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Sample records for phototrophic biofilm tolerance

  1. Ciliates as engineers of phototrophic biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerman, Ellen J.; van der Geest, Harm G.; van der Meulen, Myra D.; Manders, Erik M. M.; van de Koppel, Johan; Herman, Peter M. J.; Admiraal, Wim

    1. Phototrophic biofilms consist of a matrix of phototrophs, non-photosynthetic bacteria and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which is spatially structured. Despite widespread exploitation of algae and bacteria within phototrophic biofilms, for example by protozoans, the 'engineering'

  2. Microbial ecology of phototrophic biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeselers, G.

    2007-01-01

    Biofilms are layered structures of microbial cells and an extracellular matrix of polymeric substances, associated with surfaces and interfaces. Biofilms trap nutrients for growth of the enclosed microbial community and help prevent detachment of cells from surfaces in flowing systems. Phototrophic

  3. Ciliates as engineers of phototrophic biofilms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerman, E.J.; van der Geest, H.G.; van der Meulen, M.D; Manders, E.M.M.; van de Koppel, J.; Herman, P.M.J.; Admiraal, W.

    2011-01-01

    1. Phototrophic biofilms consist of a matrix of phototrophs, non-photosynthetic bacteria and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which is spatially structured. Despite widespread exploitation of algae and bacteria within phototrophic biofilms, for example by protozoans, the ‘engineering’

  4. Ciliates as engineers of phototrophic biofilms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerman, E.J.; Geest, H.G.; Meulen, M.D.; Manders, E.M.M.; Van de Koppel, J.; Herman, P.M.J.; Admiraal, W.

    2011-01-01

    1.Phototrophic biofilms consist of a matrix of phototrophs, non-photosynthetic bacteria and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which is spatially structured. Despite widespread exploitation of algae and bacteria within phototrophic biofilms, for example by protozoans, the ‘engineering’ effects

  5. Evaluation of single and joint toxic effects of diuron and its main metabolites on natural phototrophic biofilms using a pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Stéphane; Lissalde, Sophie; Lavieille, Delphine; Margoum, Christelle; Mazzella, Nicolas; Roubeix, Vincent; Montuelle, Bernard

    2010-09-15

    This study assessed the single and joint acute toxicity of diuron and two of its metabolites (DCPMU and 3,4-DCA) on natural phototrophic biofilms using a PICT approach with photosynthesis bioassays. River biofilm communities were collected at three sampling stations exhibiting increasing concentrations of diuron, DCPMU and 3,4-DCA from upstream to downstream. Applied individually, the parent compound was more toxic than its metabolites, with DCPMU being more toxic than 3,4-DCA which only inhibited photosynthesis at very high concentrations (EC25 at about 5 mg/l). Sensitivity of biofilm communities to diuron and DCPMU decreased from upstream to downstream, revealing tolerance induction in contaminated sections of the river, as expected from the PICT concept. Nevertheless, PICT was not applicable for 3,4-DCA, which similarly affected upstream, intermediate and downstream biofilm communities. Chemical mixtures of diuron and DCPMU demonstrated additive effects whereas combinations with 3,4-DCA enhanced the observed effects. Our results reveal that the individual and combined presence of diuron and DCPMU in lotic ecosystems can have both short-term effects (as shown with bioassays) and long-term effects (as shown through the PICT approach) on phototrophic biofilms, whereas environmental concentrations of 3,4-DCA may not affect biofilm photosynthetic activity. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Phototrophic biofilms and their potential applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeselers, G.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Muyzer, G.

    2007-01-01

    Phototrophic biofilms occur on surfaces exposed to light in a range of terrestrial and aquatic environments. Oxygenic phototrophs like diatoms, green algae, and cyanobacteria are the major primary producers that generate energy and reduce carbon dioxide, providing the system with organic substrates

  7. Application of phototrophic biofilms: from fundamentals to processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strieth, D; Ulber, R; Muffler, K

    2018-03-01

    Biotechnological production of valuables by microorganisms is commonly achieved by cultivating the cells as suspended solids in an appropriate liquid medium. However, the main portion of these organisms features a surface-attached growth in their native habitats. The utilization of such biofilms shows significant challenges, e.g. concerning control of pH, nutrient supply, and heat/mass transfer. But the use of biofilms might also enable novel and innovative production processes addressing robustness and strength of the applied biocatalyst, for example if variable conditions might occur in the process or a feedstock (substrate) is changed in its composition. Besides the robustness of a biofilm, the high density of the immobilized biocatalyst facilitates a simple separation of the catalyst and the extracellular product, whereas intracellular target compounds occur in a concentrated form; thus, expenses for downstream processing can be drastically reduced. While phototrophic organisms feature a fabulous spectrum of metabolites ranging from biofuels to biologically active compounds, the low cell density of phototrophic suspension cultures is still limiting their application for production processes. The review is focusing on pro- and eukaryotic microalgae featuring the production of valuable compounds and highlights requirements for their cultivation as phototrophic biofilms, i.e. setup as well as operation of biofilm reactors, and modeling of phototrophic growth.

  8. Long alkyl-chain imidazolium ionic liquids: Antibiofilm activity against phototrophic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, G Kiran Kumar; Nancharaiah, Y V; Venugopalan, V P

    2017-07-01

    Biofilm formation is problematic and hence undesirable in medical and industrial settings. In addition to bacteria, phototrophic organisms are an integral component of biofilms that develop on surfaces immersed in natural waters. 1-Alkyl-3-methyl imidazolium ionic liquids (IL) with varying alkyl chain length were evaluated for their influence on the formation of monospecies (Navicula sp.) and multispecies biofilms under phototrophic conditions. An IL with a long alkyl side chain, 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidaazolium chloride ([C 16 (MIM)][Cl]) retarded growth, adhesion and biofilm formation of Navicula sp. at concentrations as low as 5μM. Interestingly, [C 16 (MIM)][Cl] was very effective in preventing multispecies phototrophic biofilms on fibre reinforced plastic surfaces immersed in natural waters (fresh and seawater). SYTOX ® Green staining and chlorophyll leakage assay confirmed that the biocidal activity of the IL was exerted through cell membrane disruption. The data show that [C 16 (MIM)][Cl] is a potent inhibitor of phototrophic biofilms at micromolar concentrations and a promising agent for biofilm control in re-circulating cooling water systems. This is the first report that ionic liquids inhibit biofilm formation by phototrophic organisms which are important members of biofilms in streams and cooling towers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of a laboratory model of a phototroph-heterotroph mixed-species biofilm at the stone/air interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica eVilla

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent scientific investigations have shed light on the ecological importance and physiological complexity of subaerial biofilms (SABs inhabiting lithic surfaces. In the field of sustainable cultural heritage (CH preservation, mechanistic approaches aimed at investigation of the spatiotemporal patterns of interactions between the biofilm, the stone, and the atmosphere are of outstanding importance. However, these interactions have proven difficult to explore with field experiments due to the inaccessibility of samples, the complexity of the ecosystem under investigation and the temporal resolution of the experiments.To overcome these limitations, we aimed at developing a unifying methodology to reproduce a fast-growing, phototroph-heterotroph mixed species biofilm at the stone/air interface. Our experiments underscore the ability of the dual-species SAB model to capture functional traits characteristic of biofilms inhabiting lithic substrate such as: i microcolonies of aggregated bacteria; ii network like structure following surface topography; iii cooperation between phototrophs and heterotrophs and cross feeding processes; iv ability to change the chemical parameters that characterize the microhabitats; v survival under desiccation and vi biocide tolerance. With its advantages in control, replication, range of different experimental scenarios and matches with the real ecosystem, the developed model system is a powerful tool to advance our mechanistic understanding of the stone-biofilm-atmosphere interplay in different environments.

  10. A mass-spring model unveils the morphogenesis of phototrophic Diatoma biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celler, K.; Hödl, I.; Simone, A.; Battin, T.J.; Picioreanu, C.

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms often dominate planktonic communities in the ocean and phototrophic biofilms in streams and rivers, greatly contributing to global biogeochemical fluxes. In pelagic ecosystems, these microscopic algae can form chain-like microcolonies, which seem advantageous for nutrient uptake and protect

  11. The effect of harvesting on biomass production and nutrient removal in phototrophic biofilm reactors for effluent polishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelee, N.C.; Janssen, M.; Temmink, H.; Taparaviciute, L.; Khiewwijit, R.; Janoska, A.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of wastewater treatment plants require post-treatment to remove residual nitrogen and phosphorus. This study investigated various harvesting regimes that would achieve consistent low effluent concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus in a phototrophic biofilm reactor.

  12. Exploring the secrets of the three-dimensional architecture of phototrophic biofilms in caves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roldàn Monica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Caves with dim natural light, and lighted hypogean environments, have been found to host phototrophic microorganisms from varioustaxonomic groups. These microorganisms group themselves into assemblies known as communities or biofilms, which are associated withrock surfaces. In this work, the phototrophic biofilms that colonise speleothems, walls and floors in three tourist caves (Spain were studied.Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were used to study these organisms and acquirethree-dimensional data on their biofilm structure. CLSM was used in a multi-channel mode whereby the different channels map individualbiofilm components. Cyanobacteria, green microalgae, diatoms, mosses and lichens were found to be grouped as biofilms that differedaccording to the sampling sites. The biofilms were classified into six types regarding their environmental conditions. These types weredefined by their constituent organisms, the thickness of their photosynthetic layers and their structure. Light-related stress is associated with lower biofilm thickness and species diversity, as is low humidity, and, in the case of artificially illuminated areas, the duration of lightexposure.

  13. Biofilm comprising phototrophic, diazotrophic, and hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria: a promising consortium in the bioremediation of aquatic hydrocarbon pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bader, Dhia; Kansour, Mayada K; Rayan, Rehab; Radwan, Samir S

    2013-05-01

    Biofilms harboring simultaneously anoxygenic and oxygenic phototrophic bacteria, diazotrophic bacteria, and hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria were established on glass slides suspended in pristine and oily seawater. Via denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis on PCR-amplified rRNA gene sequence fragments from the extracted DNA from biofilms, followed by band amplification, biofilm composition was determined. The biofilms contained anoxygenic phototrophs belonging to alphaproteobacteria; pico- and filamentous cyanobacteria (oxygenic phototrophs); two species of the diazotroph Azospirillum; and two hydrocarbon-utilizing gammaproteobacterial genera, Cycloclasticus and Oleibacter. The coexistence of all these microbial taxa with different physiologies in the biofilm makes the whole community nutritionally self-sufficient and adequately aerated, a condition quite suitable for the microbial biodegradation of aquatic pollutant hydrocarbons.

  14. Phototrophic microbes form endolithic biofilms in ikaite tufa columns (SW Greenland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trampe, Erik; Castenholz, Richard W; Larsen, Jens E N; Kühl, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Marine tufa-columns, formed by the hydrated carbonate mineral ikaite, present a unique alkaline microbial habitat only found in Ikka Fjord (SW-Greenland). The outermost parts of the ikaite columns exhibit a multitude of physico-chemical gradients, and the porous ikaite is colonized by endolithic phototrophic biofilms serving as a substrate for grazing epifauna, where scraping by sea urchins affects overall column-topography. We present a detailed study of the optical microenvironment, spatial organization, and photosynthetic activity of endolithic phototrophs within the porous ikaite crystal matrix. Cyanobacteria and diatoms formed distinctly coloured zones and were closely associated with ikaite-crystals via excretion of exopolymers. Scalar-irradiance measurements showed strong attenuation of visible light (400-700 nm), where only ∼1% of incident irradiance remained at 20 mm depth. Transmission spectra showed in vivo absorption signatures of diatom and cyanobacterial photopigments, which were confirmed by HPLC-analysis. Variable-chlorophyll-fluorescence-imaging showed active photosynthesis with high-light acclimation in the outer diatom layer, and low-light acclimation in the underlying cyanobacterial part. Phototrophs in ikaite thus thrive in polymer-bound endolithic biofilms in a complex gradient microhabitat experiencing constant slow percolation of highly alkaline phosphate-enriched spring water mixing with cold seawater at the tufa-column-apex. We discuss the potential role of these biofilms in ikaite column formation. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Antibiotic tolerance and microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We study the dynamics of antibiotic action within hydrodynamic flow chamber biofilms of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using isogenic mutants and fluorescent gene...... expression reporters and we address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. The dynamics of microbial killing is monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Our work shows that the apparent increased antibiotic tolerance is due to the formation...... of antibiotic tolerant subpopulations within the biofilm. The formation of these subpopulations is highly variable and dependent on the antibiotic used, the biofilm structural organization and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms....

  16. NATURAL ANTIBIOFOULING AGENTS AS NEW CONTROL METHOD FOR PHOTOTROPHIC BIOFILMS DWELLING ON MONUMENTAL STONE SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana-Adriana CUZMAN

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Five natural antibiofoulants with terrestrial (capsaicine - CS, cinnamaldehyde - CI and marine origin (zosteric acid - ZA, poly-alkylpyridinium salts - pAPS and Ceramium botryocarpum extract - CBE have been selected and tested against phototrophic biofilm formation on the stone surfaces for their inhibitory properties. The antibiofouling agents (ABAs were incorporated into two commercial silicone based coatings (Silres BS OH 100 - S and Silres BS 290 - W. In this work, phototrophic growth was evaluated by epifluorescence microscopy and semi-quantitative image analysis. The results showed an inhibitory efficiency for almost all tested ABAs. However, this efficiency has been found for short time or when the incorporating agent were incompletely cured. Among the ABAs tested, the poly-alkylpyridinium salts and cinnamaldehyde incorporated into Silres BS 290 showed the best inhibitory efficiency.

  17. Environmental drivers of phototrophic biofilms in an Alpine show cave (SW-Italian Alps)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piano, E.; Bona, F.; Falasco, E.; La Morgia, V.; Badino, G.; Isaia, M.

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation of lampenflora is a major threat for the conservation of show caves, since phototrophic organisms cause physical, chemical and aesthetic damage to speleothems. In this paper we examine the environmental factors influencing the presence and the growth of the three main photosynthetic groups composing phototrophic biofilms in the Bossea show cave (SW-Italian Alps). The presence and the primary production of cyanobacteria, diatoms and green algae were detected with BenthoTorch®, an instrument for in situ measurement of chlorophyll a concentration that has never been used before in caves. By means of different techniques of regression analysis, we highlighted the response of the three photosynthetic groups to different environmental factors. Illuminance proved to be the main factor influencing positively both the probability of the presence and the productivity of the three groups. The presence of seeping water on the substrate and the distance from the cave entrance proved to play an important role in determining patterns of colonization. By means of GIS techniques, we provide thematic maps of the cave, providing a representation of pattern of the density of the three examined photosynthetic groups within different areas of the cave. The same approach may apply to other show caves, aiming at providing suggestions for the cave management (i.e. cleaning of the cave walls and positioning of artificial lights) and reduce impact caused by tourism. - Highlights: • We used a PAM fluorimeter on autotrophic biofilms in a show cave for the first time. • We modelled the environmental factors influencing phototrophic biofilms. • Illuminance, moisture and distance from the entrance proved to be significant. • We produced thematic maps illustrating our results. • We provide suggestions for cave management

  18. Environmental drivers of phototrophic biofilms in an Alpine show cave (SW-Italian Alps)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piano, E., E-mail: elena.piano@unito.it [Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Turin, Via Accademia Albertina 13, 10123 Turin (Italy); Bona, F.; Falasco, E. [Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Turin, Via Accademia Albertina 13, 10123 Turin (Italy); La Morgia, V. [ISPRA, via Ca' Fornacetta, 9, 40064 Ozzano dell' Emilia (Italy); Badino, G. [Department of Physics, University of Turin, Via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Turin (Italy); Isaia, M. [Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Turin, Via Accademia Albertina 13, 10123 Turin (Italy)

    2015-12-01

    The proliferation of lampenflora is a major threat for the conservation of show caves, since phototrophic organisms cause physical, chemical and aesthetic damage to speleothems. In this paper we examine the environmental factors influencing the presence and the growth of the three main photosynthetic groups composing phototrophic biofilms in the Bossea show cave (SW-Italian Alps). The presence and the primary production of cyanobacteria, diatoms and green algae were detected with BenthoTorch®, an instrument for in situ measurement of chlorophyll a concentration that has never been used before in caves. By means of different techniques of regression analysis, we highlighted the response of the three photosynthetic groups to different environmental factors. Illuminance proved to be the main factor influencing positively both the probability of the presence and the productivity of the three groups. The presence of seeping water on the substrate and the distance from the cave entrance proved to play an important role in determining patterns of colonization. By means of GIS techniques, we provide thematic maps of the cave, providing a representation of pattern of the density of the three examined photosynthetic groups within different areas of the cave. The same approach may apply to other show caves, aiming at providing suggestions for the cave management (i.e. cleaning of the cave walls and positioning of artificial lights) and reduce impact caused by tourism. - Highlights: • We used a PAM fluorimeter on autotrophic biofilms in a show cave for the first time. • We modelled the environmental factors influencing phototrophic biofilms. • Illuminance, moisture and distance from the entrance proved to be significant. • We produced thematic maps illustrating our results. • We provide suggestions for cave management.

  19. Nutrient Removal and Biomass Production in an Outdoor Pilot-Scale Phototrophic Biofilm Reactor for Effluent Polishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelee, N.C.; Janssen, M.; Temmink, H.; Shrestha, R.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    An innovative pilot-scale phototrophic biofilm reactor was evaluated over a 5-month period to determine its capacity to remove nitrogen and phosphorus from Dutch municipal wastewater effluents. The areal biomass production rate ranged between 2.7 and 4.5 g dry weight/m2/day. The areal nitrogen and

  20. Combining polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) with toxicity testing to evaluate pesticide mixture effects on natural phototrophic biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesce, Stephane; Morin, Soizic; Lissalde, Sophie; Montuelle, Bernard; Mazzella, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) are valuable tools in passive sampling methods for monitoring polar organic pesticides in freshwaters. Pesticides extracted from the environment using such methods can be used to toxicity tests. This study evaluated the acute effects of POCIS extracts on natural phototrophic biofilm communities. Our results demonstrate an effect of POCIS pesticide mixtures on chlorophyll a fluorescence, photosynthetic efficiency and community structure. Nevertheless, the range of biofilm responses differs according to origin of the biofilms tested, revealing spatial variations in the sensitivity of natural communities in the studied stream. Combining passive sampler extracts with community-level toxicity tests offers promising perspectives for ecological risk assessment. - Research highlights: → Polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) were used for monitoring polar organic pesticides in a contaminated river. → The acute effects of POCIS extracts were tested on natural phototrophic biofilm communities. → POCIS pesticide mixtures affected chlorophyll a fluorescence, photosynthetic efficiency and community structure. → Biofilm responses differed according to origin of the biofilms tested, revealing variations in the sensitivity of natural communities. → Combining passive sampler extracts with community-level toxicity tests offers promising perspectives for ecological risk assessment. - Pesticide mixtures extracted from POCIS can affect chl a fluorescence, photosynthetic efficiency and community structure of natural biofilms.

  1. Antibiotic tolerance and resistance in biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important features of microbial biofilms is their tolerance to antimicrobial agents and components of the host immune system. The difficulty of treating biofilm infections with antibiotics is a major clinical problem. Although antibiotics may decrease the number of bacteria...... in biofilms, they will not completely eradicate the bacteria in vivo which may have important clinical consequences in form of relapses of the infection....

  2. Biofilm Induced Tolerance Towards Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Zampaloni, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. We established Escherichia coli biofilms with differential structural organization due...... to the presence of IncF plasmids expressing altered forms of the transfer pili in two different biofilm model systems. The mature biofilms were subsequently treated with two antibiotics with different molecular targets, the peptide antibiotic colistin and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. The dynamics...... of microbial killing were monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Strains forming structurally organized biofilms show an increased bacterial survival when challenged with colistin, compared to strains forming unstructured biofilms. The increased survival is due to genetically...

  3. Phototrophic biofilms of restored fields in the Rhenish lignite mining area: development of soil algal, bacterial, and fungal biomasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahnke, K.; Priefer, U.B. [Rhein Westfal TH Aachen, Aachen (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The formation of phototrophic biofilms in three fields under restoration of a lignite-mining area was recorded over 3 years of lucerne cultivation in terms of biomass carbon from algae, bacteria and fungi. The primary phase of biofilm development on the humus- and nitrogen deficient uppermost soil surfaces was dominated by algae. The ratio of algal carbon to heterotrophic bacterial and fungal carbon ranged from 1:0.4 to 1:2. Only during this initial developmental stage did the total microfloral carbon exceed 10% of the overall organic carbon content. With time, the ratios between algal and heterotrophic microbial carbon increased to 1:10 which was mainly due to decomposed plant residues and humus accumulation supporting the growth of bacteria and fungi. At this later stage of field development the calculated amount of bacterial and fungal carbon associated with the algae was still at least 8% of total heterotrophic microbial carbon and could even reach 20%. Bacterial and fungal biomasses were primarily governed by the organic carbon content (r = 0.81), but fluctuations-up to 50% and occurring mostly simultaneously for the three microfloral members-were observed in response to temperature and moisture conditions. The calculated in situ doubling times were 8 days (algae), 9 days (bacteria) and 14 days (fungi), respectively. Insight is given into the dynamics of phototrophic biofilm development and the abiotic factors affecting them during early phases of arable soil restoration. The results indicate that biomass changes expressed as the respective ratios between their microfloral members are a useful tool to characterise the different developmental stages of terrestrial biofilms.

  4. Microbial Biofilms: Persisters, Tolerance and Dosing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, N. G.

    2005-03-01

    Almost all moist surfaces are colonized by microbial biofilms. Biofilms are implicated in cross-contamination of food products, biofouling, medical implants and various human infections such as dental cavities, ulcerative colitis and chronic respiratory infections. Much of current research is focused on the recalcitrance of biofilms to typical antibiotic and antimicrobial treatments. Although the polymer component of biofilms impedes the penetration of antimicrobials through reaction-diffusion limitation, this does not explain the observed tolerance, it merely delays the action of the agent. Heterogeneities in growth-rate also slow the eradication of the bacteria since most antimicrobials are far less effective for non-growing, or slowly growing bacteria. This also does not fully describe biofilm tolerance, since heterogeneities arr primairly a result of nutrient consumption. In this investigation, we describe the formation of `persister' cells which neither grow nor die in the presence of antibiotics. We propose that the cells are of a different phenotype than typical bacterial cells and the expression of the phenotype is regulated by the growth rate and the antibiotic concentration. We describe several experiments which describe the dynamics of persister cells and which motivate a dosing protocol that calls for periodic dosing of the population. We then introduce a mathematical model, which describes the effect of such a dosing regiment and indicates that the relative dose/withdrawal times are important in determining the effectiveness of such a treatment. A reduced model is introduced and the similar behavior is demonstrated analytically.

  5. High light intensity mediates a shift from allochthonous to autochthonous carbon use in phototrophic stream biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Karoline; Bengtsson, Mia M.; Findlay, Robert H.; Battin, Tom J.; Ulseth, Amber J.

    2017-07-01

    Changes in the riparian vegetation along stream channels, diurnal light availability, and longitudinal fluctuations in the local light regime in streams influence primary production and carbon (C) cycling in benthic stream biofilms. To investigate the influence of light availability on the uptake dynamics of autochthonous and allochthonous dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in benthic biofilms, we experimentally added 13C-labeled allochthonous DOC to biofilms grown under light intensities ranging from 5 to 152 μmol photons m-2 s-1. We calculated the net C flux, which showed that benthic biofilms released autochthonous DOC across the entire light gradient. Light availability and diurnal light patterns influenced C uptake by benthic biofilms. More allochthonous DOC was respired under low light availability and at night, whereas under high light availability and during the day mainly autochthonous C was respired by the benthic biofilm community. Furthermore, phenol oxidase activity (indicative of allochthonous DOC uptake) was more elevated under low light availability, whereas beta-glucosidase activity (indicative of autochthonous DOC use) increased with light intensity. Collectively, our results suggest that biofilms exposed to high light inputs preferentially used autochthonous DOC, whereas biofilms incubated at attenuated levels showed greater use of allochthonous DOC. This has implications for the spatial dynamics of DOC uptake in streams and speaks against the occurrence of priming effects in algal-dominated stream biofilms.

  6. Small changes in Cu redox state and speciation generate large isotope fractionation during adsorption and incorporation of Cu by a phototrophic biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutaud, Margot; Méheut, Merlin; Glatzel, Pieter; Pokrovski, Gleb S.; Viers, Jérôme; Rols, Jean-Luc; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.

    2018-01-01

    Despite the importance of phototrophic biofilms in metal cycling in freshwater systems, metal isotope fractionation linked to metal adsorption and uptake by biofilm remains very poorly constrained. Here, copper isotope fractionation by a mature phototrophic biofilm during Cu surface adsorption and incorporation was studied in batch reactor (BR) and open drip flow reactor (DFR) systems at ambient conditions. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (both Near Edge Structure, XANES, and Extended Fine Structure, EXAFS) at Cu K-edge of the biofilm after its interaction with Cu in BR experiments allowed characterizing the molecular structure of assimilated Cu and quantifying the degree of CuII to CuI reduction linked to Cu assimilation. For both BR and DFR experiments, Cu adsorption caused enrichment in heavy isotope at the surface of the biofilm relative to the aqueous solution, with an apparent enrichment factor for the adsorption process, ε65Cuads, of +1.1 ± 0.3‰. In contrast, the isotope enrichment factor during copper incorporation into the biofilm (ε65Cuinc) was highly variable, ranging from -0.6 to +0.8‰. This variability of the ε65Cuinc value was likely controlled by Cu cellular uptake via different transport pathways resulting in contrasting fractionation. Specifically, the CuII storage induced enrichment in heavy isotope, whereas the toxicity response of the biofilm to Cu exposure resulted in reduction of CuII to CuI, thus yielding the biofilm enrichment in light isotope. EXAFS analyses suggested that a major part of the Cu assimilated by the biofilm is bound to 5.1 ± 0.3 oxygen or nitrogen atoms, with a small proportion of Cu linked to sulfur atoms (NS biofilm exhibited a similar trend over time of exposure. Our study demonstrates the complexity of biological processes associated with live phototrophic biofilms, which produce large and contrasting isotope fractionations following rather small Cu redox and speciation changes during uptake, storage or release of

  7. Warming-induced changes in denitrifier community structure modulate the ability of phototrophic river biofilms to denitrify

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulêtreau, Stéphanie, E-mail: stephanie.bouletreau@univ-tlse3.fr [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INP, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, EcoLab, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Lyautey, Emilie [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INP, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, EcoLab, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Dubois, Sophie [Université de Bordeaux, EPOC - OASU, UMR 5805, Station Marine d' Arcachon, 2 rue du Professeur Jolyet, 33120 Arcachon (France); Compin, Arthur [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INP, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, EcoLab, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Delattre, Cécile; Touron-Bodilis, Aurélie [EDF Recherche et Développement, LNHE (Laboratoire National d' Hydraulique et Environnement), 6 quai Watier, F-78401 Chatou (France); Mastrorillo, Sylvain [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INP, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, EcoLab, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Garabetian, Frédéric [Université de Bordeaux, EPOC - OASU, UMR 5805, Station Marine d' Arcachon, 2 rue du Professeur Jolyet, 33120 Arcachon (France)

    2014-01-01

    Microbial denitrification is the main nitrogen removing process in freshwater ecosystems. The aim of this study was to show whether and how water warming (+ 2.5 °C) drives bacterial diversity and structuring and how bacterial diversity affects denitrification enzymatic activity in phototrophic river biofilms (PRB). We used water warming associated to the immediate thermal release of a nuclear power plant cooling circuit to produce natural PRB assemblages on glass slides while testing 2 temperatures (mean temperature of 17 °C versus 19.5 °C). PRB were sampled at 2 sampling times during PRB accretion (6 and 21 days) in both temperatures. Bacterial community composition was assessed using ARISA. Denitrifier community abundance and denitrification gene mRNA levels were estimated by q-PCR and qRT-PCR, respectively, of 5 genes encoding catalytic subunits of the denitrification key enzymes. Denitrification enzyme activity (DEA) was measured by the acetylene-block assay at 20 °C. A mean water warming of 2.5 °C was sufficient to produce contrasted total bacterial and denitrifier communities and, therefore, to affect DEA. Indirect temperature effect on DEA may have varied between sampling time, increasing by up to 10 the denitrification rate of 6-day-old PRB and decreasing by up to 5 the denitrification rate of 21-day-old PRB. The present results suggest that indirect effects of warming through changes in bacterial community composition, coupled to the strong direct effect of temperature on DEA already demonstrated in PRB, could modulate dissolved nitrogen removal by denitrification in rivers and streams. - Highlights: •We produced river biofilms in 2 mean temperature conditions: 17 vs 19.5 °C. •We compared their denitrifiers' structuring and functioning in 6d- and 21d-old biofilms. •A difference of 2.5 °C produced contrasted denitrifier communities. •The indirect temperature effect on denitrification activity shifted between biofilm age.

  8. Diffuse urban pollution increases metal tolerance of natural heterotrophic biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fechner, Lise C.; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine; Bourgeault, Adeline; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène

    2012-01-01

    This study is a first attempt to investigate the impact of urban contamination on metal tolerance of heterotrophic river biofilms using a short-term test based on β-glucosidase activity. Tolerance levels to Cu, Cd, Zn, Ni and Pb were evaluated for biofilms collected at three sites along an urban gradient in the Seine river (France). Metallic pollution increased along the river, but concentrations remained low compared to environmental quality standards. Biofilm metal tolerance increased downstream from the urban area. Multivariate analysis confirmed the correlation between tolerance and contamination and between multi-metallic and physico-chemical gradients. Therefore, tolerance levels have to be interpreted in relation to the whole chemical and physical characteristics and not solely metal exposure. We conclude that community tolerance is a sensitive biological response to urban pressure and that mixtures of contaminants at levels lower than quality standards might have a significant impact on periphytic communities. - Highlights: ► A new short-term test based on β-glucosidase activity to assess biofilm metal tolerance. ► Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn tolerance of natural biofilms collected along an urban gradient. ► Metal tolerance levels increase upstream to downstream the river. ► Community tolerance increases at environmental quality standard exposure concentrations. ► Biofilm tolerance is a sensitive biological response to diffuse urban pollution. - Metal concentrations below environmental quality standards increase tolerance levels of natural, hetetrophic biofilms downstream from an urban area.

  9. An update on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, tolerance, and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Morten; Yang, Liang; Pamp, Sünje Johanna

    2010-01-01

    We review the recent advances in the understanding of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm lifestyle from studies using in vitro laboratory setups such as flow chambers and microtiter trays. Recent work sheds light on the role of nutrients, motility, and quorum sensing in structure formation in P....... aeruginosa biofilms. The second messenger, c-di-GMP, is established as an important regulator of the synthesis of polysaccharide and protein components of the biofilm matrix. Extracellular DNA is shown to be an essential component of the biofilm matrix. It has become apparent that biofilm formation involves...... interactions between different subpopulations. The molecular mechanisms underlying the tolerance of biofilm bacteria to antimicrobial agents are beginning to be unraveled, and new knowledge has been obtained regarding the environmental cues and regulatory mechanisms involved in biofilm dispersal....

  10. Starvation, Together with the SOS Response, Mediates High Biofilm-Specific Tolerance to the Fluoroquinolone Ofloxacin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Steve P.; Lebeaux, David; DeFrancesco, Alicia S.; Valomon, Amandine; Soubigou, Guillaume; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Beloin, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    High levels of antibiotic tolerance are a hallmark of bacterial biofilms. In contrast to well-characterized inherited antibiotic resistance, molecular mechanisms leading to reversible and transient antibiotic tolerance displayed by biofilm bacteria are still poorly understood. The physiological heterogeneity of biofilms influences the formation of transient specialized subpopulations that may be more tolerant to antibiotics. In this study, we used random transposon mutagenesis to identify biofilm-specific tolerant mutants normally exhibited by subpopulations located in specialized niches of heterogeneous biofilms. Using Escherichia coli as a model organism, we demonstrated, through identification of amino acid auxotroph mutants, that starved biofilms exhibited significantly greater tolerance towards fluoroquinolone ofloxacin than their planktonic counterparts. We demonstrated that the biofilm-associated tolerance to ofloxacin was fully dependent on a functional SOS response upon starvation to both amino acids and carbon source and partially dependent on the stringent response upon leucine starvation. However, the biofilm-specific ofloxacin increased tolerance did not involve any of the SOS-induced toxin–antitoxin systems previously associated with formation of highly tolerant persisters. We further demonstrated that ofloxacin tolerance was induced as a function of biofilm age, which was dependent on the SOS response. Our results therefore show that the SOS stress response induced in heterogeneous and nutrient-deprived biofilm microenvironments is a molecular mechanism leading to biofilm-specific high tolerance to the fluoroquinolone ofloxacin. PMID:23300476

  11. Predicting Species-Resolved Macronutrient Acquisition during Succession in a Model Phototrophic Biofilm Using an Integrated ‘Omics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R. Lindemann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The principles governing acquisition and interspecies exchange of nutrients in microbial communities and how those exchanges impact community productivity are poorly understood. Here, we examine energy and macronutrient acquisition in unicyanobacterial consortia for which species-resolved genome information exists for all members, allowing us to use multi-omic approaches to predict species’ abilities to acquire resources and examine expression of resource-acquisition genes during succession. Metabolic reconstruction indicated that a majority of heterotrophic community members lacked the genes required to directly acquire the inorganic nutrients provided in culture medium, suggesting high metabolic interdependency. The sole primary producer in consortium UCC-O, cyanobacterium Phormidium sp. OSCR, displayed declining expression of energy harvest, carbon fixation, and nitrate and sulfate reduction proteins but sharply increasing phosphate transporter expression over 28 days. Most heterotrophic members likewise exhibited signs of phosphorus starvation during succession. Though similar in their responses to phosphorus limitation, heterotrophs displayed species-specific expression of nitrogen acquisition genes. These results suggest niche partitioning around nitrogen sources may structure the community when organisms directly compete for limited phosphate. Such niche complementarity around nitrogen sources may increase community diversity and productivity in phosphate-limited phototrophic communities.

  12. The dlt genes play a role in antimicrobial tolerance of Streptococcus mutans biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Carl Martin Peter; Rybtke, Morten; Givskov, Michael

    2016-01-01

    library for genes that are important for biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance provided evidence that the dlt genes play a role in the tolerance of S. mutans biofilms towards gentamicin. The minimum bactericidal concentration for biofilm cells (MBC-B) for a dltA transposon mutant was eight-fold lower...... and complemented strain confirmed that the dlt genes in S. mutans play a role in biofilm-associated tolerance to gentamicin. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analyses of biofilms grown on glass slides showed that the dltA mutant produced roughly the same amount of biofilm as the wild-type, indicating...... that the reduced antimicrobial tolerance of the dltA mutant is not due to a defect in biofilm formation. The products of the dlt genes have been shown to mediate alanylation of teichoic acids, and in accordance the dltA mutant showed a more negatively charged surface than the wild-type, which likely...

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae biofilm tolerance towards systemic antifungals depends on growth phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth; Regenberg, Birgitte; Folkesson, Sven Anders

    2014-01-01

    Background : Biofilm-forming Candida species cause infections that can be difficult to eradicate, possibly because of antifungal drug tolerance mechanisms specific to biofilms. In spite of decades of research, the connection between biofilm and drug tolerance is not fully understood. Results : We...... used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model for drug susceptibility of yeast biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata form similarly structured biofilms and that the viable cell numbers were significantly reduced by treatment of mature biofilms...... with amphotericin B but not voriconazole, flucytosine, or caspofungin. We showed that metabolic activity in yeast biofilm cells decreased with time, as visualized by FUN-1 staining, and mature, 48-hour biofilms contained cells with slow metabolism and limited growth. Time-kill studies showed that in exponentially...

  14. Selective labelling and eradication of antibiotic-tolerant bacterial populations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Song Lin; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Hao, Piliang; Adav, Sunil S; Salido, May Margarette; Liu, Yang; Givskov, Michael; Sze, Siu Kwan; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Yang, Liang

    2016-02-19

    Drug resistance and tolerance greatly diminish the therapeutic potential of antibiotics against pathogens. Antibiotic tolerance by bacterial biofilms often leads to persistent infections, but its mechanisms are unclear. Here we use a proteomics approach, pulsed stable isotope labelling with amino acids (pulsed-SILAC), to quantify newly expressed proteins in colistin-tolerant subpopulations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms (colistin is a 'last-resort' antibiotic against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens). Migration is essential for the formation of colistin-tolerant biofilm subpopulations, with colistin-tolerant cells using type IV pili to migrate onto the top of the colistin-killed biofilm. The colistin-tolerant cells employ quorum sensing (QS) to initiate the formation of new colistin-tolerant subpopulations, highlighting multicellular behaviour in antibiotic tolerance development. The macrolide erythromycin, which has been previously shown to inhibit the motility and QS of P. aeruginosa, boosts biofilm eradication by colistin. Our work provides insights on the mechanisms underlying the formation of antibiotic-tolerant populations in bacterial biofilms and indicates research avenues for designing more efficient treatments against biofilm-associated infections.

  15. Selective labelling and eradication of antibiotic-tolerant bacterial populations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Song Lin; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Hao, Piliang; Adav, Sunil S.; Salido, May Margarette; Liu, Yang; Givskov, Michael; Sze, Siu Kwan; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Yang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance and tolerance greatly diminish the therapeutic potential of antibiotics against pathogens. Antibiotic tolerance by bacterial biofilms often leads to persistent infections, but its mechanisms are unclear. Here we use a proteomics approach, pulsed stable isotope labelling with amino acids (pulsed-SILAC), to quantify newly expressed proteins in colistin-tolerant subpopulations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms (colistin is a ‘last-resort' antibiotic against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens). Migration is essential for the formation of colistin-tolerant biofilm subpopulations, with colistin-tolerant cells using type IV pili to migrate onto the top of the colistin-killed biofilm. The colistin-tolerant cells employ quorum sensing (QS) to initiate the formation of new colistin-tolerant subpopulations, highlighting multicellular behaviour in antibiotic tolerance development. The macrolide erythromycin, which has been previously shown to inhibit the motility and QS of P. aeruginosa, boosts biofilm eradication by colistin. Our work provides insights on the mechanisms underlying the formation of antibiotic-tolerant populations in bacterial biofilms and indicates research avenues for designing more efficient treatments against biofilm-associated infections. PMID:26892159

  16. The dlt genes play a role in antimicrobial tolerance of Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Martin; Rybtke, Morten; Givskov, Michael; Høiby, Niels; Twetman, Svante; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Microbial biofilms are tolerant to antibiotic treatment and therefore cause problematic infections. Knowledge about the molecular mechanisms underlying biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance will aid the development of antibiofilm drugs. Screening of a Streptococcus mutans transposon mutant library for genes that are important for biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance provided evidence that the dlt genes play a role in the tolerance of S. mutans biofilms towards gentamicin. The minimum bactericidal concentration for biofilm cells (MBC-B) for a dltA transposon mutant was eight-fold lower than that of the wild-type. The minimum bactericidal concentration for planktonic cells (MBC-P) was only slightly reduced, indicating that the mechanism involved in the observed antimicrobial tolerance has a predominant role specifically in biofilms. Experiments with a knockout dltA mutant and complemented strain confirmed that the dlt genes in S. mutans play a role in biofilm-associated tolerance to gentamicin. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analyses of biofilms grown on glass slides showed that the dltA mutant produced roughly the same amount of biofilm as the wild-type, indicating that the reduced antimicrobial tolerance of the dltA mutant is not due to a defect in biofilm formation. The products of the dlt genes have been shown to mediate alanylation of teichoic acids, and in accordance the dltA mutant showed a more negatively charged surface than the wild-type, which likely is an important factor in the reduced tolerance of the dltA mutant biofilms towards the positively charged gentamicin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  17. Selective labelling and eradication of antibiotic-tolerant bacterial populations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Hao, Piliang

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance and tolerance greatly diminish the therapeutic potential of antibiotics against pathogens. Antibiotic tolerance by bacterial biofilms often leads to persistent infections, but its mechanisms are unclear. Here we use a proteomics approach, pulsed stable isotope labelling with amino...... acids (pulsed-SILAC), to quantify newly expressed proteins in colistin-tolerant subpopulations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms (colistin is a 'last-resort' antibiotic against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens). Migration is essential for the formation of colistin-tolerant biofilm...

  18. The consequences of being in an infectious biofilm – microenvironmental conditions governing antibiotic tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderholm, Majken; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The main driver behind biofilm research is the desire to understand the mechanisms governing the antibiotic tolerance of biofilm-growing bacteria found in chronic bacterial infections. Rather than genetic traits, several physical and chemical traits of the biofilm have been shown to be attributable...... to antibiotic tolerance. During infection, bacteria in biofilms exhibit slow growth and a low metabolic state due to O2 limitation imposed by intense O2 consumption of polymorphonuclear leukocytes or metabolically active bacteria in the biofilm periphery. Due to variable O2 availability throughout the infection......-growing bacteria. This review summarizes knowledge about the links between the microenvironment of biofilms in chronic infections and their tolerance against antibiotics...

  19. Tolerance of Clostridium perfringens biofilms to disinfectants commonly used in the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jacques, Mario; Boulianne, Martine; Archambault, Marie

    2017-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Recently, it was shown to form mono-species biofilms, a structured community of bacterial cells enclosed in a self-produced extracellular matrix. Biofilms have been associated with tolerance to antibiotics, disinfectants, and physical and environmental stresses. Very little is known about the tolerance of C. perfringens biofilm toward disinfectants. In the present study, susceptibilities of C. perfringens biofilms to five types of commonly used disinfectants on farms and in food processing environments were analysed. In this paper, we show that C. perfringens mono-species biofilms can protect the bacterial cells from the action of potassium monopersulfate, quaternary ammonium chloride, hydrogen peroxide and glutaraldehyde solutions. However, sodium hypochlorite solution was shown to be effective on C. perfringens biofilms. Our investigation of dual-species biofilms of C. perfringens with the addition of Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli demonstrated that overall, the mono-species biofilm of C. perfringens was more tolerant to all disinfectants than the dual-species biofilms. For the anaerobic grown biofilms, the mono-species biofilm of C. perfringens was more tolerant to sodium hypochlorite and quaternary ammonium chloride than the dual-species biofilms of C. perfringens with S. aureus or E. coli. This study demonstrates that C. perfringens biofilm is an effective protection mechanism to disinfectants commonly used on farms and in food processing environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Adaptation of copper community tolerance levels after biofilm transplantation in an urban river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechner, Lise C; Versace, François; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène

    2012-01-15

    The Water Framework Directive requires the development of biological tools which can act as early-warning indicators of a sudden increase (accidental pollution) or decrease (recovery due to prevention) of the chemical status of aquatic systems. River biofilms, which respond quickly to modifications of environmental parameters and also play a key part in the functioning of aquatic ecosystems, are therefore good candidates to monitor an increase or a decrease of water pollution. In the present study, we investigated the biological response of biofilms transplanted either upstream (recovery) or downstream (deterioration of exposure levels) the urban area of Paris (France). Both modifications of Cu community tolerance levels and of global bacterial and eukaryotic community structure using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) fingerprints were examined 15 and 30 days after the transplantation. Cu tolerance levels of the heterotrophic component of biofilms were assessed using a short-term toxicity test based on β-glucosidase (heterotrophic) activity. Cu tolerance increased for biofilms transplanted upstream to downstream Paris (5-fold increase on day 30) and conversely decreased for biofilms transplanted downstream to upstream (8-fold decrease on day 30). ARISA fingerprints revealed that bacterial and eukaryotic community structures of transplanted biofilms were closer to the structures of biofilms from the transplantation sites (or sites with similar contamination levels) than to biofilms from their sites of origin. Statistical analysis of the data confirmed that the key factor explaining biofilm Cu tolerance levels is the sampling site and not the site of origin. It also showed that Cu tolerance levels are related to the global urban contamination (both metals and nutrients). The study shows that biofilms adapt fast to modifications of their surroundings. In particular, community tolerance varies quickly and reflects the new exposure levels only 15

  1. Unravelling the core microbiome of biofilms in cooling tower systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, L; Tandoi, V; Congestri, R; Rossetti, S; Di Pippo, F

    2017-11-01

    In this study, next generation sequencing and catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization, combined with confocal microscopy, were used to provide insights into the biodiversity and structure of biofilms collected from four full-scale European cooling systems. Water samples were also analyzed to evaluate the impact of suspended microbes on biofilm formation. A common core microbiome, containing members of the families Sphingomonadaceae, Comamonadaceae and Hyphomicrobiaceae, was found in all four biofilms, despite the water of each coming from different sources (river and groundwater). This suggests that selection of the pioneer community was influenced by abiotic factors (temperature, pH) and tolerances to biocides. Members of the Sphingomonadaceae were assumed to play a key role in initial biofilm formation. Subsequent biofilm development was driven primarily by light availability, since biofilms were dominated by phototrophs in the two studied 'open' systems. Their interactions with other microbial populations then shaped the structure of the mature biofilm communities analyzed.

  2. Microenvironmental Ecology of Phototrophs from Extreme Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trampe, Erik

    In the three manuscripts presented in part one of this thesis, I analyse the physicochemical parameters, microenvironmental ecology and species composition of microbial phototrophs in ikaite tufa columns. This work was not easy, and encompassed underwater sampling and microsensor work demanding...... of the ikaite matrix, ii) measurements of diurnal fluctuations in irradiance and O2 under different light scenarios, and iii) the first in situ measurements of photosynthetic activity in the tufa columns (Manuscript 1). This was followed up with more detailed lab-based measurements close to the field site...... on spatial distribution of major taxonomic groups of phototrophs, detailed measurements of the optical properties of the ikaite matrix, in combination with various microscopic investigations of the phototrophic biofilms in the ikaite (Manuscript 2). Samples brought back for more advanced microscopy...

  3. Biofilm-forming bacteria with varying tolerance to peracetic acid from a paper machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasimus, Stiina; Kolari, Marko; Rita, Hannu; Hoornstra, Douwe; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja

    2011-09-01

    Biofilms cause runnability problems in paper machines and are therefore controlled with biocides. Peracetic acid is usually effective in preventing bulky biofilms. This study investigated the microbiological status of a paper machine where low concentrations (≤ 15 ppm active ingredient) of peracetic acid had been used for several years. The paper machine contained a low amount of biofilms. Biofilm-forming bacteria from this environment were isolated and characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, whole-cell fatty acid analysis, biochemical tests, and DNA fingerprinting. Seventy-five percent of the isolates were identified as members of the subclades Sphingomonas trueperi and S. aquatilis, and the others as species of the genera Burkholderia (B. cepacia complex), Methylobacterium, and Rhizobium. Although the isolation media were suitable for the common paper machine biofoulers Deinococcus, Meiothermus, and Pseudoxanthomonas, none of these were found, indicating that peracetic acid had prevented their growth. Spontaneous, irreversible loss of the ability to form biofilm was observed during subculturing of certain isolates of the subclade S. trueperi. The Sphingomonas isolates formed monoculture biofilms that tolerated peracetic acid at concentrations (10 ppm active ingredient) used for antifouling in paper machines. High pH and low conductivity of the process waters favored the peracetic acid tolerance of Sphingomonas sp. biofilms. This appears to be the first report on sphingomonads as biofilm formers in warm water using industries.

  4. Pb and Hg heavy metal tolerance of single- and mixedspecies biofilm (Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buzejić Anica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine heavy metal tolerance (lead (Pb2+ and mercury (Hg2+ of single- and mixed-species biofilms, formed by yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and bacteria Escherichia coli LM1. Single- and mixed-species biofilms were quantified by crystal violet test and the absorbance was measured using microplate reader (OD570. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and the minimal lethal concentration (MLC were determined and the results were confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. The significant difference in lead tolerance was observed between the mixed- and the single-species biofilms. The MIC of lead (Pb2+ for the examined biofilms (E. coli LM1, R. mucilaginosa and R. mucilaginosa / E. coli was recorded at concentrations of 4000 μg/ml, 4000 μg/ml and 16000 μg/ml, respectively. The MIC of mercury (Hg2+ for the biofilms was noticed at concentrations of 31.25 μg/ml, 250 μg/ml and 250 μg/ml, respectively. Standard antibiotics (amphotericin B and tetracycline were used as positive control. Results obtained for single-species biofilms were compared in between and with the results obtained for mixed-species biofilm. The tolerance of the mixed- species biofilm was higher in comparison to the singlespecies biofilms and the results were confirmed by a fluoresecence microscope. The obtained results suggest that the R. mucilaginosa / E. coli biofilm may have a potential to be used in bioremediation of wastewaters contaminated with lead and mercury.

  5. The Yin and Yang of SagS: Distinct Residues in the HmsP Domain of SagS Independently Regulate Biofilm Formation and Biofilm Drug Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemans, Jozef; Poudyal, Bandita

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of inherently drug-tolerant biofilms by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires the sensor-regulator hybrid SagS, with ΔsagS biofilms being unstructured and exhibiting increased antimicrobial susceptibility. Recent findings indicated SagS to function as a switch to control biofilm formation and drug tolerance independently. Moreover, findings suggested the periplasmic sensory HmsP domain of SagS is likely to be the control point in the regulation of biofilm formation and biofilm cells transitioning to a drug-tolerant state. We thus asked whether specific amino acid residues present in the HmsP domain contribute to the switch function of SagS. HmsP domain residues were therefore subjected to alanine replacement mutagenesis to identify substitutions that block the sensory function(s) of SagS, which is apparent by attached cells being unable to develop mature biofilms and/or prevent transition to an antimicrobial-resistant state. Mutant analyses revealed 32 residues that only contribute to blocking one sensory function. Moreover, amino acid residues affecting attachment and subsequent biofilm formation but not biofilm tolerance also impaired histidine kinase signaling via BfiS. In contrast, residues affecting biofilm drug tolerance but not attachment and subsequent biofilm formation negatively impacted BrlR transcription factor levels. Structure prediction suggested the two sets of residues affecting sensory functions are located in distinct areas that were previously described as being involved in ligand binding interactions. Taken together, these studies identify the molecular basis for the dual regulatory function of SagS. IMPORTANCE The membrane-bound sensory protein SagS plays a pivotal role in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and biofilm cells gaining their heightened resistance to antimicrobial agents, with SagS being the control point at which both pathways diverge. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the two

  6. Microscopic and Spectroscopic Analyses of Chlorhexidine Tolerance in Delftia acidovorans Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rema, Tara; Lawrence, John R.; Dynes, James J.; Hitchcock, Adam P.

    2014-01-01

    The physicochemical responses of Delftia acidovorans biofilms exposed to the commonly used antimicrobial chlorhexidine (CHX) were examined in this study. A CHX-sensitive mutant (MIC, 1.0 μg ml−1) was derived from a CHX-tolerant (MIC, 15.0 μg ml−1) D. acidovorans parent strain using transposon mutagenesis. D. acidovorans mutant (MT51) and wild-type (WT15) strain biofilms were cultivated in flow cells and then treated with CHX at sub-MIC and inhibitory concentrations and examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Specific morphological, structural, and chemical compositional differences between the CHX-treated and -untreated biofilms of both strains were observed. Apart from architectural differences, CLSM revealed a negative effect of CHX on biofilm thickness in the CHX-sensitive MT51 biofilms relative to those of the WT15 strain. STXM analyses showed that the WT15 biofilms contained two morphochemical cell variants, whereas only one type was detected in the MT51 biofilms. The cells in the MT51 biofilms bioaccumulated CHX to a similar extent as one of the cell types found in the WT15 biofilms, whereas the other cell type in the WT15 biofilms did not bioaccumulate CHX. STXM and IR spectral analyses revealed that CHX-sensitive MT51 cells accumulated the highest levels of CHX. Pretreating biofilms with EDTA promoted the accumulation of CHX in all cells. Thus, it is suggested that a subpopulation of cells that do not accumulate CHX appear to be responsible for greater CHX resistance in D. acidovorans WT15 biofilm in conjunction with the possible involvement of bacterial membrane stability. PMID:25022584

  7. Selective proteomic analysis of antibiotic-tolerant cellular subpopulations in pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babin, Brett M.; Atangcho, Lydia; van Eldijk, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    involved in central carbon metabolism. We differentiated the immediate proteomic response, characterized by an increase in flagellar motility, from the long-term adaptive strategy, which included the upregulation of purine synthesis. This targeted, selective analysis of a bacterial subpopulation...... amino acid tagging (BONCAT) method to enable selective proteomic analysis of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm subpopulation. Through controlled expression of a mutant methionyl-tRNA synthetase, we targeted BONCAT labeling to cells in the regions of biofilm microcolonies that showed increased tolerance...... demonstrates how the study of proteome dynamics can enhance our understanding of biofilm heterogeneity and antibiotic tolerance. IMPORTANCE Bacterial growth is frequently characterized by behavioral heterogeneity at the single-cell level. Heterogeneity is especially evident in the physiology of biofilms...

  8. Differentiation and distribution of colistin- and sodium dodecyl sulfate-tolerant cells in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Klausen, M; Ernst, RK

    2007-01-01

    During Pseudomonas aeruginosa flow cell biofilm development, the cell population differentiates into a nonmotile subpopulation which forms microcolonies and a migrating subpopulation which eventually colonizes the top of the microcolonies, resulting in the development of mushroom-shaped multicell......During Pseudomonas aeruginosa flow cell biofilm development, the cell population differentiates into a nonmotile subpopulation which forms microcolonies and a migrating subpopulation which eventually colonizes the top of the microcolonies, resulting in the development of mushroom......-targeting antibacterial agents. All biofilm-associated cells were sensitive to the antibacterial agents when tested in standard plate assays. A mutation eliminating the production of type IV pili, and hence surface-associated motility, prevented the formation of regular mushroom-shaped structures in the flow cell...... that only the cap-forming subpopulation in biofilms treated with colistin expresses the pmr operon. These results suggest that increased antibiotic tolerance in biofilms may be a consequence of differentiation into distinct subpopulations with different phenotypic properties....

  9. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity within biofilms with particular emphasis on persistence and antimicrobial tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Faizan A; Flint, Steve; Li, YanJun; Ou, Kai; Yuan, Lei; He, Guo Qing

    2017-09-01

    Phenotypic changes or phase variation within biofilms is an important feature of bacterial dormant life. Enhanced resistance to antimicrobials is one of the distinct features displayed by a fraction of cells within biofilms. It is believed that persisters are mainly responsible for this phenotypic heterogeneity. However, there is still an unresolved debate on the formation of persisters. In this short review, we highlight all known genomic and proteomic changes encountered by bacterial cells within biofilms. We have also described all phenotypic changes displayed by bacterial cells within biofilms with particular emphasis on enhanced antimicrobial tolerance of biofilms with particular reference to persisters. In addition, all currently known models of persistence have been succinctly discussed.

  10. Metagenomic evidence for the presence of phototrophic Gemmatimonadetes bacteria in diverse environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yonghui; Baumbach, Jan; Barbosa, Eudes Guilherme Vieira

    2016-01-01

    , biofilms, plant surfaces, intertidal sediment, soils, springs, and wastewater treatment plants, but none from marine waters or sediment. Phototrophic Gemmatimonadetes bacteria make up 0.4∼11.9% of whole phototrophic microbial communities in these habitats. Unexpectedly, an almost complete 37.9 kb long...... widely distributed in the environment and exhibit a higher genetic diversity than previously thought....

  11. The MerR-like regulator BrlR confers biofilm tolerance by activating multidrug efflux pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Julie; Schurr, Michael J; Sauer, Karin

    2013-08-01

    A defining characteristic of biofilms is antibiotic tolerance that can be up to 1,000-fold greater than that of planktonic cells. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, biofilm tolerance to antimicrobial agents requires the biofilm-specific MerR-type transcriptional regulator BrlR. However, the mechanism by which BrlR mediates biofilm tolerance has not been elucidated. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling indicated that brlR was required for maximal expression of genes associated with antibiotic resistance, in particular those encoding the multidrug efflux pumps MexAB-OprM and MexEF-OprN. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed a direct regulation of these genes by BrlR, with DNA binding assays confirming BrlR binding to the promoter regions of the mexAB-oprM and mexEF-oprN operons. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis further indicated BrlR to be an activator of mexAB-oprM and mexEF-oprN gene expression. Moreover, immunoblot analysis confirmed increased MexA abundance in cells overexpressing brlR. Inactivation of both efflux pumps rendered biofilms significantly more susceptible to five different classes of antibiotics by affecting MIC but not the recalcitrance of biofilms to killing by bactericidal agents. Overexpression of either efflux pump in a ΔbrlR strain partly restored tolerance of ΔbrlR biofilms to antibiotics. Expression of brlR in mutant biofilms lacking both efflux pumps partly restored antimicrobial tolerance of biofilms to wild-type levels. Our results indicate that BrlR acts as an activator of multidrug efflux pumps to confer tolerance to P. aeruginosa biofilms and to resist the action of antimicrobial agents.

  12. Tolerance of yeast biofilm cells towards systemic antifungals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth

    was the only tested drug with activity against both growth arrested biofilm and planktonic cells but was found to only kill ~95 % of the cells. By using a collection of barcode tagged deletion mutants, we were identified that defects in protein synthesis, intracellular transport, cell cycle and lipid...

  13. The catabolite repression control protein Crc plays a role in the development of antimicrobial-tolerant subpopulations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lianbo; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Gao, Qingguo

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria form complex surface-attached biofilm communities in nature. Biofilm cells differentiate into subpopulations which display tolerance towards antimicrobial agents. However, the signal transduction pathways regulating subpopulation differentiation in biofilms are largely unelucidated. In t....... In the present study, we show that the catabolite repression control protein Crc regulates the metabolic state of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells in biofilms, and plays an important role in the development of antimicrobial-tolerant subpopulations in P. aeruginosa biofilms....

  14. Tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in in-vitro biofilms to high-level peracetic acid disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinbobola, A B; Sherry, L; Mckay, W G; Ramage, G; Williams, C

    2017-10-01

    Biofilm has been suggested as a cause of disinfection failures in flexible endoscopes where no lapses in the decontamination procedure can be identified. To test this theory, the activity of peracetic acid, one of the widely used disinfectants in the reprocessing of flexible endoscopes, was evaluated against both planktonic and sessile communities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To investigate the ability of P. aeruginosa biofilm to survive high-level peracetic acid disinfection. The susceptibility of planktonic cells of P. aeruginosa and biofilms aged 24, 48, 96, and 192 h to peracetic acid was evaluated by estimating their viability using resazurin viability and plate count methods. The biomass of the P. aeruginosa biofilms was also quantified using Crystal Violet assay. Planktonic cells of P. aeruginosa were treated with 5-30 ppm concentration of peracetic acid in the presence of 3.0 g/L of bovine serum albumin (BSA) for 5 min. Biofilms of P. aeruginosa were also treated with various peracetic acid concentrations (100-3000 ppm) for 5 min. Planktonic cells of P. aeruginosa were eradicated by 20 ppm of peracetic acid, whereas biofilms showed an age-dependent tolerance to peracetic acid, and 96 h biofilm was only eradicated at peracetic acid concentration of 2500 ppm. Ninety-six-hour P. aeruginosa biofilm survives 5 min treatment with 2000 ppm of peracetic acid, which is the working concentration used in some endoscope washer-disinfectors. This implies that disinfection failure of flexible endoscopes might occur when biofilms build up in the lumens of endoscopes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. The ABC of Biofilm Drug Tolerance: the MerR-Like Regulator BrlR Is an Activator of ABC Transport Systems, with PA1874-77 Contributing to the Tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms to Tobramycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudyal, Bandita; Sauer, Karin

    2018-02-01

    A hallmark of biofilms is their tolerance to killing by antimicrobial agents. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa , biofilm drug tolerance requires the c-di-GMP-responsive MerR transcriptional regulator BrlR. However, the mechanism by which BrlR mediates biofilm drug tolerance has not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that BrlR activates the expression of at least 7 ABC transport systems, including the PA1874-PA1875-PA1876-PA1877 (PA1874-77) operon, with chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA binding assays confirming BrlR binding to the promoter region of PA1874-77. Insertional inactivation of the 7 ABC transport systems rendered P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms susceptible to tobramycin or norfloxacin. Susceptibility was linked to drug accumulation, with BrlR contributing to norfloxacin accumulation in a manner dependent on multidrug efflux pumps and the PA1874-77 ABC transport system. Inactivation of the respective ABC transport system, furthermore, eliminated the recalcitrance of biofilms to killing by tobramycin but not norfloxacin, indicating that drug accumulation is not linked to biofilm drug tolerance. Our findings indicate for the first time that BrlR, a MerR-type transcriptional activator, activates genes encoding several ABC transport systems, in addition to multiple multidrug efflux pump genes. Moreover, our data confirm a BrlR target contributing to drug tolerance, likely countering the prevailing dogma that biofilm tolerance arises from a multiplicity of factors. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Daniel; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-07-01

    The ability to form biofilms is a universal attribute of bacteria. Biofilms are multicellular communities held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix. The mechanisms that different bacteria employ to form biofilms vary, frequently depending on environmental conditions and specific strain attributes. In this review, we emphasize four well-studied model systems to give an overview of how several organisms form biofilms: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Using these bacteria as examples, we discuss the key features of biofilms as well as mechanisms by which extracellular signals trigger biofilm formation.

  17. Microscale Canopy Interactions in Aquatic Phototrophs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichtenberg, Mads

    . This was investigated in a range of aquatic phototrophs such as macroalgae, reef-building corals, and photosynthetic biofilms. As a first step, we demonstrate that a microscale stratification of the internal light- and chemical environment exists across the investigated systems, with concomitant internal gradients...... of photosynthesis and respiration. We further investigate this by compiling a closed radiative energy budget of a coral and find that corals are highly efficient light collectors that can display photosynthetic quantum efficiencies close to the theoretical limit. Using a similar approach, we then investigate i) how...

  18. Temperature modulates phototrophic periphyton response to chronic copper exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Anne Sophie; Dabrin, Aymeric; Morin, Soizic; Gahou, Josiane; Foulquier, Arnaud; Coquery, Marina; Pesce, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Streams located in vineyard areas are highly prone to metal pollution. In a context of global change, aquatic systems are generally subjected to multi-stress conditions due to multiple chemical and/or physical pressures. Among various environmental factors that modulate the ecological effects of toxicants, special attention should be paid to climate change, which is driving an increase in extreme climate events such as sharp temperature rises. In lotic ecosystems, periphyton ensures key ecological functions such as primary production and nutrient cycling. However, although the effects of metals on microbial communities are relatively well known, there is scant data on possible interactions between temperature increase and metal pollution. Here we led a study to evaluate the influence of temperature on the response of phototrophic periphyton to copper (Cu) exposure. Winter communities, collected in a 8 °C river water, were subjected for six weeks to four thermal conditions in microcosms in presence or not of Cu (nominal concentration of 15 μg L"−"1). At the initial river temperature (8 °C), our results confirmed the chronic impact of Cu on periphyton, both in terms of structure (biomass, distribution of algal groups, diatomic composition) and function (photosynthetic efficiency). At higher temperatures (13, 18 and 23 °C), Cu effects were modulated. Indeed, temperature increase reduced Cu effects on algal biomass, algal class proportions, diatom assemblage composition and photosynthetic efficiency. This reduction of Cu effects on periphyton may be related to lower bioaccumulation of Cu and/or to selection of more Cu-tolerant species at higher temperatures. - Highlights: • At in situ temperature, Cu impacted structure and activity of phototrophic biofilms. • Cu effects were reduced with increasing temperature (from +5 °C to +15 °C). • The decrease in Cu effects may be related to lower Cu bioaccumulation in biofilms. • Changes in diatom

  19. Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    López, Daniel; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The ability to form biofilms is a universal attribute of bacteria. Biofilms are multicellular communities held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix. The mechanisms that different bacteria employ to form biofilms vary, frequently depending on environmental conditions and specific strain attributes. In this review, we emphasize four well-studied model systems to give an overview of how several organisms form biofilms: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, and ...

  20. Treatment of hydrocarbon-rich wastewater using oil degrading bacteria and phototrophic microorganisms in rotating biological contactor: Effect of N:P ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavan, Anal; Mukherji, Suparna

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of hydrocarbon-rich industrial wastewater in bioreactors using heterotrophic microorganisms is often associated with various operational problems. In this study, a consortium of phototrophic microorganisms and a bacterium is developed on the discs of a rotating biological contactor (RBC) for treatment of wastewater containing diesel oil. The reactor was fed with oil degrading bacterium, Burkholderia cepacia and oil tolerant phototrophic microorganisms. After biofilm formation and acclimatization to 0.6% (v/v) diesel, continuous-mode operation was initiated at 21 h hydraulic retention time (HRT). Residual diesel in the effluent was 0.003%. Advantages of this system include good total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal, no soluble carbon source requirement and good settleability of biosolids. Biofilm observations revealed the predominance of B. cepacia and cyanobacteria (Phormidium, Oscillatoria and Chroococcus). The N:P ratio affected the relative dominance of the phototrophic microorganisms and bacterial culture. This ratio was a critical factor in determining the performance efficiency of the reactor. At 21 h HRT and organic loading of 27.33 g TPH/m 2 d, the N:P ratio 28.5:1 and 38:1 both yielded high and almost comparable TPH and COD removal efficiencies. This study presents a feasible technology for the treatment of hydrocarbon-rich wastewater from petrochemical industries and petroleum refineries

  1. PO43- dependence of the tolerance of autotrophic and heterotrophic biofilm communities to copper and diuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlili, Ahmed; Bérard, Annette; Roulier, Jean-Louis; Volat, Bernadette; Montuelle, Bernard

    2010-06-10

    Pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) concept is based on the assumption that the toxicant exerts selection pressure on the biological communities when exposure reaches a critical level for a sufficient period of time and therefore sensitive species are eliminated. However, induced tolerance of microbial biofilm communities cannot be attributed solely to the presence of toxicants in rivers but also to various environmental factors, such as amount of nutrients. An experimental study was undertaken to highlight the potential impact of a phosphorus gradient on the sensitivity of periphytic microbial community to Cu and diuron. Biofilms were exposed to real-world levels of chronic environmental contamination of toxicants with a phosphorus gradient. Biofilm sensitivity to Cu and diuron was assessed by performing short-term inhibition tests based on photosynthetic efficiency to target photoautotrophs, extracellular enzyme activity (beta-glucosidase and leucine-aminopeptidase) and substrate-induced respiration activity to target heterotrophs. The impact of P-gradient associated to pollution was evaluated by measuring pesticide concentrations in biofilms, biomass parameters (chla, AFDW), bacterial cell density, photosynthetic efficiency and community structure (using 18S and 16S rDNA gene analysis to target eukaryotes and DGGE and HPLC pigment analysis to target bacteria and photoautotrophs). The obtained results show that depending on the studied toxicant and the used structural or functional parameter, the effect of the phosphorus gradient was variable. This highlights the importance of using a range of parameters that target all the biological communities in the biofilm. The PICT method can be regarded as a good tool for assessing anthropogenic environmental contamination, but it is necessary to dissociate the real impact of toxicants from environmental factors.

  2. Antimicrobial Tolerance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms Is Activated during an Early Developmental Stage and Requires the Two-Component Hybrid SagS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kajal; Marques, Cláudia N. H.; Petrova, Olga E.

    2013-01-01

    A hallmark characteristic of biofilms is their extraordinary tolerance to antimicrobial agents. While multiple factors are thought to contribute to the high level of antimicrobial tolerance of biofilms, little is known about the timing of induction of biofilm tolerance. Here, we asked when over the course of their development do biofilms gain their tolerance to antimicrobial agents? We demonstrate that in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, biofilm tolerance is linked to biofilm development, with transition to the irreversible attachment stage regulated by the two-component hybrid SagS, marking the timing when biofilms switch to the high-level tolerance phenotype. Inactivation of sagS rendered biofilms but not planktonic cells more susceptible to tobramycin, norfloxacin, and hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, inactivation of sagS also eliminated the recalcitrance of biofilms to killing by bactericidal antimicrobial agents, a phenotype comparable to that observed upon inactivation of brlR, which encodes a MerR-like transcriptional regulator required for biofilm tolerance. Multicopy expression of brlR in a ΔsagS mutant restored biofilm resistance and recalcitrance to killing by bactericidal antibiotics to wild-type levels. In contrast, expression of sagS did not restore the susceptibility phenotype of ΔbrlR mutant biofilms to wild-type levels, indicating that BrlR functions downstream of SagS. Inactivation of sagS correlated with reduced BrlR levels in biofilms, with the produced BrlR being impaired in binding to the previously described BrlR-activated promoters of the two multidrug efflux pump operons mexAB-oprM and mexEF-oprN. Our findings demonstrate that biofilm tolerance is linked to early biofilm development and SagS, with SagS contributing indirectly to BrlR activation. PMID:23995639

  3. Effect of the Biofilm Age and Starvation on Acid Tolerance of Biofilm Formed by Streptococcus mutans Isolated from Caries-Active and Caries-Free Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Chen, Shuai; Zhang, Chengfei; Zhao, Xingfu; Huang, Xiaojing; Cai, Zhiyu

    2017-03-30

    Streptococcus mutans ( S. mutans ) is considered a leading cause of dental caries. The capability of S. mutans to tolerate low pH is essential for its cariogenicity. Aciduricity of S. mutans is linked to its adaptation to environmental stress in oral cavity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of biofilm age and starvation condition on acid tolerance of biofilm formed by S. mutans clinical isolates. S. mutans clinical strains isolated from caries-active (SM593) and caries-free (SM18) adults and a reference strain (ATCC25175) were used for biofilm formation. (1) Both young and mature biofilms were formed and then exposed to pH 3.0 for 30 min with (acid-adapted group) or without (non-adapted group) pre-exposure to pH 5.5 for three hours. (2) The mature biofilms were cultured with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (starved group) or TPY (polypeptone-yeast extract) medium (non-starved group) at pH 7.0 for 24 h and then immersed in medium of pH 3.0 for 30 min. Biofilms were analyzed through viability staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy. In all three strains, mature, acid-adapted and starved biofilms showed significantly less destructive structure and more viable bacteria after acid shock than young, non-adapted and non-starved biofilms, respectively (all p mutans strains against acid shock. Additionally, SM593 exhibited greater aciduricity compared to SM18 and ATCC25175, which indicated that the colonization of high cariogenicity of clinical strains may lead to high caries risk in individuals.

  4. Use of the MicroRespTM method to assess pollution-induced community tolerance to metals for lotic biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlili, Ahmed; Marechal, Marjorie; Montuelle, Bernard; Volat, Bernadette; Dorigo, Ursula; Berard, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the ecological status of aquatic ecosystems and the impact of anthropogenic contamination requires correlating exposure to toxicants with impact on biological communities. Several tools exist for assessing the ecotoxicity of substances, but there is still a need for new tools that are ecologically relevant and easy to use. We have developed a protocol based on the substrate-induced respiration of a river biofilm community, using the MicroResp TM technique, in a pollution-induced community tolerance approach. The results show that MicroResp TM can be used in bioassays to assess the toxicity toward biofilm communities of a wide range of metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Ag, Ni, Fe, Co, Al and As). Moreover, a community-level physiological profile based on the mineralization of different carbon substrates was established. Finally, the utility of MicroResp TM was confirmed in an in-situ study showing gradient of tolerance to copper correlated to a contamination gradient of this metal in a small river. - A modified MicroResp TM technique as a tool for measuring induced tolerance to heavy metals of a microbial biofilm community. - Research highlights: → MicroResp TM allows to plot dose-response curves with various tested metals. → Induced-tolerance to copper of heterotrophic biofilm community was successfully measured. → No co-tolerance detected between copper, silver and cadmium by using MicroResp TM . → MicroResp TM allows assessment of change in catabolic diversity in microbial community.

  5. Withania somnifera attenuates acid production, acid tolerance and extra-cellular polysaccharide formation of Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Santosh; Song, Kwang-Yeob; Jeon, Jae-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha) is a plant of the Solanaceae family. It has been widely used as a remedy for a variety of ailments in India and Nepal. The plant has also been used as a controlling agent for dental diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the activity of the methanol extract of W. somnifera against the physiological ability of cariogenic biofilms and to identify the components of the extract. To determine the activity of the extract, assays for sucrose-dependent bacterial adherence, glycolytic acid production, acid tolerance, and extracellular polysaccharide formation were performed using Streptococcus mutans biofilms. The viability change of S. mutans biofilms cells was also determined. A phytochemical analysis of the extract was performed using TLC and LC/MS/MS. The extract showed inhibitory effects on sucrose-dependent bacterial adherence (≥ 100 μg/ml), glycolytic acid production (≥ 300 μg/ml), acid tolerance (≥ 300 μg/ml), and extracellular polysaccharide formation (≥ 300 μg/ml) of S. mutans biofilms. However, the extract did not alter the viability of S. mutans biofilms cells in all concentrations tested. Based on the phytochemical analysis, the activity of the extract may be related to the presence of alkaloids, anthrones, coumarines, anthraquinones, terpenoids, flavonoids, and steroid lactones (withanolide A, withaferin A, withanolide B, withanoside IV, and 12-deoxy withastramonolide). These data indicate that W. somnifera may be a potential agent for restraining the physiological ability of cariogenic biofilms.

  6. Trk2 Potassium Transport System in Streptococcus mutans and Its Role in Potassium Homeostasis, Biofilm Formation, and Stress Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binepal, Gursonika; Gill, Kamal; Crowley, Paula; Cordova, Martha; Brady, L. Jeannine; Senadheera, Dilani B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Potassium (K+) is the most abundant cation in the fluids of dental biofilm. The biochemical and biophysical functions of K+ and a variety of K+ transport systems have been studied for most pathogenic bacteria but not for oral pathogens. In this study, we establish the modes of K+ acquisition in Streptococcus mutans and the importance of K+ homeostasis for its virulence attributes. The S. mutans genome harbors four putative K+ transport systems that included two Trk-like transporters (designated Trk1 and Trk2), one glutamate/K+ cotransporter (GlnQHMP), and a channel-like K+ transport system (Kch). Mutants lacking Trk2 had significantly impaired growth, acidogenicity, aciduricity, and biofilm formation. [K+] less than 5 mM eliminated biofilm formation in S. mutans. The functionality of the Trk2 system was confirmed by complementing an Escherichia coli TK2420 mutant strain, which resulted in significant K+ accumulation, improved growth, and survival under stress. Taken together, these results suggest that Trk2 is the main facet of the K+-dependent cellular response of S. mutans to environment stresses. IMPORTANCE Biofilm formation and stress tolerance are important virulence properties of caries-causing Streptococcus mutans. To limit these properties of this bacterium, it is imperative to understand its survival mechanisms. Potassium is the most abundant cation in dental plaque, the natural environment of S. mutans. K+ is known to function in stress tolerance, and bacteria have specialized mechanisms for its uptake. However, there are no reports to identify or characterize specific K+ transporters in S. mutans. We identified the most important system for K+ homeostasis and its role in the biofilm formation, stress tolerance, and growth. We also show the requirement of environmental K+ for the activity of biofilm-forming enzymes, which explains why such high levels of K+ would favor biofilm formation. PMID:26811321

  7. Foreign Body Infection Models to Study Host-Pathogen Response and Antimicrobial Tolerance of Bacterial Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Nowakowska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The number of implanted medical devices is steadily increasing and has become an effective intervention improving life quality, but still carries the risk of infection. These infections are mainly caused by biofilm-forming staphylococci that are difficult to treat due to the decreased susceptibility to both antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. To understand the particular pathogenesis and treatment tolerance of implant-associated infection (IAI animal models that closely resemble human disease are needed. Applications of the tissue cage and catheter abscess foreign body infection models in the mouse will be discussed herein. Both models allow the investigation of biofilm and virulence of various bacterial species and a comprehensive insight into the host response at the same time. They have also been proven to serve as very suitable tools to study the anti-adhesive and anti-infective efficacy of different biomaterial coatings. The tissue cage model can additionally be used to determine pharmacokinetics, efficacy and cytotoxicity of antimicrobial compounds as the tissue cage fluid can be aspirated repeatedly without the need to sacrifice the animal. Moreover, with the advance in innovative imaging systems in rodents, these models may offer new diagnostic measures of infection. In summary, animal foreign body infection models are important tools in the development of new antimicrobials against IAI and can help to elucidate the complex interactions between bacteria, the host immune system, and prosthetic materials.

  8. Mycobacterium avium Possesses Extracellular DNA that Contributes to Biofilm Formation, Structural Integrity, and Tolerance to Antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha J Rose

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is an opportunistic pathogen that is associated with biofilm-related infections of the respiratory tract and is difficult to treat. In recent years, extracellular DNA (eDNA has been found to be a major component of bacterial biofilms, including many pathogens involved in biofilm-associated infections. To date, eDNA has not been described as a component of mycobacterial biofilms. In this study, we identified and characterized eDNA in a high biofilm-producing strain of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH. In addition, we surveyed for presence of eDNA in various MAH strains and other nontuberculous mycobacteria. Biofilms of MAH A5 (high biofilm-producing strain and MAH 104 (reference strain were established at 22°C and 37°C on abiotic surfaces. Acellular biofilm matrix and supernatant from MAH A5 7 day-old biofilms both possess abundant eDNA, however very little eDNA was found in MAH 104 biofilms. A survey of MAH clinical isolates and other clinically relevant nontuberculous mycobacterial species revealed many species and strains that also produce eDNA. RAPD analysis demonstrated that eDNA resembles genomic DNA. Treatment with DNase I reduced the biomass of MAH A5 biofilms when added upon biofilm formation or to an already established biofilm both on abiotic surfaces and on top of human pharyngeal epithelial cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of an established biofilm with DNase 1 and either moxifloxacin or clarithromycin significantly increased the susceptibility of the bacteria within the biofilm to these clinically used antimicrobials. Collectively, our results describe an additional matrix component of mycobacterial biofilms and a potential new target to help treat biofilm-associated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections.

  9. Deficiency of PdxR in Streptococcus mutans affects vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, S; Bitoun, J P; Nguyen, A H; Bozner, D; Yao, X; Wen, Z T

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a key etiological agent of the human dental caries, lives primarily on the tooth surface in tenacious biofilms. The SMU864 locus, designated pdxR, is predicted to encode a member of the novel MocR/GabR family proteins, which are featured with a winged helix DNA-binding N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain highly homologous to the pyridoxal phosphate-dependent aspartate aminotransferases. A pdxR-deficient mutant, TW296, was constructed using allelic exchange. PdxR deficiency in S. mutans had little effect on cell morphology and growth when grown in brain heart infusion. However, when compared with its parent strain, UA159, the PdxR-deficient mutant displayed major defects in acid tolerance response and formed significantly fewer biofilms (P mutans is known to require vitamin B6 to grow in defined medium, B6 vitamers, especially pyridoxal, were strongly inhibitory at millimolar concentrations, against S. mutans growth and biofilm formation. Our results suggest that PdxR in S. mutans plays an important role in regulation of vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 exopolysaccharides are important for mixed species biofilm community development and stress tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan ePeriasamy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 produces three polysaccharides, alginate, Psl and Pel that play distinct roles in attachment and biofilm formation for monospecies biofilms. Considerably less is known about their role in the development of mixed species biofilm communities. This study has investigated the roles of alginate, Psl and Pel during biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa in a defined and experimentally informative mixed species biofilm community, consisting of P. aeruginosa, Pseudomonas protegens and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide had the biggest impact on the integration of P. aeruginosa in the mixed species biofilms, where the percent composition of the psl mutant was significantly lower (0.06% than its wild-type parent (2.44%. In contrast, loss of the Pel polysaccharide had no impact on mixed species biofilm development. Loss of alginate or its overproduction resulted in P. aeruginosa representing 8.4% and 18.11%, respectively, of the mixed species biofilm. Dual species biofilms of P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae were not affected by loss of alginate, Pel or Psl, while the mucoid P. aeruginosa strain achieved a greater biomass than its parent strain. When P. aeruginosa was grown with P. protegens, loss of the Pel or alginate polysaccharides resulted in biofilms that were not significantly different from biofilms formed by the wild-type PAO1. In contrast, overproduction of alginate resulted in biofilms that were comprised of 35-40% of P. aeruginosa, which was significantly higher than the wild-type (5-20%. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide significantly reduced the percentage composition of P. aeruginosa in dual species biofilms with P. protegens (<1%. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide significantly disrupted the communal stress resistance of the three species biofilms. Thus, the polysaccharide composition of an individual species significantly impacts mixed species biofilm development and the emergent properties of such

  11. Phototrophic pigment production with microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, K.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract

    Microalgal pigments are regarded as natural alternatives for food colorants. To facilitate optimization of microalgae-based pigment production, this thesis aimed to obtain key insights in the pigment metabolism of phototrophic microalgae, with the main focus on secondary

  12. Role of glutathione metabolism status in the definition of some cellular parameters and oxidative stress tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells growing as biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, Grégoire; Penninckx, Michel; Block, Jean-Claude; Leroy, Pierre

    2008-08-01

    The resistance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to oxidative stress (H(2)O(2) and Cd(2+)) was compared in biofilms and planktonic cells, with the help of yeast mutants deleted of genes related to glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress. Biofilm-forming cells were found predominantly in the G1 stage of the cell cycle. This might explain their higher tolerance to oxidative stress and the young replicative age of these cells in an old culture. The reduced glutathione status of S. cerevisiae was affected by the growth phase and apparently plays an important role in oxidative stress tolerance in cells growing as a biofilm.

  13. Construction and evaluation of a modular biofilm-forming chamber for microbial recovery of neodymium and semi-continuous biofilm preparation. Tolerance of Serratia sp.N14 on acidic conditions and neutralized aqua regia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavlekas, Dimitrios A

    2017-02-01

    Recovery of neodymium from liquid metallic wastes and scrap leachates is a crucial step for its recycling, which can take place through the immobilized biofilms of Serratia sp. N14. These biofilms are produced in a fermentor vessel with a turnaround time of 10-14 days, which is unacceptable from an economic point of view for an industrial process. This study proposes the construction and evaluation of a modular system, whereby a biofilm-forming chamber is inserted into the continuous biomass outflow of the main chemostat vessel, for an alternative semi-continuous and economic production of biofilm. The activity of the biofilm from the outflow chamber was found to be the same as the one from the main chamber, which was stored in a cold room (4°C), for 9-12 months, depending on a 24 h nucleation step.Moreover, the ability of the biofilm to function in the presence of a leaching agent (aqua regia) or in acidic conditions was also evaluated. The biofilm of the main chamber can remain active even at 50% neutralized aqua regia (pH 3.0), while at acidic conditions, phosphate release of the cells is reduced to 50%. This strain proves to be very tolerant in low pH or high salt concentration solutions. The biofilm produced from the outflow of the main fermentor vessel is of acceptable activity, rather than being disposed.

  14. Stress Tolerance-Related Genetic Traits of Fish Pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum in a Mature Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor A. Levipan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the causative agent of bacterial cold-water disease and rainbow trout fry syndrome, and hence this bacterium is placed among the most important salmonid pathogens in the freshwater aquaculture industry. Since bacteria in biofilms differ substantially from free-living counterparts, this study sought to find the main differences in gene expression between sessile and planktonic states of F. psychrophilum LM-02-Fp and NCMB1947T, with focus on stress-related changes in gene expression occurring during biofilm formation. To this end, biofilm and planktonic samples were analyzed by RNA sequencing to detect differentially expressed candidate genes (DECGs between the two growth states, and decreasing the effects of interstrain variation by considering only genes with log2-fold changes ≤ −2 and ≥ 2 at Padj-values ≤ 0.001 as DECGs. Overall, 349 genes accounting for ~15% of total number of genes expressed in transcriptomes of F. psychrophilum LM-02-Fp and NCMB1947T (n = 2327 were DECGs between biofilm and planktonic states. Approximately 83 and 81% of all up- and down-regulated candidate genes in mature biofilms, respectively, were assigned to at least one gene ontology term; these were primarily associated with the molecular function term “catalytic activity.” We detected a potential stress response in mature biofilms, characterized by a generalized down-regulation of DECGs with roles in the protein synthesis machinery (n = 63, primarily ribosomal proteins and energy conservation (seven ATP synthase subunit genes, as well as an up-regulation of DECGs involved in DNA repair (ruvC, recO, phrB1, smf, and dnaQ and oxidative stress response (cytochrome C peroxidase, probable peroxiredoxin, and a probable thioredoxin. These results support the idea of a strategic trade-off between growth-related processes and cell homeostasis to preserve biofilm structure and metabolic functioning. In addition, LDH-based cytotoxicity

  15. The copYAZ Operon Functions in Copper Efflux, Biofilm Formation, Genetic Transformation, and Stress Tolerance in Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kamna; Senadheera, Dilani B.; Lévesque, Céline M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In bacteria, copper homeostasis is closely monitored to ensure proper cellular functions while avoiding cell damage. Most Gram-positive bacteria utilize the copYABZ operon for copper homeostasis, where copA and copB encode copper-transporting P-type ATPases, whereas copY and copZ regulate the expression of the cop operon. Streptococcus mutans is a biofilm-forming oral pathogen that harbors a putative copper-transporting copYAZ operon. Here, we characterized the role of copYAZ operon in the physiology of S. mutans and delineated the mechanisms of copper-induced toxicity in this bacterium. We observed that copper induced toxicity in S. mutans cells by generating oxidative stress and disrupting their membrane potential. Deletion of the copYAZ operon in S. mutans strain UA159 resulted in reduced cell viability under copper, acid, and oxidative stress relative to the viability of the wild type under these conditions. Furthermore, the ability of S. mutans to form biofilms and develop genetic competence was impaired under copper stress. Briefly, copper stress significantly reduced cell adherence and total biofilm biomass, concomitantly repressing the transcription of the gtfB, gtfC, gtfD, gbpB, and gbpC genes, whose products have roles in maintaining the structural and/or functional integrity of the S. mutans biofilm. Furthermore, supplementation with copper or loss of copYAZ resulted in significant reductions in transformability and in the transcription of competence-associated genes. Copper transport assays revealed that the ΔcopYAZ strain accrued significantly large amounts of intracellular copper compared with the amount of copper accumulation in the wild-type strain, thereby demonstrating a role for CopYAZ in the copper efflux of S. mutans. The complementation of the CopYAZ system restored copper expulsion, membrane potential, and stress tolerance in the copYAZ-null mutant. Taking these results collectively, we have established the function of the S. mutans

  16. The copYAZ Operon Functions in Copper Efflux, Biofilm Formation, Genetic Transformation, and Stress Tolerance in Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kamna; Senadheera, Dilani B; Lévesque, Céline M; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G

    2015-08-01

    In bacteria, copper homeostasis is closely monitored to ensure proper cellular functions while avoiding cell damage. Most Gram-positive bacteria utilize the copYABZ operon for copper homeostasis, where copA and copB encode copper-transporting P-type ATPases, whereas copY and copZ regulate the expression of the cop operon. Streptococcus mutans is a biofilm-forming oral pathogen that harbors a putative copper-transporting copYAZ operon. Here, we characterized the role of copYAZ operon in the physiology of S. mutans and delineated the mechanisms of copper-induced toxicity in this bacterium. We observed that copper induced toxicity in S. mutans cells by generating oxidative stress and disrupting their membrane potential. Deletion of the copYAZ operon in S. mutans strain UA159 resulted in reduced cell viability under copper, acid, and oxidative stress relative to the viability of the wild type under these conditions. Furthermore, the ability of S. mutans to form biofilms and develop genetic competence was impaired under copper stress. Briefly, copper stress significantly reduced cell adherence and total biofilm biomass, concomitantly repressing the transcription of the gtfB, gtfC, gtfD, gbpB, and gbpC genes, whose products have roles in maintaining the structural and/or functional integrity of the S. mutans biofilm. Furthermore, supplementation with copper or loss of copYAZ resulted in significant reductions in transformability and in the transcription of competence-associated genes. Copper transport assays revealed that the ΔcopYAZ strain accrued significantly large amounts of intracellular copper compared with the amount of copper accumulation in the wild-type strain, thereby demonstrating a role for CopYAZ in the copper efflux of S. mutans. The complementation of the CopYAZ system restored copper expulsion, membrane potential, and stress tolerance in the copYAZ-null mutant. Taking these results collectively, we have established the function of the S. mutans Cop

  17. Auto Poisoning of the Respiratory Chain by a Quorum Sensing Regulated Molecule Favors Biofilm Formation and Antibiotic Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazan, Ronen; Que, Yok Ai; Maura, Damien; Strobel, Benjamin; Majcherczyk, Paul Anthony; Hopper, Laura Rose; Wilbur, David J.; Hreha, Teri N.; Barquera, Blanca; Rahme, Laurence G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacterial programmed cell death and quorum sensing are direct examples of prokaryote group behaviors, wherein cells coordinate their actions to function cooperatively like one organism for the benefit of the whole culture. We demonstrate here that 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO), a Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing -regulated low-molecular-weight excreted molecule, and triggers autolysis by self-perturbing the electron transfer reactions of the cytochrome bc1 complex. HQNO induces specific self-poisoning by disrupting the flow of electrons through the respiratory chain at the cytochrome bc1 complex, causing a leak of reducing equivalents to O2 whereby electrons that would normally be passed to cytochrome c are donated directly to O2. The subsequent mass production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduces membrane potential and disrupts membrane integrity, causing bacterial cell autolysis and DNA release. DNA subsequently promotes biofilm formation and increases antibiotic tolerance to beta-lactams, suggesting that HQNO-dependent cell autolysis is advantageous to the bacterial populations. These data both identify a new programmed cell death system, and a novel role for HQNO as a critical-inducer of biofilm formation and antibiotic tolerance. This newly identified pathway suggests intriguing mechanistic similarities with the initial mitochondrial-mediated steps of eukaryotic apoptosis. PMID:26776731

  18. Sfp-type PPTase inactivation promotes bacterial biofilm formation and ability to enhance wheat drought tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salme eTimmusk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Paenibacillus polymyxa is a common soil bacterium with broad range of practical applications. An important group of secondary metabolites in P. polymyxa are nonribosomal peptide and polyketide derived metabolites (NRP/PK. Modular nonribosomal peptide synthetases catalyse main steps in the biosynthesis of the complex secondary metabolites. Here we report on the inactivation of an A26 sfp-type phosphopantetheinyl transferase. The inactivation of the gene resulted in loss of NRP/PK production. In contrast to the former Bacillus spp. model the mutant strain compared to wild type showed greatly enhanced biofilm formation ability. Its biofilm promotion is directly mediated by NRP/PK, as exogenous addition of the wild type metabolite extracts restores its biofilm formation level. Wheat inoculation with bacteria that had lost their sfp-type PPTase gene resulted in two times higher plant survival and about three times increased biomass under severe drought stress compared to wild type.

  19. Tolerance development in Listeria monocytogenes-Escherichia coli dual-species biofilms after sublethal exposures to pronase-benzalkonium chloride combined treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-López, Pedro; Cabo, Marta López

    2017-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the effects that sublethal exposures to pronase (PRN) and benzalkonium chloride (BAC) combined treatments have on Listeria monocytogenes-Escherichia coli dual-species biofilms grown on stainless steel in terms of tolerance development (TD) to these compounds. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy was used to observe the changes of the biofilm structure. PRN-BAC exposure was carried out using three different approaches and TD was evaluated treating biofilms with a final 100 μg/ml PRN followed by 50 μg/ml BAC combined treatment. Results showed that exposure to PRN-BAC significantly decreased the number of adhered L. monocytogenes (P reduction values were generally lower in L. monocytogenes compared to E. coli. Additionally, microscopy images showed an altered morphology produced by sublethal PRN-BAC in exposed L. monocytogenes-E. coli dual-species biofilms compared to control samples. Results also demonstrated that L. monocytogenes-E. coli dual-species biofilms are able to develop tolerance to PRN-BAC combined treatments depending on way they have been previously exposed. Moreover, they suggest that the generation of bacterial tolerance should be included as a parameter for sanitation procedures design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Linking community tolerance and structure with low metallic contamination: a field study on 13 biofilms sampled across the Seine river basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechner, Lise C; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène

    2014-03-15

    It is difficult to assess the biological consequences of diffuse water contamination by micropollutants which are present in rivers at low, even sublethal levels. River biofilms, which respond quickly to changes of environmental parameters, are good candidates to acquire knowledge on the response of aquatic organisms to diffuse chemical contamination in the field. The study was designed as an attempt to link biofilm metal tolerance and metallic contamination in a field survey covering 13 different sampling sites in the Seine river basin (north of France) with low contamination levels. Cd and Zn tolerance of heterotrophic communities was assessed using a short-term toxicity test based on β-glucosidase activity. Metal tolerance levels varied between sites but there was no obvious correlation between tolerance and corresponding water contamination levels for Cd and Zn. Indeed, metallic contamination at the sampling sites remained subtle when compared to water quality standards (only two sampling sites had either Zn or both Cu and Zn concentrations exceeding the Environmental Quality Standards set by the EU Water Framework Directive). Yet, multivariate analysis of the data using Partial Least Squares Regression revealed that both metallic and environmental parameters were important variables explaining the variability of metal tolerance levels. Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) was also performed on both bacterial and eukaryotic biofilm communities from the 13 sampling sites. Multivariate analysis of ARISA fingerprints revealed that biofilms with similar tolerance levels have similar ARISA profiles. Those results confirm that river biofilms are potential indicators of low, diffuse contamination levels of aquatic systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Interactions between phototrophic bacteria in marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, Rutger

    1989-01-01

    Phototrophic bacteria are the most consicious organisms occuring in laminated microbial sediment ecosystems (microbial mats). In the Waddensea area ecosystems consisting of a toplayer of the cyanobacterium Microleus chthonoplastes overlying a red layer of the purple sulfur bacterium Thiocapsa

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Givskov, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies of biopsies from infectious sites, explanted tissue and medical devises have provided evidence that biofilms are the underlying cause of a variety of tissue-associated and implant-associated recalcitrant human infections. With a need for novel anti-biofilm treatment strategies, research...... in biofilm infection microbiology, biofilm formation mechanisms and biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance has become an important area in microbiology. Substantial knowledge about biofilm formation mechanisms, biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance and immune evasion mechanisms has been obtained...... through work with biofilms grown in in vitro experimental setups, and the relevance of this information in the context of chronic infections is being investigated by the use of animal models of infection. Because our current in vitro experimental setups and animal models have limitations, new advanced...

  3. The diversity and abundance of bacteria and oxygenic phototrophs in saline biological desert crusts in Xinjiang, northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Liu, Ruyin; Zhang, Hongxun; Yun, Juanli

    2013-07-01

    Although microorganisms, particularly oxygenic phototrophs, are known as the major players in the biogeochemical cycles of elements in desert soil ecosystems and have received extensive attention, still little is known about the effects of salinity on the composition and abundances of microbial community in desert soils. In this study, the diversity and abundance of bacteria and oxygenic phototrophs in biological desert crusts from Xinjiang province, which were under different salinity conditions, were investigated by using clone library and quantitative PCR (qPCR). The 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis showed that cyanobacteria, mainly Microcoleus vagnitus of the order Oscillatoriales, were predominant in the low saline crusts, while other phototrophs, such as diatom, were the main microorganism group responsible for the oxygenic photosynthesis in the high saline crusts. Furthermore, the higher salt content in crusts may stimulate the growth of other bacteria, including Deinococcus-Thermus, Bacteroidetes, and some subdivisions of Proteobacteria (β-, γ-, and δ-Proteobacteria). The cpcBA-IGS gene analysis revealed the existence of novel M. vagnitus strains in this area. The qPCR results showed that the abundance of oxygenic phototrophs was significantly higher under lower saline condition than that in the higher saline crusts, suggesting that the higher salinity in desert crusts could suppress the numbers of total bacteria and phototrophic bacteria but did highly improve the diversity of salt-tolerant bacteria.

  4. Genes essential for phototrophic growth by a purple alphaproteobacterium: Genes for phototrophic growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jianming [Key Lab of Applied Mycology, College of Life Sciences, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao Shandong Province People' s Republic of China; Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Yin, Liang [Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Lessner, Faith H. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville AR USA; Nakayasu, Ernesto S. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Payne, Samuel H. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Fixen, Kathryn R. [Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Gallagher, Larry [Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Harwood, Caroline S. [Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA

    2017-07-24

    Anoxygenic purple phototrophic bacteria have served as important models for studies of photophosphorylation. The pigment-protein complexes responsible for converting light energy to ATP are relatively simple and these bacteria can grow heterotrophically under aerobic conditions, thus allowing for the study of mutants defective in photophosphorylation. In the past, genes responsible for anoxygenic phototrophic growth have been identified in a number of different bacterial species. Here we systematically studied the genetic basis for this metabolism by using Tn-seq to identify genes essential for the anaerobic growth of the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris on acetate in light. We identified 171 genes required for growth in this condition, 35 of which are annotated as photosynthesis genes. Among these are a few new genes not previously shown to be essential for phototrophic growth. We verified the essentiality of many of the genes we identified by analyzing the phenotypes of mutants we generated by Tn mutagenesis that had altered pigmentation. We used directed mutagenesis to verify that the R. palustris NADH:quinone oxidoreductase complex IE is essential for phototrophic growth. As a complement to the genetic data, we carried out proteomics experiments in which we found that 429 proteins were present in significantly higher amounts in cells grown anaerobically in light compared to aerobically. Among these were proteins encoded by subset of the phototrophic growth-essential genes.

  5. Mushroom speleothems: Stromatolites that formed in the absence of phototrophs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontognali, Tomaso; D'Angeli, Ilenia; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano; Gonzales, Esteban; DeWaele, Jo

    2016-04-01

    Unusual speleothems resembling giant mushrooms occur in Santa Catalina Cave, Cuba. Although these mineral buildups are considered a natural heritage, their composition and formation mechanism remain poorly understood. Here we characterize their morphology and mineralogy and present a model for their genesis. We propose that the mushrooms, which are mainly comprised of calcite and aragonite, formed during four different phases within an evolving cave environment. The stipe of the mushroom is an assemblage of three well-known speleothems: a stalagmite surrounded by calcite rafts that were subsequently encrusted by cave clouds (mammilaries). More peculiar is the cap of the mushroom, which is morphologically similar to cerebroid stromatolites and thrombolites of microbial origin occurring in marine environments. Scanning electron microscopy investigations of this last unit revealed the presence of fossilized extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) - the constituents of biofilms and microbial mats. These organic microstructures are mineralized with Ca-carbonate, suggesting that the mushroom cap formed through a microbially-influenced mineralization process. The existence of cerebroid Ca-carbonate buildups forming in dark caves (i.e., in the absence of phototrophs) has interesting implications for the study of fossil microbialites preserved in ancient rocks, which are today considered as one of the earliest evidence for life on Earth.

  6. Mushroom speleothems: Stromatolites that formed in the absence of phototrophs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaso eBontognali

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Unusual speleothems resembling giant mushrooms occur in Santa Catalina Cave, Cuba. Although these mineral buildups are considered a natural heritage, their composition and formation mechanism remain poorly understood. Here we characterize their morphology and mineralogy and present a model for their genesis. We propose that the mushrooms, which are mainly comprised of calcite and aragonite, formed during four different phases within an evolving cave environment. The stipe of the mushroom is an assemblage of three well-known speleothems: a stalagmite surrounded by calcite rafts that were subsequently encrusted by cave clouds (mammilaries. More peculiar is the cap of the mushroom, which is morphologically similar to cerebroid stromatolites and thrombolites of microbial origin occurring in marine environments. Scanning electron microscopy investigations of this last unit revealed the presence of fossilized extracellular polymeric substances (EPS – the constituents of biofilms and microbial mats. These organic microstructures are mineralized with Ca-carbonate, suggesting that the mushroom cap formed through a microbially-influenced mineralization process. The existence of cerebroid Ca-carbonate buildups forming in dark caves (i.e., in the absence of phototrophs has interesting implications for the study of fossil microbialites preserved in ancient rocks, which are today considered as one of the earliest evidence for life on Earth.

  7. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are characterized by oxidizing various inorganic sulfur compounds for use as electron donors in carbon dioxide fixation during anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. These bacteria are divided into the purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB......). They utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms...... in other types of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The biochemistry and genetics of sulfur compound oxidation in PSB and GSB are described in detail. A variety of enzymes catalyzing sulfur oxidation reactions have been isolated from GSB and PSB (especially Allochromatium vinosum, a representative...

  8. Isolation and Identification of Phototrophic Microorganisms from Rudkhan Castle as a Biodeteriorating Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Mohammadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Phototrophic microorganisms are the first residents of different surfaces of ancient buildings’ walls. These organisms can expand to provide the colonization of other microorganisms and to form microbial biofilms. During biofilm growth, acids and metabolites production bore the substratum and cause surfaces damages. Rudkan Castle, the historic monument located in Gilan province, an area with a humid climate has an appropriate surfaces to grow these microorganisms. Materials and methods: In this study, morphological identification of algae and cyanobacteria which was isolated from different areas of the brick walls of Castle has been investigated. Samples were taken from 24 different areas of Castle walls and were aseptically cultured into Blue Green Medium (BGM and Bolds Basal Medium (BBM, and colonies were observed using light microscopy. Results: The dominant organisms which were isolated and identified, were Cladophora, Trentepohlia, Klebsormidium, Trebouxia, Pleurastrum, Chlorococcum as chlorophyta order and Scytonema, Tolypothrix, Leptolyngbya, Plectolyngbya, Phormidium, Gloeocapsa, Microcoleus, Nostoc as a cyanobacteria order. Discussion and conclusion: As expected, diversity of a large number of cyanobacteria and algae phototrophs was isolated. Diversity of organisms on the surface of monuments depends on many factors, including the weather condition such as moisture, the amount of radiation absorbed by the surface, temperature of area, the materials used in the monuments, the biological acceptance of surface and presence of variety of organisms in the soil surface and the air on. Study of destructive factors is the first step toward the protection and restoration of ancient monuments.

  9. Anoxic and oxic phototrophic primary production during the Precambrian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebey-Honeycutt, Christina Marie; Bjerrum, Christian J.; Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2009-01-01

    of the mixed layer often lies above the base of the photic zone . Thus, an ecosystem model for the Precambrian should reflect the net primary production (NPP) of oxygenic phototrophs in the mixed layer and anoxygenic phototrophs below (NPPox and NPPred, respectively). Satelite data and a vertically generalized...

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display...... a remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because...... the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  11. Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    is linked to a different set of circumstances than the ones suggested by existing models in contemporary democratic theory. Reorienting the discussion of tolerance, the book raises the question of how to disclose new possibilities within our given context of affect and perception. Once we move away from......Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated...... by the desire to experiment and to become otherwise. The objective is to discuss what gets lost, conceptually as well as politically, when we neglect the subsistence of active tolerance within other practices of tolerance, and to develop a theory of active tolerance in which tolerance's mobilizing character...

  12. Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated by the d...... these alternatives by returning to the notion of tolerance as the endurance of pain, linking this notion to exemplars and theories relevant to the politics of multiculturalism, religious freedom, and free speech....

  13. Carbohydrate secretion by phototrophic communities in tidal sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winder, B.; Staats, N.; Stal, L.J.; Paterson, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    Two different benthic phototrophic communities on tidal flats were investigated for their carbohydrate content and distribution. Carbohydrates were analysed as two operationally defined fractions, related to the difficulty of extraction from the sediment matrix. Water-soluble (colloidal) and EDTA-

  14. Biofilms in wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, R A; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, M

    2014-01-01

    Following confirmation of the presence of biofilms in chronic wounds, the term biofilm became a buzzword within the wound healing community. For more than a century pathogens have been successfully isolated and identified from wound specimens using techniques that were devised in the nineteenth...... extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Cells within such aggregations (or biofilms) display varying physiological and metabolic properties that are distinct from those of planktonic cells, and which contribute to their persistence. There are many factors that influence healing in wounds and the discovery...... of biofilms in chronic wounds has provided new insight into the reasons why. Increased tolerance of biofilms to antimicrobial agents explains the limited efficacy of antimicrobial agents in chronic wounds and illustrates the need to develop new management strategies. This review aims to explain the nature...

  15. Tolerance to the antimicrobial peptide colistin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is linked to metabolically active cells, and depends on the pmr and mexAB-oprM genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pamp, Sünje Johanna; Gjermansen, Morten; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    -mediated killing in biofilms, conventional antimicrobial compounds such as ciprofloxacin and tetracycline were found to specifically kill the subpopulation of metabolically active biofilm cells, whereas the subpopulation exhibiting low metabolic activity survived the treatment. Consequently, targeting the two...... physiologically distinct subpopulations by combined antimicrobial treatment with either ciprofloxacin and colistin or tetracycline and colistin almost completely eradicated all biofilm cells....

  16. Combating biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities consisting of microcolonies embedded in a matrix of self-produced polymer substances. Biofilm cells show much greater resistance to environmental challenges including antimicrobial agents than their free-living counterparts. The biofilm mode of life...... is believed to significantly contribute to successful microbial survival in hostile environments. Conventional treatment, disinfection and cleaning strategies do not proficiently deal with biofilm-related problems, such as persistent infections and contamination of food production facilities. In this review......, strategies to control biofilms are discussed, including those of inhibition of microbial attachment, interference of biofilm structure development and differentiation, killing of biofilm cells and induction of biofilm dispersion....

  17. Endolithic phototrophs in built and natural stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylarde, Christine C; Gaylarde, Peter M; Neilan, Brett A

    2012-08-01

    Lichens, algae and cyanobacteria have been detected growing endolithically in natural rock and in stone buildings in various countries of Australasia, Europe and Latin America. Previously these organisms had mainly been described in natural carbonaceous rocks in aquatic environments, with some reports in siliceous rocks, principally from extremophilic regions. Using various culture and microscopy methods, we have detected endoliths in siliceous stone, both natural and cut, in humid temperate and subtropical climates. Such endolithic growth leads to degradation of the stone structure, not only by mechanical means, but also by metabolites liberated by the cells. Using in vitro culture, transmission, optical and fluorescence microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy, both coccoid and filamentous cyanobacteria and algae, including Cyanidiales, have been identified growing endolithically in the facades of historic buildings built from limestone, sandstone, granite, basalt and soapstone, as well as in some natural rocks. Numerically, the most abundant are small, single-celled, colonial cyanobacteria. These small phototrophs are difficult to detect by standard microscope techniques and some of these species have not been previously reported within stone.

  18. Antibiotic resistance of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoiby, N.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Givskov, M.

    2010-01-01

    A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein and DNA. Bacterial biofilms cause chronic infections because they show increased tolerance to antibiotics and disinfectant chemicals as well as resisting phagocytosis...... and other components of the body's defence system. The persistence of, for example, staphylococcal infections related to foreign bodies is due to biofilm formation. Likewise, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients is caused by biofilm-growing mucoid strains....... Characteristically, gradients of nutrients and oxygen exist from the top to the bottom of biofilms and these gradients are associated with decreased bacterial metabolic activity and increased doubling times of the bacterial cells; it is these more or less dormant cells that are responsible for some of the tolerance...

  19. Distribution of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs in the Eastern Adriatic Sea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šantić, D.; Šestanović, S.; Vrdoljak, A.; Šolić, M.; Kušpilić, G.; Ninčević Gladan, Ž.; Koblížek, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 130, SEP 2017 (2017), s. 134-141 ISSN 0141-1136 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs * Adriatic sea * Picoplankton Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 3.101, year: 2016

  20. Exposure of phototrophs to 548 days in low Earth orbit: microbial selection pressures in outer space and on early earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, Charles S; Rettberg, Petra; Rabbow, Elke; Olsson-Francis, Karen

    2011-10-01

    An epilithic microbial community was launched into low Earth orbit, and exposed to conditions in outer space for 548 days on the European Space Agency EXPOSE-E facility outside the International Space Station. The natural phototroph biofilm was augmented with akinetes of Anabaena cylindrica and vegetative cells of Nostoc commune and Chroococcidiopsis. In space-exposed dark controls, two algae (Chlorella and Rosenvingiella spp.), a cyanobacterium (Gloeocapsa sp.) and two bacteria associated with the natural community survived. Of the augmented organisms, cells of A. cylindrica and Chroococcidiopsis survived, but no cells of N. commune. Only cells of Chroococcidiopsis were cultured from samples exposed to the unattenuated extraterrestrial ultraviolet (UV) spectrum (>110 nm or 200 nm). Raman spectroscopy and bright-field microscopy showed that under these conditions the surface cells were bleached and their carotenoids were destroyed, although cell morphology was preserved. These experiments demonstrate that outer space can act as a selection pressure on the composition of microbial communities. The results obtained from samples exposed to >200 nm UV (simulating the putative worst-case UV exposure on the early Earth) demonstrate the potential for epilithic colonization of land masses during that time, but that UV radiation on anoxic planets can act as a strong selection pressure on surface-dwelling organisms. Finally, these experiments have yielded new phototrophic organisms of potential use in biomass and oxygen production in space exploration.

  1. Biofilm Risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirtanen, Gun Linnea; Salo, Satu

    2016-01-01

    This chapter on biofilm risks deals with biofilm formation of pathogenic microbes, sampling and detection methods, biofilm removal, and prevention of biofilm formation. Several common pathogens produce sticky and/or slimy structures in which the cells are embedded, that is, biofilms, on various...... surfaces in food processing. Biofilms of common foodborne pathogens are reviewed. The issue of persistent and nonpersistent microbial contamination in food processing is also discussed. It has been shown that biofilms can be difficult to remove and can thus cause severe disinfection and cleaning problems...... in food factories. In the prevention of biofilm formation microbial control in process lines should both limit the number of microbes on surfaces and reduce microbial activity in the process. Thus the hygienic design of process equipment and process lines is important in improving the process hygiene...

  2. Pattern formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parsek, Matthew R.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria are capable of forming elaborate multicellular communities called biofilms. Pattern formation in biofilms depends on cell proliferation and cellular migration in response to the available nutrients and other external cues, as well as on self-generated intercellular signal molecules...... and the production of an extracellular matrix that serves as a structural 'scaffolding' for the biofilm cells. Pattern formation in biofilms allows cells to position themselves favorably within nutrient gradients and enables buildup and maintenance of physiologically distinct subpopulations, which facilitates...... survival of one or more subpopulations upon environmental insult, and therefore plays an important role in the innate tolerance displayed by biofilms toward adverse conditions....

  3. Salmonella biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelijn, G.A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Salmonellaspp. is a problem in the food industry, since biofilms may act as a persistent source of product contamination. Therefore the aim of this study was to obtain more insight in the processes involved and the factors contributing to Salmonellabiofilm

  4. Effect of copper and lead on two consortia of phototrophic microorganisms and their capacity to sequester metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos, A. [Departament de Genètica i Microbiologia, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Edifici C, Campus de UAB, Bellaterra (Cerdanyola del Vallès), 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departamento de Recursos Hidrobiológicos, Universidad de Nariño, Pasto (N) (Colombia); Maldonado, J. [Departament de Genètica i Microbiologia, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Edifici C, Campus de UAB, Bellaterra (Cerdanyola del Vallès), 08193 Barcelona (Spain); De los Rios, A. [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales(CSIC), Serrano 115 dpdo, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Solé, A. [Departament de Genètica i Microbiologia, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Edifici C, Campus de UAB, Bellaterra (Cerdanyola del Vallès), 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Esteve, I., E-mail: isabel.esteve@uab.cat [Departament de Genètica i Microbiologia, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Edifici C, Campus de UAB, Bellaterra (Cerdanyola del Vallès), 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departamento de Recursos Hidrobiológicos, Universidad de Nariño, Pasto (N) (Colombia); Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales(CSIC), Serrano 115 dpdo, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •We studied the tolerance-resistance of phototrophic microorganisms to copper and lead. •We determined the capacity of consortia of microorganisms to sequester copper and lead. •CLSM-λscan is a technique for evaluating in vivo effect of metals on microorganisms. •SEM-EDX and TEM-EDX determined the capacity of microorganisms to sequester metals. -- Abstract: The roles of consortia of phototrophic microorganisms have been investigated in this paper to determine their potential role to tolerate or resist metals and to capture them from polluted cultures. With this purpose, two consortia of microorganisms: on one hand, Geitlerinema sp. DE2011 (Ge) and Scenedesmus sp. DE2009 (Sc) (both identified in this paper by molecular biology methods) isolated from Ebro Delta microbial mats, and on the other, Spirulina sp. PCC 6313 (Sp) and Chroococcus sp. PCC 9106 (Ch), from Pasteur culture collection were polluted with copper and lead. In order to analyze the ability of these consortia to tolerate and capture metals, copper and lead were selected, because both have been detected in Ebro Delta microbial mats. The tolerance-resistance to copper and lead for both consortia was determined in vivo and at cellular level by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM-λscan function). The results obtained demonstrate that both consortia are highly tolerant-resistant to lead and that the limits between the copper concentration having cytotoxic effect and that having an essential effect are very close in these microorganisms. The capacity of both consortia to capture extra- and intracellular copper and lead was determined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) respectively, coupled to an Energy Dispersive X-ray detector (EDX). The results showed that all the microorganisms assayed were able to capture copper extracellularly in the extrapolymeric substances, and lead extra- and intracellularly in polyphosphate inclusions. Moreover

  5. Effect of copper and lead on two consortia of phototrophic microorganisms and their capacity to sequester metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgos, A.; Maldonado, J.; De los Rios, A.; Solé, A.; Esteve, I.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •We studied the tolerance-resistance of phototrophic microorganisms to copper and lead. •We determined the capacity of consortia of microorganisms to sequester copper and lead. •CLSM-λscan is a technique for evaluating in vivo effect of metals on microorganisms. •SEM-EDX and TEM-EDX determined the capacity of microorganisms to sequester metals. -- Abstract: The roles of consortia of phototrophic microorganisms have been investigated in this paper to determine their potential role to tolerate or resist metals and to capture them from polluted cultures. With this purpose, two consortia of microorganisms: on one hand, Geitlerinema sp. DE2011 (Ge) and Scenedesmus sp. DE2009 (Sc) (both identified in this paper by molecular biology methods) isolated from Ebro Delta microbial mats, and on the other, Spirulina sp. PCC 6313 (Sp) and Chroococcus sp. PCC 9106 (Ch), from Pasteur culture collection were polluted with copper and lead. In order to analyze the ability of these consortia to tolerate and capture metals, copper and lead were selected, because both have been detected in Ebro Delta microbial mats. The tolerance-resistance to copper and lead for both consortia was determined in vivo and at cellular level by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM-λscan function). The results obtained demonstrate that both consortia are highly tolerant-resistant to lead and that the limits between the copper concentration having cytotoxic effect and that having an essential effect are very close in these microorganisms. The capacity of both consortia to capture extra- and intracellular copper and lead was determined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) respectively, coupled to an Energy Dispersive X-ray detector (EDX). The results showed that all the microorganisms assayed were able to capture copper extracellularly in the extrapolymeric substances, and lead extra- and intracellularly in polyphosphate inclusions. Moreover

  6. Inactivation of Efflux Pumps Abolishes Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Malin; Hancock, Viktoria; Klemm, Per

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms cause numerous problems in health care and industry; notably, biofilms are associated with a large number of infections. Biofilm-dwelling bacteria are particularly resistant to antibiotics, making it hard to eradicate biofilm-associated infections. Bacteria rely on efflux pumps...... to get rid of toxic substances. We discovered that efflux pumps are highly active in bacterial biofilms, thus making efflux pumps attractive targets for antibiofilm measures. A number of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) are known. EPIs were shown to reduce biofilm formation, and in combination they could...... abolish biofilm formation completely. Also, EPIs were able to block the antibiotic tolerance of biofilms. The results of this feasibility study might pave the way for new treatments for biofilm-related infections and may be exploited for prevention of biofilms in general....

  7. The absence of N-acetylglucosamine in wall teichoic acids of Listeria monocytogenes modifies biofilm architecture and tolerance to rinsing and cleaning procedures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brauge

    Full Text Available The wall teichoic acid (WTA is the major carbohydrate found within the extracellular matrix of the Listeria monocytogenes biofilm. We first addressed the frequency of spontaneous mutations in two genes (lmo2549 and lmo2550 responsible for the GlcNAcylation in 93 serotype 1/2a strains that were mainly isolated from seafood industries. We studied the impact of mutations in lmo2549 or lmo2550 genes on biofilm formation by using one mutant carrying a natural mutation inactivating the lmo2550 gene (DSS 1130 BFA2 strain and two EGD-e mutants that lack respective genes by in-frame deletion of lmo2549 or lmo2550 using splicing-by-overlap-extension PCR, followed by allelic exchange mutagenesis. The lmo2550 gene mutation, occurring in around 50% isolates, caused a decrease in bacterial adhesion to stainless steel compared to wild-type EGD-e strain during the adhesion step. On the other hand, bacterial population weren't significantly different after 24h-biofilm formation. The biofilm architecture was different between the wild-type strain and the two mutants inactivated for lmo2549 or lmo2550 genes respectively with the presence of bacterial micro-colonies for mutants which were not observed in the wild-type EGD-e strain biofilm. These differences might account for the stronger hydrophilic surface exhibited by the mutant cells. Upon a water flow or to a cleaning procedure at a shear stress of 0.16 Pa, the mutant biofilms showed the higher detachment rate compared to wild-type strain. Meanwhile, an increase in the amount of residual viable but non-culturable population on stainless steel was recorded in two mutants. Our data suggests that the GlcNAc residue of WTA played a role in adhesion and biofilm formation of Listeria monocyctogenes.

  8. The absence of N-acetylglucosamine in wall teichoic acids of Listeria monocytogenes modifies biofilm architecture and tolerance to rinsing and cleaning procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauge, Thomas; Faille, Christine; Sadovskaya, Irina; Charbit, Alain; Benezech, Thierry; Shen, Yang; Loessner, Martin J; Bautista, Jean Romain; Midelet-Bourdin, Graziella

    2018-01-01

    The wall teichoic acid (WTA) is the major carbohydrate found within the extracellular matrix of the Listeria monocytogenes biofilm. We first addressed the frequency of spontaneous mutations in two genes (lmo2549 and lmo2550) responsible for the GlcNAcylation in 93 serotype 1/2a strains that were mainly isolated from seafood industries. We studied the impact of mutations in lmo2549 or lmo2550 genes on biofilm formation by using one mutant carrying a natural mutation inactivating the lmo2550 gene (DSS 1130 BFA2 strain) and two EGD-e mutants that lack respective genes by in-frame deletion of lmo2549 or lmo2550 using splicing-by-overlap-extension PCR, followed by allelic exchange mutagenesis. The lmo2550 gene mutation, occurring in around 50% isolates, caused a decrease in bacterial adhesion to stainless steel compared to wild-type EGD-e strain during the adhesion step. On the other hand, bacterial population weren't significantly different after 24h-biofilm formation. The biofilm architecture was different between the wild-type strain and the two mutants inactivated for lmo2549 or lmo2550 genes respectively with the presence of bacterial micro-colonies for mutants which were not observed in the wild-type EGD-e strain biofilm. These differences might account for the stronger hydrophilic surface exhibited by the mutant cells. Upon a water flow or to a cleaning procedure at a shear stress of 0.16 Pa, the mutant biofilms showed the higher detachment rate compared to wild-type strain. Meanwhile, an increase in the amount of residual viable but non-culturable population on stainless steel was recorded in two mutants. Our data suggests that the GlcNAc residue of WTA played a role in adhesion and biofilm formation of Listeria monocyctogenes.

  9. Strategies for combating bacterial biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hong; Moser, Claus Ernst; Wang, Heng-Zhuang

    2015-01-01

    Formation of biofilm is a survival strategy for bacteria and fungi to adapt to their living environment, especially in the hostile environment. Under the protection of biofilm, microbial cells in biofilm become tolerant and resistant to antibiotics and the immune responses, which increases the di.......International Journal of Oral Science advance online publication, 12 December 2014; doi:10.1038/ijos.2014.65....

  10. Weathering of a Roman Mosaic-A Biological and Quantitative Study on In Vitro Colonization of Calcareous Tesserae by Phototrophic Microorganisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addolorata Marasco

    Full Text Available The potential impact of cyanobacteria and microalgae on the weathering of calcareous tesserae from a Roman mosaic of the II Century CE has been followed through in vitro experiments. Laboratory tests were carried out by inoculating mosaic tiles with single strains of Cyanobacteria or Chlorophyta to evaluate the roles of pioneer phototrophic microrganism on the resulting architecture of biofilms. The interaction between tesserae and strains was assessed at the whole substratum and micrometer scales, by image analysis and Confocal Laser Scanning (CLS microscopy, respectively. The biofilm surface coverage on each tessera varied from 19% (Fischerella ambigua to 97% (Microcoleus autumnalis. Cyanobacteria showed a better growth on calcareous tesserae, whereas the only green alga attaining a superficial coverage higher than 50% was Coelastrella rubescens. CLS microscopy evidenced two different types of spatial arrangement of the phototrophic organisms on the tesserae, that were defined as compact or porous, respectively. In the first one was measured a reduced number of empty spaces between cells or filaments, whereas in the second type, a reticulate texture allowed the presence of numerous empty volumes. The colonization processes observed are an intrinsic characteristic of each strain. We have proposed a colonization index IC as a sensible tool to describe, in a quantitative way, the pioneering attitude of each photosynthetic microorganism to colonize lithic substrates under laboratory conditions.

  11. Effect of copper and lead on two consortia of phototrophic microorganisms and their capacity to sequester metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, A; Maldonado, J; De Los Rios, A; Solé, A; Esteve, I

    2013-09-15

    The roles of consortia of phototrophic microorganisms have been investigated in this paper to determine their potential role to tolerate or resist metals and to capture them from polluted cultures. With this purpose, two consortia of microorganisms: on one hand, Geitlerinema sp. DE2011 (Ge) and Scenedesmus sp. DE2009 (Sc) (both identified in this paper by molecular biology methods) isolated from Ebro Delta microbial mats, and on the other, Spirulina sp. PCC 6313 (Sp) and Chroococcus sp. PCC 9106 (Ch), from Pasteur culture collection were polluted with copper and lead. In order to analyze the ability of these consortia to tolerate and capture metals, copper and lead were selected, because both have been detected in Ebro Delta microbial mats. The tolerance-resistance to copper and lead for both consortia was determined in vivo and at cellular level by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM-λscan function). The results obtained demonstrate that both consortia are highly tolerant-resistant to lead and that the limits between the copper concentration having cytotoxic effect and that having an essential effect are very close in these microorganisms. The capacity of both consortia to capture extra- and intracellular copper and lead was determined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) respectively, coupled to an Energy Dispersive X-ray detector (EDX). The results showed that all the microorganisms assayed were able to capture copper extracellularly in the extrapolymeric substances, and lead extra- and intracellularly in polyphosphate inclusions. Moreover, the studied micro-organisms did not exert any inhibitory effect on each other's metal binding capacity. From the results obtained in this paper, it can be concluded that consortia of phototrophic microorganisms could play a very important role in biorepairing sediments polluted by metals, as a result of their ability to tolerate or resist high concentrations of metals and to

  12. Extracellular DNA as matrix component in microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria in nature primarily live in surface-associated communities commonly known as biofilms. Because bacteria in biofilms, in many cases, display tolerance to host immune systems, antibiotics, and biocides, they are often difficult or impossible to eradicate. Biofilm formation, therefore, leads...

  13. Carbon isotope fractionation by anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in euxinic Lake Cadagno

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole Rita Elisabeth; Bristow, L. A.; Cox, R. P.

    2017-01-01

    carbon (POC) in the Lake Cadagno chemocline. This large fractionation between the DIC and POC was also found in culture experiments carried out with anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria isolated from the lake. In the Lake Cadagno chemocline, anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria controlled the bulk C......Anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria utilize ancient metabolic pathways to link sulfur and iron metabolism to the reduction of CO2. In meromictic Lake Cadagno, Switzerland, both purple sulfur (PSB) and green sulfur anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (GSB) dominate the chemocline community and drive...

  14. Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus Ernst

    A still increasing interest and emphasis on the sessile bacterial lifestyle biofilms has been seen since it was realized that the vast majority of the total microbial biomass exists as biofilms. Aggregation of bacteria was first described by Leeuwenhoek in 1677, but only recently recognized...... as being important in chronic infection. In 1993 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) recognized that the biofilm mode of growth was relevant to microbiology. This book covers both the evidence for biofilms in many chronic bacterial infections as well as the problems facing these infections...... such as diagnostics, pathogenesis, treatment regimes and in vitro and in vivo models for studying biofilms. This is the first scientific book on biofilm infections, chapters written by the world leading scientist and clinicians. The intended audience of this book is scientists, teachers at university level as well...

  15. Quorum sensing inhibitors disable bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    It is now evident that bacteria assume the biofilm mode of growth during chronic infections. The important hallmarks of biofilm infections are development of local inflammations, extreme tolerance to the action of conventional antimicrobial agents and an almost infinite capacity to evade the host...... defence systems in particular innate immunity. In the biofilm mode, bacteria use cell to cell communication termed quorum-sensing (QS) to coordinate expression of virulence, tolerance towards a number of antimicrobial agents and shielding against the host defence system. Chemical biology approaches may...

  16. Biofilm Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade we have gained much knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in initiation and termination of biofilm formation. In many bacteria, these processes appear to occur in response to specific environmental cues and result in, respectively, induction or terminat......During the past decade we have gained much knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in initiation and termination of biofilm formation. In many bacteria, these processes appear to occur in response to specific environmental cues and result in, respectively, induction...... or termination of biofilm matrix production via the second messenger molecule c-di-GMP. In between initiation and termination of biofilm formation we have defined specific biofilm stages, but the currently available evidence suggests that these transitions are mainly governed by adaptive responses......, and not by specific genetic programs. It appears that biofilm formation can occur through multiple pathways and that the spatial structure of the biofilms is species dependent as well as dependent on environmental conditions. Bacterial subpopulations, e.g., motile and nonmotile subpopulations, can develop...

  17. Multitask Imidazolium Salt Additives for Innovative Poly(l-lactide) Biomaterials: Morphology Control, Candida spp. Biofilm Inhibition, Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biocompatibility, and Skin Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrekker, Clarissa M L; Sokolovicz, Yuri C A; Raucci, Maria G; Selukar, Balaji S; Klitzke, Joice S; Lopes, William; Leal, Claudio A M; de Souza, Igor O P; Galland, Griselda B; Dos Santos, João Henrique Z; Mauler, Raquel S; Kol, Moshe; Dagorne, Samuel; Ambrosio, Luigi; Teixeira, Mário L; Morais, Jonder; Landers, Richard; Fuentefria, Alexandre M; Schrekker, Henri S

    2016-08-24

    Candida species have great ability to colonize and form biofilms on medical devices, causing infections in human hosts. In this study, poly(l-lactide) films with different imidazolium salt (1-n-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C16MImCl) and 1-n-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium methanesulfonate (C16MImMeS)) contents were prepared, using the solvent casting process. Poly(l-lactide)-imidazolium salt films were obtained with different surface morphologies (spherical and directional), and the presence of the imidazolium salt in the surface was confirmed. These films with different concentrations of the imidazolium salts C16MImCl and C16MImMeS presented antibiofilm activity against isolates of Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida albicans. The minor antibiofilm concentration assay enabled one to determine that an increasing imidazolium salt content promoted, in general, an increase in the inhibition percentage of biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs confirmed the effective prevention of biofilm formation on the imidazolium salt containing biomaterials. Lower concentrations of the imidazolium salts showed no cytotoxicity, and the poly(l-lactide)-imidazolium salt films presented good cell adhesion and proliferation percentages with human mesenchymal stem cells. Furthermore, no acute microscopic lesions were identified in the histopathological evaluation after contact between the films and pig ear skin. In combination with the good morphological, physicochemical, and mechanical properties, these poly(l-lactide)-based materials with imidazolium salt additives can be considered as promising biomaterials for use in the manufacturing of medical devices.

  18. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Mancl, Kimberly A.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque,are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible, thus biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well-elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relati...

  19. Phototrophic biofilms on the interior walls of concrete Iterson-type cooling towers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hauer, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 6 (2010), s. 733-736 ISSN 0921-8971 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/08/0318 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : cyanobacteria * algae * cooling towers Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.792, year: 2010

  20. The Composition and Metabolic Phenotype of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Apicella

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available N. gonorrhoeae has been shown to form biofilms during cervical infection. Thus, biofilm formation may play an important role in the infection of women. The ability of N. gonorrhoeae to form membrane blebs is crucial to biofilm formation. Blebs contain DNA and outer membrane structures, which have been shown to be major constituents of the biofilm matrix. The organism expresses a DNA thermonuclease that is involved in remodeling of the biofilm matrix. Comparison of the transcriptional profiles of gonococcal biofilms and planktonic runoff indicate that genes involved in anaerobic metabolism and oxidative stress tolerance are more highly expressed in biofilm. The expression of aniA, ccp, and norB, which encode nitrite reductase, cytochrome c peroxidase, and nitric oxide reductase respectively, is required for mature biofilm formation over glass and human cervical cells. In addition, anaerobic respiration occurs in the substratum of gonococcal biofilms and disruption of the norB gene required for anaerobic respiration, results in a severe biofilm attenuation phenotype. It has been demonstrated that accumulation of nitric oxide (NO contributes to the phenotype of a norB mutant and can retard biofilm formation. However, NO can also enhance biofilm formation, and this is largely dependent on the concentration and donation rate or steady state kinetics of NO. The majority of the genes involved in gonococcal oxidative stress tolerance are also required for normal biofilm formation, as mutations in the following genes result in attenuated biofilm formation over cervical cells and/or glass: oxyR, gor, prx, mntABC, trxB, and estD. Overall, biofilm formation appears to be an adaptation for coping with the environmental stresses present in the female genitourinary tract. Therefore, this review will discuss the studies, which describe the composition and metabolic phenotype of gonococcal biofilms.

  1. Divergent mitochondrial respiratory chains in phototrophic relatives of apicomplexan parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Flegontov, Pavel

    2015-02-06

    Four respiratory complexes and ATP-synthase represent central functional units in mitochondria. In some mitochondria and derived anaerobic organelles, a few or all of these respiratory complexes have been lost during evolution. We show that the respiratory chain of Chromera velia, a phototrophic relative of parasitic apicomplexans, lacks complexes I and III, making it a uniquely reduced aerobic mitochondrion. In Chromera, putative lactate:cytochrome c oxidoreductases are predicted to transfer electrons from lactate to cytochrome c, rendering complex III unnecessary. The mitochondrial genome of Chromera has the smallest known protein-coding capacity of all mitochondria, encoding just cox1 and cox3 on heterogeneous linear molecules. In contrast, another photosynthetic relative of apicomplexans, Vitrella brassicaformis, retains the same set of genes as apicomplexans and dinoflagellates (cox1, cox3, and cob). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  2. Divergent mitochondrial respiratory chains in phototrophic relatives of apicomplexan parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Flegontov, Pavel; Michá lek, Jan; Janouškovec, Jan; Lai, De Hua; Jirků, Milan; Hajdušková , Eva; Tomčala, Aleš; Otto, Thomas D.; Keeling, Patrick J.; Pain, Arnab; Oborní k, Miroslav; Lukeš, J.

    2015-01-01

    Four respiratory complexes and ATP-synthase represent central functional units in mitochondria. In some mitochondria and derived anaerobic organelles, a few or all of these respiratory complexes have been lost during evolution. We show that the respiratory chain of Chromera velia, a phototrophic relative of parasitic apicomplexans, lacks complexes I and III, making it a uniquely reduced aerobic mitochondrion. In Chromera, putative lactate:cytochrome c oxidoreductases are predicted to transfer electrons from lactate to cytochrome c, rendering complex III unnecessary. The mitochondrial genome of Chromera has the smallest known protein-coding capacity of all mitochondria, encoding just cox1 and cox3 on heterogeneous linear molecules. In contrast, another photosynthetic relative of apicomplexans, Vitrella brassicaformis, retains the same set of genes as apicomplexans and dinoflagellates (cox1, cox3, and cob). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. The evolution of glutathione metabolism in phototrophic microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, R. C.; Buschbacher, R. M.; Newton, G. L.

    1987-01-01

    Of the many roles ascribed to glutathione (GSH) the one most clearly established is its role in the protection of higher eucaryotes against oxygen toxicity through destruction of thiol-reactive oxygen byproducts. If this is the primary function of GSH then GSH metabolism should have evolved during or after the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. That many bacteria do not produce GSH is consistent with this view. In the present study we have examined the low-molecular-weight thiol composition of a variety of phototrophic microorganisms to ascertain how evolution of GSH production is related to evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cells were extracted in the presence of monobromobimane (mBBr) to convert thiols to fluorescent derivatives, which were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Significant levels of GSH were not found in the green bacteria (Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum and Chloroflexus aurantiacus). Substantial levels of GSH were present in the purple bacteria (Chromatium vinosum, Rhodospirillum rubrum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and Rhodocyclus gelatinosa), the cyanobacteria [Anacystis nidulans, Microcoleus chthonoplastes S.G., Nostoc muscorum, Oscillatoria amphigranulata, Oscillatoria limnetica, Oscillatoria sp. (Stinky Spring, Utah), Oscillatoria terebriformis, Plectonema boryanum, and Synechococcus lividus], and eucaryotic algae (Chlorella pyrenoidsa, Chlorella vulgaris, Euglena gracilis, Scenedesmus obliquus, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii). Other thiols measured included cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine, thiosulfate, coenzyme A, and sulfide; several unidentified thiols were also detected. Many of the organisms examined also exhibited a marked ability to reduce mBBr to syn-(methyl,methyl)bimane, an ability that was quenched by treatment with 2-pyridyl disulfide or 5,5'-bisdithio-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) prior to reaction with mBBr. These observations indicate the presence of a reducing system capable of electron transfer to mBBr and reduction of

  4. Interactions between soil phototrophs and vascular plants in Himalayan cold deserts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řeháková, Klára; Čapková, Kateřina; Dvorský, M.; Kopecký, M.; Altman, J.; Šmilauer, P.; Doležal, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 115, Dec (2017), s. 568-578 ISSN 0038-0717 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : cold desert * Himalaya * interactions * soil phototrophs Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 4.857, year: 2016

  5. Energy positive domestic wastewater treatment: the roles of anaerobic and phototrophic technologies

    KAUST Repository

    Shoener, B. D.; Bradley, I. M.; Cusick, R. D.; Guest, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    The negative energy balance of wastewater treatment could be reversed if anaerobic technologies were implemented for organic carbon oxidation and phototrophic technologies were utilized for nutrient recovery. To characterize the potential for energy

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is due to biofilm-growing mucoid (alginate-producing) strains. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria, embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein...... and DNA. In CF lungs, the polysaccharide alginate is the major part of the P. aeruginosa biofilm matrix. Bacterial biofilms cause chronic infections because they show increased tolerance to antibiotics and resist phagocytosis, as well as other components of the innate and the adaptive immune system....... As a consequence, a pronounced antibody response develops, leading to immune complex-mediated chronic inflammation, dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The chronic inflammation is the major cause of the lung tissue damage in CF. Biofilm growth in CF lungs is associated with an increased frequency...

  7. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Phuc T.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Atci, Erhan; Reardon, Patrick N.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, James K.; Call, Douglas R.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located ne...

  8. Two-stage heterotrophic and phototrophic culture strategy for algal biomass and lipid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yubin; Chi, Zhanyou; Lucker, Ben; Chen, Shulin

    2012-01-01

    A two-stage heterotrophic and phototrophic culture strategy for algal biomass and lipid production was studied, wherein high density heterotrophic cultures of Chlorellasorokiniana serve as seed for subsequent phototrophic growth. The data showed growth rate, cell density and productivity of heterotrophic C.sorokiniana were 3.0, 3.3 and 7.4 times higher than phototrophic counterpart, respectively. Hetero- and phototrophic algal seeds had similar biomass/lipid production and fatty acid profile when inoculated into phototrophic culture system. To expand the application, food waste and wastewater were tested as feedstock for heterotrophic growth, and supported cell growth successfully. These results demonstrated the advantages of using heterotrophic algae cells as seeds for open algae culture system. Additionally, high inoculation rate of heterotrophic algal seed can be utilized as an effective method for contamination control. This two-stage heterotrophic phototrophic process is promising to provide a more efficient way for large scale production of algal biomass and biofuels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Strategies for prevention and treatment of staphylococcal biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Rikke Louise

    Biofilm formation by bacteria that colonize biomedical implants cause infections that cannot be eradicated by antibiotic therapy. Bacteria in biofilms are tolerant to every antibiotic known today, and this tolerance is partly due to their low metabolic activity, the occurrence of persister cells...... in biofilms. Innovative biomaterials may at best delay biofilm formation and an important question in this context is to understand how the material can contribute to more successful antibiotic treatment by not providing the cues that trigger the onset of antibiotic tolerance in the attached bacteria...... treatments that more effectively tackle biofilm infections. We have explored how the combination of antibiotic therapy with matrix-targeting enzymes can enhance the efficacy of antibiotics. The matrix composition is highly variable among different bacterial species, and this strategy will not produce a one...

  10. Cyanobacteria, algae and microfungi present in biofilm from Božana Cave (Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slađana Popović

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Phototrophic microorganisms (cyanobacteria and algae and microfungi, were identified from biofilm on the walls of the entrance of BožanaCavein west Serbia. Temperature, relative humidity and light intensity were measured, and chlorophyll a content determined. Light intensity differed from the entrance inwards. However, Chl a content was not proportional to light intensity, instead it was positively correlated to biofilm weight. Biofilm samples from two sites were also observed using a scanning electron microscope. Coccoid forms of cyanobacteria were abundant at the sampling site with the lowest light intensity, while members of the order Nostocales were predominant at the sampling site with the highest light intensity measured. Cyanobacteria were the dominant group of phototrophs colonizing cave walls (29 taxa, with the order Chroococcales prevailing (21 taxa. The most frequently documented cyanobacteria were species from genera Gloeocapsa, Scytonema, Aphanocapsa and Chroococcus. Desmococcus olivaceus and Trentepohlia aurea were the only green algae documented on cave walls. Ascomycetes were common (e.g. Alternaria, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Epicoccum, Penicillum and Trichoderma, while zygomycetes and oomycetes were less frequent. The different color of each biofilm sample was ascribed to the presence of various different species of cyanobacteria and algae.

  11. Extracellular DNA as matrix component in microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria in nature primarily live in surface-associated communities commonly known as biofilms. Because bacteria in biofilms, in many cases, display tolerance to host immune systems, antibiotics, and biocides, they are often difficult or impossible to eradicate. Biofilm formation, therefore, leads...... to various persistent infections in humans and animals, and to a variety of complications in industry, where solid–water interfaces occur. Knowledge about the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation is necessary for creating strategies to control biofilms. Recent studies have shown...... that extracellular DNA is an important component of the extracellular matrix of microbial biofilms. The present chapter is focussed on extracellular DNA as matrix component in biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa as an example from the Gram-negative bacteria, and Streptococcus and Staphylococcus as examples...

  12. Hydraulic resistance of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.; Paulitsch-Fuchs, Astrid H.; Zwijnenburg, Arie; Kruithof, Joop C.; Flemming, Hans Curt

    2013-01-01

    resistance is very low compared to the expected biofilm resistance and, thus, biofilm resistance can be determined accurately. Transmembrane pressure drop was monitored. As biofilm parameters, thickness, total cell number, TOC, and extracellular polymeric

  13. The protective layer of biofilm : A repellent function for a new class of amphiphilic proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovacs, Akos T.; van Gestel, Jordi; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    Bacteria can survive harsh conditions when growing in complex communities of cells known as biofilms. The matrix of the biofilm presents a scaffold where cells are attached to each other and to the surface. The biofilm matrix is also a protective barrier that confers tolerance against various

  14. Stress relaxation analysis facilitates a quantitative approach towards antimicrobial penetration into biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Yan; Peterson, Brandon W; Jongsma, Marije A; Ren, Yijin; Sharma, Prashant K; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm-related infections can develop everywhere in the human body and are rarely cleared by the host immune system. Moreover, biofilms are often tolerant to antimicrobials, due to a combination of inherent properties of bacteria in their adhering, biofilm mode of growth and poor physical

  15. Fungal Biofilms: In Vivo Models for Discovery of Anti-Biofilm Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nett, Jeniel E; Andes, David R

    2015-06-01

    During infection, fungi frequently transition to a biofilm lifestyle, proliferating as communities of surface-adherent aggregates of cells. Phenotypically, cells in a biofilm are distinct from free-floating cells. Their high tolerance of antifungals and ability to withstand host defenses are two characteristics that foster resilience. Biofilm infections are particularly difficult to eradicate, and most available antifungals have minimal activity. Therefore, the discovery of novel compounds and innovative strategies to treat fungal biofilms is of great interest. Although many fungi have been observed to form biofilms, the most well-studied is Candida albicans. Animal models have been developed to simulate common Candida device-associated infections, including those involving vascular catheters, dentures, urinary catheters, and subcutaneous implants. Models have also reproduced the most common mucosal biofilm infections: oropharyngeal and vaginal candidiasis. These models incorporate the anatomical site, immune components, and fluid dynamics of clinical niches and have been instrumental in the study of drug resistance and investigation of novel therapies. This chapter describes the significance of fungal biofilm infections, the animal models developed for biofilm study, and how these models have contributed to the development of new strategies for the eradication of fungal biofilm infections.

  16. Metagenomic Sequencing of Marine Periphyton: Taxonomic and Functional Insights into Biofilm Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal eSanli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Periphyton communities are complex phototrophic, multispecies biofilms that develop on surfaces in aquatic environments. These communities harbor a large diversity of organisms comprising viruses, bacteria, algae, fungi, protozoans and metazoans. However, thus far the total biodiversity of periphyton has not been described. In this study, we use metagenomics to characterize periphyton communities from the marine environment of the Swedish west coast. Although we found approximately ten times more eukaryotic rRNA marker gene sequences compared to prokaryotic, the whole metagenome-based similarity searches showed that bacteria constitute the most abundant phyla in these biofilms. We show that marine periphyton encompass a range of heterotrophic and phototrophic organisms. Heterotrophic bacteria, including the majority of proteobacterial clades and Bacteroidetes, and eukaryotic macro-invertebrates were found to dominate periphyton. The phototrophic groups comprise Cyanobacteria and the alpha-proteobacterial genus Roseobacter, followed by different micro- and macro-algae. We also assess the metabolic pathways that predispose these communities to an attached lifestyle. Functional indicators of the biofilm form of life in periphyton involve genes coding for enzymes that catalyze the production and degradation of extracellular polymeric substances, mainly in the form of complex sugars such as starch and glycogen-like meshes together with chitin. Genes for 278 different transporter proteins were detected in the metagenome, constituting the most abundant protein complexes. Finally, genes encoding enzymes that participate in anaerobic pathways, such as denitrification and methanogenesis, were detected suggesting the presence of anaerobic or low-oxygen micro-zones within the biofilms.

  17. Biogeography of thermophilic phototrophic bacteria belonging to Roseiflexus genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisin, Vasil A; Grouzdev, Denis S; Namsaraev, Zorigto B; Sukhacheva, Marina V; Gorlenko, Vladimir M; Kuznetsov, Boris B

    2016-03-01

    Isolated environments such as hot springs are particularly interesting for studying the microbial biogeography. These environments create an 'island effect' leading to genetic divergence. We studied the phylogeographic pattern of thermophilic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria, belonging to the Roseiflexus genus. The main characteristic of the observed pattern was geographic and geochronologic fidelity to the hot springs within Circum-Pacific and Alpine-Himalayan-Indonesian orogenic belts. Mantel test revealed a correlation between genetic divergence and geographic distance among the phylotypes. Cluster analysis revealed a regional differentiation of the global phylogenetic pattern. The phylogeographic pattern is in correlation with geochronologic events during the break up of Pangaea that led to the modern configuration of continents. To our knowledge this is the first geochronological scenario of intercontinental prokaryotic taxon divergence. The existence of the modern phylogeographic pattern contradicts with the existence of the ancient evolutionary history of the Roseiflexus group proposed on the basis of its deep-branching phylogenetic position. These facts indicate that evolutionary rates in Roseiflexus varied over a wide range. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic phototrophs: A spotlight on algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohr M.; Schwender J.; Polle, J. E. W.

    2012-04-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest groups of natural compounds and have a variety of important functions in the primary metabolism of land plants and algae. In recent years, our understanding of the numerous facets of isoprenoid metabolism in land plants has been rapidly increasing, while knowledge on the metabolic network of isoprenoids in algae still lags behind. Here, current views on the biochemistry and genetics of the core isoprenoid metabolism in land plants and in the major algal phyla are compared and some of the most pressing open questions are highlighted. Based on the different evolutionary histories of the various groups of eukaryotic phototrophs, we discuss the distribution and regulation of the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in land plants and algae and the potential consequences of the loss of the MVA pathway in groups such as the green algae. For the prenyltransferases, serving as gatekeepers to the various branches of terpenoid biosynthesis in land plants and algae, we explore the minimal inventory necessary for the formation of primary isoprenoids and present a preliminary analysis of their occurrence and phylogeny in algae with primary and secondary plastids. The review concludes with some perspectives on genetic engineering of the isoprenoid metabolism in algae.

  19. The anaerobic phototrophic metabolism of 3-chlorobenzoate by Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal, V S

    1992-10-09

    The degradation of chlorinated aromatic compounds by anaerobic bacteria is now known to be an important mechanism of bioremediation. In an experimental study, a mixed phototrophic culture was found to metabolize 3-chlorobenzoate in the presence of benzoate following adaptation on a benzoate and 3-chlorobenzoate medium for 7 weeks. The dominant bacterial isolate was identified as Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Radioisotopic studies showed [sup 14]C-3-chlorobenzoate was converted by the isolate to [sup 14]CO[sub 2] and cell biomass in the absence of oxygen and in the presence of a cosubstrate red light. Cyclohexane carboxylate was able to replace the cosubstrate, benzoate. The isolate also metabolized 3-chlorobenzoate in the presence of pimelic acid, sodium acetate, and sodium succinate; however, the metabolic rate was reduced. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry and high pressure liquid chromatography indicated the intracellular presence of 3-chlorobenzoate and benzoyl-CoA. Cell-free extracts produced benzoate and benzoyl-CoA. A probable route of 3-chlorobenzoate metabolism via dehalogenation followed by steps similar to the benzoate reductive ring fission pathway is suggested. Comparison of kinetic coefficients showed a higher affinity of the isolate for benzoate. Isolates from representative samples of various freshwater and wastewater ecosystems indicated widespread ecological distribution of R. palustris and the common occurrence of the 3-chlorobenzoate metabolic phenotype. R. palustris was found to grow in mixed anaerobic cultures and retained its 3-chlorobenzoate degradation property. 91 refs., 25 figs., 14 tabs.

  20. Flow cytometry combined with viSNE for the analysis of microbial biofilms and detection of microplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgier, Linn; Freimann, Remo; Zupanic, Anze; Kroll, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms serve essential ecosystem functions and are used in different technical applications. Studies from stream ecology and waste-water treatment have shown that biofilm functionality depends to a great extent on community structure. Here we present a fast and easy-to-use method for individual cell-based analysis of stream biofilms, based on stain-free flow cytometry and visualization of the high-dimensional data by viSNE. The method allows the combined assessment of community structure, decay of phototrophic organisms and presence of abiotic particles. In laboratory experiments, it allows quantification of cellular decay and detection of survival of larger cells after temperature stress, while in the field it enables detection of community structure changes that correlate with known environmental drivers (flow conditions, dissolved organic carbon, calcium) and detection of microplastic contamination. The method can potentially be applied to other biofilm types, for example, for inferring community structure for environmental and industrial research and monitoring. PMID:27188265

  1. Competition for inorganic carbon between oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs in a hypersaline microbial mat, Guerrero Negro, Mexico

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finke, Niko; Hoehler, Tori M.; Polerecky, Lubos

    2013-01-01

    While most oxygenic phototrophs harvest light only in the visible range (400-700 nm, VIS), anoxygenic phototrophs can harvest near infrared light (> 700 nm, NIR). To study interactions between the photosynthetic guilds we used microsensors to measure oxygen and gross oxygenic photosynthesis (gOP)...

  2. The in vivo biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria can grow and proliferate either as single, independent cells or organized in aggregates commonly referred to as biofilms. When bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often becomes very resistant to treatment and can develop into a chronic state. Biofilms...... have been studied for decades using various in vitro models, but it remains debatable whether such in vitro biofilms actually resemble in vivo biofilms in chronic infections. In vivo biofilms share several structural characteristics that differ from most in vitro biofilms. Additionally, the in vivo...... experimental time span and presence of host defenses differ from chronic infections and the chemical microenvironment of both in vivo and in vitro biofilms is seldom taken into account. In this review, we discuss why the current in vitro models of biofilms might be limited for describing infectious biofilms...

  3. Control of Biofilms with the Fatty Acid Signaling Molecule cis-2-Decenoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia N. H. Marques

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms in organized structures attached to surfaces. Importantly, biofilms are a major cause of bacterial infections in humans, and remain one of the most significant challenges to modern medical practice. Unfortunately, conventional therapies have shown to be inadequate in the treatment of most chronic biofilm infections based on the extraordinary innate tolerance of biofilms to antibiotics. Antagonists of quorum sensing signaling molecules have been used as means to control biofilms. QS and other cell-cell communication molecules are able to revert biofilm tolerance, prevent biofilm formation and disrupt fully developed biofilms, albeit with restricted effectiveness. Recently however, it has been demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a small messenger molecule cis-2-decenoic acid (cis-DA that shows significant promise as an effective adjunctive to antimicrobial treatment of biofilms. This molecule is responsible for induction of the native biofilm dispersion response in a range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and in yeast, and has been shown to reverse persistence, increase microbial metabolic activity and significantly enhance the cidal effects of conventional antimicrobial agents. In this manuscript, the use of cis-2-decenoic acid as a novel agent for biofilm control is discussed. Stimulating the biofilm dispersion response as a novel antimicrobial strategy holds significant promise for enhanced treatment of infections and in the prevention of biofilm formation.

  4. Biofilm mediated decontamination of pollutants from the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Mitra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we highlight beneficial use of microbial biofilms in remediation of environmental pollutants by bioremediation. Bioremediation is an environment friendly, cost effective, sustainable technology that utilizes microbes to decontaminate and degrade a wide variety of pollutants into less harmful products. Relative to free-floating planktonic cells, microbes existing in biofilm mode are advantageous for bioremediation because of greater tolerance to pollutants, environmental stress and ability to degrade varied harsh pollutants via diverse catabolic pathways. In biofilm mode, microbes are immobilized in a self-synthesized matrix which offers protection from stress, contaminants and predatory protozoa. Contaminants ranging from heavy metals, petroleum, explosives, pesticides have been remediated using microbial consortia of biofilms. In the industry, biofilm based bioremediation is used to decontaminate polluted soil and groundwater. Here we discuss conventional and newer strategies utilizing biofilms in environmental remediation.

  5. High bacterial diversity in epilithic biofilms of oligotrophic mountain lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartrons, Mireia; Catalan, Jordi; Casamayor, Emilio O

    2012-11-01

    Benthic microbial biofilms attached to rocks (epilithic) are major sites of carbon cycling and can dominate ecosystem primary production in oligotrophic lakes. We studied the bacterial community composition of littoral epilithic biofilms in five connected oligotrophic high mountain lakes located at different altitudes by genetic fingerprinting and clone libraries of the 16S rRNA gene. Different intra-lake samples were analyzed, and consistent changes in community structure (chlorophyll a and organic matter contents, and bacterial community composition) were observed along the altitudinal gradient, particularly related with the location of the lake above or below the treeline. Epilithic biofilm genetic fingerprints were both more diverse among lakes than within lakes and significantly different between montane (below the tree line) and alpine lakes (above the tree line). The genetic richness in the epilithic biofilm was much higher than in the plankton of the same lacustrine area studied in previous works, with significantly idiosyncratic phylogenetic composition (specifically distinct from lake plankton or mountain soils). Data suggest the coexistence of aerobic, anaerobic, phototrophic, and chemotrophic microorganisms in the biofilm, Bacteroidetes and Cyanobacteria being the most important bacterial taxa, followed by Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, and Deltaproteobacteria, Chlorobi, Planctomycetes, and Verrucomicrobia. The degree of novelty was especially high for epilithic Bacteroidetes, and up to 50 % of the sequences formed monophyletic clusters distantly related to any previously reported sequence. More than 35 % of the total sequences matched at <95 % identity to any previously reported 16S rRNA gene, indicating that alpine epilithic biofilms are unexplored habitats that contain a substantial degree of novelty within a short geographical distance. Further research is needed to determine whether these communities are involved in more biogeochemical pathways than

  6. Biophysics of biofilm infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Philip S

    2014-04-01

    This article examines a likely basis of the tenacity of biofilm infections that has received relatively little attention: the resistance of biofilms to mechanical clearance. One way that a biofilm infection persists is by withstanding the flow of fluid or other mechanical forces that work to wash or sweep microorganisms out of the body. The fundamental criterion for mechanical persistence is that the biofilm failure strength exceeds the external applied stress. Mechanical failure of the biofilm and release of planktonic microbial cells is also important in vivo because it can result in dissemination of infection. The fundamental criterion for detachment and dissemination is that the applied stress exceeds the biofilm failure strength. The apparent contradiction for a biofilm to both persist and disseminate is resolved by recognizing that biofilm material properties are inherently heterogeneous. There are also mechanical aspects to the ways that infectious biofilms evade leukocyte phagocytosis. The possibility of alternative therapies for treating biofilm infections that work by reducing biofilm cohesion could (1) allow prevailing hydrodynamic shear to remove biofilm, (2) increase the efficacy of designed interventions for removing biofilms, (3) enable phagocytic engulfment of softened biofilm aggregates, and (4) improve phagocyte mobility and access to biofilm. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Implications of Biofilm Formation on Urological Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadieux, Peter A.; Wignall, Geoffrey R.; Carriveau, Rupp; Denstedt, John D.

    2008-09-01

    Despite millions of dollars and several decades of research targeted at their prevention and eradication, biofilm-associated infections remain the major cause of urological device failure. Numerous strategies have been aimed at improving device design, biomaterial composition, surface properties and drug delivery, but have been largely circumvented by microbes and their plethora of attachment, host evasion, antimicrobial resistance, and dissemination strategies. This is not entirely surprising since natural biofilm formation has been going on for millions of years and remains a major part of microorganism survival and evolution. Thus, the fact that biofilms develop on and in the biomaterials and tissues of humans is really an extension of this natural tendency and greatly explains why they are so difficult for us to combat. Firstly, biofilm structure and composition inherently provide a protective environment for microorganisms, shielding them from the shear stress of urine flow, immune cell attack and some antimicrobials. Secondly, many biofilm organisms enter a metabolically dormant state that renders them tolerant to those antibiotics and host factors able to penetrate the biofilm matrix. Lastly, the majority of organisms that cause biofilm-associated urinary tract infections originate from our own oral cavity, skin, gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts and therefore have already adapted to many of our host defenses. Ultimately, while biofilms continue to hold an advantage with respect to recurrent infections and biomaterial usage within the urinary tract, significant progress has been made in understanding these dynamic microbial communities and novel approaches offer promise for their prevention and eradication. These include novel device designs, antimicrobials, anti-adhesive coatings, biodegradable polymers and biofilm-disrupting compounds and therapies.

  8. OligoG CF-5/20 disruption of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm in a murine lung infection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Hengzhuang; Song, Zhijun; Ciofu, Oana

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm growth is a universal survival strategy for bacteria, providing an effective and resilient approach for survival in an otherwise hostile environment. In the context of an infection, a biofilm provides resistance and tolerance to host immune defenses and antibiotics, allowing the biofilm p...

  9. Biofilm Fixed Film Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipesh Das

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The work reviewed here was published between 2008 and 2010 and describes research that involved aerobic and anoxic biofilm treatment of water pollutants. Biofilm denitrification systems are covered when appropriate. References catalogued here are divided on the basis of fundamental research area or reactor types. Fundamental research into biofilms is presented in two sections, Biofilm Measurement and Characterization and Growth and Modeling. The reactor types covered are: trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, fluidized bed bioreactors, submerged bed biofilm reactors, biological granular activated carbon, membrane bioreactors, and immobilized cell reactors. Innovative reactors, not easily classified, are then presented, followed by a section on biofilms on sand, soil and sediment.

  10. Distribution of phototrophic populations and primary production in a microbial mat from the Ebro Delta, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Alonso, Maira; Mir, Joan; Caumette, Pierre; Gaju, Núria; Guerrero, Ricardo; Esteve, Isabel

    2004-03-01

    Microbial mats arising in the sand flats of the Ebro Delta (Tarragona, Spain) were investigated during the summer season, when the community was highly developed. These mats are composed of three pigmented layers of phototrophic organisms, an upper brown layer mainly composed of Lyngbya aestuarii and diatoms, an intermediate green layer of the cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes, and an underlying pink layer of a so-far unidentified purple sulfur bacterium. In the photic zone, oxygenic phototrophs constitute about 58% of total photosynthetic biomass, measured as biovolume, and anoxygenic phototrophs represent 42%. Diatoms constitute 11.8% of the oxygenic biomass, M. chthonoplastes 61.2%, and L. aestuarii and coccoid cyanobacteria 20.6 and 6.4%, respectively. In this laminated community, organic matter has an autochthonous origin, and photosynthesis is the most important source of organic carbon. Oxygen production reaches up to 27.2 mmol O(2) m(-2) h(-1), measured at 1000 microE m(-2) s(-1) light intensity, whereas oxidation of sulfide in the light has been calculated to be 18.6 mmol S m(-2) h(-1). This amount represents 26% of the total photosynthetic production in terms of photoassimilated carbon, demonstrating the important role of anoxygenic phototrophs as primary producers in the pink layer of Ebro Delta microbial mats.

  11. Phaeobacterium nitratireducens gen. nov., sp. nov., a phototrophic gammaproteobacterium isolated from a mangrove forest sediment sample

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nupur, P.; Srinivas, T.N.R.; Takaichi, S.; AnilKumar, P.

    A novel brown-coloured, Gram-negative-staining, rod-shaped, motile, phototrophic, purple sulfur bacterium, designated strain AK40T , was isolated in pure culture from a sediment sample collected from Coringa mangrove forest, India. Strain...

  12. COMPETITION BETWEEN ANOXYGENIC PHOTOTROPHIC BACTERIA AND COLORLESS SULFUR BACTERIA IN A MICROBIAL MAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VISSCHER, PT; VANDENENDE, FP; SCHAUB, BEM; VANGEMERDEN, H

    The populations of chemolithoautotrophic (colorless) sulfur bacteria and anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria were enumerated in a marine microbial mat. The highest population densities were found in the 0-5 mm layer of the mat: 2.0 X 10(9) cells CM-3 sediment, and 4.0 X 10(7) cells cm-3 sediment for

  13. Phototrophic Fe(II-oxidation in the chemocline of a ferruginous meromictic lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Alexis eWalter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Precambrian Banded Iron Formation (BIF deposition was conventionally attributed to the precipitation of iron-oxides resulting from the abiotic reaction of ferrous iron (Fe(II with photosynthetically-produced oxygen. Earliest traces of oxygen date from 2.7 Ga, thus raising questions as to what may have caused BIF precipitation before oxygenic photosynthesis evolved. The discovery of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria thriving through the oxidation of Fe(II has provided support for a biological origin for some BIFs, but despite reports suggesting that anoxygenic phototrophs may oxidize Fe(II in the environment, a model ecosystem of an ancient ocean where they are demonstrably active was lacking. Here we show that anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria contribute to Fe(II oxidation in the water column of the ferruginous sulfate-poor, meromictic lake La Cruz (Spain. We observed in-situ photoferrotrophic activity through stimulation of phototrophic carbon uptake in the presence of Fe(II, and determined light-dependent Fe(II-oxidation by the natural chemocline microbiota. Moreover, a photoferrotrophic bacterium most closely related to Chlorobium ferrooxidans was enriched from the ferruginous water column. Our study for the first time demonstrates a direct link between anoxygenic photoferrotrophy and the anoxic precipitation of Fe(III-oxides in a ferruginous water column, providing a plausible mechanism for the bacterial origin of BIF’s before the advent of free oxygen.

  14. High turnover rates of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs in European freshwater lakes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cepáková, Zuzana; Hrouzek, Pavel; Žišková, Eva; Nuyanzina-Boldareva, Ekaterina; Šorf, M.; Kozlíková-Zapomělová, Eliška; Salka, I.; Grossart, H. P.; Koblížek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 12 (2016), s. 5063-5071 ISSN 1462-2912 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416; GA ČR GA13-11281S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic bacteria * bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) * AAP bacteria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.395, year: 2016

  15. Genomic analysis reveals key aspects of prokaryotic symbiosis in the phototrophic consortium "Chlorochromatium aggregatum"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhenfeng; Müller, Johannes; Li, Tao

    2013-01-01

    'Chlorochromatium aggregatum' is a phototrophic consortium, a symbiosis that may represent the highest degree of mutual interdependence between two unrelated bacteria not associated with a eukaryotic host. 'Chlorochromatium aggregatum' is a motile, barrel-shaped aggregate formed from a single cell...

  16. Paired methods to measure biofilm killing and removal: a case study with Penicillin G treatment of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausbacher, D; Lorenz, L; Pitts, B; Stewart, P S; Goeres, D M

    2018-03-01

    Biofilms are microbial aggregates that show high tolerance to antibiotic treatments in vitro and in vivo. Killing and removal are both important in biofilm control, therefore methods that measure these two mechanisms were evaluated in a parallel experimental design. Kill was measured using the single tube method (ASTM method E2871) and removal was determined by video microscopy and image analysis using a new treatment flow cell. The advantage of the parallel test design is that both methods used biofilm covered coupons harvested from a CDC biofilm reactor, a well-established and standardized biofilm growth method. The control Staphylococcus aureus biofilms treated with growth medium increased by 0·6 logs during a 3-h contact time. Efficacy testing showed biofilms exposed to 400 μmol l -1 penicillin G decreased by only 0·3 logs. Interestingly, time-lapse confocal scanning laser microscopy revealed that penicillin G treatment dispersed the biofilm despite being an ineffective killing agent. In addition, no biofilm removal was detected when assays were performed in 96-well plates. These results illustrate that biofilm behaviour and impact of treatments can vary substantially when assayed by different methods. Measuring both killing and removal with well-characterized methods will be crucial for the discovery of new anti-biofilm strategies. Biofilms are tolerant to antimicrobial treatments and can lead to persistent infections. Finding new anti-biofilm strategies and understanding their mode-of-action is therefore of high importance. Historically, antimicrobial testing has focused on measuring the decrease in viability. While kill data are undeniably important, measuring biofilm disruption provides equally useful information. Starting with biofilm grown in the same reactor, we paired assessment of biofilm removal using a new treatment-flow-cell and real-time microscopy with kill data collected using the single tube method (ASTM E2871). Pairing these two methods

  17. Effects of humic acid on the interactions between zinc oxide nanoparticles and bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Kai; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zhu, Yunlin; Gao, Chunhui; Huang, Qiaoyun; Cai, Peng

    2017-12-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) on interactions between ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and Pseudomonas putida KT2440 biofilms at different maturity stages were investigated. Three stages of biofilm development were identified according to bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) activity associated with biofilm development process. In the initial biofilm stage 1, the ATP content of bacteria was reduced by more than 90% when biofilms were exposed to ZnO NPs. However, in the mature biofilm stages 2 and 3, the ATP content was only slightly decreased. Biofilms at stage 3 exhibited less susceptibility to ZnO NPs than biofilms at stage 2. These results suggest that more mature biofilms have a significantly higher tolerance to ZnO NPs compared to young biofilms. In addition, biofilms with intact extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) showed higher tolerance to ZnO NPs than those without EPS, indicating that EPS play a key role in alleviating the toxic effects of ZnO NPs. In both pure ZnO NPs and ZnO-HA mixtures, dissolved Zn 2+ originating from the NPs significantly contributed to the overall toxicity. The presence of HA dramatically decreased the toxicity of ZnO NPs due to the binding of Zn 2+ on HA. The combined results from this work suggest that the biofilm maturity stages and environmental constituents (such as humic acid) are important factors to consider when evaluating potential risks of NPs to ecological systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bacteriophage Lysin CF-301, a Potent Antistaphylococcal Biofilm Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, Raymond; Khan, Babar K; Raz, Assaf; Rotolo, Jimmy A; Wittekind, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Biofilms pose a unique therapeutic challenge because of the antibiotic tolerance of constituent bacteria. Treatments for biofilm-based infections represent a major unmet medical need, requiring novel agents to eradicate mature biofilms. Our objective was to evaluate bacteriophage lysin CF-301 as a new agent to target Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. We used minimum biofilm-eradicating concentration (MBEC) assays on 95 S. aureus strains to obtain a 90% MBEC (MBEC 90 ) value of ≤0.25 μg/ml for CF-301. Mature biofilms of coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus pyogenes , and Streptococcus agalactiae were also sensitive to disruption, with MBEC 90 values ranging from 0.25 to 8 μg/ml. The potency of CF-301 was demonstrated against S. aureus biofilms formed on polystyrene, glass, surgical mesh, and catheters. In catheters, CF-301 removed all biofilm within 1 h and killed all released bacteria by 6 h. Mixed-species biofilms, formed by S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis on several surfaces, were removed by CF-301, as were S. aureus biofilms either enriched for small-colony variants (SCVs) or grown in human synovial fluid. The antibacterial activity of CF-301 was further demonstrated against S. aureus persister cells in exponential-phase and stationary-phase populations. Finally, the antibiofilm activity of CF-301 was greatly improved in combinations with the cell wall hydrolase lysostaphin when tested against a range of S. aureus strains. In all, the data show that CF-301 is highly effective at disrupting biofilms and killing biofilm bacteria, and, as such, it may be an efficient new agent for treating staphylococcal infections with a biofilm component. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Bacteriophage Lysin CF-301, a Potent Antistaphylococcal Biofilm Agent

    KAUST Repository

    Schuch, Raymond

    2017-05-02

    Biofilms pose a unique therapeutic challenge because of the antibiotic tolerance of constituent bacteria. Treatments for biofilm-based infections represent a major unmet medical need, requiring novel agents to eradicate mature biofilms. Our objective was to evaluate bacteriophage lysin CF-301 as a new agent to target Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. We used minimum biofilm-eradicating concentration (MBEC) assays on 95 S. aureus strains to obtain a 90% MBEC (MBEC90) value of <= 0.25 mu g/ml for CF-301. Mature biofilms of coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus agalactiae were also sensitive to disruption, with MBEC90 values ranging from 0.25 to 8 mu g/ml. The potency of CF-301 was demonstrated against S. aureus biofilms formed on polystyrene, glass, surgical mesh, and catheters. In catheters, CF-301 removed all biofilm within 1 h and killed all released bacteria by 6 h. Mixed-species biofilms, formed by S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis on several surfaces, were removed by CF-301, as were S. aureus biofilms either enriched for small-colony variants (SCVs) or grown in human synovial fluid. The antibacterial activity of CF-301 was further demonstrated against S. aureus persister cells in exponential-phase and stationary-phase populations. Finally, the antibiofilm activity of CF-301 was greatly improved in combinations with the cell wall hydrolase lysostaphin when tested against a range of S. aureus strains. In all, the data show that CF-301 is highly effective at disrupting biofilms and killing biofilm bacteria, and, as such, it may be an efficient new agent for treating staphylococcal infections with a biofilm component.

  20. Bacteriophage Lysin CF-301, a Potent Antistaphylococcal Biofilm Agent

    KAUST Repository

    Schuch, Raymond; Khan, Babar Khalid; Raz, Assaf; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; Wittekind, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms pose a unique therapeutic challenge because of the antibiotic tolerance of constituent bacteria. Treatments for biofilm-based infections represent a major unmet medical need, requiring novel agents to eradicate mature biofilms. Our objective was to evaluate bacteriophage lysin CF-301 as a new agent to target Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. We used minimum biofilm-eradicating concentration (MBEC) assays on 95 S. aureus strains to obtain a 90% MBEC (MBEC90) value of <= 0.25 mu g/ml for CF-301. Mature biofilms of coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus agalactiae were also sensitive to disruption, with MBEC90 values ranging from 0.25 to 8 mu g/ml. The potency of CF-301 was demonstrated against S. aureus biofilms formed on polystyrene, glass, surgical mesh, and catheters. In catheters, CF-301 removed all biofilm within 1 h and killed all released bacteria by 6 h. Mixed-species biofilms, formed by S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis on several surfaces, were removed by CF-301, as were S. aureus biofilms either enriched for small-colony variants (SCVs) or grown in human synovial fluid. The antibacterial activity of CF-301 was further demonstrated against S. aureus persister cells in exponential-phase and stationary-phase populations. Finally, the antibiofilm activity of CF-301 was greatly improved in combinations with the cell wall hydrolase lysostaphin when tested against a range of S. aureus strains. In all, the data show that CF-301 is highly effective at disrupting biofilms and killing biofilm bacteria, and, as such, it may be an efficient new agent for treating staphylococcal infections with a biofilm component.

  1. Mycoalgae biofilm: development of a novel platform technology using algae and fungal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Aravindan; Hu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae is considered a promising source for biofuel and bioenergy production, bio-remediation and production of high-value bioactive compounds, but harvesting microalgae is a major bottleneck in the algae based processes. The objective of this research is to mimic the growth of natural lichen and develop a novel biofilm platform technology using filamentous fungi and microalgae to form a lichen type of biofilm "mycoalgae" in a supporting polymer matrix. The possibility of co-existence of Chlorella vulgaris with various fungal cultures was tested to identify the best strain combination for high algae harvest efficiency. The effect of different matrices for cell attachment and biofilm formation, cell surface characterization of mycoalgae biofilm, kinetics of the process with respect to the algae-fungi cell distribution and total biomass production was studied. Mycoalgae biofilm with algae attachment efficiency of 99.0 % and above was achieved in a polymer-cotton composite matrix with glucose concentration of 2 g/L in the growth medium and agitation intensity of 150 rpm at 27 °C. The total biomass in the co-culture with the selected strain combination (Mucor sp. and Chlorella sp.) was higher than the axenic cultures of fungi and algae at the conditions tested. The results show that algae can be grown with complete attachment to a bio-augmenting fungal surface and can be harvested readily as a biofilm for product extraction from biomass. Even though, interaction between heterotrophic fungi and phototrophic algae was investigated in solid media after prolonged contact in a report, this research is the first of its kind in developing an artificial lichen type biofilm called "mycoalgae" biofilm completely attached on a matrix in liquid cultures. The mycoalgae biofilm based processes, propounds the scope for exploring new avenues in the bio-production industry and bioremediation.

  2. Energy positive domestic wastewater treatment: the roles of anaerobic and phototrophic technologies

    KAUST Repository

    Shoener, B. D.

    2014-01-01

    The negative energy balance of wastewater treatment could be reversed if anaerobic technologies were implemented for organic carbon oxidation and phototrophic technologies were utilized for nutrient recovery. To characterize the potential for energy positive wastewater treatment by anaerobic and phototrophic biotechnologies we performed a comprehensive literature review and analysis, focusing on energy production (as kJ per capita per day and as kJ m-3 of wastewater treated), energy consumption, and treatment efficacy. Anaerobic technologies included in this review were the anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR), anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR), anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFB), upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), and microbial fuel cell (MFC). Phototrophic technologies included were the high rate algal pond (HRAP), photobioreactor (PBR), stirred tank reactor, waste stabilization pond (WSP), and algal turf scrubber (ATS). Average energy recovery efficiencies for anaerobic technologies ranged from 1.6% (MFC) to 47.5% (ABR). When including typical percent chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals by each technology, this range would equate to roughly 40-1200 kJ per capita per day or 110-3300 kJ m-3 of treated wastewater. The average bioenergy feedstock production by phototrophic technologies ranged from 1200-4700 kJ per capita per day or 3400-13000 kJ m-3 (exceeding anaerobic technologies and, at times, the energetic content of the influent organic carbon), with usable energy production dependent upon downstream conversion to fuels. Energy consumption analysis showed that energy positive anaerobic wastewater treatment by emerging technologies would require significant reductions of parasitic losses from mechanical mixing and gas sparging. Technology targets and critical barriers for energy-producing technologies are identified, and the role of integrated anaerobic and phototrophic

  3. Energy positive domestic wastewater treatment: the roles of anaerobic and phototrophic technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoener, B D; Bradley, I M; Cusick, R D; Guest, J S

    2014-05-01

    The negative energy balance of wastewater treatment could be reversed if anaerobic technologies were implemented for organic carbon oxidation and phototrophic technologies were utilized for nutrient recovery. To characterize the potential for energy positive wastewater treatment by anaerobic and phototrophic biotechnologies we performed a comprehensive literature review and analysis, focusing on energy production (as kJ per capita per day and as kJ m(-3) of wastewater treated), energy consumption, and treatment efficacy. Anaerobic technologies included in this review were the anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR), anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR), anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFB), upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), and microbial fuel cell (MFC). Phototrophic technologies included were the high rate algal pond (HRAP), photobioreactor (PBR), stirred tank reactor, waste stabilization pond (WSP), and algal turf scrubber (ATS). Average energy recovery efficiencies for anaerobic technologies ranged from 1.6% (MFC) to 47.5% (ABR). When including typical percent chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals by each technology, this range would equate to roughly 40-1200 kJ per capita per day or 110-3300 kJ m(-3) of treated wastewater. The average bioenergy feedstock production by phototrophic technologies ranged from 1200-4700 kJ per capita per day or 3400-13 000 kJ m(-3) (exceeding anaerobic technologies and, at times, the energetic content of the influent organic carbon), with usable energy production dependent upon downstream conversion to fuels. Energy consumption analysis showed that energy positive anaerobic wastewater treatment by emerging technologies would require significant reductions of parasitic losses from mechanical mixing and gas sparging. Technology targets and critical barriers for energy-producing technologies are identified, and the role of integrated anaerobic and

  4. Strategies for combating bacterial biofilms: A focus on anti-biofilm agents and their mechanisms of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ranita; Tiwari, Monalisa; Donelli, Gianfranco; Tiwari, Vishvanath

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biofilm refers to the complex, sessile communities of microbes found either attached to a surface or buried firmly in an extracellular matrix as aggregates. The biofilm matrix surrounding bacteria makes them tolerant to harsh conditions and resistant to antibacterial treatments. Moreover, the biofilms are responsible for causing a broad range of chronic diseases and due to the emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria it has really become difficult to treat them with efficacy. Furthermore, the antibiotics available till date are ineffective for treating these biofilm related infections due to their higher values of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), which may result in in-vivo toxicity. Hence, it is critically important to design or screen anti-biofilm molecules that can effectively minimize and eradicate biofilm related infections. In the present article, we have highlighted the mechanism of biofilm formation with reference to different models and various methods used for biofilm detection. A major focus has been put on various anti-biofilm molecules discovered or tested till date which may include herbal active compounds, chelating agents, peptide antibiotics, lantibiotics and synthetic chemical compounds along with their structures, mechanism of action and their respective MICs, MBCs, minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (MBICs) as well as the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values available in the literature so far. Different mode of action of anti biofilm molecules addressed here are inhibition via interference in the quorum sensing pathways, adhesion mechanism, disruption of extracellular DNA, protein, lipopolysaccharides, exopolysaccharides and secondary messengers involved in various signaling pathways. From this study, we conclude that the molecules considered here might be used to treat biofilm-associated infections after significant structural modifications, thereby

  5. Patterned biofilm formation reveals a mechanism for structural heterogeneity in bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huan; Hou, Shuyu; Yongyat, Chanokpon; De Tore, Suzanne; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-09-03

    Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous and are the major cause of chronic infections in humans and persistent biofouling in industry. Despite the significance of bacterial biofilms, the mechanism of biofilm formation and associated drug tolerance is still not fully understood. A major challenge in biofilm research is the intrinsic heterogeneity in the biofilm structure, which leads to temporal and spatial variation in cell density and gene expression. To understand and control such structural heterogeneity, surfaces with patterned functional alkanthiols were used in this study to obtain Escherichia coli cell clusters with systematically varied cluster size and distance between clusters. The results from quantitative imaging analysis revealed an interesting phenomenon in which multicellular connections can be formed between cell clusters depending on the size of interacting clusters and the distance between them. In addition, significant differences in patterned biofilm formation were observed between wild-type E. coli RP437 and some of its isogenic mutants, indicating that certain cellular and genetic factors are involved in interactions among cell clusters. In particular, autoinducer-2-mediated quorum sensing was found to be important. Collectively, these results provide missing information that links cell-to-cell signaling and interaction among cell clusters to the structural organization of bacterial biofilms.

  6. Interference of Pseudomonas aeruginosa signalling and biofilm formation for infection control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Høiby, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the best described bacterium with regards to quorum sensing (QS), in vitro biofilm formation and the development of antibiotic tolerance. Biofilms composed of P. aeruginosa are thought to be the underlying cause of many chronic infections, including those in wounds...... and in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. In this review, we provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in QS, QS-enabled virulence, biofilm formation and biofilm-enabled antibiotic tolerance. We now have substantial knowledge of the multicellular behaviour of P. aeruginosa in vitro. A major...

  7. Main photoautotrophic components of biofilms in natural draft cooling towers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Tomáš; Čapek, Petr; Böhmová, Petra

    2016-05-01

    While photoautotrophic organisms are an important component of biofilms that live in certain regions of natural draft cooling towers, little is known about these communities. We therefore examined 18 towers at nine sites to identify the general patterns of community assembly in three distinct tower parts, and we examined how community structures differ depending on geography. We also compared the newly acquired data with previously published data. The bottom sections of draft cooling towers are mainly settled by large filamentous algae, primarily Cladophora glomerata. The central portions of towers host a small amount of planktic algae biomass originating in the cooling water. The upper fourths of towers are colonized by biofilms primarily dominated by cyanobacteria, e.g., members of the genera Gloeocapsa and Scytonema. A total of 41 taxa of phototrophic microorganisms were identified. Species composition of the upper fourth of all towers was significantly affected by cardinal position. There was different species composition at positions facing north compared to positions facing south. West- and east-facing positions were transitory and highly similar to each other in terms of species composition. Biofilms contribute to the degradation of paint coatings inside towers.

  8. Enhanced Uranium Immobilization and Reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cologgi, Dena L.; Speers, Allison M.; Bullard, Blair A.; Kelly, Shelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms formed by dissimilatory metal reducers are of interest to develop permeable biobarriers for the immobilization of soluble contaminants such as uranium. Here we show that biofilms of the model uranium-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens immobilized substantially more U(VI) than planktonic cells and did so for longer periods of time, reductively precipitating it to a mononuclear U(IV) phase involving carbon ligands. The biofilms also tolerated high and otherwise toxic concentrations (up to 5 mM) of uranium, consistent with a respiratory strategy that also protected the cells from uranium toxicity. The enhanced ability of the biofilms to immobilize uranium correlated only partially with the biofilm biomass and thickness and depended greatly on the area of the biofilm exposed to the soluble contaminant. In contrast, uranium reduction depended on the expression of Geobacter conductive pili and, to a lesser extent, on the presence of the c cytochrome OmcZ in the biofilm matrix. The results support a model in which the electroactive biofilm matrix immobilizes and reduces the uranium in the top stratum. This mechanism prevents the permeation and mineralization of uranium in the cell envelope, thereby preserving essential cellular functions and enhancing the catalytic capacity of Geobacter cells to reduce uranium. Hence, the biofilms provide cells with a physically and chemically protected environment for the sustained immobilization and reduction of uranium that is of interest for the development of improved strategies for the in situ bioremediation of environments impacted by uranium contamination. PMID:25128347

  9. An optical microfluidic platform for spatiotemporal biofilm treatment monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Wook; Mosteller, Matthew P; Subramanian, Sowmya; Meyer, Mariana T; Ghodssi, Reza; Bentley, William E

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms constitute in excess of 65% of clinical microbial infections, with the antibiotic treatment of biofilm infections posing a unique challenge due to their high antibiotic tolerance. Recent studies performed in our group have demonstrated that a bioelectric effect featuring low-intensity electric signals combined with antibiotics can significantly improve the efficacy of biofilm treatment. In this work, we demonstrate the bioelectric effect using sub-micron thick planar electrodes in a microfluidic device. This is critical in efforts to develop microsystems for clinical biofilm infection management, including both in vivo and in vitro applications. Adaptation of the method to the microscale, for example, can enable the development of localized biofilm infection treatment using microfabricated medical devices, while augmenting existing capabilities to perform biofilm management beyond the clinical realm. Furthermore, due to scale-down of the system, the voltage requirement for inducing the electric field is reduced further below the media electrolysis threshold. Enhanced biofilm treatment using the bioelectric effect in the developed microfluidic device elicited a 56% greater reduction in viable cell density and 26% further decrease in biomass growth compared to traditional antibiotic therapy. This biofilm treatment efficacy, demonstrated in a micro-scale device and utilizing biocompatible voltage ranges, encourages the use of this method for future clinical biofilm treatment applications. (paper)

  10. Effect of silver nanoparticles on Pseudomonas putida biofilms at different stages of maturity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuptimdang, Pumis, E-mail: pumis.th@gmail.com [International Program in Hazardous Substance and Environmental Management, Graduate School, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Center of Excellence on Hazardous Substance Management, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Limpiyakorn, Tawan, E-mail: tawan.l@chula.ac.th [Center of Excellence on Hazardous Substance Management, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Department of Environmental Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Research Unit Control of Emerging Micropollutants in Environment, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); McEvoy, John, E-mail: john.mcevoy@ndsu.edu [Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58108 (United States); Prüß, Birgit M., E-mail: birgit.pruess@ndsu.edu [Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58108 (United States); Khan, Eakalak, E-mail: eakalak.khan@ndsu.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58108 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Biofilm stages in static batch conditions were similar to dynamic conditions. • Expression of csgA gene increased earlier than alg8 gene in biofilm maturation. • AgNPs had higher effect on less mature biofilms. • Removal of extracellular polymeric substance made biofilms susceptible to AgNPs. - Abstract: This study determined the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on Pseudomonas putida KT2440 biofilms at different stages of maturity. Three biofilm stages (1–3, representing early to late stages of development) were identified from bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) activity under static (96-well plate) and dynamic conditions (Center for Disease Control and Prevention biofilm reactor). Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) levels, measured using crystal violet and total carbohydrate assays, and expression of the EPS-associated genes, csgA and alg8, supported the conclusion that biofilms at later stages were older than those at earlier stages. More mature biofilms (stages 2 and 3) showed little to no reduction in ATP activity following exposure to AgNPs. In contrast, the same treatment reduced ATP activity by more than 90% in the less mature stage 1 biofilms. Regardless of maturity, biofilms with EPS stripped off were more susceptible to AgNPs than controls with intact EPS, demonstrating that EPS is critical for biofilm tolerance of AgNPs. The findings from this study show that stage of maturity is an important factor to consider when studying effect of AgNPs on biofilms.

  11. Effect of silver nanoparticles on Pseudomonas putida biofilms at different stages of maturity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thuptimdang, Pumis; Limpiyakorn, Tawan; McEvoy, John; Prüß, Birgit M.; Khan, Eakalak

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Biofilm stages in static batch conditions were similar to dynamic conditions. • Expression of csgA gene increased earlier than alg8 gene in biofilm maturation. • AgNPs had higher effect on less mature biofilms. • Removal of extracellular polymeric substance made biofilms susceptible to AgNPs. - Abstract: This study determined the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on Pseudomonas putida KT2440 biofilms at different stages of maturity. Three biofilm stages (1–3, representing early to late stages of development) were identified from bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) activity under static (96-well plate) and dynamic conditions (Center for Disease Control and Prevention biofilm reactor). Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) levels, measured using crystal violet and total carbohydrate assays, and expression of the EPS-associated genes, csgA and alg8, supported the conclusion that biofilms at later stages were older than those at earlier stages. More mature biofilms (stages 2 and 3) showed little to no reduction in ATP activity following exposure to AgNPs. In contrast, the same treatment reduced ATP activity by more than 90% in the less mature stage 1 biofilms. Regardless of maturity, biofilms with EPS stripped off were more susceptible to AgNPs than controls with intact EPS, demonstrating that EPS is critical for biofilm tolerance of AgNPs. The findings from this study show that stage of maturity is an important factor to consider when studying effect of AgNPs on biofilms

  12. The Biofilm Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The concept of biofilms has emerged in the clinical setting during the last decade. Infections involving biofilms have been documented in all parts of the human body, and it is currently believed that the presence of biofilm-forming bacteria is equivalent to chronic infection. A quick Pubmed search...

  13. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Aspects on Campylobacter jejuni Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta T. Melo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm represents a way of life that allows greater survival of microorganisms in hostile habitats. Campylobacter jejuni is able to form biofilms in vitro and on surfaces at several points in the poultry production chain. Genetic determinants related to their formation are expressed differently between strains and external conditions are decisive in this respect. Our approach combines phylogenetic analysis and the presence of seven specific genes linked to biofilm formation in association with traditional microbiology techniques, using Mueller Hinton and chicken juice as substrates in order to quantify, classify, determine the composition and morphology of the biomass of simple and mixed biofilms of 30 C. jejuni strains. It also evaluates the inhibition of its formation by biocides commonly used in industry and also by zinc oxide nanoparticles. Genetic analysis showed high heterogeneity with the identification of 23 pulsotypes. Despite the diversity, the presence of flaA, cadF, luxS, dnaJ, htrA, cbrA, and sodB genes in all strains shows the high potential for biofilm formation. This ability was only expressed in chicken juice, where they presented phenotype of a strong biofilm producer, with a mean count of 7.37 log CFU/mL and an ultrastructure characteristic of mature biofilm. The composition of simple and mixed biofilms was predominantly composed by proteins. The exceptions were found in mixed biofilms with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which includes a carbohydrate-rich matrix, lower ability to sessile form in chicken juice and compact architecture of the biofilm, this aspects are intrinsic to this species. Hypochlorite, chlorhexidine, and peracetic acid were more effective in controlling viable cells of C. jejuni in biofilm, but the existence of tolerant strains indicates exposure to sublethal concentrations and development of adaptation mechanisms. This study shows that in chicken juice C. jejuni presents greater potential in producing mature

  14. Novel acsF Gene Primers Revealed a Diverse Phototrophic Bacterial Population, Including Gemmatimonadetes, in Lake Taihu (China)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yili; Zeng, Yanhua; Lu, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Seq sequencing of the 16S rRNA, pufM, and bchY genes was carried out to assess the diversity of local phototrophic communities. In addition, we designed new degenerate primers of aerobic cyclase gene acsF, which serves as a convenient marker for both phototrophic Gemmatimonadetes and phototrophic Proteobacteria...... a diverse community of phototrophic Gemmatimonadetes forming 30 operational taxonomic units. These species represented 10.5 and 17.3% of the acsF reads in the upper semiaerobic sediment and anoxic sediment, whereas their abundance in the water column was ... fundamental biological processes on Earth. Recently, the presence of photosynthetic reaction centers has been reported from a rarely studied bacterial phylum, Gemmatimonadetes, but almost nothing is known about the diversity and environmental distribution of these organisms. The newly designed acsF primers...

  15. Extracellular DNA Shields against Aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Nilsson, Martin; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years, it has been established that extracellular DNA is a key constituent of the matrix of microbial biofilms. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that DNA binds positively charged antimicrobials such as aminoglycosides and antimicrobial peptides. In the present study, we...... provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release......-deficient P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing mutant are more susceptible to aminoglycoside treatment than wild-type biofilms but become rescued from the detrimental action of aminoglycosides upon supplementation with exogenous DNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that exposure to lysed polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  16. Effects of ginseng on Pseudomonas aeruginosa motility and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hong; Lee, Baoleri; Yang, Liang

    2011-01-01

    protected animal models from developing chronic lung infection by P. aeruginosa. In the present study, the effects of ginseng on the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms were further investigated in vitro and in vivo. Ginseng aqueous extract at concentrations of 0.5-2.0% did not inhibit the growth of P......Biofilm-associated chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis are virtually impossible to eradicate with antibiotics because biofilm-growing bacteria are highly tolerant to antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. Previously, we found that ginseng treatments....... aeruginosa, but significantly prevented P. aeruginosa from forming biofilm. Exposure to 0.5% ginseng aqueous extract for 24 h destroyed most 7-day-old mature biofilms formed by both mucoid and nonmucoid P. aeruginosa strains. Ginseng treatment enhanced swimming and twitching motility, but reduced swarming...

  17. Cold Plasmas for Biofilm Control: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Brendan F; Flynn, Padrig B; O'Brien, Séamus; Hickok, Noreen; Freeman, Theresa; Bourke, Paula

    2018-06-01

    Bacterial biofilm infections account for a major proportion of chronic and medical device associated infections in humans, yet our ability to control them is compromised by their inherent tolerance to antimicrobial agents. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) represents a promising therapeutic option. CAP treatment of microbial biofilms represents the convergence of two complex phenomena: the production of a chemically diverse mixture of reactive species and intermediates, and their interaction with a heterogeneous 3D interface created by the biofilm extracellular polymeric matrix. Therefore, understanding these interactions and physiological responses to CAP exposure are central to effective management of infectious biofilms. We review the unique opportunities and challenges for translating CAP to the management of biofilms. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Isolation and characterization of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs from exposed soils from the Sør Rondane Mountains, East Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahon, Guillaume; Willems, Anne

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the culturable aerobic phototrophic bacteria present in soil samples collected in the proximity of the Belgian Princess Elisabeth Station in the Sør Rondane Mountains, East Antarctica. Until recently, only oxygenic phototrophic bacteria (Cyanobacteria) were well known from Antarctic soils. However, more recent non-cultivation-based studies have demonstrated the presence of anoxygenic phototrophs and, particularly, aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in these areas. Approximately 1000 isolates obtained after prolonged incubation under different growth conditions were studied and characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Representative strains were identified by sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes. More than half of the isolates grouped among known aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic taxa, particularly with Sphingomonadaceae, Methylobacterium and Brevundimonas. In addition, a total of 330 isolates were tested for the presence of key phototrophy genes. While rhodopsin genes were not detected, multiple isolates possessed key genes of the bacteriochlorophyll synthesis pathway. The majority of these potential aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic strains grouped with Alphaproteobacteria (Sphingomonas, Methylobacterium, Brevundimonas and Polymorphobacter). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  19. Cellulose degradation and assimilation by the unicellular phototrophic eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blifernez-Klassen, Olga; Klassen, Viktor; Doebbe, Anja; Kersting, Klaudia; Grimm, Philipp; Wobbe, Lutz; Kruse, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Plants convert sunlight to biomass, which is primarily composed of lignocellulose, the most abundant natural biopolymer and a potential feedstock for fuel and chemical production. Cellulose assimilation has so far only been described for heterotrophic organisms that rely on photosynthetically active primary producers of organic compounds. Among phototrophs, the unicellular green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is widely known as one of the best established model organisms. It occupies many habitats, including aquatic and soil ecosystems. This ubiquity underscores the versatile metabolic properties of this microorganism. Here we present yet another paradigm of adaptation for C. reinhardtii, highlighting its photoheterotrophic ability to utilize cellulose for growth in the absence of other carbon sources. When grown under CO(2)-limiting conditions in the light, secretion of endo-β-1,4-glucanases by the cell causes digestion of exogenous cellulose, followed by cellobiose uptake and assimilation. Phototrophic microbes like C. reinhardtii may thus serve as biocatalysts for cellulosic biofuel production.

  20. Leucine incorporation by aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in the Delaware estuary

    OpenAIRE

    Stegman, Monica R; Cottrell, Matthew T; Kirchman, David L

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria are well known to be abundant in estuaries, coastal regions and in the open ocean, but little is known about their activity in any aquatic ecosystem. To explore the activity of AAP bacteria in the Delaware estuary and coastal waters, single-cell 3H-leucine incorporation by these bacteria was examined with a new approach that combines infrared epifluorescence microscopy and microautoradiography. The approach was used on samples from the Delaware c...

  1. Formation of hydroxyl radicals contributes to the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Peter Ø; Briales, Alejandra; Brochmann, Rikke P; Wang, Hengzhuang; Kragh, Kasper N; Kolpen, Mette; Hempel, Casper; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2014-04-01

    Antibiotic-tolerant, biofilm-forming Pseudomonas aeruginosa has long been recognized as a major cause of chronic lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients. The mechanisms involved in the activity of antibiotics on biofilm are not completely clear. We have investigated whether the proposed induction of cytotoxic hydroxyl radicals (OH˙) during antibiotic treatment of planktonically grown cells may contribute to action of the commonly used antibiotic ciprofloxacin on P. aeruginosa biofilms. For this purpose, WT PAO1, a catalase deficient ΔkatA and a ciprofloxacin resistant mutant of PAO1 (gyrA), were grown as biofilms in microtiter plates and treated with ciprofloxacin. Formation of OH˙ and total amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured and viability was estimated. Formation of OH˙ and total ROS in PAO1 biofilms treated with ciprofloxacin was shown but higher levels were measured in ΔkatA biofilms, and no ROS production was seen in the gyrA biofilms. Treatment with ciprofloxacin decreased the viability of PAO1 and ΔkatA biofilms but not of gyrA biofilms. Addition of thiourea, a OH˙ scavenger, decreased the OH˙ levels and killing of PAO1 biofilm. Our study shows that OH˙ is produced by P. aeruginosa biofilms treated with ciprofloxacin, which may contribute to the killing of biofilm subpopulations. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Biodegradation of carbamate pesticides by natural river biofilms in different seasons and their effects on biofilm community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tien, Chien-Jung; Lin, Mon-Chu; Chiu, Wan-Hsin; Chen, Colin S.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of natural river biofilms from different seasons to degrade the carbamate pesticides methomyl, carbaryl and carbofuran in single and multiple pesticide systems, and the effects of these pesticides on algal and bacterial communities within biofilms. Spring biofilms had the lowest biomass of algae and bacteria but showed the highest methomyl degradation (>99%) and dissipation rates, suggesting that they might contain microorganisms with high methomyl degradation abilities. Degradation of carbofuran (54.1–59.5%) by biofilms in four seasons was similar, but low degradation of carbaryl (0–27.5%) was observed. The coexistence of other pesticides was found to cause certain effects on pesticide degradation and primarily resulted in lower diversity of diatoms and bacteria than when using a single pesticide. The tolerant diatoms and bacteria potentially having the ability to degrade test pesticides were identified. River biofilms could be suitable biomaterials or used to isolate degraders for bioremediating pesticide-contaminated water. -- Highlights: •Natural river biofilms showed high ability to degrade methomyl and carbofuran. •The presence of other pesticides caused certain effects on pesticide degradation. •Carbamate pesticides caused adverse effects on communities of diatoms and bacteria. •The tolerant diatoms and bacteria were found as potential pesticide-degraders. -- Biodegradation of carbamate pesticides by river biofilms

  3. Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-15

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism Francisco G...jaques.reifman.civ@mail.mil Abstract A hallmark of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to establish biofilm -based infections that are difficult to...eradicate. Biofilms are less susceptible to host inflammatory and immune responses and have higher antibiotic tolerance than free-living planktonic

  4. Light structures phototroph, bacterial and fungal communities at the soil surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence O Davies

    Full Text Available The upper few millimeters of soil harbour photosynthetic microbial communities that are structurally distinct from those of underlying bulk soil due to the presence of light. Previous studies in arid zones have demonstrated functional importance of these communities in reducing soil erosion, and enhancing carbon and nitrogen fixation. Despite being widely distributed, comparative understanding of the biodiversity of the soil surface and underlying soil is lacking, particularly in temperate zones. We investigated the establishment of soil surface communities on pasture soil in microcosms exposed to light or dark conditions, focusing on changes in phototroph, bacterial and fungal communities at the soil surface (0-3 mm and bulk soil (3-12 mm using ribosomal marker gene analyses. Microbial community structure changed with time and structurally similar phototrophic communities were found at the soil surface and in bulk soil in the light exposed microcosms suggesting that light can influence phototroph community structure even in the underlying bulk soil. 454 pyrosequencing showed a significant selection for diazotrophic cyanobacteria such as Nostoc punctiforme and Anabaena spp., in addition to the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. The soil surface also harboured distinct heterotrophic bacterial and fungal communities in the presence of light, in particular, the selection for the phylum Firmicutes. However, these light driven changes in bacterial community structure did not extend to the underlying soil suggesting a discrete zone of influence, analogous to the rhizosphere.

  5. Molecular characterization of phototrophic microorganisms in the forefield of a receding glacier in the Swiss Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Beat; Bühler, Lukas; Schmutz, Stefan; Zumsteg, Anita; Furrer, Gerhard

    2013-03-01

    Recently deglaciated areas are ideal environments to study soil formation and primary microbial succession where phototrophic microorganisms may play a role as primary producers. The aim of our study was to investigate the cyanobacterial and green algal community composition in three different successional stages of the Damma glacier forefield in the Swiss Alps using 16S rDNA and ITS rDNA clone libraries. Cyanobacterial target sequences varied along the glacier forefield, with the highest cyanobacterial 16S rRNA gene copies found in sparsely vegetated soils. Sequence analysis revealed that the phototrophic communities were distinct in each of the three soil environments. The majority of the cyanobacterial sequences retrieved from barren soils were related to the Oscillatoriales. The diversity in sparsely vegetated soils was low, and sequences closely related to Nostoc sp. dominated. The majority of the algal phylotypes are related to members of the Trebouxiophyceae known to live as symbiotic partners in lichens. We conclude that the community composition appears to shift markedly along the chronosequence, indicating that each soil environment selects for its phototrophic community. When cyanobacteria occur together with eukaryotic microalgae, they form a rich source of organic matter and may be important contributors of carbon in nutrient-deficient deglaciated soils.

  6. Molecular characterization of phototrophic microorganisms in the forefield of a receding glacier in the Swiss Alps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, Beat; Bühler, Lukas; Schmutz, Stefan; Zumsteg, Anita; Furrer, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Recently deglaciated areas are ideal environments to study soil formation and primary microbial succession where phototrophic microorganisms may play a role as primary producers. The aim of our study was to investigate the cyanobacterial and green algal community composition in three different successional stages of the Damma glacier forefield in the Swiss Alps using 16S rDNA and ITS rDNA clone libraries. Cyanobacterial target sequences varied along the glacier forefield, with the highest cyanobacterial 16S rRNA gene copies found in sparsely vegetated soils. Sequence analysis revealed that the phototrophic communities were distinct in each of the three soil environments. The majority of the cyanobacterial sequences retrieved from barren soils were related to the Oscillatoriales. The diversity in sparsely vegetated soils was low, and sequences closely related to Nostoc sp. dominated. The majority of the algal phylotypes are related to members of the Trebouxiophyceae known to live as symbiotic partners in lichens. We conclude that the community composition appears to shift markedly along the chronosequence, indicating that each soil environment selects for its phototrophic community. When cyanobacteria occur together with eukaryotic microalgae, they form a rich source of organic matter and may be important contributors of carbon in nutrient-deficient deglaciated soils. (letter)

  7. Gain and loss of phototrophic genes revealed by comparison of two Citromicrobium bacterial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zheng

    Full Text Available Proteobacteria are thought to have diverged from a phototrophic ancestor, according to the scattered distribution of phototrophy throughout the proteobacterial clade, and so the occurrence of numerous closely related phototrophic and chemotrophic microorganisms may be the result of the loss of genes for phototrophy. A widespread form of bacterial phototrophy is based on the photochemical reaction center, encoded by puf and puh operons that typically are in a 'photosynthesis gene cluster' (abbreviated as the PGC with pigment biosynthesis genes. Comparison of two closely related Citromicrobial genomes (98.1% sequence identity of complete 16S rRNA genes, Citromicrobium sp. JL354, which contains two copies of reaction center genes, and Citromicrobium strain JLT1363, which is chemotrophic, revealed evidence for the loss of phototrophic genes. However, evidence of horizontal gene transfer was found in these two bacterial genomes. An incomplete PGC (pufLMC-puhCBA in strain JL354 was located within an integrating conjugative element, which indicates a potential mechanism for the horizontal transfer of genes for phototrophy.

  8. Exopolysaccharides regulate calcium flow in cariogenic biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varenganayil, Muth M.; Decho, Alan W.

    2017-01-01

    Caries-associated biofilms induce loss of calcium from tooth surfaces in the presence of dietary carbohydrates. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) provide a matrix scaffold and an abundance of primary binding sites within biofilms. The role of EPS in binding calcium in cariogenic biofilms is only partially understood. Thus, the aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between the calcium dissolution rates and calcium tolerance of caries-associated bacteria and yeast as well as to examine the properties of EPS to quantify its binding affinity for dissolved calcium. Calcium dissolution was measured by dissolution zones on Pikovskaya’s agar. Calcium tolerance was assessed by isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) by adding CaCl2 to the bacterial cultures. Acid-base titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to identify possible functional groups responsible for calcium binding, which was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Lactobacillus spp. and mutans streptococci demonstrated calcium dissolution in the presence of different carbohydrates. All strains that demonstrated high dissolution rates also revealed higher rates of calcium tolerance by IMC. In addition, acidic functional groups were predominantly identified as possible binding sites for calcium ions by acid-base titration and FTIR. Finally, ITC revealed EPS to have a higher binding affinity for calcium compared, for example, to lactic acid. In conclusion, this study illustrates the role of EPS in terms of the calcium tolerance of cariogenic microbiota by determining the ability of EPS to control free calcium concentrations within the biofilms as a self-regulating mode of action in the pathogenesis of dental caries. PMID:29023506

  9. Exopolysaccharides regulate calcium flow in cariogenic biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Astasov-Frauenhoffer

    Full Text Available Caries-associated biofilms induce loss of calcium from tooth surfaces in the presence of dietary carbohydrates. Exopolysaccharides (EPS provide a matrix scaffold and an abundance of primary binding sites within biofilms. The role of EPS in binding calcium in cariogenic biofilms is only partially understood. Thus, the aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between the calcium dissolution rates and calcium tolerance of caries-associated bacteria and yeast as well as to examine the properties of EPS to quantify its binding affinity for dissolved calcium. Calcium dissolution was measured by dissolution zones on Pikovskaya's agar. Calcium tolerance was assessed by isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC by adding CaCl2 to the bacterial cultures. Acid-base titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy were used to identify possible functional groups responsible for calcium binding, which was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC. Lactobacillus spp. and mutans streptococci demonstrated calcium dissolution in the presence of different carbohydrates. All strains that demonstrated high dissolution rates also revealed higher rates of calcium tolerance by IMC. In addition, acidic functional groups were predominantly identified as possible binding sites for calcium ions by acid-base titration and FTIR. Finally, ITC revealed EPS to have a higher binding affinity for calcium compared, for example, to lactic acid. In conclusion, this study illustrates the role of EPS in terms of the calcium tolerance of cariogenic microbiota by determining the ability of EPS to control free calcium concentrations within the biofilms as a self-regulating mode of action in the pathogenesis of dental caries.

  10. Air-dust-borne associations of phototrophic and hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms: promising consortia in volatile hydrocarbon bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bader, Dhia; Eliyas, Mohamed; Rayan, Rihab; Radwan, Samir

    2012-11-01

    Aquatic and terrestrial associations of phototrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms active in hydrocarbon bioremediation have been described earlier. The question arises: do similar consortia also occur in the atmosphere? Dust samples at the height of 15 m were collected from Kuwait City air, and analyzed microbiologically for phototrophic and heterotrophic hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms, which were subsequently characterized according to their 16S rRNA gene sequences. The hydrocarbon utilization potential of the heterotrophs alone, and in association with the phototrophic partners, was measured quantitatively. The chlorophyte Gloeotila sp. and the two cyanobacteria Nostoc commune and Leptolyngbya thermalis were found associated with dust, and (for comparison) the cynobacteria Leptolyngbya sp. and Acaryochloris sp. were isolated from coastal water. All phototrophic cultures harbored oil vapor-utilizing bacteria in the magnitude of 10(5) g(-1). Each phototrophic culture had its unique oil-utilizing bacteria; however, the bacterial composition in Leptolyngbya cultures from air and water was similar. The hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria were affiliated with Acinetobacter sp., Aeromonas caviae, Alcanivorax jadensis, Bacillus asahii, Bacillus pumilus, Marinobacter aquaeolei, Paenibacillus sp., and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The nonaxenic cultures, when used as inocula in batch cultures, attenuated crude oil in light and dark, and in the presence of antibiotics and absence of nitrogenous compounds. Aqueous and diethyl ether extracts from the phototrophic cultures enhanced the growth of the pertinent oil-utilizing bacteria in batch cultures, with oil vapor as a sole carbon source. It was concluded that the airborne microbial associations may be effective in bioremediating atmospheric hydrocarbon pollutants in situ. Like the aquatic and terrestrial habitats, the atmosphere contains dust-borne associations of phototrophic and heterotrophic hydrocarbon

  11. A new dry-surface biofilm model: An essential tool for efficacy testing of hospital surface decontamination procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almatroudi, Ahmad; Hu, Honghua; Deva, Anand; Gosbell, Iain B; Jacombs, Anita; Jensen, Slade O; Whiteley, Greg; Glasbey, Trevor; Vickery, Karen

    2015-10-01

    The environment has been shown to be a source of pathogens causing infections in hospitalised patients. Incorporation of pathogens into biofilms, contaminating dry hospital surfaces, prolongs their survival and renders them tolerant to normal hospital cleaning and disinfection procedures. Currently there is no standard method for testing efficacy of detergents and disinfectants against biofilm formed on dry surfaces. The aim of this study was to develop a reproducible method of producing Staphylococcus aureus biofilm with properties similar to those of biofilm obtained from dry hospital clinical surfaces, for use in efficacy testing of decontamination products. The properties (composition, architecture) of model biofilm and biofilm obtained from clinical dry surfaces within an intensive care unit were compared. The CDC Biofilm Reactor was adapted to create a dry surface biofilm model. S. aureus ATCC 25923 was grown on polycarbonate coupons. Alternating cycles of dehydration and hydration in tryptone soy broth (TSB) were performed over 12 days. Number of biofilm bacteria attached to individual coupons was determined by plate culture and the coefficient of variation (CV%) calculated. The DNA, glycoconjugates and protein content of the biofilm were determined by analysing biofilm stained with SYTO 60, Alexa-488-labelled Aleuria aurantia lectin and SyproOrange respectively using Image J and Imaris software. Biofilm architecture was analysed using live/dead staining and confocal microscopy (CM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Model biofilm was compared to naturally formed biofilm containing S. aureus on dry clinical surfaces. The CDC Biofilm reactor reproducibly formed a multi-layered, biofilm containing about 10(7) CFU/coupon embedded in thick extracellular polymeric substances. Within run CV was 9.5% and the between run CV was 10.1%. Protein was the principal component of both the in vitro model biofilm and the biofilms found on clinical surfaces. Continued

  12. Experimental toxicity and bioaccumulation of cadmium in freshwater periphytic diatoms in relation with biofilm maturity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duong, Thi Thuy; Morin, Soizic; Coste, Michel; Herlory, Olivier; Feurtet-Mazel, Agnes; Boudou, Alain

    2010-01-01

    A study was undertaken to examine cadmium accumulation in freshwater biofilm, its effects on biofilm development and on diatom community structure in laboratory experimental conditions. A suspension of a biofilm originated from the Riou-Mort River (South West France) was inoculated into three experimental units containing clean glass substrates under laboratory conditions. Settling and already developed biofilms were exposed to a Cd concentration of 100 μg L -1 . Metal accumulation (total and intracellular metal content) in biofilms, dry weight and ash-free dry mass, diatom cell density and diatom community composition were analyzed. Both total and intracellular Cd accumulated by the biofilm throughout the experiment increased with duration of metal exposure. Biofilms in the course of maturation were showed higher Cd content and less effective development than settled biofilms. However diatom communities in younger biofilms exposed to Cd increased their tolerance to Cd by a highly significant development of Nitzschia palea. In contrast, Cd exposure had different effect in installed biofilm and taxonomic composition. These results indicate that mature biofilm may limit Cd accumulation into its architecture and protect diatom communities from the effects of metals.

  13. Standardized reactors for the study of medical biofilms: a review of the principles and latest modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Inês B; Meireles, Ana; Gonçalves, Ana L; Goeres, Darla M; Sjollema, Jelmer; Simões, Lúcia C; Simões, Manuel

    2018-08-01

    Biofilms can cause severe problems to human health due to the high tolerance to antimicrobials; consequently, biofilm science and technology constitutes an important research field. Growing a relevant biofilm in the laboratory provides insights into the basic understanding of the biofilm life cycle including responses to antibiotic therapies. Therefore, the selection of an appropriate biofilm reactor is a critical decision, necessary to obtain reproducible and reliable in vitro results. A reactor should be chosen based upon the study goals and a balance between the pros and cons associated with its use and operational conditions that are as similar as possible to the clinical setting. However, standardization in biofilm studies is rare. This review will focus on the four reactors (Calgary biofilm device, Center for Disease Control biofilm reactor, drip flow biofilm reactor, and rotating disk reactor) approved by a standard setting organization (ASTM International) for biofilm experiments and how researchers have modified these standardized reactors and associated protocols to improve the study and understanding of medical biofilms.

  14. Hydraulic resistance of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.

    2013-02-01

    Biofilms may interfere with membrane performance in at least three ways: (i) increase of the transmembrane pressure drop, (ii) increase of feed channel (feed-concentrate) pressure drop, and (iii) increase of transmembrane passage. Given the relevance of biofouling, it is surprising how few data exist about the hydraulic resistance of biofilms that may affect the transmembrane pressure drop and membrane passage. In this study, biofilms were generated in a lab scale cross flow microfiltration system at two fluxes (20 and 100Lm-2h-1) and constant cross flow (0.1ms-1). As a nutrient source, acetate was added (1.0mgL-1 acetate C) besides a control without nutrient supply. A microfiltration (MF) membrane was chosen because the MF membrane resistance is very low compared to the expected biofilm resistance and, thus, biofilm resistance can be determined accurately. Transmembrane pressure drop was monitored. As biofilm parameters, thickness, total cell number, TOC, and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were determined, it was demonstrated that no internal membrane fouling occurred and that the fouling layer actually consisted of a grown biofilm and was not a filter cake of accumulated bacterial cells. At 20Lm-2h-1 flux with a nutrient dosage of 1mgL-1 acetate C, the resistance after 4 days reached a value of 6×1012m-1. At 100Lm-2h-1 flux under the same conditions, the resistance was 5×1013m-1. No correlation of biofilm resistance to biofilm thickness was found; Biofilms with similar thickness could have different resistance depending on the applied flux. The cell number in biofilms was between 4×107 and 5×108 cellscm-2. At this number, bacterial cells make up less than a half percent of the overall biofilm volume and therefore did not hamper the water flow through the biofilm significantly. A flux of 100Lm-2h-1 with nutrient supply caused higher cell numbers, more biomass, and higher biofilm resistance than a flux of 20Lm-2h-1. However, the biofilm thickness

  15. Culturing Toxic Benthic Blooms: The Fate of Natural Biofilms in a Microcosm System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Di Pippo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A microcosm designed for culturing aquatic phototrophic biofilms on artificial substrata was used to perform experiments with microphytobenthos sampled during summer toxic outbreaks of Ostreopsis cf. ovata along the Middle Tyrrhenian coast. This dynamic approach aimed at exploring the unique and complex nature of O. cf. ovata bloom development in the benthic system. Epibenthic assemblages were used as inocula for co-cultures of bloom organisms on polycarbonate slides at controlled environmental conditions. Biofilm surface adhesion, growth, and spatial structure were evaluated along with shifts in composition and matrix production in a low disturbance regime, simulating source habitat. Initial adhesion and substratum colonisation appeared as stochastic processes, then community structure and physiognomy markedly changed with time. Dominance of filamentous cyanobacteria and diatoms, and dense clusters of Amphidinium cf. carterae at the mature biofilm phases, were recorded by light and confocal microscopy, whilst O. cf. ovata growth was visibly limited in the late culture phases. Life-form strategies, competitiveness for resources, and possibly allelopathic interactions shaped biofilm structure during culture growth. HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography analysis of exopolysaccharidic matrix revealed variations in sugar total amounts and composition. No toxic compounds were detected in the final communities tested by LC-MS (Liquid Chromatography- Mass Spectrometry and MALDI-TOF MS (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time OF Flight Mass Spectroscopy techniques.

  16. Microbiology of dental plaque biofilms and their role in oral health and caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Philip D

    2010-07-01

    Dental plaque is the biofilm found naturally on teeth. Dental plaque is also implicated in dental caries, which is associated with shifts in the microbial balance of the biofilm resulting in increased proportions of acid producing and acid tolerating bacteria, especially (but not exclusively) mutans streptococci and lactobacilli. The regular intake of fermentable dietary sugars, or impaired saliva flow, produces persistent conditions of low pH within the biofilm, which selects for these cariogenic bacteria. Clinicians should prevent this disruption to the natural microbial balance of the biofilm (relevant approaches are described) rather than merely treating its consequences by restoring cavities. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Meningococcal biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappann, M.; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Claus, H.

    2006-01-01

    We show that in a standardized in vitro flow system unencapsulated variants of genetically diverse lineages of Neisseria meningitidis formed biofilms, that could be maintained for more than 96 h. Biofilm cells were resistant to penicillin, but not to rifampin or ciprofloxacin. For some strains......, microcolony formation within biofilms was observed. Microcolony formation in strain MC58 depended on a functional copy of the pilE gene encoding the pilus subunit pilin, and was associated with twitching of cells. Nevertheless, unpiliated pilE mutants formed biofilms showing that attachment and accumulation......X alleles was identified among genetically diverse meningococcal strains. PilX alleles differed in their propensity to support autoaggregation of cells in suspension, but not in their ability to support microcolony formation within biofilms in the continuous flow system....

  18. Computation studies into architecture and energy transfer properties of photosynthetic units from filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linnanto, Juha Matti [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Freiberg, Arvi [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu, Estonia and Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Tartu, Riia 23, 51010 Tartu (Estonia)

    2014-10-06

    We have used different computational methods to study structural architecture, and light-harvesting and energy transfer properties of the photosynthetic unit of filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs. Due to the huge number of atoms in the photosynthetic unit, a combination of atomistic and coarse methods was used for electronic structure calculations. The calculations reveal that the light energy absorbed by the peripheral chlorosome antenna complex transfers efficiently via the baseplate and the core B808–866 antenna complexes to the reaction center complex, in general agreement with the present understanding of this complex system.

  19. Modeling the Habitat Range of Phototrophic Microorganisms in Yellowstone National Park: Toward the Development of a Comprehensive Fitness Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eBoyd

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which geochemical variation constrains the distribution of phototrophic metabolisms was modeled based on 439 observations in geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP, Wyoming. Generalized additive models (GAMs were developed to predict the distribution of photosynthesis as a function of spring temperature, pH, and total sulfide. GAMs comprised of temperature explained 42.7% of the variation in the distribution of phototrophic metabolisms whereas GAMs comprised of sulfide and pH explained 20.7% and 11.7% of the variation, respectively. These results suggest that of the measured variables, temperature is the primary constraint on the distribution of phototrophic metabolism in YNP. GAMs comprised of multiple variables explained a larger percentage of the variation in the distribution of phototrophic metabolism, indicating additive interactions among variables. A GAM that combined temperature and sulfide explained the greatest variation in the dataset (54.8% while minimizing the introduction of degrees of freedom. In an effort to verify the extent to which phototroph distribution reflects constraints on activity, we examined the influence of sulfide and temperature on dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC uptake rates under both light and dark conditions. Light-driven DIC uptake decreased systematically with increasing concentrations of sulfide in acidic, algal-dominated systems, but was unaffected in alkaline, bacterial-dominated systems. In both alkaline and acidic systems, light-driven DIC uptake was suppressed in cultures incubated at temperatures 10°C greater than their in situ temperature. Collectively, these results suggest that the habitat range of phototrophs in YNP springs, specifically that of cyanobacteria and algae, largely results from constraints imposed by temperature and sulfide on the activity and fitness of these populations, a finding that is consistent with the predictions from GAMs.

  20. Rapid assessment of different oxygenic phototrophs and single-cell photosynthesis with multicolour variable chlorophyll fluorescence imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trampe, Erik Christian Løvbjerg; Kolbowski, J.; Schreiber, U.

    2011-01-01

    , red or white light. Automated sequential exposure of microscopic samples to the three excitation colours enables subsequent deconvolution of the resulting fluorescence signals and colour marking of cells with different photopigmentation, i.e., cyanobacteria, green algae, red algae and diatoms....... The photosynthetic activity in complex mixtures of phototrophs and natural samples can thus be assigned to different types of phototrophs, which can be quantified simultaneously. Here, we describe the composition and performance of the new imaging system and present applications with both natural phytoplankton...

  1. Microscale profiling of photosynthesis-related variables in a highly productive biofilm photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong; Piltz, Bastian; Podola, Björn; Dron, Anthony; de Beer, Dirk; Melkonian, Michael

    2016-05-01

    In the present study depth profiles of light, oxygen, pH and photosynthetic performance in an artificial biofilm of the green alga Halochlorella rubescens in a porous substrate photobioreactor (PSBR) were recorded with microsensors. Biofilms were exposed to different light intensities (50-1,000 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) ) and CO2 levels (0.04-5% v/v in air). The distribution of photosynthetically active radiation showed almost identical trends for different surface irradiances, namely: a relatively fast drop to a depth of about 250 µm, (to 5% of the incident), followed by a slower decrease. Light penetrated into the biofilm deeper than the Lambert-Beer Law predicted, which may be attributed to forward scattering of light, thus improving the overall light availability. Oxygen concentration profiles showed maxima at a depth between 50 and 150 μm, depending on the incident light intensity. A very fast gas exchange was observed at the biofilm surface. The highest oxygen concentration of 3.2 mM was measured with 1,000 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) and 5% supplementary CO2. Photosynthetic productivity increased with light intensity and/or CO2 concentration and was always highest at the biofilm surface; the stimulating effect of elevated CO2 concentration in the gas phase on photosynthesis was enhanced by higher light intensities. The dissolved inorganic carbon concentration profiles suggest that the availability of the dissolved free CO2 has the strongest impact on photosynthetic productivity. The results suggest that dark respiration could explain previously observed decrease in growth rate over cultivation time in this type of PSBR. Our results represent a basis for understanding the complex dynamics of environmental variables and metabolic processes in artificial phototrophic biofilms exposed to a gas phase and can be used to improve the design and operational parameters of PSBRs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Effects of humic acid on the interactions between zinc oxide nanoparticles and bacterial biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Kai; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zhu, Yunlin; Gao, Chunhui; Huang, Qiaoyun; Cai, Peng

    2017-12-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) on interactions between ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and Pseudomonas putida KT2440 biofilms at different maturity stages were investigated. Three stages of biofilm development were identified according to bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) activity associated with biofilm development process. In the initial biofilm stage 1, the ATP content of bacteria was reduced by more than 90% when biofilms were exposed to ZnO NPs. However, in the mature biofilm stages 2 and 3, the ATP content was only slightly decreased. Biofilms at stage 3 exhibited less susceptibility to ZnO NPs than biofilms at stage 2. These results suggest that more mature biofilms have a significantly higher tolerance to ZnO NPs compared to young biofilms. In addition, biofilms with intact extracellular poly-meric substances (EPS) showed higher tolerance to ZnO NPs than those without EPS, indicating that EPS play a key role in alleviating the toxic effects of ZnO NPs. In both pure ZnO NPs and ZnO-HA mixtures, dissolved Zn2+ originating from the NPs significantly contributed to the overall toxicity. The presence of HA dramatically decreased the toxicity of ZnO NPs due to the binding of Zn2+ on HA. The combined results from this work suggest that the biofilm maturity stages and environmental constituents (such as humic acid) are important factors to consider when evaluating potential risks of NPs to ecological systems.

  3. A Biofilm Matrix-Associated Protease Inhibitor Protects Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Proteolytic Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Boo Shan; Reichhardt, Courtney; Merrihew, Gennifer E; Araujo-Hernandez, Sophia A; Harrison, Joe J; MacCoss, Michael J; Parsek, Matthew R

    2018-04-10

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces an extracellular biofilm matrix that consists of nucleic acids, exopolysaccharides, lipid vesicles, and proteins. In general, the protein component of the biofilm matrix is poorly defined and understudied relative to the other major matrix constituents. While matrix proteins have been suggested to provide many functions to the biofilm, only proteins that play a structural role have been characterized thus far. Here we identify proteins enriched in the matrix of P. aeruginosa biofilms. We then focused on a candidate matrix protein, the serine protease inhibitor ecotin (PA2755). This protein is able to inhibit neutrophil elastase, a bactericidal enzyme produced by the host immune system during P. aeruginosa biofilm infections. We show that ecotin binds to the key biofilm matrix exopolysaccharide Psl and that it can inhibit neutrophil elastase when associated with Psl. Finally, we show that ecotin protects both planktonic and biofilm P. aeruginosa cells from neutrophil elastase-mediated killing. This may represent a novel mechanism of protection for biofilms to increase their tolerance against the innate immune response. IMPORTANCE Proteins associated with the extracellular matrix of bacterial aggregates called biofilms have long been suggested to provide many important functions to the community. To date, however, only proteins that provide structural roles have been described, and few matrix-associated proteins have been identified. We developed a method to identify matrix proteins and characterized one. We show that this protein, when associated with the biofilm matrix, can inhibit a bactericidal enzyme produced by the immune system during infection and protect biofilm cells from death induced by the enzyme. This may represent a novel mechanism of protection for biofilms, further increasing their tolerance against the immune response. Together, our results are the first to show a nonstructural function for a confirmed matrix

  4. Phenotypes of Non-Attached Pseudomonas aeruginosa Aggregates Resemble Surface Attached Biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    For a chronic infection to be established, bacteria must be able to cope with hostile conditions such as low iron levels, oxidative stress, and clearance by the host defense, as well as antibiotic treatment. It is generally accepted that biofilm formation facilitates tolerance to these adverse......, RT-PCR as well as traditional culturing techniques to study the properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregates. We found that non-attached aggregates from stationary-phase cultures have comparable growth rates to surface attached biofilms. The growth rate estimations indicated that, independently...... were also found to be strikingly similar to flow-cell biofilms. Our data indicate that the tolerance of both biofilms and non-attached aggregates towards antibiotics is reversible by physical disruption. We provide evidence that the antibiotic tolerance is likely to be dependent on both...

  5. Carbon metabolic pathways in phototrophic bacteria and their broader evolutionary implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hsiang eTang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis is the biological process that converts solar energy to biomass, bio-products and biofuel. It is the only major natural solar energy storage mechanism on Earth. To satisfy the increased demand for sustainable energy sources and identify the mechanism of photosynthetic carbon assimilation, which is one of the bottlenecks in photosynthesis, it is essential to understand the process of solar energy storage and associated carbon metabolism in photosynthetic organisms. Researchers have employed physiological studies, microbiological chemistry, enzyme assays, genome sequencing, transcriptomics, and 13C-based metabolomics/fluxomics to investigate central carbon metabolism and enzymes that operate in phototrophs. In this report, we review diverse CO2 assimilation pathways, acetate assimilation, carbohydrate catabolism, the TCA cycle and some key and/or unconventional enzymes in central carbon metabolism of phototrophic microorganisms. We also discuss the reducing equivalent flow during photoautotrophic and photoheterotrophic growth, evolutionary links in the central carbon metabolic network, and correlations between photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic organisms. Considering the metabolic versatility in these fascinating and diverse photosynthetic bacteria, many essential questions in their central carbon metabolism still remain to be addressed.

  6. Biofilms Formed by Gram-Negative Bacteria Undergo Increased Lipid A Palmitoylation, Enhancing In Vivo Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalabaev, Sabina; Chauhan, Ashwini; Novikov, Alexey; Iyer, Pavithra; Szczesny, Magdalena; Beloin, Christophe; Caroff, Martine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial biofilm communities are associated with profound physiological changes that lead to novel properties compared to the properties of individual (planktonic) bacteria. The study of biofilm-associated phenotypes is an essential step toward control of deleterious effects of pathogenic biofilms. Here we investigated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structural modifications in Escherichia coli biofilm bacteria, and we showed that all tested commensal and pathogenic E. coli biofilm bacteria display LPS modifications corresponding to an increased level of incorporation of palmitate acyl chain (palmitoylation) into lipid A compared to planktonic bacteria. Genetic analysis showed that lipid A palmitoylation in biofilms is mediated by the PagP enzyme, which is regulated by the histone-like protein repressor H-NS and the SlyA regulator. While lipid A palmitoylation does not influence bacterial adhesion, it weakens inflammatory response and enhances resistance to some antimicrobial peptides. Moreover, we showed that lipid A palmitoylation increases in vivo survival of biofilm bacteria in a clinically relevant model of catheter infection, potentially contributing to biofilm tolerance to host immune defenses. The widespread occurrence of increased lipid A palmitoylation in biofilms formed by all tested bacteria suggests that it constitutes a new biofilm-associated phenotype in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25139899

  7. Studying bacterial multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence and significance of multispecies biofilms have now been demonstrated in various bacterial habitats with medical, industrial, and ecological relevance. It is highly evident that several species of bacteria coexist and interact in biofilms, which highlights the need for evaluating...... the approaches used to study these complex communities. This review focuses on the establishment of multispecies biofilms in vitro, interspecies interactions in microhabitats, and how to select communities for evaluation. Studies have used different experimental approaches; here we evaluate the benefits...... and drawbacks of varying the degree of complexity. This review aims to facilitate multispecies biofilm research in order to expand the current limited knowledge on interspecies interactions. Recent technological advances have enabled total diversity analysis of highly complex and diverse microbial communities...

  8. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  9. Interactions in multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burmølle, Mette; Ren, Dawei; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The recent focus on complex bacterial communities has led to the recognition of interactions across species boundaries. This is particularly pronounced in multispecies biofilms, where synergistic interactions impact the bacterial distribution and overall biomass produced. Importantly, in a number...... of settings, the interactions in a multispecies biofilm affect its overall function, physiology, or surroundings, by resulting in enhanced resistance, virulence, or degradation of pollutants, which is of significant importance to human health and activities. The underlying mechanisms causing these synergistic...

  10. Novel acsF Gene Primers Revealed a Diverse Phototrophic Bacterial Population, Including Gemmatimonadetes, in Lake Taihu (China)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huang, Y.; Zeng, Y.; Lu, H.; Feng, H.; Zeng, Yo.; Koblížek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 18 (2016), s. 5587-5594 ISSN 0099-2240 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-11281S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : AEROBIC ANOXYGENIC PHOTOTROPHS * MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES * OPERONS Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 3.807, year: 2016

  11. Evolutionary Divergence of Marine Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria as Seen from Diverse Organisations of Their Photosynthesis Gene Clusters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zheng, Q.; Koblížek, Michal; Beatty, J.T.; Jiao, N.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 2013 (2013), s. 359-383 ISSN 0065-2296 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/0221; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0110 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria * photosynthesis * genome sequence Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.740, year: 2013

  12. Bacteriophages and Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Harper

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are an extremely common adaptation, allowing bacteria to colonize hostile environments. They present unique problems for antibiotics and biocides, both due to the nature of the extracellular matrix and to the presence within the biofilm of metabolically inactive persister cells. Such chemicals can be highly effective against planktonic bacterial cells, while being essentially ineffective against biofilms. By contrast, bacteriophages seem to have a greater ability to target this common form of bacterial growth. The high numbers of bacteria present within biofilms actually facilitate the action of bacteriophages by allowing rapid and efficient infection of the host and consequent amplification of the bacteriophage. Bacteriophages also have a number of properties that make biofilms susceptible to their action. They are known to produce (or to be able to induce enzymes that degrade the extracellular matrix. They are also able to infect persister cells, remaining dormant within them, but re-activating when they become metabolically active. Some cultured biofilms also seem better able to support the replication of bacteriophages than comparable planktonic systems. It is perhaps unsurprising that bacteriophages, as the natural predators of bacteria, have the ability to target this common form of bacterial life.

  13. Phototrophic gemmatimonadetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yonghui; Koblížek, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthesis first emerged in prokaryotes over three billion years ago and represents one of the most fundamental biological processes on Earth. So far, species capable of performing (bacterio)chlorophyll-based phototrophy have been reported in seven bacterial phyla, i.e., Cyanobacteria, Proteo...

  14. Interspecific bacterial interactions are reflected in multispecies biofilm spatial organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzheng Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Interspecies interactions are essential for the persistence and development of any kind of complex community, and microbial biofilms are no exception. Multispecies biofilms are structured and spatially defined communities that have received much attention due to their omnipresence in natural environments. Species residing in these complex bacterial communities usually interact both intra- and interspecifically. Such interactions are considered to not only be fundamental in shaping overall biomass and the spatial distribution of cells residing in multispecies biofilms, but also to result in coordinated regulation of gene expression in the different species present. These communal interactions often lead to emergent properties in biofilms, such as enhanced tolerance against antibiotics, host immune responses and other stresses, which have been shown to provide benefits to all biofilm members not only the enabling sub-populations. However, the specific molecular mechanisms of cellular processes affecting spatial organization, and vice versa, are poorly understood and very complex to unravel. Therefore, detailed description of the spatial organization of individual bacterial cells in multispecies communities can be an alternative strategy to reveal the nature of interspecies interactions of constituent species. Closing the gap between visual observation and biological processes may become crucial for resolving biofilm related problems, which is of utmost importance to environmental, industrial, and clinical implications. This review briefly presents the state of the art of studying interspecies interactions and spatial organization of multispecies communities, aiming to support theoretical and practical arguments for further advancement of this field.

  15. Feeding by phototrophic red-tide dinoflagellates on the ubiquitous marine diatom Skeletonema costatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Yoo, Yeong; Jeong, Hae Jin; Kim, Mi Seon; Kang, Nam Seon; Song, Jae Yoon; Shin, Woongghi; Kim, Kwang Young; Lee, Kitack

    2009-01-01

    We investigated feeding by phototrophic red-tide dinoflagellates on the ubiquitous diatom Skeletonema costatum to explore whether dinoflagellates are able to feed on S. costatum, inside the protoplasm of target dinoflagellate cells observed under compound microscope, confocal microscope, epifluorescence microscope, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) after adding living and fluorescently labeled S. costatum (FLSc). To explore effects of dinoflagellate predator size on ingestion rates of S. costatum, we measured ingestion rates of seven dinoflagellates at a single prey concentration. In addition, we measured ingestion rates of the common phototrophic dinoflagellates Prorocentrum micans and Gonyaulax polygramma on S. costatum as a function of prey concentration. We calculated grazing coefficients by combining field data on abundances of P. micans and G. polygramma on co-occurring S. costatum with laboratory data on ingestion rates obtained in the present study. All phototrophic dinoflagellate predators tested (i.e. Akashiwo sanguinea, Amphidinium carterae, Alexandrium catenella, Alexandrium tamarense, Cochlodinium polykrikoides, G. polygramma, Gymnodinium catenatum, Gymnodinium impudicum, Heterocapsa rotundata, Heterocapsa triquetra, Lingulodinium polyedrum, Prorocentrum donghaiense, P. micans, Prorocentrum minimum, Prorocentrum triestinum, and Scrippsiella trochoidea) were able to ingest S. costatum. When mean prey concentrations were 170-260 ng C/ml (i.e. 6,500-10,000 cells/ml), the ingestion rates of G. polygramma, H. rotundata, H. triquetra, L. polyedrum, P. donghaiense, P. micans, and P. triestinum on S. costatum (0.007-0.081 ng C/dinoflagellate/d [0.2-3.0 cells/dinoflagellate/d]) were positively correlated with predator size. With increasing mean prey concentration of ca 1-3,440 ng C/ml (40-132,200 cells/ml), the ingestion rates of P. micans and G. polygramma on S. costatum continuously increased. At the given prey concentrations, the maximum ingestion

  16. Helicobacter pylori Biofilm Formation and Its Potential Role in Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathroubi, Skander; Servetas, Stephanie L; Windham, Ian; Merrell, D Scott; Ottemann, Karen M

    2018-06-01

    Despite decades of effort, Helicobacter pylori infections remain difficult to treat. Over half of the world's population is infected by H. pylori , which is a major cause of duodenal and gastric ulcers as well as gastric cancer. During chronic infection, H. pylori localizes within the gastric mucosal layer, including deep within invaginations called glands; thanks to its impressive ability to survive despite the harsh acidic environment, it can persist for the host's lifetime. This ability to survive and persist in the stomach is associated with urease production, chemotactic motility, and the ability to adapt to the fluctuating environment. Additionally, biofilm formation has recently been suggested to play a role in colonization. Biofilms are surface-associated communities of bacteria that are embedded in a hydrated matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Biofilms pose a substantial health risk and are key contributors to many chronic and recurrent infections. This link between biofilm-associated bacteria and chronic infections likely results from an increased tolerance to conventional antibiotic treatments as well as immune system action. The role of this biofilm mode in antimicrobial treatment failure and H. pylori survival has yet to be determined. Furthermore, relatively little is known about the H. pylori biofilm structure or the genes associated with this mode of growth. In this review, therefore, we aim to highlight recent findings concerning H. pylori biofilms and the molecular mechanism of their formation. Additionally, we discuss the potential roles of biofilms in the failure of antibiotic treatment and in infection recurrence. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Purple Phototrophic Bacterium Enhances Stevioside Yield by Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni via Foliar Spray and Rhizosphere Irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Yiming; Lin, Xiangui

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the effects of foliar spray and rhizosphere irrigation with purple phototrophic bacteria (PPB) on growth and stevioside (ST) yield of Stevia. rebaudiana. The S. rebaudiana plants were treated by foliar spray, rhizosphere irrigation, and spray plus irrigation with PPB for 10 days, respectively. All treatments enhanced growth of S. rebaudiana, and the foliar method was more efficient than irrigation. Spraying combined with irrigation increased the ST yield plant -1 by 69.2% as compared to the control. The soil dehydrogenase activity, S. rebaudiana shoot biomass, chlorophyll content in new leaves, and soluble sugar in old leaves were affected significantly by S+I treatment, too. The PPB probably works in the rhizosphere by activating the metabolic activity of soil bacteria, and on leaves by excreting phytohormones or enhancing the activity of phyllosphere microorganisms. PMID:23825677

  18. Anti-biofilm efficacy of low temperature processed AgCl–TiO2 nanocomposite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, Kshipra; Kowshik, Meenal

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are a major concern in the medical settings and food industries due to their high tolerance to antibiotics, biocides and mechanical stress. Currently, the development of novel methods to control biofilm formation is being actively pursued. In the present study, sol–gel coatings of AgCl–TiO 2 nanoparticles are presented as potential anti-biofilm agents, wherein TiO 2 acts as a good supporting matrix to prevent aggregation of silver and facilitates its controlled release. Low-temperature processed AgCl–TiO 2 nanocomposite coatings inhibit biofilm formation by Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In vitro biofilm assay experiments demonstrated that AgCl–TiO 2 nanocomposite coated surfaces, inhibited the development of biofilms over a period of 10 days as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The silver release kinetics exhibited an initial high release, followed by a slow and sustained release. The anti-biofilm efficacy of the coatings could be attributed to the release of silver, which prevents the initial bacterial adhesion required for biofilm formation. - Highlights: • Potential of AgCl–TiO 2 nanocomposite coating to inhibit biofilm formation is exhibited. • Initial rapid release followed by later slow and sustained release of silver obtained. • TiO 2 being porous and inorganic in nature acts as a good supporting matrix

  19. Nitrogen transformation under different dissolved oxygen levels by the anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Marichromatium gracile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xuan; Chen, Zhongwei; Zhao, Chungui; Yang, Suping

    2017-06-01

    Marichromatium gracile: YL28 (M. gracile YL28) is an anoxygenic phototrophic bacterial strain that utilizes ammonia, nitrate, or nitrite as its sole nitrogen source during growth. In this study, we investigated the removal and transformation of ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite by M. gracile YL28 grown in a combinatorial culture system of sodium acetate-ammonium, sodium acetate-nitrate and sodium acetate-nitrite in response to different initial dissolved oxygen (DO) levels. In the sodium acetate-ammonium system under aerobic conditions (initial DO = 7.20-7.25 mg/L), we detected a continuous accumulation of nitrate and nitrite. However, under semi-anaerobic conditions (initial DO = 4.08-4.26 mg/L), we observed a temporary accumulation of nitrate and nitrite. Interestingly, under anaerobic conditions (initial DO = 0.36-0.67 mg/L), there was little accumulation of nitrate and nitrite, but an increase in nitrous oxide production. In the sodium acetate-nitrite system, nitrite levels declined slightly under aerobic conditions, and nitrite was completely removed under semi-anaerobic and anaerobic conditions. In addition, M. gracile YL28 was able to grow using nitrite as the sole nitrogen source in situations when nitrogen gas produced by denitrification was eliminated. Taken together, the data indicate that M. gracile YL28 performs simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and denitrification at low-DO levels and uses nitrite as the sole nitrogen source for growth. Our study is the first to demonstrate that anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria perform heterotrophic ammonia-oxidization and denitrification under anaerobic conditions.

  20. Constraining the role of anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria in deposition of BIFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappler, A.; Posth, N. R.; Hegler, F.; Wartha, E.; Huelin, S.

    2007-12-01

    Banded Iron Formations (BIFs) are Precambrian sedimentary deposits of alternating iron oxide and silica mineral layers. Their presence in the rock record ca.3.8-2.2 Ga makes them particularly intriguing formations for the debate over when oxygen became dominant on Earth. The mechanism(s) of BIF deposition is still unclear; suggestions including both abiotic and biotic processes. We are interested in constraining one of these proposed mechanisms; the direct biological oxidation of Fe(II) via anoxygenic Fe(II)-oxidizing autophototrophs. In order to find the limitations of photoferrotrophic BIF deposition, we take a holistic approach, investigating the oxidation of Fe(II) by modern Fe(II)-oxidizing phototrophs, the precipitation of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, and the fate of the cell-mineral aggregates in the water column and at the basin floor. Specifically, physiology experiments with Fe(II)-oxidizing phototrophs under various conditions of light intensity, pH, Fe(II) concentration and temperature allow us to determine the environmental limits of such organisms. We carry out precipitation experiments to characterize the sedimentation rates, aggregate size and composition in order to resolve the effect of reactions in the water column. Finally, we simulate the diagenetic fate of these aggregates on the basin floor by placing them in gold capsules under T and P conditions relevant for the Transvaal Supergroup BIFs of South Africa. Recently, we have developed a tank simulating the Archean ocean in which the strains grow in continuous culture and collect the aggregates formed under various geochemical conditions. We aim to model the extent of and limitations to photoferrotrophs in BIF deposition. This information will help constrain whether biotic processes were dominant in the Archean ocean and will offer insight to the evolution of the early biogeosphere.

  1. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Phuc T.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Atci, Erhan; Reardon, Patrick N.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, James K.; Call, Douglas R.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA). We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mVAg/AgCl [cathodic (CAT) mat system] and +300 mVAg/AgCl [anodic (AN) mat system] and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both AN and CAT mat systems. Interestingly, the CAT mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the AN mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO) and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the CAT mats than in the AN mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the CAT mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. These data suggested that variation in the

  2. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk eBeyenal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA. We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mVAg/AgCl (cathodic mat system and +300 mVAg/AgCl (anodic mat system and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both anodic and cathodic mat systems. Interestingly, the cathodic mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the anodic mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the cathodic mats than in the anodic mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the cathodic mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. These data suggested that

  3. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Phuc T; Renslow, Ryan S; Atci, Erhan; Reardon, Patrick N; Lindemann, Stephen R; Fredrickson, James K; Call, Douglas R; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA). We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mVAg/AgCl [cathodic (CAT) mat system] and +300 mVAg/AgCl [anodic (AN) mat system] and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both AN and CAT mat systems. Interestingly, the CAT mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the AN mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO) and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the CAT mats than in the AN mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the CAT mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. These data suggested that variation in the

  4. Optimized candidal biofilm microtiter assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krom, Bastiaan P.; Cohen, Jesse B.; Feser, Gail E. McElhaney; Cihlar, Ronald L.

    Microtiter based candidal biofilm formation is commonly being used. Here we describe the analysis of factors influencing the development of candidal biofilms such as the coating with serum, growth medium and pH. The data reported here show that optimal candidal biofilm formation is obtained when

  5. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria can attach to any surface in contact with water and proliferate into complex communities enclosed in an adhesive matrix, these communities are called biofilms. The matrix makes the biofilm difficult to remove by physical means, and bacteria in biofilm can survive treatment with many...

  6. Bacterial biofilm mechanical properties persist upon antibiotic treatment and survive cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zrelli, K; Galy, O; Henry, N; Latour-Lambert, P; Ghigo, J M; Beloin, C; Kirwan, L

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria living on surfaces form heterogeneous three-dimensional consortia known as biofilms, where they exhibit many specific properties one of which is an increased tolerance to antibiotics. Biofilms are maintained by a polymeric network and display physical properties similar to that of complex fluids. In this work, we address the question of the impact of antibiotic treatment on the physical properties of biofilms based on recently developed tools enabling the in situ mapping of biofilm local mechanical properties at the micron scale. This approach takes into account the material heterogeneity and reveals the spatial distribution of all the small changes that may occur in the structure. With an Escherichia coli biofilm, we demonstrate using in situ fluorescent labeling that the two antibiotics ofloxacin and ticarcillin—targeting DNA replication and membrane assembly, respectively—induced no detectable alteration of the biofilm mechanical properties while they killed the vast majority of the cells. In parallel, we show that a proteolytic enzyme that cleaves extracellular proteins into short peptides, but does not alter bacterial viability in the biofilm, clearly affects the mechanical properties of the biofilm structure, inducing a significant increase of the material compliance. We conclude that conventional biofilm control strategy relying on the use of biocides targeting cells is missing a key target since biofilm structural integrity is preserved. This is expected to efficiently promote biofilm resilience, especially in the presence of persister cells. In contrast, the targeting of polymer network cross-links—among which extracellular proteins emerge as major players—offers a promising route for the development of rational multi-target strategies to fight against biofilms. (paper)

  7. Bacterial biofilm mechanical properties persist upon antibiotic treatment and survive cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrelli, K.; Galy, O.; Latour-Lambert, P.; Kirwan, L.; Ghigo, J. M.; Beloin, C.; Henry, N.

    2013-12-01

    Bacteria living on surfaces form heterogeneous three-dimensional consortia known as biofilms, where they exhibit many specific properties one of which is an increased tolerance to antibiotics. Biofilms are maintained by a polymeric network and display physical properties similar to that of complex fluids. In this work, we address the question of the impact of antibiotic treatment on the physical properties of biofilms based on recently developed tools enabling the in situ mapping of biofilm local mechanical properties at the micron scale. This approach takes into account the material heterogeneity and reveals the spatial distribution of all the small changes that may occur in the structure. With an Escherichia coli biofilm, we demonstrate using in situ fluorescent labeling that the two antibiotics ofloxacin and ticarcillin—targeting DNA replication and membrane assembly, respectively—induced no detectable alteration of the biofilm mechanical properties while they killed the vast majority of the cells. In parallel, we show that a proteolytic enzyme that cleaves extracellular proteins into short peptides, but does not alter bacterial viability in the biofilm, clearly affects the mechanical properties of the biofilm structure, inducing a significant increase of the material compliance. We conclude that conventional biofilm control strategy relying on the use of biocides targeting cells is missing a key target since biofilm structural integrity is preserved. This is expected to efficiently promote biofilm resilience, especially in the presence of persister cells. In contrast, the targeting of polymer network cross-links—among which extracellular proteins emerge as major players—offers a promising route for the development of rational multi-target strategies to fight against biofilms.

  8. Alginate production affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development and architecture, but is not essential for biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stapper, A.P.; Narasimhan, G.; Oman, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    of their biofilm formation using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Biofilm Image Processing (BIP) and Community Statistics (COMSTAT) software programs were used to provide quantitative measurements of the two-dimensional biofilm images. All three strains formed distinguishable biofilm architectures, indicating...

  9. Adaptation of intertidal biofilm communities is driven by metal ion and oxidative stresses

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Weipeng; Wang, Yong; Lee, On On; Tian, Renmao; Cao, Huiluo; Gao, Zhaoming; Li, Yongxin; Yu, Li; Xu, Ying; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Marine organisms in intertidal zones are subjected to periodical fluctuations and wave activities. To understand how microbes in intertidal biofilms adapt to the stresses, the microbial metagenomes of biofilms from intertidal and subtidal zones were compared. The genes responsible for resistance to metal ion and oxidative stresses were enriched in both 6-day and 12-day intertidal biofilms, including genes associated with secondary metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, signal transduction and extracellular polymeric substance metabolism. In addition, these genes were more enriched in 12-day than 6-day intertidal biofilms. We hypothesize that a complex signaling network is used for stress tolerance and propose a model illustrating the relationships between these functions and environmental metal ion concentrations and oxidative stresses. These findings show that bacteria use diverse mechanisms to adapt to intertidal zones and indicate that the community structures of intertidal biofilms are modulated by metal ion and oxidative stresses.

  10. Adaptation of intertidal biofilm communities is driven by metal ion and oxidative stresses

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Weipeng

    2013-11-11

    Marine organisms in intertidal zones are subjected to periodical fluctuations and wave activities. To understand how microbes in intertidal biofilms adapt to the stresses, the microbial metagenomes of biofilms from intertidal and subtidal zones were compared. The genes responsible for resistance to metal ion and oxidative stresses were enriched in both 6-day and 12-day intertidal biofilms, including genes associated with secondary metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, signal transduction and extracellular polymeric substance metabolism. In addition, these genes were more enriched in 12-day than 6-day intertidal biofilms. We hypothesize that a complex signaling network is used for stress tolerance and propose a model illustrating the relationships between these functions and environmental metal ion concentrations and oxidative stresses. These findings show that bacteria use diverse mechanisms to adapt to intertidal zones and indicate that the community structures of intertidal biofilms are modulated by metal ion and oxidative stresses.

  11. Dental biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Fiehn, Nils-Erik

    2017-01-01

    and cause gingival inflammation and breakdown of supporting periodontal fibers and bone and ultimately tooth loss, i.e., gingivitis, chronic or aggressive periodontitis, and around dental implants, peri-implantitis. Furthermore, bacteria from the dental biofilm may spread to other parts of the body......-fermenting bacteria causing demineralization of teeth, dental caries, which may further lead to inflammation and necrosis in the pulp and periapical region, i.e., pulpitis and periapical periodontitis. In supra- and subgingival biofilms, predominantly gram-negative, anaerobic proteolytic bacteria will colonize...

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael

    2014-01-01

    biofilms, which protect the aggregated, biopolymer-embedded bacteria from the detrimental actions of antibiotic treatments and host immunity. A key component in the protection against innate immunity is rhamnolipid, which is a quorum sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factor. QS is a cell-to-cell signaling...... mechanism used to coordinate expression of virulence and protection of aggregated biofilm cells. Rhamnolipids are known for their ability to cause hemolysis and have been shown to cause lysis of several cellular components of the human immune system, for example, macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  13. Manipulatiaon of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Palmer, R.J.; Smith, C.A.; Whitaker, K.W.; White, D.C.; Zinn, M.; kirkegaard, R.

    1998-08-09

    The Biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms by generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desquamation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in the distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  14. Bacterial biofilm and associated infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhsin Jamal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic entities, microorganisms that drastically affect human health need to be thoroughly investigated. A biofilm is an architectural colony of microorganisms, within a matrix of extracellular polymeric substance that they produce. Biofilm contains microbial cells adherent to one-another and to a static surface (living or non-living. Bacterial biofilms are usually pathogenic in nature and can cause nosocomial infections. The National Institutes of Health (NIH revealed that among all microbial and chronic infections, 65% and 80%, respectively, are associated with biofilm formation. The process of biofilm formation consists of many steps, starting with attachment to a living or non-living surface that will lead to formation of micro-colony, giving rise to three-dimensional structures and ending up, after maturation, with detachment. During formation of biofilm several species of bacteria communicate with one another, employing quorum sensing. In general, bacterial biofilms show resistance against human immune system, as well as against antibiotics. Health related concerns speak loud due to the biofilm potential to cause diseases, utilizing both device-related and non-device-related infections. In summary, the understanding of bacterial biofilm is important to manage and/or to eradicate biofilm-related diseases. The current review is, therefore, an effort to encompass the current concepts in biofilm formation and its implications in human health and disease.

  15. Manipulation of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.C.; Palmer, R.J., Jr.; Zinn, M.; Smith, C.A.; Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Whitaker, K.W.; Kirkegaard, R.D.

    1998-08-15

    The biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms be generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desaturation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  16. Antimicrobial potential of Eucalyptus globulus against biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine mastitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, F. I.; Martins, Natália; Ferreira, Isabel C. F. R.; Henriques, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus are among the most common species isolated from bovine mastitis. The pathogenesis of this bacterium is facilitated by a number of virulence factors, including the ability to adhere to abiotic surfaces and/or host tissues often leading to biofilms' formation. From the clinical perspective, the most important feature of Staphytococcus species' biofilms is their high tolerance to the conventional antimicrobial therapy. So, the increasing number of bovine m...

  17. Biofilm in endodontics: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Parolia, Abhishek; Shetty, K Vikram; Mehta, Lata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic disease is a biofilm-mediated infection, and primary aim in the management of endodontic disease is the elimination of bacterial biofilm from the root canal system. The most common endodontic infection is caused by the surface-associated growth of microorganisms. It is important to apply the biofilm concept to endodontic microbiology to understand the pathogenic potential of the root canal microbiota as well as to form the basis for new approaches for disinfection. It is foremost to understand how the biofilm formed by root canal bacteria resists endodontic treatment measures. Bacterial etiology has been confirmed for common oral diseases such as caries and periodontal and endodontic infections. Bacteria causing these diseases are organized in biofilm structures, which are complex microbial communities composed of a great variety of bacteria with different ecological requirements and pathogenic potential. The biofilm community not only gives bacteria effective protection against the host's defense system but also makes them more resistant to a variety of disinfecting agents used as oral hygiene products or in the treatment of infections. Successful treatment of these diseases depends on biofilm removal as well as effective killing of biofilm bacteria. So, the fundamental to maintain oral health and prevent dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis is to control the oral biofilms. From these aspects, the formation of biofilms carries particular clinical significance because not only host defense mechanisms but also therapeutic efforts including chemical and mechanical antimicrobial treatment measures have the most difficult task of dealing with organisms that are gathered in a biofilm. The aim of this article was to review the mechanisms of biofilms’ formation, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, the different types of biofilms, the factors influencing biofilm formation, the mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, techniques to

  18. Biofilm roughness determines Cryptosporidium parvum retention in environmental biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCesare, E A Wolyniak; Hargreaves, B R; Jellison, K L

    2012-06-01

    The genus Cryptosporidium is a group of waterborne protozoan parasites that have been implicated in significant outbreaks of gastrointestinal infections throughout the world. Biofilms trap these pathogens and can contaminate water supplies through subsequent release. Biofilm microbial assemblages were collected seasonally from three streams in eastern Pennsylvania and used to grow biofilms in laboratory microcosms. Daily oocyst counts in the influx and efflux flow allowed the calculation of daily oocyst retention in the biofilm. Following the removal of oocysts from the influx water, oocyst attachment to the biofilm declined to an equilibrium state within 5 days that was sustained for at least 25 days. Varying the oocyst loading rate for the system showed that biofilm retention could be saturated, suggesting that discrete binding sites determined the maximum number of oocysts retained. Oocyst retention varied seasonally but was consistent across all three sites; however, seasonal oocyst retention was not consistent across years at the same site. No correlation between oocyst attachment and any measured water quality parameter was found. However, oocyst retention was strongly correlated with biofilm surface roughness and roughness varied among seasons and across years. We hypothesize that biofilm roughness and oocyst retention are dependent on environmentally driven changes in the biofilm community rather than directly on water quality conditions. It is important to understand oocyst transport dynamics to reduce risks of human infection. Better understanding of factors controlling biofilm retention of oocysts should improve our understanding of oocyst transport at different scales.

  19. Commensal Protection of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobials by Candida albicans Biofilm Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Eric F.; Tsui, Christina; Kucharíková, Sona; Andes, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biofilm-associated polymicrobial infections, particularly those involving fungi and bacteria, are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality and tend to be challenging to treat. Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus specifically are considered leading opportunistic fungal and bacterial pathogens, respectively, mainly due to their ability to form biofilms on catheters and indwelling medical devices. However, the impact of mixed-species biofilm growth on therapy remains largely understudied. In this study, we investigated the influence of C. albicans secreted cell wall polysaccharides on the response of S. aureus to antibacterial agents in biofilm. Results demonstrated significantly enhanced tolerance for S. aureus to drugs in the presence of C. albicans or its secreted cell wall polysaccharide material. Fluorescence confocal time-lapse microscopy revealed impairment of drug diffusion through the mixed biofilm matrix. Using C. albicans mutant strains with modulated cell wall polysaccharide expression, exogenous supplementation, and enzymatic degradation, the C. albicans-secreted β-1,3-glucan cell wall component was identified as the key matrix constituent providing the bacteria with enhanced drug tolerance. Further, antibody labeling demonstrated rapid coating of the bacteria by the C. albicans matrix material. Importantly, via its effect on the fungal biofilm matrix, the antifungal caspofungin sensitized the bacteria to the drugs. Understanding such symbiotic interactions with clinical relevance between microbial species in biofilms will greatly aid in overcoming the limitations of current therapies and in defining potential new targets for treating polymicrobial infections. PMID:27729510

  20. Spatial distributions of Pseudomonas fluorescens colony variants in mixed-culture biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workentine, Matthew L; Wang, Siyuan; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J

    2013-07-28

    The emergence of colony morphology variants in structured environments is being recognized as important to both niche specialization and stress tolerance. Pseudomonas fluorescens demonstrates diversity in both its natural environment, the rhizosphere, and in laboratory grown biofilms. Sub-populations of these variants within a biofilm have been suggested as important contributors to antimicrobial stress tolerance given their altered susceptibility to various agents. As such it is of interest to determine how these variants might be distributed in the biofilm environment. Here we present an analysis of the spatial distribution of Pseudomonas fluorescens colony morphology variants in mixed-culture biofilms with the wildtype phenotype. These findings reveal that two variant colony morphotypes demonstrate a significant growth advantage over the wildtype morphotype in the biofilm environment. The two variant morphotypes out-grew the wildtype across the entire biofilm and this occurred within 24 h and was maintained through to 96 h. This competitive advantage was not observed in homogeneous broth culture. The significant advantage that the variants demonstrate in biofilm colonization over the wildtype denotes the importance of this phenotype in structured environments.

  1. PATHOGENICITY OF BIOFILM BACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a paucity of information concerning any link between the microorganisms commonly found in biofilms of drinking water systems and their impacts on human health. For bacteria, culture-based techniques detect only a limited number of the total microorganisms associated wit...

  2. [Biofilms in otolaryngology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena Viveros, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    According to the National Institute of Health of the USA, «more than 60% of all microbial infections are caused by biofilms».'This can surprise us, but it is enough to consider that common infections like those of the genito-urinary tract, infections produced by catheters, middle ear infections in children, the formation of dental plaque and gingivitis are caused by biofilms, for this statement to seem more realistic. At present this is one of the subjects of great interest within medicine, particularly in otolaryngology. Bacteria have traditionally been considered to be in a free state without evident organization, partly perhaps by the ease of studying them in this form. Nevertheless, the reality is that, in nature, the great majority of these germs form complex colonies adhered to surfaces, colonies that have received the name of biofilms. These biofilms are more common than previously thought and almost all of the people have been in contact with them in the form of infections in the teeth or humid, slippery areas. New treatments that can eradicate them are currently being investigated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Biofilm Matrix Composition Affects the Susceptibility of Food Associated Staphylococci to Cleaning and Disinfection Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Annette; Langsrud, Solveig; Heir, Even; Mikkelsen, Maria I.; Møretrø, Trond

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are frequently isolated from food processing environments, and it has been speculated whether survival after cleaning and disinfection with benzalkonium chloride (BC)-containing disinfectants is due to biofilm formation, matrix composition, or BC efflux mechanisms. Out of 35 food associated staphylococci, eight produced biofilm in a microtiter plate assay and were identified as Staphylococcus capitis (2), S. cohnii, S. epidermidis, S. lentus (2), and S. saprophyticus (2). The eight biofilm producing strains were characterized using whole genome sequencing. Three of these strains contained the ica operon responsible for production of a polysaccharide matrix, and formed a biofilm which was detached upon exposure to the polysaccharide degrading enzyme Dispersin B, but not Proteinase K or trypsin. These strains were more tolerant to the lethal effect of BC both in suspension and biofilm than the remaining five biofilm producing strains. The five BC susceptible strains were characterized by lack of the ica operon, and their biofilms were detached by Proteinase K or trypsin, but not Dispersin B, indicating that proteins were major structural components of their biofilm matrix. Several novel cell wall anchored repeat domain proteins with domain structures similar to that of MSCRAMM adhesins were identified in the genomes of these strains, potentially representing novel mechanisms of ica-independent biofilm accumulation. Biofilms from all strains showed similar levels of detachment after exposure to alkaline chlorine, which is used for cleaning in the food industry. Strains with qac genes encoding BC efflux pumps could grow at higher concentrations of BC than strains without these genes, but no differences were observed at biocidal concentrations. In conclusion, the biofilm matrix of food associated staphylococci varies with respect to protein or polysaccharide nature, and this may affect the sensitivity toward a commonly used disinfectant. PMID:27375578

  4. Biofilm matrix composition affects the susceptibility of food associated staphylococci to cleaning and disinfection agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette eFagerlund

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci are frequently isolated from food processing environments, and it has been speculated whether survival after cleaning and disinfection with benzalkonium chloride-containing disinfectants is due to biofilm formation, matrix composition or benzalkonium chloride efflux mechanisms. Out of 35 food associated staphylococci, eight produced biofilm in a microtiter plate assay and were identified as Staphylococcus capitis (2, S. cohnii, S. epidermidis, S. lentus (2, and S. saprophyticus (2. The eight biofilm producing strains were characterized using whole genome sequencing. Three of these strains contained the ica operon responsible for production of a polysaccharide matrix, and formed a biofilm which was detached upon exposure to the polysaccharide degrading enzyme Dispersin B, but not Proteinase K or trypsin. These strains were more tolerant to the lethal effect of benzalkonium chloride both in suspension and biofilm than the remaining five biofilm producing strains. The five benzalkonium chloride susceptible strains were characterized by lack of the ica operon, and their biofilms were detached by Proteinase K or trypsin, but not Dispersin B, indicating that proteins were major structural components of their biofilm matrix. Several novel cell wall anchored repeat domain proteins with domain structures similar to that of MSCRAMM adhesins were identified in the genomes of these strains, potentially representing novel mechanisms of ica-independent biofilm accumulation. Biofilms from all strains showed similar levels of detachment after exposure to alkaline chlorine, which is used for cleaning in the food industry. Strains with qac genes encoding benzalkonium chloride efflux pumps could grow at higher concentrations of benzalkonium chloride than strains without these genes, but no differences were observed at biocidal concentrations. In conclusion, the biofilm matrix of food associated staphylococci varies with respect to protein or

  5. Acid environments affect biofilm formation and gene expression in isolates of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Denis; McCabe, Evonne M; McCusker, Matthew P; Martins, Marta; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2015-08-03

    The aim of this study was to examine the survival and potential virulence of biofilm-forming Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 under mild acid conditions. Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 employs an acid tolerance response (ATR) allowing it to adapt to acidic environments. The threat that these acid adapted cells pose to food safety could be enhanced if they also produce biofilms in acidic conditions. The cells were acid-adapted by culturing them in 1% glucose and their ability to form biofilms on stainless steel and on the surface of Luria Bertani (LB) broth at pH7 and pH5 was examined. Plate counts were performed to examine cell survival. RNA was isolated from cells to examine changes in the expression of genes associated with virulence, invasion, biofilm formation and global gene regulation in response to acid stress. Of the 4 isolates that were examined only one (1481) that produced a rigid biofilm in LB broth at pH7 also formed this same structure at pH5. This indicated that the lactic acid severely impeded the biofilm producing capabilities of the other isolates examined under these conditions. Isolate 1481 also had higher expression of genes associated with virulence (hilA) and invasion (invA) with a 24.34-fold and 13.68-fold increase in relative gene expression respectively at pH5 compared to pH7. Although genes associated with biofilm formation had increased expression in response to acid stress for all the isolates this only resulted in the formation of a biofilm by isolate 1481. This suggests that in addition to the range of genes associated with biofilm production at neutral pH, there are genes whose protein products specifically aid in biofilm production in acidic environments. Furthermore, it highlights the potential for the use of lactic acid for the inhibition of Salmonella biofilms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Biofilm composition in the Olt River (Romania) reservoirs impacted by a chlor-alkali production plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranguet, P; Cosio, C; Le Faucheur, S; Hug Peter, D; Loizeau, J-L; Ungureanu, V-Gh; Slaveykova, V I

    2017-05-24

    Freshwater biofilms can be useful indicators of water quality and offer the possibility to assess contaminant effects at the community level. The present field study examines the effects of chlor-alkali plant effluents on the community composition of biofilms grown in the Olt River (Romania) reservoirs. The relationship between ambient water quality variables and community composition alterations was explored. Amplicon sequencing revealed a significant modification of the composition of microalgal, bacterial and fungal communities in the biofilms collected in the impacted reservoirs in comparison with those living in the uncontaminated control reservoir. The abundance corrected Simpson index showed lower richness and diversity in biofilms collected in the impacted reservoirs than in the control reservoir. The biofilm bacterial communities of the impacted reservoirs were characterized by the contaminant-tolerant Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes, whereas microalgal communities were predominantly composed of Bacillariophyta and fungal communities of Lecanoromycetes and Paraglomycetes. A principal component analysis revealed that major contaminants present in the waste water of the chlor-alkali production plant, i.e. Na + , Ca 2+ , Cl - and Hg, were correlated with the alteration of biofilm community composition in the impacted reservoirs. However, the biofilm composition was also influenced by water quality variables such as NO 3 - , SO 4 2- , DOC and Zn from unknown sources. The results of the present study imply that, even when below the environmental quality standards, typical contaminants of chlor-alkali plant releases may affect biofilm composition and that their impacts on the microbial biodiversity might be currently overlooked.

  7. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Biofilm Production by Salmonella sp. Strains Isolated from Frozen Poultry Carcasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Sereno

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objectives of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial resistance and the biofilm-producing ability of Salmonella sp. strains isolated from frozen poultry carcasses. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by the disk-diffusion method. Biofilm-producing ability was determined in 96-well polystyrene microplates stained with crystal violet at 1%. Out of the 22 strains tested, all were multiresistant, that is, resistant to more than three antimicrobial classes, and 72.7% were able to form biofilms. The highest resistance rates obtained were against sulfonamides, tetracycline, and quinolones. On the other hand, 100% of the strains were sensitive to chloramphenicol. According to the rate of biofilm formation, 3 (13.6% and 13 (59.1% strains were classified as moderate and weak biofilm-producers, respectively, and 27.3% did not form biofilms. Biofilms increase the tolerance of microorganisms to stress, reducing their sensitivity to disinfectants and antimicrobials; favor equipment corrosion; and act as substrates for the adhesion of bacteria with lower biofilm-producing capacity. The results of the present study stress the importance of cleaning procedures in food processing plants and highlight the public health risks related to the emergence of multiresistant strains.

  8. New Technologies for Studying Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    FRANKLIN, MICHAEL J.; CHANG, CONNIE; AKIYAMA, TATSUYA; BOTHNER, BRIAN

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have traditionally been studied as single-cell organisms. In laboratory settings, aerobic bacteria are usually cultured in aerated flasks, where the cells are considered essentially homogenous. However, in many natural environments, bacteria and other microorganisms grow in mixed communities, often associated with surfaces. Biofilms are comprised of surface-associated microorganisms, their extracellular matrix material, and environmental chemicals that have adsorbed to the bacteria or their matrix material. While this definition of a biofilm is fairly simple, biofilms are complex and dynamic. Our understanding of the activities of individual biofilm cells and whole biofilm systems has developed rapidly, due in part to advances in molecular, analytical, and imaging tools and the miniaturization of tools designed to characterize biofilms at the enzyme level, cellular level, and systems level. PMID:26350329

  9. Silver against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kirketerp-Møller, K.; Kristiansen, S.

    2007-01-01

    bacteria in both the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. The action of silver on mature in vitro biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a primary pathogen of chronic infected wounds, was investigated. The results show that silver is very effective against mature biofilms of P. aeruginosa......, but that the silver concentration is important. A concentration of 5-10 ig/mL silver sulfadiazine eradicated the biofilm whereas a lower concentration (1 ig/mL) had no effect. The bactericidal concentration of silver required to eradicate the bacterial biofilm was 10-100 times higher than that used to eradicate...... planktonic bacteria. These observations strongly indicate that the concentration of silver in currently available wound dressings is much too low for treatment of chronic biofilm wounds. It is suggested that clinicians and manufacturers of the said wound dressings consider whether they are treating wounds...

  10. Development of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 as a Phototrophic Cell Factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuzhong Zhang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae play profound roles in ecology and biogeochemistry. One model cyanobacterial species is the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. This species is highly amenable to genetic modification. Its genome has been sequenced and many systems biology and molecular biology tools are available to study this bacterium. Recently, researchers have put significant efforts into understanding and engineering this bacterium to produce chemicals and biofuels from sunlight and CO2. To demonstrate our perspective on the application of this cyanobacterium as a photosynthesis-based chassis, we summarize the recent research on Synechocystis 6803 by focusing on five topics: rate-limiting factors for cell cultivation; molecular tools for genetic modifications; high-throughput system biology for genome wide analysis; metabolic modeling for physiological prediction and rational metabolic engineering; and applications in producing diverse chemicals. We also discuss the particular challenges for systems analysis and engineering applications of this microorganism, including precise characterization of versatile cell metabolism, improvement of product rates and titers, bioprocess scale-up, and product recovery. Although much progress has been achieved in the development of Synechocystis 6803 as a phototrophic cell factory, the biotechnology for “Compounds from Synechocystis” is still significantly lagging behind those for heterotrophic microbes (e.g., Escherichia coli.

  11. Leucine incorporation by aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in the Delaware estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegman, Monica R; Cottrell, Matthew T; Kirchman, David L

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria are well known to be abundant in estuaries, coastal regions and in the open ocean, but little is known about their activity in any aquatic ecosystem. To explore the activity of AAP bacteria in the Delaware estuary and coastal waters, single-cell 3H-leucine incorporation by these bacteria was examined with a new approach that combines infrared epifluorescence microscopy and microautoradiography. The approach was used on samples from the Delaware coast from August through December and on transects through the Delaware estuary in August and November 2011. The percent of active AAP bacteria was up to twofold higher than the percentage of active cells in the rest of the bacterial community in the estuary. Likewise, the silver grain area around active AAP bacteria in microautoradiography preparations was larger than the area around cells in the rest of the bacterial community, indicating higher rates of leucine consumption by AAP bacteria. The cell size of AAP bacteria was 50% bigger than the size of other bacteria, about the same difference on average as measured for activity. The abundance of AAP bacteria was negatively correlated and their activity positively correlated with light availability in the water column, although light did not affect 3H-leucine incorporation in light–dark experiments. Our results suggest that AAP bacteria are bigger and more active than other bacteria, and likely contribute more to organic carbon fluxes than indicated by their abundance. PMID:24824666

  12. Optimization of phototrophic hydrogen production by Rhodopseudomonas palustris PBUM001 via statistical experimental design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, Zadariana [Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya (Malaysia); Faculty of Civil Engineering, Technology University of MARA (Malaysia); Mohamad Annuar, Mohamad Suffian; Vikineswary, S. [Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Malaya (Malaysia); Ibrahim, Shaliza [Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya (Malaysia)

    2009-09-15

    Phototrophic hydrogen production by indigenous purple non-sulfur bacteria, Rhodopseudomonas palustris PBUM001 from palm oil mill effluent (POME) was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). The process parameters studied include inoculum sizes (% v/v), POME concentration (% v/v), light intensity (klux), agitation (rpm) and pH. The experimental data on cumulative hydrogen production and COD reduction were fitted into a quadratic polynomial model using response surface regression analysis. The path to optimal process conditions was determined by analyzing response surface three-dimensional surface plot and contour plot. Statistical analysis on experimental data collected following Box-Behnken design showed that 100% (v/v) POME concentration, 10% (v/v) inoculum size, light intensity at 4.0 klux, agitation rate at 250 rpm and pH of 6 were the best conditions. The maximum predicted cumulative hydrogen production and COD reduction obtained under these conditions was 1.05 ml H{sub 2}/ml POME and 31.71% respectively. Subsequent verification experiments at optimal process values gave the maximum yield of cumulative hydrogen at 0.66 {+-} 0.07 ml H{sub 2}/ml POME and COD reduction at 30.54 {+-} 9.85%. (author)

  13. Carbon isotope fractionation by thermophilic phototrophic sulfur bacteria: evidence for autotrophic growth in natural populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, M. T.; Takigiku, R.; Lee, R. G.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Purple phototrophic bacteria of the genus Chromatium can grow as either photoautotrophs or photoheterotrophs. To determine the growth mode of the thermophilic Chromatium species, Chromatium tepidum, under in situ conditions, we have examined the carbon isotope fractionation patterns in laboratory cultures of this organism and in mats of C. tepidum which develop in sulfide thermal springs in Yellowstone National Park. Isotopic analysis (13C/12C) of total carbon, carotenoid pigments, and bacteriochlorophyll from photoautotrophically grown cultures of C. tepidum yielded 13C fractionation factors near -20%. Cells of C. tepidum grown on excess acetate, wherein synthesis of the Calvin cycle enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase) was greatly repressed, were isotopically heavier, fractionation factors of ca. -7% being observed. Fractionation factors determined by isotopic analyses of cells and pigment fractions of natural populations of C. tepidum growing in three different sulfide thermal springs in Yellowstone National Park were approximately -20%, indicating that this purple sulfur bacterium grows as a photoautotroph in nature.

  14. Ecology of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lamy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP bacteria are photoheterotrophic prokaryotes able to use both light and organic substrates for energy production. They are widely distributed in coastal and oceanic environments and may contribute significantly to the carbon cycle in the upper ocean. To better understand questions regarding links between the ecology of these photoheterotrophic bacteria and the trophic status of water masses, we examined their horizontal and vertical distribution and the effects of nutrient additions on their growth along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea. Concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChl-a and AAP bacterial abundance decreased from the western to the eastern basin of the Mediterranean Sea and were linked with concentrations of chlorophyll-a, nutrient and dissolved organic carbon. Inorganic nutrient and glucose additions to surface seawater samples along the oligotrophic gradient revealed that AAP bacteria were nitrogen- and carbon-limited in the ultraoligotrophic eastern basin. The intensity of the AAP bacterial growth response generally differed from that of the total bacterial growth response. BChl-a quota of AAP bacterial communities was significantly higher in the eastern basin than in the western basin, suggesting that reliance on phototrophy varied along the oligotrophic gradient and that nutrient and/or carbon limitation favors BChl-a synthesis.

  15. Leucine incorporation by aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in the Delaware estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegman, Monica R; Cottrell, Matthew T; Kirchman, David L

    2014-11-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria are well known to be abundant in estuaries, coastal regions and in the open ocean, but little is known about their activity in any aquatic ecosystem. To explore the activity of AAP bacteria in the Delaware estuary and coastal waters, single-cell (3)H-leucine incorporation by these bacteria was examined with a new approach that combines infrared epifluorescence microscopy and microautoradiography. The approach was used on samples from the Delaware coast from August through December and on transects through the Delaware estuary in August and November 2011. The percent of active AAP bacteria was up to twofold higher than the percentage of active cells in the rest of the bacterial community in the estuary. Likewise, the silver grain area around active AAP bacteria in microautoradiography preparations was larger than the area around cells in the rest of the bacterial community, indicating higher rates of leucine consumption by AAP bacteria. The cell size of AAP bacteria was 50% bigger than the size of other bacteria, about the same difference on average as measured for activity. The abundance of AAP bacteria was negatively correlated and their activity positively correlated with light availability in the water column, although light did not affect (3)H-leucine incorporation in light-dark experiments. Our results suggest that AAP bacteria are bigger and more active than other bacteria, and likely contribute more to organic carbon fluxes than indicated by their abundance.

  16. Domestic wastewater treatment with purple phototrophic bacteria using a novel continuous photo anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülsen, Tim; Barry, Edward M; Lu, Yang; Puyol, Daniel; Keller, Jürg; Batstone, Damien J

    2016-09-01

    A key future challenge of domestic wastewater treatment is nutrient recovery while still achieving acceptable discharge limits. Nutrient partitioning using purple phototrophic bacteria (PPB) has the potential to biologically concentrate nutrients through growth. This study evaluates the use of PPB in a continuous photo-anaerobic membrane bioreactor (PAnMBR) for simultaneous organics and nutrient removal from domestic wastewater. This process could continuously treat domestic wastewater to discharge limits (60% of PPB, though the PPB community was highly variable. The outcomes from the current work demonstrate the potential of PPB for continuous domestic (and possibly industrial) wastewater treatment and nutrient recovery. Technical challenges include the in situ COD supply in a continuous reactor system, as well as efficient light delivery. Addition of external (agricultural or fossil) derived organics is not financially nor environmentally justified, and carbon needs to be sourced internally from the biomass itself to enable this technology. Reduced energy consumption for lighting is technically feasible, and needs to be addressed as a key objective in scaleup. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Extracellular DNA Contributes to Dental Biofilm Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Meyer, Rikke Louise; Dige, Irene

    2017-01-01

    dental biofilms. This study aimed to determine whether eDNA was part of the matrix in biofilms grown in situ in the absence of sucrose and whether treatment with DNase dispersed biofilms grown for 2.5, 5, 7.5, 16.5, or 24 h. Three hundred biofilms from 10 study participants were collected and treated...... the amount of biofilm in very early stages of growth (up to 7.5 h), but the treatment effect decreased with increasing biofilm age. This study proves the involvement of eDNA in dental biofilm formation and its importance for biofilm stability in the earliest stages. Further research is required to uncover...

  18. Clotrimazole and econazole inhibit Streptococcus mutans biofilm and virulence in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei; Ren, Biao; Dai, Huanqin; Zhang, Lixin; Zhang, Qiong; Zhou, Xuedong; Li, Yuqing

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the inhibitory effect of eight antifungal drugs on S. mutans growth, biofilm formation and virulence factors. The actions of antifungal drugs on S. mutans were determined by recovery plates and survival kinetic curves. Biofilms were observed by scanning electron microscopy and the viable cells were recovered on BHI plates, meanwhile biofilms were stained by BacLight live/dead kit to investigate the biofilm viability. Bacteria/extracellular polysaccharides staining assays were performed to determine the EPS production of S. mutans biofilms. Acidogenicity and acidurity of S. mutans were determined using pH drop and acid tolerance assays, and the expression of ldh gene was evaluated using qPCR. We found that clotrimazole (CTR) and econazole (ECO) showed antibacterial activities on S. mutans UA159 and S. mutans clinical isolates at 12.5 and 25mg/L, respectively. CTR and ECO could also inhibit S. mutans biofilm formation and reduce the viability of preformed biofilm. CTR and ECO affected the live/dead ratio and the EPS/bacteria ratio of S. mutans biofilms. CTR and ECO also inhibited the pH drop, lactate acid production, and acid tolerance. The abilities of CTR and ECO to inhibit S. mutans ldh expression were also confirmed. We found that two antifungal azoles, CTR and ECO, had the abilities to inhibit the growth and biofilm formation of S. mutans and more importantly, they could also inhibit the virulence factors of S. mutans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Biofilm and Dental Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Øilo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available All treatment involving the use of biomaterials in the body can affect the host in positive or negative ways. The microbiological environment in the oral cavity is affected by the composition and shape of the biomaterials used for oral restorations. This may impair the patients’ oral health and sometimes their general health as well. Many factors determine the composition of the microbiota and the formation of biofilm in relation to biomaterials such as, surface roughness, surface energy and chemical composition, This paper aims to give an overview of the scientific literature regarding the association between the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of dental biomaterials and oral biofilm formation, with emphasis on current research and future perspectives.

  20. Biofilms promote altruism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreft, Jan-Ulrich

    2004-08-01

    The origin of altruism is a fundamental problem in evolution, and the maintenance of biodiversity is a fundamental problem in ecology. These two problems combine with the fundamental microbiological question of whether it is always advantageous for a unicellular organism to grow as fast as possible. The common basis for these three themes is a trade-off between growth rate and growth yield, which in turn is based on irreversible thermodynamics. The trade-off creates an evolutionary alternative between two strategies: high growth yield at low growth rate versus high growth rate at low growth yield. High growth yield at low growth rate is a case of an altruistic strategy because it increases the fitness of the group by using resources economically at the cost of decreased fitness, or growth rate, of the individual. The group-beneficial behaviour is advantageous in the long term, whereas the high growth rate strategy is advantageous in the short term. Coexistence of species requires differences between their niches, and niche space is typically divided into four 'axes' (time, space, resources, predators). This neglects survival strategies based on cooperation, which extend the possibilities of coexistence, arguing for the inclusion of cooperation as the fifth 'axis'. Here, individual-based model simulations show that spatial structure, as in, for example, biofilms, is necessary for the origin and maintenance of this 'primitive' altruistic strategy and that the common belief that growth rate but not yield decides the outcome of competition is based on chemostat models and experiments. This evolutionary perspective on life in biofilms can explain long-known biofilm characteristics, such as the structural organization into microcolonies, the often-observed lack of mixing among microcolonies, and the shedding of single cells, as promoting the origin and maintenance of the altruistic strategy. Whereas biofilms enrich altruists, enrichment cultures, microbiology's paradigm

  1. [Bacterial biofilms and infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, I; Del Pozo, J L; Penadés, J R; Leiva, J

    2005-01-01

    In developed countries we tend to think of heart disease and the numerous forms of cancer as the main causes of mortality, but on a global scale infectious diseases come close, or may even be ahead: 14.9 million deaths in 2002 compared to cardiovascular diseases (16.9 million deaths) and cancer (7.1 million deaths) (WHO report 2004). The infectious agents responsible for human mortality have evolved as medical techniques and hygienic measures have changed. Modern-day acute infectious diseases caused by specialized bacterial pathogens such as diphtheria, tetanus, cholera, plague, which represented the main causes of death at the beginning of XX century, have been effectively controlled with antibiotics and vaccines. In their place, more than half of the infectious diseases that affect mildly immunocompromised patients involve bacterial species that are commensal with the human body; these can produce chronic infections, are resistant to antimicrobial agents and there is no effective vaccine against them. Examples of these infections are the otitis media, native valve endocarditis, chronic urinary infections, bacterial prostatitis, osteomyelitis and all the infections related to medical devices. Direct analysis of the surface of medical devices or of tissues that have been foci of chronic infections shows the presence of large numbers of bacteria surrounded by an exopolysaccharide matrix, which has been named the "biofilm". Inside the biofilm, bacteria grow protected from the action of the antibodies, phagocytic cells and antimicrobial treatments. In this article, we describe the role of bacterial biofilms in human persistent infections.

  2. Biofilm architecture in a novel pressurized biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Xia, Siqing; Duan, Liang; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    2015-01-01

    A novel pure-oxygen pressurized biofilm reactor was operated at different organic loading, mechanical shear and hydrodynamic conditions to understand the relationships between biofilm architecture and its operation. The ultimate goal was to improve the performance of the biofilm reactor. The biofilm was labeled with seven stains and observed with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Unusual biofilm architecture of a ribbon embedded between two surfaces with very few points of attachment was observed. As organic loading increased, the biofilm morphology changed from a moderately rough layer into a locally smoother biomass with significant bulging protuberances, although the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency remained unchanged at about 75%. At higher organic loadings, biofilms contained a larger fraction of active cells distributed uniformly within a proteinaceous matrix with decreasing polysaccharide content. Higher hydrodynamic shear in combination with high organic loading resulted in the collapse of biofilm structure and a substantial decrease in reactor performance (a COD removal of 16%). Moreover, the important role of proteins for the spatial distribution of active cells was demonstrated quantitatively.

  3. The Small Molecule DAM Inhibitor, Pyrimidinedione, Disrupts Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Yadav

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae persist in the human nasopharynx within organized biofilms. However, expansion to other tissues may cause severe infections such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia, and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Bacteria within biofilms possess increased tolerance to antibiotics and are able to resist host defense systems. Bacteria within biofilms exhibit different physiology, metabolism, and gene expression profiles than planktonic cells. These differences underscore the need to identify alternative therapeutic targets and novel antimicrobial compounds that are effective against pneumococcal biofilms. In bacteria, DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam alters pathogenic gene expression and catalyzes the methylation of adenine in the DNA duplex and of macromolecules during the activated methyl cycle (AMC. In pneumococci, AMC is involved in the biosynthesis of quorum sensing molecules that regulate competence and biofilm formation. In this study, we examine the effect of a small molecule Dam inhibitor, pyrimidinedione, on Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and evaluate the changes in global gene expression within biofilms via microarray analysis. The effects of pyrimidinedione on in vitro biofilms were studied using a static microtiter plate assay, and the architecture of the biofilms was viewed using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of pyrimidinedione was tested on a human middle ear epithelium cell line by CCK-8. In situ oligonucleotide microarray was used to compare the global gene expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 within biofilms grown in the presence and absence of pyrimidinedione. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study gene expression. Pyrimidinedione inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner, but it does not inhibit planktonic cell growth. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the absence of organized biofilms, where cell

  4. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms: recent developments in biofilm dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Jessica L; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections and represents a significant burden on the healthcare system. S. aureus attachment to medical implants and host tissue, and the establishment of a mature biofilm, play an important role in the persistence of chronic infections. The formation of a biofilm, and encasement of cells in a polymer-based matrix, decreases the susceptibility to antimicrobials and immune defenses, making these infections difficult to eradicate. During infection, dispersal of cells from the biofilm can result in spread to secondary sites and worsening of the infection. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the pathways behind biofilm dispersal in S. aureus, with a focus on enzymatic and newly described broad-spectrum dispersal mechanisms. Additionally, we explore potential applications of dispersal in the treatment of biofilm-mediated infections.

  5. Anti-biofilm efficacy of low temperature processed AgCl–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naik, Kshipra, E-mail: kshipra_naik21@yahoo.co.in; Kowshik, Meenal, E-mail: meenal@goa.bits-pilani.ac.in

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are a major concern in the medical settings and food industries due to their high tolerance to antibiotics, biocides and mechanical stress. Currently, the development of novel methods to control biofilm formation is being actively pursued. In the present study, sol–gel coatings of AgCl–TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are presented as potential anti-biofilm agents, wherein TiO{sub 2} acts as a good supporting matrix to prevent aggregation of silver and facilitates its controlled release. Low-temperature processed AgCl–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite coatings inhibit biofilm formation by Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In vitro biofilm assay experiments demonstrated that AgCl–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite coated surfaces, inhibited the development of biofilms over a period of 10 days as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The silver release kinetics exhibited an initial high release, followed by a slow and sustained release. The anti-biofilm efficacy of the coatings could be attributed to the release of silver, which prevents the initial bacterial adhesion required for biofilm formation. - Highlights: • Potential of AgCl–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite coating to inhibit biofilm formation is exhibited. • Initial rapid release followed by later slow and sustained release of silver obtained. • TiO{sub 2} being porous and inorganic in nature acts as a good supporting matrix.

  6. Antibiotic treatment of biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Rojo-Molinero, Estrella; Macià, María D.

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with a wide range of infections, from those related to exogenous devices, such as catheters or prosthetic joints, to chronic tissue infections such as those occurring in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Biofilms are recalcitrant to antibiotic treatment due ...

  7. Experimental evolution in biofilm populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenackers, Hans P.; Parijs, Ilse; Foster, Kevin R.; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a major form of microbial life in which cells form dense surface associated communities that can persist for many generations. The long-life of biofilm communities means that they can be strongly shaped by evolutionary processes. Here, we review the experimental study of evolution in biofilm communities. We first provide an overview of the different experimental models used to study biofilm evolution and their associated advantages and disadvantages. We then illustrate the vast amount of diversification observed during biofilm evolution, and we discuss (i) potential ecological and evolutionary processes behind the observed diversification, (ii) recent insights into the genetics of adaptive diversification, (iii) the striking degree of parallelism between evolution experiments and real-life biofilms and (iv) potential consequences of diversification. In the second part, we discuss the insights provided by evolution experiments in how biofilm growth and structure can promote cooperative phenotypes. Overall, our analysis points to an important role of biofilm diversification and cooperation in bacterial survival and productivity. Deeper understanding of both processes is of key importance to design improved antimicrobial strategies and diagnostic techniques. PMID:26895713

  8. Microalgal biofilms for wastewater treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelee, N.C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to explore the possibilities of using microalgal biofilms for the treatment of municipal wastewater, with a focus on the post-treatment of municipal wastewater effluent. The potential of microalgal biofilms for wastewater treatment was first investigated using a

  9. Bacterial Biofilms in Jones Tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eric S; Hauck, Matthew J; Kirk Harris, Jonathan; Robertson, Charles E; Dailey, Roger A

    To investigate the presence and microbiology of bacterial biofilms on Jones tubes (JTs) by direct visualization with scanning electron microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of representative JTs, and to correlate these findings with inflammation and/or infection related to the JT. In this study, prospective case series were performed. JTs were recovered from consecutive patients presenting to clinic for routine cleaning or recurrent irritation/infection. Four tubes were processed for scanning electron microscopy alone to visualize evidence of biofilms. Two tubes underwent PCR alone for bacterial quantification. One tube was divided in half and sent for scanning electron microscopy and PCR. Symptoms related to the JTs were recorded at the time of recovery. Seven tubes were obtained. Five underwent SEM, and 3 out of 5 showed evidence of biofilms (60%). Two of the 3 biofilms demonstrated cocci and the third revealed rods. Three tubes underwent PCR. The predominant bacteria identified were Pseudomonadales (39%), Pseudomonas (16%), and Staphylococcus (14%). Three of the 7 patients (43%) reported irritation and discharge at presentation. Two symptomatic patients, whose tubes were imaged only, revealed biofilms. The third symptomatic patient's tube underwent PCR only, showing predominantly Staphylococcus (56%) and Haemophilus (36%) species. Two of the 4 asymptomatic patients also showed biofilms. All symptomatic patients improved rapidly after tube exchange and steroid antibiotic drops. Bacterial biofilms were variably present on JTs, and did not always correlate with patients' symptoms. Nevertheless, routine JT cleaning is recommended to treat and possibly prevent inflammation caused by biofilms.

  10. Interaction of Nanoparticles with Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this work we have studied the interaction and adsorption of engineered nanoparticles such as TiO2, ZnO, CeO2 , and carbon nanotubes with biofilms. Biofilm is an extracellular polymeric substance coating comprised of living material and it is an aggregation of bacteria, algae, ...

  11. Isolation of a significant fraction of non-phototroph diversity from a desert Biological Soil Crust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulisses eNunes da Rocha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biological Soil Crusts (BSCs are organosedimentary assemblages comprised of microbes and minerals in topsoil of terrestrial environments. BSCs strongly impact soil quality in dryland ecosystems (e.g., soil structure and nutrient yields due to pioneer species such as Microcoleus vaginatus; phototrophs that produce filaments that bind the soil together, and support an array of heterotrophic microorganisms. These microorganisms in turn contribute to soil stability and biogeochemistry of BSCs. Non-cyanobacterial populations of BSCs are less well known than cyanobacterial populations. Therefore, we attempted to isolate a broad range of numerically significant and phylogenetically representative BSC aerobic heterotrophs. Combining simple pre-treatments (hydration of BSCs under dark and light and isolation strategies (media with varying nutrient availability and protection from oxidative stress we recovered 402 bacterial and one fungal isolate in axenic culture, which comprised 116 phylotypes (at 97% 16S rRNA gene sequence homology, 115 bacterial and one fungal. Each medium enriched a mostly distinct subset of phylotypes, and cultivated phylotypes varied due to the BSC pre-treatment. The fraction of the total phylotype diversity isolated, weighted by relative abundance in the community, was determined by the overlap between isolate sequences and OTUs reconstructed from metagenome or metatranscriptome reads. Together, more than 8% of relative abundance of OTUs in the metagenome was represented by our isolates, a cultivation efficiency much larger than typically expected from most soils. We conclude that simple cultivation procedures combined with specific pre-treatment of samples afford a significant reduction in the culturability gap, enabling physiological and metabolic assays that rely on ecologically relevant axenic cultures.

  12. Biofilm models of polymicrobial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrilska, Rebecca A; Rumbaugh, Kendra P

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between microbes are complex and play an important role in the pathogenesis of infections. These interactions can range from fierce competition for nutrients and niches to highly evolved cooperative mechanisms between different species that support their mutual growth. An increasing appreciation for these interactions, and desire to uncover the mechanisms that govern them, has resulted in a shift from monomicrobial to polymicrobial biofilm studies in different disease models. Here we provide an overview of biofilm models used to study select polymicrobial infections and highlight the impact that the interactions between microbes within these biofilms have on disease progression. Notable recent advances in the development of polymicrobial biofilm-associated infection models and challenges facing the study of polymicrobial biofilms are addressed.

  13. Cleaning and Disinfection of Biofilms Composed of Listeria monocytogenes and Background Microbiota from Meat Processing Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møretrø, Trond; Heir, Even; Briandet, Romain; Langsrud, Solveig

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Surfaces of food processing premises are exposed to regular cleaning and disinfection (C&D) regimes, using biocides that are highly effective against bacteria growing as planktonic cells. However, bacteria growing in surface-associated communities (biofilms) are typically more tolerant toward C&D than their individual free-cell counterparts, and survival of pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes may be affected by interspecies interactions within biofilms. In this study, Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter were the most frequently isolated genera surviving on conveyor belts subjected to C&D in meat processing plants. In the laboratory, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and L. monocytogenes dominated the community, both in suspensions and in biofilms formed on conveyor belts, when cultures were inoculated with eleven-genus cocktails of representative bacterial strains from the identified background flora. When biofilms were exposed to daily C&D cycles mimicking treatments used in food industry, the levels of Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas mandelii diminished, and biofilms were instead dominated by Pseudomonas putida (65 to 76%), Pseudomonas fluorescens (11 to 15%) and L. monocytogenes (3 to 11%). The dominance of certain species after daily C&D correlated with high planktonic growth rates at 12°C and tolerance to C&D. In single-species biofilms, L. monocytogenes developed higher tolerance to C&D over time, for both the peracetic acid and quaternary ammonium disinfectants, indicating that a broad-spectrum mechanism was involved. Survival after C&D appeared to be a common property of L. monocytogenes strains, as persistent and sporadic subtypes showed equal survival rates in complex biofilms. Biofilms established preferentially in surface irregularities of conveyor belts, potentially constituting harborage sites for persistent contamination. IMPORTANCE In the food industry, efficient production hygiene is a key measure to avoid the accumulation of spoilage bacteria and

  14. Cleaning and disinfection of biofilms composed of Listeria monocytogenes and background microbiota from meat processing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Annette; Møretrø, Trond; Heir, Even; Briandet, Romain; Langsrud, Solveig

    2017-06-30

    Surfaces of food processing premises are exposed to regular cleaning and disinfection (C&D) regimes, using biocides that are highly effective against bacteria growing as planktonic cells. However, bacteria growing in surface associated communities (biofilms) are typically more tolerant towards C&D than their individual free cells counterparts, and survival of pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes may be affected by interspecies interactions within biofilms. In this study, Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter were the most frequently isolated genera surviving on conveyor belts subjected to C&D in meat processing plants. In the laboratory, Pseudomonas , Acinetobacter and L. monocytogenes dominated the community both in suspensions and in biofilms formed on conveyor belts, when cultures were inoculated with eleven-genera cocktails of representative bacterial strains from the identified background flora. When biofilms were exposed to daily C&D cycles, mimicking treatments used in food industry, the levels of Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas mandelii diminished, and biofilms were instead dominated by Pseudomonas putida (65-76%), Pseudomonas fluorescens (11-15%) and L. monocytogenes (3-11%). The dominance of certain species after daily C&D correlated with high planktonic growth rates at 12°C and tolerance to C&D. In single-species biofilms, L. monocytogenes developed higher tolerance to C&D over time, both for the peracetic acid and quaternary ammonium disinfectant, indicating that a broad-spectrum mechanism was involved. Survival after C&D appeared to be a common property of L. monocytogenes strains, as both persistent and sporadic subtypes showed equal survival in complex biofilms. Biofilms established preferentially in surface irregularities of conveyor belts, potentially constituting harborage sites for persistent contamination. IMPORTANCE In food industry, efficient production hygiene is a key measure to avoid accumulation of spoilage bacteria and eliminate pathogens

  15. Crafting tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchner, Antje; Freitag, Markus; Rapp, Carolin

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing changes in social structures, orientation, and value systems confront us with the growing necessity to address and understand transforming patterns of tolerance as well as specific aspects, such as social tolerance. Based on hierarchical analyses of the latest World Values Survey (2005......–08) and national statistics for 28 countries, we assess both individual and contextual aspects that influence an individual's perception of different social groupings. Using a social tolerance index that captures personal attitudes toward these groupings, we present an institutional theory of social tolerance. Our...

  16. Impact of Hydrodynamics on Oral Biofilm Strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paramonova, E.; Kalmykowa, O. J.; van der Mei, H. C.; Busscher, H. J.; Sharma, P. K.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical removal of oral biofilms is ubiquitously accepted as the best way to prevent caries and periodontal diseases. Removal effectiveness strongly depends on biofilm strength. To investigate the influence of hydrodynamics on oral biofilm strength, we grew single- and multi-species biofilms of

  17. Confocal microscopy imaging of the biofilm matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Meyer, Rikke L

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is an integral part of microbial biofilms and an important field of research. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is a valuable tool for the study of biofilms, and in particular of the biofilm matrix, as it allows real-time visualization of fully hydrated, living specimens...... the concentration of solutes and the diffusive properties of the biofilm matrix....

  18. Oral Biofilm Architecture on Natural Teeth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijnge, Vincent; van Leeuwen, M. Barbara M.; Degener, John E.; Abbas, Frank; Thurnheer, Thomas; Gmuer, Rudolf; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Periodontitis and caries are infectious diseases of the oral cavity in which oral biofilms play a causative role. Moreover, oral biofilms are widely studied as model systems for bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and biofilm resistance to antibiotics, due to their widespread presence and

  19. Bacterial biofilms: prokaryotic adventures in multicellularity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Givskov, Michael Christian; Kjelleberg, S.

    2003-01-01

    The development of bacterial biofilms includes both the initial social behavior of undifferentiated cells, as well as cell death and differentiation in the mature biofilm, and displays several striking similarities with higher organisms. Recent advances in the field provide new insight...... into differentiation and cell death events in bacterial biofilm development and propose that biofilms have an unexpected level of multicellularity....

  20. Composition changes of phototrophic microbial communities along the salinity gradient in the solar saltern evaporation ponds of Eilat, Israel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řeháková, Klára; Zapomělová, Eliška; Prášil, Ondřej; Veselá, J.; Medová, Hana; Oren, A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 636, č. 1 (2009), s. 77-88 ISSN 0018-8158 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/06/0462; GA AV ČR KJB600960703; GA AV ČR 1QS600170504; GA AV ČR 1QS500200570 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516; CEZ:AV0Z60170517; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : phototrophic microbial community * salterns * species composition Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.754, year: 2009

  1. Carotenoid charge transfer states and their role in energy transfer processes in LH1-RC complexes from aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlouf, V.; Fuciman, M.; Dulebo, A.; Kaftan, D.; Koblížek, Michal; Frank, H.A.; Polívka, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 38 (2013), s. 10987-10999 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/1164; GA ČR GBP501/12/G055; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : carotenoid * aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs * Roseobacter sp. Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.377, year: 2013

  2. The interaction of soil phototrophs and fungi with pH and their impact on soil CO2, CO18O and OCS exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauze, Joana; Ogée, Jérôme; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Crouzet, Olivier; Nowak, Virginie; Wohl, Steven; Kaisermann, Aurore; Jones, Sam P; Wingate, Lisa

    2017-12-01

    The stable oxygen isotope composition of atmospheric CO 2 and the mixing ratio of carbonyl sulphide (OCS) are potential tracers of biospheric CO 2 fluxes at large scales. However, the use of these tracers hinges on our ability to understand and better predict the activity of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) in different soil microbial groups, including phototrophs. Because different classes of the CA family (α, β and γ) may have different affinities to CO 2 and OCS and their expression should also vary between different microbial groups, differences in the community structure could impact the 'community-integrated' CA activity differently for CO 2 and OCS. Four soils of different pH were incubated in the dark or with a diurnal cycle for forty days to vary the abundance of native phototrophs. Fluxes of CO 2 , CO 18 O and OCS were measured to estimate CA activity alongside the abundance of bacteria, fungi and phototrophs. The abundance of soil phototrophs increased most at higher soil pH. In the light, the strength of the soil CO 2 sink and the CA-driven CO 2 -H 2 O isotopic exchange rates correlated with phototrophs abundance. OCS uptake rates were attributed to fungi whose abundance was positively enhanced in alkaline soils but only in the presence of increased phototrophs. Our findings demonstrate that soil-atmosphere CO 2 , OCS and CO 18 O fluxes are strongly regulated by the microbial community structure in response to changes in soil pH and light availability and supports the idea that different members of the microbial community express different classes of CA, with different affinities to CO 2 and OCS.

  3. Dental biofilm: ecological interactions in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, P D; Zaura, Egija

    2017-03-01

    The oral microbiome is diverse and exists as multispecies microbial communities on oral surfaces in structurally and functionally organized biofilms. To describe the network of microbial interactions (both synergistic and antagonistic) occurring within these biofilms and assess their role in oral health and dental disease. PubMed database was searched for studies on microbial ecological interactions in dental biofilms. The search results did not lend themselves to systematic review and have been summarized in a narrative review instead. Five hundred and forty-seven original research articles and 212 reviews were identified. The majority (86%) of research articles addressed bacterial-bacterial interactions, while inter-kingdom microbial interactions were the least studied. The interactions included physical and nutritional synergistic associations, antagonism, cell-to-cell communication and gene transfer. Oral microbial communities display emergent properties that cannot be inferred from studies of single species. Individual organisms grow in environments they would not tolerate in pure culture. The networks of multiple synergistic and antagonistic interactions generate microbial inter-dependencies and give biofilms a resilience to minor environmental perturbations, and this contributes to oral health. If key environmental pressures exceed thresholds associated with health, then the competitiveness among oral microorganisms is altered and dysbiosis can occur, increasing the risk of dental disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Integrating fluid dynamic and biologic effects on staphylococci bacteria biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Erica; Endres, Jennifer; Bayles, Kenneth; Wei, Timothy

    2017-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are able to form biofilms and distinctive tower structures that facilitate their ability to tolerate treatment and to spread within the human body. The formation of towers, which break off, get carried downstream and serve to initiate biofilms in other parts of the body are of particular interest here. In previous work on biofilm growth and evolution in steady, laminar microchannel flows, it has been established that tower formation occurs around a very limited range of applied shear stresses centered on 0.6 dynes/cm2. Quantifying cell density characteristics as a function of time during biofilm formation reveals indicators of tower development hours before towers actually form and become visible. The next step in this research is to explore biological factors that might explain why this specific shear is so important. Additional studies with mutants, e.g. ica-A, that have been tied to tower formation have been conducted. The shear dependence of these mutants and their correlation to the behavior of wild type S. aureus is examined.

  5. Growing and analyzing biofilms in flow chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic......, and disassembly and cleaning of the system. In addition, embedding and fluorescent in situ hybridization of flow chamber-grown biofilms are addressed....

  6. Variability of Listeria monocytogenes strains in biofilm formation on stainless steel and polystyrene materials and resistance to peracetic acid and quaternary ammonium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poimenidou, Sofia V; Chrysadakou, Marilena; Tzakoniati, Aikaterini; Bikouli, Vasiliki C; Nychas, George-John; Skandamis, Panagiotis N

    2016-11-21

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen able to tolerate adverse conditions by forming biofilms or by deploying stress resistant mechanisms, and thus manages to survive for long periods in food processing plants. This study sought to investigate the correlation between biofilm forming ability, tolerance to disinfectants and cell surface characteristics of twelve L. monocytogenes strains. The following attributes were evaluated: (i) biofilm formation by crystal violet staining method on polystyrene, and by standard cell enumeration on stainless steel and polystyrene; (ii) hydrophobicity assay using solvents; (iii) minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and biofilm eradication concentration (BEC) of peracetic acid (PAA) and quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs), and (iv) resistance to sanitizers (PAA 2000ppm; QACs 500ppm) of biofilms on polystyrene and stainless steel. After 72h of incubation, higher biofilm levels were formed in TSB at 20°C, followed by TSB at 37°C (P=0.087) and diluted TSB 1/10 at both 20 (P=0.005) and 37°C (P=0.004). Cells grown at 30°C to the stationary phase had significant electron donating nature and a low hydrophobicity, while no significant correlation of cell surface properties to biofilm formation was observed. Strains differed in MIC PAA and BEC PAA by 24- and 15-fold, respectively, while a positive correlation between MIC PAA and BEC PAA was observed (P=0.02). The MIC QACs was positively correlated with the biofilm-forming ability on stainless steel (P=0.03). Regarding the impact of surface type, higher biofilm populations were enumerated on polystyrene than on stainless steel, which were also more tolerant to disinfectants. Among all strains, the greatest biofilm producer was a persistent strain with significant tolerance to QACs. These results may contribute to better understanding of L. monocytogenes behavior and survival on food processing surfaces. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Conductive properties of methanogenic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Lesnik, Keaton Larson; Liu, Hong

    2018-02-01

    Extracellular electron transfer between syntrophic partners needs to be efficiently maintained in methanogenic environments. Direct extracellular electron transfer via electrical current is an alternative to indirect hydrogen transfer but requires construction of conductive extracellular structures. Conductive mechanisms and relationship between conductivity and the community composition in mixed-species methanogenic biofilms are not well understood. The present study investigated conductive behaviors of methanogenic biofilms and examined the correlation between biofilm conductivity and community composition between different anaerobic biofilms enriched from the same inoculum. Highest conductivity observed in methanogenic biofilms was 71.8±4.0μS/cm. Peak-manner response of conductivity upon changes over a range of electrochemical potentials suggests that electron transfer in methanogenic biofilms occurs through redox driven super-exchange. The strong correlation observed between biofilm conductivity and Geobacter spp. in the metabolically diverse anaerobic communities suggests that the efficiency of DEET may provide pressure for microbial communities to select for species that can produce electrical conduits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Phenotypes of non-attached Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregates resemble surface attached biofilm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Alhede

    Full Text Available For a chronic infection to be established, bacteria must be able to cope with hostile conditions such as low iron levels, oxidative stress, and clearance by the host defense, as well as antibiotic treatment. It is generally accepted that biofilm formation facilitates tolerance to these adverse conditions. However, microscopic investigations of samples isolated from sites of chronic infections seem to suggest that some bacteria do not need to be attached to surfaces in order to establish chronic infections. In this study we employed scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, RT-PCR as well as traditional culturing techniques to study the properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregates. We found that non-attached aggregates from stationary-phase cultures have comparable growth rates to surface attached biofilms. The growth rate estimations indicated that, independently of age, both aggregates and flow-cell biofilm had the same slow growth rate as a stationary phase shaking cultures. Internal structures of the aggregates matrix components and their capacity to survive otherwise lethal treatments with antibiotics (referred to as tolerance and resistance to phagocytes were also found to be strikingly similar to flow-cell biofilms. Our data indicate that the tolerance of both biofilms and non-attached aggregates towards antibiotics is reversible by physical disruption. We provide evidence that the antibiotic tolerance is likely to be dependent on both the physiological states of the aggregates and particular matrix components. Bacterial surface-attachment and subsequent biofilm formation are considered hallmarks of the capacity of microbes to cause persistent infections. We have observed non-attached aggregates in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients; otitis media; soft tissue fillers and non-healing wounds, and we propose that aggregated cells exhibit enhanced survival in the hostile host environment, compared with non

  9. Effect of acid shock on protein expression by biofilm cells of Streptococcus mutans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welin, J; Wilkins, J C; Beighton, D

    2003-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a component of the dental plaque biofilm and a major causal agent of dental caries. Log-phase cells of the organism are known to induce an acid tolerance response (ATR) at sub-lethal pH values ( approximately 5.5) that enhances survival at lower pH values such as those...

  10. Reinforcement of the bactericidal effect of ciprofloxacin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm by hyperbaric oxygen treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Mousavi, Nabi; Sams, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is the most severe complication in cystic fibrosis patients. It is characterised by antibiotic-tolerant biofilms in the endobronchial mucus with zones of oxygen (O2) depletion mainly due to polymorphonuclear leucocyte activity. Whilst the exact mechan...

  11. Heavy metals-bioremediation by highly radioresistant Deinococcus radiodurans biofilm prospective use in nuclear reactor decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Sudhir K.; Subba Rao, T.

    2015-01-01

    of heavy metals. The study signifies the potential use of D. radiodurans biofilms, which can tolerate >20 kGy in nuclear reactor decontamination process for the removal of active heavy metals. (author)

  12. Biofilm models for the practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgenroth, Eberhard Friedrich; van Loosdrecht, M. C. M.; Wanner, O.

    2000-01-01

    Even though mathematical biofilm models are extensively used in biofilm research, there has been very little application of these models in the engineering practice so far. However, practitioners would be interested in models that can be used as tools to control plant operation under dynamic...... conditions or to help them handle complex interactions between particle removal, carbon oxidation, nitrification, denitrification and biological phosphorus removal. But even though there is a whole range of biofilm models available, it is difficult for the practitioner to select the appropriate modeling...

  13. Comparison of RNA extraction methods from biofilm samples of Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    França Angela

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial biofilms are communities of bacteria adhered to a surface and surrounded by an extracellular polymeric matrix. Biofilms have been associated with increased antibiotic resistance and tolerance to the immune system. Staphylococcus epidermidis is the major bacterial species found in biofilm-related infections on indwelling medical devices. Obtaining high quality mRNA from biofilms is crucial to validate the transcriptional measurements associated with the switching to the biofilm mode of growth. Therefore, we selected three commercially available RNA extraction kits with distinct characteristics, including those using silica membrane or organic extraction methods, and enzymatic or mechanical cell lysis, and evaluated the RNA quality obtained from two distinct S. epidermidis bacterial biofilms. Results RNA extracted using the different kits was evaluated for quantity, purity, integrity, and functionally. All kits were able to extract intact and functional total RNA from the biofilms generated from each S. epidermidis strain. The results demonstrated that the kit based on mechanical lysis and organic extraction (FastRNA® Pro Blue was the only one that was able to isolate pure and large quantities of RNA. Normalized expression of the icaA virulence gene showed that RNA extracted with PureLink™ had a significant lower concentration of icaA mRNA transcripts than the other kits tested. Conclusions When working with complex samples, such as biofilms, that contain a high content extracellular polysaccharide and proteins, special care should be taken when selecting the appropriate RNA extraction system, in order to obtain accurate, reproducible, and biologically significant results. Among the RNA extraction kits tested, FastRNA® Pro Blue was the best option for both S. epidermidis biofilms used.

  14. The Effect of Cryopreserved Human Placental Tissues on Biofilm Formation of Wound-Associated Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yong; Singh-Varma, Anya; Hoffman, Tyler; Dhall, Sandeep; Danilkovitch, Alla; Kohn, Joachim

    2018-01-08

    Biofilm, a community of bacteria, is tolerant to antimicrobial agents and ubiquitous in chronic wounds. In a chronic DFU (Diabetic Foot Ulcers) clinical trial, the use of a human cryopreserved viable amniotic membrane (CVAM) resulted in a high rate of wound closure and reduction of wound-related infections. Our previous study demonstrated that CVAM possesses intrinsic antimicrobial activity against a spectrum of wound-associated bacteria under planktonic culture conditions. In this study, we evaluated the effect of CVAM and cryopreserved viable umbilical tissue (CVUT) on biofilm formation of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa , the two most prominent pathogens associated with chronic wounds. Firstly, we showed that, like CVAM, CVUT released antibacterial activity against multiple bacterial pathogens and the devitalization of CVUT reduced its antibacterial activity. The biofilm formation was then measured using a high throughput method and an ex vivo porcine dermal tissue model. We demonstrate that the formation of biofilm was significantly reduced in the presence of CVAM- or CVUT-derived conditioned media compared to control assay medium. The formation of P. aeruginosa biofilm on CVAM-conditioned medium saturated porcine dermal tissues was reduced 97% compared with the biofilm formation on the control medium saturated dermal tissues. The formation of S. auerus biofilm on CVUT-conditioned medium saturated dermal tissues was reduced 72% compared with the biofilm formation on the control tissues. This study is the first to show that human cryopreserved viable placental tissues release factors that inhibit biofilm formation. Our results provide an explanation for the in vivo observation of their ability to support wound healing.

  15. The Effect of Cryopreserved Human Placental Tissues on Biofilm Formation of Wound-Associated Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Mao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm, a community of bacteria, is tolerant to antimicrobial agents and ubiquitous in chronic wounds. In a chronic DFU (Diabetic Foot Ulcers clinical trial, the use of a human cryopreserved viable amniotic membrane (CVAM resulted in a high rate of wound closure and reduction of wound-related infections. Our previous study demonstrated that CVAM possesses intrinsic antimicrobial activity against a spectrum of wound-associated bacteria under planktonic culture conditions. In this study, we evaluated the effect of CVAM and cryopreserved viable umbilical tissue (CVUT on biofilm formation of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, the two most prominent pathogens associated with chronic wounds. Firstly, we showed that, like CVAM, CVUT released antibacterial activity against multiple bacterial pathogens and the devitalization of CVUT reduced its antibacterial activity. The biofilm formation was then measured using a high throughput method and an ex vivo porcine dermal tissue model. We demonstrate that the formation of biofilm was significantly reduced in the presence of CVAM- or CVUT-derived conditioned media compared to control assay medium. The formation of P. aeruginosa biofilm on CVAM-conditioned medium saturated porcine dermal tissues was reduced 97% compared with the biofilm formation on the control medium saturated dermal tissues. The formation of S. auerus biofilm on CVUT-conditioned medium saturated dermal tissues was reduced 72% compared with the biofilm formation on the control tissues. This study is the first to show that human cryopreserved viable placental tissues release factors that inhibit biofilm formation. Our results provide an explanation for the in vivo observation of their ability to support wound healing.

  16. Stratified growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, E.; Roe, F.; Bugnicourt, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, stratified patterns of protein synthesis and growth were demonstrated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Spatial patterns of protein synthetic activity inside biofilms were characterized by the use of two green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene constructs. One construct...... synthesis was restricted to a narrow band in the part of the biofilm adjacent to the source of oxygen. The zone of active GFP expression was approximately 60 Am wide in colony biofilms and 30 Am wide in flow cell biofilms. The region of the biofilm in which cells were capable of elongation was mapped...... by treating colony biofilms with carbenicillin, which blocks cell division, and then measuring individual cell lengths by transmission electron microscopy. Cell elongation was localized at the air interface of the biofilm. The heterogeneous anabolic patterns measured inside these biofilms were likely a result...

  17. Novel method for quantitative estimation of biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syal, Kirtimaan

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm protects bacteria from stress and hostile environment. Crystal violet (CV) assay is the most popular method for biofilm determination adopted by different laboratories so far. However, biofilm layer formed at the liquid-air interphase known as pellicle is extremely sensitive to its washing...... and staining steps. Early phase biofilms are also prone to damage by the latter steps. In bacteria like mycobacteria, biofilm formation occurs largely at the liquid-air interphase which is susceptible to loss. In the proposed protocol, loss of such biofilm layer was prevented. In place of inverting...... and discarding the media which can lead to the loss of the aerobic biofilm layer in CV assay, media was removed from the formed biofilm with the help of a syringe and biofilm layer was allowed to dry. The staining and washing steps were avoided, and an organic solvent-tetrahydrofuran (THF) was deployed...

  18. Role of nutrient limitation and stationary-phase existence in Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilm resistance to ampicillin and ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderl, Jeff N; Zahller, Jeff; Roe, Frank; Stewart, Philip S

    2003-04-01

    Biofilms formed by Klebsiella pneumoniae resisted killing during prolonged exposure to ampicillin or ciprofloxacin even though these agents have been shown to penetrate bacterial aggregates. Bacteria dispersed from biofilms into medium quickly regained most of their susceptibility. Experiments with free-floating bacteria showed that stationary-phase bacteria were protected from killing by either antibiotic, especially when the test was performed in medium lacking carbon and nitrogen sources. These results suggested that the antibiotic tolerance of biofilm bacteria could be explained by nutrient limitation in the biofilm leading to stationary-phase existence of at least some of the cells in the biofilm. This mechanism was supported by experimental characterization of nutrient availability and growth status in biofilms. The average specific growth rate of bacteria in biofilms was only 0.032 h(-1) compared to the specific growth rate of planktonic bacteria of 0.59 h(-1) measured in the same medium. Glucose did not penetrate all the way through the biofilm, and oxygen was shown to penetrate only into the upper 100 micro m. The specific catalase activity was elevated in biofilm bacteria to a level similar to that of stationary-phase planktonic cells. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that bacteria were affected by ampicillin near the periphery of the biofilm but were not affected in the interior. Taken together, these results indicate that K. pneumoniae in this system experience nutrient limitation locally within the biofilm, leading to zones in which the bacteria enter stationary phase and are growing slowly or not at all. In these inactive regions, bacteria are less susceptible to killing by antibiotics.

  19. Spatial Pattern of Copper Phosphate Precipitation Involves in Copper Accumulation and Resistance of Unsaturated Pseudomonas putida CZ1 Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangcun; Lin, Huirong; Chen, Xincai

    2016-12-28

    Bacterial biofilms are spatially structured communities that contain bacterial cells with a wide range of physiological states. The spatial distribution and speciation of copper in unsaturated Pseudomonas putida CZ1 biofilms that accumulated 147.0 mg copper per g dry weight were determined by transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and micro-X-ray fluorescence microscopy coupled with micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (micro-XANES) analysis. It was found that copper was mainly precipitated in a 75 μm thick layer as copper phosphate in the middle of the biofilm, while there were two living cell layers in the air-biofilm and biofilm-medium interfaces, respectively, distinguished from the copper precipitation layer by two interfaces. The X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of biofilm revealed that species resembling Cu₃(PO₄)₂ predominated in biofilm, followed by Cu-Citrate- and Cu-Glutathione-like species. Further analysis by micro-XANES revealed that 94.4% of copper were Cu₃(PO₄)₂-like species in the layer next to the air interface, whereas the copper species of the layer next to the medium interface were composed by 75.4% Cu₃(PO₄)₂, 10.9% Cu-Citrate-like species, and 11.2% Cu-Glutathione-like species. Thereby, it was suggested that copper was initially acquired by cells in the biofilm-air interface as a citrate complex, and then transported out and bound by out membranes of cells, released from the copper-bound membranes, and finally precipitated with phosphate in the extracellular matrix of the biofilm. These results revealed a clear spatial pattern of copper precipitation in unsaturated biofilm, which was responsible for the high copper tolerance and accumulation of the biofilm.

  20. The action of chemical and mechanical stresses on single and dual species biofilm removal of drinking water bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, I B; Lemos, M; Mathieu, L; Simões, M; Simões, L C

    2018-08-01

    The presence of biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) is a global public health concern as they can harbor pathogenic microorganisms. Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) is the most commonly used disinfectant for microbial growth control in DWDS. However, its effect on biofilm removal is still unclear. This work aims to evaluate the effects of the combination of chemical (NaOCl) and mechanical stresses on the removal of single and dual species biofilms of two bacteria isolated from DWDS and considered opportunistic, Acinectobacter calcoaceticus and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. A rotating cylinder reactor was successfully used for the first time in drinking water biofilm studies with polyvinyl chloride as substratum. The single and dual species biofilms presented different characteristics in terms of metabolic activity, mass, density, thickness and content of proteins and polysaccharides. Their complete removal was not achieved even when a high NaOCl concentrations and an increasing series of shear stresses (from 2 to 23Pa) were applied. In general, NaOCl pre-treatment did not improve the impact of mechanical stress on biofilm removal. Dual species biofilms were colonized mostly by S. maltophilia and were more susceptible to chemical and mechanical stresses than these single species. The most efficient treatment (93% biofilm removal) was the combination of NaOCl at 175mg·l -1 with mechanical stress against dual species biofilms. Of concern was the high tolerance of S. maltophilia to chemical and mechanical stresses in both single and dual species biofilms. The overall results demonstrate the inefficacy of NaOCl on biofilm removal even when combined with high shear stresses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen sensitizes anoxic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm to ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Lerche, Christian J; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is characterized by the presence of endobronchial antibiotic-tolerant biofilm subject to strong oxygen (O2) depletion due to the activity of surrounding polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The exact mechanisms affecting the antibiotic susceptibility...... metabolism activity and the endogenous formation of reactive O2 radicals (ROS). In this study we aimed to apply hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) in order to sensitize anoxic P. aeruginosa agarose-biofilms established to mimic situations with intense O2 consumption by the host response in the cystic...... fibrosis (CF) lung. Application of HBOT resulted in enhanced bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin at clinically relevant durations and was accompanied by indications of restored aerobic respiration, involvement of endogenous lethal oxidative stress and increased bacterial growth. The findings highlight...

  2. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Y.; Byrne, H.; Osborne, J.; Pitt-Francis, J.; Gavaghan, D.; Quintard, M.

    2013-01-01

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate

  3. Bacterial biofilms and antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Caldas-Arias

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms give to bacteria micro-environmental benefits; confers protection against antimicrobials. Bacteria have antibiotic resistance by conventional and unusual mechanisms leading to delayed wound healing, to increase recurrent chronic infections and nosocomial contamination of medical devices. Objective: This narrative review aims to introduce the characteristics of Bacteria-biofilms, antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and potential alternatives for prevention and control of its formation. Methods: Search strategy was performed on records: PubMed / Medline, Lilacs, Redalyc; with suppliers such as EBSCO and thesaurus MeSH and DeCS. Conclusions: Knowledge and research performance of biofilm bacteria are relevant in the search of technology for detection and measuring sensitivity to antibiotics. The identification of Bacterial-biofilms needs no-traditional microbiological diagnosis.

  4. Exploiting social evolution in biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, Kerry E; Heilmann, Silja; van Ditmarsch, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria are highly social organisms that communicate via signaling molecules, move collectively over surfaces and make biofilm communities. Nonetheless, our main line of defense against pathogenic bacteria consists of antibiotics-drugs that target individual-level traits of bacterial cells...... and thus, regrettably, select for resistance against their own action. A possible solution lies in targeting the mechanisms by which bacteria interact with each other within biofilms. The emerging field of microbial social evolution combines molecular microbiology with evolutionary theory to dissect...... the molecular mechanisms and the evolutionary pressures underpinning bacterial sociality. This exciting new research can ultimately lead to new therapies against biofilm infections that exploit evolutionary cheating or the trade-off between biofilm formation and dispersal....

  5. Biofilms: Community Behavior by Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    United we stand, divided we fall. This is a ... controls biofilm development, swarming motility and the produc- ... thought that the absence of overt gut flora upsets the balance .... there are several risks of integration which makes this strategy.

  6. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.; Wexler, A. D.; Bucs, Szilard; Dreszer, C.; Zwijnenburg, A.; Flemming, H. C.; Kruithof, J. C.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.

    2015-01-01

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies

  7. Om tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huggler, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    Begrebet tolerance og dets betydninger diskuteres med henblik på en tydeliggørelse af begrebets forbindelse med stat, religion, ytringsfrihed, skeptisk erkendelsesteori, antropologi og pædagogik.......Begrebet tolerance og dets betydninger diskuteres med henblik på en tydeliggørelse af begrebets forbindelse med stat, religion, ytringsfrihed, skeptisk erkendelsesteori, antropologi og pædagogik....

  8. Laboratory tools to quantify biogenic dissolution of rocks and minerals: a model rock biofilm growing in percolation columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz eSeiffert

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sub-aerial biofilms (SAB are ubiquitous, self-sufficient microbial ecosystems found on mineral surfaces at all altitudes and latitudes. SABs, which are the principal causes of weathering on exposed terrestrial surfaces, are characterised by patchy growth dominated by associations of algae, cyanobacteria, fungi and heterotrophic bacteria. A recently developed in vitro system to study colonisation of rocks exposed to air included two key SAB participants - the rock-inhabiting ascomycete Knufia petricola (CBS 123872 and the phototrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133. Both partners are genetically tractable and we used them here to study weathering of granite, K-feldspar and plagioclase. Small fragments of the various rocks or minerals (1 to 6 mm were packed into flow-through columns and incubated with 0.1% glucose and 10 µM thiamine-hydrochloride (90 µL.min-1 to compare weathering with and without biofilms. Dissolution of the minerals was followed by: analysing (i the degradation products in the effluent from the columns via Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy and (ii by studying polished sections of the incubated mineral fragment/grains using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses. K. petricola/N. punctiforme stimulated release of Ca, Na, Mg and Mn. Analyses of the polished sections confirmed depletion of Ca, Na and K near the surface of the fragments. The abrupt decrease in Ca concentration observed in peripheral areas of plagioclase fragments favoured a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. Percolation columns in combination with a model biofilm can thus be used to study weathering in closed systems. Columns can easily be filled with different minerals and biofilms, the effluent as well as grains can be collected after long-term exposure under axenic conditions and easily analysed.

  9. Laboratory tools to quantify biogenic dissolution of rocks and minerals: a model rock biofilm growing in percolation columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, Franz; Bandow, Nicole; Kalbe, Ute; Milke, Ralf; Gorbushina, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Sub-aerial biofilms (SAB) are ubiquitous, self-sufficient microbial ecosystems found on mineral surfaces at all altitudes and latitudes. SABs, which are the principal causes of weathering on exposed terrestrial surfaces, are characterised by patchy growth dominated by associations of algae, cyanobacteria, fungi and heterotrophic bacteria. A recently developed in vitro system to study colonisation of rocks exposed to air included two key SAB participants - the rock-inhabiting ascomycete Knufia petricola (CBS 123872) and the phototrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133. Both partners are genetically tractable and we used them here to study weathering of granite, K-feldspar and plagioclase. Small fragments of the various rocks or minerals (1 to 6 mm) were packed into flow-through columns and incubated with 0.1% glucose and 10 µM thiamine-hydrochloride (90 µL.min-1) to compare weathering with and without biofilms. Dissolution of the minerals was followed by: analysing (i) the degradation products in the effluent from the columns via Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy and (ii) by studying polished sections of the incubated mineral fragment/grains using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses. K. petricola/N. punctiforme stimulated release of Ca, Na, Mg and Mn. Analyses of the polished sections confirmed depletion of Ca, Na and K near the surface of the fragments. The abrupt decrease in Ca concentration observed in peripheral areas of plagioclase fragments favoured a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism. Percolation columns in combination with a model biofilm can thus be used to study weathering in closed systems. Columns can easily be filled with different minerals and biofilms, the effluent as well as grains can be collected after long-term exposure under axenic conditions and easily analysed.

  10. Biofilm in endodontics: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Zambrano de la Peña, Sonia; Salcedo-Moncada, Doris; Petkova- Gueorguieva, Marieta; Ventocilla Huasupoma, María

    2017-01-01

    It is demonstrated the efforts made endodontic microbiology and science to get to decipher the secrets of this unique structure although every day new questions arise. We need the treatments we use to combat biofilm achieve oxygenate the periapical ecosystem and basically scrape and loosen the tightly adhering bacteria Knowing the process of biofilm formation, microbial metabolism and strategies that they use to resist and remain hidden but active , we know why we observe refractory periapica...

  11. Critical review on biofilm methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azeredo, Joana; F. Azevedo, Nuno; Briandet, Romain

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms are widespread in nature and constitute an important strategy implemented by microorganisms to survive in sometimes harsh environmental conditions. They can be beneficial or have a negative impact particularly when formed in industrial settings or on medical devices. As such, research in...... and limitations of several methods. Accordingly, this review aims at helping scientists in finding the most appropriate and up-to-date methods to study their biofilms....

  12. Contribution of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria to total organic carbon pool in aquatic system of subtropical karst catchments, Southwest China: evidence from hydrochemical and microbiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Song, Ang; Peng, Wenjie; Jin, Zhenjiang; Müller, Werner E G; Wang, Xiaohong

    2017-06-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria may play a particular role in carbon cycling of aquatic systems. However, little is known about the interaction between aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria and hydrochemistry in groundwater-surface water exchange systems of subtropical karst catchments. We carried out a detailed study on the abundance of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria and bacterioplankton, hydrochemistry and taxonomy of bacterioplankton in the Maocun watershed, Southwest China, an area with karst geological background. Our results revealed that bacteria are the important contributors to total organic carbon source/sequestration in the groundwater-surface water of this area. The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria, including β-Proteobacteria, also appear in the studied water system. In addition to that, the genus Polynucleobacter of the phototropic β-Proteobacteria shows a close link with those sampling sites by presenting bacterial origin organic carbon on CCA biplot and is found to be positively correlated with total nitrogen, dissolved oxygen and pH (r = 0.860, 0.747 and 0.813, respectively) in the Maocun watershed. The results suggest that Polynucleobacter might be involved in the production of organic carbon and might act as the negative feedback on global warming. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Plasticity of Candida albicans Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Karla J.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Candida albicans, the most pervasive fungal pathogen that colonizes humans, forms biofilms that are architecturally complex. They consist of a basal yeast cell polylayer and an upper region of hyphae encapsulated in extracellular matrix. However, biofilms formed in vitro vary as a result of the different conditions employed in models, the methods used to assess biofilm formation, strain differences, and, in a most dramatic fashion, the configuration of the mating type locus (MTL). Therefore, integrating data from different studies can lead to problems of interpretation if such variability is not taken into account. Here we review the conditions and factors that cause biofilm variation, with the goal of engendering awareness that more attention must be paid to the strains employed, the methods used to assess biofilm development, every aspect of the model employed, and the configuration of the MTL locus. We end by posing a set of questions that may be asked in comparing the results of different studies and developing protocols for new ones. This review should engender the notion that not all biofilms are created equal. PMID:27250770

  14. The transcriptional programme of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium reveals a key role for tryptophan metabolism in biofilms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hamilton, Shea

    2009-12-11

    Abstract Background Biofilm formation enhances the capacity of pathogenic Salmonella bacteria to survive stresses that are commonly encountered within food processing and during host infection. The persistence of Salmonella within the food chain has become a major health concern, as biofilms can serve as a reservoir for the contamination of food products. While the molecular mechanisms required for the survival of bacteria on surfaces are not fully understood, transcriptional studies of other bacteria have demonstrated that biofilm growth triggers the expression of specific sets of genes, compared with planktonic cells. Until now, most gene expression studies of Salmonella have focused on the effect of infection-relevant stressors on virulence or the comparison of mutant and wild-type bacteria. However little is known about the physiological responses taking place inside a Salmonella biofilm. Results We have determined the transcriptomic and proteomic profiles of biofilms of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We discovered that 124 detectable proteins were differentially expressed in the biofilm compared with planktonic cells, and that 10% of the S. Typhimurium genome (433 genes) showed a 2-fold or more change in the biofilm compared with planktonic cells. The genes that were significantly up-regulated implicated certain cellular processes in biofilm development including amino acid metabolism, cell motility, global regulation and tolerance to stress. We found that the most highly down-regulated genes in the biofilm were located on Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2), and that a functional SPI2 secretion system regulator (ssrA) was required for S. Typhimurium biofilm formation. We identified STM0341 as a gene of unknown function that was needed for biofilm growth. Genes involved in tryptophan (trp) biosynthesis and transport were up-regulated in the biofilm. Deletion of trpE led to decreased bacterial attachment and this biofilm defect was restored by

  15. The Role of Isocitrate Lyase (ICL1) in the Metabolic Adaptation of Candida albicans Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishola, Oluwaseun Ayodeji; Ting, Seng Yeat; Tabana, Yasser M; Ahmed, Mowaffaq Adam; Yunus, Muhammad Amir; Mohamed, Rafeezul; Lung Than, Leslie Thian; Sandai, Doblin

    2016-01-01

    Background A major characteristic of Candida biofilm cells that differentiates them from free-floating cells is their high tolerance to antifungal drugs. This high resistance is attributed to particular biofilm properties, including the accumulation of extrapolymeric substances, morphogenetic switching, and metabolic flexibility. Objectives This study evaluated the roles of metabolic processes (in particular the glyoxylate cycle) on biofilm formation, antifungal drug resistance, morphology, and cell wall components. Methods Growth, adhesion, biofilm formation, and cell wall carbohydrate composition were quantified for isogenic Candida albicans ICL1/ICL1, ICL1/icl1, and icl1/icl1 strains. The morphology and topography of these strains were compared by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. FKS1 (glucan synthase), ERG11 (14-α-demethylase), and CDR2 (efflux pump) mRNA levels were quantified using qRT-PCR. Results The ICL1/icl1 and icl1/icl1 strains formed similar biofilms and exhibited analogous drug-tolerance levels to the control ICL1/ICL1 strains. Furthermore, the drug sequestration ability of β-1, 3-glucan, a major carbohydrate component of the extracellular matrix, was not impaired. However, the inactivation of ICL1 did impair morphogenesis. ICL1 deletion also had a considerable effect on the expression of the FKS1, ERG11, and CDR2 genes. FKS1 and ERG11 were upregulated in ICL1/icl1 and icl1/icl1 cells throughout the biofilm developmental stages, and CDR2 was upregulated at the early phase. However, their expression was downregulated compared to the control ICL1/ICL1 strain. Conclusions We conclude that the glyoxylate cycle is not a specific determinant of biofilm drug resistance. PMID:27800147

  16. Current understanding of multi-species biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    every year worldwide to deal with damage to equipment, contaminations of products, energy losses, and infections in human beings resulted from microbial biofilms. Microorganisms compete, cooperate, and communicate with each other in multi-species biofilms. Understanding the mechanisms of multi......Direct observation of a wide range of natural microorganisms has revealed the fact that the majority of microbes persist as surface-attached communities surrounded by matrix materials, called biofilms. Biofilms can be formed by a single bacterial strain. However, most natural biofilms are actually......-species biofilm formation will facilitate the development of methods for combating bacterial biofilms in clinical, environmental, industrial, and agricultural areas. The most recent advances in the understanding of multi-species biofilms are summarized and discussed in the review....

  17. Killing of Serratia marcescens biofilms with chloramphenicol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Christopher; Shenoy, Anukul T; Orihuela, Carlos J; González-Juarbe, Norberto

    2017-03-29

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram-negative bacterium with proven resistance to multiple antibiotics and causative of catheter-associated infections. Bacterial colonization of catheters mainly involves the formation of biofilm. The objectives of this study were to explore the susceptibility of S. marcescens biofilms to high doses of common antibiotics and non-antimicrobial agents. Biofilms formed by a clinical isolate of S. marcescens were treated with ceftriaxone, kanamycin, gentamicin, and chloramphenicol at doses corresponding to 10, 100 and 1000 times their planktonic minimum inhibitory concentration. In addition, biofilms were also treated with chemical compounds such as polysorbate-80 and ursolic acid. S. marcescens demonstrated susceptibility to ceftriaxone, kanamycin, gentamicin, and chloramphenicol in its planktonic form, however, only chloramphenicol reduced both biofilm biomass and biofilm viability. Polysorbate-80 and ursolic acid had minimal to no effect on either planktonic and biofilm grown S. marcescens. Our results suggest that supratherapeutic doses of chloramphenicol can be used effectively against established S. marcescens biofilms.

  18. Candida Biofilms: Development, Architecture, and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHANDRA, JYOTSNA; MUKHERJEE, PRANAB K.

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular device–related infections are often associated with biofilms (microbial communities encased within a polysaccharide-rich extracellular matrix) formed by pathogens on the surfaces of these devices. Candida species are the most common fungi isolated from catheter-, denture-, and voice prosthesis–associated infections and also are commonly isolated from contact lens–related infections (e.g., fungal keratitis). These biofilms exhibit decreased susceptibility to most antimicrobial agents, which contributes to the persistence of infection. Recent technological advances have facilitated the development of novel approaches to investigate the formation of biofilms and identify specific markers for biofilms. These studies have provided extensive knowledge of the effect of different variables, including growth time, nutrients, and physiological conditions, on biofilm formation, morphology, and architecture. In this article, we will focus on fungal biofilms (mainly Candida biofilms) and provide an update on the development, architecture, and resistance mechanisms of biofilms. PMID:26350306

  19. Effect of bacteriocin and exopolysaccharides isolated from probiotic on P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vivek; Harjai, Kusum; Shukla, Geeta

    2018-03-01

    Microorganisms develop biofilms on indwelling medical devices and are associated with biofilm-related infections, resulting in substantial morbidity and mortality. Therefore, to prevent and control biofilm-associated infections, the present study was designed to assess the anti-biofilm potential of postbiotics derived from probiotic organisms against most prevalent biofilm-forming Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Eighty lactic acid bacteria isolated from eight neonatal fecal samples possessed antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa PAO1. Among these, only four lactic acid bacteria produced both bacteriocin and exopolysaccharides but only one isolate was found to maximally attenuate the P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm. More specifically, the phenotypic and probiotic characterization showed that the isolated lactic acid bacteria were gram positive, non-motile, and catalase and oxidase negative; tolerated acidic and alkaline pH; has bile salt concentration; showed 53% hydrophobicity; and was found to be non-hemolytic. Phylogenetically, the organism was found to be probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum with accession no. KT998657. Interestingly, pre-coating of a microtiter plate either with bacteriocin or with exopolysaccharides as well as their combination significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the number of viable cells forming biofilms to 41.7% compared with simultaneous coating of postbiotics that had 72.4% biofilm-forming viable cells as observed by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Therefore, it can be anticipated that postbiotics as the natural biointerventions can be employed as the prophylactic agents for medical devices used to treat gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections.

  20. HiPIP oxido-reductase activity in membranes from aerobically grown cells of the facultative phototroph Rhodoferax fermentans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hochkoeppler, Alejandro; Kofod, Pauli; Zannoni, Davide

    1995-01-01

    The role of the periplasmically located, water-soluble, HiPIP (high-potential iron-sulfur protein) in the respiratory chain of the facultative phototroph Rhodoferax fermentans has been examined. The oxidized HiPIP is reduced by succinate-dependent respiration via the bc 1 complex, this reaction...... being inhibited by myxothiazol and/or stigmatellin. The reduced HiPIP can be oxidized by the membrane-bound cytochrome oxidase, this reaction being inhibited by 0.1 mM cyanide. We conclude that aerobically grown Rf. fermentans contains a redox chain in which HiPIP mediates electron transfer between...... the bc 1 complex and the cb-type cytochrome oxidase....

  1. Singlet-triplet fission of carotenoid excitation in light-harvesting LH2 complexes of purple phototrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenina, I B; Makhneva, Z K; Moskalenko, A A; Gudkov, N D; Bolshakov, M A; Pavlova, E A; Proskuryakov, I I

    2014-03-01

    The current generally accepted structure of light-harvesting LH2 complexes from purple phototrophic bacteria conflicts with the observation of singlet-triplet carotenoid excitation fission in these complexes. In LH2 complexes from the purple bacterium Allochromatium minutissimum, a drop in the efficiency of carotenoid triplet generation is demonstrated, which correlates with the extent of selective photooxidation of bacteriochlorophylls absorbing at ~850 nm. We conclude that singlet-triplet fission of carotenoid excitation proceeds with participation of these excitonically coupled bacteriochlorophylls. In the framework of the proposed mechanism, the contradiction between LH2 structure and photophysical properties of carotenoids is eliminated. The possibility of singlet-triplet excitation fission involving a third mediator molecule was not considered earlier.

  2. Biosynthesis of Chlorophyll a in a Purple Bacterial Phototroph and Assembly into a Plant Chlorophyll-Protein Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, Andrew; Jackson, Philip J; Chidgey, Jack W; Dickman, Mark J; Hunter, C Neil; Canniffe, Daniel P

    2016-09-16

    Improvements to photosynthetic efficiency could be achieved by manipulating pigment biosynthetic pathways of photosynthetic organisms in order to increase the spectral coverage for light absorption. The development of organisms that can produce both bacteriochlorophylls and chlorophylls is one way to achieve this aim, and accordingly we have engineered the bacteriochlorophyll-utilizing anoxygenic phototroph Rhodobacter sphaeroides to make chlorophyll a. Bacteriochlorophyll and chlorophyll share a common biosynthetic pathway up to the precursor chlorophyllide. Deletion of genes responsible for the bacteriochlorophyll-specific modifications of chlorophyllide and replacement of the native bacteriochlorophyll synthase with a cyanobacterial chlorophyll synthase resulted in the production of chlorophyll a. This pigment could be assembled in vivo into the plant water-soluble chlorophyll protein, heterologously produced in Rhodobacter sphaeroides, which represents a proof-of-principle for the engineering of novel antenna complexes that enhance the spectral range of photosynthesis.

  3. Cleaning and Disinfection of Bacillus cereus Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Amanda; Klein, Dan; Lopolito, Paul; Schwarz, John Spencer

    2016-01-01

    Methodology has been evolving for the testing of disinfectants against bacterial single-species biofilms, as the difficulty of biofilm remediation continues to gain much-needed attention. Bacterial single-species biofilm contamination presents a real risk to good manufacturing practice-regulated industries. However, mixed-species biofilms and biofilms containing bacterial spores remain an even greater challenge for cleaning and disinfection. Among spore-forming microorganisms frequently encountered in pharmaceutical manufacturing areas, the spores of Bacillus cereus are often determined to be the hardest to disinfect and eradicate. One of the reasons for the low degree of susceptibility to disinfection is the ability of these spores to be encapsulated within an exopolysachharide biofilm matrix. In this series of experiments, we evaluated the disinfectant susceptibility of B. cereus biofilms relative to disassociated B. cereus spores and biofilm from a non-spore-forming species. Further, we assessed the impact that pre-cleaning has on increasing that susceptibility. Methodology has been evolving for the testing of disinfectants against bacterial single-species biofilms, as the difficulty of biofilm remediation continues to gain much-needed attention. Bacterial single-species biofilm contamination presents a real risk to good manufacturing practice-regulated industries. However, mixed-species biofilms and biofilms containing bacterial spores remain an even greater challenge for cleaning and disinfection. Among spore-forming microorganisms frequently encountered in pharmaceutical manufacturing areas, the spores of Bacillus cereus are often determined to be the hardest to disinfect and eradicate. One of the reasons for the low degree of susceptibility to disinfection is the ability of these spores to be encapsulated within an exopolysachharide biofilm matrix. In this series of experiments, we evaluated the disinfectant susceptibility of B. cereus biofilms relative to

  4. Maggot excretions inhibit biofilm formation on biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; van de Veerdonk, Mariëlle C; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Schreurs, Marco W J; Jukema, Gerrolt N

    2010-10-01

    Biofilm-associated infections in trauma surgery are difficult to treat with conventional therapies. Therefore, it is important to develop new treatment modalities. Maggots in captured bags, which are permeable for larval excretions/secretions, aid in healing severe, infected wounds, suspect for biofilm formation. Therefore we presumed maggot excretions/secretions would reduce biofilm formation. We studied biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterobacter cloacae on polyethylene, titanium, and stainless steel. We compared the quantities of biofilm formation between the bacterial species on the various biomaterials and the quantity of biofilm formation after various incubation times. Maggot excretions/secretions were added to existing biofilms to examine their effect. Comb-like models of the biomaterials, made to fit in a 96-well microtiter plate, were incubated with bacterial suspension. The formed biofilms were stained in crystal violet, which was eluted in ethanol. The optical density (at 595 nm) of the eluate was determined to quantify biofilm formation. Maggot excretions/secretions were pipetted in different concentrations to (nonstained) 7-day-old biofilms, incubated 24 hours, and finally measured. The strongest biofilms were formed by S. aureus and S. epidermidis on polyethylene and the weakest on titanium. The highest quantity of biofilm formation was reached within 7 days for both bacteria. The presence of excretions/secretions reduced biofilm formation on all biomaterials. A maximum of 92% of biofilm reduction was measured. Our observations suggest maggot excretions/secretions decrease biofilm formation and could provide a new treatment for biofilm formation on infected biomaterials.

  5. Investigating Metabolic Control of Persister Formation in Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Beer , K., McKay, G., Siehnel, R., Schafhauser, J., Wang, Y., et al. (2011). Active starva- tion responses mediate antibiotic tolerance in biofilms and...ATP concentration in Escherichia coli fermentations . Biotechnology and bioengineering 52, 364-372. Lemke, J.J., Sanchez-Vazquez, P., Burgos, H.L...1082– 1093. 33. Nguyen D, Joshi-Datar A, Lepine F, Bauerle E, Olakanmi O, Beer K, McKay G, Siehnel R, Schafhauser J, Wang Y, Britigan BE, Singh PK. 2011

  6. Localized electron transfer rates and microelectrode-based enrichment of microbial communities within a phototrophic microbial mat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome eBabauta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phototrophic microbial mats frequently exhibit sharp, light-dependent redox gradients that regulate microbial respiration on specific electron acceptors as a function of depth. In this work, a benthic phototrophic microbial mat from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville in north-central Washington, was used to develop a microscale electrochemical method to study local electron transfer processes within the mat. To characterize the physicochemical variables influencing electron transfer, we initially quantified redox potential, pH and dissolved oxygen gradients by depth in the mat under photic and aphotic conditions. We further demonstrated that power output of a mat fuel cell was light-dependent. To study local electron transfer processes, we deployed a microscale electrode (microelectrode with tip size ~20 µm. To enrich a subset of microorganisms capable of interacting with the microelectrode, we anodically polarized the microelectrode in the mat. Subsequently, to characterize the microelectrode-associated community and compare it to the neighboring mat community, we performed amplicon sequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S gene. Differences in Bray-Curtis beta diversity, illustrated by large changes in relative abundance at the phylum level, suggested successful enrichment of specific mat community members on the microelectrode surface. The microelectrode-associated community exhibited substantially reduced alpha diversity and elevated relative abundances of Prosthecochloris, Loktanella, Catellibacterium, other unclassified members of Rhodobacteraceae, Thiomicrospira, and Limnobacter, compared with the community at an equivalent depth in the mat. Our results suggest that local electron transfer to an anodically polarized microelectrode selected for a specific microbial population, with substantially more abundance and diversity of sulfur-oxidizing phylotypes compared with the neighboring mat community.

  7. Localized electron transfer rates and microelectrode-based enrichment of microbial communities within a phototrophic microbial mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babauta, Jerome T; Atci, Erhan; Ha, Phuc T; Lindemann, Stephen R; Ewing, Timothy; Call, Douglas R; Fredrickson, James K; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats frequently exhibit sharp, light-dependent redox gradients that regulate microbial respiration on specific electron acceptors as a function of depth. In this work, a benthic phototrophic microbial mat from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville in north-central Washington, was used to develop a microscale electrochemical method to study local electron transfer processes within the mat. To characterize the physicochemical variables influencing electron transfer, we initially quantified redox potential, pH, and dissolved oxygen gradients by depth in the mat under photic and aphotic conditions. We further demonstrated that power output of a mat fuel cell was light-dependent. To study local electron transfer processes, we deployed a microscale electrode (microelectrode) with tip size ~20 μm. To enrich a subset of microorganisms capable of interacting with the microelectrode, we anodically polarized the microelectrode at depth in the mat. Subsequently, to characterize the microelectrode-associated community and compare it to the neighboring mat community, we performed amplicon sequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S gene. Differences in Bray-Curtis beta diversity, illustrated by large changes in relative abundance at the phylum level, suggested successful enrichment of specific mat community members on the microelectrode surface. The microelectrode-associated community exhibited substantially reduced alpha diversity and elevated relative abundances of Prosthecochloris, Loktanella, Catellibacterium, other unclassified members of Rhodobacteraceae, Thiomicrospira, and Limnobacter, compared with the community at an equivalent depth in the mat. Our results suggest that local electron transfer to an anodically polarized microelectrode selected for a specific microbial population, with substantially more abundance and diversity of sulfur-oxidizing phylotypes compared with the neighboring mat community.

  8. 5-aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy and its strain-dependent combined effect with antibiotics on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Zhao Zhang

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is hard to be eradicated, not only due to the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains but also because of its ability to form biofilm. Antibiotics are the major approach to treating biofilm infections, but their effects are unsatisfactory. One of the potential alternative treatments for controlling biofilm infections is photodynamic therapy (PDT, which requires the administration of photosensitizer, followed by light activation. 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA, a natural photosensitizer prodrug, presents favorable characteristics, such as easy penetration and rapid clearance. These advantages enable ALA-based PDT (ALA-PDT to be well-tolerated by patients and it can be repeatedly applied without cumulative toxicity or serious side effects. ALA-PDT has been proven to be an effective treatment for multidrug resistant pathogens; however, the study of its effect on S. aureus biofilm is limited. Here, we established our PDT system based on the utilization of ALA and a light-emitting diode, and we tested the effect of ALA-PDT on S. aureus biofilm as well as the combined effect of ALA-PDT and antibiotics on S. aureus biofilm. Our results showed that ALA-PDT has a strong antibacterial effect on S. aureus biofilm, which was confirmed by the confocal laser scanning microscope. We also found that lethal photosensitization occurred predominantly in the upper layer of the biofilm, while the residual live bacteria were located in the lower layer of the biofilm. In addition, the improved bactericidal effect was observed in the combined treatment group but in a strain-dependent manner. Our results suggest that ALA-PDT is a potential alternative approach for future clinical use to treat S. aureus biofilm-associated infections, and some patients may benefit from the combined treatment of ALA-PDT and antibiotics, but drug sensitivity testing should be performed in advance.

  9. In vitro biofilm formation by methicillin susceptible and resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Lambiase

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common pathogens isolated from respiratory tracts of Cystic Fibrosis patients (CF. The infection by this pathogen starts in early infancy, often preceding chronic infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The infection and colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are, by then, events very frequent among CF patients and this bacterial isolation leads to complications in therapeutic management because of the limited treatment options. Strains of Staphylococcus aureus are able to produce biofilms on natural or synthetic surfaces. Biofilms are sophisticated communities of matrix-encased bacteria and infections by biofilm-producing bacteria are particularly problematic because sessile bacteria can often withstand host immune responses and are generally much more tolerant to antibiotics. The first aim of this work is to evaluate the ability of MRSA strains isolated from respiratory secretions of CF patients to develop biofilms in comparison with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA strains obtained from respiratory secretions of CF patients.Therefore, our second aim is to evaluate the environmental influence on this ability. To evaluate the development of biofilm on solid matrix and the possible environmental influence,we applied the method described by Christensen et al. We found that a significantly higher number of MRSA strains were biofilm positive compared with MSSA strains (p<0.05.The presence of glucose did not influence the ability to form biofilm in our MRSA strains (p=0.165. MSSA strains are not strong biofilm-producers, but, when grown in TSB added with 0.25% glucose, the number of biofilm-forming strains increases, as expected. These data suggest a possible association between methicillin-resistance and biofilm formation.

  10. One of two TolC-like proteins is involved in antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae clinical isolate SC1516

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the etiologic agent of porcine contagious pleuropneumonia, a significant disease that causes serious economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Persistent infections caused by bacterial biofilms are recalcitrant to treat because of the particular drug resistance of biofilm-dwelling cells. TolC, a key component of multidrug efflux pumps, are responsible for multidrug resistance in many Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we identified two TolC-like proteins, TolC1 and TolC2, in A. pleuropneumoniae. Deletion of tolC1, but not tolC2, caused a significant reduction in biofilm formation, as well as increased drug sensitivity of both planktonic and biofilm cells. The genetic-complementation of the tolC1 mutation restored the competent biofilm and drug resistance. Besides, biofilm formation was inhibited and drug sensitivity was increased by the addition of phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide (PAβN, a well-known efflux pump inhibitor (EPI, suggesting a role for EPI in antibacterial strategies towards drug tolerance of A. pleuropneumoniae. Taken together, TolC1 is required for biofilm formation and is a part of the multidrug resistance machinery of both planktonic and biofilm cells, which could supplement therapeutic strategies for resistant bacteria and biofilm-related infections of A. pleuropneumoniae clinical isolate SC1516.

  11. Microbiële biofilms in tandheelkunde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krom, B.P.

    2015-01-01

    Aangehechte gemeenschappen van micro-organismen, ook wel biofilms genoemd, zijn altijd en overal aanwezig. Hoewel biofilms een slechte naam hebben, zijn ze meestal natuurlijk, gezond en zelfs gewenst. In de tandartspraktijk komen zowel gezonde (orale biofilms) als ongezonde (bijv. in de waterleiding

  12. Microbiële biofilms in tandheelkunde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krom, B.P.

    2015-01-01

    Aangehechte gemeenschappen van micro-organismen, ook wel biofilms genoemd, zijn altijd en overal aanwezig. Hoewel biofilms een slechte naam hebben, zijn ze meestal natuurlijk, gezond en zelfs gewenst. In de mondzorgpraktijk komen zowel gezonde (orale biofilms) als ongezonde (bijv. in de waterleiding

  13. Differential growth of wrinkled biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeso, D. R.; Carpio, A.; Einarsson, B.

    2015-02-01

    Biofilms are antibiotic-resistant bacterial aggregates that grow on moist surfaces and can trigger hospital-acquired infections. They provide a classical example in biology where the dynamics of cellular communities may be observed and studied. Gene expression regulates cell division and differentiation, which affect the biofilm architecture. Mechanical and chemical processes shape the resulting structure. We gain insight into the interplay between cellular and mechanical processes during biofilm development on air-agar interfaces by means of a hybrid model. Cellular behavior is governed by stochastic rules informed by a cascade of concentration fields for nutrients, waste, and autoinducers. Cellular differentiation and death alter the structure and the mechanical properties of the biofilm, which is deformed according to Föppl-Von Kármán equations informed by cellular processes and the interaction with the substratum. Stiffness gradients due to growth and swelling produce wrinkle branching. We are able to reproduce wrinkled structures often formed by biofilms on air-agar interfaces, as well as spatial distributions of differentiated cells commonly observed with B. subtilis.

  14. Towards Tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisette Kuyper; Jurjen Iedema; Saskia Keuzenkamp

    2013-01-01

    Across Europe, public attitudes towards lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) individuals range from broad tolerance to widespread rejection. Attitudes towards homosexuality are more than mere individual opinions, but form part of the social and political structures which foster or hinder the equality

  15. Intolerant tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushf, G

    1994-04-01

    The Hyde Amendment and Roman Catholic attempts to put restrictions on Title X funding have been criticized for being intolerant. However, such criticism fails to appreciate that there are two competing notions of tolerance, one focusing on the limits of state force and accepting pluralism as unavoidable, and the other focusing on the limits of knowledge and advancing pluralism as a good. These two types of tolerance, illustrated in the writings of John Locke and J.S. Mill, each involve an intolerance. In a pluralistic context where the free exercise of religion is respected, John Locke's account of tolerance is preferable. However, it (in a reconstructed form) leads to a minimal state. Positive entitlements to benefits like artificial contraception or nontherapeutic abortions can legitimately be resisted, because an intolerance has already been shown with respect to those that consider the benefit immoral, since their resources have been coopted by taxation to advance an end that is contrary to their own. There is a sliding scale from tolerance (viewed as forbearance) to the affirmation of communal integrity, and this scale maps on to the continuum from negative to positive rights.

  16. Medical biofilms--nanotechnology approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neethirajan, Suresh; Clond, Morgan A; Vogt, Adam

    2014-10-01

    Biofilms are colonies of bacteria or fungi that adhere to a surface, protected by an extracellular polymer matrix composed of polysaccharides and extracellular DNA. They are highly complex and dynamic multicellular structures that resist traditional means of killing planktonic bacteria. Recent developments in nanotechnology provide novel approaches to preventing and dispersing biofilm infections, which are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Medical device infections are responsible for approximately 60% of hospital acquired infections. In the United States, the estimated cost of caring for healthcare-associated infections is approximately between $28 billion and $45 billion per year. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of biofilm formation and degradation, its relevance to challenges in clinical practice, and new technological developments in nanotechnology that are designed to address these challenges.

  17. Synergistic Interactions in Multispecies Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Dawei

    The coexistence of hugely diverse microbes in most environments highlights the intricate interactions in microbial communities, which are central to their properties, such as productivity, stability and the resilience to disturbance. Biofilm, in environmental habitats, is such a spatially...... multispecies biofilm models, oral microbial community, also known as “dental plaque” is thoroughly investigated as a focal point to describe the interspecies interactions [1]. However, owing to the lack of a reliable high throughput and quantitative approach for exploring the interplay between multiple...... bacterial species, the study to elucidate the impact of interaction networks on the multispecies biofilms in natural ecosystems, especially in soil, is still at an early stage. The diverse patterns of interactions within the mixed communities as well as the predatorprey relationship between protozoa...

  18. Synchronized dynamics of bacterial niche-specific functions during biofilm development in a cold seep brine pool

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Weipeng

    2015-07-14

    The biology of biofilm in deep-sea environments is barely being explored. Here, biofilms were developed at the brine pool (characterized by limited carbon sources) and the normal bottom water adjacent to Thuwal cold seeps. Comparative metagenomics based on 50 Gb datasets identified polysaccharide degradation, nitrate reduction, and proteolysis as enriched functional categories for brine biofilms. The genomes of two dominant species: a novel deltaproteobacterium and a novel epsilonproteobacterium in the brine biofilms were reconstructed. Despite rather small genome sizes, the deltaproteobacterium possessed enhanced polysaccharide fermentation pathways, whereas the epsilonproteobacterium was a versatile nitrogen reactor possessing nar, nap and nif gene clusters. These metabolic functions, together with specific regulatory and hypersaline-tolerant genes, made the two bacteria unique compared with their close relatives including those from hydrothermal vents. Moreover, these functions were regulated by biofilm development, as both the abundance and the expression level of key functional genes were higher in later-stage biofilms, and co-occurrences between the two dominant bacteria were demonstrated. Collectively, unique mechanisms were revealed: i) polysaccharides fermentation, proteolysis interacted with nitrogen cycling to form a complex chain for energy generation; ii) remarkably, exploiting and organizing niche-specific functions would be an important strategy for biofilm-dependent adaptation to the extreme conditions.

  19. Growing and Analyzing Biofilms in Flow Chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic......, and disassembly and cleaning of the system. In addition, embedding and fluorescent in situ hybridization of flow chamber–grown biofilms are addressed. Curr. Protoc. Microbiol. 21:1B.2.1-1B.2.17. © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc....

  20. Light Regimes Shape Utilization of Extracellular Organic C and N in a Cyanobacterial Biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, Rhona K.; Mayali, Xavier; Boaro, Amy A.; Zemla, Adam; Everroad, R. Craig; Nilson, Daniel; Weber, Peter K.; Lipton, Mary; Bebout, Brad M.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Thelen, Michael P.

    2016-06-28

    Although it is becoming clear that many microbial primary producers can also play a role as organic consumers, we know very little about the metabolic regulation of photoautotroph organic matter consumption. Cyanobacteria in phototrophic biofilms can reuse extracellular organic carbon, but the metabolic drivers of extracellular processes are surprisingly complex. We investigated the metabolic foundations of organic matter reuse by comparing exoproteome composition and incorporation of13C-labeled and15N-labeled cyanobacterial extracellular organic matter (EOM) in a unicyanobacterial biofilm incubated using different light regimes. In the light and the dark, cyanobacterial direct organic C assimilation accounted for 32% and 43%, respectively, of all organic C assimilation in the community. Under photosynthesis conditions, we measured increased excretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and proteins involved in micronutrient transport, suggesting that requirements for micronutrients may drive EOM assimilation during daylight hours. This interpretation was supported by photosynthesis inhibition experiments, in which cyanobacteria incorporated N-rich EOM-derived material. In contrast, under dark, C-starved conditions, cyanobacteria incorporated C-rich EOM-derived organic matter, decreased excretion of EPS, and showed an increased abundance of degradative exoproteins, demonstrating the use of the extracellular domain for C storage. Sequence-structure modeling of one of these exoproteins predicted a specific hydrolytic activity that was subsequently detected, confirming increased EOM degradation in the dark. Associated heterotrophic bacteria increased in abundance and upregulated transport proteins under dark relative to light conditions. Taken together, our results indicate that biofilm cyanobacteria are successful competitors for organic C and N and that cyanobacterial nutrient and energy requirements control the use of EOM.

  1. How Cyanobacterial Distributions Reveal Flow and Irradiance Conditions of Photosynthetic Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prufert-Bebout, Lee

    2001-01-01

    Microbial life on Earth is enormously abundant at sediment-water interfaces. The fossil record in fact contains abundant evidence of the preservation of life on such surfaces. It is therefore critical to our interpretation of early Earth history, and potentially to history of life on other planets, to be able to recognize life forms at these interfaces. On Earth this life often occurs as organized structures of microbes and their extracellular exudates known as biofilms. When such biofilms occur in areas receiving sunlight photosynthetic biofilms are the dominant form in natural ecosystems due to selective advantage inherent in their ability to utilize solar energy. Cyanobacteria are the dominant phototrophic microbes in most modern and ancient photosynthetic biofilms, microbial mats and stromatolites. Due to their long (3.5 billion year) evolutionary history, this group has extensively diversified resulting in an enormous array of morphologies and physiological abilities. This enormous diversity and specialization results in very specific selection for a particular cyanobacterium in each available photosynthetic niche. Furthermore these organisms can alter their spatial orientation, cell morphology, pigmentation and associations with heterotrophic organisms in order to fine tune their optimization to a given micro-niche. These adaptations can be detected, and if adequate knowledge of the interaction between environmental conditions and organism response is available, the detectable organism response can be used to infer the environmental conditions causing that response. This presentation will detail two specific examples which illustrate this point. Light and water are essential to photosynthesis in cyanobacteria and these organisms have specific detectable behavioral responses to these parameters. We will present cyanobacterial responses to quantified flow and irradiance to demonstrate the interpretative power of distribution and orientation information. This

  2. Biofilm reactors for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, J L; Clausen, E C; Gaddy, J L

    1988-07-01

    Whole cell immobilization has been studied in the laboratory during the last few years as a method to improve the performance and economics of most fermentation processes. Among the various techniques available for cell immobilization, methods that provide generation of a biofilm offer reduced diffusional resistance, high productivities, and simple operation. This paper reviews some of the important aspects of biofilm reactors for ethanol production, including reactor start-up, steady state behavior, process stability, and mathematical modeling. Special emphasis is placed on covalently bonded Saccharomyces cerevisiae in packed bed reactors.

  3. Interactions between polymorphonuclear leukocytes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms on silicone implants in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gennip, Maria; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten

    2012-01-01

    (PMNs). In contrast, the number of cells of a P. aeruginosa rhlA mutant that cannot produce rhamnolipids was significantly reduced on the implants by day 1, and the bacteria were actively phagocytosed by infiltrating PMNs. In addition, we identified extracellular wire-like structures around the bacteria......Chronic infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa persist because the bacterium forms biofilms that are tolerant to antibiotic treatment and the host immune response. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to visualize biofilm development in vivo following...... intraperitoneal inoculation of mice with bacteria growing on hollow silicone tubes, as well as to examine the interaction between these bacteria and the host innate immune response. Wild-type P. aeruginosa developed biofilms within 1 day that trapped and caused visible cavities in polymorphonuclear leukocytes...

  4. A short history of microbial biofilms and biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels

    2017-01-01

    The observation of aggregated microbes surrounded by a self-produced matrix adhering to surfaces or located in tissues or secretions is old since both Leeuwenhoek and Pasteur have described the phenomenon. In environmental and technical microbiology, biofilms, 80–90 years ago, were already shown ...

  5. Molecular Basis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Biofilm Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kaj Scherz

    In this study, I sought to identify genes regulating the global molecular program for development of sessile multicellular communities, also known as biofilm, of the eukaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). Yeast biofilm has a clinical interest, as biofilms can cause chronic...... infections in humans. Biofilm is also interesting from an evolutionary standpoint, as an example of primitive multicellularity. By using a genome-wide screen of yeast deletion mutants, I show that 71 genes are essential for biofilm formation. Two-thirds of these genes are required for transcription of FLO11......, but only a small subset is previously described as regulators of FLO11. These results reveal that the regulation of biofilm formation and FLO11 is even more complex than what has previously been described. I find that the molecular program for biofilm formation shares many essential components with two...

  6. Cell death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Thompson, L.S.; James, S.

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms often develop multicellular, three-dimensional structures known as microcolonies. Complex differentiation within biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, leading to the creation of voids inside microcolonies and to the dispersal of cells from within these voids....... However, key developmental processes regulating these events are poorly understood. A normal component of multicellular development is cell death. Here we report that a repeatable pattern of cell death and lysis occurs in biofilms of P. aeruginosa during the normal course of development. Cell death...... occurred with temporal and spatial organization within biofilms, inside microcolonies, when the biofilms were allowed to develop in continuous-culture flow cells. A subpopulation of viable cells was always observed in these regions. During the onset of biofilm killing and during biofilm development...

  7. Modelling the growth of a methanotrophic biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, J.-P.; Arvin, E.

    1999-01-01

    This article discusses the growth of methanotrophic biofilms. Several independent biofilm growths scenarios involving different inocula were examined. Biofilm growth, substrate removal and product formation were monitored throughout the experiments. Based on the oxygen consumption it was concluded...... that heterotrophs and nitrifiers co-existed with methanotrophs in the biofilm. Heterotrophic biomass grew on soluble polymers formed by the hydrolysis of dead biomass entrapped in the biofilm. Nitrifier populations developed because of the presence of ammonia in the mineral medium. Based on these experimental...... was performed on this model. It indicated that the most influential parameters were those related to the biofilm (i.e. density; solid-volume fraction; thickness). This suggests that in order to improve the model, further research regarding the biofilm structure and composition is needed....

  8. Biofilms of vaginal Lactobacillus in vitro test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Rui; Xiao, Bing-Bing; Liao, Qin-Ping

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on biofilms of Lactobacillus spp. - a type of normal flora isolated from healthy human vaginas of women of childbearing age; thereupon, it broadens the research scope of investigation of vaginal normal flora. The static slide culture method was adopted to foster biofilms, marked by specific fluorescence staining. Laser scanning confocal and scanning electron microscopy were used to observe the microstructure of the biofilms. Photographs taken from the microstructure were analysed to calculate the density of the biofilms. The body of Lactobacillus spp., though red, turned yellow when interacting with the green extracellular polysaccharides. The structure of the biofilm and aquaporin within the biofilm were imaged. Lactobacillus density increases over time. This study provides convincing evidence that Lactobacillus can form biofilms and grow over time in vitro. This finding establishes an important and necessary condition for selecting proper strains for the pharmaceutics of vaginal ecology.

  9. The clinical impact of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria survive in nature by forming biofilms on surfaces and probably most, if not all, bacteria (and fungi) are capable of forming biofilms. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein and extracellular DNA....... Bacterial biofilms are resistant to antibiotics, disinfectant chemicals and to phagocytosis and other components of the innate and adaptive inflammatory defense system of the body. It is known, for example, that persistence of staphylococcal infections related to foreign bodies is due to biofilm formation....... Likewise, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients are caused by biofilm growing mucoid strains. Gradients of nutrients and oxygen exist from the top to the bottom of biofilms and the bacterial cells located in nutrient poor areas have decreased metabolic activity...

  10. Salt Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Liming; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2002-01-01

    Studying salt stress is an important means to the understanding of plant ion homeostasis and osmo-balance. Salt stress research also benefits agriculture because soil salinity significantly limits plant productivity on agricultural lands. Decades of physiological and molecular studies have generated a large body of literature regarding potential salt tolerance determinants. Recent advances in applying molecular genetic analysis and genomics tools in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana are sh...

  11. Current and future trends for biofilm reactors for fermentation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Duygu; Demirci, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Biofilms in the environment can both cause detrimental and beneficial effects. However, their use in bioreactors provides many advantages including lesser tendencies to develop membrane fouling and lower required capital costs, their higher biomass density and operation stability, contribution to resistance of microorganisms, etc. Biofilm formation occurs naturally by the attachment of microbial cells to the support without use of any chemicals agent in biofilm reactors. Biofilm reactors have been studied and commercially used for waste water treatment and bench and pilot-scale production of value-added products in the past decades. It is important to understand the fundamentals of biofilm formation, physical and chemical properties of a biofilm matrix to run the biofilm reactor at optimum conditions. This review includes the principles of biofilm formation; properties of a biofilm matrix and their roles in the biofilm formation; factors that improve the biofilm formation, such as support materials; advantages and disadvantages of biofilm reactors; and industrial applications of biofilm reactors.

  12. Functional recovery of biofilm bacterial communities after copper exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boivin, Marie-Elene Y.; Massieux, Boris; Breure, Anton M.; Greve, Gerdit D.; Rutgers, Michiel; Admiraal, Wim

    2006-01-01

    Potential of bacterial communities in biofilms to recover after copper exposure was investigated. Biofilms grown outdoor in shallow water on glass dishes were exposed in the laboratory to 0.6, 2.1, 6.8 μmol/l copper amended surface water and a reference and subsequently to un-amended surface water. Transitions of bacterial communities were characterised with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and community-level physiological profiles (CLPP). Exposure to 6.8 μmol/l copper provoked distinct changes in DGGE profiles of bacterial consortia, which did not reverse upon copper depuration. Exposure to 2.1 and 6.8 μmol/l copper was found to induce marked changes in CLPP of bacterial communities that proved to be reversible during copper depuration. Furthermore, copper exposure induced the development of copper-tolerance, which was partially lost during depuration. It is concluded that bacterial communities exposed to copper contaminated water for a period of 26 days are capable to restore their metabolic attributes after introduction of unpolluted water in aquaria for 28 days. - Genetically different bacterial communities can have similar functions and tolerance to copper

  13. Candida biofilms: is adhesion sexy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soll, David R

    2008-08-26

    The development of Candida albicans biofilms requires two types of adhesion molecule - the Als proteins and Hwp1. Mutational analyses have recently revealed that these molecules play complementary roles, and their characteristics suggest that they may have evolved from primitive mating agglutinins.

  14. Biofilm in drinking water networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristiani, Pietrangela

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial growth in drinking waters is today controlled adding small and non toxic quantities of sanitising products. An innovative electrochemical biofilm monitoring system, already successfully applied in industrial waters, could be confirmed as an effective diagnostic tool of water quality also for drinking distributions systems [it

  15. Distribution and Origin of Oxygen-Dependent and Oxygen-Independent Forms of Mg-Protoporphyrin Monomethylester Cyclase among Phototrophic Proteobacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boldareva, Ekaterina; Bláhová, Zuzana; Sobotka, Roman; Koblížek, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 8 (2013), s. 2596-2604 ISSN 0099-2240 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/0221; GA ČR GBP501/12/G055; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0110 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : AEROBIC ANOXYGENIC PHOTOTROPHS * CHLOROPHYLL ISOCYCLIC RING * PURPLE BACTERIA Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.952, year: 2013

  16. A comparative ToF-SIMS and GC–MS analysis of phototrophic communities collected from an alkaline silica-depositing hot spring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siljeström, S.; Parenteau, M. N.; Jahnke, L. L.; Cady, S. L.

    2017-07-01

    One of few techniques that is able to spatially resolve chemical data, including organic molecules, to morphological features in modern and ancient geological samples, is time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The ability to connect chemical data to morphology is key for interpreting the biogenicity of preserved remains in ancient samples. However, due to the lack of reference data for geologically relevant samples and the ease with which samples can be contaminated, ToF-SIMS data may be difficult to interpret. In this project, we aimed to build a ToF-SIMS spectral database by performing parallel ToF-SIMS and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) analyses of extant photosynthetic microbial communities collected from an alkaline silica-depositing hot spring in Yellowstone National Park, USA. We built the library by analyzing samples of increasing complexity: pure lipid standards commonly found in thermophilic phototrophs, solvent extracts of specific lipid fractions, total lipid extracts, pure cultures of dominant phototrophic community members, and unsilicified phototrophic streamer communities. The results showed that important lipids and pigments originating from phototrophs were detected by ToF-SIMS (e.g., wax esters, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, digalactosyldiacylglycerol, sufloquinovosyldiaglycerol, alkanes, etc.) in the streamer lipid extracts. Many of the lipids were also detected in situ in the unsilicified streamer, and could even be spatially resolved to individual cells within the streamer community. Together with the ToF-SIMS database, this mapping ability will be used to further explore other microbial mats and their fossilized counterparts in the geological record. This is likely to expand the geochemical understanding of these types of samples.

  17. Light history modulates antioxidant and photosynthetic responses of biofilms to both natural (light) and chemical (herbicides) stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnineau, Chloé; Sague, Irene Gallardo; Urrea, Gemma; Guasch, Helena

    2012-05-01

    In multiple stress situations, the co-occurrence of environmental and chemical factors can influence organisms' ability to cope with toxicity. In this context, the influence of light adaptation on the response of freshwater biofilms to sudden light changes or to herbicides exposure was investigated by determining various parameters: diatom community composition, photosynthetic parameters, chlorophyll a content, antioxidant enzyme activities. Biofilms were grown in microcosms under sub-optimal, saturating, and high light intensities and showed already described characteristics of shade/light adaptation (community structure, photosynthetic adaptation, etc.). Light history modulated antioxidant and photosynthetic responses of biofilms to the stress caused by short-term exposure to sudden light changes or to herbicides. First biofilms adapted to sub-optimal light intensity (shade-adapted) were found to be more sensitive to an increase in light intensity than high-light adapted ones to a reduction in light intensity. Second, while light history influenced biofilms' response to glyphosate, it had little influence on biofilms' response to copper and none on its response to oxyfluorfen. Indeed glyphosate exposure led to a stronger decrease in photosynthetic efficiency of shade-adapted biofilms (EC(50) = 11.7 mg L(-1)) than of high-light adapted communities (EC(50) = 35.6 mg L(-1)). Copper exposure led to an activation of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in biofilms adapted to sub-optimal and saturating light intensity while the protein content decreased in all biofilms exposed to copper. Oxyfluorfen toxicity was independent of light history provoking an increase in APX activity. In conclusion this study showed that both previous exposure to contaminants and physical habitat characteristics might influence community tolerance to disturbances strongly.

  18. Contribution of glucan-binding protein A to firm and stable biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumi, Y; Fujita, K; Takashima, Y; Yanagida, K; Morikawa, Y; Matsumoto-Nakano, M

    2015-06-01

    Glucan-binding proteins (Gbps) of Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen of dental caries, mediate the binding of glucans synthesized from sucrose by the action of glucosyltransferases (GTFs) encoded by gtfB, gtfC, and gtfD. Several stress proteins, including DnaK and GroEL encoded by dnaK and groEL, are related to environmental stress tolerance. The contribution of Gbp expression to biofilm formation was analyzed by focusing on the expression levels of genes encoding GTFs and stress proteins. Biofilm-forming assays were performed using GbpA-, GbpB-, and GbpC-deficient mutant strains and the parental strain MT8148. The expression levels of gtfB, gtfC, gtfD, dnaK, and groEL were evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Furthermore, the structure of biofilms formed by these Gbp-deficient mutant strains was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Biofilm-forming assay findings demonstrated that the amount formed by the GbpA-deficient mutant strain (AD1) was nearly the same as that by the parental strain, while the GbpB- and GbpC-deficient mutant strains produced lower amounts than MT8148. Furthermore, RT-qPCR assay results showed that the expressions of gtfB, dnaK, and groEL in AD1 were elevated compared with MT8148. CLSM also revealed that the structure of biofilm formed by AD1 was prominently different compared with that formed by the parental strain. These results suggest that a defect in GbpA influences the expression of genes controlling biofilm formation, indicating its importance as a protein for firm and stable biofilm formation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Y.

    2013-01-23

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these porous biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher\\'s equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels\\' network; (2) the solute\\'s diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  20. Seasonal effects of cadmium accumulation in periphytic diatom communities of freshwater biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thi Thuy Duong; Morin, Soizic; Herlory, Olivier; Feurtet-Mazel, Agnes; Coste, Michel; Boudou, Alain

    2008-01-01

    The relationships between diatom species and cadmium (Cd) accumulated in biofilms of the Riou-Mort River (SW, France) were studied in July 2004 and March 2005. Biofilms were sampled from artificial substrates immersed along a metallic pollution gradient during 20 days. Dynamics of diatom communities and cadmium accumulation were followed by collecting samples after 4, 7, 14 and 20 days of biofilm colonization. Cd accumulation in biofilms during experiment was significantly higher in Cd polluted station (Joanis) than in reference station (Firmi) for both seasons. Periphytic diatom composition varied between sites and seasons. At Firmi station, seasonal dynamics of diatom communities were stable with the dominance of Cyclotella meneghiniana and Melosira varians in July and Surirellabrebissonnii and Navicula gregaria in March. At Joanis station, diatom communities mainly responded to high levels of metal by a high proportion of small, adnate species. Positive correlations between Eolimna minima, Nitzschia palea, Encyonema minutum, Surirella angusta, and Gomphonema parvulum and cadmium accumulation were observed, indicating that these species are tolerant to high levels of cadmium. On the other hand, negative correlations of C. meneghiniana, N. gregaria, Navicula lanceolata, M. varians and Nitzschia dissipata with cadmium qualify them as sensitive diatom species. Periphytic diatom composition through the presence of specific species highlight metal tolerant indicator diatom groups which will be meaningful for biomonitoring pollution in natural aquatic systems

  1. Bacterial exopolysaccharide and biofilm formation stimulate chickpea growth and soil aggregation under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha Waheed Qurashi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To compensate for stress imposed by salinity, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production are significant strategies of salt tolerant bacteria to assist metabolism. We hypothesized that two previously isolated salt-tolerant strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 have an ability to improve plant growth, These strains can form biofilm and accumulate exopolysacharides at increasing salt stress. These results showed that bacteria might be involved in developing microbial communities under salt stress and helpful in colonizing of bacterial strains to plant roots and soil particles. Eventually, it can add to the plant growth and soil structure. We investigated the comparative effect of exopolysacharide and biofilm formation in two bacterial strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 in response to varying salt stress. We found that biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide accumulation increased at higher salinity. To check the effect of bacterial inoculation on the plant (Cicer arietinum Var. CM-98 growth and soil aggregation, pot experiment was conducted by growing seedlings under salt stress. Inoculation of both strains increased plant growth at elevated salt stress. Weight of soil aggregates attached with roots and present in soil were added at higher salt concentrations compared to untreated controls. Soil aggregation was higher at plant roots under salinity. These results suggest the feasibility of using above strains in improving plant growth and soil fertility under salinity.

  2. Seasonal effects of cadmium accumulation in periphytic diatom communities of freshwater biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thi Thuy Duong [Institute of Environmental Technology, Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France)], E-mail: duongthuy0712@yahoo.com; Morin, Soizic [Cemagref, UR REBX, 50 avenue de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas cedex (France); Herlory, Olivier [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France); Feurtet-Mazel, Agnes [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France)], E-mail: a.feurtet-mazel@epoc.u-bordeaux1.fr; Coste, Michel [Cemagref, UR REBX, 50 avenue de Verdun, F-33612 Cestas cedex (France); Boudou, Alain [Universite de Bordeaux 1, CNRS, UMR 5805 EPOC, Place du Dr Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France)

    2008-10-20

    The relationships between diatom species and cadmium (Cd) accumulated in biofilms of the Riou-Mort River (SW, France) were studied in July 2004 and March 2005. Biofilms were sampled from artificial substrates immersed along a metallic pollution gradient during 20 days. Dynamics of diatom communities and cadmium accumulation were followed by collecting samples after 4, 7, 14 and 20 days of biofilm colonization. Cd accumulation in biofilms during experiment was significantly higher in Cd polluted station (Joanis) than in reference station (Firmi) for both seasons. Periphytic diatom composition varied between sites and seasons. At Firmi station, seasonal dynamics of diatom communities were stable with the dominance of Cyclotella meneghiniana and Melosira varians in July and Surirellabrebissonnii and Navicula gregaria in March. At Joanis station, diatom communities mainly responded to high levels of metal by a high proportion of small, adnate species. Positive correlations between Eolimna minima, Nitzschia palea, Encyonema minutum, Surirella angusta, and Gomphonema parvulum and cadmium accumulation were observed, indicating that these species are tolerant to high levels of cadmium. On the other hand, negative correlations of C. meneghiniana, N. gregaria, Navicula lanceolata, M. varians and Nitzschia dissipata with cadmium qualify them as sensitive diatom species. Periphytic diatom composition through the presence of specific species highlight metal tolerant indicator diatom groups which will be meaningful for biomonitoring pollution in natural aquatic systems.

  3. Macrophytes, epipelic biofilm, and invertebrates as biotic indicators of physical habitat degradation of lowland streams (Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortelezzi, Agustina; Sierra, María Victoria; Gómez, Nora; Marinelli, Claudia; Rodrigues Capítulo, Alberto

    2013-07-01

    Our objective was to assess the effect of the physical habitat degradation in three lowland streams of Argentina that are subject to different land uses. To address this matter, we looked into some physical habitat alterations, mainly the water quality and channel changes, the impact on macrophytes' community, and the structural and functional descriptors of the epipelic biofilm and invertebrate assemblages. As a consequence of physical and chemical perturbations, we differentiated sampling sites with different degradation levels. The low degraded sites were affected mainly for the suburban land use, the moderately degraded sites for the rural land use, and the highly degraded sites for the urban land use. The data shows that the biotic descriptors that best reflected the environmental degradation were vegetation cover and macrophytes richness, the dominance of tolerant species (epipelic biofilm and invertebrates), algal biomass, O2 consumption by the epipelic biofilm, and invertebrates' richness and diversity. Furthermore, the results obtained highlight the importance of the macrophytes in the lowland streams, where there is a poor diversification of abiotic substrates and where the macrophytes not only provide shelter but also a food source for invertebrates and other trophic levels such as fish. We also noted that both in benthic communities, invertebrates and epipelic biofilm supplied different information: the habitat's physical structure provided by the macrophytes influenced mainly the invertebrate descriptors; meanwhile, the water quality mainly influenced most of the epipelic biofilm descriptors.

  4. Infectious Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Kakirman, Hacer; Stassen, Michael; Knop, Jürgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2002-01-01

    Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg) are mandatory for maintaining immunologic self-tolerance. We demonstrate that the cell-cell contact–mediated suppression of conventional CD4+ T cells by human CD25+ Treg cells is fixation resistant, independent from membrane-bound TGF-β but requires activation and protein synthesis of CD25+ Treg cells. Coactivation of CD25+ Treg cells with Treg cell–depleted CD4+ T cells results in anergized CD4+ T cells that in turn inhibit the activation of conventional, ...

  5. Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefine Hirschfeld

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design: In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion: Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown.

  6. Diuron tolerance and potential degradation by pelagic microbiomes in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent E. Angly

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diuron is a herbicide commonly used in agricultural areas where excess application causes it to leach into rivers, reach sensitive marine environments like the Great Barrier Reef (GBR lagoon and pose risks to marine life. To investigate the impact of diuron on whole prokaryotic communities that underpin the marine food web and are integral to coral reef health, GBR lagoon water was incubated with diuron at environmentally-relevant concentration (8 µg/L, and sequenced at specific time points over the following year. 16S rRNA gene amplicon profiling revealed no significant short- or long-term effect of diuron on microbiome structure. The relative abundance of prokaryotic phototrophs was not significantly altered by diuron, which suggests that they were largely tolerant at this concentration. Assembly of a metagenome derived from waters sampled at a similar location in the GBR lagoon did not reveal the presence of mutations in the cyanobacterial photosystem that could explain diuron tolerance. However, resident phages displayed several variants of this gene and could potentially play a role in tolerance acquisition. Slow biodegradation of diuron was reported in the incubation flasks, but no correlation with the relative abundance of heterotrophs was evident. Analysis of metagenomic reads supports the hypothesis that previously uncharacterized hydrolases carried by low-abundance species may mediate herbicide degradation in the GBR lagoon. Overall, this study offers evidence that pelagic phototrophs of the GBR lagoon may be more tolerant of diuron than other tropical organisms, and that heterotrophs in the microbial seed bank may have the potential to degrade diuron and alleviate local anthropogenic stresses to inshore GBR ecosystems.

  7. Diuron tolerance and potential degradation by pelagic microbiomes in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantos, Olga; Morgan, Thomas C.; Rich, Virginia; Tonin, Hemerson; Bourne, David G.; Mercurio, Philip; Negri, Andrew P.; Tyson, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    Diuron is a herbicide commonly used in agricultural areas where excess application causes it to leach into rivers, reach sensitive marine environments like the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon and pose risks to marine life. To investigate the impact of diuron on whole prokaryotic communities that underpin the marine food web and are integral to coral reef health, GBR lagoon water was incubated with diuron at environmentally-relevant concentration (8 µg/L), and sequenced at specific time points over the following year. 16S rRNA gene amplicon profiling revealed no significant short- or long-term effect of diuron on microbiome structure. The relative abundance of prokaryotic phototrophs was not significantly altered by diuron, which suggests that they were largely tolerant at this concentration. Assembly of a metagenome derived from waters sampled at a similar location in the GBR lagoon did not reveal the presence of mutations in the cyanobacterial photosystem that could explain diuron tolerance. However, resident phages displayed several variants of this gene and could potentially play a role in tolerance acquisition. Slow biodegradation of diuron was reported in the incubation flasks, but no correlation with the relative abundance of heterotrophs was evident. Analysis of metagenomic reads supports the hypothesis that previously uncharacterized hydrolases carried by low-abundance species may mediate herbicide degradation in the GBR lagoon. Overall, this study offers evidence that pelagic phototrophs of the GBR lagoon may be more tolerant of diuron than other tropical organisms, and that heterotrophs in the microbial seed bank may have the potential to degrade diuron and alleviate local anthropogenic stresses to inshore GBR ecosystems. PMID:26989611

  8. Diuron tolerance and potential degradation by pelagic microbiomes in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angly, Florent E; Pantos, Olga; Morgan, Thomas C; Rich, Virginia; Tonin, Hemerson; Bourne, David G; Mercurio, Philip; Negri, Andrew P; Tyson, Gene W

    2016-01-01

    Diuron is a herbicide commonly used in agricultural areas where excess application causes it to leach into rivers, reach sensitive marine environments like the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon and pose risks to marine life. To investigate the impact of diuron on whole prokaryotic communities that underpin the marine food web and are integral to coral reef health, GBR lagoon water was incubated with diuron at environmentally-relevant concentration (8 µg/L), and sequenced at specific time points over the following year. 16S rRNA gene amplicon profiling revealed no significant short- or long-term effect of diuron on microbiome structure. The relative abundance of prokaryotic phototrophs was not significantly altered by diuron, which suggests that they were largely tolerant at this concentration. Assembly of a metagenome derived from waters sampled at a similar location in the GBR lagoon did not reveal the presence of mutations in the cyanobacterial photosystem that could explain diuron tolerance. However, resident phages displayed several variants of this gene and could potentially play a role in tolerance acquisition. Slow biodegradation of diuron was reported in the incubation flasks, but no correlation with the relative abundance of heterotrophs was evident. Analysis of metagenomic reads supports the hypothesis that previously uncharacterized hydrolases carried by low-abundance species may mediate herbicide degradation in the GBR lagoon. Overall, this study offers evidence that pelagic phototrophs of the GBR lagoon may be more tolerant of diuron than other tropical organisms, and that heterotrophs in the microbial seed bank may have the potential to degrade diuron and alleviate local anthropogenic stresses to inshore GBR ecosystems.

  9. Mycobacterium biofilms: factors involved in development, dispersal, and therapeutic strategies against biofilm-relevant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xiaohong; Deng, Wanyan; Liu, Minqiang; Xie, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria can develop biofilm (BF), a multicellular structure largely combining bacteria and their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The formation of biofilm results in an alternative existence in which microbes ensure their survival in adverse environments. Biofilm-relevant infections are more persistent, resistant to most antibiotics, and more recalcitrant to host immunity. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, can develop biofilm, though whether M. tuberculosis can form biofilm within tuberculosis patients has yet to be determined. Here, we summarize the factors involved in the development and dispersal of mycobacterial biofilms, as well as underlying regulatory factors and inhibitors against biofilm to deepen our understanding of their development and to elucidate potential novel modes of action for future antibiotics. Key factors in biofilm formation identified as drug targets represent a novel and promising avenue for developing better antibiotics.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm, a Programmed Bacterial Life for Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keehoon; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2017-06-28

    A biofilm is a community of microbes that typically inhabit on surfaces and are encased in an extracellular matrix. Biofilms display very dissimilar characteristics to their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are ubiquitous in the environment and influence our lives tremendously in both positive and negative ways. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium known to produce robust biofilms. P. aeruginosa biofilms cause severe problems in immunocompromised patients, including those with cystic fibrosis or wound infection. Moreover, the unique biofilm properties further complicate the eradication of the biofilm infection, leading to the development of chronic infections. In this review, we discuss the history of biofilm research and general characteristics of bacterial biofilms. Then, distinct features pertaining to each stage of P. aeruginosa biofilm development are highlighted. Furthermore, infections caused by biofilms on their own or in association with other bacterial species ( i.e. , multispecies biofilms) are discussed in detail.

  11. Novel metabolic activity indicator in Streptococcus mutans biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, D.M.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; ten Cate, J.M.; Crielaard, W.

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of micro-organisms in biofilms requires novel strategies to evaluate the efficacy of caries preventive agents in actual biofilms. Hence we investigated fluorescence intensity (FI) in Streptococcus mutans biofilms constitutively expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP).

  12. Infectious Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Kakirman, Hacer; Stassen, Michael; Knop, Jürgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2002-01-01

    Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg) are mandatory for maintaining immunologic self-tolerance. We demonstrate that the cell-cell contact–mediated suppression of conventional CD4+ T cells by human CD25+ Treg cells is fixation resistant, independent from membrane-bound TGF-β but requires activation and protein synthesis of CD25+ Treg cells. Coactivation of CD25+ Treg cells with Treg cell–depleted CD4+ T cells results in anergized CD4+ T cells that in turn inhibit the activation of conventional, freshly isolated CD4+ T helper (Th) cells. This infectious suppressive activity, transferred from CD25+ Treg cells via cell contact, is cell contact–independent and partially mediated by soluble transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. The induction of suppressive properties in conventional CD4+ Th cells represents a mechanism underlying the phenomenon of infectious tolerance. This explains previously published conflicting data on the role of TGF-β in CD25+ Treg cell–induced immunosuppression. PMID:12119350

  13. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm removal by targeting biofilm-associated extracellular proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir K Shukla

    2017-01-01

    Methods: Biofilm assay was done in 96-well microtitre plate to evaluate the effect of proteinase K on biofilms of bovine mastitis S. Aureus isolates. Extracellular polymeric substances were extracted and evaluated for their composition (protein, polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, before and after the proteinase K treatment. Results: Biofilm assay showed that 2 μg/ml proteinase K significantly inhibited biofilm development in bap-positive S. aureus V329 as well as other S. aureus isolates (SA7, SA10, SA33, SA352, but not in bap-mutant M556 and SA392 (a weak biofilm-producing strain. Proteinase K treatment on S. aureus planktonic cells showed that there was no inhibition of planktonic growth up to 32 μg/ml of proteinase K. Proteinase K treatment on 24 h old preformed biofilms showed an enhanced dispersion of bap-positive V329 and SA7, SA10, SA33 and SA352 biofilms; however, proteinase K did not affect the bap-mutant S. aureus M556 and SA392 biofilms. Biofilm compositions study before and after proteinase K treatment indicated that Bap might also be involved in eDNA retention in the biofilm matrix that aids in biofilm stability. When proteinase K was used in combination with antibiotics, a synergistic effect in antibiotic efficacy was observed against all biofilm-forming S. aureus isolates. Interpretation & conclusions: Proteinase K inhibited biofilms growth in S. aureus bovine mastitis isolates but did not affect their planktonic growth. An enhanced dispersion of preformed S. aureus biofilms was observed on proteinase K treatment. Proteinase K treatment with antibiotics showed a synergistic effect against S. aureus biofilms. The study suggests that dispersing S. aureus by protease can be of use while devising strategies againstS. aureus biofilms.

  14. Fremmedlegemeinfektioner--nyt om biofilm og quorum sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Ciofu, Oana

    2007-01-01

    Biofilms are structured consortia of bacteria embedded in self-produced polymer matrix. Biofilms are resistant to antibiotics, disinfectives and phagocytosis. The persistence of foreign body infections is due to biofilms. Chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients is a biofilm....... Bacteria in biofilms communicate by means of quorum sensing which activates genes for virulence factors. Biofilms can be prevented by antibiotic prophylaxis or early therapy or by quorum sensing inhibitors which make them susceptible to antibiotics and phagocytosis....

  15. Silver-Palladium Surfaces Inhibit Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Schroll, Casper; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2009-01-01

    Undesired biofilm formation is a major concern in many areas. In the present study, we investigated biofilm-inhibiting properties of a silver-palladium surface that kills bacteria by generating microelectric fields and electrochemical redox processes. For evaluation of the biofilm inhibition...... efficacy and study of the biofilm inhibition mechanism, the silver-sensitive Escherichia coli J53 and the silver-resistant E. coli J53[pMG101] strains were used as model organisms, and batch and flow chamber setups were used as model systems. In the case of the silver-sensitive strain, the silver......-palladium surfaces killed the bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low or high bacterial load. In the case of the silver-resistant strain, the silver-palladium surfaces killed surface-associated bacteria and prevented biofilm formation under conditions of low bacterial load, whereas under...

  16. Mucosal biofilm detection in chronic otitis media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessman, Marcus; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Eickhardt-Sørensen, Steffen Robert

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine middle ear biopsies from Greenlandic patients with chronic otitis media (COM) for the presence of mucosal biofilms and the bacteria within the biofilms. Thirty-five middle ear biopsies were obtained from 32 Greenlandic COM patients admitted to ear...... of the patients served as controls. PNA-FISH showed morphological signs of biofilms in 15 out of 35 (43 %) middle ear biopsies. In the control skin biopsies, there were signs of biofilms in eight out of 23 biopsies (30 %), probably representing skin flora. PCR and 16s sequencing detected bacteria in seven out...... of 20 (35 %) usable middle ear biopsies, and in two out of ten (20 %) usable control samples. There was no association between biofilm findings and PCR and 16s sequencing. Staphylococci were the most common bacteria in bacterial culture. We found evidence of bacterial biofilms in 43 % of middle ear...

  17. Microbial biofilms: biosurfactants as antibiofilm agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banat, Ibrahim M; De Rienzo, Mayri A Díaz; Quinn, Gerry A

    2014-12-01

    Current microbial inhibition strategies based on planktonic bacterial physiology have been known to have limited efficacy on the growth of biofilm communities. This problem can be exacerbated by the emergence of increasingly resistant clinical strains. All aspects of biofilm measurement, monitoring, dispersal, control, and inhibition are becoming issues of increasing importance. Biosurfactants have merited renewed interest in both clinical and hygienic sectors due to their potential to disperse microbial biofilms in addition to many other advantages. The dispersal properties of biosurfactants have been shown to rival those of conventional inhibitory agents against bacterial and yeast biofilms. This makes them suitable candidates for use in new generations of microbial dispersal agents and for use as adjuvants for existing microbial suppression or eradication strategies. In this review, we explore aspects of biofilm characteristics and examine the contribution of biologically derived surface-active agents (biosurfactants) to the disruption or inhibition of microbial biofilms.

  18. Biofilm inhibitors that target amyloid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Diego; Sanabria-Valentín, Edgardo; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2013-01-24

    Bacteria establish stable communities, known as biofilms, that are resistant to antimicrobials. Biofilm robustness is due to the presence of an extracellular matrix, which for several species-among them Bacillus subtilis-includes amyloid-like protein fibers. In this work, we show that B. subtilis biofilms can be a simple and reliable tool for screening of molecules with antiamyloid activity. We identified two molecules, AA-861 and parthenolide, which efficiently inhibited biofilms by preventing the formation of amyloid-like fibers. Parthenolide also disrupted pre-established biofilms. These molecules also impeded the formation of biofilms of other bacterial species that secrete amyloid proteins, such as Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the identified molecules decreased the conversion of the yeast protein New1 to the prion state in a heterologous host, indicating the broad range of activity of the molecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Biofilms and their significance in medical microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernohorská, L; Votava, M

    2002-11-01

    Microorganisms are able to adhere to various surfaces and to form there a three-dimensional structure known as biofilm. In biofilms, microbial cells show characteristics and behaviours different from those of plankton cells. Intercellular signalizations of the quorum-sensing type regulate interaction between members of the biofilm. Bacteria embedded in the biofilm can escape and form well known planktonic forms, that are obviously only a part of the bacterial life cycle. Bacteria adhere also to medically important surfaces such as catheters, either urinary or intravenous ones, artificial heart valves, orthopedic implants and so on and contribute to device-related infections like cystitis, catheter-related sepsis, endocarditis etc. Once a biofilm has been established on a surface, the bacteria harboured inside are less exposed to the host's immune response and less susceptible to antibiotics. As an important cause of nosocomial infections the biofilm must remain in the centre of the microbiologist's attention.

  20. Material modeling of biofilm mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laspidou, C S; Spyrou, L A; Aravas, N; Rittmann, B E

    2014-05-01

    A biofilm material model and a procedure for numerical integration are developed in this article. They enable calculation of a composite Young's modulus that varies in the biofilm and evolves with deformation. The biofilm-material model makes it possible to introduce a modeling example, produced by the Unified Multi-Component Cellular Automaton model, into the general-purpose finite-element code ABAQUS. Compressive, tensile, and shear loads are imposed, and the way the biofilm mechanical properties evolve is assessed. Results show that the local values of Young's modulus increase under compressive loading, since compression results in the voids "closing," thus making the material stiffer. For the opposite reason, biofilm stiffness decreases when tensile loads are imposed. Furthermore, the biofilm is more compliant in shear than in compression or tension due to the how the elastic shear modulus relates to Young's modulus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Artificial biofilms establish the role of matrix interactions in staphylococcal biofilm assembly and disassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Elizabeth J.; Ganesan, Mahesh; Younger, John G.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the microstructural and mechanical properties of bacterial biofilms can be created through colloidal self-assembly of cells and polymers, and thereby link the complex material properties of biofilms to well understood colloidal and polymeric behaviors. This finding is applied to soften and disassemble staphylococcal biofilms through pH changes. Bacterial biofilms are viscoelastic, structured communities of cells encapsulated in an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) comprised of polysaccharides, proteins, and DNA. Although the identity and abundance of EPS macromolecules are known, how these matrix materials interact with themselves and bacterial cells to generate biofilm morphology and mechanics is not understood. Here, we find that the colloidal self-assembly of Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A cells and polysaccharides into viscoelastic biofilms is driven by thermodynamic phase instability of EPS. pH conditions that induce phase instability of chitosan produce artificial S. epidermidis biofilms whose mechanics match natural S. epidermidis biofilms. Furthermore, pH-induced solubilization of the matrix triggers disassembly in both artificial and natural S. epidermidis biofilms. This pH-induced disassembly occurs in biofilms formed by five additional staphylococcal strains, including three clinical isolates. Our findings suggest that colloidal self-assembly of cells and matrix polymers produces biofilm viscoelasticity and that biofilm control strategies can exploit this mechanism. PMID:26272750

  2. Phototrophic hydrogen production from glucose by pure and co-cultures of Clostridium butyricum and Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Herbert H.P.; Zhu, Heguang; Zhang, Tong [Centre for Environmental Engineering Research, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China)

    2006-12-15

    Phototrophic hydrogen production from glucose by pure and co-cultures of Clostridium butyricum and Rhodobacter sphaeroides was studied in batch experiments. Results showed that in all batches hydrogen was produced after a lag phase of about 10h; pure culture of R. sphaeroides produced hydrogen at rates substantially lower than C. butyricum. In co-culture systems, R. sphaeroides even with cell populations 5.9 times higher still could not compete with C. butyricum for glucose. In co-culture systems, R. sphaeroides syntrophically interacted with C. butyricum, using the acetate and butyrate produced by the latter as substrate for hydrogen production. Hydrogen production was ceased in all batches when the pH was lowered to the level of pH 6.5, resulting from the accumulation of fatty acids. It was also demonstrated in this study that fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was an effective means for the quantification of the relative abundance of individual bacteria in a co-culture system. (author)

  3. Effect of salinity on diazotrophic activity and microbial composition of phototrophic communities from Bitter-1 soda lake (Kulunda Steppe, Russia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namsaraev, Zorigto; Samylina, Olga; Sukhacheva, Marina; Borisenko, Gennadii; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Tourova, Tatiana

    2018-04-16

    Bitter-1 is a shallow hypersaline soda lake in Kulunda Steppe (Altai region, Russia). During a study period between 2005 and 2016, the salinity in the littoral area of the lake fluctuated within the range from 85 to 400 g/L (in July of each year). Light-dependent nitrogen fixation occurred in this lake up to the salt-saturating conditions. The rates increased with a decrease in salinity, both under environmental conditions and in laboratory simulations. The salinities below 100 g/L were favorable for light-dependent nitrogen fixation, while the process was dramatically inhibited above 200 g/L salts. The analysis of nifH genes in environmental samples and in enrichment cultures of diazotrophic phototrophs suggested that anaerobic fermenting and sulfate-reducing bacteria could participate in the dark nitrogen fixation process up to soda-saturating conditions. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that haloalkaliphilic nonheterocystous cyanobacteria (Euhalothece sp. and Geitlerinema sp.) and anoxygenic purple sulfur bacteria (Ectothiorhodospira sp.) might also play a role in the process at light conditions. The heterocystous cyanobacterium Nodularia sp. develops at low salinity (below 80 g/L) that is not characteristic for Bitter-1 Lake and thus does not make a significant contribution to the nitrogen fixation in this lake.

  4. Shape of the growing front of biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Stone, Howard A.; Golestanian, Ramin

    2017-12-01

    The spatial organization of bacteria in dense biofilms is key to their collective behaviour, and understanding it will be important for medical and technological applications. Here we study the morphology of a compact biofilm that undergoes unidirectional growth, and determine the condition for the stability of the growing interface as a function of the nutrient concentration and mechanical tension. Our study suggests that transient behaviour may play an important role in shaping the structure of a biofilm.

  5. Effect of Lactoferrin on Oral Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    effect of Lf on the early stages of single-species and multi- species oral biofilm development. Streptococcus gordonii (Sg), Streptococcus mutans ...and biofilm development by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus mutans have been demonstrated, limited studies have been conducted on its effect...the effect of Lf on the early stages of single- species and multi-species oral biofilm development. Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus mutans

  6. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M C; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Krom, Bastiaan P; Janus, Marleen M; Ten Cate, Jacob M; de Soet, Johannes J; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  7. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M C Volgenant

    Full Text Available Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation. Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  8. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air and aqueous solution. Operating parameters were optimized to improve imaging of structural details for a mature biofilm in liquid. By using a soft cantilever (0.03 N/m) and slow scan rate (0.5 Hz), biofilm and individual bacterial cell’s structural topography were resolved and continuously imaged in liquid without loss of spatial resolution or sample damage. The developed methodology will allow future in situ investigations to temporally monitor mixed culture drinking water biofilm structural changes during disinfection treatments. Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air and aqueous solution. Operating parameters were optimized to improve imaging of structural details for a mature biofilm in liquid. By using a soft cantilever (0.03 N/m) and slow scan rate (0.5 Hz), biofilm and individual bacterial cell’s structural topography were resolved and continuously imaged in liquid without loss of spatial resolution or sample damage. The developed methodo

  9. Biofilm responses to marine fish farm wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz-Lazaro, Carlos; Navarrete-Mier, Francisco; Marin, Arnaldo

    2011-01-01

    The changes in the biofilm community due to organic matter enrichment, eutrophication and metal contamination derived from fish farming were studied. The biofilm biomass, polysaccharide content, trophic niche and element accumulation were quantified along an environmental gradient of fish farm wastes in two seasons. Biofilm structure and trophic diversity was influenced by seasonality as well as by the fish farm waste load. Fish farming enhanced the accumulation of organic carbon, nutrients, selenium and metals by the biofilm community. The accumulation pattern of these elements was similar regardless of the structure and trophic niche of the community. This suggests that the biofilm communities can be considered a reliable tool for assessing dissolved aquaculture wastes. Due to the ubiquity of biofilms and its wide range of consumers, its role as a sink of dissolved wastes may have important implications for the transfer of aquaculture wastes to higher trophic levels in coastal systems. - Research highlights: → Biofilms can act as a trophic pathway of fish farm dissolved wastes. → Biofilms are reliable tools for monitoring fish farm dissolved wastes. → The influence of the fish farm dissolved wastes can be detected 120-350 m from farm. - Under the influence of fish farming biofilm accumulates organic carbon, nutrients, selenium and metals, regardless of the structure and trophic niche of the community.

  10. Focus on the physics of biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecuyer, Sigolene; Stocker, Roman; Rusconi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are the smallest and most abundant form of life. They have traditionally been considered as primarily planktonic organisms, swimming or floating in a liquid medium, and this view has shaped many of the approaches to microbial processes, including for example the design of most antibiotics. However, over the last few decades it has become clear that many bacteria often adopt a sessile, surface-associated lifestyle, forming complex multicellular communities called biofilms. Bacterial biofilms are found in a vast range of environments and have major consequences on human health and industrial processes, from biofouling of surfaces to the spread of diseases. Although the study of biofilms has been biologists’ territory for a long time, a multitude of phenomena in the formation and development of biofilms hinges on physical processes. We are pleased to present a collection of research papers that discuss some of the latest developments in many of the areas to which physicists can contribute a deeper understanding of biofilms, both experimentally and theoretically. The topics covered range from the influence of physical environmental parameters on cell attachment and subsequent biofilm growth, to the use of local probes and imaging techniques to investigate biofilm structure, to the development of biofilms in complex environments and the modeling of colony morphogenesis. The results presented contribute to addressing some of the major challenges in microbiology today, including the prevention of surface contamination, the optimization of biofilm disruption methods and the effectiveness of antibiotic treatments. (editorial)

  11. Electroactive biofilms of sulphate reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordas, Cristina M.; Guerra, L. Tiago; Xavier, Catarina; Moura, Jose J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Biofilms formed from a pure strain of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans 27774 on stainless steel and graphite polarised surfaces were studied. The polarisation conditions applied were -0.4 V vs. SCE for different times. A cathodic current related with the biofilms growth was observed with a maximum intensity of -270 mA m -2 that remained stable for several days using graphite electrodes. These sulphate reducing bacteria biofilms present electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen and oxygen reduction reactions. Electrode polarisation has a selective effect on the catalytic activity. The biofilms were also observed by scanning electronic microscopy revealing the formation of homogeneous films on the surfaces

  12. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Mechanisms of Candida biofilm drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taff, Heather T; Mitchell, Kaitlin F; Edward, Jessica A; Andes, David R

    2013-01-01

    Candida commonly adheres to implanted medical devices, growing as a resilient biofilm capable of withstanding extraordinarily high antifungal concentrations. As currently available antifungals have minimal activity against biofilms, new drugs to treat these recalcitrant infections are urgently needed. Recent investigations have begun to shed light on the mechanisms behind the profound resistance associated with the biofilm mode of growth. This resistance appears to be multifactorial, involving both mechanisms similar to conventional, planktonic antifungal resistance, such as increased efflux pump activity, as well as mechanisms specific to the biofilm lifestyle. A unique biofilm property is the production of an extracellular matrix. Two components of this material, β-glucan and extracellular DNA, promote biofilm resistance to multiple antifungals. Biofilm formation also engages several stress response pathways that impair the activity of azole drugs. Resistance within a biofilm is often heterogeneous, with the development of a subpopulation of resistant persister cells. In this article we review the molecular mechanisms underlying Candida biofilm antifungal resistance and their relative contributions during various growth phases. PMID:24059922

  14. Candida Biofilms: Threats, Challenges, and Promising Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheiro, Mafalda; Teixeira, Miguel Cacho

    2018-01-01

    Candida species are fungal pathogens known for their ability to cause superficial and systemic infections in the human host. These pathogens are able to persist inside the host due to the development of pathogenicity and multidrug resistance traits, often leading to the failure of therapeutic strategies. One specific feature of Candida species pathogenicity is their ability to form biofilms, which protects them from external factors such as host immune system defenses and antifungal drugs. This review focuses on the current threats and challenges when dealing with biofilms formed by Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Candida parapsilosis, highlighting the differences between the four species. Biofilm characteristics depend on the ability of each species to produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and display dimorphic growth, but also on the biofilm substratum, carbon source availability and other factors. Additionally, the transcriptional control over processes like adhesion, biofilm formation, filamentation, and EPS production displays great complexity and diversity within pathogenic yeasts of the Candida genus. These differences not only have implications in the persistence of colonization and infections but also on antifungal resistance typically found in Candida biofilm cells, potentiated by EPS, that functions as a barrier to drug diffusion, and by the overexpression of drug resistance transporters. The ability to interact with different species in in vivo Candida biofilms is also a key factor to consider when dealing with this problem. Despite many challenges, the most promising strategies that are currently available or under development to limit biofilm formation or to eradicate mature biofilms are discussed. PMID:29487851

  15. Biofilm responses to marine fish farm wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz-Lazaro, Carlos, E-mail: carsanz@um.es [Departamento de Ecologia e Hidrologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Murcia, 30100 Murcia (Spain); Navarrete-Mier, Francisco; Marin, Arnaldo [Departamento de Ecologia e Hidrologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Murcia, 30100 Murcia (Spain)

    2011-03-15

    The changes in the biofilm community due to organic matter enrichment, eutrophication and metal contamination derived from fish farming were studied. The biofilm biomass, polysaccharide content, trophic niche and element accumulation were quantified along an environmental gradient of fish farm wastes in two seasons. Biofilm structure and trophic diversity was influenced by seasonality as well as by the fish farm waste load. Fish farming enhanced the accumulation of organic carbon, nutrients, selenium and metals by the biofilm community. The accumulation pattern of these elements was similar regardless of the structure and trophic niche of the community. This suggests that the biofilm communities can be considered a reliable tool for assessing dissolved aquaculture wastes. Due to the ubiquity of biofilms and its wide range of consumers, its role as a sink of dissolved wastes may have important implications for the transfer of aquaculture wastes to higher trophic levels in coastal systems. - Research highlights: > Biofilms can act as a trophic pathway of fish farm dissolved wastes. > Biofilms are reliable tools for monitoring fish farm dissolved wastes. > The influence of the fish farm dissolved wastes can be detected 120-350 m from farm. - Under the influence of fish farming biofilm accumulates organic carbon, nutrients, selenium and metals, regardless of the structure and trophic niche of the community.

  16. Electroactive biofilms of sulphate reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordas, Cristina M.; Guerra, L. Tiago; Xavier, Catarina [Requimte-CQFB, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Moura, Jose J.G. [Requimte-CQFB, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)], E-mail: jose.moura@dq.fct.unl.pt

    2008-12-01

    Biofilms formed from a pure strain of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans 27774 on stainless steel and graphite polarised surfaces were studied. The polarisation conditions applied were -0.4 V vs. SCE for different times. A cathodic current related with the biofilms growth was observed with a maximum intensity of -270 mA m{sup -2} that remained stable for several days using graphite electrodes. These sulphate reducing bacteria biofilms present electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen and oxygen reduction reactions. Electrode polarisation has a selective effect on the catalytic activity. The biofilms were also observed by scanning electronic microscopy revealing the formation of homogeneous films on the surfaces.

  17. Candida Biofilms: Threats, Challenges, and Promising Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheiro, Mafalda; Teixeira, Miguel Cacho

    2018-01-01

    Candida species are fungal pathogens known for their ability to cause superficial and systemic infections in the human host. These pathogens are able to persist inside the host due to the development of pathogenicity and multidrug resistance traits, often leading to the failure of therapeutic strategies. One specific feature of Candida species pathogenicity is their ability to form biofilms, which protects them from external factors such as host immune system defenses and antifungal drugs. This review focuses on the current threats and challenges when dealing with biofilms formed by Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis , and Candida parapsilosis , highlighting the differences between the four species. Biofilm characteristics depend on the ability of each species to produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and display dimorphic growth, but also on the biofilm substratum, carbon source availability and other factors. Additionally, the transcriptional control over processes like adhesion, biofilm formation, filamentation, and EPS production displays great complexity and diversity within pathogenic yeasts of the Candida genus. These differences not only have implications in the persistence of colonization and infections but also on antifungal resistance typically found in Candida biofilm cells, potentiated by EPS, that functions as a barrier to drug diffusion, and by the overexpression of drug resistance transporters. The ability to interact with different species in in vivo Candida biofilms is also a key factor to consider when dealing with this problem. Despite many challenges, the most promising strategies that are currently available or under development to limit biofilm formation or to eradicate mature biofilms are discussed.

  18. Targeting quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics combined with an increasing acknowledgement of the role of biofilms in chronic infections has led to a growing interest in new antimicrobial strategies that target the biofilm mode of growth. In the aggregated biofilm mode, cell-to-cell communication...... alternative antibacterial strategies. Here, we review state of the art research of quorum sensing inhibitors against the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is found in a number of biofilm-associated infections and identified as the predominant organism infecting the lungs of cystic...

  19. Microbial pathogenesis and biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Høiby, N.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2004-01-01

    been termed 'maturation', which is thought to be mediated by a differentiation process. Maturation into late stages of biofilm development resulting in stable and robust structures may require the formation of a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which are most often assumed to consist...... a highly significant role in connection with chronic infections [1]. Bacterial growth on surfaces depends on several factors [2]. In nature, surfaces are probably often conditioned with a thin film of organic molecules, which may serve as attractants for bacterial chemotactic systems and which subsequently...... permit bacterial growth to occur. In laboratory model systems the growth of the surface-associated bacteria is supported by the nutrient supply in the moving or standing liquid. A benchmark of biofilm formation by several organisms in vitro is the development of three-dimensional structures that have...

  20. Growth of Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120∆C biofilms in the presence of n-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halan, Babu; Vassilev, Igor; Lang, Karsten; Schmid, Andreas; Buehler, Katja

    2017-07-01

    Biocatalytic processes often encounter problems due to toxic reactants and products, which reduce biocatalyst viability. Thus, robust organisms capable of tolerating or adapting towards such compounds are of high importance. This study systematically investigated the physiological response of Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120∆C biofilms when exposed to n-butanol, one of the potential next generation biofuels as well as a toxic substance using microscopic and biochemical methods. Initially P. taiwanensis VLB120∆C biofilms did not show any observable growth in the presence of 3% butanol. Prolonged cultivation of 10 days led to biofilm adaptation, glucose and oxygen uptake doubled and consequently it was possible to quantify biomass. Complementing the medium with yeast extract and presumably reducing the metabolic burden caused by butanol exposure further increased the biomass yield. In course of cultivation cells reduced their size in the presence of n-butanol which results in an enlarged surface-to-volume ratio and thus increased nutrient uptake. Finally, biofilm enhanced its extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production when exposed to n-butanol. The predominant response of these biofilms under n-butanol stress are higher energy demand, increased biomass yield upon medium complements, larger surface-to-volume ratio and enhanced EPS production. Although we observed a distinct increase in biomass in the presence of 3% butanol it was not possible to cultivate P. taiwanensis VLB120∆C biofilms at higher n-butanol concentrations. Thereby this study shows that biofilms are not per se tolerant against solvents, and need to adapt to toxic n-butanol concentrations. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Calcium-chelating alizarin and other anthraquinones inhibit biofilm formation and the hemolytic activity of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Yong Ryu, Shi; Lee, Jintae

    2016-01-14

    Staphylococcal biofilms are problematic and play a critical role in the persistence of chronic infections because of their abilities to tolerate antimicrobial agents. Thus, the inhibitions of biofilm formation and/or toxin production are viewed as alternative means of controlling Staphylococcus aureus infections. Here, the antibiofilm activities of 560 purified phytochemicals were examined. Alizarin at 10 μg/ml was found to efficiently inhibit biofilm formation by three S. aureus strains and a Staphylococcus epidermidis strain. In addition, two other anthraquinones purpurin and quinalizarin were found to have antibiofilm activity. Binding of Ca(2+) by alizarin decreased S. aureus biofilm formation and a calcium-specific chelating agent suppressed the effect of calcium. These three anthraquinones also markedly inhibited the hemolytic activity of S. aureus, and in-line with their antibiofilm activities, increased cell aggregation. A chemical structure-activity relationship study revealed that two hydroxyl units at the C-1 and C-2 positions of anthraquinone play important roles in antibiofilm and anti-hemolytic activities. Transcriptional analyses showed that alizarin repressed the α-hemolysin hla gene, biofilm-related genes (psmα, rbf, and spa), and modulated the expressions of cid/lrg genes (the holin/antiholin system). These findings suggest anthraquinones, especially alizarin, are potentially useful for controlling biofilm formation and the virulence of S. aureus.

  2. Essential Oils and Eugenols Inhibit Biofilm Formation and the Virulence of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Guy; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Gwon, Giyeon; Kim, Soon-Il; Park, Jae Gyu; Lee, Jintae

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC) has caused foodborne outbreaks worldwide and the bacterium forms antimicrobial-tolerant biofilms. We investigated the abilities of various plant essential oils and their components to inhibit biofilm formation by EHEC. Bay, clove, pimento berry oils and their major common constituent eugenol at 0.005% (v/v) were found to markedly inhibit EHEC biofilm formation without affecting planktonic cell growth. In addition, three other eugenol derivatives isoeugenol, 2-methoxy-4-propylphenol, and 4-ethylguaiacol had antibiofilm activity, indicating that the C-1 hydroxyl unit, the C-2 methoxy unit, and C-4 alkyl or alkane chain on the benzene ring of eugenol play important roles in antibiofilm activity. Interestingly, these essential oils and eugenol did not inhibit biofilm formation by three laboratory E. coli K-12 strains that reduced curli fimbriae production. Transcriptional analysis showed that eugenol down-regulated 17 of 28 genes analysed, including curli genes (csgABDFG), type I fimbriae genes (fimCDH) and ler-controlled toxin genes (espD, escJ, escR, and tir), which are required for biofilm formation and the attachment and effacement phenotype. In addition, biocompatible poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) coatings containing clove oil or eugenol exhibited efficient biofilm inhibition on solid surfaces. In a Caenorhabditis elegans nematode model, clove oil and eugenol attenuated the virulence of EHEC. PMID:27808174

  3. Molecular methods for biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Ferrera, Isabel; Balagué , Vanessa; Voolstra, Christian R.; Aranda, Manuel; Bayer, Till; Abed, Raeid M.M.; Dobretsov, Sergey; Owens, Sarah M.; Wilkening, Jared; Fessler, Jennifer L.; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2014-01-01

    at the same time and to compare bacterial communities among different samples or in a single sample after certain treatments. DGGE, T-RFLP and ARISA share similar steps but require different materials and equipment. The three methods involve (i) sampling of the biofilms; (ii) DNA extraction and quantification; and (iii) PCR using specific primers. Metagenomics: This chapter focuses classical and next-generation metagenomics methods. These are limited to bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) and Fosmid libraries and Sanger and next-generation 454 sequencing, as these methods are currently the most frequently used in research. The chapter discusses the special handling of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) needed to construct BAC and Fosmid libraries from marine water samples. It also briefly addresses the related topics of library archiving, databasing, and screening. The chapter provides a high-level overview of the special handling methods required to prepare DNA for BAC library construction. No special handling is needed for Fosmid library construction.

  4. Molecular methods for biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Ferrera, Isabel

    2014-08-30

    at the same time and to compare bacterial communities among different samples or in a single sample after certain treatments. DGGE, T-RFLP and ARISA share similar steps but require different materials and equipment. The three methods involve (i) sampling of the biofilms; (ii) DNA extraction and quantification; and (iii) PCR using specific primers. Metagenomics: This chapter focuses classical and next-generation metagenomics methods. These are limited to bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) and Fosmid libraries and Sanger and next-generation 454 sequencing, as these methods are currently the most frequently used in research. The chapter discusses the special handling of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) needed to construct BAC and Fosmid libraries from marine water samples. It also briefly addresses the related topics of library archiving, databasing, and screening. The chapter provides a high-level overview of the special handling methods required to prepare DNA for BAC library construction. No special handling is needed for Fosmid library construction.

  5. Reliability of Haemophilus influenzae biofilm measurement via static method, and determinants of in vitro biofilm production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, Najla A; Tristram, Stephen; Narkowicz, Christian K; Jacobson, Glenn A

    2016-12-01

    Information is lacking regarding the precision of microtitre plate (MTP) assays used to measure biofilm. This study investigated the precision of an MTP assay to measure biofilm production by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and the effects of frozen storage and inoculation technique on biofilm production. The density of bacterial final growth was determined by absorbance after 18-20 h incubation, and biofilm production was then measured by absorbance after crystal violet staining. Biofilm formation was categorised as high and low for each strain. For the high biofilm producing strains of NTHi, interday reproducibility of NTHi biofilm formation measured using the MTP assay was excellent and met the acceptance criteria, but higher variability was observed in low biofilm producers. Method of inoculum preparation was a determinant of biofilm formation with inoculum prepared directly from solid media showing increased biofilm production for at least one of the high producing strains. In general, storage of NTHi cultures at -80 °C for up to 48 weeks did not have any major effect on their ability to produce biofilm.

  6. Antibiotic-Loaded Synthetic Calcium Sulfate Beads for Prevention of Bacterial Colonization and Biofilm Formation in Periprosthetic Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, R. P.; Brayford, M. J.; Webb, J. S.; Cooper, J. J.; Aiken, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    Periprosthetic infection (PI) causes significant morbidity and mortality after fixation and joint arthroplasty and has been extensively linked to the formation of bacterial biofilms. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), as a cement or as beads, is commonly used for antibiotic release to the site of infection but displays variable elution kinetics and also represents a potential nidus for infection, therefore requiring surgical removal once antibiotics have eluted. Absorbable cements have shown improved elution of a wider range of antibiotics and, crucially, complete biodegradation, but limited data exist as to their antimicrobial and antibiofilm efficacy. Synthetic calcium sulfate beads loaded with tobramycin, vancomycin, or vancomycin-tobramycin dual treatment (in a 1:0.24 [wt/wt] ratio) were assessed for their abilities to eradicate planktonic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis relative to that of PMMA beads. The ability of the calcium sulfate beads to prevent biofilm formation over multiple days and to eradicate preformed biofilms was studied using a combination of viable cell counts, confocal microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy of the bead surface. Biofilm bacteria displayed a greater tolerance to the antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts. Antibiotic-loaded beads were able to kill planktonic cultures of 106 CFU/ml, prevent bacterial colonization, and significantly reduce biofilm formation over multiple days. However, established biofilms were harder to eradicate. These data further demonstrate the difficulty in clearing established biofilms; therefore, early preventive measures are key to reducing the risk of PI. Synthetic calcium sulfate loaded with antibiotics has the potential to reduce or eliminate biofilm formation on adjacent periprosthetic tissue and prosthesis material and, thus, to reduce the rates of periprosthetic infection. PMID:25313221

  7. Physics of biofilms: the initial stages of biofilm formation and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Guillaume; Bergman, Andrew; Zhang, Qiucen; Bortz, David; Austin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    One of the physiological responses of bacteria to external stress is to assemble into a biofilm. The formation of a biofilm greatly increases a bacterial population's resistance to a hostile environment by shielding cells, for example, from antibiotics. In this paper, we describe the conditions necessary for the emergence of biofilms in natural environments and relate them to the emergence of biofilm formation inside microfluidic devices. We show that competing species of Escherichia coli bacteria form biofilms to spatially segregate themselves in response to starvation stress, and use in situ methods to characterize the physical properties of the biofilms. Finally, we develop a microfluidic platform to study the inter-species interactions and show how biofilm-mediated genetic interactions can improve a species’ resistance to external stress. (paper)

  8. Biofilms in chronic infections - a matter of opportunity - monospecies biofilms in multispecies infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burmølle, Mette; Thomsen, Trine Rolighed; Fazli, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    It has become evident that aggregation or biofilm formation is an important survival mechanism for bacteria in almost any environment. In this review, we summarize recent visualizations of bacterial aggregates in several chronic infections (chronic otitis media, cystic fibrosis, infection due...... to permanent tissue fillers and chronic wounds) both as to distribution (such as where in the wound bed) and organization (monospecies or multispecies microcolonies). We correlate these biofilm observations to observations of commensal biofilms (dental and intestine) and biofilms in natural ecosystems (soil......). The observations of the chronic biofilm infections point toward a trend of low bacterial diversity and sovereign monospecies biofilm aggregates even though the infection in which they reside are multispecies. In contrast to this, commensal and natural biofilm aggregates contain multiple species that are believed...

  9. Biofilm formation and determination of minimum biofilm eradication concentration of antibiotics in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassew, Dereje Damte; Mechesso, Abraham Fikru; Park, Na-Hye; Song, Ju-Beom; Shur, Joo-Woon; Park, Seung-Chun

    2017-10-20

    The study was aimed to investigate biofilm forming ability of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and to determine the minimum biofilm eradication concentrations of antibiotics. Biofilm forming ability of six strains of M. hyopneumoniae was examined using crystal violet staining on coverslips. The results demonstrated an apparent line of biofilm growth in 3 of the strains isolated from swine with confirmed cases of enzootic pneumonia. BacLight bacterial viability assay revealed that the majority of the cells were viable after 336 hr of incubation. Moreover, M. hyopneumoniae persists in the biofilm after being exposed to 10 fold higher concentration of antibiotics than the minimum inhibitory concentrations in planktonic cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of biofilm formation in M. hyopneumoniae. However, comprehensive studies on the mechanisms of biofilm formation are needed to combat swine enzootic pneumonia caused by resistant M. hyopneumoniae.

  10. Nitrogen cycling in Hot Spring Sediments and Biofilms (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Burton, M. S.; Havig, J. R.; Shock, E.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past several decades, gene-targeted analyses have revealed that microbial communities in hydrothermal environments can be surprisingly diverse. However, we know shockingly little about basic ecological functions such as carbon and nitrogen cycling or community shifts over time, or environmental parameters such as growth criteria. Previous work has shown that carbon cycling in one hot spring in Yellowstone National Park [“Bison Pool”] and its associated runoff channel functions as a complex system. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in biofilms across a temperature and chemical gradient at this location revealed that multiple autotrophic carbon fixation pathways are functioning in this system, and nitrogen fixation varies across the chemosynthetic/photosynthetic ecotone [1]. Further, sequencing of metagenomes from multiple locations at “Bison Pool” has indicated the presence of genes involved in carbon fixation [both phototrophic and autotrophic], and heterotrophy, as well as nitrogen fixation [2]. Studies from other Yellowstone locations have also found genetic evidence for carbon and nitrogen fixation [3-5]. The role of individual microbes in nitrogen cycling as environmental conditions vary over space and time is the focus of this study. Here, we explore the diversity of nifH [nitrogen fixation], nirK [nitrite reduction] and amoA [ammonia oxidation] genes across a variety of Yellowstone environments. Environmental nucleic acids were extracted, and the presence/absence of Bacteria and Archaea determined by PCR. In addition, PCR-directed screens reveal the presence or absence of the aforementioned functional genes, indicating genetic capacity for nitrogen cycling. We have examined the transition of genetic diversity and genetic capacity within sediments and biofilms at the chemosynthetic/photosynthetic ecotone in several hot springs spanning ranges of pH and geochemical conditions. By sampling across this ecotone, changes in the genetic

  11. Repressive Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Jarlbæk

    2017-01-01

    Consultation of organised interests and others when drafting laws is often seen as an important source of both input and output legitimacy. But whereas the input side of the equation stems from the very process of listening to societal actors, output legitimacy can only be strengthened if consult......Consultation of organised interests and others when drafting laws is often seen as an important source of both input and output legitimacy. But whereas the input side of the equation stems from the very process of listening to societal actors, output legitimacy can only be strengthened...... a substantial effect on the substance of laws – shows that there is a great difference in the amenability of different branches of government but that, in general, authorities do not listen much despite a very strong consultation institution and tradition. A suggestion for an explanation could be pointing...... to an administrative culture of repressive tolerance of organised interests: authorities listen but only reacts in a very limited sense. This bears in it the risk of jeopardising the knowledge transfer from societal actors to administrative ditto thus harming the consultation institutions’ potential for strengthening...

  12. Mannitol enhances antibiotic sensitivity of persister bacteria in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Barraud

    Full Text Available The failure of antibiotic therapies to clear Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the key mortality factor for cystic fibrosis (CF patients, is partly attributed to the high tolerance of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Mannitol has previously been found to restore aminoglycoside sensitivity in Escherichia coli by generating a proton-motive force (PMF, suggesting a potential new strategy to improve antibiotic therapy and reduce disease progression in CF. Here, we used the commonly prescribed aminoglycoside tobramycin to select for P. aeruginosa persister cells during biofilm growth. Incubation with mannitol (10-40 mM increased tobramycin sensitivity of persister cells up to 1,000-fold. Addition of mannitol to pre-grown biofilms was able to revert the persister phenotype and improve the efficacy of tobramycin. This effect was blocked by the addition of a PMF inhibitor or in a P. aeruginosa mutant strain unable to metabolise mannitol. Addition of glucose and NaCl at high osmolarity also improved the efficacy of tobramycin although to a lesser extent compared to mannitol. Therefore, the primary effect of mannitol in reverting biofilm associated persister cells appears to be an active, physiological response, associated with a minor contribution of osmotic stress. Mannitol was tested against clinically relevant strains, showing that biofilms containing a subpopulation of persister cells are better killed in the presence of mannitol, but a clinical strain with a high resistance to tobramycin was not affected by mannitol. Overall, these results suggest that in addition to improvements in lung function by facilitating mucus clearance in CF, mannitol also affects antibiotic sensitivity in biofilms and does so through an active, physiological response.

  13. Effects of flow intermittency and pharmaceutical exposure on the structure and metabolism of stream biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoll, Natàlia; Casellas, Maria; Huerta, Belinda; Guasch, Helena; Acuña, Vicenç; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Serra-Compte, Albert; Barceló, Damià; Sabater, Sergi

    2015-01-15

    Increasing concentrations of pharmaceutical compounds occur in many rivers, but their environmental risk remains poorly studied in stream biofilms. Flow intermittency shapes the structure and functions of ecosystems, and may enhance their sensitivity to toxicants. This study evaluates the effects of a long-term exposure of biofilm communities to a mixture of pharmaceutical compounds at environmental concentrations on biofilm bioaccumulation capacity, the structure and metabolic processes of algae and bacteria communities, and how their potential effects were enhanced or not by the occurrence of flow intermittency. To assess the interaction between those two stressors, an experiment with artificial streams was performed. Stream biofilms were exposed to a mixture of pharmaceuticals, as well as to a short period of flow intermittency. Results indicate that biofilms were negatively affected by pharmaceuticals. The algal biomass and taxa richness decreased and unicellular green algae relatively increased. The structure of the bacterial (based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of amplified 16S rRNA genes) changed and showed a reduction of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) richness. Exposed biofilms showed higher rates of metabolic processes, such as primary production and community respiration, attributed to pharmaceuticals stimulated an increase of green algae and heterotrophs, respectively. Flow intermittency modulated the effects of chemicals on natural communities. The algal community became more sensitive to short-term exposure of pharmaceuticals (lower EC50 value) when exposed to water intermittency, indicating cumulative effects between the two assessed stressors. In contrast to algae, the bacterial community became less sensitive to short-term exposure of pharmaceuticals (higher EC50) when exposed to water intermittency, indicating co-tolerance phenomena. According to the observed effects, the environmental risk of pharmaceuticals in nature is high

  14. Enzymatic removal and disinfection of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Falholt, Per; Gram, Lone

    1997-01-01

    -coated hydroxyapatite. The activity of enzymes against bacterial cells in biofilm was measured by fluorescence microscopy and an indirect conductance test in which evolution of carbon dioxide was measured. Glucose oxidase combined with lactoperoxidase was bactericidal against biofilm bacteria but did not remove...

  15. Biofilm ved kronisk rhinosinuitis og cystisk fibrose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Jacob; Buchwald, Christian von; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are known to cause persistent foreign-body infections and have recently been acknowledged as involved in more than 65% of all human infections. Microbial biofilms have been detected in chronic rhinosinusitis, and chronic rhinosinusitis is mandatory in patients with cystic...

  16. A spray based method for biofilm removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cense, A.W.

    2005-01-01

    Biofilm growth on human teeth is the cause of oral diseases such as caries (tooth decay), gingivitis (inflammation of the gums) and periodontitis (inflammation of the tooth bone). In this thesis, a water based cleaning method is designed for removal of oral biofilms, or dental plaque. The first part

  17. Pseudomonas biofilm matrix composition and niche biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ethan E.; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are a predominant form of growth for bacteria in the environment and in the clinic. Critical for biofilm development are adherence, proliferation, and dispersion phases. Each of these stages includes reinforcement by, or modulation of, the extracellular matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been a model organism for the study of biofilm formation. Additionally, other Pseudomonas species utilize biofilm formation during plant colonization and environmental persistence. Pseudomonads produce several biofilm matrix molecules, including polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and proteins. Accessory matrix components shown to aid biofilm formation and adaptability under varying conditions are also produced by pseudomonads. Adaptation facilitated by biofilm formation allows for selection of genetic variants with unique and distinguishable colony morphology. Examples include rugose small-colony variants and wrinkly spreaders (WS), which over produce Psl/Pel or cellulose, respectively, and mucoid bacteria that over produce alginate. The well-documented emergence of these variants suggests that pseudomonads take advantage of matrix-building subpopulations conferring specific benefits for the entire population. This review will focus on various polysaccharides as well as additional Pseudomonas biofilm matrix components. Discussions will center on structure–function relationships, regulation, and the role of individual matrix molecules in niche biology. PMID:22212072

  18. Spaceflight promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooseong Kim

    Full Text Available Understanding the effects of spaceflight on microbial communities is crucial for the success of long-term, manned space missions. Surface-associated bacterial communities, known as biofilms, were abundant on the Mir space station and continue to be a challenge on the International Space Station. The health and safety hazards linked to the development of biofilms are of particular concern due to the suppression of immune function observed during spaceflight. While planktonic cultures of microbes have indicated that spaceflight can lead to increases in growth and virulence, the effects of spaceflight on biofilm development and physiology remain unclear. To address this issue, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cultured during two Space Shuttle Atlantis missions: STS-132 and STS-135, and the biofilms formed during spaceflight were characterized. Spaceflight was observed to increase the number of viable cells, biofilm biomass, and thickness relative to normal gravity controls. Moreover, the biofilms formed during spaceflight exhibited a column-and-canopy structure that has not been observed on Earth. The increase in the amount of biofilms and the formation of the novel architecture during spaceflight were observed to be independent of carbon source and phosphate concentrations in the media. However, flagella-driven motility was shown to be essential for the formation of this biofilm architecture during spaceflight. These findings represent the first evidence that spaceflight affects community-level behaviors of bacteria and highlight the importance of understanding how both harmful and beneficial human-microbe interactions may be altered during spaceflight.

  19. Biofilm Surface Density Determines Biocide Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available High resistance of biofilms for chemical challenges is a serious industrial and medical problem. In this work a gradient of surface covered with biofilm has been produced and correlated to the effectiveness of different commercially available oxidative biocides. The results for thin Escherichia coli biofilms grown in rich media supplemented with glucose or lactose on glass or poly methyl methacrylate surfaces indicate that the effectiveness of hydrogen peroxide or chlorine dioxide and quaternary ammonium compounds is inversely proportional to the fraction of the surface covered with the biofilm. In areas where biofilm covered more than 90% of the available surface the biocide treatment was inefficient after 60 min of incubation. The combined effect of oxidant and surfactant increased the effectiveness of the biocide. On the other hand, the increased biofilm viscoelasticity reduced biocide effectiveness. The results emphasize differential biocide effectiveness depending on the fraction of the attached bacterial cells. The results suggest that biofilm biocide resistance is an acquired property that increases with biofilm maturation. The more dense sessile structures present lower log reductions compared to less dense ones.

  20. Visco-elastic properties of biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterson, Brandon Wade

    2013-01-01

    Microbiële biofilms aanpakken door ze te laten resoneren Naar schatting tachtig procent van alle bacteriële infecties die door dokters behandeld worden, wordt veroorzaakt door biofilms, dunne laagjes micro-organismen. Brandon Peterson stelt in preklinisch onderzoek de hypothese op dat de hechting

  1. Biofilms and their modifications by laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, Asta; Gonpot, Preethee; Smith, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Biofilms are grown on different materials with various surface morphology and are investigated by light and scanning force microscopy. The growth patterns, coverage and adherence of the biofilm are shown to depend on the type of the substrate and its roughness as well as on the type of micro-organisms. Here we present investigations of Eschericia coli bacterial biofilms grown on the polymer material polyetheretherketone and also on titanium films on glass substrates. A Monte Carlo simulation of the growth process is developed which takes into account the aspect ratio of the micro-organisms and the diffusion of nutrient over the surface to feed them. A pulsed nitrogen laser has been applied to the samples and the interaction of the laser beam with the biofilm and the underlying substrate has been studied. Because of the inhomogeneity of the biofilms the ablated areas are different. With increasing number of laser pulses more biofilm material is removed but there appears also damage of the substrate. The threshold energy fluence for the biofilm ablation is estimated and depends on the sticking power of the bacteria. Ablation rates for the removal of the biofilms are also obtained

  2. BIOFILMS IN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtually anywhere a surface comes into contact with the water in a distribution system, one can find biofilms. Biofilms are formed in distribution system pipelines when microbial cells attach to pipe surfaces and multiply to form a film or slime layer on the pipe. Probably withi...

  3. Patterns in Abundance, Cell Size and Pigment Content of Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria along Environmental Gradients in Northern Lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Fauteux

    Full Text Available There is now evidence that aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP bacteria are widespread across aquatic systems, yet the factors that determine their abundance and activity are still not well understood, particularly in freshwaters. Here we describe the patterns in AAP abundance, cell size and pigment content across wide environmental gradients in 43 temperate and boreal lakes of Québec. AAP bacterial abundance varied from 1.51 to 5.49 x 105 cells mL-1, representing <1 to 37% of total bacterial abundance. AAP bacteria were present year-round, including the ice-cover period, but their abundance relative to total bacterial abundance was significantly lower in winter than in summer (2.6% and 7.7%, respectively. AAP bacterial cells were on average two-fold larger than the average bacterial cell size, thus AAP cells made a greater relative contribution to biomass than to abundance. Bacteriochlorophyll a (BChla concentration varied widely across lakes, and was not related to AAP bacterial abundance, suggesting a large intrinsic variability in the cellular pigment content. Absolute and relative AAP bacterial abundance increased with dissolved organic carbon (DOC, whereas cell-specific BChla content was negatively related to chlorophyll a (Chla. As a result, both the contribution of AAP bacteria to total prokaryotic abundance, and the cell-specific BChla pigment content were positively correlated with the DOC:Chla ratio, both peaking in highly colored, low-chlorophyll lakes. Our results suggest that photoheterotrophy might represent a significant ecological advantage in highly colored, low-chlorophyll lakes, where DOC pool is chemically and structurally more complex.

  4. Association of a new type of gliding, filamentous, purple phototrophic bacterium inside bundles of Microcoleus chthonoplastes in hypersaline cyanobacterial mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, E. D.; Cohen, Y.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    bacteria is not available yet in pure culture, and its taxonomical position cannot be fully established. This organism is suggested to be a new type of gliding, filamentous, purple phototroph.

  5. Synthesis of UDP-apiose in Bacteria: The marine phototroph Geminicoccus roseus and the plant pathogen Xanthomonas pisi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Amor Smith

    Full Text Available The branched-chain sugar apiose was widely assumed to be synthesized only by plant species. In plants, apiose-containing polysaccharides are found in vascularized plant cell walls as the pectic polymers rhamnogalacturonan II and apiogalacturonan. Apiosylated secondary metabolites are also common in many plant species including ancestral avascular bryophytes and green algae. Apiosyl-residues have not been documented in bacteria. In a screen for new bacterial glycan structures, we detected small amounts of apiose in methanolic extracts of the aerobic phototroph Geminicoccus roseus and the pathogenic soil-dwelling bacteria Xanthomonas pisi. Apiose was also present in the cell pellet of X. pisi. Examination of these bacterial genomes uncovered genes with relatively low protein homology to plant UDP-apiose/UDP-xylose synthase (UAS. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these bacterial UAS-like homologs belong in a clade distinct to UAS and separated from other nucleotide sugar biosynthetic enzymes. Recombinant expression of three bacterial UAS-like proteins demonstrates that they actively convert UDP-glucuronic acid to UDP-apiose and UDP-xylose. Both UDP-apiose and UDP-xylose were detectable in cell cultures of G. roseus and X. pisi. We could not, however, definitively identify the apiosides made by these bacteria, but the detection of apiosides coupled with the in vivo transcription of bUAS and production of UDP-apiose clearly demonstrate that these microbes have evolved the ability to incorporate apiose into glycans during their lifecycles. While this is the first report to describe enzymes for the formation of activated apiose in bacteria, the advantage of synthesizing apiose-containing glycans in bacteria remains unknown. The characteristics of bUAS and its products are discussed.

  6. The immune system vs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Ilya Metchnikoff and Paul Ehrlich were awarded the Nobel price in 1908. Since then, numerous studies have unraveled a multitude of mechanistically different immune responses to intruding microorganisms. However, in the vast majority of these studies, the underlying infectious agents have appeared...... in the planktonic state. Accordingly, much less is known about the immune responses to the presence of biofilm-based infections (which is probably also due to the relatively short period of time in which the immune response to biofilms has been studied). Nevertheless, more recent in vivo and in vitro studies have...... revealed both innate as well as adaptive immune responses to biofilms. On the other hand, measures launched by biofilm bacteria to achieve protection against the various immune responses have also been demonstrated. Whether particular immune responses to biofilm infections exist remains to be firmly...

  7. The ecology and biogeochemistry of stream biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battin, Tom J; Besemer, Katharina; Bengtsson, Mia M; Romani, Anna M; Packmann, Aaron I

    2016-04-01

    Streams and rivers form dense networks, shape the Earth's surface and, in their sediments, provide an immensely large surface area for microbial growth. Biofilms dominate microbial life in streams and rivers, drive crucial ecosystem processes and contribute substantially to global biogeochemical fluxes. In turn, water flow and related deliveries of nutrients and organic matter to biofilms constitute major constraints on microbial life. In this Review, we describe the ecology and biogeochemistry of stream biofilms and highlight the influence of physical and ecological processes on their structure and function. Recent advances in the study of biofilm ecology may pave the way towards a mechanistic understanding of the effects of climate and environmental change on stream biofilms and the biogeochemistry of stream ecosystems.

  8. Synergistic effects in mixed Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Holler, B.M.; Molin, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms, often composed of multiple species and genetically distinct strains, develop under complex influences of cell-cell interactions. Although detailed knowledge about the mechanisms underlying formation of single-species laboratory biofilms has emerged, little is known about...... the pathways governing development of more complex heterogeneous communities. In this study, we established a laboratory model where biofilm-stimulating effects due to interactions between genetically diverse strains of Escherichia coli were monitored. Synergistic induction of biofilm formation resulting from...... the cocultivation of 403 undomesticated E. coli strains with a characterized E. coli K-12 strain was detected at a significant frequency. The survey suggests that different mechanisms underlie the observed stimulation, yet synergistic development of biofilm within the subset of E. coli isolates (n = 56) exhibiting...

  9. Insights into chemotaxonomic composition and carbon cycling of phototrophic communities in an artesian sulfur-rich spring (Zodletone, Oklahoma, USA), a possible analog for ancient microbial mat systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühring, S I; Sievert, S M; Jonkers, H M; Ertefai, T; Elshahed, M S; Krumholz, L R; Hinrichs, K-U

    2011-03-01

    Zodletone spring in Oklahoma is a unique environment with high concentrations of dissolved-sulfide (10 mm) and short-chain gaseous alkanes, exhibiting characteristics that are reminiscent of conditions that are thought to have existed in Earth's history, in particular the late Archean and early-to-mid Proterozoic. Here, we present a process-oriented investigation of the microbial community in two distinct mat formations at the spring source, (1) the top of the sediment in the source pool and (2) the purple streamers attached to the side walls. We applied a combination of pigment and lipid biomarker analyses, while functional activities were investigated in terms of oxygen production (microsensor analysis) and carbon utilization ((13)C incorporation experiments). Pigment analysis showed cyanobacterial pigments, in addition to pigments from purple sulfur bacteria (PSB), green sulfur bacteria (GSB) and Chloroflexus-like bacteria (CLB). Analysis of intact polar lipids (IPLs) in the source sediment confirmed the presence of phototrophic organisms via diacylglycerol phospholipids and betaine lipids, whereas glyceroldialkylglyceroltetraether additionally indicated the presence of archaea. No archaeal IPLs were found in the purple streamers, which were strongly dominated by betaine lipids. (13)C-bicarbonate- and -acetate-labeling experiments indicated cyanobacteria as predominant phototrophs in the source sediment, carbon was actively fixed by PSB/CLB/GSB in purple streamers by using near infrared light. Despite the presence of cyanobacteria, no oxygen could be detected in the presence of light, suggesting anoxygenic photosynthesis as the major metabolic process at this site. Our investigations furthermore indicated photoheterotrophy as an important process in both habitats. We obtained insights into a syntrophically operating phototrophic community in an ecosystem that bears resemblance to early Earth conditions, where cyanobacteria constitute an important contributor to

  10. Biofilms On Orbit and On Earth: Current Methods, Future Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Leticia

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms have played a significant role on the effectiveness of life support hardware on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS). This presentation will discuss how biofilms impact flight hardware, how on orbit biofilms are analyzed from an engineering and research perspective, and future needs to analyze and utilize biofilms for long duration, deep space missions.

  11. Discovering Biofilms: Inquiry-Based Activities for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelman, Carly V.; Marrs, Kathleen; Anderson, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    In nature, bacteria exist in and adapt to different environments by forming microbial communities called "biofilms." We propose simple, inquiry-based laboratory exercises utilizing a biofilm formation assay, which allows controlled biofilm growth. Students will be able to qualitatively assess biofilm growth via staining. Recently, we developed a…

  12. In vitro phenotypic differentiation towards commensal and pathogenic oral biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janus, M.M.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Bikker, F.J.; Exterkate, R.A.M.; Crielaard, W.; Krom, B.P.

    2015-01-01

    Commensal oral biofilms, defined by the absence of pathology-related phenotypes, are ubiquitously present. In contrast to pathological biofilms commensal biofilms are rarely studied. Here, the effect of the initial inoculum and subsequent growth conditions on in vitro oral biofilms was studied.

  13. Bactericidal and Anti-biofilm Effects of Polyhexamethylene Biguanide in Models of Intracellular and Biofilm of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Bovine Mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor F. Kamaruzzaman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus infection is a common cause of mastitis, reducing milk yield, affecting animal welfare and causing huge economic losses within the dairy industry. In addition to the problem of acquired drug resistance, bacterial invasion into udder cells and the formation of surface biofilms are believed to reduce antibiotic efficacy, leading to treatment failure. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial activities of enrofloxacin, an antibiotic that is commonly used in mastitis therapy and polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB, an antimicrobial polymer. The antimicrobial activities were tested against intracellular S. aureus in infected Mac-T cells (host cells. Also, fluorescein-tagged PHMB was used to study PHMB uptake and localization with S. aureus within the infected Mac-T cells. Anti-biofilm activities were tested by treating S. aureus biofilms and measuring effects on biofilm mass in vitro. Enrofloxacin and PHMB at 15 mg/L killed between 42 to 92 and 99.9% of intracellular S. aureus, respectively. PHMB-FITC entered and colocalized with the intracellular S. aureus, suggesting direct interaction of the drug with the bacteria inside the host cells. Enrofloxacin and PHMB at 15 mg/L reduced between 10 to 27% and 28 to 37% of biofilms’ mass, respectively. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50 obtained from a cytotoxicity assay were 345 ± 91 and 21 ± 2 mg/L for enrofloxacin and PHMB, respectively; therefore, both compounds were tolerated by the host cells at high concentrations. These findings suggest that both antimicrobials are effective against intracellular S. aureus and can disrupt biofilm structures, with PHMB being more potent against intracellular S. aureus, highlighting the potential application of PHMB in mastitis therapy.

  14. Efficacy of NVC-422 against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in a sheep biofilm model of sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Deepti; Jekle, Andreas; Debabov, Dmitri; Wang, Lu; Khosrovi, Bez; Anderson, Mark; Foreman, Andrew; Wormald, Peter-John

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a major obstacle in management of recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis. NVC-422 is a potent, fast-acting, broad-spectrum, nonantibiotic, antimicrobial with a new mechanism of action effective against biofilm bacteria in in vitro conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of NVC-422 as local antibiofilm treatment in a sheep model of rhinosinusitis. After accessing and occluding frontal sinus ostia in 24 merino sheep via staged endoscopic procedures, S. aureus clinical isolate was instilled in frontal sinuses. Following biofilm formation, ostial obstruction was removed and sinuses irrigated with 0.1% and 0.5% NVC-422 in 5 mM acetate isotonic saline at pH 4.0. Sheep were monitored for adverse effects and euthanized 24 hours after treatment. Frontal sinuses were assessed for infection and changes in mucosa after the treatment. S. aureus biofilms were identified with Baclight-confocal scanning microscopy protocol and the biofilm biomass assayed by applying the COMSTAT2 program to recorded image stacks. After 2 irrigations with 0.1% NVC-422, S. aureus biofilm biomass was reduced when compared to control sinuses (p = 0.0001), though this effect was variable in samples. NVC-422 0.5% solution irrigations reduced biofilm even more significantly and consistently over all samples (p biofilm biomass (p biofilms, with dose-dependent efficacy in this animal model of biofilm-associated sinusitis. Copyright © 2012 American Rhinologic Society-American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy, LLC.

  15. Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms: towards the development of novel anti-biofilm therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Patrick K; Yeung, Amy T Y; Hancock, Robert E W

    2014-12-10

    The growth of bacteria as structured aggregates termed biofilms leads to their protection from harsh environmental conditions such as physical and chemical stresses, shearing forces, and limited nutrient availability. Because of this highly adapted ability to survive adverse environmental conditions, bacterial biofilms are recalcitrant to antibiotic therapies and immune clearance. This is particularly problematic in hospital settings where biofilms are a frequent cause of chronic and device-related infections and constitute a significant burden on the health-care system. The major therapeutic strategy against infections is the use of antibiotics, which, due to adaptive resistance, are often insufficient to clear biofilm infections. Thus, novel biofilm-specific therapies are required. Specific features of biofilm development, such as surface adherence, extracellular matrix formation, quorum sensing, and highly regulated biofilm maturation and dispersal are currently being studied as targets to be exploited in the development of novel biofilm-specific treatments. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa for illustrative purposes, this review highlights the antibiotic resistance mechanisms of biofilms, and discusses current research into novel biofilm-specific therapies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Metal concentrations in stream biofilm and sediments and their potential to explain biofilm microbial community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancion, Pierre-Yves; Lear, Gavin; Dopheide, Andrew; Lewis, Gillian D.

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations of metals associated with sediments have traditionally been analysed to assess the extent of heavy metal contamination in freshwater environments. Stream biofilms present an alternative medium for this assessment which may be more relevant to the risk incurred by stream ecosystems as they are intensively grazed by aquatic organisms at a higher trophic level. Therefore, we investigated zinc, copper and lead concentrations in biofilms and sediments of 23 stream sites variously impacted by urbanisation. Simultaneously, biofilm bacterial and ciliate protozoan community structure was analysed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis and Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed that biofilm associated metals explained a greater proportion of the variations observed in bacterial and ciliate communities than did sediment associated-metals. This study suggests that the analysis of metal concentrations in biofilms provide a good assessment of detrimental effects of metal contaminants on aquatic biota. - Highlights: ► Zn, Cu and Pb concentrations in biofilm and sediments from 23 streams were assessed. ► Bacteria and ciliate protozoa were simultaneously used as biological indicators. ► Zn and Cu were generally enriched in biofilm compared to sediments. ► Metals in biofilm provide a useful assessment of freshwater ecosystem contamination. ► Results highlight the likely ecological importance of biofilm associated metals. - Metal concentrations in stream biofilms provide a good assessment of the effects of trace metal contaminants on freshwater ecosystems.

  17. Biofilm development in fixed bed biofilm reactors: experiments and simple models for engineering design purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilágyi, N; Kovács, R; Kenyeres, I; Csikor, Zs

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm development in a fixed bed biofilm reactor system performing municipal wastewater treatment was monitored aiming at accumulating colonization and maximum biofilm mass data usable in engineering practice for process design purposes. Initially a 6 month experimental period was selected for investigations where the biofilm formation and the performance of the reactors were monitored. The results were analyzed by two methods: for simple, steady-state process design purposes the maximum biofilm mass on carriers versus influent load and a time constant of the biofilm growth were determined, whereas for design approaches using dynamic models a simple biofilm mass prediction model including attachment and detachment mechanisms was selected and fitted to the experimental data. According to a detailed statistical analysis, the collected data have not allowed us to determine both the time constant of biofilm growth and the maximum biofilm mass on carriers at the same time. The observed maximum biofilm mass could be determined with a reasonable error and ranged between 438 gTS/m(2) carrier surface and 843 gTS/m(2), depending on influent load, and hydrodynamic conditions. The parallel analysis of the attachment-detachment model showed that the experimental data set allowed us to determine the attachment rate coefficient which was in the range of 0.05-0.4 m d(-1) depending on influent load and hydrodynamic conditions.

  18. Impact of Delftia tsuruhatensis and Achromobacter xylosoxidans on Escherichia coli dual-species biofilms treated with antibiotic agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azevedo, Andreia S; Almeida, Carina; Pereira, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that for urinary tract infections species with a lower or unproven pathogenic potential, such as Delftia tsuruhatensis and Achromobacter xylosoxidans, might interact with conventional pathogenic agents such as Escherichia coli. Here, single- and dual-species biofilms...... of these microorganisms were characterized in terms of microbial composition over time, the average fitness of E. coli, the spatial organization and the biofilm antimicrobial profile. The results revealed a positive impact of these species on the fitness of E. coli and a greater tolerance to the antibiotic agents....... In dual-species biofilms exposed to antibiotics, E. coli was able to dominate the microbial consortia in spite of being the most sensitive strain. This is the first study demonstrating the protective effect of less common species over E. coli under adverse conditions imposed by the use of antibiotic...

  19. Impact of Delftia tsuruhatensis and Achromobacter xylosoxidans on Escherichia coli dual-species biofilms treated with antibiotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Andreia S; Almeida, Carina; Pereira, Bruno; Melo, Luís F; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that for urinary tract infections species with a lower or unproven pathogenic potential, such as Delftia tsuruhatensis and Achromobacter xylosoxidans, might interact with conventional pathogenic agents such as Escherichia coli. Here, single- and dual-species biofilms of these microorganisms were characterized in terms of microbial composition over time, the average fitness of E. coli, the spatial organization and the biofilm antimicrobial profile. The results revealed a positive impact of these species on the fitness of E. coli and a greater tolerance to the antibiotic agents. In dual-species biofilms exposed to antibiotics, E. coli was able to dominate the microbial consortia in spite of being the most sensitive strain. This is the first study demonstrating the protective effect of less common species over E. coli under adverse conditions imposed by the use of antibiotic agents.

  20. Effect of acid shock on protein expression by biofilm cells of Streptococcus mutans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welin, J; Wilkins, J C; Beighton, D

    2003-01-01

    suggested that surface growth itself triggered an ATR in biofilm cells, we were interested in comparing the effects of a pH change from 7.5 to 5.5 on protein synthesis by the two cell types. For this, cells were pulse labeled with [(14)C]-amino acids following the pH change to pH 5.5, the proteins extracted...... in control biofilm cells were significantly less downregulated and key enzymes, such as lactate dehydrogenase were upregulated during pH 5.5 incubation, suggesting that the enhanced acid resistance of biofilm cells is associated with the maintenance of pH homeostasis by H+ extrusion via membrane ATPase......Streptococcus mutans is a component of the dental plaque biofilm and a major causal agent of dental caries. Log-phase cells of the organism are known to induce an acid tolerance response (ATR) at sub-lethal pH values ( approximately 5.5) that enhances survival at lower pH values such as those...

  1. Role of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Coaggregation in Anaerobe Survival in Planktonic and Biofilm Oral Microbial Communities during Aeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, David J.; Marsh, Philip D.; Watson, G. Keith; Allison, Clive

    1998-01-01

    Coaggregation is a well-characterized phenomenon by which specific pairs of oral bacteria interact physically. The aim of this study was to examine the patterns of coaggregation between obligately anaerobic and oxygen-tolerant species that coexist in a model oral microbial community. Obligate anaerobes other than Fusobacterium nucleatum coaggregated only poorly with oxygen-tolerant species. In contrast, F. nucleatum was able to coaggregate not only with both oxygen-tolerant and other obligately anaerobic species but also with otherwise-noncoaggregating obligate anaerobe–oxygen-tolerant species pairs. The effects of the presence or absence of F. nucleatum on anaerobe survival in both the biofilm and planktonic phases of a complex community of oral bacteria grown in an aerated (gas phase, 200 ml of 5% CO2 in air · min−1) chemostat system were then investigated. In the presence of F. nucleatum, anaerobes persisted in high numbers (>107 · ml−1 in the planktonic phase and >107 · cm−2 in 4-day biofilms). In an equivalent culture in the absence of F. nucleatum, the numbers of black-pigmented anaerobes (Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella nigrescens) were significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.001) in both the planktonic phase and in 4-day biofilms, while the numbers of facultatively anaerobic bacteria increased in these communities. Coaggregation-mediated interactions between F. nucleatum and other species facilitated the survival of obligate anaerobes in aerated environments. PMID:9746571

  2. Effect of biofilm formation by Oenococcus oeni on malolactic fermentation and the release of aromatic compounds in wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre eBastard

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The winemaking process involves the alcoholic fermentation of must, often followed by malolactic fermentation. The latter, mainly carried out by the lactic acid bacterium Oenococcus oeni, is used to improve wine quality when acidity reduction is required. Moreover, it prevents microbial spoilage and improves the wine’s organoleptic profile. Prior observations showed that O. oeni is able to resist several months in harsh wine conditions when adhered on oak barrels. Since biofilm is a prevailing microbial lifestyle in natural environments, the capacity of O. oeni to form biofilms was investigated on winemaking material such as stainless steel and oak chips. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy showed that O. oeni was able to adhere to these surfaces and form spatially organized microcolonies embedded in extracellular substances. To assess the competitive advantage of this mode of life in wine, the properties of biofilm and planktonic cells were compared after inoculation in a fermented must (pH 3.5 or 3.2 and 12% ethanol The results indicated that the biofilm culture of O. oeni conferred (i increased tolerance to wine stress, and (ii functional performance with effective malolactic activities. Relative gene expression focusing on stress genes and genes involved in EPS synthesis was investigated in a mature biofilm and emphasized the role of the matrix in increased biofilm resistance.As oak is commonly used in wine aging, we focused on the O. oeni biofilm on this material and its contribution to the development of wine color and the release of aromatic compounds. Analytical chromatography was used to target the main oak aging compounds such as vanillin, gaiacol, eugenol, whisky-lactones and furfural. The results reveal that O. oeni biofilm developed on oak can modulate the wood-wine transfer of volatile aromatic compounds during malolactic fermentation and aging by decreasing furfural, gaiacol and eugenol in

  3. Rapid in Vitro Quantification of S. aureus Biofilms on Vascular Graft Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Herten

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Increasing resistance of microorganisms and particularly tolerance of bacterial biofilms against antibiotics require the need for alternative antimicrobial substances. S. aureus is the most frequent pathogen causing vascular graft infections. In order to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy, quantification of the bacterial biofilms is necessary. Aim of the present study was the validation of an in vitro model for quantification of bacterial biofilm on vascular graft surfaces using three different assays.Methods: Standardized discs of vascular graft material (Dacron or PTFE or polystyrene (PS as control surface with 0.25 cm2 surface area were inoculated with 10−3 diluted overnight culture of three biofilm-producing S. aureus isolates (BEB-029, BEB-295, SH1000 in 96-well PS culture plates. After incubation for 4 and 18 h, the biofilm was determined by three different methods: (a mitochondrial ATP concentration as measure of bacterial viability (ATP, (b crystal violet staining (Cry, and (c vital cell count by calculation of colony-forming units (CFU. The experiments were performed three times. Quadruplicates were used for each isolate, time point, and method. In parallel, bacterial biofilms were documented via scanning electron microscopy.Results: All three methods could quantify biofilms on the PS control. Time needed was 0:40, 13:10, and 14:30 h for ATP, Cry, and CFU, respectively. The Cry assay could not be used for vascular graft surfaces due to high unspecific background staining. However, ATP assay and CFU count showed comparable results on vascular graft material and control. The correlations between ATP and CFU assay differed according to the surface and incubation time and were significant only after 4 h on Dacron (BEB-029, p = 0.013 and on PS (BEB-029, p < 0.001. Between ATP and Cry assay on PS, a significant correlation could be detected after 4 h (BEB-295, p = 0.027 and after 18 h (all three strains, p < 0.026. The

  4. Fractal analysis of Xylella fastidiosa biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, A. L. D.; Lorite, G. S.; Rodrigues, C. M.; Souza, A. A.; Cotta, M. A.

    2009-07-01

    We have investigated the growth process of Xylella fastidiosa biofilms inoculated on a glass. The size and the distance between biofilms were analyzed by optical images; a fractal analysis was carried out using scaling concepts and atomic force microscopy images. We observed that different biofilms show similar fractal characteristics, although morphological variations can be identified for different biofilm stages. Two types of structural patterns are suggested from the observed fractal dimensions Df. In the initial and final stages of biofilm formation, Df is 2.73±0.06 and 2.68±0.06, respectively, while in the maturation stage, Df=2.57±0.08. These values suggest that the biofilm growth can be understood as an Eden model in the former case, while diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) seems to dominate the maturation stage. Changes in the correlation length parallel to the surface were also observed; these results were correlated with the biofilm matrix formation, which can hinder nutrient diffusion and thus create conditions to drive DLA growth.

  5. Biological synthesis of nanoparticles in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzil, Abid H; Sultana, Sujala T; Saunders, Steven R; Shi, Liang; Marsili, Enrico; Beyenal, Haluk

    2016-12-01

    The biological synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs) by bacteria and biofilms via extracellular redox reactions has received attention because of the minimization of harmful chemicals, low cost, and ease of culturing and downstream processing. Bioreduction mechanisms vary across bacteria and growth conditions, which leads to various sizes and shapes of biosynthesized NPs. NP synthesis in biofilms offers additional advantages, such as higher biomass concentrations and larger surface areas, which can lead to more efficient and scalable biosynthesis. Although biofilms have been used to produce NPs, the mechanistic details of NP formation are not well understood. In this review, we identify three critical areas of research and development needed to advance our understanding of NP production by biofilms: 1) synthesis, 2) mechanism and 3) stabilization. Advancement in these areas could result in the biosynthesis of NPs that are suitable for practical applications, especially in drug delivery and biocatalysis. Specifically, the current status of methods and mechanisms of nanoparticle synthesis and surface stabilization using planktonic bacteria and biofilms is discussed. We conclude that the use of biofilms to synthesize and stabilize NPs is underappreciated and could provide a new direction in biofilm-based NP production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of Mechanical Properties of Microbial Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Elizabeth; Gose, James; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven

    2017-11-01

    The physical properties of microbial biofilms grown subject to shear flows determine the form and mechanical characteristics of the biofilm structure, and consequently, the turbulent interactions over and through the biofilm. These biofilms - sometimes referred to as slime - are comprised of microbial cells and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrices that surround the multicellular communities. Some of the EPSs take the form of streamers that tend to oscillate in flows, causing increased turbulent mixing and drag. As the presence of EPS governs the compliance and overall stability of the filamentous streamers, investigation of the mechanical properties of biofilms may also inform efforts to understand hydrodynamic performance of fouled systems. In this study, a mixture of four diatom genera was grown under turbulent shear flow on test panels. The mechanical properties and hydrodynamic performance of the biofilm were investigated using rheology and turbulent flow studies in the Skin-Friction Flow Facility at the University of Michigan. The diatoms in the mixture of algae were identified, and the elastic and viscous moduli were determined from small-amplitude oscillations, while a creep test was used to evaluate the biofilm compliance.

  7. Crenarchaeal biofilm formation under extreme conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Koerdt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biofilm formation has been studied in much detail for a variety of bacterial species, as it plays a major role in the pathogenicity of bacteria. However, only limited information is available for the development of archaeal communities that are frequently found in many natural environments. METHODOLOGY: We have analyzed biofilm formation in three closely related hyperthermophilic crenarchaeotes: Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, S. solfataricus and S. tokodaii. We established a microtitre plate assay adapted to high temperatures to determine how pH and temperature influence biofilm formation in these organisms. Biofilm analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that the three strains form very different communities ranging from simple carpet-like structures in S. solfataricus to high density tower-like structures in S. acidocaldarius in static systems. Lectin staining indicated that all three strains produced extracellular polysaccharides containing glucose, galactose, mannose and N-acetylglucosamine once biofilm formation was initiated. While flagella mutants had no phenotype in two days old static biofilms of S. solfataricus, a UV-induced pili deletion mutant showed decreased attachment of cells. CONCLUSION: The study gives first insights into formation and development of crenarchaeal biofilms in extreme environments.

  8. Biofilms in Infections of the Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo J. M. Bispo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to form biofilms in a variety of environments is a common trait of bacteria, and may represent one of the earliest defenses against predation. Biofilms are multicellular communities usually held together by a polymeric matrix, ranging from capsular material to cell lysate. In a structure that imposes diffusion limits, environmental microgradients arise to which individual bacteria adapt their physiologies, resulting in the gamut of physiological diversity. Additionally, the proximity of cells within the biofilm creates the opportunity for coordinated behaviors through cell–cell communication using diffusible signals, the most well documented being quorum sensing. Biofilms form on abiotic or biotic surfaces, and because of that are associated with a large proportion of human infections. Biofilm formation imposes a limitation on the uses and design of ocular devices, such as intraocular lenses, posterior contact lenses, scleral buckles, conjunctival plugs, lacrimal intubation devices and orbital implants. In the absence of abiotic materials, biofilms have been observed on the capsule, and in the corneal stroma. As the evidence for the involvement of microbial biofilms in many ocular infections has become compelling, developing new strategies to prevent their formation or to eradicate them at the site of infection, has become a priority.

  9. Treatment of Oral Multispecies Biofilms by an Anti-Biofilm Peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhejun Wang

    Full Text Available Human oral biofilms are multispecies microbial communities that exhibit high resistance to antimicrobial agents. Dental plaque gives rise to highly prevalent and costly biofilm-related oral infections, which lead to caries or other types of oral infections. We investigated the ability of the recently identified anti-biofilm peptide 1018 to induce killing of bacterial cells present within oral multispecies biofilms. At 10 μg/ml (6.5 μM, peptide 1018 was able to significantly (p50% of the biofilm being killed and >35% being dispersed in only 3 minutes. Peptide 1018 may potentially be used by itself or in combination with CHX as a non-toxic and effective anti-biofilm agent for plaque disinfection in clinical dentistry.

  10. Candida Biofilms: Threats, Challenges, and Promising Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafalda Cavalheiro

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Candida species are fungal pathogens known for their ability to cause superficial and systemic infections in the human host. These pathogens are able to persist inside the host due to the development of pathogenicity and multidrug resistance traits, often leading to the failure of therapeutic strategies. One specific feature of Candida species pathogenicity is their ability to form biofilms, which protects them from external factors such as host immune system defenses and antifungal drugs. This review focuses on the current threats and challenges when dealing with biofilms formed by Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Candida parapsilosis, highlighting the differences between the four species. Biofilm characteristics depend on the ability of each species to produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS and display dimorphic growth, but also on the biofilm substratum, carbon source availability and other factors. Additionally, the transcriptional control over processes like adhesion, biofilm formation, filamentation, and EPS production displays great complexity and diversity within pathogenic yeasts of the Candida genus. These differences not only have implications in the persistence of colonization and infections but also on antifungal resistance typically found in Candida biofilm cells, potentiated by EPS, that functions as a barrier to drug diffusion, and by the overexpression of drug resistance transporters. The ability to interact with different species in in vivo Candida biofilms is also a key factor to consider when dealing with this problem. Despite many challenges, the most promising strategies that are currently available or under development to limit biofilm formation or to eradicate mature biofilms are discussed.

  11. Persistent and transient Listeria monocytogenes strains from retail deli environments vary in their ability to adhere and form biofilms and rarely have inlA premature stop codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjin; Ray, Andrea J; Hammons, Susan R; Oliver, Haley F

    2015-02-01

    Based on recent risk assessments, up to 83% of listeriosis cases from deli meat in the United States are predicted to be from ready-to-eat deli meats contaminated during processing at retail grocery stores. Listeria monocytogenes is known to use sanitizer tolerance and biofilm formation to survive, but interplay of these mechanisms along with virulence potential and persistence mechanisms specific to deli environments had yet to be elucidated. In this study, 442 isolates from food and nonfood contact surfaces in 30 retail delis over 9 months were tested for inlA premature stop codons (PMSCs); inlA encodes InlA, which is necessary to cause listeriosis. A total of 96 isolates, composed of 23 persistent and 73 transient strains, were tested for adhesion and biofilm-forming ability and sanitizer tolerance. Only 10/442 isolates had inlA PMSCs (pdelis with other persistent strains. Most (7/10) PMSC-containing isolates were collected from food contact surfaces (pdelis (p<0.05). Persistent strains had enhanced adhesion on day 1 of a 5-day adhesion-biofilm formation assay. However, there was no significant difference in sanitizer tolerance between persistent and transient strains. Results suggest that foods contaminated with persistent L. monocytogenes strains from the retail environment are (1) likely to have wild-type virulence potential and (2) may persist due to increased adhesion and biofilm formation capacity rather than sanitizer tolerance, thus posing a significant public health risk.

  12. Biofilm extracellular DNA enhances mixed species biofilms of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pammi, Mohan; Liang, Rong; Hicks, John; Mistretta, Toni-Ann; Versalovic, James

    2013-11-14

    Polymicrobial infections are responsible for significant mortality and morbidity in adults and children. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans are the most frequent combination of organisms isolated from polymicrobial infections. Vascular indwelling catheters are sites for mixed species biofilm formation and pose a significant risk for polymicrobial infections. We hypothesized that enhancement of biofilms in a mixed species environment increases patient mortality and morbidity. Mixed species biofilms of S. epidermidis and C. albicans were evaluated in vitro and in a subcutaneous catheter infection model in vivo. Mixed species biofilms were enhanced compared to single species biofilms of either S. epidermidis or C. albicans. A mixed species environment increased catheter infection and increased dissemination of S. epidermidis in mice. Microarrays were used to explore differential gene expression of S. epidermidis in the mixed species biofilms. In mixed species biofilms, compared to single species S. epidermidis biofilms, 2.7% of S. epidermidis genes were upregulated and 6% were down regulated. Staphylococcal autolysis repressors lrgA and lrgB were down regulated 36-fold and 27-fold respectively. The role of biofilm extracellular DNA was investigated by quantitation and by evaluating the effects of DNAse in a concentration and time dependent manner. S. epidermidis specific eDNA was increased in mixed species biofilms and further confirmed by degradation with DNAse. Mixed-species biofilms are enhanced and associated with increased S. epidermidis-specific eDNA in vitro and greater systemic dissemination of S. epidermidis in vivo. Down regulation of the lrg operon, a repressor of autolysis, associated with increased eDNA suggests a possible role for bacterial autolysis in mixed species biofilms. Enhancement and systemic dissemination of S. epidermidis may explain adverse outcomes after clinical polymicrobial infections of S. epidermidis and C. albicans.

  13. Prevention of biofilm formation and removal of existing biofilms by extracellular DNases of Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Helen L; Reuter, Mark; Hanman, Kate; Betts, Roy P; van Vliet, Arnoud H M

    2015-01-01

    The fastidious nature of the foodborne bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni contrasts with its ability to survive in the food chain. The formation of biofilms, or the integration into existing biofilms by C. jejuni, is thought to contribute to food chain survival. As extracellular DNA (eDNA) has previously been proposed to play a role in C. jejuni biofilms, we have investigated the role of extracellular DNases (eDNases) produced by C. jejuni in biofilm formation. A search of 2791 C. jejuni genomes highlighted that almost half of C. jejuni genomes contains at least one eDNase gene, but only a minority of isolates contains two or three of these eDNase genes, such as C. jejuni strain RM1221 which contains the cje0256, cje0566 and cje1441 eDNase genes. Strain RM1221 did not form biofilms, whereas the eDNase-negative strains NCTC 11168 and 81116 did. Incubation of pre-formed biofilms of NCTC 11168 with live C. jejuni RM1221 or with spent medium from a RM1221 culture resulted in removal of the biofilm. Inactivation of the cje1441 eDNase gene in strain RM1221 restored biofilm formation, and made the mutant unable to degrade biofilms of strain NCTC 11168. Finally, C. jejuni strain RM1221 was able to degrade genomic DNA from C. jejuni NCTC 11168, 81116 and RM1221, whereas strain NCTC 11168 and the RM1221 cje1441 mutant were unable to do so. This was mirrored by an absence of eDNA in overnight cultures of C. jejuni RM1221. This suggests that the activity of eDNases in C. jejuni affects biofilm formation and is not conducive to a biofilm lifestyle. These eDNases do however have a potential role in controlling biofilm formation by C. jejuni strains in food chain relevant environments.

  14. A novel approach for harnessing biofilm communities in moving bed biofilm reactors for industrial wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Joe A. Lemire; Marc A. Demeter; Iain George; Howard Ceri; Raymond J. Turner

    2015-01-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) are an effective biotechnology for treating industrial wastewater. Biomass retention on moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) carriers (biofilm support materials), allows for the ease-of-operation and high treatment capacity of MBBR systems. Optimization of MBBR systems has largely focused on aspects of carrier design, while little attention has been paid to enhancing strategies for harnessing microbial biomass. Previously, our research group demonstrated that ...

  15. The Calgary Biofilm Device: New Technology for Rapid Determination of Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Bacterial Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Ceri, H.; Olson, M. E.; Stremick, C.; Read, R. R.; Morck, D.; Buret, A.

    1999-01-01

    Determination of the MIC, based on the activities of antibiotics against planktonic bacteria, is the standard assay for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Adherent bacterial populations (biofilms) present with an innate lack of antibiotic susceptibility not seen in the same bacteria grown as planktonic populations. The Calgary Biofilm Device (CBD) is described as a new technology for the rapid and reproducible assay of biofilm susceptibilities to antibiotics. The CBD produces 96 equivalent bi...

  16. Biofilm extracellular DNA enhances mixed species biofilms of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Polymicrobial infections are responsible for significant mortality and morbidity in adults and children. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans are the most frequent combination of organisms isolated from polymicrobial infections. Vascular indwelling catheters are sites for mixed species biofilm formation and pose a significant risk for polymicrobial infections. We hypothesized that enhancement of biofilms in a mixed species environment increases patient mortality and morbidity. Results Mixed species biofilms of S. epidermidis and C. albicans were evaluated in vitro and in a subcutaneous catheter infection model in vivo. Mixed species biofilms were enhanced compared to single species biofilms of either S. epidermidis or C. albicans. A mixed species environment increased catheter infection and increased dissemination of S. epidermidis in mice. Microarrays were used to explore differential gene expression of S. epidermidis in the mixed species biofilms. In mixed species biofilms, compared to single species S. epidermidis biofilms, 2.7% of S. epidermidis genes were upregulated and 6% were down regulated. Staphylococcal autolysis repressors lrgA and lrgB were down regulated 36-fold and 27-fold respectively. The role of biofilm extracellular DNA was investigated by quantitation and by evaluating the effects of DNAse in a concentration and time dependent manner. S. epidermidis specific eDNA was increased in mixed species biofilms and further confirmed by degradation with DNAse. Conclusions Mixed-species biofilms are enhanced and associated with increased S. epidermidis-specific eDNA in vitro and greater systemic dissemination of S. epidermidis in vivo. Down regulation of the lrg operon, a repressor of autolysis, associated with increased eDNA suggests a possible role for bacterial autolysis in mixed species biofilms. Enhancement and systemic dissemination of S. epidermidis may explain adverse outcomes after clinical polymicrobial infections of S

  17. Dynamics of biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel under mono-species and mixed-culture simulated fish processing conditions and chemical disinfection challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Eleni; Giaouris, Efstathios D; Berillis, Panagiotis; Boziaris, Ioannis S

    2018-02-21

    The progressive ability of a six-strains L. monocytogenes cocktail to form biofilm on stainless steel (SS), under fish-processing simulated conditions, was investigated, together with the biocide tolerance of the developed sessile communities. To do this, the pathogenic bacteria were left to form biofilms on SS coupons incubated at 15°C, for up to 240h, in periodically renewable model fish juice substrate, prepared by aquatic extraction of sea bream flesh, under both mono-species and mixed-culture conditions. In the latter case, L. monocytogenes cells were left to produce biofilms together with either a five-strains cocktail of four Pseudomonas species (fragi, savastanoi, putida and fluorescens), or whole fish indigenous microflora. The biofilm populations of L. monocytogenes, Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, H 2 S producing and aerobic plate count (APC) bacteria, both before and after disinfection, were enumerated by selective agar plating, following their removal from surfaces through bead vortexing. Scanning electron microscopy was also applied to monitor biofilm formation dynamics and anti-biofilm biocidal actions. Results revealed the clear dominance of Pseudomonas spp. bacteria in all the mixed-culture sessile communities throughout the whole incubation period, with the in parallel sole presence of L. monocytogenes cells to further increase (ca. 10-fold) their sessile growth. With respect to L. monocytogenes and under mono-species conditions, its maximum biofilm population (ca. 6logCFU/cm 2 ) was reached at 192h of incubation, whereas when solely Pseudomonas spp. cells were also present, its biofilm formation was either slightly hindered or favored, depending on the incubation day. However, when all the fish indigenous microflora was present, biofilm formation by the pathogen was greatly hampered and never exceeded 3logCFU/cm 2 , while under the same conditions, APC biofilm counts had already surpassed 7logCFU/cm 2 by the end of the first 96h of

  18. Anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2003-01-01

    by the immobilization of the biomass, which forms static biofilms, particle-supported biofilms, or granules depending on the reactor's operational conditions. The advantages of the high-rate anaerobic digestion over the conventional aerobic wastewater treatment methods has created a clear trend for the change......-rate anaerobic treatment systems based on anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm are described in this chapter. Emphasis is given to a) the Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) systems, b) the main characteristics of the anaerobic granular sludge, and c) the factors that control the granulation process...

  19. Biofilm formation in a hot water system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagh, L.K.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Arvin, Erik

    2002-01-01

    The biofilm formation rate was measured in situ in a hot water system in an apartment building by specially designed sampling equipment, and the net growth of the suspended bacteria was measured by incubation of water samples with the indigeneous bacteria. The biofilm formation rate reached......, in the sludge, or in the water from the distribution system was negligible. This indicated that bacterial growth took place on the inner surfaces in the hot water system and biofilm formation and detachment of bacteria could account for most of the suspended bacteria actually measured in hot water. Therefore...

  20. Enhancement of phototrophic hydrogen production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides ZX-5 using a novel strategy - shaking and extra-light supplementation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xu; Wang, Yong-Hong; Zhang, Si-Liang; Chu, Ju; Zhang, Ming; Huang, Ming-Zhi; Zhuang, Ying-Ping [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, P.O. Box 329, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2009-12-15

    Biohydrogen has gained attention due to its potential as a sustainable alternative to conventional methods for hydrogen production. In this study, the effect of light intensity as well as cultivation method (standing- and shaking-culture) on the cell growth and hydrogen production of Rhodobacter sphaeroides ZX-5 were investigated in 38-ml anaerobic photobioreactor with RCVBN medium. Thus, a novel shaking and extra-light supplementation (SELS) approach was developed to enhance the phototrophic H{sub 2} production by R. sphaeroides ZX-5 using malate as the sole carbon source. The optimum illumination condition for shaking-culture by strain ZX-5 increased to 7000-8000 lux, markedly higher than that for standing-culture (4000-5000 lux). Under shaking and elevated illumination (7000-8000 lux), the culture was effective in promoting photo-H{sub 2} production, resulting in a 59% and 56% increase of the maximum and average hydrogen production rate, respectively, in comparison with the culture under standing and 4000-5000 lux conditions. The highest hydrogen-producing rate of 165.9 ml H{sub 2}/l h was observed under the application of SELS approach. To our knowledge, this record is currently the highest hydrogen production rate of non-immobilized purple non-sulphur (PNS) bacteria. This optimal performance of photo-H{sub 2} production using SELS approach is a favorable choice of sustainable and economically feasible strategy to improve phototrophic H{sub 2} production efficiency. (author)

  1. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda

  2. Targeting phenotypically tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ben; Nathan, Carl

    2016-01-01

    While the immune system is credited with averting tuberculosis in billions of individuals exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the immune system is also culpable for tempering the ability of antibiotics to deliver swift and durable cure of disease. In individuals afflicted with tuberculosis, host immunity produces diverse microenvironmental niches that support suboptimal growth, or complete growth arrest, of M. tuberculosis. The physiological state of nonreplication in bacteria is associated with phenotypic drug tolerance. Many of these host microenvironments, when modeled in vitro by carbon starvation, complete nutrient starvation, stationary phase, acidic pH, reactive nitrogen intermediates, hypoxia, biofilms, and withholding streptomycin from the streptomycin-addicted strain SS18b, render M. tuberculosis profoundly tolerant to many of the antibiotics that are given to tuberculosis patients in a clinical setting. Targeting nonreplicating persisters is anticipated to reduce the duration of antibiotic treatment and rate of post-treatment relapse. Some promising drugs to treat tuberculosis, such as rifampicin and bedaquiline, only kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis in vitro at concentrations far greater than their minimal inhibitory concentrations against replicating bacilli. There is an urgent demand to identify which of the currently used antibiotics, and which of the molecules in academic and corporate screening collections, have potent bactericidal action on nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. With this goal, we review methods of high throughput screening to target nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and methods to progress candidate molecules. A classification based on structures and putative targets of molecules that have been reported to kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis revealed a rich diversity in pharmacophores. However, few of these compounds were tested under conditions that would exclude the impact of adsorbed compound acting during the recovery phase of

  3. Diversity of cultivated and metabolically active aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Jeanthon

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP bacteria play significant roles in the bacterioplankton productivity and biogeochemical cycles of the surface ocean. In this study, we applied both cultivation and mRNA-based molecular methods to explore the diversity of AAP bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea in early summer 2008. Colony-forming units obtained on three different agar media were screened for the production of bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChl-a, the light-harvesting pigment of AAP bacteria. BChl-a-containing colonies represented a low part of the cultivable fraction. In total, 54 AAP strains were isolated and the phylogenetic analyses based on their 16S rRNA and pufM genes showed that they were all affiliated to the Alphaproteobacteria. The most frequently isolated strains belonged to Citromicrobium bathyomarinum, and Erythrobacter and Roseovarius species. Most other isolates were related to species not reported to produce BChl-a and/or may represent novel taxa. Direct extraction of RNA from seawater samples enabled the analysis of the expression of pufM, the gene coding for the M subunit of the reaction centre complex of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis. Clone libraries of pufM gene transcripts revealed that most phylotypes were highly similar to sequences previously recovered from the Mediterranean Sea and a large majority (~94 % was affiliated to the Gammaproteobacteria. The most abundantly detected phylotypes occurred in the western and eastern Mediterranean basins. However, some were exclusively detected in the eastern basin, reflecting the highest diversity of pufM transcripts observed in this ultra-oligotrophic region. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document extensively the diversity of AAP isolates and to unveil the active AAP community in an oligotrophic marine environment. By pointing out the discrepancies

  4. Gymnodinium smaydae n. sp., a new planktonic phototrophic dinoflagellate from the coastal waters of Western Korea: morphology and molecular characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nam Seon; Jeong, Hae Jin; Moestrup, Øjvind; Lee, Sung Yeon; Lim, An Suk; Jang, Tae Young; Lee, Kyung Ha; Lee, Moo Joon; Jang, Se Hyeon; Potvin, Eric; Lee, Sook Kyung; Noh, Jae Hoon

    2014-01-01

    The marine phototrophic dinoflagellate Gymnodinium smaydae n. sp. is described from cells prepared for light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. Also, sequences of the small (SSU) and large subunits (LSU) and the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) of ribosomal DNA were analyzed. This newly isolated dinoflagellate possessed nuclear chambers, nuclear fibrous connective, an apical groove running in a counterclockwise direction around the apex, and a major accessory pigment peridinin, which are four key features for the genus Gymnodinium. The epicone was conical with a round apex, while the hypocone was ellipsoid. Cells growing photosynthetically were 6.3-10.9 μm long and 5.1-10.0 μm wide, and therefore smaller than any other Gymnodinium species so far reported except Gymnodinium nanum. Cells were covered with polygonal amphiesmal vesicles arranged in 11 horizontal rows, and the vesicles were smaller than those of the other Gymnodinium species. This dinoflagellate had a sharp and elongated ventral ridge reaching half way down the hypocone, unlike other Gymnodinium species. Moreover, displacement of the cingulum was 0.4-0.6 × cell length while in other known Gymnodinium species it is less than 0.3 × cell length. In addition, the new species possessed a peduncle, permanent chloroplasts, pyrenoids, trichocysts, pusule systems, and small knobs along the apical furrow, but it lacked an eyespot, nematocysts, and body scales. The sequence of the SSU, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2, and LSU rDNA region differed by 1.5-3.8%, 6.0-17.4%, and 9.1-17.5%, respectively, from those of the most closely related species. The phylogenetic trees demonstrated that the new species belonged to the Gymnodinium clade at the base of a clade consisting of Gymnodinium acidotum, Gymnodinium dorsalisulcum, Gymnodinium eucyaneum, etc. Based on morphological and molecular data, we suggest that the taxon represents a new species, Gymnodinium smaydae n. sp. © 2013 The Author

  5. In vitro activity of azole derivatives and griseofulvin against planktonic and biofilm growth of clinical isolates of dermatophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Correia, Edmilson Emanuel Monteiro; Guedes, Glaucia Morgana de Melo; de Oliveira, Jonathas Sales; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Pinheiro, Adriana de Queiroz; Chaves, Lúcio Jackson Queiroz; Pereira Neto, Waldemiro de Aquino; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha

    2018-03-08

    As shown by recent research, most of the clinically relevant fungi, including dermatophytes, form biofilms in vitro and in vivo, which may exhibit antimicrobial tolerance that favour recurrent infections. The aim of this study was to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of itraconazole (ITC), voriconazole (VCZ) and griseofulvin (GRI) against Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton tonsurans, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Microsporum canis and Microsporum gypseum in planktonic and biofilm growth. For the planktonic form, susceptibility testing was performed according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), document M38-A2, while biofilm susceptibility was evaluated using the XTT colorimetric essay. The planktonic growth of all strains was inhibited, with MIC values ranging from 0.00195 to 0.1225 μg/mL for VRC, 0.00195 to 0.25 μg/mL for ITC and GRI, while a 50-fold increase in the MIC was required to significantly reduce the metabolic activity (P < .05) of dermatophyte biofilms. In brief, the ability of dermatophytes to form biofilms may be a contributing factor for the recalcitrance of dermatophytoses or the dissemination of the disease. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Antibacterial activity of Thymoquinone, an active principle of Nigella sativa and its potency to prevent bacterial biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhrouf Amina

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thymoquinone is an active principle of Nigella sativa seed known as "Habbah Al-Sauda" in Arabic countries and "Sinouj" in Tunisia. Bacterial biofilms tend to exhibit significant tolerance to antimicrobials drugs during infections. Methods The antibacterial activity of Thymoquinone (TQ and its biofilm inhibition potencies were investigated on 11 human pathogenic bacteria. The growth and development of the biofilm were assessed using the crystal violet (CV and the 2, 3-bis [2-methyloxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT reduction assay. Results TQ exhibited a significant bactericidal activity against the majority of the tested bacteria (MICs values ranged from 8 to 32 μg/ml especially Gram positive cocci (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epidermidis CIP 106510. Crystal violet assay demonstrated that the minimum biofilm inhibition concentration (BIC50 was reached with 22 and 60 μg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epidermidis CIP 106510 respectively. In addition our data revealed that cells oxidative activity was influenced by TQ supplementation. In the same way, TQ prevented cell adhesion to glass slides surface. Conclusion The ability of TQ to prevent biofilm formation warrants further investigation to explore its use as bioactive substances with antibiofilm potential.

  7. Fate of Salmonella Typhimurium in laboratory-scale drinking water biofilms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schaefer, Lisa M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available biofilms in monoculture and the fate and persistence of Salmonella in a mixed aquatic biofilm was examined. In monoculture S. Typhimurium formed loosely structured biofilms. Salmonella colonized established multi-species drinking water biofilms within 24...

  8. The Interface between Fungal Biofilms and Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Kernien

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal biofilms are communities of adherent cells surrounded by an extracellular matrix. These biofilms are commonly found during infection caused by a variety of fungal pathogens. Clinically, biofilm infections can be extremely difficult to eradicate due to their resistance to antifungals and host defenses. Biofilm formation can protect fungal pathogens from many aspects of the innate immune system, including killing by neutrophils and monocytes. Altered immune recognition during this phase of growth is also evident by changes in the cytokine profiles of monocytes and macrophages exposed to biofilm. In this manuscript, we review the host response to fungal biofilms, focusing on how these structures are recognized by the innate immune system. Biofilms formed by Candida, Aspergillus, and Cryptococcus have received the most attention and are highlighted. We describe common themes involved in the resilience of fungal biofilms to host immunity and give examples of biofilm defenses that are pathogen-specific.

  9. Characterization of starvation-induced dispersion in Pseudomonas putida biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjermansen, Morten; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Sternberg, Claus

    2005-01-01

    The biofilm lifestyle, where microbial cells are aggregated because of expression of cell-to-cell interconnecting compounds, is believed to be of paramount importance to microbes in the environment. Because microbes must be able to alternate between sessile and planktonic states, it is anticipated...... that they must be able to regulate their ability to form biofilm and to dissolve biofilm. We present an investigation of a biofilm dissolution process occurring in flow-chamber-grown Pseudomonas putida biofilms. Local starvation-induced biofilm dissolution appears to be an integrated part of P. putida biofilm...... development that causes characteristic structural rearrangements. Rapid global dissolution of entire P. putida biofilms was shown to occur in response to carbon starvation. Genetic analysis suggested that the adjacent P. putida genes PP0164 and PP0165 play a role in P. putida biofilm formation and dissolution...

  10. Susceptibility of Porphyromonas gingivalis in biofilms to amoxicillin, doxycycline and metronidazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T.

    2002-01-01

    Biofilm, Porphyromonas gingivalis, susceptibility testing, amoxicillin, doxycycline, metronidazole......Biofilm, Porphyromonas gingivalis, susceptibility testing, amoxicillin, doxycycline, metronidazole...

  11. Biofilm Formation by a Metabolically Versatile Bacterium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harwood, Caroline S

    2005-01-01

    .... The goal of this project is to conduct basic studies that will facilitate the development of a process wherein Rhodopseudomonas cells grown on surfaces as biofilms, produce hydrogen with energy...

  12. New approaches to combat Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerits, Evelien; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In nature, bacteria predominantly reside in structured, surface-attached communities embedded in a self-produced, extracellular matrix. These so-called biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many infections, as they are difficult to eradicate due to their resistance to antimicrobials and host defense mechanisms. This review focusses on the biofilm-forming periodontal bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis. Current knowledge on the virulence mechanisms underlying P. gingivalis biofilm formation is presented. In addition, oral infectious diseases in which P. gingivalis plays a key role are described, and an overview of conventional and new therapies for combating P. gingivalis biofilms is given. More insight into this intriguing pathogen might direct the development of better strategies to combat oral infections. PMID:28473880

  13. Bursting the bubble on bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crusz, Shanika A; Popat, Roman; Rybtke, Morten Theil

    2012-01-01

    The flow cell biofilm system is an important and widely used tool for the in vitro cultivation and evaluation of bacterial biofilms under hydrodynamic conditions of flow. This paper provides an introduction to the background and use of such systems, accompanied by a detailed guide to the assembly...... of the apparatus including the description of new modifications which enhance its performance. As such, this is an essential guide for the novice biofilm researcher as well as providing valuable trouble-shooting techniques for even the most experienced laboratories. The adoption of a common and reliable...... methodology amongst researchers would enable findings to be shared and replicated amongst the biofilm research community, with the overall aim of advancing understanding and management of these complex and widespread bacterial communities....

  14. Treatment of Oral Multispecies Biofilms by an Anti-Biofilm Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhejun; de la Fuente-Núñez, Cesar; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-01-01

    Human oral biofilms are multispecies microbial communities that exhibit high resistance to antimicrobial agents. Dental plaque gives rise to highly prevalent and costly biofilm-related oral infections, which lead to caries or other types of oral infections. We investigated the ability of the recently identified anti-biofilm peptide 1018 to induce killing of bacterial cells present within oral multispecies biofilms. At 10 μg/ml (6.5 μM), peptide 1018 was able to significantly (pbiofilm formation over 3 days. The activity of the peptide on preformed biofilms was found to be concentration-dependent since more than 60% of the total plaque biofilm cell population was killed by 10 μg/ml of peptide 1018 in 3 days, while at 5 μg/ml 50% of cells were dead and at 1 μg/ml the peptide triggered cell death in around 30% of the total bacterial population, as revealed by confocal microscopy. The presence of saliva did not affect peptide activity, since no statistically significant difference was found in the ability of peptide 1018 to kill oral biofilms using either saliva coated and non-saliva coated hydroxyapatite surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy experiments indicated that peptide 1018 induced cell lysis in plaque biofilms. Furthermore, combined treatment using peptide 1018 and chlorhexidine (CHX) increased the anti-biofilm activity of each compound compared to when these were used alone, resulting in >50% of the biofilm being killed and >35% being dispersed in only 3 minutes. Peptide 1018 may potentially be used by itself or in combination with CHX as a non-toxic and effective anti-biofilm agent for plaque disinfection in clinical dentistry.

  15. The Cytochrome bd Oxidase of Porphyromonas gingivalis Contributes to Oxidative Stress Resistance and Dioxygen Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Leclerc

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is an etiologic agent of periodontal disease in humans. The disease is associated with the formation of a mixed oral biofilm which is exposed to oxygen and environmental stress, such as oxidative stress. To investigate possible roles for cytochrome bd oxidase in the growth and persistence of this anaerobic bacterium inside the oral biofilm, mutant strains deficient in cytochrome bd oxidase activity were characterized. This study demonstrated that the cytochrome bd oxidase of Porphyromonas gingivalis, encoded by cydAB, was able to catalyse O2 consumption and was involved in peroxide and superoxide resistance, and dioxygen tolerance.

  16. Activated Sludge and Aerobic Biofilm Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Von Sperling, Marcos

    2007-01-01

    "Activated Sludge and Aerobic Biofilm Reactors is the fifth volume in the series Biological Wastewater Treatment. The first part of the book is devoted to the activated sludge process, covering the removal of organic matter, nitrogen and phosphorus.A detailed analysis of the biological reactor (aeration tank) and the final sedimentation tanks is provided. The second part of the book covers aerobic biofilm reactors, especially trickling filters, rotating biological contractors and submerged ae...

  17. Role of Multicellular Aggregates in Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper N. Kragh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In traditional models of in vitro biofilm development, individual bacterial cells seed a surface, multiply, and mature into multicellular, three-dimensional structures. Much research has been devoted to elucidating the mechanisms governing the initial attachment of single cells to surfaces. However, in natural environments and during infection, bacterial cells tend to clump as multicellular aggregates, and biofilms can also slough off aggregates as a part of the dispersal process. This makes it likely that biofilms are often seeded by aggregates and single cells, yet how these aggregates impact biofilm initiation and development is not known. Here we use a combination of experimental and computational approaches to determine the relative fitness of single cells and preformed aggregates during early development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We find that the relative fitness of aggregates depends markedly on the density of surrounding single cells, i.e., the level of competition for growth resources. When competition between aggregates and single cells is low, an aggregate has a growth disadvantage because the aggregate interior has poor access to growth resources. However, if competition is high, aggregates exhibit higher fitness, because extending vertically above the surface gives cells at the top of aggregates better access to growth resources. Other advantages of seeding by aggregates, such as earlier switching to a biofilm-like phenotype and enhanced resilience toward antibiotics and immune response, may add to this ecological benefit. Our findings suggest that current models of biofilm formation should be reconsidered to incorporate the role of aggregates in biofilm initiation.

  18. Neutrophil extracellular trap formation in supragingival biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Josefine; Dommisch, Henrik; Skora, Philipp; Horvath, Gabor; Latz, Eicke; Hoerauf, Achim; Waller, Tobias; Kawai, Toshihisa; Jepsen, Søren; Deschner, James; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Oral biofilms are the causative agents of the highly prevalent oral diseases periodontitis and caries. Additionally, the host immune response is thought to play a critical role in disease onset. Neutrophils are known to be a key host response factor to bacterial challenge on host surfaces. Release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) as a novel antimicrobial defense strategy has gained increasing attention in the past years. Here, we investigated the influx of neutrophils into the dental plaque and the ability of oral bacteria to trigger intra-biofilm release of NETs and intracellular proteins. Supragingival biofilms and whole saliva were sampled from systemically healthy subjects participating in an experimental gingivitis study. Biofilms were analysed by immunofluorescence followed by confocal and fluorescence microscopy. Moreover, concentrations of cytokines and immune-associated proteins in biofilm suspensions and saliva were assessed by ELISA. Neutrophils obtained from blood were stimulated with twelve bacterial species isolated from cultured biofilms or with lipopolysaccharide to monitor NET formation. Neutrophils, NETs, neutrophil-associated proteins (myeloperoxidase, elastase-2, cathepsin G, cathelicidin LL-37), interleukin-8, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor were detected within plaque samples and saliva. All tested bacterial species as well as the polymicrobial samples isolated from the plaque of each donor induced release of NETs and interleukin-8. The degree of NET formation varied among different subjects and did not correlate with plaque scores or clinical signs of local inflammation. Our findings indicate that neutrophils are attracted towards dental biofilms, in which they become incorporated and where they are stimulated by microbes to release NETs and immunostimulatory proteins. Thus, neutrophils and NETs may be involved in host biofilm control, although their specific role needs to be further elucidated. Moreover, inter

  19. Effects of oxygen on biofilm formation and the AtlA autolysin of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert A

    2007-09-01

    The Streptococcus mutans atlA gene encodes an autolysin required for biofilm maturation and biogenesis of a normal cell surface. We found that the capacity to form biofilms by S. mutans, one of the principal causative agents of dental caries, was dramatically impaired by growth of the organism in an aerated environment and that cells exposed to oxygen displayed marked changes in surface protein profiles. Inactivation of the atlA gene alleviated repression of biofilm formation in the presence of oxygen. Also, the formation of long chains, a characteristic of AtlA-deficient strains, was less evident in cells grown with aeration. The SMu0629 gene is immediately upstream of atlA and encodes a product that contains a C-X-X-C motif, a characteristic of thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases. Inactivation of SMu0629 significantly reduced the levels of AtlA protein and led to resistance to autolysis. The SMu0629 mutant also displayed an enhanced capacity to form biofilms in the presence of oxygen compared to that of the parental strain. The expression of SMu0629 was shown to be under the control of the VicRK two-component system, which influences oxidative stress tolerance in S. mutans. Disruption of vicK also led to inhibition of processing of AtlA, and the mutant was hyperresistant to autolysis. When grown under aerobic conditions, the vicK mutant also showed significantly increased biofilm formation compared to strain UA159. This study illustrates the central role of AtlA and VicK in orchestrating growth on surfaces and envelope biogenesis in response to redox conditions.

  20. Physicochemical characteristics and microbial community evolution of biofilms during the start-up period in a moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Hong-Qiang; Geng, Jin-Ju; Xu, Ke; Huang, Hui; Ding, Li-Li

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate biofilm properties evolution coupled with different ages during the start-up period in a moving bed biofilm reactor system. Physicochemical characteristics including adhesion force, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), morphology as well as volatile solid and microbial community were studied. Results showed that the formation and development of biofilms exhibited four stages, including (I) initial attachment and young biofilm formation, (II) biofilms accumulation, (III) biofilm sloughing and updating, and (IV) biofilm maturation. During the whole start-up period, adhesion force was positively and significantly correlated with the contents of EPS, especially the content of polysaccharide. In addition, increased adhesion force and EPS were beneficial for biofilm retention. Gram-negative bacteria mainly including Sphaerotilus, Zoogloea and Haliscomenobacter were predominant in the initial stage. Actinobacteria was beneficial to resist sloughing. Furthermore, filamentous bacteria were dominant in maturation biofilm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of biofilm roughness and hydrodynamic conditions in Legionella pneumophila adhesion to and detachment from simulated drinking water biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yun; Monroy, Guillermo L; Derlon, Nicolas; Janjaroen, Dao; Huang, Conghui; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2015-04-07

    Biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) could exacerbate the persistence and associated risks of pathogenic Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), thus raising human health concerns. However, mechanisms controlling adhesion and subsequent detachment of L. pneumophila associated with biofilms remain unclear. We determined the connection between L. pneumophila adhesion and subsequent detachment with biofilm physical structure characterization using optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique. Analysis of the OCT images of multispecies biofilms grown under low nutrient condition up to 34 weeks revealed the lack of biofilm deformation even when these biofilms were exposed to flow velocity of 0.7 m/s, typical flow for DWDS. L. pneumophila adhesion on these biofilm under low flow velocity (0.007 m/s) positively correlated with biofilm roughness due to enlarged biofilm surface area and local flow conditions created by roughness asperities. The preadhered L. pneumophila on selected rough and smooth biofilms were found to detach when these biofilms were subjected to higher flow velocity. At the flow velocity of 0.1 and 0.3 m/s, the ratio of detached cell from the smooth biofilm surface was from 1.3 to 1.4 times higher than that from the rough biofilm surface, presumably because of the low shear stress zones near roughness asperities. This study determined that physical structure and local hydrodynamics control L. pneumophila adhesion to and detachment from simulated drinking water biofilm, thus it is the first step toward reducing the risk of L. pneumophila exposure and subsequent infections.

  2. Teaching Tolerance? Associational Diversity and Tolerance Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapp, Carolin; Freitag, Markus

    2015-01-01

    , a closer look is taken at how associational diversity relates to the formation of tolerance and the importance of associations as schools of tolerance are evaluated. The main theoretical argument follows contact theory, wherein regular and enduring contact in diverse settings reduces prejudice and thereby...

  3. Fremmedlegemeinfektioner--nyt om biofilm og quorum sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Ciofu, Oana

    2007-01-01

    Biofilms are structured consortia of bacteria embedded in self-produced polymer matrix. Biofilms are resistant to antibiotics, disinfectives and phagocytosis. The persistence of foreign body infections is due to biofilms. Chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients is a biofilm....... Bacteria in biofilms communicate by means of quorum sensing which activates genes for virulence factors. Biofilms can be prevented by antibiotic prophylaxis or early therapy or by quorum sensing inhibitors which make them susceptible to antibiotics and phagocytosis. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Nov-26...

  4. Nanoindentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Xu, Zhe; Du, Yingjie; Lu, Hongbing; Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Gandee, Leah; Zimmern, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a source of many chronic infections. Biofilms and their inherent resistance to antibiotics are attributable to a range of health issues including affecting prosthetic implants, hospital-acquired infections, and wound infection. Mechanical properties of biofilm, in particular, at micro- and nano-scales, are governed by microstructures and porosity of the biofilm, which in turn may contribute to their inherent antibiotic resistance. We utilize atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation and finite element simulation to investigate the nanoscale mechanical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm. This biofilm was derived from human samples and represents a medically relevant model. (paper)

  5. The Candida albicans Biofilm Matrix: Composition, Structure and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Christopher G; Vila, Taissa; Romo, Jesus A; Montelongo-Jauregui, Daniel; Wall, Gina; Ramasubramanian, Anand; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2017-03-01

    A majority of infections caused by Candida albicans -the most frequent fungal pathogen-are associated with biofilm formation. A salient feature of C. albicans biofilms is the presence of the biofilm matrix. This matrix is composed of exopolymeric materials secreted by sessile cells within the biofilm, in which all classes of macromolecules are represented, and provides protection against environmental challenges. In this review, we summarize the knowledge accumulated during the last two decades on the composition, structure, and function of the C. albicans biofilm matrix. Knowledge of the matrix components, its structure, and function will help pave the way to novel strategies to combat C. albicans biofilm infections.

  6. Biofilm formation of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Esteban; Halliday-Wimmonds, Iona; Francis , Stewart; Kearney, Michael T.; Hansen, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) is an emergent fish pathogen in both marine and fresh water environments. The bacterium is suspected to persist in the environment even without the presence of a suitable fish host. In the present study, the influence of different abiotic factors such as salinity and temperature were used to study the biofilm formation of different isolates of Fno including intracellular growth loci C (iglC)and pathogenicity determinant protein A (pdpA) knockout strains. Finally, we compared the susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm to three disinfectants used in the aquaculture and ornamental fish industry, namely Virkon®, bleach and hydrogen peroxide. The data indicates that Fno is capable of producing biofilms within 24 h where both salinity as well as temperature plays a role in the growth and biofilm formation of Fno. Mutations in theiglC or pdpA, both known virulence factors, do not appear to affect the capacity of Fno to produce biofilms, and the minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum biocidal concentration for the three disinfectants were lower than the minimum biofilm eradication concentration values. This information needs to be taken into account if trying to eradicate the pathogen from a