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Sample records for photosystem ii confer

  1. Photosystem II and photoinhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feikema, Willem Onno

    2006-01-01

    Plants harvest light energy and convert it into chemical energy. Light absorption by photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) results in charge separations in their reaction centers (RCs), initiating a chain of redox reactions with PSI generating the reducing power for CO2 assimilation into sugars, and

  2. Light harvesting in photosystem II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amerongen, H.; Croce, R.

    2013-01-01

    Water oxidation in photosynthesis takes place in photosystem II (PSII). This photosystem is built around a reaction center (RC) where sunlight-induced charge separation occurs. This RC consists of various polypeptides that bind only a few chromophores or pigments, next to several other cofactors. It

  3. Functional architecture of photosystem II supercomplexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caffarri, S.; Kouril, R.; Kereiche, S.; Boekema, E.J.; Croce, R.

    2009-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a large multiprotein complex, which catalyses water splitting and plastoquinone reduction necessary to transform sunlight into chemical energy. Detailed functional and structural studies of the complex from higher plants have been hampered by the impossibility to purify it

  4. Lipids in the Structure of Photosystem I, Photosystem II and the Cytochrome b6f Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kern, Jan; Zouni, Athina; Guskov, Albert; Krauss, Norbert; Wada, Hajime; Murata, Norio

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes the data accumulated in the last decade regarding the specific function of lipids in oxygenic photosynthesis, based on crystal structures of at least 3.0 Å resolution of the main photosynthetic membrane protein—pigment complexes, photosystem I, photosystem II and cytochrome

  5. Photoinduced changes in photosystem II pigments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, Atanaska S; Busheva, Mira C; Stoitchkova, Katerina V; Tzonova, Iren K, E-mail: katys@phys.uni-sofia.b

    2010-11-01

    The photosynthetic apparatus in higher plants performs two seemingly opposing tasks: efficient harvest of sunlight, but also rapid and harmless dissipation of excess light energy as heat to avoid deleterious photodamage. In order to study this process in pigment-protein supercomplexes of photosystem II (PSII), 77 K fluorescence and room temperature resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy were applied to investigate the changes in structure and spectral properties of the pigments in spinach PSII membranes. The high-light treatment results in a strong quenching of the fluorescence (being largest when the excitation is absorbed by carotenoids) and a red-shift of the main maximum. Decomposition of the fluorescence spectra into four bands revealed intensive quenching of F685 and F695 bands, possible bleaching of chlorophyll a, enhanced extent of light harvesting complexes (LHCII) aggregation and increased energy transfer to aggregated LHCII. The analysis of RR spectra revealed the predominant contribution of ss-carotene (ss-Car) upon 457.8 and 488 nm excitations and lutein (Lut) at 514.5 nm. During prolonged exposure to strong light no significant bleaching of ss-Car and weak photobleaching of Lut is observed. The results will contribute to the efforts to produce more efficient and robust solar cells when exposed to fluctuations in light intensity.

  6. Photoinduced changes in photosystem II pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Atanaska S.; Busheva, Mira C.; Stoitchkova, Katerina V.; Tzonova, Iren K.

    2010-11-01

    The photosynthetic apparatus in higher plants performs two seemingly opposing tasks: efficient harvest of sunlight, but also rapid and harmless dissipation of excess light energy as heat to avoid deleterious photodamage. In order to study this process in pigment-protein supercomplexes of photosystem II (PSII), 77 K fluorescence and room temperature resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy were applied to investigate the changes in structure and spectral properties of the pigments in spinach PSII membranes. The high-light treatment results in a strong quenching of the fluorescence (being largest when the excitation is absorbed by carotenoids) and a red-shift of the main maximum. Decomposition of the fluorescence spectra into four bands revealed intensive quenching of F685 and F695 bands, possible bleaching of chlorophyll a, enhanced extent of light harvesting complexes (LHCII) aggregation and increased energy transfer to aggregated LHCII. The analysis of RR spectra revealed the predominant contribution of ß-carotene (ß-Car) upon 457.8 and 488 nm excitations and lutein (Lut) at 514.5 nm. During prolonged exposure to strong light no significant bleaching of ß-Car and weak photobleaching of Lut is observed. The results will contribute to the efforts to produce more efficient and robust solar cells when exposed to fluctuations in light intensity.

  7. Carotenoids assist in cyanobacterial Photosystem II assembly and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas eZakar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids (carotenes and xanthophylls are ubiquitous constituents of living organisms. They are protective agents against oxidative stresses and serve as modulators of membrane microviscosity. As antioxidants they can protect photosynthetic organisms from free radicals like reactive oxygen species that originate from water splitting, the first step of photosynthesis. We summarize the structural and functional roles of carotenoids in connection with cyanobacterial Photosystem II. Although carotenoids are hydrophobic molecules, their complexes with proteins also allow cytoplasmic localization. In cyanobacterial cells such complexes are called orange carotenoid proteins, and they protect Photosystem II and Photosystem I by preventing their overexcitation through phycobilisomes. Recently it has been observed that carotenoids are not only required for the proper functioning, but also for the structural stability of phycobilisomes.

  8. Quality control of Photosystem II: reversible and irreversible protein aggregation decides the fate of Photosystem II under excessive illumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasusi eYamamoto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In response to excessive light, the thylakoid membranes of higher plant chloroplasts show dynamic changes including the degradation and reassembly of proteins, a change in the distribution of proteins, and large-scale structural changes such as unstacking of the grana. Here, we examined the aggregation of light-harvesting chlorophyll-protein complexes and Photosystem II core subunits of spinach thylakoid membranes under light stress with 77K chlorophyll fluorescence; aggregation of these proteins was found to proceed with increasing light intensity. Measurement of changes in the fluidity of thylakoid membranes with fluorescence polarization of diphenylhexatriene showed that membrane fluidity increased at a light intensity of 500–1,000 µmol photons m-2 s-1, and decreased at very high light intensity (1,500 µmol photons m-2 s-1. The aggregation of light-harvesting complexes at moderately high light intensity is known to be reversible, while that of Photosystem II core subunits at extremely high light intensity is irreversible. It is likely that the reversibility of protein aggregation is closely related to membrane fluidity: increases in fluidity should stimulate reversible protein aggregation, whereas irreversible protein aggregation might decrease membrane fluidity. When spinach leaves were pre-illuminated with moderately high light intensity, the qE component of non-photochemical quenching and the optimum quantum yield of Photosystem II increased, indicating that Photosystem II/ light-harvesting complexes rearranged in the thylakoid membranes to optimize Photosystem II activity. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the thylakoids underwent partial unstacking under these light stress conditions. Thus, protein aggregation is involved in thylakoid dynamics and regulates photochemical reactions, thereby deciding the fate of Photosystem II.

  9. Structure and membrane organization of photosystem II in green plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hankamer, B; Barber, J; Boekema, EJ

    1997-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the pigment protein complex embedded in the thylakoid membrane of higher plants, algae, and cyanobacteria that uses solar energy to drive the photosynthetic water-splitting reaction. This chapter reviews the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures of PSII as

  10. Functional architecture of higher plant photosystem II supercomplexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caffarri, Stefano; Kouril, Roman; Kereiche, Sami; Boekema, Egbert J.; Croce, Roberta; Kereïche, Sami

    2009-01-01

    Photosystem II ( PSII) is a large multiprotein complex, which catalyses water splitting and plastoquinone reduction necessary to transform sunlight into chemical energy. Detailed functional and structural studies of the complex from higher plants have been hampered by the impossibility to purify it

  11. Functional architecture of higher plant photosystem II supercomplexes

    OpenAIRE

    Caffarri, Stefano; Kouřil, Roman; Kereïche, Sami; Boekema, Egbert J; Croce, Roberta

    2009-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a large multiprotein complex, which catalyses water splitting and plastoquinone reduction necessary to transform sunlight into chemical energy. Detailed functional and structural studies of the complex from higher plants have been hampered by the impossibility to purify it to homogeneity. In this work, homogeneous preparations ranging from a newly identified particle composed by a monomeric core and antenna proteins to the largest C2S2M2 supercomplex were isolated. Ch...

  12. Phytotoxicity of Four Photosystem II Herbicides to Tropical Seagrasses

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, Florita; Collier, Catherine J.; Mercurio, Philip; Negri, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    Coastal waters of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are contaminated with agricultural pesticides, including the photosystem II (PSII) herbicides which are the most frequently detected at the highest concentrations. Designed to control weeds, these herbicides are equally potent towards non-target marine species, and the close proximity of seagrass meadows to flood plumes has raised concerns that seagrasses may be the species most threatened by herbicides from runoff. While previous work has identi...

  13. Organisation on Photosystem I and Photosystem II in red alga Cyanidium caldarium: encounter of cyanobacterial and higher plant concepts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gardian, Zdenko; Bumba, Ladislav; Schrofel, A.; Herbstová, Miroslava; Nebesářová, Jana; Vácha, František

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 1767, č. 6 (2007), s. 725-731 ISSN 0005-2728 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA608170603; GA ČR GP310/07/P115; GA ČR GA206/06/0364 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513; CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Photosystem I * Photosystem II Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.835, year: 2007

  14. The relative absorption cross-sections of photosystem I and photosystem II in chloroplasts from three types of Nicotiana tabacum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, A; Thielen, A P

    1980-02-08

    In the present study we used three types of Nicotiana tabacum, cv John William's Broad Leaf (the wild type and two mutants, the yellow-green Su/su and the yellow Su/su var. Aurea) in order to correlat functional properties of Photosystem II and Photosystem I with the structural organization of their chloroplasts. The effective absorption cross-section of Photosystem II and Photosystem I centers was measured by means of the rate constant of their photoconversion under light-limiting conditions. In agreement with earlier results (Okabe, K., Schmid, G.H. and Straub, J. (1977) Plant Physiol. 60, 150--156) the photosynthetic unit size for both System II and System I in the two mutants was considerably smaller as compared to the wild type. We observed biphasic kinetics in the photoconversion of System II in all three types of N. tabacum. However, the photoconversion of System I occurred with monophasic and exponential kinetics. Under our experimental conditions, the effective cross-section of Photosystem I was comparable to that of the fast System II component (alpha centers). The relative amplitude of the slow System II component (beta centers) varied between 30% in the wild type to 70% in the Su/su var. Aurea mutant. The increased fraction of beta centers is correlated with the decreased fraction of appressed photosynthetic membranes in the chloroplasts of the two mutants. As a working hypothesis, it is suggested that beta centers are located on photosynthetic membranes directly exposed to the stroma medium.

  15. Non-intrusive Assessment of Photosystem II and Photosystem I in Whole Coral Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milán Szabó

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Reef building corals (phylum Cnidaria harbor endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae (genus Symbiodinium that generate photosynthetic products to fuel their host's metabolism. Non-invasive techniques such as chlorophyll (Chl fluorescence analyses of Photosystem II (PSII have been widely used to estimate the photosynthetic performance of Symbiodinium in hospite. However, since the spatial origin of PSII chlorophyll fluorescence in coral tissues is uncertain, such signals give limited information on depth-integrated photosynthetic performance of the whole tissue. In contrast, detection of absorbance changes in the near infrared (NIR region integrates signals from deeper tissue layers due to weak absorption and multiple scattering of NIR light. While extensively utilized in higher plants, NIR bio-optical techniques are seldom applied to corals. We have developed a non-intrusive measurement method to examine photochemistry of intact corals, based on redox kinetics of the primary electron donor in Photosystem I (P700 and chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics (Fast-Repetition Rate fluorometry, FRRf. Since the redox state of P700 depends on the operation of both PSI and PSII, important information can be obtained on the PSII-PSI intersystem electron transfer kinetics. Under moderate, sub-lethal heat stress treatments (33°C for ~20 min, the coral Pavona decussata exhibited down-regulation of PSII electron transfer kinetics, indicated by slower rates of electron transport from QA to plastoquinone (PQ pool, and smaller relative size of oxidized PQ with concomitant decrease of a specifically-defined P700 kinetics area, which represents the active pool of PSII. The maximum quantum efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm and functional absorption cross-section of PSII (σPSII remained unchanged. Based on the coordinated response of P700 parameters and PSII-PSI electron transport properties, we propose that simple P700 kinetics parameters as employed here serve as indicators of

  16. Switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James Weifu

    2010-01-05

    A switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production. The designer transgenic algae includes at least two transgenes for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production wherein a first transgene serves as a genetic switch that can controls photosystem II (PSII) oxygen evolution and a second transgene encodes for creation of free proton channels in the algal photosynthetic membrane. In one embodiment, the algae includes a DNA construct having polymerase chain reaction forward primer (302), a inducible promoter (304), a PSII-iRNA sequence (306), a terminator (308), and a PCR reverse primer (310). In other embodiments, the PSII-iRNA sequence (306) is replaced with a CF.sub.1-iRNA sequence (312), a streptomycin-production gene (314), a targeting sequence (316) followed by a proton-channel producing gene (318), or a PSII-producing gene (320). In one embodiment, a photo-bioreactor and gas-product separation and utilization system produce photobiological H.sub.2 from the switchable PSII designer alga.

  17. Resistance to the photosystem II herbicide diuron is dominant to sensitivity in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942

    OpenAIRE

    Brusslan, Judy; Haselkorn, Robert

    1989-01-01

    The transformable cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC7942, was used to study the genetics of resistance to the herbicide diuron. In wild-type cells, diuron binds to one of the core proteins, called D1, of photosystem II reaction centres. This binding prevents the transfer of electrons from QA, the primary quinone acceptor, to QB, which is necessary to create the charge separation that drives ATP synthesis. A single amino acid substitution in the D1 protein reduces diuron binding and confers...

  18. Phytotoxicity of Four Photosystem II Herbicides to Tropical Seagrasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Florita; Collier, Catherine J.; Mercurio, Philip; Negri, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    Coastal waters of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are contaminated with agricultural pesticides, including the photosystem II (PSII) herbicides which are the most frequently detected at the highest concentrations. Designed to control weeds, these herbicides are equally potent towards non-target marine species, and the close proximity of seagrass meadows to flood plumes has raised concerns that seagrasses may be the species most threatened by herbicides from runoff. While previous work has identified effects of PSII herbicides on the photophysiology, growth and mortality in seagrass, there is little comparative quantitative toxicity data for seagrass. Here we applied standard ecotoxicology protocols to quantify the concentrations of four priority PSII herbicides that inhibit photochemistry by 10, 20 and 50% (IC10, IC20 and IC50) over 72 h in two common seagrass species from the GBR lagoon. The photosystems of seagrasses Zostera muelleri and Halodule uninervis were shown to be generally more sensitive to the PSII herbicides Diuron, Atrazine, Hexazinone and Tebuthiuron than corals and tropical microalgae. The herbicides caused rapid inhibition of effective quantum yield (∆F/F m ′), indicating reduced photosynthesis and maximum effective yields (Fv/Fm) corresponding to chronic damage to PSII. The PSII herbicide concentrations which affected photosynthesis have been exceeded in the GBR lagoon and all of the herbicides inhibited photosynthesis at concentrations lower than current marine park guidelines. There is a strong likelihood that the impacts of light limitation from flood plumes and reduced photosynthesis from PSII herbicides exported in the same waters would combine to affect seagrass productivity. Given that PSII herbicides have been demonstrated to affect seagrass at environmental concentrations, we suggest that revision of environmental guidelines and further efforts to reduce PSII herbicide concentrations in floodwaters may both help protect seagrass meadows

  19. Phytotoxicity of four photosystem II herbicides to tropical seagrasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Florita; Collier, Catherine J; Mercurio, Philip; Negri, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    Coastal waters of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are contaminated with agricultural pesticides, including the photosystem II (PSII) herbicides which are the most frequently detected at the highest concentrations. Designed to control weeds, these herbicides are equally potent towards non-target marine species, and the close proximity of seagrass meadows to flood plumes has raised concerns that seagrasses may be the species most threatened by herbicides from runoff. While previous work has identified effects of PSII herbicides on the photophysiology, growth and mortality in seagrass, there is little comparative quantitative toxicity data for seagrass. Here we applied standard ecotoxicology protocols to quantify the concentrations of four priority PSII herbicides that inhibit photochemistry by 10, 20 and 50% (IC10, IC20 and IC50) over 72 h in two common seagrass species from the GBR lagoon. The photosystems of seagrasses Zosteramuelleri and Haloduleuninervis were shown to be generally more sensitive to the PSII herbicides Diuron, Atrazine, Hexazinone and Tebuthiuron than corals and tropical microalgae. The herbicides caused rapid inhibition of effective quantum yield (∆F/F m '), indicating reduced photosynthesis and maximum effective yields (Fv/Fm ) corresponding to chronic damage to PSII. The PSII herbicide concentrations which affected photosynthesis have been exceeded in the GBR lagoon and all of the herbicides inhibited photosynthesis at concentrations lower than current marine park guidelines. There is a strong likelihood that the impacts of light limitation from flood plumes and reduced photosynthesis from PSII herbicides exported in the same waters would combine to affect seagrass productivity. Given that PSII herbicides have been demonstrated to affect seagrass at environmental concentrations, we suggest that revision of environmental guidelines and further efforts to reduce PSII herbicide concentrations in floodwaters may both help protect seagrass meadows of

  20. Phytotoxicity of four photosystem II herbicides to tropical seagrasses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florita Flores

    Full Text Available Coastal waters of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR are contaminated with agricultural pesticides, including the photosystem II (PSII herbicides which are the most frequently detected at the highest concentrations. Designed to control weeds, these herbicides are equally potent towards non-target marine species, and the close proximity of seagrass meadows to flood plumes has raised concerns that seagrasses may be the species most threatened by herbicides from runoff. While previous work has identified effects of PSII herbicides on the photophysiology, growth and mortality in seagrass, there is little comparative quantitative toxicity data for seagrass. Here we applied standard ecotoxicology protocols to quantify the concentrations of four priority PSII herbicides that inhibit photochemistry by 10, 20 and 50% (IC10, IC20 and IC50 over 72 h in two common seagrass species from the GBR lagoon. The photosystems of seagrasses Zosteramuelleri and Haloduleuninervis were shown to be generally more sensitive to the PSII herbicides Diuron, Atrazine, Hexazinone and Tebuthiuron than corals and tropical microalgae. The herbicides caused rapid inhibition of effective quantum yield (∆F/F m ', indicating reduced photosynthesis and maximum effective yields (Fv/Fm corresponding to chronic damage to PSII. The PSII herbicide concentrations which affected photosynthesis have been exceeded in the GBR lagoon and all of the herbicides inhibited photosynthesis at concentrations lower than current marine park guidelines. There is a strong likelihood that the impacts of light limitation from flood plumes and reduced photosynthesis from PSII herbicides exported in the same waters would combine to affect seagrass productivity. Given that PSII herbicides have been demonstrated to affect seagrass at environmental concentrations, we suggest that revision of environmental guidelines and further efforts to reduce PSII herbicide concentrations in floodwaters may both help protect

  1. Resonance assignment of PsbP: an extrinsic protein from photosystem II of Spinacia oleracea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rathner, A.; Chandra, K.; Rathner, P.; Horničáková, M.; Schlagnitweit, J.; Kohoutová, Jaroslava; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Müller, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2015), s. 341-346 ISSN 1874-2718 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : PsbP * Photosystem II * Oxygen evolving complex Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.687, year: 2015

  2. Accelerated degradation of the D2 protein of photosystem II under ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, M.A.K.; Edelman, M.; Greenberg, B.M.; Gaba, V.

    1996-01-01

    The D2 protein of photosystem II is relatively stable in vivo under photosynthetic active radiation, but its degradation accelerates under UVB radiation. Little is known about accelerated D2 protein degradation. We characterized wavelength dependence and sensitivity toward photosystem II inhibitors. The in vivo D2 degradation spectrum resembles the pattern for the rapidly turning over D1 protein of photosystem II, with rates being maximal in the UVB region. We propose that D2 degradation, like D1 degradation, is activated by distinct photosensitizers in the UVB and visible regions of the spectrum. In both wavelength regions, photosystem II inhibitors that are known to be targeted to the D1 protein affect D2 degradation. This suggests that degradation of the two proteins is coupled, D2 degradation being influenced by events occurring at the Q B niche on the D1 protein. (Author)

  3. Quality control of photosystem II: lipid peroxidation accelerates photoinhibition under excessive illumination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffanie Chan

    Full Text Available Environmental stresses lower the efficiency of photosynthesis and sometimes cause irreversible damage to plant functions. When spinach thylakoids and Photosystem II membranes were illuminated with excessive visible light (100-1,000 µmol photons m(-1 s(-1 for 10 min at either 20°C or 30°C, the optimum quantum yield of Photosystem II decreased as the light intensity and temperature increased. Reactive oxygen species and endogenous cationic radicals produced through a photochemical reaction at and/or near the reaction center have been implicated in the damage to the D1 protein. Here we present evidence that lipid peroxidation induced by the illumination is involved in the damage to the D1 protein and the subunits of the light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II. This is reasoned from the results that considerable lipid peroxidation occurred in the thylakoids in the light, and that lipoxygenase externally added in the dark induced inhibition of Photosystem II activity in the thylakoids, production of singlet oxygen, which was monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping, and damage to the D1 protein, in parallel with lipid peroxidation. Modification of the subunits of the light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II by malondialdehyde as well as oxidation of the subunits was also observed. We suggest that mainly singlet oxygen formed through lipid peroxidation under light stress participates in damaging the Photosystem II subunits.

  4. Functional architecture of higher plant photosystem II supercomplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffarri, Stefano; Kouril, Roman; Kereïche, Sami; Boekema, Egbert J; Croce, Roberta

    2009-10-07

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a large multiprotein complex, which catalyses water splitting and plastoquinone reduction necessary to transform sunlight into chemical energy. Detailed functional and structural studies of the complex from higher plants have been hampered by the impossibility to purify it to homogeneity. In this work, homogeneous preparations ranging from a newly identified particle composed by a monomeric core and antenna proteins to the largest C(2)S(2)M(2) supercomplex were isolated. Characterization by biochemical methods and single particle electron microscopy allowed to relate for the first time the supramolecular organization to the protein content. A projection map of C(2)S(2)M(2) at 12 A resolution was obtained, which allowed determining the location and the orientation of the antenna proteins. Comparison of the supercomplexes obtained from WT and Lhcb-deficient plants reveals the importance of the individual subunits for the supramolecular organization. The functional implications of these findings are discussed and allow redefining previous suggestions on PSII energy transfer, assembly, photoinhibition, state transition and non-photochemical quenching.

  5. Structure of photosystem II and substrate binding at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Iris D; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin; Koroidov, Sergey; Brewster, Aaron S; Tran, Rosalie; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kroll, Thomas; Michels-Clark, Tara; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G; Stan, Claudiu A; Hussein, Rana; Zhang, Miao; Douthit, Lacey; Kubin, Markus; de Lichtenberg, Casper; Long Vo, Pham; Nilsson, Håkan; Cheah, Mun Hon; Shevela, Dmitriy; Saracini, Claudio; Bean, Mackenzie A; Seuffert, Ina; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Pastor, Ernest; Weninger, Clemens; Fransson, Thomas; Lassalle, Louise; Bräuer, Philipp; Aller, Pierre; Docker, Peter T; Andi, Babak; Orville, Allen M; Glownia, James M; Nelson, Silke; Sikorski, Marcin; Zhu, Diling; Hunter, Mark S; Lane, Thomas J; Aquila, Andy; Koglin, Jason E; Robinson, Joseph; Liang, Mengning; Boutet, Sébastien; Lyubimov, Artem Y; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Moriarty, Nigel W; Liebschner, Dorothee; Afonine, Pavel V; Waterman, David G; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wernet, Philippe; Dobbek, Holger; Weis, William I; Brunger, Axel T; Zwart, Petrus H; Adams, Paul D; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Sauter, Nicholas K; Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K; Yano, Junko

    2016-12-15

    Light-induced oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) in plants, algae and cyanobacteria has generated most of the dioxygen in the atmosphere. PS II, a membrane-bound multi-subunit pigment protein complex, couples the one-electron photochemistry at the reaction centre with the four-electron redox chemistry of water oxidation at the Mn 4 CaO 5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Under illumination, the OEC cycles through five intermediate S-states (S 0 to S 4 ), in which S 1 is the dark-stable state and S 3 is the last semi-stable state before O-O bond formation and O 2 evolution. A detailed understanding of the O-O bond formation mechanism remains a challenge, and will require elucidation of both the structures of the OEC in the different S-states and the binding of the two substrate waters to the catalytic site. Here we report the use of femtosecond pulses from an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) to obtain damage-free, room temperature structures of dark-adapted (S 1 ), two-flash illuminated (2F; S 3 -enriched), and ammonia-bound two-flash illuminated (2F-NH 3 ; S 3 -enriched) PS II. Although the recent 1.95 Å resolution structure of PS II at cryogenic temperature using an XFEL provided a damage-free view of the S 1 state, measurements at room temperature are required to study the structural landscape of proteins under functional conditions, and also for in situ advancement of the S-states. To investigate the water-binding site(s), ammonia, a water analogue, has been used as a marker, as it binds to the Mn 4 CaO 5 cluster in the S 2 and S 3 states. Since the ammonia-bound OEC is active, the ammonia-binding Mn site is not a substrate water site. This approach, together with a comparison of the native dark and 2F states, is used to discriminate between proposed O-O bond formation mechanisms.

  6. Isolation and biochemical characterisation of monomeric and dimeric photosystem II complexes from spinach and their relevance to the organisation of photosystem II in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hankamer, B; Nield, J; Zheleva, D; Boekema, E; Jansson, S; Barber, J

    1997-01-01

    Membranes enriched in photosystem II were isolated from spinach and further solubilised using n-octyl beta-D-glucopyranoside (OctGlc) and n-dodecyl beta-D-maltoside (DodGlc(2)). The OctGlc preparation had high rates of oxygen evolution and when subjected to size-exclusion HPLC and sucrose density

  7. Engineered Photosystem II reaction centers optimize photochemistry versus photoprotection at different solar intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinyard, David J; Gimpel, Javier; Ananyev, Gennady M; Mayfield, Stephen P; Dismukes, G Charles

    2014-03-12

    The D1 protein of Photosystem II (PSII) provides most of the ligating amino acid residues for the Mn4CaO5 water-oxidizing complex (WOC) and half of the reaction center cofactors, and it is present as two isoforms in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. These isoforms, D1:1 and D1:2, confer functional advantages for photosynthetic growth at low and high light intensities, respectively. D1:1, D1:2, and seven point mutations in the D1:2 background that are native to D1:1 were expressed in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We used these nine strains to show that those strains that confer a higher yield of PSII charge separation under light-limiting conditions (where charge recombination is significant) have less efficient photochemical turnover, measured in terms of both a lower WOC turnover probability and a longer WOC cycle period. Conversely, these same strains under light saturation (where charge recombination does not compete) confer a correspondingly faster O2 evolution rate and greater protection against photoinhibition. Taken together, the data clearly establish that PSII primary charge separation is a trade-off between photochemical productivity (water oxidation and plastoquinone reduction) and charge recombination (photoprotection). These trade-offs add up to a significant growth advantage for the two natural isoforms. These insights provide fundamental design principles for engineering of PSII reaction centers with optimal photochemical efficiencies for growth at low versus high light intensities.

  8. PHOTOINHIBITION AND RECOVERY IN RELATION TO HETEROGENEITY OF PHOTOSYSTEM-II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANWIJK, KJ; SCHNETTGER, B; GRAF, M; KRAUSE, GH

    1993-01-01

    Photosystem II (PS II) heterogeneity during photoinhibition at 4-degrees-C and subsequent recovery at 20-degrees-C was investigated in spinach leaves and chloroplasts. The population of inactive, Q(B)-nonreducing centers was estimated by means of fluorescence induction in the presence of

  9. Functional and structural analysis of photosystem II core complexes from spinach with high oxygen evolution capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haag, Elisabeth; Irrgang, Klaus-D.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Renger, Gernot

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen-evolving photo system II core complexes were prepared from spinach by solubilizing photosystem II membrane fragments with dodecyl-β-D-maltoside. The core complexes consist of the intrinsic 47-kDa, 43-kDa, D1 and D2 polypeptides, the two subunits of cytochrome b559 and the extrinsic 33-kDa

  10. A CK2 site is reversibly phosphorylated in the photosystem II subunit CP29

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Testi, Maria Grazia; Croce, Roberta; Polverino-De Laureto, Patrizia; Bassi, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a major mechanism in the regulation of protein function. In chloroplast thylakoids several photosystem II subunits, including the major antenna light-harvesting complex II and several core complex components, are reversibly phosphorylated depending on the redox state of

  11. Effects of light, food availability and temperature stress on the function of photosystem II and photosystem I of coral symbionts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia O Hoogenboom

    Full Text Available Reef corals are heterotrophic coelenterates that achieve high productivity through their photosynthetic dinoflagellate symbionts. Excessive seawater temperature destabilises this symbiosis and causes corals to "bleach," lowering their photosynthetic capacity. Bleaching poses a serious threat to the persistence of coral reefs on a global scale. Despite expanding research on the causes of bleaching, the mechanisms remain a subject of debate.This study determined how light and food availability modulate the effects of temperature stress on photosynthesis in two reef coral species. We quantified the activities of Photosystem II, Photosystem I and whole chain electron transport under combinations of normal and stressful growth temperatures, moderate and high light levels and the presence or absence of feeding of the coral hosts. Our results show that PS1 function is comparatively robust against temperature stress in both species, whereas PS2 and whole chain electron transport are susceptible to temperature stress. In the symbiotic dinoflagellates of Stylophora pistillata the contents of chlorophyll and major photosynthetic complexes were primarily affected by food availability. In Turbinaria reniformis growth temperature was the dominant influence on the contents of the photosynthetic complexes. In both species feeding the host significantly protected photosynthetic function from high temperature stress.Our findings support the photoinhibition model of coral bleaching and demonstrate that PS1 is not a major site for thermal damage during bleaching events. Feeding mitigates bleaching in two scleractinian corals, so that reef responses to temperature stresses will likely be influenced by the coinciding availabilities of prey for the host.

  12. Is There Excitation Energy Transfer between Different Layers of Stacked Photosystem-II-Containing Thylakoid Membranes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Shazia; Chmeliov, Jevgenij; Trinkunas, Gediminas; Valkunas, Leonas; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2016-04-07

    We have compared picosecond fluorescence decay kinetics for stacked and unstacked photosystem II membranes in order to evaluate the efficiency of excitation energy transfer between the neighboring layers. The measured kinetics were analyzed in terms of a recently developed fluctuating antenna model that provides information about the dimensionality of the studied system. Independently of the stacking state, all preparations exhibited virtually the same value of the apparent dimensionality, d = 1.6. Thus, we conclude that membrane stacking does not affect the efficiency of the delivery of excitation energy toward the reaction centers but ensures a more compact organization of the thylakoid membranes within the chloroplast and separation of photosystems I and II.

  13. Photosystem II solubilizes as a monomer by mild detergent treatment of unstacked thylakoid membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Jan P.; Germano, Marta; Roon, Henny van; Boekema, Egbert J.

    2002-01-01

    We studied the aggregation state of Photosystem II in stacked and unstacked thylakoid membranes from spinach after a quick andmild solubilization with the non-ionic detergent n-dodecyl-α,D-maltoside, followed by analysis by diode-array-assisted gel filtration chromatography and electron microscopy.

  14. Plants lacking the main light-harvesting complex retain photosystem II macro-organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruban, A.V.; Wentworth, M.; Yakushevska, A.E.; Andersson, J.; Lee, P.J.; Keegstra, W.; Dekker, J.P.; Boekema, E.J.; Jansson, S.; Horton, P.

    2003-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a key component of photosynthesis, the process of converting sunlight into the chemical energy of life. In plant cells, it forms a unique oligomeric macrostructure in membranes of the chloroplasts. Several light-harvesting antenna complexes are organized precisely in the

  15. Plants lacking the main light-harvesting complex retain photosystem II macro-organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruban, AV; Wentworth, M; Yakushevska, AE; Andersson, J; Lee, PJ; Keegstra, W; Dekker, JP; Boekema, EJ; Jansson, S; Horton, P

    2003-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a key component of photosynthesis, the process of converting sunlight into the chemical energy of life. In plant cells, it forms a unique oligomeric macrostructure in membranes of the chloroplasts(1). Several light-harvesting antenna complexes are organized precisely in the

  16. The effects of light-induced reduction of the photosystem II reaction center

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutý, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 15 (2009), s. 923-933 ISSN 1610-2940 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Photosystem II * Reaction center * Pheophytin Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.336, year: 2009

  17. Pigment binding sites occupancy and functional architecture of the Photosystem II antenna complex Lhcb5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballottari, M.; Mozzo, M.; Croce, R.; Morosinotto, T.; Bassi, R.

    2009-01-01

    Lhcb5 is an antenna protein that is highly conserved in plants and green algae. It is part of the inner layer of photosystem II antenna system retained in high light acclimated plants. To study the structure-function relation and the role of individual pigments in this complex, we (i) "knocked out"

  18. Room temperature photooxidation of beta-carotene and peripheral chlorophyll in photosystem II reaction centre

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Litvín, Radek; Bína, David; Vácha, František

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 2 (2008), s. 179-187 ISSN 0166-8595 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA608170604 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : photosystem II Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.681, year: 2008

  19. Modulation of photosystem II chlorophyll fluorescence by electrogenic events generated by photosystem I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulychev, A.A.; Vredenberg, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    In an attempt to uncover electric field interactions between PS I and PS II during their functioning, fluorescence induction curves were measured on hydroxylamine-treated thylakoids of Chenopodium album under conditions ensuring low and high levels of photogenerated membrane potentials. In parallel

  20. Backbone assignment and secondary structure of the PsbQ protein from Photosystem II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horničáková, M.; Kohoutová, Jaroslava; Schlagnitweit, J.; Wohlschlager, Ch.; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Fiala, R.; Schoefberger, W.; Müller, N.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2011), s. 169-175 ISSN 1874-2718 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Photosystem II * PsbQ * Missing link * NMR resonance assignment * Protein-protein interaction Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.720, year: 2011 http://www.springerlink.com/content/3n38075w5h1l1082/fulltext.pdf

  1. Plants lacking the main light-harvesting complex retain photosystem II macro-organization

    OpenAIRE

    Ruban, AV; Wentworth, M; Yakushevska, AE; Andersson, J; Lee, PJ; Keegstra, W; Dekker, JP; Boekema, EJ; Jansson, S; Horton, P

    2003-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a key component of photosynthesis, the process of converting sunlight into the chemical energy of life. In plant cells, it forms a unique oligomeric macrostructure in membranes of the chloroplasts(1). Several light-harvesting antenna complexes are organized precisely in the PSII macrostructure-the major trimeric complexes (LHCII)(2) that bind 70% of PSII chlorophyll and three minor monomeric complexes(3)-which together form PSII supercomplexes(4-6). The antenna comple...

  2. Assembling and maintaining the Photosystem II complex in chloroplasts and cyanobacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komenda, Josef; Sobotka, Roman; Nixon, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2012), s. 245-2051 ISSN 1369-5266 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1000; GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/11/0377; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0110; GA AV ČR IAA400200801 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : alga * cyanobacteria * Photosystem II Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 8.455, year: 2012

  3. Acute and additive toxicity of ten photosystem-II herbicides to seagrass

    OpenAIRE

    Adam D. Wilkinson; Catherine J. Collier; Florita Flores; Andrew P. Negri

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II herbicides are transported to inshore marine waters, including those of the Great Barrier Reef, and are usually detected in complex mixtures. These herbicides inhibit photosynthesis, which can deplete energy reserves and reduce growth in seagrass, but the toxicity of some of these herbicides to seagrass is unknown and combined effects of multiple herbicides on seagrass has not been tested. Here we assessed the acute phytotoxicity of 10 PSII herbicides to the seagrass Halophila ...

  4. Editorial: Assembly of the Photosystem II Membrane-Protein Complex of Oxygenic Photosynthesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eaton-Rye, J.J.; Sobotka, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, May 26 (2017), s. 1-4, č. článku 884. ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/19.0392 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Photosystem II * photosynthetic electron transport * cyanobacteria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  5. Stoichiometry of photosystem I, photosystem II, and phycobilisomes in the red alga Porphyridium cruentum as a function of growth irradiance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, F.X. Jr.; Mustardy, L.; Gantt, E. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park (USA)); Dennenberg, R.J.; Jursinic, P.A. (Department of Agriculture, Peoria, IL (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Cells of the red alga Porphyridium cruentum (ATCC 50161) exposed to increasing growth irradiance exhibited up to a three-fold reduction in photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) and phycobilisomes but little change in the relative numbers of these components. Batch cultures of P. cruentum were grown under four photon flux densities of continuous white light; 6 (low light LL), 35 (medium light, ML), 180 (high light, HL), and 280 (very high light, VHL) microeinsteins per square meter per second and sampled in the exponential phase of growth. Ratios of PSII to PSI ranged between 0.43 and 0.54. About three PSII centers per phycobilisome were found, regardless of growth irradiance. The phycoerythrin content of phycobilisomes decreased by about 25% for HL and VHL compared to LL and ML cultures. The unit sizes of PSI (chlorophyll/P{sub 700}) and PSII (chlorophyll/Q{sub A}) decreased by about 20% with increase in photon flux density from 6 to 280 microeinsteins per square meter per second. A threefold reduction in cell content of chlorophyll at the higher photon flux densities was accompanied by a twofold reduction in {beta}-carotene, and a drastic reduction in thylakoid membrane area. Cell content of zeaxanthin, the major carotenoid in P. cruentum, did not vary with growth irradiance, suggesting a role other than light-harvesting. HL cultures had a growth rate twice that of ML, eight times that of LL, and slightly greater than that of VHL cultures. Cell volume increased threefold from LL to VHL, but volume of the single chloroplast did not change. From this study it is evident that a relatively fixed stoichiometry of PSI, PSII, and phycobilisomes is maintained in the photosynthetic apparatus of this red alga over a wide range of growth irradiance.

  6. Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy and Diffraction of Photosystem II at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Gildea, Richard J.; Echols, Nathaniel; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Koroidov, Sergey; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R.; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Koglin, Jason E.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Glatzel, Pieter; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Intense femtosecond X-ray pulses produced at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) were used for simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of microcrystals of Photosystem II (PS II) at room temperature. This method probes the overall protein structure and the electronic structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of PS II. XRD data are presented from both the dark state (S1) and the first illuminated state (S2) of PS II. Our simultaneous XRD/XES study shows that the PS II crystals are intact during our measurements at the LCLS, not only with respect to the structure of PS II, but also with regard to the electronic structure of the highly radiation sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster, opening new directions for future dynamics studies. PMID:23413188

  7. Two photon absorption energy transfer in the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) modified with organic boron dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Rui; Feng, Jiao; Wang, Shuangqing; Li, Shayu; Yang, Chunhong; Yang, Guoqiang

    2014-07-01

    The plant light-harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHC-II) play important roles in collecting solar energy and transferring the energy to the reaction centers of photosystems I and II. A two photon absorption compound, 4-(bromomethyl)-N-(4-(dimesitylboryl)phenyl)-N-phenylaniline (DMDP-CH2Br), was synthesized and covalently linked to the LHC-II in formation of a LHC-II-dye complex, which still maintained the biological activity of LHC-II system. Under irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses at 754 nm, the LHC-II-dye complex can absorb two photons of the laser light effectively compared with the wild type LHC-II. The absorbed excitation energy is then transferred to chlorophyll a with an obvious fluorescence enhancement. The results may be interesting and give potentials for developing hybrid photosystems.

  8. A CK2 site is reversibly phosphorylated in the photosystem II subunit CP29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testi, M G; Croce, R; Polverino-De Laureto, P; Bassi, R

    1996-12-16

    Protein phosphorylation is a major mechanism in the regulation of protein function. In chloroplast thylakoids several photosystem II subunits, including the major antenna light-harvesting complex II and several core complex components, are reversibly phosphorylated depending on the redox state of the electron carriers. A previously unknown reversible phosphorylation event has recently been described on the CP29 subunit which leads to conformational changes and protection from cold stress (Bergantino, E., Dainese, P., Cerovic, Z. Sechi, S. and Bassi, R. (1995) J. Biol Chem. 270, 8474-8481). In this study, we have identified the phosphorylation site on the N-terminal, stroma-exposed domain, showing that it is located in a sequence not homologous to the other members of the Lhc family. The phosphorylated sequence is unique in chloroplast membranes since it meets the requirements for CK2 (casein kinase II) kinases. The possibility that this phosphorylation is involved in a signal transduction pathway is discussed.

  9. Flash photolysis ESR study of photosystem II signal II/sub vf/, the physiological donor to P-680/sup +/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warden, J T [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY; Blankenship, R E; Sauer, K

    1976-01-01

    In flash-illuminated, oxygen-evolving spinach chloroplasts and green algae, a free radical transient has been observed with spectral parameters similar to those of Signal II (g approx. = 2.0045, ..delta..H/sub pp/ approx. = 19 G). However, in contrast with ESR Signal II, the transient radical does not readily saturate even at microwave power levels of 200 mW. This species is formed most efficiently with ''red'' illumination (lambda < 680 nm) and occurs stoichiometrically in a 1:1 ratio with P-700/sup +/. The Photosystem II transient is formed in less than 100 ..mu..s and decays via first-order kinetics with a halftime of 400-900 ..mu..s. Additionally, the t/sub /sup 1///sub 2// for radical decay is temperature independent between 20 and 4/sup 0/C; however, below 4/sup 0/C the transient signal exhibits Arrhenius behavior with an activation energy of approx. 10 kcal . mol/sup -1/. Inhibition of electron transport through Photosystem II by o-phenanthroline, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea or reduced 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone suppresses the formation of the light-induced transient. At low concentrations (0.2 mM), 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone partially inhibits the free radical formation, however, the decay kinetics are unaltered. High concentrations of 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone (1-5 mM) restore both the transient signal and electron flow through Photosystem II. These findings suggest that this ''quinoidal'' type ESR transient functions as the physiological donor to the oxidized reaction center chlorophyll, P-680/sup +/.

  10. Simulations of the polarisation-dependent Raman intensity of β-carotene in photosystem II crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brose, K.; Zouni, A.; Müh, F.; Mroginski, M.A.; Maultzsch, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • First polarisation-dependent Raman spectroscopy on photosystem II crystals. • Orientation-dependent Raman intensity simulations for di- and monomeric crystals. • Simulations account for all β-carotenes (β-Car) in the unit cell for the first time. • Prediction for identificationy of the β-Car cation in side-path electron transport. - Abstract: In order to clarify possibilities to identify the β-carotene (β-Car) radicals in secondary electron transfer (ET) reactions in the photosystem II core complex (PSIIcc), Raman intensities of all 96 β-Car cofactors in the unit cell of PSIIcc-dimer crystals as a function of polarisation and crystal orientation were simulated based on the 2.9 Å resolution structure. The Raman-active symmetry A g in the C 2h group is assigned to the β-Car modes ν 66 and ν 67 . Simulations are in agreement with experiment for off-resonant excitation at 1064 nm. Resonant measurements at 476 and 532 nm excitation can not be explained, which is attributed to mode mixing in the excited state and the existence of different spectral pools. The identity of the β-Car oxidised in secondary ET can not be resolved by Raman measurements on PSIIcc-dimer crystals. Additional simulations show that similar measurements on PSIIcc-monomer crystals could provide a possible route to solve this issue

  11. Simulations of the polarisation-dependent Raman intensity of β-carotene in photosystem II crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brose, K., E-mail: katharina.brose@gmx.net [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Zouni, A. [Institut für Chemie, Max-Volmer-Laboratorium, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Müh, F. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Johannes Kepler Universität Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Mroginski, M.A. [Institut für Chemie, Max-Volmer-Laboratorium, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Maultzsch, J. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-06-03

    Highlights: • First polarisation-dependent Raman spectroscopy on photosystem II crystals. • Orientation-dependent Raman intensity simulations for di- and monomeric crystals. • Simulations account for all β-carotenes (β-Car) in the unit cell for the first time. • Prediction for identificationy of the β-Car cation in side-path electron transport. - Abstract: In order to clarify possibilities to identify the β-carotene (β-Car) radicals in secondary electron transfer (ET) reactions in the photosystem II core complex (PSIIcc), Raman intensities of all 96 β-Car cofactors in the unit cell of PSIIcc-dimer crystals as a function of polarisation and crystal orientation were simulated based on the 2.9 Å resolution structure. The Raman-active symmetry A{sub g} in the C{sub 2h} group is assigned to the β-Car modes ν{sub 66} and ν{sub 67}. Simulations are in agreement with experiment for off-resonant excitation at 1064 nm. Resonant measurements at 476 and 532 nm excitation can not be explained, which is attributed to mode mixing in the excited state and the existence of different spectral pools. The identity of the β-Car oxidised in secondary ET can not be resolved by Raman measurements on PSIIcc-dimer crystals. Additional simulations show that similar measurements on PSIIcc-monomer crystals could provide a possible route to solve this issue.

  12. Photosystem II electron flow as a measure for phytoplankton gross primary production = [Fotosysteem II elektronentransport als een maat voor de bruto primaire produktie van fytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geel, C.

    1997-01-01

    Saturating pulse fluorescence measurements, well known from studies of higher plants for determination of photosystem II (PS II) characteristics, were applied to cultures of the green alga Dunaliella teitiolecta (Chapter 2). The actual efficiency of PS IIPS

  13. Photosystem I shows a higher tolerance to sorbitol-induced osmotic stress than photosystem II in the intertidal macro-algae Ulva prolifera (Chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Zheng, Zhenbing; Gu, Wenhui; Xie, Xiujun; Huan, Li; Pan, Guanghua; Wang, Guangce

    2014-10-01

    The photosynthetic performance of the desiccation-tolerant, intertidal macro-algae Ulva prolifera was significantly affected by sorbitol-induced osmotic stress. Our results showed that photosynthetic activity decreased significantly with increases in sorbitol concentration. Although the partial activity of both photosystem I (PS I) and photosystem II (PS II) was able to recover after 30 min of rehydration, the activity of PS II decreased more rapidly than PS I. At 4 M sorbitol concentration, the activity of PS II was almost 0 while that of PS I was still at about one third of normal levels. Following prolonged treatment with 1 and 2 M sorbitol, the activity of PS I and PS II decreased slowly, suggesting that the effects of moderate concentrations of sorbitol on PS I and PS II were gradual. Interestingly, an increase in non-photochemical quenching occurred under these conditions in response to moderate osmotic stress, whereas it declined significantly under severe osmotic stress. These results suggest that photoprotection in U. prolifera could also be induced by moderate osmotic stress. In addition, the oxidation of PS I was significantly affected by osmotic stress. P700(+) in the thalli treated with high concentrations of sorbitol could still be reduced, as PS II was inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), but it could not be fully oxidized. This observation may be caused by the higher quantum yield of non-photochemical energy dissipation in PS I due to acceptor-side limitation (Y(NA)) during rehydration in seawater containing DCMU. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  14. The interaction of quinones, herbicides and bicarbonate with their binding environment at the acceptor side of photosystem II in photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaas, W.F.J.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis experiments are described which are directed towards a further characterization of the interaction of the native bound plastoquinone Q B , artificial quinones, herbicides and bicarbonate with their binding environment at the acceptor side of Photosystem II in

  15. Purification and spectroscopic characterization of photosystem II reaction center complexes isolated with or without Triton X-100.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijckelhoff, C.; van Roon, H.; Groot, M.L.; van Grondelle, R.; Dekker, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    The pigment composition of the isolated photosystem II reaction center complex in its most stable and pure form currently is a matter of considerable debate. In this contribution, we present a new method based on a combination of gel filtration chromatography and diode array detection to analyze the

  16. Determination of the excitation migration time in Photosystem II consequences for the membrane organization and charge separation parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broess, K.; Trinkunas, G.; Hoek, van A.; Croce, R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2008-01-01

    The fluorescence decay kinetics of Photosystem II (PSII) membranes from spinach with open reaction centers (RCs), were compared after exciting at 420 and 484 nm. These wavelengths lead to preferential excitation of chlorophyll (Chl) a and Chl b, respectively, which causes different initial

  17. Determination of the excitation migration time in Photosystem II - Consequences for the membrane organization and charge separation parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broess, Koen; Trinkunas, Gediminas; van Hoek, Arie; Croce, Roberta; van Amerongen, Herbert

    The fluorescence decay kinetics of Photosystem II (PSII) membranes from spinach with open reaction centers (RCs), were compared after exciting at 420 and 484 nm. These wavelengths lead to preferential excitation of chlorophyll (Chl) a and Chl b, respectively, which causes different initial

  18. Determination of the excitation migration time in Photosystem II. Consequences for the membrane organization and charge separation parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broess, Koen; Trinkunas, Gediminas; van Hoek, Arie; Croce, Roberta; van Amerongen, Herbert

    The fluorescence decay kinetics of Photosystem II (PSII) membranes from spinach with open reaction centers (RCs), were compared after exciting at 420 and 484 nm. These wavelengths lead to preferential excitation of chlorophyll (Chl) a and Chl b, respectively, which causes different initial

  19. Photosystem II Assembly Steps Take Place in the Thylakoid Membrane of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp PCC6803

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sealo, T.T.; Zhang, L.; Knoppová, Jana; Komenda, Josef; Norling, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2016), s. 95-104 ISSN 0032-0781 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G055; GA MŠk LO1416 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Aqueous two-phase partitioning * Cyanobacteria * Photosystem II biogenesis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.760, year: 2016

  20. Characterization of the alterations of the chlorophyll a fluorescence induction curve after addition of Photosystem II inhibiting herbicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiraki, M.; Rensen, van J.J.S.; Vredenberg, W.J.; Wakabayashi, K.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of Photosystem II inhibiting herbicides, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (diuron), atrazine and two novel 2-benzylamino-1,3,5-triazine compounds, on photosynthetic oxygen evolution and chlorophyll a fluorescence induction were measured in thylakoids isolated from Chenopodium

  1. A modified fluorometric method to quantify the concentration effect (pI50) of photosystem II-inhibiting herbicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiraki, M.; Vredenberg, W.J.; Rensen, van J.J.S.; Wakabayashi, K.

    2004-01-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence induction curves of isolated thylakoids were measured in the absence and in the presence of various concentrations of photosystem II-inhibiting herbicides. A mathematical program was applied to simulate the curves. Based on these simulated curves a new method is developed to

  2. Perioxidases play important roles in abscisic acid (ABA)-simulating photosystem II (PSII) thermostabilty of apple tree rootstock leaves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brestic, M.; Shao, H. B.; Ferus, P.; Malbeck, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 71 (2011), s. 15891-15900 ISSN 1684-5315 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Photosystem II thermostability * antioxidant activity * phytohormones Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.573, year: 2010

  3. Cyanobacterial photosystem II at 2.9-A resolution and the role of quinones, lipids, channels and chloride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guskov, Albert; Kern, Jan; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Broser, Matthias; Zouni, Athina; Saenger, Wolfram

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a large homodimeric protein-cofactor complex located in the photosynthetic thylakoid membrane that acts as light-driven water:plastoquinone oxidoreductase. The crystal structure of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus at 2.9-A resolution allowed the unambiguous assignment

  4. Degradation and Movement in Soil of the Herbicide Isoproturon Analyzed by a Photosystem II-Based Biosensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malý, Jan; Klem, K.; Lukavská, Alena; Masojídek, Jiří

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 34, - (2005), s. 1780-1788 ISSN 0047-2425 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/03/0659; GA MPO FT-TA/089 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Photosystem II * Herbicide-detection Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.121, year: 2005

  5. How exciton-vibrational coherences control charge separation in the photosystem II reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Romero, Elisabet; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2015-12-14

    In photosynthesis absorbed sun light produces collective excitations (excitons) that form a coherent superposition of electronic and vibrational states of the individual pigments. Two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy allows a visualization of how these coherences are involved in the primary processes of energy and charge transfer. Based on quantitative modeling we identify the exciton-vibrational coherences observed in 2D photon echo of the photosystem II reaction center (PSII-RC). We find that the vibrations resonant with the exciton splittings can modify the delocalization of the exciton states and produce additional states, thus promoting directed energy transfer and allowing a switch between the two charge separation pathways. We conclude that the coincidence of the frequencies of the most intense vibrations with the splittings within the manifold of exciton and charge-transfer states in the PSII-RC is not occurring by chance, but reflects a fundamental principle of how energy conversion in photosynthesis was optimized.

  6. Does Parmelina tiliacea lichen photosystem II survive at liquid nitrogen temperatures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukarroum, Abdallah; El Gharous, Mohamed; Strasser, Reto J

    2017-02-01

    Parmelina tiliacea lichens kept in the wet and dry state were stored in liquid nitrogen for 1 week and the subsequent recovery of their photosynthetic apparatus was followed. The chlorophyll a fluorescence rise and the maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry φ Po (F V /F M ) were analysed for this purpose. Storage of wet thalli for 1 week in liquid nitrogen led to an impairment of photosystem II and probably the photosynthetic apparatus as a whole, from which the thalli did not recover over time. Thalli exposed in the dry state thalli were far less affected by the treatment and recovered well. These results indicate that the thalli are extremely tolerant to liquid nitrogen temperatures only in the dry state. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Manganese Loading and Photosystem II Stability are Key Components of Manganese Efficiency in Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund

    Manganese (Mn) deficiency constitutes a major plant nutritional problem in commercial crop production of winter cereals. In plants, Mn has an indispensable role in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Hence, the consequences of Mn deficiency are reduced plant growth......, and eventually substantial yield losses. It is well known, that genotypes within plant species differ considerably in tolerance to growth under Mn limiting conditions, a phenomenon designated as Mn efficiency. However, the physiological responses reflecting the underlying mechanisms of Mn efficiency are still...... not fully understood. In this PhD study, a new method for determination and characterization of metal binding in size-fractionated photosynthetic protein complexes from barley thylakoids was established. The applicability of the method was shown by quantification of Mn binding in PSII from thylakoids of two...

  8. Quality control of Photosystem II: the mechanisms for avoidance and tolerance of light and heat stresses are closely linked to membrane fluidity of the thylakoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasusi Yamamoto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available When oxygenic photosynthetic organisms are exposed to excessive light and/or heat, Photosystem II is damaged and electron transport is blocked. In these events, reactive oxygen species, endogenous radicals and lipid peroxidation products generated by photochemical reaction and/or heat cause the damage. Regarding light stress, plants first dissipate excessive light energy captured by light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complexes as heat to avoid the hazards, but once light stress is unavoidable, they tolerate the stress by concentrating damage in a particular protein in photosystem II, i.e. the reaction-center binding D1 protein of Photosystem II. The damaged D1 is removed by specific proteases and replaced with a new copy produced through de novo synthesis (reversible photoinhibition. When light intensity becomes extremely high, irreversible aggregation of D1 occurs and thereby D1 turnover is prevented. Once the aggregated products accumulate in Photosystem II complexes, removal of them by proteases is difficult, and irreversible inhibition of Photosystem II takes place (irreversible photoinhibition. Important is that various aspects of both the reversible and irreversible photoinhibition are highly dependent on the membrane fluidity of the thylakoids. Heat stress-induced inactivation of photosystem II is an irreversible process, which may be also affected by the fluidity of the thylakoid membranes. Here I describe why the membrane fluidity is a key to regulate the avoidance and tolerance of Photosystem II on environmental stresses.

  9. Excitation energy transfer between Light-harvesting complex II and Photosystem I in reconstituted membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Parveen; Lingvay, Mónika; Kiss, Teréz; Deák, Róbert; Bóta, Attila; Ughy, Bettina; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H

    2016-04-01

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII), the major peripheral antenna of Photosystem II in plants, participates in several concerted mechanisms for regulation of the excitation energy and electron fluxes in thylakoid membranes. In part, these include interaction of LHCII with Photosystem I (PSI) enhancing the latter's absorption cross-section - for example in the well-known state 1 - state 2 transitions or as a long-term acclimation to high light. In this work we examined the capability of LHCII to deliver excitations to PSI in reconstituted membranes in vitro. Proteoliposomes with native plant thylakoid membrane lipids and different stoichiometric ratios of LHCII:PSI were reconstituted and studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence emission from LHCII was strongly decreased in PSI-LHCII membranes due to trapping of excitations by PSI. Kinetic modelling of the time-resolved fluorescence data revealed the existence of separate pools of LHCII distinguished by the time scale of energy transfer. A strongly coupled pool, equivalent to one LHCII trimer per PSI, transferred excitations to PSI with near-unity efficiency on a time scale of less than 10ps but extra LHCIIs also contributed significantly to the effective antenna size of PSI, which could be increased by up to 47% in membranes containing 3 LHCII trimers per PSI. The results demonstrate a remarkable competence of LHCII to increase the absorption cross-section of PSI, given the opportunity that the two types of complexes interact in the membrane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanism of interaction of Al3+ with the proteins composition of photosystem II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imed Hasni

    Full Text Available The inhibitory effect of Al3+on photosystem II (PSII electron transport was investigated using several biophysical and biochemical techniques such as oxygen evolution, chlorophyll fluorescence induction and emission, SDS-polyacrylamide and native green gel electrophoresis, and FTIR spectroscopy. In order to understand the mechanism of its inhibitory action, we have analyzed the interaction of this toxic cation with proteins subunits of PSII submembrane fractions isolated from spinach. Our results show that Al 3+, especially above 3 mM, strongly inhibits oxygen evolution and affects the advancement of the S states of the Mn4O5Ca cluster. This inhibition was due to the release of the extrinsic polypeptides and the disorganization of the Mn4O5Ca cluster associated with the oxygen evolving complex (OEC of PSII. This fact was accompanied by a significant decline of maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm together with a strong damping of the chlorophyll a fluorescence induction. The energy transfer from light harvesting antenna to reaction centers of PSII was impaired following the alteration of the light harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHCII. The latter result was revealed by the drop of chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra at low temperature (77 K, increase of F0 and confirmed by the native green gel electrophoresis. FTIR measurements indicated that the interaction of Al 3+ with the intrinsic and extrinsic polypeptides of PSII induces major alterations of the protein secondary structure leading to conformational changes. This was reflected by a major reduction of α-helix with an increase of β-sheet and random coil structures in Al 3+-PSII complexes. These structural changes are closely related with the functional alteration of PSII activity revealed by the inhibition of the electron transport chain of PSII.

  11. HERBICIDAS INIBIDORES DO FOTOSSISTEMA II – PARTE II / PHOTOSYSTEM II INHIBITOR HERBICIDES - PART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ILCA P. DE F. E SILVA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Os herbicidas inibidores do fotossistema II (PSII ligam-se ao sítio da QB localizado na proteína D1 o qual se localiza na membrana dos tilacóides dos cloroplastos, causando, o bloqueia do transporte de elétrons da QA para QB, tendo como consequência, a peroxidação dos lipídios. Os principais fatores que afetam a evolução da resistência de plantas daninhas aos herbicidas têm sido agrupados em: genéticos, bioecológicos e agronômicos. A resistência de plantas daninhas a herbicidas é definida como a habilidade de uma planta sobreviver e reproduzir, após exposição a uma dose de herbicida normalmente letal para um biótipo normal da planta. A seletividade de um herbicida está relacionada à capacidade de eliminar plantas daninhas sem interferir na qualidade da planta de interesse econômico.

  12. A miniature bioassay for testing the acute phytotoxicity of photosystem II herbicides on seagrass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Wilkinson

    Full Text Available Photosystem II (PSII herbicides have been detected in nearshore tropical waters such as those of the Great Barrier Reef and may add to the pressure posed by runoff containing sediments and nutrients to threatened seagrass habitats. There is a growing number of studies into the potential effects of herbicides on seagrass, generally using large experimental setups with potted plants. Here we describe the successful development of an acute 12-well plate phytotoxicity assay for the PSII herbicide Diuron using isolated Halophila ovalis leaves. Fluorescence images demonstrated Diuron affected the entire leaf surface evenly and responses were not influenced by isolating leaves from the plant. The optimum exposure duration was 24 h, by which time the inhibition of effective quantum yield of PSII (∆F/F(m' was highest and no deterioration of photosystems was evident in control leaves. The inhibition of ∆F/F(m' by Diuron in isolated H. ovalis leaves was identical to both potted and hydroponically grown plants (with leaves remaining attached to rhizomes, indicating similar reductions in photosynthetic activity in these acute well-plate assays. The sensitivity of the assay was not influenced by irradiance (range tested 40 to 400 μmol photons m(-2 s(-1. High irradiance, however, caused photo-oxidative stress in H. ovalis and this generally impacted in an additive or sub-additive way with Diuron to damage PSII. The bioassay using isolated leaves is more rapid, uses far less biological material and does not rely on specialised aquarium facilities in comparison with assays using potted plants. The development and validation of this sensitive bioassay will be useful to reliably screen and monitor the phytotoxicity of existing and emerging PSII herbicides and contribute to risk assessments and water quality guideline development in the future.

  13. A Miniature Bioassay for Testing the Acute Phytotoxicity of Photosystem II Herbicides on Seagrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Adam D.; Collier, Catherine J.; Flores, Florita; Mercurio, Phil; O’Brien, Jake; Ralph, Peter J.; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) herbicides have been detected in nearshore tropical waters such as those of the Great Barrier Reef and may add to the pressure posed by runoff containing sediments and nutrients to threatened seagrass habitats. There is a growing number of studies into the potential effects of herbicides on seagrass, generally using large experimental setups with potted plants. Here we describe the successful development of an acute 12-well plate phytotoxicity assay for the PSII herbicide Diuron using isolated Halophila ovalis leaves. Fluorescence images demonstrated Diuron affected the entire leaf surface evenly and responses were not influenced by isolating leaves from the plant. The optimum exposure duration was 24 h, by which time the inhibition of effective quantum yield of PSII (∆F/Fm’) was highest and no deterioration of photosystems was evident in control leaves. The inhibition of ∆F/Fm’ by Diuron in isolated H. ovalis leaves was identical to both potted and hydroponically grown plants (with leaves remaining attached to rhizomes), indicating similar reductions in photosynthetic activity in these acute well-plate assays. The sensitivity of the assay was not influenced by irradiance (range tested 40 to 400 μmol photons m-2 s-1). High irradiance, however, caused photo-oxidative stress in H. ovalis and this generally impacted in an additive or sub-additive way with Diuron to damage PSII. The bioassay using isolated leaves is more rapid, uses far less biological material and does not rely on specialised aquarium facilities in comparison with assays using potted plants. The development and validation of this sensitive bioassay will be useful to reliably screen and monitor the phytotoxicity of existing and emerging PSII herbicides and contribute to risk assessments and water quality guideline development in the future. PMID:25674791

  14. Effects of ethylene on photosystem II and antioxidant enzyme activity in Bermuda grass under low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhengrong; Fan, Jibiao; Chen, Ke; Amombo, Erick; Chen, Liang; Fu, Jinmin

    2016-04-01

    The phytohormone ethylene has been reported to mediate plant response to cold stress. However, it is still debated whether the effect of ethylene on plant response to cold stress is negative or positive. The objective of the present study was to explore the role of ethylene in the cold resistance of Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon (L).Pers.). Under control (warm) condition, there was no obvious effect of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) or the antagonist Ag(+) of ethylene signaling on electrolyte leakage (EL) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Under cold stress conditions, ACC-treated plant leaves had a greater level of EL and MDA than the untreated leaves. However, the EL and MDA values were lower in the Ag(+) regime versus the untreated. In addition, after 3 days of cold treatment, ACC remarkably reduced the content of soluble protein and also altered antioxidant enzyme activity. Under control (warm) condition, there was no significant effect of ACC on the performance of photosystem II (PS II) as monitored by chlorophyll α fluorescence transients. However, under cold stress, ACC inhibited the performance of PS II. Under cold condition, ACC remarkably reduced the performance index for energy conservation from excitation to the reduction of intersystem electron acceptors (PI(ABS)), the maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry (φP0), the quantum yield of electron transport flux from Q(A) to Q(B) (φE0), and the efficiency/probability of electron transport (ΨE0). Simultaneously, ACC increased the values of specific energy fluxes for absorption (ABS/RC) and dissipation (DI0/RC) after 3 days of cold treatment. Additionally, under cold condition, exogenous ACC altered the expressions of several related genes implicated in the induction of cold tolerance (LEA, SOD, POD-1 and CBF1, EIN3-1, and EIN3-2). The present study thus suggests that ethylene affects the cold tolerance of Bermuda grass by impacting the antioxidant system

  15. Room temperature femtosecond X-ray diffraction of photosystem II microcrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Hellmich, Julia; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Glöckner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Sellberg, Jonas; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gildea, Richard J.; Glatzel, Pieter; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; McQueen, Trevor A.; DiFiore, Dörte; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Messinger, Johannes; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Zouni, Athina; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the dioxygen on earth is generated by the oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) using light from the sun. This light-driven, four-photon reaction is catalyzed by the Mn4CaO5 cluster located at the lumenal side of PS II. Various X-ray studies have been carried out at cryogenic temperatures to understand the intermediate steps involved in the water oxidation mechanism. However, the necessity for collecting data at room temperature, especially for studying the transient steps during the O–O bond formation, requires the development of new methodologies. In this paper we report room temperature X-ray diffraction data of PS II microcrystals obtained using ultrashort (< 50 fs) 9 keV X-ray pulses from a hard X-ray free electron laser, namely the Linac Coherent Light Source. The results presented here demonstrate that the ”probe before destroy” approach using an X-ray free electron laser works even for the highly-sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster in PS II at room temperature. We show that these data are comparable to those obtained in synchrotron radiation studies as seen by the similarities in the overall structure of the helices, the protein subunits and the location of the various cofactors. This work is, therefore, an important step toward future studies for resolving the structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster without any damage at room temperature, and of the reaction intermediates of PS II during O–O bond formation. PMID:22665786

  16. Formation of singlet oxygen by decomposition of protein hydroperoxide in photosystem II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Pathak

    Full Text Available Singlet oxygen (1O2 is formed by triplet-triplet energy transfer from triplet chlorophyll to O2 via Type II photosensitization reaction in photosystem II (PSII. Formation of triplet chlorophyll is associated with the change in spin state of the excited electron and recombination of triplet radical pair in the PSII antenna complex and reaction center, respectively. Here, we have provided evidence for the formation of 1O2 by decomposition of protein hydroperoxide in PSII membranes deprived of Mn4O5Ca complex. Protein hydroperoxide is formed by protein oxidation initiated by highly oxidizing chlorophyll cation radical and hydroxyl radical formed by Type I photosensitization reaction. Under highly oxidizing conditions, protein hydroperoxide is oxidized to protein peroxyl radical which either cyclizes to dioxetane or recombines with another protein peroxyl radical to tetroxide. These highly unstable intermediates decompose to triplet carbonyls which transfer energy to O2 forming 1O2. Data presented in this study show for the first time that 1O2 is formed by decomposition of protein hydroperoxide in PSII membranes deprived of Mn4O5Ca complex.

  17. Heat-induced reorganization of the structure of photosystem II membranes: role of oxygen evolving complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busheva, Mira; Tzonova, Iren; Stoitchkova, Katerina; Andreeva, Atanaska

    2012-12-05

    The sensitivity of the green plants' photosystem II (PSII) to high temperatures is investigated in PSII enriched membranes and in membranes, from which the oxygen evolving complex is removed. Using steady-state 77 K fluorescence and resonance Raman spectroscopy we analyze the interdependency between the temperature-driven changes in structure and energy distribution in the PSII supercomplex. The results show that the heat treatment induces different reduction of the 77 K fluorescence emission in both types of investigated membranes: (i) an additional considerable decrease of the overall fluorescence emission in Tris-washed membranes as compared to the native membranes; (ii) a transition point at 42°C(,) observed only in native membranes; (iii) a sharp reduction of the PSII core fluorescence in Tris-washed membranes at temperatures higher than 50°C; (iv) a 3 nm red-shift of F700 band's maximum in Tris-washed membranes already at 20°C and its further shift by 1 nm at temperature increase. Both treatments intensified their action by increasing the aggregation and dissociation of the peripheral light harvesting complexes. The oxygen-evolving complex, in addition to its main function to produce O(2), increases the thermal stability of PSII core by strengthening the connection between the core and the peripheral antenna proteins and by keeping their structural integrity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Spectroscopic properties of reaction center pigments in photosystem II core complexes: revision of the multimer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raszewski, Grzegorz; Diner, Bruce A; Schlodder, Eberhard; Renger, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    Absorbance difference spectra associated with the light-induced formation of functional states in photosystem II core complexes from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (e.g., P(+)Pheo(-),P(+)Q(A)(-),(3)P) are described quantitatively in the framework of exciton theory. In addition, effects are analyzed of site-directed mutations of D1-His(198), the axial ligand of the special-pair chlorophyll P(D1), and D1-Thr(179), an amino-acid residue nearest to the accessory chlorophyll Chl(D1), on the spectral properties of the reaction center pigments. Using pigment transition energies (site energies) determined previously from independent experiments on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes, good agreement between calculated and experimental spectra is obtained. The only difference in site energies of the reaction center pigments in D1-D2-cytb559 and photosystem II core complexes concerns Chl(D1). Compared to isolated reaction centers, the site energy of Chl(D1) is red-shifted by 4 nm and less inhomogeneously distributed in core complexes. The site energies cause primary electron transfer at cryogenic temperatures to be initiated by an excited state that is strongly localized on Chl(D1) rather than from a delocalized state as assumed in the previously described multimer model. This result is consistent with earlier experimental data on special-pair mutants and with our previous calculations on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes. The calculations show that at 5 K the lowest excited state of the reaction center is lower by approximately 10 nm than the low-energy exciton state of the two special-pair chlorophylls P(D1) and P(D2) which form an excitonic dimer. The experimental temperature dependence of the wild-type difference spectra can only be understood in this model if temperature-dependent site energies are assumed for Chl(D1) and P(D1), reducing the above energy gap from 10 to 6 nm upon increasing the temperature from 5 to 300 K. At physiological temperature, there are

  19. Amorphous manganese-calcium oxides as a possible evolutionary origin for the CaMn₄ cluster in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi

    2011-06-01

    In this paper a few calcium-manganese oxides and calcium-manganese minerals are studied as catalysts for water oxidation. The natural mineral marokite is also studied as a catalyst for water oxidation for the first time. Marokite is made up of edge-sharing Mn(3+) in a distorted octahedral environment and eight-coordinate Ca(2+) centered polyhedral layers. The structure is similar to recent models of the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II. Thus, the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II does not have an unusual structure and could be synthesized hydrothermally. Also in this paper, oxygen evolution is studied with marokite (CaMn₂O₄), pyrolusite (MnO₂) and compared with hollandite (Ba(0.2)Ca(0.15)K(0.3)Mn(6.9)Al(0.2)Si(0.3)O(16)), hausmannite (Mn₃O₄), Mn₂O₃.H₂O, Ca Mn₃O₆.H₂O, CaMn₄O₈.H₂O, CaMn₂O₄.H₂O and synthetic marokite (CaMn₂O₄). I propose that the origin of the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II resulted from absorption of calcium and manganese ions that were precipitated together in the archean oceans by protocyanobacteria because of changing pH from ~5 to ~8-10. As reported in this paper, amorphous calcium-manganese oxides with different ratios of manganese and calcium are effective catalysts for water oxidation. The bond types and lengths of the calcium and manganese ions in the calcium-manganese oxides are directly comparable to those in the OEC. This primitive structure of these amorphous calcium-manganese compounds could be changed and modified by environmental groups (amino acids) to form the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II.

  20. Subunit Organization of a Synechocystis Hetero-Oligomeric Thylakoid FtsH Complex Involved in Photosystem II Repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boehm, M.; Yu, J.; Krynická, Vendula; Barker, M.; Tichý, Martin; Komenda, Josef; Nixon, P. J.; Nield, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 9 (2012), s. 3669-3683 ISSN 1040-4651 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0110; GA ČR GBP501/12/G055 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : photosystem II * FtsH metalloproteases * subunit Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.251, year: 2012

  1. Photosystem II Photochemistry and Phycobiliprotein of the Red Algae Kappaphycus alvarezii and Their Implications for Light Adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Xiangyu; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhu, Jianyi; Yao, Chunyan; Liu, Jianguo; Qin, Song; Jiang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Photosystem II photochemistry and phycobiliprotein (PBP) genes of red algae Kappaphycus alvarezii, raw material of κ -carrageenan used in food and pharmaceutical industries, were analyzed in this study. Minimum saturating irradiance (I k ) of this algal species was less than 115  μ mol m−2 s−1. Its actual PSII efficiency (yield II) increased when light intensity enhanced and decreased when light intensity reached 200  μ mol m−2 s−1. Under dim light, yield II declined at first and then increas...

  2. The role of calcium in the oxygen evolving center of photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latimer, Matthew John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The photosynthetic oxygen evolving complex (OEC) contains a cluster of four manganese atoms and requires both Ca and Cl for activity. Ca can be replaced by Sr with retention of activity. The role of Ca in the OEC has been investigated by performing Mn X-ray absorption experiments on Ca-depleted samples of photosystem II (PS II) and on PS II samples depleted of Ca and reconstituted by either Ca or Sr. Mn X-ray K-edge spectra exhibit no significant differences in oxidation state or symmetry between Ca- and Sr-reactivated preparations, but differences are observed in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The amplitude of a Fourier transform peak arising from scatterers at distances greater than 3 A is larger for samples reactivated with strontium relative to calcium. Curve-fitting analyses of the EXAFS data using FEFF 5-calculated parameters favor a model where both manganese and calcium (or strontium) scatterers contribute to the ~3 Å Fourier peak (Mn-Mn at 3.3Å and Mn-Ca(Sr) at 3.4--3.5 Å). Possible structural arrangements for a calcium binding site are discussed. Analysis of Mn K-edge spectra from Ca-depleted samples in the S1, S2, and S3 states shows an edge shift on the S1-S2 transition, but no edge shift on the S2-S3 transition, supporting a model where the oxidizing equivalent from the S2 to S3 transition is stored on a ligand or nearby protein residue rather than on the Mn cluster. Parallels between Ca-depleted and native samples are discussed.

  3. Two roles of thylakoid lipids in modifying the activity of herbicides which inhibit photosystem II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupatt, C.C. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Thylakoid lipids may modify the activity of herbicides which inhibit electron transport at the Q/sub B/ protein of photosystem II in two ways: (1) lipids can act as a hydrophobic barrier to a binding site localized close to the loculus of the membrane, and (2) changes in lipid composition can reduce the ability of inhibitors to block electron transport, possibly due to a change in the conformation of the Q/sub B/ protein. The herbicide binding site was localized close to the locular side of the thylakoid membrane by determining the activity of a number of substituted phenylurea and s-triazine herbicides in inverted and non-inverted thylakoids. Quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis showed that inversion of thylakoids reduced the requirement of molecular lipophilicity deemed necessary for phenylurea activity in non-inverted membranes, whereas s-triazines exhibited no differences in the lipophilicity requirement in thylakoid membranes of either orientation. The binding affinity of 14 C-diuron was reduced in bicarbonate-depleted thylakoids relative to reconstituted or control membranes, as is the case with atrazine binding. These observations support a model of the herbicide binding site containing both common and herbicide family specific binding domains. Thylakoids isolated either from detached lambs quarters (Chenopodium album L.) leaves, treated with SAN 6706, or from soybean (Glycine max L.), with norflurazon or pyrazon applied preemergence, exhibited decreased susceptibility to atrazine. The ability of lipid-modifying treatments to decrease the atrazine susceptibility of field-grown soybeans was also investigated

  4. Photosystem II heterogeneity of in hospite zooxanthellae in scleractinian corals exposed to bleaching conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ross; PeterJ, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Increased ocean temperatures are thought to be triggering mass coral bleaching events around the world. The intracellular symbiotic zooxanthellae (genus Symbiodinium) are expelled from the coral host, which is believed to be a response to photosynthetic damage within these symbionts. Several sites of impact have been proposed, and here we probe the functional heterogeneity of Photosystem II (PSII) in three coral species exposed to bleaching conditions. As length of exposure to bleaching conditions (32 degrees C and 350 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1)) increased, the QA- reoxidation kinetics showed a rise in the proportion of inactive PSII centers (PSIIx), where QB was unable to accept electrons. PSIIx contributed up to 20% of the total PSII centers in Pocillopora damicornis, 35% in Acropora nobilis and 14% in Cyphastrea serailia. Changes in Fv/Fm and amplitude of the J step along fast induction curves were found to be highly dependent upon the proportion of PSIIx centers within the total pool of PSII reaction centers. Determination of PSII antenna size revealed that under control conditions in the three coral species up to 60% of PSII centers were lacking peripheral light-harvesting complexes (PSIIbeta). In P. damicornis, the proportion of PSIIbeta increased under bleaching conditions and this could be a photoprotective mechanism in response to excess light. The rapid increases in PSIIx and PSIIbeta observed in these corals under bleaching conditions indicates these physiological processes are involved in the initial photochemical damage to zooxanthellae.

  5. Plants lacking the main light-harvesting complex retain photosystem II macro-organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruban, A V; Wentworth, M; Yakushevska, A E; Andersson, J; Lee, P J; Keegstra, W; Dekker, J P; Boekema, E J; Jansson, S; Horton, P

    2003-02-06

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a key component of photosynthesis, the process of converting sunlight into the chemical energy of life. In plant cells, it forms a unique oligomeric macrostructure in membranes of the chloroplasts. Several light-harvesting antenna complexes are organized precisely in the PSII macrostructure-the major trimeric complexes (LHCII) that bind 70% of PSII chlorophyll and three minor monomeric complexes-which together form PSII supercomplexes. The antenna complexes are essential for collecting sunlight and regulating photosynthesis, but the relationship between these functions and their molecular architecture is unresolved. Here we report that antisense Arabidopsis plants lacking the proteins that form LHCII trimers have PSII supercomplexes with almost identical abundance and structure to those found in wild-type plants. The place of LHCII is taken by a normally minor and monomeric complex, CP26, which is synthesized in large amounts and organized into trimers. Trimerization is clearly not a specific attribute of LHCII. Our results highlight the importance of the PSII macrostructure: in the absence of one of its main components, another protein is recruited to allow it to assemble and function.

  6. Artificial Photosystem I and II: Highly Selective solar fuels and tandem photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuchen; Castellanos, Ignacio; Cerkovnik, Logan; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Artificial photosynthesis, or generation of solar fuels from CO2/H2O, can provide an important alternative for rising CO2 emission and renewable energy generation. In our recent work, composite photocatalysts (CPCs) made from widebandgap nanotubes and different QDs were used to mimic Photosystem II (PS680) and I (PS700), respectively. By tuning the redox potentials using the size, composition and energy band alignment of QDs, we demonstrate highly selective (>90%) and efficient production of ethane, ethanol and acetaldehyde as solar fuels with different wavelengths of light. We also show that this selectivity is a result of precise energy band alignments (using cationic/anionic doping of nanotubes, QD size etc.), confirmed using measurements of electronic density of states, and alignment of higher redox potentials with hot-carriers can also lead to hot-carrier photocatalysis. This wavelength-selective CPCs can have important implications for inexpensive production of solar fuels including alkanes, alcohols, aldehydes and hydrogen, and making tandem structures (red, green, blue) with three CPCs, allowing almost full visible spectrum (410 ~ 730nm) utilization with different fuels produced simultaneously.

  7. Protein kinase that phosphorylates light-harvesting complex is autophosphorylated and is associated with photosystem II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughlan, S.J.; Hind, G.

    1987-01-01

    Thylakoid membranes were phosphorylated with [γ- 32 P]ATP and extracted with octyl glucoside and cholate. Among the radiolabeled phosphoproteins in the extract was a previously characterized protein kinase of 64-kDa apparent mass. The ability of this enzyme to undergo autophosphorylation in situ was used to monitor its distribution in the membrane. Fractionation studies showed that the kinase is confined to granal regions of the thylakoid, where it appears to be associated with the light-harvesting chlorophyll-protein complex of photosystem II. The kinetics of kinase autophosphorylation were investigated both in situ and in extracted, purified enzyme. In the membrane, autophosphorylation saturated within 20-30 min and was reversed with a half-time of 7-8 min upon removal of ATP or oxidative inactivation of the kinase; the accompanying dephosphorylation of light-harvesting complex was slower and kinetically complex. Fluoride (10 mM) inhibited these dephosphorylations. Autophosphorylation of the isolated kinase was independent of enzyme concentration, indicative of an intramolecular mechanism. A maximum of one serine residue per mole of kinase was esterified. Autophosphorylation was more rapid in the presence of histone IIIs, an exogenous substrate. Dephosphorylation of the isolated enzyme was not observed

  8. Improvements in serial femtosecond crystallography of photosystem II by optimizing crystal uniformity using microseeding procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Hellmich, Julia; Tran, Rosalie; Bommer, Martin; Yachandra, Vittal K; Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Zouni, Athina

    In photosynthesis, photosystem II (PSII) is the multi-subunit membrane protein complex that catalyzes photo-oxidation of water into dioxygen through the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). To understand the water oxidation reaction, it is important to get structural information about the transient and intermediate states of the OEC in the dimeric PSII core complex (dPSIIcc). In recent times, femtosecond X-ray pulses from the free electron laser (XFEL) are being used to obtain X-ray diffraction (XRD) data of dPSIIcc microcrystals at room temperature that are free of radiation damage. In our experiments at the XFEL, we used an electrospun liquid microjet setup that requires microcrystals less than 40 μ m in size. In this study, we explored various microseeding techniques to get a high yield of monodisperse uniform-sized microcrystals. Monodisperse microcrystals of dPSIIcc of uniform size were a key to improve the stability of the jet and the quality of XRD data obtained at the XFEL. This was evident by an improvement of the quality of the datasets obtained, from 6.5Å, using crystals grown without the micro seeding approach, to 4.5Å using crystals generated with the new method.

  9. Improvements in serial femtosecond crystallography of photosystem II by optimizing crystal uniformity using microseeding procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Zouni, Athina; Technische Univ. Berlin

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthesis, photosystem II (PSII) is the multi-subunit membrane protein complex that catalyzes photo-oxidation of water into dioxygen through the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). To understand the water oxidation reaction, it is important to get structural information about the transient and intermediate states of the OEC in the dimeric PSII core complex (dPSIIcc). In recent times, femtosecond X-ray pulses from the free electron laser (XFEL) are being used to obtain X-ray diffraction (XRD) data of dPSIIcc microcrystals at room temperature that are free of radiation damage. In our experiments at the XFEL, we used an electrospun liquid microjet setup that requires microcrystals less than 40 μm in size. In this study, we explored various microseeding techniques to get a high yield of monodisperse uniform-sized microcrystals. Monodisperse microcrystals of dPSIIcc of uniform size were a key to improve the stability of the jet and the quality of XRD data obtained at the XFEL. This was evident by an improvement of the quality of the datasets obtained, from 6.5 Å, using crystals grown without the micro seeding approach, to 4.5 Å using crystals generated with the new method

  10. Acute and additive toxicity of ten photosystem-II herbicides to seagrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Adam D; Collier, Catherine J; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P

    2015-11-30

    Photosystem II herbicides are transported to inshore marine waters, including those of the Great Barrier Reef, and are usually detected in complex mixtures. These herbicides inhibit photosynthesis, which can deplete energy reserves and reduce growth in seagrass, but the toxicity of some of these herbicides to seagrass is unknown and combined effects of multiple herbicides on seagrass has not been tested. Here we assessed the acute phytotoxicity of 10 PSII herbicides to the seagrass Halophila ovalis over 24 and/or 48 h. Individual herbicides exhibited a broad range of toxicities with inhibition of photosynthetic activity (∆F/F(m)') by 50% at concentrations ranging from 3.5 μg l(-1) (ametryn) to 132 μg l(-1) (fluometuron). We assessed potential additivity using the Concentration Addition model of joint action for binary mixtures of diuron and atrazine as well as complex mixtures of all 10 herbicides. The effects of both mixture types were largely additive, validating the application of additive effects models for calculating the risk posed by multiple PSII herbicides to seagrasses. This study extends seagrass ecotoxicological data to ametryn, metribuzin, bromacil, prometryn and fluometuron and demonstrates that low concentrations of PSII herbicide mixtures have the potential to impact ecologically relevant endpoints in seagrass, including ∆F/F(m)'.

  11. Acute and additive toxicity of ten photosystem-II herbicides to seagrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Adam D.; Collier, Catherine J.; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P.

    2015-11-01

    Photosystem II herbicides are transported to inshore marine waters, including those of the Great Barrier Reef, and are usually detected in complex mixtures. These herbicides inhibit photosynthesis, which can deplete energy reserves and reduce growth in seagrass, but the toxicity of some of these herbicides to seagrass is unknown and combined effects of multiple herbicides on seagrass has not been tested. Here we assessed the acute phytotoxicity of 10 PSII herbicides to the seagrass Halophila ovalis over 24 and/or 48 h. Individual herbicides exhibited a broad range of toxicities with inhibition of photosynthetic activity (∆F/Fm‧) by 50% at concentrations ranging from 3.5 μg l-1 (ametryn) to 132 μg l-1 (fluometuron). We assessed potential additivity using the Concentration Addition model of joint action for binary mixtures of diuron and atrazine as well as complex mixtures of all 10 herbicides. The effects of both mixture types were largely additive, validating the application of additive effects models for calculating the risk posed by multiple PSII herbicides to seagrasses. This study extends seagrass ecotoxicological data to ametryn, metribuzin, bromacil, prometryn and fluometuron and demonstrates that low concentrations of PSII herbicide mixtures have the potential to impact ecologically relevant endpoints in seagrass, including ∆F/Fm‧.

  12. Photosystem II excitation pressure and photosynthetic carbon metabolism in Chlorella vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savitch, L.V.; Maxwell, D.P.; Huner, N.P.A.

    1996-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris grown at 5 degrees C/150 micromoles m -2 s -1 mimics cells grown under high irradiance (27 degrees C/2200 micromoles m -2 s -1 ). This has been rationalized through the suggestion that both populations of cells were exposed to comparable photosystem II (PSII) excitation pressures measured as the chlorophyll a fluorescence quenching parameter, 1 - qP (D.P. Maxwell, S. Falk, N.P.A. Huner [1995] Plant Physiol 107: 687-694). To assess the possible role(s) of feedback mechanisms on PSII excitation pressure, stromal and cytosolic carbon metabolism were examined. Sucrose phosphate synthase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activities as well as the ratios of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate/fructose-6 phosphate and sucrose/starch indicated that cells grown at 27 degrees C/2200 micromoles m -2 s -1 appeared to exhibit a restriction in starch metabolism. In contrast, cells grown at 5 degrees C/150 micromoles-1 m -2 s -1 appeared to exhibit a restriction in the sucrose metabolism based on decreased cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and sucrose phosphate synthase activities as well as a low sucrose/starch ratio. These metabolic restrictions may feedback on photosynthetic electron transport and, thus, contribute to the observed PSII excitation pressure. We conclude that, although PSII excitation pressure may reflect redox regulation of photosynthetic acclimation to light and temperature in C. vulgaris, it cannot be considered the primary redox signal. Alternative metabolic sensing/signaling mechanisms are discussed

  13. Freezing cytorrhysis and critical temperature thresholds for photosystem II in the peat moss Sphagnum capillifolium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Othmar; Neuner, Gilbert

    2010-07-01

    Leaflets of Sphagnum capillifolium were exposed to temperatures from -5 degrees C to +60 degrees C under controlled conditions while mounted on a microscope stage. The resultant cytological response to these temperature treatments was successfully monitored using a light and fluorescence microscope. In addition to the observable cytological changes during freezing cytorrhysis and heat exposure on the leaflets, the concomitant critical temperature thresholds for inactivation of photosystem II (PS II) were studied using a micro fibre optic and a chlorophyll fluorometer mounted to the microscope stage. Chlorophyllous cells of S. capillifolium showed extended freezing cytorrhysis immediately after ice nucleation at -1.1 degrees C in the water in which the leaflets were submersed during the measurement. The occurrence of freezing cytorrhysis, which was visually manifested by cell shrinkage, was highly dynamic and was completed within 2 s. A total reduction of the mean projected diameter of the chloroplast containing area during freezing cytorrhysis from 8.9 to 3.8 microm indicates a cell volume reduction of approximately -82%. Simultaneous measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence of PS II was possible even through the frozen water in which the leaf samples were submersed. Freezing cytorrhysis was accompanied by a sudden rise of basic chlorophyll fluorescence. The critical freezing temperature threshold of PS II was identical to the ice nucleation temperature (-1.1 degrees C). This is significantly above the temperature threshold at which frost damage to S. capillifolium leaflets occurs (-16.1 degrees C; LT(50)) which is higher than observed in most higher plants from the European Alps during summer. High temperature thresholds of PS II were 44.5 degrees C which is significantly below the heat tolerance of chlorophyllous cells (49.9 degrees C; LT(50)). It is demonstrated that light and fluorescence microscopic techniques combined with simultaneous chlorophyll fluorescence

  14. Photosystem II functionality in barley responds dynamically to changes in leaf manganese status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidsel Birkelund Schmidt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A catalytic manganese (Mn cluster is required for the oxidation of water in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC of photosystem II (PSII in plants. Despite this essential role of Mn in generating the electrons driving photosynthesis, limited information is available on how Mn deficiency affects PSII functionality. We have here used parameters derived from measurements of fluorescence induction kinetics (OJIP transients, non-photochemical quenching and PSII subunit composition to investigate how latent Mn deficiency changes the photochemistry in two barley genotypes differing in Mn efficiency. Mn deficiency caused dramatic reductions in the quantum yield of PSII and led to the appearance of two new inflection points, the K step and the D dip, in the OJIP fluorescence transients, indicating severe damage to the OEC. In addition, Mn deficiency decreased the ability to induce non-photochemical quenching (NPQ in the light, rendering the plants incapable of dissipating excess energy in a controlled way. Thus, the Mn deficient plants became severely affected in their ability to recover from high light-induced photoinhibition, especially under strong Mn deficiency. Interestingly, the Mn-efficient genotype was able to maintain a higher non-photochemical quenching than the Mn-inefficient genotype when exposed to mild Mn deficiency. However, during severe Mn deficiency, there were no differences between the two genotypes, suggesting a general loss of the ability to disassemble and repair PSII. The pronounced defects of PSII activity were supported by a dramatic decrease in the abundance of the OEC protein subunits, PsbP and PsbQ in response to Mn deficiency for both genotypes. We conclude that regulation of photosynthetic performance by means of maintaining and inducing NPQ mechanisms contribute to genotypic differences in the Mn efficiency of barley genotypes growing under conditions with mild Mn deficiency.

  15. Alleviation of cold damage to photosystem II and metabolisms by melatonin in Bermudagrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibiao eFan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available As a typical warm-season grass, Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.Pers.] is widely applied in turf systems and animal husbandry. However, cold temperature is a key factor limiting resource utilization for Bermudagrass. Therefore, it is relevant to study the mechanisms by which Burmudagrass responds to cold. Melatonin is a crucial animal and plant hormone that is responsible for plant abiotic stress responses. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of melatonin in cold stress response of Bermudagrass. Wild Bermudagrass pre-treated with 100 μM melatonin was subjected to different cold stress treatments (-5 °C for 8 h with or without cold acclimation. The results showed lower malondialdehyde (MDA and electrolyte leakage (EL values, higher levels of chlorophyll, and greater superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities after melatonin treatment than those in non-melatonin treatment under cold stress. Analysis of chlorophyll a revealed that the chlorophyll fluorescence transient (OJIP curves were higher after treatment with melatonin than that of non-melatonin treated plants under cold stress. The values of photosynthetic fluorescence parameters increased after treatment with melatonin under cold stress. The analysis of metabolism showed alterations in 46 metabolites in cold-stressed plants after melatonin treatment. Among the measured metabolites, five sugars (arabinose, mannose, glucopyranose, maltose, turanose and one organic acid (propanoic acid were significantly increased. However, valine and threonic acid contents were reduced in melatonin-treated plants. In summary, melatonin maintained cell membrane stability, increased antioxidant enzymes activities, improved the process of photosystem II, and induced alterations in Bermudagrass metabolism under cold stress.

  16. Calcium-manganese oxides as structural and functional models for active site in oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II: lessons from simple models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    The oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II which induces the oxidation of water to dioxygen in plants, algae and certain bacteria contains a cluster of one calcium and four manganese ions. It serves as a model to split water by sunlight. Reports on the mechanism and structure of photosystem II provide a more detailed architecture of the oxygen evolving complex and the surrounding amino acids. One challenge in this field is the development of artificial model compounds to study oxygen evolution reaction outside the complicated environment of the enzyme. Calcium-manganese oxides as structural and functional models for the active site of photosystem II are explained and reviewed in this paper. Because of related structures of these calcium-manganese oxides and the catalytic centers of active site of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II, the study may help to understand more about mechanism of oxygen evolution by the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Variations in constitutive and inducible UV-B tolerance; dissecting photosystem II protection in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Marcel A K; Martret, Bénedicte Le; Koornneef, Maarten

    2010-01-01

    The rise in ultraviolet-B (UV-B) (280-315 nm) radiation levels, that is a consequence of stratospheric ozone layer depletion, has triggered extensive research on the effects of UV-B on plants. Plants raised under natural sunlight conditions are generally well protected from the potentially harmful effects of UV-B radiation. However, it is mostly unknown to which extent UV protection is constitutive and/or induced. In this study, we have analysed the role of constitutive and inducible protection responses in avoiding UV-B damage to photosystem II of photosynthesis. We have assayed the UV susceptibility of photosystem II in 224 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions from across the Northern hemisphere, and found a continuum of constitutive UV-protection levels, with some accessions being UV sensitive and others UV tolerant. Statistical analysis showed only very weak associations between constitutive UV tolerance and the geographic origin of accessions. Instead, most of the variance in constitutive UV-B protection of photosynthesis is present at the level of local Arabidopsis populations originating in the same geographic and climatic area. The variance in constitutive UV protection is, however, small compared to the amplitude of environmentally induced changes in UV protection. Thus, our data emphasise the importance of inducible responses for the protection of photosystem II against UV-B. Remarkably, the conditions that induce UV-protective responses vary; accessions from lower latitudes were found to switch-on UV defences more readily than those of higher latitudes. Such altered regulation of induction may comprise a suitable adaptation response when levels of a stressor are fluctuating in the short term, but predictable over longer periods.

  18. Discovery of a Chllorophyll Binding Protein Complex Involved in the Early Steps of Photosystem II Assembly in Synechocystis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knoppová, Jana; Sobotka, Roman; Tichý, Martin; Jianfeng, Yu; Koník, P.; Halada, Petr; Nixon, P. J.; Komenda, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2014), s. 1200-1212 ISSN 1040-4651 R&D Projects: GA ČR P501/11/0377; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0110 Grant - others:UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council(GB) BB/F020554/1; UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council(GB) BB/L003260/1; Magistrát hl. m. Prahy(CZ) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24023 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Synechocystis * photosystem II * assembly * proteins Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.338, year: 2014

  19. Tight-binding model of the photosystem II reaction center: application to two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelzinis, Andrius; Valkunas, Leonas; Abramavicius, Darius; Fuller, Franklin D; Ogilvie, Jennifer P; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-01-01

    We propose an optimized tight-binding electron–hole model of the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC). Our model incorporates two charge separation pathways and spatial correlations of both static disorder and fast fluctuations of energy levels. It captures the main experimental features observed in time-resolved two-dimensional (2D) optical spectra at 77 K: peak pattern, lineshapes and time traces. Analysis of 2D spectra kinetics reveals that specific regions of the 2D spectra of the PSII RC are sensitive to the charge transfer states. We find that the energy disorder of two peripheral chlorophylls is four times larger than the other RC pigments. (paper)

  20. Tight-binding model of the photosystem II reaction center: application to two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelzinis, Andrius; Valkunas, Leonas; Fuller, Franklin D.; Ogilvie, Jennifer P.; Mukamel, Shaul; Abramavicius, Darius

    2013-07-01

    We propose an optimized tight-binding electron-hole model of the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC). Our model incorporates two charge separation pathways and spatial correlations of both static disorder and fast fluctuations of energy levels. It captures the main experimental features observed in time-resolved two-dimensional (2D) optical spectra at 77 K: peak pattern, lineshapes and time traces. Analysis of 2D spectra kinetics reveals that specific regions of the 2D spectra of the PSII RC are sensitive to the charge transfer states. We find that the energy disorder of two peripheral chlorophylls is four times larger than the other RC pigments.

  1. The evolutionary pathway from anoxygenic to oxygenic photosynthesis examined by comparison of the properties of photosystem II and bacterial reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J P; Williams, J C

    2011-01-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, such as purple bacteria, cyanobacteria, and plants, light is captured and converted into energy to create energy-rich compounds. The primary process of energy conversion involves the transfer of electrons from an excited donor molecule to a series of electron acceptors in pigment-protein complexes. Two of these complexes, the bacterial reaction center and photosystem II, are evolutionarily related and structurally similar. However, only photosystem II is capable of performing the unique reaction of water oxidation. An understanding of the evolutionary process that lead to the development of oxygenic photosynthesis can be found by comparison of these two complexes. In this review, we summarize how insight is being gained by examination of the differences in critical functional properties of these complexes and by experimental efforts to alter pigment-protein interactions of the bacterial reaction center in order to enable it to perform reactions, such as amino acid and metal oxidation, observable in photosystem II.

  2. Cyclic Electron Flow around Photosystem I Promotes ATP Synthesis Possibly Helping the Rapid Repair of Photodamaged Photosystem II at Low Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In higher plants, moderate photoinhibition of photosystem II (PSII leads to a stimulation of cyclic electron flow (CEF at low light, which is accompanied by an increase in the P700 oxidation ratio. However, the specific role of CEF stimulation at low light is not well known. Furthermore, the mechanism underlying this increase in P700 oxidation ratio at low light is unclear. To address these questions, intact leaves of the shade-adapted plant Panax notoginseng were treated at 2258 μmol photons m-2 s-1 for 30 min to induce PSII photoinhibition. Before and after this high-light treatment, PSI and PSII activity, the energy quenching in PSII, the redox state of PSI and proton motive force (pmf at a low light of 54 μmol photons m-2 s-1 were determined at the steady state. After high-light treatment, electron flow through PSII (ETRII significantly decreased but CEF was remarkably stimulated. The P700 oxidation ratio significantly increased but non-photochemical quenching changed negligibly. Concomitantly, the total pmf decreased significantly and the proton gradient (ΔpH across the thylakoid membrane remained stable. Furthermore, the P700 oxidation ratio was negatively correlated with the value of ETRII. These results suggest that upon PSII photoinhibition, CEF is stimulated to increase the ATP synthesis, facilitating the rapid repair of photodamaged PSII. The increase in P700 oxidation ratio at low light cannot be explained by the change in pmf, but is primarily controlled by electron transfer from PSII.

  3. Ascorbic Acid Alleviates Damage from Heat Stress in the Photosystem II of Tall Fescue in Both the Photochemical and Thermal Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available L-Ascorbate (Asc plays important roles in plant development, hormone signaling, the cell cycle and cellular redox system, etc. The higher content of Asc in plant chloroplasts indicates its important role in the photosystem. The objective of this study was to study the roles of Asc in tall fescue leaves against heat stress. After a heat stress treatment, we observed a lower value of the maximum quantum yield for primary photochemistry (φPo, which reflects the inhibited activity of the photochemical phase of photosystem II (PSII. Moreover, we observed a higher value of efficiency of electron transfer from QB to photosystem I acceptors (δR0, which reflects elevated activity of the thermal phase of the photosystem of the tall fescue. The addition of Asc facilitate the behavior of the photochemical phase of the PSII by lowering the ROS content as well as that of the alternative electron donor to provide electron to the tyrosine residue of the D1 protein. Additionally, exogenous Asc reduces the activity of the thermal phase of the photosystem, which could contribute to the limitation of energy input into the photosystem in tall fescue against heat stress. Synthesis of the Asc increased under heat stress treatment. However, under heat stress this regulation does not occur at the transcription level and requires further study.

  4. Photosystem II function and dynamics in three widely used Arabidopsis thaliana accessions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Yin

    Full Text Available Columbia-0 (Col-0, Wassilewskija-4 (Ws-4, and Landsberg erecta-0 (Ler-0 are used as background lines for many public Arabidopsis mutant collections, and for investigation in laboratory conditions of plant processes, including photosynthesis and response to high-intensity light (HL. The photosystem II (PSII complex is sensitive to HL and requires repair to sustain its function. PSII repair is a multistep process controlled by numerous factors, including protein phosphorylation and thylakoid membrane stacking. Here we have characterized the function and dynamics of PSII complex under growth-light and HL conditions. Ws-4 displayed 30% more thylakoid lipids per chlorophyll and 40% less chlorophyll per carotenoid than Col-0 and Ler-0. There were no large differences in thylakoid stacking, photoprotection and relative levels of photosynthetic complexes among the three accessions. An increased efficiency of PSII closure was found in Ws-4 following illumination with saturation flashes or continuous light. Phosphorylation of the PSII D1/D2 proteins was reduced by 50% in Ws-4 as compared to Col-0 and Ler-0. An increase in abundance of the responsible STN8 kinase in response to HL treatment was found in all three accessions, but Ws-4 displayed 50% lower levels than Col-0 and Ler-0. Despite this, the HL treatment caused in Ws-4 the lagest extent of PSII inactivation, disassembly, D1 protein degradation, and the largest decrease in the size of stacked thylakoids. The dilution of chlorophyll-protein complexes with additional lipids and carotenoids in Ws-4 may represent a mechanism to facilitate lateral protein traffic in the membrane, thus compensating for the lack of a full complement of STN8 kinase. Nevertheless, additional PSII damage occurs in Ws-4, which exceeds the D1 protein synthesis capacity, thus leading to enhanced photoinhibition. Our findings are valuable for selection of appropriate background line for PSII characterization in Arabidopsis

  5. Field-acclimated Gossypium hirsutum cultivars exhibit genotypic and seasonal differences in photosystem II thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, John L; Oosterhuis, Derrick M; Collins, Guy D; Pilon, Cristiane; Fitzsimons, Toby R

    2013-03-15

    Previous investigations have demonstrated that photosystem II (PSII) thermostability acclimates to prior exposure to heat and drought, but contrasting results have been reported for cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). We hypothesized that PSII thermotolerance in G. hirsutum would acclimate to environmental conditions during the growing season and that there would be differences in PSII thermotolerance between commercially-available U.S. cultivars. To this end, three cotton cultivars were grown under dryland conditions in Tifton Georgia, and two under irrigated conditions in Marianna Arkansas. At Tifton, measurements included PSII thermotolerance (T15, the temperature causing a 15% decline in maximum quantum yield), leaf temperatures, air temperatures, midday (1200 to 1400h) leaf water potentials (ΨMD), leaf-air vapor pressure deficit (VPD), actual quantum yield (ΦPSII) and electron transport rate through PSII (ETR) on three sample dates. At Marianna, T15 was measured on two sample dates. Optimal air and leaf temperatures were observed on all sample dates in Tifton, but PSII thermotolerance increased with water deficit conditions (ΨMD=-3.1MPa), and ETR was either unaffected or increased under water-stress. Additionally, T15 for PHY 499 was ∼5°C higher than for the other cultivars examined (DP 0912 and DP 1050). The Marianna site experienced more extreme high temperature conditions (20-30 days Tmax≥35°C), and showed an increase in T15 with higher average Tmax. When average T15 values for each location and sample date were plotted versus average daily Tmax, strong, positive relationships (r(2) from .954 to .714) were observed between Tmax and T15. For all locations T15 was substantially higher than actual field temperature conditions. We conclude that PSII thermostability in G. hirsutum acclimates to pre-existing environmental conditions; PSII is extremely tolerant to high temperature and water-deficit stress; and differences in PSII thermotolerance exist between

  6. Structural oxidation state studies of the manganese cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Wenchuan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed on Photosystem II (PSII)-enriched membranes prepared from spinach to explore: (1) the correlation between structure and magnetic spin state of the Mn cluster in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in the S2 state; and (2) the oxidation state changes of the Mn cluster in the flash-induced S-states. The structure of the Mn cluster in the S2 state with the g~4 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal (S2-g4 state) was compared with that in the S2 state with multiline signal (S2-MLS state) and the S1 state. The S2-g4 state has a higher XAS inflection point energy than that of the S1 state, indicating the oxidation of Mn in the advance from the S1 to the S2-g4 state. Differences in the edge shape and in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) show that the structure of the Mn cluster in the S2-g4 state is different from that in the S2-MLS or the S1 state. In the S2-g4 state, the second shell of backscatterers from the Mn absorber contains two Mn-Mn distances of 2.73 Å and 2.85 Å. Very little distance disorder exists in the second shell of the S1 or S2-MLS states. The third shell of the S2-g4 state at about 3.3 Å also contains increased heterogeneity relative to that of the S2-MLS or the S1 state. Various S-states were prepared at room-temperature by saturating, single-turnover flashes. The flash-dependent oscillation in the amplitude of the MLS was used to characterize the S-state composition and to construct "pure" S-state Mn K-edge spectra. The edge position shifts to higher energy by 1.8 eV upon the S1 → S2 transition.

  7. 'Photosystem II: the water splitting enzyme of photosynthesis and the origin of oxygen in our atmosphere'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, James

    2016-01-01

    About 3 billion years ago an enzyme emerged which would dramatically change the chemical composition of our planet and set in motion an unprecedented explosion in biological activity. This enzyme used solar energy to power the thermodynamically and chemically demanding reaction of water splitting. In so doing it provided biology with an unlimited supply of reducing equivalents needed to convert carbon dioxide into the organic molecules of life while at the same time produced oxygen to transform our planetary atmosphere from an anaerobic to an aerobic state. The enzyme which facilitates this reaction and therefore underpins virtually all life on our planet is known as Photosystem II (PSII). It is a pigment-binding, multisubunit protein complex embedded in the lipid environment of the thylakoid membranes of plants, algae and cyanobacteria. Today we have detailed understanding of the structure and functioning of this key and unique enzyme. The journey to this level of knowledge can be traced back to the discovery of oxygen itself in the 18th-century. Since then there has been a sequence of mile stone discoveries which makes a fascinating story, stretching over 200 years. But it is the last few years that have provided the level of detail necessary to reveal the chemistry of water oxidation and O-O bond formation. In particular, the crystal structure of the isolated PSII enzyme has been reported with ever increasing improvement in resolution. Thus the organisational and structural details of its many subunits and cofactors are now well understood. The water splitting site was revealed as a cluster of four Mn ions and a Ca ion surrounded by amino-acid side chains, of which seven provide direct ligands to the metals. The metal cluster is organised as a cubane structure composed of three Mn ions and a Ca2+ linked by oxo-bonds with the fourth Mn ion attached to the cubane. This structure has now been synthesised in a non-protein environment suggesting that it is a totally

  8. HERBICIDAS INIBIDORES DO FOTOSSISTEMA II – PARTE I /\tPHOTOSYSTEM II INHIBITOR HERBICIDES - PART I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ILCA P. DE F. E SILVA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available O controle químico tem sido o mais utilizado em grandes áreas de plantio, principalmente por ser um método rápido e eficiente. Os herbicidas inibidores do fotossistema II (PSII são fundamentais para o manejo integrado de plantas daninhas e práticas conservacionista de solo. A aplicação é realizada em pré-emergência ou pós-emergência inicial das plantas daninhas. A absorção é pelas raízes, tendo como barreira as estrias de Caspari, sendo a translocação realizada pelo xilema. O processo de absorção e translocação também são dependentes das próprias características do produto, como as propriedades lipofílicas e hidrofílicas, as quais podem ser medidas através do coeficiente de partição octanol-água (Kow. A inibição da fotossíntese acontece pela ligação dos herbicidas deste grupo ao sítio de ligação da QB, na proteína D1 do fotossistema II, o qual se localiza na membrana dos tilacóides dos cloroplastos, causando, o bloqueia do transporte de elétrons da QA para QB, interrompendo a fixação do CO2 e a produção de ATP e NAPH2.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of the extrinsic PsbP protein of photosystem II from Spinacia oleracea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohoutová, J.; Kutá Smatanová, I.; Brynda, J.; Lapkouski, M.; Revuelta, J. L.; Arellano, J. B.; Ettrich, R.

    2009-01-01

    Degradation-free crystalization of thrombin-digested recombinant His-tagged PsbP protein of photosystem II from Spinacia oleracea resulting in crystals diffracting to 2.06 Å. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the extrinsic PsbP protein of photosystem II from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was performed using N-terminally His-tagged recombinant PsbP protein overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant PsbP protein (thrombin-digested recombinant His-tagged PsbP) stored in bis-Tris buffer pH 6.00 was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique with PEG 550 MME as a precipitant and zinc sulfate as an additive. SDS–PAGE analysis of a dissolved crystal showed that the crystals did not contain the degradation products of recombinant PsbP protein. PsbP crystals diffracted to 2.06 Å resolution in space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 38.68, b = 46.73, c = 88.9 Å

  10. Heat stress and recovery of photosystem II efficiency in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars acclimated to different growth temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haque, Sabibul; Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig; Rosenqvist, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The effect of heat stress on photosystem II (PS II) efficiency and post-stress recovery was studied in four wheat cultivars using chlorophyll fluorescence. The main aim was to examine the cultivar differences in relation to inhibition and recovery of PSII functionality after heat stress...... and 25 °C) and subjected to heat stress (40 °C) for two days at early tillering and three days at anthesis and early grain development stages. The plants were returned to their original growth conditions after heat stress and recovery was observed for three days. The maximum photochemical efficiency (Fv...... heat tolerance characteristics as compared to the other three cultivars. The largest decrease in Fv/Fm and F′q/F′m after heat stress occurred in the cultivar PWS7, which did not recover completely after 72 h. All cultivars grown at 25 °C had a slightly increased heat tolerance and better recovery...

  11. Femtosecond visible/visible and visible/mid-IR pump-probe study of the photosystem II core antenna complex CP47

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.L.; Breton, J.; van Wilderen, L.; Dekker, J.P.; van Grondelle, R.

    2004-01-01

    CP47 is one of the two core antenna proteins of Photosystem II involved in the transfer of solar energy toward the photochemically active reaction center, the D1D2cytb559 complex. We have performed vis/vis and vis/mid-IR pump-probe experiments at room temperature as a first step in linking the

  12. Induction of Efficient Energy Dissipation in the Isolated Light-harvesting Complex of Photosystem II in the Absence of Protein Aggregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilioaia, C.; Johnson, M.P.; Horton, P.; Ruban, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    Under excess illumination, the Photosystem II light-harvesting antenna of higher plants has the ability to switch into an efficient photoprotective mode, allowing safe dissipation of excitation energy into heat. In this study, we show induction of the energy dissipation state, monitored by

  13. Pathways and timescales of primary charge separation in the photosystem II reaction center as revealed by a simultaneous fit of time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novoderezhkin, V.I.; Andrizhiyevskaya, E.G.; Dekker, J.P.; van Grondelle, R.

    2005-01-01

    We model the dynamics of energy transfer and primary charge separation in isolated photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers. Different exciton models with specific site energies of the six core pigments and two peripheral chlorophylls (Chls) in combination with different charge transfer schemes have

  14. Photosynthetic alterations of pea leaves infected systemically by pea enation mosaic virus: A coordinated decrease in efficiencies of CO(2) assimilation and photosystem II photochemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyseláková, H.; Prokopová, J.; Nauš, J.; Novák, Ondřej; Navrátil, M.; Šafářová, D.; Špundová, M.; Ilík, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 11 (2011), s. 1279-1289 ISSN 0981-9428 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/1649; GA MŠk ED0007/01/01 Keywords : Chlorophyll fluorescence * Pea enation mosaic virus * Pea * Photosynthesis * Photosystem II * Senescence Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.838, year: 2011

  15. AstroNet-II International Final Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Masdemont, Josep

    2016-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the "AstroNet-II International Final Conference". This conference was one of the last milestones of the Marie-Curie Research Training Network on Astrodynamics "AstroNet-II", that has been funded by the European Commission under the Seventh Framework Programme. The aim of the conference, and thus this book, is to communicate work on astrodynamics problems to an international and specialised audience. The results are presented by both members of the network and invited specialists. The topics include: trajectory design and control, attitude control, structural flexibility of spacecraft and formation flying. The book addresses a readership across the traditional boundaries between mathematics, engineering and industry by offering an interdisciplinary and multisectorial overview of the field.

  16. The role of Slr0151, a tetratricopeptide repeat protein from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, during Photosystem II assembly and repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eRast

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The assembly and repair of photosystem II (PSII is facilitated by a variety of assembly factors. Among those, the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR protein Slr0151 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis has previously been assigned a repair function under high light conditions (Yang et al., 2014, J. Integr. Plant Biol. 56, 1136-50. Here, we show that inactivation of Slr0151 affects thylakoid membrane ultrastructure even under normal light conditions. Moreover, the level and localization of Slr0151 are affected in a variety of PSII-related mutants. In particular, the data suggest a close functional relationship between Slr0151 and Sll0933, which interacts with Ycf48 during PSII assembly and is homologous to PAM68 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed a punctate distribution of Slr0151 within several different membrane types in Synechocystis cells.

  17. A fluorescence detected magnetic resonance investigation of the carotenoid triplet states associated with Photosystem II of isolated spinach thylakoid membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Santabarbara, S; Carbonera, D; Heathcote, P

    2005-01-01

    The carotenoid triplet populations associated with the fluorescence emission chlorophyll forms of Photosystem II have been investigated in isolated spinach thylakoid membranes by means of fluorescence detected magnetic resonance in zero field (FDMR). The spectra collected in the 680-690 nm emission range, have been fitted by a global analysis procedure. At least five different carotenoid triplet states coupled to the terminal emitting chlorophyll forms of PS II, peaking at 682 nm, 687 nm and 692 nm, have been characterised. The triplets associated with the outer antenna emission forms, at 682 nm, have zero field splitting parameters D = 0.0385 cm/sup -1/, E = 0.00367 cm/sup -1/; D = 0.0404 cm/sup -1/, E = 0.00379 cm/sup -1/ and D = 0.0386 cm/sup -1/, E = 0.00406 cm/sup -1/ which are very similar to those previously reported for the xanthophylls of the isolated LHC II complex. Therefore the FDMR spectra recorded in this work provide insights into the organisation of the LHC II complex in the unperturbed enviro...

  18. Photosystem II Photochemistry and Phycobiliprotein of the Red Algae Kappaphycus alvarezii and Their Implications for Light Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Photosystem II photochemistry and phycobiliprotein (PBP genes of red algae Kappaphycus alvarezii, raw material of κ-carrageenan used in food and pharmaceutical industries, were analyzed in this study. Minimum saturating irradiance (Ik of this algal species was less than 115 μmol m−2 s−1. Its actual PSII efficiency (yield II increased when light intensity enhanced and decreased when light intensity reached 200 μmol m−2 s−1. Under dim light, yield II declined at first and then increased on the fourth day. Under high light, yield II retained a stable value. These results indicate that K. alvarezii is a low-light-adapted species but possesses regulative mechanisms in response to both excessive and deficient light. Based on the PBP gene sequences, K. alvarezii, together with other red algae, assembled faster and showed a closer relationship with LL-Prochlorococcus compared to HL-Prochlorococcus. Many amino acid loci in PBP sequences of K. alvarezii were conserved with those of LL-Prochlorococcus. However, loci conserved with HL-Prochlorococcus but divergent with LL-Prochlorococcus were also found. The diversities of PE and PC are proposed to have played some roles during the algal evolution and divergence of light adaption.

  19. Photosystem II photochemistry and phycobiliprotein of the red algae Kappaphycus alvarezii and their implications for light adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiangyu; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhu, Jianyi; Yao, Chunyan; Liu, Jianguo; Qin, Song; Jiang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Photosystem II photochemistry and phycobiliprotein (PBP) genes of red algae Kappaphycus alvarezii, raw material of κ -carrageenan used in food and pharmaceutical industries, were analyzed in this study. Minimum saturating irradiance (I k) of this algal species was less than 115 μmol m(-2) s(-1). Its actual PSII efficiency (yield II) increased when light intensity enhanced and decreased when light intensity reached 200 μmol m(-2) s(-1). Under dim light, yield II declined at first and then increased on the fourth day. Under high light, yield II retained a stable value. These results indicate that K. alvarezii is a low-light-adapted species but possesses regulative mechanisms in response to both excessive and deficient light. Based on the PBP gene sequences, K. alvarezii, together with other red algae, assembled faster and showed a closer relationship with LL-Prochlorococcus compared to HL-Prochlorococcus. Many amino acid loci in PBP sequences of K. alvarezii were conserved with those of LL-Prochlorococcus. However, loci conserved with HL-Prochlorococcus but divergent with LL-Prochlorococcus were also found. The diversities of PE and PC are proposed to have played some roles during the algal evolution and divergence of light adaption.

  20. Low-energy absorption and luminescence of higher plant photosystem II core samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, Joseph L.; Smith, Paul J.; Pace, Ron J.; Krausz, Elmars

    2007-01-01

    The charge-separating state of PSII has been recently assigned as a homogeneously broadened band peaking at 705 nm. The possibility of observing emission due to luminescence from the charge-separating state was investigated. Emission from the charge-separating state is predicted to be both broad and substantially Stokes shifted. Our PSII cores show an easily observable and broad emission peaking near 735 nm when excited at 707 nm and beyond for temperatures below 100 K as well as the well-known F685 and F695 nm emission when excited at 633 nm. However, the 735 nm emission bears a close correspondence to that previously reported for the light harvesting pigment of photosystem I (PSI), LHCI-730, and we attribute our observed emission to a minor contamination of our sample with this protein. High sensitivity circular dichroism (CD) spectra establish that LHCI and/or PSI contamination of our samples does not contribute significantly to the absorption seen in the 700-730 nm region. Furthermore, systematic illumination-induced absorption changes seen in this region are shown to quantitatively track with charge separation and the subsequent secondary acceptor plastoquinone (Q A ) acceptor anion formation. These results confirm that absorption in the 700-730 nm region is associated with the reaction centre of active PSII

  1. Loss of Functional Photosystem II Reaction Centres in Zooxanthellae of Corals Exposed to Bleaching Conditions: Using Fluorescence Rise Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R; Larkum, A W D; Frankart, C; Kühl, M; Ralph, P J

    2004-01-01

    Mass coral bleaching is linked to elevated sea surface temperatures, 1-2 degrees C above average, during periods of intense light. These conditions induce the expulsion of zooxanthellae from the coral host in response to photosynthetic damage in the algal symbionts. The mechanism that triggers this release has not been clearly established and to further our knowledge of this process, fluorescence rise kinetics have been studied for the first time. Corals that were exposed to elevated temperature (33 degrees C) and light (280 mumol photons m(-2) s(-1)), showed distinct changes in the fast polyphasic induction of chlorophyll-a fluorescence, indicating biophysical changes in the photochemical processes. The fluorescence rise over the first 2000ms was monitored in three species of corals for up to 8 h, with a PEA fluorometer and an imaging-PAM. Pocillopora damicornis showed the least impact on photosynthetic apparatus, while Acropora nobilis was the most sensitive, with Cyphastrea serailia intermediate between the other two species. A. nobilis showed a remarkable capacity for recovery from bleaching conditions. For all three species, a steady decline in the slope of the initial rise and the height of the J-transient was observed, indicating the loss of functional Photosystem II (PS II) centres under elevated-temperature conditions. A significant loss of PS II centres was confirmed by a decline in photochemical quenching when exposed to bleaching stress. Non-photochemical quenching was identified as a significant mechanism for dissipating excess energy as heat under the bleaching conditions. Photophosphorylation could explain this decline in PS II activity. State transitions, a component of non-photochemical quenching, was a probable cause of the high non-photochemical quenching during bleaching and this mechanism is associated with the phosphorylation-induced dissociation of the light harvesting complexes from the PS II reaction centres. This reversible process may

  2. Photosystem II cycle activity and alternative electron transport in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum under dynamic light conditions and nitrogen limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Heiko; Jakob, Torsten; Lavaud, Johann; Wilhelm, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Alternative electron sinks are an important regulatory mechanism to dissipate excessively absorbed light energy particularly under fast changing dynamic light conditions. In diatoms, the cyclic electron transport (CET) around Photosystem II (PS II) is an alternative electron transport pathway (AET) that contributes to avoidance of overexcitation under high light illumination. The combination of nitrogen limitation and high-intensity irradiance regularly occurs under natural conditions and is expected to force the imbalance between light absorption and the metabolic use of light energy. The present study demonstrates that under N limitation, the amount of AET and the activity of CETPSII in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum were increased. Thereby, the activity of CETPSII was linearly correlated with the amount of AET rates. It is concluded that CETPSII significantly contributes to AET in P. tricornutum. Surprisingly, CETPSII was found to be activated already at the end of the dark period under N-limited conditions. This coincided with a significantly increased degree of reduction of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. The analysis of the macromolecular composition of cells of P. tricornutum under N-limited conditions revealed a carbon allocation in favor of carbohydrates during the light period and their degradation during the dark phase. A possible linkage between the activity of CETPSII and degree of reduction of the PQ pool on the one side and the macromolecular changes on the other is discussed.

  3. Combined effect of diuron and simazine on photosystem II photochemistry in a sandy soil and soil amended with solid olive-mill waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Cox, Lucía; Cornejo, Juan; Figueroa, Enrique

    2007-01-01

    Diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)- = 1,1-dimethylurea) and simazine (6-chloro-N(2), N(4)-diethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) are soil-applied herbicides used in olive crops. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of these herbicides on Photosystem II photochemistry of Olea europaea L., and whether the amendment of soil with an organic waste (OW) from olive oil production industry modifies this effect. For this purpose, herbicide soil adsorption studies, with unamended and OW-amended soil, and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements in adult olive leaves, after one, two and three weeks of soil herbicide treatment and/or OW amendment, were performed. Soil application of these herbicides reduced the efficiency of Photosystem II photochemistry of olive trees due to chronic photoinhibition, and this effect is counterbalanced by the addition of OW to the soil. OW reduces herbicide uptake by the plant due to an increase in herbicide adsorption.

  4. The exposed N-terminal tail of the D1 subunit is required for rapid D1 degradation during Photosystem II repair in Synechocystis sp

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komenda, Josef; Tichý, Martin; Prášil, Ondřej; Knoppová, Jana; Kuviková, Stanislava; de Vries, R.; Nixon, P. J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 19, - (2007), s. 2839-2854 ISSN 1040-4651 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA ČR GA203/04/0800; GA ČR GA206/06/0322 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : photosystem II * cyanobacterium * synechocystis sp. pcc 6803 Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.653, year: 2007

  5. Rising CO2 interacts with growth light and growth rate to alter photosystem II photoinactivation of the coastal diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    Full Text Available We studied the interactive effects of pCO(2 and growth light on the coastal marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana CCMP 1335 growing under ambient and expected end-of-the-century pCO(2 (750 ppmv, and a range of growth light from 30 to 380 µmol photons·m(-2·s(-1. Elevated pCO(2 significantly stimulated the growth of T. pseudonana under sub-saturating growth light, but not under saturating to super-saturating growth light. Under ambient pCO(2 susceptibility to photoinactivation of photosystem II (σ(i increased with increasing growth rate, but cells growing under elevated pCO(2 showed no dependence between growth rate and σ(i, so under high growth light cells under elevated pCO(2 were less susceptible to photoinactivation of photosystem II, and thus incurred a lower running cost to maintain photosystem II function. Growth light altered the contents of RbcL (RUBISCO and PsaC (PSI protein subunits, and the ratios among the subunits, but there were only limited effects on these and other protein pools between cells grown under ambient and elevated pCO(2.

  6. Potential of Ranunculus acris L. for biomonitoring trace element contamination of riverbank soils: photosystem II activity and phenotypic responses for two soil series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Lilian; Lamy, Pierre; Bert, Valerie; Quintela-Sabaris, Celestino; Mench, Michel

    2016-02-01

    Foliar ionome, photosystem II activity, and leaf growth parameters of Ranunculus acris L., a potential biomonitor of trace element (TE) contamination and phytoavailability, were assessed using two riverbank soil series. R. acris was cultivated on two potted soil series obtained by mixing a TE (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn)-contaminated technosol with either an uncontaminated sandy riverbank soil (A) or a silty clay one slightly contaminated by TE (B). Trace elements concentrations in the soil-pore water and the leaves, leaf dry weight (DW) yield, total leaf area (TLA), specific leaf area (SLA), and photosystem II activity were measured for both soil series after a 50-day growth period. As soil contamination increased, changes in soluble TE concentrations depended on soil texture. Increase in total soil TE did not affect the leaf DW yield, the TLA, the SLA, and the photosystem II activity of R. acris over the 50-day exposure. The foliar ionome did not reflect the total and soluble TE concentrations in both soil series. Foliar ionome of R. acris was only effective to biomonitor total and soluble soil Na concentrations in both soil series and total and soluble soil Mo concentrations in the soil series B.

  7. Mixture toxicity of three photosystem II inhibitors (atrazine, isoproturon, and diuron) toward photosynthesis of freshwater phytoplankton studied in outdoor mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauert, Stefanie; Escher, Beate; Singer, Heinz; Hollender, Juliane; Knauer, Katja

    2008-09-01

    Mixture toxicity of three herbicides with the same mode of action was studied in a long-term outdoor mesocosm study. Photosynthetic activity of phytoplankton as the direct target site of the herbicides was chosen as physiological response parameter. The three photosystem II (PSII) inhibitors atrazine, isoproturon, and diuron were applied as 30% hazardous concentrations (HC30), which we derived from species sensitivity distributions calculated on the basis of EC50 growth inhibition data. The respective herbicide mixture comprised 1/3 of the HC30 of each herbicide. Short-term laboratory experiments revealed that the HC30 values corresponded to EC40 values when regarding photosynthetic activity as the response parameter. In the outdoor mesocosm experiment, effects of atrazine, isoproturon, diuron and their mixture on the photosynthetic activity of phytoplankton were investigated during a five-week period with constant exposure and a subsequent five-month postexposure period when the herbicides dissipated. The results demonstrated that mixture effects determined at the beginning of constant exposure can be described by concentration addition since the mixture elicited a phytotoxic effect comparable to the single herbicides. Declining effects on photosynthetic activity during the experiment might be explained by both a decrease in water herbicide concentrations and by the induction of community tolerance.

  8. Combined effects of temperature and the herbicide diuron on Photosystem II activity of the tropical seagrass Halophila ovalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Adam D.; Collier, Catherine J.; Flores, Florita; Langlois, Lucas; Ralph, Peter J.; Negri, Andrew P.

    2017-03-01

    Tropical seagrasses are at their highest risk of exposure to photosystem II (PSII) herbicides when elevated rainfall and runoff from farms transports these toxicants into coastal habitats during summer, coinciding with periods of elevated temperature. PSII herbicides, such as diuron, can increase the sensitivity of corals to thermal stress, but little is known of the potential for herbicides to impact the thermal optima of tropical seagrass. Here we employed a well-plate approach to experimentally assess the effects of diuron on the photosynthetic performance of Halophila ovalis leaves across a 25 °C temperature range (36 combinations of these stressors across 15-40 °C). The thermal optimum for photosynthetic efficiency (▵) in H. ovalis was 31 °C while lower and higher temperatures reduced ▵ as did all elevated concentrations of diuron. There were significant interactions between the effects of temperature and diuron, with a majority of the combined stresses causing sub-additive (antagonistic) effects. However, both stressors caused negative responses and the sum of the responses was greater than that caused by temperature or diuron alone. These results indicate that improving water quality (reducing herbicide in runoff) is likely to maximise seagrass health during extreme temperature events that will become more common as the climate changes.

  9. Cyanobacterial flv4-2 Operon-Encoded Proteins Optimize Light Harvesting and Charge Separation in Photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukhutsina, Volha; Bersanini, Luca; Aro, Eva-Mari; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) complexes drive the water-splitting reaction necessary to transform sunlight into chemical energy. However, too much light can damage and disrupt PSII. In cyanobacteria, the flv4-2 operon encodes three proteins (Flv2, Flv4, and Sll0218), which safeguard PSII activity under air-level CO2 and in high light conditions. However, the exact mechanism of action of these proteins has not been clarified yet. We demonstrate that the PSII electron transfer properties are influenced by the flv4-2 operon-encoded proteins. Accelerated secondary charge separation kinetics was observed upon expression/overexpression of the flv4-2 operon. This is likely induced by docking of the Flv2/Flv4 heterodimer in the vicinity of the QB pocket of PSII, which, in turn, increases the QB redox potential and consequently stabilizes forward electron transfer. The alternative electron transfer route constituted by Flv2/Flv4 sequesters electrons from QB(-) guaranteeing the dissipation of excess excitation energy in PSII under stressful conditions. In addition, we demonstrate that in the absence of the flv4-2 operon-encoded proteins, about 20% of the phycobilisome antenna becomes detached from the reaction centers, thus decreasing light harvesting. Phycobilisome detachment is a consequence of a decreased relative content of PSII dimers, a feature observed in the absence of the Sll0218 protein. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chemical Equilibrium Models for the S3 State of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Hiroshi; Shoji, Mitsuo; Shen, Jian-Ren; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2016-01-19

    We have performed hybrid density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate how chemical equilibria can be described in the S3 state of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II. For a chosen 340-atom model, 1 stable and 11 metastable intermediates have been identified within the range of 13 kcal mol(-1) that differ in protonation, charge, spin, and conformational states. The results imply that reversible interconversion of these intermediates gives rise to dynamic equilibria that involve processes with relocations of protons and electrons residing in the Mn4CaO5 cluster, as well as bound water ligands, with concomitant large changes in the cluster geometry. Such proton tautomerism and redox isomerism are responsible for reversible activation/deactivation processes of substrate oxygen species, through which Mn-O and O-O bonds are transiently ruptured and formed. These results may allow for a tentative interpretation of kinetic data on substrate water exchange on the order of seconds at room temperature, as measured by time-resolved mass spectrometry. The reliability of the hybrid DFT method for the multielectron redox reaction in such an intricate system is also addressed.

  11. Spectral properties of chlorines and electron transfer with their participation in the photosynthetic reaction center of photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchupak, E. E.; Ivashin, N. V.

    2014-02-01

    Structural factors that provide localization of excited states and determine the properties of primary donor and acceptor of electron in the reaction center of photosystem II (PSII RC) are studied. The results of calculations using stationary and time-dependent density functional theory indicate an important role of protein environments of chlorophylls PA, PB, BA, and BB and pheophytins HA and HB in the area with a radius of no greater than ≤10 Å in the formation of excitonic states of PSII RC. When the neighboring elements are taken into account, the wavelength of long-wavelength Q y transition of chlorophyll molecules is varied by about 10 nm. The effect is less developed for pheophytin molecules (Δλ ≅ 2 nm). The following elements strongly affect energy of the transition: HisA198 and HisD197 amino-acid residues that serve as ligands of magnesium atoms affect PA and PB, respectively; MetA183 affects PA; MetA172 and MetD198 affect BA; water molecules that are located above the planes of the BA and BB macrocycles form H bonds with carbonyl groups; and phytol chains of PA and PB affect BA, BB, HA, and HB. The analysis of excitonic states, mutual positions of molecular orbitals of electron donors and acceptors, and matrix elements of electron transfer reaction shows that (i) charge separation between BA and HA and PB and BA is possible in the active A branch of cofactors of PSII RC and (ii) electron transfer is blocked at the BB - HB fragment in inactive B branch of PSII RC.

  12. The mechanism of photosystem-II inactivation during sulphur deprivation-induced H2 production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Valéria; Vidal-Meireles, André; Podmaniczki, Anna; Szentmihályi, Klára; Rákhely, Gábor; Zsigmond, Laura; Kovács, László; Tóth, Szilvia Z

    2018-05-01

    Sulphur limitation may restrain cell growth and viability. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, sulphur limitation may induce H 2 production lasting for several days, which can be exploited as a renewable energy source. Sulphur limitation causes a large number of physiological changes, including the inactivation of photosystem II (PSII), leading to the establishment of hypoxia, essential for the increase in hydrogenase expression and activity. The inactivation of PSII has long been assumed to be caused by the sulphur-limited turnover of its reaction center protein PsbA. Here we reinvestigated this issue in detail and show that: (i) upon transferring Chlamydomonas cells to sulphur-free media, the cellular sulphur content decreases only by about 25%; (ii) as demonstrated by lincomycin treatments, PsbA has a significant turnover, and other photosynthetic subunits, namely RbcL and CP43, are degraded more rapidly than PsbA. On the other hand, sulphur limitation imposes oxidative stress early on, most probably involving the formation of singlet oxygen in PSII, which leads to an increase in the expression of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase, playing an essential role in ascorbate biosynthesis. When accumulated to the millimolar concentration range, ascorbate may inactivate the oxygen-evolving complex and provide electrons to PSII, albeit at a low rate. In the absence of a functional donor side and sufficient electron transport, PSII reaction centers are inactivated and degraded. We therefore demonstrate that the inactivation of PSII is a complex and multistep process, which may serve to mitigate the damaging effects of sulphur limitation. © 2018 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Degradation and movement in soil of the herbicide isoproturon analyzed by a Photosystem II-based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malý, J; Klem, K; Lukavská, A; Masojídek, J

    2005-01-01

    We have examined the persistence and movement of a urea-type herbicide, isoproturon [IPU; 3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-1,1'-dimethylurea], in soil using a novel herbicide-detection device, the prototype of a portable electrochemical biosensor based on Photosystem II particles immobilized on printed electrodes, and evaluated its results against two other methods: (i) chlorophyll-fluorescence bioassay based on polyphasic induction curves, and (ii) standard analysis represented by liquid chromatography. The data of the herbicide's content determined in soil extracts from field experiments correlated in all three methods. The biosensor assay was effective in determining the herbicide's concentration to as low as 10(-7) M. The results of our experiments also showed the kinetics of movement, degradation, and persistence of isoproturon in various depths of soil. After 6 to 9 wk, almost half of the isoproturon was still actively present in the upper soil layers (0-10 and 10-20 cm) and only 5 to 10% of biological activity was inhibited in the deeper soil layer tested (20-30 cm). Thus, inhibition within the limit of detection of both bioassays could be observed up to 9 wk after application in all profiles (0-30 cm), whereas inhibition persisted for up to 11 wk in the upper soil profile (0-10 cm). The use of the biosensor demonstrated its possibility for making rapid and cheap phytotoxicity tests. Our biosensor can give preliminary information about the biological activity of isoproturon in hours--much faster than growth biotests that may take several days or more.

  14. Photochemical reactions in dehydrated photosynthetic organisms, leaves, chloroplasts and photosystem II particles: reversible reduction of pheophytin and chlorophyll and oxidation of {beta}-carotene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuvalov, Vladimir A.; Heber, Ulrich

    2003-11-01

    Photoreactions of dehydrated leaves, isolated broken chloroplasts and PSII membrane fragments of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) were studied at different air humidities and compared with photoreactions of dry fronds of a fern, Polypodium vulgare, and a dry lichen, Parmelia sulcata, which in contrast to spinach are insensitive to photoinactivation in the dry state. Even in very dry air, P700 in the reaction center of photosystem I of dry leaves was oxidized, and the primary quinone acceptor Q{sub A} in the reaction center of photosystem II was photoreduced by low light. These reactions were only very slowly reversed in the dark and saturated under low light intensity. Light-minus-dark difference absorption spectra of the dry leaves, isolated chloroplasts and PSII membrane fragments measured at higher light intensities revealed absorbance changes of {beta}-carotene at 500 nm (light-dependent bleaching) and 980 nm (light-dependent band formation) and bleaching of chlorophyll at 436 and 680 nm with appearance of bands at 450 and 800 nm. Decrease of chlorophyll fluorescence upon strong illumination indicated photoaccumulation of a quencher. All these changes were kinetically related and readily reversible. They are interpreted to show light-induced oxidation of {beta}-carotene (Car) and reduction of chlorophyll-680 (Chl-680) in the reaction center of photosystem II of the dried leaves, chloroplasts and photosystem II particles. The fluorescence quencher was suggested to be Chl-680{sup -} or Car{sup +} in close proximity to P680, the primary electron donor. Appreciable photoaccumulation of reduced pheophytin was only observed in dry leaves after Q{sub A} reduction had been lost during heat treatment of hydrated leaves prior to dehydration. The observations are interpreted to show light-dependent cyclic electron flow within the reaction center of photosystem II in which Chl-680 (or Pheo) is reduced by P680* and Car is oxidized by P680{sup +} with consequent recombination of

  15. Photochemical reactions in dehydrated photosynthetic organisms, leaves, chloroplasts and photosystem II particles: reversible reduction of pheophytin and chlorophyll and oxidation of β-carotene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuvalov, Vladimir A.; Heber, Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    Photoreactions of dehydrated leaves, isolated broken chloroplasts and PSII membrane fragments of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) were studied at different air humidities and compared with photoreactions of dry fronds of a fern, Polypodium vulgare, and a dry lichen, Parmelia sulcata, which in contrast to spinach are insensitive to photoinactivation in the dry state. Even in very dry air, P700 in the reaction center of photosystem I of dry leaves was oxidized, and the primary quinone acceptor Q A in the reaction center of photosystem II was photoreduced by low light. These reactions were only very slowly reversed in the dark and saturated under low light intensity. Light-minus-dark difference absorption spectra of the dry leaves, isolated chloroplasts and PSII membrane fragments measured at higher light intensities revealed absorbance changes of β-carotene at 500 nm (light-dependent bleaching) and 980 nm (light-dependent band formation) and bleaching of chlorophyll at 436 and 680 nm with appearance of bands at 450 and 800 nm. Decrease of chlorophyll fluorescence upon strong illumination indicated photoaccumulation of a quencher. All these changes were kinetically related and readily reversible. They are interpreted to show light-induced oxidation of β-carotene (Car) and reduction of chlorophyll-680 (Chl-680) in the reaction center of photosystem II of the dried leaves, chloroplasts and photosystem II particles. The fluorescence quencher was suggested to be Chl-680 - or Car + in close proximity to P680, the primary electron donor. Appreciable photoaccumulation of reduced pheophytin was only observed in dry leaves after Q A reduction had been lost during heat treatment of hydrated leaves prior to dehydration. The observations are interpreted to show light-dependent cyclic electron flow within the reaction center of photosystem II in which Chl-680 (or Pheo) is reduced by P680* and Car is oxidized by P680 + with consequent recombination of Car + and Chl-680 - (or Pheo

  16. Photoinhibition of photosynthesis in higher plants : From photosystem II paricticle to intact leaf

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, Klaas Jan

    1992-01-01

    In this thesis several aspects of photoinhibition have been studied. Photoinhibition of PS II was studied, both on a basic (biophysical and biochemical) level and on a more integrated (eco)physiological level. The results of the different approaches were integrated and discussed with respect to the

  17. Studies on femtosecond fluorescence dynamics of photosystem II Particle complex at low temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Liu Xiao; He, Jun Fang; Cai, Xia; Peng Jun Fang; Kuang Ting Yun

    2004-01-01

    In order to understanding the diversity of energy transfer in PS II at different temperatures, PS II particle complex purified from spinach was investigated with femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in the case of excitation 507 nm at 83 K, 160 K, 273 K. The data were analyzed by Gauss analysis and fluorescence decay time- fitting. Some results were achieved. (1) Increase of the temperature results in a broadening of the fluorescence emission spectra due to the temperature-dependent expressions for nonradiative transitions between two electronic states. (2) There are at least several characteristic Chl molecules exist in PS II particle complex, i.e. Chl b/sub 639//sup 640/, Chl b/sub 640//sup 645/, Chl a/sub 660//sup 663/, Chl a/sub 667//sup 668/, Chl a/sub 673//sup 676/, Chl a/sub 680 //sup 681/, Chl a/sub 680/681//sup 682/, Chl a/sub 684,685//sup 668 /689/, Chl a/sub 688//sup 698/, (Chl a/b/sub a//sup e/: a represents the peak of absorption, e represents the peak of emission). (3) Though the ...

  18. Photosystem II repair and plant immunity: Lessons learned from Arabidopsis mutant lacking the THYLAKOID LUMEN PROTEIN 18.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari eJärvi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplasts play an important role in the cellular sensing of abiotic and biotic stress. Signals originating from photosynthetic light reactions, in the form of redox and pH changes, accumulation of reactive oxygen and electrophile species or stromal metabolites are of key importance in chloroplast retrograde signaling. These signals initiate plant acclimation responses to both abiotic and biotic stresses. To reveal the molecular responses activated by rapid fluctuations in growth light intensity, gene expression analysis was performed with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and the tlp18.3 mutant plants, the latter showing a stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light conditions (Biochem. J, 406, 415-425. Expression pattern of genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain did not differ between fluctuating and constant light conditions, neither in wild type nor in tlp18.3 plants, and the composition of the thylakoid membrane protein complexes likewise remained unchanged. Nevertheless, the fluctuating light conditions repressed in wild-type plants a broad spectrum of genes involved in immune responses, which likely resulted from shade-avoidance responses and their intermixing with hormonal signaling. On the contrary, in the tlp18.3 mutant plants there was an imperfect repression of defense-related transcripts upon growth under fluctuating light, possibly by signals originating from minor malfunction of the photosystem II (PSII repair cycle, which directly or indirectly modulated the transcript abundances of genes related to light perception via phytochromes. Consequently, a strong allocation of resources to defense reactions in the tlp18.3 mutant plants presumably results in the stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light.

  19. Photosystem II-cyclic electron flow powers exceptional photoprotection and record growth in the microalga Chlorella ohadii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananyev, Gennady; Gates, Colin; Kaplan, Aaron; Dismukes, G Charles

    2017-11-01

    The desert microalga Chlorella ohadii was reported to grow at extreme light intensities with minimal photoinhibition, tolerate frequent de/re-hydrations, yet minimally employs antenna-based non-photochemical quenching for photoprotection. Here we investigate the molecular mechanisms by measuring Photosystem II charge separation yield (chlorophyll variable fluorescence, Fv/Fm) and flash-induced O 2 yield to measure the contributions from both linear (PSII-LEF) and cyclic (PSII-CEF) electron flow within PSII. Cells grow increasingly faster at higher light intensities (μE/m 2 /s) from low (20) to high (200) to extreme (2000) by escalating photoprotection via shifting from PSII-LEF to PSII-CEF. This shifts PSII charge separation from plastoquinone reduction (PSII-LEF) to plastoquinol oxidation (PSII-CEF), here postulated to enable proton gradient and ATP generation that powers photoprotection. Low light-grown cells have unusually small antennae (332 Chl/PSII), use mainly PSII-LEF (95%) and convert 40% of PSII charge separations into O 2 (a high O 2 quantum yield of 0.06mol/mol PSII/flash). High light-grown cells have smaller antenna and lower PSII-LEF (63%). Extreme light-grown cells have only 42 Chl/PSII (no LHCII antenna), minimal PSII-LEF (10%), and grow faster than any known phototroph (doubling time 1.3h). Adding a synthetic quinone in excess to supplement the PQ pool fully uncouples PSII-CEF from its natural regulation and produces maximum PSII-LEF. Upon dark adaptation PSII-LEF rapidly reverts to PSII-CEF, a transient protection mechanism to conserve water and minimize the cost of antenna biosynthesis. The capacity of the electron acceptor pool (plastoquinone pool), and the characteristic times for exchange of (PQH 2 ) B with PQ pool and reoxidation of (PQH 2 ) pool were determined. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Endophytic infection alleviates Pb{sup 2+} stress effects on photosystem II functioning of Oryza sativa leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xuemei, E-mail: lxmls132@163.com [College of Chemistry and Life Science, Shenyang Normal University, Shenyang 110034 (China); Zhang, Lihong, E-mail: lihongzhang132@163.com [Environmental Science Department of Liaoning University,Shenyang 110036 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Chl fluorescence parameters of endophyte-infected rice under Pb{sup 2+} stress were tested. • The efficiency and stability of PSII are markedly affected by Pb{sup 2+} stress. • Endophyte infection improved photosynthetic system activity under Pb{sup 2+} stress. • JIP-test is a suitable tool for monitoring of Pb{sup 2+} stress. • Endophyte infection may increase tolerance to Pb{sup 2+} in rice. - Abstract: The aims of this study were to examine the effect of Pb{sup 2+} stress on the primary reaction of photosynthesis and to assess the potential benefits of endophytic infection on the Pb{sup 2+} tolerance of rice seedlings. Rice inoculated with an endophytic fungus (E+) and non-inoculated (E−) were subjected to 0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 μM Pb{sup 2+}. The responses to Pb{sup 2+} stress were characterized by the analysis of Chl a fluorescence. A comparison of E− with E+ rice seedlings, as evaluated by their performance index (PI{sub ABS} and PI{sub tot}), revealed the inhibitory effects of Pb{sup 2+} on photosystem II (PSII) connectivity, the oxygen evolving complex (OEC), and on the J step of the induction curves, which is associated with an inhibition of electron transport from the quinone acceptor Q{sub A} to Q{sub B}. Furthermore, the changes of the donor and the acceptor parameters of PSII were greater in E− than in E+ under Pb{sup 2+} stress. These observations suggest that the efficiency and stability of PSII are markedly affected by Pb{sup 2+} stress, and the photosynthetic energy conservation in E+ was more effective than in E−. We showed that endophytic infection plays an important role in enhancing the photosynthetic mechanism of rice seedlings exposed to Pb{sup 2+} stress.

  1. The Alleviation of Heat Damage to Photosystem II and Enzymatic Antioxidants by Exogenous Spermidine in Tall Fescue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb is a typical cool-season grass that is widely used in turf and pasture. However, high temperature as an abiotic stress seriously affects its utilization. The objective of this study was to explore the effect of spermidine (Spd on heat stress response of tall fescue. The samples were exposed to 22°C (normal condition or 44°C (heat stress for 4 h. The results showed that exogenous Spd partially improved the quality of tall fescue leaves under normal temperature conditions. Nevertheless, after heat stress treatment, exogenous Spd significantly decreased the electrolyte leakage of tall fescue leaves. Spd also profoundly reduced the H2O2 and O2⋅- content and increased antioxidant enzymes activities. In addition, PAs can also regulate antioxidant enzymes activities including SOD, POD, and APX which could help to scavenge ROS. Moreover, application of Spd could also remarkably increase the chlorophyll content and had a positive effect on the chlorophyll α fluorescence transients under high temperature. The Spd reagent enhanced the performance of photosystem II (PSII as observed by the JIP-test. Under heat stress, the Spd profoundly improved the partial potentials at the steps of energy bifurcations (PIABS and PItotal and the quantum yields and efficiencies (φP0, δR0, φR0, and γRC. Exogenous Spd could also reduce the specific energy fluxes per QA- reducing PSII reaction center (RC (TP0/RC and ET0/RC. Additionally, exogenous Spd improved the expression level of psbA and psbB, which encoded the proteins of PSII core reaction center complex. We infer that PAs can stabilize the structure of nucleic acids and protect RNA from the degradation of ribonuclease. In brief, our study indicates that exogenous Spd enhances the heat tolerance of tall fescue by maintaining cell membrane stability, increasing antioxidant enzymes activities, improving PSII, and relevant gene expression.

  2. The Alleviation of Heat Damage to Photosystem II and Enzymatic Antioxidants by Exogenous Spermidine in Tall Fescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Hu, Tao; Amombo, Erick; Wang, Guangyang; Xie, Yan; Fu, Jinmin

    2017-01-01

    Tall fescue ( Festuca arundinacea Schreb) is a typical cool-season grass that is widely used in turf and pasture. However, high temperature as an abiotic stress seriously affects its utilization. The objective of this study was to explore the effect of spermidine (Spd) on heat stress response of tall fescue. The samples were exposed to 22°C (normal condition) or 44°C (heat stress) for 4 h. The results showed that exogenous Spd partially improved the quality of tall fescue leaves under normal temperature conditions. Nevertheless, after heat stress treatment, exogenous Spd significantly decreased the electrolyte leakage of tall fescue leaves. Spd also profoundly reduced the H 2 O 2 and O 2 ⋅- content and increased antioxidant enzymes activities. In addition, PAs can also regulate antioxidant enzymes activities including SOD, POD, and APX which could help to scavenge ROS. Moreover, application of Spd could also remarkably increase the chlorophyll content and had a positive effect on the chlorophyll α fluorescence transients under high temperature. The Spd reagent enhanced the performance of photosystem II (PSII) as observed by the JIP-test. Under heat stress, the Spd profoundly improved the partial potentials at the steps of energy bifurcations (PI ABS and PI total ) and the quantum yields and efficiencies (φP 0 , δR 0 , φR 0 , and γRC). Exogenous Spd could also reduce the specific energy fluxes per Q A - reducing PSII reaction center (RC) (TP 0 /RC and ET 0 /RC). Additionally, exogenous Spd improved the expression level of psbA and psbB , which encoded the proteins of PSII core reaction center complex. We infer that PAs can stabilize the structure of nucleic acids and protect RNA from the degradation of ribonuclease. In brief, our study indicates that exogenous Spd enhances the heat tolerance of tall fescue by maintaining cell membrane stability, increasing antioxidant enzymes activities, improving PSII, and relevant gene expression.

  3. The protonation state around TyrD/TyrD• in photosystem II is reflected in its biphasic oxidation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöholm, Johannes; Ho, Felix; Ahmadova, Nigar; Brinkert, Katharina; Hammarström, Leif; Mamedov, Fikret; Styring, Stenbjörn

    2017-02-01

    The tyrosine residue D2-Tyr160 (Tyr D ) in photosystem II (PSII) can be oxidized through charge equilibrium with the oxygen evolving complex in PSII. The kinetics of the electron transfer from Tyr D has been followed using time-resolved EPR spectroscopy after triggering the oxidation of pre-reduced Tyr D by a short laser flash. After its oxidation Tyr D is observed as a neutral radical (Tyr D • ) indicating that the oxidation is coupled to a deprotonation event. The redox state of Tyr D was reported to be determined by the two water positions identified in the crystal structure of PSII [Saito et al. (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110, 7690]. To assess the mechanism of the proton coupled electron transfer of Tyr D the oxidation kinetics has been followed in the presence of deuterated buffers, thereby resolving the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of Tyr D oxidation at different H/D concentrations. Two kinetic phases of Tyr D oxidation - the fast phase (msec-sec time range) and the slow phase (tens of seconds time range) were resolved as was previously reported [Vass and Styring (1991) Biochemistry 30, 830]. In the presence of deuterated buffers the kinetics was significantly slower compared to normal buffers. Furthermore, although the kinetics were faster at both high pH and pD values the observed KIE was found to be similar (~2.4) over the whole pL range investigated. We assign the fast and slow oxidation phases to two populations of PSII centers with different water positions, proximal and distal respectively, and discuss possible deprotonation events in the vicinity of Tyr D . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Thermotolerance and Photosystem II Behaviour in Co-occuring Temperate Tree Species Exposed to Short-term Extreme Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, A.; Warren, J.; Cummings, C.; Han, J.

    2017-12-01

    Thermal stress can induce irreversible photodamage with longer consequences for plant metabolism. We focused on photosystem II (PSII) behaviour to understand how this complex responds in different co-occuring temperate trees exposed to short-term extreme heat waves. The study was designed for understanding complex heat tolerance mechanisms in trees. During manipulative heat-wave experiments, we monitored instantaneous PSII performance and tracked both transient and chronic PSII damages using chlorophyll a fluorescence characteristics. Fluorescence signals were used to simulate PSII bioenergetic processes. The light (Fv'/Fm') and dark-adapted (Fv/Fm) fluorescence traits including fast induction kinetics (OJIP), electron transport rate, PSII operating efficiency and quenching capacities were significantly affected by the heat treatments. Loss in PSII efficiency was more apparent in species like black cottonwood, yellow poplar, walnuts and conifers, whereas oaks maintained relatively better PSII functions. The post-heat recovery of Fv/Fm varied across the studied species showing differential carry over effects. PSII down-regulation was one of dominant factors for the loss in operational photosynthesis during extreme heat wave events. Both light and dark-adapted fluorescence characteristics showed loss in photo-regulatory functions and photodamage. Some resilient species showed rapid recovery from transient PSII damage, whereas fingerprints of chronic PSII damage were observed in susceptibles. Thresholds for Fv/Fm and non-photochemical quenching were identified for the studied species. PSII malfunctioning was largely associated with the observed photosynthetic down-regulation during heat wave treatments, however, its physiological recovery should be a key factor to determine species resilience to short-term extreme heat wave events.

  5. Interactions between the photosystem II subunit PsbS and xanthophylls studied in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonente, Giulia; Howes, Barry D; Caffarri, Stefano; Smulevich, Giulietta; Bassi, Roberto

    2008-03-28

    The photosystem II subunit PsbS is essential for excess energy dissipation (qE); however, both lutein and zeaxanthin are needed for its full activation. Based on previous work, two models can be proposed in which PsbS is either 1) the gene product where the quenching activity is located or 2) a proton-sensing trigger that activates the quencher molecules. The first hypothesis requires xanthophyll binding to two PsbS-binding sites, each activated by the protonation of a dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding lumen-exposed glutamic acid residue. To assess the existence and properties of these xanthophyll-binding sites, PsbS point mutants on each of the two Glu residues PsbS E122Q and PsbS E226Q were crossed with the npq1/npq4 and lut2/npq4 mutants lacking zeaxanthin and lutein, respectively. Double mutants E122Q/npq1 and E226Q/npq1 had no qE, whereas E122Q/lut2 and E226Q/lut2 showed a strong qE reduction with respect to both lut2 and single glutamate mutants. These findings exclude a specific interaction between lutein or zeaxanthin and a dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding site and suggest that the dependence of nonphotochemical quenching on xanthophyll composition is not due to pigment binding to PsbS. To verify, in vitro, the capacity of xanthophylls to bind PsbS, we have produced recombinant PsbS refolded with purified pigments and shown that Raman signals, previously attributed to PsbS-zeaxanthin interactions, are in fact due to xanthophyll aggregation. We conclude that the xanthophyll dependence of qE is not due to PsbS but to other pigment-binding proteins, probably of the Lhcb type.

  6. Interactions between the Photosystem II Subunit PsbS and Xanthophylls Studied in Vivo and in Vitro*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonente, Giulia; Howes, Barry D.; Caffarri, Stefano; Smulevich, Giulietta; Bassi, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    The photosystem II subunit PsbS is essential for excess energy dissipation (qE); however, both lutein and zeaxanthin are needed for its full activation. Based on previous work, two models can be proposed in which PsbS is either 1) the gene product where the quenching activity is located or 2) a proton-sensing trigger that activates the quencher molecules. The first hypothesis requires xanthophyll binding to two PsbS-binding sites, each activated by the protonation of a dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding lumen-exposed glutamic acid residue. To assess the existence and properties of these xanthophyll-binding sites, PsbS point mutants on each of the two Glu residues PsbS E122Q and PsbS E226Q were crossed with the npq1/npq4 and lut2/npq4 mutants lacking zeaxanthin and lutein, respectively. Double mutants E122Q/npq1 and E226Q/npq1 had no qE, whereas E122Q/lut2 and E226Q/lut2 showed a strong qE reduction with respect to both lut2 and single glutamate mutants. These findings exclude a specific interaction between lutein or zeaxanthin and a dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding site and suggest that the dependence of nonphotochemical quenching on xanthophyll composition is not due to pigment binding to PsbS. To verify, in vitro, the capacity of xanthophylls to bind PsbS, we have produced recombinant PsbS refolded with purified pigments and shown that Raman signals, previously attributed to PsbS-zeaxanthin interactions, are in fact due to xanthophyll aggregation. We conclude that the xanthophyll dependence of qE is not due to PsbS but to other pigment-binding proteins, probably of the Lhcb type. PMID:18070876

  7. II Latin American Conference on Bioimpedance

    CERN Document Server

    Bertemes-Filho, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents the proceedings of CLABIO 2015 - II Latin American Conference on Bioimpedance, held in Montevideo, Uruguay - September 30 - October 02, 2015. The works cover a broad range in Biomedical Engineering and Computing, Medical Physics and Medical Sciences, Environment, Biology and Chemistry. The topics are: ·Bioimpedance Applications ·Bioimpedance Instrumentation ·Body and Tissue Composition ·Cell Culture and Cell Suspension ·Electrical Impedance Tomography ·Electrode Modelling ·Magnetic Induction - Electrical Impedance Tomography ·Magnetic Resonance - Electrical Impedance Tomography ·Nonlinear Phenomena ·Organ and Tissue Impedance ·Plant Tissue Impedance ·Skin Impedance Modelling ·Technological Advances in Bioimpedance ·Theory and Modelling.

  8. Halogenated 1-Hydroxynaphthalene-2-Carboxanilides Affecting Photosynthetic Electron Transport in Photosystem II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Gonec

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Series of seventeen new multihalogenated 1-hydroxynaphthalene-2-carboxanilides was prepared and characterized. All the compounds were tested for their activity related to the inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport (PET in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. chloroplasts. 1-Hydroxy-N-phenylnaphthalene-2-carboxamides substituted in the anilide part by 3,5-dichloro-, 4-bromo-3-chloro-, 2,5-dibromo- and 3,4,5-trichloro atoms were the most potent PET inhibitors (IC50 = 5.2, 6.7, 7.6 and 8.0 µM, respectively. The inhibitory activity of these compounds depends on the position and the type of halogen substituents, i.e., on lipophilicity and electronic properties of individual substituents of the anilide part of the molecule. Interactions of the studied compounds with chlorophyll a and aromatic amino acids present in pigment-protein complexes mainly in PS II were documented by fluorescence spectroscopy. The section between P680 and plastoquinone QB in the PET chain occurring on the acceptor side of PS II can be suggested as the site of action of the compounds. The structure-activity relationships are discussed.

  9. The role of metals in production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospíšil, Pavel

    2014-07-01

    Metal ions play a crucial role in enzymatic reactions in all photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria, algae and plants. It well known that metal ions maintain the binding of substrate in the active site of the metalloenzymes and control the redox activity of the metalloenzyme in the enzymatic reaction. A large pigment-protein complex, PSII, known to serve as a water-plastoquinone oxidoreductase, contains three metal centers comprising non-heme iron, heme iron of Cyt b559 and the water-splitting manganese complex. Metal ions bound to PSII proteins maintain the electron transport from water to plastoquinone and regulate the pro-oxidant and antioxidant activity in PSII. In this review, attention is focused on the role of PSII metal centers in (i) the formation of superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals by sequential one-electron reduction of molecular oxygen and the formation of hydrogen peroxide by incomplete two-electron oxidation of water; and (ii) the elimination of superoxide anion radical by one-electron oxidation and reduction (superoxide dismutase activity) and of hydrogen peroxide by two-electron oxidation and reduction (catalase activity). The balance between the formation and elimination of reactive oxygen species by PSII metal centers is discussed as an important aspect in the prevention of photo-oxidative damage of PSII proteins and lipids. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of the extrinsic PsbP protein of photosystem II from Spinacia oleracea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohoutová, Jaroslava; Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Brynda, Jiří; Lapkouski, Mikalai; Revuelta, J. L.; Arellano, J.B.; Ettrich, Rüdiger

    F65, č. 2 (2009), s. 111-115 ISSN 1744-3091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : photosystem protein * crystallization * X-ray analysis Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.551, year: 2009

  11. XANES, EXAFS and Kbeta spectroscopic studies of the oxygen-evolving complex in Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robblee, John Henry [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-12-01

    possible oxidation states of Mn in the S0 state. The dichroic nature of X-rays from synchrotron radiation and single-crystal Mn complexes have been exploited to selectively probe Mn-ligand bonds using XANES and EXAFS spectroscopy. The results from single-crystal Mn complexes show that dramatic dichroism exists in these complexes, and are suggestive of a promising future for single-crystal studies of PS II.

  12. Brassinosteroids improve photosystem II efficiency, gas exchange, antioxidant enzymes and growth of cowpea plants exposed to water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, J V; Lobato, A K S

    2017-01-01

    Water deficit is considered the main abiotic stress that limits agricultural production worldwide. Brassinosteroids (BRs) are natural substances that play roles in plant tolerance against abiotic stresses, including water deficit. This research aims to determine whether BRs can mitigate the negative effects caused by water deficiency, revealing how BRs act and their possible contribution to increased tolerance of cowpea plants to water deficit. The experiment was a factorial design with the factors completely randomised, with two water conditions (control and water deficit) and three levels of brassinosteroids (0, 50 and 100 nM 24-epibrassinolide; EBR is an active BRs). Plants sprayed with 100 nM EBR under the water deficit presented significant increases in Φ PSII , q P and ETR compared with plants subjected to the water deficit without EBR. With respect to gas exchange, P N , E and g s exhibited significant reductions after water deficit, but application of 100 nM EBR caused increases in these variables of 96, 24 and 33%, respectively, compared to the water deficit + 0 nM EBR treatment. To antioxidant enzymes, EBR resulted in increases in SOD, CAT, APX and POX, indicating that EBR acts on the antioxidant system, reducing cell damage. The water deficit caused significant reductions in Chl a , Chl b and total Chl, while plants sprayed with 100 nM EBR showed significant increases of 26, 58 and 33% in Chl a , Chl b and total Chl, respectively. This study revealed that EBR improves photosystem II efficiency, inducing increases in Φ PSII , q P and ETR. This substance also mitigated the negative effects on gas exchange and growth induced by the water deficit. Increases in SOD, CAT, APX and POX of plants treated with EBR indicate that this steroid clearly increased the tolerance to the water deficit, reducing reactive oxygen species, cell damage, and maintaining the photosynthetic pigments. Additionally, 100 nM EBR resulted in a better dose-response of cowpea

  13. Site Energies of Active and Inactive Pheophytins in the Reaction Center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, K.; Neupane, B.; Zazubovich, V.; Sayre, R. T.; Picorel, R.; Seibert, M.; Jankowiak, R.

    2012-03-29

    It is widely accepted that the primary electron acceptor in various Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) preparations is pheophytin {alpha} (Pheo {alpha}) within the D1 protein (Pheo{sub D1}), while Pheo{sub D2} (within the D2 protein) is photochemically inactive. The Pheo site energies, however, have remained elusive, due to inherent spectral congestion. While most researchers over the past two decades placed the Q{sub y}-states of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} bands near 678-684 and 668-672 nm, respectively, recent modeling [Raszewski et al. Biophys. J. 2005, 88, 986-998; Cox et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 12364-12374] of the electronic structure of the PSII RC reversed the assignment of the active and inactive Pheos, suggesting that the mean site energy of Pheo{sub D1} is near 672 nm, whereas Pheo{sub D2} ({approx}677.5 nm) and Chl{sub D1} ({approx}680 nm) have the lowest energies (i.e., the Pheo{sub D2}-dominated exciton is the lowest excited state). In contrast, chemical pigment exchange experiments on isolated RCs suggested that both pheophytins have their Q{sub y} absorption maxima at 676-680 nm [Germano et al. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 11472-11482; Germano et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 1664-1672]. To provide more insight into the site energies of both Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} (including the corresponding Q{sub x} transitions, which are often claimed to be degenerate at 543 nm) and to attest that the above two assignments are most likely incorrect, we studied a large number of isolated RC preparations from spinach and wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (at different levels of intactness) as well as the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (D2-L209H), in which the active branch Pheo{sub D1} is genetically replaced with chlorophyll {alpha} (Chl {alpha}). We show that the Q{sub x}-/Q{sub y}-region site energies of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} are {approx}545/680 nm and {approx}541.5/670 nm, respectively, in good agreement with our previous assignment

  14. Unraveling photosystems. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Each of the three cyanobacteria examined contains two or more genes for the B protein of photosystem II of photosynthesis. One of these genes from the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon has been sequenced. Synthetic oliogopeptides were used to raise antibodies to two ten amino acid-long sequences of the 32 kilodalton B protein. To examine whether chloroplast promoter sequences (and hence possibly chloroplast genes) can function in cyanobacteria, we have used a series of plasmids containing the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene minus its bacterial promoter. It appears that chloroplast promoters are recognized in cyanobacteria and act efficiently

  15. Damage to photosystem II due to heat stress without light-driven electron flow: involvement of enhanced introduction of reducing power into thylakoid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marutani, Yoko; Yamauchi, Yasuo; Kimura, Yukihiro; Mizutani, Masaharu; Sugimoto, Yukihiro

    2012-08-01

    Under a moderately heat-stressed condition, the photosystems of higher plants are damaged in the dark more easily than they are in the presence of light. To obtain a better understanding of this heat-derived damage mechanism that occurs in the dark, we focused on the involvement of the light-independent electron flow that occurs at 40 °C during the damage. In various plant species, the maximal photochemical quantum yield of photosystem (PS) II (Fv/Fm) decreased as a result of heat treatment in the dark. In the case of wheat, the most sensitive plant species tested, both Fv/Fm and oxygen evolution rapidly decreased by heat treatment at 40 °C for 30 min in the dark. In the damage, specific degradation of D1 protein was involved, as shown by immunochemical analysis of major proteins in the photosystem. Because light canceled the damage to PSII, the light-driven electron flow may play a protective role against PSII damage without light. Light-independent incorporation of reducing power from stroma was enhanced at 40 °C but not below 35 °C. Arabidopsis mutants that have a deficit of enzymes which mediate the incorporation of stromal reducing power into thylakoid membranes were tolerant against heat treatment at 40 °C in the dark, suggesting that the reduction of the plastoquinone pool may be involved in the damage. In conclusion, the enhanced introduction of reducing power from stroma into thylakoid membranes that occurs around 40 °C causes over-reduction of plastoquinone, resulting in the damage to D1 protein under heat stress without linear electron flow.

  16. Oxidized amino acid residues in the vicinity of Q(A and Pheo(D1 of the photosystem II reaction center: putative generation sites of reducing-side reactive oxygen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie K Frankel

    Full Text Available Under a variety of stress conditions, Photosystem II produces reactive oxygen species on both the reducing and oxidizing sides of the photosystem. A number of different sites including the Mn4O5Ca cluster, P680, PheoD1, QA, QB and cytochrome b559 have been hypothesized to produce reactive oxygen species in the photosystem. In this communication using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry we have identified several residues on the D1 and D2 proteins from spinach which are oxidatively modified and in close proximity to QA (D1 residues (239F, (241Q, (242E and the D2 residues (238P, (239T, (242E and (247M and PheoD1 (D1 residues (130E, (133L and (135F. These residues may be associated with reactive oxygen species exit pathways located on the reducing side of the photosystem, and their modification may indicate that both QA and PheoD1 are sources of reactive oxygen species on the reducing side of Photosystem II.

  17. Fluorescence F 0 of photosystems II and I in developing C3 and C 4 leaves, and implications on regulation of excitation balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Richard B; Oja, Vello; Eichelmann, Hillar; Bichele, Irina; Dall'Osto, Luca; Laisk, Agu

    2014-10-01

    This work addresses the question of occurrence and function of photosystem II (PSII) in bundle sheath (BS) cells of leaves possessing NADP-malic enzyme-type C4 photosynthesis (Zea mays). Although no requirement for PSII activity in the BS has been established, several component proteins of PSII have been detected in BS cells of developing maize leaves exhibiting O2-insensitive photosynthesis. We used the basal fluorescence emissions of PSI (F 0I) and PSII (F 0II) as quantitative indicators of the respective relative photosystem densities. Chl fluorescence induction was measured simultaneously at 680 and 750 nm. In mature leaves, the F m(680)/F 0(680) ratio was 10.5 but less in immature leaves. We propose that the lower ratio was caused by the presence of a distinct non-variable component, F c, emitting at 680 and 750 nm. After F c was subtracted, the fluorescence of PSI (F 0I) was detected as a non-variable component at 750 nm and was undetectably low at 680 nm. Contents of Chls a and b were measured in addition to Chl fluorescence. The Chl b/(a + b) was relatively stable in developing sunflower leaves (0.25-0.26), but in maize it increased from 0.09 to 0.21 with leaf tissue age. In sunflower, the F 0I/(F 0I + F 0II) was 0.39 ± 0.01 independent of leaf age, but in maize, this parameter was 0.65 in young tissue of very low Chl content (20-50 mg m(-2)) falling to a stable level of 0.53 ± 0.01 at Chl contents >100 mg m(-2). The values of F 0I/(F 0I + F 0II) showed that in sunflower, excitation was partitioned between PSII and PSI in a ratio of 2:1, but the same ratio was 1:1 in the C4 plant. The latter is consistent with a PSII:PSI ratio of 2:1 in maize mesophyll cells and PSI only in BS cells (2:1:1 distribution). We suggest, moreover, that redox mediation of Chl synthesis, rather than protein accumulation, regulates photosystem assembly to ensure optimum excitation balance between functional PSII and PSI. Indeed, the apparent necessity for two

  18. Light-Harvesting Complex Protein LHCBM9 Is Critical for Photosystem II Activity and Hydrogen Production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewe, Sabrina; Ballottari, Matteo; Alcocer, Marcelo; D’Andrea, Cosimo; Blifernez-Klassen, Olga; Hankamer, Ben; Mussgnug, Jan H.; Bassi, Roberto; Kruse, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms developed multiple strategies for balancing light-harvesting versus intracellular energy utilization to survive ever-changing environmental conditions. The light-harvesting complex (LHC) protein family is of paramount importance for this function and can form light-harvesting pigment protein complexes. In this work, we describe detailed analyses of the photosystem II (PSII) LHC protein LHCBM9 of the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in terms of expression kinetics, localization, and function. In contrast to most LHC members described before, LHCBM9 expression was determined to be very low during standard cell cultivation but strongly increased as a response to specific stress conditions, e.g., when nutrient availability was limited. LHCBM9 was localized as part of PSII supercomplexes but was not found in association with photosystem I complexes. Knockdown cell lines with 50 to 70% reduced amounts of LHCBM9 showed reduced photosynthetic activity upon illumination and severe perturbation of hydrogen production activity. Functional analysis, performed on isolated PSII supercomplexes and recombinant LHCBM9 proteins, demonstrated that presence of LHCBM9 resulted in faster chlorophyll fluorescence decay and reduced production of singlet oxygen, indicating upgraded photoprotection. We conclude that LHCBM9 has a special role within the family of LHCII proteins and serves an important protective function during stress conditions by promoting efficient light energy dissipation and stabilizing PSII supercomplexes. PMID:24706511

  19. Photosystem II excitation pressure and development of resistance to photoinhibition. II. Adjustment of photosynthetic capacity in winter wheat and winter rye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, G.R.; Savitch, L.V.; Ivanov, A.G.; Huner, N.P.A.

    1996-01-01

    Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Monopol), spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Katepwa), and winter rye (Secale cereale L. cv Musketeer) grown at 5 degrees C and moderate irradiance (250 micromoles m -2 s -1 ) (5/250) exhibit an increased tolerance to photoinhibition at low temperature in comparison to plants grown at 20 degrees C and 250 micromoles m -2 s -1 (20/250). However, 5/250 plants exhibited a higher photosystem II (PSII) excitation pressure (0.32-0.63) than 20/250 plants (0.18-0.21), measured as 1 - q p , the coefficient of photochemical quenching. Plants grown at 20 degrees C and a high irradiance (800 micromoles m -2 s -1 ) (20/800) also exhibited a high PSII excitation pressure (0.32-0.48). Similarly, plants grown at 20/800 exhibited a comparable tolerance to photoinhibition relative to plants grown at 5/250. In contrast to a recent report for Chlorella vulgaris (D.P. Maxwell, S. Falk, N.P.A. Huner [1995] Plant Physiol 107: 687-694), this tolerance to photoinhibition occurs in winter rye with minimal adjustment to polypeptides of the PSII light-harvesting complex, chlorophyll a/b ratios, or xanthophyll cycle carotenoids. However, Monopol winter wheat exhibited a 2.5-fold stimulation of sucrose-phosphate synthase activity upon growth at 5/250, in comparison to Katepwa spring wheat. We demonstrate that low-temperature-induced tolerance to photoinhibition is not a low-temperature-growth effect per se but, instead, reflects increased photosynthetic capacity in response to elevated PSII excitation pressure, which may be modulated by either temperature or irradiance

  20. Characterization of mutants expressing thermostable D1 and D2 polypeptides of photosystem II in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Norihisa; Kaseda, Jun; Nakayama, Yasumune; Nagahama, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Takahira; Matsuoka, Masayoshi

    2018-06-08

    Photosystem II complex embedded in thylakoid membrane performs oxygenic photosynthesis where the reaction center D1/D2 heterodimer accommodates all components of the electron transport chain. To express thermostable D1/D2 heterodimer in a cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, we constructed a series of mutant strains whose psbA1 and psbD1 genes encoding, respectively, the most highly expressed D1 and D2 polypeptides were replaced with those of a thermophilic strain, Thermosynechococcus vulcanus. Because the C-terminal 16 amino acid sequences of D1 polypeptides should be processed prior to maturation but diverge from each other, we also constructed the psbA1ΔC-replaced strain expressing a thermostable D1 polypeptide devoid of the C-terminal extension. The psbA1/psbD1-replaced strain showed decreased growth rate and oxygen evolution rate, suggesting inefficient photosystem II. Immunoblot analyses for thermostable D1, D2 polypeptides revealed that the heterologous D1 protein was absent in thylakoid membrane from any mutant strains with psbA1, psbA1ΔC, and psbA1/psbD1-replacements, whereas the heterologous D2 protein was present in thylakoid membrane as well as purified photosystem II complex from the psbA1/psbD1-replaced strain. In the latter strain, the compensatory expression of psbA3 and psbD2 genes was elevated. These data suggest that heterologous D2 polypeptide could be combined with the host D1 polypeptide to form chimeric D1/D2 heterodimer, whereas heterologous D1 polypeptide even without the C-terminal extension was unable to make complex with the host D2 polypeptide. Since the heterologous D1 could not be detected even in the whole cells of psbA1/psbD1-replaced strain, the rapid degradation of unprocessed or unassembled heterologous D1 was implicated. Copyright © 2018 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of some optical properties of a native and reconstituted photosystem II antenna complex, CP29 : Pigment binding sites can be occupied by chlorophyll a or chlorophyll b and determine spectral forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giuffra, Elisabetta; Zucchelli, Giuseppe; Sandona, Dorianna; Croce, Roberta; Cugini, Daniela; Garlaschi, Flavio M.; Bassi, Roberto; Jennings, Robert C.

    1997-01-01

    The minor photosystem II antenna complex CP29(Lhcb-4) has been reconstituted in vitro with the Lhcb-4 apoprotein, overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the native pigments. Modulation of the pigment composition during reconstitution yields binding products with markedly different chlorophyll a/b

  2. Separate photosensitizers mediate degradation of the 32-kDa photosystem II reaction center protein in the visible and UV spectral regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, B.M.; Gaba, V.; Canaani, O.; Malkin, S.; Mattoo, A.K.; Edelman, M.

    1989-01-01

    A component of the photosystem II reaction center, the 32-kDa protein, is rapidly turned over in the light. The mechanism of its light-dependent metabolism is largely unknown. We quantified the rate of 32-kDa protein degradation over a broad spectral range (UV, visible, and far red). The quantum yield for degradation was highest in the UVB (280-320 nm) region. Spectral evidence demonstrates two distinctly different photosensitizers for 32-kDa protein degradation. The data implicate the bulk photosynthetic pigments (primarily chlorophyll) in the visible and far red regions, and plastoquinone (in one or more of its redox states) in the UV region. A significant portion of 32-kDa protein degradation in sunlight is attributed to UVB irradiance

  3. Toxic effects of amoxicillin on the photosystem II of Synechocystis sp. characterized by a variety of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Xiangliang; Deng Chunnuan; Zhang Daoyong; Wang Jianlong; Mu Guijin; Chen Ying

    2008-01-01

    Amoxicillin is one of the widely used antibiotics of environmental concern. This study shows that amoxicillin has toxic effects on the photosynthesis of Synechocystis sp. Its inhibitory effects on photosystem II (PSII) of Synechocystis sp. were investigated by using a variety of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence tests. The inhibitory effects of amoxicillin on PSII activity of Synechocystis sp. are concentration-dependent. Amoxicillin exposure leads to slowing down of electron transport on both donor side and acceptor side and causes accumulation of P680 + . Q A - reoxidation test revealed that amoxicillin hinders electron transfer from Q A - to Q B /Q B - and more Q A - is oxidized through S 2 (Q A Q B ) - charge recombination. Analysis of PSII heterogeneity demonstrated that an exposure to amoxicillin increases the proportion of inactive PSII (PSII X ) centers and the proportion of PSII centers with small antenna (PSIIβ). These changes finally result in deterioration of full photosynthesis performance

  4. Study of the Mn-binding sites in photosystem II using antibodies raised against lumenal regions of the D1 and D2 reaction center proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmasso, Enrique Agustin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-04-01

    The experiments discussed in this thesis focus on identifying the protein segments or specific amino acids which provide ligands to the Mn cluster of photosystem II (PS II). This Mn cluster plays a central role in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PS II. The Mn cluster is thought to be bound by lumenal regions of the PS II reaction center proteins known as D1 and D2. First, several peptides were synthesized which correspond to specific lumenal segments of the D1 and D2 proteins. Next, polyclonal antibodies were successfully elicited using three of these peptides. The peptides recognized by these antibodies correspond to protein segments of the spinach reaction center proteins: Ile-321 to Ala-344 of D1 (D1-a), Asp-319 to Arg-334 of D1 (D1-b), and Val-300 to Asn-319 of D2 (D2-a). These antibodies were then used in assays which were developed to structurally or functionally probe the potential Mn-binding regions of the D1 and D2 proteins.

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis ameliorates the optimum quantum yield of photosystem II and reduces non-photochemical quenching in rice plants subjected to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, Rosa; Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Aroca, Ricardo; Garcia, Rosalva; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2015-08-01

    Rice is the most important food crop in the world and is a primary source of food for more than half of the world population. However, salinity is considered the most common abiotic stress reducing its productivity. Soil salinity inhibits photosynthetic processes, which can induce an over-reduction of the reaction centres in photosystem II (PSII), damaging the photosynthetic machinery. The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis may improve host plant tolerance to salinity, but it is not clear how the AM symbiosis affects the plant photosynthetic capacity, particularly the efficiency of PSII. This study aimed at determining the influence of the AM symbiosis on the performance of PSII in rice plants subjected to salinity. Photosynthetic activity, plant gas-exchange parameters, accumulation of photosynthetic pigments and rubisco activity and gene expression were also measured in order to analyse comprehensively the response of the photosynthetic processes to AM symbiosis and salinity. Results showed that the AM symbiosis enhanced the actual quantum yield of PSII photochemistry and reduced the quantum yield of non-photochemical quenching in rice plants subjected to salinity. AM rice plants maintained higher net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate than nonAM plants. Thus, we propose that AM rice plants had a higher photochemical efficiency for CO2 fixation and solar energy utilization and this increases plant salt tolerance by preventing the injury to the photosystems reaction centres and by allowing a better utilization of light energy in photochemical processes. All these processes translated into higher photosynthetic and rubisco activities in AM rice plants and improved plant biomass production under salinity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Antenna complexes protect Photosystem I from Photoinhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboresi, Alessandro; Ballottari, Matteo; Hienerwadel, Rainer; Giacometti, Giorgio M; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    Background Photosystems are composed of two moieties, a reaction center and a peripheral antenna system. In photosynthetic eukaryotes the latter system is composed of proteins belonging to Lhc family. An increasing set of evidences demonstrated how these polypeptides play a relevant physiological function in both light harvesting and photoprotection. Despite the sequence similarity between antenna proteins associated with the two Photosystems, present knowledge on their physiological role is mostly limited to complexes associated to Photosystem II. Results In this work we analyzed the physiological role of Photosystem I antenna system in Arabidopsis thaliana both in vivo and in vitro. Plants depleted in individual antenna polypeptides showed a reduced capacity for photoprotection and an increased production of reactive oxygen species upon high light exposure. In vitro experiments on isolated complexes confirmed that depletion of antenna proteins reduced the resistance of isolated Photosystem I particles to high light and that the antenna is effective in photoprotection only upon the interaction with the core complex. Conclusion We show that antenna proteins play a dual role in Arabidopsis thaliana Photosystem I photoprotection: first, a Photosystem I with an intact antenna system is more resistant to high light because of a reduced production of reactive oxygen species and, second, antenna chlorophyll-proteins are the first target of high light damages. When photoprotection mechanisms become insufficient, the antenna chlorophyll proteins act as fuses: LHCI chlorophylls are degraded while the reaction center photochemical activity is maintained. Differences with respect to photoprotection strategy in Photosystem II, where the reaction center is the first target of photoinhibition, are discussed. PMID:19508723

  7. Quenching of chlorophyll a singlets and triplets by carotenoids in light-harvesting complex of photosystem II: comparison of aggregates with trimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, K. Razi; Melø, T. B.; Raju, B. Bangar; Jávorfi, Tamás; Simidjiev, Ilian; Garab, Gyözö

    1997-12-01

    Laser-induced changes in the absorption spectra of isolated light-harvesting chlorophyll a/ b complex (LHC II) associated with photosystem II of higher plants have been recorded under anaerobic conditions and at ambient temperature by using multichannel detection with sub-microsecond time resolution. Difference spectra (Δ A) of LHC II aggregates have been found to differ from the corresponding spectra of trimers on two counts: (i) in the aggregates, the carotenoid (Car) triplet-triplet absorption band (Δ A>0) is red-shifted and broader; and (ii) the features attributable to the perturbation of the Qy band of a chlorophyll a (Chl a) by a nearby Car triplet are more pronounced, than in trimers. Aggregation, which is known to be accompanied by a reduction in the fluorescence yield of Chl a, is shown to cause a parallel decline in the triplet formation yield of Chl a; on the other hand, the efficiency (100%) of Chl a-to-Car transfer of triplet energy and the lifetime (9.3 μs) of Car triplets are not affected by aggregation. These findings are rationalized by postulating that the antenna Cars transact, besides light-harvesting and photoprotection, a third process: energy dissipation within the antenna. The suggestion is advanced that luteins, which are buried inside the LHC II monomers, as well as the other, peripheral, xanthophylls (neoxanthin and violaxanthin) quench the excited singlet state of Chl a by catalyzing internal conversion, a decay channel that competes with fluorescence and intersystem crossing; support for this explanation is presented by recalling reports of similar behaviour in bichromophoric model compounds in which one moiety is a Car and the other a porphyrin or a pyropheophorbide.

  8. Structural insights into the light-driven auto-assembly process of the water-oxidizing Mn4CaO5-cluster in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Bommer, Martin; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Hussein, Rana; Yano, Junko; Dau, Holger; Kern, Jan; Dobbek, Holger; Zouni, Athina

    2017-07-18

    In plants, algae and cyanobacteria, Photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the light-driven splitting of water at a protein-bound Mn 4 CaO 5 -cluster, the water-oxidizing complex (WOC). In the photosynthetic organisms, the light-driven formation of the WOC from dissolved metal ions is a key process because it is essential in both initial activation and continuous repair of PSII. Structural information is required for understanding of this chaperone-free metal-cluster assembly. For the first time, we obtained a structure of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus without the Mn 4 CaO 5 -cluster. Surprisingly, cluster-removal leaves the positions of all coordinating amino acid residues and most nearby water molecules largely unaffected, resulting in a pre-organized ligand shell for kinetically competent and error-free photo-assembly of the Mn 4 CaO 5 -cluster. First experiments initiating (i) partial disassembly and (ii) partial re-assembly after complete depletion of the Mn 4 CaO 5 -cluster agree with a specific bi-manganese cluster, likely a di-µ-oxo bridged pair of Mn(III) ions, as an assembly intermediate.

  9. Design and combinatorial library generation of 1H 1,4 benzodiazepine 2,5 diones as photosystem-II inhibitors: A public QSAR approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purusottam Banjare

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Exponential rise in the population around the word increased the demand of food grains/crops with limited expansion of the agricultural land. To meet the demand, generation of new herbicidal agents is of primary need for the manufacturing firm. In silico tool like QSAR is one of the regularly used in designing newer compounds along with wet experiment. Photosystem-II (PS-II regarded as one of the major target for the herbicidal agents. With this aim in the present study a series of 1H, 1,4 benzodiazepine 2,5-dione analogues as herbicidal (PS-II inhibitors agents were subjected to QSAR analysis using 2D PaDEL descriptors (open source. Two different splitting techniques namely, kennard stone based and k-means clustering splitting were used to divide the whole data set and GFA based on MAE criteria was used a statistical method to develop a model to investigate the physicochemical and structural requirement of potential PS-II inhibitors. All the models are statistically robust both internally and externally (Q2: 0.540–0.693, R2pred: 0.722–0.810. The activity is mostly affected by polarizabilities, electro negativities as well as substituents at the phenyl ring. Based on the results, a library of compounds was generated using SmiLib v2.0 tool (open source and better predicted inside applicability domain compounds were identified by applying three different applicability domain (AD approaches. Therefore the developed public QSAR models may be helpful for the scientific community for the further research.

  10. II International Conference on Plasma and Laser Research and Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurnaev, V A; Dodulad, E I

    2016-01-01

    II Conference on Plasma and Laser Research and Technologies took place on January 25 th until January 27 th , 2016 at National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI” (NRNU MEPhI). It was organized by the Institute of Laser and Plasma Technologies and was supported by the Competitiveness Program of NRNU MEPhI. The Conference consisted of four sections: Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion, Laser physics, Modern aspects of solid state matter physics and Charged particle accelerators. The Conference provided participants an opportunity to present their research results for the consideration of a wide audience from the sidelines of science. The main topics of the Conference were: • Controlled nuclear fusion with magnetic and inertial confinement; • Low-temperature plasma and its application in modern technology; • Laser physics and technologies for industry, environmental control and precise measurements; • Optical information control, holography, spintronics and photonics; • Modern aspects of solid state matter physics and nanophysics; • Charged particle accelerators. More than 200 specialists on plasma, laser and solid state physics took part in the II Conference. They represented leading Russian scientific research centres and universities (such as Troitsk Institute of Innovative and Thermonuclear Research, Institute of Crystallography, National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry and others) and universities from Belarus, Ukraine, Germany, USA, Canada, Belgium, and Sweden. All report presentations were broadcasted online on the NRNU MEPhI official site. The translation was watched by viewers from Moscow, Prague, St. Petersburgh and other cities, who could not attend the Conference. We would like to thank heartily all of the speakers, participants and organizing committee members for their contribution to the conference. (paper)

  11. Role of phosphatidylglycerol in the function and assembly of Photosystem II reaction center, studied in a cdsA-inactivated PAL mutant strain of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 that lacks phycobilisomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laczkó-Dobos, H.; Ughy, B.; Tóth, S. Z.; Komenda, Josef; Zsiros, O.; Domonkos, I.; Párducz, A.; Bogos, B.; Komura, M.; Itoh, S.; Gombos, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 1777, č. 9 (2008), s. 1184-1194 ISSN 0005-2728 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400200801 Grant - others:HU(HU) OTKA T60109; HU(HU) OTKA T68692 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : synechocystis sp. pcc6803 * phosphatidylglycerol * photosystem II Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.447, year: 2008

  12. Salt-induced variation in some potential physiochemical attributes of two genetically diverse spring wheat (triticum aestivum L.) cultivars: photosynthesis and photosystem II efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, M.A.; Ashraf, M.

    2011-01-01

    Variation in salt tolerance potential of two contrasting wheat cultivars (salt tolerant S-24 and moderately salt sensitive MH-97) at different growth stages was observed when these wheat cultivars were exposed to salinity stress in hydroponic culture. Salinity caused a marked reduction in photosynthetic pigments, transpiration and photos synthetic rates, and stomatal conductance at early growth stages in both wheat cultivars, being more prominent in cv. MH-97. In addition, a marked salt-induced alteration was observed in different attributes of chlorophyll fluorescence. On the basis of physiological characterization of these two wheat cultivars at different growth stages, it was inferred that cv. S-24 exhibited higher salinity tolerance at all growth stages in terms of less salinity-induced degradation of photosynthetic pigments, higher photosynthetic rates, maintenance of photosystem II under salinity stress as compared to that in cv. MH-97. In view of the results presented here, it is evident that wheat plants were prone to adverse effects of salinity at early growth stages as compared to later growth stages. (author)

  13. Insights into Photosystem II from Isomorphous Difference Fourier Maps of Femtosecond X-ray Diffraction Data and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Structural Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jimin; Askerka, Mikhail; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S

    2017-02-10

    Understanding structure-function relations in photosystem II (PSII) is important for the development of biomimetic photocatalytic systems. X-ray crystallography, computational modeling, and spectroscopy have played central roles in elucidating the structure and function of PSII. Recent breakthroughs in femtosecond X-ray crystallography offer the possibility of collecting diffraction data from the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) before radiation damage of the sample, thereby overcoming the main challenge of conventional X-ray diffraction methods. However, the interpretation of XFEL data from PSII intermediates is challenging because of the issues regarding data-processing, uncertainty on the precise positions of light oxygen atoms next to heavy metal centers, and different kinetics of the S-state transition in microcrystals compared to solution. Here, we summarize recent advances and outstanding challenges in PSII structure-function determination with emphasis on the implementation of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics techniques combined with isomorphous difference Fourier maps, direct methods, and high-resolution spectroscopy.

  14. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulation of the ligand vibrations of the water-oxidizing Mn4CaO5 cluster in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shin; Noguchi, Takumi

    2016-10-11

    During photosynthesis, the light-driven oxidation of water performed by photosystem II (PSII) provides electrons necessary to fix CO 2 , in turn supporting life on Earth by liberating molecular oxygen. Recent high-resolution X-ray images of PSII show that the water-oxidizing center (WOC) is composed of an Mn 4 CaO 5 cluster with six carboxylate, one imidazole, and four water ligands. FTIR difference spectroscopy has shown significant structural changes of the WOC during the S-state cycle of water oxidation, especially within carboxylate groups. However, the roles that these carboxylate groups play in water oxidation as well as how they should be properly assigned in spectra are unresolved. In this study, we performed a normal mode analysis of the WOC using the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method to simulate FTIR difference spectra on the S 1 to S 2 transition in the carboxylate stretching region. By evaluating WOC models with different oxidation and protonation states, we determined that models of high-oxidation states, Mn(III) 2 Mn(IV) 2 , satisfactorily reproduced experimental spectra from intact and Ca-depleted PSII compared with low-oxidation models. It is further suggested that the carboxylate groups bridging Ca and Mn ions within this center tune the reactivity of water ligands bound to Ca by shifting charge via their π conjugation.

  15. Evaluation of the role of damage to photosystem II in the inhibition of CO2 assimilation in pea leaves on exposure to UV-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogues, S.; Baker, N.R.

    1995-01-01

    Mature pea (Pisum sativum L., cv. Meteor) leaves were exposed to two levels of UV-B radiation, with and without supplementary UV-C radiation, during 15 h photoperiods. Simultaneous measurements of CO 2 assimilation and modulated chlorophyll fluorescence parameters demonstrated that irradiation with UV-B resulted in decreases in CO 2 assimilation that are not accompanied by decreases in the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) primary photochemistry. Increased exposure to UV-B resulted in a further loss of CO 2 assimilation and decreases in the maximum quantum efficiency of PSII primary photochemistry, which were accompanied by a loss of the capacity of thylakoids isolated from the leaves to bind atrazine, thus demonstrating that photodamage to PSII reaction centres had occurred. Addition of UV-C to the UV-B treatments increased markedly the rate of inhibition of photosynthesis, but the relationships between CO 2 assimilation and PSII characteristics remained the same, indicating that UV-B and UV-C inhibit leaf photosynthesis by a similar mechanism. It is concluded that PSII is not the primary target site involved in the onset of the inhibition of photosynthesis in pea leaves induced by irradiation with UV-B. (author)

  16. Nitrogen ligation to manganese in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex: Continuous-wave and pulsed EPR studies of Photosystem II particles containing 14N or 15N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeRose, V.J.; Yachandra, V.K.; McDermott, A.E.; Britt, R.D.; Sauer, K.; Klein, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of nitrogen ligation to the Mn in the oxygen-evolving complex from photosystem II was investigated with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopies using 14 N- and 15 N-labeled preparations. Oxygen-evolving preparations were isolated from a thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp., grown on a medium containing either 14 NO 3 - or 15 NO - 3 as the sole source of nitrogen. The substructure on the multiline EPR signal, which arises from Mn in the S 2 state of the enzyme, was measured with continuous-wave EPR. No changes were detected in the substructure peak positions upon substitution of 15 N for 14 N, indicating that this substructure is not due to superhyperfine coupling from nitrogen ligands. To detect potential nitrogen ligands with superhyperfine couplings of lesser magnitude than could be observed with conventional EPR methods, electron spin-echo envelope modulation experiments were also performed on the multiline EPR signal. The Fourier transform of the light-minus-dark time domain ESEEM data shows a peak at 4.8 MHz in 14 N samples which is absent upon substitution with 15 N. This gives unambiguous evidence for weak hyperfine coupling of nitrogen to the Mn of the oxygen-evolving complex. Possible origins of this nitrogen interaction are discussed

  17. Identification of the roles of individual amino acid residues of the helix E of the major antenna of photosystem II (LHCII) by alanine scanning mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Rao, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Chunhong

    2014-10-01

    The functions of the helix E (W97-F105), an amphiphilic lumenal 310 helix of the major antenna of photosystem II (LHCII), are still unidentified. To elucidate the roles of individual amino acid residue of the helix E, alanine scanning mutagenesis has been performed to mutate every residue of this domain to alanine. The influence of every alanine substitution on the structure and function of LHCII has been investigated biochemically and spectroscopically. The results show that all mutations have little impact on the pigment binding and configuration. However, many mutants presented decreased thermo- or photo-stability compared with the wild type, highlighting the significance of this helix to the stability of LHCII. The most critical residue for stability is W97. The mutant W97A yielded very fragile trimeric pigment protein complexes. The structural analysis revealed that the hydrogen bonding and aromatic interactions between W97, F195, F194 and a water molecule contributed greatly to the stability of LHCII. Moreover, Q103A and F105A have been identified to be able to reinforce the tendency of aggregation in vitro. The structural analysis suggested that the enhancement in aggregation formation for Q103A and F105A might be attributed to the changing hydrophobicity of the region. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Polarized X-ray absorption spectroscopy of single-crystal Mn(V) complexes relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yano, Junko; Robblee, John; Pushkar, Yulia

    2007-01-01

    High-valent Mn-oxo species have been suggested to have a catalytically important role in the water splitting reaction which occurs in the Photosystem II membrane protein. In this study, five- and six-coordinate mononuclear Mn(V) compounds were investigated by polarized X-ray absorption spectroscopy...... structure of the metal site was then studied by measuring the polarization dependence of X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) pre-edge spectra (1s to 3d transition) and comparing with the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The Mn(V)-nitrido compound, in which the manganese......-edge peak. This component was interpreted as a 1s to 3d(xz,yz) transition with 4px,y mixing, due to the displacement of the Mn atom out of the equatorial plane. The XANES results have been correlated to DFT calculations, and the spectra have been simulated using a TD (time-dependent)-DFT approach...

  19. Quantum mechanical calculations of xanthophyll-chlorophyll electronic coupling in the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II of higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, C D P; Valkunas, L; Ruban, A V

    2013-06-27

    Light-harvesting by the xanthophylls in the antenna of photosystem II (PSII) is a very efficient process (with 80% of the absorbed energy being transfer to chlorophyll). However, the efficiencies of the individual xanthophylls vary considerably, with violaxanthin in LHCII contributing very little to light-harvesting. To investigate the origin of the variation we used Time Dependent Density Functional Theory to model the Coulombic interactions between the xanthophyll 1(1)B(u)(+) states and the chlorophyll Soret band states in the LHCII and CP29 antenna complexes. The results show that the central L1 and L2 binding sites in both complexes favored close cofacial associations between the bound xanthophylls and chlorophyll a, implying efficient energy transfer, consistent with previously reported experimental evidence. Additionally, we found that the peripheral V1 binding site in LHCII did not favor close xanthophyll-chlorophyll associations, confirming observations that violaxanthin in LHCII is not an effective light-harvester. Finally, violaxanthin bound into the L2 site of the CP29 complex was found to be very strongly coupled to its neighboring chlorophylls.

  20. Differential acclimation of enzymatic antioxidant metabolism and photosystem II photochemistry in tall fescue under drought and heat and the combined stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoyue eBi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Quality inferiority in cool-season turfgrass due to drought, heat and a combination of both stresses is predicted to be more prevalent in the future. Understanding the various response to heat and drought stress will assist in the selection and breeding of tolerant grass varieties. The objective of this study was to investigate the behavior of antioxidant metabolism and photosystem II (PSII photochemistry in two tall fescue genotypes (PI 234881 and PI 578718 with various thermotolerance capacities. Wide variations were found between heat-tolerant PI 578718 and heat-sensitive PI 234881 for leaf relative water content, malondialdehyde and electrolyte leakage under drought, high-temperature or a combination of both stresses. The sensitivity of PI 234881 exposed to combined stresses was associated with lower superoxide dismutase activity and higher H2O2 accumulation than that in PI 578718. Various antioxidant enzymes displayed positive correlation with chlorophyll content, but negative with membrane injury index at most of the stages in both tall fescue genotypes. The JIP-test analysis in PI 578718 indicated a significant improvement in ABS/RC, TR0/RC, RE0/RC, RE0/ABS values as compared to the control regime, which indicated that PI 578718 had a high potential to protect the PSII system under drought and high temperature stress. And the PS II photochemistry in PI 234881 was damaged significantly compared with PI578718. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR revealed that heat and drought stresses deduced the gene expression of psbB and psbC, but induced the expression of psbA. These findings to some extent confirmed that the various adaptations of physiological traits may contribute to breeding in cold-season turfgrass in response to drought, high-temperature and a combination of both stresses.

  1. Characterization of the Sr(2+)- and Cd(2+)-Substituted Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II by Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitari, Fabio; Bovi, Daniele; Narzi, Daniele; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2015-09-29

    The Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex is the catalytic core of the Photosystem II (PSII) enzyme, responsible for the water splitting reaction in oxygenic photosynthesis. The role of the redox-inactive ion in the cluster has not yet been fully clarified, although several experimental data are available on Ca2+-depleted and Ca2+-substituted PSII complexes, indicating Sr2+-substituted PSII as the only modification that preserves oxygen evolution. In this work, we investigated the structural and electronic properties of the PSII catalytic core with Ca2+ replaced with Sr2+ and Cd2+ in the S2 state of the Kok−Joliot cycle by means of density functional theory and ab initio molecular dynamics based on a quantum mechanics/ molecular mechanics approach. Our calculations do not reveal significant differences between the substituted and wild-type systems in terms of geometries, thermodynamics, and kinetics of two previously identified intermediate states along the S2 to S3 transition, namely, the open cubane S2 A and closed cubane S2 B conformers. Conversely, our calculations show different pKa values for the water molecule bound to the three investigated heterocations. Specifically, for Cd-substituted PSII, the pKa value is 5.3 units smaller than the respective value in wild type Ca-PSII. On the basis of our results, we conclude that, assuming all the cations sharing the same binding site, the induced difference in the acidity of the binding pocket might influence the hydrogen bonding network and the redox levels to prevent the further evolution of the cycle toward the S3 state.

  2. Characterization of the low-temperature triplet state of chlorophyll in photosystem II core complexes: Application of phosphorescence measurements and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabelin, Alexey A; Neverov, Konstantin V; Krasnovsky, Alexander A; Shkuropatova, Valentina A; Shuvalov, Vladimir A; Shkuropatov, Anatoly Ya

    2016-06-01

    Phosphorescence measurements at 77 K and light-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy at 95 K were applied to study of the triplet state of chlorophyll a ((3)Chl) in photosystem II (PSII) core complexes isolated from spinach. Using both methods, (3)Chl was observed in the core preparations with doubly reduced primary quinone acceptor QA. The spectral parameters of Chl phosphorescence resemble those in the isolated PSII reaction centers (RCs). The main spectral maximum and the lifetime of the phosphorescence corresponded to 955±1 nm and of 1.65±0.05 ms respectively; in the excitation spectrum, the absorption maxima of all core complex pigments (Chl, pheophytin a (Pheo), and β-carotene) were observed. The differential signal at 1667(-)/1628(+)cm(-1) reflecting a downshift of the stretching frequency of the 13(1)-keto C=O group of Chl was found to dominate in the triplet-minus-singlet FTIR difference spectrum of core complexes. Based on FTIR results and literature data, it is proposed that (3)Chl is mostly localized on the accessory chlorophyll that is in triplet equilibrium with P680. Analysis of the data suggests that the Chl triplet state responsible for the phosphorescence and the FTIR difference spectrum is mainly generated due to charge recombination in the reaction center radical pair P680(+)PheoD1(-), and the energy and temporal parameters of this triplet state as well as the molecular environment and interactions of the triplet-bearing Chl molecule are similar in the PSII core complexes and isolated PSII RCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Distinct roles of the photosystem II protein PsbS and zeaxanthin in the regulation of light harvesting in plants revealed by fluorescence lifetime snapshots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylak-Glassman, Emily J; Malnoë, Alizée; De Re, Eleonora; Brooks, Matthew D; Fischer, Alexandra Lee; Niyogi, Krishna K; Fleming, Graham R

    2014-12-09

    The photosystem II (PSII) protein PsbS and the enzyme violaxanthin deepoxidase (VDE) are known to influence the dynamics of energy-dependent quenching (qE), the component of nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) that allows plants to respond to fast fluctuations in light intensity. Although the absence of PsbS and VDE has been shown to change the amount of quenching, there have not been any measurements that can detect whether the presence of these proteins alters the type of quenching that occurs. The chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime probes the excited-state chlorophyll relaxation dynamics and can be used to determine the amount of quenching as well as whether two different genotypes with the same amount of NPQ have similar dynamics of excited-state chlorophyll relaxation. We measured the fluorescence lifetimes on whole leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana throughout the induction and relaxation of NPQ for wild type and the qE mutants, npq4, which lacks PsbS; npq1, which lacks VDE and cannot convert violaxanthin to zeaxanthin; and npq1 npq4, which lacks both VDE and PsbS. These measurements show that although PsbS changes the amount of quenching and the rate at which quenching turns on, it does not affect the relaxation dynamics of excited chlorophyll during quenching. In addition, the data suggest that PsbS responds not only to ΔpH but also to the Δψ across the thylakoid membrane. In contrast, the presence of VDE, which is necessary for the accumulation of zeaxanthin, affects the excited-state chlorophyll relaxation dynamics.

  4. Dissecting the Photoprotective Mechanism Encoded by the flv4-2 Operon: a Distinct Contribution of Sll0218 in Photosystem II Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersanini, Luca; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Battchikova, Natalia; Heinz, Steffen; Lespinasse, Maija; Ruohisto, Essi; Mustila, Henna; Nickelsen, Jörg; Vass, Imre; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2017-03-01

    In Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, the flv4-2 operon encodes the flavodiiron proteins Flv2 and Flv4 together with a small protein, Sll0218, providing photoprotection for Photosystem II (PSII). Here, the distinct roles of Flv2/Flv4 and Sll0218 were addressed, using a number of flv4-2 operon mutants. In the ∆sll0218 mutant, the presence of Flv2/Flv4 rescued PSII functionality as compared with ∆sll0218-flv2, where neither Sll0218 nor the Flv2/Flv4 heterodimer are expressed. Nevertheless, both the ∆sll0218 and ∆sll0218-flv2 mutants demonstrated deficiency in accumulation of PSII proteins suggesting a role for Sll0218 in PSII stabilization, which was further supported by photoinhibition experiments. Moreover, the accumulation of PSII assembly intermediates occurred in Sll0218-lacking mutants. The YFP-tagged Sll0218 protein localized in a few spots per cell at the external side of the thylakoid membrane, and biochemical membrane fractionation revealed clear enrichment of Sll0218 in the PratA-defined membranes, where the early biogenesis steps of PSII occur. Further, the characteristic antenna uncoupling feature of the ∆flv4-2 operon mutants is shown to be related to PSII destabilization in the absence of Sll0218. It is concluded that the Flv2/Flv4 heterodimer supports PSII functionality, while the Sll0218 protein assists PSII assembly and stabilization, including optimization of light harvesting. © 2016 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Enviroment Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Evidence for a Role of Chloroplastic m-Type Thioredoxins in the Biogenesis of Photosystem II in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Liu, Jun; Liu, Bing; Feng, Dongru; Da, Qingen; Wang, Peng; Shu, Shengying; Su, Jianbin; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Jinfa; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplastic m-type thioredoxins (TRX m) are essential redox regulators in the light regulation of photosynthetic metabolism. However, recent genetic studies have revealed novel functions for TRX m in meristem development, chloroplast morphology, cyclic electron flow, and tetrapyrrole synthesis. The focus of this study is on the putative role of TRX m1, TRX m2, and TRX m4 in the biogenesis of the photosynthetic apparatus in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). To that end, we investigated the impact of single, double, and triple TRX m deficiency on chloroplast development and the accumulation of thylakoid protein complexes. Intriguingly, only inactivation of three TRX m genes led to pale-green leaves and specifically reduced stability of the photosystem II (PSII) complex, implying functional redundancy between three TRX m isoforms. In addition, plants silenced for three TRX m genes displayed elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, which in turn interrupted the transcription of photosynthesis-related nuclear genes but not the expression of chloroplast-encoded PSII core proteins. To dissect the function of TRX m in PSII biogenesis, we showed that TRX m1, TRX m2, and TRX m4 interact physically with minor PSII assembly intermediates as well as with PSII core subunits D1, D2, and CP47. Furthermore, silencing three TRX m genes disrupted the redox status of intermolecular disulfide bonds in PSII core proteins, most notably resulting in elevated accumulation of oxidized CP47 oligomers. Taken together, our results suggest an important role for TRX m1, TRX m2, and TRX m4 proteins in the biogenesis of PSII, and they appear to assist the assembly of CP47 into PSII. PMID:24151299

  6. Stress memory induced rearrangements of HSP transcription, photosystem II photochemistry and metabolism of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb. in response to high-temperature stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao eHu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available When plants are pre-exposed to stress, they can produce some stable signals and physiological reactions that may be carried forward as ‘stress memory’. However, there is insufficient information about is known about plants’ stress memory responses mechanisms. Here, two tall fescue genotypes, heat-tolerant PI 574522 and heat-sensitive PI 512315, were subjected to recurring high-temperature pre-acclimation treatment. Two heat shock protein (HSP genes, LMW-HSP and HMW-HSP, exhibited transcriptional memory for their higher transcript abundance during one or more subsequent stresses (S2, S3, S4 relative to the first stress (S1, and basal transcript levels during the recovery states (R1, R2 and R3. Activated transcriptional memory from two trainable genes could persist up to 4 days, and induce higher thermotolerance in tall fescue. This was confirmed by greater turf quality and lower electrolyte leakage. Pre-acclimation treatment inhibited the decline at steps of O-J-I-P and energy transport fluxes in active Photosystem II reaction center (PSII RC for both tall fescue genotypes. The heat stress memory was associated with major shifts in leaf metabolite profiles. Furthermore, there was an exclusive increase in leaf organic acids (citric acid, malic acid, tris phosphoric acid, threonic acid, sugars (sucrose, glucose, idose, allose, talose, glucoheptose, tagatose, psicose, amino acids (serine, proline, pyroglutamic acid, glycine, alanine and one fatty acid (butanoic acid in pre-acclimated plants. These discoveries involved in transcriptional memory, PSII RC energy transport and metabolite profiles could provide new insights into the plant high–temperature response process.

  7. Protein-protein interactions within photosystem II under photoprotection: the synergy between CP29 minor antenna, subunit S (PsbS) and zeaxanthin at all-atom resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalakis, Vangelis

    2018-05-07

    The assembly and disassembly of protein complexes within cells are crucial life-sustaining processes. In photosystem II (PSII) of higher plants, there is a delicate yet obscure balance between light harvesting and photo-protection under fluctuating light conditions, that involves protein-protein complexes. Recent breakthroughs in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are combined with new approaches herein to provide structural and energetic insight into such a complex between the CP29 minor antenna and the PSII subunit S (PsbS). The microscopic model involves extensive sampling of bound and dissociated states at atomic resolution in the presence of photo-protective zeaxanthin (Zea), and reveals well defined protein-protein cross-sections. The complex is placed within PSII, and macroscopic connections are emerging (PsbS-CP29-CP24-CP47) along the energy transfer pathways from the antenna to the PSII core. These connections explain macroscopic observations in the literature, while the previously obscured atomic scale details are now revealed. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of the Non-Photochemical Quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence, the down-regulatory mechanism of photosynthesis, that enables the protection of PSII against excess excitation load. Zea is found at the PsbS-CP29 cross-section and a pH-dependent equilibrium between PsbS dimer/monomers and the PsbS-CP29 dissociation/association is identified as the target for engineering tolerant plants with increased crop and biomass yields. Finally, the new MD based approaches can be used to probe protein-protein interactions in general, and the PSII structure provided can initiate large scale molecular simulations of the photosynthetic apparatus, under NPQ conditions.

  8. Langmuir-Blodgett and X-ray diffraction studies of isolated photosystem II reaction centers in monolayers and multilayers: physical dimensions of the complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uphaus, R A; Fang, J Y; Picorel, R; Chumanov, G; Wang, J Y; Cotton, T M; Seibert, M

    1997-04-01

    The photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) is a hydrophobic intrinsic protein complex that drives the water-oxidation process of photosynthesis. Unlike the bacterial RC complex, an X-ray crystal structure of the PSII RC is not available. In order to determine the physical dimensions of the isolated PSII RC complex, we applied Langmuir techniques to determine the cross-sectional area of an isolated RC in a condensed monolayer film. Low-angle X-ray diffraction results obtained by examining Langmuir-Blodgett multilayer films of alternating PSII RC/Cd stearate monolayers were used to determine the length (or height; z-direction, perpendicular to the plane of the original membrane) of the complex. The values obtained for a PSII RC monomer were 26 nm2 and 4.8 nm, respectively, and the structural integrity of the RC in the multilayer film was confirmed by several approaches. Assuming a cylindrical-type RC structure, the above dimensions lead to a predicted volume of about 125 nm3. This value is very close to the expected volume of 118 nm3, calculated from the known molecular weight and partial specific volume of the PSII RC proteins. This same type of comparison was also made with the Rhodobacter sphaeroides RC based on published data, and we conclude that the PSII RC is much shorter in length and has a more regular solid geometric structure than the bacterial RC. Furthermore, the above dimensions of the PSII RC and those of PSII core (RC plus proximal antenna) proteins protruding outside the plane of the PSII membrane into the lumenal space as imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy (Seibert, Aust. J. Pl. Physiol. 22, 161-166, 1995) fit easily into the known dimensions of the PSII core complex visualized by others as electron-density projection maps. From this we conclude that the in situ PSII core complex is a dimeric structure containing two copies of the PSII RC.

  9. Pigment organization and their interactions in reaction centers of photosystem II: optical spectroscopy at 6 K of reaction centers with modified pheophytin composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, M; Shkuropatov, A Y; Permentier, H; de Wijn, R; Hoff, A J; Shuvalov, V A; van Gorkom, H J

    2001-09-25

    Photosystem II reaction centers (RC) with selectively exchanged pheophytin (Pheo) molecules as described in [Germano, M., Shkuropatov, A. Ya., Permentier, H., Khatypov, R. A., Shuvalov, V. A., Hoff, A. J., and van Gorkom, H. J. (2000) Photosynth. Res. 64, 189-198] were studied by low-temperature absorption, linear and circular dichroism, and triplet-minus-singlet absorption-difference spectroscopy. The ratio of extinction coefficients epsilon(Pheo)/epsilon(Chl) for Q(Y) absorption in the RC is approximately 0.40 at 6 K and approximately 0.45 at room temperature. The presence of 2 beta-carotenes, one parallel and one perpendicular to the membrane plane, is confirmed. Absorption at 670 nm is due to the perpendicular Q(Y) transitions of the two peripheral chlorophylls (Chl) and not to either Pheo. The "core" pigments, two Pheo and four Chl absorb in the 676-685 nm range. Delocalized excited states as predicted by the "multimer model" are seen in the active branch. The inactive Pheo and the nearby Chl, however, mainly contribute localized transitions at 676 and 680 nm, respectively, although large CD changes indicate that exciton interactions are present on both branches. Replacement of the active Pheo prevents triplet formation, causes an LD increase at 676 and 681 nm, a blue-shift of 680 nm absorbance, and a bleach of the 685 nm exciton band. The triplet state is mainly localized on the Chl corresponding to B(A) in purple bacteria. Both Pheo Q(Y) transitions are oriented out of the membrane plane. Their Q(X) transitions are parallel to that plane, so that the Pheos in PSII are structurally similar to their homologues in purple bacteria.

  10. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer and a Tyrosine-Histidine Pair in a Photosystem II-Inspired β-Hairpin Maquette: Kinetics on the Picosecond Time Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagba, Cynthia V; McCaslin, Tyler G; Chi, San-Hui; Perry, Joseph W; Barry, Bridgette A

    2016-02-25

    Photosystem II (PSII) and ribonucleotide reductase employ oxidation and reduction of the tyrosine aromatic ring in radical transport pathways. Tyrosine-based reactions involve either proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) or electron transfer (ET) alone, depending on the pH and the pKa of tyrosine's phenolic oxygen. In PSII, a subset of the PCET reactions are mediated by a tyrosine-histidine redox-driven proton relay, YD-His189. Peptide A is a PSII-inspired β-hairpin, which contains a single tyrosine (Y5) and histidine (H14). Previous electrochemical characterization indicated that Peptide A conducts a net PCET reaction between Y5 and H14, which have a cross-strand π-π interaction. The kinetic impact of H14 has not yet been explored. Here, we address this question through time-resolved absorption spectroscopy and 280-nm photolysis, which generates a neutral tyrosyl radical. The formation and decay of the neutral tyrosyl radical at 410 nm were monitored in Peptide A and its variant, Peptide C, in which H14 is replaced by cyclohexylalanine (Cha14). Significantly, both electron transfer (ET, pL 11, L = lyonium) and PCET (pL 9) were accelerated in Peptide A and C, compared to model tyrosinate or tyrosine at the same pL. Increased electronic coupling, mediated by the peptide backbone, can account for this rate acceleration. Deuterium exchange gave no significant solvent isotope effect in the peptides. At pL 9, but not at pL 11, the reaction rate decreased when H14 was mutated to Cha14. This decrease in rate is attributed to an increase in reorganization energy in the Cha14 mutant. The Y5-H14 mechanism in Peptide A is reminiscent of proton- and electron-transfer events involving YD-H189 in PSII. These results document a mechanism by which proton donors and acceptors can regulate the rate of PCET reactions.

  11. Xanthophyll cycle-dependent quenching of photosystem II chlorophyll a fluorescence: Formation of a quenching complex with a short fluorescence lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, A.M.; Hazlett, T.L.; Govindjee [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-03-14

    Excess light triggers protective nonradiative dissipation of excitation energy in photosystem II through the formation of a trans-thylakoid pH gradient that in turn stimulates formation of zeaxanthin and antheraxanthin. These xanthophylls when combined with protonation of antenna pigment-protein complexes may increase nonradiative dissipation and, thus, quench chlorophyll a fluorescence. Here we measured, in parallel, the chlorophyll a fluorescence lifetime and intensity to understand the mechanism of this process. Increasing the xanthophyll concentration in the presence of a pH gradient (quenched conditions) decreases the fractional intensity of a fluorescence lifetime component centered at {approx}2 ns and increases a component at {approx}0.4 ns. Uncoupling the pH gradient (unquenched conditions) eliminates the 0.4-ns component. Changes in the xanthophyll concentration do not significantly affect the fluorescence lifetimes in either the quenched or unquenched sample conditions. However, there are differences in fluorescence lifetimes between the quenched and unquenched states that are due to pH-related, but nonxanthophyll-related, processes. Quenching of the maximal fluorescence intensity correlates with both the xanthophyll concentration and the fractional intensity of the 0.4-ns component. The unchanged fluorescence lifetimes and the proportional quenching of the maximal and dark-level fluorescence intensities indicate that the xanthophyllact on antenna, not reaction center processes. Further, the fluorescence quenching is interpreted as the combined effect of the pH gradient and xanthophyll concentration, resulting in the formation of a quenching complex with a short ({approx}0.4 ns) fluorescence lifetime. 33 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Overlapping Residual Herbicides for Control of Photosystem (PS) II- and 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase (HPPD)-Inhibitor-Resistant Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri S. Watson) in Glyphosate-Resistant Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Parminder S.; Ganie, Zahoor A.; Jhala, Amit J.

    2018-01-01

    A Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri S. Watson) biotype has evolved resistance to photosystem (PS) II- (atrazine) and 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD)-inhibiting herbicides (mesotrione, tembotrione, and topramezone) in maize seed production field in Nebraska, USA. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of soil residual pre-emergence (PRE) herbicides followed by (fb) tank-mixture of residual and foliar active post-emergence (POST) herbicides on PS-II- and HPPD-inhibitor-resistant Palmer amaranth control, maize yield, and net economic returns. Field experiments were conducted in a grower's field infested with PS II- and HPPD-inhibitor-resistant Palmer amaranth near Shickley in Fillmore County, Nebraska, USA in 2015 and 2016. The contrast analysis suggested that saflufenacil plus dimethenamid-P or pyroxasulfone plus saflufenacil applied PRE provided 80–82% Palmer amaranth control compared to 65 and 39% control with saflufenacil and pyroxasulfone applied alone at 3 weeks after PRE (WAPRE), respectively. Among the PRE fb POST herbicide programs, 95–98% Palmer amaranth control was achieved with pyroxasulfone plus safluefenacil, or saflufenacil plus dimethenamid-P applied PRE, fb glyphosate plus topramezone plus dimethenamid-P plus atrazine, glyphosate plus diflufenzopyr plus dicamba plus pyroxasulfone, glyphosate plus diflufenzopyr plus pendimethalin, or glyphosate plus diflufenzopyr plus dicamba plus atrazine applied POST at 3 weeks after POST (WAPOST) through maize harvest. Based on contrast analysis, PRE fb POST programs provided 77–83% Palmer amaranth control at 3 WAPOST through maize harvest compared to 12–15% control with PRE-only and 66–84% control with POST-only programs. Similarly, PRE fb POST programs provided 99% biomass reduction at 6 WAPOST compared to PRE-only (28%) and POST-only (87%) programs. PRE fb POST programs provided higher maize yield (13,617 kg ha−1) and net return (US $1,724 ha−1) compared to the PRE

  13. The low molecular weight protein PsaI stabilizes the light-harvesting complex II docking site of photosystem I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plöchinger, Magdalena; Torabi, Salar; Rantala, Marjaana

    2016-01-01

    PsaI represents one of three low molecular weight peptides of PSI. Targeted inactivation of the plastid PsaI gene in Nicotiana tabacum has no measurable effect on photosynthetic electron transport around PSI or on accumulation of proteins involved in photosynthesis. Instead, the lack of Psa......I destabilizes the association of PsaL and PsaH to PSI, both forming the light-harvesting complex (LHC)II docking site of PSI. These alterations at the LHCII binding site surprisingly did not prevent state transition but led to an increased incidence of PSI-LHCII complexes, coinciding with an elevated...

  14. Calcium EXAFS establishes the Mn-Ca cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinco, Roehl M.; McFarlane Holman, Karen L.; Robblee, John H.; Yano, Junko; Pizarro, Shelly A.; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Sauer, Kenneth; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2002-08-02

    The proximity of Ca to the Mn cluster of the photosynthetic water-oxidation complex is demonstrated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have collected EXAFS data at the Ca K-edge using active PS II membrane samples that contain approximately 2 Ca per 4 Mn. These samples are much less perturbed than previously investigated Sr-substituted samples, which were prepared subsequent to Ca depletion. The new Ca EXAFS clearly shows backscattering from Mn at 3.4 angstroms, a distance that agrees with that surmised from previously recorded Mn EXAFS. This result is also consistent with earlier related experiments at the Sr K-edge, using samples that contained functional Sr, that show Mn is {approx}; 3.5 angstroms distant from Sr. The totality of the evidence clearly advances the notion that the catalytic center of oxygen evolution is a Mn-Ca heteronuclear cluster.

  15. Molecular modeling and computational simulation of the photosystem-II reaction center to address isoproturon resistance in Phalaris minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Durg Vijay; Agarwal, Shikha; Kesharwani, Rajesh Kumar; Misra, Krishna

    2012-08-01

    Isoproturon is the only herbicide that can control Phalaris minor, a competitive weed of wheat that developed resistance in 1992. Resistance against isoproturon was reported to be due to a mutation in the psbA gene that encodes the isoproturon-binding D1 protein. Previously in our laboratory, a triazole derivative of isoproturon (TDI) was synthesized and found to be active against both susceptible and resistant biotypes at 0.5 kg/ha but has shown poor specificity. In the present study, both susceptible D1((S)), resistant D1((R)) and D2 proteins of the PS-II reaction center of P. minor have been modeled and simulated, selecting the crystal structure of PS-II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus (2AXT.pdb) as template. Loop regions were refined, and the complete reaction center D1/D2 was simulated with GROMACS in lipid (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphoglycerol, POPG) environment along with ligands and cofactor. Both S and R models were energy minimized using steepest decent equilibrated with isotropic pressure coupling and temperature coupling using a Berendsen protocol, and subjected to 1,000 ps of MD simulation. As a result of MD simulation, the best model obtained in lipid environment had five chlorophylls, two plastoquinones, two phenophytins and a bicarbonate ion along with cofactor Fe and oxygen evolving center (OEC). The triazole derivative of isoproturon was used as lead molecule for docking. The best worked out conformation of TDI was chosen for receptor-based de novo ligand design. In silico designed molecules were screened and, as a result, only those molecules that show higher docking and binding energies in comparison to isoproturon and its triazole derivative were proposed for synthesis in order to get more potent, non-resistant and more selective TDI analogs.

  16. Photoprotection in Plants Involves a Change in Lutein 1 Binding Domain in the Major Light-harvesting Complex of Photosystem II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilioaia, C.; Johnson, M.P.; Liao, P.N.; Pascal, A.A.; van Grondelle, R.; Walla, P.J.; Ruban, A.V.; Robert, B.

    2011-01-01

    Nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) is the fundamental process by which plants exposed to high light intensities dissipate the potentially harmful excess energy as heat. Recently, it has been shown that efficient energy dissipation can be induced in the major light-harvesting complexes of photosystem

  17. HYDROGEN PRODUCTION BY THE CYANOBACTERIUM PLECTONEMA BORYANUM: EFFECTS OF INITIAL NITRATE CONCENTRATION, LIGHT INTENSITY, AND INHIBITION OF PHOTOSYSTEM II BY DCMU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, B.; Huesemann, M.

    2008-01-01

    The alarming rate at which atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are increasing due to the burning of fossil fuels will have incalculable consequences if disregarded. Fuel cells, a source of energy that does not add to carbon dioxide emissions, have become an important topic of study. Although signifi cant advances have been made related to fuel cells, the problem of cheap and renewable hydrogen production still remains. The cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum has demonstrated potential as a resolution to this problem by producing hydrogen under nitrogen defi cient growing conditions. Plectonema boryanum cultures were tested in a series of experiments to determine the effects of light intensity, initial nitrate concentration, and photosystem II inhibitor DCMU (3-(3,4- dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) upon hydrogen production. Cultures were grown in sterile Chu. No. 10 medium within photobioreactors constantly illuminated by halogen lights. Because the enzyme responsible for hydrogen production is sensitive to oxygen, the medium was continuously sparged with argon/CO2 (99.7%/0.3% vol/vol) by gas dispersion tubes immersed in the culture. Hydrogen production was monitored by using a gas chromatograph equipped with a thermal conductivity detector. In the initial experiment, the effects of initial nitrate concentration were tested and results revealed cumulative hydrogen production was maximum at an initial nitrate concentration of 1 mM. A second experiment was then conducted at an initial nitrate concentration of 1 mM to determine the effects of light intensity at 50, 100, and 200 μmole m-2 s-1. Cumulative hydrogen production increased with increasing light intensity. A fi nal experiment, conducted at an initial nitrate concentration of 2 mM, tested the effects of high light intensity at 200 and 400 μmole m-2 s-1. Excessive light at 400 μmole m-2 s-1 decreased cumulative hydrogen production. Based upon all experiments, cumulative hydrogen production rates were optimal

  18. Effect of chromium oxide (III) nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species and photosystem II activity in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Cristina Henning da; Perreault, François; Oukarroum, Abdallah; Melegari, Sílvia Pedroso; Popovic, Radovan; Matias, William Gerson

    2016-01-01

    With the growth of nanotechnology and widespread use of nanomaterials, there is an increasing risk of environmental contamination by nanomaterials. However, the potential implications of such environmental contamination are hard to evaluate since the toxicity of nanomaterials if often not well characterized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of a chromium-based nanoparticle, Cr_2O_3-NP, used in a wide diversity of industrial processes and commercial products, on the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The deleterious impacts of Cr_2O_3-NP were characterized using cell density measurements, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), esterase enzymes activity, and photosystem II electron transport as indicators of toxicity. Cr_2O_3-NP exposure inhibited culture growth and significantly lowered cellular Chlorophyll a content. From cell density measurements, EC50 values of 2.05 ± 0.20 and 1.35 ± 0.06 g L"−"1 Cr_2O_3-NP were obtained after 24 and 72 h of exposure, respectively. In addition, ROS levels were increased to 160.24 ± 2.47% and 59.91 ± 0.15% of the control value after 24 and 72 h of exposition to 10 g L"−"1 Cr_2O_3-NP. At 24 h of exposure, the esterase activity increased to 160.24% of control value, revealing a modification of the short-term metabolic response of algae to Cr_2O_3-NP exposure. In conclusion, the metabolism of C. reinhardtii was the most sensitive to Cr_2O_3-NP after 24 h of treatment. - Highlights: • Cr_2O_3 nanoparticles are unstable and form large aggregates in the medium. • EC50 for growth inhibition of C. reinhardtii is 1.35 g L"−"1 at 72 h. • Cr_2O_3 nanoparticles increase ROS levels at 10 g L"−"1. • Cr_2O_3 nanoparticles affect photosynthetic electron transport.

  19. Effect of chromium oxide (III) nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species and photosystem II activity in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Cristina Henning da [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Perreault, François [School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-3005 (United States); Oukarroum, Abdallah [Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec in Montréal, 2101, Jeanne Mance Street, Station Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H2X 2J6 (Canada); Melegari, Sílvia Pedroso [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Center of Marine Studies, Federal University of Parana, Beira-mar Avenue, 83255-976, Pontal do Parana, PR (Brazil); Popovic, Radovan [Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec in Montréal, 2101, Jeanne Mance Street, Station Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H2X 2J6 (Canada); Matias, William Gerson, E-mail: william.g.matias@ufsc.br [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    With the growth of nanotechnology and widespread use of nanomaterials, there is an increasing risk of environmental contamination by nanomaterials. However, the potential implications of such environmental contamination are hard to evaluate since the toxicity of nanomaterials if often not well characterized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of a chromium-based nanoparticle, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP, used in a wide diversity of industrial processes and commercial products, on the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The deleterious impacts of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP were characterized using cell density measurements, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), esterase enzymes activity, and photosystem II electron transport as indicators of toxicity. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP exposure inhibited culture growth and significantly lowered cellular Chlorophyll a content. From cell density measurements, EC50 values of 2.05 ± 0.20 and 1.35 ± 0.06 g L{sup −1} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP were obtained after 24 and 72 h of exposure, respectively. In addition, ROS levels were increased to 160.24 ± 2.47% and 59.91 ± 0.15% of the control value after 24 and 72 h of exposition to 10 g L{sup −1} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP. At 24 h of exposure, the esterase activity increased to 160.24% of control value, revealing a modification of the short-term metabolic response of algae to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP exposure. In conclusion, the metabolism of C. reinhardtii was the most sensitive to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP after 24 h of treatment. - Highlights: • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles are unstable and form large aggregates in the medium. • EC50 for growth inhibition of C. reinhardtii is 1.35 g L{sup −1} at 72 h. • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles increase ROS levels at 10 g L{sup −1}. • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles affect photosynthetic electron transport.

  20. Participation of Glutamate-354 of the CP43 Polypeptide in the Ligation of Mn and the Binding of Substrate Water in Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Service, Rachel; Yano, Junko; McConnell, Iain; Hwang, Hong Jin; Niks, Dimitri; Hille, Russ; Wydrzynski, Tom; Burnap, Robert; Hillier, Warwick; Debus, Richard

    2010-09-30

    In the current X-ray crystallographic structural models of photosystem II, Glu354 of the CP43 polypeptide is the only amino acid ligand of the oxygen-evolving Mn4Ca cluster that is not provided by the D1 polypeptide. To further explore the influence of this structurally unique residue on the properties of the Mn4Ca cluster, the CP43-E354Q mutant of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was characterized with a variety of biophysical and spectroscopic methods, including polarography, EPR, X-ray Absorption, FTIR, and mass spectrometry. The kinetics of oxygen release in the mutant were essentially unchanged from those in wild-type. In addition, the oxygen flash-yields exhibited normal period-four oscillations having normal S state parameters, although the yields were lower, correlating with the mutant?s lower steady-state rate (approx. 20percent compared to wild-type). Experiments conducted with H218O showed that the fast and slow phases of substrate water exchange in CP43-E354Q thylakoid membranes were accelerated 8.5- and 1.8-fold, respectively, in the S3 state compared to wild-type. Purified oxygen-evolving CP43-E354Q PSII core complexes exhibited a slightly altered S1 state Mn-EXAFS spectrum, a slightly altered S2 state multiline EPR signal, a substantially altered S2-minus-S1 FTIR difference spectrum, and an unusually long lifetime for the S2 state (> 10 hours) in a substantial fraction of reaction centers. In contrast, the S2 state Mn-EXAFS spectrum was nearly indistinguishable from that of wild-type. The S2-minus-S1 FTIR difference spectrum showed alterations throughout the amide and carboxylate stretching regions. Global labeling with 15N and specific labeling with L-[1-13C]alanine revealed that the mutation perturbs both amide II and carboxylate stretching modes and shifts the symmetric carboxylate stretching modes of the ?-COO? group of D1-Ala344 (the C-terminus of the D1 polypeptide) to higher frequencies by 3 ? 4 cm-1 in both the S1 and S2 states

  1. Brevetoxin, the Dinoflagellate Neurotoxin, Localizes to Thylakoid Membranes and Interacts with the Light-Harvesting Complex II (LHCII) of Photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassell, Ryan T; Chen, Wei; Thomas, Serge; Liu, Li; Rein, Kathleen S

    2015-05-04

    The brevetoxins are neurotoxins that are produced by the "Florida red tide" dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. They bind to and activate the voltage-gated sodium channels in higher organisms, specifically the Nav 1.4 and Nav 1.5 channel subtypes. However, the native physiological function that the brevetoxins perform for K. brevis is unknown. By using fluorescent and photoactivatable derivatives, brevetoxin was shown to localize to the chloroplast of K. brevis where it binds to the light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) and thioredoxin. The LHCII is essential to non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), whereas thioredoxins are critical to the maintenance of redox homeostasis within the chloroplast and contribute to the scavenging of reactive oxygen. A culture of K. brevis producing low levels of toxin was shown to be deficient in NPQ and produced reactive oxygen species at twice the rate of the toxic culture, implicating a role in NPQ for the brevetoxins. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Decreased Photochemical Efficiency of Photosystem II following Sunlight Exposure of Shade-Grown Leaves of Avocado: Because of, or in Spite of, Two Kinetically Distinct Xanthophyll Cycles?1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Husen; Förster, Britta; Chow, Wah Soon; Pogson, Barry James; Osmond, C. Barry

    2013-01-01

    This study resolved correlations between changes in xanthophyll pigments and photosynthetic properties in attached and detached shade-grown avocado (Persea americana) leaves upon sun exposure. Lutein epoxide (Lx) was deepoxidized to lutein (L), increasing the total pool by ΔL over 5 h, whereas violaxanthin (V) conversion to antheraxanthin (A) and zeaxanthin (Z) ceased after 1 h. During subsequent dark or shade recovery, de novo synthesis of L and Z continued, followed by epoxidation of A and Z but not of L. Light-saturated nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) was strongly and linearly correlated with decreasing [Lx] and increasing [∆L] but showed a biphasic correlation with declining [V] and increasing [A+Z] separated when V deepoxidation ceased. When considering [ΔL+∆Z], the monophasic linear correlation was restored. Photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem (PSI; deduced from the delivery of electrons to PSI in saturating single-turnover flashes) showed a strong correlation in their continuous decline in sunlight and an increase in NPQ capacity. This decrease was also reflected in the initial reduction of the slope of photosynthetic electron transport versus photon flux density. Generally longer, stronger sun exposures enhanced declines in both slope and maximum photosynthetic electron transport rates as well as photochemical efficiency of PSII and PSII/PSI more severely and prevented full recovery. Interestingly, increased NPQ capacity was accompanied by slower relaxation. This was more prominent in detached leaves with closed stomata, indicating that photorespiratory recycling of CO2 provided little photoprotection to avocado shade leaves. Sun exposure of these shade leaves initiates a continuum of photoprotection, beyond full engagement of the Lx and V cycle in the antenna, but ultimately photoinactivated PSII reaction centers. PMID:23213134

  3. Angiotensin II Removes Kidney Resistance Conferred by Ischemic Preconditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Seong Jang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic preconditioning (IPC by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R renders resistance to the kidney. Strong IPC triggers kidney fibrosis, which is involved in angiotensin II (AngII and its type 1 receptor (AT1R signaling. Here, we investigated the role of AngII/AT1R signal pathway in the resistance of IPC kidneys to subsequent I/R injury. IPC of kidneys was generated by 30 minutes of bilateral renal ischemia and 8 days of reperfusion. Sham-operation was performed to generate control (non-IPC mice. To examine the roles of AngII and AT1R in IPC kidneys to subsequent I/R, IPC kidneys were subjected to either 30 minutes of bilateral kidney ischemia or sham-operation following treatment with AngII, losartan (AT1R blocker, or AngII plus losartan. IPC kidneys showed fibrotic changes, decreased AngII, and increased AT1R expression. I/R dramatically increased plasma creatinine concentrations in non-IPC mice, but not in IPC mice. AngII treatment in IPC mice resulted in enhanced morphological damage, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses, with functional impairment, whereas losartan treatment reversed these effects. However, AngII treatment in non-IPC mice did not change I/R-induced injury. AngII abolished the resistance of IPC kidneys to subsequent I/R via the enhancement of oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, suggesting that the AngII/AT1R signaling pathway is associated with outcome in injury-experienced kidney.

  4. Proceedings of the American Power Conference. Volume 58-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    This book is part 2 of the proceedings of the American Power Conference, Technology for Competition and Globalization, 1996. The topics of the papers include structural plant design; challenges of the global marketplace; thermal hydraulic methods for nuclear power plant safety and operation; decontamination and decommissioning; competitive operations and maintenance; fuel opportunities; cooling; competitive power pricing; operations; transformers; relays; plant controls; training to meet the competitive future; burning technologies; ash and byproducts utilization; advanced systems; computer tools for plant design; globalization of power; power system protection and power quality; life extension; grounding; and transmission line equipment

  5. Photochemical efficiency of photosystem II, photon yield of O2 evolution, photosynthetic capacity, and carotenoid composition during the midday depression of net CO2 uptake in Arbutus unedo growing in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmig-Adams, B; Adams, W W; Winter, K; Meyer, A; Schreiber, U; Pereira, J S; Krüger, A; Czygan, F C; Lange, O L

    1989-03-01

    During the "midday depression" of net CO2 exchange in the mediterranean sclerophyllous shrub Arbutus unedo, examined in the field in Portugal during August of 1987, several parameters indicative of photosynthetic competence were strongly and reversibly affected. These were the photochemical efficiency of photosystem (PS) II, measured as the ratio of variable to maximum chlorophyll fluorescence, as well as the photon yield and the capacity of photosynthetic O2 evolution at 10% CO2, of which the apparent photon yield of O2 evolution was most depressed. Furthermore, there was a strong and reversible increase in the content of the carotenoid zeaxanthin in the leaves that occurred at the expense of both violaxanthin and β-carotene. Diurnal changes in fluorescence characteristics were interpreted to indicate three concurrent effects on the photochemical system. First, an increase in the rate of radiationless energy dissipation in the antenna chlorophyll, reflected by changes in 77K fluorescence of PSII and PSI as well as in chlorophyll a fluorescence at ambient temperature. Second, a state shift characterized by an increase in the proportion of energy distributed to PSI as reflected by changes in PSI fluorescence. Third, an effect lowering the photon yield of O2 evolution and PSII fluorescence at ambient temperature without affecting PSII fluorescence at 77K which would be expected from a decrease in the activity of the water splitting enzyme system, i.e. a donor side limitation.

  6. The effect of aluminium-stress and exogenous spermidine on chlorophyll degradation, glutathione reductase activity and the photosystem II D1 protein gene (psbA) transcript level in lichen Xanthoria parietina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Gulseren; Eryilmaz, Isil Ezgi; Ozakca, Dilek

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the effects of short-term aluminium toxicity and the application of spermidine on the lichen Xanthoria parietina were investigated at the physiological and transcriptional levels. Our results suggest that aluminium stress leads to physiological processes in a dose-dependent manner through differences in lipid peroxidation rate, chlorophyll content and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) activity in aluminium and spermidine treated samples. The expression of the photosystem II D1 protein (psbA) gene was quantified using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Increased glutathione reductase activity and psbA mRNA transcript levels were observed in the X. parietina thalli that were treated with spermidine before aluminium-stress. The results showed that the application of spermidine could mitigate aluminium-induced lipid peroxidation and chlorophyll degradation on lichen X. parietina thalli through an increase in psbA transcript levels and activity of glutathione reductase (GR) enzymes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Proceedings of the 1984 DOE nuclear reactor and facility safety conference. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    This report is a collection of papers on reactor safety. The report takes the form of proceedings from the 1984 DOE Nuclear Reactor and Facility Safety Conference, Volume II of two. These proceedings cover Safety, Accidents, Training, Task/Job Analysis, Robotics and the Engineering Aspects of Man/Safety interfaces.

  8. Proceedings of the 1984 DOE nuclear reactor and facility safety conference. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This report is a collection of papers on reactor safety. The report takes the form of proceedings from the 1984 DOE Nuclear Reactor and Facility Safety Conference, Volume II of two. These proceedings cover Safety, Accidents, Training, Task/Job Analysis, Robotics and the Engineering Aspects of Man/Safety interfaces

  9. pH-Dependent Regulation of the Relaxation Rate of the Radical Anion of the Secondary Quinone Electron Acceptor QB in Photosystem II As Revealed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Yosuke; Noguchi, Takumi

    2018-05-15

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a protein complex that performs water oxidation using light energy during photosynthesis. In PSII, electrons abstracted from water are eventually transferred to the secondary quinone electron acceptor, Q B , and upon double reduction, Q B is converted to quinol by binding two protons. Thus, excess electron transfer in PSII increases the pH of the stroma. In this study, to investigate the pH-dependent regulation of the electron flow in PSII, we have estimated the relaxation rate of the Q B - radical anion in the pH region between 5 and 8 by direct monitoring of its population using light-induced Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy. The decay of Q B - by charge recombination with the S 2 state of the water oxidation center in PSII membranes was shown to be accelerated at higher pH, whereas that of Q A - examined in the presence of a herbicide was virtually unaffected at pH ≤7.5 and slightly slowed at pH 8. These observations were consistent with the previous studies that included rather indirect monitoring of the Q B - and Q A - decays using fluorescence detection. The accelerated relaxation of Q B - was explained by the shift of a redox equilibrium between Q A - and Q B - to the Q A - side due to the decrease in the redox potential of Q B at higher pH, which is induced by deprotonation of a single amino acid residue near Q B . It is proposed that this pH-dependent Q B - relaxation is one of the mechanisms of electron flow regulation in PSII for its photoprotection.

  10. Generalized approximate spin projection calculations of effective exchange integrals of the CaMn4O5 cluster in the S1 and S3 states of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, H; Shoji, M; Yamanaka, S; Mino, H; Umena, Y; Kawakami, K; Kamiya, N; Shen, J-R; Yamaguchi, K

    2014-06-28

    Full geometry optimizations followed by the vibrational analysis were performed for eight spin configurations of the CaMn4O4X(H2O)3Y (X = O, OH; Y = H2O, OH) cluster in the S1 and S3 states of the oxygen evolution complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). The energy gaps among these configurations obtained by vertical, adiabatic and adiabatic plus zero-point-energy (ZPE) correction procedures have been used for computation of the effective exchange integrals (J) in the spin Hamiltonian model. The J values are calculated by the (1) analytical method and the (2) generalized approximate spin projection (AP) method that eliminates the spin contamination errors of UB3LYP solutions. Using J values derived from these methods, exact diagonalization of the spin Hamiltonian matrix was carried out, yielding excitation energies and spin densities of the ground and lower-excited states of the cluster. The obtained results for the right (R)- and left (L)-opened structures in the S1 and S3 states are found to be consistent with available optical and magnetic experimental results. Implications of the computational results are discussed in relation to (a) the necessity of the exact diagonalization for computations of reliable energy levels, (b) magneto-structural correlations in the CaMn4O5 cluster of the OEC of PSII, (c) structural symmetry breaking in the S1 and S3 states, and (d) the right- and left-handed scenarios for the O-O bond formation for water oxidation.

  11. Water oxidation by photosystem II: H(2)O-D(2)O exchange and the influence of pH support formation of an intermediate by removal of a proton before dioxygen creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerencsér, László; Dau, Holger

    2010-11-30

    Understanding the chemistry of photosynthetic water oxidation requires deeper insight into the interrelation between electron transfer (ET) and proton relocations. In photosystem II membrane particles, the redox transitions of the water-oxidizing Mn complex were initiated by nanosecond laser flashes and monitored by absorption spectroscopy at 360 nm (A(360)). In the oxygen evolution transition (S(3) + hν → S(0) + O(2)), an exponential decrease in A(360) (τ(O(2)) = 1.6 ms) can be assigned to Mn reduction and O(2) formation. The corresponding rate-determining step is the ET from the Mn complex to a tyrosine radical (Y(Z)(ox)). We find that this A(360) decrease is preceded by a lag phase with a duration of 170 ± 40 μs (τ(lag) at pH 6.2), indicating formation of an intermediate before ET and O-O bond formation and corroborating results obtained by time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy. Whereas τ(O(2)) exhibits a minor kinetic isotope effect and negligible pH dependence, formation of the intermediate is slowed significantly both in D(2)O (τ(lag) increase of ∼140% in D(2)O) and at low pH (τ(lag) of 30 ± 20 μs at pH 7.0 vs τ(lag) of 470 ± 80 μs at pH 5.5). These findings support the fact that in the oxygen evolution transition an intermediate is created by deprotonation and removal of a proton from the Mn complex, after Y(Z)(ox) formation but before the onset of electron transfer and O-O bond formation.

  12. Creation of a 3Mn/1Fe cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II and investigation of its functional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semin, B К; Davletshina, L N; Seibert, M; Rubin, A B

    2018-01-01

    Extraction of Mn cations from the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of Ca-depleted PSII membranes (PSII[-Ca,4Mn]) by reductants like hydroquinone (H 2 Q) occurs with lower efficiency at acidic pH (2Mn/reaction center [RC] are extracted at pH5.7) than at neutral pH (3Mn/RC are extracted at pH6.5) [Semin et al. Photosynth. Res. 125 (2015) 95]. Fe(II) also extracts Mn cations from PSII(-Ca,4Mn), but only 2Mn/RC at pH6.5, forming a heteronuclear 2Mn/2Fe cluster [Semin and Seibert, J. Bioenerg. Biomembr. 48 (2016) 227]. Here we investigated the efficiency of Mn extraction by Fe(II) at acidic pH and found that Fe(II) cations can extract only 1Mn/RC from PSII(-Ca,4Mn) membranes at pH 5.7, forming a 3Mn/1Fe cluster. Also we found that the presence of Fe cations in a heteronuclear cluster (2Mn/2Fe) increases the resistance of the remaining Mn cations to H 2 Q action, since H 2 Q can extract Mn cations from homonuclear Mn clusters of PSII(-Ca,4Mn) and PSII(-Ca,2Mn) membranes but not from the heteronuclear cluster in PSII(-Ca,2Mn,2Fe) membranes. H 2 Q also cannot extract Mn from PSII membranes obtained by incubation of PSII(-Ca,4Mn) membranes with Fe(II) cations at pH5.7, which suggests the formation of a heteronuclear 3Mn/1Fe cluster in the OEC. Functional activity of PSII with a 3Mn/1Fe cluster was investigated. PSII preparations with a 3Mn/1Fe cluster in the OEC are able to photoreduce the exogenous electron acceptor 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol, possibly due to incomplete oxidation of water molecules as is the case with PSII(-Ca,2Mn,2Fe) samples. However, in the contrast to PSII(-Ca,2Mn,2Fe) samples PSII(-Ca,3Mn,1Fe) membranes can evolve O 2 at a low rate in the presence of exogenous Ca 2+ (at about 27% of the rate of O 2 evolution in native PSII membranes). The explanation for this phenomenon (either water splitting and production of molecular O 2 by the 3Mn/1Fe cluster or apparent O 2 evolution due to minor contamination of PSII(3Mn,1Fe) samples with PSII(-Ca,4Mn) membranes

  13. Abstracts of the international scientific-practical conference on space research, technology and conversion-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on space research, technology and conversion-II was held on 16-18 April, 1997 in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. The specialists discussed various aspects of space research, technology and conversion problems. More than 60 talks were presented in the meeting on the following subjects: remote sensing and the processing of satellite information; space navigation and others, including radiation effects in silicon solar cells caused by cosmic radiation. (A.A.D.)

  14. Antenna entropy in plant photosystems does not reduce the free energy for primary charge separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Robert C; Zucchelli, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated the concept of the so-called "antenna entropy" of higher plant photosystems. Several interesting points emerge: 1. In the case of a photosystemwhich harbours an excited state, the “antenna entropy” is equivalent to the configurational (mixing) entropy of a thermodynamic canonical ensemble. The energy associated with this parameter has been calculated for a hypothetical isoenergetic photosystem, photosystem I and photosystem II, and comes out in the range of 3.5 - 8% of the photon energy considering 680 nm. 2. The “antenna entropy” seems to be a rather unique thermodynamic phenomenon, in as much as it does not modify the free energy available for primary photochemistry, as has been previously suggested. 3. It is underlined that this configurational (mixing) entropy, unlike heat dispersal in a thermal system, does not involve energy dilution. This points out an important difference between thermal and electronic energy dispersal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Programme for Environmental Studies, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, Jeddah II Conference, 12-18 January 1976. Provisional Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab Organization for Education and Science, Cairo (Egypt).

    This publication presents the report of Jeddah II Conference of the Program for Environmental Studies, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden (PERSGA) hosted by King Abdul Aziz University in Jeddah in January 1976. The Arab League Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization (ALECSO) initiated the conference to study the issues of scientific research on,…

  16. Appalachian Rivers II Conference: Technology for Monitoring, Assessing, and Restoring Streams, Rivers, and Watersheds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None available

    1999-07-29

    On July 28-29, 1999, the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and the WMAC Foundation co-sponsored the Appalachian Rivers II Conference in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting brought together over 100 manufacturers, researchers, academicians, government agency representatives, watershed stewards, and administrators to examine technologies related to watershed assessment, monitoring, and restoration. Sessions included presentations and panel discussions concerning watershed analysis and modeling, decision-making considerations, and emerging technologies. The final session examined remediation and mitigation technologies to expedite the preservation of watershed ecosystems.

  17. Nuclear Electronics II. Proceedings of the Conference on Nuclear Electronics. V. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1962-04-15

    Nuclear instruments are used in almost every phase of atomic energy work, from assessing health hazards and prospecting for nuclear materials to plant control and nuclear physics experiments. The demands on nucleonic instrumentation are growing steadily. High-energy particle physics need such instruments for measuring extremely short times; in various research experiments most advanced electronic systems are required; and routine applications of radioisotopes call for more reliable instruments for automated counting facilities. In order to give designers and users of nuclear instrumentation an opportunity to discuss the research results and to exchange information on recent developments and new designs, the International Atomic Energy Agency, in co-operation with the Federal Nuclear Energy Commission of Yugoslavia, organized a Conference on Nuclear Electronics which was held in Belgrade from 15-20 May 1961. It was attended by more than 300 scientists from nearly 30 countries and five international organizations. Over 150 papers were read and discussed. As the field of nuclear electronics has expanded considerably, it was impossible to discuss all aspects of nuclear electronics in one series of meetings. Included in the main topics were radiation detectors, electronic circuitry in conventional and fast-pulse techniques and advanced electronic systems used in nuclear research. The Proceedings presented in these volumes contain the full records of the Conference, including discussions. The present state of technique, together with current trends and developments, are outlined. Of particular value should be the world-wide survey on progress recently made in such fields as those connected with semiconductor detectors, spark counters, luminescence chambers and fast electronic facilities for nuclear physics research. Together with the Proceedings of the Symposium on the same subject held in Paris and also published by the International Atomic Energy Agency, these volumes

  18. The O2-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II: Recent Insights from Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), and Femtosecond X-ray Crystallography Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askerka, Mikhail; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S

    2017-01-17

    Efficient photoelectrochemical water oxidation may open a way to produce energy from renewable solar power. In biology, generation of fuel due to water oxidation happens efficiently on an immense scale during the light reactions of photosynthesis. To oxidize water, photosynthetic organisms have evolved a highly conserved protein complex, Photosystem II. Within that complex, water oxidation happens at the CaMn 4 O 5 inorganic catalytic cluster, the so-called oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), which cycles through storage "S" states as it accumulates oxidizing equivalents and produces molecular oxygen. In recent years, there has been significant progress in understanding the OEC as it evolves through the catalytic cycle. Studies have combined conventional and femtosecond X-ray crystallography with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods and have addressed changes in protonation states of μ-oxo bridges and the coordination of substrate water through the analysis of ammonia binding as a chemical analog of water. These advances are thought to be critical to understanding the catalytic cycle since protonation states regulate the relative stability of different redox states and the geometry of the OEC. Therefore, establishing the mechanism for substrate water binding and the nature of protonation/redox state transitions in the OEC is essential for understanding the catalytic cycle of O 2 evolution. The structure of the dark-stable S 1 state has been a target for X-ray crystallography for the past 15 years. However, traditional X-ray crystallography has been hampered by radiation-induced reduction of the OEC. Very recently, a revolutionary X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) technique was applied to PSII to reveal atomic positions at 1.95 Å without radiation damage, which brought us closer than ever to establishing the ultimate structure of the OEC in the S 1 state. However, the atom positions in this crystal

  19. Human leukocyte antigen class II susceptibility conferring alleles among non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipu, H.N.; Ahmed, T.A.; Bashir, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the frequency of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II susceptibility conferring alleles among type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients, in comparison with healthy controls. Cross-sectional comparative study. Patients with non-insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus meeting World Health Organization criteria were studied. These were compared with age and gender matched healthy control subjects. For each subject (patients as well as controls), DNA was extracted from ethylene diamine tetra-acetate sample and HLA class II DRB1 typing was carried out at allele group level (DRB1*01-DRB1*16) by sequence specific primers. Human leukocyte antigen DRB1 type was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and results were recorded. Frequencies were determined as number of an allele divided by total number of alleles per group; p-value was computed using Pearson's chi-square test. Among the 100 patients, there were 63 males and 37 females with 68 controls. A total of 13 different HLA DRB1 alleles were detected, with DRB1*15 being the commonest in both the groups. The allele DRB1*13 had statistically significant higher frequency in patient group as compared to controls (p 0.005). HLA DRB1*13 was found with a significantly increased frequency in non-insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus. (author)

  20. Consequences of Modification of Photosystem Stoichiometry and Amount in Cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermaas, Willem [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2016-12-13

    The proposed research seeks to address two interconnected, important questions that impact photosynthetic processes and that reflect key differences between the photosynthetic systems of cyanobacteria and plants or algae. The first question is what are the reasons and consequences of the high photosystem I / photosystem II (PS I/PS II) ratio in many cyanobacteria, vs. a ratio that is close to unity in many plants and algae. The corresponding hypothesis is that most of PS I functions in cyclic electron transport, and that reduction in PS I will result primarily in a shortage of ATP rather than reducing power. This hypothesis will be tested by reducing the amount of PS I by changing the promoter region of the psaAB operon in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and generating a range of mutants with different PS I content and thereby different PS I/PS II ratios, with some of the mutants having a PS II/PS I ratio closer to that in plants. The resulting mutants will be probed in terms of their growth rates, electron transfer rates, and P700 redox kinetics. A second question relates to a Mehler-type reaction catalyzed by two flavoproteins, Flv1 and Flv3, that accept electrons from PS I and that potentially function as an electron safety valve leading to no useful purpose of the photosynthesis-generated electrons. The hypothesis to be tested is that Flv1 and Flv3 use the electrons for useful purposes such as cyclic electron flow around PS I. This hypothesis will be tested by analysis of a mutant strain lacking flv3, the gene for one of the flavoproteins. This research is important for a more detailed understanding of the consequences of photosystem stoichiometry and amounts in a living system. Such an understanding is critical for not only insights in the regulatory systems of the organism but also to guide the development of biological or bio-hybrid systems for solar energy conversion into fuels.

  1. Photosystem I electron donor or fluorescence quencher

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wientjes, I.E.; Croce, R.

    2012-01-01

    Light energy harvested by the pigments in Photosystem I (PSI) is used for charge separation in the reaction center (RC), after which the positive charge resides on a special chlorophyll dimer called P700. In studies on the PSI trapping kinetics, P700

  2. Advances in Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining 21st Pacific Asia Conference, PAKDD 2017 Held in Jeju, South Korea, May 23 26, 2017. Proceedings Part I, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-27

    Data Mining 21’’ Pacific-Asia Conference, PAKDD 2017Jeju, South Korea, May 23-26, Sb. GRANT NUMBER 2017 Proceedings, Part I, Part II Sc. PROGRAM...Springer; Switzerland. 14. ABSTRACT The Pacific-Asia Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (PAKDD) is a leading international conference...in the areas of knowledge discovery and data mining (KDD). We had three keynote speeches, delivered by Sang Cha from Seoul National University

  3. Journal of Environmental Radioactivity special issue: II International Conference on Radioecological Concentration Processes. (50 years later).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Tenorio, Rafael; Holm, Elis

    2018-06-01

    An international conference on Radioecological Concentration Processes was held in Seville, Spain, 6-9 November 2016 at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores. It was attended by 160 participants from 35 different countries. This was the 2nd conference on this item since 1966, 50 years ago. The conference covered aspects of radiological important radionuclides on terrestrial, marine and freshwater environments and has allowed obtaining a clear picture of the status of the Radioecology as a consolidated discipline in the 21st century. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Consequences of state transitions on the structural and functional organization of Photosystem I in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drop, Bartlomiej; Yadav K.N., Sathish; Boekema, Egbert J.; Croce, Roberta

    State transitions represent a photoacclimation process that regulates the light-driven photosynthetic reactions in response to changes in light quality/quantity. It balances the excitation between photosystem I (PSI) and II (PSII) by shuttling LHCII, the main light-harvesting complex of green algae

  5. [(H2O)(terpy)Mn(μ-O)2Mn(terpy)(OH2)](NO3)3 (terpy = 2,2′:6,2″-terpyridine) and its relevance to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II examined through pH dependent cyclic voltametry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Clyde W.; Shinopoulos, Katherine E.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Brudvig, Gary W.

    2010-01-01

    Photosynthetic water oxidation occurs naturally at a tetranuclear manganese center in the photosystem II protein complex. Synthetically mimicking this tetramanganese center, known as the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), has been an ongoing challenge of bioinorganic chemistry. Most past efforts have centered on water-oxidation catalysis using chemical oxidants. However, solar energy applications have drawn attention to electrochemical methods. In this paper, we examine the electrochemical behavior of the biomimetic water-oxidation catalyst [(H2O)(terpy)Mn(μ-O)2Mn(terpy)(H2O)](NO3)3 [terpy = 2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine] (1) in water under a variety of pH and buffered conditions and in the presence of acetate that binds to 1 in place of one of the terminal water ligands. These experiments will show that 1 not only exhibits proton-coupled electron-transfer reactivity analogous to the OEC, but also may be capable of electrochemical oxidation of water to oxygen. PMID:20372724

  6. Different roles of alpha- and beta-branch xanthophylls in photosystem assembly and photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, Luca; Fiore, Alessia; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Giuliano, Giovanni; Bassi, Roberto

    2007-11-30

    Xanthophylls (oxygenated carotenoids) are essential components of the plant photosynthetic apparatus, where they act in photosystem assembly, light harvesting, and photoprotection. Nevertheless, the specific function of individual xanthophyll species awaits complete elucidation. In this work, we analyze the photosynthetic phenotypes of two newly isolated Arabidopsis mutants in carotenoid biosynthesis containing exclusively alpha-branch (chy1chy2lut5) or beta-branch (chy1chy2lut2) xanthophylls. Both mutants show complete lack of qE, the rapidly reversible component of nonphotochemical quenching, and high levels of photoinhibition and lipid peroxidation under photooxidative stress. Both mutants are much more photosensitive than npq1lut2, which contains high levels of viola- and neoxanthin and a higher stoichiometry of light-harvesting proteins with respect to photosystem II core complexes, suggesting that the content in light-harvesting complexes plays an important role in photoprotection. In addition, chy1chy2lut5, which has lutein as the only xanthophyll, shows unprecedented photosensitivity even in low light conditions, reduced electron transport rate, enhanced photobleaching of isolated LHCII complexes, and a selective loss of CP26 with respect to chy1chy2lut2, highlighting a specific role of beta-branch xanthophylls in photoprotection and in qE mechanism. The stronger photosystem II photoinhibition of both mutants correlates with the higher rate of singlet oxygen production from thylakoids and isolated light-harvesting complexes, whereas carotenoid composition of photosystem II core complex was not influential. In depth analysis of the mutant phenotypes suggests that alpha-branch (lutein) and beta-branch (zeaxanthin, violaxanthin, and neoxanthin) xanthophylls have distinct and complementary roles in antenna protein assembly and in the mechanisms of photoprotection.

  7. Second European study conference on molecular low energy collisions (MOLEC II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The conference contained 52 papers on molecular low energy collisions including nonadiabatic transitions and excited states, vibrational and rotational energy transfer, chemical reactions, dissociation and ionization, general methods, potential surfaces, electronic excitation and excited states, inelastic scattering and anisotropic potentials, chemical reactions, and Van der Waals molecules. (JFP)

  8. Pacific Nations Broadcasting II; Proceedings of the Conference (23rd, San Francisco, April 1973).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Benjamin, Ed.

    Having as its goal the further development of understanding through the communications media, this document examines the utilization of broadcast media from both technological and sociological vantages. The papers contained herein were presented at the twenty-third annual Broadcast Industry Conference held at California State University in San…

  9. Nuclear data for reactors. Proceedings of the second international conference. Vol. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    The Second International Conference on Nuclear Data for Reactors, held in Helsinki at the invitation of the Finnish Government, was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency from 15 to 19 June 1970. The Conference, held as a result of recommendations made by the International Nuclear Data Committee, was attended by 163 participants from 28 countries and four international organizations, and 21 invited and 98 contributed papers were presented. This Conference was the second held by the IAEA on Nuclear Data for Reactors. Almost four years have elapsed since the first was held in Paris in 1966. During these years gratifying progress has been made by reactor, nuclear and evaluation physicists, whose collaboration has been greatly enhanced. As a result, many laboratories have concentrated their efforts on items of particular importance for reactor research and development, and many measurements are now available. The main purpose of this Conference was to provide an opportunity to review results of recent basic neutron-physics investigations against a background need for basic information, especially concerning reactors. The Conference itself, together with the preparatory meetings of IAEA experts in Studsvik on the status of α( 239 Pu) and the ν-bar-values for fissionable nuclei, showed an emphasis on the nuclear data aspects most important for nuclear technology. Most contributors dealt with the measurement and analysis of neutron cross-sections. This extensive new cross-section information can be attributed to several factors, the most important being the development and systematic exploitation of high-intensity neutron sources, such as modern linear accelerators, modern cyclotrons and underground nuclear explosions, improvements in instrumentation and in sample preparation techniques, and other technical improvements. Compared with the first IAEA Conference on Nuclear Data for Reactors this one has many more contributions on neutron data evaluation. Many

  10. CNS proceedings of the 16. annual conference, volume I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wight, A.L.; Loewer, R.

    1995-01-01

    The proceedings of the 16. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society cover a wide range of nuclear topics, but the emphasis is on CANDU reactors and Canadian experience. The 82 papers are arranged in 16 sessions dealing with the following subjects: thermalhydraulics, containment, control and instrumentation, reactor physics, fuel channels, engineering and maintenance, safety and licensing, severe accidents and probabilistic safety assessment, new reactors and applications, radiation, fuel, computers. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  11. CNS proceedings of the 16. annual conference, volume I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wight, A L; Loewer, R [eds.

    1996-12-31

    The proceedings of the 16. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society cover a wide range of nuclear topics, but the emphasis is on CANDU reactors and Canadian experience. The 82 papers are arranged in 16 sessions dealing with the following subjects: thermalhydraulics, containment, control and instrumentation, reactor physics, fuel channels, engineering and maintenance, safety and licensing, severe accidents and probabilistic safety assessment, new reactors and applications, radiation, fuel, computers. The individual papers have been abstracted separately.

  12. Gp96 Peptide Antagonist gp96-II Confers Therapeutic Effects in Murine Intestinal Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia A. Nold-Petry

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe expression of heat shock protein gp96 is strongly correlated with the degree of tissue inflammation in ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, thereby leading us to the hypothesis that inhibition of expression via gp96-II peptide prevents intestinal inflammation.MethodsWe employed daily injections of gp96-II peptide in two murine models of intestinal inflammation, the first resulting from five daily injections of IL-12/IL-18, the second via a single intrarectal application of TNBS (2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid. We also assessed the effectiveness of gp96-II peptide in murine and human primary cell culture.ResultsIn the IL-12/IL-18 model, all gp96-II peptide-treated animals survived until day 5, whereas 80% of placebo-injected animals died. gp96-II peptide reduced IL-12/IL-18-induced plasma IFNγ by 89%, IL-1β by 63%, IL-6 by 43% and tumor necrosis factor (TNF by 70% compared to controls. The clinical assessment Disease Activity Index of intestinal inflammation severity was found to be significantly lower in the gp96-II-treated animals when compared to vehicle-injected mice. gp96-II peptide treatment in the TNBS model limited weight loss to 5% on day 7 compared with prednisolone treatment, whereas placebo-treated animals suffered a 20% weight loss. Histological disease severity was reduced equally by prednisolone (by 40% and gp96-II peptide (35%. Mice treated with either gp96-II peptide or prednisolone exhibited improved endoscopic scores compared with vehicle-treated control mice: vascularity, fibrin, granularity, and translucency scores were reduced by up to 49% by prednisolone and by up to 30% by gp96-II peptide. In vitro, gp96-II peptide reduced TLR2-, TLR4- and IL-12/IL-18-induced cytokine expression in murine splenocytes, with declines in constitutive IL-6 (54%, lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF (48%, IL-6 (81% and in Staphylococcus epidermidis-induced TNF (67% and IL-6 (81%, as well as IL-12/IL-18-induced IFNγ (75%. gp

  13. Light-harvesting features revealed by the structure of plant Photosystem I

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Shem, A; Nelson, N; 10.1023/B:PRES.0000036881.23512.42

    2004-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is driven by two multi-subunit membrane protein complexes, Photosystem I and Photosystem II. In plants and green algae, both complexes are composed of two moieties: a reaction center (RC), where light-induced charge translocation occurs, and a peripheral antenna that absorbs light and funnels its energy to the reaction center. The peripheral antenna of PS I (LHC I) is composed of four gene products (Lhca 1-4) that are unique among the chlorophyll a/b binding proteins in their pronounced long-wavelength absorbance and in their assembly into dimers. The recently determined structure of plant Photosystem I provides the first relatively high- resolution structural model of a super-complex containing a reaction center and its peripheral antenna. We describe some of the structural features responsible for the unique properties of LHC I and discuss the advantages of the particular LHC I dimerization mode over monomeric or trimeric forms. In addition, we delineate some of the interactions betw...

  14. Beams `96. Proceedings of the 11th international conference on high power particle beams. Vol. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungwirth, K.; Ullschmied, J. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    The scientific programme of the conference carved the physics and technology of intense beams of charged particles, from basic experimental and theoretical problems of beam generation, transport and interaction with various media, up to beam and pulsed power applications in science and in industry. The breakdown of the papers by main topical groups is as follows: radiation sources, Z-pinches, accelerate related topics, astrophysics, ICF, ION Beam Physics, ION DIODES, ION RINGS, Beam plasma systems, diagnostic and others. This volumes contains 160 contributions, out which 133 have been input to INIS.

  15. Beams '96. Proceedings of the 11th international conference on high power particle beams. Vol. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungwirth, K.; Ullschmied, J.

    1996-01-01

    The scientific programme of the conference carved the physics and technology of intense beams of charged particles, from basic experimental and theoretical problems of beam generation, transport and interaction with various media, up to beam and pulsed power applications in science and in industry. The breakdown of the papers by main topical groups is as follows: radiation sources, Z-pinches, accelerate related topics, astrophysics, ICF, ION Beam Physics, ION DIODES, ION RINGS, Beam plasma systems, diagnostic and others. This volumes contains 160 contributions, out which 133 have been input to INIS

  16. Robust photosystem I activity by Cyanothece sp. (Cyanobacteria) and its role in prolonged bloom persistence in lake St Lucia, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plooy, Schalk J; Anandraj, Akash; White, Sarah; Perissinotto, Renzo; du Preez, Derek R

    2018-04-12

    Worldwide, cyanobacterial blooms are becoming more frequent, exacerbated by eutrophication, anthropogenic effects, and global climate change. Environmental factors play a direct role in photosynthesis of cyanobacteria and subsequent cellular changes, growth, and bloom dynamics. This study investigated the photosynthetic functioning of a persistent bloom-forming (18 months) cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp., isolated from Lake St Lucia, South Africa. DUAL-PAM fluorometric methods were used to observe physiological responses in Cyanothece sp. photosystems I and II. Results show that photosystem I activity was maintained under all environmental conditions tested, while photosystem II activity was not observed at all. Out of the environmental factors tested (temperature, salinity, and nitrogen presence), only temperature significantly influenced photosystem I activity. In particular, high temperature (40 °C) facilitated faster electron transport rates, while effects of salinity and nitrogen were variable. Cyanothece sp. has shown to sustain bloom status for long periods largely because of the essential role of photosystem I activity during highly dynamic and even extreme (e.g., salinities higher than 200) environmental conditions. This ensures the continual supply of cellular energy (e.g. ATP) to important processes such as nitrogen assimilation, which is essential for protein synthesis, cell growth and, therefore, bloom maintenance.

  17. Proceedings of the sixth international conference on fluidized bed combustion. Volume II. Technical sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    The Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion was held April 9-11, 1980, at the Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, Georgia. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The papers covered recent developments in atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion, especially the design, operation and control of pilot and demonstration plants. The cleanup of combustion products and the erosion, corrosion and fouling of gas turbines was emphasized also. Fifty-five papers from Volume 2 of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; five papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  18. Material science lesson from the biological photosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younghye; Lee, Jun Ho; Ha, Heonjin; Im, Sang Won; Nam, Ki Tae

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by photosynthesis, artificial systems for a sustainable energy supply are being designed. Each sequential energy conversion process from light to biomass in natural photosynthesis is a valuable model for an energy collection, transport and conversion system. Notwithstanding the numerous lessons of nature that provide inspiration for new developments, the features of natural photosynthesis need to be reengineered to meet man's demands. This review describes recent strategies toward adapting key lessons from natural photosynthesis to artificial systems. We focus on the underlying material science in photosynthesis that combines photosystems as pivotal functional materials and a range of materials into an integrated system. Finally, a perspective on the future development of photosynthesis mimetic energy systems is proposed.

  19. The same ELA class II risk factors confer equine insect bite hypersensitivity in two distinct populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Lisa S; Swinburne, June E; Meadows, Jennifer R S; Broström, Hans; Eriksson, Susanne; Fikse, W Freddy; Frey, Rebecka; Sundquist, Marie; Tseng, Chia T; Mikko, Sofia; Lindgren, Gabriella

    2012-03-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a chronic allergic dermatitis common in horses. Affected horses mainly react against antigens present in the saliva from the biting midges, Culicoides ssp, and occasionally black flies, Simulium ssp. Because of this insect dependency, the disease is clearly seasonal and prevalence varies between geographical locations. For two distinct horse breeds, we genotyped four microsatellite markers positioned within the MHC class II region and sequenced the highly polymorphic exons two from DRA and DRB3, respectively. Initially, 94 IBH-affected and 93 unaffected Swedish born Icelandic horses were tested for genetic association. These horses had previously been genotyped on the Illumina Equine SNP50 BeadChip, which made it possible to ensure that our study did not suffer from the effects of stratification. The second population consisted of 106 unaffected and 80 IBH-affected Exmoor ponies. We show that variants in the MHC class II region are associated with disease susceptibility (p (raw) = 2.34 × 10(-5)), with the same allele (COR112:274) associated in two separate populations. In addition, we combined microsatellite and sequencing data in order to investigate the pattern of homozygosity and show that homozygosity across the entire MHC class II region is associated with a higher risk of developing IBH (p = 0.0013). To our knowledge this is the first time in any atopic dermatitis suffering species, including man, where the same risk allele has been identified in two distinct populations.

  20. II Consenso Brasileiro sobre Helicobacter pylori Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Vaz Coelho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Avanços significativos ocorridos desde o Primeiro Consenso Brasileiro sobre H. pylori realizado em 1995, em Belo Horizonte, MG, justificam este segundo consenso. O evento foi organizado pela Federação Brasileira de Gastroenterologia e pelo Núcleo Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter, sendo realizado em São Paulo nos dias 19 e 20 de junho de 2004. Contou com a participação das principais autoridades nacionais na área, a partir de lista elaborada pelas duas sociedades organizadoras do evento. Assim, participaram 36 delegados provenientes de 15 estados brasileiros, incluindo gastroenterologistas, patologistas, pediatras e microbiologistas. Os participantes foram alocados em um dos cinco sub-temas a serem contemplados no encontro, a saber: Helicobacter pylori e dispepsia funcional; Helicobacter pylori e AINEs; Helicobacter pylori e doença do refluxo gastroesofágico; tratamento Helicobacter pylori e retratamento Helicobacter pylori. Foi adotado como consensual as decisões que atingissem 70% ou mais de concordância entre os participantes. Os resultados foram apresentados em outubro de 2004 durante sessão especial da VI Semana Brasileira do Aparelho Digestivo, realizada em Recife, PE, e esta publicação apresenta o sumário das principais recomendações e conclusões do evento.Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter and took place on June, 19-20, 2004 in São Paulo, SP. Thirty six delegates coming from 15 different Brazilian states including gastroenterologists, pathologists, microbiologists and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The

  1. Photobiological hydrogen production with switchable photosystem-II designer algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James Weifu

    2014-02-18

    A process for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production using transgenic alga. The process includes inducing exogenous genes in a transgenic alga by manipulating selected environmental factors. In one embodiment inducing production of an exogenous gene uncouples H.sub.2 production from existing mechanisms that would downregulate H.sub.2 production in the absence of the exogenous gene. In other embodiments inducing an exogenous gene triggers a cascade of metabolic changes that increase H.sub.2 production. In some embodiments the transgenic alga are rendered non-regenerative by inducing exogenous transgenes for proton channel polypeptides that are targeted to specific algal membranes.

  2. Inhibition of photosystem II by UV-B-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tevini, M.; Pfister, K.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of UV-B-radiation on PSII activity of spinach chloroplasts was analyzed by measuring the integrity of the herbicide-binding protein (HBP 32), by measurement of fluorescence induction in the presence of Diuron (DCMU), and by mathematical analysis of the fluorescence induction curves. It was shown that UV-B inactivates the PSII α-centers but not PSII β-centers. However, the possibility cannot be excluded that in addition the donor site of PSII near the reaction center is attacked by UV-B-radiation. (orig.)

  3. Regulation of Photosystem II Electron transport by Bicarbonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensen, van J.J.S.

    2012-01-01

    In oxygenic photosynthesis, carbon dioxide is fixed by ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and further reduced to carbohydrates. However, CO2, in the form of carbonate or bicarbonate, is also directly involved in the “light reactions” through structural and regulatory roles

  4. Photochemical and photoelectrochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence in photosystem II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredenberg, W.J.; Durchan, M.; Prasil, O.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with kinetics and properties of variable fluorescence in leaves and thylakoids upon excitation with low intensity multi-turnover actinic light pulses corresponding with an excitation rate of about 10 Hz. These show a relatively small and amply documented rise in the sub-s time range

  5. Isolation of plant Photosystem II complexes by fractional solubilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja eHaniewicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available PSII occurs in different forms and supercomplexes in thylakoid membranes. Using a transplastomic strain of Nicotiana tabacum histidine tagged on the subunit PsbE, we have previously shown that a mild extraction protocol with β-dodecylmaltoside enriches PSII characteristic of lamellae and grana margins. Here, we characterize residual granal PSII that is not extracted by this first solubilization step. Using affinity purification, we demonstrate that this PSII fraction consists of PSII-LHCII mega- and supercomplexes, PSII dimers and PSII monomers, which were separated by gel filtration and functionally characterized. Our findings represent an alternative demonstration of different PSII populations in thylakoid membranes, and they make it possible to prepare PSII-LHCII supercomplexes in high yield.

  6. Isolated photosystem I reaction centers on a functionalized gated high electron mobility transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliza, Sazia A; Lee, Ida; Tulip, Fahmida S; Mostafa, Salwa; Greenbaum, Elias; Ericson, M Nance; Islam, Syed K

    2011-09-01

    In oxygenic plants, photons are captured with high quantum efficiency by two specialized reaction centers (RC) called Photosystem I (PS I) and Photosystem II (PS II). The captured photon triggers rapid charge separation and the photon energy is converted into an electrostatic potential across the nanometer-scale (~6 nm) reaction centers. The exogenous photovoltages from a single PS I RC have been previously measured using the technique of Kelvin force probe microscopy (KFM). However, biomolecular photovoltaic applications require two-terminal devices. This paper presents for the first time, a micro-device for detection and characterization of isolated PS I RCs. The device is based on an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure. AlGaN/GaN HEMTs show high current throughputs and greater sensitivity to surface charges compared to other field-effect devices. PS I complexes immobilized on the floating gate of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs resulted in significant changes in the device characteristics under illumination. An analytical model has been developed to estimate the RCs of a major orientation on the functionalized gate surface of the HEMTs. © 2011 IEEE

  7. Isolated Photosystem I Reaction Centers on a Functionalized Gated High Electron Mobility Transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliza, Sazia A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lee, Ida [ORNL; Tulip, Fahmida S [ORNL; Islam, Syed K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Mostafa, Salwa [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In oxygenic plants, photons are captured with high quantum efficiency by two specialized reaction centers (RC) called Photosystem I (PS I) and Photosystem II (PS II). The captured photon triggers rapid charge separation and the photon energy is converted into an electrostatic potential across the nanometer-scale nm reaction centers. The exogenous photovoltages from a single PS I RC have been previously measured using the technique of Kelvin force probe microscopy (KFM). However, biomolecular photovoltaic applications require two-terminal devices. This paper presents for the first time, a micro-device for detection and characterization of isolated PS I RCs. The device is based on an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure. AlGaN/GaN HEMTs show high current throughputs and greater sensitivity to surface charges compared to other field-effect devices. PS I complexes immobilized on the floating gate of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs resulted in significant changes in the device characteristics under illumination. An analytical model has been developed to estimate the RCs of a major orientation on the functionalized gate surface of the HEMTs.

  8. Changes in activities of both photosystems and the regulatory effect of cyclic electron flow in field-grown cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L) under water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Ya-Li; Yao, He-Sheng; Han, Ji-Mei; Chow, Wah Soon; Fan, Da-Yong; Zhang, Wang-Feng

    2018-01-01

    To clarify the influence of water deficit on the functionality of the photosynthetic apparatus of cotton plants, leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll a fluorescence, and P700 redox state were examined in field-grown cotton Gossypium hirsutum L. cv. Xinluzao 45. In addition, we measured changes in the P515 signal and analyzed the activity of ATP synthase and the trans-thylakoid proton gradient (ΔpH). With increasing water deficit, the net CO 2 assimilation rate (A N ) and stomatal conductance (g s ) significantly decreased, but the maximum quantum efficiency of PSII photochemistry (F v /F m ) did not change. The photochemical activity of photosystem II (PSII) was reflected by the photochemical quenching coefficient (qP), quantum efficiency of photosystem II [Y(II)], and electron transport rate through PSII [ETR(II)], while the activity of photosystem I (PSI) was reflected by the quantum efficiency of photosystem I [Y(I)] and the electron transport rate through PSI [ETR(I)]. Both activities were maintained under mild water deficit, but were slightly decreased under moderate water deficit. Under moderate water deficit, cyclic electron flow (CEF), the fraction of absorbed light dissipated thermally via the ΔpH- and xanthophyll-regulated process [Y(NPQ)], and the fraction of P700 oxidized under a given set of conditions [Y(ND)] increased. Our results suggest that the activities of both photosystems are stable under mild water deficit and decrease only slightly under moderate water deficit. Moderate water deficit stimulates CEF, and the stimulation of CEF is essential for protecting PSI and PSII against photoinhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. A Femtosecond Visible/Visible and Visible/Mid-Infrared Transient Absorption Study of the Light Harvesting Complex II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stahl, A.D.; Di Donato, M.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; van Grondelle, R.; Groot, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Light harvesting complex II (LHCII) is the most abundant protein in the thylakoid membrane of higher plants and green algae. LHCII acts to collect solar radiation, transferring this energy mainly toward photosystem II, with a smaller amount going to photosystem I; it is then converted into a

  10. Vulnerability of photosynthesis and photosystem I in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) exposed to waterlogging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kun; Zhao, Shijie; Cui, Mingxing; Han, Guangxuan; Wen, Pei

    2018-04-01

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) is an important energy crop for utilizing coastal marginal land. This study was to investigate waterlogging tolerance of Jerusalem artichoke through photosynthetic diagnose with emphasis on photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI) performance. Potted plants were subjected to severe (liquid level 5 cm above vermiculite surface) and moderate (liquid level 5 cm below vermiculite surface) waterlogging for 9 days. Large decreased photosynthetic rate suggested photosynthesis vulnerability upon waterlogging. After 7 days of severe waterlogging, PSII and PSI photoinhibition arose, indicated by significant decrease in the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) and PSI (△MR/MR 0 ), and PSI seemed more vulnerable because of greater decrease in △MR/MR 0 than Fv/Fm. In line with decreased △MR/MR 0 and unchanged Fv/Fm after 9 days of moderate waterlogging, the amount of PSI reaction center protein rather than PSII reaction center protein was lowered, confirming greater PSI vulnerability. According to positive correlation between △MR/MR 0 and efficiency that an electron moves beyond primary quinone and negative correlation between △MR/MR 0 and PSII excitation pressure, PSI inactivation elevated PSII excitation pressure by depressing electron transport at PSII acceptor side. Thus, PSI vulnerability induced PSII photoinhibition and endangered the stability of whole photosynthetic apparatus under waterlogging. In agreement with photosystems photoinhibition, elevated H 2 O 2 concentration and lipid peroxidation in the leaves corroborated waterlogging-induced oxidative stress. In conclusion, Jerusalem artichoke is a waterlogging sensitive species in terms of photosynthesis and PSI vulnerability. Consistently, tuber yield was tremendously reduced by waterlogging, confirming waterlogging sensitivity of Jerusalem artichoke. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Preface: Proceedings of the Colloidal Dispersions in External Fields II Conference (Bonn-Bad Godesberg, 31 March 2 April 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwen, H.

    2008-10-01

    This special issue reflects the scientific programme of the International Colloidal Dispersions in External Fields Conference (CODEF II) that took place in Bonn-Bad Godesberg from 31 March-2 April 2008. This is the second conference in a series that started in 2004 when the first CODEF meeting was held. The proceedings of the first CODEF meeting were summarized in a previous special issue (Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter 16 (issue 38)). The present issue represents recent progress in this rapidly developing field. The CODEF meeting series is held in conjunction with the German-Dutch Transregional Collaborative Research Centre SFB TR6 with the title Physics of Colloidal Dispersions in External Fields. Scientists working within this network as well as international invited guest speakers contributed to these meetings. The contributions in this issue are organized according to the type of different fields applied namely: bulk (no external field) shear flow electric field magnetic and laser-optical field confinement We would like to thank the CODEF II sponsors (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and MWFZ Mainz) for their financial support. Furthermore, we thank IOP Publishing for their willingness to publish the proceedings of this conference as a special issue. Participants O Alarcón-Waess (Puebla), M Allen (Coventry), J L Arauz-Lara (San Luis Potosi), L Assoud (Düsseldorf), G K Auernhammer (Mainz), R Backofen (Dresden), M Balbás-Gambra (Munich), J Bammert (Bayreuth), M Baptista (Mainz), J-L Barrat (Lyon), M Bier (Utrecht), K Binder (Mainz), R Blaak (Düsseldorf), V Blickle (Stuttgart), D Block (Kiel), S Böhm (Düsseldorf), V Botan (Mainz), J P Bouchaud (Paris), J Brader (Konstanz), G Brambilla (Montpellier), W J Briels (Enschede), M Brinkmann (Göttingen), C Brunet (Paris), H-J Butt (Mainz), M A Camargo Chaparro (Düsseldorf), R Castañeda Priego (Guanajuato), J J Cerdà Pino (Frankfurt), A Chatterji (Jülich), M Chavez Paez (San Luis Potosi), A Chremos

  12. The Arabidopsis nox mutant lacking carotene hydroxylase activity reveals a critical role for xanthophylls in photosystem I biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, Luca; Piques, Maria; Ronzani, Michela; Molesini, Barbara; Alboresi, Alessandro; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Bassi, Roberto

    2013-02-01

    Carotenes, and their oxygenated derivatives xanthophylls, are essential components of the photosynthetic apparatus. They contribute to the assembly of photosynthetic complexes and participate in light absorption and chloroplast photoprotection. Here, we studied the role of xanthophylls, as distinct from that of carotenes, by characterizing a no xanthophylls (nox) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, which was obtained by combining mutations targeting the four carotenoid hydroxylase genes. nox plants retained α- and β-carotenes but were devoid in xanthophylls. The phenotype included depletion of light-harvesting complex (LHC) subunits and impairment of nonphotochemical quenching, two effects consistent with the location of xanthophylls in photosystem II antenna, but also a decreased efficiency of photosynthetic electron transfer, photosensitivity, and lethality in soil. Biochemical analysis revealed that the nox mutant was specifically depleted in photosystem I function due to a severe deficiency in PsaA/B subunits. While the stationary level of psaA/B transcripts showed no major differences between genotypes, the stability of newly synthesized PsaA/B proteins was decreased and translation of psaA/B mRNA was impaired in nox with respect to wild-type plants. We conclude that xanthophylls, besides their role in photoprotection and LHC assembly, are also needed for photosystem I core translation and stability, thus making these compounds indispensable for autotrophic growth.

  13. The structure of spinach Photosystem I studied by electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, Egbert J.; Wynn, R. Max; Malkin, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The structure of three types of Photosystem I (PS I) complex isolated from spinach chloroplasts was studied by electron microscopy and computer image analysis. Molecular projections (top views and side views) of a native PS I complex (PSI-200), an antenna-depleted PS I complex (PSI-100) and the PS I

  14. Photosystem I-​based Biophotovoltaics on Nanostructured Hematite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocakoglu, K.; Krupnik, T.; van den Bosch, B.; Harputlu, E.; Gullo, M.P.; Olmos, J.D.J.; Yildirimcan, S.; Gupta, R.K.; Yakuphanoglu, F.; Barbieri, A.; Reek, J.N.H.; Kargul, J.

    2014-01-01

    The electronic coupling between a robust red algal photosystem I (PSI) associated with its light harvesting antenna (LHCI) and nanocrystalline n-​type semiconductors, TiO2 and hematite (α-​Fe2O3) is utilized for fabrication of the biohybrid dye-​sensitized solar cells (DSSC)​. PSI-​LHCI is

  15. PMS : Photosystem I electron donor or fluorescence quencher

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wientjes, Emilie; Croce, Roberta

    Light energy harvested by the pigments in Photosystem I (PSI) is used for charge separation in the reaction center (RC), after which the positive charge resides on a special chlorophyll dimer called P700. In studies on the PSI trapping kinetics, P700(+) is usually chemically reduced to re-open the

  16. Structure, function and regulation of plant photosystem I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Poul Erik; Bassi, Roberto; Boekema, Egbert J.; Dekker, Jan P.; Jansson, Stefan; Leister, Dario; Robinson, Colin; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    Photosystem I (PSI) is a multisubunit protein complex located in the thylakoid membranes of green plants and algae, where it initiates one of the first steps of solar energy conversion by light-driven electron transport. In this review, we discuss recent progress on several topics related to the

  17. Structure, function and regulation of plant photosystem I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, P.E.; Bassi, R.; Boekema, E.J.; Dekker, J.P.; Jansson, S.; Leister, D.; Robinson, C.; Scheller, H.V.

    2007-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) is a multisubunit protein complex located in the thylakoid membranes of green plants and algae, where it initiates one of the first steps of solar energy conversion by light-driven electron transport. In this review, we discuss recent progress on several topics related to the

  18. Report on international round table conference 'Accidental radiation contamination of food of animal origin'. Vol.II (Working papers)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The World Association of Veterinary Food Hygienists (WAVFH) held an international round table conference in Stockholm, Sweden, January 26-29, 1987. The topic of the conference was 'Accidental Radiation Contamination of Food of Animal Origin'. The agenda was divided into three major topic areas: 1. Ecological Science; 2. Veterinary Science - Live Animals; and 3. Veterinary Science - Food of Animal Origin. Experts and delegates from member countries presented papers, participated in discussions and workshops and produced a multidisciplinary report covering the topic areas. Two volumes were produced; one a collection of all papers presented, and the other a compilation of the proceedings from each of the topic workshops. In order to rapidly distribute the Association's information to members, papers and other information were collated and disseminated as presented to the conference participants

  19. Report on international round table conference 'Accidental radiation contamination of food of animal origin'. Vol.II (Working papers)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-07-01

    The World Association of Veterinary Food Hygienists (WAVFH) held an international round table conference in Stockholm, Sweden, January 26-29, 1987. The topic of the conference was 'Accidental Radiation Contamination of Food of Animal Origin'. The agenda was divided into three major topic areas: 1. Ecological Science; 2. Veterinary Science - Live Animals; and 3. Veterinary Science - Food of Animal Origin. Experts and delegates from member countries presented papers, participated in discussions and workshops and produced a multidisciplinary report covering the topic areas. Two volumes were produced; one a collection of all papers presented, and the other a compilation of the proceedings from each of the topic workshops. In order to rapidly distribute the Association's information to members, papers and other information were collated and disseminated as presented to the conference participants.

  20. II International Scientific Theological Conference “Spiritual Silk Road. Creativity. Integration”, Bolgar–Kazan, 3–5 September, 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Giniyatullina

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available On September 3–5, 2017, the Second International Scientific Theological Conference “Spiritual Silk Road. Creativity. Integration” was held as a continuation of the official opening of the Bolgar Islamic Academy. The conference was organized by the Russian Mufties Council, the Spiritual Administration of Muslims of the Russian Federation, the strategic vision group “Russia – Islamic World”, Kazan Federal University. The grand opening of the Bolgar Islamic Academy was held on September 4 in the town of Bolgar (Republic of Tatarstan. The plenary session saw the presentation of the theological work “Qalandar-name” of the Golden Horde thinker and spiritual leader Abu Bakr Qalandar Rumi, translated from Farsi. Assistant to the President of Tatarstan Kamil Iskhakov was elected President of the Bolgar Islamic Academy. Deputy Mufti of the Republic of Tatarstan for Education, Rector of the Russian Islamic Institute Rafik Mukhametshin was appointed Rector of the Academy. President of the Republic of Tatarstan Rustam Minnikhanov opened the solemn ceremony and noted in his speech: “For many centuries, Bolgar was a place of concentration of eminent scholars-theologians. By opening in its heart an Islamic academy, we revive its former greatness. Last year, the first stone was laid in the foundation of the academy on the anniversary of the adoption of Islam. Today it welcomes the first students”. The conference was continued in the form of sectional sessions and discussion roundtables on September 5 in the city of Kazan. The conference facilitated the interaction of the spiritual departments and the relevant government departments of Russia, China and the countries of Central Asia and the Southern Caucasus. The resolution was approved following the results of the conference determining the main results of the conference and the main directions for further cooperation.

  1. First national conference on environmental health research - state of the art in Malaysia today : proceedings : Vol. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This book compiled the paper presented at this conference. The papers discussed mainly on environmental health problems and research. Other subjects include air pollutions and health, wastewater and health, SBS - sick building syndrome, air quality, marine pollution and toxicology, and radiation and health.

  2. Proceedings of the American Journalism Historians' Association Conference (Roanoke, Virginia, October 6-8, 1994). Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Journalism Historians' Association.

    The second part of the proceedings of this conference of journalism historians contains the following 21 papers: "The First Information Revolution" (Irving Fang); "The 'Andromeda Strain' Phenomenon: Mutating Systems and International Communication Policy" (Eliza Tanner); "Guns or Butter?: Black Press Editorial Policy…

  3. First national conference on environmental health research - state of the art in Malaysia today : proceedings : Vol. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This book compiled the paper presented at this conference. The papers discussed mainly on environmental health problems and research. Other subjects include air pollutions and health, wastewater and health, SBS - sick building syndrome, air quality, marine pollution and toxicology, and radiation and health

  4. Pacific Telecommunications Council Annual Conference Proceedings (15th, Honolulu, Hawaii, January 17-20, 1993). Volumes I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, James G., Ed.; Wedemeyer, Dan J., Ed.

    This two-volume set contains 165 papers presented at a conference that brought together over 1,100 telecommunications leaders and leading commentators from over 40 countries across the Pacific region. The papers indicate that the optimism of the telecommunications industry is possibly greater than during the 1980s, although tempered by a more…

  5. Effect of Cytokinin and Auxin Treatments on Morphogenesis, Terpenoid Biosynthesis, Photosystem Structural Organization, and Endogenous Isoprenoid Cytokinin Profile in Artemisia alba Turra In Vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Danova, K.; Motyka, Václav; Todorova, M.; Trendafilova, A.; Krumova, S.; Dobrev, Petre; Andreeva, T.; Oreshkova, T.; Taneva, S.; Evstatieva, L.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2018), s. 403-418 ISSN 0721-7595 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-14649S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Artemisia alba Turra in vitro * Cis- and trans-zeatin * Endogenous cytokinins * Photosystem II and thylakoid morphology * Plant growth regulators * Terpenoid profile of the essential oil Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.073, year: 2016

  6. Biomass accumulation, photochemical efficiency of photosystem II, nutrient contents and nitrate reductase activity in young rosewood plants (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke submitted to different NO3-:NH4+ ratios Acúmulo de biomassa, eficiência fotoquímica do fotossistema II, conteúdo de nutrientes e atividade da redutase do nitrato em plantas jovens de pau-rosa (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke submetidas a diferentes relações NO3-:NH4+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denize Caranhas de Sousa Barreto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The rosewood (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke is a native tree species of Amazon rainforest growing naturally in acidic forest soils with reduced redox potential. However, this species can also been found growing in forest gaps containing oxide soils. Variations in the forms of mineral nitrogen (NO3- or NH4+ may be predicted in these different edaphic conditions. Considering that possibility, an experiment was carried out to analyze the effects of different NO3-:NH4+ ratios on the growth performance, mineral composition, chloroplastid pigment contents, photochemical efficiency photosystem II (PSII, and nitrate redutase activity (RN, E.C.1.6.6.1 on A. rosaeodora seedlings. Nine-month-old seedlings were grown in pots with a washed sand capacity of 7.5 kg and submitted to different NO3-:NH4+ ratios (T1 = 0:100%, T2 = 25:75%, T3 = 50:50%, T4 = 75:25%, and T5 = 100:0%. The lowest relative growth rate was observed when the NO3-:NH4+ ratio was equal to 0:100%. In general, high concentrations of NO3- rather than NH4+ favored a greater nutrient accumulation in different parts of the plant. For the chloroplastid pigment, the highest Chl a, Chl b, Chl tot, Chl a/b and Chl tot/Cx+c contents were found in the treatment with 75:25% of NO3-:NH4+, and for Chl b and Cx+c it was observed no difference. In addition, there was a higher photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm when high NO3- concentrations were used. A linear and positive response for the nitrate reductase activity was recorded when the nitrate content increased on the culture substrate. Our results suggest that A. rosaeodora seedlings have a better growth performance when the NO3- concentrations in the culture substrate were higher than the NH4+ concentrations.O pau-rosa (Aniba rosaeodora Ducke habita, naturalmente, solos florestais ácidos com potencial redox reduzido. No entanto, estas espécies têm sido encontradas também em clareiras que, teoricamente, apresentam solos mais oxidados. Nestas diferentes

  7. Large photovoltages generated by plant photosystem I crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toporik, Hila; Carmeli, Chanoch; Nelson, Nathan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Carmeli, Itai [School of Chemistry, Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Volotsenko, Irina; Molotskii, Michel; Rosenwaks, Yossi [Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2012-06-12

    Micrometer-thick plant photosystem I crystals made of up to 1000 layers of serially arranged protein complexes generate unprecedented high photovoltages when placed on a conducting solid surface and measured using Kelvin probe force microscopy. The successive layers form serially photoinduced dipoles in the crystal that give rise to electric fields as large as 100 kV cm{sup -1}. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II alleles which confer susceptibility or protection in the Morphea in Adults and Children (MAC) cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobe, Heidi; Ahn, Chul; Arnett, Frank; Reveille, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-class I) and II (HLA-class II) alleles associated with morphea (localized scleroderma) in the Morphea in Adults and Children (MAC) cohort by a nested case–control association study. Methods Morphea patients were included from MAC cohort and matched controls from the NIH/NIAMS Scleroderma Family Registry and DNA Repository and Division of Rheumatology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. HLA- Class II genotyping and SSCP typing was performed of HLA-A, -B, -C alleles. Associations between HLA-Class I and II alleles and morphea as well as its subphenotypes were determined. Results There were 211 cases available for HLA-class I typing with 726 matched controls and 158 cases available for HLA Class-II typing with 1108 matched controls. The strongest associations were found with DRB1*04:04 (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4–4.0 P=0.002) and HLA-B*37 conferred the highest OR among Class I alleles (3.3, 95% CI 1.6–6.9, P= 0.0016). Comparison with risk alleles in systemic sclerosis determined using the same methods and control population revealed one common allele (DRB*04:04). Conclusion Results of the present study demonstrate specific HLA Class I and II alleles are associated with morphea and likely generalized and linear subtypes. The associated morphea alleles are different than in scleroderma, implicating morphea is also immunogenetically distinct. Risk alleles in morphea are also associated with conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune conditions. Population based studies indicate patients with RA have increased risk of morphea, implicating a common susceptibility allele. PMID:25223600

  9. Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Proceedings of the Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Vol. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-10-15

    At the beginning of 1963 nuclear power plants produced some 3 500 000 kW of electrical power to different distribution grids around the world. Much significant operating experience has been gained with these power reactors, but this experience is often not collected in such a way as to make it easily available. The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors in Vienna from 4 -8 June 1963 which was attended by 240 participants representing 27 of the Agency's Member States and six international organizations. At the Conference, 42 papers giving detailed experience with more than 20 nuclear power stations were discussed. Although similar meetings on a national or regional scale have been held earlier in various countries, this is the first arranged by the Agency on a world-wide basis. Some of the detailed material may have been given earlier but for the most part it represents new and recently acquired experience, and for the first time it has been possible to compile in one place such extensive material on the operating experience with power reactors. The Conference discussed the experience gained both generally in the context of national and international nuclear power development programmes, and more specifically in the detailed operating experience with different power reactor stations. In addition, various plant components, fuel cycles, staffing of nuclear plants and licensing of such staff were treated. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of interest not only to nuclear , plant designers and operators who daily encounter problems similar to those discussed by the Conference, but also to those guiding the planning and implementation of power development programmes.

  10. Proceedings of the second Arab conference on the peaceful uses of atomic energy. Part II: A and B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barakat, M F; El-Mashri, S M [eds.

    1995-10-01

    The second Arab conference on the peaceful uses of atomic energy was held on 5-9 November, 1994 in Cairo. The specialists discussed peaceful uses of atomic energy in different sciences. The application of atomic energy techniques in the fields of reactor physics and engineering, nuclear chemistry, radioactive wastes, nuclear safety, radiobiology, soil and agriculture and environmental studies were discussed at the meeting. More than 1000 papers were presented in the meeting.

  11. Proceedings of the second Arab conference on the peaceful uses of atomic energy. Part II: A and B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barakat, M.F.; El-Mashri, S.M.

    1995-10-01

    The second arab conference on the peaceful uses of atomic energy was held on 5-9 November, 1994 in Cairo. The specialists discussed peaceful uses of atomic energy in different sciences. The application of atomic energy techniques in the fields of reactor physics and engineering, nuclear chemistry, radioactive wastes, nuclear safety, radiobiology, soil and agriculture and environmental studies were discussed at the meeting. More than 1000 papers were presented in the meeting

  12. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research. Vol. II. Proceedings of a Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Physics Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Research on controlled nuclear fusion was first disclosed at the Second United Nations Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, held at Geneva in 1958. From the information given, it was evident that a better understanding of the behaviour of hot dense plasmas was needed before the goal of economic energy release from nuclear fusion could be reached. The fact that research since then has been most complex and costly has enhanced the desirability of international co-operation and exchange of information and experience. Having organized its First Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research at Salzburg in 1961, the International Atomic Energy Agency again provided the means for such cooperation in organizing its Second Conference on this subject on 6-10 September, 1965, at Culham, Abingdon, Berks, England. The meeting was arranged with the generous help of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority at their Culham Laboratory, where the facilities and assistance of the staff were greatly appreciated. At the meeting, which was attended by 268 participants from 26 member states and three international organizations, significant results from many experiments, including those from the new and larger machines, became available. It has now become feasible to intercorrelate data obtained from a number of similar machines; this has led to a more complete understanding of plasma behaviour. No breakthrough was reported nor had been expected towards the economical release of the energy from fusion, but there was increased understanding of the problems of production, control and containment of high-density and high-temperature plasmas

  13. Disposal of Radioactive Wastes. Vol. II. Proceedings of the Scientific Conference on the Disposal of Radioactive Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-07-01

    Almost every human activity creates some kind of waste. Whether it is harmful, inconvenient, neutral or even positively useful in some other activity depends largely on its nature, which can often be changed by some fairly simple chemical process so as to neutralize harmful wastes, render inconvenient wastes useful, and so on. Radioactive ''waste'' can be extremely harmful or useful, again depending on its form and the way it is handled; but its essential nature cannot be changed or destroyed by any means at present under the control of man. Furthermore, the harmful waste of today may well become the useful raw material of tomorrow. As more and more countries embark on programs of nuclear research and nuclear power, the quantities of radioactive material to be disposed of are rapidly increasing and the problems of safeguarding humanity on the one hand and of storing possibly useful material on the other are assuming great importance. It was for these reasons that the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization combined their forces in sponsoring and organizing, with the co-operation of the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, a large scientific conference devoted to the subject of the disposal of radioactive wastes. The Conference was held from 16 to 21 November 1959 at the Oceanographic Museum in Monaco, in deference to the leading position of this institution in the field of oceanography, which is an extremely important discipline in relation to the disposal of wastes into the sea. A total of 283 scientists attended, representing 31 countries and 11 international organizations. It is with the consciousness of offering scientific information of great value to the future progress of an extremely important field of knowledge that I now commend these Proceedings to the earnest attention of all workers in that field.

  14. II International Conference: Radiation Protection Training. Future Strategies. Ciemat, 17-19 September, 2003. Book of Papers and Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Safety in the use of ionising radiation and protection against potential risks due to exposure to radiation sources are not static concepts, rather their evolution runs parallel with an increased knowledge of the technologies and basic concepts employed. Education and training, which are inherently tied to with research, are the means to disseminate the advances made to the scientists and professionals working with ionising radiation. At present, Radiation Protection (RP) training is considered to be the best means to promote a safety culture and to improve the competence of exposed workers. Indeed, progress in both RP teaching and training, which form part of this transfer of technology and specialized knowledge, are fields that are in continuous motion. The first conference on Radiation Protection training was celebrated in Saclay (France) under the slogan Radiation Protection: What are the Future Training needs?. It can be considered as the first such meeting dedicated to the community of professionals, from a wide range of scientific and technological backgrounds, related in some way to Radiation Protection training. (Author)

  15. HLA non-class II genes may confer type I diabetes susceptibility in a Mapuche (Amerindian) affected family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bravo, Francisco; Martinez-Laso, Jorge; Martin-Villa, Jose M; Moscoso, Juan; Moreno, Almudena; Serrano-Vela, Juan I; Zamora, Jorge; Asenjo, Silvia; Gleisner, Andrea; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A rare case of type I diabetes is studied in an Amerindian (Mapuche) family from Chile, analyzing glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet-cell autoantibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. The affected sib is the only one that has one specific HLA haplotype combination that differs from the other sibs only in the HLA class I genes. It is concluded that HLA diabetes susceptibility factors may be placed outside the class II region or even that susceptibility factors do not exist in the HLA region in this Amerindian family.

  16. The Arabidopsis nox Mutant Lacking Carotene Hydroxylase Activity Reveals a Critical Role for Xanthophylls in Photosystem I Biogenesis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall’Osto, Luca; Piques, Maria; Ronzani, Michela; Molesini, Barbara; Alboresi, Alessandro; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Bassi, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Carotenes, and their oxygenated derivatives xanthophylls, are essential components of the photosynthetic apparatus. They contribute to the assembly of photosynthetic complexes and participate in light absorption and chloroplast photoprotection. Here, we studied the role of xanthophylls, as distinct from that of carotenes, by characterizing a no xanthophylls (nox) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, which was obtained by combining mutations targeting the four carotenoid hydroxylase genes. nox plants retained α- and β-carotenes but were devoid in xanthophylls. The phenotype included depletion of light-harvesting complex (LHC) subunits and impairment of nonphotochemical quenching, two effects consistent with the location of xanthophylls in photosystem II antenna, but also a decreased efficiency of photosynthetic electron transfer, photosensitivity, and lethality in soil. Biochemical analysis revealed that the nox mutant was specifically depleted in photosystem I function due to a severe deficiency in PsaA/B subunits. While the stationary level of psaA/B transcripts showed no major differences between genotypes, the stability of newly synthesized PsaA/B proteins was decreased and translation of psaA/B mRNA was impaired in nox with respect to wild-type plants. We conclude that xanthophylls, besides their role in photoprotection and LHC assembly, are also needed for photosystem I core translation and stability, thus making these compounds indispensable for autotrophic growth. PMID:23396829

  17. Subunit stoichiometry of the chloroplast photosystem I complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, B.D.; Malkin, R.

    1988-01-01

    A native photosystem I (PS I) complex and a PS I core complex depleted of antenna subunits has been isolated from the uniformly 14 C-labeled aquatic higher plant, Lemna. These complexes have been analyzed for their subunit stoichiometry by quantitative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis methods. The results for both preparations indicate that one copy of each high molecular mass subunit is present per PS I complex and that a single copy of most low molecular mass subunits is also present. These results suggest that iron-sulfur center X, an early PS I electron acceptor proposed to bind to the high molecular mass subunits, contains a single [4Fe-4S] cluster which is bound to a dimeric structure of high molecular mass subunits, each providing 2 cysteine residues to coordinate this cluster

  18. Differential Roles of Carotenes and Xanthophylls in Photosystem I Photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Stefano; Bressan, Mauro; Carbonera, Donatella; Agostini, Alessandro; Dall'Osto, Luca

    2016-07-05

    Carotenes and their oxygenated derivatives, xanthophylls, are structural elements of the photosynthetic apparatus and contribute to increasing both the light-harvesting and photoprotective capacity of the photosystems. β-Carotene is present in both the core complexes and light-harvesting system (LHCI) of Photosystem (PS) I, while xanthophylls lutein and violaxanthin bind exclusively to its antenna moiety; another xanthophyll, zeaxanthin, which protects chloroplasts against photooxidative damage, binds to the LHCI complexes under conditions of excess light. We functionally dissected various components of the xanthophyll- and carotene-dependent photoprotection mechanism of PSI by analyzing two Arabidopsis mutants: szl1 plants, with a carotene content lower than that of the wild type, and npq1, with suppressed zeaxanthin formation. When exposed to excess light, the szl1 genotype displayed PSI photoinhibition stronger than that of wild-type plants, while removing zeaxanthin had no such effect. The PSI-LHCI complex purified from szl1 was more photosensitive than the corresponding wild-type and npq1 complexes, as is evident from its faster photobleaching and increased rate of singlet oxygen release, suggesting that β-carotene is crucial in controlling chlorophyll triplet formation. Accordingly, fluorescence-detected magnetic resonance analysis showed an increase in the amplitude of signals assigned to chlorophyll triplets in β-carotene-depleted complexes. When PSI was fractioned into its functional moieties, it was revealed that the boost in the rate of singlet oxygen release caused by β-carotene depletion was greater in LHCI than in the core complex. We conclude that PSI-LHCI complex-bound β-carotene elicits a protective response, consisting of a reduction in the yield of harmful triplet excited states, while accumulation of zeaxanthin plays a minor role in restoring phototolerance.

  19. Comparative kinetic and energetic modelling of phyllosemiquinone oxidation in Photosystem I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santabarbara, Stefano; Zucchelli, Giuseppe

    2016-04-14

    The oxidation kinetics of phyllo(semi)quinone (PhQ), which acts as an electron transfer (ET) intermediate in the Photosystem I reaction centre, are described by a minimum of two exponential phases, characterised by lifetimes in the 10-30 ns and 150-300 ns ranges. The fastest phase is considered to be dominated by the oxidation of the PhQ molecule coordinated by the PsaB reaction centre subunit (PhQB), and the slowest phase is dominated by the oxidation of the PsaA coordinated PhQ (PhQA). Testing different energetic schemes within a unified theory-based kinetic modelling approach provides reliable limit-values for some of the physical-chemical parameters controlling these ET reactions: (i) the value of ΔG(0) associated with PhQA oxidation is smaller than ∼+30 meV; (ii) the value of the total reorganisation energy (λt) likely exceeds 0.7 eV; (iii) different mean nuclear modes are coupled to PhQB and PhQA oxidation, the former being larger, and both being ≥100 cm(-1).

  20. Relato da II Conferência Interna do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Educação Matemática UNESP - RIO CLARO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Lorenzetti Wodewotzki

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The Graduate Program in Mathematical location of UNESP - RC (State University of São Paulo at Rio Claro has been promoting, since 2000, in the city of Ipeúna, SP, an annual internal conference aiming to join the program faculty and student representatives, with the main purpose of evaluating current situation and perspectives, as well as to discuss and to suggest guidelines which could help to bring about qualitative improvements in the Program. The present report describes the main issues discussed in the II Conference that was held from September 10-11 2001.O Programa de Pós-graduação em Educação Matemática da UNESP - Rio Claro tem promovido, desde 2000, na cidade de Ipeúna, SP, uma conferência anual interna, visando congregar o Corpo Docente do Programa e representantes de seu Corpo Discente, com o objetivo principal de avaliar a situação atual e perspectivas, assim como o de discutir e sugerir diretrizes que possivelmente possam contribuir para o aperfeiçoamento qualitativo do referido Programa. O presente relato descreve as principais questões tratadas na II Conferência, ocorrida no período de 10 a 11 de setembro de 2001.

  1. FISA-2009 Conference on Euratom Research and Training Activities: Nuclear Fission - Past, Present and Future (Generation-II, -III and -IV + Partitioning and Transmutation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, V.; Deffrennes, M.; Hugon, M.; Manolatos, P.; Ptackova, K.; Van Goethem, G.; Webster, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the research and training activities carried out under the Euratom 7th Framework Programme (FP7, 2007-2011) in the field of nuclear fission science and technology, covering in particular nuclear systems and safety, and including innovative reactor systems and partitioning and transmutation. It is based on the more than 40 invited lectures that were delivered by Euratom project coordinators and keynote speakers at the FISA-2009 Conference (), organised by the European Commission DG Research, 22-24 June 2009, Prague, Czech Republic. The Euratom programme must be considered in the context of current and future nuclear technology and the respective research effort: ·Generation-II (i.e. yesterday, NPP construction 1970-2000): safety and reliability of nuclear facilities and energy independence in order to ensure security of supply worldwide; ·Generation-III (i.e. today, construction 2000-2040+): continuous improvement of safety and reliability, and increased industrial competitiveness in a growing energy market; ·Generation-IV (i.e. tomorrow, construction from 2040) for increased sustainability though optimal utilisation of natural resources and waste minimisation, and increased proliferation resistance. Consequently, the focus of the lectures devoted to Generation-II and -III is on the major scientific challenges and technological developments needed to guarantee safety and reliability, in particular issues associated with plant lifetime extension and operation. The focus of the lectures devoted to Generation-IV is on the design objectives and associated research issues that have been agreed upon internationally, in particular the ambitious criteria and technology goals established at the international level by the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF). In the future, electricity must continue to be produced competitively, and in addition high temperature process heat may also be required, while exploiting a maximum of fissile and

  2. Computational science - ICCS 2008: 8th international conference, Kraków, Poland, June 23-25, 2008: Proceedings, part II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bubak, M.; van Albada, G.D.; Dongarra, J.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The three-volume set LNCS 5101-5103 constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computational Science, ICCS 2008, held in Krakow, Poland in June 2008. The 167 revised papers of the main conference track presented together with the abstracts of 7 keynote talks and the

  3. Proceedings - II Scientific Conferences CBIOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Monteiro Rodrigues, et al.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available 1st Session - CBIOS Group PT (Pharmacology and Therapeutics Keynote Lecture C.01 - High-density lipoproteins beyond atherogenesis. José Delgado Alves Speakers / Prelectores C.02 - Mind the GAAP: a tale of camels, calcium, channels and cancer. Nuno Saraiva C.03 - Case study: Ochratoxin A, ROS and Antioxidants. João G. Costa, Nuno Saraiva, Patrícia S. Guerreiro, Henriqueta Louro, Maria J. Silva, Joana P. Miranda, Matilde Castro, Ines BatinicHaberle, Ana S. Fernandes and Nuno G. Oliveira C.04 - A investigação em Educação Física, Desporto e Exercício na Universidade Lusófona. António Labisa Palmeira C.05 - Systemic Lisbon Battery: dados de 5 anos de avaliação de défices cognitivos por intermédio da Realidade Virtual. Pedro Gamito, J. Oliveira and D. Morais 2st Session - CBIOS Group DDS (Development Delivery Systems Keynote Lecture C.06 - Modelling and Simulation for Drug Absorption Prediction from DDS. Nuno Silva Speakers / Prelectores C.07 - Functional Ingredients in delivery systems. Tânia Santos de Almeida, Ana Júlio, Margarida Pereira, Rita Caparica, Nicole Pereira, Afonso Antunes, Filipa Rocha, Nuno Saraiva, Ana Sofia Fernandes, Maria Eduarda Araújo, André Baby, Catarina Pinto Reis, Catarina Rosado and Joana Mota C.08 - Targeting Parvifloron D to pancreatic cancer using nanocarriers. Ana Rebelo, Patrícia Rijo, Jesus Molpeceres and Catarina Pinto Reis 3st Session - CBIOS Group FSP (Food Sciences and Phytochemistrys Keynote Lecture C.09 - Sustainable Chemistry by Design. Susana D. Lucas Speakers / Prelectores C.10 - Insight Food Science and Phytochemistry Group. Marisa Nicolai, Diogo Matias, Filipe Pereira, Catarina Garcia, Joana Andrade, Íris Neto, Catarina Reis and Patrícia Rijo C.11 - 6,7-Dehydroroyleanone as a Lead Molecule for the Development of Anticancer Hybrid Nanoparticles. Catarina Garcia a,b, Catarina Silvaa, Tijana Stanković, Milica Pešić, Isabel Martins , Patrícia Domingos, Cistina Silva Pereira, Marisa Nicolai, Carlos M. Monteiro, Carlos A.M. CAM, Catarina Pinto Reisa, Patrícia Rijo, P. Abstract List / Posters P.01 INFLUENCE OF AN IONIC LIQUID IN CAFFEINE RELEASE FROM LIPIDIC IMPLANTS. Afonso Antunes, Joana Portugal Mota, J., Tânia Santos de Almeida P.02 PREPARAÇÃOE CARACTERIZAÇÃO DE NANOPARTÍCULAS POLIMÉRICAS PARA FINS COSMÉTICOS. Ana Henriques Mota, Patrícia Rijo, Jesus Molpeceres, Lia Ascensão, Luís Monteiro Rodrigues, Catarina Pinto Reis P.03 AMINO ACID BASED IONIC LIQUIDS AS FUNCTIONAL INGREDIENTS IN TOPICAL FORMULATIONS CONTAINING CAFFEINE. Ana Júlio, Cláudia Antunes, Rita Caparica, Maria E. Araújo, Nuno Saraiva, Ana Fernandes, André R. Baby, Catarina Rosado, Joana Portugal Mota, Tânia Santos de Almeida P.04 ANTHROPOMETRIC, BODY COMPOSITION AND NUTRITIONAL INTAKE EVALUATION OF SWIMMING ATHLETES. Ana Morgado, Bruno Pereira, Nelson Tavares P.05 PLECTRANTHUS SPP. STUDY: ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF EXTRACTS AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ESSENTIAL OILS. Anastasia Borozan, Catarina Garcia, Luís Roque, Ana C. Figueiredo, Carlos M. Monteiro, Carlos A.M. Afonso, Catarina Reis, Patrícia Rijo P.06 DESENVOLVIMENTO DE NANOPARTÍCULAS DE PRATA PARA ADMINISTRAÇÃO TÓPICA. Beatriz Simões Janeiro, Ana Henriques Mota, Patrícia Rijo, and Catrina Pinto Reis P.07 DESENVOLVIMENTO FOLICULAR NA CADELA E NA GATA AO LONGO DO CICLO ÉSTRICO. Carolina Cardoso & Daniel Murta P.08 EVALUATION OF RED AND PROCESSED MEAT VERSUS POULTRY MEAT CONSUMPTION BEFORE AND AFTER THE OCTOBER 2015 WHO REPORT IN A COLLECTIVE CATERING UNIT. Catarina Afonso, Nelson Tavares P.09 DETERMINATION OF THE ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF MEDICINAL PLANTS EXTRACTS – A DIDACTIC APPROACH. Catarina Garcia, Catarina Oliveira, Claúdia S. Oliveira, Amílcar Roberto, Catarina Reis, Marisa Nicolai, Patrícia Rijo P.10 ACADEMIC ASSESSMENT OF ANTIMICROBIAL AND ANTIOXIDANT PROPERTIES OF ETHANOLIC EXTRACTS FROM PLECTRANTHUS MADAGASCARIENSIS. Catarina Garcia, Catarina Teodósio, Beatriz Janeiro, Catarina Reis, Patrícia Rijo. P.11 ASSESSING THE EFFECT OF MANUAL MASSAGE ON THE LOWER LIMB MICROCIRCULATION. Clemente Rocha, Henrique Silva, Inês Frazão and Luís Monteiro Rodrigues P.12 MYRTLE EXTRACT AS A COSMETIC PRESERVATIVE. Epole N. Ntungwe, Joana Marçalo, Catarina Garcia, Marisa Nicolai, Luis Monteiro Rodrigues, Catarina Reis, Patrícia Rijo P.13 IN VITRO INHIBITION OF ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE BY SOME PLECTRANTHUS SPECIES EXTRACTS. M. André, C. Antunes, J. Silva, C Reis, P. Rijo and M. Nicolai. P.14 EVALUATION OF THE NUTRITIONAL STATUS IN PRE-SURGICAL PATIENTS AND OUTPATIENTS: A CASE STUDY. Flávio Jerónimo, Nelson Tavares P.15 THERMAL STABILITY OF PROTEINS IN THE PRESENCE OF IONIC LIQUIDS. Filipa Rocha, Rita Caparica, Ricardo Peres, Joana Portugal Mota, Tânia Santos de Almeida P.16 CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF ESSENTIAL OILS FROM PLECTRANTHUS SPP. Francisco Sousa 1, Catarina Garcia, Ana C. Figueiredo, Carlos M. Monteiro, Carlos AM Afonso, Catarina Pinto Reis, Patrícia Rijo P.17 EXPLORING THE MICROVASCULAR RESPONSE TO AN OXYGEN STRESS TEST IN A MURINE MODEL OF CARDIAC HYPERTROPHY. Henrique Silva, Alain-Pierre Gadeau, Luís Monteiro Rodrigues. P.18 COMBINING PHOTOPLETHYSMOGRAPHY AND LASER DOPPLER FLOWMETRY TO CHARACTERIZE THE PERIPHERAL VASCULAR RESPONSE IN THE HUMAN LOWER LIMB. Henrique Silva, Clemente Rocha, Beatriz Navarro Brazález, Rita Faria, Raquel Ferreira, Luís Monteiro Rodrigues P.19 EXPLORING THE INFLUENCE OF HEMODYNAMIC DETERMINANTS ON SKIN BARRIER FUNCTION. Henrique Silva, Inês R. Frazão, Hugo Ferreira, Luís Monteiro Rodrigues P.20 EXPLORING THE IMPACT OF ANESTHESIA ON THE ENTROPY PROFILE OF THE DOG’S SKIN PERFUSION – A PILOT STUDY. Henrique Silva, João Requicha, Rui Assunção, Clemente Rocha, Luís Lobo, Margarida Estudante, L. Monteiro Rodrigues. P.21 EVALUATION OF A NUTRITION EDUCATION PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION AT REAL COLÉGIO DE PORTUGAL. Inês Martins1, Ana Abreu Marta Crespo, Rita Faria, Jessica Barreira, Nelson Tavares. P.22 EXPLORING THE IN VITRO ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND SKIN-RELATED ENZYMATIC INHIBITION ACTIVITIES OF PLECTRANTHUS SPP. EXTRACTS AND ISOLATED COMPOUNDS. Joana Marçalo, Luísa Custódio, Marisa Nicolai, Luís Monteiro Rodrigues, Catarina Pinto Reis, Célia Faustino, Patrícia Rijo P.23 EVALUATION OF GLYCATED HEMOGLOBIN (HA1C STATUS IN PATIENTS FROM AN INTERNAL MEDICINE SERVICE AT A LISBON HOSPITAL. Joana Padrão, Nelson Tavares P.24 NANOFORMULATIONS FOR THE TREATMENT OF YEAST INFECTIONS IN THE ORAL MUCOSA. Luís Roque, Catarina Garcia, Patrícia Rijo and Catarina Pinto Reis P.25 NANOCARRIERS FOR SKIN DELIVERY OF COSMETIC ANTIOXIDANTS. Mafalda Almeida,1 Patrícia Penela, Ana Júlio, André R. Baby, Daniela C. Oliveira, Catarina Rosado, Tânia Santos de Almeida,Joana Portugal Mota P.26 COMPARISON OF THE SENSORIAL PROFILES IN TWO DISTINCTIVE PERIODS OF TWO BRANDS OF CERVEJAS DE MOÇAMBIQUE, THE 2M AND MANICA. Mitchelle Carneiro, Nelson Tavares P.27 EVALUATION OF THE AMOUNT OF ADDED SALT IN COOKING MEALS IN A LISBON HOSPITAL. Nuno Rubio, Nelson Tavares

  4. 1981 Image II Conference Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    Sulfide Photoconductor Light Valve (CdSLV), currently in production to support a growing line of graphic large screen display pro- ducts, resulted in...optics. 235 During the same time investigations have been made in order to grow larger crystals where the targets are cut. The DKDP crystals which allow...matches to their experience base. An individual who sees a rhinoceros for the first time may perceive it as a horse with a horn and call it a unicorn

  5. Isolation and characterization of oxygen-evolving photosystem II particles and photosystem II core complex from the filamentous cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šetlíková, Eva; Sofrová, D.; Kovář, V.; Budáč, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 4 (2013), s. 517-530 ISSN 0300-3604 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/08/1683; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0110 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : antibodies * fluorescence spectra * IMAC chromatography Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.007, year: 2013

  6. 4. International Conference on Current Problems in Nuclear Physics and Atomic Energy (NPAE-Kyiv2012). Proceedings. Part I and Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyshnevskyi, Ivan M.

    2012-01-01

    Such wide area of topics, discussed during the Conference, is closely connected with the interests of our country to develop the fundamental research in the field of nuclear physics, which is the base of nuclear energy. The purpose of the Conference was to bring together scientists to share their knowledge in the current problems in nuclear physics and atomic energy. consideration of the spherical ground-state proton emitters, while nuclear deformations are supposed to be further included by standard way

  7. On the ultrafast kinetics of the energy and electron transfer reactions in photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavov, Chavdar Lyubomirov

    2009-07-09

    The subject of the current work is one of the main participants in the light-dependent phase of oxygenic photosynthesis, Photosystem I (PS I). This complex carries an immense number of cofactors: chlorophylls (Chl), carotenoids, quinones, etc, which together with the protein entity exhibit several exceptional properties. First, PS I has an ultrafast light energy trapping kinetics with a nearly 100% quantum efficiency. Secondly, both of the electron transfer branches in the reaction center are suggested to be active. Thirdly, there are some so called 'red' Chls in the antenna system of PS I, absorbing light with longer wavelengths than the reaction center. These 'red' Chls significantly modify the trapping kinetics of PS I. The purpose of this thesis is to obtain better understanding of the above-mentioned, specific features of PS I. This will not merely cast more light on the mechanisms of energy and electron transfer in the complex, but also will contribute to the future developments of optimized artificial light-harvesting systems. In the current work, a number of PS I complexes isolated from different organisms (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Arabidopsis thaliana) and possessing distinctive features (different macroorganisation, monomers, trimers, monomers with a semibelt of peripheral antenna attached; presence of 'red' Chls) is investigated. The studies are primarily focused on the electron transfer kinetics in each of the cofactor branches in the PS I reaction center, as well as on the effect of the antenna size and the presence of 'red' Chls on the trapping kinetics of PS I. These aspects are explored with the help of several ultrafast optical spectroscopy methods: (i) time-resolved fluorescence ? single photon counting and synchroscan streak camera; and (ii) ultrafast transient absorption. Physically meaningful information about the molecular mechanisms of the energy trapping in PS I is

  8. Growing green electricity: progress and strategies for use of photosystem I for sustainable photovoltaic energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khoa; Bruce, Barry D

    2014-09-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is driven via sequential action of Photosystem II (PSII) and (PSI)reaction centers via the Z-scheme. Both of these pigment-membrane protein complexes are found in cyanobacteria, algae, and plants. Unlike PSII, PSI is remarkably stable and does not undergo limiting photo-damage. This stability, as well as other fundamental structural differences, makes PSI the most attractive reaction centers for applied photosynthetic applications. These applied applications exploit the efficient light harvesting and high quantum yield of PSI where the isolated PSI particles are redeployed providing electrons directly as a photocurrent or, via a coupled catalyst to yield H₂. Recent advances in molecular genetics, synthetic biology, and nanotechnology have merged to allow PSI to be integrated into a myriad of biohybrid devices. In photocurrent producing devices, PSI has been immobilized onto various electrode substrates with a continuously evolving toolkit of strategies and novel reagents. However, these innovative yet highly variable designs make it difficult to identify the rate-limiting steps and/or components that function as bottlenecks in PSI-biohybrid devices. In this study we aim to highlight these recent advances with a focus on identifying the similarities and differences in electrode surfaces, immobilization/orientation strategies, and artificial redox mediators. Collectively this work has been able to maintain an annual increase in photocurrent density (Acm⁻²) of ~10-fold over the past decade. The potential drawbacks and attractive features of some of these schemes are also discussed with their feasibility on a large-scale. As an environmentally benign and renewable resource, PSI may provide a new sustainable source of bioenergy. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Induction of cyclic electron flow around photosystem I during heat stress in grape leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongjiang; Geng, Qingwei; Du, Yuanpeng; Yang, Xinghong; Zhai, Heng

    2017-03-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) in plants is susceptible to high temperatures. The cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI is thought to protect both PSII and PSI from photodamage. However, the underlying physiological mechanisms of the photosynthetic electron transport process and the role of CEF in grape at high temperatures remain unclear. To investigate this issue, we examined the responses of PSII energy distribution, the P700 redox state and CEF to high temperatures in grape leaves. After exposing 'Cabernet Sauvignon' leaves to various temperatures (25, 30, 35, 40 and 45°C) in the light (600μmol photons m -2 s -1 ) for 4h, the maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm) significantly decreased at high temperatures (40 and 45°C), while the maximum photo-oxidizable P700 (Pm) was not affected. As the temperature increased, higher initial rates of increase in post-illumination Chl fluorescence were detected, which were accompanied by an increase in high energy state quenching (qE). The chloroplast NAD(P)H dehydrogenase-dependent CEF (NDH-dependent CEF) activities were different among grape cultivators. 'Gold Finger' with greater susceptibility to photoinhibition, exhibited lower NDH-dependent CEF activities under acute heat stress than a more heat tolerant 'Cabernet Sauvignon'. These results suggest that overclosure of PSII reaction centers at high temperature resulted in the photoinhibition of PSII, while the stimulation of CEF in grape played an important role in the photoprotection of PSII and PSI at high temperatures through contributing to the generation of a proton gradient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries for the 31. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the 12. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; industrial irradiation; computer applications; fuel channel analysis; small reactors; severe accidents; fuel behaviour under accident conditions; reactor components, safety related computer software; nuclear fuel management; fuel behaviour and performance; reactor safety; reactor engineering; nuclear waste management; and, uranium mining and processing

  11. INTERCARTO CONFERENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Tikunov

    2010-01-01

    The InterCarto conferences are thematically organized to target one of the most pressing problems of modern geography—creation and use of geographical information systems (GISs) as effective tools for achieving sustainable development of territories. Over the years, from 1994 to 2009, 1872 participants from 51 countries and 156 cities, who made 1494 reports, attended the conferences. There were 1508 participants from 49 regions of Russia making 1340 presentations. The conferences hosted 31 di...

  12. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries of the international conference on radioactive waste management of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: storage and disposal; hydrogeology and geochemistry; transportation; buffers and backfill; public attitudes; tailings; site investigations and geomechanics; concrete; economics; licensing; matrix materials and container design; durability of fuel; biosphere modelling; radioactive waste processing; and, future options

  13. Growth inhibition and effect on photosystem by three imidazolium chloride ionic liquids in rice seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Huijun, E-mail: lhj@mail.zjgsu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310018, Zhejiang Province (China); Zhang, Shuxian [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310018, Zhejiang Province (China); Jiaxing University, Jiaxing 314001, Zhejiang Province (China); Zhang, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Caidong [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310018, Zhejiang Province (China)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • The three ILs have phytotoxic on rice growth. • The antioxidant enzyme activities increased first and then declined with ILs concentration increased. • The Hill reaction activity decreased and the PS II of leaves was damaged by ILs. • The toxicity of ILs increased as the alkyl chain length increased as the order: [OMIM]Cl < [DMIM]Cl < [C{sub 12}MIM]Cl. - Abstract: The effects of three imidazolium chloride ionic liquids (ILs) including 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid ([OMIM]Cl), 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid ([DMIM]Cl) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid ([C{sub 12}MIM]Cl) were studied in hydroponically grown rice seedlings. The growth inhibition rate increased and the Hill reaction activity of isolated rice chloroplasts decreased with increasing ILs concentrations. The IC{sub 50,5d} for stem length was 0.70 mg/L of [OMIM]Cl, 0.15 mg/L of [DMIM]Cl, and 0.055 mg/L of [C{sub 12}MIM]Cl, respectively. The SOD, POD and CAT activities of chloroplast exhibited initial increases followed by decreases in activity with increasing ILs concentrations. Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters such as the maximum effective quantum yield of PSII(F{sub v}/F{sub m}), the potential activity of PSII(F{sub v}/F{sub 0}), the yield of photochemical quantum [Y(II)], the photochemical quenching coefficient (qP), the non-photochemical quenching coefficient (NPQ) and the relative electron transport ratio (rETR) were affected, showing that ILs will damage the PSII. The results demonstrated that imidazolium chloride ILs are phytotoxic to rice growth and their photosystem, the toxicity increased as the alkyl chain length increased with the following order: [OMIM]Cl < [DMIM]Cl < [C{sub 12}MIM]Cl. The results will help to better understand the possible role of the defense mechanism in rice caused by ILs exposure.

  14. INTERCARTO CONFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Tikunov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The InterCarto conferences are thematically organized to target one of the most pressing problems of modern geography—creation and use of geographical information systems (GISs as effective tools for achieving sustainable development of territories. Over the years, from 1994 to 2009, 1872 participants from 51 countries and 156 cities, who made 1494 reports, attended the conferences. There were 1508 participants from 49 regions of Russia making 1340 presentations. The conferences hosted 31 different sections, most popular of which were Environmental GIS-Projects: Development and Experience, Sustainable Development and Innovative Projects, GIS: the Theory and Methodology, Projects for Russia and Regions, and GIS-Technologies and Digital Mapping. The next annual InterCarto-InterGIS conference will take place in December 2011. The Russian component of the conference will be held in the Altay Kray followed by another meeting on Bali, Indonesia

  15. Ergodicity, configurational entropy and free energy in pigment solutions and plant photosystems: influence of excited state lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Robert C; Zucchelli, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We examine ergodicity and configurational entropy for a dilute pigment solution and for a suspension of plant photosystem particles in which both ground and excited state pigments are present. It is concluded that the pigment solution, due to the extreme brevity of the excited state lifetime, is non-ergodic and the configurational entropy approaches zero. Conversely, due to the rapid energy transfer among pigments, each photosystem is ergodic and the configurational entropy is positive. This decreases the free energy of the single photosystem pigment array by a small amount. On the other hand, the suspension of photosystems is non-ergodic and the configurational entropy approaches zero. The overall configurational entropy which, in principle, includes contributions from both the single excited photosystems and the suspension which contains excited photosystems, also approaches zero. Thus the configurational entropy upon photon absorption by either a pigment solution or a suspension of photosystem particles is approximately zero. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries of the 28. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association, and the 9. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: power reactors; fuel cycles; nuclear power and public understanding; future trends; applications of nuclear technology; CANDU reactors; operational enhancements; design of small reactors; accident behaviour in fuel channels; fuel storage and waste management; reactor commissioning/decommissioning; nuclear safety experiments and modelling; the next generation reactors; advances in nuclear engineering education in Canada; safety of small reactors; current position and improvements of fuel channels; current issues in nuclear safety; and radiation applications - medical and industrial

  17. Conference on the Trend in Income Inequality in the U.S. Part I, Trends in Inequality of Well-Offness in the United States since World War II. Part 2, Conference Overview: Conceptual Issues, Data Issues, and Policy Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taussig, Michael K.; Danziger, Sheldon

    The first part of this document summarizes the current state of knowledge on trends in inequality of economic well-being in the United States since World War II. It surveys alternative answers to the often asked question: Has inequality in the U.S. increased, decreased, or remained roughly the same over a period of time? Intelligent laymen, and…

  18. Isotopes: technologies, materials and application. II International scientific conference of young scientists, post-graduate students and students. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The collection contains materials of abstracts of the conference participants to sum up the experience of research and development in the field of isotope production technologies, the use of compounds specified isotopic composition in different sectors of the economy, as well as the disposal and storage technology of the isotope production wastes. Advanced ideas produce isotopes of rare elements for medicine, microelectronics and nuclear industries are presented. Prospectively projects of scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University in isotope modifying substances are discussed [ru

  19. Memorias Conferencia Internacional IEEE Mexico 1971, Sobre Sistemas, Redes Y Computadoras. Volumen I and Volumen II. (Proceedings of International Conference of IEEE Concerning Systems, Networks, and Computers. Volume I and Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concheiro, A. Alonso, Ed.; And Others

    The following papers in English from this international conference may be of particular interest to those in the field of education. T. Nakahara, A. Tsukamota, and M. Matsumoto describe a computer-aided design technique for an economical urban cable television system. W. D. Wasson and R. K. Chitkara outline a recognition scheme based on analysis…

  20. Mutations in domain II of 23 S rRNA facilitate translation of a 23 S rRNA-encoded pentapeptide conferring erythromycin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, M; Douthwaite, S; Tenson, T

    1996-01-01

    Mutations in domain II of Escherichia coli 23 S rRNA that cause resistance to erythromycin do so in a manner fundamentally different from mutations at the drug binding site in domain V of the 23 S rRNA. The domain II mutations are located in a hairpin structure between nucleotides 1198 and 1247...... this hypothesis, a range of point mutations was generated in domain II of 23 S rRNA in the vicinity of the E-peptide open reading frame. We find a correlation between erythromycin resistance of the mutant clones and increased accessibility of the ribosome binding site of the E-peptide gene. Furthermore......, the erythromycin resistance determinant in the mutants was shown to be confined to a small 23 S rRNA segment containing the coding region and the ribosome binding site of the E-peptide open reading frame. It thus appears that the domain II mutations mediate erythromycin resistance by increasing expression...

  1. Toward the crystallization of photosystem II core complex from Pisum sativum L

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prudnikova, T.; Gavira, J. A.; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Molina, E.P.; Hunalová, Ivana; Sviridova, E.; Schmidt, V.; Kohoutová, J.; Kutý, Michal; Kaftan, D.; Vácha, F.; Garcia-Ruiz, J. M.; Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 8 (2010), s. 3391-3396 ISSN 1528-7483 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50510513; CEZ:AV0Z60870520; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : crystal-structure * cyanobacterial * elongatus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.390, year: 2010

  2. Experimental and theoretical studies on the excess capacity of Photosystem II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaňa, R.; Lazár, D.; Prášil, Ondřej; Nauš, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 72, - (2002), s. 271-284 ISSN 0166-8595 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/02/P071; GA ČR GA206/98/P110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903; CEZ:MSM 153100010 Keywords : chlorella * model * photoinhibition Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.567, year: 2002

  3. Exogenous Calcium Enhances the Photosystem II Photochemistry Response in Salt Stressed Tall Fescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangyang; Bi, Aoyue; Amombo, Erick; Li, Huiying; Zhang, Liang; Cheng, Cheng; Hu, Tao; Fu, Jinmin

    2017-01-01

    Calcium enhances turfgrass response to salt stress. However, little is known about PSII photochemical changes when exogenous calcium was applied in salinity-stressed turfgrass. Here, we probe into the rearrangements of PSII electron transport and endogenous ion accumulation in tall fescue ( Festuca arundinacea Schreber) treated with exogenous calcium under salt stress. Three-month-old seedlings of genotype "TF133" were subjected to the control (CK), salinity (S), salinity + calcium nitrate (SC), and salinity + ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (SE). Calcium nitrate and ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid was used as exogenous calcium donor and calcium chelating agent respectively. At the end of a 5-day duration treatment, samples in SC regime had better photochemistry performance on several parameters than salinity only. Such as the Area (equal to the plastoquinone pool size), N (number of [Formula: see text] redox turnovers until F m is reached), ψE 0 , or δRo (Efficiencdy/probability with which a PSII trapped electron is transferred from Q A to Q B or PSI acceptors), ABS/RC (Absorbed photon flux per RC). All the above suggested that calcium enhanced the electron transfer of PSII (especially beyond [Formula: see text]) and prevented reaction centers from inactivation in salt-stressed tall fescue. Furthermore, both grass shoot and root tissues generally accumulated more C, N, Ca 2+ , and K + in the SC regime than S regime. Interrelated analysis indicated that ψE 0 , δRo, ABS/RC, C, and N content in shoots was highly correlated to each other and significantly positively related to Ca 2+ and K + content in roots. Besides, high salt increased ATP6E and CAMK2 transcription level in shoot at 1 and 5 day, respectively while exogenous calcium relieved it. In root, CAMK2 level was reduced by Salinity at 5 day and exogenous calcium recovered it. These observations involved in electron transport capacity and ion accumulation assist in understanding better the protective role of exogenous calcium in tall fescue under salt stress.

  4. effet de l'interaction lumiere-salinite sur l'activite du photosysteme ii

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    19 nov. 2015 ... effects on the photochemical activity of PSII driving, and to photoinhibition. ... It is quite sufficient to eliminate only one factor of the association light-salinity for the PSII ... a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Uganda License.

  5. How exciton-vibrational coherences control charge separation in the photosystem II reaction center

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novoderezhkin, V.I.; Romero Mesa, E.; van Grondelle, R.

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthesis absorbed sun light produces collective excitations (excitons) that form a coherent superposition of electronic and vibrational states of the individual pigments. Two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy allows a visualization of how these coherences are involved in the primary

  6. Halogenated 1-Hydroxynaphthalene-2-Carboxanilides Affecting Photosynthetic Electron Transport in Photosystem II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goněc, T.; Kos, J.; Pesko, M.; Dohanosová, J.; Oravec, Michal; Liptaj, T.; Králová, K.; Jampílek, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 1709. ISSN 1420-3049 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : hydroxynaphthalene-carboxamides * photosynthetic electron transport ( PET ) inhibition * spinach chloroplasts * structure-activity relationships Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.861, year: 2016

  7. Change in Photosystem II Photochemistry During Algal Growth Phases of Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukarroum, Abdallah

    2016-06-01

    Sensitivity of photosynthetic processes towards environmental stress is used as a bioanalytical tool to evaluate the responses of aquatic plants to a changing environment. In this paper, change of biomass density, chlorophyll a fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters during growth phases of two microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus were studied. The photosynthetic growth behaviour changed significantly with cell age and algae species. During the exponential phase of growth, the photosynthesis capacity reached its maximum and decreased in ageing algal culture during stationary phase. In conclusion, the chlorophyll a fluorescence OJIP method and the derived fluorescence parameters would be an accurate method for obtaining information on maximum photosynthetic capacities and monitoring algal cell growth. This will contribute to more understanding, for example, of toxic actions of pollutants in microalgae test.

  8. Combinatorial Development of Water Splitting Catalysts Based on the Oxygen Evolving Complex of Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodbury, Neal [Arizona State University

    2010-03-31

    The use of methods to create large arrays of potential catalysts for the reaction H2O ½ O2 + 2H+ on the anode of an electrolysis system were investigated. This reaction is half of the overall reaction involved in the splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. This method consisted of starting with an array of electrodes and developing patterned electrochemical approaches for creating a different, defined peptide at each position in the array. Methods were also developed for measuring the rate of reaction at each point in the array. In this way, the goal was to create and then tests many thousands of possible catalysts simultaneously. This type of approach should lead to an ability to optimize catalytic activity systematically, by iteratively designing and testing new libraries of catalysts. Optimization is important to decrease energy losses (over-potentials) associated with the water splitting reaction and thus for the generation of hydrogen. Most of the efforts in this grant period were focused on developing the chemistry and analytical methods required to create pattern peptide formation either using a photolithography approach or an electrochemical approach for dictating the positions of peptide bond formation. This involved testing a large number of different reactions and conditions. We have been able to find conditions that have allowed us to pattern peptide bond formation on both glass slides using photolithographic methods and on electrode arrays made by the company Combimatrix. Part of this effort involved generating novel approaches for performing mass spectroscopy directly from the patterned arrays. We have also been able to demonstrate the ability to measure current at each electrode due to electrolysis of water. This was performed with customized instrumentation created in collaboration with Combimatrix. In addition, several different molecular designs for peptides that bound metals (primarily Mn) were developed and synthesized and metal binding was demonstrated. Finally, we investigated a number of methods. We have shown that we can create surfaces on glass slides appropriate for patterning peptide formation and have made arrays of peptides as large as 30,000 using photolithographic methods. However, side reactions with certain amino acid additions greatly limited the utility of the photolithographic approach. In addition, we found that transferring this patterned chemistry approach to large arrays was problematic. Thus, we turned to direct electrochemical patterning using the Combimatrix electrode arrays. Here we were also able to demonstrate patterned peptide bond forming chemistry, but yield and consistency of the reaction remains insufficient to create the quality of array required for realistic optimization of catalytic peptide sequences. We are currently exploring both new polymerization chemistries for generating catalysts on surface as well as adopting methods developed at Intel for creating peptide arrays directly on electronic substrates (silicon wafers).

  9. Exogenous Calcium Enhances the Photosystem II Photochemistry Response in Salt Stressed Tall Fescue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyang Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Calcium enhances turfgrass response to salt stress. However, little is known about PSII photochemical changes when exogenous calcium was applied in salinity-stressed turfgrass. Here, we probe into the rearrangements of PSII electron transport and endogenous ion accumulation in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreber treated with exogenous calcium under salt stress. Three-month-old seedlings of genotype “TF133” were subjected to the control (CK, salinity (S, salinity + calcium nitrate (SC, and salinity + ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (SE. Calcium nitrate and ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid was used as exogenous calcium donor and calcium chelating agent respectively. At the end of a 5-day duration treatment, samples in SC regime had better photochemistry performance on several parameters than salinity only. Such as the Area (equal to the plastoquinone pool size, N (number of QA- redox turnovers until Fm is reached, ψE0, or δRo (Efficiencdy/probability with which a PSII trapped electron is transferred from QA to QB or PSI acceptors, ABS/RC (Absorbed photon flux per RC. All the above suggested that calcium enhanced the electron transfer of PSII (especially beyond QA- and prevented reaction centers from inactivation in salt-stressed tall fescue. Furthermore, both grass shoot and root tissues generally accumulated more C, N, Ca2+, and K+ in the SC regime than S regime. Interrelated analysis indicated that ψE0, δRo, ABS/RC, C, and N content in shoots was highly correlated to each other and significantly positively related to Ca2+ and K+ content in roots. Besides, high salt increased ATP6E and CAMK2 transcription level in shoot at 1 and 5 day, respectively while exogenous calcium relieved it. In root, CAMK2 level was reduced by Salinity at 5 day and exogenous calcium recovered it. These observations involved in electron transport capacity and ion accumulation assist in understanding better the protective role of exogenous calcium in tall fescue under salt stress.

  10. Accessibility controls selective degradation of photosystem II subunits by FtsH protease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krynická, Vendula; Shao, S.; Nixon, P.J.; Komenda, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 12 (2015), UNSP 15168 ISSN 2055-026X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416; GA ČR GBP501/12/G055 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : SYNECHOCYSTIS SP PCC-6803 * DRIVEN SYNTHESIS * COMPLEX Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  11. Photosystem II functionality in barley responds dynamically to changes in leaf manganese status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Powikrowska, Marta; Krogholm, Ken Suszkiewicz

    2016-01-01

    functionality. We have here used parameters derived from measurements of fluorescence induction kinetics (OJIP transients), non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and PSII subunit composition to investigate how latent Mn deficiency changes the photochemistry in two barley genotypes differing in Mn efficiency. Mn...... the plants incapable of dissipating excess energy in a controlled way. Thus, the Mn deficient plants became severely affected in their ability to recover from high light-induced photoinhibition, especially under strong Mn deficiency. Interestingly, the Mn-efficient genotype was able to maintain a higher NPQ...... decrease in the abundance of the OEC protein subunits, PsbP and PsbQ in response to Mn deficiency for both genotypes. We conclude that regulation of photosynthetic performance by means of maintaining and inducing NPQ mechanisms contribute to genotypic differences in the Mn efficiency of barley genotypes...

  12. Photoprotection in the antenna complexes of photosystem II : Role of individual xanthophylls in chlorophyll triplet quenching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mozzo, Milena; Dall'Osto, Luca; Hienerwadel, Rainer; Bassi, Roberto; Croce, Roberta

    2008-01-01

    In this work the photoprotective role of all xanthophylls in LHCII, Lhcb4, and Lhcb5 is investigated by laser-induced Triplet-minus-Singlet (TmS) spectroscopy. The comparison of native LHCII trimeric complexes with different carotenoid composition shows that the xanthophylls in sites V1 and N1 do

  13. Photoprotection vs. Photoinhibition of Photosystem II in Transplastomic Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) Dominantly Accumulating Astaxanthin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Ritsuko; Yamano, Nami; Hashimoto, Hideki; Misawa, Norihiko; Ifuku, Kentaro

    2016-07-01

    Transplastomic (chloroplast genome-modified; CGM) lettuce that dominantly accumulates astaxanthin grows similarly to a non-transgenic control with almost no accumulation of naturally occurring photosynthetic carotenoids. In this study, we evaluated the activity and assembly of PSII in CGM lettuce. The maximum quantum yield of PSII in CGM lettuce was <0.6; however, the quantum yield of PSII was comparable with that in control leaves under higher light intensity. CGM lettuce showed a lower ability to induce non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) than the control under various light intensities. The fraction of slowly recovering NPQ in CGM lettuce, which is considered to be photoinhibitory quenching (qI), was less than half that of the control. In fact, 1 O 2 generation was lower in CGM than in control leaves under high light intensity. CGM lettuce contained less PSII, accumulated mostly as a monomer in thylakoid membranes. The PSII monomers purified from the CGM thylakoids bound echinenone and canthaxanthin in addition to β-carotene, suggesting that a shortage of β-carotene and/or the binding of carbonyl carotenoids would interfere with the photophysical function as well as normal assembly of PSII. In contrast, high accumulation of astaxanthin and other carbonyl carotenoids was found within the thylakoid membranes. This finding would be associated with the suppression of photo-oxidative stress in the thylakoid membranes. Our observation suggests the importance of a specific balance between photoprotection and photoinhibition that can support normal photosynthesis in CGM lettuce producing astaxanthin. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Detection of photosynthetic herbicides: Algal growth inhibition test vs. electrochemical photosystem II biosensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Masojídek, Jiří; Souček, Pavel; Máchová, J.; Frolík, Jan; Klem, Karel; Malý, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 1 (2011), s. 117-122 ISSN 0147-6513 R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA/089 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : PSII-biosensor * Biotest * Herbicide Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.294, year: 2011

  15. Photochemical behavior of xanthophylls in the recombinant photosystem II antenna complex, CP26

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, H.A.; Das, S. K.; Bautista, J.A.; Bruce, D.; Vasil' ev, S.; Crimi, M.; Croce, R.; Bassi, R.

    2001-01-01

    The steady state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic properties of the xanthophylls, violaxanthin, zeaxanthin, and lutein, and the efficiencies of singlet energy transfer from the individual xanthophylls to chlorophyll have been investigated in recombinant CP26 protein overexpressed in

  16. Photoprotection in the antenna complexes of photosystem II: role of individual xanthophylls in chlorophyll triplet quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzo, Milena; Dall'Osto, Luca; Hienerwadel, Rainer; Bassi, Roberto; Croce, Roberta

    2008-03-07

    In this work the photoprotective role of all xanthophylls in LHCII, Lhcb4, and Lhcb5 is investigated by laser-induced Triplet-minus-Singlet (TmS) spectroscopy. The comparison of native LHCII trimeric complexes with different carotenoid composition shows that the xanthophylls in sites V1 and N1 do not directly contribute to the chlorophyll triplet quenching. The largest part of the triplets is quenched by the lutein bound in site L1, which is located in close proximity to the chlorophylls responsible for the low energy state of the complex. The lutein in the L2 site is also active in triplet quenching, and it shows a longer triplet lifetime than the lutein in the L1 site. This lifetime difference depends on the occupancy of the N1 binding site, where neoxanthin acts as an oxygen barrier, limiting the access of O(2) to the inner domain of the Lhc complex, thereby strongly contributing to the photostability. The carotenoid triplet decay of monomeric Lhcb1, Lhcb4, and Lhcb5 is mono-exponential, with shorter lifetimes than observed for trimeric LHCII, suggesting that their inner domains are more accessible for O(2). As for trimeric LHCII, only the xanthophylls in sites L1 and L2 are active in triplet quenching. Although the chlorophyll to carotenoid triplet transfer is efficient (95%) in all complexes, it is not perfect, leaving 5% of the chlorophyll triplets unquenched. This effect appears to be intrinsically related to the molecular organization of the Lhcb proteins.

  17. Photoprotection in the antenna complexes of photosystem II - Role of individual xanthophylls in chlorophyll triplet quenching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mozzo, Milena; Dall'Osto, Luca; Hienerwadel, Rainer; Bassi, Roberto; Croce, Roberta; Osto, Luca Dall’

    2008-01-01

    In this work the photoprotective role of all xanthophylls in LHCII, Lhcb4, and Lhcb5 is investigated by laser-induced Triplet-minus-Singlet (TmS) spectroscopy. The comparison of native LHCII trimeric complexes with different carotenoid composition shows that the xanthophylls in sites V1 and N1 do

  18. Photosystem II Water Oxidation: Mechanism, Efficiency and Flux in Diverse Oxygenic Phototrophs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dismukes, Gerard Charles [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Ananyev, Gennady [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Gates, Colin [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2018-01-09

    In one year, we pursued four aims: 1) extend the VZAD model to allow analysis of PSII chlorophyll fluorescence emission as modulated by interaction with the WOC (partial success); 2) compare the solar energy conversion efficiencies of PSII-WOCs from intact cells, isolated thylakoid membranes and PSII core complexes and crystals from cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus (collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; some success after changing collaborator); 3) determine whether PSIIs can store light energy by pumping protons across the thylakoid membrane (PSII-cyclic electron flow) and how it is regulated within the green alga Chlorella ohadii (collaboration with the Hebrew University of Jerusalem; some success); and 4) genetically replace the native PSII-D1 protein subunit from a higher plant with two cyanobacterial D1 isoforms to test whether their functional advantages in growth and photoprotection can be transferred (collaboration with Rutgers University; success).

  19. Room temperature oxidation of the peripheral chlorophyll of photosystem II reaction centre

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Litvín, R.; Vácha, František

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 26, - (2004), s. 98 ISSN 0137-5881. [FESPB Congress Book of Abstracts /14./. Cracow, 23.08.2004-27.08.2004] Keywords : plant physiology Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.433, year: 2004

  20. New Nuclear Materials Including Non Metallic Fuel Elements. Vol. II. Proceedings of the Conference on New Nuclear Materials Technology, Including Non Metallic Fuel Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    One of the major aims of the International Atomic Energy Agency in furthering the peaceful uses of atomic energy is to encourage the development of economical nuclear power. Certainly, one of the more obvious methods of producing economical nuclear power is the development of economical fuels that can be used at high temperatures for long periods of time, and which have sufficient strength and integrity to operate under these conditions without permitting the release of fission products. In addition it is desirable that after irradiation these new fuels be economically reprocessed to reduce further the cost of the fuel cycle. As nuclear power becomes more and more competitive with conventional power the interest in new and more efficient higher-temperature fuels naturally increases rapidly. For these reasons, the Agency organized a Conference on New Nuclear Materials Technology, Including Non-Metallic Fuel Elements, which was held from 1 to 5 July 1963 at the International Hotel, Prague, with the assistance and co-operation of the Government of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic. A total of 151 scientists attended, from 23 countries and 4 international organizations. The participants heard and discussed more than 60 scientific papers. The Agency wishes to thank the scientists who attended this Conference for their papers and for many spirited discussions that truly mark a successful meeting. The Agency wishes also to record its gratitude for the assistance and generous hospitality accorded the Conference, the participants and the Agency's staff by the Government of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and by the people of Prague. The scientific information contained in these Proceedings should help to quicken the pace of progress in the fabrication of new and m ore economical fuels, and it is hoped that these proceedings will be found useful to all workers in this and related fields

  1. The Vitamin B12-Dependent Photoreceptor AerR Relieves Photosystem Gene Repression by Extending the Interaction of CrtJ with Photosystem Promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxu Fang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purple nonsulfur bacteria adapt their physiology to a wide variety of environmental conditions often through the control of transcription. One of the main transcription factors involved in controlling expression of the Rhodobacter capsulatus photosystem is CrtJ, which functions as an aerobic repressor of photosystem genes. Recently, we reported that a vitamin B12 binding antirepressor of CrtJ called AerR is required for anaerobic expression of the photosystem. However, the mechanism whereby AerR regulates CrtJ activity is unclear. In this study, we used a combination of next-generation sequencing and biochemical methods to globally identify genes under control of CrtJ and the role of AerR in controlling this regulation. Our results indicate that CrtJ has a much larger regulon than previously known, with a surprising regulatory function under both aerobic and anaerobic photosynthetic growth conditions. A combination of in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation-DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq and ChIP-seq and exonuclease digestion (ChIP-exo studies and in vitro biochemical studies demonstrate that AerR forms a 1:2 complex with CrtJ (AerR-CrtJ2 and that this complex binds to many promoters under photosynthetic conditions. The results of in vitro and in vivo DNA binding studies indicate that AerR-CrtJ2 anaerobically forms an extended interaction with the bacteriochlorophyll bchC promoter to relieve repression by CrtJ. This is contrasted by aerobic growth conditions where CrtJ alone functions as an aerobic repressor of bchC expression. These results indicate that the DNA binding activity of CrtJ is modified by interacting with AerR in a redox-regulated manner and that this interaction alters CrtJ’s function.

  2. Mendel conference

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected accepted papers of Mendel conference that has been held in Brno, Czech Republic in June 2015. The book contents three chapters which represent recent advances in soft computing including intelligent image processing and bio-inspired robotics.: Chapter 1: Evolutionary Computing, and Swarm intelligence, Chapter 2: Neural Networks, Self-organization, and Machine Learning, and Chapter3: Intelligent Image Processing, and Bio-inspired Robotics. The Mendel conference was established in 1995, and it carries the name of the scientist and Augustinian priest Gregor J. Mendel who discovered the famous Laws of Heredity. In 2015 we are commemorating 150 years since Mendel's lectures, which he presented in Brno on February and March 1865. The main aim of the conference was to create a periodical possibility for students, academics and researchers to exchange their ideas and novel research methods.  .

  3. Berkeley Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-10-15

    To a regular observer at annual international meetings, progress in particle physics from one year to the next sometimes might seem ponderously slow. But shift the timescale and the result is startling. Opening his summary of the 1986 International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Berkeley, California, from 16-23 July, Steve Weinberg first recalled the 1966 Conference, also held in Berkeley. Then the preoccupations were current algebra, hadron resonances and the interpretation of scattering in terms of Regge poles, and the theory of weak interactions. Physics certainly has moved.

  4. Berkeley Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    To a regular observer at annual international meetings, progress in particle physics from one year to the next sometimes might seem ponderously slow. But shift the timescale and the result is startling. Opening his summary of the 1986 International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Berkeley, California, from 16-23 July, Steve Weinberg first recalled the 1966 Conference, also held in Berkeley. Then the preoccupations were current algebra, hadron resonances and the interpretation of scattering in terms of Regge poles, and the theory of weak interactions. Physics certainly has moved

  5. Effect of ionic liquids with different cations and anions on photosystem and cell structure of Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yilu; Liu, Dingdong; Dong, Ying; Chen, Jiazheng; Liu, Huijun

    2018-03-01

    The rapid increase in the production and practical application of ionic liquids (ILs) could pose potential threats to aquatic systems. In this study, we investigated the effects of four ILs with different cations and anions, including 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate ([HMIM]NO 3 ), 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([HMIM]Cl), N-hexyl-3-metylpyridinium chloride ([HMPy]Cl), and N-hexyl-3-metylpyridinium bromide ([HMPy]Br), on photosystem and cellular structure of Scenedesmus obliquus. The results indicated that ILs are phytotoxic to S. obliquus. The contents of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll decreased with increasing ILs concentrations. The chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of photosynthetic system II (PSII), including minimal fluorescence yield (F 0 ), potential efficiency of PSII (F v /F o ), maximum quantum efficiency of PSII photochemistry (F v /F m ), yield of photochemical quantum [Y(II)], and non-photochemical quenching coefficient without measuring F 0 ' (NPQ), were all affected. This indicates that ILs could damage PSII, inhibit the primary reaction of photosynthesis, interdict the process of electron-transfer and lead to loss of heat-dissipating ability. ILs also increased cell membrane permeability of S. obliquus, influenced the cellular ultrastructure, changed the morphology of algae cells and destroyed the cell wall, cell membrane and organelles. The results indicated that imidazolium ILs had greater effect than pyridinium ILs, NO 3 - -IL and Br - -IL had greater effect than Cl - -IL. To minimize threats to the environment, the structure of ILs should be taken into consideration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Conference proceedings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2016-02-29

    Feb 29, 2016 ... In addition, there are persistent problems with leadership and planning, vaccine stock management, supply chain capacity and quality, provider-parent communication, and financial sustainability. The conference delegates agreed to move from talking to taking concrete actions around children's health, and ...

  7. Glasgow conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Gordon

    1994-10-15

    The biennial 'Rochester' International Conferences on High Energy Physics which tick the rhythm of high energy physics progress reflect the dominance of the 'Standard Model' - the picture of electroweak and quark/gluon interactions in a simple framework of six weaklyinteracting particles (leptons) and six quarks. Despite its limited intellectual appeal, after a decade of intense probing the Standard Model still refuses to budge.

  8. Conference summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.J.

    1975-10-01

    A brief review is given of the main results presented at the International Conference on Heavy Ion Sources, October 27--30, 1975. The sections are as follows: highlights, general observations, fundamental processes in sources, positive ion sources, negative ion sources, beam formation and emittance measurements, stripping, accelerators and experiments, and future prospects

  9. Lisbon Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Although no major physics discoveries were announced, the European Physical Society's International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Lisbon from 9-15 July, was significant in that it showed the emerging pattern of physics for the 1980s

  10. Conference report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tamara Shefer

    Bloomberg Philanthropies. The conference theme “from research to implementation” emphasised the importance of connecting knowledge around violence with injury prevention, while stressing the need to address the multitude of transnational public health challenges. In speaking to this theme, the. Tampere Declaration ...

  11. Conference Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Richard

    1982-01-01

    Presents an overview of the management planning technique known as Break Even Analysis and outlines its use as a tool in financial planning for organizations intending to conduct or sponsor a conference, seminar, or workshop. Three figures illustrating Break Even Analysis concepts and a Break Even Analysis worksheet are included. (JL)

  12. Conference proceedings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-08-07

    Aug 7, 2015 ... Conference was organized in June 2-6, 2014 at the Yaoundé Mont Febe Hotel, in Cameroon. Under the theme«Practice .... while the implementation of family planning in African HIV programs will favor safe contraception ... equipment. The WHO-stepwise approach for the global strategy for the prevention ...

  13. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The papers presented at this conference cover the fields of thermalhydraulics, nuclear plant design and operation, licensing, decontamination, restoration and dismantling of nuclear power facilities, services to the nuclear industry, new applications of nuclear technology, reactor physics and fuel cycles, accelerator-breeders, fusion research and lasers

  14. Proceedings of the International Conference on II-VI Compounds and Related Optoelectronic Materials (6th) Held in Newport, Rhode Island on 13-17 September 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-17

    used. ALE growth is monolayer abruptness. The technique has been accomplished by the sequential flow of each reac- used for the growth of various 11-VI...electric charge distribution ments, the indium profile was measured by the in the neighbourhood of the radioactive probe sequential etching of the orginal...transferred rating Zn, -,MgS, Se, -, layers assume a type I via an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) transfer tube to band lineup between Zn,.MgS,.Se,-. and the II

  15. Conference Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    National and international aspects of climate change were the central concern of this conference organized by the Alliance for Responsible Environmental Alternatives (AREA). AREA is a coalition of industry, labour and municipalities from across Canada which was created to reflect the views and represent the interests of Canadians in the Climate Change Debate. Ways and means of optimizing Canada's response to the Global Climate Change Challenge were discussed. Discussions emphasized issues regarding the effectiveness of voluntary mechanisms to reduce greenhouse gases, as opposed to government-mandated actions for achieving climate change targets. The issue of how a differentiated system for emission reduction targets and timetables can be implemented was also debated. The economic implications of climate change were outlined. Canada's national agenda and the likely outcomes of the Conference of Parties (COP 4) in Buenos Aires also received much attention. tabs., figs

  16. SIGEF Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Terceño-Gómez, Antonio; Ferrer-Comalat, Joan; Merigó-Lindahl, José; Linares-Mustarós, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected papers presented at the SIGEF conference, held at the Faculty of Economics and Business of the University of Girona (Spain), 06-08 July, 2015. This edition of the conference has been presented with the slogan “Scientific methods for the treatment of uncertainty in social sciences”. There are different ways for dealing with uncertainty in management. The book focuses on soft computing theories and their role in assessing uncertainty in a complex world. It gives a comprehensive overview of quantitative management topics and discusses some of the most recent developments in all the areas of business and management in soft computing including Decision Making, Expert Systems and Forgotten Effects Theory, Forecasting Models, Fuzzy Logic and Fuzzy Sets, Modelling and Simulation Techniques, Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms and Optimization and Control. The book might be of great interest for anyone working in the area of management and business economics and might be es...

  17. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This volume contains summaries of 28 papers presented at the 27. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. These papers discuss the general situation of the Canadian nuclear industry and the CANDU reactor; dialogue with the public; the International Atomic Energy Agency; and economic goals and operating lessons. It also contains summaries of 70 papers presented at the 8. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, which discuss plant life extension; safety and the environment; reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; risk assessment; the CANDU spacer location and repositioning project; CANDU operations; safety research after Chernobyl; fuel channels; and nuclear technology developments. The individual papers are also available in INIS-mf--13673 (CNA), and INIS-mf--12909 (CNS). (L.L.)

  18. Glasgow conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    1994-01-01

    The biennial 'Rochester' International Conferences on High Energy Physics which tick the rhythm of high energy physics progress reflect the dominance of the 'Standard Model' - the picture of electroweak and quark/gluon interactions in a simple framework of six weaklyinteracting particles (leptons) and six quarks. Despite its limited intellectual appeal, after a decade of intense probing the Standard Model still refuses to budge

  19. Washington Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The 1981 Particle Accelerator Conference was held in Washington from 11-13 March. It was the ninth in the series of meetings organized in the USA which differ from the 'International' meetings in their coverage of the full range of accelerator engineering and technology, including applications outside e field of high energy physics. The Conference took place under the cloud of further budget cuts for Fiscal Year 1982 in the USA which the Department of Energy has applied in line with the financial policy of the new administration. Coming on top of many years of budget trimming which have reduced the number of high energy physics Laboratories funded by the DOE to three (Brookhaven, Fermilab, Stanford - Cornell is funded by the National Science Foundation) and reduced the exploitation of these Laboratories to less than half of their potential, the new cuts did not exactly help to boost morale. Nevertheless, the huge amount of tailed work in accelerator physics and technology which was presented at the Conference showed how alive the field is

  20. Conference report: Turismo no Mercosul: VII Jornadas Nacionales y II Simpósio Internacional de Investigación em Turismo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Marçal Rocha

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Nas VIII Jornadas Nacionales e II Simposio Internacional De Investigacion Accion En Turismo, realizado na aprazível cidade de Posadas, província de Misiones - Argentina, nos dias 7, 8 e 9 de julho de 2007, teve como tema Las políticas en Turismo en los nuevos escenarios del MERCOSUR. O ponto de partida das discussões foi a complexidade que envolve o fenômeno turismo, especialmente nos países do Mercosul, que apesar de terem especificidades das mais diversas, têm problemas muito próximos em relação às políticas para o setor.

  1. The CpG island methylator phenotype may confer a survival benefit in patients with stage II or III colorectal carcinomas receiving fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Byung-Hoon; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Bae, Jeong Mo; Lee, Eui Jin; Yu, Hong Suk; Kim, Young-Ho; Chang, Dong Kyung; Kim, Hee Cheol; Park, Cheol Keun; Lee, Suk-Hee

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) with CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) is recognized as a distinct subgroup of CRC, and CIMP status affects prognosis and response to chemotherapy. Identification of CIMP status in CRC is important for proper patient management. In Eastern countries, however, the clinicopathologic and molecular characteristics and prognosis of CRCs with CIMP are still unclear. A total of 245 patients who underwent their first surgical resection for sporadic CRC were enrolled and CIMP status of the CRCs was determined using the quantitative MethyLight assay. The clinicopathologic and molecular characteristics were reviewed and compared according to CIMP status. In addition, the three-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) of 124 patients with stage II or stage III CRC was analyzed in order to assess the effectiveness of fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy with respect to CIMP status. CIMP-high CRCs were identified in 34 cases (13.9%), and were significantly associated with proximal tumor location, poorly differentiated carcinoma, mucinous histology, and high frequencies of BRAF mutation, MGMT methylation, and MSI-high compared to CIMP-low/negative carcinomas. For patients with stage II or III CIMP-low/negative CRCs, no significant difference was found in RFS between those undergoing surgery alone and those receiving surgery with fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy. However, for patients with CIMP-high CRCs, patients undergoing surgery with fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 17; three-year RFS: 100%) showed significantly better RFS than patients treated with surgery alone (n = 7; three-year RFS: 71.4%) (P = 0.022). Our results suggest that selected patients with CIMP-high CRC may benefit from fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy with longer RFS. Further large scale-studies are required to confirm our results

  2. The CpG island methylator phenotype may confer a survival benefit in patients with stage II or III colorectal carcinomas receiving fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Cheol

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal carcinoma (CRC with CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP is recognized as a distinct subgroup of CRC, and CIMP status affects prognosis and response to chemotherapy. Identification of CIMP status in CRC is important for proper patient management. In Eastern countries, however, the clinicopathologic and molecular characteristics and prognosis of CRCs with CIMP are still unclear. Methods A total of 245 patients who underwent their first surgical resection for sporadic CRC were enrolled and CIMP status of the CRCs was determined using the quantitative MethyLight assay. The clinicopathologic and molecular characteristics were reviewed and compared according to CIMP status. In addition, the three-year recurrence-free survival (RFS of 124 patients with stage II or stage III CRC was analyzed in order to assess the effectiveness of fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy with respect to CIMP status. Results CIMP-high CRCs were identified in 34 cases (13.9%, and were significantly associated with proximal tumor location, poorly differentiated carcinoma, mucinous histology, and high frequencies of BRAF mutation, MGMT methylation, and MSI-high compared to CIMP-low/negative carcinomas. For patients with stage II or III CIMP-low/negative CRCs, no significant difference was found in RFS between those undergoing surgery alone and those receiving surgery with fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy. However, for patients with CIMP-high CRCs, patients undergoing surgery with fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 17; three-year RFS: 100% showed significantly better RFS than patients treated with surgery alone (n = 7; three-year RFS: 71.4% (P = 0.022. Conclusions Our results suggest that selected patients with CIMP-high CRC may benefit from fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy with longer RFS. Further large scale-studies are required to confirm our results.

  3. The CpG island methylator phenotype may confer a survival benefit in patients with stage II or III colorectal carcinomas receiving fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) with CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) is recognized as a distinct subgroup of CRC, and CIMP status affects prognosis and response to chemotherapy. Identification of CIMP status in CRC is important for proper patient management. In Eastern countries, however, the clinicopathologic and molecular characteristics and prognosis of CRCs with CIMP are still unclear. Methods A total of 245 patients who underwent their first surgical resection for sporadic CRC were enrolled and CIMP status of the CRCs was determined using the quantitative MethyLight assay. The clinicopathologic and molecular characteristics were reviewed and compared according to CIMP status. In addition, the three-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) of 124 patients with stage II or stage III CRC was analyzed in order to assess the effectiveness of fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy with respect to CIMP status. Results CIMP-high CRCs were identified in 34 cases (13.9%), and were significantly associated with proximal tumor location, poorly differentiated carcinoma, mucinous histology, and high frequencies of BRAF mutation, MGMT methylation, and MSI-high compared to CIMP-low/negative carcinomas. For patients with stage II or III CIMP-low/negative CRCs, no significant difference was found in RFS between those undergoing surgery alone and those receiving surgery with fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy. However, for patients with CIMP-high CRCs, patients undergoing surgery with fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 17; three-year RFS: 100%) showed significantly better RFS than patients treated with surgery alone (n = 7; three-year RFS: 71.4%) (P = 0.022). Conclusions Our results suggest that selected patients with CIMP-high CRC may benefit from fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy with longer RFS. Further large scale-studies are required to confirm our results. PMID:21827707

  4. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The 113 papers presented at this conference covered the areas of 1) fuel design, development and production; 2) nuclear plant safety; 3) nuclear instrumentation; 4) public and regulatory matters; 5) developments and opportunities in fusion; 6) fuel behaviour under normal operating conditions; 7) nuclear plant design and operations; 8) materials science and technology; 9) nuclear power issues; 10) fusion technology; 11) fuel behaviour under accident conditions; 12) large scale fuel channel replacement programs; 13) thermalhydraulics experimental studies; 14) reactor physics and analysis; 15) applications of accelerators; 16) fission product release and severe fuel damage under accident conditions; 17) thermalhydraulics modeling and assessments; 18) waste management and the environment; and 20) new reactor concepts

  5. Fusarium solani Infection Depressed Photosystem Performance by Inducing Foliage Wilting in Apple Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Yan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium fungi are soil-borne pathogens, and the pathological effects on plant photosystems remain unclear. This study aimed to deeply reveal pathological characterization in apple seedlings infected with Fusarium solani by investigating photosystems performance and interaction. Roots were immersed in conidial suspension for inoculation. Thereafter, prompt and delayed chlorophyll a fluorescence and modulated 820 nm reflection were simultaneously detected. After 30 days of infection, leaf relative water content and dry weight were remarkably decreased by 55.7 and 47.1%, suggesting that the infected seedlings were subjected to Fusarium-induced water deficit stress. PSI reaction center was more susceptible than PSII reaction center in infected seedlings due to greater decrease in the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSI than that of PSII, but PSI reaction center injury was aggravated slowly, as PSII injury could partly protect PSI by restricting electron donation. PSII donor and acceptor sides were also damaged after 20 days of infection, and the restricted electron donation induced PSII and PSI disconnection by blocking PSI re-reduction. In accordance with greater damage of PSI reaction center, PSI oxidation was also suppressed. Notably, significantly increased efficiency of electron transport from plastoquinone (PQ to PSI acceptors (REo/ETo after 20 days of infection suggested greater inhibition on PQ reduction than re-oxidation, and the protection for PSI acceptors might alleviate the reduction of electron transport efficiency beyond PQ upon damaged PSI reaction center. Lowered delayed fluorescence in microsecond domain verified PSII damage in infected seedlings, and elevated delayed fluorescence in sub-millisecond domain during PQ reduction process conformed to increased REo/ETo. In conclusion, F. solani infection depressed PSII and PSI performance and destroyed their coordination by inducing pathological wilting in apple seedlings. It may

  6. The chloroplasts membrane phospholipids of Chlamydomonas reinhardii mutant not forming the Photosystem 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trusova, V.M.; Ladygin, V.G.; Mezentsev, V.V.; Molchanov, M.I.

    1987-01-01

    Study on a component composition and physical state of photosynthetic membranes of Chlamydomonas chloroplasts of the wild type and mutant A-110 with disturbance of electron transfer chain in the photosystem 2 region permitted to conclude that 170 A diameter particles localized on the internal hydrophobic surface of membrane chips are deleted with respect to phosphatidylglycerin. The results obtained permit to suggest that the formation of protein-lipid complexes containing phosphatidylglycerins is suppressed in mutant A-110 which is not capable of the lamellar system differentation in

  7. NATO Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Lynn, W

    1975-01-01

    The contents of this volume involve selection, emendation and up-dating of papers presented at the NATO Conference "Mathe­ matical Analysis of Decision problems in Ecology" in Istanbul, Turkey, July 9-13, 1973. It was sponsored by the System Sciences Division of NATO directed by Dr. B. Bayraktar with local arrange­ ments administered by Dr. Ilhami Karayalcin, professor of the Department of Industrial Engineering at the Technical University of Istanbul. It was organized by A. Charnes, University professor across the University of Texas System, and Walter R.Lynn, Di­ rector of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell Unjversity. The objective of the conference was to bring together a group of leading researchers from the major sciences involved in eco­ logical problems and to present the current state of progress in research of a mathematical nature which might assist in the solu­ tion of these problems. Although their presentations are not herein recorded, the key­ note address of Dr....

  8. EGC Conferences

    CERN Document Server

    Ritschard, Gilbert; Pinaud, Bruno; Venturini, Gilles; Zighed, Djamel; Advances in Knowledge Discovery and Management

    This book is a collection of representative and novel works done in Data Mining, Knowledge Discovery, Clustering and Classification that were originally presented in French at the EGC'2012 Conference held in Bordeaux, France, on January 2012. This conference was the 12th edition of this event, which takes place each year and which is now successful and well-known in the French-speaking community. This community was structured in 2003 by the foundation of the French-speaking EGC society (EGC in French stands for ``Extraction et Gestion des Connaissances'' and means ``Knowledge Discovery and Management'', or KDM). This book is intended to be read by all researchers interested in these fields, including PhD or MSc students, and researchers from public or private laboratories. It concerns both theoretical and practical aspects of KDM. The book is structured in two parts called ``Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining'' and ``Classification and Feature Extraction or Selection''. The first part (6 chapters) deals with...

  9. Munich conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1988-10-15

    'The Standard Model has survived impact for another year', declared Don Perkins of Oxford, summarizing the 24th International Conference on High Energy Physics held in Munich from 4-10 August. 'But is this a triumph or a frustration for physics?' he added. The twin pillars of the Standard Model, the electroweak unification of electromagnetism and the weak nuclear force, and the field theory (quantum chromodynamics) of the quark-gluon interactions responsible for the strong nuclear force, have not trembled since the electroweak unification went to the textbooks in 1983, but from time to time small cracks have appeared which might have gone on to shake the theory severely, if not undermine it. Major conference summarizers have got used to singing the praises of the Standard Model, but this year at Munich even detailed examination failed to reveal any serious cracks, while looking deeper into physics even some anomalous results hinting at gaps in understanding have either gone away or have diminished credibility.

  10. Munich conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    'The Standard Model has survived impact for another year', declared Don Perkins of Oxford, summarizing the 24th International Conference on High Energy Physics held in Munich from 4-10 August. 'But is this a triumph or a frustration for physics?' he added. The twin pillars of the Standard Model, the electroweak unification of electromagnetism and the weak nuclear force, and the field theory (quantum chromodynamics) of the quark-gluon interactions responsible for the strong nuclear force, have not trembled since the electroweak unification went to the textbooks in 1983, but from time to time small cracks have appeared which might have gone on to shake the theory severely, if not undermine it. Major conference summarizers have got used to singing the praises of the Standard Model, but this year at Munich even detailed examination failed to reveal any serious cracks, while looking deeper into physics even some anomalous results hinting at gaps in understanding have either gone away or have diminished credibility

  11. Title - EFARS - Conference (Uninvited)

    OpenAIRE

    Lohrey, MC; Lawrence, AS

    2016-01-01

    Abstract - EFARS - Conference (Uninvited) "Notes" - EFARS - Conference (Uninvited) In preparation (Publication status) Yes, full paperYes, abstract onlyNo (Peer reviewed?) "Add a comment" - EFARS - Conference - Uninvited

  12. Conference Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This volume contains the unedited proceedings of the Second Annual Conference on Managing Electricity Price Volatility. There were a total of eleven papers presented, dealing with a variety of issues affecting price volatility. Subjects treated included: new power generation development in Alberta; an analysis of electricity supply and demand to predict future price volatility; the effect of government intervention in the Alberta electricity market; risk management in volatile energy markets; an analysis of Alberta's capacity to supply its own internal electric power needs; the impact of increased electricity import and export capacity on price fluctuation in Alberta; improving market liquidity in Alberta; using weather derivatives to offset price risk; the impact of natural gas prices on electricity price volatility; capitalizing on advancements in online trading; and strategies for businesses to keep operating through times of price volatility. In most cases only overhead viewgraphs are available

  13. MUSME Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, Eusebio

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of MUSME 2014, held at Huatulco in Oaxaca, Mexico, October 2014. Topics include analysis and synthesis of mechanisms; dynamics of multibody systems; design algorithms for mechatronic systems; simulation procedures and results; prototypes and their performance; robots and micromachines; experimental validations; theory of mechatronic simulation; mechatronic systems; and control of mechatronic systems. The MUSME symposium on Multibody Systems and Mechatronics was held under the auspices of IFToMM, the International Federation for Promotion of Mechanism and Machine Science, and FeIbIM, the Iberoamerican Federation of Mechanical Engineering. Since the first symposium in 2002, MUSME events have been characterised by the way they stimulate the integration between the various mechatronics and multibody systems dynamics disciplines, present a forum for facilitating contacts among researchers and students mainly in South American countries, and serve as a joint conference for the ...

  14. Cairo conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, A J

    1994-09-03

    The United Nations Conference on Population and Development in Cairo in September, 1994, will evoke criticism of the inability of governments to act quickly enough to avert demographic and environmental crises. Rapid population growth has clear implications for public health. Globally there now occur anthropogenic changes in atmospheric composition, the degradation of fertile lands and ocean fisheries, an accelerating loss of biodiversity, and the social and ecological problems of massive urbanization. In the future, per capita consumption levels will increase in burgeoning populations of developing countries, thus adding to the environmental impacts of overconsuming rich countries. By the end of the decade there will be over six billion people, of whom one half will live in cities. These demographic and environmental trends, if translated into climatic change, regional food shortages, and weakened ecosystems, would adversely affect human health. The World Health Organization is likely to concentrate only on accessible family planning and promotion of health for women and families. Continuing asymmetric child-saving aid, unaccompanied by substantial aid to help mobilize the social and economic resources needed to reduce fertility, may delay the demographic transition in poor countries and potentiate future public health disasters. As a result of recent reductions in fertility, even in Sub-Saharan Africa, average family sizes have been halved. Yet the demographic momentum will double population by 2050. The biosphere is a complex of ecosystems and, if unsustained, it could not fulfill the productive, cleansing, and protective functions on which life depends. The Cairo conference must therefore recognize that sustaining human health is a prime reason for concern about population growth and models of economic development.

  15. Comparison of the Light-Harvesting Networks of Plant and Cyanobacterial Photosystem I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şener, Melih K.; Jolley, Craig; Ben-Shem, Adam; Fromme, Petra; Nelson, Nathan; Croce, Roberta; Schulten, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    With the availability of structural models for photosystem I (PSI) in cyanobacteria and plants it is possible to compare the excitation transfer networks in this ubiquitous photosystem from two domains of life separated by over one billion years of divergent evolution, thus providing an insight into the physical constraints that shape the networks' evolution. Structure-based modeling methods are used to examine the excitation transfer kinetics of the plant PSI-LHCI supercomplex. For this purpose an effective Hamiltonian is constructed that combines an existing cyanobacterial model for structurally conserved chlorophylls with spectral information for chlorophylls in the Lhca subunits. The plant PSI excitation migration network thus characterized is compared to its cyanobacterial counterpart investigated earlier. In agreement with observations, an average excitation transfer lifetime of ∼49 ps is computed for the plant PSI-LHCI supercomplex with a corresponding quantum yield of 95%. The sensitivity of the results to chlorophyll site energy assignments is discussed. Lhca subunits are efficiently coupled to the PSI core via gap chlorophylls. In contrast to the chlorophylls in the vicinity of the reaction center, previously shown to optimize the quantum yield of the excitation transfer process, the orientational ordering of peripheral chlorophylls does not show such optimality. The finding suggests that after close packing of chlorophylls was achieved, constraints other than efficiency of the overall excitation transfer process precluded further evolution of pigment ordering. PMID:15994896

  16. Proceedings of the 4th Radiobiological conference with international participation 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benova, K.; Falis, M.

    2008-06-01

    Scientific conference deals with problems in radiobiology, photobiology and radio-environmental sciences. The Conference included the following sessions: (i): Radiobiology; (ii) Biology. Proceedings contains thirty-two papers dealing with the scope of INIS

  17. Vancouver Cyclotron Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Although no longer on the high energy frontier, the cyclotron field is still a major scientific growth area. Its progress is highlighted at the international conference on cyclotron design, development and utilization held at intervals of about three years, under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). Vancouver, surrounded by mountains, water and some cyclotrons, provided a pleasant setting for the 13th Conference, held last summer. With over 200 cyclotrons in operation around the world, the attendance, 241 delegates and 26 industrial exhibitors, was a near record, reflecting the flourishing state of the field. The early sessions covered the initial operation of new or upgraded cyclotron facilities. Major facilities completed since the previous Conference in Berlin in May 1989 included the 400 MeV ring cyclotron at Osaka, the U400M cyclotron at Dubna which will be coupled to the U400 to give 20 MeV nucléon uranium beams, the 130 MeV cyclotron at Jyvaskyla (in Finland, the furthest north!), the 110 MeV JAERI machine in Japan, and the 65 MeV proton therapy cyclotron in Nice. Among the facility upgrades were the KFA cyclotron at Julich which will inject the 2.5 GeV storage ring COSY, and the addition of an FM mode to the K=200 CW mode at Uppsala to give protons up to 180 MeV. The impressive current of 1.5 mA at 72 MeV obtained from the PSI Injector II will soon be injected into the 590 MeV ring

  18. Conference summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Tim [Inta Communication Limited for European Service Network/ DG Research, Trillium House, 32 New Street, St. Neots, Cambridge PE19 1AJ (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    The summaries were derived from presentations, interviews and discussions at the conference. The summaries are given at two levels, overall for the conference and for specific sessions as follows: 1) Overall Conference: 'A Sound Scientific Basis for Serious Decisions; 2) Sessions on EC Policy and Socio-Political Issues: 'Promoting Safety and Protecting Society'; 3) Session on P and T: 'Partitioning and Transmutation: A Technical Fix or Technical Training?'; 4) Sessions on Geological Disposal and Research Networking: 'No Technical Barriers to Geological Disposal'. First an overall summary of Euradwaste '04 is presented. Significant progress was made on the technical and scientific basis for geological disposal of radioactive waste during the European Commission's Fifth EURATOM Framework Programme for Research (FP5). Deep geological disposal is technically feasible now and can demonstrate the guarantees of long-term isolation and protection of the public. In parallel, socio-political studies have produced methodologies for constructive dialogue with potential host communities that reflect the honesty and openness expected by a democratic society. A harmonized legislative framework for nuclear safety and waste disposal across the enlarged European Union is currently being discussed. Disposal in deep (> 300 metre) geological repositories, the favoured strategy in Europe for long-lived high-level radioactive waste, is now possible. The Sessions on EC Policy and Socio-Political Issues are summarized as follows. The opening day of Euradwaste '04 focused on European Commission policy, including the proposed Directives on disposal of radioactive waste and nuclear safety and socio-political aspects including governance and decision making, public perception/acceptance of waste disposal and its sustainability. A decision on the proposed package will now be made after Union enlargement. Public agreement on the siting of

  19. Electric field effects on red chlorophylls, b-carotenes and P700 in cyanobacterial photosystem I complexes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frese, R.N.; Palacios, M.A.; Azzizi, A.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Kruip, J.; Rögner, M.; Karapetyan, N.V.; Schlodder, E.; van Grondelle, R.; Dekker, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    We have probed the absorption changes due to an externally applied electric field (Stark effect) of Photosystem I (PSI) core complexes from the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, Synechococcus elongatus and Spirulina platensis. The results reveal that the so-called C719 chlorophylls in S.

  20. Strain of Synechocystis PCC 6803 with Aberrant Assembly of Photosystem NN Contains Tandem Duplication of a Large Chromosomal Region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichý, Martin; Bečková, Martina; Kopečná, Jana; Noda, J.; Sobotka, Roman; Komenda, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, May 12 (2016), s. 648 ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Synechocystis 6803 * chlorophyll * photosystem I Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  1. Madrid Physics Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1989-11-15

    Hard on the heels of the Lepton-Photon Symposium at Stanford in August came the International Europhysics Conference on High Energy Physics in Madrid from 6-13 September. With the two meetings held so close together, there was much overlap in the physics reported, although some teams were able to use the extra month to present new results. A notable example was the Mark II team working at Stanford's SLC linear collider, who presented new limits on the number of allowed neutrinos.The Madrid meeting attracted about 600 participants from all over the world. An initial three days of parallel sessions followed by four days of plenary talks could cover the field in depth and in breadth.

  2. 6th iTi Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Kampers, Gerrit; Oberlack, Martin; Wacławczyk, Marta; Talamelli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    This volume collects the edited and reviewed contributions presented in the 6th iTi Conference in Bertinoro, covering fundamental and applied aspects in turbulence. In the spirit of the iTi conference, the volume has been produced after the conference so that the authors had the possibility to incorporate comments and discussions raised during the meeting. In the present book the contributions have been structured according to the topics : I Theory II Wall bounded flows III Particles in flows IV Free flows V Complex flows The volume is dedicated to the memory of Prof. Konrad Bajer who prematurely passed away in Warsaw on August 29, 2014. .

  3. Protein sequences and redox titrations indicate that the electron acceptors in reaction centers from heliobacteria are similar to Photosystem I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, J. T.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers isolated from Heliobacillus mobilis exhibit a single major protein on SDS-PAGE of 47 000 Mr. Attempts to sequence the reaction center polypeptide indicated that the N-terminus is blocked. After enzymatic and chemical cleavage, four peptide fragments were sequenced from the Heliobacillus mobilis apoprotein. Only one of these sequences showed significant specific similarity to any of the protein and deduced protein sequences in the GenBank data base. This fragment is identical with 56% of the residues, including both cysteines, found in highly conserved region that is proposed to bind iron-sulfur center Fx in the Photosystem I reaction center peptide that is the psaB gene product. The similarity to the psaA gene product in this region is 48%. Redox titrations of laser-flash-induced photobleaching with millisecond decay kinetics on isolated reaction centers from Heliobacterium gestii indicate a midpoint potential of -414 mV with n = 2 titration behavior. In membranes, the behavior is intermediate between n = 1 and n = 2, and the apparent midpoint potential is -444 mV. This is compared to the behavior in Photosystem I, where the intermediate electron acceptor A1, thought to be a phylloquinone molecule, has been proposed to undergo a double reduction at low redox potentials in the presence of viologen redox mediators. These results strongly suggest that the acceptor side electron transfer system in reaction centers from heliobacteria is indeed analogous to that found in Photosystem I. The sequence similarities indicate that the divergence of the heliobacteria from the Photosystem I line occurred before the gene duplication and subsequent divergence that lead to the heterodimeric protein core of the Photosystem I reaction center.

  4. Conference Papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    A total of 18 papers were presented at the 2003 Annual Executive Conference of the Canadian Gas Association held at St. Andrews, NB, from June 25th to June 28th. Titles of the presentations were as follows: (1) 'Positioning natural gas in a transforming world' by Pierre Marcel Desjardins; (2) 'Positioning natural gas in a transforming world' by Jean-Paul Theoret; (3) 'Perceptions of natural gas' by Noel Sampson; (4) 'Energy efficiency as an opportunity for the natural gas industry' by Peter Love; (5) 'Natural gas R and D - NRCan perspective' by Graham R. Campbell; (6) 'Impact of earned media on corporate perceptions in the gas industry' by Michael Coates; (7) 'Moving forward with an initiative for natural gas technology innovation' by Emmanuel Morin; (8) 'Natural gas R and D - No more dodging the issue' by Chuck Szmurlo; (9) 'Meeting the technology needs of the gas industry and the gas consumer' by Stanley S. Borys; (10) 'Market signals' by John Wellard; (11) 'Future sources of Canadian natural gas' by Rick Hyndman; (12) 'The state of supply: Northeast U.S. perspective' by Tom Kiley; (13) 'AGA's priorities and perspectives' by Dick Reiten; (14) 'Global energy issues: Recent development in policy and business' by Gerald Doucet; (15) 'Keeping the distribution cart behind the horse: Why finding more offshore gas is much more important than completing the natural gas grid, including for New Brunswick' by Brian Lee Crowley; (16) 'Environmental opportunities and challenges for the gas industry' by Manfred Klein; (17) 'The potential for natural gas demand destruction' by Timothy Partridge; and (18) 'Pushing the envelope on gas supply' by Roland R. George. In most instances only speaking notes and view graphs are available

  5. Molecular electronics of a single photosystem I reaction center: Studies with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, I.; Lee, J.W.; Warmack, R.J.; Allison, D.P.; Greenbaum, E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-14

    Thylakoids and photosystem I (PSI) reaction centers were imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy. The thylakoids were isolated from spinach chloroplasts, and PSI reaction centers were extracted from thylakoid membranes. Because thylakoids are relatively thick nonconductors, they were sputter-coated with Pd/Au before imaging. PSI photosynthetic centers and chemically platinized PSI were investigated without sputter-coating. They were mounted on flat gold substrates that had been treated with mercaptoacetic acid to help bind the proteins. With tunneling spectroscopy, the PSI centers displayed a semiconductor-like response with a band gap of 1.8 eV. Lightly platinized (platinized for 1 hr) centers displayed diode-like conduction that resulted in dramatic contrast changes between images taken with opposite bias voltages. The electronic properties of this system were stable under long-term storage. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Solar Photo Catalytic Hydrogen Production from water using a dual bed photosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florida Solar Energy Center

    2003-03-30

    A body of work was performed in which the feasibility of photocatalytically decomposing water into its constituent elements using a dual bed, or modular photosystem, under solar radiation was investigated. The system envisioned consists of two modules, each consisting of a shallow, flat, sealed container, in which microscopic photocatalytic particles are immobilized. The photocatalysts absorb light, generating free electrons and lattice vacancy holes, which are capable of performing reductive and oxidative chemistry, respectively. The photocatalysts would be chosen as to whether they specifically promote H{sub 2} or O{sub 2} evolution in their respective containers. An aqueous solution containing a redox mediator is pumped between the two chambers in order to transfer electron equivalents from one reaction to the other.

  7. Contribution of vitamin K1 to the electron spin polarization in spinach photosystem I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustandi, R.R.; Snyder, S.W.; Feezel, L.L.; Michalski, T.J.; Norris, J.R.; Thurnauer, M.C.; Biggins, J.

    1990-01-01

    The electron spin polarized (ESP) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal observed in spinach photosystem I (PSI) particles was examined in preparations depleted of vitamin K1 by solvent extraction and following biological reconstitution by the quinone. The ESP EPR signal was not detected in the solvent-extracted PSI sample but was restored upon reconstitution with either protonated or deuterated vitamin K1 under conditions that also restored electron transfer to the terminal PSI acceptors. Reconstitution using deuterated vitamin K1 resulted in a line narrowing of the ESP EPR signal, supporting the conclusion that the ESP EPR signals in the reconstituted samples arise from a radical pair consisting of the oxidized PSI primary donor, P700+, and reduced vitamin K1

  8. The optoelectronic properties of a photosystem I-carbon nanotube hybrid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaniber, Simone M; Holleitner, Alexander W; Simmel, Friedrich C; Carmeli, Itai

    2009-01-01

    The photoconductance properties of photosystem I (PSI) covalently bound to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are measured. We demonstrate that the PSI forms active electronic junctions with the CNTs, enabling control of the CNTs' photoconductance by the PSI. In order to electrically contact the photoactive proteins, a cysteine mutant is generated at one end of the PSI by genetic engineering. The CNTs are covalently bound to this reactive group using carbodiimide chemistry. We detect an enhanced photoconductance signal of the hybrid material at photon wavelengths resonant to the absorption maxima of the PSI compared to non-resonant wavelengths. The measurements prove that it is feasible to integrate photosynthetic proteins into optoelectronic circuits at the nanoscale.

  9. The optoelectronic properties of a photosystem I-carbon nanotube hybrid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaniber, Simone M; Holleitner, Alexander W [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Simmel, Friedrich C [LMU Munich, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, D-80539 Muenchen (Germany); Carmeli, Itai, E-mail: holleitner@wsi.tum.d, E-mail: itai@post.tau.ac.i [Chemistry Department and NIBN, Ben Gurion University, 84105 Be' er Sheva (Israel)

    2009-08-26

    The photoconductance properties of photosystem I (PSI) covalently bound to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are measured. We demonstrate that the PSI forms active electronic junctions with the CNTs, enabling control of the CNTs' photoconductance by the PSI. In order to electrically contact the photoactive proteins, a cysteine mutant is generated at one end of the PSI by genetic engineering. The CNTs are covalently bound to this reactive group using carbodiimide chemistry. We detect an enhanced photoconductance signal of the hybrid material at photon wavelengths resonant to the absorption maxima of the PSI compared to non-resonant wavelengths. The measurements prove that it is feasible to integrate photosynthetic proteins into optoelectronic circuits at the nanoscale.

  10. Alumina plate containing photosystem I reaction center complex oriented inside plate-penetrating silica nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamidaki, Chihiro; Kondo, Toru; Noji, Tomoyasu; Itoh, Tetsuji; Yamaguchi, Akira; Itoh, Shigeru

    2013-08-22

    The photosynthetic photosystem I reaction center complex (PSI-RC), which has a molecular diameter of 21 nm with 100 pigments, was incorporated into silica nanopores with a 100-nm diameter that penetrates an alumina plate of 60-μm thickness to make up an inorganic-biological hybrid photocell. PSI-RCs, purified from a thermophilic cyanobacterium, were stable inside the nanopores and rapidly photoreduced a mediator dye methyl viologen. The reduced dye was more stable inside nanopores suggesting the decrease of dissolved oxygen. The analysis by a cryogenic electron spin paramagnetic resonance indicated the oriented arrangement of RCs inside the 100-nm nanopores, with their surface parallel to the silica wall and perpendicular to the plane of the alumina plate. PSI RC complex in the semicrystalline orientation inside silica nanopores can be a new type of light energy conversion unit to supply strong reducing power selectively to other molecules inside or outside nanopores.

  11. Effects of Irregular Bimetallic Nanostructures on the Optical Properties of Photosystem I from Thermosynechococcus elongatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Ashraf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The fluorescence of photosystem I (PSI trimers in proximity to bimetallic plasmonic nanostructures have been explored by single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS at cryogenic temperature (1.6 K. PSI serves as a model for biological multichromophore-coupled systems with high potential for biotechnological applications. Plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated by thermal annealing of thin metallic films. The fluorescence of PSI has been intensified due to the coupling with plasmonic nanostructures. Enhancement factors up to 22.9 and 5.1 are observed for individual PSI complexes coupled to Au/Au and Ag/Au samples, respectively. Additionally, a wavelength dependence of fluorescence enhancement is observed, which can be explained by the multichromophoric composition of PSI.

  12. Cofactors involved in light-driven charge separation in photosystem I identified by subpicosecond infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Stahl, Andreas D; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie-Louise

    2011-02-01

    Photosystem I is one of the key players in the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy. While the chlorophyll dimer P(700) has long been identified as the primary electron donor, the components involved in the primary charge separation process in PSI remain undetermined. Here, we have studied the charge separation dynamics in Photosystem I trimers from Synechococcus elongatus by femtosecond vis-pump/mid-infrared-probe spectroscopy upon excitation at 700, 710, and 715 nm. Because of the high specificity of the infrared region for the redox state and small differences in the molecular structure of pigments, we were able to clearly identify specific marker bands indicating chlorophyll (Chl) oxidation. Magnitudes of chlorophyll cation signals are observed to increase faster than the time resolution of the experiment (~0.2 ps) upon both excitation conditions: 700 nm and selective red excitation. Two models, involving either ultrafast charge separation or charge transfer character of the red pigments in PSI, are discussed to explain this observation. A further increase in the magnitudes of cation signals on a subpicosecond time scale (0.8-1 ps) indicates the formation of the primary radical pair. Evolution in the cation region with time constants of 7 and 40 ps reveals the formation of the secondary radical pair, involving a secondary electron donor. Modeling of the data allows us to extract the spectra of the two radical pairs, which have IR signatures consistent with A+A₀- and P₇₀₀+A₁-. We conclude that the cofactor chlorophyll A acts as the primary donor in PSI. The existence of an equilibrium between the two radical pairs we interpret as concerted hole/electron transfer between the pairs of electron donors and acceptors, until after 40 ps, relaxation leads to a full population of the P₇₀₀+A₁. radical pair.

  13. Excitation transfer and trapping kinetics in plant photosystem I probed by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Parveen; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Zhengtang; Tan, Howe-Siang; Lambrev, Petar H

    2018-03-01

    Photosystem I is a robust and highly efficient biological solar engine. Its capacity to utilize virtually every absorbed photon's energy in a photochemical reaction generates great interest in the kinetics and mechanisms of excitation energy transfer and charge separation. In this work, we have employed room-temperature coherent two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to follow exciton equilibration and excitation trapping in intact Photosystem I complexes as well as core complexes isolated from Pisum sativum. We performed two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy measurements with low excitation pulse energies to record excited-state kinetics free from singlet-singlet annihilation. Global lifetime analysis resolved energy transfer and trapping lifetimes closely matches the time-correlated single-photon counting data. Exciton energy equilibration in the core antenna occurred on a timescale of 0.5 ps. We further observed spectral equilibration component in the core complex with a 3-4 ps lifetime between the bulk Chl states and a state absorbing at 700 nm. Trapping in the core complex occurred with a 20 ps lifetime, which in the supercomplex split into two lifetimes, 16 ps and 67-75 ps. The experimental data could be modelled with two alternative models resulting in equally good fits-a transfer-to-trap-limited model and a trap-limited model. However, the former model is only possible if the 3-4 ps component is ascribed to equilibration with a "red" core antenna pool absorbing at 700 nm. Conversely, if these low-energy states are identified with the P 700 reaction centre, the transfer-to-trap-model is ruled out in favour of a trap-limited model.

  14. The impact of modifying photosystem antenna size on canopy photosynthetic efficiency-Development of a new canopy photosynthesis model scaling from metabolism to canopy level processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qingfeng; Wang, Yu; Qu, Mingnan; Ort, Donald R; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2017-12-01

    Canopy photosynthesis (A c ) describes photosynthesis of an entire crop field and the daily and seasonal integrals of A c positively correlate with daily and seasonal biomass production. Much effort in crop breeding has focused on improving canopy architecture and hence light distribution inside the canopy. Here, we develop a new integrated canopy photosynthesis model including canopy architecture, a ray tracing algorithm, and C 3 photosynthetic metabolism to explore the option of manipulating leaf chlorophyll concentration ([Chl]) for greater A c and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). Model simulation results show that (a) efficiency of photosystem II increased when [Chl] was decreased by decreasing antenna size and (b) the light received by leaves at the bottom layers increased when [Chl] throughout the canopy was decreased. Furthermore, the modelling revealed a modest ~3% increase in A c and an ~14% in NUE was accompanied when [Chl] reduced by 60%. However, if the leaf nitrogen conserved by this decrease in leaf [Chl] were to be optimally allocated to other components of photosynthesis, both A c and NUE can be increased by over 30%. Optimizing [Chl] coupled with strategic reinvestment of conserved nitrogen is shown to have the potential to support substantial increases in A c , biomass production, and crop yields. © 2017 The Authors Plant, Cell & Environment Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. In vivo photosystem I reduction in thermophilic and mesophilic cyanobacteria: The thermal resistance of the process is limited by factors other than the unfolding of the partners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, Raul V.; Hervas, Manuel; Rosa, Miguel A. de la; Navarro, Jose A.

    2005-01-01

    Photosystem I reduction by plastocyanin and cytochrome c 6 in cyanobacteria has been extensively studied in vitro, but much less information is provided on this process inside the cell. Here, we report an analysis of the electron transfer from both plastocyanin and cytochrome c 6 to photosystem I in intact cells of several cyanobacterial species, including a comparative study of the temperature effect in mesophilic and thermophilic organisms. Our data show that cytochrome c 6 reduces photosystem I by following a reaction mechanism involving complex formation, whereas the copper-protein follows a simpler collisional mechanism. These results contrast with previous kinetic studies in vitro. The effect of temperature on photosystem I reduction leads us to conclude that the thermal resistance of this process is determined by factors other than the proper stability of the protein partners

  16. Student Scientific Conference, 2009. Proceedings of reviewed contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The conference included the following sections: (i) Biology (145 contributions); (ii) Chemistry (42 contributions); (iii) Geology (42 contributions); (iv) Environment (40 contributions); (v) Geography (28 contributions); (vi) Didactics (13 contributions). Contributions relevant of INIS interest has been inputted to INIS.

  17. Student Scientific Conference, 2010. Proceedings of reviewed contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The conference included the following sections: (i) Biology (154 contributions); (ii) Chemistry (39 contributions); (iii) Geography; (41 contributions); (iv) Geology (22 contributions); (v) Environment (45 contributions); (vi) Didactics (6 contributions). Contributions relevant of INIS interest has been inputted to INIS.

  18. Student Scientific Conference - Nuclear Physics, 2008. Proceedings of contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The conference included the following sections: (i) Biophysics and medicine physics; (ii) Experimental physics and theoretical physics; (iii) Nuclear physics; (iv) Informatics; (v) Mathematics; (vi) Theoretical graphics. Contributions of nuclear physics have been inputted to INIS.

  19. International Conference SES 2009: Secure Energy Supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Conference included the following sessions: Opening addresses; (I) Energy policy; (II) Environment, Renewable sources and NPPs; (III) Secure energy supply - New nuclear units. Verbal 21 presentations have been inputted into INIS, all in the form of the full authors' presentations.

  20. UNISIST II: Special Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattery, Lowell H., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    The major part of this report of the Intergovernmental Conference on Scientific and Technical Information (UNISIST II), held in Paris May 28-June 1, 1979, focuses on three sets of recommendations which were unanimously approved after combining the recommendations proposed by various groups and blocs: (1) recommendations to the United Nations…

  1. INFCE plenary conference documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document consists of the reports to the First INFCE Plenary Conference (November 1978) by the Working Groups a Plenary Conference of its actions and decisions, the Communique of the Final INFCE Plenary Conference (February 1980), and a list of all documents in the IAEA depository for INFCE

  2. Conferences are like swans

    OpenAIRE

    Corker, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Chris Corker was the lead on bringing the 2011 Higher Education Research Scholarship Group Conference to fruition, both in the months preceding the event and on the day. In this viewpoint, Chris shares his experiences of conference administration and delivery, and explores how conferences and swans have more in common that you would imagine.

  3. COAL Conference Poster

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Taylor Alexander; McGibbney, Lewis John

    2017-01-01

    COAL Conference Poster This archive contains the COAL conference poster for the AGU Fall Meeting 2017 by Taylor Alexander Brown. The Inkscape SVG source is available at https://github.com/capstone-coal/coal-conference-poster/ under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license.

  4. FdC1 and Leaf-Type Ferredoxins Channel Electrons From Photosystem I to Different Downstream Electron Acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaoqian; Chen, Shuai; Voon, Chia Pao; Wong, Kam-Bo; Tikkanen, Mikko; Lim, Boon L

    2018-01-01

    Plant-type ferredoxins in Arabidopsis transfer electrons from the photosystem I to multiple redox-driven enzymes involved in the assimilation of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur. Leaf-type ferredoxins also modulate the switch between the linear and cyclic electron routes of the photosystems. Recently, two novel ferredoxin homologs with extra C-termini were identified in the Arabidopsis genome (AtFdC1, AT4G14890; AtFdC2, AT1G32550). FdC1 was considered as an alternative electron acceptor of PSI under extreme ferredoxin-deficient conditions. Here, we showed that FdC1 could interact with some, but not all, electron acceptors of leaf-type Fds, including the ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR), sulfite reductase (SiR), and nitrite reductase (NiR). Photoreduction assay on cytochrome c and enzyme assays confirmed its capability to receive electrons from PSI and donate electrons to the Fd-dependent SiR and NiR but not to the ferredoxin-NADP + oxidoreductase (FNR). Hence, FdC1 and leaf-type Fds may play differential roles by channeling electrons from photosystem I to different downstream electron acceptors in photosynthetic tissues. In addition, the median redox potential of FdC1 may allow it to receive electrons from FNR in non-photosynthetic plastids.

  5. International Conference on Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    OMICS International, (conference series) the World Class Open Access Publisher and Scientific Event Organizer is hosting “International Conference on physics” which is going to be the biggest conference dedicated to Physics. The theme “Highlighting innovations and challenges in the field of Physics” and it features a three day conference addressing the major breakthroughs, challenges and the solutions adopted. The conference will be held during June 27-29, 2016 at New Orleans, USA. Will be published in: http://physics.conferenceseries.com/

  6. Facilitating Learning at Conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib; Elsborg, Steen

    2011-01-01

    The typical conference consists of a series of PowerPoint presentations that tend to render participants passive. Students of learning have long abandoned the transfer model that underlies such one-way communication. We propose an al-ternative theory of conferences that sees them as a forum...... for learning, mutual inspiration and human flourishing. We offer five design principles that specify how conferences may engage participants more and hence increase their learning. In the research-and-development effort reported here, our team collaborated with conference organizers in Denmark to introduce...... and facilitate a variety of simple learning techniques at thirty one- and two-day conferences of up to 300 participants each. We present ten of these techniques and data evaluating them. We conclude that if conference organizers allocate a fraction of the total conference time to facilitated processes...

  7. Analysis of Light-Induced Transmembrane Ion Gradients and Membrane Potential in Photosystem I Proteoliposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennisi, Cristian P.; Greenbaum, Elias; Yoshida, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) complexes can support a light-driven electrochemical gradient for protons, which is the driving force for energy-conserving reactions across biological membranes. In this work, a computational model that enables a quantitative description of the light-induced proton gradients across the membrane of PSI proteoliposomes is presented. Using a set of electrodiffusion equations, a compartmental model of a vesicle suspended in aqueous medium was studied. The light-mediated proton movement was modeled as a single proton pumping step with backpressure of the electric potential. The model fits determinations of pH obtained from PSI proteoliposomes illuminated in the presence of mediators of cyclic electron transport. The model also allows analysis of the proton gradients in relation to the transmembrane ion fluxes and electric potential. Sensitivity analysis enabled a determination of the parameters that have greater influence on steady-state levels and onset/decay rates of transmembrane pH and electric potential. This model could be used as a tool for optimizing PSI proteoliposomes for photo-electrochemical applications.

  8. Probing the conformational dynamics of photosystem I in unconfined and confined spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Gaurav; Chattoraj, Shyamtanu; Nandi, Somen; Mondal, Prasenjit; Saha, Abhijit; Bhattacharyya, Kankan; Ghosh, Surajit

    2017-12-20

    The fluorescence dynamics of Photosystem I (PSI) in bulk water and inside a confined environment like a liposome have been investigated using time resolved confocal microscopy. In bulk water, PSI exhibits a major emission peak at ∼680 nm, while in the liposome it exhibits a markedly blue shifted emission maximum at ∼485 nm. This is indicative of conformational changes due to entrapment and emergence of a stressed conformation of PSI inside the liposome. The observed time constants for the fluorescence lifetime of PSI inside the liposome are significantly high as opposed to PSI in bulk water. More interestingly, the fluorescence intensity of PSI in bulk water exhibits strong fluctuations with many high intensity jumps and these are anti-correlated with the fluorescence lifetime of PSI. In contrast, inside the liposome, no such anti-correlated behaviour is observed. We further demonstrated that PSI exhibits at least two conformational states in bulk water, whereas a single conformation is observed inside the liposome, indicating the conformational rigidity and locking of the PSI complex inside a liposome.

  9. Solar photocatalytic H{sub 2} production from water using a dual bed photosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linkous, C.A. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The authors are developing a dual stage, direct photoconversion scheme for water splitting. The overall system consists of an aqueous solution circulated through two modules, or beds, each of which contains a photochemically active surface layer below the solution. The idea is to divide the energy requirement for water decomposition between the two photosystems, so that more abundant, lower energy photons in the solar spectrum can be utilized, and that the H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} products can be evolved separately from each other. Catalyst-modified semiconductor powders, immobilized within a polymer binder are currently being employed as the photoactive layers. TiO{sub 2} and platinized-InP have been employed for the O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} evolution tasks, respectively. A major effort over the last year was identification of a suitable redox mediator that is responsible for transferring electron equivalents from one unit to the other. After testing more than a dozen candidates, spanning a wide range of electropotentials, under a variety of conditions, it was found that the bromide/bromate (Br{sup {minus}}/BrO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) and iodide/iodate (I{sup {minus}}/IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) redox systems could function in both modules, necessary for closed cycle operation.

  10. AINSE's 40th anniversary conference. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Highlights of 40 years of activity of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) were the main focus of this conference. Topics covered include nuclear physics, plasma physics, radiation chemistry, radiation biology, neutron diffraction, nuclear techniques of analysis and other relevant aspects of nuclear science and technology. The conference handbook contains the summaries of the 78 papers and posters presented and the list of participants

  11. Functional assignments for the carboxyl-terminal domains of the ferrochelatase from Synechocystis PCC 6803: The CAB domain plays a regulatory role, and region II is essential for catalysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobotka, Roman; Tichý, Martin; Wilde, A.; Hunter, C. N.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 155, č. 4 (2011), 1735-1747 ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1000 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : TRANSFER-RNA REDUCTASE * DELTA-AMINOLEVULINIC-ACID * PHOTOSYSTEM-II Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.535, year: 2011

  12. Characterization of a Synechocystis double mutant lacking the photosystem II assembly factors YCF48 and Sll0933

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rengstl, B.; Knoppová, Jana; Komenda, Josef; Nickelsen, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 237, č. 2 (2013), s. 471-480 ISSN 0032-0935 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G055; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0110 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Complex assembly * Cyanobacteria * Photosynthesis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.376, year: 2013

  13. Monolayers of Natural and Recombinant Photosystem II on Gold Electrodes - Potentials for Use as Biosensors for Detection of Herbicides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malý, Jan; Masci, A.; Masojídek, Jiří; Suguira, M.; Pilloton, R.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 8 (2004), s. 1645-1656 ISSN 0003-2719 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/03/0659 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : Immobilization * Protein A * Inhibition curve Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.165, year: 2004

  14. Diuron treatment reveals the different roles of two cyclic electron transfer pathways in photosystem II in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yujian; Chen, Si; Fan, Xiaoji; Song, Hao; Li, Xingxing; Xu, Jiahui; Qian, Haifeng

    2017-04-01

    Three ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana, ecotype Columbia (Wild type, Wt) and two mutants (pgr5 and ndf4), were used to evaluate the effects of diuron on photosynthetic activity of A. thaliana. It was found that diuron adversely affected the fresh weight and chlorophyll content of the plants. Chlorophyll fluorescence studies determined that the pgr5 mutant was more sensitive to diuron than Wt and the ndf4 mutant. Gene expression analysis revealed different roles for the two cyclic electron transfer (CET) pathways, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (NDH) and proton gradient regulation (PGR5) pathways, in the plant after diuron treatment. For example, a gene in the NDH pathway, lhca5, was activated in the low dose (LD) group in the pgr5 mutant, but was down-regulated in the moderate dose (MD) group, along with two other NDH-related genes (ppl2 and ndhH). In the PGR5 pathway, the pgr5 gene was functional under conditions of increased stress (MD group), and was up-regulated to a greater extent in the ndf4 mutant than that in the Wt and pgr5 mutant. Our results suggest that the PGR5 pathway in plants is more important than the NDH pathway during resistance to environmental stress. Deficiencies in the PGR5 pathway could not be counteracted by the NDH pathway, but deficiencies in the NDH pathway could be overcome by stimulating PGR5. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Ribosome-Bound Protein Pam68 Promotes Insertion of Chlorophyll into the CP47 Subunit of Photosystem II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bučinská, Lenka; Kiss, Eva; Koník, Peter; Knoppová, Jana; Komenda, Josef; Sobotka, Roman

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 176, č. 4 (2018), s. 2931-2942 ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/19.0392 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : SYNECHOCYSTIS SP PCC-6803 * SP PCC 6803 * ESCHERICHIA-COLI Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 6.456, year: 2016

  16. Photosystem II electron transport rates and oxygen production in natural waterblooms of freshwater cyanobacteria during a diel cycle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Masojídek, Jiří; Grobbelaar, J. U.; Pechar, Libor; Koblížek, Michal

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 1 (2001), s. 57-66 ISSN 0142-7873 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/96/1222 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : electron transport * evolution Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.259, year: 2001

  17. Refactoring the six-gene photosystem II core in the chloroplast of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimpel, Javier A.; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Scranton, Melissa A.

    2016-01-01

    production, particularly under specific environmental conditions. PSII is a complex multisubunit enzyme with strong interdependence among its components. In this work, we have deleted the six core genes of PSII in the eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and refactored them in a single DNA construct...

  18. Variations in constitutive and inducible UV-B tolerance; dissecting photosystem II protection in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, M.A.K.; LeMartret, B.; Koornneef, M.

    2010-01-01

    The rise in ultraviolet-B (UV-B) (280–315 nm) radiation levels, that is a consequence of stratospheric ozone layer depletion, has triggered extensive research on the effects of UV-B on plants. Plants raised under natural sunlight conditions are generally well protected from the potentially harmful

  19. Dynamic responses of photosystem II in the Namib Desert shrub, Zygophyllum prismatocarpum, during and after foliar deposition of limestone dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heerden, P.D.R. van; Krueger, G.H.J.; Kilbourn Louw, M.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of limestone dust deposition on vegetation in desert ecosystems have not yet been reported. We investigated these effects in a succulent shrub from the Namib Desert at a limestone quarry near Skorpion Zinc mine (Namibia). Effects of limestone dust were determined in Zygophyllum prismatocarpum (dollar bush) plants with heavy, moderate and no visible foliar dust cover by means of chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements. Limestone dust deposition decreased overall plant performance through loss of chlorophyll content, inhibition of CO 2 assimilation, uncoupling of the oxygen-evolving complex and decreased electron transport. Importantly, dynamic recovery occurred after termination of limestone extraction at the quarry. Recovery was accelerated by rainfall, mainly because of dust removal from leaves and stimulation of new growth. These results indicate that limestone dust has severe effects on photosynthesis in desert shrubs, but that recovery is possible and that, in arid environments, this process is modulated by rainfall. - Limestone dust deposition reduced photosynthetic capacity in the Namib Desert shrub, Zygophyllum prismatocarpum

  20. Solar Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production from Water Using a Dual Bed Photosystem - Phase I Final Report and Phase II Proposal; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clovis A. Linkous; Darlene K. Slattery

    2000-01-01

    In this work we are attempting to perform the highly efficient storage of solar energy in the form of H(sub 2) via photocatalytic decomposition of water. While it has been demonstrated that H(sub 2) and O(sub 2) can be evolved from a single vessel containing a single suspended photocatalyst (Sayama 1994; 1997), we are attempting to perform net water-splitting by using two photocatalysts immobilized in separate containers, or beds. A schematic showing how the device would work is shown

  1. A structural investigation of the central chlorophyll a binding sites in the minor photosystem II antenna protein, Lhcb4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pascal, Andy; Caffarri, Stefano; Croce, Roberta; Sandonà, Dorianna; Bassi, Roberto; Robert, Bruno

    2002-01-01

    Mutant proteins from light-harvesting complexes of higher plants may be obtained by expressing modified apoproteins in Escherichia coli, and reconstituting them in the presence of chlorophyll and carotenoid cofactors. This method has allowed, in particular, the engineering of mutant LHCs in which

  2. CyanoP is Involved in the Early Steps of Photosystem II Assembly in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp PCC 6803

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knoppová, Jana; Yu, J.; Koník, P.; Nixon, P.; Komenda, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 9 (2016), s. 1921-1931 ISSN 0032-0781 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G055; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015055; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Cyanobacteria * CyanoP * Photosynthesis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.760, year: 2016

  3. Mathematics Education in the South Pacific. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Incorporated (25th, Auckland, New Zealand, July 7-10, 2002). Volume I [and] Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Bill, Ed.; Irwin, Kathryn C., Ed.; Pfannkuch, Maxine, Ed.; Thomas, Michael O. J., Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of the 25th annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australia (MERGA) held at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. The focus of this meeting is mathematics education in the South Pacific. Presentations are centered around the topic of numeracy in primary or elementary school.…

  4. 76 FR 64083 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, November 29, 2011, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and... reliability that were identified in earlier Commission technical conferences. The conference also will discuss...

  5. International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Cryocoolers 13

    2005-01-01

    This is the 13th volume in the conference series. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature super-capacitor applications.

  6. CONFERENCE: Computers and accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-01-15

    In September of last year a Conference on 'Computers in Accelerator Design and Operation' was held in West Berlin attracting some 160 specialists including many from outside Europe. It was a Europhysics Conference, organized by the Hahn-Meitner Institute with Roman Zelazny as Conference Chairman, postponed from an earlier intended venue in Warsaw. The aim was to bring together specialists in the fields of accelerator design, computer control and accelerator operation.

  7. Conference proceedings ISES 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Janne Winther; Peerstrup Ahrendt, Line; Malmkvist, Jens

    The 10th Internatinal Equitation Science Conference is held i Denmark from August 6th - 9th 2014. This book of proceedings contaions abstracts of 35 oral and 57 poster presentations within the conference themes Equine Stress, Learning and Training as well as free papers.......The 10th Internatinal Equitation Science Conference is held i Denmark from August 6th - 9th 2014. This book of proceedings contaions abstracts of 35 oral and 57 poster presentations within the conference themes Equine Stress, Learning and Training as well as free papers....

  8. Sudden Exposure to Solar UV-B Radiation Reduces Net CO2 Uptake and Photosystem I Efficiency in Shade-Acclimated Tropical Tree Seedlings1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, G. Heinrich; Grube, Esther; Virgo, Aurelio; Winter, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Tree seedlings developing in the understory of the tropical forest have to endure short periods of high-light stress when tree-fall gaps are formed, and direct solar radiation, including substantial UV light, reaches the leaves. In experiments simulating the opening of a tree-fall gap, the response of photosynthesis in leaves of shade-acclimated seedlings (Anacardium excelsum, Virola surinamensis, and Calophyllum longifolium) to exposure to direct sunlight (for 20–50 min) was investigated in Panama (9°N). To assess the effects of solar UV-B radiation (280–320 nm), the sunlight was filtered through plastic films that selectively absorbed UV-B or transmitted the complete spectrum. The results document a strong inhibition of CO2 assimilation by sun exposure. Light-limited and light-saturated rates of photosynthetic CO2 uptake by the leaves were affected, which apparently occurred independently of a simultaneous inhibition of potential photosystem (PS) II efficiency. The ambient UV-B light substantially contributed to these effects. The photochemical capacity of PSI, measured as absorbance change at 810 nm in saturating far-red light, was not significantly affected by sun exposure of the seedlings. However, a decrease in the efficiency of P700 photooxidation by far-red light was observed, which was strongly promoted by solar UV-B radiation. The decrease in PSI efficiency may result from enhanced charge recombination in the reaction center, which might represent an incipient inactivation of PSI, but contributes to thermal dissipation of excessive light energy and thereby to photoprotection. PMID:12586898

  9. The Arabidopsis szl1 Mutant Reveals a Critical Role of β-Carotene in Photosystem I Photoprotection1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Stefano; Li, Zhirong; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Bassi, Roberto; Dall’Osto, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Carotenes and their oxygenated derivatives, the xanthophylls, are structural determinants in both photosystems (PS) I and II. They bind and stabilize photosynthetic complexes, increase the light-harvesting capacity of chlorophyll-binding proteins, and have a major role in chloroplast photoprotection. Localization of carotenoid species within each PS is highly conserved: Core complexes bind carotenes, whereas peripheral light-harvesting systems bind xanthophylls. The specific functional role of each xanthophyll species has been recently described by genetic dissection, however the in vivo role of carotenes has not been similarly defined. Here, we have analyzed the function of carotenes in photosynthesis and photoprotection, distinct from that of xanthophylls, by characterizing the suppressor of zeaxanthin-less (szl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) which, due to the decreased activity of the lycopene-β-cyclase, shows a lower carotene content than wild-type plants. When grown at room temperature, mutant plants showed a lower content in PSI light-harvesting complex I complex than the wild type, and a reduced capacity for chlorophyll fluorescence quenching, the rapidly reversible component of nonphotochemical quenching. When exposed to high light at chilling temperature, szl1 plants showed stronger photoxidation than wild-type plants. Both PSI and PSII from szl1 were similarly depleted in carotenes and yet PSI activity was more sensitive to light stress than PSII as shown by the stronger photoinhibition of PSI and increased rate of singlet oxygen release from isolated PSI light-harvesting complex I complexes of szl1 compared with the wild type. We conclude that carotene depletion in the core complexes impairs photoprotection of both PS under high light at chilling temperature, with PSI being far more affected than PSII. PMID:23029671

  10. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Department of Chemistry Bayero University, P. M. B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. E-mail: hnuhu2000@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and .... water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in acetone. The molar conductance measurement [Table 3] of the complex compounds in.

  11. Self-assembling peptide detergents stabilize isolated photosystem ion a dry surface for an extended time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We used a class of designed peptide detergents to stabilize photosystem I (PS-I upon extended drying under N2 on a gold-coated-Ni-NTA glass surface. PS-I is a chlorophyll-containing membrane protein complex that is the primary reducer of ferredoxin and the electron acceptor of plastocyanin. We isolated the complex from the thylakoids of spinach chloroplasts using a chemical detergent. The chlorophyll molecules associated with the PS-I complex provide an intrinsic steady-state emission spectrum between 650 and 800 nm at -196.15 degrees C that reflects the organization of the pigment-protein interactions. In the absence of detergents, a large blue shift of the fluorescence maxima from approximately 735 nm to approximately 685 nm indicates a disruption in light-harvesting subunit organization, thus revealing chlorophyll-protein interactions. The commonly used membrane protein-stabilizing detergents, N-dodecyl-beta-D-maltoside and N-octyl-beta-D-glucoside, only partially stabilized the approximately 735-nm complex with approximately 685-nm spectroscopic shift. However, prior to drying, addition of the peptide detergent acetyl-AAAAAAK at increasing concentration significantly stabilized the PS-I complex. Moreover, in the presence of acetyl-AAAAAAK, the PS-I complex is stable in a dried form at room temperature for at least 3 wk. Another peptide detergent, acetyl-VVVVVVD, also stabilized the complex but to a lesser extent. These observations suggest that the peptide detergents may effectively stabilize membrane proteins in the solid-state. These designed peptide detergents may facilitate the study of diverse types of membrane proteins.

  12. Requirements for construction of a functional hybrid complex of photosystem I and [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Alexander; Kopczak, Marta J; Rögner, Matthias; Lenz, Oliver

    2010-04-01

    The development of cellular systems in which the enzyme hydrogenase is efficiently coupled to the oxygenic photosynthesis apparatus represents an attractive avenue to produce H(2) sustainably from light and water. Here we describe the molecular design of the individual components required for the direct coupling of the O(2)-tolerant membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH) from Ralstonia eutropha H16 to the acceptor site of photosystem I (PS I) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. By genetic engineering, the peripheral subunit PsaE of PS I was fused to the MBH, and the resulting hybrid protein was purified from R. eutropha to apparent homogeneity via two independent affinity chromatographical steps. The catalytically active MBH-PsaE (MBH(PsaE)) hybrid protein could be isolated only from the cytoplasmic fraction. This was surprising, since the MBH is a substrate of the twin-arginine translocation system and was expected to reside in the periplasm. We conclude that the attachment of the additional PsaE domain to the small, electron-transferring subunit of the MBH completely abolished the export competence of the protein. Activity measurements revealed that the H(2) production capacity of the purified MBH(PsaE) fusion protein was very similar to that of wild-type MBH. In order to analyze the specific interaction of MBH(PsaE) with PS I, His-tagged PS I lacking the PsaE subunit was purified via Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity and subsequent hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Formation of PS I-hydrogenase supercomplexes was demonstrated by blue native gel electrophoresis. The results indicate a vital prerequisite for the quantitative analysis of the MBH(PsaE)-PS I complex formation and its light-driven H(2) production capacity by means of spectroelectrochemistry.

  13. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, C J [ed.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the full text or extended abstracts of papers number 61- to number 114

  14. Addendum to material selection guidelines for geothermal energy-utilization systems. Part I. Extension of the field experience data base. Part II. Proceedings of the geothermal engineering and materials (GEM) program conference (San Diego, CA, 6-8 October 1982)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.S.; Ellis, P.F. II

    1983-05-01

    The extension of the field experience data base includes the following: key corrosive species, updated field experiences, corrosion of secondary loop components or geothermal binary power plants, and suitability of conventional water-source heat pump evaporator materials for geothermal heat pump service. Twenty-four conference papers are included. Three were abstracted previously for EDB. Separate abstracts were prepared for twenty-one. (MHR)

  15. Conferinţa Mondială a Populaţiei, Bucureşti 1974. Semnificaţii politice (World Population Conference, Bucharest 1974. Political Meanings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezar STANCIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available n 1974, the United Nations organized the first inter-governmental conference dedicated especially to problems of population and demography. Apart from technical issue involved, the conference represented yet another manifestation of disagreements between the industrialized countries, on one hand, and the underdeveloped or developing countries. The first group argued that overpopulation was a major risk as the Earth did not have sufficient resources to feed the ever-growing population and birth control measures were required. The latter group disagreed with this perspective and claimed that population issues could be solved only by the development of the poor countries. Development, argued this group of countries, had to be insured by a restructuring of the international economy and more financial assistance from the developed countries. This paper examines Romania’s position in this context, analyzing how the regime in Bucharest tried to balance between foreign constraints such as its obligation as host country to remain neutral, its effort to build bridges to the underdeveloped or developing countries thus trying to tacitly evade it international status of Warsaw Pact member and gain acceptance in the Group of 77. The World Population Conference in 1974 is a conclusive case study for Romania’s foreign policy after the Soviet-American détente of 1972.

  16. Radiation`96. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The conference program includes eight invited lectures which cover a range of contemporary topics in radiation science and technology. In addition, thirty-two oral papers were presented, along with forty-five posters. The conference handbook contains one-page precis or extended abstracts of all presentations, and is a substantial compendium of current radiation research in Australia.

  17. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base

  18. Radiation`96. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The conference program includes eight invited lectures which cover a range of contemporary topics in radiation science and technology. In addition, thirty-two oral papers were presented, along with forty-five posters. The conference handbook contains one-page precis or extended abstracts of all presentations, and is a substantial compendium of current radiation research in Australia.

  19. FPGAworld CONFERENCE2009 SEPTEMBER

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The FPGAworld Conference addresses aspects of digital and hardware/software system engineering on FPGA technology. It is a discussion and network forum for students, researchers and engineers working on industrial and research projects, state-of-the-art investigations, development and applications. The book contains some presentations; for more information see (www.fpgaworld.com/conference).

  20. Major Biomass Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top Scientists, Industry and Government Leaders to Gather for Major Biomass Conference America, South America and Europe will focus on building a sustainable, profitable biomass business at the Third Biomass Conference of the Americas in Montreal. Scheduled presentations will cover all biomass

  1. Hamburg Accelerator Conference (2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Edmund J.N. [CERN Accelerator School (Switzerland)

    1992-11-15

    From 20-24 July, Hamburg welcomed the Fifteenth International Conference on High Energy Accelerators (HEACC). The HEACC Conference traditionally reviews the status of all major accelerator projects whether they are already running like clockwork, still in the construction phase, or waiting impatiently for financial approval.

  2. Program of the Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The International Conference SES 2006 (Secure Energy Supply, Bezpecna dodavka energie) was realised in Bratislava, during September 26 - 29, 2006 in the hotel Crowne Plaza and deals with most important problems of world and Slovak energetics. Objective of this Conference was discussion of experience and information concerning strategic aspects of energy supply safety and the development of the Slovak and European Energy Industry

  3. Vehicular Networking Conference (VNC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altintas, O.; Chen, W.; Heijenk, Geert; Dressler, F.; Ekici, E.; Kargl, Frank; Shigeno, H.; Dietzel, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    On behalf of the Organizing Committee, we would like to welcome you to the third edition of the IEEE Vehicular Networking Conference (IEEE VNC 2011) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. IEEE VNC is a unique conference sponsored by both the IEEE Communications Society and the IEEE Intelligent

  4. Radiation'96. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The conference program includes eight invited lectures which cover a range of contemporary topics in radiation science and technology. In addition, thirty-two oral papers were presented, along with forty-five posters. The conference handbook contains one-page precis or extended abstracts of all presentations, and is a substantial compendium of current radiation research in Australia

  5. Hamburg Accelerator Conference (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Edmund J.N.

    1992-01-01

    From 20-24 July, Hamburg welcomed the Fifteenth International Conference on High Energy Accelerators (HEACC). The HEACC Conference traditionally reviews the status of all major accelerator projects whether they are already running like clockwork, still in the construction phase, or waiting impatiently for financial approval

  6. Threats, protests greet conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, D

    1994-09-04

    In preparation for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, Egypt has deployed 14,000 police to protect participants from threatened violence. The Vatican has joined forces with Muslim fundamentalists to condemn the conference as a vehicle for imposing Western ideals, particularly abortion, on Third world countries. In addition, the opposition is raising the specter of a descent of homosexuals onto Cairo and Muslim fundamentalists have threatened to murder Western representatives. A suit filed by Islamic lawyers, aimed at stopping the conference, failed. Sudan and Saudi Arabia plan to boycott the conference, and it remains uncertain whether Libya will be represented. Conference organizers have not been deterred by the threats and note that the controversy has drawn public attention to the central issues under debate.

  7. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, C J [ed.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the foreword, technical program, the author index and of the papers (1-60) presented at the conference.

  8. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, C.J.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the foreword, technical program, the author index and of the papers (1-60) presented at the conference

  9. To conference or not to conference

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    can travel throughout the world, from Cape to Cairo, from Jakarta to. Istanbul, from San ... Is there any real advantage of going to conferences in the era of electronic ... to register and travel, and the time off work, are justified, although we are.

  10. Colorado Conference on iterative methods. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The conference provided a forum on many aspects of iterative methods. Volume I topics were:Session: domain decomposition, nonlinear problems, integral equations and inverse problems, eigenvalue problems, iterative software kernels. Volume II presents nonsymmetric solvers, parallel computation, theory of iterative methods, software and programming environment, ODE solvers, multigrid and multilevel methods, applications, robust iterative methods, preconditioners, Toeplitz and circulation solvers, and saddle point problems. Individual papers are indexed separately on the EDB.

  11. Managing the exploration process: conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The conference includes eight articles on the theme of the meeting including: I - creating an environment that fosters exploration and development ideas; II - integrating a global perspective when setting objectives for exploration planning; III - practical issues is setting exploration objectives; IV - portfolio analysis of exploration prospect of ideas; V - the effective presentation of exploration prospects; V I - the future of information management; VII - assessing exploration assets; and V III - environmental and regulatory considerations when planning an exploratory well. Individual articles indexed/abstracted separately include: articles I, II, III, VII, and V III

  12. Marketing in the E-Business World, Parts I & II | Smith | LBS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marketing in the E-Business World, Parts I & II. ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... of many of Americas largest companies gather at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City for the Conference Boards Annual Marketing Conference.

  13. Otto Toeplitz Memorial Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    A conference in operator theory and its applications commemorating the 100th anniversary of the birth of the distinguished German mathematician Otto Toeplitz, organized by the University of Tel Aviv together with German Mathematical Society, took place in Tel Aviv, Israel, from May 11th to 15th, 1981. I give here a broad very subjective overview of the proceedings of the conference for the benefit of readers of TTSP; for those interested in further details, a forthcoming volume in the Birkhaeuser series Operator Theory: Advances and Applications will consist of expanded written versions of most of the talks given at the conference

  14. 7th iTi Conference in Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Talamelli, Alessandro; Oberlack, Martin; Peinke, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects the edited and reviewed contribution presented in the 7th iTi Conference in Bertinoro, covering fundamental and applied aspects in turbulence. In the spirit of the iTi conference, the volume is produced after the conference so that the authors had the opportunity to incorporate comments and discussions raised during the meeting. In the present book, the contributions have been structured according to the topics: I Theory II Wall bounded flows III Pipe flow IV Modelling V Experiments VII Miscellaneous topics.

  15. ITER at the international conference on fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinin, G.; Barabash, V.; Matera, R.

    1998-01-01

    The reports summarizes the topics of the eighth International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-8) which was held in Sendai, Japan, on 26-31 October 1997. The ICFRM is focused on the whole spectrum of materials and technologies to be applied in fusion reactors and related facilities. The total number of conference participants was over 500, representing 24 countries and about 600 oral and poster papers were presented at the conference. Three sessions were devoted to ITER materials: (i) Design-Materials Interface and ITER (oral session); (ii) ITER, Irradiation Facility and Technology, (poster session); (iii) ITER and Beyond (discussion session)

  16. The 26. CLI national conference. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevet, Pierre-Franck; Niel, Jean-Christophe; Legrand, Henri; Dumont, Jean-Jacques; Lachaume, Jean-Luc; Delalonde, Jean-Claude; Sene, Monique; Le Deaut, Jean Yves; Charles, Thierry; Sasseigne, Philippe; Fournier, Nicolas; Murith, Christophe; Rivasi, Michele; Perissat, Frederic; KESSLER, Emmanuel

    2014-12-01

    This document gathers contributions presented during a conference held in December 2014. After introduction speeches and a focus of some updates by ANCCLI and ASN representatives, this conference comprised two round tables. The first one addressed the continuation of nuclear reactor operation after their fourth safety re-examination, with contributions by representatives of the ASN, of the ANCCLI, of the IRSN, and of EDF. The second one addressed the issue of a European harmonisation regarding actions of protection of populations in case of a nuclear accident, with interventions of representatives of a CLI, of the ASN, of the Swiss federal office for public health, of an NGO (Nuclear Transparency Watch), and of a departmental prefect

  17. The learning conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    little support amongst serious students of learning. The professional conference as a forum for knowledge sharing is in dire need of a new learning theory and a more enlightened practice. The notion of human flourishing is offered as basis for theory, and four simple design principles for the so......The typical one-day conference attended by managers or professionals in search of inspiration is packed with PowerPoint presentations and offers little opportunity for involvement or knowledge sharing. Behind the conventional conference format lurks the transfer model of learning, which finds......-called “learning conference” are proposed: People go to conferences to 1. get concise input, 2. interpret it in the light of their ongoing concerns, 3. talk about their current projects and 4. meet the other attendees and be inspired by them. Six practical techniques that induce attendees to do these things...

  18. EVOLVE 2014 International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Tantar, Emilia; Sun, Jian-Qiao; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Qian; Schütze, Oliver; Emmerich, Michael; Legrand, Pierrick; Moral, Pierre; Coello, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This volume encloses research articles that were presented at the EVOLVE 2014 International Conference in Beijing, China, July 1–4, 2014.The book gathers contributions that emerged from the conference tracks, ranging from probability to set oriented numerics and evolutionary computation; all complemented by the bridging purpose of the conference, e.g. Complex Networks and Landscape Analysis, or by the more application oriented perspective. The novelty of the volume, when considering the EVOLVE series, comes from targeting also the practitioner’s view. This is supported by the Machine Learning Applied to Networks and Practical Aspects of Evolutionary Algorithms tracks, providing surveys on new application areas, as in the networking area and useful insights in the development of evolutionary techniques, from a practitioner’s perspective. Complementary to these directions, the conference tracks supporting the volume, follow on the individual advancements of the subareas constituting the scope of the confe...

  19. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, R.M. [Georgetown Univ., Kennedy Inst. of Ethics, Washington, DC (United States); Venter, J.C. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gilbert, W. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Mulligan, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mansfield, B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  20. Conference on radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    32 abstracts of contributions presented at the conference and covering all aspects of radioecology are included. The lecturers were mainly from Czechoslovakia; contributions from the USSR, France, Belgium, Hungary, Bulgaria, etc., however, were also presented. (P.A.)

  1. Ranking Operations Management conferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.; Gupta, Sushil; Laptaned, U

    2007-01-01

    Several publications have appeared in the field of Operations Management which rank Operations Management related journals. Several ranking systems exist for journals based on , for example, perceived relevance and quality, citation, and author affiliation. Many academics also publish at conferences

  2. Photos of the conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Åhman

    1984-05-01

    Full Text Available Birgitta  Åhman is the photographer of the series of pictures from the conference, also for the cover photo of the full paper edition showing Kongsvold Mountain Hut and Biological Station.

  3. The light-harvesting complexes of higher plant Photosystem I: Lhca1/4 and Lhca2/3 form two red-emitting heterodimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wientjes, I.E.; Croce, R.

    2011-01-01

    The outer antenna of higher-plant PSI (Photosystem I) is composed of four complexes [Lhc (light-harvesting complex) a1-Lhca4] belonging to the light-harvesting protein family. Difficulties in their purification have so far prevented the determination of their properties and most of the knowledge

  4. The light-harvesting complexes of higher-plant Photosystem I : Lhca1/4 and Lhca2/3 form two red-emitting heterodimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wientjes, Emilie; Croce, Roberta

    2011-01-01

    The outer antenna of higher-plant PSI (Photosystem I) is composed of four complexes [Lhc (light-harvesting complex) al-Lhca4] belonging to the light-harvesting protein family. Difficulties in their purification have so far prevented the determination of their properties and most of the knowledge

  5. The exogenous application of brassinosteroids to Zea Mays (L.) stressed by long-term chilling does not affect the activities of photosystem 1 or 2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honnerová, J.; Rothová, O.; Holá, D.; Kohout, Ladislav; Kvasnica, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 4 (2010), s. 500-505 ISSN 0721-7595 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB601110611 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : chilling stress * brassinosteroids * photosystem 1 * Hill reaction Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.066, year: 2010

  6. THE STRUCTURE OF PHOTOSYSTEM-I FROM THE THERMOPHILIC CYANOBACTERIUM SYNECHOCOCCUS SP DETERMINED BY ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY OF 2-DIMENSIONAL CRYSTALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOTTCHER, B; GRABER, P; BOEKEMA, EJ

    1992-01-01

    The structure of the Photosystem I (PS I) complex from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. has been investigated by electron microscopy and image analysis of two-dimensional crystals. Crystals were obtained from isolated PS I by removal of detergents with Bio-Beads. After negative

  7. Japan Accelerator Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    At the international level, the high energy accelerator scene evolves rapidly and the International Conference on High Energy Accelerators is where its strong pulse can best be felt. This year, the Conference was held for the first time in Japan, with the 14th meeting in the series having been hosted in August by the Japanese KEK National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba. The venue was a recognition of the premier accelerator physics and technology status achieved by this diligent nation

  8. 2nd SUMO Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    This contributed volume contains the conference proceedings of the Simulation of Urban Mobility (SUMO) conference 2014, Berlin. The included research papers cover a wide range of topics in traffic planning and simulation, including open data, vehicular communication, e-mobility, urban mobility, multimodal traffic as well as usage approaches. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.  

  9. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  10. Japan Accelerator Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1989-11-15

    At the international level, the high energy accelerator scene evolves rapidly and the International Conference on High Energy Accelerators is where its strong pulse can best be felt. This year, the Conference was held for the first time in Japan, with the 14th meeting in the series having been hosted in August by the Japanese KEK National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba. The venue was a recognition of the premier accelerator physics and technology status achieved by this diligent nation.

  11. Conference Report: The BPS Annual Conference 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Roncaglia

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article I will review four papers presented at the British Psychological Society Annual Conference held this year in London held over a 3 day period. The Conference included a variety of scientific presentations and discussions through symposia, roundtable discussions, single papers and poster sessions. Although numerous papers took an experimental approach, few applied any type of qualitative methodology. The topics covered within the different psychological disciplines spanned from early childhood through old age; I have chosen four papers that covered a life course perspective and took into consideration clinical issues as well. The first paper discusses a grounded theory approach used to analyse a play therapy session between therapist and child. The second review reports some recent findings in the way the brains of people on the autistic spectrum disorder might function. The third paper discusses positive psychology and how such an emerging movement has influenced new research in the field. The last paper reviewed will discuss the issue of the ageing process, and I will present some arguments related to the useful application of qualitative methodologies within this area of research. In conclusion, I will highlight some personal reflections on the Conference and the need for a greater balance between qualitative and quantitative methodologies to be used in collaboration rather than as antagonists. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0402176

  12. Conference scene: DGVS spring conference 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolligs, Frank Thomas

    2009-10-01

    The 3rd annual DGVS Spring Conference of the German Society for Gastroenterology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Verdauungs- und Stoffwechselkrankheiten) was held at the Seminaris Campus Hotel in Berlin, Germany, on 8-9 May, 2009. The conference was organized by Roland Schmid and Matthias Ebert from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. The central theme of the meeting was 'translational gastrointestinal oncology: towards personalized medicine and individualized therapy'. The conference covered talks on markers for diagnosis, screening and surveillance of colorectal cancer, targets for molecular therapy, response prediction in clinical oncology, development and integration of molecular imaging in gastrointestinal oncology and translational research in clinical trial design. Owing to the broad array of topics and limitations of space, this article will focus on biomarkers, response prediction and the integration of biomarkers into clinical trials. Presentations mentioned in this summary were given by Matthias Ebert (Technical University of Munich, Germany), Esmeralda Heiden (Epigenomics, Berlin, Germany), Frank Kolligs (University of Munich, Germany), Florian Lordick (University of Heidelberg, Germany), Hans Jorgen Nielsen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Anke Reinacher-Schick (University of Bochum, Germany), Christoph Röcken (University of Berlin, Germany), Wolff Schmiegel (University of Bochum, Germany) and Thomas Seufferlein (University of Halle, Germany).

  13. World Energy Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, G.; Schilling, H.D.

    1979-01-01

    After making some general remarks about goals, tasks, and works of the World Energy Conference the topics and the frame of the 11th World Energy Conference which will take place in Munich from 8th to 12th September 1980 are outlined. This conference is held under the general topic 'energy for our world' and deals with the reciprocal relation between energy supply, environment, and society. The main part of the publication presented here is the German version of the most important sections of the investigation 'World Energy-Looking Ahead to 2020' by the Conservation Commission (CC) of the World Energy Conference. Added to this is the German original brief version of a report by the Mining-Research Company (Bergbau-Forschung GmbH) to the CC which deals with the estimation of the world's coal resources and their future availability. This report was presented on the 10th World Energy Conference in Istanbul together with the corresponding reports concerning the other energy sources. Finally, an introduction to the technical programme for the 11th World Energy Conference 1980 is given. (UA) [de

  14. The HLA-B*39 allele increases type 1 diabetes risk conferred by HLA-DRB1*04:04-DQB1*03:02 and HLA-DRB1*08-DQB1*04 class II haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikk, M-L; Kiviniemi, M; Laine, A-P; Härkönen, T; Veijola, R; Simell, O; Knip, M; Ilonen, J

    2014-01-01

    To further characterise the effect of the HLA-B*39 allele on type 1 diabetes risk we assessed its role in different HLA-DR/DQ haplotypes and genotypes using 1764 nuclear families with a diabetic child collected in the framework of the Finnish Paediatric Diabetes Register. HLA assays were based on sequence specific hybridization using lanthanide labelled oligonucleotide probes. Transmissions of major HLA-DR/DQ haplotypes with and without the HLA-B*39 allele to diabetic index cases were analysed by direct haplotype and allele counting. The HLA-B*39 allele significantly increased the disease risk conferred by DRB1*04:04-DQA1*03-DQB1*03:02 and (DR8)-DQB1*04 haplotypes. The same effect was observed on genotype level as disease association for the HLA-B*39 allele was observed in multiple genotypes containing DRB1*04:04-DQA1*03-DQB1*03:02 or (DR8)-DQB1*04 haplotypes. Finally we considered the two common subtypes of the HLA-B*39 allele, B*39:01 and B*39:06 and observed their unequal distribution when stratified for specific DR-DQ haplotypes. The risk for type 1 diabetes conferred by certain DR/DQ haplotypes is modified by the presence of the HLA-B*39 and this confirms the independent disease predisposing effect of the HLA-B*39 allele. The results can be applied in enhancing the sensitivity and specificity of DR/DQ based screening programs for subjects at disease risk. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanisms of energy transfer and conversion in plant Light-Harvesting Complex II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Tiago Ferreira de

    2009-09-24

    The light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) is the major antenna complex in plant photosynthesis. It accounts for roughly 30% of the total protein in plant chloroplasts, which makes it arguably the most abundant membrane protein on Earth, and binds about half of plant chlorophyll (Chl). The complex assembles as a trimer in the thylakoid membrane and binds a total of 54 pigment molecules, including 24 Chl a, 18 Chl b, 6 lutein (Lut), 3 neoxanthin (Neo) and 3 violaxanthin (Vio). LHC-II has five key roles in plant photosynthesis. It: (1) harvests sunlight and transmits excitation energy to the reaction centres of photosystems II and I, (2) regulates the amount of excitation energy reaching each of the two photosystems, (3) has a structural role in the architecture of the photosynthetic supercomplexes, (4) contributes to the tight appression of thylakoid membranes in chloroplast grana, and (5) protects the photosynthetic apparatus from photo damage by non photochemical quenching (NPQ). A major fraction of NPQ is accounted for its energy-dependent component qE. Despite being critical for plant survival and having been studied for decades, the exact details of how excess absorbed light energy is dissipated under qE conditions remain enigmatic. Today it is accepted that qE is regulated by the magnitude of the pH gradient ({delta}pH) across the thylakoid membrane. It is also well documented that the drop in pH in the thylakoid lumen during high-light conditions activates the enzyme violaxanthin de-epoxidase (VDE), which converts the carotenoid Vio into zeaxanthin (Zea) as part of the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, studies with Arabidopsis mutants revealed that the photosystem II subunit PsbS is necessary for qE. How these physiological responses switch LHC-II from the active, energy transmitting to the quenched, energy-dissipating state, in which the solar energy is not transmitted to the photosystems but instead dissipated as heat, remains unclear and is the

  16. 2nd Bozeman Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, John

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains a collection of papers delivered by the partici­ pants at the second Conference on Computation and Control held at Mon­ tana State University in Bozeman, Montana from August 1-7, 1990. The conference, as well as this proceedings, attests to the vitality and cohesion between the control theorist and the numerical analyst that was adver­ tised by the first Conference on Computation and Control in 1988. The proceedings of that initial conference was published by Birkhiiuser Boston as the first volume of this same series entitled Computation and Control, Proceedings of the Bozeman Conference, Bozeman, Montana, 1988. Control theory and numerical analysis are both, by their very nature, interdisciplinary subjects as evidenced by their interaction with other fields of mathematics and engineering. While it is clear that new control or es­ timation algorithms and new feedback design methodologies will need to be implemented computationally, it is likewise clear that new problems in computation...

  17. Proceedings of the Northwest regional energy conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denman, A S; Comstock, D R [eds.

    1978-12-01

    The conference was directed toward two main objectives. First, a major portion of the proceedings were to focus on the policies, programs, and priorities of the new US DOE, and their relationships to the Pacific Northwest region. Second, the conference was to explore specific energy issues of regional significance and provide an opportunity for regional feedback on energy policies. The 10 sessions of the conference are Keynote Session: Congress, and the National Energy Plan Sen. Henry Jackson; National Perspectives on Energy Issues (I): An Overview of the NEP, Programs and Priorities of DOE (Alvin Alm and NEP - Conservation and Solar Applications (Don Beattie); and Luncheon address - Alaska Energy Issues (Robert LeResche); National Perspectives on Energy Issues (II): Utility Rate Reform - National Provisions and Relationships to the Pacific Northwest (David Bardin) and Technology for Energy and Long Term Short Alternatives (Robert Thorne); Concurrent Interest Group Sessions: State and Local Roles in Energy Planning and Decision-Making and Industry and University Roles in DOE Research and Programs; Banquet address. The US Energy Future (James Schlesinger); Regional Perspectives on Energy Issues: DOE-X - Organization and Response to Regional Needs (Randall Hardy). What Comes After Number 13 (Sterling Munro), Hanford 1978 (Alex Fremling), and Low Head Hydro and Geothermal (Richard Wood); Lucheon address - The Washington Perspective on Energy (Dixie Lee Ray); Regional Power Planning (Panel); and Conference Wrap Up Session. (MCW)

  18. Conferences and Family Reunions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Sutherland

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Professional associations and conferences have similarities with and differences from families and family reunions. This comparison can illustrate some ways professional associations can approach the integration of new members and the planning of conferences in order to facilitate membership development and leadership renewal. Unlike family reunions, professional conferences are not closed events that require a shared culture in order to fully participate; they are events that should show the constant change and development of practice that is representative of the profession – for both members and non-members. Some of the topics explored in the article are: making it easy for outsiders to contribute, considering the tastes of new members, making it easy to volunteer in a meaningful way, and remembering who the future of the organization is. These simple considerations will assist in opening professional associations to new participants and help them to maintain their relevance and vitality over time.

  19. Low Energy Conference 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    11 of the 19 presentations have been indexed for the database. The following national organisations jointly organised the Low-energy Conference 2009: The Norwegian Society for the Conservation of Nature, the Norwegian Society of Engineers and Technologists, Norwegian Technology, the Federation of Norwegian Industries and the Low-Energy Program. Energy efficiency is often given little attention in the ongoing debates concerning different initiatives in order to reduce greenhouse emissions. The aim of the conference was to set energy efficiency on the agenda as an important environmental instrument. Both the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change - IPCC and the International Energy Agency - IEA regard energy efficiency as one of the fastest and most effective ways of reducing greenhouse emissions. Despite of this little is done. Many countries are ahead of Norway - why are we lagging behind? The Low-Energy conference has a broad approach: Nigel Jollands from the International Energy Agency -IEA puts energy efficiency in a global perspective. Soeren Rise from Teqniq in Denmark informs about the Danes' energy saving agreement, which appears to have been a success. The conference increased the competencies on concrete energy efficiency solutions, how to speed up the marketing of energy-friendly buildings and technologies, possibilities through industry and the impact of EU-directives and other instruments in order to trigger the potential. The conference closed with a discussion panel of leading energy politicians. The conference contributed to raise the debate in advance of the General election in Norway and the climate negotiations in Copenhagen during the autumn 2009. (EW)

  20. Species-specific differences of the spectroscopic properties of P700 - Analysis of the influence of non-conserved amino acid residues by site-directed mutagenesis of photosystem I from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witt, H.; Bordignon, E.; Carbonera, D.; Dekker, J.P.; Karapetyan, N.; Teutloff, C.; Webber, A.; Lubitz, W.; Schlodder, E.

    2003-01-01

    We applied optical spectroscopy, magnetic resonance techniques, and redox titrations to investigate the properties of the primary electron donor P700 in photosystem I (PS I) core complexes from cyanobacteria (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Spirulina platensis, and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803), algae

  1. CONFERENCE: Nuclear visions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Last summer, four hundred visitors of about 30 different nationalities descended on the ancient town of Visby on the Swedish island of Gotland for the Second International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions. For the conference itself, sessions were organized not according to conventional topics like low, intermediate and high energy reactions, but along phenomena-related lines that brought listeners together instead of splitting them up. Examples were 'phase transitions', 'new facilities' and 'breaking nuclear matter into pieces'

  2. VMEbus in physics conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The first conference ''VMEbus in Physics'' was held at CERN on 7th and 8th October 1985. The conference surveyed the applications of the VMEbus standards in physics, with special emphasis on particle physics and accelerator control. Developments in the definition of the standards and in the formation of users groups were discussed. Manufacturer's representatives were given the opportunity to appreciate the requirements of the fast-growing VMEbus market in the physics community. These proceedings contain the unedited text of the oral and poster presentations given on that occasion. (orig.)

  3. CONFERENCE: Linacs at Seeheim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-07-15

    The 12th Linear Accelerator Conference, organized by GSI Darmstadt, was held from 8-11 May at the Lufthansa Schulungszentrum in Seeheim, West Germany. It was the first of this series of Linac Accelerator Conferences - started in 1961 with 20 participants and 17 contributions at Brookhaven - held outside North America. In Seeheim, 32 invited talks, 11 oral and 98 poster papers were presented to more than 250 participants from the USA, Canada, Europe, Japan, the USSR and China, representing 39 research institutions and 12 industrial laboratories.

  4. International conference, ICPRAM 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, J; Fred, Ana; Pattern recognition : applications and methods : revised selected papers

    2013-01-01

    This edited book includes extended and revised versions of a set of selected papers from the First International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPRAM 2012), held in Vilamoura, Algarve, Portugal, from 6 to 8 February, 2012, sponsored by the Institute for Systems and Technologies of Information Control and Communication (INSTICC) and held in cooperation with the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) and Pattern Analysis, Statistical Modelling and Computational Learning (PASCAL2). The conference brought together researchers, engineers and practitioners interested on the areas of Pattern Recognition, both from theoretical and application perspectives.

  5. Internet conferences in glycobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, B J; Doughty, S W; Parretti, M F; Tennison, J; Wilson, I

    1997-09-01

    In this article we describe recent activities in the use of electronic conferencing in glycobiology focusing on our experiences with the organization and development of the Second Electronic Glycoscience Conference (EGC-2), which was held on the Internet and World Wide Web in September 1996. EGC-2 involved the presentation and discussion of scientific research results in a virtual conferencing environment which incorporated virtual replicas of many activities usually observed at a physical conference in addition to features unique to the electronic medium. Highlights of the scientific program and technical developments in the design and use of these facilities are briefly described. EGC-3 will be held in October 1997.

  6. The learning conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    2007-01-01

    /methodology/approach: A typical full-day conference is analyzed. It has six hours of podium talk and twenty-five minutes for delegates to become involved. What model of learning can possibly lie behind this? The transfer model, which assumes learners to be empty vessels. An alternative view is that conference delegates...... are described: Individual reflection, the buzz dyad, ?You have won two consultants, free of charge?, facilitated group work, the knowledge exchange, and lunch with gaffer tape. Originality/value: This paper introduces modern learning theory and techniques into an educational context which has resisted...

  7. CONFERENCE: Linacs at Seeheim

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The 12th Linear Accelerator Conference, organized by GSI Darmstadt, was held from 8-11 May at the Lufthansa Schulungszentrum in Seeheim, West Germany. It was the first of this series of Linac Accelerator Conferences - started in 1961 with 20 participants and 17 contributions at Brookhaven - held outside North America. In Seeheim, 32 invited talks, 11 oral and 98 poster papers were presented to more than 250 participants from the USA, Canada, Europe, Japan, the USSR and China, representing 39 research institutions and 12 industrial laboratories

  8. Structuring oil and gas joint ventures with aboriginal communities: conference papers conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Insight Conference featured twelve articles on the following topics: 1 - researching and understanding your legal partners; II - an aboriginal game plan - a plan for success; III - legal and management issues relating to aboriginal ventures; IV - tax status of reserve-based aboriginal people and businesses under the Indian Act; v - first nations as exempt bodies under the Income Tax Act; V I - innovative options for structuring oil and gas leases and exploration permits on aboriginal lands; VII - joint venture and partnership arrangements; V III - the impact of taxation on aboriginal ventures; I X - bankruptcy and insolvency issues for on-reserve businesses; X - financing options for oil and gas ventures with first nations; XI - Syncrude's commitment to aboriginal development; and X II - structuring oil and gas ventures with aboriginal communities. Articles abstracted/indexed separately include: I, II, V I (2), V III, X, XI, and X II

  9. Student Scientific Conference, 2010. Proceedings of reviewed contributions; Studentska vedecka konferencia, Zbornik recenzovanych prispevkov 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-04-28

    The conference included the following sections: (i) Biology (154 contributions); (ii) Chemistry (39 contributions); (iii) Geography; (41 contributions); (iv) Geology (22 contributions); (v) Environment (45 contributions); (vi) Didactics (6 contributions). Contributions relevant of INIS interest has been inputted to INIS.

  10. Student Scientific Conference, 2009. Proceedings of reviewed contributions; Studentska vedecka konferencia, 2009. Zbornik recenzovanych prispevkov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-04-22

    The conference included the following sections: (i) Biology (145 contributions); (ii) Chemistry (42 contributions); (iii) Geology (42 contributions); (iv) Environment (40 contributions); (v) Geography (28 contributions); (vi) Didactics (13 contributions). Contributions relevant of INIS interest has been inputted to INIS.

  11. Veterans in Society Conference 2014: Humanizing the Discourse (Conference Program)

    OpenAIRE

    Virginia Tech. Department of English. Center for the Study of Rhetoric in Society; Virginia Tech. Veterans Studies Group

    2014-01-01

    This program lists the daily sessions, presentations, and events that took place during the 2014 Veterans in Society Conference, which was held from April 27-28, 2014 at the Hotel Roanoke in Roanoke, VA. This program also includes speaker and presenter bios, descriptions of unrecorded conference events, and a letter from conference co-chair Jim Dubinsky, the director of Virginia Tech's Center for the Study of Rhetoric in Society. The 2014 Veterans in Society Conference: Humanizing the Discour...

  12. 78 FR 27963 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, July 9, 2013 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. This... technical support for webcasts and offers the option of listening to the meeting via phone-bridge for a fee...

  13. ECED 2013: Eastern and Central Europe Decommissioning. International Conference on Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities. Conference Guide and Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The Conference included the following sessions: (I) Opening session (2 contributions); (II) Managerial and Funding Aspects of Decommissioning (5 contributions); (III) Technical Aspects of Decommissioning I (6 contributions); (IV) Experience with Present Decommissioning Projects (4 contributions); (V) Poster Session (14 contributions); (VI) Eastern and Central Europe Decommissioning - Panel Discussion; (VII) Release of Materials, Waste Management and Spent Fuel Management (6 contributions); (VIII) Technical Aspects of Decommissioning II (5 contributions).

  14. 2010 ELECTRODEPOSITION GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 1-6, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Searson

    2010-08-06

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Electrodeposition will present cutting-edge research on electrodeposition with emphasis on (i) advances in basic science, (ii) developments in next-generation technologies, and (iii) new and emerging areas. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics, from atomic scale processes, nucleation and growth, thin film deposition, and electrocrystallization, to applications of electrodeposition in devices including microelectronics, solar energy, and power sources. The Conference will bring together investigators from a wide range of scientific disciplines, including chemical engineering, materials science and engineering, physics, and chemistry. The Conference will feature invited speakers at the forefront of the field, and a late-breaking news session that will provide the opportunity for graduate students, post-docs, and junior faculty to participate. The collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with scientific talks and poster sessions, as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, provides an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to discuss current issues and promotes cross-disciplinary collaborations in the various research areas represented. The Conference will be held at Colby-Sawyer College, located in the Mt. Kearsarge-Lake Sunapee Region of New Hampshire. The surrounding mountains, forests, and lakes provide a beautiful setting for this conference. The attendance is limited so early application is strongly advised.

  15. Santa Fe Accelerator Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The 10th USA National Particle Accelerator Conference was hosted this year by the Los Alamos National Laboratory in Santa Fe from 21-23 March. It was a resounding success in emphasizing the ferment of activity in the accelerator field. About 900 people registered and about 500 papers were presented in invited and contributed talks and poster sessions

  16. Annual Conference Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  17. International Nuclear Physics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    We are pleased to announce that the 26th International Nuclear Physics Conference (INPC2016) will take place in Adelaide (Australia) from September 11-16, 2016. The 25th INPC was held in Firenze in 2013 and the 24th INPC in Vancouver, Canada, in 2010. The Conference is organized by the Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter at the University of Adelaide, together with the Australian National University and ANSTO. It is also sponsored by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) and by a number of organisations, including AUSHEP, BNL, CoEPP, GSI and JLab. INPC 2016 will be held in the heart of Adelaide at the Convention Centre on the banks of the River Torrens. It will consist of 5 days of conference presentations, with plenary sessions in the mornings, up to ten parallel sessions in the afternoons, poster sessions and a public lecture. The Conference will officially start in the evening of Sunday 11th September with Registration and a Reception and will end late on the afternoon of Fri...

  18. Hamburg Accelerator Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Edmund J.N. [CERN Accelerator School (Switzerland)

    1992-10-15

    From 20-24 July, Hamburg welcomed the Fifteenth International Conference on High Energy Accelerators (HEACC). A natural highlight was the recent commissioning success of the HERA electron-proton collider at Hamburg's DESY Laboratory and its first high energy electron-proton collision data. This gave the meeting the feel of a family event celebrating a newborn.

  19. BEAUTY'99 Conference Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerola, Paula

    2000-01-01

    Investigations of B hadrons are expected to break new ground in measuring CP-violation effects. This series of BEAUTY conferences, originating from the 1993 conference in Liblice, has contributed significantly in developing ideas of CP-violation measurements using B hadrons and formulating and comparing critically the B-physics experiments. In the '99 conference in Bled we saw the ripening of the field and the first fruit emerging - Tevatron have produced beautiful B-physics results and more are expected to come with the next run, while the B-physics experiments at DESY, SLAC and KEK are starting their operation. The longer-term projects at LHC and Tevatron have taken their shape and detailed prototyping work is going on. Meanwhile, on the phenomenological side, there has been impressive theoretical progress in understanding deeper the 'standard' measurements and proposing new signatures. In this summary, I will highlight the status of the field as presented in the conference, concentrating on signatures, experiments and R and D programmes

  20. Bioenergy 93 conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In this report the presentations given in the Bioenergy 93 Conference are published. The papers are grouped as follows: Opening addresses, biomass implementation strategies, nordic bioenergy research programs, production, handling and conversion of biofuels, combustion technology of biofuels and bioenergy visions

  1. Leader Training Conference Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan-Ohio Regional Educational Lab., Inc., Detroit.

    The purpose of this conference was to prepare key people in the field of education to function as inservice education leaders in their respective settings. It called for participants to learn what the MOREL inservice education program is and what it hopes to accomplish, to identify the role and functions of the inservice education leader, and to…

  2. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, Evan [American Institute of Chemical Engineers

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  3. Vienna wirechamber conference 98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This volume of the Vienna wirechamber conference 1998 contains abstracts of lectures and abstracts of poster sessions of the following topics: high energy physics, gaseous detectors, radiation detectors, calorimetry, drift chambers, wire spark chambers, tracking chambers, neutron detectors, particle detection, muon spectrometry, nuclear medicine. (Suda)

  4. CONFERENCE: Quark matter 88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Maurice

    1988-01-01

    The 'Quark Matter' Conference caters for physicists studying nuclear matter under extreme conditions. The hope is that relativistic (high energy) heavy ion collisions allow formation of the long-awaited quark-gluon plasma, where the inter-quark 'colour' force is no longer confined inside nucleon-like dimensions

  5. Transactions: student conference, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Papers presented at this conference covered the topics of CANDU reactor physics, control systems and steam generators; imaging in neutron radiography; cooling systems for a SLOWPOKE reactor; accelerator breeders; the investigation of point defects using positrons; neutron and gamma detectors; fusion reaction kinetics; and heavy ion fusion

  6. International waste management conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the international waste management conference. Topics covered include: Quality assurance in the OCR WM program; Leading the spirit of quality; Dept. of Energy hazardous waste remedial actions program; management of hazardous waste projects; and System management and quality assurance

  7. Microbicides 2006 conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGowan Ian

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Current HIV/AIDS statistics show that women account for almost 60% of HIV infections in Sub-Saharan Africa. HIV prevention tools such as male and female condoms, abstinence and monogamy are not always feasible options for women due to various socio-economic and cultural factors. Microbicides are products designed to be inserted in the vagina or rectum prior to sex to prevent HIV acquisition. The biannual Microbicides conference took place in Cape Town, South Africa from 23–26 April 2006. The conference was held for the first time on the African continent, the region worst affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The conference brought together a record number of 1,300 scientists, researchers, policy makers, healthcare workers, communities and advocates. The conference provided an opportunity for an update on microbicide research and development as well as discussions around key issues such as ethics, acceptability, access and community involvement. This report discusses the current status of microbicide research and development, encompassing basic and clinical science, social and behavioural science, and community mobilisation and advocacy activities.

  8. Hamburg Accelerator Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Edmund J.N.

    1992-01-01

    From 20-24 July, Hamburg welcomed the Fifteenth International Conference on High Energy Accelerators (HEACC). A natural highlight was the recent commissioning success of the HERA electron-proton collider at Hamburg's DESY Laboratory and its first high energy electron-proton collision data. This gave the meeting the feel of a family event celebrating a newborn

  9. Grammar! A Conference Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Lid, Ed.; Boaks, Peter, Ed.

    Papers from a conference on the teaching of grammar, particularly in second language instruction, include: "Grammar: Acquisition and Use" (Richard Johnstone); "Grammar and Communication" (Brian Page); "Linguistic Progression and Increasing Independence" (Bernardette Holmes); "La grammaire? C'est du bricolage!" ("Grammar? That's Hardware!") (Barry…

  10. Wire chamber conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartl, W.; Neuhofer, G.; Regler, M.

    1986-02-01

    This booklet contains program and the abstracts of the papers presented at the conference, most of them dealing with performance testing of various types of wire chambers. The publication of proceedings is planned as a special issue of 'Nuclear instruments and methods' later on. All abstracts are in English. An author index for the book of abstracts is given. (A.N.)

  11. Santa Fe Linac Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The 1981 Linear Accelerator Conference, organized by Los Alamos National Laboratory, was held from 19-23 October in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The surroundings were superb and helped to ensure a successful meeting. There were more than two hundred and twenty participants, with good representation from Japan and Western Europe

  12. EGEE helping bridge digital divide EGEE'06 Conference preview

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "In this GRIDtoday Q&A, EGEE project director Bob Jones discusses where EGEEE began and where it is now as the project enters the EGEE II era. In addition, Jones previews the EGEE'06 conference, which kicks off Sept. 25 in Geneva, Switzerland, and features for the first time a prominent businee track." (2 pages)

  13. 7 CFR 1.140 - Conferences and procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conferences and procedure. 1.140 Section 1.140 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Rules of Practice Governing...) An outline of the case or defense; (ii) The legal theories upon which the party will rely; (iii...

  14. 1987 Oak Ridge model conference: Proceedings: Volume 2, Environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    See the abstract for Volume I for general information on the conference. Topics discussed in Volume II include data management techiques for environmental protection efforts, the use of models in environmental auditing, in emergency plans, chemical accident emergency response, risk assessment, monitoring of waste sites, air and water monitoring of waste sites, and in training programs

  15. Student Scientific Conference - Nuclear Physics, 2006. Proceedings of contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    The conference included the following sections: (i) Applied mathematics; (ii) Didactics; (iii) Experimental physics and biophysics; (iv) Nuclear physics; (v) Theoretical physics, astronomy, meteorology and Earth physics; (vi) Mathematics; (vii) Theoretical informatics. Contributions of nuclear physics have been inputted to INIS.

  16. 2. International conference on nuclear technologies of XXI centuries. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakushev, A.P.

    2010-01-01

    The collection contains abstracts of the II International conference 'Nuclear technologies of the XXI century' on energy problems in the world, the prospects for nuclear power plant in Belarus, the various technological, technical and economic aspects of nuclear safety of NPP and nuclear reactions and international cooperation. The materials published in electronic form.

  17. 1987 Oak Ridge model conference: Proceedings: Volume 2, Environmental protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    See the abstract for Volume I for general information on the conference. Topics discussed in Volume II include data management techiques for environmental protection efforts, the use of models in environmental auditing, in emergency plans, chemical accident emergency response, risk assessment, monitoring of waste sites, air and water monitoring of waste sites, and in training programs. (TEM)

  18. Indico CONFERENCE: Define the Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Ferreira, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    In this tutorial you are going to learn how to define the programme of a conference in Indico. The program of your conference is divided in different “tracks”. Tracks represent the subject matter of the conference, such as “Online Computing”, “Offline Computing”, and so on.

  19. Practical lesson of Photosynthesis: A demonstration of Hill reaction in chloroplasts with energy dissipation by fluorescence upon photosystems uncoupling or inhibition by Diuron herbicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Ravara Viviani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During photosynthesis, the photochemical electron transfer process is easily demonstrated by the Hill reaction, where artificial electron acceptors are reduced by active chloroplasts suspensions in the presence of light.  However, the destiny of luminous energy absorbed by chlorophyll molecules in uncoupled or damaged photosystems is not usually demonstrated. Here we provide an adaptation of the classical Hill reaction using intact spinach chloroplasts, which includes the visualization of energy dissipation by fluorescence in lysed chloroplasts, and a dose/effect response in photosystems inhibited by the herbicide DCMU. This laboratory lesson, which is aimed to biochemistry and biophysics for undergraduate courses of Chemistry, Biological, Environmental and Agricultural Sciences, provides the basic photochemical principles using the classical Hill reaction, and photophysical principles through the visualization of energy dissipation by chlorophyll fluorescence,  improving the understanding of the photosynthetic process, and introducing the concept of fluorescence and its applications as bioanalytical tool to monitor photosynthesis in plants and vegetal ecosystems.

  20. Conference summaries. Canadian Nuclear Association 29. annual conference; Canadian Nuclear Society 10. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 papers from the twenty-ninth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. Abstracts were also prepared for the 102 papers from the tenth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society