4 Electromagnetic Physics Modelling and Validation

    CERN Document Server

    Apostolakis, J; Bagulya, A; Brown, J M C; Burkhardt, H; Chikuma, N; Cortes-Giraldo, M A; Elles, S; Grichine, V; Guatelli, S; Incerti, S; Ivanchenko, V N; Jacquemier, J; Kadri, O; Maire, M; Pandola, L; Sawkey, D; Toshito, T; Urban, L; Yamashita, T

    2015-01-01

    In this work we report on recent improvements in the electromagnetic (EM) physics models of Geant4 and new validations of EM physics. Improvements have been made in models of the photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, gamma conversion to electron and muon pairs, fluctuations of energy loss, multiple scattering, synchrotron radiation, and high energy positron annihilation. The results of these developments are included in the new Geant4 version 10.1 and in patches to previous versions 9.6 and 10.0 that are planned to be used for production for run-2 at LHC. The Geant4 validation suite for EM physics has been extended and new validation results are shown in this work. In particular, the effect of gamma-nuclear interactions on EM shower shape at LHC energies is discussed.

  6. Progress in Geant4 Electromagnetic Physics Modelling and Validation

    CERN Document Server

    Apostolakis, J; Bagulya, A; Brown, J M C; Burkhardt, H; Chikuma, N; Cortes-Giraldo, M A; Elles, S; Grichine, V; Guatelli, S; Incerti, S; Ivanchenko, V N; Jacquemier, J; Kadri, O; Maire, M; Pandola, L; Sawkey, D; Toshito, T; Urban, L; Yamashita, T

    2015-01-01

    In this work we report on recent improvements in the electromagnetic (EM) physics models of Geant4 and new validations of EM physics. Improvements have been made in models of the photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, gamma conversion to electron and muon pairs, fluctuations of energy loss, multiple scattering, synchrotron radiation, and high energy positron annihilation. The results of these developments are included in the new Geant4 version 10.1 and in patches to previous versions 9.6 and 10.0 that are planned to be used for production for run-2 at LHC. The Geant4 validation suite for EM physics has been extended and new validation results are shown in this work. In particular, the effect of gamma-nuclear interactions on EM shower shape at LHC energies is discussed.

  7. Physical mapping of human chromosome 16. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1992-08-01

    Project aims for the past year have been to refine the cytogenetic based physical map of human chromosome 16. This has been achieved by extending the panel of mouse/human hybrids of chromosome 16 to over sixty hybrids and mapping approximately 250 DNA makers. The high resolution of this physical map, with an average distance between breakpoints of less than 1.6 Mb, and the availability of at least one STS in the majority of these intervals, will be the basis for constructing extensive contigs of cloned DNA.

  8. Geant4 and beyond: recent progress in precision physics modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Batic, Matej; Han, Min Cheol; Hauf, Steffen; Hoff, Gabriela; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Han Sung; Kim, Sung Hun; Kuster, Markus; Pia, Maria Grazia; Saracco, Paolo; Weidenspointner, Georg

    2014-01-01

    This extended abstract briefly summarizes ongoing research activity on the evaluation and experimental validation of physics methods for photon and electron transport. The analysis includes physics models currently implemented in Geant4 as well as modeling methods used in other Monte Carlo codes, or not yet considered in general purpose Monte Carlo simulation systems. The validation of simulation models is performed with the support of rigorous statistical methods, which involve goodness-of-fit tests followed by categorical analysis. All results are quantitative, and are fully documented.

  9. Experimental Physics Division of the Los Alamos Project. Progress report No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1943-09-01

    Included in this semi-monthly report written in 1943 are progress with neutron beams, neutron absorption in enriched materials, equipment operation and maintenance reports of the cyclotron neutron source facility, and instrumentation maintenance activities of individuals in the cyclotron group. (GHT)

  10. Noninterceptive beam energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilpatrick, J. D.; Carter, H.; Plum, M.; Power, J. F.; Rose, C. R.; Shurter, R. B.

    1995-05-01

    Several members of the Accelerator and Operations Technology (AOT) division beam-diagnostics team performed time-of-flight (TOF) beam-energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using developmental beam time. These measurements provided information for a final design of an on-line beam energy measurement. The following paper discusses these measurements and how they apply to the final beam energy measurement design.

  11. Noninterceptive beam energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, J.D.; Carter, H.; Plum, M.; Power, J.F.; Rose, C.R.; Shurter, R.B.

    1995-12-31

    Several members of the Accelerator and Operations Technology (AOT) division beam-diagnostics team performed time-of-flight (TOF) beam-energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using developmental beam time. These measurements provided information for a final design of an on-line beam energy measurement. The following paper discusses these measurements and how they apply to the final beam energy measurement design.

  12. Atlas: A Facility for High Energy Density Physics Research at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-07-01

    LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY W. M. Parsons, W. A. Reass, J. ~-Griego, D. W. Bowman...C. Thompson, R. F. Gribble, J. S. Shlachter, C. A. Ekdahl, P. D. Goldstone, and S.M. Younger Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM. 87545...Atlas A Facility For High Energy Density Physics Research At Los Alamos National Laboratory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  13. Developing a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in Connecticut: Update on progress and new directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gingerich, R.E. [Connecticut Hazardous Waste Management Service, Hartford, CT (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Connecticut is a member of the Northeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (Northeast LLRW Compact). The other member of the Northeast LLRW Compact is New Jersey. The Northeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission (Northeast Compact Commission), the Northeast LLRW Compact`s governing body, has designated both Connecticut and New Jersey as host states for disposal facilities. The Northeast Compact Commission has recommended that, for purposes of planning for each state`s facility, the siting agency for the state should use projected volumes and characteristics of the LLW generated in its own state. In 1987 Connecticut enacted legislation that assigns major responsibilities for developing a LLW disposal facility in Connecticut to the Connecticut Hazardous Waste Management Service (CHWMS). The CHWMS is required to: prepare and revise, as necessary, a LLW Management Plan for the state; select a site for a LLW disposal facility; select a disposal technology to be used at the site; select a firm to obtain the necessary approvals for the facility and to develop and operate it; and serve as the custodial agency for the facility. This paper discusses progress in developing a facility.

  14. Research Opportunities on the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF) on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng-Chuan; Adriaans, Mary Jayne; Pensinger, John; Israelsson, Ulf

    2000-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF) is a state-of-the-art facility for long duration science Investigations whose objectives can only be achieved in microgravity and at low temperature. LTMPF consists of two reusable, cryogenic facilities with self-contained electronics, software and communication capabilities. The Facility will be first launched by Japanese HIIA Rocket in 2003 and retrieved by the Space Shuttle, and will have at least five months cryogen lifetime on the Japanese Experiment Module Exposed Facility (JEM EF) of the International Space Station. A number of high precision sensors of temperature, pressure and capacitance will be available, which can be further tailored to accommodate a wide variety of low temperature experiments. This paper will describe the LTMPF and its goals and design requirements. Currently there are six candidate experiments in the flight definition phase to fly on LTMPF. Future candidate experiments will be selected through the NASA Research Announcement process. Opportunities for utilization and collaboration with international partners will also be discussed. This work is being carried out by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The work was funded by NASA Microgravity Research Division.

  15. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schietinger, T.; Aiba, M.; Arsov, V.; Bettoni, S.; Beutner, B.; Calvi, M.; Craievich, P.; Dehler, M.; Frei, F.; Ganter, R.; Hauri, C. P.; Ischebeck, R.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Janousch, M.; Kaiser, M.; Keil, B.; Löhl, F.; Orlandi, G. L.; Ozkan Loch, C.; Peier, P.; Prat, E.; Raguin, J.-Y.; Reiche, S.; Schilcher, T.; Wiegand, P.; Zimoch, E.; Anicic, D.; Armstrong, D.; Baldinger, M.; Baldinger, R.; Bertrand, A.; Bitterli, K.; Bopp, M.; Brands, H.; Braun, H. H.; Brönnimann, M.; Brunnenkant, I.; Chevtsov, P.; Chrin, J.; Citterio, A.; Csatari Divall, M.; Dach, M.; Dax, A.; Ditter, R.; Divall, E.; Falone, A.; Fitze, H.; Geiselhart, C.; Guetg, M. W.; Hämmerli, F.; Hauff, A.; Heiniger, M.; Higgs, C.; Hugentobler, W.; Hunziker, S.; Janser, G.; Kalantari, B.; Kalt, R.; Kim, Y.; Koprek, W.; Korhonen, T.; Krempaska, R.; Laznovsky, M.; Lehner, S.; Le Pimpec, F.; Lippuner, T.; Lutz, H.; Mair, S.; Marcellini, F.; Marinkovic, G.; Menzel, R.; Milas, N.; Pal, T.; Pollet, P.; Portmann, W.; Rezaeizadeh, A.; Ritt, S.; Rohrer, M.; Schär, M.; Schebacher, L.; Scherrer, St.; Schlott, V.; Schmidt, T.; Schulz, L.; Smit, B.; Stadler, M.; Steffen, Bernd; Stingelin, L.; Sturzenegger, W.; Treyer, D. M.; Trisorio, A.; Tron, W.; Vicario, C.; Zennaro, R.; Zimoch, D.

    2016-10-26

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including atransverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunchesof up to200 pC chargeand up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of a FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measureme...

  16. Research Opportunities on the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF) on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng-Chuan; Adriaans, Mary Jayne; Pensinger, John; Israelsson, Ulf

    2000-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF) is a state-of-the-art facility for long duration science Investigations whose objectives can only be achieved in microgravity and at low temperature. LTMPF consists of two reusable, cryogenic facilities with self-contained electronics, software and communication capabilities. The Facility will be first launched by Japanese HIIA Rocket in 2003 and retrieved by the Space Shuttle, and will have at least five months cryogen lifetime on the Japanese Experiment Module Exposed Facility (JEM EF) of the International Space Station. A number of high precision sensors of temperature, pressure and capacitance will be available, which can be further tailored to accommodate a wide variety of low temperature experiments. This paper will describe the LTMPF and its goals and design requirements. Currently there are six candidate experiments in the flight definition phase to fly on LTMPF. Future candidate experiments will be selected through the NASA Research Announcement process. Opportunities for utilization and collaboration with international partners will also be discussed. This work is being carried out by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The work was funded by NASA Microgravity Research Division.

  17. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schietinger, T; Aiba, M; Arsov, V; Bettoni, S; Beutner, B; Calvi, M; Craievich, P; Dehler, M; Frei, F; Ganter, R; Hauri, C P; Ischebeck, R; Ivanisenko, Y; Janousch, M; Kaiser, M; Keil, B; Löhl, F; Orlandi, G L; Loch, C Ozkan; Peier, P; Prat, E; Raguin, J -Y; Reiche, S; Schilcher, T; Wiegand, P; Zimoch, E; Anicic, D; Armstrong, D; Baldinger, M; Baldinger, R; Bertrand, A; Bitterli, K; Bopp, M; Brands, H; Braun, H H; Brönnimann, M; Brunnenkant, I; Chevtsov, P; Chrin, J; Citterio, A; Divall, M Csatari; Dach, M; Dax, A; Ditter, R; Divall, E; Falone, A; Fitze, H; Geiselhart, C; Guetg, M W; Hämmerli, F; Hauff, A; Heiniger, M; Higgs, C; Hugentobler, W; Hunziker, S; Janser, G; Kalantari, B; Kalt, R; Kim, Y; Koprek, W; Korhonen, T; Krempaska, R; Laznovsky, M; Lehner, S; Pimpec, F Le; Lippuner, T; Lutz, H; Mair, S; Marcellini, F; Marinkovic, G; Menzel, R; Milas, N; Pal, T; Pollet, P; Portmann, W; Rezaeizadeh, A; Ritt, S; Rohrer, M; Schär, M; Schebacher, L; Scherrer, St; Schmidt, V Schlott T; Schulz, L; Smit, B; Stadler, M; Steffen, B; Stingelin, L; Sturzenegger, W; Treyer, D M; Trisorio, A; Tron, W; Vicario, C; Zennaro, R; Zimoch, D

    2016-01-01

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and testbed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the X-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultra-low-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics meas...

  18. Physics at a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, A; Choubey, S; Gandhi, R; Goswami, S [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India); Roberts, B L [Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Bouchez, J [Service de Physique des Particules, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Antoniadis, I; Ellis, J; Giudice, G F; Schwetz, T [Department of Physics, CERN Theory Division, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Umasankar, S [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Taramani, C.I.T. Campus, Chennai 600113 (India); Karagiorgi, G; Aguilar-Arevalo, A; Conrad, J M; Shaevitz, M H [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Pascoli, S [Department of Physics, University of Durham, Ogen Center for Fundamental Physics, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Geer, S [Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510-0500 (United States); Campagne, J E [LAL, Universite Paris-Sud 11, Batiment 200, F-91898 Orsay cedex (France); Rolinec, M [Physik-Department T30d, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Blondel, A [Departement de Physique Nucleaire et Corpusculaire (DPNC), Universite de Geneve, Geneve (Switzerland)] (and others)

    2009-10-15

    The conclusions of the Physics Working Group of the International Scoping Study of a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS) are presented. The ISS was carried out by the international community between NuFact05, (the 7th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Super-beams, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome, 21-26 June 2005) and NuFact06 (Ivine, CA, 24-30 August 2006). The physics case for an extensive experimental programme to understand the properties of the neutrino is presented and the role of high-precision measurements of neutrino oscillations within this programme is discussed in detail. The performance of second-generation super-beam experiments, beta-beam facilities and the Neutrino Factory are evaluated and a quantitative comparison of the discovery potential of the three classes of facility is presented. High-precision studies of the properties of the muon are complementary to the study of neutrino oscillations. The Neutrino Factory has the potential to provide extremely intense muon beams and the physics potential of such beams is discussed in the final section of the report.

  19. The Ignition Physics Campaign on NIF: Status and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, M. J.; Ignition Team

    2016-03-01

    We have made significant progress in ICF implosion performance on NIF since the 2011 IFSA. Employing a 3-shock, high adiabat CH (“High-Foot”) design, total neutron yields have increased 10-fold to 6.3 x1015 (a yield of ∼ 17 kJ, which is greater than the energy invested in the DT fuel ∼ 12kJ). At that level, the yield from alpha self-heating is essentially equivalent to the compression yield, indicating that we are close to the alpha self-heating regime. Low adiabat, 4-shock High Density Carbon (HDC) capsules have been imploded in conventional gas-filled hohlraums, and employing a 6 ns, 2-shock pulse, HDC capsules were imploded in near-vacuum hohlraums with overall coupling ∼ 98%. Both the 4- and 2-shock HDC capsules had very low mix and high yield over simulated performance. Rugby holraums have demonstrated uniform x-ray drive with minimal Cross Beam Energy Transfer (CBET), and we have made good progress in measuring and modelling growth of ablation front hydro instabilities.

  20. Progress Report for Period Ending December 1961. Department of Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tell, B. (ed.)

    1962-08-15

    This is the second Progress Report from the Department for Reactor Physics of Aktiebolaget Atomenergi, which is issued for the information of institutions and persons interested in the progress of the work. In this report the activities of the General Physics Section have been included, since this section nowadays belongs to the department. This is merely an informal progress report, and the results and data presented must be taken as preliminary. Final results will be submitted for publication either in the regular technical journals or as monographs in the series AE-reports.

  1. UCLA Particle Physics Research Group annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1983-11-01

    The objectives, basic research programs, recent results, and continuing activities of the UCLA Particle Physics Research Group are presented. The objectives of the research are to discover, to formulate, and to elucidate the physics laws that govern the elementary constituents of matter and to determine basic properties of particles. The research carried out by the Group last year may be divided into three separate programs: (1) baryon spectroscopy, (2) investigations of charge symmetry and isospin invariance, and (3) tests of time reversal invariance. The main body of this report is the account of the techniques used in our investigations, the results obtained, and the plans for continuing and new research. An update of the group bibliography is given at the end.

  2. Progress on Solar Physics in China During 2004 - 2006

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Yihua; AI Guoxiang

    2006-01-01

    The solar physics studies in China during 2004-2006 from solar interior to solar atmospheres and solar-interplanetary space are summarized. These researches are arranged under the topics of solar interior, photosphere, chromosphere and transition region, corona, flares and CMEs (and the associated radio bursts, X-ray/γ-ray bursts and particle acceleration), solar wind, solar cycle, and ground-based instrumentation.

  3. Physics and Technology for the Next Generation of Radioactive Ion Beam Facilities: EURISOL

    CERN Document Server

    Kadi, Y; Catherall, R; Giles, T; Stora, T; Wenander, F K

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of artificial radioactivity in 1935, nuclear scientists have developed tools to study nuclei far from stability. A major breakthrough came in the eighties when the first high energy radioactive beams were produced at Berkeley, leading to the discovery of neutron halos. The field of nuclear structure received a new impetus, and the major accelerator facilities worldwide rivalled in ingenuity to produce more intense, purer and higher resolution rare isotope beams, leading to our much improved knowledge and understanding of the general evolution of nuclear properties throughout the nuclear chart. However, today, further progress is hampered by the weak beam intensities of current installations which correlate with the difficulty to reach the confines of nuclear binding where new phenomena are predicted, and where the r-process path for nuclear synthesis is expected to be located. The advancement of Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) science calls for the development of so-called next-generation facil...

  4. IPEN's Nuclear Physics and Chemistry Department - Progress report - 1995-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The biannual progress report of 1995-1996 of IPEN's Nuclear Physics and Chemistry Department - Brazilian organization - introduces the next main topics: neutron activation and radiochemical analysis; nuclear structure and reactions; neutron diffraction; hyperfine interactions; applied physics and instrumentation; publications; academic activities; services; and personnel.

  5. Engineering Physics Division progress report period ending May 31, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-07-01

    Progress is described in the following areas: nuclear cross sections and related quantities; methods for generating and validating multigroup cross-section libraries; methods for reactor and shield analysis; methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis; integral experiments and nuclear analyses (integral experiments supporting fusion reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting fusion reactor designs, high-energy particle transport calculations, integral experiments supporting gas-cooled fast breeder reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting gas-cooled reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting utilization of light-water reactors, and integral experiment analyses supporting surveillance dosimetry improvement program); energy economics modeling and analysis; safety and reliability assessments for nuclear power reactors; and information analysis and distribution. Publications and papers presented are listed. (WHK)

  6. PFBC HGCU test facility technical progress report. First Quarter, CY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This is the eighteenth Technical Progress Report submitted in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. During this quarter, the Tidd Hot Gas Clean Up System operated for 835 hours during six separate test runs. The system was starting into a seventh run at the end of the quarter. Highlights of this period are summarized below: the longest run during the quarter was approximately 333 hours; filter pressure drop was stable during all test runs this quarter using spoiling air to the primary cyclone upstream of the Advanced Particle Filter (APF); the tempering air system was commissioned this quarter which enabled the unit to operate at full load conditions while limiting the gas temperature in the APF to 1,400 F; during a portion of the one run, the tempering air was removed and the filter operated without problems up to 1,450 F; ash sampling was performed by Battelle personnel upstream and downstream of the APF and ash loading and particle size distribution data were obtained, a summary report is included; a hot area on the APF head was successfully repaired in service; a hot spot on the top of an expansion joint was successfully repaired by drilling holes from the inside of the pipe and pumping in refractory insulation; a corrosion inspection program for the HGCU system was issued giving recommendations for points to inspect; filter internal inspections following test runs 13 and 17 revealed a light coating (up to 1/4 inch thick) of residual ash on the candles and some ash bridging between the dust sheds and inner rows of candles. Data from these inspections are included with this report.

  7. UCLA Particle and Nuclear Physics Research Group, 1993 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.; Clajus, M.; Price, J.W.; Tippens, W.B.; White, D.B.

    1993-09-01

    The research programs of the UCLA Particle and Nuclear Physics Research Group, the research objectives, results of experiments, the continuing activities and new initiatives are presented. The primary goal of the research is to test the symmetries and invariances of particle/nuclear physics with special emphasis on investigating charge symmetry, isospin invariance, charge conjugation, and CP. Another important part of our work is baryon spectroscopy, which is the determination of the properties (mass, width, decay modes, etc.) of particles and resonances. We also measure some basic properties of light nuclei, for example the hadronic radii of {sup 3}H and {sup 3}He. Special attention is given to the eta meson, its production using photons, electrons, {pi}{sup {plus_minus}}, and protons, and its rare and not-so-rare decays. In Section 1, the physics motivation of our research is outlined. Section 2 provides a summary of the research projects. The status of each program is given in Section 3. We discuss the various experimental techniques used, the results obtained, and we outline the plans for the continuing and the new research. Details are presented of new research that is made possible by the use of the Crystal Ball Detector, a highly segmented NaI calorimeter and spectrometer with nearly 4{pi} acceptance (it was built and used at SLAC and is to be moved to BNL). The appendix contains an update of the bibliography, conference participation, and group memos; it also indicates our share in the organization of conferences, and gives a listing of the colloquia and seminars presented by us.

  8. Progress in Hadronic Physics Modelling in Geant4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolakis, John; /CERN; Folger, Gunter; /CERN; Grichine, Vladimir; /CERN; Heikkinen, Aatos; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Howard, Alexander; /CERN; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; /CERN; Kaitaniemi, Pekka; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Koi, Tatsumi; /SLAC; Kosov, Mikhail; /CERN /Moscow, ITEP; Quesada, Jose Manuel; /Seville U.; Ribon, Alberto; /CERN; Uzhinsky, Vladimir; /CERN; Wright, Dennis; /SLAC

    2011-11-28

    Geant4 offers a set of models to simulate hadronic showers in calorimeters. Recent improvements to several models relevant to the modelling of hadronic showers are discussed. These include improved cross sections, a revision of the FTF model, the addition of quasi-elastic scattering to the QGS model, and enhancements in the nuclear precompound and de-excitation models. The validation of physics models against thin target experiments has been extended especially in the energy region 10 GeV and below. Examples of new validation results are shown.

  9. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department annual progress report 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risø National Laboratory in 1999. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviateatmospheric aspects of environmental problems....... The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danishand international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A sum......-mary of the department's activities in 1999 is presented, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members....

  10. Annual progress report 2000. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, S.E.; Skrumsager, B. [eds.

    2001-05-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2000. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2000 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  11. Annual progress report 2000. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, S.E.; Skrumsager, B. (eds.)

    2001-05-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2000. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2000 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  12. Total cross-section measurements progress in nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, G; Mulvey, J H

    2013-01-01

    Total Cross-Section Measurements discusses the cross-sectional dimensions of elementary hadron collisions. The main coverage of the book is the resonance and high energy area of the given collision. A section of the book explains in detail the characteristic of a resonance region. Another section is focused on the location of the high energy region of collision. Parts of the book define the meaning of resonance in nuclear physics. Also explained are the measurement of resonance and the identification of the area where the resonance originates. Different experimental methods to measure the tota

  13. Applied physical chemistry progress report, October 1991--September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.E.; Attaya, H.M.; Billone, M.C.; Blomquist, R.A.; Kopasz, J.P.; Leibowitz, L.; Roche, M.F.; Seils, C.A.

    1993-12-01

    This document reports on the work done in applied physical chemistry at the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in the period October 1991 through September 1992. this work includes research into the process that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor under development at ANL, and the properties of candidate tritium breeding materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. Viscosity and liquidus-solidus temperatures of core-concrete mixtures were studied.

  14. Student facility with ratio and proportion: Mapping the reasoning space in introductory physics

    CERN Document Server

    Boudreaux, Andrew; Brahmia, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Six specific modes of reasoning about ratio and proportion have been delineated as a means of operationalizing expert practice. These modes stem from consideration of how physicists reason in context, are informed by prior work in physics and mathematics education, and have grain size matched to the steps in reasoning needed to solve problems commonly used in physics instruction. A suite of assessment questions has been developed and validated to probe student facility with the reasoning modes. Responses to open-ended and multiple-choice versions of the assessment questions have been collected from more than 3000 students at Western Washington University, Rutgers University, and New Mexico State University. Results have been used to identify specific reasoning difficulties, to document differences in performance between student populations, and to explore the effect of question context on student reasoning. We find that students enrolled in university physics courses have difficulty interpreting and applying ...

  15. Physics at a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, A; Gandhi, R; Goswami, S; Roberts, B L; Bouchez, J; Antoniadis, I; Ellis, J; Giudice, G F; Schwetz, T; Umansankar, S; Karagiorgi, G; Aguilar-Arevalo, A; Conrad, J M; Shaevitz, M H; Pascoli, Silvia; Geer, S; Rolinec, M; Blondel, A; Campanelli, M; Kopp, J; Lindner, M; Peltoniemi, J; Dornan, P J; Long, K; Matsushita, T; Rogers, C; Uchida, Y; Dracos, M; Whisnant, K; Casper, D; Chen, Mu-Chun; Popov, B; Aysto, J; Marfatia, D; Okada, Y; Sugiyama, H; Jungmann, K; Lesgourgues, J; Murayama, France H; Zisman, M; Tortola, M A; Friedland, A; Antusch, S; Biggio, C; Donini, A; Fernandez-Martinez, E; Gavela, B; Maltoni, M; Lopez-Pavon, J; Rigolin, S; Mondal, N; Palladino, V; Filthaut, F; Albright, C; de Gouvea, A; Kuno, Y; Nagashima, Y; Mezzetoo, M; Lola, S; Langacker, P; Baldini, A; Nunokawa, H; Meloni, D; Diaz, M; King, S F; Zuber, K; Akeroyd, A G; Grossman, Y; Farzan, Y; Tobe, K; Aoki, Mayumi; Kitazawa, N; Yasuda, O; Petcov, S; Romanino, A; Chimenti, P; Vacchi, A; Smirnov, A Yu; Couce, Italy E; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Hernandez, P; Sorel, M; Valle, J W F; Harrison, P F; Lundardini, C; Nelson, J K; Barger, V; Everett, L; Huber, P; Winter, W; Fetscher, W; van der Schaaf, A

    2009-01-01

    The conclusions of the Physics Working Group of the international scoping study of a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS) are presented. The ISS was carried by the international community between NuFact05, (the 7th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Superbeams, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome, June 21-26, 2005) and NuFact06 (Ivine, California, 24{30 August 2006). The physics case for an extensive experimental programme to understand the properties of the neutrino is presented and the role of high-precision measurements of neutrino oscillations within this programme is discussed in detail. The performance of second generation super-beam experiments, beta-beam facilities, and the Neutrino Factory are evaluated and a quantitative comparison of the discovery potential of the three classes of facility is presented. High-precision studies of the properties of the muon are complementary to the study of neutrino oscillations. The Neutrino Factory has the potential to provide ...

  16. EnergyLab Nordhavn – Progress and Physical Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Christoffer; Honoré, Kristian; Foteinaki, Kyriaki

    EnergyLab Nordhavn is a large-scale integrated research and demonstration project that contributes to the grand challenge of transforming the energy system to efficiently integrate a large share of renewable energy. The project focuses on a cost-effective future smart energy system that integrates...... laboratory and an environment for strong research-based innovation in smart energy technologies, innovative business models and energy management tools for the future sustainable low-energy city districts. Particularly exciting is the synergy between • the physical density of the environment in Nordhavn...... • the “settler attitude” of the new local population • new trends of co-creation and participation. • new tools creating awareness on carbon footprint and other environmental impact. EnergyLab Nordhavn partners are DTU BYG, DTU MEK, DTU CEE, Københavns Kommune, DONG Energy Electricity Distributions, HOFOR, By...

  17. Sport facility proximity and physical activity: Results from the Study of Community Sports in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiujin; Dai, Jian; Xun, Pengcheng; Jamieson, Lynn M; He, Ka

    2015-01-01

    Increased sport facility proximity is associated with higher likelihood of meeting physical activity (PA) recommendations in western studies, but it is uncertain whether the findings can be generalized to the Chinese population. From September 2012 to December 2012, 3926 participants drawn from China using a multi-stage sampling strategy were invited to participate in the Study of Community Sports in China. Participants' demographics, commuting time to the nearest sport facility and PA levels were assessed. Among 3926 participants included (51.2% female) in the final analysis, 878 (22.4%) of them met the PA recommendation. Participants who spent ≥30 minutes in commuting time had 80% odds [odds ratio (OR): 0.80 (95% CI: 0.65-0.98)] of meeting the PA recommendation compared to those who spent less than 10 minutes. For every 10-minute increment in commuting time, the odds reduced by 6% [OR = 0.94 (0.88-0.99)]. The observed associations were not appreciably modified by age, gender or education level. In this cross-sectional community-based study, we found that residents in China were less likely to meet the PA recommendation if they needed more commuting time to the nearest sport facility. Increasing sport facility proximity may be effective in improving the PA levels in the Chinese population.

  18. [Studies in intermediate energy nuclear physics]. Technical progress report, [October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, R.J.

    1993-10-01

    This report summarizes work carried out between October 1, 1992 and September 30, 1993 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder. The experimental program in intermediate-energy nuclear physics is very broadly based; it includes pion-nucleon and pion-nucleus studies at LAMPF and TRIUMF, kaon-nucleus scattering at the AGS, and equipment development for experiments at the next generation of accelerator facilities.

  19. Studies in theoretical particle physics. Progress report, 1990--1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D.B.

    1991-07-01

    This proposal focuses on research on three distinct areas of particle physics: (1) Nonperturbative QCD. I tend to continue work on analytic modelling of nonperturbative effects in the strong interactions. I have been investigating the theoretical connection between the nonrelativistic quark model and QCD. The primary motivation has been to understand the experimental observation of nonzero matrix elements involving current strange quarks in ordinary matter -- which in the quark model has no strange quark component. This has led to my present work on understanding constituent (quark model) quarks as collective excitations of QCD degrees of freedom. (2) Weak Scale Baryogenesis. A continuation of work on baryogenesis in the early universe from weak interactions. In particular, an investigation of baryogenesis occurring during the weak phase transition through anomalous baryon violating processes in the standard model of weak interactions. (3) Flavor and Compositeness. Further investigation of a new mechanism that I recently discovered for dynamical mass generation for fermions, which naturally leads to a family hierarchy structure. A discussion of recent past work is found in the next section, followed by an outline of the proposed research. A recent publication from each of these three areas is attached to this proposal.

  20. Medium-energy physics program. Progress report, August 1--October 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Dyck, O.B.; Dunn, E.D. (comps.)

    1978-05-01

    A report is given of the medium-energy physics program at the LAMPF linac for the period from August 1 through October 31, 1977. Topics discussed include: (1) accelerator facilities and development; (2) the main beam lines; (3) experimental areas; (4) research; (5) nuclear chemistry; (6) practical applications; (7) linac technology; and (8) management. (PMA)

  1. Overview of the TCV tokamak program: scientific progress and facility upgrades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coda, S.; Ahn, J.; Albanese, R.; Alberti, S.; Alessi, E.; Allan, S.; Anand, H.; Anastassiou, G.; Andrèbe, Y.; Angioni, C.; Ariola, M.; Bernert, M.; Beurskens, M.; Bin, W.; Blanchard, P.; Blanken, T. C.; Boedo, J. A.; Bolzonella, T.; Bouquey, F.; Braunmüller, F. H.; Bufferand, H.; Buratti, P.; Calabró, G.; Camenen, Y.; Carnevale, D.; Carpanese, F.; Causa, F.; Cesario, R.; Chapman, I. T.; Chellai, O.; Choi, D.; Cianfarani, C.; Ciraolo, G.; Citrin, J.; Costea, S.; Crisanti, F.; Cruz, N.; Czarnecka, A.; Decker, J.; De Masi, G.; De Tommasi, G.; Douai, D.; Dunne, M.; Duval, B. P.; Eich, T.; Elmore, S.; Esposito, B.; Faitsch, M.; Fasoli, A.; Fedorczak, N.; Felici, F.; Février, O.; Ficker, O.; Fietz, S.; Fontana, M.; Frassinetti, L.; Furno, I.; Galeani, S.; Gallo, A.; Galperti, C.; Garavaglia, S.; Garrido, I.; Geiger, B.; Giovannozzi, E.; Gobbin, M.; Goodman, T. P.; Gorini, G.; Gospodarczyk, M.; Granucci, G.; Graves, J. P.; Guirlet, R.; Hakola, A.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Hawke, J.; Hennequin, P.; Hnat, B.; Hogeweij, D.; Hogge, J.-Ph.; Honoré, C.; Hopf, C.; Horáček, J.; Huang, Z.; Igochine, V.; Innocente, P.; Ionita Schrittwieser, C.; Isliker, H.; Jacquier, R.; Jardin, A.; Kamleitner, J.; Karpushov, A.; Keeling, D. L.; Kirneva, N.; Kong, M.; Koubiti, M.; Kovacic, J.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Krawczyk, N.; Kudlacek, O.; Labit, B.; Lazzaro, E.; Le, H. B.; Lipschultz, B.; Llobet, X.; Lomanowski, B.; Loschiavo, V. P.; Lunt, T.; Maget, P.; Maljaars, E.; Malygin, A.; Maraschek, M.; Marini, C.; Martin, P.; Martin, Y.; Mastrostefano, S.; Maurizio, R.; Mavridis, M.; Mazon, D.; McAdams, R.; McDermott, R.; Merle, A.; Meyer, H.; Militello, F.; Miron, I. G.; Molina Cabrera, P. A.; Moret, J.-M.; Moro, A.; Moulton, D.; Naulin, V.; Nespoli, F.; Nielsen, A. H.; Nocente, M.; Nouailletas, R.; Nowak, S.; Odstrčil, T.; Papp, G.; Papřok, R.; Pau, A.; Pautasso, G.; Pericoli Ridolfini, V.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, C.; Pisokas, T.; Porte, L.; Preynas, M.; Ramogida, G.; Rapson, C.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Reich, M.; Reimerdes, H.; Reux, C.; Ricci, P.; Rittich, D.; Riva, F.; Robinson, T.; Saarelma, S.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Sauter, O.; Scannell, R.; Schlatter, Ch.; Schneider, B.; Schneider, P.; Schrittwieser, R.; Sciortino, F.; Sertoli, M.; Sheikh, U.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, M.; Sinha, J.; Sozzi, C.; Spolaore, M.; Stange, T.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Tamain, P.; Teplukhina, A.; Testa, D.; Theiler, C.; Thornton, A.; Tophøj, L.; Tran, M. Q.; Tsironis, C.; Tsui, C.; Uccello, A.; Vartanian, S.; Verdoolaege, G.; Verhaegh, K.; Vermare, L.; Vianello, N.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Vlahos, L.; Vu, N. M. T.; Walkden, N.; Wauters, T.; Weisen, H.; Wischmeier, M.; Zestanakis, P.; Zuin, M.; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-10-01

    The TCV tokamak is augmenting its unique historical capabilities (strong shaping, strong electron heating) with ion heating, additional electron heating compatible with high densities, and variable divertor geometry, in a multifaceted upgrade program designed to broaden its operational range without sacrificing its fundamental flexibility. The TCV program is rooted in a three-pronged approach aimed at ITER support, explorations towards DEMO, and fundamental research. A 1 MW, tangential neutral beam injector (NBI) was recently installed and promptly extended the TCV parameter range, with record ion temperatures and toroidal rotation velocities and measurable neutral-beam current drive. ITER-relevant scenario development has received particular attention, with strategies aimed at maximizing performance through optimized discharge trajectories to avoid MHD instabilities, such as peeling-ballooning and neoclassical tearing modes. Experiments on exhaust physics have focused particularly on detachment, a necessary step to a DEMO reactor, in a comprehensive set of conventional and advanced divertor concepts. The specific theoretical prediction of an enhanced radiation region between the two X-points in the low-field-side snowflake-minus configuration was experimentally confirmed. Fundamental investigations of the power decay length in the scrape-off layer (SOL) are progressing rapidly, again in widely varying configurations and in both D and He plasmas; in particular, the double decay length in L-mode limited plasmas was found to be replaced by a single length at high SOL resistivity. Experiments on disruption mitigation by massive gas injection and electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) have begun in earnest, in parallel with studies of runaway electron generation and control, in both stable and disruptive conditions; a quiescent runaway beam carrying the entire electrical current appears to develop in some cases. Developments in plasma control have benefited from

  2. Recent Progresses in Laboratory Astrophysics with Ames’ COSmIC Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Bejaoui, Salma

    2016-06-01

    We present and discuss the characteristics and the capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to generate, process and analyze interstellar, circumstellar and planetary analogs in the laboratory [1]. COSmIC stands for “Cosmic Simulation Chamber” and is dedicated to the study of neutral and ionized molecules and nano particles under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate space environments. COSmIC integrates a variety of state-of-the-art instruments that allow forming, processing and monitoring simulated space conditions for planetary, circumstellar and interstellar materials in the laboratory. COSmIC is composed of a Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) expansion that generates a plasma in free supersonic jet expansion coupled to two high-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems for photonic detection and a Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection [2].Recent laboratory results that were obtained using COSmIC will be presented, in particular the progress that has been achieved in the domain of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) [3] and in monitoring, in the laboratory, the formation of dust grains and aerosols from their gas-phase molecular precursors in environments as varied as stellar/circumstellar outflows [4] and planetary atmospheres [5]. Plans for future, next generation, laboratory experiments on cosmic molecules and grains in the growing field of laboratory astrophysics will also be addressed as well as the implications of the current studies for astronomy.References: [1] Salama F., In Organic Matter in Space, IAU Symposium 251, Kwok & Sandford Eds.Cambridge University Press, Vol. 4, S251, p. 357 (2008) and references therein.[2] Ricketts C., Contreras C., Walker, R., Salama F., Int. J. Mass Spec, 300, 26 (2011)[3] Salama F., Galazutdinov G., Krelowski J

  3. Recent Progress in Planetary Laboratory Astrophysics achieved with NASA Ames' COSmIC Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Bejaoui, Salma

    2016-10-01

    We describe the characteristics and the capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to generate, process and analyze interstellar, circumstellar and planetary analogs in the laboratory [1]. COSmIC stands for "Cosmic Simulation Chamber" and is dedicated to the study of neutral and ionized molecules and nanoparticles under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate various space environments such as planetary atmospheres. COSmIC integrates a variety of state-of-the-art instruments that allow forming, processing and monitoring simulated space conditions for planetary, circumstellar and interstellar materials in the laboratory. The COSmIC experimental setup is composed of a Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) expansion, that generates a plasma in the stream of a free supersonic jet expansion, coupled to two high-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems for photonic detection [2, 3], and a Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection [4].Recent results obtained using COSmIC will be highlighted. In particular, the progress that has been achieved in an on-going study investigating the formation and the characterization of laboratory analogs of Titan's aerosols generated from gas-phase molecular precursors [5] will be presented. Plans for future laboratory experiments on planetary molecules and aerosols in the growing field of planetary laboratory astrophysics will also be addressed, as well as the implications of studies underway for astronomical observations.References: [1] Salama F., in Organic Matter in Space, IAU S251, Kwok & Sandford eds, CUP, S251, 4, 357 (2008).[2] Biennier L., Salama, F., Allamandola L., & Scherer J., J. Chem. Phys., 118, 7863 (2003)[3] Tan X, & Salama F., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 84318 (2005)[4] Ricketts C., Contreras C., Walker, R., Salama F., Int. J. Mass Spec, 300

  4. Physical Design of Critical Experiment Facility for Verifying Characteristics and Effects of Coupling Between Reactor and Spallation Target of ADS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN; Sheng-gui; ZHOU; Qi; LI; Yan

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of studying and verifying characteristics and effects of coupling between reactor and spallation target of ADS,based on the critical experimental facility design criteria and the availableexperiment condition,physical design of a critical experiment facility with lead coolant is completed,using critical calculation code MONK-9A.The contents of physical designs mainly include nuclear fuel,array of fuel rods,neutron source

  5. Health physics division annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-07-01

    This annual progress report follows, as in the past, the organizational structure of the Health Physics Division. Each part is a report of work done by a section of the division: Assessment and Technology Section (Part I), headed by H.W. Dickson; Biological and Radiation Physics Section (Part II), H.A. Wright; Chemical Physics and Spectroscopy Section (Part III), W.R. Garrett; Emergency Technology Section (Part IV), C.V. Chester, Medical Physics and Internal Dosimetry Section (Part V), K.E. Cowser; and the Analytic Dosimetry and Education Group (Part VI), J.E. Turner.

  6. Facilities of renewal of functions to ligamentous muscular systems of man after the physical loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikura A.Y.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the state of health of young people and their physical development is examined. The initial indexes of free motions and influence of loading are probed on their changes. The proportion of development of body of man is rotined. Rehabilitation facilities are considered for a return to the initial indexes of proportion of development of body of man. The method of rapid renewal of deep short muscles of man, which substantially hindered the process of weakening is offered. Application of method is improved by the general state of health, harmonizes a feel.

  7. ANKE, a new facility for medium energy hadron physics at COSY-Juelich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsov, S.; Bechstedt, U.; Bothe, W.; Bongers, N.; Borchert, G.; Borgs, W.; Braeutigam, W.; Buescher, M. E-mail: m.buescher@fz-juelich.de; Cassing, W.; Chernyshev, V.; Chiladze, B.; Dietrich, J.; Drochner, M.; Dymov, S.; Erven, W.; Esser, R.; Franzen, A.; Golubeva, Ye.; Gotta, D.; Grande, T.; Grzonka, D.; Hardt, A.; Hartmann, M.; Hejny, V.; Horn, L. van; Jarczyk, L.; Junghans, H.; Kacharava, A.; Kamys, B.; Khoukaz, A.; Kirchner, T.; Klehr, F.; Klein, W.; Koch, H.R.; Komarov, V.I.; Kondratyuk, L.; Koptev, V.; Kopyto, S.; Krause, R.; Kravtsov, P.; Kruglov, V.; Kulessa, P.; Kulikov, A.; Lang, N.; Langenhagen, N.; Lepges, A.; Ley, J.; Maier, R.; Martin, S.; Macharashvili, G.; Merzliakov, S.; Meyer, K.; Mikirtychiants, S.; Mueller, H.; Munhofen, P.; Mussgiller, A.; Nekipelov, M.; Nelyubin, V.; Nioradze, M.; Ohm, H.; Petrus, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Prietzschk, B.; Probst, H.J.; Pysz, K.; Rathmann, F.; Rimarzig, B.; Rudy, Z.; Santo, R.; Paetz Schieck, H.; Schleichert, R.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, Chr.; Schneider, H.; Schwarz, U.; Seyfarth, H.; Sibirtsev, A.; Sieling, U.; Sistemich, K.; Selikov, A.; Stechemesser, H.; Stein, H.J.; Strzalkowski, A.; Watzlawik, K.-H.; Wuestner, P.; Yashenko, S.; Zalikhanov, B.; Zhuravlev, N.; Zwoll, K.; Zychor, I.; Schult, O.W.B.; Stroeher, H

    2001-04-21

    ANKE is a new experimental facility for the spectroscopy of products from proton-induced reactions on internal targets. It has recently been implemented in the accelerator ring of the cooler synchrotron COSY of the Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZ-Juelich), Germany. The device consists of three dipole magnets, various target installations and dedicated detection systems. It will enable a variety of hadron-physics experiments like meson production in elementary proton-nucleon processes and studies of medium modifications in proton-nucleus interactions.

  8. Presentation and progression of Friedreich ataxia and implications for physical therapist examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maring, Joyce R; Croarkin, Earllaine

    2007-12-01

    Friedreich ataxia, although rare, is the most prevalent inherited ataxia. Recent insight into the disease pathogenesis is creating new hope for effective therapies. The purposes of this update are: (1) to review the etiology, presentation, and progression of Friedreich ataxia and (2) to describe a comprehensive physical therapist examination emphasizing valid and reliable performance measurements associated with disease progression. Early identification of individuals with Friedreich ataxia and precise characterization of impairments and functional limitations gain importance as new drug therapies are considered.

  9. Developing a cyber-physical fluid dynamics facility for fluid-structure interaction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowski, Andrew W.; Williamson, Charles H. K.

    2011-07-01

    In fluid-structure interaction studies, such as vortex-induced vibration, one needs to select essential parameters for the system, such as mass, spring stiffness, and damping. Normally, these parameters are set physically by the mechanical arrangement. However, our approach utilizes a combination of a physical system, comprises a fluid and a mechanical actuator, and a cyber system, taking the form of a computer-based force-feedback controller. This arrangement allows us to impose mass-spring-damping parameters in virtual space and in up to six degrees of freedom. [A similar concept, in one degree of freedom, was pioneered by a group at MIT (see Hover et al., 1998), in studies of vortex-induced vibration of cables.] Although the use of a cyber-physical system has clear advantages over using a purely physical experiment, there are serious challenges to overcome in the design of the governing control system. Our controller, based on a discretization of Newton's laws, makes it straightforward to add and modify any kind of nonlinear, time-varying, or directional force: it is virtually specified but imposed on a physical object. We implement this idea in both a first-generation and a second-generation facility. In this paper, we present preliminary applications of this approach in flow-structure interactions.

  10. The physics of cancer: The role of epigenetics and chromosome conformation in cancer progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naimark, Oleg B.; Nikitiuk, Aleksandr S. [Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics UrB RAS, Perm, 614013 (Russian Federation); Baudement, Marie-Odile; Forné, Thierry [Institut de Génétique Moléculaire de Montpellier UMR 5535, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, 1919 route de Mende, Montpellier cedex 5, 34293 France (France); Lesne, Annick, E-mail: annick.lesne@igmm.cnrs.fr [Institut de Génétique Moléculaire de Montpellier UMR 5535, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, 1919 route de Mende, Montpellier cedex 5, 34293 France (France); Laboratoire de Physique Théorique de la Matière Condensée UMR 7600, CNRS, UPMC, Sorbonne Universités, 4 place Jussieu, Paris cedex 5, 75252 France (France)

    2016-08-02

    Cancer progression is generally described in terms of accumulated genetic alterations and ensuing changes in cell properties. However, intermediary modifications are involved in the establishment of cancer cell phenotypes, at different levels of nuclear organization: DNA damages and their structural consequences, epigenetic modifications and their impact on chromatin architecture, changes in chromosome 3D organization. We review some of these alterations with a focus on their physical aspects. The challenge is to understand the multiscale interplay between generic physical mechanisms and specific biological factors in cancer cells. We argue that such an interdisciplinary perspective offers a novel viewpoint on cancer progression, early diagnosis and possibly therapeutic targets.

  11. The physics of cancer: The role of epigenetics and chromosome conformation in cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naimark, Oleg B.; Nikitiuk, Aleksandr S.; Baudement, Marie-Odile; Forné, Thierry; Lesne, Annick

    2016-08-01

    Cancer progression is generally described in terms of accumulated genetic alterations and ensuing changes in cell properties. However, intermediary modifications are involved in the establishment of cancer cell phenotypes, at different levels of nuclear organization: DNA damages and their structural consequences, epigenetic modifications and their impact on chromatin architecture, changes in chromosome 3D organization. We review some of these alterations with a focus on their physical aspects. The challenge is to understand the multiscale interplay between generic physical mechanisms and specific biological factors in cancer cells. We argue that such an interdisciplinary perspective offers a novel viewpoint on cancer progression, early diagnosis and possibly therapeutic targets.

  12. European network for promoting the physical health of residents in psychiatric and social care facilities (HELPS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiser, Prisca; Becker, Thomas; Losert, Carolin;

    2009-01-01

    consisting of 15 European countries has been established and took up the work. As one main result of the project they expect that a widespread use of the HELPS toolkit could have a significant positive effect on the physical health status of residents of mental health and social care facilities, as well...... by promoting behaviour-based and/or environment-based interventions. METHODS AND DESIGN: HELPS is an interdisciplinary European network that aims at (i) gathering relevant knowledge on physical illness in people with mental illness, (ii) identifying health promotion initiatives in European countries that meet...... as to hold resonance for community dwelling people with mental health problems. DISCUSSION: A general strategy on health promotion for people with mental disorders must take into account behavioural, environmental and iatrogenic health risks. A European health promotion toolkit needs to consider...

  13. Safety of sports facilities and training of graduates in physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano Spica, V; Giampaoli, S; Di Onofrio, V; Liguori, G

    2015-01-01

    Post-industrial societies have to face the problem of physical inactivity and inappropriate lifestyles. Programs to promote physical activity are strongly supported by supranational, national and local institutions and organizations. These programs can be developed in sport facilities but also in places that are not institutionally dedicated to sport. The use of urban and working sites has the advantage of better reach the various segments of the population, but at the same time requires coordination between various professionals in structuring an effective intervention. Bibliographical research in the historical archives of the library of the University of Rome Foro Italico, online databases, paleoigiene (wikigiene), documents archives (GSMS-SItI, WHO, ISS, OsEPi, INAIL, ISTAT, national laws). Several guidelines and regulations face the problem of safety in sport environments. The context is in rapid evolution and directions are provided by public health authorities. Graduates in Sport and Physical Activity, represent an additional resource in terms of: prevention and safety in the workplace, health education, application of preventive and adapted physical activities in the territory. These tasks can be integrated in all prevention stages: e.g. childhood and primary prevention programs in school, adapted physical activity for the elderly. The contribution of public health specialists is strategic in the surveillance and coordination of integrated projects. At the same time, graduates in Physical Education appear to be pivots for health promotion and qualified resources for institutions in the territory. Their training should always include contents related to prevention and safety, regulations on sport and working environments, along with bases of preventive medicine related to the context of physical activity.

  14. MHD coal-fired flow facility. Annual technical progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alstatt, M.C.; Attig, R.C.; Brosnan, D.A.

    1981-03-01

    The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) reports on significant activity, task status, planned research, testing, development, and conclusions for the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Faclity (CFFF) and the Energy Conversion Facility (ECF).

  15. Power systems development facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: (1) Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source. (2) Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams. (3) Combustion Gas Turbine. (4) Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

  16. Radiation physics, biophysics and radiation biology. Progress report for October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, H.H.; Hall, E.J.

    1980-07-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 31 of the 32 papers presented in this progress report. The other paper is represented by an abstract only and deals with field shaping and recalibration of x-ray facilities.

  17. U.C. Davis high energy particle physics research: Technical progress report -- 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-12-31

    Summaries of progress made for this period is given for each of the following areas: (1) Task A--Experiment, H1 detector at DESY; (2) Task C--Experiment, AMY detector at KEK; (3) Task D--Experiment, fixed target detectors at Fermilab; (4) Task F--Experiment, PEP detector at SLAC and pixel detector; (5) Task B--Theory, particle physics; and (6) Task E--Theory, particle physics.

  18. Progress in Physics and Technology Developments for the Modification of JT-60

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Tamai; Y. Kudo; S. Sakurai; K. Masaki; T. Suzuki; M. Takechi; Y. Kamada; A. Sakasai; S. Ishida; K. Abe; A. Ando; M. Matsukawa; T. Cho; T. Fujii; T. Fujita; S. Goto; K. Hananda; A. Hatayama; T. Hino; H. Horiike; N. Hosogane; M. Ichimura; G. Kurita; S. Tsuji-Iio; S. Itoh; M. Katsurai; M. Kikuchi; A. Kohyama; H. Kubo; M. Kuriyama; M. Matsuoka; Y. Miura; N. Miya; N. Hayashi; T. Mizuuchi; K. Nagasaki; H. Ninomiya; N. Nishino; Y. Ogawa; K. Okano; T. Ozeki; M. Saigusa; M. Sakamoto; M. Satoh; K. Urata; M. Shimada; R. Shimada; M. Shimizu; T. Takagi; Y. Takase; T. Tanabe; K. Toi; Y. Ueda; Y. Uesugi; K. Ushigusa; Y. M. Miura; Y. Yagi; T. Yamamoto; K. Yatsu; K. Yoshikawa; K. Kizu; K. Tsuchiya; A. Morioka

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress in the physics and engineering design study for the modificationprogramme of JT-60 is presented. In order to achieve a steady state high-β plasma operation,which is the dominant issue of this programme, physics design for the MHD control and thestability analysis is investigated. Engineering design and the R & D for the superconducting coils,irradiation shield are performed well towards the mission of programme.

  19. Using virtual reality in the training of security staff and evaluation of physical protection barriers in nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augusto, Silas C.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Mol, Pedro C.; Sales, Douglas S. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: silas@ien.gov.br, e-mail: mol@ien.gov.br, e-mail: pedro98@gmail.com, e-mail: dsales@ien.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    The physical security of facilities containing radioactive objects, an already important matter, now has a new aggravating factor: the existence of groups intending to obtain radioactive materials for the purpose of intentionally induce radioactive contamination incidents, as for example the explosion of dirty bombs in populated regions, damaging both people and environment. In this context, the physical security of such facilities must be reinforced so to reduce the possibilities of such incidents. This paper presents a adapted game engine used as a virtual reality system, enabling the modeling and simulation of scenarios of nuclear facilities containing radioactive objects. In these scenarios, the physical protection barriers, as fences and walls, are simulated along with vigilance screens. Using a computer network, several users can participate simultaneously in the simulation, being represented by avatars. Users can play the roles of both invaders and security staff. The invaders have as objective to surpass the facility's physical protection barriers to steal radioactive objects and flee. The security staff have as objective to prevent and stop the theft of radioactive objects from the facility. The system can be used to analysis simulated scenarios and train vigilance/security staff. A test scenario was already developed and used, and the preliminary tests had satisfactory results, as they enabled the evaluation of the physical protection barriers of the virtual facility, and the training of those who participated in the simulations in the functions of a security staff. (author)

  20. Physical Exposure to Seismic Hazards of Health Facilities in Mexico City, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, S. M.; Novelo Casanova, D.

    2010-12-01

    Although health facilities are essential infrastructure during disasters and emergencies, they are also usually highly vulnerable installations in the case of the occurrence of large and major earthquakes. Hospitals are one of the most complex critical facilities in modern cities and they are used as first response in emergency situations. The operability of a hospital must be maintained after the occurrence of a local strong earthquake in order to satisfy the need for medical care of the affected population. If a health facility is seriously damaged, it cannot fulfill its function when most is needed. In this case, hospitals become a casualty of the disaster. To identify the level of physical exposure of hospitals to seismic hazards in Mexico City, we analyzed their geographic location with respect to the seismic response of the different type of soils of the city from past earthquakes, mainly from the events that occurred on September 1985 (Ms= 8.0) and April 1989 (Ms= 6.9). Seismic wave amplification in this city is the result of the interaction of the incoming seismic waves with the soft and water saturated clay soils, on which a large part of Mexico City is built. The clay soils are remnants of the lake that existed in the Valley of Mexico and which has been drained gradually to accommodate the growing urban sprawl. Hospital facilities were converted from a simple database of names and locations into a map layer of resources. This resource layer was combined with other map layers showing areas of seismic microzonation in Mexico City. This overlay was then used to identify those hospitals that may be threatened by the occurrence of a large or major seismic event. We analyzed the public and private hospitals considered as main health facilities. Our results indicate that more than 50% of the hospitals are highly exposed to seismic hazards. Besides, in most of these health facilities we identified the lack of preventive measures and preparedness to reduce their

  1. Microgravity Combustion Science and Fluid Physics Experiments and Facilities for the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauver, Richard W.; Kohl, Fred J.; Weiland, Karen J.; Zurawski, Robert L.; Hill, Myron E.; Corban, Robert R.

    2001-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, the Microgravity Science Program supports both ground-based and flight experiment research in the disciplines of Combustion Science and Fluid Physics. Combustion Science research includes the areas of gas jet diffusion flames, laminar flames, burning of droplets and misting fuels, solids and materials flammability, fire and fire suppressants, turbulent combustion, reaction kinetics, materials synthesis, and other combustion systems. The Fluid Physics discipline includes the areas of complex fluids (colloids, gels, foams, magneto-rheological fluids, non-Newtonian fluids, suspensions, granular materials), dynamics and instabilities (bubble and drop dynamics, magneto/electrohydrodynamics, electrochemical transport, geophysical flows), interfacial phenomena (wetting, capillarity, contact line hydrodynamics), and multiphase flows and phase changes (boiling and condensation, heat transfer, flow instabilities). A specialized International Space Station (ISS) facility that provides sophisticated research capabilities for these disciplines is the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF). The FCF consists of the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR), the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and the Shared Accommodations Rack and is designed to accomplish a large number of science investigations over the life of the ISS. The modular, multiuser facility is designed to optimize the science return within the available resources of on-orbit power, uplink/downlink capacity, crew time, upmass/downmass, volume, etc. A suite of diagnostics capabilities, with emphasis on optical techniques, will be provided to complement the capabilities of the subsystem multiuser or principal investigator-specific experiment modules. The paper will discuss the systems concept, technical capabilities, functionality, and the initial science investigations in each discipline.

  2. Implementation Planning and Progress on Physical Activity Goals: The Mediating Role of Life-Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Michelle; Gaudreau, Patrick; Carraro, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    This 4-week prospective study examined whether the use of life-management strategies mediates the relationship between implementation planning and short-term progress on physical activity goals. In particular, the strategies of elective selection, compensation, and loss-based selection were disentangled to assess their specific mediating effects.…

  3. Progression in Physical Education Teachers' Career-Long Professional Learning: Conceptual and Practical Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Kathleen; Makopoulou, Kyriaki; Chambers, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the issue of learning "progression" in pedagogy for physical education (PE) teachers in their career-long professional development (CPD). This issue arose from an analysis of findings from three research projects in which the authors were involved. The projects were undertaken in different national contexts (Ireland, Greece,…

  4. Implementation Planning and Progress on Physical Activity Goals: The Mediating Role of Life-Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Michelle; Gaudreau, Patrick; Carraro, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    This 4-week prospective study examined whether the use of life-management strategies mediates the relationship between implementation planning and short-term progress on physical activity goals. In particular, the strategies of elective selection, compensation, and loss-based selection were disentangled to assess their specific mediating effects.…

  5. Professional technical support services for the Mining Equipment Test Facility. First annual technical progress report, April 14-September 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garson, R C

    1981-10-01

    The Department of Energy recently began the operation of its Mining Equipment Test Facility. One component at that facility is the highly sophisticated Mine Roof Simulator (MRS) for research and development of roof support equipment. Because of its previous experience, the University of Pittsburgh was contracted to assist the Facilities Manager by providing professional technical support services, principally for the MRS. This technical progress report briefly describes the services provided during the reporting period and planned for the next period. No significant technical disclosures of interest to those not associated with the MRS are contained herein. One of the four units of the US government-owned METF is the Mine Roof Simulator. This unique $10 million test facility was designed to simulate underground mine roof loads and motions. The MRS is a hybrid, analog-digital, computer-controlled, closed-loop, electro-hydraulic, research device capable of applying either loads or displacements in the vertical and one horizontal axis. Its vertical capacity of 3,000,000 pounds can be applied over its 20 by 20 foot active test area. The horizontal load capacity is 1,600,000 pounds. It can simulate coal seam heights of up to 16 feet. Automatic data acquisition and real time display are provided. The most modern, sophisticated technology was used in its design and construction.

  6. Implementation planning and progress on physical activity goals: the mediating role of life-management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Michelle; Gaudreau, Patrick; Carraro, Natasha

    2012-03-01

    This 4-week prospective study examined whether the use of life-management strategies mediates the relationship between implementation planning and short-term progress on physical activity goals. In particular the strategies of elective selection, compensation, and loss-based selection were disentangled to assess their specific mediating effects. Results from a sample of 131undergraduate students showed that, as a composite, life-management strategies fully mediated the relationship between planning and goal progress. More specifically, decomposing the effects demonstrated that only elective selection and compensation mediated the association between planning and greater progress on a personal physical activity goal. Results are discussed in light of their practical implications and contributions to the personal goal literature.

  7. Research Progress of Solar Corona and Interplanetary Physics in China: 2010-2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xinhua; XIANG Changqing

    2012-01-01

    The scientific objective of solar corona and interplanetary research is the understanding of the various phenomena related to solar activities and their effects on the space environments of the Earth. Great progress has been made in the study of solar corona and interplanetary physics by the Chinese space physics community during the past years. This paper will give a brief report about the latest progress of the corona and interplanetary research in China during the years of 2010--2012. The paper can be divided into the following parts: solar corona and solar wind, CME- ICME, magnetic reconnection, energetic particles, space plasma, space weather numerical modeling by 3D SIP-CESE MHD model, space weather prediction methods, and proposed missions. They constitute the abundant content of study for the complicated phenomena that originate from the solar corona, propagate in interplanetary space, and produce geomagnetic disturbances. All these progresses are acquired by the Chinese space physicists, either independently or through international collaborations.

  8. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department 1 January - 31 December 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical and chemical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 1999 are presented in this progress report. Theresearch in physics is concentrated on neutron...... and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scale structures. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small...

  9. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department 1 January - 31 December 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical and chemical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 2000 are presented in this progress report. Theresearch in physics is concentrated on neutron...... and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scale structures.The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small...

  10. Progress on the Global Network of Optical Magnetometers to search for Exotic physics (GNOME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Dmitri; Gnome Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We discuss progress on the construction, implementation, and coordination of a network of geographically separated, time-synchronized ultrasensitive atomic magnetometers and comagnetometers to search for correlated transient signals heralding new physics. The Global Network of Optical Magnetometers to search for Exotic physics (GNOME) is sensitive to nuclear and electron spin couplings to various exotic fields generated by astrophysical sources. A specific example of new physics detectable with the GNOME, presently unconstrained by previous experiments, is a network of domain walls of light pseudoscalar (axion-like) fields. Supported by the Heising-Simons Foundation, Simons Foundation, and the National Science Foundation.

  11. LSST summit facility construction progress report: reacting to design refinements and field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jeffrey D.; Gressler, William; Sebag, Jacques; Seriche, Jaime; Serrano, Eduardo

    2016-07-01

    The civil work, site infrastructure and buildings for the summit facility of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) are among the first major elements that need to be designed, bid and constructed to support the subsequent integration of the dome, telescope, optics, camera and supporting systems. As the contracts for those other major subsystems now move forward under the management of the LSST Telescope and Site (T and S) team, there has been inevitable and beneficial evolution in their designs, which has resulted in significant modifications to the facility and infrastructure. The earliest design requirements for the LSST summit facility were first documented in 2005, its contracted full design was initiated in 2010, and construction began in January, 2015. During that entire development period, and extending now roughly halfway through construction, there continue to be necessary modifications to the facility design resulting from the refinement of interfaces to other major elements of the LSST project and now, during construction, due to unanticipated field conditions. Changes from evolving interfaces have principally involved the telescope mount, the dome and mirror handling/coating facilities which have included significant variations in mass, dimensions, heat loads and anchorage conditions. Modifications related to field conditions have included specifying and testing alternative methods of excavation and contending with the lack of competent rock substrate where it was predicted to be. While these and other necessary changes are somewhat specific to the LSST project and site, they also exemplify inherent challenges related to the typical timeline for the design and construction of astronomical observatory support facilities relative to the overall development of the project.

  12. Fast Breeder Blanket Facility (FBBF). Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1976--August 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, K.O. (ed.)

    1976-08-01

    The work performed was primarily concerned with the preparation of the experiments to be performed on the Fast Breeder Blanket Facility (FBBF) and the corresponding analysis. The work on the experimental program has been started. Since experiments are subject to safety constraints, a safety investigation program (for a hypothetically flooded facility) is reported. The neutronics part of the preanalysis is also reported. The testing of the first configuration has largely been prepared. The identification of the experiment need has been worked on extensively, largely through unsponsored research which had been started before the contract became effective. The work done in this area by other groups is being reviewed.

  13. Sociospatial distribution of access to facilities for moderate and vigorous intensity physical activity in Scotland by different modes of transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamb Karen E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People living in neighbourhoods of lower socioeconomic status have been shown to have higher rates of obesity and a lower likelihood of meeting physical activity recommendations than their more affluent counterparts. This study examines the sociospatial distribution of access to facilities for moderate or vigorous intensity physical activity in Scotland and whether such access differs by the mode of transport available and by Urban Rural Classification. Methods A database of all fixed physical activity facilities was obtained from the national agency for sport in Scotland. Facilities were categorised into light, moderate and vigorous intensity activity groupings before being mapped. Transport networks were created to assess the number of each type of facility accessible from the population weighted centroid of each small area in Scotland on foot, by bicycle, by car and by bus. Multilevel modelling was used to investigate the distribution of the number of accessible facilities by small area deprivation within urban, small town and rural areas separately, adjusting for population size and local authority. Results Prior to adjustment for Urban Rural Classification and local authority, the median number of accessible facilities for moderate or vigorous intensity activity increased with increasing deprivation from the most affluent or second most affluent quintile to the most deprived for all modes of transport. However, after adjustment, the modelling results suggest that those in more affluent areas have significantly higher access to moderate and vigorous intensity facilities by car than those living in more deprived areas. Conclusions The sociospatial distributions of access to facilities for both moderate intensity and vigorous intensity physical activity were similar. However, the results suggest that those living in the most affluent neighbourhoods have poorer access to facilities of either type that can be reached on foot

  14. Physical exercise for older people : focusing on people living in residential care facilities and people with dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Littbrand, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    The main purposes of this thesis were to evaluate a high-intensity functional weight-bearing exercise pro­gramme, regarding its applicability (attendance, achieved intensity, adverse events) as well as its effect on physical functions and activities of daily living (ADL) among older people living in residential care facilities, with a special focus on people with dementia. Furthermore, a main purpose was to systematically review the applicability and effects of physical exercise on physical f...

  15. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sincovec, R.F.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides a record of the research activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division for the period January 1, 1993, through December 31, 1994. This report is the final archival record of the EPM Division. On October 1, 1994, ORELA was transferred to Physics Division and on January 1, 1995, the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division and the Computer Applications Division reorganized to form the Computer Science and Mathematics Division and the Computational Physics and Engineering Division. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL`s research in the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division.

  16. Decadal Vision Progress Report Implementation Plans and Status for the Next Generation ARM Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mather, James

    2016-06-01

    The reconfiguration of the ARM facility, formally initiated in early 2014, is geared toward implementing the Next Generation of the ARM Facility, which will more tightly link ARM measurements and atmospheric models. The strategy is outlined in the ARM Climate Research Facility Decadal Vision (DOE 2014a). The strategy includes the implementation of a high-resolution model, initially at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, and enhancements at the SGP and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites to provide additional observations to support modeling and process studies. Enhancements at the SGP site focus on ground-based instruments while enhancements at the NSA make use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) and Tethered Balloon Systems (TBS). It is also recognized that new data tools and data products will need to be developed to take full advantage of these improvements. This document provides an update on the status of these ARM facility enhancements, beginning with the measurement enhancements at the SGP and NSA, followed by a discussion of the modeling project including associated data-processing activities.

  17. Progress Report of Beijing Radioactive Ion-Beam Facility (BRIF) in 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The year 2011 is featured with several important events for the Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility (BRIF) project. At the beginning of the year, the two divisions of the BRIF project, i.e. Engineering Division and Technology Division, have been merged into one as the BRIF Division.

  18. Experimental and Theoretical Progress of Linear Collider Final Focus Design and ATF2 Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Seryi, Andrei; Zimmermann, Frank; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuroda, Shigeru; Okugi, Toshiyuki; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji; White, Glen; Woodley, Mark; Angal-Kalinin, Deepa

    2014-01-01

    In this brief overview we will reflect on the process of the design of the linear collider (LC) final focus (FF) optics, and will also describe the theoretical and experimental efforts on design and practical realisation of a prototype of the LC FF optics implemented in the ATF2 facility at KEK, Japan, presently being commissioned and operated.

  19. Thermal buckling and progressive ovalization of pipes: experiences at the TTS sodium test facility and their analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watashi, K. [PNC, Ibaraki (Japan). OEC; Iwata, K. [PNC, Ibaraki (Japan). OEC

    1995-01-01

    Two remarkable thermally induced deformation mechanisms of pipes which may have serious effects on structural integrity, thermal buckling and progressive ovalization, were observed on the horizontal piping of the sodium test facility, called TTS, with which cyclic thermal transient tests of structures had been conducted. The thermal buckling, which was caused by thermal stratification, occurred at a circumferentially welded region of the pipe where a noticeable geometrical imperfection existed. The buckling was analyzed comprehensively for this pipe, using both the finite element method and a simplified method based on Gellin`s analysis results. The predictions were reasonable and gave confidence in accounting for the sodium leakage encountered at the TTS. It was also demonstrated by the finite element analyses that the progressive ovalization of the pipe cross-section from a circular to a downward triangular shape can be caused by cyclic thermal stratification under the existence of cover gas in the pipe. ((orig.)).

  20. Nuclear Physics Programs for the Future Rare Isotope Beams Accelerator Facility in Korea

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Chang-Bum

    2016-01-01

    We present nuclear physics programs based on the planned experiments using rare isotope beams (RIBs) for the future Korean Rare Isotope Beams Accelerator facility; RAON. This ambitious facility has both an Isotope Separation On Line (ISOL) and fragmentation capability for producing RIBs and accelerating beams of wide range mass of nuclides with energies of a few to hundreds MeV per nucleon. Low energy RIBs at Elab = 5 to 20 MeV per nucleon are for the study of nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics toward and beyond the drip lines while higher energy RIBs produced by in-flight fragmentation with the re-accelerated ions from the ISOL enable to explore the neutron drip lines in intermediate mass regions. The planned programs have goals for investigating nuclear structures of the exotic nuclei toward and beyond the nucleon drip lines by addressing the following issues: how the shell structure evolves in areas of extreme proton to neutron imbalance; whether the isospin symmetry maintains in isobaric mirror nu...

  1. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research. Annual progress report, September 1, 1991--September 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    Progress in the various components of the UCLA High-Energy Physics Research program is summarized, including some representative figures and lists of resulting presentations and published papers. Principal efforts were directed at the following: (I) UCLA hadronization model, PEP4/9 e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} analysis, {bar P} decay; (II) ICARUS and astroparticle physics (physics goals, technical progress on electronics, data acquisition, and detector performance, long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to the Gran Sasso and ICARUS, future ICARUS program, and WIMP experiment with xenon), B physics with hadron beams and colliders, high-energy collider physics, and the {phi} factory project; (III) theoretical high-energy physics; (IV) H dibaryon search, search for K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} and {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{bar {nu}}, and detector design and construction for the FNAL-KTeV project; (V) UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab; and (VI) VLPC/scintillating fiber R & D.

  2. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities. Semi-annual progress report, July 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norem, J.; Bajt, D.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period July 1, 1995 - December 31, 1995. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  3. Class notes from the first international training course on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrington, P.B. (ed.)

    1979-05-01

    The International Training Course on Physical Protection of Nuclear Facilities and Materials was intended for representatives from the developing countries who are responsible for preparing regulations and designing and assessing physical protection systems. The first part of the course consists of lectures on the objectives, organizational characteristics, and licensing and regulations requirements of a state system of physical protection. Since the participants may have little experience in nuclear energy, background information is provided on the topics of nuclear materials, radiation hazards, reactor systems, and reactor operations. Transportation of nuclear materials is addressed and emphasis is placed on regulations. Included in these discussions are presentations by guest speakers from countries outside the United States of America who present their countries' threat to nuclear facilities. Effectiveness evaluation methodology is introduced to the participants by means of instructions which teach them how to use logic trees and the EASI (Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption) program. The following elements of a physical protection system are discussed: barriers, protective force, intrusion detection systems, communications, and entry-control systems. Total systems concepts of physical protection system design are emphasized throughout the course. Costs, manpower/technology trade-offs, and other practical considerations are discussed. Approximately one-third of the course is devoted to practical exercises during which the attendees participatein problem solving. A hypothetical nuclear facility is introduced, and the attendees participate in the conceptual design of a physical protection system for the facility.

  4. An integrated model to measure service management and physical constraints' effect on food consumption in assisted-living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Chun; Shanklin, Carol W

    2008-05-01

    The United States is experiencing remarkable growth in the elderly population, which provides both opportunities and challenges for assisted-living facilities. The objective of this study was to explore how service management influences residents' actual food consumption in assisted-living facilities. Physical factors influencing residents' service evaluation and food consumption also were investigated. A total of 394 questionnaires were distributed to assisted-living residents in seven randomly selected facilities. The questionnaire was developed based on an in-depth literature review and pilot study. Residents' perceived quality evaluations, satisfaction, and physical constraints were measured. Residents' actual food consumption was measured using a plate waste technique. A total of 118 residents in five facilities completed both questionnaires and food consumption assessments. Descriptive, multivariate analyses and structural equation modeling techniques were employed. Service management, including food and service quality and customer satisfaction, was found to significantly influence residents' food consumption. Physical constraints associated with aging, including a decline in health status, chewing problems, sensory loss, and functional disability, also significantly influenced residents' food consumption. A significant relationship was found between physical constraints and customer satisfaction. Foodservice that provides good food and service quality increases customer satisfaction and affects residents' actual food consumption. Physical constraints also influence residents' food consumption directly, or indirectly through satisfaction. The findings suggest that food and nutrition professionals in assisted-living should consider the physical profiles of their residents to enhance residents' satisfaction and nutrient intake. Recommendations for exploring residents' perspectives are discussed.

  5. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division, 1996 January 1 to December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, B.M. (ed.)

    1997-04-01

    This document is the last Progress Report for the Neutron and Condensed Matter Science Branch, at Chalk River Labs of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The materials science program continued to include measurements of stress as a major component, but the determination of phase diagrams for specific alloys was also a prominent activity. Studies were made of two types of unusual magnetic materials. The magnetic properties of several oxide pyrochlore were investigated and spin waves were measured in the magnetic semiconductor, chalcopyrite. The crystal structures of the deuterated anti fluorite were determined and the reorientation of the ammonium ion was refined in detail. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements were used to investigate whether spontaneous phase separation into chiral domains occurs for mixtures of DPPC of opposite chirality. A new Neutron Velocity Selector was commissioned.

  6. Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities. Final progress report, March 1980--March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU), under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-80ET-15601, Diagnostic Development and Support of MHD Test Facilities, developed diagnostic instruments for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery (HRSR) support, were refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics were developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems were interfaced with DIAL`s computers. Technical support was provided for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort. DIAL personnel also cooperated with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs. The initial contract, Testing and Evaluation of Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery, established a data base on heat transfer, slagging effects on heat transfer surfaces, metal durability, secondary combustor performance, secondary combustor design requirements, and other information pertinent to the design of HR/SR components at the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF). To accomplish these objectives, a combustion test stand was constructed that simulated MHD environments, and mathematical models were developed and evaluated for the heat transfer in hot-wall test sections. Two transitions occurred during the span of this contract. In May 1983, the objectives and title of the contract changed from Testing and Evaluation of Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery to Diagnostic Development and Support of MHD Test Facilities. In July 1988, the research laboratory`s name changed from the MHD Energy Center to the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory.

  7. Evaluating the progress of the UK's Material Recycling Facilities: a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad; Courtenay, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Over the last 15 years, the UK has made great strides in reducing the amount of waste being sent to landfill while also increasing the amount of waste being recycled. The key drivers for this change are the European Union Landfill Directive (1999/31/EC) and the UK Landfill Tax. However, also playing their part are the growing numbers of Material Recycling Facilities (MRFs), which process recyclables. This mini review evaluates the current state of MRFs in the UK, through extensive secondary research, and detailed primary data analysis focussing on MRFs located in South-East England, UK. This study also explores technologies that aim to generate energy from waste, including Waste-to-Energy (WtE) and Refuse-derived Fuel (RDF) facilities. These facilities can have a huge appetite for waste, which can be detrimental to recycling efforts as some of the waste being sent there should be recycled. It was found that the waste sent to a typical UK MRF would recycle around 92% of materials while 6% was sent to energy recovery and the remaining 2% ended up in landfill. Therefore, the total estimated rejected or non-compliance materials from MRFs are around 8%. A key recommendation from this study is to adopt a strategy to combine MRFs with a form of energy generation, such as WtE or RDF. This integrated approach would ensure any residual waste arising from the recycling process can be used as a sustainable fuel, while also increasing the recycling rates.

  8. Recent Progress in Entry Radiation Measurements in the NASA Ames Electric ARC Shock Tube Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) at NASA Ames Research Center is NASA's only working shock tube capable of obtaining conditions representative of entry in a multitude of planetary atmospheres. The facility is capable of mapping spectroscopic signatures of a wide range of planetary entries from the Vacuum Ultraviolet through Mid-Wave Infrared (120-5500 nm). This paper summarizes the tests performed in EAST for Earth, Mars and Venus entries since 2008, then focuses on a specific test case for CO2/N2 mixtures. In particular, the paper will focus on providing information for the proper interpretation of the EAST data.

  9. Research in theoretical physics. Annual progress report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domokos, G.; Kovesi-Domokos, S.

    1992-12-01

    Progress made in the following areas is summarized: simulation of extensive air showers induced by interactions existing beyond the currently accepted ``Standard Model`` of elementary particle interactions; search for physics beyond the ``Standard Model`` in gluonic inclusive decays of heavy quarks; obtaining limits on the applicability of the special theory of relativity; an improved method of obtaining upper limits on the masses of primaries of extensive air showers associated with point sources in the sky. 8 figs., 1 tab., 73 refs.

  10. Overview of Progress and Future Prospects in Indirect Drive Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurricane, O. A.; ">ICF Program, Facility (NIF). Experiments on the NIF have achieved the highest yet recorded stagnation pressures (Pstagnation > 150-230 Gigabar) of any facility based inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, albeit they are still short of the pressures required for ignition on the NIF (i.e. ∼ 300 - 400 Gbar), and have exhibited undesirable shape distortions that waste kinetic energy. We review the issues that have been uncovered and discuss the program strategy and plan that we are following to systematically address the known issues as we press on.

  11. MHD Coal-Fired Flow Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altstatt, M. C.; Attig, R. C.; Baucum, W. E.

    1980-07-31

    Significant activity, task status, planned research, testing, development, and conclusions for the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) and the Energy Conversion Facility (ECF), formerly the Research and Development Laboratory, are reported. CFFF Bid Package construction is now virtually complete. The remaining construction effort is being conducted by UTSI. On the quench system, another Task 1 effort, the cyclone was erected on schedule. On Tasks 2 through 6, vitiation heater and nozzle fabrication were completed, an investigation of a fish kill (in no way attributable to CFFF operations) in Woods Reservoir was conducted, major preparation for ambient air quality monitoring was made, a broadband data acquisition system for enabling broadband data to be correlated with all general performance data was selected, a Coriolis effect coal flow meter was installed at the CFFF. On Task 7, an analytical model of the coal flow combustor configuration was prepared, MHD generator testing which, in part, involved continued materials evaluation and the heat transfer characteristics of capped and uncapped electrodes was conducted, agglomerator utilization was studied, and development of a laser velocimeter system was nearly completed.

  12. A nuclear physics program at the Rare Isotope Beams Accelerator Facility in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Bum Moon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the new physics possibilities that fall within the field of nuclear structure and astrophysics based on experiments with radioactive ion beams at the future Rare Isotope Beams Accelerator facility in Korea. This ambitious multi-beam facility has both an Isotope Separation On Line (ISOL and fragmentation capability to produce rare isotopes beams (RIBs and will be capable of producing and accelerating beams of wide range mass of nuclides with energies of a few to hundreds MeV per nucleon. The large dynamic range of reaccelerated RIBs will allow the optimization in each nuclear reaction case with respect to cross section and channel opening. The low energy RIBs around Coulomb barrier offer nuclear reactions such as elastic resonance scatterings, one or two particle transfers, Coulomb multiple-excitations, fusion-evaporations, and direct capture reactions for the study of the very neutron-rich and proton-rich nuclides. In contrast, the high energy RIBs produced by in-flight fragmentation with reaccelerated ions from the ISOL enable to explore the study of neutron drip lines in intermediate mass regions. The proposed studies aim at investigating the exotic nuclei near and beyond the nucleon drip lines, and to explore how nuclear many-body systems change in such extreme regions by addressing the following topics: the evolution of shell structure in areas of extreme proton to neutron imbalance; the study of the weak interaction in exotic decay schemes such as beta-delayed two-neutron or two-proton emission; the change of isospin symmetry in isobaric mirror nuclei at the drip lines; two protons or two neutrons radioactivity beyond the drip lines; the role of the continuum states including resonant states above the particle-decay threshold in exotic nuclei; and the effects of nuclear reaction rates triggered by the unbound proton-rich nuclei on nuclear astrophysical processes.

  13. Research progress at the Slow Positron Facility in the Institute of Materials Structure Science, KEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, T.; Wada, K.; Mochizuki, I.; Kimura, M.; Toge, N.; Shidara, T.; Fukaya, Y.; Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A.; Iida, S.; Michishio, K.; Nagashima, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Recent results at the Slow Positron Facility (SPF), Institute of Materials Structure Science (IMSS), KEK are reported. Studies using the total-reflection high-energy positron diffraction (TRHEPD) station revealed the structures of rutile-TiO2(110) (1×2), graphene on Cu (111) and Co (0001), and germanene on Al (111). First observations of the shape resonance in the Ps- photodetachment process were made using the positronium negative ion (Ps-) station. Experiments using the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) station showed significant enhancement of the Ps formation efficiency and the energy loss in the Ps formation-emission process. A pulse-stretching section has been implemented, which stretches the positron pulse width from 1.2 μs up to almost 20 ms.

  14. Cle Elum and Supplementation Research Facility : Monthly Progress Report October 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility

    2008-12-11

    FISH PRODUCTION: On October 7th the 2008 spawning season was completed. 823 adults were transferred to the facility for the 2008 season. The overall adult mortality was 6.9% (1.3% pre-spawning mortality and 5.6% encountered after sorting). Wild/natural salmon collected included 278 females, 173 males, and 29 jacks for a total 480 fish for the 2008 brood. Supplemented brood stock collected included 149 adults (85 females, 35 males and 29 jacks). Hatchery control brood collected for research included 194 adults (91 females, 68 males and 35 jacks). Eggs will be inventoried in November with an actual summary of eggs numbers to be submitted for the November report. The estimated egg takes (production) for the 2008 season was 1,375,146 eggs with 1,006,063 comprising of W x W crosses and 250,755 eggs of H x H crosses with 118,328 supplement crosses. Total fish on hand for the 2007 brood is 768,751 with an average fish per pound of 30.6 f/lb. FISH CULTURE: The marking and pit-tagging operation started on October 13th. The pit-tagging portion was completed on October 23rd. A total 40,000 juveniles were pit-tagged (2,000 from each of the production ponds and 4,000 each for the hatchery juvenile ponds 9 & 10). Cle Elum staff began shocking, sorting, counting and splitting eggs in incubation. Shocking eggs will separate live eggs from dead eggs. Eggs are treated with formalin three times a week to control fungus. The focus for the culturists during the month of October entail completing the final spawn (egg take) on the 7th, pond cleaning, keeping the marking trailers supplied with fish and end of month sampling. The adult holding ponds were power washed and winterized for the shut down period. Facility crew members Greg Strom and Mike Whitefoot assisted Joe Blodgett and his crew with fish brood collection on the 22nd of October. Fall Chinook and Coho salmon were seined up and put in tanker trucks from Chandler canal and transported to holding ponds for later spawning. Charlie

  15. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department 1 January - 31 December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, M.; Bechgaard, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Feidenhans`l, R.; Johannsen, I. [eds.

    1998-01-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical and chemical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 1997 are presented in this progress report. The research in physics in concentrated on neutron and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scale structures. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface-modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Theoretical work related to these problems in undertaken, including Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au). 129 ills., 213 refs.

  16. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department. 1 January - 31 December 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebech, B. [ed.

    2000-02-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical and chemical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 1999 are presented in this progress report. The research in physics is concentrated on neutron and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scalestructures. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface-modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Theoretical work related to these problems is undertaken, including Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au)

  17. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department 1 January - 31 December 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechgaard, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Feidenhans`l, R.; Johannsen, I. [eds.

    1999-04-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 1998 are presented in this progress report. The research in physics is concentrated on neutron and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scale structures. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface-modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Theoretical work related to these problems is undertaken, including Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au) 2 tabs., 142 ills., 169 refs.

  18. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department. 1 January - 31 December 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebech, B. [ed.

    2001-03-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical and chemical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 2000 are presented in this progress report. The research in physics is concentrated on neutron and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scale structures. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface-modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Theoretical work related to these problems is undertaken, including Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au)

  19. Conventional Gymnasium vs. Geodesic Field House. A Comparative Study of High School Physical Education and Assembly Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Facilities Labs., Inc., New York, NY.

    A description is presented of the design features of a high school's geodesic dome field house. Following consideration of various design features and criteria for the physical education facility, a comprehensive analysis is given of comparative costs of a geodesic dome field house and conventional gymnasium. On the basis of the study it would…

  20. Relationships between Physical Activity and the Proximity of Exercise Facilities and Home Exercise Equipment Used by Undergraduate University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Julian A.; Phillips, D. Allen

    2005-01-01

    The authors used stratified random sampling procedures to investigate the relationships among physical activity (PA), the proximity of exercise facilities, and the quantity of home exercise equipment in a sample of 411 undergraduates. To examine the data they collected from the modified Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire and the Home…

  1. Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility : Monthly Progress Report : December 1, 2008 - December 31, 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility

    2009-01-12

    FISH PRODUCTION: Brood year 2008 production and experimental hatchery & supplemental crossed eggs continue to be incubated and chilled water at 380 Fahrenheit for the month. Temperature units are {approx}960 TU's at the end of the month. Hatching was observed at {approx}900 temperature units (TU's). The 2007 Brood year (BY) has approximately 773,477 juveniles on hand at the end of December, averaging 30.6 fish per pound. Fish tagging operations wrapped up on the 5th. Transportation of fish to acclimation sites is tentatively scheduled to begin January 12th. FISH CULTURE: Production pond cleaning continues on a weekly basis, and feeding continues to be performed two days per week due to the colder river water temperatures. Eggs in the incubation continue to be tempered in 38 degree water and temperature units recorded daily. On the 20th the river became too inclement for normal operations as the intake screens were covered with ice, at that time we shutdown two river pumps and turned on wells four and six to get 6,825 gallons of water. This was the operation at the facility for twenty-four hours at which point we were able to get back to normal operations. WATER PRODUCTION: The current combined well and river water supply to the complex is 14,756 gallons/min. The river pumps are supplying 13,571 gallons per minute. Well pumps No.2 and No.4 are operating and supplying 1,185 gallons/min. More on well pumps in the well field maintenance section of this report. ACCLIMATION SITES: Preparation of acclimation sites for fish transfer was the main focus for the month of December. Each week thermographs that record water temperature have the data disc changed at the acclimations sites. Ford Excavation with assistance from YKFP maintenance has started clearing snow out of the Easton acclimation site. VEHICLE MAINTENANCE: The snowmobiles were taken in to have annual maintenance performed. The full-size John Deere tractor needed and was taken to Barnet Implement in

  2. Experimental particle physics. Progress report, September 16, 1991--September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, R.I.; Lane, C.E.

    1992-09-01

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics beyond the standard model and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are working on the MACRO experiment, which employs a large-area underground detector to search fore grand unification magnetic monopoles and dark matter candidates and to study cosmic ray muons as well as low- and high-energy neutrinos; the Chooz experiment to search for reactor neutrino oscillations at a distance of 1 km from the source; a new proposal (the Perry experiment) to construct a one-kiloton liquid scintillator in the Fairport, Ohio underground facility IMB to study neutrino oscillations with a 13 km baseline; and development of technology for improved liquid scintillators and for very-low-background materials in support of the MACRO and Perry experiments and for new solar neutrino experiments.

  3. The Atlas pulsed power facility for high energy density physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, R B; Barr, G W; Bowman, D W; Cochrane, J C; Davis, H A; Elizondo, J M; Gribble, R F; Griego, J R; Hicks, R D; Hinckley, W B; Hosack, K W; Nielsen, K E; Parker, J V; Parsons, M O; Rickets, R L; Salazar, H R; Sánchez, P G; Scudder, D W; Shapiro, C; Thompson, M C; Trainor, R J; Valdez, G A; Vigil, B N; Watt, R G; Wysocki, F J; Kirbie, H C

    1999-01-01

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. Here, the authors describe how the primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently- removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the Marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-ys risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line compo...

  4. The NASA Heliophysics Active Final Archive at the Space Physics Data Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    The 2009 NASA Heliophysics Science Data Management Policy re-defined and extended the responsibilities of the Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project. Building on SPDF's established capabilities, the new policy assigned the role of active "Final Archive" for non-solar NASA Heliophysics data to SPDF. The policy also recognized and formalized the responsibilities of SPDF as a source for critical infrastructure services such as VSPO to the overall Heliophysics Data Environment (HpDE) and as a Center of Excellence for existing SPDF science-enabling services and software including CDAWeb, SSCWeb/4D Orbit Viewer, OMNIweb and CDF. We will focus this talk to the principles, strategies and planned SPDF architecture to effectively and efficiently perform these roles, with special emphasis on how SPDF will ensure the long-term preservation and ongoing online community access to all the data entrusted to SPDF. We will layout our archival philosophy and what we are advocating in our work with NASA missions both current and future, with potential providers of NASA and NASA-relevant archival data, and to make the data and metadata held by SPDF accessible to other systems and services within the overall HpOE. We will also briefly review our current services, their metrics and our current plans and priorities for their evolution.

  5. Search for new physics with neutrinos at Radioactive Ion Beam facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Espinoza, Catalina; Volpe, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    We propose applications of Radioactive Ion Beam facilities to investigate physics beyond the Standard Model. In particular, we focus on the possible measurement of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering and on a search for sterile neutrinos, by means of a low energy beta-beam with a Lorentz boost factor $\\gamma \\approx 1$. In the considered setup the collected radioactive ions are sent inside a 4$\\pi$ detector. For the first application we provide the number of events associated with neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering, when the detector is filled in with a noble liquid. For the sterile search we consider that the spherical detector is filled in with a liquid scintillator, and that the neutrino detection channel is inverse-beta decay. We provide the exclusion curves for the sterile neutrino mixing parameters, based upon the 3+1 formalism, depending upon the achievable ion intensity. Our results are obtained both for unbinned and binned events, with binning in energy and in distance. The proposed experiment rep...

  6. Developing and understanding a hospital-based proton facility: bringing physics into medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, James M

    2007-08-01

    From October 18 to 20, 2006, a symposium, Developing and Understanding a Hospital-based Proton Facility: Bringing Physics Into Medicine, was held at the Renaissance Esmeralda Resort and Spa, Indian Wells, California. The event was offered by the Department of Radiation Medicine at Loma Linda University (LLU), supported by the Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC) and the United States Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC). The meeting was intended to discuss factors involved in planning, developing, and operating a hospital-based proton treatment center. It brought together some of the most distinguished physicists, radiation biologists, and radiation oncologists in the world, and more than 100 individuals participated in the three-day educational offering. This overview reports on the event and introduces several papers written by many of the speakers from their presentations, for publication in this issue of Technology in Cancer Research and Treatment. Both the symposium and the papers are appropriate for this journal: exploitation of technology was one of the underlying themes of the symposium.

  7. Future directions in particle and nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron beam facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geesaman, D.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [ed.

    1993-11-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics in particle and nuclear physics: hadron dynamics; lepton physics; spin physics; hadron and nuclear spectroscopy; hadronic weak interactions; and Eta physics. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  8. Progress of the ELISE test facility: towards one hour pulses in hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.; Heinemann, B.; Kraus, W.; Riedl, R.; Wimmer, C.; the NNBI Team

    2016-10-01

    In order to fulfil the ITER requirements, the negative hydrogen ion source used for NBI has to deliver a high source performance, i.e. a high extracted negative ion current and simultaneously a low co-extracted electron current over a pulse length up to 1 h. Negative ions will be generated by the surface process in a low-temperature low-pressure hydrogen or deuterium plasma. Therefore, a certain amount of caesium has to be deposited on the plasma grid in order to obtain a low surface work function and consequently a high negative ion production yield. This caesium is re-distributed by the influence of the plasma, resulting in temporal instabilities of the extracted negative ion current and the co-extracted electrons over long pulses. This paper describes experiments performed in hydrogen operation at the half-ITER-size NNBI test facility ELISE in order to develop a caesium conditioning technique for more stable long pulses at an ITER relevant filling pressure of 0.3 Pa. A significant improvement of the long pulse stability is achieved. Together with different plasma diagnostics it is demonstrated that this improvement is correlated to the interplay of very small variations of parameters like the electrostatic potential and the particle densities close to the extraction system.

  9. Progress of the ELISE test facility: results of caesium operation with low RF power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.; Wünderlich, D.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Kraus, W.; Fröschle, M.; Ruf, B.; Nocentini, R.; the NNBI Team

    2015-05-01

    The Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik test facility ELISE is an important intermediate step towards the in-time realization of the ITER neutral beam injection system (NBI). ELISE is equipped with a large radio-frequency (RF) driven negative hydrogen ion source (1 × 0.9 m2) of half the size of the ITER NBI source. The paper reports on the main results of the very first operation of the source with caesium, but with low RF power, both for hydrogen and deuterium, with pulse lengths of up to 500 s. The results are rather encouraging for the achievement of the required ITER NBI parameters, especially in hydrogen, where large current densities with respect to the low RF power could be achieved at a ratio of co-extracted electrons to extracted ions of 0.5-0.6 at the relevant source pressure of 0.3 Pa. The required magnetic filter field was significantly lower than expected from the experience with the prototype RF source. Similar large extracted ion currents could be achieved also in deuterium, but with larger amounts of co-extracted electrons. Here, the required ratio of co-extracted electrons to extracted ions of one could be achieved only in short pulses.

  10. TIMED Science With the Space Physics Data Facility's (SPDF) Data and Models Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilitza, D.; McGuire, R. E.; Kovalick, T.; Candey, R. M.; Leckner, H.

    2005-12-01

    NASA's Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) provides access to a large volume of data and models that are of relevance to Ionospheric, Thermospheric and Mesospheric (ITM) physics and to the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) mission in particular. SPDF has developed a number of web systems to facilitate user access to important data and model resources and is making these services available through Web Services (or Application Programming Interfaces, API) directly to applications such as VxOs. The Coordinated Data Analysis web (CDAWeb) provides access to data from most of NASA's currently operating space science satellites and many of the earlier missions covering the full expanse of the Earth-Sun system from mesosphere to heliosphere. CDAWeb lets user plot data using a wide range of parameter display options including mapped images and movies; capabilities also include parameter listings and data downloads in CDF and ASCII format. TIMED data display options, for example, include GUVI airglow intensities and TIDI neutral wind vectors in a transverse Mercator projection that shows simultaneously both poles and the equatorial region. Coupled with CDAWeb's comprehensive coverage of solar wind parameters the TIMED data will provide new insights into the ITM response to solar and magnetic storms. SPDF's SSCWeb interface enables users to plot orbits for the majority of space physics satellites and to query for magnetic field line conjunctions between multiple spacecraft and ground stations and for magnetic region occupancy and thus enables coordinates science investigation between TIMED and CEDAR ground stations. Recently an Interactive 3-D orbit viewer was added to SSCWeb. Access to legacy data from older ITM satellite missions is provided through the ATMOWeb browse and download system enabling the study of solar cycle effects on ITM parameters. SPDF's Modelweb service is the front-end to a unique collection of solar-terrestrial databased

  11. [Research Progress on the Interaction Effects and Its Neural Mechanisms between Physical Fatigue and Mental Fatigue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lixin; Zhang, Chuncui; He, Feng; Zhao, Xin; Qi, Hongzhi; Wan, Baikun; Ming, Dong

    2015-10-01

    Fatigue is an exhaustion state caused by prolonged physical work and mental work, which can reduce working efficiency and even cause industrial accidents. Fatigue is a complex concept involving both physiological and psychological factors. Fatigue can cause a decline of concentration and work performance and induce chronic diseases. Prolonged fatigue may endanger life safety. In most of the scenarios, physical and mental workloads co-lead operator into fatigue state. Thus, it is very important to study the interaction influence and its neural mechanisms between physical and mental fatigues. This paper introduces recent progresses on the interaction effects and discusses some research challenges and future development directions. It is believed that mutual influence between physical fatigue and mental fatigue may occur in the central nervous system. Revealing the basal ganglia function and dopamine release may be important to explore the neural mechanisms between physical fatigue and mental fatigue. Future effort is to optimize fatigue models, to evaluate parameters and to explore the neural mechanisms so as to provide scientific basis and theoretical guidance for complex task designs and fatigue monitoring.

  12. The development and operation of the international solar-terrestrial physics central data handling facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program is committed to the development of a comprehensive, multi-mission ground data system which will support a variety of national and international scientific missions in an effort to study the flow of energy from the sun through the Earth-space environment, known as the geospace. A major component of the ISTP ground data system is an ISTP-dedicated Central Data Handling Facility (CDHF). Acquisition, development, and operation of the ISTP CDHF were delegated by the ISTP Project Office within the Flight Projects Directorate to the Information Processing Division (IPD) within the Mission Operations and Data Systems Directorate (MO&DSD). The ISTP CDHF supports the receipt, storage, and electronic access of the full complement of ISTP Level-zero science data; serves as the linchpin for the centralized processing and long-term storage of all key parameters generated either by the ISTP CDHF itself or received from external, ISTP Program approved sources; and provides the required networking and 'science-friendly' interfaces for the ISTP investigators. Once connected to the ISTP CDHF, the online catalog of key parameters can be browsed from their remote processing facilities for the immediate electronic receipt of selected key parameters using the NASA Science Internet (NSI), managed by NASA's Ames Research Center. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to describe how the ISTP CDHF was successfully implemented and operated to support initially the Japanese Geomagnetic Tail (GEOTAIL) mission and correlative science investigations, and (2) to describe how the ISTP CDHF has been enhanced to support ongoing as well as future ISTP missions. Emphasis will be placed on how various project management approaches were undertaken that proved to be highly effective in delivering an operational ISTP CDHF to the Project on schedule and

  13. Analysis Facility infrastructure (TIER3) for ATLAS High Energy physics experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez de la Hoz, S.; March, L.; Ros, E.; Sanchez, J.; Amoros, G.; Fassi, F.; Fernandez, A.; Kaci, M.; Lamas, A.; Salt, J.

    2007-07-01

    ATLAS project has been asked to define the scope and role of Tier-3 resources (facilities or centres) within the existing ATLAS computing model, activities and facilities. This document attempts to address these questions by describing Tier-3 resources generally, and their relationship to the ATLAS Software and Computing Project. Originally the tiered computing model came out of MONARC (see http://monarc.web.cern.ch/MONARC/) work and was predicated upon the network being a scarce resource. In this model the tiered hierarchy ranged from the Tier-0 (CERN) down to the desktop or workstation (Tier 3). The focus on defining the roles of each tiered component has evolved with the initial emphasis on the Tier-0 (CERN) and Tier-1 (National centres) definition and roles. The various LHC projects, including ATLAS, then evolved the tiered hierarchy to include Tier-2s (Regional centers) as part of their projects. Tier-3s, on the other hand, have (implicitly and sometime explicitly) been defined as whatever an institution could construct to support their Physics goals using institutional and otherwise leveraged resources and therefore have not been considered to be part of the official ATLAS Research Program computing resources nor under their control, meaning there is no formal MOU process to designate sites as Tier-3s and no formal control of the program over the Tier-3 resources. Tier-3s are the responsibility of individual institutions to define, fund, deploy and support. However, having noted this, we must also recognize that Tier-3s must exist and will have implications for how our computing model should support ATLAS physicists. Tier-3 users will want to access data and simulations and will want to enable their Tier-3 resources to support their analysis and simulation work. Tiers 3s are an important resource for physicists to analyze LHC (Large Hadron Collider) data. This document will define how Tier-3s should best interact with the ATLAS computing model, detail the

  14. Using silver yoga exercises to promote physical and mental health of elders with dementia in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jue-Ting; Chen, Kuei-Min

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to test the effects of yoga exercises on the physical and mental health of elderly people with dementia living in long-term care facilities. A quasi-experimental, pretest-post-test design was used. A convenience sample of 68 residents in long-term care facilities in southern Taiwan, aged 60 years and above with mild to moderate dementia, was selected. An experimental group of 33 elders participated in a 12-week yoga training program of three 55-minute sessions a week; a control group of 35 elders maintained their usual daily activities. Data were collected before and after completing the 12-week study. Measurements included body composition, cardiopulmonary functions, body flexibility, muscle strength and endurance, balance, joints motion, depression, and problem behaviors. The yoga-trained participants had better physical and mental health than those who did not participate, including lowered blood pressure, reduced respiration rate, strengthened cardiopulmonary fitness, enhanced body flexibility, improved muscle strength and endurance, improved balance, and increased joints motion (all p values Yoga exercise has positive benefits for both the physical and mental health of elders with dementia living in long-term care facilities. It is recommended that yoga be included as one of the routine activities in these long-term care facilities.

  15. Research in high energy physics. Progress report, 1 July 1993--30 June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, J.; Block, M.; Buchholz, D. [and others

    1994-07-01

    Progress on Task A centered around data analysis. E835 is now approved. It will extend E760 studies, exploring new charmonium states and featuring an upgraded detector system plus operation at 4--6 times higher luminosity. Results are given on E760 analysis. Task B has 10 papers that have either appeared in print, or have been prepared for publication. They break down into four categories; experimental physics, theoretical physics, and computer computational techniques. They are described here along with an exciting new experimental proposal to use Da{Phi}ne, the {Phi} factory that is being constructed at Frascati National Laboratory. Progress for Task C which includes participating in the D0 project at TeV I, and the photoproduction experiment, E687, at TeV II is given. While Northwestern is not participating in the top quark physics group at D0, they have been involved in the data analysis and the discussions that led to the limits on the top quark mass. Task D comprises the shared services for the Northwestern DOE contract. This includes the maintenance and operation of all computers within the HEP group. The projects supported by Task D during the past year are given. Task E progress was to resolve the apparent conflict between EMC, SMC, and SLAC results on nucleon structure functions and Bjorken sum rules. Task F covered research in hadronic decay of the tau, thermal field theory, plasma effects in astrophysics, and heavy quarkonium. Task G covers E665, a general purpose muon scattering experiment which can detect both the scattered muon and most charged and neutral hadrons produced in the forward region. The Northwest group has collaborated very closely in the past year with the Harvard group on analyses of structure functions and vector meson production in the 1991 data sample.

  16. ANALYSIS OF THE SYSTEMS OF DIDACTICS FACILITIES ON PHYSICS IN THE CONDITIONS OF PROFESSION-ORIENTED SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana M. Zasiekina

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Actuality of material of the article is predefined a social query in relation to direction the process of studies on forming of vital competence of personality of student; that didactics facilities together with principles, forms and methods of studies come forward as resources of realization of an educational-educate activity, and their structurally well-organized co-operation create terms for effective achievement of aims of studies and education, and also by the necessity of development of theoretical and methodical principles of the system use of didactics facilities for learning physics in the modern conditions of profession-oriented school.

  17. Research in theoretical elementary particle physics at the University of Florida: Task A. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P.; Thorn, C.B.

    1994-12-01

    This is the Annual Progress Report of the theoretical particle theory group at the University of Florida under DOE Grant DE-FG05-86ER40272. At present our group consists of four Full Professors (Field, Ramond, Thorn, Sikivie), one Associate Professor (Woodard), and two Assistant Professors (Qiu, Kennedy). In addition, we have four postdoctoral research associates and seven graduate students. The research of our group covers a broad range of topics in theoretical high energy physics including both theory and phenomenology. Included in this report is a summary of the last several years, an outline of our current research program.

  18. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics. Technical progress report, July 11, 1992--May 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the progress made in theoretical and experimental research funded by US Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG03-92ER54150, during the period July 11, 1992 through May 31, 1993. Four main tasks are reported: applied plasma physics theory, alpha particle diagnostic, edge and current density diagnostic, and plasma rotation drive. The report also discusses the research plans for the theory and experimental programs for the next grant year. Reports and publications supported by the grant during this period are listed in the final section.

  19. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to provide an archival record of the activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division during the period September 1, 1989 through March 31, 1991. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL's research on the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the division. As in previous reports, our research is described through abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, and presentations. Summary lists of publications and presentations, staff additions and departures, scientific and professional activities of division staff, and technical conferences organized and sponsored by the division are included as appendices. The report is organized following the division of our research among four sections and information centers. These research areas are: Mathematical Sciences; Nuclear Data Measurement and Evaluations; Intelligent Systems; Nuclear Analysis and Shielding; and Engineering Physics Information Center.

  20. Annual progress report of the Department of Solid State Physics 1 January -31 December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, M.; Bechgaard, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Feidenhans`l, R.; Johannsen, I.

    1997-01-01

    Research in the department is concerned with `Materials with Distinct Physical and Chemical Properties`. The principal activities of the department in the period from 1 January to 31 December, 1996, are presented in this Progress Report. Neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques are used to study a wide variety of problems in condensed matter physics and include: two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering, heavy fermions, high T{sub c} superconductivity, phase transitions in model systems, precipitation phenomena, and nano-scale structures in various materials. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Related to these problems there is work going on in theory, Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au) 6 tabs., 144 ills., 197 refs.

  1. Annual progress report of the Department of Solid State Physics 1 January - 31 December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, M.; Bechgaard, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Feidenhans`l, R.; Johannsen, I. [eds.

    1996-01-01

    Research in the department is concerned with `Materials with Distinct Physical and Chemical Properties`. The principal activities of the department in the period from 1 January to 31 December, 1995, are presented in this Progress Report. Neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques are used to study a wide variety of problems in condensed matter physics and include: two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering, heavy fermions, high T{sub c} superconductivity, phase transitions in model systems, precipitation phenomena, and nano-scale structures in various materials. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Related to these problems there is work going on in theory, Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au) 5 tabs., 135 ills., 163 refs.

  2. Progressive adaptation in physical activity and neuromuscular performance during 520d confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belavý, Daniel L; Gast, Ulf; Daumer, Martin; Fomina, Elena; Rawer, Rainer; Schießl, Hans; Schneider, Stefan; Schubert, Harald; Soaz, Cristina; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    To understand whether prolonged confinement results in reductions in physical activity and adaptation in the musculoskeletal system, six subjects were measured during 520 d isolation in the Mars500 study. We tested the hypothesis that physical activity reduces in prolonged confinement and that this would be associated with decrements of neuromuscular performance. Physical activity, as measured by average acceleration of the body's center of mass ("activity temperature") using the actibelt® device, decreased progressively over the course of isolation (p<0.00001). Concurrently, countermovement jump power and single-leg hop force decreased during isolation (p<0.001) whilst grip force did not change (p≥0.14). Similar to other models of inactivity, greater decrements of neuromuscular performance occurred in the lower-limb than in the upper-limb. Subject motivational state increased non-significantly (p = 0.20) during isolation, suggesting reductions in lower-limb neuromuscular performance were unrelated to motivation. Overall, we conclude that prolonged confinement is a form of physical inactivity and is associated with adaptation in the neuromuscular system.

  3. Progressive adaptation in physical activity and neuromuscular performance during 520d confinement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Belavý

    Full Text Available To understand whether prolonged confinement results in reductions in physical activity and adaptation in the musculoskeletal system, six subjects were measured during 520 d isolation in the Mars500 study. We tested the hypothesis that physical activity reduces in prolonged confinement and that this would be associated with decrements of neuromuscular performance. Physical activity, as measured by average acceleration of the body's center of mass ("activity temperature" using the actibelt® device, decreased progressively over the course of isolation (p<0.00001. Concurrently, countermovement jump power and single-leg hop force decreased during isolation (p<0.001 whilst grip force did not change (p≥0.14. Similar to other models of inactivity, greater decrements of neuromuscular performance occurred in the lower-limb than in the upper-limb. Subject motivational state increased non-significantly (p = 0.20 during isolation, suggesting reductions in lower-limb neuromuscular performance were unrelated to motivation. Overall, we conclude that prolonged confinement is a form of physical inactivity and is associated with adaptation in the neuromuscular system.

  4. History of Physics Education Research as a Model for Geoscience Education Research Community Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, T. F.

    2011-12-01

    Discipline-based Education Research (DBER) is a research field richly combining a deep understanding of how to teach a particular discipline with an evolving understanding how people learn that discipline. At its center, DBER has an overarching goal of improving the teaching and learning of a discipline by focusing on understanding the underlying mental mechanisms learners use as they develop expertise. Geoscience Education Research, or GER, is a young but rapidly advancing field which is poised to make important contributions to the teaching and learning of earth and space science. Nascent geoscience education researchers could accelerate their community's progress by learning some of the lessons from the more mature field of Physics Education Research, PER. For the past three decades, the PER community has been on the cutting edge of DBER. PER started purely as an effort among traditionally trained physicists to overcome students' tenaciously held misconceptions about force, motion, and electricity. Over the years, PER has wrestled with the extent to which they included the faculty from the College of Education, the value placed on interpretive and qualitative research methods, the most appropriate involvement of professional societies, the nature of its PhD programs in the College of Science, and how to best disseminate the results of PER to the wider physics teaching community. Decades later, as a more fully mature field, PER still struggles with some of these aspects, but has learned important lessons in how its community progresses and evolves to be successful, valuable, and pertinent.

  5. Theoretical and experimental studies of elementary physics. Annual technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodek, A.; Ferbel, T.; Melissinos, A.C.; Olsen, S.; Slattery, P.; Tipton, P.; Das, A.; Hagen, C.R.; Rajeev, S.G.; Okubo, S.

    1992-04-30

    The experimental high energy physics program is directed toward the execution of experiments that probe the basic constituents of matter and the forces between them. These experiments are carried out at national and international accelerator facilities. At the current time, we are primarily concentrating on the following projects: Direct photon production in hadronic reactions (Fermilab E706); Production of hybrid mesons in the nuclear Coulomb field; The D-Zero experiment at the Tevatron collider; Deep inelastic neutrino- and electron-nucleon scattering at FNAL and SLAC; Nonlinear QED at critical field strengths at SLAC; The Experiments at KEK (AMY, 17keV neutrino); The CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider; and SSC-related detector R&D on scintillating tile- and diamond-based calorimetry and microstrip tracking detectors.

  6. Ways of improvement of the emotional state of students of higher institute by facilities of physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stasyuk R.M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The questions of improvement of the emotional state of students during studies by facilities of physical education, increases of the personal interest, to employments are considered. 280 students of I-IV of courses were polled. According to the survey were found changes in emotional state of students throughout the period of study and level of activity in the classroom with physical training. As for changing emotional state throughout the study period, in 30% of students turned out to be prone to depression during the session, and with each subsequent course they are less worried during exams and tests. Having analyzed the activity of students in physical education classes, were the following: first course - 100% attendance, II and III courses - about 82%, but on fourth year - 65%. Based on this proposed various measures to improve the interest of students towards physical education.

  7. Non-accelerator particle physics: Progress report, February 1, 1987-January 31, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, R.I.

    1988-01-01

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics such as grand unification and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are currently engaged in construction of the MACRO detector, an Italian-American collaborative research instrument with a total particle acceptance of 12,000 m/sup 2/sr, which will perform a sensitive search for magnetic monopoles using excitation-ionization methods. Other major objectives of the MACRO experiment are to search for astrophysical high energy neutrinos expected to be emitted by such objects as Vela X-1, LMC X-4 and SN-1987A and to search for low energy neutrino bursts from gravitational stellar collapse. The past year has seen major progress in our program of liquid scintillator development. We now have an advanced scintillator formulation whose figure-of-merit for use in long counters (such as the MACRO counters) is double that of the previous best scintillator. The new formulation promises to enhance substantially the physics potential of the MACRO detector. Dr. Charles Lane (Ph.D. 1987, Caltech)l has now joined our group, resulting in significant expansion of our responsibilities on the MACRO experiment. We are now leaders of the American effort to develop the off-line data analysis for MACRO.

  8. Are engineers unsung heroes of medical progress?: the historic bond between physics, engineering, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufman, Harold

    2002-01-01

    This review traces the heretofore unsung hero role of engineering in the evolution of today's healthcare and the growing bond between physics, engineering, and medicine. It recognizes the debt owed to the various specialties of healthcare engineering, especially the bioengineers who contribute not only to a better understanding of basic physiologic and pathologic processes but also to the development and application of technology and the adaptation of new engineering discoveries to medicine. In the past half-millennium, the fields of physics, engineering, and medicine have made a large number of seminal contributions to each other, resulting in ever-advancing healthcare methodologies, although only a precious few remain identified by the originators' names. In this review, 3 engineers are cited in detail for their milestone contributions to medical progress: Roentgen in radiology, Bovie in electrosurgery, and, more recently, Greatbatch in implantable cardiac pacemakers. Future horizons in medicine appear to be ever more attainable because of the synergism between the physical and biological sciences.

  9. Program for upgrading nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting at all facilities within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuferev, V.; Zhikharev, S.; Yakimov, Y. [All-Russian Inst. of Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1998-12-31

    As part of the Department of Energy-Russian program for strengthening nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A), plans have now been formulated to install an integrated MPC and A system at all facilities containing large quantities of weapons-usable nuclear material within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF, Arzamas-16) complex. In addition to storage facilities, the complex houses a number of critical facilities used to conduct nuclear physics research and facilities for developing procedures for disassembly of nuclear weapons.

  10. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable amount of progress has been made in Physics since the last CMS Week in June given the exponential growth in the delivered LHC luminosity. The first major milestone was the delivery of a variety of results to the ICHEP international conference held in Paris this July. For this conference, CMS prepared 15 Physics Analysis Summaries on physics objects and 22 Summaries on new and interesting physics measurements that exploited the luminosity recorded by the CMS detector. The challenge was incorporating the largest batch of luminosity that was delivered only days before the conference (300 nb-1 total). The physics covered from this initial running period spanned hadron production measurements, jet production and properties, electroweak vector boson production, and even glimpses of the top quark. Since then, the accumulated integrated luminosity has increased by a factor of more than 100, and all groups have been working tremendously hard on analysing this dataset. The September Physics Week was held ...

  11. Educational intervention on physical restraint use in long-term care facilities - Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shao-Huan; Lu, Li-Chin; Lan, Shou-Jen; Chen, Jong-Chen; Wu, Wen-Jun; Chang, Shen-Peng; Lin, Long-Yau

    2017-08-01

    "Physical restraint" formerly used as a measure of protection for psychiatric patients is now widely used. However, existing studies showed that physical restraint not only has inadequate effect of protection but also has negative effects on residents. To analyzes the impact of educational program on the physical restraint use in long-term care facilities. A systematic review with meta-analysis and meta-regression. Eight databases, including Cochrane Library, ProQuest, PubMed, EMBASE, EBSCO, Web of Science, Ovid Medline and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), were searched up to January 2017. Eligible studies were classified by intervention and accessed for quality using the Quality Assessment Tool for quantitative studies. Sixteen research articles were eligible in the final review; 10 randomize control trail studies were included in the analysis. The meta-analysis revealed that the use of physical restraint was significantly less often in the experimental (education) group (OR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.39 to 0.78, p < 0.001) compared to the control group. Meta-regression revealed the period of post education would have decreased the effect of the restraint educational program (β: 0.08, p = 0.002); instead, the longer education period and more times of education would have a stronger effect of reducing the use of physical restraint (β: -0.07, p < 0.001; β: -0.04, p = 0.056). The educational program had an effect on the reduced use of physical restraint. The results of meta-regression suggest that long-term care facilities should provide a continuous education program of physical restraint for caregivers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  12. Educational intervention on physical restraint use in long-term care facilities – Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Huan Lan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available “Physical restraint” formerly used as a measure of protection for psychiatric patients is now widely used. However, existing studies showed that physical restraint not only has inadequate effect of protection but also has negative effects on residents. To analyzes the impact of educational program on the physical restraint use in long-term care facilities. Design: A systematic review with meta-analysis and meta-regression. Eight databases, including Cochrane Library, ProQuest, PubMed, EMBASE, EBSCO, Web of Science, Ovid Medline and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro, were searched up to January 2017. Eligible studies were classified by intervention and accessed for quality using the Quality Assessment Tool for quantitative studies. Sixteen research articles were eligible in the final review; 10 randomize control trail studies were included in the analysis. The meta-analysis revealed that the use of physical restraint was significantly less often in the experimental (education group (OR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.39 to 0.78, p < 0.001 compared to the control group. Meta-regression revealed the period of post education would have decreased the effect of the restraint educational program (β: 0.08, p = 0.002; instead, the longer education period and more times of education would have a stronger effect of reducing the use of physical restraint (β: −0.07, p < 0.001; β: −0.04, p = 0.056. The educational program had an effect on the reduced use of physical restraint. The results of meta-regression suggest that long-term care facilities should provide a continuous education program of physical restraint for caregivers.

  13. The safety attitudes of people who use multi-purpose recreation facilities as a physical activity setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Caroline F; Otago, Leonie; White, Peta; Donaldson, Alex; Mahoney, Mary

    2011-06-01

    Multi-purpose recreation facilities (MPRFs) are a popular setting for physical activity and it is therefore important that they are safe for all patrons. However, the attitudes of MPRF users towards safety are a potential barrier to the success of injury prevention programmes implemented within MPRFs. This article reports a survey of the safety attitudes of over 700 users of four indoor MPRFs. Factor analysis of 12 five-point Likert scale statements showed that the attitudes clustered around three major dimensions - the importance of safety, the benefits of safety and the perceptions of injury risk. Together, these three dimensions accounted for 49% of the variability in the attitudes. More than 85% of respondents agreed/strongly agreed that: safety was an important aspect of physical activity participation; being injured affected enjoyment of physical activity; people should adopt appropriate safety measures for all physical activity; and individuals were responsible for their own safety. The MPRF users, particularly women and older people, were generally safety conscious, believed in adopting safety measures, and were willing to take responsibility for their own safety. Facility managers can be confident that if they provide evidence-based injury prevention interventions in these settings, then users will respond appropriately and adopt the promoted behaviours.

  14. Task A: Research in theoretical elementary particle physics at the University of Florida; Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P.; Thorn, C.B.

    1993-11-01

    This is the Annual Progress Report of the theoretical particle theory group at the University of Florida under DoE Grant DE-FG05-86ER40272. At present our group consists of four Full Professors (Field, Ramond, Thorn, Sikivie) and three Assistant Professors (Qiu, Woodard, Kennedy). Dallas Kennedy recently joined our group increasing the Particle Theory faculty to seven. In addition, we have three postdoctoral research associates, an SSC fellow, and eight graduate students. The research of our group covers a broad range of topics in theoretical high energy physics with balance between theory and phenomenology. Included in this report is a summary of the last several years of operation of the group and an outline of our current research program.

  15. Progress and open questions in the physics of neutrino cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Ruso, L; Nieves, J

    2014-01-01

    New and more precise measurements of neutrino cross sections have renewed the interest in a better understanding of electroweak interactions on nucleons and nuclei. This effort is crucial to achieve the precision goals of the neutrino oscillation program, making new discoveries, like the CP violation in the leptonic sector, possible. We review the recent progress in the physics of neutrino cross sections, putting emphasis on the open questions that arise in the comparison with new experimental data. Following an overview of recent neutrino experiments and future plans, we present some details about the theoretical development in the description of (anti)neutrino-induced quasielastic scattering and the role of multi-nucleon quasielastic-like mechanisms. We cover not only pion production in nucleons and nuclei but also other inelastic channels including strangeness production and photon emission. Coherent reaction channels on nuclear targets are also discussed. Finally, we briefly describe some of the Monte Car...

  16. High energy physics at Tufts University. Progress report. [Summaries of research activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    In the past year the Bubble Chamber Group has been involved in a wide range of activities in experimental high energy physics. Beam momenta varying from 2.9 to 300 GeV/c; bubble chambers including the FNAL 30-inch, BNL 80-inch, ANL 12-foot and FNAL 15-foot; targets which include hydrogen, deuterium, hydrogen with downstream plate, and deuterium with downstream spark chambers; beam particles including K/sup -/, anti p and p--one is still waiting for neutrinos--were used. A search was made for exotic particles and charmed particles, continued to study strange baryons and mesons, probed the dimensions of the ''fireball,'' and studied multiplicities and correlations in high energy collisions. The following progress in each of the activities which have taken place is summarized. A list of publications is included.

  17. Theoretical studies in hadronic and nuclear physics. Progress report, December 1, 1992--June 30 , 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, J.J.; Cohen, T.D.

    1993-07-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. The section on Hadrons in Nuclei reports research into the ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate decreases in nuclear matter, and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon`s mass. The section on the Structure of Hadrons reports progress in understanding the structure of the nucleon. These results cover widely different approaches -- lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. Progress in Relativistic Nuclear Physics is reported on electromagnetic interactions in a relativistic bound state formalism, with applications to elastic electron scattering by deuterium, and on application of a two-body quasipotential equation to calculate the spectrum of mesons formed as bound states of a quark and antiquark. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium similar to that found from QCD sum rules. Calculations of three-body bound states with simple forms of relativistic dynamics are also discussed. The section on Heavy Ion Dynamics and Related Processes describes progress on the (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) problem and heavy-on dynamics. In particular, the sharp electrons observed in {beta}{sup +} irradiation of heavy atoms have recently been subsumed into the ``Composite Particle Scenario,`` generalizing the ``(e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}-Puzzle`` of the pairs from heavy ion collisions to the ``Sharp Lepton Problem.``

  18. Impact of health facility-based insecticide treated bednet distribution in Malawi: progress and challenges towards achieving universal coverage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Skarbinski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High levels of insecticide treated bednet (ITN use reduce malaria burden in countries with intense transmission such as Malawi. Since 2007 Malawi has implemented free health facility-based ITN distribution for pregnant women and children <5 years old (under-5s. We evaluated the progress of this targeted approach toward achieving universal ITN coverage. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional household survey in eight districts in April 2009. We assessed household ITN possession, ITN use by all household members, and P. falciparum asexual parasitemia and anemia (hemoglobin <11 grams/deciliter in under-5s. RESULTS: We surveyed 7,407 households containing 29,806 persons. Fifty-nine percent of all households (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 56-62, 67% (95% CI: 64-70 of eligible households (i.e., households with pregnant women or under-5s, and 40% (95% CI: 36-45 of ineligible households owned an ITN. In households with at least one ITN, 76% (95% CI: 74-78 of all household members, 88% (95% CI: 87-90 of under-5s and 90% (95% CI: 85-94 of pregnant women used an ITN the previous night. Of 6,677 ITNs, 92% (95% CI: 90-94 were used the previous night with a mean of 2.4 persons sleeping under each ITN. In multivariable models adjusting for district, socioeconomic status and indoor residual spraying use, ITN use by under-5s was associated with a significant reduction in asexual parasitemia (adjusted odds ratio (aOR 0.79; 95% CI: 0.64-0.98; p-value 0.03 and anemia (aOR 0.79; 95% CI 0.62-0.99; p-value 0.04. Of potential targeted and non-targeted mass distribution strategies, a campaign distributing 1 ITN per household might increase coverage to 2.1 household members per ITN, and thus achieve near universal coverage often defined as 2 household members per ITN. CONCLUSIONS: Malawi has substantially increased ITN coverage using health facility-based distribution targeting pregnant women and under-5s, but needs to supplement these activities with

  19. Environmental scanning as a moderator of strategy-performance relationships: an empirical analysis of physical therapy facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mark A; Miles, Grant; McDowell, William C

    2008-05-01

    To date, strategic management research in health care is largely confined to the acute care sector of the industry. This research examines the linkages among environmental scanning, competitive strategy and performance in physical therapy facilities. Nontrivial differences between acute and subacute care firms suggest the role of environmental scanning may change in non-acute care settings. Consistent with previous research, these results indicate that the frequency of internal and external scanning is related to the strategic orientation of physical therapy facilities. Contrary to the expectations, broader scope of scanning is positively related to an increasing market-focused and increasing efficiency strategic orientation. A key objective of the research is to test the impact of strategy/scanning alignment on facility performance. These findings support predictions on the moderating role of scanning activities in the strategy-performance relationship. However, a paradoxical pattern of results has possible implications for clinician managers in subacute care settings as well as the interpretation of scanning activities.

  20. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Volume 1, The report and Appendix A, Progress report for the period October 1 to December 31, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-02-01

    This report documents recent progress on ground-water monitoring projects for four Hanford Site facilities: the 300 Area Process Trenches, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, the 200 Area Low-Level Burial Grounds, and the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste (NRDW) Landfill. The existing ground-water monitoring projects for the first two facilities named in the paragraph above are currently being expanded by adding new wells to the networks. During the reporting period, sampling of the existing wells continued on a monthly basis, and the analytical results for samples collected from September through November 1986 are included and discussed in this document. 8 refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Safeguards-by-Design: Early Integration of Physical Protection and Safeguardability into Design of Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Bjornard; R. Bean; S. DeMuth; P. Durst; M. Ehinger; M. Golay; D. Hebditch; J. Hockert; J. Morgan

    2009-09-01

    The application of a Safeguards-by-Design (SBD) process for new nuclear facilities has the potential to minimize proliferation and security risks as the use of nuclear energy expands worldwide. This paper defines a generic SBD process and its incorporation from early design phases into existing design / construction processes and develops a framework that can guide its institutionalization. SBD could be a basis for a new international norm and standard process for nuclear facility design. This work is part of the U.S. DOE’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), and is jointly sponsored by the Offices of Non-proliferation and Nuclear Energy.

  2. Progress and promises of human cardiac magnetic resonance at ultrahigh fields: A physics perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Graessl, Andreas; Thalhammer, Christof; Dieringer, Matthias A.; Kraus, Oliver; Santoro, Davide; Fuchs, Katharina; Hezel, Fabian; Waiczies, Sonia; Ittermann, Bernd; Winter, Lukas

    2013-04-01

    A growing number of reports eloquently speak about explorations into cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) at ultrahigh magnetic fields (B0 ⩾ 7.0 T). Realizing the progress, promises and challenges of ultrahigh field (UHF) CMR this perspective outlines current trends in enabling MR technology tailored for cardiac MR in the short wavelength regime. For this purpose many channel radiofrequency (RF) technology concepts are outlined. Basic principles of mapping and shimming of transmission fields including RF power deposition considerations are presented. Explorations motivated by the safe operation of UHF-CMR even in the presence of conductive implants are described together with the physics, numerical simulations and experiments, all of which detailing antenna effects and RF heating induced by intracoronary stents at 7.0 T. Early applications of CMR at 7.0 T and their clinical implications for explorations into cardiovascular diseases are explored including assessment of cardiac function, myocardial tissue characterization, MR angiography of large and small vessels as well as heteronuclear MR of the heart and the skin. A concluding section ventures a glance beyond the horizon and explores future directions. The goal here is not to be comprehensive but to inspire the biomedical and diagnostic imaging communities to throw further weight behind the solution of the many remaining unsolved problems and technical obstacles of UHF-CMR with the goal to transfer MR physics driven methodological advancements into extra clinical value.

  3. Trends and Progress in Nuclear and Hadron Physics: A Straight or Winding Road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, James P.; Adhikari, Lekha; Chen, Guangyao; Li, Meijian; Li, Yang; Maris, Pieter; Qian, Wenyang; Spence, John R.; Tang, Shuo; Tuchin, Kirill; Zhao, Xingbo

    2017-03-01

    Quantitative calculations of the properties of hadrons and nuclei, with assessed uncertainties, have emerged as competitive with experimental measurements in a number of major cases. We may well be entering an era where theoretical predictions are critical for experimental progress. Cross-fertilization between the fields of relativistic hadronic structure and non-relativistic nuclear structure is readily apparent. Non-perturbative renormalization methods such as similarity renormalization group and Okubo-Lee-Suzuki schemes as well as many-body methods such as coupled cluster, configuration interaction and lattice simulation methods are now employed and advancing in both major areas of physics. New algorithms to apply these approaches on supercomputers are shared among these areas of physics. The roads to success have intertwined with each community taking the lead at various times in the recent past. We briefly sketch these fascinating paths and comment on some symbiotic relationships. We also overview some recent results from the Hamiltonian basis light-front quantization approach.

  4. Addressing Smoking in Supported Residential Facilities for People with Severe Mental Illness: Has Any Progress Been Achieved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Lawn

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Smoking rates for people with severe mental illness have remained high despite significant declines in smoking rates in the general population, particularly for residents of community supported residential facilities (SRFs where smoking has been largely neglected and institutionalized. Methods: Two studies undertaken 10 years apart (2000 and 2010 with SRFs in Adelaide, Australia looked at historical trends to determine whether any progress has been made to address smoking for this population. The first study was ethnographic and involved narrative description and analysis of the social milieu of smoking following multiple observations of smoking behaviours in two SRFs. The second study involved an eight-week smoking cessation group program providing tailored support and free nicotine replacement therapy to residents across six SRFs. Changes in smoking behaviours were measured using pre and post surveys with residents, with outcomes verified by also seeking SRF staff and smoking cessation group facilitator qualitative feedback and reflection on their observations of residents and the setting. Results: The culture of smoking in mental health SRFs is a complex part of the social milieu of these settings. There appears to have been little change in smoking behaviours of residents and attitudes and support responses by staff of SRFs since 2000 despite smoking rates declining in the general community. Tailored smoking cessation group programs for this population were well received and did help SRF residents to quit or cut down their smoking. They did challenge staff negative attitudes to residents’ capacity to smoke less or quit. Conclusions: A more systematic approach that addresses SRF regulations, smoke-free policies, staff attitudes and training, and consistent smoking cessation support to residents is needed.

  5. Neutrino Physics in 2020

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Maury

    2014-01-01

    Many talks at the 16th Lomonosov Conference, dedicated to Bruno Pontecorvo, detail the remarkable progress in neutrino physics over the last two decades. In this paper, I give an opinionated, and therefore likely inaccurate, review of the future, with some opinions on how both the physics situation and future facilities will develop, focusing on the year 2020.

  6. Lack of facilities rather than sociocultural factors as the primary barrier to physical activity among female Saudi university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samara A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Anastasia Samara,1 Anne Nistrup,1 Tamader Y AL-Rammah,2 Arja R Aro11Unit for Health Promotion and Research, University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark; 2Faculty of Rehabilitation and Health Sciences, Princess Nora Bint Abdul Rahman University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaPurpose: The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is experiencing a dramatic increase in physical inactivity, with women having higher levels of inactivity than men among all age groups. It is assumed that factors such as dress codes, restrictions on going outdoors, and conservative norms are the main reasons for women’s low physical activity. Our aim was to explore the different parameters related to physical activity, including self-efficacy, as well as the perceived barriers to and benefits of physical activity in young Saudi females.Patients and methods: Ninety-four first-year female Saudi university students in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, participated in the present study in 2014. The students were from eight bachelor’s programs in health and well-being, and each completed a questionnaire with questions divided into five parts as follows: 1 socioeconomic status, 2 physical activity, 3 self-efficacy 4 social factors, and 5 barriers and facilitators related to physical activity.Results: The students exercised at home and alone, and there was low self-efficacy for physical activity (mean score =42±14. Among social factors, attending university was the only factor that hindered physical activity (32%. Physical activity was positively perceived overall (mean score =131±10. Students showed awareness of the benefits of physical activity for health and well-being. The most important barrier was the lack of designated areas available for physical activity. Students disagreed that family or the Islamic community were barriers to physical activity.Conclusion: The lack of facilities and lack of encouragement from the university, but not a lack of knowledge (a high level of

  7. Physical environmental stimuli that turn healthcare facilities into healing environments through psychologically mediated effects: systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Karin; Pieterse, Marcel; Pruyn, Ad

    2006-01-01

    Aim. This paper reports a systematic review to determine the effects of physical environmental stimuli in healthcare settings on the health and well-being of patients. Background. The concept of healing environments suggests that the physical environment of the healthcare setting can encourage the

  8. European network for promoting the physical health of residents in psychiatric and social care facilities (HELPS: background, aims and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marginean Roxana

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with mental disorders have a higher prevalence of physical illnesses and reduced life expectancy as compared with the general population. However, there is a lack of knowledge across Europe concerning interventions that aim at reducing somatic morbidity and excess mortality by promoting behaviour-based and/or environment-based interventions. Methods and design HELPS is an interdisciplinary European network that aims at (i gathering relevant knowledge on physical illness in people with mental illness, (ii identifying health promotion initiatives in European countries that meet country-specific needs, and (iii at identifying best practice across Europe. Criteria for best practice will include evidence on the efficacy of physical health interventions and of their effectiveness in routine care, cost implications and feasibility for adaptation and implementation of interventions across different settings in Europe. HELPS will develop and implement a "physical health promotion toolkit". The toolkit will provide information to empower residents and staff to identify the most relevant risk factors in their specific context and to select the most appropriate action out of a range of defined health promoting interventions. The key methods are (a stakeholder analysis, (b international literature reviews, (c Delphi rounds with experts from participating centres, and (d focus groups with staff and residents of mental health care facilities. Meanwhile a multi-disciplinary network consisting of 15 European countries has been established and took up the work. As one main result of the project they expect that a widespread use of the HELPS toolkit could have a significant positive effect on the physical health status of residents of mental health and social care facilities, as well as to hold resonance for community dwelling people with mental health problems. Discussion A general strategy on health promotion for people with mental

  9. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigg, D.W.; Schwint, A.E.; Hartwell, J.K.; Heber, E.M.; Trivillin, V.; Castillo, J.; Wentzeis, L.; Sloan, P.; Wemple, C.A.

    2004-10-04

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  10. Collaborative Physical and Biological Dosimetry Studies for Neutron Capture Therapy at the RA-1 Research Reactor Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg; Amanda E. Schwint; John K. Hartwell; Elisa M. Heber; Veronica Trivillin; Jorge Castillo; Luis Wentzeis; Patrick Sloan; Charles A. Wemple

    2004-10-01

    Initial physical dosimetry measurements have been completed using activation spectrometry and thermoluminiscent dosimeters to characterize the BNCT irradiation facility developed at the RA-1 research reactor operated by the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission in Buenos Aires. Some biological scoping irradiations have also been completed using a small-animal (hamster) oral mucosa tumor model. Results indicate that the RA-1 neutron source produces useful dose rates but that some improvements in the initial configuration will be needed to optimize the spectrum for thermal-neutron BNCT research applications.

  11. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress Report for the Period April 1 to June 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-09-01

    This report describes the progress of 13 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period April 1 to June 30, 1989. These projects are for the 300 area process trenches (300 area), 183-H solar evaporation basins (100-H area), 200 areas low-level burial grounds, nonradioactive dangerous waste landfill (southeast of the 200 areas), 1301-N liquid waste disposal facility (100-N area), 1324-N surface impoundment and 1324-NA percolation pond (100-N area), 1325-N liquid waste disposal facility (100-N area), 216-A-10 crib (200-east area), 216-A-29 ditch (200-east area), 216-A-36B crib (200-east area), 216-B-36B crib (200-east area), 216-B-3 pond (east of the 200-east area), 2101-M pond (200-east area), grout treatment facility (200-east area).

  12. A facility to search for hidden particles at the CERN SPS: the SHiP physics case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekhin, Sergey; Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Asaka, Takehiko; Batell, Brian; Bezrukov, Fedor; Bondarenko, Kyrylo; Boyarsky, Alexey; Choi, Ki-Young; Corral, Cristóbal; Craig, Nathaniel; Curtin, David; Davidson, Sacha; de Gouvêa, André; Dell'Oro, Stefano; deNiverville, Patrick; Bhupal Dev, P. S.; Dreiner, Herbi; Drewes, Marco; Eijima, Shintaro; Essig, Rouven; Fradette, Anthony; Garbrecht, Björn; Gavela, Belen; Giudice, Gian F.; Goodsell, Mark D.; Gorbunov, Dmitry; Gori, Stefania; Grojean, Christophe; Guffanti, Alberto; Hambye, Thomas; Hansen, Steen H.; Helo, Juan Carlos; Hernandez, Pilar; Ibarra, Alejandro; Ivashko, Artem; Izaguirre, Eder; Jaeckel, Joerg; Jeong, Yu Seon; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Kahn, Yonatan; Katz, Andrey; Kim, Choong Sun; Kovalenko, Sergey; Krnjaic, Gordan; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Marcocci, Simone; Mccullough, Matthew; McKeen, David; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Moch, Sven-Olaf; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.; Morrissey, David E.; Ovchynnikov, Maksym; Paschos, Emmanuel; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Pospelov, Maxim; Hall Reno, Mary; Ringwald, Andreas; Ritz, Adam; Roszkowski, Leszek; Rubakov, Valery; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Schienbein, Ingo; Schmeier, Daniel; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Schwaller, Pedro; Senjanovic, Goran; Seto, Osamu; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Shchutska, Lesya; Shelton, Jessie; Shrock, Robert; Shuve, Brian; Spannowsky, Michael; Spray, Andy; Staub, Florian; Stolarski, Daniel; Strassler, Matt; Tello, Vladimir; Tramontano, Francesco; Tripathi, Anurag; Tulin, Sean; Vissani, Francesco; Winkler, Martin W.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes the physics case for a new fixed target facility at CERN SPS. The SHiP (search for hidden particles) experiment is intended to hunt for new physics in the largely unexplored domain of very weakly interacting particles with masses below the Fermi scale, inaccessible to the LHC experiments, and to study tau neutrino physics. The same proton beam setup can be used later to look for decays of tau-leptons with lepton flavour number non-conservation, τ \\to 3μ and to search for weakly-interacting sub-GeV dark matter candidates. We discuss the evidence for physics beyond the standard model and describe interactions between new particles and four different portals—scalars, vectors, fermions or axion-like particles. We discuss motivations for different models, manifesting themselves via these interactions, and how they can be probed with the SHiP experiment and present several case studies. The prospects to search for relatively light SUSY and composite particles at SHiP are also discussed. We demonstrate that the SHiP experiment has a unique potential to discover new physics and can directly probe a number of solutions of beyond the standard model puzzles, such as neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the Universe, dark matter, and inflation.

  13. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, Niamh; Solanky, Bhavana S; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A E; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Miller, David H; Thompson, Alan J; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-09-01

    Neurodegeneration is thought to be the major cause of ongoing, irreversible disability in progressive stages of multiple sclerosis. Gamma-aminobutyric acid is the principle inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. The aims of this study were to investigate if gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (i) are abnormal in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis compared with healthy controls; and (ii) correlate with physical and cognitive performance in this patient population. Thirty patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and 17 healthy control subjects underwent single-voxel MEGA-PRESS (MEscher-GArwood Point RESolved Spectroscopy) magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T, to quantify gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the prefrontal cortex, right hippocampus and left sensorimotor cortex. All subjects were assessed clinically and underwent a cognitive assessment. Multiple linear regression models were used to compare differences in gamma-aminobutyric acid concentrations between patients and controls adjusting for age, gender and tissue fractions within each spectroscopic voxel. Regression was used to examine the relationships between the cognitive function and physical disability scores specific for these regions with gamma-aminobuytric acid levels, adjusting for age, gender, and total N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamine-glutamate complex levels. When compared with controls, patients performed significantly worse on all motor and sensory tests, and were cognitively impaired in processing speed and verbal memory. Patients had significantly lower gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the hippocampus (adjusted difference = -0.403 mM, 95% confidence intervals -0.792, -0.014, P = 0.043) and sensorimotor cortex (adjusted difference = -0.385 mM, 95% confidence intervals -0.667, -0.104, P = 0.009) compared with controls. In patients, reduced motor function in the right upper and lower limb was associated with lower gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration in the

  14. Research Progress of Nuclear Astrophysics Physics:Progress of Jinping Underground Laboratory for Nuclear Astrophysics Experiment JUNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Wei-ping; LI; Zhi-hong; HE; Jian-jun; TANG; Xiao-dong; LIAN; Gang; GUO; Bing; AN; Zhu; CHEN; Qing-hao; CHEN; Xiong-jun; CHEN; Yang-ping; CHEN; Zhi-jun; CUI; Bao-qun; DU; Xian-chao; FU; Chang-bo; GAN; Lin; HAN; Zhi-yu; HE; Guo-zhu; A.Heger; HOU; Su-qing; HUANG; Han-xiong; HUANG; Ning; JIA; Bao-lu; JIANG; Li-yang; S.Kubono; LI; Jian-min; LI; Kuo-ang; LI; Tao; LI; Xin-yue; LI; Yun-ju; M.Lugaro; LUO; Xiao-bing; MA; Shao-bo; MEI; Dong-ming; QIAN; Yong-zhong; QIN; Jiu-chang; REN; Jie; SU; Jun; SUN; Liang-ting; TAN; Wan-peng; I.Tanihata; WANG; Peng; WANG; You-bao; WU; Qi; XU; Shi-wei; YAN; Sheng-quan; YANG; Li-tao; YU; Xiang-qing; YUE; Qian; ZENG; Sheng; ZHANG; Huan-yu; ZHANG; Hui; ZHANG; Li-yong; ZHANG; Ning-tao; ZHANG; Qi-wei; ZHANG; Tao; ZHANG; Xiao-peng; ZHANG; Xue-zhen; ZHANG; Zi-min; ZHAO; Wei; ZHAO; Zhuo; ZHOU; Chao; ZHOU; Yong

    2015-01-01

    1 Progress of this program This program is supported by the China Jinping Underground Laboratory(CJPL)and the direct measurement of stellar key reactions of(α,γ),(α,n),(p,γ)and(p,α)will be precisely carried out at the merit of current project by utilizing high stability and intensity accelerator,high efficiency detector and the shielding of extremely low background.Four

  15. Hadron Physics at the Charm and Bottom Thresholds and Other Novel QCD Physics Topics at the NICA Accelerator Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-20

    The NICA collider project at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna will have the capability of colliding protons, polarized deuterons, and nuclei at an effective nucleon-nucleon center-of mass energy in the range {radical}s{sub NN} = 4 to 11 GeV. I briefly survey a number of novel hadron physics processes which can be investigated at the NICA collider. The topics include the formation of exotic heavy quark resonances near the charm and bottom thresholds, intrinsic strangeness, charm, and bottom phenomena, hidden-color degrees of freedom in nuclei, color transparency, single-spin asymmetries, the RHIC baryon anomaly, and non-universal antishadowing.

  16. Rehabilitation of teenagers of patients by a cerebral paralysis by facilities of physical culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vindiuk P.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Influence of physical exercises is investigated in combination with mobile games on power supply of organism of teenagers of patients by a cerebral paralysis. In research took part 16 schoolchildren of teens with the spastic cerebral paralysis. For determination of their functional preparedness multivariable express diagnostics of S.A. Dushanin was utillized. It is recommended in the lessons of physical culture to include the specially organized mobile games, elements of cross-country race preparation and employment on exercise bicycle. It is set that an early and successive rehabilitation and physical education is instrumental in maximally complete renewal of the lost functions. It is marked that the index of maximal consumption of oxygen was increased on 7,4%, to the aerobic economy - on 3,1%. It is set that the lessons of physical culture in growth of indexes of functional preparation were instrumental.

  17. Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Colorado technical progress report, 1976 and proposal for continuation of contract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-11-01

    This report summarizes the work carried out at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado during the period November 1, 1975 to November 1, 1976. The low energy nuclear physics section is dominated by light-ion reaction studies which span a wide range. These include both two-neutron and two-proton transfer reactions, charge exchange and inelastic scattering, as well as single nucleon transfer reactions. The nuclei studied vary widely in their mass and characteristics. These reaction studies have been aided by the multi-use scattering chamber which now allows the energy-loss-spectrometer beam preparation system (beam swinger) to shift from charged particle studies to neutron time-of-flight studies with a minimum loss of time. The intermediate energy section reflects the increase in activity accompanying the arrival of LAMPF data and the initiation of (p,d) studies at the Indiana separated-sector cyclotron. The nucleon removal results provided by the ..pi.. beam at EPICS previous to completion of the spectrometer have shown that nuclear effects dominate this process, so that the widely used free interaction picture is inadequate. The section entitled ''Other Activities'' reveals continuing activities in new applications of nuclear techniques to problems in medicine and biology. Reactions important to astrophysics continue to be investigated and our trace-element program remains at a high level of activity. The theoretical section reports new progress in understanding magnitudes of two-step reactions by inclusion of finite-range effects. A new finite-range program which is fast and economical has been completed. Intermediate energy results include calculations of ..pi..-..gamma.. angular correlations, low energy ..pi..-nucleus interactions, as well as (p,d) and nucleon scattering calculations for intermediate energies.

  18. A review of progress in the physics of open quantum systems: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, I; Bird, J P

    2015-11-01

    This report on progress explores recent advances in our theoretical and experimental understanding of the physics of open quantum systems (OQSs). The study of such systems represents a core problem in modern physics that has evolved to assume an unprecedented interdisciplinary character. OQSs consist of some localized, microscopic, region that is coupled to an external environment by means of an appropriate interaction. Examples of such systems may be found in numerous areas of physics, including atomic and nuclear physics, photonics, biophysics, and mesoscopic physics. It is the latter area that provides the main focus of this review, an emphasis that is driven by the capacity that exists to subject mesoscopic devices to unprecedented control. We thus provide a detailed discussion of the behavior of mesoscopic devices (and other OQSs) in terms of the projection-operator formalism, according to which the system under study is considered to be comprised of a localized region (Q), embedded into a well-defined environment (P) of scattering wavefunctions (with Q   +   P   =   1). The Q subspace must be treated using the concepts of non-Hermitian physics, and of particular interest here is: the capacity of the environment to mediate a coupling between the different states of Q; the role played by the presence of exceptional points (EPs) in the spectra of OQSs; the influence of EPs on the rigidity of the wavefunction phases, and; the ability of EPs to initiate a dynamical phase transition (DPT). EPs are singular points in the continuum, at which two resonance states coalesce, that is where they exhibit a non-avoided crossing. DPTs occur when the quantum dynamics of the open system causes transitions between non-analytically connected states, as a function of some external control parameter. Much like conventional phase transitions, the behavior of the system on one side of the DPT does not serve as a reliable indicator of that on the other. In

  19. A review of progress in the physics of open quantum systems: theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, I.; Bird, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    This report on progress explores recent advances in our theoretical and experimental understanding of the physics of open quantum systems (OQSs). The study of such systems represents a core problem in modern physics that has evolved to assume an unprecedented interdisciplinary character. OQSs consist of some localized, microscopic, region that is coupled to an external environment by means of an appropriate interaction. Examples of such systems may be found in numerous areas of physics, including atomic and nuclear physics, photonics, biophysics, and mesoscopic physics. It is the latter area that provides the main focus of this review, an emphasis that is driven by the capacity that exists to subject mesoscopic devices to unprecedented control. We thus provide a detailed discussion of the behavior of mesoscopic devices (and other OQSs) in terms of the projection-operator formalism, according to which the system under study is considered to be comprised of a localized region (Q), embedded into a well-defined environment (P) of scattering wavefunctions (with Q   +   P   =   1). The Q subspace must be treated using the concepts of non-Hermitian physics, and of particular interest here is: the capacity of the environment to mediate a coupling between the different states of Q; the role played by the presence of exceptional points (EPs) in the spectra of OQSs; the influence of EPs on the rigidity of the wavefunction phases, and; the ability of EPs to initiate a dynamical phase transition (DPT). EPs are singular points in the continuum, at which two resonance states coalesce, that is where they exhibit a non-avoided crossing. DPTs occur when the quantum dynamics of the open system causes transitions between non-analytically connected states, as a function of some external control parameter. Much like conventional phase transitions, the behavior of the system on one side of the DPT does not serve as a reliable indicator of that on the other. In

  20. The association between the physical environment and the well-being of older people in residential care facilities: A multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Susanna; McKee, Kevin; Wijk, Helle; Elf, Marie

    2017-06-06

    To investigate the associations between the quality of the physical environment and the psychological and social well-being of older people living in residential care facilities. Many older people in care facilities have cognitive and physical frailties and are at risk of experiencing low levels of well-being. High-quality physical environments can support older people as frailty increases and promote their well-being. Although the importance of the physical environment for residents' well-being is recognized, more research is needed. A cross-sectional survey of 20 care facilities from each of which 10 residents were sampled. As the individual resident data were nested in the facilities, a multilevel analysis was conducted. Data were collected during 2013 and 2014. The care facilities were purposely sampled to ensure a high level of variation in their physical characteristics. Residents' demographic and health data were collected via medical records and interviews. Residents' well-being and perceived quality of care were assessed via questionnaires and interviews. Environmental quality was assessed with a structured observational instrument. Multilevel analysis indicated that cognitive support in the physical environment was associated with residents' social well-being, after controlling for independence and perceived care quality. However, no significant association was found between the physical environment and residents' psychological well-being. Our study demonstrates the role of the physical environment for enhancing the social well-being of frail older people. Professionals and practitioners involved in the design of care facilities have a responsibility to ensure that such facilities meet high-quality specifications. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Cardiac Acceleration at the Onset of Exercise : A Potential Parameter for Monitoring Progress During Physical Training in Sports and Rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, Florentina J.; Monden, Paul G.; van Meeteren, Nico L. U.; Daanen, Hein A. M.

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were

  2. Cardiac acceleration at the onset of exercise: A potential parameter for monitoring progress during physical training in sports and rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, F.J.; Monden, P.G.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were

  3. Cardiac Acceleration at the Onset of Exercise : A Potential Parameter for Monitoring Progress During Physical Training in Sports and Rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, Florentina J.; Monden, Paul G.; van Meeteren, Nico L. U.; Daanen, Hein A. M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were se

  4. Differential relationship between physical activity and progression to diabetes by glucose tolerance status: the Inter99 Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, S; Glümer, C; Witte, D R

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse how strongly commuting and leisure-time physical activity affect progression to diabetes and to study whether this relationship is different in individuals with isolated impaired fasting glucose (i-IFG) and isolated impaired glucose tolerance (i-IGT)....

  5. Experimental particle physics at the University of Pittsburgh. Progress report, November 1, 1995--October 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreau, J.F.; Engels, E. Jr.; Shepard, P.F.; Thompson, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    This report covers the progress on two different tasks, Task A and Task B. Task A focuses on rare and semi-rare decays of {phi} and of the short-lived kaon with emphasis on those aspects needed in preparation for the proposed {Phi}-Factory measurements of CPT violation and {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon} from the CP-violating decays of the K{sub L}K{sub S} final state. The second aspect of the kaon decay work is participation in the so-called rare kaon decay experiments, E865, at BNL. The major goals of Task B, Fermilab program, are as follows: (1) participation in the analysis of the E706 data taken during the 1990--1991 fixed target run at Fermilab and (2) the continuation of the work with the CDF collaboration particularly the SVX II upgrade. The E706 part of the program involves the completion of publications reporting the results of the 1990--91 data run. The analysis of these data is now mature and physics results are emerging. The CDF program involves a dedicated effort to the design of a silicon vertex detector upgrade, SVX II, to be accomplished by the time Fermilab run II collider run (1999). In addition they are participating in the 1993--1995 collide run Ib and actively analyzing the data from both runs Ia and Ib.

  6. Spinal cord grey matter abnormalities are associated with secondary progression and physical disability in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, H; Schneider, T; Yiannakas, M C; Altmann, D R; Wheeler-Kingshott, C A M; Ciccarelli, O; Miller, D H

    2015-06-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), pathological studies have identified substantial demyelination and neuronal loss in the spinal cord grey matter (GM). However, there has been limited in vivo investigation of cord GM abnormalities and their possible functional effects using MRI combined with clinical evaluation. We recruited healthy controls (HC) and people with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), relapsing remitting (RR) and secondary progressive (SP) MS. All subjects had 3 T spinal cord MRI with measurement of cord cross-sectional area and diffusion tensor imaging metrics in the GM and posterior and lateral column white matter tracts using region of interest analysis. Physical disability was assessed using the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) and motor components of the MS functional composite scale. We calculated differences between MS and HC using a ANOVA and associations with disability using linear regression. 113 people were included in this study: 30 controls, 21 CIS, 33 RR and 29 SPMS. Spinal cord radial diffusivity (RD), fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity in the GM and posterior columns were significantly more abnormal in SPMS than in RRMS. Spinal cord GM RD (β=0.33, pphysical disability in relapse-onset MS and SPMS in particular. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. A facility to Search for Hidden Particles at the CERN SPS: the SHiP physics case

    CERN Document Server

    Alekhin, Sergey; Asaka, Takehiko; Batell, Brian; Bezrukov, Fedor; Bondarenko, Kyrylo; Boyarsky, Alexey; Choi, Ki-Young; Corral, Cristobal; Craig, Nathaniel; Curtin, David; Davidson, Sacha; de Gouvea, Andre; Dell'Oro, Stefano; deNiverville, Patrick; Bhupal Dev, P.S.; Dreiner, Herbi; Drewes, Marco; Eijima, Shintaro; Essig, Rouven; Fradette, Anthony; Garbrecht, Bjorn; Gavela, Belen; Giudice, Gian F.; Goodsell, Mark D.; Gorbunov, Dmitry; Gori, Stefania; Grojean, Christophe; Guffanti, Alberto; Hambye, Thomas; Hansen, Steen H.; Helo, Juan Carlos; Hernandez, Pilar; Ibarra, Alejandro; Ivashko, Artem; Izaguirre, Eder; Jaeckel, Joerg; Jeong, Yu Seon; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Kahn, Yonatan; Katz, Andrey; Kim, Choong Sun; Kovalenko, Sergey; Krnjaic, Gordan; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Marcocci, Simone; Mccullough, Matthew; McKeen, David; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Moch, Sven-Olaf; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.; Morrissey, David E.; Ovchynnikov, Maksym; Paschos, Emmanuel; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Pospelov, Maxim; Reno, Mary Hall; Ringwald, Andreas; Ritz, Adam; Roszkowski, Leszek; Rubakov, Valery; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Schienbein, Ingo; Schmeier, Daniel; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Schwaller, Pedro; Senjanovic, Goran; Seto, Osamu; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Shchutska, Lesya; Shelton, Jessie; Shrock, Robert; Shuve, Brian; Spannowsky, Michael; Spray, Andy; Staub, Florian; Stolarski, Daniel; Strassler, Matt; Tello, Vladimir; Tramontano, Francesco; Tripathi, Anurag; Tulin, Sean; Vissani, Francesco; Winkler, Martin W.; Zurek, Kathryn M.; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the physics case for a new fixed target facility at CERN SPS. The SHiP (Search for Hidden Particles) experiment is intended to hunt for new physics in the largely unexplored domain of very weakly interacting particles with masses below the Fermi scale, inaccessible to the LHC experiments, and to study tau neutrino physics. The same proton beam setup can be used later to look for decays of tau-leptons with lepton flavour number non-conservation, $\\tau\\to 3\\mu$ and to search for weakly-interacting sub-GeV dark matter candidates. We discuss the evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model and describe interactions between new particles and four different portals - scalars, vectors, fermions or axion-like particles. We discuss motivations for different models, manifesting themselves via these interactions, and how they can be probed with the SHiP experiment and present several case studies. The prospects to search for relatively light SUSY and composite particles at SHiP are also discussed....

  8. [Participation in high energy physics]: Task C, Particle physics and cosmology. Progress report, January 1991--April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S.

    1992-05-01

    Over the past year or so the research of our group has spanned many topics at the boundary of particle physics and cosmology. The major focus has been in the general areas of inflation, cosmological phase transitions, astrophysical constraints to particle physics theories, and dark matter/structure formation as it relates to particle physics. Narrative summaries of the research of the individual group members are given in this paper.

  9. Methods of correction of carriage of junior schoolchildren by facilities of physical exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagara V.F.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The results of influence of methods of physical rehabilitation on the organism of children are resulted. In research took part 16 children of lower school with the scoliotic changes of pectoral department of spine. The complex of methods of physical rehabilitation included special correction and general health-improving exercises, medical gymnastics, correction position. Employments on a medical gymnastics during 30-45 minutes 3-4 times per a week were conducted. The improvement of indexes of mobility of spine and state of carriage of schoolchildren is marked. The absolute indexes of the state of carriage and flexibility of spine considerably got around physiology sizes. A rehabilitation complex which includes the elements of correction gymnastics is recommended, medical physical culture, correction, massage of muscles of trunk, position. It is also necessary to adhere to the rational mode of day and feed, provide the normative parameters of working furniture and self-control of the state of carriage.

  10. Elementary particle physics at the University of Florida. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: theoretical elementary particle physics; experimental elementary particle physics; axion project; SSC detector development; and computer acquisition. (LSP).

  11. Academic and Facility Programs for Physical and Recreational Education at Napa College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutch, Denis P.

    This comprehensive, detailed planning guide was initiated to insure better preparation of Napa College (Napa, California) physical and recreational education majors transferring to 4-year institutions, and to better fulfill the college's community recreational responsibility. The guide examines the academic program to be developed, the facilities…

  12. The HEPCloud Facility: elastic computing for High Energy Physics – The NOvA Use Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuess, S. [Fermilab; Garzoglio, G. [Fermilab; Holzman, B. [Fermilab; Kennedy, R. [Fermilab; Norman, A. [Fermilab; Timm, S. [Fermilab; Tiradani, A. [Fermilab

    2017-03-15

    The need for computing in the HEP community follows cycles of peaks and valleys mainly driven by conference dates, accelerator shutdown, holiday schedules, and other factors. Because of this, the classical method of provisioning these resources at providing facilities has drawbacks such as potential overprovisioning. As the appetite for computing increases, however, so does the need to maximize cost efficiency by developing a model for dynamically provisioning resources only when needed. To address this issue, the HEPCloud project was launched by the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division in June 2015. Its goal is to develop a facility that provides a common interface to a variety of resources, including local clusters, grids, high performance computers, and community and commercial Clouds. Initially targeted experiments include CMS and NOvA, as well as other Fermilab stakeholders. In its first phase, the project has demonstrated the use of the “elastic” provisioning model offered by commercial clouds, such as Amazon Web Services. In this model, resources are rented and provisioned automatically over the Internet upon request. In January 2016, the project demonstrated the ability to increase the total amount of global CMS resources by 58,000 cores from 150,000 cores - a 25 percent increase - in preparation for the Recontres de Moriond. In March 2016, the NOvA experiment has also demonstrated resource burst capabilities with an additional 7,300 cores, achieving a scale almost four times as large as the local allocated resources and utilizing the local AWS s3 storage to optimize data handling operations and costs. NOvA was using the same familiar services used for local computations, such as data handling and job submission, in preparation for the Neutrino 2016 conference. In both cases, the cost was contained by the use of the Amazon Spot Instance Market and the Decision Engine, a HEPCloud component that aims at minimizing cost and job interruption. This paper

  13. Direct-drive implosion physics: Results from OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, P. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Craxton, R. S.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Froula, D. H.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ma, T.; Pape, S. Le; MacKinnon, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Direct-drive-implosion experiments from both OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are critical to gain confidence in ignition predictions on the NIF. Adequate performance of hydrodynamically scaled 1.8-MJ ignition designs must be obtained on OMEGA at 26 kJ. Implosions on the NIF must be used to identify and mitigate the effect of laser-plasma interactions (LPI's) on hydrodynamic parameters at the NIF scale. Results from spherically driven OMEGA cryogenic implosion experiments are described. Mitigation of nonuniformity sources and cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) is important for improving target performance on OMEGA. Initial polar-driven implosion experiments on the NIF have provided valuable measurements of trajectory and symmetry. Simulations that include the effect of CBET more closely reproduce the observed velocity.

  14. Performance analysis and physics potential of upgrades of existing neutrino facilities

    CERN Document Server

    CorneIis, K; Ferrari, A; Garoby, R; Gilardoni, S; Goddard, B; Gschwendtner, E; Papaphilipou, Y; Shaposhnikova, E; Stererenberg, R; Stora, T; Wildner, E

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the CERN Neutrino to Gran Sasso (CNGS) facility and its upgrade potential has been reviewed. Mid-term options such as the creation of new conventional neutrino beams from the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) that built upon the CNGS technology have been explored. Longer-term prospects of these, involving further upgrades of the CERN accelerator complex, as well as other concepts such as a neutrino factory, a beta-beam or a multi-MW neutrino super-beam studied within the EC-funded FP7 EUROnu activity mapped to the CERN infrastructure are presented. Highlights of the required R&D effort and technical challenges are discussed.

  15. Updates to the Generation of Physics Data Inputs for MAMMOTH Simulations of the Transient Reactor Test Facility - FY2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortensi, Javier [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baker, Benjamin Allen [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schunert, Sebastian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Yaqi [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gleicher, Frederick Nathan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); DeHart, Mark David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The INL is currently evolving the modeling and simulation (M&S) capability that will enable improved core operation as well as design and analysis of TREAT experiments. This M&S capability primarily uses MAMMOTH, a reactor physics application being developed under Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework. MAMMOTH allows the coupling of a number of other MOOSE-based applications. This second year of work has been devoted to the generation of a deterministic reference solution for the full core, the preparation of anisotropic diffusion coefficients, the testing of the SPH equivalence method, and the improvement of the control rod modeling. In addition, this report includes the progress made in the modeling of the M8 core configuration and experiment vehicle since January of this year.

  16. Perspectives on Gamma-Ray Burst Physics and Cosmology with Next Generation Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Weimin; Amati, Lorenzo; Cannizzo, John K.; Cordier, Bertrand; Gehrels, Neil; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Götz, Diego; Produit, Nicolas; Qiu, Yulei; Sun, Jianchao; Tanvir, Nial R.; Wei, Jianyan; Zhang, Chen

    2016-12-01

    High-redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) beyond redshift {˜}6 are potentially powerful tools to probe the distant early Universe. Their detections in large numbers and at truly high redshifts call for the next generation of high-energy wide-field instruments with unprecedented sensitivity at least one order of magnitude higher than the ones currently in orbit. On the other hand, follow-up observations of the afterglows of high-redshift GRBs and identification of their host galaxies, which would be difficult for the currently operating telescopes, require new, extremely large facilities of at multi-wavelengths. This chapter describes future experiments that are expected to advance this exciting field, both being currently built and being proposed. The legacy of Swift will be continued by SVOM, which is equipped with a set of space-based multi-wavelength instruments as well as and a ground segment including a wide angle camera and two follow-up telescopes. The established Lobster-eye X-ray focusing optics provides a promising technology for the detection of faint GRBs at very large distances, based on which the THESEUS, Einstein Probe and other mission concepts have been proposed. Follow-up observations and exploration of the reionization era will be enabled by large facilities such as SKA in the radio, the 30 m class telescopes in the optical/near-IR, and the space-borne WFIRST and JWST in the optical/near-IR/mid-IR. In addition, the X-ray and γ-ray polarization experiment POLAR is also introduced.

  17. Perspectives on Gamma-Ray Burst Physics and Cosmology with Next Generation Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Weimin; Amati, Lorenzo; Cannizzo, John K.; Cordier, Bertrand; Gehrels, Neil; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Götz, Diego; Produit, Nicolas; Qiu, Yulei; Sun, Jianchao; Tanvir, Nial R.; Wei, Jianyan; Zhang, Chen

    2016-07-01

    High-redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) beyond redshift {˜}6 are potentially powerful tools to probe the distant early Universe. Their detections in large numbers and at truly high redshifts call for the next generation of high-energy wide-field instruments with unprecedented sensitivity at least one order of magnitude higher than the ones currently in orbit. On the other hand, follow-up observations of the afterglows of high-redshift GRBs and identification of their host galaxies, which would be difficult for the currently operating telescopes, require new, extremely large facilities of at multi-wavelengths. This chapter describes future experiments that are expected to advance this exciting field, both being currently built and being proposed. The legacy of Swift will be continued by SVOM, which is equipped with a set of space-based multi-wavelength instruments as well as and a ground segment including a wide angle camera and two follow-up telescopes. The established Lobster-eye X-ray focusing optics provides a promising technology for the detection of faint GRBs at very large distances, based on which the THESEUS, Einstein Probe and other mission concepts have been proposed. Follow-up observations and exploration of the reionization era will be enabled by large facilities such as SKA in the radio, the 30 m class telescopes in the optical/near-IR, and the space-borne WFIRST and JWST in the optical/near-IR/mid-IR. In addition, the X-ray and γ-ray polarization experiment POLAR is also introduced.

  18. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Jupiter Laser Facility is an institutional user facility in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. The facility is designed to provide a high degree...

  19. The Status of Women in Physics in the U.S.: Progress and New Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Aihua

    2005-10-01

    The 2005 Chair of the American Physical Society Committee on the Status of Women in Physics describes the committee's recent activities to recognize distinguished women physicists, improve the climate for women in physics, and provide leadership training for women in physics. The committee's response to the Harvard University president's suggestion of innate gender differences as regards women's representation in math and science is also discussed, as well as some encouraging developments in the status of women in physics in the U.S.

  20. Perspectives on Gamma-Ray Burst Physics and Cosmology with Next Generation Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Weimin; Cannizzo, John K; Cordier, Bertrand; Gehrels, Neil; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Götz, Diego; Produit, Nicolas; Qiu, Yulei; Sun, Jianchao; Tanvir, Nial R; Wei, Jianyan; Zhang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    High-redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) beyond redshift $\\sim6$ are potentially powerful tools to probe the distant early Universe. Their detections in large numbers and at truly high redshifts call for the next generation of high-energy wide-field instruments with unprecedented sensitivity at least one order of magnitude higher than the ones currently in orbit. On the other hand, follow-up observations of the afterglows of high-redshift GRBs and identification of their host galaxies, which would be difficult for the currently operating telescopes, require new, extremely large facilities of at multi-wavelengths. This chapter describes future experiments that are expected to advance this exciting field, both being currently built and being proposed. The legacy of Swift will be continued by SVOM, which is equipped with a set of space-based multi-wavelength instruments as well as and a ground segment including a wide angle camera and two follow-up telescopes. The established Lobster-eye X-ray focusing optics provi...

  1. A facile method for preparation superhydrophobic paper with enhanced physical strength and moisture-proofing property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Yang, Jin; Li, Pan; Lan, Tianqing; Peng, Lincai

    2017-03-15

    We proposed a green and facile method to fabricate superhydrophobic paper in this study, which is layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles/sodium alginate (ALG) multilayers on paper surface followed by an adsorption treatment of colloidal carnauba wax. The formation of TiO2/ALG multilayers on paper surface was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), zeta potential measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The wetting property of modified paper was investigated by water contact angle (WCA) measurement. Moreover, the modified paper tensile strength has been evaluated. The results showed that WCA of paper modified with a wax-treated (TiO2/ALG)3.5 multilayer reached up to 151.5°, and this obtained superhydrophobic paper exhibited improved tensile strength (increased by 4.1% compared to the pristine paper), excellent moisture-proofing property and high strength stability under high relative humidity condition, which might has a great potential for use in the liquid paper packaging and moisture-proof paper packaging.

  2. RFX-mod: A multi-configuration fusion facility for three-dimensional physics studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piovesan, P.; Bonfiglio, D.; Auriemma, F.; Bonomo, F.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; De Masi, G.; Fassina, A.; Franz, P.; Gobbin, M.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Martines, E.; Momo, B.; Piron, L.; Valisa, M.; Veranda, M.; Vianello, N.; Zaniol, B.; Agostini, M. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); and others

    2013-05-15

    RFX-mod [Sonato et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 66, 161 (2003)] exploits its 192 active coils in both reversed-field pinch (RFP) and tokamak configurations with varying degrees of 3D shaping, providing also a test bed for validating stellarator codes and 3D nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic codes. This makes RFX-mod a unique and flexible facility for comparative studies on 3D shaping and control. The paper discusses how 3D fields allow access to RFP and tokamak advanced regimes. 3D fields are used to feedback control Single Helicity (SH) RFP equilibria with 1/7 helicity up to ∼2 MA. They also allow accessing SH regimes with higher density (Greenwald fraction up to 0.5), presently inaccessible in spontaneous SH regimes. Feedback on the 2/1 resistive-wall mode in RFX-mod tokamak plasmas allows for safe operation at q(a)<2, an almost unexplored promising regime. Forcing the 2/1 mode to saturate at finite but small level, a helical tokamak equilibrium with significant n = 1 modulation is produced and a new way to tailor sawteeth is found. The effects of different levels of 3D shaping on momentum transport in both RFP and tokamak helical states are discussed.

  3. Sports Facilities, Shopping Centers or Homes: What Locations are Important for Adults’ Physical Activity? A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke Jansen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity (PA is influenced by the built environment. However, little is known about the types of built environment where adults spend their time, and at what levels of PA they engage in those environments. Understanding the effect of the built environment on PA requires insight into PA behavior at different types of locations (e.g., home, work, shopping centers, and sports facilities. Therefore, this study describes where adults aged 45–65 years were active with moderate-to-vigorous intensity (MVPA, and examines associations of socio-demographic factors and neighborhood with MVPA at these locations. Participants’ (N = 308 PA was measured for seven days using accelerometers and GPS-devices. Adults spent most minutes of MVPA at home and work. Highest MVPA-ratios of total time spent at a location were achieved in sports facilities and during transport. Neighborhood characteristics and socio-demographic factors such as work status, health status and household structure, had significant effects on MVPA at various locations and on total MVPA. Understanding PA behavior at various locations may provide insights that allow professionals in different domains (e.g., health, landscaping, urban planning to develop strategies to stimulate PA.

  4. Sports Facilities, Shopping Centers or Homes: What Locations are Important for Adults' Physical Activity? A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Marijke; Ettema, Dick; Pierik, Frank; Dijst, Martin

    2016-03-04

    Physical activity (PA) is influenced by the built environment. However, little is known about the types of built environment where adults spend their time, and at what levels of PA they engage in those environments. Understanding the effect of the built environment on PA requires insight into PA behavior at different types of locations (e.g., home, work, shopping centers, and sports facilities). Therefore, this study describes where adults aged 45-65 years were active with moderate-to-vigorous intensity (MVPA), and examines associations of socio-demographic factors and neighborhood with MVPA at these locations. Participants' (N = 308) PA was measured for seven days using accelerometers and GPS-devices. Adults spent most minutes of MVPA at home and work. Highest MVPA-ratios of total time spent at a location were achieved in sports facilities and during transport. Neighborhood characteristics and socio-demographic factors such as work status, health status and household structure, had significant effects on MVPA at various locations and on total MVPA. Understanding PA behavior at various locations may provide insights that allow professionals in different domains (e.g., health, landscaping, urban planning) to develop strategies to stimulate PA.

  5. Telephone-based motivational interviewing to promote physical activity and stage of change progression in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienthal, Kaitlin R; Pignol, Anna Evans; Holm, Jeffrey E; Vogeltanz-Holm, Nancy

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the efficacy of motivational interviewing (MI) for increasing physical activity in aging adults. Eighty-six participants aged 55 years and older were randomly assigned to receive either four weekly sessions of telephone-based MI for increasing physical activity, or a healthy activity living guide (information only control). Changes from baseline weekly caloric expenditure from physical activity, self-efficacy for physical activity, and stage of change for physical activity were compared across groups at posttreatment and six months follow-up. Results indicated that MI participants had higher weekly caloric expenditures from physical activity at posttreatment, but not at six months follow-up; higher self-efficacy for physical activity at six months follow-up; and demonstrated greater stage of change progression across assessments. These findings support the use of telephone-based MI for increasing physical activity in older adults in the short-term. Future studies will need to determine if follow-up booster sessions increase long-term efficacy.

  6. Development and testing of an ignition physics test facility and an oxygen/methane swirl torch igniter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Jesus Roberto

    There are many advantages to LOX/methane propulsion, such as in-situ resource utilization from Mars and the Moon, and simplicity of ground operations due to its non-toxic nature. There exists a lack of fundamental understanding of the ignition physics, and flame characteristics of these propellants when related to rocket propulsion, which has created undesirably long design cycles and flight hardware that is not optimized. Motivated by these issues, a study of the ignition physics of a shear coaxial injector is proposed, in which the flow field dynamics and ignition transients will be observed through a visually accessible combustion chamber. The main goal of this work is to study the effects of geometric differences of the injector, such as recess in the liquid oxygen post and thickness of the LOX post, on the jet breakup downstream of the injector, and the flame anchoring mechanism and location. A facility was developed to support this endeavor in a safe and efficient way, including a cryogenic delivery system, a Multipurpose Optically Accessible Combustor (MOAC) with torch igniter, and a bunker with a Data Acquisition and Remote Controls system (DARCS). A swirl coflow premixed torch igniter was designed, manufactured and developed with the intent of using it as the MOAC's main ignition source. It was designed to use oxygen and methane as the propellants in an incremental step towards the goal of a LOX/methane rocket engine. Extensive testing was done on the igniter in the development phase to prove that it will reliable ignite and sustain combustion under a variety of propellant inlet conditions of which include: warm gas, cold gas, and liquid cryogenic conditions. The testing phase also provided data for component reliability and proof of concept for the testing facilities designed, especially for the cryogenic delivery system, and methane condensing unit. Future injector testing parameters of the hardware produced is included along with recommendations to

  7. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviors Associated With Risk of Progression From Gestational Diabetes Mellitus to Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Wei; Tobias, Deirdre K; Bowers, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at substantially increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The identification of important modifiable factors could help prevent T2DM in this high-risk population. OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of physical...... their total physical activity levels, women who increased their total physical activity levels by 7.5 MET-h/wk or more (equivalent to 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity) had a 47% lower risk of T2DM (RR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.38-0.75); the association remained significant after additional...... activity and television watching and other sedentary behaviors, and changes in these behaviors in the progression from GDM to T2DM. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Prospective cohort study of 4554 women from the Nurses' Health Study II who had a history of GDM, as part of the ongoing Diabetes & Women...

  8. CERN, World's largest particle physics lab, selects Progress SonicMQ

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Progress Software Corporation (NADAQ: PRGS), a global supplier of application insfrastructure software used to develop, deploy, integrate and manage business applications, today announced that CERN the world's largest physis laboratory and particle accelerator, has chosen Progress® SonicMQ® for mission-critical message delivery." (1 page)

  9. Particle physics and cosmology, Task C. Progress report, January 1992--April 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S.

    1993-05-01

    The research has spanned many topics at the boundary of particle physics and cosmology. The major focus has been in the general areas of inflationary cosmology, cosmological phase transitions, astrophysical constraints to particle physics theories, and dark matter/structure formation as it relates to particle physics. Some attention is given to axion physics. Narrative summaries of the research of the individual group members are given, followed by a list of publications.

  10. Facile preparation of methylcellulose/poly(vinyl alcohol) physical complex hydrogels with tunable thermosensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Nan Geng; Cong Ming Xiao

    2009-01-01

    Novel complex hydrogels of methylcellulose (MC) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with wide-spectrum thermoresponsivity were prepared via physical and mild process. Thermal phase transition of MC/PVA hydrogels exhibited two forms including sol/sol to gel/sol and sol/gel to gel/gel. The phase transition temperature of MC/PVA solution ranged from 38.7 to 60.6 ℃ and was able to be adjusted by simply changing the feeding ratios of two components. The interior morphology of MC/PVA gels was examined with fluorescence analysis and scanning electron microscopy analysis, which showed that MC was well dispersed in matrix before and after thermally gelling.

  11. Progress in high energy physics and nuclear safety : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Safe Nuclear Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Polański, Aleksander; Begun, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    The book contains recent results on the progress in high-energy physics, accelerator, detection and nuclear technologies, as well as nuclear safety in high-energy experimentation and in nuclear industry, covered by leading experts in the field. The forthcoming experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and cosmic-ray experiments are highlighted. Most of the current high-energy experiments and their physical motivation are analyzed. Various nuclear energy safety aspects, including progress in the production of new radiation-resistant materials, new and safe nuclear reactor designs, such as the slowly-burning reactor, as well as the use of coal-nuclear symbiotic methods of energy production can be found in the book.

  12. Physics Division annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977. [ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelson, P.H.

    1977-09-01

    The bulk of the Division's effort concerned nuclear physics and accelerator development, but work in the areas of nuclear data, research applicable to the magnetic fusion project, atomic and molecular physics, and high-energy physics is also recounted. Lists of publications, technical talks, personnel, etc., are included. Individual reports with sufficient data are abstracted separately. (RWR)

  13. Elementary particle physics at the University of Florida. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Task A: theoretical elementary particle physics; Task B: experimental elementary particle physics; Task C: axion project; Task G: experimental research in collider physics; and Task S: computer acquisition. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. The Influence of Daily Structured Physical Activity on Academic Progress of Elementary Students with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Brett; Dimon, Chelsea; Stone, Danielle; Desmond, Deborah; Casilio, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests regular physical activity can positively influence academic performance. Although, little has been published on physical activity's impact on academic performance of students with intellectual disabilities, research shows the impact on brain and cognitive function of movement and physical activity. In this study, seven…

  15. Future directions of accelerator-based NP and HEP facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roser, T.

    2011-07-24

    Progress in particle and nuclear physics has been closely connected to the progress in accelerator technologies - a connection that is highly beneficial to both fields. This paper presents a review of the present and future facilities and accelerator technologies that will push the frontiers of high-energy particle interactions and high intensity secondary particle beams.

  16. Theory and phenomenology of strong and weak interaction high energy physics: Progress report, May 1, 1987-April 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carruthers, P.; Thews, R.L.

    1988-01-22

    This paper contains progress information on the following topics in High Energy Physics: strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions; aspects of quark-gluon models for hadronic interactions, decays, and structure; the dynamical generation of a mass gap and the role and truthfulness of perturbation theory; statistical and dynamical aspects of hadronic multiparticle production; and realization of chiral symmetry and temperature effects in supersymmetric theories. (LSP)

  17. Engineering and Physics Optimization of Breed and Burn Fast Reactor Systems; NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE (NERI) QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ERROR, [value too long for type character varying(50); Hejzlar, Pavel; Yarsky, Peter; Driscoll, Mike; Wachs, Dan; Weaver, Kevan; Czerwinski, Ken; Pope, Mike; Parry, James; Marshall, Theron D.; Davis, Cliff B.; Crawford, Dustin; Hartmann, Thomas; Saha, Pradip

    2005-01-31

    This project is organized under four major tasks (each of which has two or more subtasks) with contributions among the three collaborating organizations (MIT, INEEL and ANL-West): Task A: Core Physics and Fuel Cycle; Task B: Core Thermal Hydraulics; Task C: Plant Design; Task D: Fuel Design The lead PI, Michael J. Driscoll, has consolidated and summarized the technical progress submissions provided by the contributing investigators from all sites, under the above principal task headings.

  18. Evaluation of the Initial Isothermal Physics Measurements at the Fast Flux Test Facility, a Prototypic Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess

    2010-03-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400-MWt, sodium-cooled, low-pressure, high-temperature, fast-neutron flux, nuclear fission reactor plant designed for the irradiation testing of nuclear reactor fuels and materials for the development of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs). The FFTF was fueled with plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) and reflected by Inconel-600. Westinghouse Hanford Company operated the FFTF as part of the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) for the U.S. Department of Energy on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Although the FFTF was a testing facility not specifically designed to breed fuel or produce electricity, it did provide valuable information for LMFBR projects and base technology programs in the areas of plant system and component design, component fabrication, prototype testing, and site construction. The major objectives of the FFTF were to provide a strong, disciplined engineering base for the LMFBR program, provide fast flux testing for other U.S. programs, and contribute to the development of a viable self-sustaining competitive U.S. LMFBR industry. During its ten years of operation, the FFTF acted as a national research facility to test advanced nuclear fuels, materials, components, systems, nuclear power plant operating and maintenance procedures, and active and passive reactor safety technologies; it also produced a large number of isotopes for medical and industrial users, generated tritium for the U.S. fusion research program, and participated in cooperative, international research work. Prior to the implementation of the reactor characterization program, a series of isothermal physics measurements were performed; this acceptance testing program consisted of a series of control rod worths, critical rod positions, subcriticality measurements, maximum reactivity addition rates, shutdown margins, excess reactivity, and isothermal temperature coefficient reactivity. The results of these

  19. Facile approach to fabricate waterborne polyaniline nanocomposites with environmental benignity and high physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haihua; Wen, Huan; Hu, Bin; Fei, Guiqiang; Shen, Yiding; Sun, Liyu; Yang, Dong

    2017-03-01

    Waterborne polyaniline (PANI) dispersion has got extensive attention due to its environmental friendliness and good processability, whereas the storage stability and mechanical property have been the challenge for the waterborne PANI composites. Here we prepare for waterborne PANI dispersion through the chemical graft polymerisation of PANI into epichlorohydrin modified poly (vinyl alcohol) (EPVA). In comparison with waterborne PANI dispersion prepared through physical blend and in situ polymerisation, the storage stability of PANI-g-EPVA dispersion is greatly improved and the dispersion keeps stable for one year. In addition, the as-prepared PANI-g-EPVA film displays more uniform and smooth morphology, as well as enhanced phase compatibility. PANI is homogeneously distributed in the EPVA matrix on the nanoscale. PANI-g-EPVA displays different morphology at different aniline content. The electrical conductivity corresponds to 7.3 S/cm when only 30% PANI is incorporated into the composites, and then increases up to 20.83 S/cm with further increase in the aniline content. Simultaneously, the tensile strength increases from 35 MPa to 64 MPa. The as-prepared PANI-g-EPVA dispersion can be directly used as the conductive ink or coatings for cellulose fibre paper to prepare flexible conductive paper with high conductivity and mechanical property, which is also suitable for large scalable production.

  20. Weight and Physical Activity - Prevention Summary Table | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  1. Survival, Smoking, Physical Activity, and Obesity - Life After Cancer Summary Table | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  2. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, October 1976-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A.

    1979-01-01

    DOE Contract No. EY-76-S-02-4078 was started in October 1976 to set up an investigative radiochemical facility at the Yale Medical Center which would bridge the gap between current investigation with radionuclides at the Yale School of Medicine and the facilities in the Chemistry Department at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. To facilitate these goals, Dr. Mathew L. Thakur was recruited who joined the Yale University faculty in March of 1977. This report briefly summarizes our research accomplishments through the end of June 1979. These can be broadly classified into three categories: (1) research using indium-111 labelled cellular blood components; (2) development of new radiopharmaceuticals; and (3) interaction with Dr. Alfred Wolf and colleagues in the Chemistry Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  3. Review of Physics Research Programs at LAMPF. Progress report, January-December 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C. (ed.)

    1984-04-01

    Research and development summaries are presented under the main headings: research, proton storage ring construction and research program development, status of LAMPF II, facility and experimental development, and accelerator operations. Complete lists are given for experiments run in 1983, new prospects, and active and complete experiments by channel. (WHK)

  4. Research Progress of Nuclear Astrophysics Physics:Study of Key Scientific Problems in Nuclear Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Bing; LIU; Wei-ping; LI; Zhi-hong; WANG; You-bao; HE; Jian-jun; SHI; Jian-rong; TANG; Xiao-dong; YAN; Sheng-quan; SU; Jun; LI; Yun-ju; ZENG; Sheng; LIAN; Gang; BAI; Xi-xiang; CHEN; Yong-shou; PANG; Dan-yang; GU; Jian-zhong; HAN; Zhi-yu; LI; Xin-yue

    2015-01-01

    1 Summary A systematic study of the key scientific problems in nuclear synthesis has been conducted.Significant research achievements from several important subjects such as direct measurement of astrophysical reaction,observation of abundances of elements,studies on decay properties of nuclei and reaction rates of primordial nucleosynthesis have been made utilizing large scientific facilities from China

  5. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1--March 31, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the progress of eight Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988. The facilities represented by the eight projects are the 300 Area Process trenches, 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds, Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill, 216-A-36B Crib, 1301-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility, 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility, and 1324-N/NA Surface Impoundment and Percolation Ponds. The latter four projects are included in this series of quarterly reports for the first time. This report is the seventh in a series of periodic status reports; the first six cover the period from May 1, 1986, through December 31, 1987 (PNL 1986; 1987a, b, c, d; 1988a). This report satisfies the requirements of Section 17B(3) of the Consent Agreement and Compliance Order issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (1986a) to the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office. 13 refs., 19 figs., 24 tabs.

  6. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending August 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-01

    This paper contains abstracts on research performed at the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The areas covered are: mathematical science; nuclear-data measurement and evaluation; intelligent systems; nuclear analysis and shielding; and Engineering Physics Information Center. (LSP)

  7. Developing Technical Writing Skills in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory: A Progressive Approach Employing Peer Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragson, Derek E.; Hagen, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Writing formal "journal-style" lab reports is often one of the requirements chemistry and biochemistry students encounter in the physical chemistry laboratory. Helping students improve their technical writing skills is the primary reason this type of writing is a requirement in the physical chemistry laboratory. Developing these skills is an…

  8. Division of Atomic Physics. Lund Institute of Technology. Progress Report 1993-1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlstroem, C.G. [ed.

    1995-12-31

    The Division of Atomic Physics is responsible for basic physics teaching in all engineering disciplines and for specialized teaching in Optics, Atomic Physics, Spectroscopy, Laser Physics, and Non-Linear Optics. Research activities are mainly carried out in the fields of basic and applied spectroscopy, largely based on the use of lasers. Projects in the following areas are reported: Basic Atomic Physics - Atomic physics with high power laser radiation; Laser spectroscopic investigations of atomic and ionic excited states in the short-wavelength region; Laser spectroscopy in the visible; Theoretical Atomic Physics; Applied Optics and Quantum Electronics -High resolution spectroscopy; Photon echoes in Rare Earth Ion Doped Crystals; diode laser Spectroscopy; Environmental Remote Sensing -Tropospheric Ozone Lidar; Measurement of gases of geophysical origin; Industrial and Urban Pollution Measurements; Laser induced fluorescence of vegetation and water; Applications in Medicine and Biology - Tissue diagnostic using Laser-induced fluorescence; Photodynamic Therapy; Measurement of Optical Properties of Tissue with applications to Diagnostics; Two Photon Excited fluorescence Microscopy; Capillary Electrophoresis; New Techniques; Industrial Applications - Optical spectroscopy in Metallurgy; Physics of Electric Breakdown in Dielectric liquids; Optical Spectroscopy of Paper.

  9. Developing Technical Writing Skills in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory: A Progressive Approach Employing Peer Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragson, Derek E.; Hagen, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Writing formal "journal-style" lab reports is often one of the requirements chemistry and biochemistry students encounter in the physical chemistry laboratory. Helping students improve their technical writing skills is the primary reason this type of writing is a requirement in the physical chemistry laboratory. Developing these skills is an…

  10. Progress report on evaluation of potential impact of /sup 14/C releases from an HTGR reprocessing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killough, G.G.; Dixon, K.R.; Edwards, N.T.; Murphy, B.D.; Rohwer, P.S.; Harris, W.F.; Kaye, S.V.

    1976-07-01

    The potential radiological impacts of atmospheric releases of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ are assessed for a model HTGR reprocessing facility. Two off-gas systems were considered: (1) a 300-ft stack with no thermal output, and (2) a 1000-ft stack with a stack gas temperature of 80/sup 0/C and heat output of 4.2 x 10/sup 7/ Btu/hr. Meteorological data for the Oak Ridge area were used with an assumed annual release rate of 5000 Ci as input to an atmospheric transport model, which in turn was used to predict air concentrations of /sup 14/C at points of habitation and food production in the local area (within 50 miles) of the facility. The total-body dose rates estimated for the average resident living in the local area were 0.107 mrem/yr for the 300-ft stack and 0.063 mrem/yr for the 1000-ft stack. Population doses were computed for a population of 10/sup 6/ individuals uniformly distributed within the 50-mile local area of the facility; these were 110 man-rem for the 300-ft stack and 63 man-rem for the 1000-ft stack. The results of these dose calculations suggest that a 1000-ft stack would be very effective in reducing the estimated doses. Plant growth carbon assimilation model was derived in order to investigate the adequacy of the assumption of tissue equilibration with time-averaged ambient specific activity as a basis for dose estimates. Simulation runs with these models suggest that in the presence of frequent fluctuations of large amplitude in the ambient air /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ concentrations, specific activity in plant tissue can exceed conventionally calculated time-averaged specific activity.

  11. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, June 1981-July 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A

    1982-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following research areas: (1) evaluation of /sup 14/C-labelled carboxyethyl ester 2-cardoxy methyl ester of arachidonic acid; (2) the effects of drug intervention on cardiac inflammatory response following experimental myocardial infarction using indium-111 labeled autologous leukoyctes; (3) the evaluation of /sup 97/Ru-oxine to label human platelets in autologous plasma; and (4) the specific in vitro radiolabeling of human neutrophils. (ACR)

  12. The Impact of Physical Facilities on Students' Level of Motivation and Academic Performance in Senior Secondary Schools in South West Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akomolafe, Comfort Olufunke; Adesua, Veronica Olubunmi

    2016-01-01

    The paper examines the relevance of physical facilities in enhancing the level of motivation and the academic performance of senior secondary school students in South West Nigeria. The study adopted ex-post facto design. The population consists of all senior secondary students in South West Nigeria. The sample for the study include one thousand…

  13. Final design and progress of WEAVE: the next generation wide-field spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Gavin; Trager, Scott; Abrams, Don Carlos; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; Middleton, Kevin; Benn, Chris; Dee, Kevin; Sayède, Frédéric; Lewis, Ian; Pragt, Johannes; Pico, Sergio; Walton, Nic; Rey, Jeurg; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Peñate, José; Lhome, Emilie; Agócs, Tibor; Alonso, José; Terrett, David; Brock, Matthew; Gilbert, James; Schallig, Ellen; Ridings, Andy; Guinouard, Isabelle; Verheijen, Marc; Tosh, Ian; Rogers, Kevin; Lee, Martin; Steele, Iain; Stuik, Remko; Tromp, Niels; Jaskó, Attila; Carrasco, Esperanza; Farcas, Szigfrid; Kragt, Jan; Lesman, Dirk; Kroes, Gabby; Mottram, Chris; Bates, Stuart; Rodriguez, Luis Fernando; Gribbin, Frank; Delgado, José Miguel; Herreros, José Miguel; Martin, Carlos; Cano, Diego; Navarro, Ramon; Irwin, Mike; Lewis, Jim; Gonzalez Solares, Eduardo; Murphy, David; Worley, Clare; Bassom, Richard; O'Mahoney, Neil; Bianco, Andrea; Zurita, Christina; ter Horst, Rik; Molinari, Emilio; Lodi, Marcello; Guerra, José; Martin, Adrian; Vallenari, Antonella; Salasnich, Bernardo; Baruffolo, Andrea; Jin, Shoko; Hill, Vanessa; Smith, Dan; Drew, Janet; Poggianti, Bianca; Pieri, Mat; Dominquez Palmero, Lillian; Farina, Cecilia

    2016-08-01

    We present the Final Design of the WEAVE next-generation spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT), together with a status update on the details of manufacturing, integration and the overall project schedule now that all the major fabrication contracts are in place. We also present a summary of the current planning behind the 5-year initial phase of survey operations. WEAVE will provide optical ground-based follow up of ground-based (LOFAR) and space-based (Gaia) surveys. WEAVE is a multi-object and multi-IFU facility utilizing a new 2-degree prime focus field of view at the WHT, with a buffered pick-and-place positioner system hosting 1000 multi-object (MOS) fibres, 20 integral field units, or a single large IFU for each observation. The fibres are fed to a single (dual-beam) spectrograph, with total of 16k spectral pixels, located within the WHT GHRIL enclosure on the telescope Nasmyth platform, supporting observations at R 5000 over the full 370-1000nm wavelength range in a single exposure, or a high resolution mode with limited coverage in each arm at R 20000. The project is now in the manufacturing and integration phase with first light expected for early of 2018.

  14. Research in elementary particle physics. Progress report, March 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Lai-Him; Haymaker, R.; Imlay, R.; McNeil, R.; Metcalf, W.; Svoboda, R.

    1993-10-01

    Theoretical work on effective action expansion, low-energy models of hadrons and lattice gauge theories is reported. The progress on the electron-proton experiment ZEUS in Germany, LSND neutrino experiment at LAMPF, the Dumand experiment in Hawaii, and the Super Kamiokande experiment in Japan is described. Results from IMB are described.

  15. Fusion related atomic physics. Progress report, June 1, 1975--February 28, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-02-01

    Summaries of research progress on ion--atom collisions are given. Electron capture by high velocity point charges (bare nuclei with Z less than or equal to 9) was studied in several ways. Studies on the nuclear reactions induced by /sup 13/C and /sup 9/Be ions near the Coulomb barrier have continued. (MOW)

  16. Neutron Physics Division progress report for period ending February 28, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maienschein, F.C.

    1977-05-01

    Summaries are given of research progress in the following areas: (1) measurements of cross sections and related quantities, (2) cross section evaluations and theory, (3) cross section processing, testing, and sensitivity analysis, (4) integral experiments and their analyses, (5) development of methods for shield and reactor analyses, (6) analyses for specific systems or applications, and (7) information analysis and distribution. (SDF)

  17. Microsensors for in-situ chemical, physical, and radiological characterization of mixed waste. 1998 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thundat, T.G.; Warmack, R.J.; Dabestani, R.; Britt, P.; Bonnesen, P.V.; Brown, G.M.

    1998-06-01

    'A widespread need exists for portable, real-time, in-situ chemical, physical, and radiological sensors for characterization of mixed wastes, groundwater, contaminated solids, and process streams. None of the currently available technologies offer a clear path to the development of sensors that are miniature, cost-effective, selective, highly sensitive with a wide dynamic range, and have the ability to work in air or liquid while providing chemical, physical, and radiological information. The objective of this research program is to conduct the fundamental research necessary to develop microcantilever-based micromechanical sensors for in-situ characterization of groundwater, sediments, and mixed wastes. Chemical selectivity will be achieved by coupling surface modification chemistry with molecular recognition agents. Physical measurements of adsorption (absorption) induced deflection (bending) and resonance frequency variation of microcantilevers can be achieved with extreme precision resulting in ppb-ppt sensitivity. Good progress has been made in the first nine months of this project. Progress has been made in three focus areas: radiation detection, detection of heavy metals in water, modification of microcantilever surfaces for chemical selectivity, and pH measurement.'

  18. Recent progress and review of Physics Dynamics Coupling in geophysical models

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Markus; Rasch, Philip J; Caldwell, Peter M; Williamson, David L; Klocke, Daniel; Jablonowski, Christiane; Thatcher, Diana R; Wood, Nigel; Cullen, Mike; Beare, Bob; Willett, Martin; Lemarié, Florian; Blayo, Eric; Malardel, Sylvie; Termonia, Piet; Gassmann, Almut; Lauritzen, Peter H; Johansen, Hans; Zarzycki, Colin M; Sakaguchi, Koichi; Leung, Ruby

    2016-01-01

    Geophysical models of the atmosphere and ocean invariably involve parameterizations. These represent two distinct areas: a) Subgrid processes which the model cannot (yet) resolve, due to its discrete resolution, and b) sources in the equation, due to radiation for example. Hence coupling between these physics parameterizations and the resolved fluid dynamics and also between the dynamics of the different fluids in the system (air and water) is necessary. This coupling is an important aspect of geophysical models. However, often model development is strictly segregated into either physics or dynamics. Hence, this area has many more unanswered questions than in-depth understanding. Furthermore, recent developments in the design of dynamical cores (e.g. significant increase of resolution, move to non-hydrostatic equation sets etc), extended process physics (e.g. prognostic micro physics, 3D turbulence, non-vertical radiation etc) and predicted future changes of the computational infrastructure (e.g. Exascale wit...

  19. Progressive adaptation in physical activity and neuromuscular performance during 520d confinement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belavý, Daniel L; Gast, Ulf; Daumer, Martin; Fomina, Elena; Rawer, Rainer; Schießl, Hans; Schneider, Stefan; Schubert, Harald; Soaz, Cristina; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    To understand whether prolonged confinement results in reductions in physical activity and adaptation in the musculoskeletal system, six subjects were measured during 520 d isolation in the Mars500 study...

  20. Quantum Chromodynamics and nuclear physics at extreme energy density. Progress report, May 1992--April 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, B.

    1993-05-15

    This report discusses research in the following topics: Hadron structure physics; relativistic heavy ion collisions; finite- temperature QCD; real-time lattice gauge theory; and studies in quantum field theory.

  1. Research in elementary particle physics. Technical progress report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirsch, L.E.; Schnitzer, H.J.; Bensinger, J.R.; Blocker, C.A.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas of high energy physics: B meson mixing; CDF response to low energy jets; jet scaling behavior; search for pair produced leptoquarks at CDF; SSC program; quantum field theory; and neural networks. (LSP).

  2. Research in theoretical particle physics. Technical progress report, May 1, 1991--April 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKay, D.W.; Munczek, H.; Ralston, J.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses the following topics in high energy physics: dynamical symmetry breaking and Schwinger-Dyson equation; consistency bound on the minimal model Higgs mass; tests of physics beyond the standard model; particle astrophysics; the interface between perturbative and non-perturbative QCD; cosmology; anisotropy in quantum networks and integer quantum hall behavior; anomalous color transparency; quantum treatment of solitons; color transparency; quantum stabilization of skyrmions; and casimir effect. (LSP)

  3. Association Euratom - DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics - Annual Progress Report 2012

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom – DTU, Technical University of Denmark covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology ther...

  4. Association Euratom - DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics - Annual Progress Report 2013

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom – DTU, Technical University of Denmark covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomsonscattering. Within fusion technology there...

  5. Association Euratom - DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics - Annual Progress Report 2011

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom – DTU, Technical University of Denmark (until 31-12- 2011: Association Euratom – Risø DTU) covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collecti...

  6. Theoretical Studies in Nuclear Physics. Progress report, 1 May 1991--30 April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, R.H.; Madsen, V.A.

    1992-12-31

    Work in nuclear structure and reaction theory, specifically, the relation of reactions to the nuclear structure. Other work was in intermediate energy physics, few-body problems, and computational physics that heavy ions can be used to measure simultaneously both neutron and proton multipole matrix elements of the target nucleus has added new interest to this area of nuclear structure. Considerable attention to the is therefore paid to the to the methods for calculating multiple matrix elements.

  7. Solar-Heliospheric-Interstellar Cosmic Ray Tour with the NASA Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory and the Space Physics Data Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Papitashvili, Natalia E.; Johnson, Rita C.; Lal, Nand; McGuire, Robert E.

    2015-04-01

    NASA now has a large collection of solar, heliospheric, and local interstellar (Voyager 1) cosmic ray particle data sets that can be accessed through the data system services of the NASA Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) in collaboration with the NASA Space Physics Data Facility SPDF), respectively led by the first and last authors. The VEPO services were developed to enhance the long-existing OMNIWeb solar wind and energetic particle services of SPDF for on-line browse, correlative, and statistical analysis of NASA and ESA mission fields, plasma, and energetic particle data. In this presentation we take of tour through VEPO and SPDF of SEP reservoir events, the outer heliosphere earlier surveyed by the Pioneer, Voyager, and Ulysses spacecraft and now being probed by New Horizons, and the heliosheath-heliopause-interstellar regions now being explored by the Voyagers and IBEX. Implications of the latter measurements are also considered for the flux spectra of low to high energy cosmic rays in interstellar space.

  8. Virtual reality in the creation of a tool to support planning of physical security at nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santo, Andre Cotelli do E.; Mol, Antonio Carlos de A.; Goncalves, Deise Galvao de S.; Marins, Eugenio; Freitas, Victor Goncalves G., E-mail: cotelli.andre@gmail.com, E-mail: mol@ien.gov.br, E-mail: deise.galvao@gmail.com, E-mail: eugenio@ien.gov.br, E-mail: vgoncalves@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio De Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In recent years was observed the importance of improving the physical security of nuclear facilities, mainly due to the increasing advancement of brazilian nuclear program. The present work aims to develop a tool that allows the visualization and planning of action strategies in a virtual environment, in order to improve this security. To this end, was created a virtual model of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), which is located on Ilha do Fundao - Rio de Janeiro - Brazil. This environment is a three-dimensional model, with representations close to reality, where virtual characters (avatars) can move and interact in real time. In this virtual world, it was developed a dynamic weather system, where is possible to change between day and night, and climate changes such as: rain, storms, snow, among other features. Furthermore, the tool has a surveillance system using virtual cameras, allowing the monitoring of the environment. This way, making possible to simulate strategies approach, allowing an evaluation of the procedures performed, as well as assisting in the training of security installations subject to radiation. (author)

  9. How Novel Algorithms and Access to High Performance Computing Platforms are Enabling Scientific Progress in Atomic and Molecular Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Barry I.

    2016-10-01

    Over the past 40 years there has been remarkable progress in the quantitative treatment of complex many-body problems in atomic and molecular physics (AMP). This has happened as a consequence of the development of new and powerful numerical methods, translating these algorithms into practical software and the associated evolution of powerful computing platforms ranging from desktops to high performance computational instruments capable of massively parallel computation. We are taking the opportunity afforded by this CCP2015 to review computational progress in scattering theory and the interaction of strong electromagnetic fields with atomic and molecular systems from the early 1960’s until the present time to show how these advances have revealed a remarkable array of interesting and in many cases unexpected features. The article is by no means complete and certainly reflects the views and experiences of the author.

  10. Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume I of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Paul

    2003-01-01

    In fulfillment of the NWPPC's 3-Step Process for the implementation of new hatcheries in the Columbia Basin, this Step 1 submission package to the Council includes four items: (1) Cover letter from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe, Interdisciplinary Team Chair, and the USFWS; (2) References to key information (Attachments 1-4); (3) The updated Master Plan for the Tribe's native cutthroat restoration project; and (4) Appendices. In support of the Master Plan submitted by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe the reference chart (Item 2) was developed to allow reviewers to quickly access information necessary for accurate peer review. The Northwest Power Planning Council identified pertinent issues to be addressed in the master planning process for new artificial production facilities. References to this key information are provided in three attachments: (1) NWPPC Program language regarding the Master Planning Process, (2) Questions Identified in the September 1997 Council Policy, and (3) Program language identified by the Council's Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP). To meet the need for off-site mitigation for fish losses on the mainstem Columbia River, in a manner consistent with the objectives of the Council's Program, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe is proposing that the BPA fund the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of a trout production facility located adjacent to Coeur d'Alene Lake on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The updated Master Plan (Item 3) represents the needs associated with the re-evaluation of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Trout Production Facility (No.199004402). This plan addresses issues and concerns expressed by the NWPPC as part of the issue summary for the Mountain Columbia provincial review, and the 3-step hatchery review process. Finally, item 4 (Appendices) documents the 3-Step process correspondence to date between the Coeur d'Alene Tribe and additional relevant entities. Item 4

  11. Resource conservation and recovery act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report, January 1--March 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-06-01

    This document describes the progress of 13 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period January 1 to March 31, 1989. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality. 32 refs., 30 figs., 103 tabs.

  12. South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control federal facility agreement. Annual progress report, fiscal year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hucks, R.L.

    1996-01-30

    South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) reviewed 105 primary documents during fiscal year 1995 (October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995). The primary documents reviewed consisted of 27 RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation (RFI/RI) workplans, 13 RFI/RI Reports, 12 Baseline Risk Assessments (BRA`s), 27 Site Evaluation (SE) Reports, 8 Proposed Plans, 5 Record of Decisions (ROD`s), 6 Remedial Design Workplans, 6 Remedial Action Workplans and 10 miscellaneous primary documents. Numerous other administrative duties were conducted during the reporting period that are not accounted for above. These included, but were not limited to, extension requests, monitoring well approvals, and Treatability Studies. The list of outgoing correspondence from SCDHEC to the Department of Energy (DOE) and Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is attached.

  13. Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama. Technical progress report, Run 243 with Illinois 6 coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-02-01

    This report presents the operating results for Run 243 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R and D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run was made in an Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (ITSL) mode using Illinois 6 coal from the Burning Star mine. The primary objective was to demonstrate the effect of a dissolver on the ITSL product slate, especially on the net C/sub 1/-C/sub 5/ gas production and hydrogen consumption. Run 243 began on 3 February 1983 and continued through 28 June 1983. During this period, 349.8 tons of coal was fed in 2947 hours of operation. Thirteen special product workup material balances were defined, and the results are presented herein. 29 figures, 19 tables.

  14. The PixFEL project: Progress towards a fine pitch X-ray imaging camera for next generation FEL facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, G.; Batignani, G.; Benkechkache, M. A.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Comotti, D.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Fabris, L.; Forti, F.; Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Mendicino, R.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Pancheri, L.; Paoloni, E.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.

    2016-07-01

    The INFN PixFEL project is developing the fundamental building blocks for a large area X-ray imaging camera to be deployed at next generation free electron laser (FEL) facilities with unprecedented intensity. Improvement in performance beyond the state of art in imaging instrumentation will be explored adopting advanced technologies like active edge sensors, a 65 nm node CMOS process and vertical integration. These are the key ingredients of the PixFEL project to realize a seamless large area focal plane instrument composed by a matrix of multilayer four-side buttable tiles. In order to minimize the dead area and reduce ambiguities in image reconstruction, a fine pitch active edge thick sensor is being optimized to cope with very high intensity photon flux, up to 104 photons per pixel, in the range from 1 to 10 keV. A low noise analog front-end channel with this wide dynamic range and a novel dynamic compression feature, together with a low power 10 bit analog to digital conversion up to 5 MHz, has been realized in a 110 μm pitch with a 65 nm CMOS process. Vertical interconnection of two CMOS tiers will be also explored in the future to build a four-side buttable readout chip with high density memories. In the long run the objective of the PixFEL project is to build a flexible X-ray imaging camera for operation both in burst mode, like at the European X-FEL, or in continuous mode with the high frame rates anticipated for future FEL facilities.

  15. The PixFEL project: Progress towards a fine pitch X-ray imaging camera for next generation FEL facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, G., E-mail: giuliana.rizzo@pi.infn.it [Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Batignani, G. [Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Benkechkache, M.A. [Università di Trento, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, I-38123 Trento (Italy); University Constantine 1, Department of Electronics in the Science and Technology Faculty, I-25017, Constantine (Algeria); Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G. [Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Comotti, D. [Università di Pavia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell' Informazione, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [Università di Trento, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, I-38123 Trento (Italy); TIFPA INFN, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Fabris, L. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Università di Bergamo, Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienze Applicate, I-24044 Dalmine (Italy); Forti, F. [Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P. [Università di Pavia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell' Informazione, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Manghisoni, M. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Università di Bergamo, Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienze Applicate, I-24044 Dalmine (Italy); and others

    2016-07-11

    The INFN PixFEL project is developing the fundamental building blocks for a large area X-ray imaging camera to be deployed at next generation free electron laser (FEL) facilities with unprecedented intensity. Improvement in performance beyond the state of art in imaging instrumentation will be explored adopting advanced technologies like active edge sensors, a 65 nm node CMOS process and vertical integration. These are the key ingredients of the PixFEL project to realize a seamless large area focal plane instrument composed by a matrix of multilayer four-side buttable tiles. In order to minimize the dead area and reduce ambiguities in image reconstruction, a fine pitch active edge thick sensor is being optimized to cope with very high intensity photon flux, up to 10{sup 4} photons per pixel, in the range from 1 to 10 keV. A low noise analog front-end channel with this wide dynamic range and a novel dynamic compression feature, together with a low power 10 bit analog to digital conversion up to 5 MHz, has been realized in a 110 μm pitch with a 65 nm CMOS process. Vertical interconnection of two CMOS tiers will be also explored in the future to build a four-side buttable readout chip with high density memories. In the long run the objective of the PixFEL project is to build a flexible X-ray imaging camera for operation both in burst mode, like at the European X-FEL, or in continuous mode with the high frame rates anticipated for future FEL facilities.

  16. Does the level of physical activity in university students influence development and progression of myopia? - A 2-year prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Niels; Jensen, Hanne; Goldschmidt, E.

    2008-01-01

    with a refractive change toward myopia, whereas physical activity was inversely associated with a refractive change toward myopia (P = 0.015). Myopic eyes progressed significantly more than did emmetropic and hyperopic eyes (P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS. An association between physical activity and myopia was observed......PURPOSE. To study whether physical activity has a protective effect on the development and progression of myopia in medical students. METHODS. In a 2-year longitudinal cohort study, 156 Caucasian first-year medical students from the University of Copenhagen were enrolled. The baseline examination......, suggesting a protective effect of physical activity on the development and progression of myopia in university students. The results confirm that intensive studying is a risk factor of myopia and that myopic progression or development is more likely in medical students in their early 20s than in their late...

  17. A progressive mesh method for physical simulations using lattice Boltzmann method on single-node multi-gpu architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Duchateau, Julien; Maquignon, Nicolas; Roussel, Gilles; Renaud, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new progressive mesh algorithm is introduced in order to perform fast physical simulations by the use of a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) on a single-node multi-GPU architecture. This algorithm is able to mesh automatically the simulation domain according to the propagation of fluids. This method can also be useful in order to perform various types of simulations on complex geometries. The use of this algorithm combined with the massive parallelism of GPUs allows to obtain very good performance in comparison with the static mesh method used in literature. Several simulations are shown in order to evaluate the algorithm.

  18. Studies in Medium Energy Physics. Progress report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, G.W.; McDonough, J.; Purcell, M.J.; Ray, R.L.; Read, D.M.; Worm, S.D.

    1992-12-01

    Progress is briefly reported in the following areas: p + A precision elastic forward-angle cross sections for 500- to 800-MeV p on {sup 40}Ca; precision measurement of D{sub NN} for {sup 13}C({rvec p}, {rvec p}) at 500 MeV; design of a polarized nuclear target; search for very rare K{sub L} decays; search for the H dibaryon; experimental search for quark -- gluon plasma; and theoretical work on proton -- nucleus scattering.

  19. Exploring learning progressions of form-4 physics students in Hong Kong using assessment for learning strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, Purvi Anand

    2015-01-01

    An emerging concept of Learning Progressions (LPs) has been becoming popular amongst science educators and researchers (Alonzo & Steedle, 2009). LPs can fulfill the recommendations of increased focus on student’s learning in science, and has the potential to align the curriculum, instructions and assessments, which have been assigned a prime importance in the majority of educational reforms worldwide (CDC, 2001; NRC, 2007 & 2012). This study aims to explore the LPs of form 4 secondary school ...

  20. Progress of Systematic Hands on Devices for Active Learning Methods by Visualizing ICT Tools in Physics with Milliseconds Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Akizo; Okiharu, Fumiko

    We are developing various systematic hands on devices for progress of active learning (AL) to improve students' conceptual understanding in physics laws. We are promoting AL methods in physics education for getting deeper conceptual understanding by using various ICT-based hands on devices and using visualizing ICT tools with milliseconds resolution. Here we investigate AL modules on collisions of big balloon pendulum with another known mass pendulum to get directly the air mass in the big balloon. We also discuss on Newton's laws of blowgun darts systems by using tapioca straws where we get definite works and energy just proportional to the length of the pipes of connected tapioca straws. These AL plans by using modules of big balloon system and blowgun-darts system are shown to be very effective for deeper conceptual understanding of Newton's Laws in almost frictionless worlds.

  1. Engineering Physics Division progress report for period ending November 30, 1978. [ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maienschein, F.C.

    1979-01-01

    Research and other activities of the Engineering Physics Division (formerly Neutron Physics Division) of ORNL during the period February 28, 1977 to November 30, 1978, are reported. The format is that of abstracts and summaries of prepared papers. Work is summarized in the following general areas: measurements of neutron cross sections and related quantities; cross-section theory, evaluations, and evaluation techniques; cross-section processing, testing, and sensitivity analyses; integral experiments and their analyses; development of methods for shield and reactor analyses; analyses for specific systems or applications (liquid-metal fast breeder reactor program, gas-cooled reactor program, alternate fuel cycle program, magnetic fusion energy program, high-energy physics program, accelerator breeding studies, miscellaneous studies); and information analysis and distribution. Overviews of each of these areas are included. (RWR)

  2. Technical progress report for the Magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility: October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    Progress is reported on a multitask contract to develop technology for steam bottoming cycle of a Combined Cycle MHD Steam Power Plant. The report describes a 314 hour proof-of-concept (POC) test completed during the quarter. Results include secondary combustion and effect of potassium on the light-off temperature, fouling of heat transfer surfaces, particulate clean-up device performance and advanced diagnostic system performance. Test results on ceramic materials and tubes directed toward the development of a high temperature recuperative air heater are summarized. Results of data analysis of previous tests that are reported include the continuing analysis of tube materials that were exposed to 1500 and 2000 hours of eastern coal fired operation during the previously completed 2000 hour POC test series on eastern, high sulfur coal.

  3. RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976) ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes the progress of 13 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period October 1 to December 31, 1988. There are 16 individual hazardous waste facilities covered by the 13 ground-water monitoring projects. The Grout Treatment Facility is included in this series of quarterly reports for the first time. The 13 projects discussed in this report were designed according to applicable interim-status ground-water monitoring requirements specified in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). During this quarter, field activities primarily consisted of sampling and analyses, and water-level monitoring. The 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds section includes sediment analyses in addition to ground-water monitoring results. Twelve new wells were installed during the previous quarter: two at the 216-A-29 Ditch, six at the 216-A-10 Crib, and four at the 216-B-3 Pond. Preliminary characterization data for these new wells include drillers' logs and other drilling and site characterization data, and are provided in Volume 2 or on microfiche in the back of Volume 1. 26 refs., 28 figs., 74 tabs.

  4. Permanent play facility provision is associated with children's time spent sedentary and in light physical activity during school hours: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Eirik Dalene

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the associations between: 1 number of permanent outdoor play facilities per pupil and 2 the size of the outdoor play area per pupil with sedentary time and physical activity (PA during school hours in six-, nine-, and 15-year olds. We conducted a cross-sectional study of nationally representative samples of Norwegian six- (n = 1071, nine- (n = 1421 and 15-year-olds (n = 1106 in 2011 (the Physical Activity Among Norwegian Children Study. The participation rates were 56.4%, 73.1% and 57.8% for six-, nine- and 15-year olds, respectively. We assessed PA objectively for seven consecutive days using accelerometers, the size of a school's outdoor play area (SOPA using an online map service and the permanent play facility (PPF provision using a standardized form during school site visits. We successfully measured SOPA and PPF in 99 schools, from which 3040 participants provided valid accelerometer data. We used generalized least-squares random-effects models with robust variance estimation to assess associations. Our results indicate that better provision of permanent play facilities may reduce sedentary time and increase time spent in light PA among six-year-olds. Permanent play facility provision was not associated with sedentary time or PA among nine- and 15-year-olds. Associations found between outdoor play area size, physical activity and sedentary time were negligible. Future research should investigate what types of permanent play facilities may be associated with physical activity in both children and adolescents.

  5. The Impact of Regulations, Safety Considerations and Physical Limitations on Research Progress at Maximum Biocontainment

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We describe herein, limitations on research at biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment laboratories, with regard to biosecurity regulations, safety considerations, research space limitations, and physical constraints in executing experimental procedures. These limitations can severely impact the number of collaborations and size of research projects investigating microbial pathogens of biodefense concern. Acquisition, use, storage, and transfer of biological select agents and toxins (BSAT) are ...

  6. Physical activity in relation to development and progression of myopia - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr Thykjær, Anne; Lundberg, Kristian; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    On a global scale, myopia is one of the most common causes of visual impairment. Given the increasing prevalence of myopia, it is vital to understand the pathogenesis and to identify potential interventions. Some studies have described physical activity as a potential correlation for myopia...

  7. Indiana University High Energy Physics, Task A. Technical progress report, 1992--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brabson, B.; Crittenden, R.; Dzierba, A. [and others

    1993-10-01

    This report discusses research at Indians University on the following high energy physics experiments: A search for mesons with unusual quantum numbers; hadronic states produced in association with high-mass dimuons; FNAL E740 (D0); superconducting super collider; and OPAL experiment at CERN.

  8. Recent Progress in the Physics of Open Quantum Systems: Theory and Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Rotter, I

    2015-01-01

    This Report explores recent advances in our understanding of the physics of open quantum systems (OQSs) which consist of some localized region that is coupled to an external environment. Examples of such systems may be found in numerous areas of physics including mesoscopic physics that provides the main focus of this review. We provide a detailed discussion of the behavior of OQSs in terms of the projection-operator formalism, according to which the system under study is considered to be comprised of a localized region ($Q$), embedded into a well-defined environment ($P$) of scattering wavefunctions (with $Q+P=1$). The $Q$ subspace must be treated using the concepts of non-Hermitian physics, and of particular interest here is: the capacity of the environment to mediate a coupling between the different states of $Q$; the role played by the presence of exceptional points (EPs) in the spectra of OQSs; the influence of EPs on the rigidity of the wavefunction phases, and; the ability of EPs to initiate a dynamica...

  9. Manufacturing progress of EDIPO. A Nb{sub 3}Sn-dipole for the ITER conductor test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borlein, M.; Amend, J.; Theisen, W.; Walter, W. [Babcock Noell GmbH, Wuerzburg (Germany); Baker, W.; Fernandez-Cano, E.; Portone, A.; Salpietro, E. [Fusion For Energy F4E, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is a joint international research and development project that aims to demonstrate the scientific and technical feasibility of fusion power. For the construction of ITER and the manufacturing of its components, high quality standards must be met. Especially the coils of the magnet system - the heart of the ITER machine - are unique in size and complexity. Therefore the magnet coil manufacturing must be followed by a lot of quality measures. One of the necessary tests is the control of the conductor - to be sure that the conductor fulfils the technical performance needed for a proper magnet operation. As the conductor will experience a magnetic field of approx. 12-13 T during operation, it has to be tested within a magnetic background field. The European Dipole-magnet, called EDIPO, will be the heart of this conductor test facility which will be constructed at the CRPP Villigen (CH). Following the presentation, given in the Annual Meeting on Nuclear Technology in 2007, this paper shows the current status of the manufacturing of this complex Nb{sub 3}Sn-Magnet. At first, the design of the EDIPO shall be described. (orig.)

  10. Progress in detailed modelling of low foot and high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Kritcher, A. L.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    Several dozen high convergence inertial confinement fusion ignition experiments have now been completed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These include both “low foot” experiments from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and more recent “high foot” experiments. At the time of the NIC, there were large discrepancies between simulated implosion performance and experimental data. In particular, simulations over predicted neutron yields by up to an order of magnitude, and some experiments showed clear evidence of mixing of ablator material deep into the hot spot that could not be explained at the time. While the agreement between data and simulation improved for high foot implosion experiments, discrepancies nevertheless remain. This paper describes the state of detailed modelling of both low foot and high foot implosions using 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D radiation hydrodynamics simulations with HYDRA. The simulations include a range of effects, in particular, the impact of the plastic membrane used to support the capsule in the hohlraum, as well as low-mode radiation asymmetries tuned to match radiography measurements. The same simulation methodology is applied to low foot NIC implosion experiments and high foot implosions, and shows a qualitatively similar level of agreement for both types of implosions. While comparison with the experimental data remains imperfect, a reasonable level of agreement is emerging and shows a growing understanding of the high-convergence implosions being performed on NIF.

  11. Research in elementary particle physics. Progress report, March 1, 1992--February 28, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Lai-Him; Haymaker, R.; Imlay, R.; McNeil, R.; Metcalf, W.; Svoboda, R.

    1992-10-01

    We describe theoretical work on effective action expansion on an effective low energy theory of hadrons and lattice gauge theories. The high energy experimental group at Louisiana State University has analyzed data on a neutrino oscillation experiment at LAMPF. The LSND neutrino experiment is preparing to take data in 1993. IMB data has been analyzed. Preparations for a beam test at KEK for IMB are in progress. Dumand is preparing to test one string of the detector early next summer. The ZEUS electron proton colliding beam experiment has started to take data. Early results have been reported.

  12. Efficacy of an Exercise and Nutritional Supplement Program on Physical Performance and Nutritional Status in Older Adults With Mobility Limitations Residing at Senior Living Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Michael P; Nelson, Miriam E; Sacheck, Jennifer M; Reid, Kieran F; Kirn, Dylan; Fielding, Roger A; Chui, Kenneth K H; Folta, Sara C

    2017-01-17

    This cluster-randomized trial was designed to determine the efficacy of a 6-month exercise-nutritional supplement program (ENP) on physical function and nutritional status for older adults and the feasibility of implementing this program in a senior living setting. Twenty senior living facilities were randomized to either a three day per week group-based ENP led by a trained facility staff member or a health education program (SAP). Participants (N=121) completed a short physical performance battery, 400 meter walk, handgrip strength test, and mini-nutrition assessment. 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], Insulin-like growth-factor 1 (IGF-1) and activity level were also measured. The ENP did not significantly improve physical function or nutritional status compared with the SAP. Compared with baseline, participants in the ENP engaged in 39 minutes less physical activity per week at 6-months. Several facility characteristics hindered implementation of the ENP. This study highlights the complexity of implementing an evidence-based program in a field setting.

  13. Research in particle physics. Progress report, June 1, 1992--January 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Research accomplishments and current activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics are presented. Principal areas of activity include the following: detectors for studies of electron{endash}positron annihilation in colliding beams; advanced accelerator component design, including the superconducting beam inflector, electrostatic quadrupoles, and the ``electrostatic muon kicker``; the detector for the MACRO (Monopole, Astrophysics, and Cosmic Ray Observatory) experiment; neutrino astrophysics and the search for proton decay; theoretical particle physics (electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking, hadron collider phenomenology, cosmology and astrophysics, new field-theoretic models, nonperturbative investigations of quantum field theories, electroweak interactions); measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; calorimetry for the GEM experiment; and muon detectors for the GEM experiment at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  14. Non-accelerator particle physics: Progress report for period February 1, 1988--January 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics such as grand unification and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are currently engaged in construction of the MACRO detector, an Italian-American collaborative research instrument with a total particle acceptance of 10,000 m/sup 2/sr, which will perform a sensitive search for magnetic monopoles using excitation-ionization methods. Other major objectives of the MACRO experiment are to search for astrophysical high energy neutrinos expected to be emitted by such objects as Vela X-1, LMC X-4, and SN-1987A and to search for low energy neutrino bursts from gravitational stellar collapse. We are also working on GRANDE, a proposed very large area surface detector for astrophysical neutrinos, and on the development of new techniques for liquid scintillation detection. 18 refs.

  15. The Progression of Podcasting/Vodcasting in a Technical Physics Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanville, Y. J.

    2010-11-01

    Technology such as Microsoft PowerPoint presentations, clickers, podcasting, and learning management suites is becoming prevalent in classrooms. Instructors are using these media in both large lecture hall settings and small classrooms with just a handful of students. Traditionally, each of these media is instructor driven. For instance, podcasting (audio recordings) provided my technical physics course with supplemental notes to accompany a traditional algebra-based physics lecture. Podcasting is an ideal tool for this mode of instruction, but podcasting/vodcasting is also an ideal technique for student projects and student-driven learning. I present here the various podcasting/vodcasting projects my students and I have undertaken over the last few years.

  16. Theory of elementary particles and accelerator theory: Task C: Experimental high energy physics. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, J.E.

    1992-12-31

    The experimental high energy physics group at the University of Oregon broadened its effort during the past year. The SLD effort extends from maintaining and operating the SLD luminosity monitor which was built at Oregon, to significant responsibility in physics analysis, such as event selection and background analysis for the left-right asymmetry measurement. The OPAL work focussed on the luminosity monitor upgrade to a silicon-tungsten calorimeter. Building on the work done at Oregon for SLD, the tungsten for this upgrade was machined by the Oregon shops and shipped to CERN for assembly. The Oregon GEM effort now concentrates on tracking, specifically silicon tracking. Oregon also has developed a silicon strip preradiator prototype, and tested it in a Brookhaven beam.

  17. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-01

    This report provides an archival record of the activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division during the period June 30, 1985 through September 30, 1987. Work in Mathematical Sciences continues to include applied mathematics research, statistics research, and computer science. Nuclear-data measurements and evaluations continue for fusion reactors, fission reactors, and other nuclear systems. Also discussed are long-standing studies of fission-reactor shields through experiments and related analysis, of accelerator shielding, and of fusion-reactor neutronics. Work in Machine Intelligence continues to feature the development of an autonomous robot. The last descriptive part of this report reflects the work in our Engineering Physics Information Center, which again concentrates primarily upon radiation-shielding methods and related data.

  18. Medium-energy physics program. Progress report, February 1--April 1, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, E. (comp.)

    1976-09-01

    A quarterly report on the medium-energy physics program at LAMPF is given. Topics covered include: (1) engineering support; (2) accelerator support; (3) accelerator systems development; (4) injector systems; (5) electronic instrumentation and computer systems; (6) accelerator operations; (7) experimental areas; (8) beam line development; (9) large-spectrometer systems; (10) research; (11) nuclear chemistry; (12) practical applications of LAMPF; and (13) management. (PMA)

  19. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, R.C.

    1993-05-01

    In this report, our research is described through abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, and presentations organized into sections following the five major operating units in the division: Mathematical Sciences, Intelligent Systems, Nuclear Data and Measurement Analysis, Nuclear Analysis and Shielding, and the Engineering Physics Information Centers. Each section begins with an introduction highlighting honors, awards, and significant research accomplishments in that unit during the reporting period.

  20. A research program in neutrino physics, cosmic rays and elementary particles. Progress report for Task A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reines, F.; Sobel, H.W.

    1991-08-01

    Physics interests of the group are focused primarily on tests of conservation laws and studies of fundamental interactions between particles. There is also a significant interest in astrophysics and cosmic rays. Task A consists of three experimental programs; a Double-Beta Decay study (currently at the Hoover Dam), a Reactor Neutrino program (until this year at Savannah River), and the IMB Proton Decay experiment in a Cleveland salt mine. Discussion of the research in each area is given.

  1. New Progress Achieved by NSFC Project in Basic Research of Black Hole Physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Supported by NSFC,Prof.Wu Shuangqing from Huazhong Normal University conducted independent research on gravitation theory,discovered the exact solutions for the five-dimensional G(o)del charged rota-ting black hole in the universe,and made important headway in the characteristic research of black hole so-lutions.Part of the research results has been published in international top journal Physical Review Letters 100,121301 (2008).

  2. Engineering Physics Division progress report for period ending November 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    Separate abstracts are included for sections concerning measurement of nuclear cross sections and related quantities; nuclear cross-section evaluations and theory; nuclear cross-section processing, testing, and sensitivity analysis; engineering physics division integral experiments and their analyses; development of methods for shield and reactor analysis; analyses for specific systems or applications; energy model validation; systems reliability and operations research; and information analysis and distribution.

  3. Physical Design Progress of an 800 MeV Proton Cyclotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Jian-jun; LI; Ming; ZHANG; Tian-jue

    2013-01-01

    Based on the pervious conceptual design work,we carried out further physical design recently.A 3D FEA model of the magnet is built(as is shown in Fig.1)and the isochronous magnet field is obtained by iterative optimization of the magnet structure.Fig.2 shows the differential phase error of the field,which is within 0.05 percent except the extraction region.After that the accelerating orbit is calculated.In the

  4. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1994-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a blend of physics, chemistry and biology and epitomizes the multidisciplinary approach towards understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. To an increasing extent, the focus of attention is on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights from the past year are briefly described.

  5. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-02-01

    The report is divided into eight sections: (1) nuclear data measurements and evaluation; (2) systems analysis and shielding; (3) applied physics and fusion reactor analysis; (4) mathematical modeling and intelligent control; (5) reliability and human factors research; (6) applied risk and decision analysis; (7) information analysis and data management; and (8) mathematical sciences. Each section then consists of abstracts of presented or published papers. (WRF)

  6. High Energy Physics at Tufts University. Progress report, 1992--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-15

    This report discusses the following topics: Fermilab fixed target experiments; Soudan II nucleon decay project; Physics at the proton-antiproton collider at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV; The Solenoidal Detector for the supercollider; Neutrino telescope proposal; Polarization in massive quark and hadron production; Production characteristics of top quarks; Scattering, spin dependence and mass corrections in Skyrmion models; and computation and networking.

  7. [Research in theoretical nuclear physics]. [Annual progress report, July 1992--June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapusta, J.I.

    1993-12-31

    The main subject of research was the physics of matter at energy densities greater than 0.15 GeV/fm{sup 3}. Theory encompasses the relativistic many-body/quantum field theory aspects of QCD and the electroweak interactions at these high energy densities, both in and out of thermal equilibrium. Applications range from neutron stars/pulsars to QCD and electroweak phase transitions in the early universe, from baryon number violation in cosmology to the description of nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN and at Brookhaven. Recent activity to understand the properties of matter at energy densities where the electroweak W and Z boson degrees of freedom are important is reported. This problem has applications to cosmology and has the potential to explain the baryon asymmetry produced in the big bang at energies where the particle degrees of freedom will soon be experimentally, probed. This problem is interesting for nuclear physics because of the techniques used in many-body, physics of nuclei and the quark-gluon plasma may be extended to this new problem. The was also interested in problems related to multiparticle production. This includes work on production of particles in heavy-ion collisions, the small x part, of the nuclear and hadron wave function, and multiparticle production induced by instantons in weakly coupled theories. These problems have applications in the heavy ion program at RHIC and the deep inelastic scattering experiments at HERA.

  8. The impact of regulations, safety considerations and physical limitations on research progress at maximum biocontainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurtleff, Amy C; Garza, Nicole; Lackemeyer, Matthew; Carrion, Ricardo; Griffiths, Anthony; Patterson, Jean; Edwin, Samuel S; Bavari, Sina

    2012-12-01

    We describe herein, limitations on research at biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment laboratories, with regard to biosecurity regulations, safety considerations, research space limitations, and physical constraints in executing experimental procedures. These limitations can severely impact the number of collaborations and size of research projects investigating microbial pathogens of biodefense concern. Acquisition, use, storage, and transfer of biological select agents and toxins (BSAT) are highly regulated due to their potential to pose a severe threat to public health and safety. All federal, state, city, and local regulations must be followed to obtain and maintain registration for the institution to conduct research involving BSAT. These include initial screening and continuous monitoring of personnel, controlled access to containment laboratories, accurate and current BSAT inventory records. Safety considerations are paramount in BSL-4 containment laboratories while considering the types of research tools, workflow and time required for conducting both in vivo and in vitro experiments in limited space. Required use of a positive-pressure encapsulating suit imposes tremendous physical limitations on the researcher. Successful mitigation of these constraints requires additional time, effort, good communication, and creative solutions. Test and evaluation of novel vaccines and therapeutics conducted under good laboratory practice (GLP) conditions for FDA approval are prioritized and frequently share the same physical space with important ongoing basic research studies. The possibilities and limitations of biomedical research involving microbial pathogens of biodefense concern in BSL-4 containment laboratories are explored in this review.

  9. The Impact of Regulations, Safety Considerations and Physical Limitations on Research Progress at Maximum Biocontainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Patterson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe herein, limitations on research at biosafety level 4 (BSL-4 containment laboratories, with regard to biosecurity regulations, safety considerations, research space limitations, and physical constraints in executing experimental procedures. These limitations can severely impact the number of collaborations and size of research projects investigating microbial pathogens of biodefense concern. Acquisition, use, storage, and transfer of biological select agents and toxins (BSAT are highly regulated due to their potential to pose a severe threat to public health and safety. All federal, state, city, and local regulations must be followed to obtain and maintain registration for the institution to conduct research involving BSAT. These include initial screening and continuous monitoring of personnel, controlled access to containment laboratories, accurate and current BSAT inventory records. Safety considerations are paramount in BSL-4 containment laboratories while considering the types of research tools, workflow and time required for conducting both in vivo and in vitro experiments in limited space. Required use of a positive-pressure encapsulating suit imposes tremendous physical limitations on the researcher. Successful mitigation of these constraints requires additional time, effort, good communication, and creative solutions. Test and evaluation of novel vaccines and therapeutics conducted under good laboratory practice (GLP conditions for FDA approval are prioritized and frequently share the same physical space with important ongoing basic research studies. The possibilities and limitations of biomedical research involving microbial pathogens of biodefense concern in BSL-4 containment laboratories are explored in this review.

  10. Both physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation reduce the facing-the-viewer bias in biological motion perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Heenan

    Full Text Available Biological motion stimuli, such as orthographically projected stick figure walkers, are ambiguous about their orientation in depth. The projection of a stick figure walker oriented towards the viewer, therefore, is the same as its projection when oriented away. Even though such figures are depth-ambiguous, however, observers tend to interpret them as facing towards them more often than facing away. Some have speculated that this facing-the-viewer bias may exist for sociobiological reasons: Mistaking another human as retreating when they are actually approaching could have more severe consequences than the opposite error. Implied in this hypothesis is that the facing-towards percept of biological motion stimuli is potentially more threatening. Measures of anxiety and the facing-the-viewer bias should therefore be related, as researchers have consistently found that anxious individuals display an attentional bias towards more threatening stimuli. The goal of this study was to assess whether physical exercise (Experiment 1 or an anxiety induction/reduction task (Experiment 2 would significantly affect facing-the-viewer biases. We hypothesized that both physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation would decrease facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers, but not for bottom- or top-half-only human stimuli, as these carry less sociobiological relevance. On the other hand, we expected that the anxiety induction task (Experiment 2 would increase facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers only. In both experiments, participants completed anxiety questionnaires, exercised on a treadmill (Experiment 1 or performed an anxiety induction/reduction task (Experiment 2, and then immediately completed a perceptual task that allowed us to assess their facing-the-viewer bias. As hypothesized, we found that physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation reduced facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers only. Our

  11. Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume II of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Paul

    2003-01-01

    This appendices covers the following reports: (1) Previous ISRP Reviews (Project 199004400) Implement Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities-Coeur d'Alene Reservation; (2) Step 1 review of the hatchery master plan (Memorandum from Mark Fritsch, Fish Production Coordinator, Draft version March 10, 2000); (3) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response to ISRP comments on Project No. 199004402; includes attachment A Water Quantity Report. This is an incomplete document Analysis of Well Yield Potential for a Portion of the Coeur d'Alene Reservation near Worley, Idaho, February 2001; (4) Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program, Rainbow Trout Feasibility Report on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation prepared by Ronald L. Peters, February 2001; (5) Coeur d'Alene Tribe response letter pursuant to the questions raised in the Step 1 review of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility from Ronald L. Peters, March 27, 2001 ; includes attachments Water quantity report (this is the complete report), Appendix A Logs for Test Wells and 1999 Worley West Park Well, letters from Ralston, Appendix B Cost of Rainbow Purchase Alternative; (6) NPPC response (memorandum from Mark Fritsch, March 28, 2001); (7) Response to NPPC (letter to Frank Cassidy, Jr., Chair, from Ernest L. Stensgar, April 18, 2001); (8) Final ISRP review (ISRP 2001-4: Mountain Columbia Final Report); (9) Response to ISRP comment (letter to Mark Walker, Director of Public Affairs, from Ronald Peters, May 7, 2001); (10) Final comments to the Fish 4 committee; (11) Scope of Work/Budget FY 2001-2004; (12) Letter from City of Worley concerning water service; (13) Letter to BPA regarding status of Step 1 package; (14) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1990 annual report; (15) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1991 annual report; and (16) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the

  12. Annual progress report for 1999. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, S.E.; Skrumsager, B. [eds.

    2000-06-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 1999. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the departments is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 1999 is presented, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  13. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department annual progress report for 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department at Risø National Laboratory in 2000. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviateatmospheric aspects of environmental problems....... The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danishand international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary...

  14. Recent progress in oxide scintillation crystals development by low-thermal gradient Czochralski technique for particle physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlegel, V. N.; Borovlev, Yu. A.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Grigorieva, V. D.; Danevich, F. A.; Ivannikova, N. V.; Postupaeva, A. G.; Vasiliev, Ya. V.

    2017-08-01

    Modern particle physics experiments call for high performance scintillation detectors with unique properties: radiation-resistant in high energy and astrophysics, highly radiopure, containing certain elements or enriched isotopes in astroparticle physics. The low-thermal gradient Czochralski (LTG CZ) crystal growth technique provides excellent quality large volume radiopure crystal scintillators. Absence of thermoelastic stress in the crystal and overheating of the melt in the LTG CZ method is particularly significant in production of crystalline materials with strong thermal anisotropic properties and low mechanical strength, with a very high yield of crystalline boules and low losses of initial charge, crucially important in production of crystal scintillators from enriched isotopes for double beta decay experiments. Here we discuss progress in development of the well known scintillators (Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO), CdWO4, ZnWO4, CaMoO4, PbMoO4), as well as R&D of new materials (ZnMoO4, Li2MoO4, Na2Mo2O7) for the next generation experiments in particle physics.

  15. The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Technical progress report, September 1995 - March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, B.G.; Pisupati, S.V.; Scaroni, A.W. [and others

    1996-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), through an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated a three-phase program with the Consortium for Coal-Water Slurry Fuel Technology, with the aim of decreasing DOD`s reliance on imported oil by increasing its use of coal. The program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium and DOE. Activities this reporting period are summarized by phase. During this reporting period, the Phase I final report was completed. Work in Phase II focused on emissions reductions, coal beneficiation/preparation studies, and economic analyses of coal use. Emissions reductions investigations included completing a study to identify appropriate SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control technologies for coal-fired industrial boilers. In addition, work continued on the design of a ceramic filtering device for installation on the demonstration boiler. The ceramic filtering device will be used to demonstrate a smaller and more efficient filtering device for retrofit applications. Work related to coal preparation and utilization, and the economic analysis was primarily focused on preparing the final report. Work in Phase III focused on coal preparation studies and economic analyses of coal use. Coal preparation studies were focused on continuing activities on particle size control, physical separations, surface-based separation processes, and dry processing. The economic study focused on community sensitivity to coal usage, regional economic impacts of new coal utilization technologies, and constructing a national energy portfolio.

  16. A facile method for studying interaction of rhodamine B and bovine serum albumin:Towards physical-binding mediated fluorescence labeling of proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马宇星; 钟睿博; 郭俊; 刘雨双; 袁鸣; 白志军; 刘涛涛; 赵欣敏; 张峰

    2015-01-01

    Strategies for labeling proteins with fluorophores are always important for biotechnology. Here we take a model protein (bovine serum albumin) and a typical fluorophore (rhodamine B) to demonstrate a direct labeling method just by physical adsorption. In combination with size exclusion chromatography and the Scartchard equation, we have developed a facile analysis method for calculating the binding constant and binding sites. The molecular docking method has been used to study the binding site in amino acid level.

  17. Non-accelerator particle physics: Progress report for period February 1, 1986-January 31, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, R.I.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics such as grand unification and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are currently participating in construction of the MACRO detector, an underground instrument which will have an acceptance of 12,000 m/sup 2/sr, and which will attempt to perform a definitive search for magnetic monopoles using excitation-ionization methods. Other major objectives of the MARCO experiment will be to search for astrophysical high energy neutrinos expected to be emitted by such objects as Vela X-1 and LMC X-4 and to search for low energy neutrino bursts from gravitational stellar collapse. We have developed a high transparency liquid scintillator suitable for use in the 12-meter-long MACRO detector boxes. We are also currently engaged in: (1) further improving the performance of this scintillator in order to maximize the sensitivity of the MACRO detector to lightly ionizing particles and to further improve the stability and transparency of the scintillator; (2) preparing the techniques necessary for full scale production of the 750 tons of liquid scintillator needed for MACRO; (3) planning and development of the on-line data acquisition system and off-line data analysis for MACRO.

  18. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics. Progress report 1 Oct 1979 to 30 Sep 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasiorowicz, S.; Fishbane, P.; Kaus, P.; Riverside, U. C.; Geffen, D. A.; Wilson, W.; Suura, Hiroshi; Haqq, Emmanuel; Rosner, Jonathan L.; Kwong, Waikwok; Schonfeld, Jonathan F.; Quigg, C.; Thacker, H. B.; Moxhay, Peter; Robinett, Richard; Karl, Gabriel; Meshkov, Sydney

    1980-09-30

    Research performed in theoretical high energy physics includes: nonabelian Stokes theorem; connection between asymptotic behavior and bound states in QCD; classical solutions for gauge fields interacting with Higgs mesons; neutrino oscillations; relativistic wave equation and mass spectrum of gluonium; dynamical structures of the pion; convergence of reflectionless approximations to confining potentials; degeneracy in one-dimensional quantum mechanics; review of heavy quarks and new particles; semiclassical results on normalization of bound state wave functions; proton lifetime; quark magnetic moments and E1 radiative transitions in charmonium; lectures on quark models; inverse scattering and the upsilon family; and magnetic moments of quarks in baryons and mesons. In experimental high energy physics, the emphasis has been on strong interactions but also includes several crucial tests of the currently most important theories of elementary particle interactions. Experiments described include: electromagnetic couplings of vector mesons; direct photon production at large transverse momentum; hyperon experiments; spin effects in strong interactions; a dense detector for proton decay; and exclusive processes at large transverse momenta. (GHT)

  19. Efficacy of a randomized controlled self-regulation based physical activity intervention for chronic fatigue: Mediation effects of physical activity progress and self-regulation skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, M M; de Gucht, V; Leal, I; Maes, S

    2017-03-01

    Examine the medium-term effects of a brief physical activity (PA) self-regulation (SR) based intervention (4-STEPS program) for chronic fatigue, and explore the mediating effects of PA related variables and SR skills. A two-arm randomized controlled trial (Usual Care vs 4-STEPS) was carried out. The 4-STEPS program consisted of Motivational Interviewing and SR-skills training. Fatigue severity (primary outcome) and impact, PA, health-related quality of life (HrQoL), and somatic and psychological distress were assessed at baseline, post-treatment (12weeks) and 12months follow-up. Ninety-one patients (45 intervention and 46 controls) were included. At follow-up, there were significant treatment effects on fatigue severity (g=0.72) and fatigue impact, leisure-time PA, and physical and psychological HrQoL. No significant effects were found for number of daily steps and somatic and psychological distress. Fatigue severity at follow-up was partially mediated by post-treatment progress on a personal PA goal (effect ratio=18%). Results suggest that a brief intervention, focusing on the formulation and pursuit of personal PA goals and the use of SR skills, produces sustained benefits for fatigue severity. Despite these promising results, dropout was high and the intervention was not beneficial for all secondary outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. H-mode and Edge Physics on the Pegasus ST: Progress and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongard, M. W.; Bodner, G. M.; Barr, J. L.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Hinson, E. T.; Kriete, D. M.; Lewicki, B. T.; Perry, J. M.; Reusch, J. A.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Thome, K. E.; Winz, G. R.

    2015-11-01

    Ohmic H-modes are routinely attained on the Pegasus ST, in part due to the low L-H power threshold PLH arising from low-BT operation at A ~ 1 . Characteristics of H-mode include: improved τe, consistent with H98 ~ 1 edge current and pressure pedestal formation; and the occurrence of ELMs. Experiments in the past year have examined magnetic topology and density dependencies of PLH in detail. PLH exceeds ITER L-H scaling values by 10-20 ×, with PLH /PITPA 08 increasing sharply as A --> 1 . No PLH-minimizing density has been found. Unlike at high- A, PLH is insensitive to limited or diverted magnetic topologies to date. The low BT and modest pedestal values at A ~ 1 afford unique edge diagnostic accessibility to investigate ELMs and their nonlinear dynamics. Jedge (R , t) measured through a Type I ELM shows a complex pedestal collapse and filament ejection. These studies are being extended to higher Ip and longer pulse length with LHI startup to conserve Ohmic V-s and improve MHD stability. A modest-cost upgrade to the facility will enable detailed validation studies of nonlinear ELM dynamics and ELM control. This initiative will upgrade the centerstack, increasing BT by × 3 , Ohmic V-s by × 4 , and pulse lengths to 100 ms at A < 1 . 3 , as well as deploy a comprehensive 3D magnetic perturbation coil system with full poloidal coverage from frame coils and helical centerstack windings. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  1. Recent progress in understanding physical and chemical properties of mineral dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Formenti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of recently acquired knowledge of the physico-chemical properties of mineral dust from Africa and Asia based on data and discussion during the Third International Dust Workshop, held in Leipzig (Germany in September 2008. Various regional experiments have been conducted in the last few years, mostly close to source regions or after short-range transport. Significant progress has been made in characterising the mineralogy of iron and the description of particle shape close to source regions. We consider that future research should focus on the evolution of dust properties during transport. In particular, the prediction of the characteristics of the size distribution of mineral dust at emission and their dynamics evolution during transport should be considered as a high-priority. The presence of large airborne particles above 20 μm in diameter, suggested by various studies, has limited implication for radiation, but should be important for deposition-based studies such as those on ocean productivity. Modelling the uplifting and transport of such large particles will represent a new serious challenge for transport models. A critical assessment and standardisation of the experimental and analytical methods is recommended.

  2. High Energy Physics at Tufts University. Progress report, 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-15

    This report discusses the following topics: Neutrino Interactions in the 15-foot Bubble Chamber; Pion and Kaon Production of Charm and Charm-Strange States; Study of Heavy Flavors at the Tagged Particle Spectrometer; Neutrino Oscillations at the Fermilab Main Injector; Soudan II Nucleon Decay Project; Physics at the Antiproton-Proton Collider at {radical}{bar s} = 1.8 TeV; Designing the Solenoidal Detector for the Supercollider; Neutrino Telescope Proposal; Polarization in Inclusive Hyperon Production and QCD Subprocesses; Production and Decay Characteristics of Top Quarks; Scattering in Extended Skyrmion Models and Spin Dependence; Search for Top Quark Production at the Tevatron; Polarization Correlations in Hadronic Production of Top Quarks; and Computation and Networking.

  3. Physical state & copy number of high risk human papillomavirus type 16 DNA in progression of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirish Shukla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: High-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV infection and its integration in host genome is a key event in malignant transformation of cervical cells. HPV16 being a dominant HR-HPV type, we undertook this study to analyze if viral load and physical state of the virus correlated with each other in the absence of other confounding variables and examined their potential as predictors of progressive cervical lesions. Methods: Both, viral load and integration status of HPV16 were determined by real time URR PCR and estimation of E2:E6 ratio in a total of 130 PGMY-RLB -confirmed, monotypic HPV16-infected cervical DNA samples from biopsies of cytology-confirmed low grade (LSIL, 30 and high grade (HSIL, 30, and invasive carcinoma, (squamous cell carcinoma SCC, 70 cases. Results: Investigation of DNA samples revealed a gradual increase in HPV16 viral load over several magnitudes and increased frequency of integration from LSIL to HSIL and HSIL to invasive cancer in relation to the severity of lesions in monotypic HPV16-infected cervical tissues. In a substantial number of precancer (11/60 and cancer cases (29/70, HPV16 was detected in concomitant mixed form. The concomitant form of HPV16 genome carried significantly higher viral load. Interpretation & conclusions: Overall, viral load and integration increased with disease severity and could be useful biomarkers in disease progression, at least, in HPV16-infected cervical pre-cancer and cancer lesions.

  4. Progress report for a research program in theoretical high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, D.; Fried, H.M.; Jevicki, A.; Kang, Kyungsik; Tan, Chung-I.

    1990-06-30

    Research this past year was carried out in the fields of cosmic strings and galaxy formation, inflationary models of the universe, topological defects and phase transitions, group contractions and chiral fermions, low-frequency approximations in (QCD), loop bremsstrahlung of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} pairs in heavy-ion collisions, approximations to solutions of non-linear differential equations, the use of continued functions'' as solution to vortex problems, string theory and large-N matrix models, topological expansions in QCD, one-dimensional string theory and its infrared divergences, strings in less than one-dimension, hadron-hadron interactions and the possible existence of the odderon, electroweak interactions and possible new physics in the TeV range, axions, quark flavor mixings and neutrino oscillations, large-N matrix models and their relation to string theories and two-dimensional quantized gravity, and the statistical mechanics of strings at high temperatures.

  5. Experimental heavy ion physics at high energies. Progress report, September 1992--November 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This report summarizes the research activities of the experimental high energy heavy ion physics group at Vanderbilt University carried out under Grant No. DE-FG05092ER40712 with the Department of Energy during the period Oct 1, 1992 to Nov 30, 1993. This research encompasses four areas of related inquiry in relativistic and high energy nuclear reactions. The preparation of the PHENIX experiment which has been approved as one of the two major experiments at RHIC to start in 1998. The RD10/RD45 Muon Identifier experiment which will provide essential input for the design of the Muon Endcap arm detector sub-system in PHENIX. The E855 Soft Photon Experiment at the AGS designed to clarify the status of a possible quark-gluon-plasma signature with presently available heavy-ion collisions. The construction CsI Ball detector project at Texas A&M which is designed as part of a comprehensive detector system which will probe the nuclear equation of state in the 50 MeV/nucleon domain.

  6. Progress in Simulations with Twisted Mass Fermions at the Physical Point

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Rehim, A; Dimopoulos, P; Frezzotti, R; Jansen, K; Kallidonis, C; Kostrzewa, B; Mangin-Brinet, M; Rossi, G C; Urbach, C; Wenger, U

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution, results from $N_f=2$ lattice QCD simulations at one lattice spacing using twisted mass fermions with a clover term at the physical pion mass are presented. The mass splitting between charged and neutral pions (including the disconnected contribution) is shown to be around $20(20)~\\mathrm{MeV}$. Further, a first measurement using the clover twisted mass action of the average momentum fraction of the pion is given. Finally, an analysis of pseudoscalar meson masses and decay constants is presented involving linear interpolations in strange and charm quark masses. Matching to meson mass ratios allows the calculation of quark mass ratios: $\\mu_s/\\mu_l=27.63(13)$, $\\mu_c/\\mu_l=339.6(2.2)$ and $\\mu_c/\\mu_s=12.29(10)$. From this mass matching the quantities $f_K=153.9(7.5)~\\mathrm{MeV}$, $f_D=219(11)~\\mathrm{MeV}$, $f_{D_s}=255(12)~\\mathrm{MeV}$ and $M_{D_s}=1894(93)~\\mathrm{MeV}$ are determined without the application of finite volume or discretization artefact corrections and with errors domin...

  7. Thermo Physics Facilities Branch Brochure ARC Jet Complex Fact Sheets, Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility Fact Sheets, Ames Vertical Gun Range Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretter, E. F. (Editor); Kuhns, Jay (Editor); Nuez, Jay (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The Ames Arc Jet Complex has a rich heritage of over 40 years in Thermal Protection System (TPS) development for every NASA Space Transportation and Planetary program, including Apollo, Space Shuttle, Viking, Pioneer-Venus, Galileo, Mars Pathfinder,Stardust, NASP,X-33,X-34,SHARP-B1 and B2,X-37 and Mars Exploration Rovers. With this early TPS history came a long heritage in the development of the arc jet facilities. These are used to simulate the aerodynamic heating that occurs on the nose cap, wing leading edges and on other areas of the spacecraft requiring thermal protection. TPS samples have been run in the arc jets from a few minutes to over an hour,from one exposure to multiple exposures of the same sample, in order t o understand the TPS materials response to a hot gas flow environment (representative of real hyperthermal environments experienced in flight). The Ames Arc l e t Complex is a key enabler for customers involved in the three major areas of TPS development: selection, validation, and qualification. The arc jet data are critical for validating TPS thermal models, heat shield designs and repairs, and ultimately for flight qualification.

  8. Gammasphere software development. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piercey, R.B.

    1993-05-01

    Activities of the nuclear physics group are described. Progress was made in organizing the Gammasphere Software Working Group, establishing a nuclear computing facility, participating in software development at Lawrence Berkeley, developing a common data file format, and adapting the ORNL UPAK software to run at Gammasphere. A universal histogram object was developed that defines a file format and provides for an objective-oriented programming model. An automated liquid nitrogen fill system was developed for Gammasphere (110 Ge detectors comprise the sphere).

  9. Gammasphere software development. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piercey, R.B.

    1993-05-01

    Activities of the nuclear physics group are described. Progress was made in organizing the Gammasphere Software Working Group, establishing a nuclear computing facility, participating in software development at Lawrence Berkeley, developing a common data file format, and adapting the ORNL UPAK software to run at Gammasphere. A universal histogram object was developed that defines a file format and provides for an objective-oriented programming model. An automated liquid nitrogen fill system was developed for Gammasphere (110 Ge detectors comprise the sphere).

  10. Cross-sectional relationship between physical fitness components and functional performance in older persons living in long-term care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Mechelen Willem

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The age-related deterioration of physiological capacities such as muscle strength and balance is associated with increased dependence. Understanding the contribution of physical fitness components to functional performance facilitates the development of adequate exercise interventions aiming at preservation of function and independence of older people. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between physical fitness components and functional performance in older people living in long-term care facilities. Methods Design cross-sectional study Subjects 226 persons living in long-term care facilities (mean age: 81.6 ± 5.6. Outcome measures Physical fitness and functional performance were measured by performance-based tests. Results Knee and elbow extension strength were significantly higher in men (difference = 44.5 and 50.0 N, respectively, whereas women were more flexible (difference sit & reach test = 7.2 cm. Functional performance was not significantly different between the genders. In men, motor coordination (eye-hand coordination and measures of strength were the main contributors to functional performance, whereas in women flexibility (sit and reach test and motor coordination (tandem stance and eye-hand coordination played a major role. Conclusion The results of this study show that besides muscle strength, fitness components such as coordination and flexibility are associated with functional performance of older people living in long-term care facilities. This suggests that men and women living in long-term care facilities, differ considerably concerning the fitness factors contributing to functional performance. Women and men may, therefore, need exercise programs emphasizing different fitness aspects in order to improve functional performance.

  11. Textiles Performance Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textiles Performance Testing Facilities has the capabilities to perform all physical wet and dry performance testing, and visual and instrumental color analysis...

  12. The association between high recreational physical activity and physical activity as a part of daily living in adolescents and availability of local indoor sports facilities and sports clubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niclasen, B.; Petzold, M.; Schnohr, Christina Warrer

    2012-01-01

    members) in Greenlandic adolescents. Material and methods: Data from the 2006 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey including 2,430 children aged 11-17 years was used. Logistic regression models were developed with dichotomous measures on VPA and MVPA as outcomes, number of indoor sports...... facilities and of sports clubs with child members as independent variables, and adjusted for age, gender, family affluence (FAS), and type of habitation (capital, town or village). Results: High VPA increased with access to indoor facilities, while high MVPA was less likely (odds ratio (OR) 0.54 (0...

  13. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood ``biological fingerprint`` of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  14. High energy physics at Tufts University. Progress report. [Summaries of research activities at Tufts University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    During the year a final paper was produced on XI* production from 2.9 GeV/c K/sup -/p interactions, and a paper on the ..sigma../sup -/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup +/ (..pi../sup 0/) final state from 2.9 GeV/c K/sup -/d interactions is on the verge of completion. From our 14.75 GeV/c anti pp experiment results have been prepared for publication on three topics: the charm search, V/sup 0/ inclusive production, and ..pi../sup 0/ production. Further analysis of data is continuing. In the 300 GeV/c pp experiment, investigations are completed or underway in three areas: neutral and charged pion correlations, inclusive ..gamma.. and V/sup 0/ production, and inclusive resonance production. Further data on inclusive V/sup 0/ distributions from 6.5 GeV/c K/sup -/p interactions has been obtained and analysis is nearing completion. A good deal of effort went into the development of proposals for new physics. These new directions may be represented by three approved experiments at three different laboratories: Neutrino-deuterium interactions at Fermilab (an approved and a proposed experiment); Search for new states decaying into anti ..lambda lambda.. and K/sup 0//sub s/K/sup 0//sub s/ using the Multiparticle Spectrometer at B.N.L. (approved in May, 1977); Search for baryonium using the SLAC hybrid bubble chamber system, which won approval in September with a recommendation for prompt running from the Program Advisory Committee. A list of publications is included.

  15. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Chemical and Physical Properties Progress in FY 2000 and FY 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, BA

    2002-04-17

    The purpose of this work was to provide chemical- and physical-property data addressing the technical risks of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process as applied specifically to the removal of cesium from alkaline high-level salt waste stored at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site. As part of the overall Salt Processing Project, this effort supported decision-making in regards to selecting a preferred technology among three alternatives: (1) CSSX, (2) nonelutable ion-exchange with an inorganic silicotitanate material and (3) precipitation with tetraphenylborate. High risks, innate to CSSX, that needed specific attention included: (1) chemical stability of the solvent matrix, (2) radiolytic stability of the solvent matrix, (3) proof-of-concept performance of the proposed process flowsheet with simulated waste, and (4) performance of the CSSX flowsheet with actual SRS high-level waste. This body of work directly addressed the chemical-stability risk and additionally provided supporting information that served to plan, carry out, and evaluate experiments conducted by other CSSX investigators addressing the other high risks. Information on cesium distribution in extraction, scrubbing, and stripping served as input for flowsheet design, provided a baseline for evaluating solvent performance under numerous stresses, and contributed to a broad understanding of the effects of expected process variables. In parallel, other measurements were directed toward learning how other system components distribute in the flowsheet. Such components include the solvent components themselves, constituents of the waste, and solvent-degradation products. Upon understanding which components influence flowsheet performance, it was then possible to address in a rational fashion how to clean up the solvent and maintain its stable function.

  16. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research. Annual grant progress report (FDP), January 15, 1993--January 14, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, D.B.

    1993-10-01

    Progress on seven tasks is reported. (I)UCLA hadronization model, antiproton decay, PEP4/9 e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} analysis: In addition to these topics, work on CP and CPT phenomenology at a {phi} factory and letters of support on the hadronization project are included. (II)ICARUS detector and rare B decays with hadron beams and colliders: Developments are summarized and some typcial events as shown; in addition, the RD5 collaboration at CERN and the asymmetric {phi} factory project are sketched. (III)Theoretical physics: Feynman diagram calculations in gauge theory; supersymmetric standard model; effects of quantum gravity in breaking of global symmetries; models of quark and lepton substructure; renormalized field theory; large-scale structure in the universe and particle-astrophysics/early universe cosmology. (IV)H dibaryon search at BNL, kaon experiments (E799/KTeV) at Fermilab: Project design and some scatterplots are given. (V)UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab. (VI)Detectors for hadron physics at ultrahigh energy colliders: Scintillating fiber and visible light photon counter research. (VII)Administrative support and conference organization.

  17. 1991 Technical progress report of the University of South Carolina`s High Energy Physics Group, February 1990--July 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    The high energy physics group at the University of South Carolina includes five teaching faculty members, one research faculty member, and five graduate students. Profs. Childers, Darden, and Wilson devote most of their research effort to Fermilab experiment E789, which is designed to observe charmless two-body decays of b-flavored mesons and baryons. Prof. Wilson works on Fermilab experiment E687 which studies charm physics in the wide-band photon beam. Profs. Rosenfeld and Wang participate in the AMY collaboration, which studies electron-positron interactions using the TRISTAN collider at KEK. Prof. Rosenfeld and one student collaborate with personnel from KEK and INS, Tokyo, on an experiment to detect a 17 keV neutrino in the {beta}-decay spectrum of {sup 63}Ni. Members of the group also participate in Fermilab Proposal P803 which will search for the oscillation of muon neutrino to tau neutrino with sensitivity better than a factor of 40 than previously achieved and in Superconducting Super Collider activities which include the development of an imaging preradiator. A brief discussion is given on progress made for each program.

  18. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-02-01

    This report describes the progress of 12 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988. During this quarter, field activities at the 300 Area process trenches, the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, the 1324-N/NA Surface Impoundment and Percolation Ponds, the 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities, and the 216-A-36B Crib consisted of ground-water sampling and analyses, and water-level monitoring. The 200 Area Low-Level Burial Grounds section includes well development data, sediment analysis, and water-level measurements. Ground-water sampling was begun at this site, and results will be included in next quarter's report. Twelve new wells were installed during the quarter, two at the 216-A-29 Ditch, size at the 216-A-10 Crib, and four at the 216-B-3 Pond. Preliminary characterization data for these new wells are included in this report. Driller's logs and other drilling and site characterization data will be provided in the next quarterly report. At the 2101-M Pond, construction was completed on four wells, and initial ground-water samples were taken. The drilling logs, geophysical logging data, and as-built diagrams are included in this report in Volume 2. 19 refs., 24 figs., 39 tabs.

  19. The impact of teaching physical education to Czech school children using progressive teaching approaches: findings of a four-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromel, Karel; El Ansari, Walid; Vasícková, Jana

    2009-09-01

    Practice teaching is an important feature of pre-professional preparation of teachers. This study assessed student teachers' (STs) and pupils': overall evaluation and evaluation of pupils' roles in physical education (PE) and second subject lessons. STs delivered the lessons using either traditional or progressive teaching approaches. Questionnaires were completed by 57 STs and 10,517 high school pupils who assessed the lessons taught by the STs. Differences in the evaluation of pupil's role were analysed according to teaching approach, school years, and gender. In both types of lessons, pupils evaluated progressive teaching approaches more positively than the traditional approaches. Pupils' roles in lessons delivered using progressive teaching approaches also increased. STs evaluated the progressive approaches in both lessons more positively than traditional approaches. Girls evaluated PE lessons more favourably than boys regardless of teaching approach. If the goal is to increase pupils' role in the lessons, progressive teaching approach may be more effective than traditional.

  20. A Request for Planning Funds for a Research and Study Abroad Facility in Geneva, Switzerland in Affiliation with the European Laboratory for Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    campbell, myron

    2013-03-31

    To create a research and study abroad program that would allow U.S. undergraduate students access to the world-leading research facilities at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the World Health Organization, various operations of the United Nations and other international organizations based in Geneva.The proposal is based on the unique opportunities currently existing in Geneva. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is now operational at CERN, data are being collected, and research results are already beginning to emerge. At the same time, a related reduction of activity at U.S. facilities devoted to particle physics is expected. In addition, the U.S. higher-education community has an ever-increasing focus on international organizations dealing with world health pandemics, arms control and human rights, a nexus also centered in Geneva.

  1. Evaluation of the Color Me Healthy Program in Influencing Nutrition and Physical Activity in Mississippi Preschool Child Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huye, Holly F.; Bankston, Sarah; Speed, Donna; Molaison, Elaine F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the level of implementation and perceived value in creating knowledge and behavior change from the Color Me Healthy (CMH) training program in child care centers, family day carehomes, or Head Start facilities throughout Mississippi. Methods: A two-phase survey was used to initially…

  2. Technology pedagogical activities on the formation of special motor skills of future teachers of physical education facilities fitness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tvelina A.О.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed the scientific and practical problems of integration of technology into the fitness training of future teachers of physical culture. The technological design algorithm by means of physical training fitness. A list of stages in a strict logical sequence: diagnostic, pre-project, projecting; realizable; control and corrective. It is noted that educational activities include: development methodology and software content of physical education students, monitoring the effectiveness of the system classes. We recommend the learning process in groups to systematize physical training with curriculum development and the location of the training material in strict logical sequence.

  3. The progress in knowledge of physical oceanography of the Gulf of Finland: a review for 1997-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarmo Soomere

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The main findings of studies of the physical oceanography of the Gulf of Finland (GoF during 1997-2007 are reviewed. The aim is to discuss relevant updates published in international peer-reviewed research papers and monographs, bearing in mind that a comprehensive overview of the studies up to the mid-1990s is available (Alenius et al. 1998. We start the discussion with updates on the basic hydrographical and stratification conditions, and progress in the understanding of atmospheric forcing and air-sea interaction. Advances in the knowledge of basin-scale and mesoscale dynamics are summarised next. Progress in circulation and water exchange dynamics has been achieved mostly by means of numerical studies. While the basic properties of circulation patterns in the gulf have been known for a century, new characteristics and tools such as water age, renewal index, and high-resolution simulations have substantially enriched our knowledge of processes in the Gulf of Finland during the last decade. We present the first overview of both status and advances in optical studies in this area. Awareness in this discipline has been significantly improved as a result of in situ measurements. Our understanding of the short- and long-term behaviour of the sea level as well as knowledge of the properties of both naturally and anthropogenically induced surface waves have expanded considerably during these ten years. Developments in understanding the ice conditions of the Gulf of Finland complete the overview, together with a short discussion of the gulf's future, including the response to climate change. Suggestions for future work are outlined.

  4. ANALYSIS OF THE SYSTEMS OF DIDACTICS FACILITIES ON PHYSICS IN THE CONDITIONS OF PROFESSION-ORIENTED SCHOOL

    OpenAIRE

    Tetiana M. Zasiekina

    2010-01-01

    Actuality of material of the article is predefined a social query in relation to direction the process of studies on forming of vital competence of personality of student; that didactics facilities together with principles, forms and methods of studies come forward as resources of realization of an educational-educate activity, and their structurally well-organized co-operation create terms for effective achievement of aims of studies and education, and also by the necessity of development of...

  5. 20th International Training Course (ITC-20) on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials evaluation report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Amanda Ann

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this evaluation report is to provide the information necessary to improve the effectiveness of the ITC provided to the International Atomic Energy Agency Member States. This report examines ITC-20 training content, delivery methods, scheduling, and logistics. Ultimately, this report evaluates whether the course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the participants needs in the protection of nuclear materials and facilities.

  6. High energy physics studies progress report. Part I. Experimental program. [Summaries of research activities at Ohio State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    The experimental program of research, including Assembly of an experiment at Fermilab E-351 to measure decay lifetimes, with tagged emulsion, of charmed particles produced by high energy neutrinos will continue. A data-taking run will take place in the coming fiscal year. Participation in the neutrino experiment E-310, Fermilab-Harvard-Pennsylvania-Rutgers-Wisconsin, will also continue. Data analysis from several experiments performed in the recent past at the ZGS ANL is in progress and will be pursued. These experiments are, E-397, E-420 and E-428 performed with the Charged and Neutral Spectrometer, and E-347 with the ..sigma../sub ..beta../ Spectrometer. Plans are in the making to collaborate with a polarized proton experiment at the ZGS. New approaches to ''third generation'' neutrino experiments at Fermilab are being discussed by the whole high energy group. Ideas of pursuing experiments at the AGS-BNL with the ..sigma../sub ..beta../ Spectrometer are explored. The theoretical research program covers topics of current interest in particle theory which will be investigated in the coming year; namely, the role of instantons in quantum chromodynamics, Higgs Lagrangian involving scalar fields, phenomenology of neutrino physics and in particular the nature of trimuon production, higher order symmetries like SU(3) x U(1) SU(5) and SU(6), dynamics of high energy diffractive scattering, classical solutions to the gauge field theories.

  7. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    There have been three physics meetings since the last CMS week: “physics days” on March 27-29, the Physics/ Trigger week on April 23-27 and the most recent physics days on May 22-24. The main purpose of the March physics days was to finalize the list of “2007 analyses”, i.e. the few topics that the physics groups will concentrate on for the rest of this calendar year. The idea is to carry out a full physics exercise, with CMSSW, for select physics channels which test key features of the physics objects, or represent potential “day 1” physics topics that need to be addressed in advance. The list of these analyses was indeed completed and presented in the plenary meetings. As always, a significant amount of time was also spent in reviewing the status of the physics objects (reconstruction) as well as their usage in the High-Level Trigger (HLT). The major event of the past three months was the first “Physics/Trigger week” in Apri...

  8. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  9. Summary of 2016 Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Physical Science Experiments on ISS. Update of LMM Science Experiments and Facility Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicker, Ronald J.; Meyer, William V.; Foster, William M.; Fletcher, William A.; Williams, Stuart J.; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will feature a series of short, entertaining, and informative videos that describe the current status and science support for the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) facility on the International Space Station. These interviews will focus on current experiments and provide an overview of future capabilities. The recently completed experiments include nano-particle haloing, 3-D self-assembly with Janus particles and a model system for nano-particle drug delivery. The videos will share perspectives from the scientists, engineers, and managers working with the NASA Light Microscopy program.

  10. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    There have been numerous developments in the physics area since the September CMS week. The biggest single event was the Physics/Trigger week in the end of Octo¬ber, whereas in terms of ongoing activities the “2007 analyses” went into high gear. This was in parallel with participation in CSA07 by the physics groups. On the or¬ganizational side, the new conveners of the physics groups have been selected, and a new database for man¬aging physics analyses has been deployed. Physics/Trigger week The second Physics-Trigger week of 2007 took place during the week of October 22-26. The first half of the week was dedicated to working group meetings. The ple¬nary Joint Physics-Trigger meeting took place on Wednesday afternoon and focused on the activities of the new Trigger Studies Group (TSG) and trigger monitoring. Both the Physics and Trigger organizations are now focused on readiness for early data-taking. Thus, early trigger tables and preparations for calibr...

  11. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    The CPT project came to an end in December 2006 and its original scope is now shared among three new areas, namely Computing, Offline and Physics. In the physics area the basic change with respect to the previous system (where the PRS groups were charged with detector and physics object reconstruction and physics analysis) was the split of the detector PRS groups (the old ECAL-egamma, HCAL-jetMET, Tracker-btau and Muons) into two groups each: a Detector Performance Group (DPG) and a Physics Object Group. The DPGs are now led by the Commissioning and Run Coordinator deputy (Darin Acosta) and will appear in the correspond¬ing column in CMS bulletins. On the physics side, the physics object groups are charged with the reconstruction of physics objects, the tuning of the simulation (in collaboration with the DPGs) to reproduce the data, the provision of code for the High-Level Trigger, the optimization of the algorithms involved for the different physics analyses (in collaboration with the analysis gr...

  12. A Prospective, Observational Study to Assess the Use of Thermography to Predict Progression of Discolored Intact Skin to Necrosis Among Patients in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jill; Kaes, Loretta; Martinez, Miguel; Moles, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Skin temperature may help prospectively determine whether an area of skin discoloration will evolve into necrosis. A prospective, observational study was conducted in 7 skilled nursing facilities to determine if skin temperature measured using infrared thermography could predict the progression of discolored intact skin (blanchable erythema, Stage 1 pressure ulcer, or sus- pected deep tissue injury [sDTI]) to necrosis and to evaluate if nurses could effectively integrate thermography into the clinical setting. Patients residing in or presenting to the facility between October 2014 and August 2015 with a pressure-related area of discolored skin determined to be blanchable erythema, a Stage 1 pressure ulcer, or sDTI and anticipated length of stay >6 days were assessed at initial presentation of the discolored area and after 7 and 14 days by facility nurses trained on camera operation and study protocol. Variables included patient demographic and clinical data, data related to the discolored area (eg, size, date of initial discovery), and temperature and appearance differences between discolored and adjacent intact skin. Skin temperatures at the discolored and adjacent areas were measured during the initial assessment. All facility pressure ulcer prevention and treatment protocols derived from evidence-based clinical practice guidelines remained in use during the study time period. Participating nurses completed a 2-part, pencil/paper survey to examine the feasibility of incorporating thermography for skin assessment into practice. Data analyses were performed using descriptive statistics (frequency analyses) and bivariate analysis (t-tests and chi-squared tests); logistic regression was used to assess associations among patient and pressure ulcer variables. Of the 67 patients studied, the overall mean age was 85 years (SD 10); 52 were women; 63 were Caucasian; and the top 3 diagnoses, accounting for 60% of the study sample, included neurologic (ie, cardiovascular

  13. Energy conservation progress in building equipment. Energy conservation on the sports facilities; Kenchiku setsubi ni okeru sho energy no shiten. Supotsu reja shisetsu no sho energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakura, I.; Kayo, M. [Kajima Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-06-05

    There are various kinds of sports and leisure facilities. Due to their classes, aims, operation styles and so forth, the grades of aimed environments and facilities change. For example, like a baseball, swimming and skating, quantity of motion and grade of sportswear are different due to their classes and a target environment is also differs. On the other hand, public facility for citizen use is required its cheaper fee, but private facility on commercial base is required its user-collecting capability with added-value. In order to content individual needs of each facility, it is important to combine properly its target environment and its equipment system. The sports and leisure facilities have often large space on their characteristics, and are necessary to maintain their target environments as well as to treat their thermal emission in closed space and to supply their required air. Therefore, it is an extremely meaningful to conduct the energy saving in the facility apt to consume a lot of energy, which is described in this paper mainly on in-door large space facilities. 17 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Cardiac acceleration at the onset of exercise: a potential parameter for monitoring progress during physical training in sports and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettinga, Florentina J; Monden, Paul G; van Meeteren, Nico L U; Daanen, Hein A M

    2014-05-01

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were searched to retrieve studies investigating HRonset. In total 652 studies were retrieved. These articles were then classified as having emphasis on HRonset in a sports or rehabilitation setting, which resulted in 8 of 112 studies with a sports application and 6 of 68 studies with a rehabilitation application that met inclusion criteria. Two co-existing mechanisms underlie HRonset: feedforward (central command) and feedback (mechanoreflex, metaboreflex, baroreflex) control. A number of studies investigated HRonset during the first few seconds of exercise (HRonsetshort), in which central command and the mechanoreflex determine vagal withdrawal, the major mechanism by which heart rate (HR) increases. In subsequent sports and rehabilitation studies, interest focused on HRonset during dynamic exercise over a longer period of time (HRonsetlong). Central command, mechanoreflexes, baroreflexes, and possibly metaboreflexes contribute to HRonset during the first seconds and minutes of exercise, which in turn leads to further vagal withdrawal and an increase in sympathetic activity. HRonset has been described as the increase in HR compared with resting state (delta HR) or by exponential modeling, with measurement intervals ranging from 0-4 s up to 2 min. Delta HR was used to evaluate HRonsetshort over the first 4 s of exercise, as well as for analyzing HRonsetlong. In exponential modeling, the HR response to dynamic exercise is biphasic, consisting of fast (parasympathetic, 0-10 s) and slow (sympathetic, 1-4 min) components. Although available studies differed largely in measurement protocols, cross-sectional and longitudinal training studies showed that studies analyzing HRonset

  15. Progress in research, January 1, 1976--December 31, 1976. [Theoretical Nuclear Physics Group, Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Texas at Austin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    The accomplishments in basic research in nuclear physics carried out by the theoretical nuclear physics group of the Department of Physics of the University of Texas at Austin during the period January 1, 1976, to December 31, 1976, are described. Most of the work has already been published, or soon will be. 26 figures. (RWR)

  16. Progress in Y-00 physical cipher for Giga bit/sec optical data communications (intensity modulation method)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Osamu; Futami, Fumio

    2014-10-01

    To guarantee a security of Cloud Computing System is urgent problem. Although there are several threats in a security problem, the most serious problem is cyber attack against an optical fiber transmission among data centers. In such a network, an encryption scheme on Layer 1(physical layer) with an ultimately strong security, a small delay, and a very high speed should be employed, because a basic optical link is operated at 10 Gbit/sec/wavelength. We have developed a quantum noise randomied stream cipher so called Yuen- 2000 encryption scheme (Y-00) during a decade. This type of cipher is a completely new type random cipher in which ciphertext for a legitimate receiver and eavesdropper are different. This is a condition to break the Shannon limit in theory of cryptography. In addition, this scheme has a good balance on a security, a speed and a cost performance. To realize such an encryption, several modulation methods are candidates such as phase-modulation, intensity-modulation, quadrature amplitude modulation, and so on. Northwestern university group demonstrated a phase modulation system (α=η) in 2003. In 2005, we reported a demonstration of 1 Gbit/sec system based on intensity modulation scheme(ISK-Y00), and gave a design method for quadratic amplitude modulation (QAM-Y00) in 2005 and 2010. An intensity modulation scheme promises a real application to a secure fiber communication of current data centers. This paper presents a progress in quantum noise randomized stream cipher based on ISK-Y00, integrating our theoretical and experimental achievements in the past and recent 100 Gbit/sec(10Gbit/sec × 10 wavelengths) experiment.

  17. Sports Facilities, Shopping Centers or Homes: What Locations are Important for Adults’ Physical Activity? A Cross-Sectional Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, F.M.; Ettema, D.F.; Pierik, Frank H.; Dijst, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is influenced by the built environment. However, little is known about the types of built environment where adults spend their time, and at what levels of PA they engage in those environments. Understanding the effect of the built environment on PA requires insight into PA

  18. Sports facilities, shopping centers or homes: What locations are important for adults’ physical activity? A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, M.; Ettema, D.; Pierik, F.; Dijst, M.

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is influenced by the built environment. However, little is known about the types of built environment where adults spend their time, and at what levels of PA they engage in those environments. Understanding the effect of the built environment on PA requires insight into PA

  19. PHYSICS

    CERN Document Server

    Submitted by

    Physics Week: plenary meeting on physics groups plans for startup (14–15 May 2008) The Physics Objects (POG) and Physics Analysis (PAG) Groups presented their latest developments at the plenary meeting during the Physics Week. In the presentations particular attention was given to startup plans and readiness for data-taking. Many results based on the recent cosmic run were shown. A special Workshop on SUSY, described in a separate section, took place the day before the plenary. At the meeting, we had also two special DPG presentations on “Tracker and Muon alignment with CRAFT” (Ernesto Migliore) and “Calorimeter studies with CRAFT” (Chiara Rovelli). We had also a report from Offline (Andrea Rizzi) and Computing (Markus Klute) on the San Diego Workshop, described elsewhere in this bulletin. Tracking group (Boris Mangano). The level of sophistication of the tracking software increased significantly over the last few months: V0 (K0 and Λ) reconstr...

  20. Site-wide physical inventory taking at IPPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poplavko, V.Ya.; Efimenko, V.F.; Belov, A.P. [A.I. Leipunsky Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1999-07-01

    As part of the US-Russian Cooperative Program of Material Protection, Control and Accounting, staff members of the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) have implemented procedures for taking physical inventory of nuclear materials at many of the facilities within the IPPE site. These include both large facilities, with substantial inventories and requiring dedicated inventory equipment and computers, and small facilities, with smaller amounts of material and subject to inventory by portable equipment. The experience to date demonstrates good progress toward the goal of regular physical inventory taking for the most attractive nuclear materials at IPPE.

  1. Physical fitness training reference manual for security force personnel at fuel cycle facilities possessing formula quantities of special nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arzino, P.A.; Caplan, C.S.; Goold, R.E. (California State Univ., Hayward, CA (United States). Foundation)

    1991-09-01

    The recommendations contained throughout this NUREG are being provided to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as a reference manual which can be used by licensee management as they develop a program plan for the safe participation of guards, Tactical Response Team members (TRTs), and all other armed response personnel in physical fitness training and in physical performance standards testing. The information provided in this NUREG will help licensees to determine if guards, TRTs, and other armed response personnel can effectively perform their normal and emergency duties without undue hazard to themselves, to fellow employees, to the plant site, and to the general public. The recommendations in this NUREG are similar in part to those contained within the Department of Energy (DOE) Medical and Fitness Implementation Guide which was published in March 1991. The guidelines contained in this NUREG are not requirements, and compliance is not required. 25 refs.

  2. EFFICIENCY INCREASE OF MASTERING PROCESS OF PHYSICS CONCEPTUAL APPARATUS BY STUDENTS THOUGHT THE INSTRUMENTALITY OF MULTIMEDIA FACILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga P. Pinchuk

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the article material specified the change of accent in school subjects teaching from the transmission of knowledge to forming of students’ ability and willingness to use this knowledge in the real vital situations. The elements of forming method of students’ conceptual apparatus on the lessons of physics are offered. The process of mastering of scientific knowledge system by students with the use of different working methods with conceptual apparatus of physics is described. Use of multimedia technologies on the different stages of teacher’s activity is studied. The author considers research of possibilities of combination of the free communication with an audience with the use of computer device and co-operation of means of network technologies and telecommunications with an educational purpose to be perspective.

  3. The relationship between nutritional status and physical function, admission frequency, length of hospital stay, and mortality in old people living in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sin-Jie; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Lin, Hung-Ru

    2012-06-01

    Nutrition is an important issue for elderly residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs). About 20% of elderly LTCF residents in Taiwan are malnourished. This study investigated correlations between nutritional status and physical function, admission frequency, hospitalstay duration, and mortality in elderly LTCF residents. Researchers used a retrospective study design and convenient sampling to enroll 174 subjects aged 67 to 105 years (average, 82.5 years) who were living in legally registered LTCFs in Beitou District, Taipei City, Taiwan. A review of LTCF resident files provided data on subjects' demographics, physical examination laboratory results for the most recent 1-year period, anthropometry, physical function, admission frequency, hospital stay duration, and causes of admissions. Subjects had lived in their LTCF for more than 1 year before their enrollment date. Subjects who died during and after the study period were also included in analysis. Results showed significant changes over the study year in subjects' nutritional status, physical function, and calf circumference. Physical function was found significantly correlated with calf circumference, hospitalization status was found correlated with nasal-gastric tube feeding status, and eating pattern was found correlated with calf circumference and levels of both serum albumin and cholesterol. Nutritional status, calf circumference, albumin level, and cholesterol level also correlated significantly with hospitalization status. In this study, the likelihood of hospitalization increased with age and nasal-gastric tube feeding use. Hospital stay duration for subjects receiving nasal-gastric tube feeding was longer than that for those receiving oral feeding. Also, weak nutritional status scores for calf circumference and hemoglobin levels were factors associated with increased mortality risk. Findings recommend that greater attention should be paid to the nutritional status of elderly persons living in LTCFs

  4. Physiotherapy in the physical rehabilitation of patients with sequelae of injuries of the lower extremities in Zhitomir of rehabilitation facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhelezniy O.D.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to study the physical properties and therapeutic effect of mechanical factors in the pathogenetic treatment in traumatology. Material : 622 patients were studied with the consequences of injuries of the lower extremities (age 18-64 years. Observations carried out since 2005 in hospitals and medical health institutions of Zhitomir. Selected physiotherapy factors that are mainly used for the physical rehabilitation of patients in trauma. Results : identified the factors that were intended to eliminate the consequences of injuries of the lower extremities. Analyzed their effect in the author's method of complex rehabilitation of patients. Performed systematization selected physiotherapy factors in a table to read and understand forms. In the medical health institutions in the city of Zhytomyr investigated and established the effectiveness of the recommendations. Conclusions : physical factors cause the body general, non-specific and specific response to each type of impact. This allows you to selectively influence the pathogenic elements of the disease. Should strictly adhere to the indications and contraindications to the use of physiotherapy factor. It is necessary to take into account age, sex, and comorbidity.

  5. Effects of Physical Environment on Health and Behaviors of Residents With Dementia in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook Young; Chaudhury, Habib; Hung, Lillian

    2016-01-01

    The challenges in investigating the effects of the physical environment on residents with dementia include having a sample of comparable study groups and a lack of long-term follow-up evaluation. The current study attempted to address these two challenges by carefully matching residents and analyzing long-term measurement data. The aim of the study was to examine whether residents with dementia (N = 12) living in a traditional large-scale setting or a small-scale, home-like setting exhibit any difference in health and behaviors over time. Physical environmental assessment of the two care facilities was conducted using the Therapeutic Environment Screening Survey for Nursing Homes. Residents' behavioral assessments were performed using three tools at three assessments over a period of 1 year: (a) Multidimensional Observation Scale for Elderly Subjects, (b) Minimum Data Set, and (c) Dementia Care Mapping. The results suggest that older adults with dementia can have increased social interaction and engagement with the support of an optimal physical environment.

  6. Underground Facilities, Technological Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Spooner, N

    2010-01-01

    This report gives a summary overview of the status of international under- ground facilities, in particular as relevant to long-baseline neutrino physics and neutrino astrophysics. The emphasis is on the technical feasibility aspects of creating the large underground infrastructures that will be needed in the fu- ture to house the necessary detectors of 100 kton to 1000 kton scale. There is great potential in Europe to build such a facility, both from the technical point of view and because Europe has a large concentration of the necessary engi- neering and geophysics expertise. The new LAGUNA collaboration has made rapid progress in determining the feasibility for a European site for such a large detector. It is becoming clear in fact that several locations are technically fea- sible in Europe. Combining this with the possibility of a new neutrino beam from CERN suggests a great opportunity for Europe to become the leading centre of neutrino studies, combining both neutrino astrophysics and neutrino beam stu...

  7. Factors Associated With the Trend of Physical and Chemical Restraint Use Among Long-Term Care Facility Residents in Hong Kong: Data From an 11-Year Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Kuen; Kwan, Joseph S K; Wai Kwan, Chi; Chong, Alice M L; Lai, Claudia K Y; Lou, Vivian W Q; Leung, Angela Y M; Liu, Justina Y W; Bai, Xue; Chi, Iris

    2017-08-23

    Negative effects of restraint use have been well-documented. However, the prevalence of restraints use has been high in long-term care facilities in Hong Kong compared with other countries and this goes against the basic principles of ethical and compassionate care for older people. The present study aimed to review the change in the prevalence of physical and chemical restraint use in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) over a period of 11 years in Hong Kong and to identify the major factors associated with their use. This is an observational study with data obtained from the Hong Kong Longitudinal Study on LTCF Residents between 2005 and 2015. Trained assessors (nurses, social workers, and therapists) used the Minimum Data Set Resident Assessment Instrument to collect the data from 10 residential LTCFs. Physical restraint was defined as the use of any of the following: full bedside rails on all open sides of bed, other types of bedside rails used, trunk restraint, limb restraint, or the use of chair to prevent rising during the past 7 days. Chemical restraint was defined as the use of any of the following medications: antipsychotic, antianxiety, or hypnotic agents during past 7 days, excluding elder residents with a diagnosis of psychiatric illness. Annual prevalence of restraint use over 11 years and factors that were associated with the use of physical and chemical restraints. We analyzed the data for 2896 older people (978 male individuals, mean age = 83.3 years). Between 2005 and 2015, the prevalence of restraint use was as follows: physical restraint use increased from 52.7% to 70.2%; chemical restraint use increased from 15.9% to 21.78%; and either physical or chemical restraint use increased from 57.9% to 75.7%. Physical restraint use was independently associated with older age, impaired activities of daily living or cognitive function, bowel and bladder incontinence, dementia, and negative mood. Chemical restraint use was independently associated

  8. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.   Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish (we hoped) the readiness of CMS to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the...

  9. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.  Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish how ready we are to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the week was thus pac...

  10. Atomic physics of relativistic high contrast laser-produced plasmas in experiments on Leopard laser facility at UNR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Faenov, A. Y.; Safronova, U. I.; Wiewior, P.; Renard-Le Galloudec, N.; Esaulov, A. A.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Wilcox, P.; Shrestha, I.; Ouart, N. D.; Shlyaptseva, V.; Osborne, G. C.; Chalyy, O.; Paudel, Y.

    2012-06-01

    The results of the recent experiments focused on study of x-ray radiation from multicharged plasmas irradiated by relativistic (I > 1019 W/cm2) sub-ps laser pulses on Leopard laser facility at NTF/UNR are presented. These shots were done under different experimental conditions related to laser pulse and contrast. In particular, the duration of the laser pulse was 350 fs or 0.8 ns and the contrast was varied from high (10-7) to moderate (10-5). The thin laser targets (from 4 to 750 μm) made of a broad range of materials (from Teflon to iron and molybden to tungsten and gold) were utilized. Using the x-ray diagnostics including the high-precision spectrometer with resolution R ˜ 3000 and a survey spectrometer, we have observed unique spectral features that are illustrated in this paper. Specifically, the observed L-shell spectra for Fe targets subject to high intensity lasers (˜1019 W/cm2) indicate electron beams, while at lower intensities (˜1016 W/cm2) or for Cu targets there is much less evidence for an electron beam. In addition, K-shell Mg features with dielectronic satellites from high-Rydberg states, and the new K-shell F features with dielectronic satellites including exotic transitions from hollow ions are highlighted.

  11. Relationships between stable fly infestation with some physical facility characteristics and sanitation practices in several dairy farms in the State of Aguascalientes, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Vázquez, C; Ramos-Parra, M; Vitela-Mendoza, I; García-Vázquez, Z; Quintero-Martínez, M T

    2007-11-10

    The possible relationships between stable fly infestation with dairy farm facilities and sanitation practices were studied using path analysis. Twelve dairies located in four counties of Aguascalientes dairy region were selected. The dairies were monitored from May to November 2003. In each occasion, fly infestation, individual physical facility characteristics, and sanitation practices were recorded. In all, 11 independent variables were involved in the study and related variables were grouped together and analyzed in two blocks by path analysis for each one of five population events (begin of fly season, first peak, fluctuation, second peak and decrease). There were significant regression coefficients only in the second peak for two variables, the distance to the silos and the distance to the dung heap (r(2)=0.96 for the full model). Among the 11 variables examined in the study, none had a statistical significant indirect contribution to fly infestation; direct contribution was observed for distance to the silos and for distance to the dung heap variables. However, only the distance to the silos variable was significantly related to stable fly Infestation.

  12. A quantitative study of gifted minority students' progression in the physical sciences and mathematics at a large research university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Dorothy Ann Stallworth

    The changing demographics of the United States will demand that more ethnic minorities be used in the science, medical, and engineering workforce. In order for ethnic minorities to gain access to these careers, they must first receive a degree in the sciences. Making it through an institution of higher learning has proven problematic for most ethnic minority students. Oftentimes, the higher the educational level, the fewer the number of ethnic minorities present. Many minority students find, that when they arrive at the university, they have less exposure to high order mathematics and science activities than their White peers do (Campbell, Wahl, Slayer, Moeller, Harouna, & Light, 1998). The study reported in this dissertation examines the progress of students who have participated in a science enrichment program early in their academic careers at the university campus, the Charles Drew Science Enrichment Program at Michigan State University. The program was created in an effort to provide ethnic minority students the opportunity to perform successfully in the core science and math courses, and increase the number of ethnic minority students who complete degrees in the biological sciences, physical sciences, and mathematics. Using data from ethnic minority students who entered fall of 1993 to fall of 1998, and participated in the Charles Drew Science Enrichment Program at Michigan State University, this quantitative longitudinal study examined the impact of a student assistance and academic support program that provides ethnic minority students the opportunity to perform successfully in core science and mathematics courses. A random sample of ethnic minority students who entered the college of natural science, but who did not participate in the program served as a control group. A random sample of White students with a major in the natural science, during the same time periods, was drawn as the second control group. Data indicated that the controlled groups did not

  13. Simulations of beam-matter interaction experiments at the CERN HiRadMat facility and prospects of high-energy-density physics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N A; Burkart, F; Shutov, A; Schmidt, R; Wollmann, D; Piriz, A R

    2014-12-01

    In a recent publication [Schmidt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 080701 (2014)], we reported results on beam-target interaction experiments that have been carried out at the CERN HiRadMat (High Radiation to Materials) facility using extended solid copper cylindrical targets that were irradiated with a 440-GeV proton beam delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). On the one hand, these experiments confirmed the existence of hydrodynamic tunneling of the protons that leads to substantial increase in the range of the protons and the corresponding hadron shower in the target, a phenomenon predicted by our previous theoretical investigations [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 25, 051003 (2012)]. On the other hand, these experiments demonstrated that the beam heated part of the target is severely damaged and is converted into different phases of high energy density (HED) matter, as suggested by our previous theoretical studies [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. E 79, 046410 (2009)]. The latter confirms that the HiRadMat facility can be used to study HED physics. In the present paper, we give details of the numerical simulations carried out to understand the experimental measurements. These include the evolution of the physical parameters, for example, density, temperature, pressure, and the internal energy in the target, during and after the irradiation. This information is important in order to determine the region of the HED phase diagram that can be accessed in such experiments. These simulations have been done using the energy deposition code fluka and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code, big2, iteratively.

  14. KDHE Project Code: C6-074-00002: Progress and Monitoring Report for the LDB/SVE/AS System at the Former CCC/USDA Grain Storage Facility, Agra, Kansas, in July-December 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Agra, Kansas, from the 1950s to the early 1970s. No structures remain on the property, and the land is used for agricultural purposes, specifically wheat production. The property is currently owned by the Kyle Railroad Co. and is leased to Mr. Herb VanEaton. The Pro-Ag Marketing grain storage facility is directly south of the former CCC/USDA facility. Quarterly progress reports for October-December 2008, January-March 2009, and April- June 2009 (Argonne 2009a,b,c) provided detailed information regarding construction and startup of the cleanup. Previous periodic monitoring reports (Argonne 2010a,b,c,d, 2011a,b,c, 2012, 2013a,b,c, 2014a,b) have tracked the subsequent progress of the cleanup effort. Data for evaluation of system performance are collected primarily by sampling SVE effluents, soil gas monitoring points, and groundwater wells for analysis for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Table 1.1 provides a detailed chronological summary of activities during implementation of the cleanup.

  15. Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) facility, within Sandia’s Solid Dynamic Physics Department, is one of a few institutions in the world with a...

  16. Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) facility, within Sandia’s Solid Dynamic Physics Department, is one of a few institutions in the world with...

  17. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Joe Incandela

    There have been two plenary physics meetings since the December CMS week. The year started with two workshops, one on the measurements of the Standard Model necessary for “discovery physics” as well as one on the Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT). Meanwhile the tail of the “2007 analyses” is going through the last steps of approval. It is expected that by the end of January all analyses will have converted to using the data from CSA07 – which include the effects of miscalibration and misalignment. January Physics Days The first Physics Days of 2008 took place on January 22-24. The first two days were devoted to comprehensive re¬ports from the Detector Performance Groups (DPG) and Physics Objects Groups (POG) on their planning and readiness for early data-taking followed by approvals of several recent studies. Highlights of POG presentations are included below while the activities of the DPGs are covered elsewhere in this bulletin. January 24th was devo...

  18. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    The all-plenary format of the CMS week in Cyprus gave the opportunity to the conveners of the physics groups to present the plans of each physics analysis group for tackling early physics analyses. The presentations were complete, so all are encouraged to browse through them on the Web. There is a wealth of information on what is going on, by whom and on what basis and priority. The CMS week was followed by two CMS “physics events”, the ICHEP08 days and the physics days in July. These were two weeks dedicated to either the approval of all the results that would be presented at ICHEP08, or to the review of all the other Monte-Carlo based analyses that were carried out in the context of our preparations for analysis with the early LHC data (the so-called “2008 analyses”). All this was planned in the context of the beginning of a ramp down of these Monte Carlo efforts, in anticipation of data.  The ICHEP days are described below (agenda and talks at: http://indic...

  19. Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cullen, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    Defined as the scientific study of matter and energy, physics explains how all matter behaves. Separated into modern and classical physics, the study attracts both experimental and theoretical physicists. From the discovery of the process of nuclear fission to an explanation of the nature of light, from the theory of special relativity to advancements made in particle physics, this volume profiles 10 pioneers who overcame tremendous odds to make significant breakthroughs in this heavily studied branch of science. Each chapter contains relevant information on the scientist''s childhood, research, discoveries, and lasting contributions to the field and concludes with a chronology and a list of print and Internet references specific to that individual.

  20. Physical, Structural and Operational Vulnerability of Critical Facilities in Valle de Chalco Solidaridad, Estado de Mexico, Mexico. Case of study: Avándaro, San Isidro and El Triunfo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Payne, D. G.; Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Ponce-Pacheco, A. B.; Espinosa-Campos, O.; Huerta-Parra, M.; Reyes-Pimentel, T.; Rodriguez, F.; Benitez-Olivares, I.

    2010-12-01

    Valle de Chalco Solidaridad is located in Mexico City Metropolitan Area in Estado de Mexico, Mexico. In this town there is a sewage canal called “La Compañía”. A wall of this canal collapsed on February 5, 2010 due to heavy rains creating the flooding of four surrounding communities. It is important to point out that this area is frequently exposed to floods. In this work, we consider a critical facility as an essential structure for performance, health care and welfare within a community or/and as a place that can be used as shelter in case of emergency or disaster. Global vulnerability (the sum of the three measured vulnerabilities) of the 25 critical facilities identified in the locations of Avándaro, San Isidro and El Triunfo was assessed using the Community Vulnerability Assessment Tool developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). For each critical facility we determined its operational, structural and physical vulnerabilities. For our analysis, we considered the four main natural hazards to which Valle de Chalco is exposed: earthquakes, floods, landslides and sinking. We considered five levels of vulnerability using a scale from 1 to 5, where values range from very low to very high vulnerability, respectively. A critical facilities database was generated by collecting general information for three categories: schools, government and church. Each facility was evaluated considering its location in relation to identified high-risk areas. Our results indicate that in average, the global vulnerability of all facilities is low, however, there are particular cases in which this global vulnerability is high. The average operational vulnerability of the three communities is moderate. The global structural vulnerability (sum of the structural vulnerability for the four analyzed hazards) is moderate. In particular, the structural vulnerability to earthquakes is low, to landslides is very low, to flooding is moderate and to sinking is