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Sample records for photosynthetic electron-transfer chain

  1. Electrochemical studies of a reconstituted photosynthetic electron-transfer chain or towards a biomimetic photoproduction of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourmond, V.

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this work is to find an efficient process to convert solar energy into hydrogen. The electrons transfers in reconstituted photosynthetic chains have been particularly studied with the aims 1)in one hand, to better understand the interactions of the different molecules of the photosynthetic chain in order to optimize the changes of the entire organisms for hydrogen production 2)in another hand, to insert the hydrogenases in a photosynthetic chain and then to photo reduce them in order to obtain kinetic data to better understand how it works. (O.M.)

  2. Electrochemical studies of a reconstituted photosynthetic electron-transfer chain or towards a biomimetic photoproduction of hydrogen; Etudes electrochimiques de chaines de transfert d'electrons photosynthetiques ou vers une photoproduction biomimetique d'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourmond, V

    2007-04-15

    The aim of this work is to find an efficient process to convert solar energy into hydrogen. The electrons transfers in reconstituted photosynthetic chains have been particularly studied with the aims 1)in one hand, to better understand the interactions of the different molecules of the photosynthetic chain in order to optimize the changes of the entire organisms for hydrogen production 2)in another hand, to insert the hydrogenases in a photosynthetic chain and then to photo reduce them in order to obtain kinetic data to better understand how it works. (O.M.)

  3. Specific Interaction between Redox Phospholipid Polymers and Plastoquinone in Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenya; Kaneko, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Masahito; Kato, Souichiro; Ito, Hidehiro; Kamachi, Toshiaki; Kamiya, Kazuhide; Nakanishi, Shuji

    2017-04-19

    Redox phospholipid polymers added in culture media are known to be capable of extracting electrons from living photosynthetic cells across bacterial cell membranes with high cytocompatibility. In the present study, we identify the intracellular redox species that transfers electrons to the polymers. The open-circuit electrochemical potential of an electrolyte containing the redox polymer and extracted thylakoid membranes shift to positive (or negative) under light irradiation, when an electron transport inhibitor specific to plastoquinone is added upstream (or downstream) in the photosynthetic electron transport chain. The same trend is also observed for a medium containing living photosynthetic cells of Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. These results clearly indicate that the phospholipid redox polymers extract photosynthetic electrons mainly from plastoquinone. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Functional size of photosynthetic electron transport chain determined by radiation inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, R.S.; Chen, L.F.; Wang, M.Y.; Tsal, M.Y.; Pan, R.L.; Hsu, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation inactivation technique was employed to determine the functional size of photosynthetic electron transport chain of spinach chloroplasts. The functional size for photosystem I+II(H 2 O to methylviologen) was 623 +/- 37 kilodaltons; for photosystem II (H 2 O to dimethylquinone/ferricyanide), 174 +/- 11 kilodaltons; and for photosystem I (reduced diaminodurene to methylviologen), 190 +/- 11 kilodaltons. The difference between 364 +/- 22 (the sum of 174 +/- 11 and 190 +/- 11) kilodaltons and 623 +/- 37 kilodaltons is partially explained to be due to the presence of two molecules of cytochrome b 6 /f complex of 280 kilodaltons. The molecular mass for other partial reactions of photosynthetic electron flow, also measured by radiation inactivation, is reported. The molecular mass obtained by this technique is compared with that determined by other conventional biochemical methods. A working hypothesis for the composition, stoichiometry, and organization of polypeptides for photosynthetic electron transport chain is proposed

  5. The Impacts of Phosphorus Deficiency on the Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, Andreas; Herdean, Andrei; Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Sharma, Anurag; Spetea, Cornelia; Pribil, Mathias; Husted, Søren

    2018-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient, and P deficiency limits plant productivity. Recent work showed that P deficiency affects electron transport to photosystem I (PSI), but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we present a comprehensive biological model describing how P deficiency disrupts the photosynthetic machinery and the electron transport chain through a series of sequential events in barley ( Hordeum vulgare ). P deficiency reduces the orthophosphate concentration in the chloroplast stroma to levels that inhibit ATP synthase activity. Consequently, protons accumulate in the thylakoids and cause lumen acidification, which inhibits linear electron flow. Limited plastoquinol oxidation retards electron transport to the cytochrome b 6 f complex, yet the electron transfer rate of PSI is increased under steady-state growth light and is limited under high-light conditions. Under P deficiency, the enhanced electron flow through PSI increases the levels of NADPH, whereas ATP production remains restricted and, hence, reduces CO 2 fixation. In parallel, lumen acidification activates the energy-dependent quenching component of the nonphotochemical quenching mechanism and prevents the overexcitation of photosystem II and damage to the leaf tissue. Consequently, plants can be severely affected by P deficiency for weeks without displaying any visual leaf symptoms. All of the processes in the photosynthetic machinery influenced by P deficiency appear to be fully reversible and can be restored in less than 60 min after resupply of orthophosphate to the leaf tissue. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Elucidating the design principles of photosynthetic electron-transfer proteins by site-directed spin labeling EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishara Silva, K; Jagannathan, Bharat; Golbeck, John H; Lakshmi, K V

    2016-05-01

    Site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool to determine solvent accessibility, side-chain dynamics, and inter-spin distances at specific sites in biological macromolecules. This information provides important insights into the structure and dynamics of both natural and designed proteins and protein complexes. Here, we discuss the application of SDSL EPR spectroscopy in probing the charge-transfer cofactors in photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) such as photosystem I (PSI) and the bacterial reaction center (bRC). Photosynthetic RCs are large multi-subunit proteins (molecular weight≥300 kDa) that perform light-driven charge transfer reactions in photosynthesis. These reactions are carried out by cofactors that are paramagnetic in one of their oxidation states. This renders the RCs unsuitable for conventional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy investigations. However, the presence of native paramagnetic centers and the ability to covalently attach site-directed spin labels in RCs makes them ideally suited for the application of SDSL EPR spectroscopy. The paramagnetic centers serve as probes of conformational changes, dynamics of subunit assembly, and the relative motion of cofactors and peptide subunits. In this review, we describe novel applications of SDSL EPR spectroscopy for elucidating the effects of local structure and dynamics on the electron-transfer cofactors of photosynthetic RCs. Because SDSL EPR Spectroscopy is uniquely suited to provide dynamic information on protein motion, it is a particularly useful method in the engineering and analysis of designed electron transfer proteins and protein networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. VU-B radiation inhibits the photosynthetic electron transport chain in chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, W.; Li, X.; Chen, L.

    2016-01-01

    UV radiation of sunlight is one of harmful factors for earth organisms, especially for photoautotrophs because they require light for energy and biomass production. A number of works have already been done regarding the effects of UV-B radiation at biochemical and molecular level, which showed that UV-B radiation could inhibit photosynthesis activity and reduce photosynthetic electron transport. However quite limited information can accurately make out inhibition site of UV-B radiation on photosynthetic electron transport. In this study, this issue was investigated through measuring oxygen evolution activity, chlorophyll a fluorescence and gene expression in a model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Our results indicated that UV-B radiation could evidently decrease photosynthesis activity and inhibit electron transport by blocking electron transfer process from the first plastoquinone electron acceptors QA to second plastoquinone electron acceptors QB, but not impair electron transfer from the water oxidizing complex to QA. The psbA gene expression was also altered by UV-B radiation, where up-regulation occurred at 2, 4 and 6h after exposure and down-regulation happened at 12 and 24 h after exposure. These results suggested that UV-B could affects D1 protein normal turnover, so there was not enough D1 for binding with QB, which may affect photosynthetic electron transport and photosynthesis activity. (author)

  8. The Impacts of Phosphorus Deficiency on the Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient, and P deficiency limits plant productivity. Recent work showed that P deficiency affects electron transport to photosystem I (PSI), but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we present a comprehensive biological model describing how P deficiency disrupts the photosynthetic machinery and the electron transport chain through a series of sequential events in barley (Hordeum vulgare). P deficiency reduces the orthophosphate concentration in the chloroplast stroma to levels that inhibit ATP synthase activity. Consequently, protons accumulate in the thylakoids and cause lumen acidification, which inhibits linear electron flow. Limited plastoquinol oxidation retards electron transport to the cytochrome b6f complex, yet the electron transfer rate of PSI is increased under steady-state growth light and is limited under high-light conditions. Under P deficiency, the enhanced electron flow through PSI increases the levels of NADPH, whereas ATP production remains restricted and, hence, reduces CO2 fixation. In parallel, lumen acidification activates the energy-dependent quenching component of the nonphotochemical quenching mechanism and prevents the overexcitation of photosystem II and damage to the leaf tissue. Consequently, plants can be severely affected by P deficiency for weeks without displaying any visual leaf symptoms. All of the processes in the photosynthetic machinery influenced by P deficiency appear to be fully reversible and can be restored in less than 60 min after resupply of orthophosphate to the leaf tissue. PMID:29540590

  9. Hydrogen production by using Rhodobacter capsulatus mutants with genetically modified electron transfer chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OEztuerk, Yavuz; Yuecel, Meral; Guenduez, Ufuk [Department of Biology, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Daldal, Fevzi [Department of Biology, Plant Science Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6018 (United States); Mandaci, Sevnur [TUEBITAK Research Institute for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Gebze Kocaeli 41470 (Turkey); Tuerker, Lemi [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Eroglu, Inci [Department of Chemical Engineering, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2006-09-15

    In Rhodobacter capsulatus excess reducing equivalents generated by organic acid oxidation is consumed to reduce protons into hydrogen by the activity of nitrogenase. Nitrogenase serves as a redox-balancing tool and is activated by the RegB/RegA global regulatory system during photosynthetic growth. The terminal cytochrome cbb{sub 3} oxidase and the redox state of the cyclic photosynthetic electron transfer chain serve redox signaling to the RegB/RegA regulatory systems in Rhodobacter. In this study, hydrogen production of various R. capsulatus strains harboring the genetically modified electron carrier cytochromes or lacking the cyt cbb{sub 3} oxidase or the quinol oxidase were compared with the wild type. The results indicated that hydrogen production of mutant strains with modified electron carrier cytochromes decreased 3- to 4-fold, but the rate of hydrogen production increased significantly in a cbb{sub 3}{sup -} mutant. Moreover, hydrogen production efficiency of various R. capsulatus strains further increased by inactivation of uptake hydrogenase genes. (author)

  10. In silico analysis of the regulation of the photosynthetic electron transport chain in C3 plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales Sierra, A.; Yin, Xinyou; Harbinson, Jeremy; Driever, Steven Michiel; Molenaar, Jaap; Kramer, David M.; Struik, Paul

    2018-01-01

    We present a new simulation model of the reactions in the photosynthetic electron transport chain of C3 species. We show that including recent insights about the regulation of the thylakoid proton motive force, ATP/NADPH balancing mechanisms (cyclic and non-cyclic alternative electron transport),

  11. The sporulation of the green alga Ulva prolifera is controlled by changes in photosynthetic electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Lin, Apeng; Gu, Wenhui; Huan, Li; Gao, Shan; Wang, Guangce

    2016-04-22

    Sporulation and spore release are essential phases of the life cycle in algae and land plants. Ulva prolifera, which is an ideal organism for studying sporulation and spore release, was used as the experimental material in the present study. The determination of photosynthetic parameters, combined with microscopic observation, treatment with photosynthetic inhibitors, limitation of carbon acquisition, and protein mass spectrometry, was employed in this experiment. Cycle electron transport (CEF) was found enhanced at the onset of sporangia formation. The inhibition effect of dibromothymoquinone (DBMIB) towards sporulation was always strong during the sporulation process whereas the inhibition effect of 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) was continuously declined accompanied with the progress of sporulation. The changes of photosynthesis resulted from the limitation of CO2 acquisition could stimulate sporulation onset. Quantitative protein analysis showed that enzymes involved in carbon fixation, including RUBISCO and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase, declined during sporogenesis, while proteins involved in sporulation, including tubulin and centrin, increased. These results suggest that enhanced cyclic electron flow (CEF) and oxidation of the plastoquinone pool are essential for sporangia formation onset, and changes in photosynthetic electron transport chain have significant impacts on sporulation of the green algae.

  12. The Mechanisms of Oxygen Reduction in the Terminal Reducing Segment of the Chloroplast Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuleva, Marina A; Ivanov, Boris N

    2016-07-01

    The review is dedicated to ascertainment of the roles of the electron transfer cofactors of the pigment-protein complex of PSI, ferredoxin (Fd) and ferredoxin-NADP reductase in oxygen reduction in the photosynthetic electron transport chain (PETC) in the light. The data regarding oxygen reduction in other segments of the PETC are briefly analyzed, and it is concluded that their participation in the overall process in the PETC under unstressful conditions should be insignificant. Data concerning the contribution of Fd to the oxygen reduction in the PETC are examined. A set of collateral evidence as well as results of direct measurements of the involvement of Fd in this process in the presence of isolated thylakoids led to the inference that this contribution in vivo is negligible. The increase in oxygen reduction rate in the isolated thylakoids in the presence of either Fd or Fd plus NADP + under increasing light intensity was attributed to the increase in oxygen reduction executed by the membrane-bound oxygen reductants. Data are presented which imply that a main reductant of the O 2 molecule in the terminal reducing segment of the PETC is the electron transfer cofactor of PSI, phylloquinone. The physiological significance of characteristic properties of oxygen reductants in this segment of the PETC is discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Photosynthetic control of electron transport and the regulation of gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foyer, C.H.; Neukermans, J.; Queval, G.; Noctor, G.; Harbinson, J.

    2012-01-01

    The term ‘photosynthetic control’ describes the short- and long-term mechanisms that regulate reactions in the photosynthetic electron transport (PET) chain so that the rate of production of ATP and NADPH is coordinated with the rate of their utilization in metabolism. At low irradiances these

  14. Photosynthetic control of electron transport and the regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Neukermans, Jenny; Queval, Guillaume; Noctor, Graham; Harbinson, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    The term 'photosynthetic control' describes the short- and long-term mechanisms that regulate reactions in the photosynthetic electron transport (PET) chain so that the rate of production of ATP and NADPH is coordinated with the rate of their utilization in metabolism. At low irradiances these mechanisms serve to optimize light use efficiency, while at high irradiances they operate to dissipate excess excitation energy as heat. Similarly, the production of ATP and NADPH in ratios tailored to meet demand is finely tuned by a sophisticated series of controls that prevents the accumulation of high NAD(P)H/NAD(P) ratios and ATP/ADP ratios that would lead to potentially harmful over-reduction and inactivation of PET chain components. In recent years, photosynthetic control has also been extrapolated to the regulation of gene expression because mechanisms that are identical or similar to those that serve to regulate electron flow through the PET chain also coordinate the regulated expression of genes encoding photosynthetic proteins. This requires coordinated gene expression in the chloroplasts, mitochondria, and nuclei, involving complex networks of forward and retrograde signalling pathways. Photosynthetic control operates to control photosynthetic gene expression in response to environmental and metabolic changes. Mining literature data on transcriptome profiles of C(3) and C(4) leaves from plants grown under high atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) levels compared with those grown with ambient CO(2) reveals that the transition to higher photorespiratory conditions in C(3) plants enhances the expression of genes associated with cyclic electron flow pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana, consistent with the higher ATP requirement (relative to NADPH) of photorespiration.

  15. In Silico Analysis of the Regulation of the Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain in C3 Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Alejandro; Yin, Xinyou; Harbinson, Jeremy; Driever, Steven M; Molenaar, Jaap; Kramer, David M; Struik, Paul C

    2018-02-01

    We present a new simulation model of the reactions in the photosynthetic electron transport chain of C3 species. We show that including recent insights about the regulation of the thylakoid proton motive force, ATP/NADPH balancing mechanisms (cyclic and noncyclic alternative electron transport), and regulation of Rubisco activity leads to emergent behaviors that may affect the operation and regulation of photosynthesis under different dynamic environmental conditions. The model was parameterized with experimental results in the literature, with a focus on Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ). A dataset was constructed from multiple sources, including measurements of steady-state and dynamic gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and absorbance spectroscopy under different light intensities and CO 2 , to test predictions of the model under different experimental conditions. Simulations suggested that there are strong interactions between cyclic and noncyclic alternative electron transport and that an excess capacity for alternative electron transport is required to ensure adequate redox state and lumen pH. Furthermore, the model predicted that, under specific conditions, reduction of ferredoxin by plastoquinol is possible after a rapid increase in light intensity. Further analysis also revealed that the relationship between ATP synthesis and proton motive force was highly regulated by the concentrations of ATP, ADP, and inorganic phosphate, and this facilitated an increase in nonphotochemical quenching and proton motive force under conditions where metabolism was limiting, such as low CO 2 , high light intensity, or combined high CO 2 and high light intensity. The model may be used as an in silico platform for future research on the regulation of photosynthetic electron transport. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Toward understanding as photosynthetic biosignatures: light harvesting and energy transfer calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Y.; Umemura, M.; Shoji, M.; Shiraishi, K.; Kayanuma, M.; Yabana, K.

    2014-03-01

    Among several proposed biosignatures, red edge is a direct evidence of photosynthetic life if it is detected (Kiang et al 2007). Red edge is a sharp change in reflectance spectra of vegetation in NIR region (about 700-750 nm). The sign of red edge is observed by Earthshine or remote sensing (Wolstencroft & Raven 2002, Woolf et al 2002). But, why around 700-750 nm? The photosynthetic organisms on Earth have evolved to optimize the sunlight condition. However, if we consider about photosynthetic organism on extrasolar planets, they should have developed to utilize the spectra of its principal star. Thus, it is not strange even if it shows different vegetation spectra. In this study, we focused on the light absorption mechanism of photosynthetic organisms on Earth and investigated the fundamental properties of the light harvesting mechanisms, which is the first stage for the light absorption. Light harvesting complexes contain photosynthetic pigments like chlorophylls. Effective light absorption and the energy transfer are accomplished by the electronic excitations of collective photosynthetic pigments. In order to investigate this mechanism, we constructed an energy transfer model by using a dipole-dipole approximation for the interactions between electronic excitations. Transition moments and transition energies of each pigment are calculated at the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) level (Marques & Gross 2004). Quantum dynamics simulation for the excitation energy transfer was calculated by the Liouvelle's equation. We adopted the model to purple bacteria, which has been studied experimentally and known to absorb lower energy. It is meaningful to focus on the mechanism of this bacteria, since in the future mission, M planets will become a important target. We calculated the oscillator strengths in one light harvesting complex and confirmed the validity by comparing to the experimental data. This complex is made of an inner and an outer ring. The

  17. In Silico Analysis of the Regulation of the Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain in C3 Plants1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David M.

    2018-01-01

    We present a new simulation model of the reactions in the photosynthetic electron transport chain of C3 species. We show that including recent insights about the regulation of the thylakoid proton motive force, ATP/NADPH balancing mechanisms (cyclic and noncyclic alternative electron transport), and regulation of Rubisco activity leads to emergent behaviors that may affect the operation and regulation of photosynthesis under different dynamic environmental conditions. The model was parameterized with experimental results in the literature, with a focus on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). A dataset was constructed from multiple sources, including measurements of steady-state and dynamic gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and absorbance spectroscopy under different light intensities and CO2, to test predictions of the model under different experimental conditions. Simulations suggested that there are strong interactions between cyclic and noncyclic alternative electron transport and that an excess capacity for alternative electron transport is required to ensure adequate redox state and lumen pH. Furthermore, the model predicted that, under specific conditions, reduction of ferredoxin by plastoquinol is possible after a rapid increase in light intensity. Further analysis also revealed that the relationship between ATP synthesis and proton motive force was highly regulated by the concentrations of ATP, ADP, and inorganic phosphate, and this facilitated an increase in nonphotochemical quenching and proton motive force under conditions where metabolism was limiting, such as low CO2, high light intensity, or combined high CO2 and high light intensity. The model may be used as an in silico platform for future research on the regulation of photosynthetic electron transport. PMID:28924017

  18. Alternative oxidase: a respiratory electron transport chain pathway essential for maintaining photosynthetic performance during drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlerberghe, Greg C; Martyn, Greg D; Dahal, Keshav

    2016-07-01

    Photosynthesis and respiration are the hubs of energy metabolism in plants. Drought strongly perturbs photosynthesis as a result of both diffusive limitations resulting from stomatal closure, and in some cases biochemical limitations that are associated with a reduced abundance of key photosynthetic components. The effects of drought on respiration, particularly respiration in the light (RL ), are less understood. The plant mitochondrial electron transport chain includes a non-energy conserving terminal oxidase called alternative oxidase (AOX). Several studies have shown that drought increases AOX transcript, protein and maximum capacity. Here we review recent studies comparing wild-type (WT) tobacco to transgenic lines with altered AOX protein amount. Specifically during drought, RL was compromised in AOX knockdown plants and enhanced in AOX overexpression plants, compared with WT. Significantly, these differences in RL were accompanied by dramatic differences in photosynthetic performance. Knockdown of AOX increased the susceptibility of photosynthesis to drought-induced biochemical limitations, while overexpression of AOX delayed the development of such biochemical limitations, compared with WT. Overall, the results indicate that AOX is essential to maintaining RL during drought, and that this non-energy conserving respiration maintains photosynthesis during drought by promoting energy balance in the chloroplast. This review also outlines several areas for future research, including the possibility that enhancement of non-energy conserving respiratory electron sinks may be a useful biotechnological approach to increase plant performance during stress. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  19. Long-distance photoinitiated electron transfer through polyene molecular wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Johnson, D.G.; Svec, W.A.; Kersey, K.M.; Cragg, D.E.; Minsek, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    Long-chain polyenes can be used as molecular wires to facilitate electron transfer between a photo-excited donor and an acceptor in an artificial photosynthetic system. The authors present data here on two Zn-porphyrin-polyene-anthraquinone molecules possessing either 5 or 9 all trans double bonds between the donor and acceptor, 1 and 2. The center-to-center distances between the porphyrin and the quinone in these relatively rigid molecules are 25 angstrom for 1 and 35 angstrom for 2. Selective picosecond laser excitation of the Zn-porphyrin and 1 and 2 results in the very rapid transfer of an electron to the anthraquinone in <2 ps and 10 ps, respectively. The resultant radical ion pairs recombine with τ = 10 ps for 1 and τ = 25 ps for 2. The electron transfer rates remain remarkably rapid over these long distances. The involvement of polyene radical cations in the mechanism of the radical ion pair recombination reaction is clear from the transient absorption spectra of 1 and 2, which show strong absorbances in the near-infrared. The strong electronic coupling between the Zn-porphyrin n the anthraquinone provided by low-lying states of the polyene make it possible to transfer an electron rapidly over very long distances

  20. Communication: Coherences observed in vivo in photosynthetic bacteria using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlberg, Peter D.; Norris, Graham J.; Wang, Cheng; Viswanathan, Subha; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Energy transfer through large disordered antenna networks in photosynthetic organisms can occur with a quantum efficiency of nearly 100%. This energy transfer is facilitated by the electronic structure of the photosynthetic antennae as well as interactions between electronic states and the surrounding environment. Coherences in time-domain spectroscopy provide a fine probe of how a system interacts with its surroundings. In two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, coherences can appear on both the ground and excited state surfaces revealing detailed information regarding electronic structure, system-bath coupling, energy transfer, and energetic coupling in complex chemical systems. Numerous studies have revealed coherences in isolated photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, but these coherences have not been observed in vivo due to the small amplitude of these signals and the intense scatter from whole cells. Here, we present data acquired using ultrafast video-acquisition gradient-assisted photon echo spectroscopy to observe quantum beating signals from coherences in vivo. Experiments were conducted on isolated light harvesting complex II (LH2) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, whole cells of R. sphaeroides, and whole cells of R. sphaeroides grown in 30% deuterated media. A vibronic coherence was observed following laser excitation at ambient temperature between the B850 and the B850 ∗ states of LH2 in each of the 3 samples with a lifetime of ∼40-60 fs

  1. Communication: Coherences observed in vivo in photosynthetic bacteria using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlberg, Peter D. [Graduate Program in the Biophysical Sciences, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Norris, Graham J.; Wang, Cheng; Viswanathan, Subha; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S., E-mail: gsengel@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-09-14

    Energy transfer through large disordered antenna networks in photosynthetic organisms can occur with a quantum efficiency of nearly 100%. This energy transfer is facilitated by the electronic structure of the photosynthetic antennae as well as interactions between electronic states and the surrounding environment. Coherences in time-domain spectroscopy provide a fine probe of how a system interacts with its surroundings. In two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, coherences can appear on both the ground and excited state surfaces revealing detailed information regarding electronic structure, system-bath coupling, energy transfer, and energetic coupling in complex chemical systems. Numerous studies have revealed coherences in isolated photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, but these coherences have not been observed in vivo due to the small amplitude of these signals and the intense scatter from whole cells. Here, we present data acquired using ultrafast video-acquisition gradient-assisted photon echo spectroscopy to observe quantum beating signals from coherences in vivo. Experiments were conducted on isolated light harvesting complex II (LH2) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, whole cells of R. sphaeroides, and whole cells of R. sphaeroides grown in 30% deuterated media. A vibronic coherence was observed following laser excitation at ambient temperature between the B850 and the B850{sup ∗} states of LH2 in each of the 3 samples with a lifetime of ∼40-60 fs.

  2. Photosynthetic fuel for heterologous enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Nielsen, Agnieszka Janina Zygadlo

    2017-01-01

    of reducing power. Recent work on the metabolic engineering of photosynthetic organisms has shown that the electron carriers such as ferredoxin and flavodoxin can be used to couple heterologous enzymes to photosynthetic reducing power. Because these proteins have a plethora of interaction partners and rely...... on electrostatically steered complex formation, they form productive electron transfer complexes with non-native enzymes. A handful of examples demonstrate channeling of photosynthetic electrons to drive the activity of heterologous enzymes, and these focus mainly on hydrogenases and cytochrome P450s. However......, competition from native pathways and inefficient electron transfer rates present major obstacles, which limit the productivity of heterologous reactions coupled to photosynthesis. We discuss specific approaches to address these bottlenecks and ensure high productivity of such enzymes in a photosynthetic...

  3. Computation studies into architecture and energy transfer properties of photosynthetic units from filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linnanto, Juha Matti [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Freiberg, Arvi [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu, Estonia and Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Tartu, Riia 23, 51010 Tartu (Estonia)

    2014-10-06

    We have used different computational methods to study structural architecture, and light-harvesting and energy transfer properties of the photosynthetic unit of filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs. Due to the huge number of atoms in the photosynthetic unit, a combination of atomistic and coarse methods was used for electronic structure calculations. The calculations reveal that the light energy absorbed by the peripheral chlorosome antenna complex transfers efficiently via the baseplate and the core B808–866 antenna complexes to the reaction center complex, in general agreement with the present understanding of this complex system.

  4. Energy transfer dynamics in an RC-LH1-PufX tubular photosynthetic membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsin, J; Sener, M; Schulten, K; Struempfer, J; Qian, P; Hunter, C N

    2010-01-01

    Light absorption and the subsequent transfer of excitation energy are the first two steps in the photosynthetic process, carried out by protein-bound pigments, mainly bacteriochlorophylls (BChls), in photosynthetic bacteria. BChls are anchored in light-harvesting (LH) complexes, such as light-harvesting complex I (LH1), which directly associates with the reaction center (RC), forming the RC-LH1 core complex. In Rhodobacter sphaeroides, RC-LH1 core complexes contain an additional protein, PufX, and assemble into dimeric RC-LH1-PufX core complexes. In the absence of LH complex II (LH2), the former complexes can aggregate into a helically ordered tubular photosynthetic membrane. We have examined the excitation transfer dynamics in a single RC-LH1-PufX core complex dimer using the hierarchical equations of motion for dissipative quantum dynamics that accurately, yet in a computationally costly manner, treat the coupling between BChls and their protein environment. A widely employed description, the generalized Foerster (GF) theory, was also used to calculate the transfer rates of the same excitonic system in order to verify the accuracy of this computationally cheap method. Additionally, in light of the structural uncertainties in the Rba. sphaeroides RC-LH1-PufX core complex, geometrical alterations were introduced into the BChl organization. It is shown that the energy transfer dynamics are not affected by the considered changes in the BChl organization and that the GF theory provides accurate transfer rates. An all-atom model for a tubular photosynthetic membrane is then constructed on the basis of electron microscopy data, and the overall energy transfer properties of this membrane are computed.

  5. Energy transfer dynamics in an RC-LH1-PufX tubular photosynthetic membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsin, J; Sener, M; Schulten, K [Department of Physics and Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States); Struempfer, J [Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology and Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States); Qian, P; Hunter, C N, E-mail: kschulte@ks.uiuc.ed [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    Light absorption and the subsequent transfer of excitation energy are the first two steps in the photosynthetic process, carried out by protein-bound pigments, mainly bacteriochlorophylls (BChls), in photosynthetic bacteria. BChls are anchored in light-harvesting (LH) complexes, such as light-harvesting complex I (LH1), which directly associates with the reaction center (RC), forming the RC-LH1 core complex. In Rhodobacter sphaeroides, RC-LH1 core complexes contain an additional protein, PufX, and assemble into dimeric RC-LH1-PufX core complexes. In the absence of LH complex II (LH2), the former complexes can aggregate into a helically ordered tubular photosynthetic membrane. We have examined the excitation transfer dynamics in a single RC-LH1-PufX core complex dimer using the hierarchical equations of motion for dissipative quantum dynamics that accurately, yet in a computationally costly manner, treat the coupling between BChls and their protein environment. A widely employed description, the generalized Foerster (GF) theory, was also used to calculate the transfer rates of the same excitonic system in order to verify the accuracy of this computationally cheap method. Additionally, in light of the structural uncertainties in the Rba. sphaeroides RC-LH1-PufX core complex, geometrical alterations were introduced into the BChl organization. It is shown that the energy transfer dynamics are not affected by the considered changes in the BChl organization and that the GF theory provides accurate transfer rates. An all-atom model for a tubular photosynthetic membrane is then constructed on the basis of electron microscopy data, and the overall energy transfer properties of this membrane are computed.

  6. Opinion: the red-light response of stomatal movement is sensed by the redox state of the photosynthetic electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Florian A

    2014-02-01

    Guard cells regulate CO2 uptake and water loss of a leaf by controlling stomatal movement in response to environmental factors such as CO2, humidity, and light. The mechanisms by which stomata respond to red light are actively debated in the literature, and even after decades of research it is still controversial whether stomatal movement is related to photosynthesis or not. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the red-light response of stomata. A comparison of published evidence suggests that stomatal movement is controlled by the redox state of photosynthetic electron transport chain components, in particular the redox state of plastoquinone. Potential consequences for the modeling of stomatal conductance are discussed.

  7. Geometric phase and quantum interference in photosynthetic reaction center: Regulation of electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yuming, E-mail: ymsun@ytu.edu.cn; Su, Yuehua; Dai, Zhenhong; Wang, WeiTian

    2016-10-20

    Photosynthesis is driven by electron transfer in reaction centers in which the functional unit is composed of several simple molecules C{sub 2}-symmetrically arranged into two branches. In view of quantum mechanism, both branches are possible pathways traversed by the transferred electron. Due to different evolution of spin state along two pathways in transmembrane electric potential (TEP), quantum state of the transferred electron at the bridged site acquires a geometric phase difference dependent on TEP, the most efficient electron transport takes place in a specific range of TEP beyond which electron transfer is dramatically suppressed. What’s more, reaction center acts like elaborately designed quantum device preparing polarized spin dependent on TEP for the transferred electron to regulate the reduction potential at bridged site. In brief, electron transfer generates the TEP, reversely, TEP modulates the efficiency of electron transfer. This may be an important approach to maintaining an appreciable pH environment in photosynthesis.

  8. Porphyrin and fullerene-based artificial photosynthetic materials for photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imahori, Hiroshi; Kashiwagi, Yukiyasu; Hasobe, Taku; Kimura, Makoto; Hanada, Takeshi; Nishimura, Yoshinobu; Yamazaki, Iwao; Araki, Yasuyuki; Ito, Osamu; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2004-01-01

    We have developed artificial photosynthetic systems in which porphyrins and fullerenes are self-assembled as building blocks into nanostructured molecular light-harvesting materials and photovoltaic devices. Multistep electron transfer strategy has been combined with our finding that porphyrin and fullerene systems have small reorganization energies, which are suitable for the construction of light energy conversion systems as well as artificial photosynthetic models. Highly efficient photosynthetic electron transfer reactions have been realized at ITO electrodes modified with self-assembled monolayers of porphyrin oligomers as well as porphyrin-fullerene linked systems. Porphyrin-modified gold nanoclusters have been found to have potential as artificial photosynthetic materials. These results provide basic information for the development of nanostructured artificial photosynthetic systems

  9. Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids. Progress report, September 1990--January 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouk, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    Basic thrust the research program involves use of microporous solids (zeolites, clays, layered and tunnel structure oxide semiconductors) as organizing media for artificial photosynthetic systems. Purpose of the microporous solid is twofold. First, it induces spatial organization of photoactive and electroactive components (sensitizers, semiconductor particles, electron relays, and catalysts) at the solid-solution interface, enhancing the quantum efficiency of charge separation and separating physically the ultimate electron donor and acceptor in the electron transport chain. Second, since the microcrystalline solid admits only molecules of a certain charge and size, it is possible to achieve permanent charge separation by sieving chemical photoproducts (e.g., H{sub 2} and I{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, or H{sub 2} and O{sub 2)} from each other. Spectroscopic and electrochemical methods are used to study the kinetics of electron transfer reactions in these hybrid molecular/solid state assemblies.

  10. Photosynthetic Energy Transfer at the Quantum/Classical Border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Nir; Paltiel, Yossi

    2018-06-01

    Quantum mechanics diverges from the classical description of our world when very small scales or very fast processes are involved. Unlike classical mechanics, quantum effects cannot be easily related to our everyday experience and are often counterintuitive to us. Nevertheless, the dimensions and time scales of the photosynthetic energy transfer processes puts them close to the quantum/classical border, bringing them into the range of measurable quantum effects. Here we review recent advances in the field and suggest that photosynthetic processes can take advantage of the sensitivity of quantum effects to the environmental 'noise' as means of tuning exciton energy transfer efficiency. If true, this design principle could be a base for 'nontrivial' coherent wave property nano-devices. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Respiratory processes in non-photosynthetic plastids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renato, Marta; Boronat, Albert; Azcón-Bieto, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Chlororespiration is a respiratory process located in chloroplast thylakoids which consists in an electron transport chain from NAD(P)H to oxygen. This respiratory chain involves the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex, the plastoquinone pool and the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX), and it probably acts as a safety valve to prevent the over-reduction of the photosynthetic machinery in stress conditions. The existence of a similar respiratory activity in non-photosynthetic plastids has been less studied. Recently, it has been reported that tomato fruit chromoplasts present an oxygen consumption activity linked to ATP synthesis. Etioplasts and amyloplasts contain several electron carriers and some subunits of the ATP synthase, so they could harbor a similar respiratory process. This review provides an update on the study about respiratory processes in chromoplasts, identifying the major gaps that need to be addressed in future research. It also reviews the proteomic data of etioplasts and amyloplasts, which suggest the presence of a respiratory electron transport chain in these plastids. PMID:26236317

  12. Respiratory processes in non-photosynthetic plastids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eRenato

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chlororespiration is a respiratory process located in chloroplast thylakoids which consists in an electron transport chain from NAD(PH to oxygen. This respiratory chain involves the NAD(PH dehydrogenase complex, the plastoquinone pool and the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX, and it probably acts as a safety valve to prevent the over-reduction of the photosynthetic machinery in stress conditions. The existence of a similar respiratory activity in non-photosynthetic plastids has been less studied. Recently, it has been reported that tomato fruit chromoplasts present an oxygen consumption activity linked to ATP synthesis. Etioplasts and amyloplasts contain several electron carriers and some subunits of the ATP synthase, so they could harbor a similar respiratory process. This review provides an update on the study about respiratory processes in chromoplasts, identifying the major gaps that need to be addressed in future research. It also reviews the proteomic data of etioplasts and amyloplasts, which suggest the presence of a respiratory electron transport chain in these plastids.

  13. Electron transfer and photophosphorylation in mitochondria of buckwheat after irradiation of seeds with. gamma. -rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guseva, V A; Kurganova, L N; Gorlanova, T M [Gor' kovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR)

    1974-11-01

    Pre-sowing irradiation of seeds at 500 R activates the transfer of electrons by photosynthetic electron transfer path of isolated buchwheat chloroplasts in the ontogenesis and stimulates the conjugated photosynthetic phosphorilation. An increased content of NADPxH/sub 2/ is observed along with an elevated level of ATP production. Intensification of oxidative phosphorilation and growth of the P/O ratio of mitochondria has been shown in the ''irradiated'' plants, together with a concomitant increase of ATPhase activity in chloroplasts and mitochondria.

  14. Modification of quinone electrochemistry by the proteins in the biological electron transfer chains: examples from photosynthetic reaction centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, M. R.; Madeo, Jennifer; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2009-01-01

    Quinones such as ubiquinone are the lipid soluble electron and proton carriers in the membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts and oxygenic bacteria. Quinones undergo controlled redox reactions bound to specific sites in integral membrane proteins such as the cytochrome bc1 oxidoreductase. The quinone reactions in bacterial photosynthesis are amongst the best characterized, presenting a model to understand how proteins modulate cofactor chemistry. The free energy of ubiquinone redox reactions in aqueous solution and in the QA and QB sites of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) are compared. In the primary QA site ubiquinone is reduced only to the anionic semiquinone (Q•−) while in the secondary QB site the product is the doubly reduced, doubly protonated quinol (QH2). The ways in which the protein modifies the relative energy of each reduced and protonated intermediate are described. For example, the protein stabilizes Q•− while destabilizing Q= relative to aqueous solution through electrostatic interactions. In addition, kinetic and thermodynamic mechanisms for stabilizing the intermediate semiquinones are compared. Evidence for the protein sequestering anionic compounds by slowing both on and off rates as well as by binding the anion more tightly is reviewed. PMID:18979192

  15. Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouk, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    Basic thrust the research program involves use of microporous solids (zeolites, clays, layered and tunnel structure oxide semiconductors) as organizing media for artificial photosynthetic systems. Purpose of the microporous solid is twofold. First, it induces spatial organization of photoactive and electroactive components (sensitizers, semiconductor particles, electron relays, and catalysts) at the solid-solution interface, enhancing the quantum efficiency of charge separation and separating physically the ultimate electron donor and acceptor in the electron transport chain. Second, since the microcrystalline solid admits only molecules of a certain charge and size, it is possible to achieve permanent charge separation by sieving chemical photoproducts (e.g., H[sub 2] and I[sub 3][sup [minus

  16. Hybrid system of semiconductor and photosynthetic protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Younghye; Shin, Seon Ae; Lee, Jaehun; Yang, Ki Dong; Nam, Ki Tae

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic protein has the potential to be a new attractive material for solar energy absorption and conversion. The development of semiconductor/photosynthetic protein hybrids is an example of recent progress toward efficient, clean and nanostructured photoelectric systems. In the review, two biohybrid systems interacting through different communicating methods are addressed: (1) a photosynthetic protein immobilized semiconductor electrode operating via electron transfer and (2) a hybrid of semiconductor quantum dots and photosynthetic protein operating via energy transfer. The proper selection of materials and functional and structural modification of the components and optimal conjugation between them are the main issues discussed in the review. In conclusion, we propose the direction of future biohybrid systems for solar energy conversion systems, optical biosensors and photoelectric devices. (topical reviews)

  17. Evaluation of the participation of ferredoxin in oxygen reduction in the photosynthetic electron transport chain of isolated pea thylakoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuleva, Marina A; Ivanov, Boris N

    2010-07-01

    The contribution to reduction of oxygen by ferredoxin (Fd) to the overall reduction of oxygen in isolated pea thylakoids was studied in the presence of Fd versus Fd + NADP(+). The overall rate of electron transport was measured using a determination of Photosystem II quantum yield from chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, and the rate of oxidation of Fd was measured from the light-induced redox changes of Fd. At low light intensity, increasing Fd concentration from 5 to 30 microM in the absence of NADP(+) increased the proportion of oxygen reduction by Fd from 25-35 to 40-60% in different experiments. This proportion decreased with increasing light intensity. When NADP(+) was added in the presence of 15 microM Fd, which was optimal for the NADP(+) reduction rate, the participation of Fd in the reduction of oxygen was low, no more than 10%, and it also decreased with increasing light intensity. At high light intensity, the overall oxygen reduction rates in the presence of Fd + NADP(+) and in the presence of Fd alone were comparable. The significance of reduction of dioxygen either by water-soluble Fd or by the membrane-bound carriers of the photosynthetic electron transport chain for redox signaling under different light intensities is discussed.

  18. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology - The Primary Events in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    transfers, occurs in a cascade in many biological processes, including photosynthesis. ... the model reactions of photosynthetic ... biological relevance. GENERAL I ARTICLE of electrons, respectively. This has entirely changed the earlier framework of interpreting reactions in chemistry and biology. This shift in emphasis ...

  19. The impacts of phosphorus deficiency on the photosynthetic electron transport chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Andreas; Herdean, Andrei; Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund

    2018-01-01

    light conditions. Under P deficiency, the enhanced electron flow through PSI increases the levels of NADPH, whereas ATP production remains restricted and hence reduces CO2 fixation. In parallel, lumen acidification activates the qE component of the non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) mechanism......Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient, and P deficiency limits plant productivity. Recent work showed that P deficiency affects electron transport to photosystem I (PSI), but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we present a comprehensive biological model describing how P deficiency...... accumulate in the thylakoids and cause lumen acidification, which inhibits linear electron flow. Limited plastoquinol (PQH2) oxidation retards electron transport to the cytochrome (Cyt) b6f complex, yet the electron transfer rate of PSI is increased under steady-state growth light and is limited under high...

  20. Energy transfer and clustering of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes in reconstituted lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewa, Takehisa; Sumino, Ayumi; Watanabe, Natsuko; Noji, Tomoyasu; Nango, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes were reconstituted into lipid membranes. ► Energy transfers between light-harvesting complexes were examined. ► Atomic force microscopy indicated cluster formation of light-harvesting complexes. ► Efficient energy transfer was observed for the clustered complexes in the membranes. - Abstract: In purple photosynthetic bacteria, light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) and light harvesting/reaction centre core complex (LH1-RC) play the key roles of capturing and transferring light energy and subsequent charge separation. These photosynthetic apparatuses form a supramolecular assembly; however, how the assembly influences the efficiency of energy conversion is not yet clear. We addressed this issue by evaluating the energy transfer in reconstituted photosynthetic protein complexes LH2 and LH1-RC and studying the structures and the membrane environment of the LH2/LH1-RC assemblies, which had been embedded into various lipid bilayers. Thus, LH2 and LH1-RC from Rhodopseudomonas palustris 2.1.6 were reconstituted in phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)/PG/cardiolipin (CL). Efficient energy transfer from LH2 to LH1-RC was observed in the PC and PE/PG/CL membranes. Atomic force microscopy revealed that LH2 and LH1-RC were heterogeneously distributed to form clusters in the PC and PE/PG/CL membranes. The results indicated that the phospholipid species influenced the cluster formation of LH2 and LH1-RC as well as the energy transfer efficiency

  1. Energy transfer and clustering of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes in reconstituted lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewa, Takehisa, E-mail: takedewa@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology, PRESTO, 4-1-8 Honcho Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Sumino, Ayumi; Watanabe, Natsuko; Noji, Tomoyasu [Department of Frontier Materials, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nango, Mamoru, E-mail: nango@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► Photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes were reconstituted into lipid membranes. ► Energy transfers between light-harvesting complexes were examined. ► Atomic force microscopy indicated cluster formation of light-harvesting complexes. ► Efficient energy transfer was observed for the clustered complexes in the membranes. - Abstract: In purple photosynthetic bacteria, light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) and light harvesting/reaction centre core complex (LH1-RC) play the key roles of capturing and transferring light energy and subsequent charge separation. These photosynthetic apparatuses form a supramolecular assembly; however, how the assembly influences the efficiency of energy conversion is not yet clear. We addressed this issue by evaluating the energy transfer in reconstituted photosynthetic protein complexes LH2 and LH1-RC and studying the structures and the membrane environment of the LH2/LH1-RC assemblies, which had been embedded into various lipid bilayers. Thus, LH2 and LH1-RC from Rhodopseudomonas palustris 2.1.6 were reconstituted in phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)/PG/cardiolipin (CL). Efficient energy transfer from LH2 to LH1-RC was observed in the PC and PE/PG/CL membranes. Atomic force microscopy revealed that LH2 and LH1-RC were heterogeneously distributed to form clusters in the PC and PE/PG/CL membranes. The results indicated that the phospholipid species influenced the cluster formation of LH2 and LH1-RC as well as the energy transfer efficiency.

  2. The End of the Line: Can Ferredoxin and Ferredoxin NADP(H) Oxidoreductase Determine the Fate of Photosynthetic Electrons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Tatjana; Hanke, Guy

    2014-01-01

    At the end of the linear photosynthetic electron transfer (PET) chain, the small soluble protein ferredoxin (Fd) transfers electrons to Fd:NADP(H) oxidoreductase (FNR), which can then reduce NADP+ to support C assimilation. In addition to this linear electron flow (LEF), Fd is also thought to mediate electron flow back to the membrane complexes by different cyclic electron flow (CEF) pathways: either antimycin A sensitive, NAD(P)H complex dependent, or through FNR located at the cytochrome b6f complex. Both Fd and FNR are present in higher plant genomes as multiple gene copies, and it is now known that specific Fd iso-proteins can promote CEF. In addition, FNR iso-proteins vary in their ability to dynamically interact with thylakoid membrane complexes, and it has been suggested that this may also play a role in CEF. We will highlight work on the different Fd-isoproteins and FNR-membrane association found in the bundle sheath (BSC) and mesophyll (MC) cell chloroplasts of the C4 plant maize. These two cell types perform predominantly CEF and LEF, and the properties and activities of Fd and FNR in the BSC and MC are therefore specialized for CEF and LEF respectively. A diversity of Fd isoproteins and dynamic FNR location has also been recorded in C3 plants, algae and cyanobacteria. This indicates that the principles learned from the extreme electron transport situations in the BSC and MC of maize might be usefully applied to understanding the dynamic transition between these states in other systems. PMID:24678667

  3. Modelling excitonic energy transfer in the photosynthetic unit of purple bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linnanto, J.M.; Korppi-Tommola, J.E.I.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular mechanics and quantum chemical configuration interaction calculations in combination with exciton theory were used to predict vibronic energies and eigenstates of light harvesting antennae and the reaction centre and to evaluate excitation energy transfer rates in the photosynthetic unit of purple bacteria. Excitation energy transfer rates were calculated by using the transition matrix formalism and exciton basis sets of the interacting antenna systems. Energy transfer rates of 600-800 fs from B800 ring to B850 ring in the LH2 antenna, 3-10 ps from LH2 to LH2 antenna, 2-8 ps from LH2 to LH1 antenna and finally 30-70 ps from LH1 to the reaction centre were obtained. Dependencies of energy transfer rates on lateral and vertical inter-complex distances were determined. The results indicate that a fair amount of spatial heterogeneity of antenna complexes in the photosynthetic membrane is tolerated without much loss in excitation energy transfer efficiency

  4. Modelling excitonic energy transfer in the photosynthetic unit of purple bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linnanto, J.M. [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)], E-mail: juha.m.linnanto@jyu.fi; Korppi-Tommola, J.E.I. [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2009-02-23

    Molecular mechanics and quantum chemical configuration interaction calculations in combination with exciton theory were used to predict vibronic energies and eigenstates of light harvesting antennae and the reaction centre and to evaluate excitation energy transfer rates in the photosynthetic unit of purple bacteria. Excitation energy transfer rates were calculated by using the transition matrix formalism and exciton basis sets of the interacting antenna systems. Energy transfer rates of 600-800 fs from B800 ring to B850 ring in the LH2 antenna, 3-10 ps from LH2 to LH2 antenna, 2-8 ps from LH2 to LH1 antenna and finally 30-70 ps from LH1 to the reaction centre were obtained. Dependencies of energy transfer rates on lateral and vertical inter-complex distances were determined. The results indicate that a fair amount of spatial heterogeneity of antenna complexes in the photosynthetic membrane is tolerated without much loss in excitation energy transfer efficiency.

  5. The mechanism of anthracene interaction with photosynthetic apparatus: A study using intact cells, thylakoid membranes and PS II complexes isolated from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksmann, Anna; Shutova, Tatiana; Samuelsson, Goeran; Tukaj, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    Intact cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as well as isolated thylakoid membranes and photosystem II complexes were used to examine a possible mechanism of anthracene (ANT) interaction with the photosynthetic apparatus. Since ANT concentrations above 1 mM were required to significantly inhibit the rate of oxygen evolution in PS II membrane fragments it may indicate that the toxicant did not directly interact with this photosystem. On the other hand, stimulation of oxygen uptake by ANT-treated thylakoids suggested that ANT could either act as an artificial electron acceptor in the photosynthetic electron transport chain or function as an uncoupler. Electron transfer from excited chlorophyll to ANT is impossible due to the very low reduction potential of ANT and therefore we propose that toxic concentrations of ANT increase the thylakoid membrane permeability and thereby function as an uncoupler, enhancing electron transport in vitro. Hence, its unspecific interference with photosynthetic membranes in vitro suggests that the inhibitory effect observed on intact cell photosynthesis is caused by uncoupling of phosphorylation.

  6. Interface for Light-Driven Electron Transfer by Photosynthetic Complexes Across Block Copolymer Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Liangju; Olson, Tien L; Lin, Su; Flores, Marco; Jiang, Yunjiang; Zheng, Wan; Williams, JoAnn C; Allen, James P; Liang, Hongjun

    2014-03-06

    Incorporation of membrane proteins into nanodevices to mediate recognition and transport in a collective and scalable fashion remains a challenging problem. We demonstrate how nanoscale photovoltaics could be designed using robust synthetic nanomembranes with incorporated photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs). Specifically, RCs from Rhodobacter sphaeroides are reconstituted spontaneously into rationally designed polybutadiene membranes to form hierarchically organized proteopolymer membrane arrays via a charge-interaction-directed reconstitution mechanism. Once incorporated, the RCs are fully active for prolonged periods based upon a variety of spectroscopic measurements, underscoring preservation of their 3D pigment configuration critical for light-driven charge transfer. This result provides a strategy to construct solar conversion devices using structurally versatile proteopolymer membranes with integrated RC functions to harvest broad regions of the solar spectrum.

  7. Coupled motions direct electrons along human microsomal P450 Chains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R Pudney

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein domain motion is often implicated in biological electron transfer, but the general significance of motion is not clear. Motion has been implicated in the transfer of electrons from human cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR to all microsomal cytochrome P450s (CYPs. Our hypothesis is that tight coupling of motion with enzyme chemistry can signal "ready and waiting" states for electron transfer from CPR to downstream CYPs and support vectorial electron transfer across complex redox chains. We developed a novel approach to study the time-dependence of dynamical change during catalysis that reports on the changing conformational states of CPR. FRET was linked to stopped-flow studies of electron transfer in CPR that contains donor-acceptor fluorophores on the enzyme surface. Open and closed states of CPR were correlated with key steps in the catalytic cycle which demonstrated how redox chemistry and NADPH binding drive successive opening and closing of the enzyme. Specifically, we provide evidence that reduction of the flavin moieties in CPR induces CPR opening, whereas ligand binding induces CPR closing. A dynamic reaction cycle was created in which CPR optimizes internal electron transfer between flavin cofactors by adopting closed states and signals "ready and waiting" conformations to partner CYP enzymes by adopting more open states. This complex, temporal control of enzyme motion is used to catalyze directional electron transfer from NADPH→FAD→FMN→heme, thereby facilitating all microsomal P450-catalysed reactions. Motions critical to the broader biological functions of CPR are tightly coupled to enzyme chemistry in the human NADPH-CPR-CYP redox chain. That redox chemistry alone is sufficient to drive functionally necessary, large-scale conformational change is remarkable. Rather than relying on stochastic conformational sampling, our study highlights a need for tight coupling of motion to enzyme chemistry to give vectorial electron

  8. Photoinduced electron transfer involving eosin-tryptophan conjugates. Long-lived radical pair states for systems incorporating aromatic amino acid side chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G. II; Farahat, C.W.; Oh, C. (Boston Univ., MA (United States))

    1994-07-14

    The electron-transfer photochemistry of the covalent derivatives of the dye eosin, in which the xanthene dye is covalently attached to the amino acid L-tryptophan via the thiohydantoin derivative, the tryptophan dipeptide, and an ethyl ester derivative, has been investigated. The singlet excited state of the dye is significantly quenched on attachment of the aromatic amino acid residue. Dye triplet states are also intercepted through intramolecular interaction of excited dye and amino acid pendants. Flash photolysis experiments verify that this interaction involves electron transfer from the indole side chains of tryptophan. Rate constants for electron transfer are discussed in terms of the distance relationships for the eosin chromophore and aromatic redox sites on peptide derivatives, the pathway for [sigma]-[pi] through-bond interaction between redox sites, and the multiplicity and state of protonation for electron-transfer intermediates. Selected electron-transfer photoreactions were studied under conditions of binding of the peptide derivatives in a high molecular weight, water-soluble, globular polymer, poly(vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone). 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Pulse radiolytic and electrochemical investigations of intramolecular electron transfer in carotenoporphyrins and carotenoporphyrin-quinone triads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Land, E.J.; Lexa, D.; Bensasson, R.V.; Gust, D.; Moore, T.A.; Moore, A.L.; Liddell, P.A.; Nemeth, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of intramolecular electron-transfer reactions in carotenoporphyrin dyads and carotenoid-porphyrin-quinone triads have been studied by using pulse radiolysis and cyclic voltammetry. Rapid (<1 μs) electron transfer from carotenoid radical anions to attached porphyrins has been inferred. Carotenoid cations, on the other hand, do not readily accept electrons from attached porphyrins or pyropheophorbides. Electrochemical studies provide the thermodynamic basis for these observations and also allow estimation of the energetics of photoinitiated two-step electron transfer and two-step charge recombination in triad models for photosynthetic charge separation

  10. Visualizing changes in electron distribution in coupled chains of cytochrome bc(1) by modifying barrier for electron transfer between the FeS cluster and heme c(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieluch, Ewelina; Pietryga, Krzysztof; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2010-02-01

    Cytochrome c(1) of Rhodobacter (Rba.) species provides a series of mutants which change barriers for electron transfer through the cofactor chains of cytochrome bc(1) by modifying heme c(1) redox midpoint potential. Analysis of post-flash electron distribution in such systems can provide useful information about the contribution of individual reactions to the overall electron flow. In Rba. capsulatus, the non-functional low-potential forms of cytochrome c(1) which are devoid of the disulfide bond naturally present in this protein revert spontaneously by introducing a second-site suppression (mutation A181T) that brings the potential of heme c(1) back to the functionally high levels, yet maintains it some 100 mV lower from the native value. Here we report that the disulfide and the mutation A181T can coexist in one protein but the mutation exerts a dominant effect on the redox properties of heme c(1) and the potential remains at the same lower value as in the disulfide-free form. This establishes effective means to modify a barrier for electron transfer between the FeS cluster and heme c(1) without breaking disulfide. A comparison of the flash-induced electron transfers in native and mutated cytochrome bc(1) revealed significant differences in the post-flash equilibrium distribution of electrons only when the connection of the chains with the quinone pool was interrupted at the level of either of the catalytic sites by the use of specific inhibitors, antimycin or myxothiazol. In the non-inhibited system no such differences were observed. We explain the results using a kinetic model in which a shift in the equilibrium of one reaction influences the equilibrium of all remaining reactions in the cofactor chains. It follows a rather simple description in which the direction of electron flow through the coupled chains of cytochrome bc(1) exclusively depends on the rates of all reversible partial reactions, including the Q/QH2 exchange rate to/from the catalytic sites

  11. Improving Delivery of Photosynthetic Reducing Power to Cytochrome P450s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellor, Silas Busck

    at sustainable production of high-value and commodity products. Cytochrome P450 enzymes play key roles in the biosynthesis of important natural products. The electron carrier ferredoxin can couple P450s non-natively to photosynthetic electron supply, providing ample reducing power for catalysis. However......, photosynthetic reducing power feeds into both central and specialized metabolism, which leads to a fiercely competitive system from which to siphon reductant. This thesis explores the optimization of light-driven P450 activity, and proposes strategies to overcome the limitations imposed by competition...... for photosynthetic reducing power. Photosynthetic electron carrier proteins interact with widely different partners because they use relatively non-specific interactions. The mechanistic basis of these interactions and its impact on natural electron transfer complexes is discussed. This particular type...

  12. Direct observation of multistep energy transfer in LHCII with fifth-order 3D electronic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengyang; Lambrev, Petar H; Wells, Kym L; Garab, Győző; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2015-07-31

    During photosynthesis, sunlight is efficiently captured by light-harvesting complexes, and the excitation energy is then funneled towards the reaction centre. These photosynthetic excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways are complex and proceed in a multistep fashion. Ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is an important tool to study EET processes in photosynthetic complexes. However, the multistep EET processes can only be indirectly inferred by correlating different cross peaks from a series of 2DES spectra. Here we directly observe multistep EET processes in LHCII using ultrafast fifth-order three-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (3DES). We measure cross peaks in 3DES spectra of LHCII that directly indicate energy transfer from excitons in the chlorophyll b (Chl b) manifold to the low-energy level chlorophyll a (Chl a) via mid-level Chl a energy states. This new spectroscopic technique allows scientists to move a step towards mapping the complete complex EET processes in photosynthetic systems.

  13. Electronic energy transfer through non-adiabatic vibrational-electronic resonance. II. 1D spectra for a dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vivek; Jonas, David M.

    2018-02-01

    Vibrational-electronic resonance in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes invalidates Förster's adiabatic framework for interpreting spectra and energy transfer, thus complicating determination of how the surrounding protein affects pigment properties. This paper considers the combined effects of vibrational-electronic resonance and inhomogeneous variations in the electronic excitation energies of pigments at different sites on absorption, emission, circular dichroism, and hole-burning spectra for a non-degenerate homodimer. The non-degenerate homodimer has identical pigments in different sites that generate differences in electronic energies, with parameters loosely based on bacteriochlorophyll a pigments in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson antenna protein. To explain the intensity borrowing, the excited state vibrational-electronic eigenvectors are discussed in terms of the vibrational basis localized on the individual pigments, as well as the correlated/anti-correlated vibrational basis delocalized over both pigments. Compared to those in the isolated pigment, vibrational satellites for the correlated vibration have the same frequency and precisely a factor of 2 intensity reduction through vibrational delocalization in both absorption and emission. Vibrational satellites for anti-correlated vibrations have their relaxed emission intensity reduced by over a factor 2 through vibrational and excitonic delocalization. In absorption, anti-correlated vibrational satellites borrow excitonic intensity but can be broadened away by the combination of vibronic resonance and site inhomogeneity; in parallel, their vibronically resonant excitonic partners are also broadened away. These considerations are consistent with photosynthetic antenna hole-burning spectra, where sharp vibrational and excitonic satellites are absent. Vibrational-excitonic resonance barely alters the inhomogeneously broadened linear absorption, emission, and circular dichroism spectra from those for a

  14. A molecular shift register based on electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Josenelson; Beratan, David N.

    1988-01-01

    An electronic shift-register memory at the molecular level is described. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. This device integrates designed electronic molecules onto a very large scale integrated (silicon microelectronic) substrate, providing an example of a 'molecular electronic device' that could actually be made. The design requirements for such a device and possible synthetic strategies are discussed. Devices along these lines should have lower energy usage and enhanced storage density.

  15. Towards quantification of vibronic coupling in photosynthetic antenna complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, V. P.; Westberg, M.; Wang, C.; Gellen, T.; Engel, G. S., E-mail: gsengel@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, The James Franck Institute and The Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Dahlberg, P. D. [Graduate Program in the Biophysical Sciences, The James Franck Institute and The Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Gardiner, A. T.; Cogdell, R. J. [Department of Botany, Institute of Molecular Cell and Systems Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-07

    Photosynthetic antenna complexes harvest sunlight and efficiently transport energy to the reaction center where charge separation powers biochemical energy storage. The discovery of existence of long lived quantum coherence during energy transfer has sparked the discussion on the role of quantum coherence on the energy transfer efficiency. Early works assigned observed coherences to electronic states, and theoretical studies showed that electronic coherences could affect energy transfer efficiency—by either enhancing or suppressing transfer. However, the nature of coherences has been fiercely debated as coherences only report the energy gap between the states that generate coherence signals. Recent works have suggested that either the coherences observed in photosynthetic antenna complexes arise from vibrational wave packets on the ground state or, alternatively, coherences arise from mixed electronic and vibrational states. Understanding origin of coherences is important for designing molecules for efficient light harvesting. Here, we give a direct experimental observation from a mutant of LH2, which does not have B800 chromophores, to distinguish between electronic, vibrational, and vibronic coherence. We also present a minimal theoretical model to characterize the coherences both in the two limiting cases of purely vibrational and purely electronic coherence as well as in the intermediate, vibronic regime.

  16. Electron transport chains in organohalide-respiring bacteria and bioremediation implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanquan; Qiu, Lan; Liu, Xiaowei; Xu, Guofang; Siegert, Michael; Lu, Qihong; Juneau, Philippe; Yu, Ling; Liang, Dawei; He, Zhili; Qiu, Rongliang

    2018-04-06

    In situ remediation employing organohalide-respiring bacteria represents a promising solution for cleanup of persistent organohalide pollutants. The organohalide-respiring bacteria conserve energy by utilizing H 2 or organic compounds as electron donors and organohalides as electron acceptors. Reductive dehalogenase (RDase), a terminal reductase of the electron transport chain in organohalide-respiring bacteria, is the key enzyme that catalyzes halogen removal. Accumulating experimental evidence thus far suggests that there are distinct models for respiratory electron transfer in organohalide-respirers of different lineages, e.g., Dehalococcoides, Dehalobacter, Desulfitobacterium and Sulfurospirillum. In this review, to connect the knowledge in organohalide-respiratory electron transport chains to bioremediation applications, we first comprehensively review molecular components and their organization, together with energetics of the organohalide-respiratory electron transport chains, as well as recent elucidation of intramolecular electron shuttling and halogen elimination mechanisms of RDases. We then highlight the implications of organohalide-respiratory electron transport chains in stimulated bioremediation. In addition, major challenges and further developments toward understanding the organohalide-respiratory electron transport chains and their bioremediation applications are identified and discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultrafast Nonradiative Decay and Excitation Energy Transfer by Carotenoids in Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen

    This dissertation investigates the photophysical and structural dynamics that allow carotenoids to serve as efficient excitation energy transfer donor to chlorophyll acceptors in photosynthetic light harvesting proteins. Femtosecond transient grating spectroscopy with optical heterodyne detection has been employed to follow the nonradiative decay pathways of carotenoids and excitation energy transfer to chlorophylls. It was found that the optically prepared S2 (11Bu+) state of beta-carotene decays in 12 fs fs to populate an intermediate electronic state, Sx, which then decays nonradiatively to the S 1 state. The ultrafast rise of the dispersion component of the heterodyne transient grating signal reports the formation of Sx intermediate since the rise of the dispersion signal is controlled by the loss of stimulated emission from the S2 state. These findings were extended to studies of peridinin, a carbonyl substituted carotenoid that serves as a photosynthetic light-harvesting chromophore in dinoflagellates. Numerical simulations using nonlinear response formalism and the multimode Brownian oscillator model assigned the Sx intermediate to a torsionally distorted structure evolving on the S2 potential surface. The decay of the Sx state is promoted by large amplitude out-of-plane torsional motions and is significantly retarded by solvent friction owing to the development of an intramolecular charge transfer character in peridinin. The slowing of the nonradiative decay allows the Sx state to transfer significant portion of the excitation energy to chlorophyll a acceptors in the peridinin-chlorophyll a protein. The results of heterodyne transient grating study on peridinin-chlorophyll a protein suggests two distinct energy transfer channels from peridinin to chlorophyll a: a 30 fs process involving quantum coherence and delocalized peridinin-Chl states and an incoherent, 2.5 ps process involving the distorted S2 state of peridinin. The torsional evolution on the S2

  18. Spectral properties of chlorines and electron transfer with their participation in the photosynthetic reaction center of photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchupak, E. E.; Ivashin, N. V.

    2014-02-01

    Structural factors that provide localization of excited states and determine the properties of primary donor and acceptor of electron in the reaction center of photosystem II (PSII RC) are studied. The results of calculations using stationary and time-dependent density functional theory indicate an important role of protein environments of chlorophylls PA, PB, BA, and BB and pheophytins HA and HB in the area with a radius of no greater than ≤10 Å in the formation of excitonic states of PSII RC. When the neighboring elements are taken into account, the wavelength of long-wavelength Q y transition of chlorophyll molecules is varied by about 10 nm. The effect is less developed for pheophytin molecules (Δλ ≅ 2 nm). The following elements strongly affect energy of the transition: HisA198 and HisD197 amino-acid residues that serve as ligands of magnesium atoms affect PA and PB, respectively; MetA183 affects PA; MetA172 and MetD198 affect BA; water molecules that are located above the planes of the BA and BB macrocycles form H bonds with carbonyl groups; and phytol chains of PA and PB affect BA, BB, HA, and HB. The analysis of excitonic states, mutual positions of molecular orbitals of electron donors and acceptors, and matrix elements of electron transfer reaction shows that (i) charge separation between BA and HA and PB and BA is possible in the active A branch of cofactors of PSII RC and (ii) electron transfer is blocked at the BB - HB fragment in inactive B branch of PSII RC.

  19. Energy transfer from natural photosynthetic complexes to single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiwatowski, Kamil [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Dużyńska, Anna; Świniarski, Michał [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Szalkowski, Marcin [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Zdrojek, Mariusz; Judek, Jarosław [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Mackowski, Sebastian, E-mail: mackowski@fizyka.umk.pl [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Wroclaw Research Center EIT+, Stablowicka 147, Wroclaw (Poland); Kaminska, Izabela [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2016-02-15

    Combination of fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy results indicates that single-walled carbon nanotubes are extremely efficient quenchers of fluorescence emission associated with chlorophylls embedded in a natural photosynthetic complex, peridinin-chlorophyll-protein. When deposited on a network of the carbon nanotubes forming a thin film, the emission of the photosynthetic complexes diminishes almost completely. This strong reduction of fluorescence intensity is accompanied with dramatic shortening of the fluorescence lifetime. Concluding, such thin films of carbon nanotubes can be extremely efficient energy acceptors in structures involving biologically functional complexes. - Highlights: • Fluorescence imaging of carbon nanotube - based hybrid structure. • Observation of efficient energy transfer from chlorophylls to carbon nanotubes.

  20. Halogenated 1-Hydroxynaphthalene-2-Carboxanilides Affecting Photosynthetic Electron Transport in Photosystem II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Gonec

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Series of seventeen new multihalogenated 1-hydroxynaphthalene-2-carboxanilides was prepared and characterized. All the compounds were tested for their activity related to the inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport (PET in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. chloroplasts. 1-Hydroxy-N-phenylnaphthalene-2-carboxamides substituted in the anilide part by 3,5-dichloro-, 4-bromo-3-chloro-, 2,5-dibromo- and 3,4,5-trichloro atoms were the most potent PET inhibitors (IC50 = 5.2, 6.7, 7.6 and 8.0 µM, respectively. The inhibitory activity of these compounds depends on the position and the type of halogen substituents, i.e., on lipophilicity and electronic properties of individual substituents of the anilide part of the molecule. Interactions of the studied compounds with chlorophyll a and aromatic amino acids present in pigment-protein complexes mainly in PS II were documented by fluorescence spectroscopy. The section between P680 and plastoquinone QB in the PET chain occurring on the acceptor side of PS II can be suggested as the site of action of the compounds. The structure-activity relationships are discussed.

  1. PHOTOINDUCED TRANSFER OF OXYGEN FROM WATER: AN ARTIFICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willner, Itamar; Otvos, John W.; Ford, William E.; Mettee, Howard; Calvin, Melvin

    1979-11-01

    The photoinduced splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen has evoked great interest in recent years as a means for energy storag eand fuel production. Photoinduced reduction of water to hydrogen, using visible light, has been described using heterogeneous or homogeneous catalysts. However, the complementary part involving the oxidation of water to oxygen is required in order to create a cyclic artificial 'photosynthetic' fuel system. The major difficulty assocaited with the photooxidation of water involves the requirement for a four electron transfer to produce oxygen. A stepwise one-electron oxidation of water is unfavorable due to the implied formation of active hydroxyl radicals. Very recently, it has been reported that RuO{sub 2} can serve as a heterogeneous charge storage catalyst for oxygen production. On the basis of the limited knowledge about natural photosynthesis, in which manganese ions play an important role in oxygen evolution, synthetic manganese complexes, and in particular dimeric complexes, have been proposed as potential catalysts for oxygen production. So far, efforts directed toward this goal have been unsuccessful. Consequently, using a manganese complex, they attempted to perform a photoinduced oxidation of water whereby the active oxygen is transferred to a trapping substrate. In such a way, the requirement for a dimerization process to evolve molecular oxygen is avoided. They wish to report a photoinduced redox cycle sensitized by a manganese porphyrin, 5-(4{prime}-hexadecylpyridium)-10, 15, 20-tri (4{prime}-pyridyl)-porphinatomanganese(III) (abbreciated to Pn-Mn{sup III}) in which the resultant reaction is the oxidation of water and trapping of the single oxygen atom by a substrate (triphenylphosphine).

  2. Triplet–triplet energy transfer in artificial and natural photosynthetic antennas

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Junming; Kish, Elizabeth; Méndez-Hernández, Dalvin D.; WongCarter, Katherine; Pillai, Smitha; Kodis, Gerdenis; Niklas, Jens; Poluektov, Oleg G.; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; Batista, Victor S.; Robert, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Rapid chlorophyll-to-carotenoid triplet–triplet energy transfer (T-TET) in photosynthetic organisms is crucial to photoprotection from singlet oxygen. Photosynthesis reengineered for increased efficiency will result in increased oxygen levels in the cells, and the need to ensure adequately rapid T-TET will arise. Using a combination of theoretical and experimental studies on artificial and natural carotenoid–chlorophyll complexes, we have identified spectroscopic markers indicative of specifi...

  3. Ultrafast time-resolved carotenoid to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 complexes from photosynthetic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Hong; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Gibson, George N; LaFountain, Amy M; Kelsh, Rhiannon M; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J; Frank, Harry A

    2008-08-28

    Steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopic investigations have been carried out at 293 and 10 K on LH2 pigment-protein complexes isolated from three different strains of photosynthetic bacteria: Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides G1C, Rb. sphaeroides 2.4.1 (anaerobically and aerobically grown), and Rps. acidophila 10050. The LH2 complexes obtained from these strains contain the carotenoids, neurosporene, spheroidene, spheroidenone, and rhodopin glucoside, respectively. These molecules have a systematically increasing number of pi-electron conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. Steady-state absorption and fluorescence excitation experiments have revealed that the total efficiency of energy transfer from the carotenoids to bacteriochlorophyll is independent of temperature and nearly constant at approximately 90% for the LH2 complexes containing neurosporene, spheroidene, spheroidenone, but drops to approximately 53% for the complex containing rhodopin glucoside. Ultrafast transient absorption spectra in the near-infrared (NIR) region of the purified carotenoids in solution have revealed the energies of the S1 (2(1)Ag-)-->S2 (1(1)Bu+) excited-state transitions which, when subtracted from the energies of the S0 (1(1)Ag-)-->S2 (1(1)Bu+) transitions determined by steady-state absorption measurements, give precise values for the positions of the S1 (2(1)Ag-) states of the carotenoids. Global fitting of the ultrafast spectral and temporal data sets have revealed the dynamics of the pathways of de-excitation of the carotenoid excited states. The pathways include energy transfer to bacteriochlorophyll, population of the so-called S* state of the carotenoids, and formation of carotenoid radical cations (Car*+). The investigation has found that excitation energy transfer to bacteriochlorophyll is partitioned through the S1 (1(1)Ag-), S2 (1(1)Bu+), and S* states of the different carotenoids to varying degrees. This is understood through a consideration of the

  4. Direct interaction between linear electron transfer chains and solute transport systems in bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, Marieke G.L.; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.; Belkum, Marco J. van; Poolman, Bert; Konings, Wil N.

    1984-01-01

    In studies on alanine and lactose transport in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides we have demonstrated that the rate of solute uptake in this phototrophic bacterium is regulated by the rate of light-induced cyclic electron transfer. In the present paper the interaction between linear electron transfer

  5. Elementary Energy Transfer Pathways in Allochromatium vinosum Photosynthetic Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüer, Larry; Carey, Anne-Marie; Henry, Sarah; Maiuri, Margherita; Hacking, Kirsty; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J

    2015-11-03

    Allochromatium vinosum (formerly Chromatium vinosum) purple bacteria are known to adapt their light-harvesting strategy during growth according to environmental factors such as temperature and average light intensity. Under low light illumination or low ambient temperature conditions, most of the LH2 complexes in the photosynthetic membranes form a B820 exciton with reduced spectral overlap with LH1. To elucidate the reason for this light and temperature adaptation of the LH2 electronic structure, we performed broadband femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy as a function of excitation wavelength in A. vinosum membranes. A target analysis of the acquired data yielded individual rate constants for all relevant elementary energy transfer (ET) processes. We found that the ET dynamics in high-light-grown membranes was well described by a homogeneous model, with forward and backward rate constants independent of the pump wavelength. Thus, the overall B800→B850→B890→ Reaction Center ET cascade is well described by simple triexponential kinetics. In the low-light-grown membranes, we found that the elementary backward transfer rate constant from B890 to B820 was strongly reduced compared with the corresponding constant from B890 to B850 in high-light-grown samples. The ET dynamics of low-light-grown membranes was strongly dependent on the pump wavelength, clearly showing that the excitation memory is not lost throughout the exciton lifetime. The observed pump energy dependence of the forward and backward ET rate constants suggests exciton diffusion via B850→ B850 transfer steps, making the overall ET dynamics nonexponential. Our results show that disorder plays a crucial role in our understanding of low-light adaptation in A. vinosum. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Elementary Energy Transfer Pathways in Allochromatium vinosum Photosynthetic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lüer, Larry; Carey, Anne-Marie; Henry, Sarah; Maiuri, Margherita; Hacking, Kirsty; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2015-11-01

    Allochromatium vinosum (formerly Chromatium vinosum) purple bacteria are known to adapt their light-harvesting strategy during growth according to environmental factors such as temperature and average light intensity. Under low light illumination or low ambient temperature conditions, most of the LH2 complexes in the photosynthetic membranes form a B820 exciton with reduced spectral overlap with LH1. To elucidate the reason for this light and temperature adaptation of the LH2 electronic structure, we performed broadband femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy as a function of excitation wavelength in A. vinosum membranes. A target analysis of the acquired data yielded individual rate constants for all relevant elementary energy transfer (ET) processes. We found that the ET dynamics in high-light-grown membranes was well described by a homogeneous model, with forward and backward rate constants independent of the pump wavelength. Thus, the overall B800→B850→B890→ Reaction Center ET cascade is well described by simple triexponential kinetics. In the low-light-grown membranes, we found that the elementary backward transfer rate constant from B890 to B820 was strongly reduced compared with the corresponding constant from B890 to B850 in high-light-grown samples. The ET dynamics of low-light-grown membranes was strongly dependent on the pump wavelength, clearly showing that the excitation memory is not lost throughout the exciton lifetime. The observed pump energy dependence of the forward and backward ET rate constants suggests exciton diffusion via B850→ B850 transfer steps, making the overall ET dynamics nonexponential. Our results show that disorder plays a crucial role in our understanding of low-light adaptation in A. vinosum.

  7. Functional LH1 antenna complexes influence electron transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschers, R.W.; Vulto, S.I.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Grondelle, R.; Kraayenhof, R.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the light harvesting 1 (LH1) antenna complex on the driving force for light-driven electron transfer in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center has been examined. Equilibrium redox titrations show that the presence of the LH1 antenna complex influences the free energy change for

  8. Functional LH1 antenna complexes influence electron transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschers, R.W.; Vulto, S.I.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Grondelle, R.; Kraayenhof, R.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the light harvesting 1 (LH1) antenna complex on the driving force for light-driven electron transfer in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center has been examined. Equilibrium redox titrations show that the presence of the LH1 antenna complex influences the free energy change for

  9. Influence of the variation potential on photosynthetic flows of light energy and electrons in pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhova, Ekaterina; Mudrilov, Maxim; Vodeneev, Vladimir; Sukhov, Vladimir

    2018-05-01

    Local damage (mainly burning, heating, and mechanical wounding) induces propagation of electrical signals, namely, variation potentials, which are important signals during the life of plants that regulate different physiological processes, including photosynthesis. It is known that the variation potential decreases the rate of CO 2 assimilation by the Calvin-Benson cycle; however, its influence on light reactions has been poorly investigated. The aim of our work was to investigate the influence of the variation potential on the light energy flow that is absorbed, trapped and dissipated per active reaction centre in photosystem II and on the flow of electrons through the chloroplast electron transport chain. We analysed chlorophyll fluorescence in pea leaves using JIP-test and PAM-fluorometry; we also investigated delayed fluorescence. The electrical signals were registered using extracellular electrodes. We showed that the burning-induced variation potential stimulated a nonphotochemical loss of energy in photosystem II under dark conditions. It was also shown that the variation potential gradually increased the flow of light energy absorbed, trapped and dissipated by photosystem II. These changes were likely caused by an increase in the fraction of absorbed light distributed to photosystem II. In addition, the variation potential induced a transient increase in electron flow through the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Some probable mechanisms for the influence of the variation potential on the light reactions of photosynthesis (including the potential role of intracellular pH decrease) are discussed in the work.

  10. Photosynthetic electron transport in thylakoid preparations from two marine red algae (Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A C; Larkum, A W

    1983-01-01

    Thylakoid membrane preparations active in photosynthetic electron transport have been obtained from two marine red algae, Griffithsia monilis and Anotrichium tenue. High concentrations (0.5-1.0 M) of salts such as phosphate, citrate, succinate and tartrate stabilized functional binding of phycobilisomes to the membrane and also stabilized Photosystem II-catalysed electron-transport activity. High concentrations (1.0 M) of chloride and nitrate, or 30 mM-Tricine/NaOH buffer (pH 7.2) in the absence of salts, detached phycobilisomes and inhibited electron transport through Photosystem II. The O2-evolving system was identified as the electron-transport chain component that was inhibited under these conditions. Washing membranes with buffers containing 1.0-1.5 M-sorbitol and 5-50 mM concentrations of various salts removed the outer part of the phycobilisome but retained 30-70% of the allophycocyanin 'core' of the phycobilisome. These preparations were 30-70% active in O2 evolution compared with unwashed membranes. In the sensitivity of their O2-evolving apparatus to the composition of the medium in vitro, the red algae resembled blue-green algae and differed from other eukaryotic algae and higher plants. It is suggested that an environment of structured water may be essential for the functional integrity of Photosystem II in biliprotein-containing algae. PMID:6860312

  11. Electronic energy transfer through non-adiabatic vibrational-electronic resonance. I. Theory for a dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vivek; Peters, William K.; Jonas, David M.

    2017-10-01

    Non-adiabatic vibrational-electronic resonance in the excited electronic states of natural photosynthetic antennas drastically alters the adiabatic framework, in which electronic energy transfer has been conventionally studied, and suggests the possibility of exploiting non-adiabatic dynamics for directed energy transfer. Here, a generalized dimer model incorporates asymmetries between pigments, coupling to the environment, and the doubly excited state relevant for nonlinear spectroscopy. For this generalized dimer model, the vibrational tuning vector that drives energy transfer is derived and connected to decoherence between singly excited states. A correlation vector is connected to decoherence between the ground state and the doubly excited state. Optical decoherence between the ground and singly excited states involves linear combinations of the correlation and tuning vectors. Excitonic coupling modifies the tuning vector. The correlation and tuning vectors are not always orthogonal, and both can be asymmetric under pigment exchange, which affects energy transfer. For equal pigment vibrational frequencies, the nonadiabatic tuning vector becomes an anti-correlated delocalized linear combination of intramolecular vibrations of the two pigments, and the nonadiabatic energy transfer dynamics become separable. With exchange symmetry, the correlation and tuning vectors become delocalized intramolecular vibrations that are symmetric and antisymmetric under pigment exchange. Diabatic criteria for vibrational-excitonic resonance demonstrate that anti-correlated vibrations increase the range and speed of vibronically resonant energy transfer (the Golden Rule rate is a factor of 2 faster). A partial trace analysis shows that vibronic decoherence for a vibrational-excitonic resonance between two excitons is slower than their purely excitonic decoherence.

  12. Electronic shift register memory based on molecular electron-transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Jose Nelson; Beratan, David N.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a shift register memory at the molecular level is described in detail. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules incorporated on a very large scale integrated (VLSI) substrate, and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. The design requirements for such a system are discussed, and several realistic strategies for synthesizing these systems are presented. The immediate advantage of such a hybrid molecular/VLSI device would arise from the possible information storage density. The prospect of considerable savings of energy per bit processed also exists. This molecular shift register memory element design solves the conceptual problems associated with integrating molecular size components with larger (micron) size features on a chip.

  13. Dynamics of transfer of electron excitation in a donor-acceptor system with a carbon chain and ways of its relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Sevryukova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties and dynamics of transport of electron excitation and the ways of its relaxation in the supramolecular D–π–A complex on the basis of merocyanines have been investigated. There have been found two components in the transfer of charge: fast and slow, which correspond to different conformational states of the carbon chain in merocyanines. It was found that the main photoluminescence of the studied molecular solutions of merocyanines by its nature is similar to the exciplex luminescence, as a manifestation of resonant and charge transfer interaction in an excited state. The lifetime in this state is about 2000 ps.

  14. Construction of hybrid photosynthetic units using peripheral and core antennae from two different species of photosynthetic bacteria: detection of the energy transfer from bacteriochlorophyll a in LH2 to bacteriochlorophyll b in LH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Ritsuko; Shimonaka, Shozo; Uchida, Naoko; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J; Sugisaki, Mitsuru; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    Typical purple bacterial photosynthetic units consist of supra-molecular arrays of peripheral (LH2) and core (LH1-RC) antenna complexes. Recent atomic force microscopy pictures of photosynthetic units in intact membranes have revealed that the architecture of these units is variable (Scheuring et al. (2005) Biochim Bhiophys Acta 1712:109-127). In this study, we describe methods for the construction of heterologous photosynthetic units in lipid-bilayers from mixtures of purified LH2 (from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila) and LH1-RC (from Rhodopseudomonas viridis) core complexes. The architecture of these reconstituted photosynthetic units can be varied by controlling ratio of added LH2 to core complexes. The arrangement of the complexes was visualized by electron-microscopy in combination with Fourier analysis. The regular trigonal array of the core complexes seen in the native photosynthetic membrane could be regenerated in the reconstituted membranes by temperature cycling. In the presence of added LH2 complexes, this trigonal symmetry was replaced with orthorhombic symmetry. The small lattice lengths for the latter suggest that the constituent unit of the orthorhombic lattice is the LH2. Fluorescence and fluorescence-excitation spectroscopy was applied to the set of the reconstituted membranes prepared with various proportions of LH2 to core complexes. Remarkably, even though the LH2 complexes contain bacteriochlorophyll a, and the core complexes contain bacteriochlorophyll b, it was possible to demonstrate energy transfer from LH2 to the core complexes. These experiments provide a first step along the path toward investigating how changing the architecture of purple bacterial photosynthetic units affects the overall efficiency of light-harvesting.

  15. The dipole moment of the electron carrier adrenodoxin is not critical for redox partner interaction and electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannemann, Frank; Guyot, Arnaud; Zöllner, Andy; Müller, Jürgen J; Heinemann, Udo; Bernhardt, Rita

    2009-07-01

    Dipole moments of proteins arise from helical dipoles, hydrogen bond networks and charged groups at the protein surface. High protein dipole moments were suggested to contribute to the electrostatic steering between redox partners in electron transport chains of respiration, photosynthesis and steroid biosynthesis, although so far experimental evidence for this hypothesis was missing. In order to probe this assumption, we changed the dipole moment of the electron transfer protein adrenodoxin and investigated the influence of this on protein-protein interactions and electron transfer. In bovine adrenodoxin, the [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin of the adrenal glands, a dipole moment of 803 Debye was calculated for a full-length adrenodoxin model based on the Adx(4-108) and the wild type adrenodoxin crystal structures. Large distances and asymmetric distribution of the charged residues in the molecule mainly determine the observed high value. In order to analyse the influence of the resulting inhomogeneous electric field on the biological function of this electron carrier the molecular dipole moment was systematically changed. Five recombinant adrenodoxin mutants with successively reduced dipole moment (from 600 to 200 Debye) were analysed for their redox properties, their binding affinities to the redox partner proteins and for their function during electron transfer-dependent steroid hydroxylation. None of the mutants, not even the quadruple mutant K6E/K22Q/K24Q/K98E with a dipole moment reduced by about 70% showed significant changes in the protein function as compared with the unmodified adrenodoxin demonstrating that neither the formation of the transient complex nor the biological activity of the electron transfer chain of the endocrine glands was affected. This is the first experimental evidence that the high dipole moment observed in electron transfer proteins is not involved in electrostatic steering among the proteins in the redox chain.

  16. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  17. Defining Electron Bifurcation in the Electron-Transferring Flavoprotein Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Costas, Amaya M; Poudel, Saroj; Miller, Anne-Frances; Schut, Gerrit J; Ledbetter, Rhesa N; Fixen, Kathryn R; Seefeldt, Lance C; Adams, Michael W W; Harwood, Caroline S; Boyd, Eric S; Peters, John W

    2017-11-01

    Electron bifurcation is the coupling of exergonic and endergonic redox reactions to simultaneously generate (or utilize) low- and high-potential electrons. It is the third recognized form of energy conservation in biology and was recently described for select electron-transferring flavoproteins (Etfs). Etfs are flavin-containing heterodimers best known for donating electrons derived from fatty acid and amino acid oxidation to an electron transfer respiratory chain via Etf-quinone oxidoreductase. Canonical examples contain a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) that is involved in electron transfer, as well as a non-redox-active AMP. However, Etfs demonstrated to bifurcate electrons contain a second FAD in place of the AMP. To expand our understanding of the functional variety and metabolic significance of Etfs and to identify amino acid sequence motifs that potentially enable electron bifurcation, we compiled 1,314 Etf protein sequences from genome sequence databases and subjected them to informatic and structural analyses. Etfs were identified in diverse archaea and bacteria, and they clustered into five distinct well-supported groups, based on their amino acid sequences. Gene neighborhood analyses indicated that these Etf group designations largely correspond to putative differences in functionality. Etfs with the demonstrated ability to bifurcate were found to form one group, suggesting that distinct conserved amino acid sequence motifs enable this capability. Indeed, structural modeling and sequence alignments revealed that identifying residues occur in the NADH- and FAD-binding regions of bifurcating Etfs. Collectively, a new classification scheme for Etf proteins that delineates putative bifurcating versus nonbifurcating members is presented and suggests that Etf-mediated bifurcation is associated with surprisingly diverse enzymes. IMPORTANCE Electron bifurcation has recently been recognized as an electron transfer mechanism used by microorganisms to maximize

  18. Connection between the membrane electron transport system and Hyn hydrogenase in the purple sulfur bacterium, Thiocapsa roseopersicina BBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengölics, Roland; Mészáros, Lívia; Győri, E; Doffkay, Zsolt; Kovács, Kornél L; Rákhely, Gábor

    2014-10-01

    Thiocapsa. roseopersicina BBS has four active [NiFe] hydrogenases, providing an excellent opportunity to examine their metabolic linkages to the cellular redox processes. Hyn is a periplasmic membrane-associated hydrogenase harboring two additional electron transfer subunits: Isp1 is a transmembrane protein, while Isp2 is located on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. In this work, the connection of HynSL to various electron transport pathways is studied. During photoautotrophic growth, electrons, generated from the oxidation of thiosulfate and sulfur, are donated to the photosynthetic electron transport chain via cytochromes. Electrons formed from thiosulfate and sulfur oxidation might also be also used for Hyn-dependent hydrogen evolution which was shown to be light and proton motive force driven. Hyn-linked hydrogen uptake can be promoted by both sulfur and nitrate. The electron flow from/to HynSL requires the presence of Isp2 in both directions. Hydrogenase-linked sulfur reduction could be inhibited by a QB site competitive inhibitor, terbutryne, suggesting a redox coupling between the Hyn hydrogenase and the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Based on these findings, redox linkages of Hyn hydrogenase are modeled. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Exact solution of a coupled spin–electron linear chain composed of localized Ising spins and mobile electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Čisárová, Jana; Strečka, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    Exact solution of a coupled spin–electron linear chain composed of localized Ising spins and mobile electrons is found. The investigated spin–electron model is exactly solvable by the use of a transfer-matrix method after tracing out the degrees of freedom of mobile electrons delocalized over a couple of interstitial (decorating) sites. The exact ground-state phase diagram reveals an existence of five phases with different number of mobile electrons per unit cell, two of which are ferromagnetic, two are paramagnetic and one is antiferromagnetic. We have studied in particular the dependencies of compressibility and specific heat on temperature and electron density. - Highlights: • A coupled spin–electron chain composed of Ising spins and mobile electrons is exactly solved. • Quantum paramagnetic, ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic ground states are found. • A compressibility shows a non-monotonous dependence on temperature and electron density. • Thermal dependences of specific heat display two distinct peaks

  20. B-side charge separation in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers: nanosecond time scale electron transfer from HB- to QB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmaier, Christine; Laible, Philip D; Hanson, Deborah K; Holten, Dewey

    2003-02-25

    We report time-resolved optical measurements of the primary electron transfer reactions in Rhodobacter capsulatus reaction centers (RCs) having four mutations: Phe(L181) --> Tyr, Tyr(M208) --> Phe, Leu(M212) --> His, and Trp(M250) --> Val (denoted YFHV). Following direct excitation of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P) to its lowest excited singlet state P, electron transfer to the B-side bacteriopheophytin (H(B)) gives P(+)H(B)(-) in approximately 30% yield. When the secondary quinone (Q(B)) site is fully occupied, P(+)H(B)(-) decays with a time constant estimated to be in the range of 1.5-3 ns. In the presence of excess terbutryn, a competitive inhibitor of Q(B) binding, the observed lifetime of P(+)H(B)(-) is noticeably longer and is estimated to be in the range of 4-8 ns. On the basis of these values, the rate constant for P(+)H(B)(-) --> P(+)Q(B)(-) electron transfer is calculated to be between approximately (2 ns)(-)(1) and approximately (12 ns)(-)(1), making it at least an order of magnitude smaller than the rate constant of approximately (200 ps)(-)(1) for electron transfer between the corresponding A-side cofactors (P(+)H(A)(-) --> P(+)Q(A)(-)). Structural and energetic factors associated with electron transfer to Q(B) compared to Q(A) are discussed. Comparison of the P(+)H(B)(-) lifetimes in the presence and absence of terbutryn indicates that the ultimate (i.e., quantum) yield of P(+)Q(B)(-) formation relative to P is 10-25% in the YFHV RC.

  1. Excitation energy transfer in natural photosynthetic complexes and chlorophyll trefoils: hole-burning and single complex/trefoil spectroscopic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryszard Jankowiak, Kansas State University, Department of Chemistry, CBC Bldg., Manhattan KS, 66505; Phone: (785) 532-6785

    2012-09-12

    In this project we studied both natural photosynthetic antenna complexes and various artificial systems (e.g. chlorophyll (Chl) trefoils) using high resolution hole-burning (HB) spectroscopy and excitonic calculations. Results obtained provided more insight into the electronic (excitonic) structure, inhomogeneity, electron-phonon coupling strength, vibrational frequencies, and excitation energy (or electron) transfer (EET) processes in several antennas and reaction centers. For example, our recent work provided important constraints and parameters for more advanced excitonic calculations of CP43, CP47, and PSII core complexes. Improved theoretical description of HB spectra for various model systems offers new insight into the excitonic structure and composition of low-energy absorption traps in very several antenna protein complexes and reaction centers. We anticipate that better understanding of HB spectra obtained for various photosynthetic complexes and their simultaneous fits with other optical spectra (i.e. absorption, emission, and circular dichroism spectra) provides more insight into the underlying electronic structures of these important biological systems. Our recent progress provides a necessary framework for probing the electronic structure of these systems via Hole Burning Spectroscopy. For example, we have shown that the theoretical description of non-resonant holes is more restrictive (in terms of possible site energies) than those of absorption and emission spectra. We have demonstrated that simultaneous description of linear optical spectra along with HB spectra provides more realistic site energies. We have also developed new algorithms to describe both nonresonant and resonant hole-burn spectra using more advanced Redfield theory. Simultaneous description of various optical spectra for complex biological system, e.g. artificial antenna systems, FMO protein complexes, water soluble protein complexes, and various mutants of reaction centers

  2. Response of Lemna minor L. to short-term cobalt exposure: The effect on photosynthetic electron transport chain and induction of oxidative damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begović, Lidija; Mlinarić, Selma; Antunović Dunić, Jasenka; Katanić, Zorana; Lončarić, Zdenko; Lepeduš, Hrvoje; Cesar, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Cobalt (Co"2"+) impaired the function of oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in L. minor L. • Electron transport through PSII components varied depending on Co"2"+ concentration. • K-band was proven to be suitable parameter for investigation of Co"2"+ toxicity. • Increased lipid peroxidation level showed early oxidative damage induced by Co"2"+. - Abstract: The effect of two concentrations of cobalt (Co"2"+) on photosynthetic activity and antioxidative response in Lemna minor L. were assessed 24, 48 and 72 h after the start of the exposure. Higher concentration of cobalt (1 mM) induced growth inhibition while lower concentration (0.01 mM) increased photosynthetic pigments content. Analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients revealed high sensitivity of photosystem II primary photochemistry to excess of Co"2"+ especially at the higher concentration where decreased electron transport beyond primary quinone acceptor Q_A"− and impaired function of oxygen evolving complex (OEC) was observed. Due to impairment of OEC, oxygen production was decreased at higher Co"2"+ concentration. Activity of superoxide dismutase was mainly inhibited while lipid peroxidation increased, at both concentrations, indicating that cobalt-induced oxidative damage after short exposure and moreover, susceptibility of the membranes in the cell to cobalt toxicity. Results obtained in this study suggest possible application of used parameters as tools in assessment of early damage caused by metals.

  3. Nature does not rely on long-lived electronic quantum coherence for photosynthetic energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hong-Guang; Prokhorenko, Valentyn I.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Ashraf, Khuram; Stevens, Amy L.; Thorwart, Michael; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2017-08-01

    During the first steps of photosynthesis, the energy of impinging solar photons is transformed into electronic excitation energy of the light-harvesting biomolecular complexes. The subsequent energy transfer to the reaction center is commonly rationalized in terms of excitons moving on a grid of biomolecular chromophores on typical timescales Olson protein, in which interference oscillatory signals up to 1.5 ps were reported and interpreted as direct evidence of exceptionally long-lived electronic quantum coherence. Here, we show that the optical 2D photon echo spectra of this complex at ambient temperature in aqueous solution do not provide evidence of any long-lived electronic quantum coherence, but confirm the orthodox view of rapidly decaying electronic quantum coherence on a timescale of 60 fs. Our results can be considered as generic and give no hint that electronic quantum coherence plays any biofunctional role in real photoactive biomolecular complexes. Because in this structurally well-defined protein the distances between bacteriochlorophylls are comparable to those of other light-harvesting complexes, we anticipate that this finding is general and directly applies to even larger photoactive biomolecular complexes.

  4. The role of energy losses in photosynthetic light harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, T. P. J.; van Grondelle, R.

    2017-07-01

    Photosynthesis operates at the bottom of the food chain to convert the energy of light into carbohydrates at a remarkable global rate of about 130 TW. Nonetheless, the overall photosynthetic process has a conversion efficiency of a few percent at best, significantly less than bottom-up photovoltaic cells. The primary photosynthetic steps, consisting of light harvesting and charge separation, are often presented as having near-unity quantum efficiency but this holds only true under ideal conditions. In this review, we discuss the importance of energy loss mechanisms to establish robustness in photosynthetic light harvesting. Thermal energy dissipation of light-harvesting complexes (LHCs) in different environments is investigated and the relationships and contrasts between concentration quenching of high pigment concentrations, photoprotection (non-photochemical quenching), quenching due to protein aggregation, and fluorescence blinking are discussed. The role of charge-transfer states in light harvesting and energy dissipation is highlighted and the importance of controlled protein structural disorder to switch the light-harvesting antennae between effective light harvesters and efficient energy quenchers is underscored. The main LHC of plants, LHCII, is used as a prime example.

  5. Light- induced electron transfer and ATP synthesis in a carotene synthesizing insect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmalette, Jean Christophe; Dombrovsky, Aviv; Brat, Pierre; Mertz, Christian; Capovilla, Maria; Robichon, Alain

    2012-08-01

    A singular adaptive phenotype of a parthenogenetic insect species (Acyrthosiphon pisum) was selected in cold conditions and is characterized by a remarkable apparition of a greenish colour. The aphid pigments involve carotenoid genes well defined in chloroplasts and cyanobacteria and amazingly present in the aphid genome, likely by lateral transfer during evolution. The abundant carotenoid synthesis in aphids suggests strongly that a major and unknown physiological role is related to these compounds beyond their canonical anti-oxidant properties. We report here that the capture of light energy in living aphids results in the photo induced electron transfer from excited chromophores to acceptor molecules. The redox potentials of molecules involved in this process would be compatible with the reduction of the NAD+ coenzyme. This appears as an archaic photosynthetic system consisting of photo-emitted electrons that are in fine funnelled into the mitochondrial reducing power in order to synthesize ATP molecules.

  6. The Arabidopsis thylakoid chloride channel AtCLCe functions in chloride homeostasis and regulation of photosynthetic electron transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei eHerdean

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chloride ions can be translocated across cell membranes through Cl− channels or Cl−/H+ exchangers. The thylakoid-located member of the Cl− channel CLC family in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtCLCe was hypothesized to play a role in photosynthetic regulation based on the initial photosynthetic characterization of clce mutant lines. The reduced nitrate content of Arabidopsis clce mutants suggested a role in regulation of plant nitrate homeostasis. In this study, we aimed to further investigate the role of AtCLCe in the regulation of ion homeostasis and photosynthetic processes in the thylakoid membrane. We report that the size and composition of proton motive force were mildly altered in two independent Arabidopsis clce mutant lines. Most pronounced effects in the clce mutants were observed on the photosynthetic electron transport of dark-adapted plants, based on the altered shape and associated parameters of the polyphasic OJIP kinetics of chlorophyll a fluorescence induction. Other alterations were found in the kinetics of state transition and in the macro-organisation of photosystem II supercomplexes, as indicated by circular dichroism measurements. Pre-treatment with KCl but not with KNO3 restored the wild-type photosynthetic phenotype. Analyses by transmission electron microscopy revealed a bow-like arrangement of the thylakoid network and a large thylakoid-free stromal region in chloroplast sections from the dark-adapted clce plants. Based on these data, we propose that AtCLCe functions in Cl− homeostasis after transition from light to dark, which affects chloroplast ultrastructure and regulation of photosynthetic electron transport.

  7. Response of Lemna minor L. to short-term cobalt exposure: The effect on photosynthetic electron transport chain and induction of oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begović, Lidija; Mlinarić, Selma; Antunović Dunić, Jasenka; Katanić, Zorana; Lončarić, Zdenko; Lepeduš, Hrvoje; Cesar, Vera

    2016-06-01

    The effect of two concentrations of cobalt (Co(2+)) on photosynthetic activity and antioxidative response in Lemna minor L. were assessed 24, 48 and 72h after the start of the exposure. Higher concentration of cobalt (1mM) induced growth inhibition while lower concentration (0.01mM) increased photosynthetic pigments content. Analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients revealed high sensitivity of photosystem II primary photochemistry to excess of Co(2+) especially at the higher concentration where decreased electron transport beyond primary quinone acceptor QA(-) and impaired function of oxygen evolving complex (OEC) was observed. Due to impairment of OEC, oxygen production was decreased at higher Co(2+) concentration. Activity of superoxide dismutase was mainly inhibited while lipid peroxidation increased, at both concentrations, indicating that cobalt-induced oxidative damage after short exposure and moreover, susceptibility of the membranes in the cell to cobalt toxicity. Results obtained in this study suggest possible application of used parameters as tools in assessment of early damage caused by metals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. High-temperature sensitivity and its acclimation for photosynthetic electron reactions of desert succulents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetti, M.B.; Nobel, P.S. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1987-08-01

    Photosynthetic electron reactions of succulent plants from hot deserts are able to tolerate extremely high temperatures and to acclimate to seasonal increase in temperature. In this study, we report the influence of relatively long, in vivo, high-temperature treatments on electron transport reactions for two desert succulents, Agave deserti and Opuntia ficus-indica, species which can tolerate 60{degree}C. Whole chain electron transport averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive to a 1-hour high-temperature treatment than did PSII (Photosystem II) which in turn averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive than did PSI. For plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30{degree}C/20{degree}C, treatment at 50{degree}C cause these reactions to be inhibited an average of 39% during the first hour, an additional 31% during the next 4 hours, and 100% by 12 hours. Upon shifting the plants from 30{degree}C/20{degree}C to 45{degree}C/35{degree}C, the high temperatures where activity was inhibited 50% increased 3{degree}C to 8{degree}C for the three electron transport reactions, the half-times for acclimation averaging 5 days for A. deserti and 4 days for O. ficus-indica. For the 45{degree}C/35{degree}C plants treated at 60{degree}C for 1 hour, PSI activity was reduced by 54% for A. deserti and 36% for O. ficus-indica. Acclimation leads to a toleration of very high temperatures without substantial disruption of electron transport for these desert succulents, facilitating their survival in hot deserts. Indeed, the electron transport reactions of these species tolerate longer periods at higher temperatures than any other vascular plants so far reported.

  9. Geometric stability and electronic structure of infinite and finite phosphorus atomic chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Jingsi; Zhou Linwei; Ji Wei

    2017-01-01

    One-dimensional mono- or few-atomic chains were successfully fabricated in a variety of two-dimensional materials, like graphene, BN, and transition metal dichalcogenides, which exhibit striking transport and mechanical properties. However, atomic chains of black phosphorus (BP), an emerging electronic and optoelectronic material, is yet to be investigated. Here, we comprehensively considered the geometry stability of six categories of infinite BP atomic chains, transitions among them, and their electronic structures. These categories include mono- and dual-atomic linear, armchair, and zigzag chains. Each zigzag chain was found to be the most stable in each category with the same chain width. The mono-atomic zigzag chain was predicted as a Dirac semi-metal. In addition, we proposed prototype structures of suspended and supported finite atomic chains. It was found that the zigzag chain is, again, the most stable form and could be transferred from mono-atomic armchair chains. An orientation dependence was revealed for supported armchair chains that they prefer an angle of roughly 35 ° –37 ° perpendicular to the BP edge, corresponding to the [110] direction of the substrate BP sheet. These results may promote successive research on mono- or few-atomic chains of BP and other two-dimensional materials for unveiling their unexplored physical properties. (special topic)

  10. Electron Transfer Strategies Regulate Carbonate Mineral and Micropore Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhirui; Tice, Michael M

    2018-01-01

    Some microbial carbonates are robust biosignatures due to their distinct morphologies and compositions. However, whether carbonates induced by microbial iron reduction have such features is unknown. Iron-reducing bacteria use various strategies to transfer electrons to iron oxide minerals (e.g., membrane-bound enzymes, soluble electron shuttles, nanowires, as well as different mechanisms for moving over or attaching to mineral surfaces). This diversity has the potential to create mineral biosignatures through manipulating the microenvironments in which carbonate precipitation occurs. We used Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Geothrix fermentans, and Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, representing three different strategies, to reduce solid ferric hydroxide in order to evaluate their influence on carbonate and micropore formation (micro-size porosity in mineral rocks). Our results indicate that electron transfer strategies determined the morphology (rhombohedral, spherical, or long-chained) of precipitated calcium-rich siderite by controlling the level of carbonate saturation and the location of carbonate formation. Remarkably, electron transfer strategies also produced distinctive cell-shaped micropores in both carbonate and hydroxide minerals, thus producing suites of features that could potentially serve as biosignatures recording information about the sizes, shapes, and physiologies of iron-reducing organisms. Key Words: Microbial iron reduction-Micropore-Electron transfer strategies-Microbial carbonate. Astrobiology 18, 28-36.

  11. On the length dependence of bridge-mediated electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, E.G.; Shevchenko, Ye.V.; May, V.

    2003-01-01

    Bridge-mediated nonadiabatic donor-acceptor (D-A) electron transfer (ET) is studied for the case of a regular molecular bridge of N identical units. It is shown that the multi-exponential ET kinetics reduces to a single-exponential transfer if, and only if, the integral population of the bridge remains small (less than 10 -2 ). An analytical expression for the overall D-A ET rate is derived and the necessary and sufficient conditions are formulated at which the rate is given as a sum of a superexchange and a sequential contribution. To describe experimental data on the N-dependence of ET reactions an approximate form of the overall transfer rate is derived. This expression is used to reproduce experimental data on distant ET through polyproline chains. Finally it is noted that the obtained analytical results can also be used for the description of more complex two-electron transfer reactions if the latter comprises separate single-electron pathways

  12. Quantum communication and state transfer in spin chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Jeugt, Joris

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the time evolution of a single spin excitation state in certain linear spin chains, as a model for quantum communication. We consider first the simplest possible spin chain, where the spin chain data (the nearest neighbour interaction strengths and the magnetic field strengths) are constant throughout the chain. The time evolution of a single spin state is determined, and this time evolution is illustrated by means of an animation. Some years ago it was discovered that when the spin chain data are of a special form so-called perfect state transfer takes place. These special spin chain data can be linked to the Jacobi matrix entries of Krawtchouk polynomials or dual Hahn polynomials. We discuss here the case related to Krawtchouk polynomials, and illustrate the possibility of perfect state transfer by an animation showing the time evolution of the spin chain from an initial single spin state. Very recently, these ideas were extended to discrete orthogonal polynomials of q-hypergeometric type. Here, a remarkable result is a new analytic model where perfect state transfer is achieved: this is when the spin chain data are related to the Jacobi matrix of q-Krawtchouk polynomials. This case is discussed here, and again illustrated by means of an animation.

  13. Simulation of solution phase electron transfer in a compact donor-acceptor dyad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Tim; Wang, Lee-Ping; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2011-10-27

    Charge separation (CS) and charge recombination (CR) rates in photosynthetic architectures are difficult to control, yet their ratio can make or break photon-to-current conversion efficiencies. A rational design approach to the enhancement of CS over CR requires a mechanistic understanding of the underlying electron-transfer (ET) process, including the role of the environment. Toward this goal, we introduce a QM/MM protocol for ET simulations and use it to characterize CR in the formanilide-anthraquinone dyad (FAAQ). Our simulations predict fast recombination of the charge-transfer excited state, in agreement with recent experiments. The computed electronic couplings show an electronic state dependence and are weaker in solution than in the gas phase. We explore the role of cis-trans isomerization on the CR kinetics, and we find strong correlation between the vertical energy gaps of the full simulations and a collective solvent polarization coordinate. Our approach relies on constrained density functional theory to obtain accurate diabatic electronic states on the fly for molecular dynamics simulations, while orientational and electronic polarization of the solvent is captured by a polarizable force field based on a Drude oscillator model. The method offers a unified approach to the characterization of driving forces, reorganization energies, electronic couplings, and nonlinear solvent effects in light-harvesting systems.

  14. Cytochrome b 6 f function and localization, phosphorylation state of thylakoid membrane proteins and consequences on cyclic electron flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Louis; Chazaux, Marie; Peltier, Gilles; Johnson, Xenie; Alric, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Both the structure and the protein composition of thylakoid membranes have an impact on light harvesting and electron transfer in the photosynthetic chain. Thylakoid membranes form stacks and lamellae where photosystem II and photosystem I localize, respectively. Light-harvesting complexes II can be associated to either PSII or PSI depending on the redox state of the plastoquinone pool, and their distribution is governed by state transitions. Upon state transitions, the thylakoid ultrastructure and lateral distribution of proteins along the membrane are subject to significant rearrangements. In addition, quinone diffusion is limited to membrane microdomains and the cytochrome b 6 f complex localizes either to PSII-containing grana stacks or PSI-containing stroma lamellae. Here, we discuss possible similarities or differences between green algae and C3 plants on the functional consequences of such heterogeneities in the photosynthetic electron transport chain and propose a model in which quinones, accepting electrons either from PSII (linear flow) or NDH/PGR pathways (cyclic flow), represent a crucial control point. Our aim is to give an integrated description of these processes and discuss their potential roles in the balance between linear and cyclic electron flows.

  15. A new pathway for transmembrane electron transfer in photosynthetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides not involving the excited special pair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brederode, M.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Mourik, F.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; van Grondelle, R.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted that electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis is driven by the first singlet excited state of a special pair of bacteriochlorophylls (P*). We have examined the first steps of electron transfer in a mutant of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center in which charge

  16. Response of Lemna minor L. to short-term cobalt exposure: The effect on photosynthetic electron transport chain and induction of oxidative damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begović, Lidija, E-mail: lbegovic@biologija.unios.hr [Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Department of Biology, Ulica cara Hadrijana 8/A, H R -31000 Osijek (Croatia); Mlinarić, Selma, E-mail: smlinaric@biologija.unios.hr [Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Department of Biology, Ulica cara Hadrijana 8/A, H R -31000 Osijek (Croatia); Antunović Dunić, Jasenka, E-mail: jantunovic@biologija.unios.hr [Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Department of Biology, Ulica cara Hadrijana 8/A, H R -31000 Osijek (Croatia); Katanić, Zorana, E-mail: zkatanic@biologija.unios.hr [Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Department of Biology, Ulica cara Hadrijana 8/A, H R -31000 Osijek (Croatia); Lončarić, Zdenko, E-mail: zdenko.loncaric@pfos.hr [Faculty of Agriculture, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Ulica kralja Petra Svačića 1d, H R -31000 Osijek (Croatia); Lepeduš, Hrvoje, E-mail: hlepedus@yahoo.com [Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Lorenza Jägera 9, HR-31000 Osijek (Croatia); Cesar, Vera, E-mail: vcesarus@yahoo.com [Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Department of Biology, Ulica cara Hadrijana 8/A, H R -31000 Osijek (Croatia)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) impaired the function of oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in L. minor L. • Electron transport through PSII components varied depending on Co{sup 2+} concentration. • K-band was proven to be suitable parameter for investigation of Co{sup 2+} toxicity. • Increased lipid peroxidation level showed early oxidative damage induced by Co{sup 2+}. - Abstract: The effect of two concentrations of cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) on photosynthetic activity and antioxidative response in Lemna minor L. were assessed 24, 48 and 72 h after the start of the exposure. Higher concentration of cobalt (1 mM) induced growth inhibition while lower concentration (0.01 mM) increased photosynthetic pigments content. Analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients revealed high sensitivity of photosystem II primary photochemistry to excess of Co{sup 2+} especially at the higher concentration where decreased electron transport beyond primary quinone acceptor Q{sub A}{sup −} and impaired function of oxygen evolving complex (OEC) was observed. Due to impairment of OEC, oxygen production was decreased at higher Co{sup 2+} concentration. Activity of superoxide dismutase was mainly inhibited while lipid peroxidation increased, at both concentrations, indicating that cobalt-induced oxidative damage after short exposure and moreover, susceptibility of the membranes in the cell to cobalt toxicity. Results obtained in this study suggest possible application of used parameters as tools in assessment of early damage caused by metals.

  17. Role of PufX protein in photosynthetic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. 1. PufX is required for efficient light-driven electron transfer and photophosphorylation under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, W P; Francia, F; Venturoli, G; Melandri, B A; Verméglio, A; Oesterhelt, D

    1995-11-21

    The pufX gene is essential for photoheterotrophic growth of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. In order to analyze the molecular function of the PufX membrane protein, we constructed a chromosomal pufX deletion mutant and phenotypically compared it to a pufX+ control strain and to two suppressor mutants which are able to grow photosynthetically in the absence of pufX. Using this genetic background, we confirmed that PufX is required for photoheterotrophic growth under anaerobic conditions, although all components of the photosynthetic apparatus were present in similar amounts in all strains investigated. We show that the deletion of PufX is not lethal for illuminated pufX- cells, suggesting that PufX is required for photosynthetic cell division. Since chromatophores isolated from the pufX- mutant were found to be unsealed vesicles, the role of PufX in photosynthetic energy transduction was studied in vivo. We show that PufX is essential for light-induced ATP synthesis (photophosphorylation) in anaerobically incubated cells. Measurements of absorption changes induced by a single turnover flash demonstrated that PufX is not required for electron flow through the reaction center and the cytochrome bc1 complex under anaerobic conditions. During prolonged illumination, however, PufX is essential for the generation of a sufficiently large membrane potential to allow photosynthetic growth. These in vivo results demonstrate that under anaerobic conditions PufX plays an essential role in facilitating effective interaction of the components of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  18. Effects of different algaecides on the photosynthetic capacity, cell integrity and microcystin-LR release of Microcystis aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Shiqing; Shao, Yisheng; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Qiao, Junlian; Ou, Huase; Deng, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Bench scale tests were conducted to study the effects of four common algaecides, including copper sulfate, hydrogen peroxide, diuron and ethyl 2-methylacetoacetate (EMA) on the photosynthetic capacity, cell integrity and microcystin-LR (MC-LR) release of Microcystis aeruginosa. The release of potassium (K + ) from cell membrane during algaecide exposure was also analyzed. The three typical photosynthetic parameters, including the effective quantum yield (φ e ), photosynthetic efficiency (α) and maximal electron transport rate (rETR max ), were measured by a pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry. Results showed that the photosynthetic capacity was all inhibited by the four algaecides, to different degrees, by limiting the energy capture in photosynthesis, and blocking the electron transfer chain in primary reaction. For example, at high diuron concentration (7.5 mg L −1 ), φ e , α and rETR max decreased from 0.46 to 0.19 (p −2 s −1 /μmol photons m −2 s −1 , and from 160.7 to 0.1 (p −2 s −1 compared with the control group after 96 h of exposure, respectively. Furthermore, the increase of algaecide dose could lead to the cell lysis, as well as release of intracellular MC-LR that enhanced the accumulation of extracellular MC-LR. The order of MC-LR release potential for the four algaecides was CuSO 4 > H 2 O 2 > diuron > EMA. Highlights: • PAM was used to investigate the effects of algaecides on Microcystis aeruginosa. • We estimate the release of potassium (K + ) from cell membrane for cell lysis. • The risk of microcystin-LR release was evaluated after algaecides exposure. • The order of MC-LR release potential was copper sulfate > hydrogen peroxide > diuron > ethyl 2-methylacetoacetate

  19. Effects of different algaecides on the photosynthetic capacity, cell integrity and microcystin-LR release of Microcystis aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shiqing [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Shao, Yisheng, E-mail: yishengshao@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); China Academy of Urban Planning and Design, Beijing 100037 (China); Gao, Naiyun [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Deng, Yang [Department of Earth and Environmental Studies, Montclair State University, Montclair NJ 07043 (United States); Qiao, Junlian; Ou, Huase; Deng, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Bench scale tests were conducted to study the effects of four common algaecides, including copper sulfate, hydrogen peroxide, diuron and ethyl 2-methylacetoacetate (EMA) on the photosynthetic capacity, cell integrity and microcystin-LR (MC-LR) release of Microcystis aeruginosa. The release of potassium (K{sup +}) from cell membrane during algaecide exposure was also analyzed. The three typical photosynthetic parameters, including the effective quantum yield (φ{sub e}), photosynthetic efficiency (α) and maximal electron transport rate (rETR{sub max}), were measured by a pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry. Results showed that the photosynthetic capacity was all inhibited by the four algaecides, to different degrees, by limiting the energy capture in photosynthesis, and blocking the electron transfer chain in primary reaction. For example, at high diuron concentration (7.5 mg L{sup −1}), φ{sub e}, α and rETR{sub max} decreased from 0.46 to 0.19 (p < 0.01), from 0.20 to 0.01 (p < 0.01) μmol electrons m{sup −2} s{sup −1}/μmol photons m{sup −2} s{sup −1}, and from 160.7 to 0.1 (p < 0.001) μmol m{sup −2} s{sup −1} compared with the control group after 96 h of exposure, respectively. Furthermore, the increase of algaecide dose could lead to the cell lysis, as well as release of intracellular MC-LR that enhanced the accumulation of extracellular MC-LR. The order of MC-LR release potential for the four algaecides was CuSO{sub 4} > H{sub 2}O{sub 2} > diuron > EMA. Highlights: • PAM was used to investigate the effects of algaecides on Microcystis aeruginosa. • We estimate the release of potassium (K{sup +}) from cell membrane for cell lysis. • The risk of microcystin-LR release was evaluated after algaecides exposure. • The order of MC-LR release potential was copper sulfate > hydrogen peroxide > diuron > ethyl 2-methylacetoacetate.

  20. The role of energy losses in photosynthetic light harvesting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krüger, T P J; Van Grondelle, R

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthesis operates at the bottom of the food chain to convert the energy of light into carbohydrates at a remarkable global rate of about 130 TW. Nonetheless, the overall photosynthetic process has a conversion efficiency of a few percent at best, significantly less than bottom-up photovoltaic cells. The primary photosynthetic steps, consisting of light harvesting and charge separation, are often presented as having near-unity quantum efficiency but this holds only true under ideal conditions. In this review, we discuss the importance of energy loss mechanisms to establish robustness in photosynthetic light harvesting. Thermal energy dissipation of light-harvesting complexes (LHCs) in different environments is investigated and the relationships and contrasts between concentration quenching of high pigment concentrations, photoprotection (non-photochemical quenching), quenching due to protein aggregation, and fluorescence blinking are discussed. The role of charge-transfer states in light harvesting and energy dissipation is highlighted and the importance of controlled protein structural disorder to switch the light-harvesting antennae between effective light harvesters and efficient energy quenchers is underscored. The main LHC of plants, LHCII, is used as a prime example. (topical review)

  1. Redox regulation of photosynthetic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queval, Guillaume; Foyer, Christine H

    2012-12-19

    Redox chemistry and redox regulation are central to the operation of photosynthesis and respiration. However, the roles of different oxidants and antioxidants in the regulation of photosynthetic or respiratory gene expression remain poorly understood. Leaf transcriptome profiles of a range of Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes that are deficient in either hydrogen peroxide processing enzymes or in low molecular weight antioxidant were therefore compared to determine how different antioxidant systems that process hydrogen peroxide influence transcripts encoding proteins targeted to the chloroplasts or mitochondria. Less than 10 per cent overlap was observed in the transcriptome patterns of leaves that are deficient in either photorespiratory (catalase (cat)2) or chloroplastic (thylakoid ascorbate peroxidase (tapx)) hydrogen peroxide processing. Transcripts encoding photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle components were lower in glutathione-deficient leaves, as were the thylakoid NAD(P)H (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate)) dehydrogenases (NDH) mRNAs. Some thylakoid NDH mRNAs were also less abundant in tAPX-deficient and ascorbate-deficient leaves. Transcripts encoding the external and internal respiratory NDHs were increased by low glutathione and low ascorbate. Regulation of transcripts encoding specific components of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains by hydrogen peroxide, ascorbate and glutathione may serve to balance non-cyclic and cyclic electron flow pathways in relation to oxidant production and reductant availability.

  2. Electron Transfer Strategies Regulate Carbonate Mineral and Micropore Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhirui; Tice, Michael M.

    2018-01-01

    Some microbial carbonates are robust biosignatures due to their distinct morphologies and compositions. However, whether carbonates induced by microbial iron reduction have such features is unknown. Iron-reducing bacteria use various strategies to transfer electrons to iron oxide minerals (e.g., membrane-bound enzymes, soluble electron shuttles, nanowires, as well as different mechanisms for moving over or attaching to mineral surfaces). This diversity has the potential to create mineral biosignatures through manipulating the microenvironments in which carbonate precipitation occurs. We used Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Geothrix fermentans, and Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, representing three different strategies, to reduce solid ferric hydroxide in order to evaluate their influence on carbonate and micropore formation (micro-size porosity in mineral rocks). Our results indicate that electron transfer strategies determined the morphology (rhombohedral, spherical, or long-chained) of precipitated calcium-rich siderite by controlling the level of carbonate saturation and the location of carbonate formation. Remarkably, electron transfer strategies also produced distinctive cell-shaped micropores in both carbonate and hydroxide minerals, thus producing suites of features that could potentially serve as biosignatures recording information about the sizes, shapes, and physiologies of iron-reducing organisms.

  3. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  4. Advances in electron transfer chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, Patrick S

    1993-01-01

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Volume 3 presents studies that discuss findings in the various aspects of electron chemistry. The book is comprised of four chapters; each chapter reviews a work that tackles an issue in electron transfer chemistry. Chapter 1 discusses the photoinduced electron transfer in flexible biaryl donor-acceptor molecules. Chapter 2 tackles light-induced electron transfer in inorganic systems in homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. The book also covers internal geometry relaxation effects on electron transfer rates of amino-centered systems. The sequential elec

  5. Chemical models of chains electron transfer in hydroxylating ferment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhrem, A.A.; Kiselev, P.A.; Metelitsa, D.I.

    1977-01-01

    The rate constants are measured of consumption of nicotineamidedinucleotide (NAD-N) during its oxidation by molecular oxygen with the participation of Ti 4+ , Sn 4+ , Cu 2+ , Fe 3+ , VO 2+ , and Ce 4+ ions in mixtures of acetonitrile with water and of dioxane with water taken in a volume ratio of 1:1 (46 deg C). The kinetics of oxidation of NAD-N with the participation of Ti 4+ at 37 deg C in a water-acetonitrile medium is studied in detail. The hydroxylating capacity of the system NAD-N - Ti 4+ - O 2 with respect to naphthalene is proved. The reaction mechanism and its relationship with the microsomal chains of electron transport are discussed

  6. Fragment molecular orbital study on electron tunneling mechanisms in bacterial photosynthetic reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka; Ando, Koji

    2012-11-01

    The tunneling mechanisms of electron transfers (ETs) in photosynthetic reaction center of Blastochloris viridis are studied by the ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method combined with the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) and the bridge Green function (GF) calculations of the electronic coupling T(DA) and the tunneling current method for the ET pathway analysis at the fragment-based resolution. For the ET from batctriopheophytin (H(L)) to menaquinone (MQ), a major tunneling current through Trp M250 and a minor back flow via Ala M215, Ala M216, and His M217 are quantified. For the ET from MQ to ubiquinone, the major tunneling pathway via the nonheme Fe(2+) and His L190 is identified as well as minor pathway via His M217 and small back flows involving His L230, Glu M232, and His M264. At the given molecular structure from X-ray experiment, the spin state of the Fe(2+) ion, its replacement by Zn(2+), or its removal are found to affect the T(DA) value by factors within 2.2. The calculated T(DA) values, together with experimentally estimated values of the driving force and the reorganization energy, give the ET rates in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  7. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Ishizaki, Akihito, E-mail: ishizaki@ims.ac.jp [Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Fleming, Graham R. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley and Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  8. Calculation of the radiative properties of photosynthetic microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauchet, Jérémi; Blanco, Stéphane; Cornet, Jean-François; Fournier, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A generic methodological chain for the predictive calculation of the light-scattering and absorption properties of photosynthetic microorganisms within the visible spectrum is presented here. This methodology has been developed in order to provide the radiative properties needed for the analysis of radiative transfer within photobioreactor processes, with a view to enable their optimization for large-scale sustainable production of chemicals for energy and chemistry. It gathers an electromagnetic model of light-particle interaction along with detailed and validated protocols for the determination of input parameters: morphological and structural characteristics of the studied microorganisms as well as their photosynthetic-pigment content. The microorganisms are described as homogeneous equivalent-particles whose shape and size distribution is characterized by image analysis. The imaginary part of their refractive index is obtained thanks to a new and quite extended database of the in vivo absorption spectra of photosynthetic pigments (that is made available to the reader). The real part of the refractive index is then calculated by using the singly subtractive Kramers–Krönig approximation, for which the anchor point is determined with the Bruggeman mixing rule, based on the volume fraction of the microorganism internal-structures and their refractive indices (extracted from a database). Afterwards, the radiative properties are estimated using the Schiff approximation for spheroidal or cylindrical particles, as a first step toward the description of the complexity and diversity of the shapes encountered within the microbial world. Finally, these predictive results are confronted to experimental normal-hemispherical transmittance spectra for validation. This entire procedure is implemented for Rhodospirillum rubrum, Arthrospira platensis and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, each representative of the main three kinds of photosynthetic microorganisms, i.e. respectively

  9. Calculation of the radiative properties of photosynthetic microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauchet, Jérémi; Blanco, Stéphane; Cornet, Jean-François; Fournier, Richard

    2015-08-01

    A generic methodological chain for the predictive calculation of the light-scattering and absorption properties of photosynthetic microorganisms within the visible spectrum is presented here. This methodology has been developed in order to provide the radiative properties needed for the analysis of radiative transfer within photobioreactor processes, with a view to enable their optimization for large-scale sustainable production of chemicals for energy and chemistry. It gathers an electromagnetic model of light-particle interaction along with detailed and validated protocols for the determination of input parameters: morphological and structural characteristics of the studied microorganisms as well as their photosynthetic-pigment content. The microorganisms are described as homogeneous equivalent-particles whose shape and size distribution is characterized by image analysis. The imaginary part of their refractive index is obtained thanks to a new and quite extended database of the in vivo absorption spectra of photosynthetic pigments (that is made available to the reader). The real part of the refractive index is then calculated by using the singly subtractive Kramers-Krönig approximation, for which the anchor point is determined with the Bruggeman mixing rule, based on the volume fraction of the microorganism internal-structures and their refractive indices (extracted from a database). Afterwards, the radiative properties are estimated using the Schiff approximation for spheroidal or cylindrical particles, as a first step toward the description of the complexity and diversity of the shapes encountered within the microbial world. Finally, these predictive results are confronted to experimental normal-hemispherical transmittance spectra for validation. This entire procedure is implemented for Rhodospirillum rubrum, Arthrospira platensis and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, each representative of the main three kinds of photosynthetic microorganisms, i.e. respectively

  10. A unified picture of energy and electron transfer in primary photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barter, Laura M.C.; Klug, David R.

    2005-01-01

    A quantitative structure-function relationship for an enzyme should relate the coordinates of atoms in a protein structure to the rates, equilibria and activation energies of the catalysed reaction. In effect, the calculational tools used for determining a structure-function relationship in an enzyme are linking two sets of experimental data, one data set being the coordinates of the enzymes constituent atoms and the other being measurements of its chemical activity. The ability to compare structure and function in this quantitative manner is an important stage in the ultimate development of engineering design rules for biological catalysts. This paper discusses the determination of parameters, in particular the state energies and the free energy surfaces that control the structure-function relationship, and thus the catalytic function of a photosynthetic enzyme. We discuss two different microscopic descriptions, one using conventional non-adiabatic electron transfer theory and the other a supermolecular description of the system (the Multimer Model), which takes into account the electron-phonon coupling in the system in a consistent manner. We demonstrate that although conventional non-adiabatic theory can be employed to reproduce the rates of electron transfer it cannot be employed to provide a consistent and unified description of all the spectroscopic data available in the literature from studies of this enzyme

  11. A unified picture of energy and electron transfer in primary photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barter, Laura M.C. [Molecular Dynamics Group, Room 266, Department of Chemistry, South Kensington Campus, Exhibition Road, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: l.barter@ic.ac.uk; Klug, David R. [Molecular Dynamics Group, Room 266, Department of Chemistry, South Kensington Campus, Exhibition Road, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-07

    A quantitative structure-function relationship for an enzyme should relate the coordinates of atoms in a protein structure to the rates, equilibria and activation energies of the catalysed reaction. In effect, the calculational tools used for determining a structure-function relationship in an enzyme are linking two sets of experimental data, one data set being the coordinates of the enzymes constituent atoms and the other being measurements of its chemical activity. The ability to compare structure and function in this quantitative manner is an important stage in the ultimate development of engineering design rules for biological catalysts. This paper discusses the determination of parameters, in particular the state energies and the free energy surfaces that control the structure-function relationship, and thus the catalytic function of a photosynthetic enzyme. We discuss two different microscopic descriptions, one using conventional non-adiabatic electron transfer theory and the other a supermolecular description of the system (the Multimer Model), which takes into account the electron-phonon coupling in the system in a consistent manner. We demonstrate that although conventional non-adiabatic theory can be employed to reproduce the rates of electron transfer it cannot be employed to provide a consistent and unified description of all the spectroscopic data available in the literature from studies of this enzyme.

  12. Photosynthetic antennas and reaction centers: Current understanding and prospects for improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, R.E. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1996-09-01

    A brief introduction to the principles, structures and kinetic processes that take place in natural photosynthetic reaction center complexes is presented. Energy is first collected by an antenna system, and is transferred to a reaction center complex where primary electron transfer takes place. Secondary reactions lead to oxidation of water and reduction of CO{sub 2} in some classes of organisms. Antenna systems are highly regulated to maximize energy collection efficiency while avoiding photodamage. Some areas that are presently not well understood are listed.

  13. Nitrogen control of photosynthetic protein synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1986-09-01

    Plant growth is severely affected by impaired photosynthesis resulting from nitrogen deficiency. The molecular aspects of this effect are being studied in the green alga Chlamydomonas grown in continuous culture systems. Photosynthetic membranes of nitrogen-limited cells are dramatically depleted in chlorophylls, xanthophylls and proteins of the light-harvesting complexes. In contrast, enzymes of the reductive pentose phosphate cycle and electron transport chain complexes are reduced only 40 to 65% on a per cell basis comparison with nitrogen-sufficient cultures. From analyses of mRNA levels by in vitro translation and hybridization analyses with cloned DNA sequences for photosynthetic proteins, we have found there are rather minor effects of nitrogen deficiency on nuclear or chloroplast gene transcription. Maturation of a transcript of the nuclear-encoded small subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase is inhibited in nitrogen-deficient cells and causes accumulation of large amounts of mRNA precursors. Most of the effects of nitrogen deficiency on photosynthetic proteins appear to result from posttranscriptional regulatory processes: light-harvesting protein synthesis may be sustained but their import into chloroplasts or translocation to photosynthetic membranes is impaired. Nitrogen-deficient cells lack violaxanthin, a pigment that is essential for the structure, function and biogenesis of the major antenna complexes. The absence of this pigment may be a causative factor for the deficiency of light harvesting complexes. Finally, the accumulation of massive amounts of starch and triglycerides in nitrogen-limited cells indicate there are some genes whose maximal expression is dependent upon nitrogen-limiting conditions. 10 refs.

  14. Visualization of Excitonic Structure in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson Photosynthetic Complex by Polarization-Dependent Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, Graham; Read, Elizabeth L.; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S.; Engel, Gregory S.; Wen, Jianzhong; Blankenship, Robert E.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic light-harvesting proceeds by the collection and highly efficient transfer of energy through a network of pigment-protein complexes. Inter-chromophore electronic couplings and interactions between pigments and the surrounding protein determine energy levels of excitonic states and dictate the mechanism of energy flow. The excitonic structure (orientation of excitonic transition dipoles) of pigment-protein complexes is generally deduced indirectly from x-ray crystallography in combination with predictions of transition energies and couplings in the chromophore site basis. Here, we demonstrate that coarse-grained excitonic structural information in the form of projection angles between transition dipole moments can be obtained from polarization-dependent two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of an isotropic sample, particularly when the nonrephasing or free polarization decay signal rather than the photon echo signal is considered. The method provides an experimental link between atomic and electronic structure and accesses dynamical information with femtosecond time resolution. In an investigation of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex from green sulfur bacteria, energy transfer connecting two particular exciton states in the protein is isolated as being the primary contributor to a cross peak in the nonrephasing 2D spectrum at 400 fs under a specific sequence of polarized excitation pulses. The results suggest the possibility of designing experiments using combinations of tailored polarization sequences to separate and monitor individual relaxation pathways

  15. Halogenated 1-Hydroxynaphthalene-2-Carboxanilides Affecting Photosynthetic Electron Transport in Photosystem II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goněc, T.; Kos, J.; Pesko, M.; Dohanosová, J.; Oravec, Michal; Liptaj, T.; Králová, K.; Jampílek, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 1709. ISSN 1420-3049 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : hydroxynaphthalene-carboxamides * photosynthetic electron transport ( PET ) inhibition * spinach chloroplasts * structure-activity relationships Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.861, year: 2016

  16. Mathematical Modeling of Acclimation Processes of the Photosynthetic Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Heidari

    2016-10-01

    and systematically analyze the dependence of system key characteristic such as rate constant and pool size. For medium and high light intensity, experimental evidence has been predicted with high accuracy by simulation. In low light intensity (100μE m-2s-1 in a few seconds the light phase, a temporary increase in the rate of NPQ was observed after about 60 seconds it reaches to a steady state level. Model simulation of the induction of NPQ relaxation is more accurate than previous predictions, due to the introduction of more stringent quenching agents (xanthophylls cycle and also the light-harvesting complex protonations. The results showed that the pH drop in the transition from darkness to light and high light intensity increases. For low light intensity quenching process occurs with a more gentle slope to the prediction model based on previous experiments is more realistic. In low light conditions, the proton concentration can easily be balanced by ATP synthase activity. This leads to a reduction in current proton-proton feedback gathered during few seconds is balanced. Thus, at high light intensities ATP levels remained stable in the new model is more consistent with reality. Conclusions A simple mathematical model which has been developed in this paper provides a more detailed description of this process and be able to predict the various components and parameters associated with it. Comparison of simulation results with experimental data revealed that protonated light harvesting complex and Zeaxanthin simultaneously induce NPQ quenching processes. The results can be seen as theoretical basis for developing more accurate models to study molecular mechanisms of acclimation processes of the photosynthetic chain.

  17. Regulation of photosynthetic electron flow in isolated chloroplasts by bicarbonate, formate and herbicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, J.F.H.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis describes some efforts that were made to gain a better understanding of the processes involved in the regulation of photosynthetic electron flow by bicarbonate, formate and herbicides in chloroplasts. In the past decade a large amount of research has been devoted to get insight into the

  18. Ab initio study on electron excitation and electron transfer in tryptophan-tyrosine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Jing; Li Xiangyuan

    2002-01-01

    In this article, ab initio calculation has been performed to evaluate the transition energy of electronic excitation in tryptophan and tyrosine by using semiempirical molecular orbital method AM1 and complete active space self-consistent field method. The solvent effect has been considered by means of the conductor-like screening model. After geometric optimizations of isolated tryptophan and tyrosine, and their corresponding radicals and cations, reaction heat of these electron transfer reactions have been obtained by the means of complete active space self-consistent field method. The transition energies from the ground state, respectively, to the lowest excited state and to the lowest triplet state of these two amino acids are also calculated and compared with the experimentally observed values. The ionization potential and electron affinity are also calculated for tryptophan and tyrosine employing Koopmans' theorem and ab initio calculation. Compared with the experimental measurements, the theoretical results are found satisfactory. Theoretical results give good explanations on the experimental phenomena that N 3 · can preferably oxide the side chain of tryptophan residue and then the electron transfer from tyrosine residue to tryptophan residue follows in peptides involving tryptophan and tyrosine

  19. Observation of Electronic Excitation Transfer Through Light Harvesting Complex II Using Two-Dimensional Electronic-Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, NHC; Gruenke, NL; Oliver, TAA; Ballottari, M; Bassi, R; Fleming, GR

    2016-10-05

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) serves a central role in light harvesting for oxygenic photosynthesis and is arguably the most important photosynthetic antenna complex. In this article, we present two-dimensional electronic–vibrational (2DEV) spectra of LHCII isolated from spinach, demonstrating the possibility of using this technique to track the transfer of electronic excitation energy between specific pigments within the complex. We assign the spectral bands via comparison with the 2DEV spectra of the isolated chromophores, chlorophyll a and b, and present evidence that excitation energy between the pigments of the complex are observed in these spectra. Lastly, we analyze the essential components of the 2DEV spectra using singular value decomposition, which makes it possible to reveal the relaxation pathways within this complex.

  20. Efficient quantum state transfer in an engineered chain of quantum bits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Martin; Knill, Emanuel; Kapit, Eliot; Vissers, Michael R.; Pappas, David P.

    2016-03-01

    We present a method of performing quantum state transfer in a chain of superconducting quantum bits. Our protocol is based on engineering the energy levels of the qubits in the chain and tuning them all simultaneously with an external flux bias. The system is designed to allow sequential adiabatic state transfers, resulting in on-demand quantum state transfer from one end of the chain to the other. Numerical simulations of the master equation using realistic parameters for capacitive nearest-neighbor coupling, energy relaxation, and dephasing show that fast, high-fidelity state transfer should be feasible using this method.

  1. Multiple photosynthetic transitions, polyploidy, and lateral gene transfer in the grass subtribe Neurachninae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Wallace, Mark J; Clayton, Harmony; Edwards, Erika J; Furbank, Robert T; Hattersley, Paul W; Sage, Rowan F; Macfarlane, Terry D; Ludwig, Martha

    2012-10-01

    The Neurachninae is the only grass lineage known to contain C(3), C(4), and C(3)-C(4) intermediate species, and as such has been suggested as a model system for studies of photosynthetic pathway evolution in the Poaceae; however, a lack of a robust phylogenetic framework has hindered this possibility. In this study, plastid and nuclear markers were used to reconstruct evolutionary relationships among Neurachninae species. In addition, photosynthetic types were determined with carbon isotope ratios, and genome sizes with flow cytometry. A high frequency of autopolyploidy was found in the Neurachninae, including in Neurachne munroi F.Muell. and Paraneurachne muelleri S.T.Blake, which independently evolved C(4) photosynthesis. Phylogenetic analyses also showed that following their separate C(4) origins, these two taxa exchanged a gene encoding the C(4) form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. The C(3)-C(4) intermediate Neurachne minor S.T.Blake is phylogenetically distinct from the two C(4) lineages, indicating that intermediacy in this species evolved separately from transitional stages preceding C(4) origins. The Neurachninae shows a substantial capacity to evolve new photosynthetic pathways repeatedly. Enablers of these transitions might include anatomical pre-conditions in the C(3) ancestor, and frequent autopolyploidization. Transfer of key C(4) genetic elements between independently evolved C(4) taxa may have also facilitated a rapid adaptation of photosynthesis in these grasses that had to survive in the harsh climate appearing during the late Pliocene in Australia.

  2. Simulation of excitonic optical line shapes of cyclic oligomers - models for basic units of photosynthetic antenna systems: Transfer integral versus local energy fluctuations with dichotomic coloured noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barvik, I.; Reineker, P.; Warns, C.; Neidlinger, T.

    1995-08-01

    For Frenkel excitons moving on cyclic and linear molecular chains modeling in part photosynthetic antenna systems we investigate the influence of dynamic and static disorder on their optical line shapes. The dynamic disorder describes the influence of vibrational degrees of freedom and is taken into account by fluctuations of the transfer matrix element between neighbouring molecules. The fluctuations are represented by dichotomic Markov processes with coloured noise. We obtain a closed set of equations of motion for the correlation functions determining the optical line shape which is solved exactly. The line shapes are discussed for various sets of the model parameters and arrangements of molecules and their dipole moments. (author). 63 refs, 10 figs

  3. Energy transfer in real and artificial photosynthetic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindman, J.C.; Hunt, J.E.; Katz, J.J.

    1995-02-01

    Fluorescence emission from the photosynthetic organisms Tribonema aequale, Anacystis nidulau, and Chlorelia vulgais and from some chlorophyll model systems have been recorded as a function of excitation wavelength and temperature. Considerable similarity was observed in the effects of excitation wavelength and temperature on the fluorescence from intact photosynthetic organisms and the model systems. The parallelism in behavior suggest that self-assembly processes may occur in both the in vivo and in vitro systems that give rise to chlorophyll species at low temperature that may differ significantly from those present at ambient temperatures.

  4. Electrolyte control of photosynthetic electron transport in cyanobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papageorgiou, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    Ion-permeable cells (permeaplasts) of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans were prepared enzymatically and were characterized with respect to several structural and functional indices. The permeaplasts contain intact, ion-impermeable thylakoids and are photosynthetically active. The authors discuss how, employing these cells, they investigated the effects of cations, acting either on the outer, or on the inner thylakoid membrane surface, on photoinduced electron exchanges with anionic donors (Cyt c-550, plastocyanin, innersurface), or anionic acceptors (FeCN 3- ; outer surface). Cations accelerate such exchanges by accumulating near the solution-membrane interfaces and screening the negative surface charge of membranes. Electrostatic screening, however, is not the only contributing factor, and other electrolyte-linked influences must be invoked in order to interpret the experimental observations

  5. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A.; Chobot, Sarah E.; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C.; Leslie Dutton, P.; Discher, Bohdana M.

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe the design, Escherichia coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics — the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  6. Impact of the lipid bilayer on energy transfer kinetics in the photosynthetic protein LH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogren, John I; Tong, Ashley L; Gordon, Samuel C; Chenu, Aurélia; Lu, Yue; Blankenship, Robert E; Cao, Jianshu; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S

    2018-03-28

    Photosynthetic purple bacteria convert solar energy to chemical energy with near unity quantum efficiency. The light-harvesting process begins with absorption of solar energy by an antenna protein called Light-Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2). Energy is subsequently transferred within LH2 and then through a network of additional light-harvesting proteins to a central location, termed the reaction center, where charge separation occurs. The energy transfer dynamics of LH2 are highly sensitive to intermolecular distances and relative organizations. As a result, minor structural perturbations can cause significant changes in these dynamics. Previous experiments have primarily been performed in two ways. One uses non-native samples where LH2 is solubilized in detergent, which can alter protein structure. The other uses complex membranes that contain multiple proteins within a large lipid area, which make it difficult to identify and distinguish perturbations caused by protein-protein interactions and lipid-protein interactions. Here, we introduce the use of the biochemical platform of model membrane discs to study the energy transfer dynamics of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes in a near-native environment. We incorporate a single LH2 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides into membrane discs that provide a spectroscopically amenable sample in an environment more physiological than detergent but less complex than traditional membranes. This provides a simplified system to understand an individual protein and how the lipid-protein interaction affects energy transfer dynamics. We compare the energy transfer rates of detergent-solubilized LH2 with those of LH2 in membrane discs using transient absorption spectroscopy and transient absorption anisotropy. For one key energy transfer step in LH2, we observe a 30% enhancement of the rate for LH2 in membrane discs compared to that in detergent. Based on experimental results and theoretical modeling, we attribute this difference to

  7. Electron Transfer between Electrically Conductive Minerals and Quinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Taran

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Long-distance electron transfer in marine environments couples physically separated redox half-reactions, impacting biogeochemical cycles of iron, sulfur and carbon. Bacterial bio-electrochemical systems that facilitate electron transfer via conductive filaments or across man-made electrodes are well-known, but the impact of abiotic currents across naturally occurring conductive and semiconductive minerals is poorly understood. In this paper I use cyclic voltammetry to explore electron transfer between electrodes made of common iron minerals (magnetite, hematite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, mackinawite, and greigite, and hydroquinones—a class of organic molecules found in carbon-rich sediments. Of all tested minerals, only pyrite and magnetite showed an increase in electric current in the presence of organic molecules, with pyrite showing excellent electrocatalytic performance. Pyrite electrodes performed better than commercially available glassy carbon electrodes and showed higher peak currents, lower overpotential values and a smaller separation between oxidation and reduction peaks for each tested quinone. Hydroquinone oxidation on pyrite surfaces was reversible, diffusion controlled, and stable over a large number of potential cycles. Given the ubiquity of both pyrite and quinones, abiotic electron transfer between minerals and organic molecules is likely widespread in Nature and may contribute to several different phenomena, including anaerobic respiration of a wide variety of microorganisms in temporally anoxic zones or in the proximity of hydrothermal vent chimneys, as well as quinone cycling and the propagation of anoxic zones in organic rich waters. Finally, interactions between pyrite and quinones make use of electrochemical gradients that have been suggested as an important source of energy for the origins of life on Earth. Ubiquinones and iron sulfide clusters are common redox cofactors found in electron transport chains across all domains

  8. Electron Transfer Between Electrically Conductive Minerals and Quinones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Olga

    2017-07-01

    Long-distance electron transfer in marine environments couples physically separated redox half-reactions, impacting biogeochemical cycles of iron, sulfur and carbon. Bacterial bio-electrochemical systems that facilitate electron transfer via conductive filaments or across man-made electrodes are well known, but the impact of abiotic currents across naturally occurring conductive and semiconducitve minerals is poorly understood. In this paper I use cyclic voltammetry to explore electron transfer between electrodes made of common iron minerals (magnetite, hematite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, mackinawite and greigite), and hydroquinones - a class of organic molecules found in carbon-rich sediments. Of all tested minerals, only pyrite and magnetite showed an increase in electric current in the presence of organic molecules, with pyrite showing excellent electrocatalytic performance. Pyrite electrodes performed better than commercially available glassy carbon electrodes and showed higher peak currents, lower overpotential values and a smaller separation between oxidation and reduction peaks for each tested quinone. Hydroquinone oxidation on pyrite surfaces was reversible, diffusion controlled, and stable over a large number of potential cycles. Given the ubiquity of both pyrite and quinones, abiotic electron transfer between minerals and organic molecules is likely widespread in Nature and may contribute to several different phenomena, including anaerobic respiration of a wide variety of microorganisms in temporally anoxic zones or in the proximity of hydrothermal vent chimneys, as well as quinone cycling and the propagation of anoxic zones in organic rich waters. Finally, interactions between pyrite and quinones make use of electrochemical gradients that have been suggested as an important source of energy for the origins of life on Earth. Ubiquinones and iron sulfide clusters are common redox cofactors found in electron transport chains across all domains of life and

  9. Oxidation of the FAD cofactor to the 8-formyl-derivative in human electron-transferring flavoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Peter; Toplak, Marina; Fuchs, Katharina; Gerstmann, Eva Christine; Prassl, Ruth; Winkler, Andreas; Macheroux, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The heterodimeric human (h) electron-transferring flavoprotein (ETF) transfers electrons from at least 13 different flavin dehydrogenases to the mitochondrial respiratory chain through a non-covalently bound FAD cofactor. Here, we describe the discovery of an irreversible and pH-dependent oxidation of the 8α-methyl group to 8-formyl-FAD (8f-FAD), which represents a unique chemical modification of a flavin cofactor in the human flavoproteome. Furthermore, a set of hETF variants revealed that several conserved amino acid residues in the FAD-binding pocket of electron-transferring flavoproteins are required for the conversion to the formyl group. Two of the variants generated in our study, namely αR249C and αT266M, cause glutaric aciduria type II, a severe inherited disease. Both of the variants showed impaired formation of 8f-FAD shedding new light on the potential molecular cause of disease development. Interestingly, the conversion of FAD to 8f-FAD yields a very stable flavin semiquinone that exhibited slightly lower rates of electron transfer in an artificial assay system than hETF containing FAD. In contrast, the formation of 8f-FAD enhanced the affinity to human dimethylglycine dehydrogenase 5-fold, indicating that formation of 8f-FAD modulates the interaction of hETF with client enzymes in the mitochondrial matrix. Thus, we hypothesize that the FAD cofactor bound to hETF is subject to oxidation in the alkaline (pH 8) environment of the mitochondrial matrix, which may modulate electron transport between client dehydrogenases and the respiratory chain. This discovery challenges the current concepts of electron transfer processes in mitochondria. PMID:29301933

  10. Revealing Linear Aggregates of Light Harvesting Antenna Proteins in Photosynthetic Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    He, Yufan; Zeng, Xiaohua; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Rajapaksha, Suneth; Kaplan, Samuel; Lu, H. Peter

    2010-01-01

    How light energy is harvested in a natural photosynthetic membrane through energy transfer is closely related to the stoichiometry and arrangement of light harvesting antenna proteins in the membrane. The specific photosynthetic architecture facilitates a rapid and efficient energy transfer among the light harvesting proteins (LH2 and LH1) and to the reaction center. Here we report the identification of linear aggregates of light harvesting proteins, LH2, in the photosynthetic membranes under...

  11. Hierarchical control of electron-transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerhoff, Hans V.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Egger, Louis

    1997-01-01

    In this chapter the role of electron transfer in determining the behaviour of the ATP synthesising enzyme in E. coli is analysed. It is concluded that the latter enzyme lacks control because of special properties of the electron transfer components. These properties range from absence of a strong...... back pressure by the protonmotive force on the rate of electron transfer to hierarchical regulation of the expression of the gens that encode the electron transfer proteins as a response to changes in the bioenergetic properties of the cell.The discussion uses Hierarchical Control Analysis...

  12. Electron-electron Thomas peak in fast transfer ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolmanov, S. G.; McGuire, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    ''Thomas process'' is a name used for a family of singular two-step processes that can lead to electron transfer. The Thomas process of the ''second kind,'' occurring in reactions with both transfer and ionization, utilizes the e-e scattering in the second step, so this Thomas process requires the dynamics of the electron-electron interaction. We calculate numerically the second order element of an S matrix and corresponding cross sections for the transfer ionization process. We find that the position and shape of the Thomas peak depend on both electron-electron and the electron-nucleus interaction. Also the direct and exchange amplitudes are equal at the peak position. We test the peaking approximation used for transfer ionization. Our results can be compared to experimental results for p + +He→H+He 2+ +e - . (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  13. Effects of water stress on photosynthetic electron transport, photophosphorylation, and metabolite levels of Xanthium strumarium mesophyll cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, T D; Badger, M R

    1982-12-01

    Several component processes of photosynthesis were measured in osmotically stressed mesophyll cells of Xanthium strumarium L. The ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration capacity was reduced by water stress. Photophoshorylation was sensitive to water stress but photosynthetic electron transport was unaffected by water potentials down to-40 bar (-4 MPa). The concentrations of several intermediates of the photosynthetic carbon-reduction cycle remained relatively constant and did not indicate that ATP supply was limiting photosynthesis in the water-stressed cells.

  14. Structure and function of cytochrome c2 in electron transfer complexes with the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: optical linear dichroism and EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drepper, F; Mathis, P

    1997-02-11

    The photosynthetic reaction center (RC) and its secondary electron donor the water-soluble cytochrome (cyt) c2 from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides have been used in cross-linked and non-cross-linked complexes, oriented in compressed gels or partially dried multilayers, to study the respective orientation of the primary donor P (BChl dimer) and of cyt c2. Three methods were used: (i) Polarized optical absorption spectra at 295 and 10 K were measured and the linear dichroism of the two individual transitions (Qx, Qy), which are nearly degenerate within the alpha-band of reduced cyt c2, was determined. Attribution of the polarization directions to the molecular axes within the heme plane yielded the average cyt orientation in the complexes. (ii) Time-resolved flash absorption measurements using polarized light allowed determination of the orientation of cyt c2 in complexes which differ in their kinetics of electron transfer. (iii) EPR spectroscopy of ferricyt c2 in cross-linked RC-cyt c2 complexes was used to determine the angle between the heme and the membrane plane. The results suggest the following structural properties for the docking of cyt c2 to the RC: (i) In cross-linked complexes, the two cytochromes displaying half-lives of 0.7 and 60 micros for electron transfer to P+ are similarly oriented (difference plane is parallel to the symmetry axis of the RC (0 degrees +/- 10 degrees). Moreover, the Qy transition, which is assumed to be polarized within the ring III-ring I direction of the heme plane, makes an angle of 56 degrees +/- 1 degree with the symmetry axis. (iii) The dichroism spectrum for the fast phase (0.7 micros) for the non-cross-linked cyt c2-RC complex suggests an orientation similar to that of cross-linked cyt c2, but the heme plane is tilted about 20 degrees closer to the membrane. An alternative model is that two or more bound states of cyt c2 with heme plane tilt angles between 0 degrees and 30 degrees allow the fast electron

  15. Managing the cellular redox hub in photosynthetic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyer, Christine H; Noctor, Graham

    2012-02-01

    Light-driven redox chemistry is a powerful source of redox signals that has a decisive input into transcriptional control within the cell nucleus. Like photosynthetic electron transport pathways, the respiratory electron transport chain exerts a profound control over gene function, in order to balance energy (reductant and ATP) supply with demand, while preventing excessive over-reduction or over-oxidation that would be adversely affect metabolism. Photosynthetic and respiratory redox chemistries are not merely housekeeping processes but they exert a controlling influence over every aspect of plant biology, participating in the control of gene transcription and translation, post-translational modifications and the regulation of assimilatory reactions, assimilate partitioning and export. The number of processes influenced by redox controls and signals continues to increase as do the components that are recognized participants in the associated signalling pathways. A step change in our understanding of the overall importance of the cellular redox hub to plant cells has occurred in recent years as the complexity of the management of the cellular redox hub in relation to metabolic triggers and environmental cues has been elucidated. This special issue describes aspects of redox regulation and signalling at the cutting edge of current research in this dynamic and rapidly expanding field. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Exogenous quinones inhibit photosynthetic electron transfer in Chloroflexus aurantiacus by specific quenching of the excited bacteriochlorophyll c antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, N-U; Tokita, S; Matsuura, K

    1999-01-01

    In the photosynthetic green filamentous bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, excitation energy is transferred from a large bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c antenna via smaller BChl a antennas to the reaction center. The effects of substituted 1,4-naphthoquinones on BChl c and BChl a fluorescence and o...... antenna. Our results provide a model system for studying the redox-dependent antenna quenching in green sulfur bacteria because the antennas in these bacteria inherently exhibit a sensitivity to O(2) similar to the quinone-supplemented cells of Cfx. aurantiacus....... and on flash-induced cytochrome c oxidation were studied in whole cells under aerobic conditions. BChl c fluorescence in a cell suspension with 5.4 microM BChl c was quenched to 50% by addition of 0.6 microM shikonin ((R)-2-(1-hydroxy-4-methyl-3-pentenyl)-5,8-dihydroxy-1, 4-naphthoquinone), 0.9 microM 5......-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, or 4 microM 2-acetyl-3-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone. Between 25 and 100 times higher quinone concentrations were needed to quench BChl a fluorescence to a similar extent. These quinones also efficiently inhibited flash-induced cytochrome c oxidation when BChl c was excited...

  17. Influence of weak vibrational-electronic couplings on 2D electronic spectra and inter-site coherence in weakly coupled photosynthetic complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monahan, Daniele M.; Whaley-Mayda, Lukas; Fleming, Graham R., E-mail: grfleming@lbl.gov [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Ishizaki, Akihito [Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)

    2015-08-14

    Coherence oscillations measured in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of pigment-protein complexes may have electronic, vibrational, or mixed-character vibronic origins, which depend on the degree of electronic-vibrational mixing. Oscillations from intrapigment vibrations can obscure the inter-site coherence lifetime of interest in elucidating the mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting. Huang-Rhys factors (S) for low-frequency vibrations in Chlorophyll and Bacteriochlorophyll are quite small (S ≤ 0.05), so it is often assumed that these vibrations influence neither 2D spectra nor inter-site coherence dynamics. In this work, we explore the influence of S within this range on the oscillatory signatures in simulated 2D spectra of a pigment heterodimer. To visualize the inter-site coherence dynamics underlying the 2D spectra, we introduce a formalism which we call the “site-probe response.” By comparing the calculated 2D spectra with the site-probe response, we show that an on-resonance vibration with Huang-Rhys factor as small as S = 0.005 and the most strongly coupled off-resonance vibrations (S = 0.05) give rise to long-lived, purely vibrational coherences at 77 K. We moreover calculate the correlation between optical pump interactions and subsequent entanglement between sites, as measured by the concurrence. At 77 K, greater long-lived inter-site coherence and entanglement appear with increasing S. This dependence all but vanishes at physiological temperature, as environmentally induced fluctuations destroy the vibronic mixing.

  18. Binding of the human "electron transferring flavoprotein" (ETF) to the medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) involves an arginine and histidine residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Antony R

    2003-10-01

    The interaction between the "electron transferring flavoprotein" (ETF) and medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) enables successful flavin to flavin electron transfer, crucial for the beta-oxidation of fatty acids. The exact biochemical determinants for ETF binding to MCAD are unknown. Here we show that binding of human ETF, to MCAD, was inhibited by 2,3-butanedione and diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) and reversed by incubation with free arginine and hydroxylamine respectively. Spectral analyses of native ETF vs modified ETF suggested that flavin binding was not affected and that the loss of ETF activity with MCAD involved modification of one ETF arginine residue and one ETF histidine residue respectively. MCAD and octanoyl-CoA protected ETF against inactivation by both 2,3-butanedione and DEPC indicating that the arginine and histidine residues are present in or around the MCAD binding site. Comparison of exposed arginine and histidine residues among different ETF species, however, indicates that arginine residues are highly conserved but that histidine residues are not. These results lead us to conclude that this single arginine residue is essential for the binding of ETF to MCAD, but that the single histidine residue, although involved, is not.

  19. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H. Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., Bowling Green, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Center for Photochemical Sciences

    2017-11-28

    This project is focused on the use of single-molecule high spatial and temporal resolved techniques to study molecular dynamics in condensed phase and at interfaces, especially, the complex reaction dynamics associated with electron and energy transfer rate processes. The complexity and inhomogeneity of the interfacial ET dynamics often present a major challenge for a molecular level comprehension of the intrinsically complex systems, which calls for both higher spatial and temporal resolutions at ultimate single-molecule and single-particle sensitivities. Combined single-molecule spectroscopy and electrochemical atomic force microscopy approaches are unique for heterogeneous and complex interfacial electron transfer systems because the static and dynamic inhomogeneities can be identified and characterized by studying one molecule at a specific nanoscale surface site at a time. The goal of our project is to integrate and apply these spectroscopic imaging and topographic scanning techniques to measure the energy flow and electron flow between molecules and substrate surfaces as a function of surface site geometry and molecular structure. We have been primarily focusing on studying interfacial electron transfer under ambient condition and electrolyte solution involving both single crystal and colloidal TiO2 and related substrates. The resulting molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes will be important for developing efficient light harvesting systems and broadly applicable to problems in fundamental chemistry and physics. We have made significant advancement on deciphering the underlying mechanism of the complex and inhomogeneous interfacial electron transfer dynamics in dyesensitized TiO2 nanoparticle systems that strongly involves with and regulated by molecule-surface interactions. We have studied interfacial electron transfer on TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces by using ultrafast single

  20. Effects of gold nanoparticles on the photophysical and photosynthetic parameters of leaves and chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Rocio; Diz, Virginia E; Lagorio, M Gabriela

    2018-04-18

    Effects of gold nanoparticles (average diameter: 10-14 nm) on leaves and chloroplasts have been studied. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) quenched significantly chlorophyll fluorescence when introduced both in intact leaves and isolated chloroplasts. Additionally, the fluorescence spectra corrected for light re-absorption processes showed a net decrease in the fluorescence ratio calculated as the quotient between the maximum fluorescence at 680 and 735 nm. This fact gave evidence for a reduction in the fluorescence emission of the PSII relative to that of the PSI. Strikingly, the photosynthetic parameters derived from the analysis of the slow phase of Kautsky's kinetics, the rate of oxygen evolution and the rate of photo-reduction of 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol were increased in the presence of AuNPs indicating an apparent greater photosynthetic capacity. The observed results were consistent with an electron transfer process from the excited PSII, which was thermodynamically possible, and which competed with both the electron transport process that initiated photosynthesis and the deactivation of the excited PSII by fluorescence emission. Additionally, it is here explained, in terms of a completely rational kinetic scheme and their corresponding algebraic expressions, why the photosynthetic parameters and the variable and non-variable fluorescence of chlorophyll are modified in a photosynthetic tissue containing gold nanoparticles.

  1. A bioelectrochemical approach to characterize extracellular electron transfer by Synechocystis sp. PCC6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Cereda

    Full Text Available Biophotovoltaic devices employ photosynthetic organisms at the anode of a microbial fuel cell to generate electrical power. Although a range of cyanobacteria and algae have been shown to generate photocurrent in devices of a multitude of architectures, mechanistic understanding of extracellular electron transfer by phototrophs remains minimal. Here we describe a mediatorless bioelectrochemical device to measure the electrogenic output of a planktonically grown cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. Light dependent production of current is measured, and its magnitude is shown to scale with microbial cell concentration and light intensity. Bioelectrochemical characterization of a Synechocystis mutant lacking Photosystem II demonstrates conclusively that production of the majority of photocurrent requires a functional water splitting aparatus and electrons are likely ultimately derived from water. This shows the potential of the device to rapidly and quantitatively characterize photocurrent production by genetically modified strains, an approach that can be used in future studies to delineate the mechanisms of cyanobacterial extracellular electron transport.

  2. Grafting of Polystyrene Chains at the Edge of Graphene Nanolayers by "Grafting Through" Approach Using Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Roghani-Mamaqani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Edge-functionalized graphene nanolayers with polystyrene chains were prepared by a “grafting through” reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization. For this purpose, double-bond containing modifier (MD was prepared. After edge-functionalization of graphene oxide (GO by two different amounts of MD and preparation of modified graphenes (LFG and HFG, RAFT polymerization of styrene was applied for preparation of functionalized GO with different densities of polystyrene chains. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that MD and polystyrene chains were grafted at the edge of GO. Gas chromatography showed that conversion decreased by the addition of modified GO content and also grafting density of MD. Number-average molecular weight and polydispersity index of polystyrene chains were derived from gel permeation chromatography. Increase of modified graphene content results in a decrease in molecular weight of attached polystyrene chains and also an increase in their PDI value. Increase of grafting density of MD results in decrease of molecular weight of polystyrene chains with no considerable variation in PDI value. Thermogravimetric analysis results showed that char residue is about 45.1 and 46.8% for LFG and HFG, respectively. The content of degradation ascribed to polystyrene increased with increase of grafting density of MD and decreased with increase of modified graphene content. X-ray diffraction results were used for evaluation of interlayer spacing of graphene layers after functionalization process and also study of nanocomposites structure. The results of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy show that graphene layers with high clarity turned to opaque layers with lots of creases by oxidation and attachment of polystyrene chains.

  3. Shapley value based transfer pricing in supply chains with stochastic demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the question of how to ideally divide total profits among supply chain members, especially in a stochastic demand market. The Shapley value is used as the methodology solution to divide profits in a supply chain. To illustrate the Shapley value solution and procedures, a two-echelon supply chain consisting of one supplier and two heterogeneous retailers is examined. The goal is to figure out ideal transfer prices for products delivered among supply chain members. These transfer prices will achieve the suggested profit allocations among three companies.

  4. Exciplex formation and electron transfer in polychromophoric systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, N.C.C.; Minsek, D.W.; Johnson, D.G.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the rates of excited anthracene decay and intramolecular exciplex formation from biochromophoric molecules containing an anthryl group and an amine donor which vary with the length of the chain link, the nature of the amine donor and the viscosity of the medium. According to the authors, the results indicate that the intramolecular exciplex formation may proceed via more than one pathway. Experimental results suggest that electron transfer from the amino donor to the excited anthryl group may play a role in the exciplex formation in viscous alkanes

  5. Short-term regulation and alternative pathways of photosynthetic electron transport in Hibiscus rosa-sinensis leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubitsin, Boris V; Vershubskii, Alexey V; Priklonskii, Vladimir I; Tikhonov, Alexander N

    2015-11-01

    In this work, using the EPR and PAM-fluorometry methods, we have studied induction events of photosynthetic electron transport in Hibiscus rosa-sinensis leaves. The methods used are complementary, providing efficient tools for in situ monitoring of P700 redox transients and photochemical activity of photosystem II (PSII). The induction of P700(+) in dark-adapted leaves is characterized by the multiphase kinetics with a lag-phase, which duration elongates with the dark-adaptation time. Analyzing effects of the uncoupler monensin and artificial electron carrier methylviologen (MV) on photooxidation of P700 and slow induction of chlorophyll a fluorescence (SIF), we could ascribe different phases of transient kinetics of electron transport processes in dark-adapted leaves to the following regulatory mechanisms: (i) acceleration of electron transfer on the acceptor side of PSI, (ii) pH-dependent modulation of the intersystem electron flow, and (iii) re-distribution of electron fluxes between alternative (linear, cyclic, and pseudocyclic) pathways. Monensin significantly decreases a level of P700(+) and inhibits SIF. MV, which mediates electron flow from PSI to O2 with consequent formation of H2O2, promotes a rapid photooxidation of P700 without any lag-phase peculiar to untreated leaves. MV-mediated water-water cycle (H2O→PSII→PSI→MV→O2→H2O2→H2O) is accompanied by generation of ascorbate free radicals. This suggests that the ascorbate peroxidase system of defense against reactive oxygen species is active in chloroplasts of H. rosa-sinensis leaves. In DCMU-treated chloroplasts with inhibited PSII, the contribution of cyclic electron flow is insignificant as compared to linear electron flow. For analysis of induction events, we have simulated electron transport processes within the framework of our generalized mathematical model of oxygenic photosynthesis, which takes into account pH-dependent mechanisms of electron transport control and re-distribution of

  6. Reaction of electron-transfer flavoprotein with electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, J.D.; Frerman, F.E.

    1985-01-01

    The oxidative half-reaction of electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF), electron transfer from ETF to electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO), is dependent on complementary surface charges on the two proteins. ETF is the positively charged member of the redox pair. The evidence is based on the pH and ionic strength dependencies of the comproportionation of oxidized ETF and ETF hydroquinone catalyzed by ETF-QO and on the effects of chemical modification of ETF on the comproportionation reaction. Acetylation of one and five epsilon-amino groups of lysyl residues results in 3- and 13-fold increases, respectively, in the K/sub m/ of ETF-QO for ETF but no change in V/sub max/. Amidination, which maintains positive charge at modified loci, has no effect on steady-state kinetic constants. These chemical modifications have no effect on the equilibrium constant for equilibration of ETF redox states. The K/sub m/ of ETF-QO for ETF is pH dependent above pH 8.5, suggesting titration of lysyl residues. The ionic strength dependence of TN/KmETF for the reaction follows the limiting Bronsted equation. The ETF-QO-catalyzed comproportionation reaction exhibits a primary deuterium isotope effect in D 2 O, perhaps indicating the participation of solvent water in the electron-transfer reaction

  7. Studying electron transfer through alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers on a hanging mercury drop electrode using potentiometric measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Atiya, Meirav; Mandler, Daniel

    2006-10-14

    A new approach based on measuring the change of the open-circuit potential (OCP) of a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE), modified with alkanethiols of different chain length conducted in a solution containing a mixture of Ru(NH3)6(2+) and Ru(NH3)6(3+) is used for studying electron transfer across the monolayer. Following the time dependence of the OCP allowed the extraction of the kinetic parameters, such as the charge transfer resistance (R(ct)) and the electron transfer rate constant (k(et)), for different alkanethiol monolayers. An electron tunneling coefficient, beta, of 0.9 A(-1) was calculated for the monolayers on Hg.

  8. Absence of quantum oscillations in electronic excitation transfer in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisfeld, Alexander; Ritschel, Gerhard; Roden, Jan; Strunz, Walter; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2012-02-01

    Energy transfer in the photosynthetic Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex of the Green Sulfur Bacteria is studied theoretically taking all three subunits (monomers) of the FMO trimer and the recently found eighth bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecule into account. For the calculations we use the efficient Non-Markovian Quantum State diffusion approach. Since it is believed that the eighth BChl is located near the main light harvesting antenna we look at the differences in transfer between the situation when BChl 8 is initially excited and the usually considered case when BChl 1 or 6 is initially excited. We find strong differences in the transfer dynamics, both qualitatively and quantitatively. When the excited state dynamics is initialized at site eight of the FMO complex, we see a slow exponential-like decay of the excitation. This is in contrast to the oscillations and a relatively fast transfer that occurs when only seven sites or initialization at sites 1 and 6 is considered. Additionally we show that differences in the values of the electronic transition energies found in the literature lead to a large difference in the transfer dynamics.

  9. Energy transfer in light-adapted photosynthetic membranes: from active to saturated photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassioli, Francesca; Olaya-Castro, Alexandra; Scheuring, Simon; Sturgis, James N; Johnson, Neil F

    2009-11-04

    In bacterial photosynthesis light-harvesting complexes, LH2 and LH1 absorb sunlight energy and deliver it to reaction centers (RCs) with extraordinarily high efficiency. Submolecular resolution images have revealed that both the LH2:LH1 ratio, and the architecture of the photosynthetic membrane itself, adapt to light intensity. We investigate the functional implications of structural adaptations in the energy transfer performance in natural in vivo low- and high-light-adapted membrane architectures of Rhodospirillum photometricum. A model is presented to describe excitation migration across the full range of light intensities that cover states from active photosynthesis, where all RCs are available for charge separation, to saturated photosynthesis where all RCs are unavailable. Our study outlines three key findings. First, there is a critical light-energy density, below which the low-light adapted membrane is more efficient at absorbing photons and generating a charge separation at RCs, than the high-light-adapted membrane. Second, connectivity of core complexes is similar in both membranes, suggesting that, despite different growth conditions, a preferred transfer pathway is through core-core contacts. Third, there may be minimal subareas on the membrane which, containing the same LH2:LH1 ratio, behave as minimal functional units as far as excitation transfer efficiency is concerned.

  10. Effect of carbon limitation on photosynthetic electron transport in Nannochloropsis oculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavřel, Tomáš; Szabó, Milán; Tamburic, Bojan; Evenhuis, Christian; Kuzhiumparambil, Unnikrishnan; Literáková, Petra; Larkum, Anthony W D; Raven, John A; Červený, Jan; Ralph, Peter J

    2018-04-01

    This study describes the impacts of inorganic carbon limitation on the photosynthetic efficiency and operation of photosynthetic electron transport pathways in the biofuel-candidate microalga Nannochloropsis oculata. Using a combination of highly-controlled cultivation setup (photobioreactor), variable chlorophyll a fluorescence and transient spectroscopy methods (electrochromic shift (ECS) and P 700 redox kinetics), we showed that net photosynthesis and effective quantum yield of Photosystem II (PSII) decreased in N. oculata under carbon limitation. This was accompanied by a transient increase in total proton motive force and energy-dependent non-photochemical quenching as well as slightly elevated respiration. On the other hand, under carbon limitation the rapid increase in proton motive force (PMF, estimated from the total ECS signal) was also accompanied by reduced conductivity of ATP synthase to protons (estimated from the rate of ECS decay in dark after actinic illumination). This indicates that the slow operation of ATP synthase results in the transient build-up of PMF, which leads to the activation of fast energy dissipation mechanisms such as energy-dependent non-photochemical quenching. N. oculata also increased content of lipids under carbon limitation, which compensated for reduced NAPDH consumption during decreased CO 2 fixation. The integrated knowledge of the underlying energetic regulation of photosynthetic processes attained with a combination of biophysical methods may be used to identify photo-physiological signatures of the onset of carbon limitation in microalgal cultivation systems, as well as to potentially identify microalgal strains that can better acclimate to carbon limitation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Transfer of long-lived radionuclides through marine food chains: a review of transfer data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belot, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental data on the transfer of long-lived radionuclides through food chains have been summarized from the available literature. The transfer to a given organism is characterized by a transfer factor (TF), defined as the activity in the organism relative to that in the ingested food or sediment. The TFs of Pu, Am and Tc from sediment to benthic species have been directly measured and generally do not exceed a value of 0.1. The TFs from prey to predator are related to uptake and retention parameters whose values can be derived from experimental data. It was estimated that these TFs do not generally exceed unity and that an increase of concentration through a food chain is very unlikely. (author)

  12. Redox potential tuning through differential quinone binding in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaas, Josh V; Taguchi, Alexander T; Dikanov, Sergei A; Wraight, Colin A; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-03-31

    Ubiquinone forms an integral part of the electron transport chain in cellular respiration and photosynthesis across a vast number of organisms. Prior experimental results have shown that the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is only fully functional with a limited set of methoxy-bearing quinones, suggesting that specific interactions with this substituent are required to drive electron transport and the formation of quinol. The nature of these interactions has yet to be determined. Through parameterization of a CHARMM-compatible quinone force field and subsequent molecular dynamics simulations of the quinone-bound RC, we have investigated and characterized the interactions of the protein with the quinones in the Q(A) and Q(B) sites using both equilibrium simulation and thermodynamic integration. In particular, we identify a specific interaction between the 2-methoxy group of ubiquinone in the Q(B) site and the amide nitrogen of GlyL225 that we implicate in locking the orientation of the 2-methoxy group, thereby tuning the redox potential difference between the quinones occupying the Q(A) and Q(B) sites. Disruption of this interaction leads to weaker binding in a ubiquinone analogue that lacks a 2-methoxy group, a finding supported by reverse electron transfer electron paramagnetic resonance experiments of the Q(A)⁻Q(B)⁻ biradical and competitive binding assays.

  13. Electron uptake and delivery sites on plastocyanin in its reactions with the photosynthetic electron transport system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Shahak, Y; Pecht, I

    1982-01-01

    French bean plastocyanin is stoichiometrically and specifically labeled upon reduction by Cr(II)aq ions, yielding a substitution-inert (Cr(III) adduct at the protein surface. The effect of the modification on the activity of plastocyanin in electron transfer between photosystems II and I has been...... and Cr-labeled plastocyanin were indistinguishable, the rates of photooxidation of the modified protein were markedly attenuated relative to those of the native one. This difference in reactivity clearly reflects the perturbation of the electron transfer pathway to P700. These findings, in conjunction...... with the structure of plastocyanin and the locus of CR(III) binding on its surface, lead to the following interpretation: (a) There are most probably two physiologically significant, electron transfer sites on plastocyanin. (b) The site involved in the electron transfer to P700 is most likely in the region...

  14. Conformational regulation of charge recombination reactions in a photosynthetic bacterial reaction center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katona, Gergely; Snijder, Arjan; Gourdon, Pontus Emanuel

    2005-01-01

    In bright light the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides stabilizes the P(+)(870).Q(-)(A) charge-separated state and thereby minimizes the potentially harmful effects of light saturation. Using X-ray diffraction we report a conformational change that occurs within the cy...... the cytoplasmic domain of this RC in response to prolonged illumination with bright light. Our observations suggest a novel structural mechanism for the regulation of electron transfer reactions in photosynthesis....

  15. 75 FR 9120 - Electronic Fund Transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 12 CFR Part 205 [Regulation E; Docket No. R-1343] Electronic Fund Transfers... implements the Electronic Fund Transfer Act, and the official staff commentary to the regulation. The final..., the Board adopted a final rule under Regulation E, which implements the Electronic Fund Transfer Act...

  16. Model-based confirmation of alternative substrates of mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleessen, Sabrina; Araújo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2012-03-30

    Discrimination of metabolic models based on high throughput metabolomics data, reflecting various internal and external perturbations, is essential for identifying the components that contribute to the emerging behavior of metabolic processes. Here, we investigate 12 different models of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in Arabidopsis thaliana during dark-induced senescence in order to elucidate the alternative substrates to this metabolic pathway. Our findings demonstrate that the coupling of the proposed computational approach, based on dynamic flux balance analysis, with time-resolved metabolomics data results in model-based confirmations of the hypotheses that, during dark-induced senescence in Arabidopsis, (i) under conditions where the main substrate for the ETC are not fully available, isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase and 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase are able to donate electrons to the ETC, (ii) phytanoyl-CoA does not act even as an indirect substrate of the electron transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex, and (iii) the mitochondrial γ-aminobutyric acid transporter has functional significance in maintaining mitochondrial metabolism. Our study provides a basic framework for future in silico studies of alternative pathways in mitochondrial metabolism under extended darkness whereby the role of its components can be computationally discriminated based on available molecular profile data.

  17. Simultaneous electrochemical-electron spin resonance studies of carotenoid cation radicals and dications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaled, M.; Hadjipetrou, A.; Xinhai Chen; Kispert, L.

    1989-01-01

    Carotenoids are present in the chloroplasts of photosynthetic green plants and serve as photoprotect devices and antenna pigments, and active role in the photosynthetic electron-transport chain with the carotenoid cation radical as an integral part of the electron-transfer process. The research reported herein has confirmed that carotenoid cation radicals have a lifetime that is sensitive to solvent, being longest in CH 2 Cl 2 and are best prepared electrochemically. Semiempirical AM1 and INDO calculations of the trans and cis isomers of β-carotene, canthaxanthin and β-apo-8'-carotenal cation radicals predicted the unresolved EPR line whose linewidth varies to a measurable degree with carotenoid, which subsequent experimental observations affirmed. Simultaneous electrochemical - electron spin resonance studies of carotenoid cation radicals and dications have shown the radicals detected by EPR are formed by the one electron oxidation of the carotenoid, that dimers are not formed upon decay of the radical cations and an estimate of the rate of comproportionation as a function of carotenoid can be given. The formal rate constant K' for heterogenous electron transfer rate at the electrode surface has been deduced from rotating disc experiments. Upon deuteration, and in the presence of excess β-carotene, the half-life for decay of the carotenoid radical cation increased an order of magnitude due to the reaction between diffusion carotenoid dications and carotenoids to form additional radical cations. The carotenoid diffusion coefficients deduced by chronocoulometry substantiates this measurement. The produces formed upon electrochemical studies are being studied by HPLC and the isomers formed thermally are being separated. Additional radical reactions are currently being studied by EPR and electrochemical methods

  18. The Response of Photosynthetic Functions of F1 Cutting Seedlings From Physocarpus amurensis Maxim (♀ × Physocarpus opulifolius “Diabolo” (♂ and the Parental Seedlings to Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Nan

    2018-06-01

    high salt concentrations the degree of photoinhibition in P. amurensis and hybrid P. amurensis were reduced due to a relatively high NPQ. With the increase of salt concentration, the Vk of P. amurensis and hybrid P. amurensis leaves presented a decreasing trend. However, the Vk of P. opulifolius “Diabolo” leaves increased slightly. This suggested that the effects of salt stress on the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC of the three P. amurensis sample types were relatively limited and only the OEC of P.s opulifolius “Diabolo” leaves were slightly sensitive to salt stress. The VJ of all leaves from the three P. amurensis types increased under salt stress, and the VJ increased significantly when the salt concentration increased to 200 mmol⋅L-1, indicating that salt stress obviously impeded the electron transfer chain from QA to QB on the PSII receptor side. Moreover, high salt concentrations caused thylakoid membrane dissociation. The electron transfer and degree of damage to the thylakoid membrane of P. opulifolius “Diabolo” leaves were obviously higher than that of P. amurensis. However, the electron transfer capacity on the PSII receptor side as well as the degree of damage of the thylakoid membrane of hybrid P. amurensis leaves was obviously lower than those of P. opulifolius “Diabolo.” The salt tolerance of photosynthetic functions of hybrid P. amurensis (♀ × P. opulifolius “Diabolo” (♂ leaves was improved compared with that of parental P. opulifolius “Diabolo,” and the hybrid shows obvious hybrid vigor for photosynthesis.

  19. Resistance of a 1D random chain: Hamiltonian version of the transfer matrix approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossetti-Romero, V.; Izrailev, F. M.; Krokhin, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    We study some mesoscopic properties of electron transport by employing one-dimensional chains and Anderson tight-binding model. Principal attention is paid to the resistance of finite-length chains with disordered white-noise potential. We develop a new version of the transfer matrix approach based on the equivalency of a discrete Schrödinger equation and a two-dimensional Hamiltonian map describing a parametric kicked oscillator. In the two limiting cases of ballistic and localized regime we demonstrate how analytical results for the mean resistance and its second moment can be derived directly from the averaging over classical trajectories of the Hamiltonian map. We also discuss the implication of the single parameter scaling hypothesis to the resistance.

  20. Resistance of a 1D random chain: Hamiltonian version of the transfer matrix approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dossetti-Romero, V.; Izrailev, F.M.; Krokhin, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    We study some mesoscopic properties of electron transport by employing one-dimensional chains and Anderson tight-binding model. Principal attention is paid to the resistance of finite-length chains with disordered white-noise potential. We develop a new version of the transfer matrix approach based on the equivalency of a discrete Schroedinger equation and a two-dimensional Hamiltonian map describing a parametric kicked oscillator. In the two limiting cases of ballistic and localized regime we demonstrate how analytical results for the mean resistance and its second moment can be derived directly from the averaging over classical trajectories of the Hamiltonian map. We also discuss the implication of the single parameter scaling hypothesis to the resistance

  1. Overexpression of plastidial thioredoxins f and m differentially alters photosynthetic activity and response to oxidative stress in tobacco plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal eREY

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants display a remarkable diversity of thioredoxins (Trxs, reductases controlling the thiol redox status of proteins. The physiological function of many of them remains elusive, particularly for plastidial Trxs f and m, which are presumed based on biochemical data to regulate photosynthetic reactions and carbon metabolism. Recent reports revealed that Trxs f and m participate in vivo in the control of starch metabolism and cyclic photosynthetic electron transfer around photosystem I, respectively. To further delineate their in planta function, we compared the photosynthetic characteristics, the level and/or activity of various Trx targets and the responses to oxidative stress in transplastomic tobacco plants overexpressing either Trx f or Trx m. We found that plants overexpressing Trx m specifically exhibit altered growth, reduced chlorophyll content, impaired photosynthetic linear electron transfer and decreased pools of glutathione and ascorbate. In both transplastomic lines, activities of two enzymes involved in carbon metabolism, NADP-malate dehydrogenase and NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase are markedly and similarly altered. In contrast, plants overexpressing Trx m specifically display increased capacity for methionine sulfoxide reductases, enzymes repairing damaged proteins by regenerating methionine from oxidized methionine. Finally, we also observed that transplastomic plants exhibit distinct responses when exposed to oxidative stress conditions generated by methyl viologen or exposure to high light combined with low temperature, the plants overexpressing Trx m being notably more tolerant than Wt and those overexpressing Trx f. Altogether, these data indicate that Trxs f and m fulfill distinct physiological functions. They prompt us to propose that the m type is involved in key processes linking photosynthetic activity, redox homeostasis and antioxidant mechanisms in the chloroplast.

  2. Mediatorless electron transfer in glucose dehydrogenase/laccase system adsorbed on carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratautas, D.; Marcinkevičienė, L.; Meškys, R.; Kulys, J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Glucose dehydrogenase from Ewingella americana (GDH) demonstrated an effective mediatorless oxidation of glucose on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). • Laccase from Trichaptum abietinum (LAC) exhibited mediatorless oxygen reduction when the enzyme was adsorbed on SWCNT. • Simultaneous adsorption of GDH and LAC on SWCNT formed an electron transfer chain in which glucose and lactose were oxidized by oxygen in mediatorless manner. - Abstract: A mediatorless electron transfer in the chain of glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and laccase (LAC) catalysing the oxidation of glucose by molecular oxygen was studied. To demonstrate mediatorless processes, the GDH from Ewingella americana was adsorbed on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The effective mediatorless oxidation of glucose proceeded at 0.2–0.4 V vs. SCE. The electrode was most active at pH 6.1, and generated 0.8 mA cm −2 biocatalytic current in the presence of 50 mM glucose. The electrode showed a bell-shaped pH dependence with pK a values of 4.1 and 7.5. LAC from Trichaptum abietinum adsorbed on SWCNT exhibited mediatorless oxygen reduction at electrode potential less than 0.65 V. The electrode was most active at pH 3.0–4.0 and generated 1.1 mA cm −2 biocatalytic current in the presence of 0.254 mM oxygen, with an apparent pK a of 1.0 and 5.4. The electrodes prepared by simultaneous adsorption of GDH and LAC on SWCNT exhibited glucose oxidation at a potential higher than 0.25 V. The oxygen consumption in the chain was demonstrated using a Clark-type oxygen electrode. The dependence of oxygen consumption on glucose and lactose concentrations as well as activity of the system on pH were measured. A model of the pH dependence as well as mediatorless consecutive glucose oxidation with oxygen catalysed by LAC/GDH system is presented. This work provides a novel approach towards the synthesis of artificial multi enzyme systems by wiring oxidoreductases with SWCNT, and offers a better

  3. Electron transfer pathways in microbial oxygen biocathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freguia, Stefano, E-mail: stefano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Tsujimura, Seiya, E-mail: seiya@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Kano, Kenji, E-mail: kkano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    The ability of some bacteria to enhance the rate of cathodic oxygen reduction to water has been recently discovered, opening the way to an entirely renewable and environmentally friendly concept of biocathode. In this study we reveal that several mechanisms may induce catalytic effects by bacteria. These comprise mechanisms that are putatively beneficial to the bacteria as well as mechanisms which are merely side effects, including quinone autoxidation and direct O{sub 2} reduction by heme compounds. Here we showed that 1 muM of ACNQ is able to generate a significant catalytic wave for oxygen reduction, with onset at approximately 0 V vs. SHE. Similarly, adsorption of hemin on a carbon surface catalyses O{sub 2} reduction to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with an onset of +0.2 V vs. SHE. To evaluate the catalytic pathways of live cells on cathodic oxygen reduction, two species of electrochemically active bacteria were selected as pure cultures, namely Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Shewanella putrefaciens. The former appears to exploit a self-excreted redox compound with redox characteristics matching those of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) for extracellular electron transfer. The latter appears to utilise outer membrane-bound redox compounds. Interaction of quinones and cytochromes with the membrane-bound electron transfer chain is yet to be proven.

  4. Hydrogen is a preferred intermediate in the energy-conserving electron transport chain of Methanosarcina barkeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Gargi; Kridelbaugh, Donna M; Guss, Adam M; Metcalf, William W

    2009-09-15

    Methanogens use an unusual energy-conserving electron transport chain that involves reduction of a limited number of electron acceptors to methane gas. Previous biochemical studies suggested that the proton-pumping F(420)H(2) dehydrogenase (Fpo) plays a crucial role in this process during growth on methanol. However, Methanosarcina barkeri Delta fpo mutants constructed in this study display no measurable phenotype on this substrate, indicating that Fpo plays a minor role, if any. In contrast, Delta frh mutants lacking the cytoplasmic F(420)-reducing hydrogenase (Frh) are severely affected in their ability to grow and make methane from methanol, and double Delta fpo/Delta frh mutants are completely unable to use this substrate. These data suggest that the preferred electron transport chain involves production of hydrogen gas in the cytoplasm, which then diffuses out of the cell, where it is reoxidized with transfer of electrons into the energy-conserving electron transport chain. This hydrogen-cycling metabolism leads directly to production of a proton motive force that can be used by the cell for ATP synthesis. Nevertheless, M. barkeri does have the flexibility to use the Fpo-dependent electron transport chain when needed, as shown by the poor growth of the Delta frh mutant. Our data suggest that the rapid enzymatic turnover of hydrogenases may allow a competitive advantage via faster growth rates in this freshwater organism. The mutant analysis also confirms the proposed role of Frh in growth on hydrogen/carbon dioxide and suggests that either Frh or Fpo is needed for aceticlastic growth of M. barkeri.

  5. Subwavelength dielectric nanorod chains for energy transfer in the visible range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Zhang, Jingjing; Yan, Changchun; Xu, Zhengji; Zhang, Dao Hua

    2017-10-15

    We report a new type of energy transfer device, formed by a dielectric nanorod array embedded in a silver slab. Such dielectric chain structures allow surface plasmon wave guiding with large propagation length and highly suppressed crosstalk between adjacent transmission channels. The simulation results show that our proposed design can be used to enhance the energy transfer along the waveguide-like dielectric nanorod chains via coupled plasmons, where the energy spreading is effectively suppressed, and superior imaging properties in terms of resolution and energy transfer distance can be achieved.

  6. Effects of selected electron transport chain inhibitors on 24-h hydrogen production by Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Elizabeth H; Chaplen, Frank W R; Ely, Roger L

    2011-02-01

    One factor limiting biosolar hydrogen (H(2)) production from cyanobacteria is electron availability to the hydrogenase enzyme. In order to optimize 24-h H(2) production this study used Response Surface Methodology and Q2, an optimization algorithm, to investigate the effects of five inhibitors of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Over 3 days of diurnal light/dark cycling, with the optimized combination of 9.4 mM KCN (3.1 μmol 10(10) cells(-1)) and 1.5 mM malonate (0.5 μmol 10(10) cells(-1)) the H(2) production was 30-fold higher, in EHB-1 media previously optimized for nitrogen (N), sulfur (S), and carbon (C) concentrations (Burrows et al., 2008). In addition, glycogen concentration was measured over 24 h with two light/dark cycling regimes in both standard BG-11 and EHB-1 media. The results suggest that electron flow as well as glycogen accumulation should be optimized in systems engineered for maximal H(2) output. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Newton's Cradle and Entanglement Transport in a Flexible Rydberg Chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuester, S.; Ates, C.; Eisfeld, A.; Rost, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    In a regular, flexible chain of Rydberg atoms, a single electronic excitation localizes on two atoms that are in closer mutual proximity than all others. We show how the interplay between excitonic and atomic motion causes electronic excitation and diatomic proximity to propagate through the Rydberg chain as a combined pulse. In this manner entanglement is transferred adiabatically along the chain, reminiscent of momentum transfer in Newton's cradle.

  8. Submolecular Gates Self-Assemble for Hot-Electron Transfer in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip-Granit, Neta; Goldberg, Eran; Samish, Ilan; Ashur, Idan; van der Boom, Milko E; Cohen, Hagai; Scherz, Avigdor

    2017-07-27

    Redox reactions play key roles in fundamental biological processes. The related spatial organization of donors and acceptors is assumed to undergo evolutionary optimization facilitating charge mobilization within the relevant biological context. Experimental information from submolecular functional sites is needed to understand the organization strategies and driving forces involved in the self-development of structure-function relationships. Here we exploit chemically resolved electrical measurements (CREM) to probe the atom-specific electrostatic potentials (ESPs) in artificial arrays of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) derivatives that provide model systems for photoexcited (hot) electron donation and withdrawal. On the basis of computations we show that native BChl's in the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) self-assemble at their ground-state as aligned gates for functional charge transfer. The combined computational and experimental results further reveal how site-specific polarizability perpendicular to the molecular plane enhances the hot-electron transport. Maximal transport efficiency is predicted for a specific, ∼5 Å, distance above the center of the metalized BChl, which is in remarkably close agreement with the distance and mutual orientation of corresponding native cofactors. These findings provide new metrics and guidelines for analysis of biological redox centers and for designing charge mobilizing machines such as artificial photosynthesis.

  9. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stams, Alfons J M; de Bok, Frank A M; Plugge, Caroline M; van Eekert, Miriam H A; Dolfing, Jan; Schraa, Gosse

    2006-03-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory syntrophic consortia of proton-reducing acetogenic bacteria and hydrogen-consuming methanogenic archaea. Anaerobic microorganisms that use insoluble electron acceptors for growth, such as iron- and manganese-oxide as well as inert graphite electrodes in microbial fuel cells, also transfer electrons exocellularly. Soluble compounds, like humic substances, quinones, phenazines and riboflavin, can function as exocellular electron mediators enhancing this type of anaerobic respiration. However, direct electron transfer by cell-cell contact is important as well. This review addresses the mechanisms of exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities. There are fundamental differences but also similarities between electron transfer to another microorganism or to an insoluble electron acceptor. The physical separation of the electron donor and electron acceptor metabolism allows energy conservation in compounds as methane and hydrogen or as electricity. Furthermore, this separation is essential in the donation or acceptance of electrons in some environmental technological processes, e.g. soil remediation, wastewater purification and corrosion.

  10. Impact of the lipid bilayer on energy transfer kinetics in the photosynthetic protein LH2† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc04814a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogren, John I.; Tong, Ashley L.; Gordon, Samuel C.; Chenu, Aurélia; Lu, Yue; Blankenship, Robert E.; Cao, Jianshu

    2018-01-01

    Photosynthetic purple bacteria convert solar energy to chemical energy with near unity quantum efficiency. The light-harvesting process begins with absorption of solar energy by an antenna protein called Light-Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2). Energy is subsequently transferred within LH2 and then through a network of additional light-harvesting proteins to a central location, termed the reaction center, where charge separation occurs. The energy transfer dynamics of LH2 are highly sensitive to intermolecular distances and relative organizations. As a result, minor structural perturbations can cause significant changes in these dynamics. Previous experiments have primarily been performed in two ways. One uses non-native samples where LH2 is solubilized in detergent, which can alter protein structure. The other uses complex membranes that contain multiple proteins within a large lipid area, which make it difficult to identify and distinguish perturbations caused by protein–protein interactions and lipid–protein interactions. Here, we introduce the use of the biochemical platform of model membrane discs to study the energy transfer dynamics of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes in a near-native environment. We incorporate a single LH2 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides into membrane discs that provide a spectroscopically amenable sample in an environment more physiological than detergent but less complex than traditional membranes. This provides a simplified system to understand an individual protein and how the lipid–protein interaction affects energy transfer dynamics. We compare the energy transfer rates of detergent-solubilized LH2 with those of LH2 in membrane discs using transient absorption spectroscopy and transient absorption anisotropy. For one key energy transfer step in LH2, we observe a 30% enhancement of the rate for LH2 in membrane discs compared to that in detergent. Based on experimental results and theoretical modeling, we attribute this difference

  11. Transfer of d-level quantum states through spin chains by random swapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayat, A.; Karimipour, V.

    2007-01-01

    We generalize an already proposed protocol for quantum state transfer to spin chains of arbitrary spin. An arbitrary unknown d-level state is transferred through a chain with rather good fidelity by the natural dynamics of the chain. We compare the performance of this protocol for various values of d. A by-product of our study is a much simpler method for picking up the state at the destination as compared with the one proposed previously. We also discuss entanglement distribution through such chains and show that the quality of entanglement transition increases with the number of levels d

  12. Surface modification of carbon nanotubes via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Qing; Tian, Jianwen; Liu, Meiying; Zeng, Guangjian; Huang, Qiang [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Wang, Ke; Zhang, Qingsong [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Deng, Fengjie, E-mail: fengjiedeng@aliyun.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Zhang, Xiaoyong, E-mail: xiaoyongzhang1980@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Wei, Yen, E-mail: weiyen@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: A novel strategy combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization has been developed for surface modification of carbon nanotubes with polymers for the first time. - Highlights: • Surface modification of CNTs via mussel inspired chemistry. • Preparation of aminated polymers through free radical polymerization. • Functionalized CNTs with aminated polymers via Michael addition reaction. • Highly dispersed CNTs in organic and aqueous solution. - Abstract: In this work, a novel strategy for surface modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was developed via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization. First, pristine CNTs were functionalized with polydopamine (PDA), which is formed via self-polymerization of dopamine in alkaline conditions. These PDA functionalized CNTs can be further reacted with amino-terminated polymers (named as PDMC), which was synthesized through chain transfer free radical polymerization using cysteamine hydrochloride as chain transfer agent and methacryloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride as the monomer. PDMC perfectly conjugated with CNT-PDA was ascertained by a series of characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The dispersibility of obtained CNT nanocomposites (named as CNT-PDA-PDMC) was further examined. Results showed that the dispersibility of CNT-PDA-PDMC in aqueous and organic solutions was obviously enhanced. Apart from PDMC, many other amino-terminated polymers can also be used to functionalization of CNTs via similar strategy. Therefore, the method described in this work should be a general strategy for fabrication various polymer nanocomposites.

  13. Ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase: a catalytically active dithiol group links photoreduced ferredoxin to thioredoxin functional in photosynthetic enzyme regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droux, M.; Miginiac-Maslow, M.; Jacquot, J.P.; Gadal, P.; Crawford, N.A.; Kosower, N.S.; Buchanan, B.B.

    1987-07-01

    The mechanism by which the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system activates the target enzyme, NADP-malate dehydrogenase, was investigated by analyzing the sulfhydryl status of individual protein components with (/sup 14/C)iodoacetate and monobromobimane. The data indicate that ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR)--an iron-sulfur enzyme present in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms--is the first member of a thiol chain that links light to enzyme regulation. FTR possesses a catalytically active dithiol group localized on the 13 kDa (similar) subunit, that occurs in all species investigated and accepts reducing equivalents from photoreduced ferredoxin and transfers them stoichiometrically to the disulfide form of thioredoxin m. The reduced thioredoxin m, in turn, reduces NADP-malate dehydrogenase, thereby converting it from an inactive (S-S) to an active (SH) form. The means by which FTR is able to combine electrons (from photoreduced ferredoxin) with protons (from the medium) to reduce its active disulfide group remains to be determined.

  14. Ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase: a catalytically active dithiol group links photoreduced ferredoxin to thioredoxin functional in photosynthetic enzyme regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droux, M.; Miginiac-Maslow, M.; Jacquot, J.P.; Gadal, P.; Crawford, N.A.; Kosower, N.S.; Buchanan, B.B.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism by which the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system activates the target enzyme, NADP-malate dehydrogenase, was investigated by analyzing the sulfhydryl status of individual protein components with [ 14 C]iodoacetate and monobromobimane. The data indicate that ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR)--an iron-sulfur enzyme present in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms--is the first member of a thiol chain that links light to enzyme regulation. FTR possesses a catalytically active dithiol group localized on the 13 kDa (similar) subunit, that occurs in all species investigated and accepts reducing equivalents from photoreduced ferredoxin and transfers them stoichiometrically to the disulfide form of thioredoxin m. The reduced thioredoxin m, in turn, reduces NADP-malate dehydrogenase, thereby converting it from an inactive (S-S) to an active (SH) form. The means by which FTR is able to combine electrons (from photoreduced ferredoxin) with protons (from the medium) to reduce its active disulfide group remains to be determined

  15. Correlation of paramagnetic states and molecular structure in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers: The symmetry of the primary electron donor in Rhodopseudomonas viridis and Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, J.R.; Budil, D.E.; Gast, P.; Chang, C.H.; El-Kabbani, O.; Schiffer, M.

    1989-01-01

    The orientation of the principal axes of the primary electron donor triplet state measured in single crystals of photosynthetic reaction centers is compared to the x-ray structures of the bacteria Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides R-26 and Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) viridis. The primary donor of Rps. viridis is significantly different from that of Rb. sphaeroides. The measured directions of the axes indicate that triplet excitation is almost completely localized on the L-subunit half of the dimer in Rps. viridis but is more symmetrically distributed on the dimeric donor in Rb. sphaeroides R-26. The large reduction of the zero field splitting parameters relative to monomeric bacteriochlorophyll triplet in vitro suggests significant participation of asymmetrical charge transfer electronic configurations in the special pair triplet state of both organisms

  16. Photosynthetic light reactions at the gold interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamran, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    In the project described in this thesis we studied a simple bio-electronic device for solar energy conversion by surface-assembly of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes on a bare gold-electrode. Optical excitation of the photosynthetic pigments gives rise to charge separation in the so-called

  17. Divergent mitochondrial respiratory chains in phototrophic relatives of apicomplexan parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Flegontov, Pavel

    2015-02-06

    Four respiratory complexes and ATP-synthase represent central functional units in mitochondria. In some mitochondria and derived anaerobic organelles, a few or all of these respiratory complexes have been lost during evolution. We show that the respiratory chain of Chromera velia, a phototrophic relative of parasitic apicomplexans, lacks complexes I and III, making it a uniquely reduced aerobic mitochondrion. In Chromera, putative lactate:cytochrome c oxidoreductases are predicted to transfer electrons from lactate to cytochrome c, rendering complex III unnecessary. The mitochondrial genome of Chromera has the smallest known protein-coding capacity of all mitochondria, encoding just cox1 and cox3 on heterogeneous linear molecules. In contrast, another photosynthetic relative of apicomplexans, Vitrella brassicaformis, retains the same set of genes as apicomplexans and dinoflagellates (cox1, cox3, and cob). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. Divergent mitochondrial respiratory chains in phototrophic relatives of apicomplexan parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Flegontov, Pavel; Michá lek, Jan; Janouškovec, Jan; Lai, De Hua; Jirků, Milan; Hajdušková , Eva; Tomčala, Aleš; Otto, Thomas D.; Keeling, Patrick J.; Pain, Arnab; Oborní k, Miroslav; Lukeš, J.

    2015-01-01

    Four respiratory complexes and ATP-synthase represent central functional units in mitochondria. In some mitochondria and derived anaerobic organelles, a few or all of these respiratory complexes have been lost during evolution. We show that the respiratory chain of Chromera velia, a phototrophic relative of parasitic apicomplexans, lacks complexes I and III, making it a uniquely reduced aerobic mitochondrion. In Chromera, putative lactate:cytochrome c oxidoreductases are predicted to transfer electrons from lactate to cytochrome c, rendering complex III unnecessary. The mitochondrial genome of Chromera has the smallest known protein-coding capacity of all mitochondria, encoding just cox1 and cox3 on heterogeneous linear molecules. In contrast, another photosynthetic relative of apicomplexans, Vitrella brassicaformis, retains the same set of genes as apicomplexans and dinoflagellates (cox1, cox3, and cob). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  19. Olefin copolymerization via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venkatesh, R.; Staal, B.B.P.; Klumperman, B.

    2004-01-01

    Successful statistical copolymn. of an a-olefin (1-octene) with an acrylate (Bu acrylate, BA) and with a methacrylate (Me methacrylate, MMA), employing reversible addn.-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) mediated polymn. has been accomplished

  20. The rate of second electron transfer to QB(-) in bacterial reaction center of impaired proton delivery shows hydrogen-isotope effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maróti, Ágnes; Wraight, Colin A; Maróti, Péter

    2015-02-01

    The 2nd electron transfer in reaction center of photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is a two step process in which protonation of QB(-) precedes interquinone electron transfer. The thermal activation and pH dependence of the overall rate constants of different RC variants were measured and compared in solvents of water (H2O) and heavy water (D2O). The electron transfer variants where the electron transfer is rate limiting (wild type and M17DN, L210DN and H173EQ mutants) do not show solvent isotope effect and the significant decrease of the rate constant of the second electron transfer in these mutants is due to lowering the operational pKa of QB(-)/QBH: 4.5 (native), 3.9 (L210DN), 3.7 (M17DN) and 3.1 (H173EQ) at pH7. On the other hand, the proton transfer variants where the proton transfer is rate limiting demonstrate solvent isotope effect of pH-independent moderate magnitude (2.11±0.26 (WT+Ni(2+)), 2.16±0.35 (WT+Cd(2+)) and 2.34±0.44 (L210DN/M17DN)) or pH-dependent large magnitude (5.7 at pH4 (L213DN)). Upon deuteration, the free energy and the enthalpy of activation increase in all proton transfer variants by about 1 kcal/mol and the entropy of activation becomes negligible in L210DN/M17DN mutant. The results are interpreted as manifestation of equilibrium and kinetic solvent isotope effects and the structural, energetic and kinetic possibility of alternate proton delivery pathways are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-local spatial frequency response of photopolymer materials containing chain transfer agents: I. Theoretical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Jinxin; Gleeson, Michael R; Liu, Shui; Sheridan, John T

    2011-01-01

    The non-local photopolymerization driven diffusion (NPDD) model predicts that a reduction in the non-local response length within a photopolymer material will improve its high spatial frequency response. The introduction of a chain transfer agent reduces the average molecular weight of polymer chains formed during free radical polymerization. Therefore a chain transfer agent (CTA) provides a practical method to reduce the non-local response length. An extended NPDD model is presented, which includes the chain transfer reaction and most major photochemical processes. The addition of a chain transfer agent into an acrylamide/polyvinyl alcohol photopolymer material is simulated and the predictions of the model are examined. The predictions of the model are experimentally examined in part II of this paper

  2. Reductive dehalogenation of 5-bromouracil by aliphatic organic radicals in aqueous solutions; electron transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matasović, Brunislav; Bonifačić, Marija

    2011-06-01

    Reductive dehalogenation of 5-bromouracil by aliphatic organic radicals CO2-rad , rad CH 2OH, rad CH(CH 3)OH, and rad CH(CH 3)O - have been studied in oxygen free aqueous solutions in the presence of organic additives: formate, methanol or ethanol. For radicals production 60Co γ-radiolysis was employed and the yield of bromide was measured by means of ion chromatography. Both radical anions have reducing potential negative enough to transfer an electron to BrU producing bromide ion and U rad radical. High yields of bromide have been measured increasing proportional to the concentration of the corresponding organic additives at a constant dose rate. This is characteristic for a chain process where regeneration of radical ions occurs by H-atom abstraction by U rad radical from formate or ethanol. Results with the neutral radicals conformed earlier proposition that the reduction reaction of α-hydroxyalkyl radicals proceeds by the proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism ( Matasović and Bonifačić, 2007). Thus, while both rad CH 2OH and rad CH(CH 3)OH did not react with BrU in water/alcohol solutions, addition of bicarbonate and acetate in mmol dm -3 concentrations, pH 7, brought about chain debromination to occur in the case of rad CH(CH 3)OH radical as reactant. Under the same conditions phosphate buffer, a base with higher bulk proton affinity, failed to have any influence. The results are taken as additional proofs for the specific complex formation of α-hydroxyalkyl radicals with suitable bases which enhances radicals' reduction potential in comparison with only water molecules as proton acceptors. Rate constants for the H-atom abstraction from ethanol and formate by U rad radicals have been estimated to amount to about ≥85 and 1200 dm 3 mol -1 s -1, respectively.

  3. Nuclear reorganization barriers to electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutin, N.; Brunschwig, B.S.; Creutz, C.; Winkler, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear barrier to electron transfer arises from the need for reorganization of intramolecular and solvent internuclear distances prior to electron transfer. For reactions with relatively small driving force (''normal'' free-energy region) the nuclear factors and rates increase as intrinsic inner-shell and outer-shell barriers decrease; this is illustrated by data for transition metal complexes in their ground electronic states. By contrast, in the inverted free-energy region, rates and nuclear factors decrease with decreasing ''intrinsic'' barriers; this is illustrated by data for the decay of charge-transfer excited states. Several approaches to the evaluation of the outer-shell barrier are explored in an investigation of the distance dependence of the nuclear factor in intramolecular electron-transfer processes. 39 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Electron transfer to sulfides:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneses, Ana Belen; Antonello, Sabrina; Arevalo, Maria Carmen; Maran, Flavio

    2005-01-01

    The problem of characterizing the steps associated with the dissociative reduction of sulfides has been addressed. The electrochemical reduction of diphenylmethyl para-methoxyphenyl sulfide in N,N-dimethylformamide, on both glassy carbon and mercury electrodes, was chosen as a test system. The electrode process involves the slow heterogeneous outer-sphere electron transfer to the sulfide, the fast cleavage of the C-S bond, the reduction of the ensuing carbon radical, and the self-protonation triggered by the generation of the strong base Ph 2 CH - . The latter reaction is rather slow, in agreement with the large intrinsic barriers characterizing proton transfers between CH-acids and carbon bases. The dissociative reduction was studied in the presence of an exogenous acid. The results, obtained by convolution analysis, point to a stepwise DET mechanism in which the ET step is accompanied by rather large reorganization energy. Similar results were obtained on both electrode materials. Analysis of the heterogeneous electron transfer and associated C-S bond cleavage indicate that the reduction of this and other sulfides lies between the stepwise dissociative electron transfers leading to the formation of stiff π* radical anions and those going through the intermediacy of loose σ* radical anions

  5. Energy transfer in purple bacterial photosynthetic units from cells grown in various light intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Gardiner, Alastair T; Blankenship, Robert E; Cogdell, Richard J

    2018-05-03

    Three photosynthetic membranes, called intra-cytoplasmic membranes (ICMs), from wild-type and the ∆pucBA abce mutant of the purple phototrophic bacterium Rps. palustris were investigated using optical spectroscopy. The ICMs contain identical light-harvesting complex 1-reaction centers (LH1-RC) but have various spectral forms of light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2). Spectroscopic studies involving steady-state absorption, fluorescence, and femtosecond time-resolved absorption at room temperature and at 77 K focused on inter-protein excitation energy transfer. The studies investigated how energy transfer is affected by altered spectral features of the LH2 complexes as those develop under growth at different light conditions. The study shows that LH1 → LH2 excitation energy transfer is strongly affected if the LH2 complex alters its spectroscopic signature. The LH1 → LH2 excitation energy transfer rate modeled with the Förster mechanism and kinetic simulations of transient absorption of the ICMs demonstrated that the transfer rate will be 2-3 times larger for ICMs accumulating LH2 complexes with the classical B800-850 spectral signature (grown in high light) compared to the ICMs from the same strain grown in low light. For the ICMs from the ∆pucBA abce mutant, in which the B850 band of the LH2 complex is blue-shifted and almost degenerate with the B800 band, the LH1 → LH2 excitation energy transfer was not observed nor predicted by calculations.

  6. High rates of solar radiation - an important natural stress factor of the photosynthetic activity of mountainous norway spruce stands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprtova, M.; Marek, M.V.

    1996-01-01

    Photosynthetic activity can be regarded as the basis of biomass productivity and vitality of forest trees, respectively. Moreover, this activity is under the strong influence of environment. Excess of photosynthetically active radiation (PhAR) can be a harmful factor of environment which is the reason of photoinhibition. Photoinhibition is demonstrated by a decrease of photosynthetic rate. An analysis of the influence of PhAR excess on function of the assimilatory apparatus of Norway spruce during summer days was done. The strong influence of PhAR excess on values of parameters of photosynthesis reflecting changes in the level of quanta capture and electron transport chain was observed. The comprehensive description of the method of chlorophyll a is given. Excess of PhAR caused rapid changes of assimilatory apparatus function and thus this PhAR excess can be regarded as a significant stress of productional activity of Norway spruce stands under field conditions

  7. Alternative photosynthetic electron transport pathways during anaerobiosis in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Happe, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis uses light as energy source to generate an oxidant powerful enough to oxidize water into oxygen, electrons and protons. Upon linear electron transport, electrons extracted from water are used to reduce NADP(+) to NADPH. The oxygen molecule has been integrated into the cellular metabolism, both as the most efficient electron acceptor during respiratory electron transport and as oxidant and/or "substrate" in a number of biosynthetic pathways. Though photosynthesis of higher plants, algae and cyanobacteria produces oxygen, there are conditions under which this type of photosynthesis operates under hypoxic or anaerobic conditions. In the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, this condition is induced by sulfur deficiency, and it results in the production of molecular hydrogen. Research on this biotechnologically relevant phenomenon has contributed largely to new insights into additional pathways of photosynthetic electron transport, which extend the former concept of linear electron flow by far. This review summarizes the recent knowledge about various electron sources and sinks of oxygenic photosynthesis besides water and NADP(+) in the context of their contribution to hydrogen photoproduction by C. reinhardtii. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Regulation of Electron Transport in Chloroplasts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Detection of Intramolecular Charge Transfer and Dynamic Solvation in Eosin B by Femtosecond Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Roscioli, Jerome D.; Beck, Warren F.

    2014-06-01

    We have employed 2D electronic photon echo spectroscopy to study intramolecular charge-transfer dynamics in eosin B. After preparation of the first excited singlet state (S_1) with 40-fs excitation pulses at 520 nm, the nitro group (--NO_2) in eosin B undergoes excited state torsional motion towards a twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) state. As the viscosity of the surrounding solvent increases, the charge-transfer rate decreases because the twisting of the --NO_2 group is hindered. These conclusions are supported by the time evolution of the 2D spectrum, which provides a direct measure of the the ground-to-excited-state energy gap time-correlation function, M(t). In comparison to the inertial and diffusive solvation time scales exhibited by eosin Y, which lacks the nitro group, the M(t) function for eosin B exhibits under the same conditions an additional component on the 150-fs timescale that arises from quenching of the S_1 state by crossing to the TICT state. These results indicate that 2D electronic spectroscopy can be used as a sensitive probe of the rate of charge transfer in a molecular system and of the coupling to the motions of the surrounding solvent. (Supported by grant DE-SC0010847 from the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Photosynthetic Systems program.)

  9. Side-chain amino-acid-based pH-responsive self-assembled block copolymers for drug delivery and gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sonu; Acharya, Rituparna; Chatterji, Urmi; De, Priyadarsi

    2013-12-10

    Developing safe and effective nanocarriers for multitype of delivery system is advantageous for several kinds of successful biomedicinal therapy with the same carrier. In the present study, we have designed amino acid biomolecules derived hybrid block copolymers which can act as a promising vehicle for both drug delivery and gene transfer. Two representative natural chiral amino acid-containing (l-phenylalanine and l-alanine) vinyl monomers were polymerized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) process in the presence of monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol) based macro-chain transfer agents (mPEGn-CTA) for the synthesis of well-defined side-chain amino-acid-based amphiphilic block copolymers, monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(Boc-amino acid methacryloyloxyethyl ester) (mPEGn-b-P(Boc-AA-EMA)). The self-assembled micellar aggregation of these amphiphilic block copolymers were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Potential applications of these hybrid polymers as drug carrier have been demonstrated in vitro by encapsulation of nile red dye or doxorubicin drug into the core of the micellar nanoaggregates. Deprotection of side-chain Boc- groups in the amphiphilic block copolymers subsequently transformed them into double hydrophilic pH-responsive cationic block copolymers having primary amino groups in the side-chain terminal. The DNA binding ability of these cationic block copolymers were further investigated by using agarose gel retardation assay and AFM. The in vitro cytotoxicity assay demonstrated their biocompatible nature and these polymers can serve as "smart" materials for promising bioapplications.

  10. Advances in electron transfer chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, Patrick S

    1995-01-01

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Volume 4 presents the reaction mechanisms involving the movement of single electrons. This book discusses the electron transfer reactions in organic, biochemical, organometallic, and excited state systems. Organized into four chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the photochemical behavior of two classes of sulfonium salt derivatives. This text then examines the parameters that control the efficiencies for radical ion pair formation. Other chapters consider the progress in the development of parameters that control the dynamics and reaction p

  11. Kinetics of electron transfer through ferrocene-terminated alkanethiol monolayers on gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smalley, J.F.; Feldberg, S.W.; Newton, M.D.; Liu, Y.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chidsey, C.E.D.; Linford, M.R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-08-31

    The kinetics of electron transfer between a substrate gold electrode and a self-assembled monolayer formed from CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub n-1}SH and ({eta}{sup 5} C{sub 5}H{sub 5})Fe ({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4})CO{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}){sub n}SH were studied as a function of n, the number of methylenes in the alkyl chain tethering the ferrocene moiety to the electrode, using the indirect laser-induced temperature jump method (ILIT). For 5 {<=} n {<=} 9 the standard electron-transfer rate constants vary according to {kappa}{sub {tau}a,n=0} exp[-{beta}{sub n}n] where {kappa}{sub {tau}a,n=0} is the (extrapolated) rate constant for the electron transfer at n = 0. At {Tau} = 25{degree}C, {kappa}{sub {tau}a,n} 0 {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup 8} s{sup -1} and {beta}{sub n} = 1.21 x 0.05. The ILIT method allows rates to be measured that are too fast to be measured by conventional chronoamperometry at a macroelectrode, which is limited to rate constants of {<=} 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. Using a Marcus formalism, the reorganization energy, {lambda}, for the electron-transfer process at a given n was determined from the slope of an Arrhenius plot over the temperature range 15-55{degree}C. Values of {lambda} determined from Arrhenius slopes for n = 8 and 9 using ILIT are in reasonable agreement with the value of {lambda} previously deduced from the potential dependence of the rate constant for n = 16. 39 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Effects of ultraviolet radiation (UVA+UVB) on young gametophytes of Gelidium floridanum: growth rate, photosynthetic pigments, carotenoids, photosynthetic performance, and ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simioni, Carmen; Schmidt, Eder C; Felix, Marthiellen R de L; Polo, Luz Karime; Rover, Ticiane; Kreusch, Marianne; Pereira, Debora T; Chow, Fungyi; Ramlov, Fernanda; Maraschin, Marcelo; Bouzon, Zenilda L

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of radiation (PAR+UVA+UVB) on the development and growth rates (GRs) of young gametophytes of Gelidium floridanum. In addition, photosynthetic pigments were quantified, carotenoids identified, and photosynthetic performance assessed. Over a period of 3 days, young gametophytes were cultivated under laboratory conditions and exposed to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) at 80 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) and PAR+UVA (0.70 W m(-2))+UVB (0.35 W m(-2)) for 3 h per day. The samples were processed for light and electron microscopy to analyze the ultrastructure features, as well as carry out metabolic studies of GRs, quantify the content of photosynthetic pigments, identify carotenoids and assess photosynthetic performance. PAR+UVA+UVB promoted increase in cell wall thickness, accumulation of floridean starch grains in the cytoplasm and disruption of chloroplast internal organization. Algae exposed to PAR+UVA+UVB also showed a reduction in GR of 97%. Photosynthetic pigments, in particular, phycoerythrin and allophycocyanin contents, decreased significantly from UV radiation exposure. This result agrees with the decrease in photosynthetic performance observed after exposure to ultraviolet radiation, as measured by a decrease in the electron transport rate (ETR), where values of ETRmax declined approximately 44.71%. It can be concluded that radiation is a factor that affects the young gametophytes of G. floridanum at this stage of development. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  13. Insights into the post-transcriptional regulation of the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirey, Tamara M; Ponting, Chris P

    2016-10-15

    The regulation of the mitochondrial electron transport chain is central to the control of cellular homeostasis. There are significant gaps in our understanding of how the expression of the mitochondrial and nuclear genome-encoded components of the electron transport chain are co-ordinated, and how the assembly of the protein complexes that constitute the electron transport chain are regulated. Furthermore, the role post-transcriptional gene regulation may play in modulating these processes needs to be clarified. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the post-transcriptional gene regulation of the electron transport chain and highlights how noncoding RNAs may contribute significantly both to complex electron transport chain regulatory networks and to mitochondrial dysfunction. © 2016 The Author(s).

  14. A novel photosynthetic strategy for adaptation to low-iron aquatic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, D.; Folea, I.M.; Jolley, C.C.; Kouril, R.; Lubner, C.E.; Lin, S.; Kolber, D.; Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Golbeck, J.H.; Boekema, E.J.; Fromme, P.

    2011-01-01

    Iron (Fe) availability is a major limiting factor for primary production in aquatic environments. Cyanobacteria respond to Fe deficiency by derepressing the isiAB operon, which encodes the antenna protein IsiA and flavodoxin. At nanomolar Fe concentrations, a PSI-IsiA supercomplex forms, comprising a PSI trimer encircled by two complete IsiA rings. This PSI-IsiA supercomplex is the largest photosynthetic membrane protein complex yet isolated. This study presents a detailed characterization of this complex using transmission electron microscopy and ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy. Excitation trapping and electron transfer are highly efficient, allowing cyanobacteria to avoid oxidative stress. This mechanism may be a major factor used by cyanobacteria to successfully adapt to modern low-Fe environments. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  15. A model for the chain-to-plane charge transfer in YBa2Cu3O6+x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matic, V. M.; Lazarov, N. Dj.; Milic, M.

    2012-01-01

    A model for the chain-to-plane charge transfer is proposed to account for the two plateaus, at 60 K and at 90 K, of the T c (x) characteristics of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+x high-T c superconductor. It is assumed that the number of holes transferred from a CuO chain of length l to two nearby CuO 2 sheets is proportional to l (that is, to the number of oxygen atoms in the chain), if the chain length is greater than, or equal to, a certain critical chain length, l cr , that is required to trigger the charge transfer process. No holes are assumed to have been transferred from chains of length l cr . The calculated T c (x) dependence is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimentally reported T c (x). The critical chain length parameter is estimated to be equal to l cr = 11 (eleven oxygen atoms in a chain), which is a greater value than that obtained in the previously proposed model for the chain-to-plane charge transfer (l cr = 4). The results obtained out of the proposed model are briefly discussed

  16. Electron transfer from electronic excited states to sub-vacuum electron traps in amorphous ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vichnevetski, E.; Bass, A.D.; Sanche, L.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the electron stimulated yield of electronically excited argon atoms (Ar * ) from monolayer quantities of Ar deposited onto thin films of amorphous ice. Two peaks of narrow width ( - electron-exciton complex into exciton states, by the transfer of an electron into a sub-vacuum electron state within the ice film. However, the 10.7 eV feature is shifted to lower energy since electron attachment to Ar occurs within small pores of amorphous ice. In this case, the excess electron is transferred into an electron trap below the conduction band of the ice layer

  17. The inter-relationship of ascorbate transport, metabolism and mitochondrial, plastidic respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarka, András; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Asard, Han

    2013-09-20

    Ascorbate, this multifaceted small molecular weight carbohydrate derivative, plays important roles in a range of cellular processes in plant cells, from the regulation of cell cycle, through cell expansion and senescence. Beyond these physiological functions, ascorbate has a critical role in responses to abiotic stresses, such as high light, high salinity, or drought. The biosynthesis, recycling, and intracellular transport are important elements of the balancing of ascorbate level to the always-changing conditions and demands. A bidirectional tight relationship was described between ascorbate biosynthesis and the mitochondrial electron transfer chain (mETC), since L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH), the enzyme catalyzing the ultimate step of ascorbate biosynthesis, uses oxidized cytochrome c as the only electron acceptor and has a role in the assembly of Complex I. A similar bidirectional relationship was revealed between the photosynthetic apparatus and ascorbate biosynthesis since the electron flux through the photosynthetic ETC affects the biosynthesis of ascorbate and the level of ascorbate could affect photosynthesis. The details of this regulatory network of photosynthetic electron transfer, respiratory electron transfer, and ascorbate biosynthesis are still not clear, as are the potential regulatory role and the regulation of intracellular ascorbate transport and fluxes. The elucidation of the role of ascorbate as an important element of the network of photosynthetic, respiratory ETC and tricarboxylic acid cycle will contribute to understanding plant cell responses to different stress conditions.

  18. A general exit strategy of monoheme cytochromes c and c2 in electron transfer complexes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De March, Matteo; Brancatelli, Giovanna; Demitri, Nicola; De Zorzi, Rita; Hickey, Neal; Geremia, Silvano

    2015-09-01

    Using our previously reported maps of the electrostatic surface of horse heart ferri- and ferro-cyt c, comparisons were made between the complementary electrostatic surfaces of three cyt c peroxidase-cyt c complexes and the photosynthetic reaction center-cyt c complex, considering both iron oxidation states. The results obtained were consistent with a sliding mechanism for the electron shuttle on the surface of the protein complexes, promoted by the change in iron oxidation state. This mechanism was found to be in agreement with theoretical and NMR studies reported in the literature. Importantly, the analysis also provided a rationale for recognition of nonproductive associations. As we have previously reported the same conclusion on examination of redox partners of cyt c in the mitochondrial respiratory pathway, our hypothesis is that the proposed mechanism could represent a general exit strategy of monoheme cyts c and c2 in electron transfer complexes. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Nonadiabatic anharmonic electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, P. P. [Molecular Physics Research, 6547 Kristina Ursula Court, Falls Church, Virginia 22044 (United States)

    2013-03-28

    The effect of an inner sphere, local mode vibration on an electron transfer is modeled using the nonadiabatic transition probability (rate) expression together with both the anharmonic Morse and the harmonic oscillator potential. For an anharmonic inner sphere mode, a variational analysis uses harmonic oscillator basis functions to overcome the difficulties evaluating Morse-model Franck-Condon overlap factors. Individual matrix elements are computed with the use of new, fast, robust, and flexible recurrence relations. The analysis therefore readily addresses changes in frequency and/or displacement of oscillator minimums in the different electron transfer states. Direct summation of the individual Boltzmann weighted Franck-Condon contributions avoids the limitations inherent in the use of the familiar high-temperature, Gaussian form of the rate constant. The effect of harmonic versus anharmonic inner sphere modes on the electron transfer is readily seen, especially in the exoergic, inverted region. The behavior of the transition probability can also be displayed as a surface for all temperatures and values of the driving force/exoergicity {Delta}=-{Delta}G. The temperature insensitivity of the transfer rate is clearly seen when the exoergicity equals the collective reorganization energy ({Delta}={Lambda}{sub s}) along a maximum ln (w) vs. {Delta} ridge of the surface. The surface also reveals additional regions for {Delta} where ln (w) appears to be insensitive to temperature, or effectively activationless, for some kinds of inner sphere contributions.

  20. Transient Exciplex Formation Electron Transfer Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Michael G. Kuzmin; Irina V. Soboleva; Elena V. Dolotova

    2011-01-01

    Transient exciplex formation mechanism of excited-state electron transfer reactions is analyzed in terms of experimental data on thermodynamics and kinetics of exciplex formation and decay. Experimental profiles of free energy, enthalpy, and entropy for transient exciplex formation and decay are considered for several electron transfer reactions in various solvents. Strong electronic coupling in contact pairs of reactants causes substantial decrease of activation energy relative to that for c...

  1. Quantum state transfer in spin chains with q-deformed interaction terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafarov, E I; Van der Jeugt, J

    2010-01-01

    We study the time evolution of a single spin excitation state in certain linear spin chains, as a model for quantum communication. Some years ago it was discovered that when the spin chain data (the nearest-neighbour interaction strengths and the magnetic field strengths) are related to the Jacobi matrix entries of Krawtchouk polynomials or dual Hahn polynomials the so-called perfect state transfer takes place. The extension of these ideas to other types of discrete orthogonal polynomials did not lead to new models with perfect state transfer, but did allow more insight in the general computation of the correlation function. In this paper, we extend the study to discrete orthogonal polynomials of q-hypergeometric type. A remarkable result is a new analytic model where perfect state transfer is achieved: this is when the spin chain data are related to the Jacobi matrix of q-Krawtchouk polynomials. The other cases studied here (affine q-Krawtchouk polynomials, quantum q-Krawtchouk polynomials, dual q-Krawtchouk polynomials, q-Hahn polynomials, dual q-Hahn polynomials and q-Racah polynomials) do not give rise to models with perfect state transfer. However, the computation of the correlation function itself is quite interesting, leading to advanced q-series manipulations.

  2. Multinational firms, global value chains and the organization of technology transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Federica Saliola; Antonello Zanfei

    2007-01-01

    This paper combines insights from different streams of literature to develop a more comprehensive framework for the analysis of technology transfer via value chain relationships. We integrate the existing literature in three ways. First, we consider value chain relationships as a multi-facet process of interaction between buyers and suppliers, involving different degrees of knowledge transmission and development. Second, we assess whether and to what extent value chain relationships are assoc...

  3. Multinational Firms, Global Value Chains and the Organization of Knowledge Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Saliola, Federica; Zanfei, Antonello

    2009-01-01

    This paper combines insights from different streams of literature to develop a more comprehensive framework for the analysis of knowledge transfer via value chain relationships. We integrate the existing literature in three ways. First, we consider value chain relationships as a multi-facet process of interaction between buyers and suppliers, involving different modes of knowledge transmission and development. Second, we assess whether and to what extent value chain relationships are associat...

  4. Thermoluminescence as a complementary technique for the toxicological evaluation of chemicals in photosynthetic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repetto, Guillermo, E-mail: grepkuh@upo.es [Departamento de Biología Molecular e Ingeniería Bioquímica, Área de Toxicología, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Carretera de Utrera km. 1, 41013 Seville (Spain); Zurita, Jorge L. [Departamento de Biología Molecular e Ingeniería Bioquímica, Área de Toxicología, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Carretera de Utrera km. 1, 41013 Seville (Spain); Roncel, Mercedes; Ortega, José M. [Instituto de Bioquímica Vegetal y Fotosíntesis, Universidad de Sevilla-CSIC, Américo Vespucio 49, 41092 Seville (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • There are very few toxicological applications of thermoluminescence. • It is a luminescence emission induced by heating the sample in the dark. • It is useful for study the photosystem II function and the level of lipid peroxidation. - Abstract: Thermoluminescence is a simple technique very useful for studying electron transfer reactions on photosystem II (standard thermoluminescence) or the level of lipid peroxidation in membranes (high temperature thermoluminescence) in photosynthetic organisms. Both techniques were used to investigate the effects produced on Chlorella vulgaris cells by six compounds: the chemical intermediates bromobenzene and diethanolamine, the antioxidant propyl gallate, the semiconductor indium nitrate, the pesticide sodium monofluoroacetate and the antimalarial drug chloroquine. Electron transfer activity of the photosystem II significantly decreased after the exposure of Chlorella cells to all the six chemicals used. Lipid peroxidation was slightly decreased by the antioxidant propyl gallate, not changed by indium nitrate and very potently stimulated by diethanolamine, chloroquine, sodium monofluoroacetate and bromobenzene. For five of the chemicals studied (not bromobenzene) there is a very good correlation between the cytotoxic effects in Chlorella cells measured by the algal growth inhibition test, and the inhibition of photosystem II activity. The results suggest that one very important effect of these chemicals in Chlorella cells is the inhibition of photosynthetic metabolism by the blocking of photosystem II functionality. In the case of sodium monofluoroacetate, diethanolamine and chloroquine this inhibition seems to be related with the induction of high level of lipid peroxidation in cells that may alter the stability of photosystem II. The results obtained by both techniques supply information that can be used as a supplement to the growth inhibition test and allows a more complete assessment of the effects of

  5. Thermoluminescence as a complementary technique for the toxicological evaluation of chemicals in photosynthetic organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repetto, Guillermo; Zurita, Jorge L.; Roncel, Mercedes; Ortega, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • There are very few toxicological applications of thermoluminescence. • It is a luminescence emission induced by heating the sample in the dark. • It is useful for study the photosystem II function and the level of lipid peroxidation. - Abstract: Thermoluminescence is a simple technique very useful for studying electron transfer reactions on photosystem II (standard thermoluminescence) or the level of lipid peroxidation in membranes (high temperature thermoluminescence) in photosynthetic organisms. Both techniques were used to investigate the effects produced on Chlorella vulgaris cells by six compounds: the chemical intermediates bromobenzene and diethanolamine, the antioxidant propyl gallate, the semiconductor indium nitrate, the pesticide sodium monofluoroacetate and the antimalarial drug chloroquine. Electron transfer activity of the photosystem II significantly decreased after the exposure of Chlorella cells to all the six chemicals used. Lipid peroxidation was slightly decreased by the antioxidant propyl gallate, not changed by indium nitrate and very potently stimulated by diethanolamine, chloroquine, sodium monofluoroacetate and bromobenzene. For five of the chemicals studied (not bromobenzene) there is a very good correlation between the cytotoxic effects in Chlorella cells measured by the algal growth inhibition test, and the inhibition of photosystem II activity. The results suggest that one very important effect of these chemicals in Chlorella cells is the inhibition of photosynthetic metabolism by the blocking of photosystem II functionality. In the case of sodium monofluoroacetate, diethanolamine and chloroquine this inhibition seems to be related with the induction of high level of lipid peroxidation in cells that may alter the stability of photosystem II. The results obtained by both techniques supply information that can be used as a supplement to the growth inhibition test and allows a more complete assessment of the effects of

  6. Utilizing the dynamic stark shift as a probe for dielectric relaxation in photosynthetic reaction centers during charge separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi; Lin, Su; Woodbury, Neal W

    2013-09-26

    In photosynthetic reaction centers, the electric field generated by light-induced charge separation produces electrochromic shifts in the transitions of reaction center pigments. The extent of this Stark shift indirectly reflects the effective field strength at a particular cofactor in the complex. The dynamics of the effective field strength near the two monomeric bacteriochlorophylls (BA and BB) in purple photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers has been explored near physiological temperature by monitoring the time-dependent Stark shift during charge separation (dynamic Stark shift). This dynamic Stark shift was determined through analysis of femtosecond time-resolved absorbance change spectra recorded in wild type reaction centers and in four mutants at position M210. In both wild type and the mutants, the kinetics of the dynamic Stark shift differ from those of electron transfer, though not in the same way. In wild type, the initial electron transfer and the increase in the effective field strength near the active-side monomer bacteriochlorophyll (BA) occur in synchrony, but the two signals diverge on the time scale of electron transfer to the quinone. In contrast, when tyrosine is replaced by aspartic acid at M210, the kinetics of the BA Stark shift and the initial electron transfer differ, but transfer to the quinone coincides with the decay of the Stark shift. This is interpreted in terms of differences in the dynamics of the local dielectric environment between the mutants and the wild type. In wild type, comparison of the Stark shifts associated with BA and BB on the two quasi-symmetric halves of the reaction center structure confirm that the effective dielectric constants near these cofactors are quite different when the reaction center is in the state P(+)QA(-), as previously determined by Steffen et al. at 1.5 K (Steffen, M. A.; et al. Science 1994, 264, 810-816). However, it is not possible to determine from static, low-temperature measurments if the

  7. Electronic Conduction through Atomic Chains, Quantum Well and Quantum Wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    Charge transport is dynamically and strongly linked with atomic structure, in nanostructures. We report our ab-initio calculations on electronic transport through atomic chains and the model calculations on electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering rates in presence of random impurity potential in a quantum well and in a quantum wire. We computed synthesis and ballistic transport through; (a) C and Si based atomic chains attached to metallic electrodes, (b) armchair (AC), zigzag (ZZ), mixed, rotated-AC and rotated-ZZ geometries of small molecules made of 2S, 6C and 4H atoms attaching to metallic electrodes, and (c) carbon atomic chain attached to graphene electrodes. Computed results show that synthesis of various atomic chains are practically possible and their transmission coefficients are nonzero for a wide energy range. The ab-initio calculations on electronic transport have been performed with the use of Landauer-type scattering formalism formulated in terms of Grben's functions in combination with ground-state DFT. The electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering rates have been calculated as function of excitation energy both at zero and finite temperatures for disordered 2D and 1D systems. Our model calculations suggest that electron scattering rates in a disordered system are mainly governed by effective dimensionality of a system, carrier concentration and dynamical screening effects.

  8. Tunneling induced electron transfer between separated protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vindel-Zandbergen, Patricia; Meier, Christoph; Sola, Ignacio R.

    2018-04-01

    We study electron transfer between two separated protons using local control theory. In this symmetric system one can favour a slow transfer by biasing the algorithm, achieving high efficiencies for fixed nuclei. The solution can be parametrized using a sequence of a pump followed by a dump pulse that lead to tunneling-induced electron transfer. Finally, we study the effect of the nuclear kinetic energy on the efficiency. Even in the absence of relative motion between the protons, the spreading of the nuclear wave function is enough to reduce the yield of electronic transfer to less than one half.

  9. Innovation and technology transfer through global value chains: Evidence from China's PV industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fang; Gallagher, Kelly Sims

    2016-01-01

    China's success as a rapid innovation follower in the infant Photovoltaic (PV) industry surprised many observers. This paper explores how China inserted itself into global clean energy innovation systems by examining the case of the solar PV industry. The paper decomposes the global PV industrial value chain, and determines the main factors shaping PV technology transfer and diffusion. Chinese firms first entered PV module manufacturing through technology acquisition, and then gradually built their global competitiveness by utilizing a vertical integration strategy within segments of the industry as well as the broader PV value chain. The main drivers for PV technology transfer from the global innovation system to China are global market formation policy, international mobilization of talent, the flexibility of manufacturing in China, and belated policy incentives from China's government. The development trajectory of the PV industry in China indicates that innovation in cleaner energy technologies can occur through both global and national innovation processes, and knowledge exchange along the global PV value chain. - Highlights: •The value chain analytical approach is synergized with the theories of technology transfer and innovation systems. •A detailed review of how China integrated itself into the global solar PV innovation system is provided. •Four main factors shape PV technology transfer to China across various value chain segments. •Innovation in cleaner energy technologies is a combination of global and national innovation processes.

  10. Electron transfer in organic glass. Distance and energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krongauz, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have investigated the distance and energy dependence of electron transfer in rigid organic glasses containing randomly dispersed electron donor and electron acceptor molecules. Pulsed radiolysis by an electron beam from a linear accelerator was used for ionization resulting in charge deposition on donor molecules. The disappearance kinetics of donor radical anions due to electron transfer to acceptor was monitored spectroscopically by the change in optical density at the wavelength corresponding to that of donor radical anion absorbance. It was found that the rate of the electron transfer observed experimentally was higher than that computed using the Marcus-Levich theory assuming that the electron-transfer activation barrier is equal to the binding energy of electron on the donor molecule. This discrepancy between the experimental and computed results suggests that the open-quotes inertclose quotes media in which electron-transfer reaction takes place may be participating in the process, resulting in experimentally observed higher electron-transfer rates. 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process in Lorentzian plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2014-01-01

    The quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process between a positive ion and a neutral atom collision is investigated in nonthermal generalized Lorentzian plasmas. The result shows that the nonthermal effect enhances the resonant electron transfer cross section in Lorentzian plasmas. It is found that the nonthermal effect on the classical resonant electron transfer cross section is more significant than that on the quantum tunneling resonant charge transfer cross section. It is shown that the nonthermal effect on the resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with an increase of the Debye length. In addition, the nonthermal effect on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with increasing collision energy. The variation of nonthermal and plasma shielding effects on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process is also discussed

  12. Rate dependence of electron transfer on donor-acceptor separation and on free enthalpy change. The Ru(bpy)32+/viologen2+ system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, H.; Frank, R.; Greiner, G.

    1986-01-01

    By attachment of hydrocarbon chains of different lengths to the bipyridyl ligands in Ru(bpy) 3 2+ we have adjusted the donor-acceptor separation in the electron-transfer system Ru[(C/sub n/H/sub 2n+1/) 2 bpyl 3 2+ /methylviolgen. Two electron-transfer reactions with different ΔG are investigated in fluid solution: the quenching of the excited complexes by methylviologen (MV 2+ ) which is exergonic with -0.4 eV and the thermal back electron transfer which is exergonic with -1.7 eV. We observe an exponential decrease of the quenching rate on distance. The back electron transfer is independent of donor-acceptor separation; electron transfer is found to take place at distances of 1.5 nm and more. The results are discussed in terms of a hypothesis on the interdependence of transfer distance and free enthalpy change and compared with current theories. In the framework of the simple classical Marcus model, the Marcus equation relating transfer rate and free enthalpy change is transposed into the Rehm-Weller equation by simple mathematical manipulations and the implications of this are discussed

  13. Reductive dehalogenation of 5-bromouracil by aliphatic organic radicals in aqueous solutions; electron transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matasovic, Brunislav [Division of Physical Chemistry, ' Ruder Boskovic' Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Bonifacic, Marija, E-mail: bonifacic@irb.h [Division of Physical Chemistry, ' Ruder Boskovic' Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-06-15

    Reductive dehalogenation of 5-bromouracil by aliphatic organic radicals {sup {center_dot}C}O{sub 2}{sup -}, {sup {center_dot}C}H{sub 2}OH, {sup {center_dot}C}H(CH{sub 3})OH, and {sup {center_dot}C}H(CH{sub 3})O{sup -} have been studied in oxygen free aqueous solutions in the presence of organic additives: formate, methanol or ethanol. For radicals production {sup 60}Co {gamma}-radiolysis was employed and the yield of bromide was measured by means of ion chromatography. Both radical anions have reducing potential negative enough to transfer an electron to BrU producing bromide ion and U{sup {center_dot}} radical. High yields of bromide have been measured increasing proportional to the concentration of the corresponding organic additives at a constant dose rate. This is characteristic for a chain process where regeneration of radical ions occurs by H-atom abstraction by U{sup {center_dot}} radical from formate or ethanol. Results with the neutral radicals conformed earlier proposition that the reduction reaction of {alpha}-hydroxyalkyl radicals proceeds by the proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism (). Thus, while both {sup {center_dot}C}H{sub 2}OH and {sup {center_dot}C}H(CH{sub 3})OH did not react with BrU in water/alcohol solutions, addition of bicarbonate and acetate in mmol dm{sup -3} concentrations, pH 7, brought about chain debromination to occur in the case of {sup {center_dot}C}H(CH{sub 3})OH radical as reactant. Under the same conditions phosphate buffer, a base with higher bulk proton affinity, failed to have any influence. The results are taken as additional proofs for the specific complex formation of {alpha}-hydroxyalkyl radicals with suitable bases which enhances radicals' reduction potential in comparison with only water molecules as proton acceptors. Rate constants for the H-atom abstraction from ethanol and formate by U{sup {center_dot}} radicals have been estimated to amount to about {>=}85 and 1200 dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1

  14. Bioaccumulation and food chain transfer of corrosion products from radioactive stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.S.

    1986-07-01

    Two sets of experiments were conducted to determine if corrosion products from radioactive Type 347 stainless steel could be biologically transferred from sediment through a marine food chain, and whether corrosion products dissolved in seawater could be bioaccumulated and then eliminated. Corrosion products containing 60 Co and 63 Ni from the radioactive stainless steel were introduced into marine sediments. Infaunal polychaete worms exposed to these sediments bioaccumulated the radionuclides. The feeding of these worms to shrimp and fish resulted in a trophic transfer of the radioactive products across a one-step food chain. The magnitude of the transfers are described in terms of transfer factors. Dissolved corrosion products as measured by the radionuclides were also bioaccumulated by shrimp and fish concentrating more than fish. Concentration factors were calculated

  15. The Electron Transport Chain: An Interactive Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Chris; Choun, James

    2014-01-01

    This activity provides students an interactive demonstration of the electron transport chain and chemiosmosis during aerobic respiration. Students use simple, everyday objects as hydrogen ions and electrons and play the roles of the various proteins embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane to show how this specific process in cellular…

  16. Two-Electron Transfer Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiaxing; Balamurugan, D; Zhang, Peng; Skourtis, Spiros S; Beratan, David N

    2015-06-18

    The frontiers of electron-transfer chemistry demand that we develop theoretical frameworks to describe the delivery of multiple electrons, atoms, and ions in molecular systems. When electrons move over long distances through high barriers, where the probability for thermal population of oxidized or reduced bridge-localized states is very small, the electrons will tunnel from the donor (D) to acceptor (A), facilitated by bridge-mediated superexchange interactions. If the stable donor and acceptor redox states on D and A differ by two electrons, it is possible that the electrons will propagate coherently from D to A. While structure-function relations for single-electron superexchange in molecules are well established, strategies to manipulate the coherent flow of multiple electrons are largely unknown. In contrast to one-electron superexchange, two-electron superexchange involves both one- and two-electron virtual intermediate states, the number of virtual intermediates increases very rapidly with system size, and multiple classes of pathways interfere with one another. In the study described here, we developed simple superexchange models for two-electron transfer. We explored how the bridge structure and energetics influence multielectron superexchange, and we compared two-electron superexchange interactions to single-electron superexchange. Multielectron superexchange introduces interference between singly and doubly oxidized (or reduced) bridge virtual states, so that even simple linear donor-bridge-acceptor systems have pathway topologies that resemble those seen for one-electron superexchange through bridges with multiple parallel pathways. The simple model systems studied here exhibit a richness that is amenable to experimental exploration by manipulating the multiple pathways, pathway crosstalk, and changes in the number of donor and acceptor species. The features that emerge from these studies may assist in developing new strategies to deliver multiple

  17. Simulation of radionuclide transfer in agricultural food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthies, M.; Eisfeld, K.; Mueller, H.; Paretzke, H.G.; Proehl, G.; Wirth, E.

    1982-12-01

    Radioactive releases from nuclear facilities could pose longterm potential hazards to man if radionuclides enter food chains leading to man. The aim of the study was to develop radioecological and dosimetric models for the assessments of the activity intake by man via ingestion and the resulting radiation exposure for members of the population, in particular after accidental releases from fuel reprocessing plants and related installations. A dynamic compartment model for the transfer of radionuclides through agricultural food chains has been developed. Special emphasis is given to the time dependence and the biological and site specific variability of the various transfer and accumulation processes. Agricultural practices representative for Western Europe have been taken into consideration for food production (grain, potatoes, vegetables, beef and pork, milk). For the most relevant long-lived radionuclides a short-term initial deposition of 1 Ci/km 2 on agricultural areas at different months has been assumed and the time dependent transport through various food chains has been assessed. As a main result great differences have been calculated for the various months of releases because of plant foliar uptake and translocation into edible parts of the plants during the vegetation cycle. The potential activity intake over 50 years for the various nuclides and the resulting radiation exposure is dominated by the first two years after the release if no food restrictions are assumed. (orig./MG) [de

  18. Fe electron transfer and atom exchange in goethite: influence of Al-substitution and anion sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latta, Drew E; Bachman, Jonathan E; Scherer, Michelle M

    2012-10-02

    The reaction of Fe(II) with Fe(III) oxides and hydroxides is complex and includes sorption of Fe(II) to the oxide, electron transfer between sorbed Fe(II) and structural Fe(III), reductive dissolution coupled to Fe atom exchange, and, in some cases mineral phase transformation. Much of the work investigating electron transfer and atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxides has been done under relatively simple aqueous conditions in organic buffers to control pH and background electrolytes to control ionic strength. Here, we investigate whether electron transfer is influenced by cation substitution of Al(III) in goethite and the presence of anions such as phosphate, carbonate, silicate, and natural organic matter. Results from (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy indicate that both Al-substitution (up to 9%) and the presence of common anions (PO(4)(3-), CO(3)(2-), SiO(4)(4-), and humic acid) does not inhibit electron transfer between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III) in goethite under the conditions we studied. In contrast, sorption of a long-chain phospholipid completely shuts down electron transfer. Using an enriched isotope tracer method, we found that Al-substitution in goethite (10%), does, however, significantly decrease the extent of atom exchange between Fe(II) and goethite (from 43 to 12%) over a month's time. Phosphate, somewhat surprisingly, appears to have little effect on the rate and extent of atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite. Our results show that electron transfer between aqueous Fe(II) and solid Fe(III) in goethite can occur under wide range of geochemical conditions, but that the extent of redox-driven Fe atom exchange may be dependent on the presence of substituting cations such as Al.

  19. Conversion of solar energy into electricity by using duckweed in Direct Photosynthetic Plant Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubenova, Yolina; Mitov, Mario

    2012-10-01

    In the present study we demonstrate for the first time the possibility for conversion of solar energy into electricity on the principles of Direct Photosynthetic Plant Fuel Cell (DPPFC) technology by using aquatic higher plants. Lemna minuta duckweed was grown autotrophically in specially constructed fuel cells under sunlight irradiation and laboratory lighting. Current and power density up to 1.62±0.10 A.m(-2) and 380±19 mW.m(-2), respectively, were achieved under sunlight conditions. The influence of the temperature, light intensity and day/night sequencing on the current generation was investigated. The importance of the light intensity was demonstrated by the higher values of generated current (at permanently connected resistance) during daytime than those through the nights, indicating the participation of light-dependent photosynthetic processes. The obtained DPPFC outputs in the night show the contribution of light-independent reactions (respiration). The electron transfer in the examined DPPFCs is associated with a production of endogenous mediator, secreted by the duckweed. The plants' adaptive response to the applied polarization is also connected with an enhanced metabolism resulting in an increase of the protein and carbohydrate intracellular content. Further investigations aiming at improvement of the DPPFC outputs and elucidation of the electron transfer mechanism are required for practical application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cyclic electron flow provides acclimatory plasticity for the photosynthetic machinery under various environmental conditions and developmental stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjaana eSuorsa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic electron flow operates in two modes, linear and cyclic. In cyclic electron flow (CEF, electrons are recycled around photosystem I. As a result, a transthylakoid proton gradient (ΔpH is generated, leading to the production of ATP without concomitant production of NADPH, thus increasing the ATP/NADPH ratio within the chloroplast. At least two routes for CEF exist: a PGR5-PGRL1–and a chloroplast NDH-like complex mediated pathway. This review focuses on recent findings concerning the characteristics of both CEF routes in higher plants, with special emphasis paid on the crucial role of CEF in under challenging environmental conditions and developmental stages.

  1. Electronic Markets Selection in Supply Chain with Uncertain Demand and Uncertain Price

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengmei Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, more and more companies start online operation. Electronic market becomes a key component of some companies’ strategy. Supply chain management is another key component of the strategy as being adopted by an increasing number of companies. There are many interactions between electronic market and supply chain. One of the key questions is to select one type of electronic market from the view of supply chain. This paper develops some models to explore the issue of selection between public electronic market and private electronic market in three scenarios where electronic market is used for buying, for selling, and for both selling and buying, respectively. In a public electronic market, neither the supplier nor the retailer is the owner of the electronic market. However, in a private electronic market, there is an owner that is either the supplier or the retailer. Besides demand uncertainty, we take into account the price uncertainty in electronic market. We explore the conditions under which the agent of supply chain selects one certain type of electronic market by comparing expected profits of supply chain members in different scenarios. Some sensitivity analyses are conducted to explore the impact of the customer demand, electronic market retail price, and e-market use fee on the selection of electronic market. Finally, some interesting managerial and academic insights are obtained.

  2. Transient Exciplex Formation Electron Transfer Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Kuzmin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient exciplex formation mechanism of excited-state electron transfer reactions is analyzed in terms of experimental data on thermodynamics and kinetics of exciplex formation and decay. Experimental profiles of free energy, enthalpy, and entropy for transient exciplex formation and decay are considered for several electron transfer reactions in various solvents. Strong electronic coupling in contact pairs of reactants causes substantial decrease of activation energy relative to that for conventional long-range ET mechanism, especially for endergonic reactions, and provides the possibility for medium reorganization concatenated to gradual charge shift in contrast to conventional preliminary medium and reactants reorganization. Experimental criteria for transient exciplex formation (concatenated mechanism of excited-state electron transfer are considered. Available experimental data show that this mechanism dominates for endergonic ET reactions and provides a natural explanation for a lot of known paradoxes of ET reactions.

  3. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, Michael; Zang, Ling; Liu, Ruchuan; Adams, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  4. Recent development in artificial photosynthetic model; Jinko kogosei no moderu ka kenkyu saikin no shinpo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, M [Ibaraki Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-03-01

    In the conversion from solar energy into chemical energy (fuels) by photochemical conversion, an electron donor is necessary since all the fuels are reductive compounds. From the viewpoint of economic profit, water is the only one candidate as a cheap compound and existing impartially. In this paper, photosynthesis as well as the realization of its artificial model, and the relevant basic research executed recently aiming at the construction of an artificial photosynthetic system are explained. The main reaction of photosynthesis is the generation of carbohydrates by the reduction reaction of carbon dioxide with water as an electron donor and solar visual light as an energy resource. As a special example thereof, the UV photolysis of water due to the photocatalysis of a micro-particle system is introduced. The method of using a semiconductor and the method of using sensitizes are described as the photo excitation system when designing the artificial model. Additionally, as the research with respect to the construction of an artificial photosynthetic system, a photo-exciting charge transfer system is introduced. 27 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Light-dependent electrogenic activity of cyanobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Pisciotta

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria account for 20-30% of Earth's primary photosynthetic productivity and convert solar energy into biomass-stored chemical energy at the rate of approximately 450 TW [1]. These single-cell microorganisms are resilient predecessors of all higher oxygenic phototrophs and can be found in self-sustaining, nitrogen-fixing communities the world over, from Antarctic glaciers to the Sahara desert [2].Here we show that diverse genera of cyanobacteria including biofilm-forming and pelagic strains have a conserved light-dependent electrogenic activity, i.e. the ability to transfer electrons to their surroundings in response to illumination. Naturally-growing biofilm-forming photosynthetic consortia also displayed light-dependent electrogenic activity, demonstrating that this phenomenon is not limited to individual cultures. Treatment with site-specific inhibitors revealed the electrons originate at the photosynthetic electron transfer chain (P-ETC. Moreover, electrogenic activity was observed upon illumination only with blue or red but not green light confirming that P-ETC is the source of electrons. The yield of electrons harvested by extracellular electron acceptor to photons available for photosynthesis ranged from 0.05% to 0.3%, although the efficiency of electron harvesting likely varies depending on terminal electron acceptor.The current study illustrates that cyanobacterial electrogenic activity is an important microbiological conduit of solar energy into the biosphere. The mechanism responsible for electrogenic activity in cyanobacteria appears to be fundamentally different from the one exploited in previously discovered electrogenic bacteria, such as Geobacter, where electrons are derived from oxidation of organic compounds and transported via a respiratory electron transfer chain (R-ETC [3], [4]. The electrogenic pathway of cyanobacteria might be exploited to develop light-sensitive devices or future technologies that convert solar

  6. Superradiance Transition and Nonphotochemical Quenching in Photosynthetic Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Gennady Petrovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nesterov, Alexander [Universidad de Guadalajara, Departamento de Fısica, Jalisco (Mexico); Lopez, Gustavo [Universidad de Guadalajara, Departamento de Fısica, Jalisco (Mexico); Sayre, Richard Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-23

    Photosynthetic organisms have evolved protective strategies to allow them to survive in cases of intense sunlight fluctuation with the development of nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). This process allows light harvesting complexes to transfer the excess sunlight energy to non-damaging quenching channels. This report compares the NPQ process with the superradiance transition (ST). We demonstrated that the maximum of the NPQ efficiency is caused by the ST to the sink associated with the CTS. However, experimental verifications are required in order to determine whether or not the NPQ regime is associated with the ST transition for real photosynthetic complexes. Indeed, it can happen that, in the photosynthetic apparatus, the NPQ regime occurs in the “non-optimal” region of parameters, and it could be independent of the ST.

  7. Okadaic acid inhibits cell growth and photosynthetic electron transport in the alga Dunaliella tertiolecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perreault, Francois; Matias, Marcelo Seleme; Oukarroum, Abdallah [Department of Chemistry, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, 2101, Rue Jeanne Mance, Montreal, QC, Canada H2X 2J6 (Canada); Matias, William Gerson [Department of Chemistry, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, 2101, Rue Jeanne Mance, Montreal, QC, Canada H2X 2J6 (Canada); Laboratorio de Toxicologia Ambiental, LABTOX, Depto. de Engenharia Sanitaria e Ambiental, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario, CEP: 88040-970, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Popovic, Radovan, E-mail: popovic.radovan@uqam.ca [Department of Chemistry, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, 2101, Rue Jeanne Mance, Montreal, QC, Canada H2X 2J6 (Canada)

    2012-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA), which is produced by several dinoflagellate species, is a phycotoxin known to induce a decrease of biomass production in phytoplankton. However, the mechanisms of OA cytotoxicity are still unknown in microalgae. In this study, we exposed the green microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta to OA concentrations of 0.05 to 0.5 {mu}M in order to evaluate its effects on cell division, reactive oxygen species production and photosynthetic electron transport. After 72 h of treatment under continuous illumination, OA concentrations higher than 0.10 {mu}M decreased culture cell density, induced oxidative stress and inhibited photosystem II electron transport capacity. OA effect in D. tertiolecta was strongly light dependent since no oxidative stress was observed when D. tertiolecta was exposed to OA in the dark. In the absence of light, the effect of OA on culture cell density and photosystem II activity was also significantly reduced. Therefore, light appears to have a significant role in the toxicity of OA in microalgae. Our results indicate that the site of OA interaction on photosynthetic electron transport is likely to be at the level of the plastoquinone pool, which can lead to photo-oxidative stress when light absorbed by the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II cannot be dissipated via photochemical pathways. These findings allowed for a better understanding of the mechanisms of OA toxicity in microalgae. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exposition of Dunaliella tertiolecta to okadaic acid in light conditions results in reactive oxygen species formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of photosystem II is dependent on oxidative stress and effects of okadaic acid on the plastoquinone pool. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress and inhibition of photosynthesis increase okadaic acid effect on cell density in light conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Okadaic acid induces toxicity in algae via both light-dependent and light

  8. Development of a Photosynthetic Microbial Electrochemical Cell (PMEC Reactor Coupled with Dark Fermentation of Organic Wastes: Medium Term Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Bensaid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the concept, the materials and the exploitation potential of a photosynthetic microbial electrochemical cell for the production of hydrogen driven by solar power are investigated. In a photosynthetic microbial electrochemical cell, which is based on photosynthetic microorganisms confined to an anode and heterotrophic bacteria confined to a cathode, water is split by bacteria hosted in the anode bioactive film. The generated electrons are conveyed through external “bio-appendages” developed by the bacteria to transparent nano-pillars made of indium tin oxide (ITO, Fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO or other conducting materials, and then transferred to the cathode. On the other hand, the generated protons diffuse to the cathode via a polymer electrolyte membrane, where they are reduced by the electrons by heterotrophic bacteria growing attached to a similar pillared structure as that envisaged for the anode and supplemented with a specific low cost substrate (e.g., organic waste, anaerobic digestion outlet. The generated oxygen is released to the atmosphere or stored, while the produced pure hydrogen leaves the electrode through the porous layers. In addition, the integration of the photosynthetic microbial electrochemical cell system with dark fermentation as acidogenic step of anaerobic digester, which is able to produce additional H2, and the use of microbial fuel cell, feed with the residues of dark fermentation (mainly volatile fatty acids, to produce the necessary extra-bias for the photosynthetic microbial electrochemical cell is here analyzed to reveal the potential benefits to this novel integrated technology.

  9. Electron transfer reactions of metal complexes in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutin, N.

    1977-01-01

    A few representative electron-transfer reactions are selected and their kinetic parameters compared with the predictions of activated complex models. Since Taube has presented an elegant treatment of intramolecular electron-transfer reactions, emphasis is on bimolecular reactions. The latter electron-transfer reactions are more complicated to treat theoretically since the geometries of their activated complexes are not as well known as for the intramolecular case. In addition in biomolecular reactions, the work required to bring the two reactants together needs to be calculated. Since both reactants generally carry charges this presents a non-trivial problem at the ionic strengths usually used to study bimolecular electron transfer

  10. Electron transfer by excited benzoquinone anions: slow rates for two-electron transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamadar, Matibur; Cook, Andrew R; Lewandowska-Andralojc, Anna; Holroyd, Richard; Jiang, Yan; Bikalis, Jin; Miller, John R

    2013-09-05

    Electron transfer (ET) rate constants from the lowest excited state of the radical anion of benzoquinone, BQ(-•)*, were measured in THF solution. Rate constants for bimolecular electron transfer reactions typically reach the diffusion-controlled limit when the free-energy change, ΔG°, reaches -0.3 eV. The rate constants for ET from BQ(-•)* are one-to-two decades smaller at this energy and do not reach the diffusion-controlled limit until -ΔG° is 1.5-2.0 eV. The rates are so slow probably because a second electron must also undergo a transition to make use of the energy of the excited state. Similarly, ET, from solvated electrons to neutral BQ to form the lowest excited state, is slow, while fast ET is observed at a higher excited state, which can be populated in a transition involving only one electron. A simple picture based on perturbation theory can roughly account for the control of electron transfer by the need for transition of a second electron. The picture also explains how extra driving force (-ΔG°) can restore fast rates of electron transfer.

  11. Electron-electron interaction and transfer ionization in fast ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitkiv, A B

    2008-01-01

    Recently it was pointed out that electron capture occurring in fast ion-atom collisions can proceed via a mechanism which earlier was not considered. In the present paper we study this mechanism in more detail. Similarly as in radiative capture, where the electron transfer occurs due to the interaction with the radiation field and proceeds via emission of a photon, within this mechanism the electron capture is caused by the interaction with another atomic electron leading mainly to the emission of the latter. In contrast to the electron-electron Thomas capture, this electron-electron (E-E) mechanism is basically a first-order one having similarities to the kinematic and radiative capture channels. It also possesses important differences with the latter two. Leading to transfer ionization, this first-order capture mechanism results in the electron emission mainly in the direction opposite to the motion of the projectile ion. The same, although less pronounced, feature is also characteristic for the momenta of the target recoil ions produced via this mechanism. It is also shown that the action of the E-E mechanism is clearly seen in recent experimental data on the transfer ionization in fast proton-helium collisions.

  12. 14 CFR 1260.69 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Government by electronic funds transfer through the Treasury Fedline Payment System (FEDLINE) or the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.69 Electronic funds transfer payment methods...

  13. Metal-induced changes in photosynthetic electron transport in poplar Ieaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralova, K.; Gaplovsky, A.; Masarovicova, E.; Havranek, E.

    2001-01-01

    This study reports the effect of different toxic metals (Cu, Hg and Cd) on dark-induced changes in the photochemical activity of detached poplar leaves that were submersed in solutions of tested metals at different pH level, on the metal accumulation in poplar leaves as well as on fluorescence quenching ability of the tested metals. Cu and Hg inhibited the photosynthetic electron transport (PET) in chloroplast prepared from the leaves of P. nigra and the corresponding IC 50 values were 32.7 and 512.7 μmol dm -3 , respectively. We could not determine the IC 50 value for CdCl 2 due to its very low PET-inhibiting activity. These results are in agreement with previous findings concerning PET inhibition by the studied metals in spinach chloroplasts. The accumulated metal amounts in poplar leaves were determined using radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis. The accumulated metal amount increased with the increasing metal concentration and with the decreasing pH value of the applied metal solution. (authors)

  14. FAD oxidizes the ERO1-PDI electron transfer chain: The role of membrane integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papp, Eszter; Nardai, Gabor; Mandl, Jozsef; Banhegyi, Gabor; Csermely, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The molecular steps of the electron transfer in the endoplasmic reticulum from the secreted proteins during their oxidation are relatively unknown. We present here that flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is a powerful oxidizer of the oxidoreductase system, Ero1 and PDI, besides the proteins of rat liver microsomes and HepG2 hepatoma cells. Inhibition of FAD transport hindered the action of FAD. Microsomal membrane integrity was mandatory for all FAD-related oxidation steps downstream of Ero1. The PDI inhibitor bacitracin could inhibit FAD-mediated oxidation of microsomal proteins and PDI, but did not hinder the FAD-driven oxidation of Ero1. Our data demonstrated that Ero1 can utilize FAD as an electron acceptor and that FAD-driven protein oxidation goes through the Ero1-PDI pathway and requires the integrity of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Our findings prompt further studies to elucidate the membrane-dependent steps of PDI oxidation and the role of FAD in redox folding

  15. RAFT Miniemulsion Polymerization of MMA with Cumyl Dithiobenzoate as Chain Transfer Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Ying GUO; Dong Lin TANG; Jing Wei ZHU; Mou Dao SONG; Bang Hua ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Reversible addition-fragmentation transfer (RAFT) miniemulsion polymerizations for PMMA with cumyl dithiobenzoate (CDB) as a chain transfer agent (CTA) has been carried out.Higher temperature made the polymerization much faster and the PDI remained below 1.20, when the temperature was upon 70 ℃.

  16. Mechanism of action of anions on the electron transport chain in thylakoid membranes of higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Rawal, Pooja; Zsiros, Ottó; Bharti, Sudhakar; Garab, Gyozo; Jajoo, Anjana

    2011-04-01

    With an aim to improve our understanding of the mechanisms behind specific anion effects in biological membranes, we have studied the effects of sodium salts of anions of varying valency in thylakoid membranes. Rates of electron transport of PS II and PS I, 77K fluorescence emission and excitation spectra, cyclic electron flow around PS I and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were measured in thylakoid membranes in order to elucidate a general mechanism of action of inorganic anions on photosynthetic electron transport chain. Re-distribution of absorbed excitation energy has been observed as a signature effect of inorganic anions. In the presence of anions, such as nitrite, sulphate and phosphate, distribution of absorbed excitation energy was found to be more in favor of Photosystem I (PS I). The amount of energy distributed towards PS I depended on the valency of the anion. In this paper, we propose for the first time that energy re-distribution and its valence dependence may not be the effect of anions per se. The entry of negative charge (anion) is accompanied by influx of positive charge (protons) to maintain a balance of charge across the thylakoid membranes. As reflected by the CD spectra, the observed energy re-distribution could be a result of structural rearrangements of the protein complexes of PS II caused by changes in the ionic environment of the thylakoid lumen.

  17. Dynamic modeling system for the transfer of radioactivity in terrestrial food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmonds, J.R.; Linsley, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    A dynamic modeling system is described for the transfer of radionuclides in terrestrial food chains. The main features of the system are its ability to predict the time dependence of the major transfer processes and its flexibility and applicability to a range of contamination scenarios. The modeling system is regarded as a basic framework on which more realistic models can be based, given the availability of reliable environmental transfer data. An example of such a development is included for 90 Sr in the pasture-cow-milk pathway. The model predicts annual average concentrations of 90 Sr in milk caused by fallout in the United Kingdom to within 15% of measured values for over most of the 20-y period for which data exist. It makes possible the evaluation of the time dependence of the contributions of various transfer processes. Following acute releases to the atmosphere or releases in any other contamination scenario where direct deposition is absent, certain pathways often not considered in food-chain models, such as the external contamination of plants caused by resuspension processes or the ingestion of contaminants together with soil by grazing animals, are shown to be potentially important in the transfer of activity to man. The main application of dynamic food-chain models is the prediction of the consequences of accidental releases to the terrestrial environment. The predictions can be used in planning countermeasures and in assessing the health, economic, and social impacts of accidental release

  18. The role of energy losses in photosynthetic light harvesting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruger, T. P. J.; van Grondelle, R.

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthesis operates at the bottom of the food chain to convert the energy of light into carbohydrates at a remarkable global rate of about 130 TW. Nonetheless, the overall photosynthetic process has a conversion efficiency of a few percent at best, significantly less than bottom-up photovoltaic

  19. A general model for the transfer of radioactive materials in terrestrial food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmonds, J.R.; Linsley, G.S.; Jones, J.A.

    1979-09-01

    A general methodology for modelling the transfer of radionuclides in the food chains to man is described. The models are dynamic in nature so that the long-term time dependence of processes in environmental materials can be represented, for example, the build-up of activity concentrations in soils during continuous deposition from atmosphere. Modules for radionuclide migration are described in well-mixed (cultivated) soil and undisturbed soil (pasture). The methods by which the transfer coefficients used in plant and animal modules are derived are also given. The foodstuffs considered are those derived from green vegetables, grain, and root vegetables together with meat and liver products from the cow and sheep and cow dairy products. The dynamic model permits the time dependence of food chain transfer processes to be represented for different land contamination scenarios; in particular, the model can be adapted to represent behaviour following a single deposit. Using the sensitivity of results to the variation of transfer parameters the model can be used to determine the parts of the food chain where improved data would be most effective in increasing the reliability of radiological assessments; a worked example is given. (author)

  20. The multiplicity of dehydrogenases in the electron transport chain of plant mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan G; Geisler, Daniela A; Møller, Ian Max

    2008-01-01

    The electron transport chain in mitochondria of different organisms contains a mixture of common and specialised components. The specialised enzymes form branches to the universal electron path, especially at the level of ubiquinone, and allow the chain to adjust to different cellular and metabolic...... and their consequences for the understanding of electron transport and redundancy of electron paths...... requirements. In plants, specialised components have been known for a long time. However, recently, the known number of plant respiratory chain dehydrogenases has increased, including both components specific to plants and those with mammalian counterparts. This review will highlight the novel branches...

  1. Theoretical study of chain transfer to solvent reactions of alkyl acrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Nazanin; Srinivasan, Sriraj; Grady, Michael C; Rappe, Andrew M; Soroush, Masoud

    2014-07-24

    This computational and theoretical study deals with chain transfer to solvent (CTS) reactions of methyl acrylate (MA), ethyl acrylate (EA), and n-butyl acrylate (n-BA) self-initiated homopolymerization in solvents such as butanol (polar, protic), methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) (polar, aprotic), and p-xylene (nonpolar). The results indicate that abstraction of a hydrogen atom from the methylene group next to the oxygen atom in n-butanol, from the methylene group in MEK, and from a methyl group in p-xylene by a live polymer chain are the most likely mechanisms of CTS reactions in MA, EA, and n-BA. Energy barriers and molecular geometries of reactants, products, and transition states are predicted. The sensitivity of the predictions to three hybrid functionals (B3LYP, X3LYP, and M06-2X) and three different basis sets (6-31G(d,p), 6-311G(d), and 6-311G(d,p)) is investigated. Among n-butanol, sec-butanol, and tert-butanol, tert-butanol has the highest CTS energy barrier and the lowest rate constant. Although the application of the conductor-like screening model (COSMO) does not affect the predicted CTS kinetic parameter values, the application of the polarizable continuum model (PCM) results in higher CTS energy barriers. This increase in the predicted CTS energy barriers is larger for butanol and MEK than for p-xylene. The higher rate constants of chain transfer to n-butanol reactions compared to those of chain transfer to MEK and p-xylene reactions suggest the higher CTS reactivity of n-butanol.

  2. Molecular Insights into Variable Electron Transfer in Amphibian Cryptochrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjulstok, Emil; Lüdemann, Gesa; Kubař, Tomáš

    2018-01-01

    are mutated, radical-pair formation is still observed. In this study, we computationally investigate electron-transfer pathways in the X. laevis cryptochrome DASH by extensively equilibrating a previously established homology model using molecular dynamics simulations and then mutating key amino acids......Cryptochrome proteins are activated by the absorption of blue light, leading to the formation of radical pairs through electron transfer in the active site. Recent experimental studies have shown that once some of the amino acid residues in the active site of Xenopus laevis cryptochrome DASH...... involved in the electron transfer. The electron-transfer pathways are then probed by using tight-binding density-functional theory. We report the alternative electron-transfer pathways resolved at the molecular level and, through comparison of amino acid sequences for cryptochromes from different species...

  3. Seasonal response of photosynthetic electron transport and energy dissipation in the eighth year of exposure to elevated atmospheric CO2 (FACE) in Pinus taeda (loblolly pine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.A.; Combs, A.; Kent, R.; Stanley, L.; Myers, K.; Tissue, D.T.; Western Sydney Univ., Richmond, NSW

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the biological adaptation of loblolly pine following long-term seasonal exposure to elevated carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) partial pressures (pCO 2 ). Exposure to elevated atmospheric CO 2 (pCO 2 ) usually results in significant stimulation in light-saturated rates of photosynthetic CO 2 assimilation. Plants are protected against photoinhibition by biochemical processes known as photoprotection, including energy dissipation, which converts excess absorbed light energy into heat. This study was conducted in the eighth year of exposure to elevated pCO 2 at the Duke FACE site. The effect of elevated pCO 2 on electron transport and energy dissipation in the pine trees was examined by coupling the analyses of the capacity for photosynthetic oxygen (O 2 ) evolution, chlorophyll fluorescence emission and photosynthetic pigment composition with measurements of net photosynthetic CO 2 assimilation (Asat). During the summer growing season, Asat was 50 per cent higher in current-year needles and 24 per cent higher in year-old needles in elevated pCO 2 in comparison with needles of the same age cohort in ambient pCO 2 . Thus, older needles exhibited greater photosynthetic down-regulation than younger needles in elevated pCO 2 . In the winter, Asat was not significantly affected by growth pCO 2 . Asat was lower in winter than in summer. Growth at elevated pCO 2 had no significant effect on the capacity for photosynthetic oxygen evolution, photosystem 2 efficiencies, chlorophyll content or the size and conversion state of the xanthophyll cycle, regardless of season or needle age. There was no evidence that photosynthetic electron transport or photoprotective energy dissipation responded to compensate for the effects of elevated pCO 2 on Calvin cycle activity. 73 refs., 4 figs

  4. Validation of photosynthetic-fluorescence parameters as biomarkers for isoproturon toxic effect on alga Scenedesmus obliquus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewez, David; Didur, Olivier; Vincent-Heroux, Jonathan; Popovic, Radovan

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic-fluorescence parameters were investigated to be used as valid biomarkers of toxicity when alga Scenedesmus obliquus was exposed to isoproturon [3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] effect. Chlorophyll fluorescence induction of algal cells treated with isoproturon showed inactivation of photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers and strong inhibition of PSII electron transport. A linear correlation was found (R 2 ≥ 0.861) between the change of cells density affected by isoproturon and the change of effective PSII quantum yield (Φ M' ), photochemical quenching (q P ) and relative photochemical quenching (q P(rel) ) values. The cells density was also linearly dependent (R 2 = 0.838) on the relative unquenched fluorescence parameter (UQF (rel) ). Non-linear correlation was found (R 2 = 0.937) only between cells density and the energy transfer efficiency from absorbed light to PSII reaction center (ABS/RC). The order of sensitivity determined by the EC-50% was: UQF (rel) > Φ M' > q P > q P(rel) > ABS/RC. Correlations between cells density and those photosynthetic-fluorescence parameters provide supporting evidence to use them as biomarkers of toxicity for environmental pollutants. - Photosynthetic-fluorescence parameters are reliable biomarkers of isoproturon toxicity

  5. Horizontal gene transfer of a plastid gene in the non-photosynthetic flowering plants Orobanche and Phelipanche (Orobanchaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Mi; Manen, Jean-François; Schneeweiss, Gerald M

    2007-06-01

    Plastid sequences are among the most widely used in phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies in flowering plants, where they are usually assumed to evolve like non-recombining, uniparentally transmitted, single-copy genes. Among others, this assumption can be violated by intracellular gene transfer (IGT) within cells or by the exchange of genes across mating barriers (horizontal gene transfer, HGT). We report on HGT of a plastid region including rps2, trnL-F, and rbcL in a group of non-photosynthetic flowering plants. Species of the parasitic broomrape genus Phelipanche harbor two copies of rps2, a plastid ribosomal gene, one corresponding to the phylogenetic position of the respective species, the other being horizontally acquired from the related broomrape genus Orobanche. While the vertically transmitted copies probably reside within the plastid genome, the localization of the horizontally acquired copies is not known. With both donor and recipient being parasitic plants, a possible pathway for the exchange of genetic material is via a commonly attacked host.

  6. Optimization of excitation transfer in a spin chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurman, Vladimir I.; Guseva, Irina S.; Fesko, Oles V.

    2016-01-01

    A revised formulation of the problem of fastest transfer of the excitation in a spin chain is considered on the base of Shrödinger equation which Hamiltonian depends linearly on control. It is taken into account that the excitation of the first or last spin means that it has greatest amplitude equal to the chain invariant whereas its phase is undefined and can be considered as an additional control variable. The role of this additional control is analyzed via transformation of the original problem with unbounded linear control to the regular derived problem known from the theory of degenerate problems [1, 2], in the same way as in [2]. The overall procedure is demonstrated in computational experiments with the use of visual examples.

  7. Polonium (210Po) and lead (210Pb) in marine organisms and their transfer in marine food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Fernando P.

    2011-01-01

    The determination of 210 Po and 210 Pb was performed in marine organisms from the seashore to abyssal depths, encompassing a plethora of species from the microscopic plankton to the sperm whale. Concentrations of those radionuclides ranged from low values of about 5 x 10 -1 Bq kg -1 (wet wt.) in jellyfish, to very high values of about of 3 x 10 4 Bq kg -1 (wet wt.) in the gut walls of sardines, with a common pattern of 210 Po > 210 Pb.These radionuclides are primarily absorbed from water and concentrated by phyto- and microzooplankton, and then are transferred to the next trophic level along marine food chains. Investigation in epipelagic, mesopelagic, bathypelagic and abyssobenthic organisms revealed that 210 Po is transferred in the marine food webs with transfer factors ranging from 0.1 to 0.7, and numerically similar to those of the energy transfer in the marine food chains. As 210 Po preferentially binds to amino acids and proteins, its transfer in food chains likely traces protein transfer and, thus, 210 Po transfer factors are similar to ecotrophic coefficients. 210 Pb is transferred less efficiently in marine food chains and this contributes to increased 210 Po: 210 Pb activity ratios in some trophic levels.

  8. Carotenoid Photoprotection in Artificial Photosynthetic Antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloz, Miroslav [VU Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pillai, Smitha [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Kodis, Gerdenis [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Gust, Devens [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Moore, Thomas A. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Moore, Ana L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); van Grondelle, Rienk [VU Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kennis, John T. M. [VU Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-04-14

    A series of phthalocyanine-carotenoid dyads in which a phenylamino group links a phthalocyanine to carotenoids having 8-11 backbone double bonds were examined by visible and near-infrared femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy combined with global fitting analysis. The series of molecules has permitted investigation of the role of carotenoids in the quenching of excited states of cyclic tetrapyrroles. The transient behavior varied dramatically with the length of the carotenoid and the solvent environment. Clear spectroscopic signatures of radical species revealed photoinduced electron transfer as the main quenching mechanism for all dyads dissolved in a polar solvent (THF), and the quenching rate was almost independent of carotenoid length. However, in a nonpolar solvent (toluene), quenching rates displayed a strong dependence on the conjugation length of the carotenoid and the mechanism did not include charge separation. The lack of any rise time components of a carotenoid S1 signature in all experiments in toluene suggests that an excitonic coupling between the carotenoid S1 state and phthalocyanine Q state, rather than a conventional energy transfer process, is the major mechanism of quenching. A pronounced inhomogeneity of the system was observed and attributed to the presence of a phenyl-amino linker between phthalocyanine and carotenoids. On the basis of accumulated work on various caroteno-phthalocyanine dyads and triads, we have now identified three mechanisms of tetrapyrrole singlet excited state quenching by carotenoids in artificial systems: (i) Car-Pc electron transfer and recombination; (ii)1Pc to Car S1 energy transfer and fast internal conversion to the Car ground state; (iii) excitonic coupling between 1Pc and Car S1 and ensuing internal conversion to the ground state of the carotenoid. The dominant mechanism depends upon the exact molecular architecture and solvent environment

  9. Dissipation of excess photosynthetic energy contributes to salinity tolerance: a comparative study of salt-tolerant Ricinus communis and salt-sensitive Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Neto, Milton C; Lobo, Ana K M; Martins, Marcio O; Fontenele, Adilton V; Silveira, Joaquim Albenisio G

    2014-01-01

    The relationships between salt tolerance and photosynthetic mechanisms of excess energy dissipation were assessed using two species that exhibit contrasting responses to salinity, Ricinus communis (tolerant) and Jatropha curcas (sensitive). The salt tolerance of R. communis was indicated by unchanged electrolyte leakage (cellular integrity) and dry weight in leaves, whereas these parameters were greatly affected in J. curcas. The leaf Na+ content was similar in both species. Photosynthesis was intensely decreased in both species, but the reduction was more pronounced in J. curcas. In this species biochemical limitations in photosynthesis were more prominent, as indicated by increased C(i) values and decreased Rubisco activity. Salinity decreased both the V(cmax) (in vivo Rubisco activity) and J(max) (maximum electron transport rate) more significantly in J. curcas. The higher tolerance in R. communis was positively associated with higher photorespiratory activity, nitrate assimilation and higher cyclic electron flow. The high activity of these alternative electron sinks in R. communis was closely associated with a more efficient photoprotection mechanism. In conclusion, salt tolerance in R. communis, compared with J. curcas, is related to higher electron partitioning from the photosynthetic electron transport chain to alternative sinks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of the site where the electron transfer chain of plant mitochondria is stimulated by electrostatic charge screening.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krab, K.; Wagner, M.J.; Wagner, A.M.; Moller, I.M.

    2000-01-01

    Modular kinetic analysis was used to determine the sites in plant mitochondria where charge-screening stimulates the rate of electron transfer from external NAD(P)H to oxygen. In mitochondria isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber callus, stimulation of the rate of oxygen uptake was

  11. Engineering electronic states of periodic and quasiperiodic chains by buckling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Amrita; Nandy, Atanu; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2017-07-01

    The spectrum of spinless, non-interacting electrons on a linear chain that is buckled in a non-uniform, quasiperiodic manner is investigated within a tight binding formalism. We have addressed two specific cases, viz., a perfectly periodic chain wrinkled in a quasiperiodic Fibonacci pattern, and a quasiperiodic Fibonacci chain, where the buckling also takes place in a Fibonacci pattern. The buckling brings distant neighbors in the parent chain to close proximity, which is simulated by a tunnel hopping amplitude. It is seen that, in the perfectly ordered case, increasing the strength of the tunnel hopping (that is, bending the segments more) absolutely continuous density of states is retained towards the edges of the band, while the central portion becomes fragmented and host subbands of narrowing widths containing extended, current carrying states, and multiple isolated bound states formed as a result of the bending. A switching ;on; and ;off; of the electronic transmission can thus be engineered by buckling. On the other hand, in the second example of a quasiperiodic Fibonacci chain, imparting a quasiperiodic buckling is found to generate continuous subband(s) destroying the usual multifractality of the energy spectrum. We present exact results based on a real space renormalization group analysis, that is corroborated by explicit calculation of the two terminal electronic transport.

  12. Lateral electron transport in monolayers of short chains at interfaces: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, Christopher B.; Szleifer, Igal; Ratner, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Electron hopping between electroactive sites in a monolayer composed of redox-active and redox-passive molecules. - Abstract: Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study lateral electronic diffusion in dense monolayers composed of a mixture of redox-active and redox-passive chains tethered to a surface. Two charge transport mechanisms are considered: the physical diffusion of electroactive chains and electron hopping between redox-active sites. Results indicate that by varying the monolayer density, the mole fraction of electroactive chains, and the electron hopping range, the dominant charge transport mechanism can be changed. For high density monolayers in a semi-crystalline phase, electron diffusion proceeds via electron hopping almost exclusively, leading to static percolation behavior. In fluid monolayers, the diffusion of chains may contribute more to the overall electronic diffusion, reducing the observed static percolation effects.

  13. Electron transport chains of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooijmans, R.J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are generally considered facultative anaerobic obligate fermentative bacteria. They are unable to synthesize heme. Some lactic acid bacteria are unable to form menaquinone as well. Both these components are cofactors of respiratory (electron transport) chains of prokaryotic

  14. Electrochemical Measurement of Electron Transfer Kinetics by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Daniel; LaBelle, Edward; Coursolle, Dan; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 can respire using carbon electrodes and metal oxyhydroxides as electron acceptors, requiring mechanisms for transferring electrons from the cell interior to surfaces located beyond the cell. Although purified outer membrane cytochromes will reduce both electrodes and metals, S. oneidensis also secretes flavins, which accelerate electron transfer to metals and electrodes. We developed techniques for detecting direct electron transfer by intact cells, using turnover and single turnover voltammetry. Metabolically active cells attached to graphite electrodes produced thin (submonolayer) films that demonstrated both catalytic and reversible electron transfer in the presence and absence of flavins. In the absence of soluble flavins, electron transfer occurred in a broad potential window centered at ∼0 V (versus standard hydrogen electrode), and was altered in single (ΔomcA, ΔmtrC) and double deletion (ΔomcA/ΔmtrC) mutants of outer membrane cytochromes. The addition of soluble flavins at physiological concentrations significantly accelerated electron transfer and allowed catalytic electron transfer to occur at lower applied potentials (−0.2 V). Scan rate analysis indicated that rate constants for direct electron transfer were slower than those reported for pure cytochromes (∼1 s−1). These observations indicated that anodic current in the higher (>0 V) window is due to activation of a direct transfer mechanism, whereas electron transfer at lower potentials is enabled by flavins. The electrochemical dissection of these activities in living cells into two systems with characteristic midpoint potentials and kinetic behaviors explains prior observations and demonstrates the complementary nature of S. oneidensis electron transfer strategies. PMID:19661057

  15. Polonium (210Po) and lead (210Pb) in marine organisms and their transfer in marine food chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernando P

    2011-05-01

    The determination of (210)Po and (210)Pb was performed in marine organisms from the seashore to abyssal depths, encompassing a plethora of species from the microscopic plankton to the sperm whale. Concentrations of those radionuclides ranged from low values of about 5 × 10(-1) Bq kg(-1) (wet wt.) in jellyfish, to very high values of about of 3 × 10(4) Bq kg(-1) (wet wt.) in the gut walls of sardines, with a common pattern of (210)Po > (210)Pb.These radionuclides are primarily absorbed from water and concentrated by phyto- and microzooplankton, and then are transferred to the next trophic level along marine food chains. Investigation in epipelagic, mesopelagic, bathypelagic and abyssobenthic organisms revealed that (210)Po is transferred in the marine food webs with transfer factors ranging from 0.1 to 0.7, and numerically similar to those of the energy transfer in the marine food chains. As (210)Po preferentially binds to amino acids and proteins, its transfer in food chains likely traces protein transfer and, thus, (210)Po transfer factors are similar to ecotrophic coefficients. (210)Pb is transferred less efficiently in marine food chains and this contributes to increased (210)Po:(210)Pb activity ratios in some trophic levels. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tattoo-Paper Transfer as a Versatile Platform for All-Printed Organic Edible Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacchini, Giorgio E; Bossio, Caterina; Greco, Francesco; Mattoli, Virgilio; Kim, Yun-Hi; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Caironi, Mario

    2018-04-01

    The use of natural or bioinspired materials to develop edible electronic devices is a potentially disruptive technology that can boost point-of-care testing. The technology exploits devices that can be safely ingested, along with pills or even food, and operated from within the gastrointestinal tract. Ingestible electronics can potentially target a significant number of biomedical applications, both as therapeutic and diagnostic tool, and this technology may also impact the food industry, by providing ingestible or food-compatible electronic tags that can "smart" track goods and monitor their quality along the distribution chain. Temporary tattoo-paper is hereby proposed as a simple and versatile platform for the integration of electronics onto food and pharmaceutical capsules. In particular, the fabrication of all-printed organic field-effect transistors on untreated commercial tattoo-paper, and their subsequent transfer and operation on edible substrates with a complex nonplanar geometry is demonstrated. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Photoinduced electron transfer between benzyloxy dendrimer phthalocyanine and benzoquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Ma, Dongdong; Pan, Sujuan; Wu, Shijun; Jiang, Yufeng; Zeng, Di; Yang, Hongqin; Peng, Yiru

    2016-10-01

    Photo-induced electron transfer (PET) is an important and fundamental process in natural photosynthesis. To mimic such interesting PET process, a suitable donor and acceptor couple were properly chosen. Dendrimer phthalocyanines and their derivatives have emerged as promising materials for artificial photosynthesis systems. In this paper, the electron transfer between the light harvest dendrimer phthalocyanine (donor) and the 1,4-benzoquinone (acceptor) was studied by UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. It was found that fluorescence of phthalocyanine was quenched by benzoquinone (BQ) via excited state electron transfer, from the phthalocyanine to the BQ upon excitation at 610 nm. The Stern-Volmer constant (KSV) of electron transfer was calculated. Our study suggests that this dendritic phthalocyanine is an effective new electron donor and transmission complex and could be used as a potential artificial photosynthesis system.

  18. Tunable self-assembled spin chains of strongly interacting cold atoms for demonstration of reliable quantum state transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, N. J. S.; Marchukov, O. V.; Petrosyan, D.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an efficient computational method to treat long, one-dimensional systems of strongly-interacting atoms forming self-assembled spin chains. Such systems can be used to realize many spin chain model Hamiltonians tunable by the external confining potential. As a concrete...... demonstration, we consider quantum state transfer in a Heisenberg spin chain and we show how to determine the confining potential in order to obtain nearly-perfect state transfer....

  19. Electronic structure and transport of a carbon chain between graphene nanoribbon leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, G P; Fang, X W; Yao, Y X; Wang, C Z; Ho, K M; Ding, Z J

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structure and transport property of a carbon chain between two graphene nanoribbon leads are studied using an ab initio tight-binding (TB) model and Landauer's formalism combined with a non-equilibrium Green's function. The TB Hamiltonian and overlap matrices are extracted from first-principles density functional calculations through the quasi-atomic minimal basis orbital scheme. The accuracy of the TB model is demonstrated by comparing the electronic structure from the TB model with that from first-principles density functional theory. The results of electronic transport on a carbon atomic chain connected to armchair and zigzag graphene ribbon leads, such as different transport characters near the Fermi level and at most one quantized conductance, reveal the effect of the electronic structure of the leads and the scattering from the atomic chain. In addition, bond length alternation and an interesting transmission resonance are observed in the atomic chain connected to zigzag graphene ribbon leads. Our approach provides a promising route to quantitative investigation of both the electronic structure and transport property of large systems.

  20. 78 FR 66251 - Electronic Fund Transfers(Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E) AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. ACTION: Notice of... subpart B of Regulation E, which implements the Electronic Fund Transfer Act, and published this list on...-rule-amendment-to-regulation-e/ . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Bureau published its remittance rule...

  1. Dissociative electron attachment and charge transfer in condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, A.D.; Sanche, L.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments using energy-selected beams of electrons incident from vacuum upon thin vapour deposited solids show that, as in the gas-phase, scattering cross sections at low energies are dominated by the formation of temporary negative ions (or resonances) and that molecular damage may be effected via dissociative electron attachment (DEA). Recent results also show that charge transfer between anionic states of target molecules and their environment is often crucial in determining cross sections for electron driven processes. Here, we review recent work from our laboratory, in which charge transfer is observed. For rare gas solids, electron exchange between the electron-exciton complex and either a metal substrate or co-adsorbed molecule enhances the desorption of metastable atoms and/or molecular dissociation. We discuss how transient electron capture by surface electron states of a substrate and subsequent electron transfer to a molecular adsorbate enhances the effective cross sections for DEA. We also consider the case of DEA to CF 2 Cl 2 condensed on water and ammonia ices, where electron exchange between pre-solvated electron states of ice and transient molecular anions can also increase DEA cross sections. Electron transfer from molecular resonances into pre-solvated electron states of ice is also discussed

  2. Advances in electron transfer chemistry, v.6

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, PS

    1999-01-01

    It is clear that electron transfer chemisty is now one of the most active areas of chemical study. Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry has been designed to allow scientists who are developing new knowledge in this rapidly expanding area to describe their most recent research findings. This volume will serve those interested in learning about current breakthroughs in this rapidly expanding area of chemical research.

  3. Photosynthesis and photosynthetic electron flow in the alpine evergreen species Quercus guyavifolia in winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alpine evergreen broadleaf tree species must regularly cope with low night temperatures in winter. However, the effects of low night temperatures on photosynthesis in alpine evergreen broadleaf tree species are unclear. We measured the diurnal photosynthetic parameters before and after cold snap for leaves of Quercus guyavifolia growing in its native habitat at 3290 m. On 11 and 12 December 2013 (before cold snap, stomatal and mesophyll conductances (gs and gm, CO2 assimilation rate (An, and total electron flow through PSII (JPSII at daytime were maintained at high levels. The major action of alternative electron flow was to provide extra ATP for primary metabolisms. On 20 December 2013 (after cold snap, the diurnal values of gs, gm, An and JPSII at daytime largely decreased, mainly due to the large decrease in night air temperature. Meanwhile, the ratio of photorespiration and alternative electron flow to JPSII largely increased on 20 December. Furthermore, the high levels of alternative electron flow were accompanied with low rates of extra ATP production. A quantitative limitation analysis reveals that the gm limitation increased on 20 December with decreased night air temperature. Therefore, the night air temperature was an important determinant of stomatal/mesophyll conductance and photosynthesis. When photosynthesis is inhibited following freezing night temperatures, photorespiration and alternative electron flow are important electron sinks, which support the role of photorespiration and alternative electron flow in photoportection for alpine plants under low temperatures.

  4. Final technical brief / DOE grant DE-FG03-96 ER 62219. Computational study of electron tunneling in proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey J. Regan

    1999-03-03

    Electron transfer (ET) processes in proteins are characterized by the motion of a single electron between centers of localization (such as the chlorophyll dimer in photosynthetic reaction centers). An electronic donor state D is created by the injection of an electron or by photo-excitation, after which the system makes a radiationless transition to an acceptor state A., resulting in the effective transfer of an electron over several angstroms. The experimental and theoretical understanding of the rate of this process has been the focus of much attention in physics, chemistry and biology.

  5. Influence of dispersants on trophic transfer of petroleum hydrocarbons in a marine food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, M. F.; Schwartz, G. J. B.; Singaram, S.; Tjeerdema, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the impact of dispersing agents on petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) bioavailability and trophic transfer in primary levels of a marine food chain. Uptake, bioaccumulation and metabolic transformation of a model PH, ( 1 4C)naphthalene, were measured and compared with Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil (PBCO) dispersed with Corexit 9527, and undispersed preparations of PBCO. The model food chain consisted of a primary algae producer and a primary rotifer consumer. Results showed that uptake of naphthalene increased significantly in the presence of a dispersant in algae. A significant increase in uptake was also recorded in rotifers via trophic transfer. Trophic transfer played a significant, sometimes even dominant, role in uptake and bioaccumulation. 27 refs., 6 figs

  6. Heat transfer between adsorbate and laser-heated hot electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueba, H; Persson, B N J

    2008-01-01

    Strong short laser pulses can give rise to a strong increase in the electronic temperature at metal surfaces. Energy transfer from the hot electrons to adsorbed molecules may result in adsorbate reactions, e.g. desorption or diffusion. We point out the limitations of an often used equation to describe the heat transfer process in terms of a friction coupling. We propose a simple theory for the energy transfer between the adsorbate and hot electrons using a newly introduced heat transfer coefficient, which depends on the adsorbate temperature. We calculate the transient adsorbate temperature and the reaction yield for a Morse potential as a function of the laser fluency. The results are compared to those obtained using a conventional heat transfer equation with temperature-independent friction. It is found that our equation of energy (heat) transfer gives a significantly lower adsorbate peak temperature, which results in a large modification of the reaction yield. We also consider the heat transfer between different vibrational modes excited by hot electrons. This mode coupling provides indirect heating of the vibrational temperature in addition to the direct heating by hot electrons. The formula of heat transfer through linear mode-mode coupling of two harmonic oscillators is applied to the recent time-resolved study of carbon monoxide and atomic oxygen hopping on an ultrafast laser-heated Pt(111) surface. It is found that the maximum temperature of the frustrated translation mode can reach high temperatures for hopping, even when direct friction coupling to the hot electrons is not strong enough

  7. Proton-coupled electron transfer versus hydrogen atom transfer: generation of charge-localized diabatic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirjoosingh, Andrew; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-03-24

    The distinction between proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanisms is important for the characterization of many chemical and biological processes. PCET and HAT mechanisms can be differentiated in terms of electronically nonadiabatic and adiabatic proton transfer, respectively. In this paper, quantitative diagnostics to evaluate the degree of electron-proton nonadiabaticity are presented. Moreover, the connection between the degree of electron-proton nonadiabaticity and the physical characteristics distinguishing PCET from HAT, namely, the extent of electronic charge redistribution, is clarified. In addition, a rigorous diabatization scheme for transforming the adiabatic electronic states into charge-localized diabatic states for PCET reactions is presented. These diabatic states are constructed to ensure that the first-order nonadiabatic couplings with respect to the one-dimensional transferring hydrogen coordinate vanish exactly. Application of these approaches to the phenoxyl-phenol and benzyl-toluene systems characterizes the former as PCET and the latter as HAT. The diabatic states generated for the phenoxyl-phenol system possess physically meaningful, localized electronic charge distributions that are relatively invariant along the hydrogen coordinate. These diabatic electronic states can be combined with the associated proton vibrational states to generate the reactant and product electron-proton vibronic states that form the basis of nonadiabatic PCET theories. Furthermore, these vibronic states and the corresponding vibronic couplings may be used to calculate rate constants and kinetic isotope effects of PCET reactions.

  8. 14 CFR 1274.931 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... cooperative agreement will be made by the Government by electronic funds transfer through the Treasury Fedline... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.931 Electronic...

  9. FdC1 and Leaf-Type Ferredoxins Channel Electrons From Photosystem I to Different Downstream Electron Acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaoqian; Chen, Shuai; Voon, Chia Pao; Wong, Kam-Bo; Tikkanen, Mikko; Lim, Boon L

    2018-01-01

    Plant-type ferredoxins in Arabidopsis transfer electrons from the photosystem I to multiple redox-driven enzymes involved in the assimilation of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur. Leaf-type ferredoxins also modulate the switch between the linear and cyclic electron routes of the photosystems. Recently, two novel ferredoxin homologs with extra C-termini were identified in the Arabidopsis genome (AtFdC1, AT4G14890; AtFdC2, AT1G32550). FdC1 was considered as an alternative electron acceptor of PSI under extreme ferredoxin-deficient conditions. Here, we showed that FdC1 could interact with some, but not all, electron acceptors of leaf-type Fds, including the ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR), sulfite reductase (SiR), and nitrite reductase (NiR). Photoreduction assay on cytochrome c and enzyme assays confirmed its capability to receive electrons from PSI and donate electrons to the Fd-dependent SiR and NiR but not to the ferredoxin-NADP + oxidoreductase (FNR). Hence, FdC1 and leaf-type Fds may play differential roles by channeling electrons from photosystem I to different downstream electron acceptors in photosynthetic tissues. In addition, the median redox potential of FdC1 may allow it to receive electrons from FNR in non-photosynthetic plastids.

  10. Screening models to predict food-chain transfer of environmental toxicants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.E.; Ward, G.M.; Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of the research effort were to determine transfer coefficients to milk, beef, eggs, and poultry meat of six radionuclides for which transfer coefficients were either undetermined or based upon secondary data. The radionuclides were isotopes of Tc, Mo, Te, Ba, Zr, and Nb. In addition, 131 I was used in experiments with hens to determine egg and poultry meat transfer coefficients. The new information on transfer coefficients obtained during this project indicates that, in some cases, lower values are appropriate and that those currently in use may provide an overestimate of the risks to man from the animal food chain. The objective of the second phase of this research was to provide information to clarify the physiological parameters that control transfer of radionuclides to animal food products. The data from the first phase has been published but this data has not appeared in the literature and thus is presented here in some detail. 10 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  11. Induction of the 'in vivo' chlorophyll fluorescence excited by CW and pulse-periodical laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakhidov, Eh.A.; Zakhidov, M.A.; Kasymdzhanov, M.A.; Khabibullaev, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    Inductional changes of fluorescence of the native chlorophyll molecules in plant leaves excited by CW and pulse-periodical laser radiation are studied. The opportunity of controlling of the photosynthesis efficiency through fluorescence response at different rates of the electron flow in charge transfer chain of the photosynthetic apparatus of plant is shown. (author). 13 refs.; 4 refs

  12. Validation of photosynthetic-fluorescence parameters as biomarkers for isoproturon toxic effect on alga Scenedesmus obliquus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewez, David; Didur, Olivier; Vincent-Heroux, Jonathan [University of Quebec in Montreal, Department of Chemistry, Environmental Toxicology Research Center - TOXEN, 2101, Jeanne-Mance, Montreal, Quebec H2X 2J6 (Canada); Popovic, Radovan [University of Quebec in Montreal, Department of Chemistry, Environmental Toxicology Research Center - TOXEN, 2101, Jeanne-Mance, Montreal, Quebec H2X 2J6 (Canada)], E-mail: popovic.radovan@uqam.ca

    2008-01-15

    Photosynthetic-fluorescence parameters were investigated to be used as valid biomarkers of toxicity when alga Scenedesmus obliquus was exposed to isoproturon [3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] effect. Chlorophyll fluorescence induction of algal cells treated with isoproturon showed inactivation of photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers and strong inhibition of PSII electron transport. A linear correlation was found (R{sup 2} {>=} 0.861) between the change of cells density affected by isoproturon and the change of effective PSII quantum yield ({phi}{sub M'}), photochemical quenching (q{sub P}) and relative photochemical quenching (q{sub P(rel)}) values. The cells density was also linearly dependent (R{sup 2} = 0.838) on the relative unquenched fluorescence parameter (UQF{sub (rel)}). Non-linear correlation was found (R{sup 2} = 0.937) only between cells density and the energy transfer efficiency from absorbed light to PSII reaction center (ABS/RC). The order of sensitivity determined by the EC-50% was: UQF{sub (rel)} > {phi}{sub M'} > q{sub P} > q{sub P(rel)} > ABS/RC. Correlations between cells density and those photosynthetic-fluorescence parameters provide supporting evidence to use them as biomarkers of toxicity for environmental pollutants. - Photosynthetic-fluorescence parameters are reliable biomarkers of isoproturon toxicity.

  13. Intramolecular photoinduced electron-transfer in azobenzene-perylene diimide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Wen-Ke; Wang Shu-Feng; Gong Qi-Huang; Feng Yi-Yu; Feng Wei; Yi Wen-Hui

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the intramolecular photoinduced electron-transfer (PET) of covalent bonded azobenzene-perylene diimide (AZO-PDI) in solvents by using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy together with ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopic techniques. Fast fluorescence quenching is observed when AZO-PDI is excited at characteristic wavelengths of AZO and perylene moieties. Reductive electron-transfer with transfer rate faster than 10 11 s −1 is found. This PET process is also consolidated by femtosecond transient absorption spectra

  14. Partitioning of electron flux between the respiratory chains of the yeast Candida parapsilosis: parallel working of the two chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, M G; Camougrand, N M

    1994-02-08

    Partitioning of the electron flux between the classical and the alternative respiratory chains of the yeast Candida parapsilosis, was measured as a function of the oxidation rate and of the Q-pool redox poise. At low respiration rate, electrons from external NADH travelled preferentially through the alternative pathway as indicated by the antimycin A-insensitivity of electron flow. Inhibition of the alternative pathway by SHAM restored full antimycin A-sensitivity to the remaining electro flow. The dependence of the respiratory rate on the redox poise of the quinone pool was investigated when the electron flux was mediated either by the main respiratory chain (growth in the absence of antimycin A) or by the second respiratory chain (growth in the presence of antimycin A). In the former case, a linear relationship was found between these two parameters. In contrast, in the latter case, the relationship between Q-pool reduction level and electron flux was non-linear, but it could be resolved into two distinct curves. This second quinone is not reducible in the presence of antimycin A but only in the presence of high concentrations of myxothiazol or cyanide. Since two quinone species exist in C. parapsilosis, UQ9 and Qx (C33H54O4), we hypothesized that these two curves could correspond to the functioning of the second quinone engaged during the alternative pathway activity. Partitioning of electrons between both respiratory chains could occur upstream of complex III with the second chain functioning in parallel to the main one, and with the additional possibility of merging into the main one at the complex IV level.

  15. THE ELECTRONIC COURSE OF HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander P. Solodov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Electronic course of heat and mass transfer in power engineering is presented containing the full Electronic book as the structured hypertext document, the full set of Mathcad-documents with the whole set of educative computer models of heat and mass transfer, the computer labs, and selected educational presentations. 

  16. The Iron-Sulfur Cluster of Electron Transfer Flavoprotein-ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is the Electron Acceptor for Electron Transfer Flavoprotein†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Michael A.; Usselman, Robert J.; Frerman, Frank E.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2011-01-01

    Electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) accepts electrons from electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and reduces ubiquinone from the ubiquinone-pool. It contains one [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ and one FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated oxidized enzyme and can be reduced to paramagnetic forms by enzymatic donors or dithionite. In the porcine protein, threonine 367 is hydrogen bonded to N1 and O2 of the flavin ring of the FAD. The analogous site in Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO is asparagine 338. Mutations N338T and N338A were introduced into the R. sphaeroides protein by site-directed mutagenesis to determine the impact of hydrogen bonding at this site on redox potentials and activity. The mutations did not alter the optical spectra, EPR g-values, spin-lattice relaxation rates, or the [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ to FAD point-dipole interspin distances. The mutations had no impact on the reduction potential for the iron-sulfur cluster, which was monitored by changes in the continuous wave EPR signals of the [4Fe-4S]+ at 15 K. For the FAD semiquinone, significantly different potentials were obtained by monitoring the titration at 100 or 293 K. Based on spectra at 293 K the N338T mutation shifted the first and second midpoint potentials for the FAD from +47 mV and −30 mV for wild type to −11 mV and −19 mV, respectively. The N338A mutation decreased the potentials to −37 mV and −49 mV. Lowering the midpoint potentials resulted in a decrease in the quinone reductase activity and negligible impact on disproportionation of ETF1e− catalyzed by ETF-QO. These observations indicate that the FAD is involved in electron transfer to ubiquinone, but not in electron transfer from ETF to ETF-QO. Therefore the iron-sulfur cluster is the immediate acceptor from ETF. PMID:18672901

  17. Bioaccumulation of 14C-Labeled Graphene in an Aquatic Food Chain through Direct Uptake or Trophic Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shipeng; Xia, Tian; Yang, Yu; Lin, Sijie; Mao, Liang

    2018-01-16

    The growing applications of graphene materials warrant a careful evaluation of their environmental fate in aquatic food webs. Escherichia coli (Bacteria), Tetrahymena thermophila (protozoa), Daphnia magna (zooplankton), and Danio rerio (vertebrate) were used to build aquatic food chains to investigate the waterborne uptake and trophic transfer of 14 C-labeled graphene. Body burden factor (BBF) and trophic transfer factor (TTF) were analyzed for each organism and food chain to assess the bioaccumulation and biomagnification of graphene. The test organisms have high potential of accumulating graphene via direct uptake from culture medium with log-transformed BBF (log BBF) values of 3.66, 5.1, 3.9, and 1.62 for each organism, respectively. In the food chain from E. coli to T. thermophila, the calculated TTFs of 0.2 to 8.6 indicate the high trophic transfer potential in this aquatic food chain. However, the TTFs calculated for the food chain from T. thermophila to D. magna and from D. magna to D. rerio are much lower than 1, indicating that biomagnification was unlikely to occur in these food chains. Body burden measured for dietary uptake by T. thermophila, D. magna, and D. rerio are higher than that via waterborne exposure in a similar nominal concentration, respectively, indicating that trophic transfer is a nonnegligible route for the bioaccumulation of graphene in organisms.

  18. Methanol as an alternative electron donor in chain elongation for butyrate and caproate formation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, W.S.; Ye, Y.; Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2016-01-01

    Chain elongation is an emerging mixed culture biotechnology converting acetate into valuable biochemicals by using ethanol as an external electron donor. In this study we proposed to test another potential electron donor, methanol, in chain elongation. Methanol can be produced through the thermochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biowaste. Use of methanol in chain elongation integrates the lignocellulosic feedstocks and the thermochemical platform technologies into chain elongation. After ...

  19. Coherent memory functions for finite systems: hexagonal photosynthetic unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barvik, I.; Herman, P.

    1990-10-01

    Coherent memory functions entering the Generalized Master Equation are presented for an hexagonal model of a photosynthetic unit. Influence of an energy heterogeneity on an exciton transfer is an antenna system as well as to a reaction center is investigated. (author). 9 refs, 3 figs

  20. Preparation of nanocomposites by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization from the surface of quantum dots in miniemulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho Esteves, de A.C.; Hodge, P.; Trindade, T.; Barros-Timmons, A.M.M.V.

    2009-01-01

    Herein, we report the synthesis of quantum dots (QDs)/polymer nanocomposites by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization in miniemulsions using a grafting from approach. First, the surfaces of CdS and CdSe QDs were functionalized using a chain transfer agent, a

  1. Structural and electronic properties of a single C chain doped zigzag BN nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ping; Wang, Qianwen; Cao, Gengyu; Tang, Fuling; Huang, Min

    2014-01-01

    The effects of single C-chain on the stability, structural and electronic properties of zigzag BN nanoribbons (ZBNNRs) were investigated by first-principles calculations. C-chain was expected to dope at B-edge for all the ribbon widths N z considered. The band gaps of C-chain doped N z -ZBNNR are narrower than that of perfect ZBNNR due to new localized states induced by C-chain. The band gaps of N z -ZBNNR-C(n) are direct except for the case of C-chain position n=2. Band gaps of BN nanoribbons are tunable by C-chain and its position n, which may endow the potential applications of BNNR in electronics.

  2. Elevated CO2 causes changes in the photosynthetic apparatus of a toxic cyanobacterium, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierangelini, Mattia; Stojkovic, Slobodanka; Orr, Philip T; Beardall, John

    2014-07-15

    We studied the physiological acclimation of growth, photosynthesis and CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii exposed to low (present day; L-CO2) and high (1300ppm; H-CO2) pCO2. Results showed that under H-CO2 the cell specific division rate (μc) was higher and the CO2- and light-saturated photosynthetic rates (Vmax and Pmax) doubled. The cells' photosynthetic affinity for CO2 (K0.5CO2) was halved compared to L-CO2 cultures. However, no significant differences were found in dark respiration rates (Rd), pigment composition and light harvesting efficiency (α). In H-CO2 cells, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), associated with state transitions of the electron transport chain (ETC), was negligible. Simultaneously, a reorganisation of PSII features including antenna connectivity (JconPSIIα), heterogeneity (PSIIα/β) and effective absorption cross sectional area (σPSIIα/β) was observed. In relation to different activities of the CCM, our findings suggest that for cells grown under H-CO2: (1) there is down-regulation of CCM activity; (2) the ability of cells to use the harvested light energy is altered; (3) the occurrence of state transitions is likely to be associated with changes of electron flow (cyclic vs linear) through the ETC; (4) changes in PSII characteristics are important in regulating state transitions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Multilayer models of photosynthetic membranes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brocklehurst, J R; Flanagan, M T

    1982-01-01

    The primary aim of this project has been to build an artificial membrane in which is incorporated, in a functional state, the protein bacteriorhodopsin responsible for generating an electrical potential difference across the membrane of the photosynthetic bacterium, halobacterium halobium, and to investigate the use of this artificial system as the basis of a solar cell. the bacteriorhodopsin has been incorporated into Langmuir-Blodgett multilayers. If ths supporting filter is then illuminated, a potential difference is generated between the two compartments. The lipid in the filter appears to act as a charge carrier for protons, the charge species that forms the electrochemical gradient generated by the bacteriorhodopsin when this molecule absorbs light. The internal resistances of such solar cells were determined and found to be so high that the cells could not be seriously considered as competitors with classical semiconductor cells. Multilayerswere deposited onto filters in which ion carriers that make the filters permeable to sodium ions had been dissolved in the paraffin. The photovoltage obtained indicated that protons transferred from one side of the filter to the other by the action of the bacteriorhodopsin were bing exchanged for sodium ions. A secondary aim of the project has been to examine the possibility of depositing mixed multilayers of a dye and a long chain quinone onto a semiconductor surface. A sensitizing multilayer has been prepared and the mobility of long chain quinones within the layers is high enough to warrant further research. However, it was found that, with the dyes and quinones used, quenched complexes were formed which would not act as sensitizers.

  4. Carrier transfer in vertically stacked quantum ring-quantum dot chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, Yu. I., E-mail: ymazur@uark.edu; Dorogan, V. G.; Benamara, M.; Salamo, G. J. [Arkansas Institute for Nanoscale Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Lopes-Oliveira, V.; Lopez-Richard, V.; Teodoro, M. D.; Marques, G. E. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, São Paulo (Brazil); Souza, L. D. de [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, São Paulo (Brazil); Arkansas Institute for Nanoscale Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Wu, J.; Wang, Z. M. [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Film and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu (China); Tarasov, G. G. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences, pr. Nauki 45, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Marega, E. [Instituto de Fisica de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, 13.566-590 São Carlos, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-04-21

    The interplay between structural properties and charge transfer in self-assembled quantum ring (QR) chains grown by molecular beam epitaxy on top of an InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) superlattice template is analyzed and characterized. The QDs and QRs are vertically stacked and laterally coupled as well as aligned within each layer due to the strain field distributions that governs the ordering. The strong interdot coupling influences the carrier transfer both along as well as between chains in the ring layer and dot template structures. A qualitative contrast between different dynamic models has been developed. By combining temperature and excitation intensity effects, the tuning of the photoluminescence gain for either the QR or the QD mode is attained. The information obtained here about relaxation parameters, energy scheme, interlayer and interdot coupling resulting in creation of 1D structures is very important for the usage of such specific QR–QD systems for applied purposes such as lasing, detection, and energy-harvesting technology of future solar panels.

  5. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Plugge, C.M.; Eekert, van M.H.A.; Dolfing, J.; Schraa, G.

    2006-01-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory

  6. Controlled quantum-state transfer in a spin chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Jiangbin; Brumer, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Control of the transfer of quantum information encoded in quantum wave packets moving along a spin chain is demonstrated. Specifically, based on a relationship with control in a paradigm of quantum chaos, it is shown that wave packets with slow dispersion can automatically emerge from a class of initial superposition states involving only a few spins, and that arbitrary unspecified traveling wave packets can be nondestructively stopped and later relaunched with perfection. The results establish an interesting application of quantum chaos studies in quantum information science

  7. Extracellular electron transfer mechanisms between microorganisms and minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Dong, Hailiang; Reguera, Gemma; Beyenal, Haluk; Lu, Anhuai; Liu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-08-30

    Electrons can be transferred from microorganisms to multivalent metal ions that are associated with minerals and vice versa. As the microbial cell envelope is neither physically permeable to minerals nor electrically conductive, microorganisms have evolved strategies to exchange electrons with extracellular minerals. In this Review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that underlie the ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons, such as c-type cytochromes and microbial nanowires, with extracellular minerals and with microorganisms of the same or different species. Microorganisms that have extracellular electron transfer capability can be used for biotechnological applications, including bioremediation, biomining and the production of biofuels and nanomaterials.

  8. Quality assurance and data collection -- Electronic Data Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomczak, L.M.; Lohner, W.G.; Ray, E.C.; Salesky, J.A.; Spitz, H.B.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Environmental Monitoring (REM) group at the Fernald Environmental Management Project is involved in an Electronic Data Transfer practice that will result in the improved quality assurance of collected data. This practice focuses on electronic data transfer from the recording instrument to reduce the manpower normally required for manual data entry and improve the quality of the data transferred. The application of this practice can enhance any data collection program where instruments with electronic memories and a signal output are utilized. Organizations employing this practice can strengthen the quality and efficiency of their data collection program. The use of these practices can assist in complying with Quality Assurance requirements under ASME NQA-1, RCRA, CERCLA, and DOE Order activities. Data from Pylon AB-5 instrumentation is typically configured to print data to a tape. The REM group has developed a process to electronically transfer stored data. The data are sent from the Pylon AB-5 field instrument to a HewlettPackard portable hand computer, model HP95LX. Data are recorded and stored on a 128 K-byte RAN card and later transferred to a PC database as an electronic file for analysis. The advantage of this system is twofold: (1) Data entry errors are eliminated and (2) considerable data collection and entry time is eliminated. Checks can then be conducted for data validity between recorded intervals due to light leaks etc. and the detection of outliers. This paper will discuss the interface and connector components that allow this transfer of data from the Pylon to the PC to take place and the process to perform that activity

  9. Electron transfer and decay processes of highly charged iodine ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Danjo, Atsunori; Hosaka, Kazumoto

    2005-01-01

    In the present experimental work we have investigated multi-electron transfer processes in I q+ (q=10, 15, 20 and 25) + Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe collisions at 1.5q keV energy. The branching ratios between Auger and radiative decay channels have been measured in decay processes of multiply excited states formed by multi-electron transfer collisions. It has been shown that, in all the multi-electron transfer processes investigated, the Auger decays are far dominant over the radiative decay processes and the branching ratios are clearly characterized by the average principal quantum number of the initial excited states of projectile ions. We could express the branching ratios in high Rydberg states formed in multi-electron transfer processes by using the decay probability of one Auger electron emission. (author)

  10. Transformation of methano[60]fullerenes in dihydrofullerofuranes induced by electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanilkin, V.V.; Toropchina, A.V.; Morozov, V.I.; Nastapova, N.V.; Gubskaya, V.P.; Sibgatullina, F.G.; Azancheev, N.M.; Efremov, Yu.Ya.; Nuretdinov, I.A.

    2004-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of methano[60]fullerenes (61-acetyl-61-(diethoxyphosphoryl)methano-60-fullerene 1, 61-acetyl-61-(diisopropoxyphosphoryl)methano-60-fullerene 2, 61-(2,2-diethoxyacetyl)-61-(diethoxy-phosphoryl)methano-60-fullerene 3, 61-phenyl-61-(1,2-dioxo-3,3-dimethyl-buthyl)methano-60-fullerene 4) in o-dichlorobenzene-DMF (3:1 v/v)/0.1 M Bu 4 NBF 4 on a glass-carbon electrode proceeds in a few steps. The reversible transfer of the first electron results in the formation of radical anions registered by ESR method. The subsequent reduction proceeds differently because of the various stability of anionic intermediates. The radical anions of the methanofullerenes 3 and 4 are less stable than the radical anions of compounds 1 and 2 and less stable than the radical anions of methanofullerenes, which contain an ester and/or a phosphonate group. The opening of a cyclopropane ring occurs during the stage of the formation of radical trianions of methanofullerenes 1, 2. The same process for compounds 3, 4 proceeds slowly in radical anions and fast in dianions. The opening of cyclopropane ring for all compounds is not accompanied by the elimination of methanogroup and results in the formation of dihydrofullerenofurane derivatives. The transformation of methanofullerene 3 induced by single electron transfer proceeds via a chain reaction mechanism

  11. Transcriptomic and genetic analysis of direct interspecies electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Summers, Zarath M

    2013-01-01

    The possibility that metatranscriptomic analysis could distinguish between direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) and H2 interspecies transfer (HIT) in anaerobic communities was investigated by comparing gene transcript abundance in cocultures in which Geobacter sulfurreducens....... These results demonstrate that there are unique gene expression patterns that distinguish DIET from HIT and suggest that metatranscriptomics may be a promising route to investigate interspecies electron transfer pathways in more-complex environments....

  12. Toxicity and transfer of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanowires in an aquatic food chain consisting of algae, water fleas, and zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Yooeun; An, Youn-Joo, E-mail: anyjoo@konkuk.ac.kr

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Trophic transfer of silver nanowires (AgNWs) was studied in an aquatic food chain. • The transfer of AgNWs from algae to fish via water fleas was observed. • Toxicity of long AgNWs on aquatic organisms is higher than that of short ones. • AgNWs damage the gut of water fleas and may cause undernourishment. • Quantity of lipid droplets increased with increasing exposure concentration. - Abstract: Nanomaterials of various shapes and dimensions are widely used in the medical, chemical, and electronic industries. Multiple studies have reported the ecotoxicological effects of nanaoparticles when released in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems; however, information on the toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs) to freshwater organisms and their transfer through the food webs is limited. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the toxicity of 10- and 20-μm-long AgNWs to the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the water flea Daphnia magna, and the zebrafish and study their movement through this three-species food chain using a variety of qualitative and quantitative methods as well as optical techniques. We found that AgNWs directly inhibited the growth of algae and destroyed the digestive organs of water fleas. The results showed that longer AgNWs (20 μm) were more toxic than shorter ones (10 μm) to both algae and water fleas, but shorter AgNWs were accumulated more than longer ones in the body of the fish. Overall, this study suggests that AgNWs are transferred through food chains, and that they affect organisms at higher trophic levels, potentially including humans. Therefore, further studies that take into account environmental factors, food web complexity, and differences between nanomaterials are required to gain better understanding of the impact of nanomaterials on natural communities and human health.

  13. Toxicity and transfer of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanowires in an aquatic food chain consisting of algae, water fleas, and zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Yooeun; An, Youn-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Trophic transfer of silver nanowires (AgNWs) was studied in an aquatic food chain. • The transfer of AgNWs from algae to fish via water fleas was observed. • Toxicity of long AgNWs on aquatic organisms is higher than that of short ones. • AgNWs damage the gut of water fleas and may cause undernourishment. • Quantity of lipid droplets increased with increasing exposure concentration. - Abstract: Nanomaterials of various shapes and dimensions are widely used in the medical, chemical, and electronic industries. Multiple studies have reported the ecotoxicological effects of nanaoparticles when released in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems; however, information on the toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs) to freshwater organisms and their transfer through the food webs is limited. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the toxicity of 10- and 20-μm-long AgNWs to the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the water flea Daphnia magna, and the zebrafish and study their movement through this three-species food chain using a variety of qualitative and quantitative methods as well as optical techniques. We found that AgNWs directly inhibited the growth of algae and destroyed the digestive organs of water fleas. The results showed that longer AgNWs (20 μm) were more toxic than shorter ones (10 μm) to both algae and water fleas, but shorter AgNWs were accumulated more than longer ones in the body of the fish. Overall, this study suggests that AgNWs are transferred through food chains, and that they affect organisms at higher trophic levels, potentially including humans. Therefore, further studies that take into account environmental factors, food web complexity, and differences between nanomaterials are required to gain better understanding of the impact of nanomaterials on natural communities and human health.

  14. Strategies to enhance the excitation energy-transfer efficiency in a light-harvesting system using the intra-molecular charge transfer character of carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukihira, Nao [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan; Sugai, Yuko [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan; Fujiwara, Masazumi [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan; Kosumi, Daisuke [Institute of Pulsed Power Science; Kumamoto University; Kumamoto; Japan; Iha, Masahiko [South Product Co. Ltd.; Uruma-shi; Japan; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko [Department of Chemistry; Graduate School of Science; Osaka City University; Osaka 558-8585; Japan; Katsumura, Shigeo [Department of Chemistry; Graduate School of Science; Osaka City University; Osaka 558-8585; Japan; Gardiner, Alastair T. [Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre; University of Glasgow; 126 University Place; Glasgow, G12 8QQ; UK; Cogdell, Richard J. [Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre; University of Glasgow; 126 University Place; Glasgow, G12 8QQ; UK; Hashimoto, Hideki [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan

    2017-01-01

    Fucoxanthin is a carotenoid that is mainly found in light-harvesting complexes from brown algae and diatoms. Due to the presence of a carbonyl group attached to polyene chains in polar environments, excitation produces an excited intra-molecular charge transfer. This intra-molecular charge transfer state plays a key role in the highly efficient (~95%) energy-transfer from fucoxanthin to chlorophyllain the light-harvesting complexes from brown algae. In purple bacterial light-harvesting systems the efficiency of excitation energy-transfer from carotenoids to bacteriochlorophylls depends on the extent of conjugation of the carotenoids. In this study we were successful, for the first time, in incorporating fucoxanthin into a light-harvesting complex 1 from the purple photosynthetic bacterium,Rhodospirillum rubrumG9+ (a carotenoidless strain). Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy was applied to this reconstituted light-harvesting complex in order to determine the efficiency of excitation energy-transfer from fucoxanthin to bacteriochlorophyllawhen they are bound to the light-harvesting 1 apo-proteins.

  15. Electron Transfer of Myoglobin Immobilized in Au Electrodes Modified with a RAFT PMMA-Block-PDMAEMA Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla N. Toledo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myoglobin was immobilized with poly(methyl methacrylate-block-poly[(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate]PMMA-block-PDMAEMA polymer synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer technique (RAFT. Cyclic voltammograms gave direct and slow quasireversible heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics between Mb-PMMA-block-PDMAEMA modified electrode and the redox center of the protein. The values for electron rate constant (Ks and transfer coefficient (α were 0.055±0.01·s−1 and 0.81±0.08, respectively. The reduction potential determined as a function of temperature (293–328 K revealed a value of reaction center entropy of ΔS0 of 351.3±0.0002 J·mol−1·K−1 and enthalpy change of -76.8±0.1 kJ·mol−1, suggesting solvent effects and charge ionization atmosphere involved in the reaction parallel to hydrophobic interactions with the copolymer. The immobilized protein also exhibits an electrocatalytical response to reduction of hydrogen peroxide, with an apparent Km of 114.7±58.7 μM. The overall results substantiate the design and use of RAFT polymers towards the development of third-generation biosensors.

  16. 78 FR 49365 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E); Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION 12 CFR Part 1005 [Docket No. CFPB-2012-0050] RIN 3170-AA33 Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E); Correction AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. ACTION... 2013 Final Rule, which along with three other final rules \\1\\ implements the Electronic Fund Transfer...

  17. The fungal phytotoxin alternariol 9-methyl ether and some of its synthetic analogues inhibit the photosynthetic electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuner, Antonio Jacinto; Barbosa, Luiz Cláudio Almeida; Miranda, Ana Cristina Mendes; Geraldo, Guilherme Carvalho; da Silva, Cleiton Moreira; Giberti, Samuele; Bertazzini, Michele; Forlani, Giuseppe

    2013-12-27

    Alternariol and monomethylalternariol are natural phytotoxins produced by some fungal strains, such as Nimbya and Alternaria. These substances confer virulence to phytopathogens, yet no information is available concerning their mode of action. Here we show that in the micromolar range alternariol 9-methyl ether is able to inhibit the electron transport chain (IC50 = 29.1 ± 6.5 μM) in isolated spinach chloroplasts. Since its effectiveness is limited by poor solubility in water, several alternariol analogues were synthesized using different aromatic aldehydes. The synthesized 6H-benzo[c]cromen-6-ones, 5H-chromene[4,3-b]pyridin-5-one, and 5H-chromene[4,3-c]pyridin-5-one also showed inhibitory properties, and three 6H-benzo[c]cromen-6-ones were more effective (IC50 = 12.8-22.8 μM) than the lead compound. Their addition to the culture medium of a cyanobacterial model strain was found to inhibit algal growth, with a relative effectiveness that was consistent with their activity in vitro. In contrast, the growth of a nonphotosynthetic plant cell culture was poorly affected. These compounds may represent a novel lead for the development of new active principles targeting photosynthesis.

  18. Polonium ({sup 210}Po) and lead ({sup 210}Pb) in marine organisms and their transfer in marine food chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Fernando P., E-mail: carvalho@itn.p [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Departamento de Proteccao Radiologica e Seguranca Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

    2011-05-15

    The determination of {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb was performed in marine organisms from the seashore to abyssal depths, encompassing a plethora of species from the microscopic plankton to the sperm whale. Concentrations of those radionuclides ranged from low values of about 5 x 10{sup -1} Bq kg{sup -1} (wet wt.) in jellyfish, to very high values of about of 3 x 10{sup 4} Bq kg{sup -1} (wet wt.) in the gut walls of sardines, with a common pattern of {sup 210}Po > {sup 210}Pb.These radionuclides are primarily absorbed from water and concentrated by phyto- and microzooplankton, and then are transferred to the next trophic level along marine food chains. Investigation in epipelagic, mesopelagic, bathypelagic and abyssobenthic organisms revealed that {sup 210}Po is transferred in the marine food webs with transfer factors ranging from 0.1 to 0.7, and numerically similar to those of the energy transfer in the marine food chains. As {sup 210}Po preferentially binds to amino acids and proteins, its transfer in food chains likely traces protein transfer and, thus, {sup 210}Po transfer factors are similar to ecotrophic coefficients. {sup 210}Pb is transferred less efficiently in marine food chains and this contributes to increased {sup 210}Po:{sup 210}Pb activity ratios in some trophic levels.

  19. Sensitivity of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to gamma radiation: Photosynthetic performance and ROS formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Tânia, E-mail: tania.gomes@niva.no [Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Section of Ecotoxicology and Risk Assessment, Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349, Oslo (Norway); Centre for Environmental Radioactivity, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Post Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Xie, Li [Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Section of Ecotoxicology and Risk Assessment, Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349, Oslo (Norway); Centre for Environmental Radioactivity, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Post Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Brede, Dag; Lind, Ole-Christian [Centre for Environmental Radioactivity, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Post Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Department for Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Environmental Science & Technology, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Post Box 5003, N-1432, Ås (Norway); Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn [Centre for Environmental Radioactivity, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Post Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Postbox 5003, N-1432, Ås (Norway); Salbu, Brit [Centre for Environmental Radioactivity, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Post Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Department for Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Environmental Science & Technology, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Post Box 5003, N-1432, Ås (Norway); and others

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters affected at higher dose rates. • Changes in PSII associated with electron transport and energy dissipation pathways. • Dose-dependent ROS production in algae exposed to gamma radiation. • Decrease in photosynthetic efficiency connected to ROS formation. - Abstract: The aquatic environment is continuously exposed to ionizing radiation from both natural and anthropogenic sources, making the characterization of ecological and health risks associated with radiation of large importance. Microalgae represent the main source of biomass production in the aquatic ecosystem, thus becoming a highly relevant biological model to assess the impacts of gamma radiation. However, little information is available on the effects of gamma radiation on microalgal species, making environmental radioprotection of this group of species challenging. In this context, the present study aimed to improve the understanding of the effects and toxic mechanisms of gamma radiation in the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii focusing on the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus and ROS formation. Algal cells were exposed to gamma radiation (0.49–1677 mGy/h) for 6 h and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters obtained by PAM fluorometry, while two fluorescent probes carboxy-H{sub 2}DFFDA and DHR 123 were used for the quantification of ROS. The alterations seen in functional parameters of C. reinhardtii PSII after 6 h of exposure to gamma radiation showed modifications of PSII energy transfer associated with electron transport and energy dissipation pathways, especially at the higher dose rates used. Results also showed that gamma radiation induced ROS in a dose-dependent manner under both light and dark conditions. The observed decrease in photosynthetic efficiency seems to be connected to the formation of ROS and can potentially lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage in chloroplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first

  20. Sensitivity of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to gamma radiation: Photosynthetic performance and ROS formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Tânia; Xie, Li; Brede, Dag; Lind, Ole-Christian; Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn; Salbu, Brit

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters affected at higher dose rates. • Changes in PSII associated with electron transport and energy dissipation pathways. • Dose-dependent ROS production in algae exposed to gamma radiation. • Decrease in photosynthetic efficiency connected to ROS formation. - Abstract: The aquatic environment is continuously exposed to ionizing radiation from both natural and anthropogenic sources, making the characterization of ecological and health risks associated with radiation of large importance. Microalgae represent the main source of biomass production in the aquatic ecosystem, thus becoming a highly relevant biological model to assess the impacts of gamma radiation. However, little information is available on the effects of gamma radiation on microalgal species, making environmental radioprotection of this group of species challenging. In this context, the present study aimed to improve the understanding of the effects and toxic mechanisms of gamma radiation in the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii focusing on the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus and ROS formation. Algal cells were exposed to gamma radiation (0.49–1677 mGy/h) for 6 h and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters obtained by PAM fluorometry, while two fluorescent probes carboxy-H 2 DFFDA and DHR 123 were used for the quantification of ROS. The alterations seen in functional parameters of C. reinhardtii PSII after 6 h of exposure to gamma radiation showed modifications of PSII energy transfer associated with electron transport and energy dissipation pathways, especially at the higher dose rates used. Results also showed that gamma radiation induced ROS in a dose-dependent manner under both light and dark conditions. The observed decrease in photosynthetic efficiency seems to be connected to the formation of ROS and can potentially lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage in chloroplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first report

  1. Electron transfer dynamics: Zusman equation versus exact theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Qiang; Chen Liping; Nan Guangjun; Xu Ruixue; Yan Yijing

    2009-01-01

    The Zusman equation has been widely used to study the effect of solvent dynamics on electron transfer reactions. However, application of this equation is limited by the classical treatment of the nuclear degrees of freedom. In this paper, we revisit the Zusman equation in the framework of the exact hierarchical equations of motion formalism, and show that a high temperature approximation of the hierarchical theory is equivalent to the Zusman equation in describing electron transfer dynamics. Thus the exact hierarchical formalism naturally extends the Zusman equation to include quantum nuclear dynamics at low temperatures. This new finding has also inspired us to rescale the original hierarchical equations and incorporate a filtering algorithm to efficiently propagate the hierarchical equations. Numerical exact results are also presented for the electron transfer reaction dynamics and rate constant calculations.

  2. Screening of exciplex formation by distant electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenko, S G; Khokhlova, S S; Burshtein, A I

    2012-01-12

    The excitation quenching by reversible exciplex formation, combined with irreversible but distant electron transfer, is considered by means of the integral encounter theory (IET). Assuming that the quenchers are in great excess, the set of IET equations for the excitations, free ions, and exciplexes is derived. Solving these equations gives the Laplace images of all these populations, and these are used to specify the quantum yields of the corresponding reaction products. It appears that diffusion facilitates the exciplex production and the electron transfer. On the other hand the stronger the electron transfer is, the weaker is the exciplex production. At slow diffusion the distant quenching of excitations by ionization prevents their reaching the contact where they can turn into exciplexes. This is a screening effect that is most pronounced when the ionization rate is large.

  3. Quantum transport in the FMO photosynthetic light-harvesting complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karafyllidis, Ioannis G

    2017-06-01

    The very high light-harvesting efficiency of natural photosynthetic systems in conjunction with recent experiments, which showed quantum-coherent energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes, raised questions regarding the presence of non-trivial quantum effects in photosynthesis. Grover quantum search, quantum walks, and entanglement have been investigated as possible effects that lead to this efficiency. Here we explain the near-unit photosynthetic efficiency without invoking non-trivial quantum effects. Instead, we use non-equilibrium Green's functions, a mesoscopic method used to study transport in nano-conductors to compute the transmission function of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex using an experimentally derived exciton Hamiltonian. The chlorosome antenna and the reaction center play the role of input and output contacts, connected to the FMO complex. We show that there are two channels for which the transmission is almost unity. Our analysis also revealed a dephasing-driven regulation mechanism that maintains the efficiency in the presence of varying dephasing potentials.

  4. Spatial propagation of excitonic coherence enables ratcheted energy transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyer, Stephan; Ishizaki, Akihito; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence shows that a variety of photosynthetic systems can preserve quantum beats in the process of electronic energy transfer, even at room temperature. However, whether this quantum coherence arises in vivo and whether it has any biological function have remained unclear. Here we present a theoretical model that suggests that the creation and recreation of coherence under natural conditions is ubiquitous. Our model allows us to theoretically demonstrate a mechanism for a ratch...

  5. Transfer and accumulation of metals in a soil-diet-wood mouse food chain along a metal pollution gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogival, Damien; Scheirs, Jan; Blust, Ronny

    2007-01-01

    We studied the accumulation and transfer of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in the compartments of a soil-diet-wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) food chain at five sites located along a metal pollution gradient. We observed a clear gradient in metal exposure at increasing distance from the smelter in all compartments of the food chain for the non-essential metals. The gradient was less clear or absent for the essential metals in acorn and mice target tissues. Regression analysis showed overall strong relationships within the soil-diet and diet-wood mouse compartments for the non-essential metals, while relationships for the essential metals were weak or absent. Total metal in soil appeared as a better predictor for the diet metal content than the available metal fraction. Our results suggest a more important transfer of non-essential elements through the food chain than essential elements, which is probably a consequence of homeostatic control of the latter group. - Non-essential metal transfer through a soil-diet-wood mouse food chain is more important than essential metal transfer

  6. Photosynthetic electron-transfer reactions in the gametophyte of Pteris multifida reveal the presence of allelopathic interference from the invasive plant species Bidens pilosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai-Mei; Shen, Yu; Zhou, Xiao-Qi; Fang, Yan-Ming; Liu, Ying; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-05-01

    To date, the response of the fern gametophyte to its environment has received considerable attention. However, studies on the influence of plant invasion on the fern gametophyte are fewer. Allelopathy has been hypothesized to play an important role in biological invasion. Hence, it is necessary to study the allelopathy of invasive plant species to the fern gametophyte and elucidate the mechanisms by which invasive plants cause phytotoxicity. As one of the main invasive plants in China, Bidens pilosa exhibits allelopathic effects on the gametophytic growth of Pteris multifida. The root exudate plays an important role among various allelochemical delivery mechanisms in B. pilosa. The effect invasive plant species has on photosynthesis in native species is poorly understood. To elucidate this effect, the changes in photosynthesis in the gametophytes of P. multifida are analyzed to examine the mechanisms of the root exudates of B. pilosa. Meanwhile, a non-invasive plant, Coreopsis basalis, was also applied to investigate the effects on fluorescence and pigments in P. multifida gametophytes. We found that gametophytes exposed to both B. pilosa and C. basalis had decreased fluorescence parameters in comparison with the control, except for non-photochemical quenching. Furthermore, it was found that these parameters were markedly affected from day 2 to day 10 in the presence of both exudates at a concentration of 25% or above. B. pilosa exudate had a negative dose-dependent effect on chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, carotenoid, and the total chlorophyll in the gametophyte. The inhibitory effects increased with increasing exudate concentrations of both species, exhibiting the greatest inhibition at day 10. In conclusion, B. pilosa irreversibly affected the photosynthesis of P. multifida on both PS I and PS II. Root exudates caused the primary damage with respect to the decrease of the acceptors and donors of photon and electron in photosynthetic units and the production and

  7. Validation of photosynthetic-fluorescence parameters as biomarkers for isoproturon toxic effect on alga Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewez, David; Didur, Olivier; Vincent-Héroux, Jonathan; Popovic, Radovan

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic-fluorescence parameters were investigated to be used as valid biomarkers of toxicity when alga Scenedesmus obliquus was exposed to isoproturon [3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] effect. Chlorophyll fluorescence induction of algal cells treated with isoproturon showed inactivation of photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers and strong inhibition of PSII electron transport. A linear correlation was found (R2>or=0.861) between the change of cells density affected by isoproturon and the change of effective PSII quantum yield (PhiM'), photochemical quenching (qP) and relative photochemical quenching (qP(rel)) values. The cells density was also linearly dependent (R2=0.838) on the relative unquenched fluorescence parameter (UQF(rel)). Non-linear correlation was found (R2=0.937) only between cells density and the energy transfer efficiency from absorbed light to PSII reaction center (ABS/RC). The order of sensitivity determined by the EC-50% was: UQF(rel)>PhiM'>qP>qP(rel)>ABS/RC. Correlations between cells density and those photosynthetic-fluorescence parameters provide supporting evidence to use them as biomarkers of toxicity for environmental pollutants.

  8. Lysine desuccinylase SIRT5 binds to cardiolipin and regulates the electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxun; Bharathi, Sivakama S; Rardin, Matthew J; Lu, Jie; Maringer, Katherine V; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Prochownik, Edward V; Gibson, Bradford W; Goetzman, Eric S

    2017-06-16

    SIRT5 is a lysine desuccinylase known to regulate mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and the urea cycle. Here, SIRT5 was observed to bind to cardiolipin via an amphipathic helix on its N terminus. In vitro , succinyl-CoA was used to succinylate liver mitochondrial membrane proteins. SIRT5 largely reversed the succinyl-CoA-driven lysine succinylation. Quantitative mass spectrometry of SIRT5-treated membrane proteins pointed to the electron transport chain, particularly Complex I, as being highly targeted for desuccinylation by SIRT5. Correspondingly, SIRT5 -/- HEK293 cells showed defects in both Complex I- and Complex II-driven respiration. In mouse liver, SIRT5 expression was observed to localize strictly to the periportal hepatocytes. However, homogenates prepared from whole SIRT5 -/- liver did show reduced Complex II-driven respiration. The enzymatic activities of Complex II and ATP synthase were also significantly reduced. Three-dimensional modeling of Complex II suggested that several SIRT5-targeted lysine residues lie at the protein-lipid interface of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B. We postulate that succinylation at these sites may disrupt Complex II subunit-subunit interactions and electron transfer. Lastly, SIRT5 -/- mice, like humans with Complex II deficiency, were found to have mild lactic acidosis. Our findings suggest that SIRT5 is targeted to protein complexes on the inner mitochondrial membrane via affinity for cardiolipin to promote respiratory chain function. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Dietary avocado oil supplementation attenuates the alterations induced by type I diabetes and oxidative stress in electron transfer at the complex II-complex III segment of the electron transport chain in rat kidney mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Sámano-García, Carlos Alberto; Calderón-Cortés, Elizabeth; Pérez-Hernández, Ismael H; Mejía-Zepeda, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Orozco, Alain R; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2013-06-01

    Impaired complex III activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in mitochondria have been identified as key events leading to renal damage during diabetes. Due to its high content of oleic acid and antioxidants, we aimed to test whether avocado oil may attenuate the alterations in electron transfer at complex III induced by diabetes by a mechanism related with increased resistance to lipid peroxidation. 90 days of avocado oil administration prevented the impairment in succinate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activity caused by streptozotocin-induced diabetes in kidney mitochondria. This was associated with a protection against decreased electron transfer through high potential chain in complex III related to cytochromes c + c1 loss. During Fe(2+)-induced oxidative stress, avocado oil improved the activities of complexes II and III and enhanced the protection conferred by a lipophilic antioxidant against damage by Fe(2+). Avocado oil also decreased ROS generation in Fe(2+)-damaged mitochondria. Alterations in the ratio of C20:4/C18:2 fatty acids were observed in mitochondria from diabetic animals that not were corrected by avocado oil treatment, which yielded lower peroxidizability indexes only in diabetic mitochondria although avocado oil caused an augment in the total content of monounsaturated fatty acids. Moreover, a protective effect of avocado oil against lipid peroxidation was observed consistently only in control mitochondria. Since the beneficial effects of avocado oil in diabetic mitochondria were not related to increased resistance to lipid peroxidation, these effects were discussed in terms of the antioxidant activity of both C18:1 and the carotenoids reported to be contained in avocado oil.

  10. Using Adobe Flash Animations of Electron Transport Chain to Teach and Learn Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplá, Milada; Klímová, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Teaching the subject of the electron transport chain is one of the most challenging aspects of the chemistry curriculum at the high school level. This article presents an educational program called "Electron Transport Chain" which consists of 14 visual animations including a biochemistry quiz. The program was created in the Adobe Flash…

  11. Stark-like electron transfer between quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubovis, S.A.; Voronko, A.N.; Basharov, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The Stark-like mechanism of electron transfer between two energy subband localized in remote quantum wells is examined theoretically. Estimations of major parameters of the problem in case of delta-function-wells model are adduced. Schematic model allowing experimental study of Stark-like transfer is proposed

  12. Electron transfer between a zinc porphyrin photo-sensitized in the visible, and various acceptors, in aqueous and micellar solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, Dominique

    1983-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of reactions occurring during the transformation of solar energy in chemical energy, and more precisely the search for photochemical systems allowing the dissociation of water into hydrogen and oxygen. In this study on water photolysis, the author chose to use a porphyrin soluble in water, the zinc tetra-meta-N-methylpyridinium porphyrin, as one of its isomer provided a good efficiency in hydrogen formation. Before reporting the study of electron photo-transfer, the author reports the study of photo-physical and photochemical properties of this porphyrin. Then, in the case of a well known electron acceptor (methyl viologen), he studied the influence of Coulomb effects on the kinetics of direct electron transfer, and on the kinetics of recombination of formed species. He also studied the influence of organised systems (cationic micelles) on these reactions when using a viologen with long chains. He finally reports the study of reactions of the triplet state of this porphyrin with metallic complexes

  13. Interspecies Electron Transfer during Propionate and Butyrate Degradation in Mesophilic, Granular Sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, J. E.; Ahring, B. K.

    1995-01-01

    Granules from a mesophilic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor were disintegrated, and bacteria utilizing only hydrogen or formate or both hydrogen and formate were added to investigate the role of interspecies electron transfer during degradation of propionate and butyrate. The data indicate that the major electron transfer occurred via interspecies hydrogen transfer, while interspecies formate transfer may not be essential for interspecies electron transfer in this system during degrada...

  14. Oxidative stress in duckweed (Lemna minor L.) induced by glyphosate: Is the mitochondrial electron transport chain a target of this herbicide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marcelo Pedrosa; Juneau, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the physiological responses of Lemna minor plants exposed to glyphosate. The deleterious effects of this herbicide on photosynthesis, respiration, and pigment concentrations were related to glyphosate-induced oxidative stress through hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) accumulation. By using photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chain (ETC) inhibitors we located the primary site of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in plants exposed to 500 mg glyphosate l -1 . Inhibition of mitochondrial ETC Complex I by rotenone reduced H 2 O 2 concentrations in glyphosate-treated plants. Complex III activity was very sensitive to glyphosate which appears to act much like antimycin A (an inhibitor of mitochondrial ETC Complex III) by shunting electrons from semiquinone to oxygen, with resulting ROS formation. Confocal evaluations for ROS localization showed that ROS are initially produced outside of the chloroplasts upon initial glyphosate exposure. Our results indicate that in addition to interfering with the shikimate pathway, glyphosate can induce oxidative stress in plants through H 2 O 2 formation by targeting the mitochondrial ETC, which would explain its observed effects on non-target organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Variations in morphology and PSII photosynthetic capabilities during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiujun; Wang, Guangce; Pan, Guanghua; Gao, Shan; Xu, Pu; Zhu, Jianyi

    2010-04-28

    Red algae are primitive photosynthetic eukaryotes, whose spores are ideal subjects for studies of photosynthesis and development. Although the development of red alga spores has received considerable research attention, few studies have focused on the detailed morphological and photosynthetic changes that occur during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta). Herein, we documented these changes in this species of red algae. In the tetraspores, we observed two types of division, cruciate and zonate, and both could develop into multicellular bodies (disks). During the first 84 hours, tetraspores divided several times, but the diameter of the disks changed very little; thereafter, the diameter increased significantly. Scanning electron microscopy observations and analysis of histological sections revealed that the natural shape of the disk remains tapered over time, and the erect frond grows from the central protrusion of the disk. Cultivation of tissue from excised disks demonstrated that the central protrusion of the disk is essential for initiation of the erect frond. Photosynthetic (i.e., PSII) activities were measured using chlorophyll fluorescence analysis. The results indicated that freshly released tetraspores retained limited PSII photosynthetic capabilities; when the tetraspores attached to a substrate, those capabilities increased significantly. In the disk, the PSII activity of both marginal and central cells was similar, although some degree of morphological polarity was present; the PSII photosynthetic capabilities in young germling exhibited an apico-basal gradient. Attachment of tetraspores to a substrate significantly enhanced their PSII photosynthetic capabilities, and triggered further development. The central protrusion of the disk is the growth point, may have transfer of nutritive material with the marginal cells. Within the young germling, the hetero-distribution of PSII

  16. Variations in morphology and PSII photosynthetic capabilities during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Shan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Red algae are primitive photosynthetic eukaryotes, whose spores are ideal subjects for studies of photosynthesis and development. Although the development of red alga spores has received considerable research attention, few studies have focused on the detailed morphological and photosynthetic changes that occur during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta. Herein, we documented these changes in this species of red algae. Results In the tetraspores, we observed two types of division, cruciate and zonate, and both could develop into multicellular bodies (disks. During the first 84 hours, tetraspores divided several times, but the diameter of the disks changed very little; thereafter, the diameter increased significantly. Scanning electron microscopy observations and analysis of histological sections revealed that the natural shape of the disk remains tapered over time, and the erect frond grows from the central protrusion of the disk. Cultivation of tissue from excised disks demonstrated that the central protrusion of the disk is essential for initiation of the erect frond. Photosynthetic (i.e., PSII activities were measured using chlorophyll fluorescence analysis. The results indicated that freshly released tetraspores retained limited PSII photosynthetic capabilities; when the tetraspores attached to a substrate, those capabilities increased significantly. In the disk, the PSII activity of both marginal and central cells was similar, although some degree of morphological polarity was present; the PSII photosynthetic capabilities in young germling exhibited an apico-basal gradient. Conclusions Attachment of tetraspores to a substrate significantly enhanced their PSII photosynthetic capabilities, and triggered further development. The central protrusion of the disk is the growth point, may have transfer of nutritive material with the marginal cells. Within

  17. Exact many-electron ground states on diamond and triangle Hubbard chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulacsi, Zsolt; Kampf, Arno; Vollhardt, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    We construct exact ground states of interacting electrons on triangle and diamond Hubbard chains. The construction requires (1) a rewriting of the Hamiltonian into positive semidefinite form, (2) the construction of a many-electron ground state of this Hamiltonian, and (3) the proof of the uniqueness of the ground state. This approach works in any dimension, requires no integrability of the model, and only demands sufficiently many microscopic parameters in the Hamiltonian which have to fulfill certain relations. The scheme is first employed to construct exact ground state for the diamond Hubbard chain in a magnetic field. These ground states are found to exhibit a wide range of properties such as flat-band ferromagnetism and correlation induced metallic, half-metallic or insulating behavior, which can be tuned by changing the magnetic flux, local potentials, or electron density. Detailed proofs of the uniqueness of the ground states are presented. By the same technique exact ground states are constructed for triangle Hubbard chains and a one-dimensional periodic Anderson model with nearest-neighbor hybridization. They permit direct comparison with results obtained by variational techniques for f-electron ferromagnetism due to a flat band in CeRh 3 B 2 . (author)

  18. Supply chain integration in the South African conveyancing environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthea P. Amadi-Echendu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although conveyancing is a legal term, business management and specifically operations management principles also apply to the processes involved in conveyancing. From a business perspective, each organisation is usually concerned with its own profit margins and processes. In our global market, however, organisations now realise that they can no longer compete successfully on the basis of their internal operational efficiencies alone. They are therefore constantly aware of the need to improve not only their internal processes but also their alignment with other supply chain linkages in an effort to optimise the performance of the whole supply chain. Such alignment, in the conveyancing environment, includes government departments that are generally less willing to adopt business principles, which in turn makes optimisation of the whole supply chain more difficult. Objectives: The article describes a supply chain perspective of the conveyancing processes in South Africa and reports some of the factors that influence and delay conveyancing transactions. It explores possibilities of collaborative relationships between different role players in the conveyancing supply chain. It aims to show that a supply chain approach, as opposed to a singular organisational approach, can help to reduce process bottlenecks and delays in order to improve overall process efficiency. Method: The research, on which the findings are based, was exploratory in nature and followed a mixed-methods (quantitative or qualitative approach and included both structured questionnaires and personal interviews. Results: The results of the study revealed that many different types of delays occur at various entities across the whole supply chain involved in property transfers. These delays are presented in a table and diagram. Conclusion: It is recommended that greater adoption of electronic technology across the whole supply chain would improve overall efficiency

  19. Using Adobe Flash animations of electron transport chain to teach and learn biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplá, Milada; Klímová, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Teaching the subject of the electron transport chain is one of the most challenging aspects of the chemistry curriculum at the high school level. This article presents an educational program called "Electron Transport Chain" which consists of 14 visual animations including a biochemistry quiz. The program was created in the Adobe Flash CS3 Professional animation program and is designed for high school chemistry students. Our goal is to develop educational materials that facilitate the comprehension of this complex subject through dynamic animations which show the course of the electron transport chain and simultaneously explain its nature. We record the process of the electron transport chain, including connections with oxidative phosphorylation, in such a way as to minimize the occurrence of discrepancies in interpretation. The educational program was evaluated in high schools through the administration of a questionnaire, which contained 12 opened-ended items and which required participants to evaluate the graphics of the animations, chemical content, student preferences, and its suitability for high school biochemistry teaching. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  20. Electron transfer kinetics on mono- and multilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velický, Matěj; Bradley, Dan F; Cooper, Adam J; Hill, Ernie W; Kinloch, Ian A; Mishchenko, Artem; Novoselov, Konstantin S; Patten, Hollie V; Toth, Peter S; Valota, Anna T; Worrall, Stephen D; Dryfe, Robert A W

    2014-10-28

    Understanding of the electrochemical properties of graphene, especially the electron transfer kinetics of a redox reaction between the graphene surface and a molecule, in comparison to graphite or other carbon-based materials, is essential for its potential in energy conversion and storage to be realized. Here we use voltammetric determination of the electron transfer rate for three redox mediators, ferricyanide, hexaammineruthenium, and hexachloroiridate (Fe(CN)(6)(3-), Ru(NH3)(6)(3+), and IrCl(6)(2-), respectively), to measure the reactivity of graphene samples prepared by mechanical exfoliation of natural graphite. Electron transfer rates are measured for varied number of graphene layers (1 to ca. 1000 layers) using microscopic droplets. The basal planes of mono- and multilayer graphene, supported on an insulating Si/SiO(2) substrate, exhibit significant electron transfer activity and changes in kinetics are observed for all three mediators. No significant trend in kinetics with flake thickness is discernible for each mediator; however, a large variation in kinetics is observed across the basal plane of the same flakes, indicating that local surface conditions affect the electrochemical performance. This is confirmed by in situ graphite exfoliation, which reveals significant deterioration of initially, near-reversible kinetics for Ru(NH3)(6)(3+) when comparing the atmosphere-aged and freshly exfoliated graphite surfaces.

  1. Evaluating the Role of Intermediaries in the Electronic Value Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Marijn; Sol, Henk G.

    2000-01-01

    Presents a business engineering methodology that supports the identification of electronic intermediary roles in the electronic value chain. The goal of this methodology is to give stakeholders insight into their current, and possible alternative, situations by means of visualization, to evaluate the added value of business models using…

  2. Inferring properties of disordered chains from FRET transfer efficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenwei; Zerze, Gül H.; Borgia, Alessandro; Mittal, Jeetain; Schuler, Benjamin; Best, Robert B.

    2018-03-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful tool for elucidating both structural and dynamic properties of unfolded or disordered biomolecules, especially in single-molecule experiments. However, the key observables, namely, the mean transfer efficiency and fluorescence lifetimes of the donor and acceptor chromophores, are averaged over a broad distribution of donor-acceptor distances. The inferred average properties of the ensemble therefore depend on the form of the model distribution chosen to describe the distance, as has been widely recognized. In addition, while the distribution for one type of polymer model may be appropriate for a chain under a given set of physico-chemical conditions, it may not be suitable for the same chain in a different environment so that even an apparently consistent application of the same model over all conditions may distort the apparent changes in chain dimensions with variation of temperature or solution composition. Here, we present an alternative and straightforward approach to determining ensemble properties from FRET data, in which the polymer scaling exponent is allowed to vary with solution conditions. In its simplest form, it requires either the mean FRET efficiency or fluorescence lifetime information. In order to test the accuracy of the method, we have utilized both synthetic FRET data from implicit and explicit solvent simulations for 30 different protein sequences, and experimental single-molecule FRET data for an intrinsically disordered and a denatured protein. In all cases, we find that the inferred radii of gyration are within 10% of the true values, thus providing higher accuracy than simpler polymer models. In addition, the scaling exponents obtained by our procedure are in good agreement with those determined directly from the molecular ensemble. Our approach can in principle be generalized to treating other ensemble-averaged functions of intramolecular distances from experimental data.

  3. Methanol as an alternative electron donor in chain elongation for butyrate and caproate formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, W.S.; Ye, Y.; Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2016-01-01

    Chain elongation is an emerging mixed culture biotechnology converting acetate into valuable biochemicals by using ethanol as an external electron donor. In this study we proposed to test another potential electron donor, methanol, in chain elongation. Methanol can be produced through the

  4. Electron transfer from nucleobase electron adducts to 5-bromouracil. Is guanine an ultimate sink for the electron in irradiated DNA?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nese, C.; Yuan, Z.; Schuchmann, M.N.; Sonntag, C. von

    1992-01-01

    Electron transfer to 5-bromouracil (5-BrU) from nucleobase (N) electron adducts (and their protonated forms) has been studied by product analysis and pulse radiolysis. When an electron is transferred to 5-BrU, the ensuing 5-BrU radical anion rapidly loses a bromide ion; the uracilyl radical thus formed reacts with added t-butanol, yielding uracil. From the uracil yields measured as the function of [N]/[5-BrU] after γ-radiolysis of Ar-saturated solutions it is concluded that thymine and adenine electron adducts and their heteroatom-protonated forms transfer electrons quantitatively to 5-BrU. The data raise the question whether in DNA the guanine moiety may act as the ultimate sink of the electron in competition with other processes such as protonation at C(6) of the thymine electron adduct. (Author)

  5. Control of Electron Transfer from Lead-Salt Nanocrystals to TiO 2

    KAUST Repository

    Hyun, Byung-Ryool

    2011-05-11

    The roles of solvent reorganization energy and electronic coupling strength on the transfer of photoexcited electrons from PbS nanocrystals to TiO 2 nanoparticles are investigated. We find that the electron transfer depends only weakly on the solvent, in contrast to the strong dependence in the nanocrystal-molecule system. This is ascribed to the larger size of the acceptor in this system, and is accounted for by Marcus theory. The electronic coupling of the PbS and TiO 2 is varied by changing the length, aliphatic and aromatic structure, and anchor groups of the linker molecules. Shorter linker molecules consistently lead to faster electron transfer. Surprisingly, linker molecules of the same length but distinct chemical structures yield similar electron transfer rates. In contrast, the electron transfer rate can vary dramatically with different anchor groups. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  6. Rapid long range intramolecular electron transfer within a steroid molecule with two electron binding groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huddleston, R.K.; Miller, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer has been observed to have occurred in less than 100 ns in a steroid molecule having two distinct electron binding groups separated by distances distributed from 7--11 A. Experiments were carried out in organic glasses at 77 K with pulse radiolysis techniques to create trapped electrons which were captured by a group on one end of the steroid molecule. Although one of the groups, benzoate, is held to the steroid spacer by a flexible linkage, the rigidity of the glassy matrices prevented movement to alter the initial distance. Interestingly, no effects of distance were seen: all ET processes appeared to have occurred much faster than our 100 ns time resolution, consistent with measurements of the rate of intermolecular electron transfer between the same functional groups in random solutions. Solvation energetics, on the other hand, had a remarkable influence on the extent and direction of electron transfer. A change in solvent polarity was observed to reverse the direction of electron transfer. Evidence was obtained for a distribution of solvation environments for ions in glasses which may be as broad as 0.15 eV

  7. Spectral sensitization of TiO2 by new hemicyanine dyes in dye solar cell yielding enhanced photovoltage: Probing chain length effect on performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadadu, Kishan B.; Soni, Saurabh S.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: New hemicyanine dyes based on indolenine moiety were utilized as light harvesting materials in dye sensitized solar cell. Chain lengths of the molecules were varied in order to study its effect of chain length on the performance of DSSC. Electron transfer kinetic of the solar cell was studied and it was found that the chain length changes the electron transfer kinetic. We have achieved remarkable photovoltage and overall performance of DSSC. Highlights: ► New hemicyanine dyes based on indolenine moiety were utilized as light harvesting materials in dye sensitized solar cell. ► Chain lengths of the molecules were varied in order to study its effect of chain length on the performance of DSSC. ► Electron transfer kinetic of the solar cell was studied and it was found that the chain length changes the electron transfer kinetic. -- Abstract: New hemicyanine dyes having indole nucleus with different alkyl chain length were synthesized and characterized using 1 H NMR and mass spectroscopy. These dyes were used to sensitize the TiO 2 film in dye sensitized solar cell. Nanocrystalline dye solar cells were fabricated and characterized using various electrochemical techniques. It has been found that the alkyl chain length present in the dye molecules greatly affects the overall performance of dye solar cell. Molecules having longer alkyl chain are having better sensitizers which enhance V oc to significant extent. Chain length dependent performance was further investigated using Tafel polarization and impedance method. Hemicyanine dye having hexyl chain has outperformed by attaining 2.9% solar to electricity conversion efficiency

  8. Photochemical reactions of electron-deficient olefins with N,N,N',N'-tetramethylbenzidine via photoinduced electron-transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yang; Zhao Junshu; Ji Yuanyuan; Yan Lei; Yu Shuqin

    2006-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer reactions of several electron-deficient olefins with N,N,N',N'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in acetonitrile solution have been studied by using laser flash photolysis technique and steady-state fluorescence quenching method. Laser pulse excitation of TMB yields 3 TMB* after rapid intersystem crossing from 1 TMB*. The triplet which located at 480 nm is found to undergo fast quenching with the electron acceptors fumaronitrile (FN), dimethyl fumarate (DMF), diethyl fumarate (DEF), cinnamonitrile (CN), α-acetoxyacrylonitrile (AAN), crotononitrile (CrN) and 3-methoxyacrylonitrile (MAN). Substituents binding to olefin molecule own different electron-donating/withdrawing powers, which determine the electron-deficient property (π-cloud density) of olefin molecule as well as control the electron transfer rate constant directly. The detection of ion radical intermediates in the photolysis reactions confirms the proposed electron transfer mechanism, as expected from thermodynamics. The quenching rate constants of triplet TMB by these olefins have been determined at 510 nm to avoid the disturbance of formed TMB cation radical around 475 nm. All the k q T values approach or reach to the diffusion-controlled limit. In addition, fluorescence quenching rate constants k q S have been also obtained by calculating with Stern-Volmer equation. A correlation between experimental electron transfer rate constants and free energy changes has been explained by Marcus theory of adiabatic outer-sphere electron transfer. Disharmonic k q values for CN and CrN in endergonic region may be the disturbance of exciplexs formation. e of exciplex formation

  9. Photoinduced electron transfer between the dendritic zinc phthalocyanines and anthraquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuizhi; Wen, Junri; Liu, Jiangsheng; Chen, Zhenzhen; Pan, Sujuan; Huang, Zheng; Peng, Yiru

    2015-03-01

    The intermolecular electron transfer between the novel dendritic zinc (II) phthalocyanines (G1-DPcB and G2-DPcB) and anthraquinone (AQ) was studied by steady-state fluorescence and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopic methods. The effect of dendron generation on intermolecular electron transfer was investigated. The results showed that the fluorescence emission of these dendritic phthalocyanines could be greatly quenched by AQ upon excitation at 610 nm. The Stern- Volmer constant (KSV) of electron transfer was decreased with increasing the dendron generations. Our study suggested that these novel dendritic phthalocyanines were effective new electron donors and transmission complexes and could be used as a potential artifical photosysthesis system.

  10. 36 CFR 1235.48 - What documentation must agencies transfer with electronic records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... documentation for the following types of electronic records: (i) E-mail messages with attachments; (ii) Scanned... agencies transfer with electronic records? 1235.48 Section 1235.48 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... agencies transfer with electronic records? (a) General. Agencies must transfer documentation adequate to...

  11. Electron beam curable branched chain polyurethane acrylates for magnetic media coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukachi, Takashi; Haga, Kei-ichi; Matsumura, Yoshio

    1989-01-01

    Electron beam curable binder resins have been studied to realize the high quality magnetic coatings. It was supposed that resins with a higher crosslink density could lead to magnetic coatings with higher abrasion resistance. Branched chain polyurethane acrylates show a higher degree of cure by irradiation with an electron beam in comparison with linear polyurethane acrylates. This paper describes the potential wear resistance between properties of magnetic coatings and the physical properties of the cured unpigmented branched chain polyurethane acrylates that were used as the binder resins. (author)

  12. Effect of the different chain transfer agents on molecular weight and optical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetinkaya, Onur; Demirci, Gökhan; Mergo, Paweł

    2017-08-01

    Investigation of molecular weight and optical properties of poly(methyl metacrylate) (PMMA) polymerized in house with different chain transfer agents was studied. Isopropyl alcohol (IPA), n-butyl mercaptan (nBMC) and pentamethyl disilane (PMDS) were used as chain transfer agents. The molecular weight (Mw) of PMMA samples were measured by Ostwald viscometer. Mw of bulk polymer samples were decreased with increase the concentration of chain transfer agents (CTA). Since reactivity of used CTAs is not same, molecular weights of samples which were produced with different type of CTA but same concentration of CTA was varied. Higher concentration of n-BMC showed higher scattering. Transmission of samples could not be correlated with different concentration of CTA. Refractive index of samples was not affected by concentration of CTA nevertheless higher molecular weight of CTA showed higher refractive index.

  13. Electron spin relaxation enhancement measurements of interspin distances in human, porcine, and Rhodobacter electron transfer flavoprotein ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF QO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Alistair J.; Usselman, Robert J.; Watmough, Nicholas; Simkovic, Martin; Frerman, Frank E.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2008-02-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is a membrane-bound electron transfer protein that links primary flavoprotein dehydrogenases with the main respiratory chain. Human, porcine, and Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO each contain a single [4Fe-4S] 2+,1+ cluster and one equivalent of FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated enzyme and become paramagnetic on reduction with the enzymatic electron donor or with dithionite. The anionic flavin semiquinone can be reduced further to diamagnetic hydroquinone. The redox potentials for the three redox couples are so similar that it is not possible to poise the proteins in a state where both the [4Fe-4S] + cluster and the flavoquinone are fully in the paramagnetic form. Inversion recovery was used to measure the electron spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S] + between 8 and 18 K and for semiquinone between 25 and 65 K. At higher temperatures the spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S] + were calculated from the temperature-dependent contributions to the continuous wave linewidths. Although mixtures of the redox states are present, it was possible to analyze the enhancement of the electron spin relaxation of the FAD semiquinone signal due to dipolar interaction with the more rapidly relaxing [4Fe-4S] + and obtain point-dipole interspin distances of 18.6 ± 1 Å for the three proteins. The point-dipole distances are within experimental uncertainty of the value calculated based on the crystal structure of porcine ETF-QO when spin delocalization is taken into account. The results demonstrate that electron spin relaxation enhancement can be used to measure distances in redox poised proteins even when several redox states are present.

  14. Electron spin relaxation enhancement measurements of interspin distances in human, porcine, and Rhodobacter electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Alistair J; Usselman, Robert J; Watmough, Nicholas; Simkovic, Martin; Frerman, Frank E; Eaton, Gareth R; Eaton, Sandra S

    2008-02-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is a membrane-bound electron transfer protein that links primary flavoprotein dehydrogenases with the main respiratory chain. Human, porcine, and Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO each contain a single [4Fe-4S](2+,1+) cluster and one equivalent of FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated enzyme and become paramagnetic on reduction with the enzymatic electron donor or with dithionite. The anionic flavin semiquinone can be reduced further to diamagnetic hydroquinone. The redox potentials for the three redox couples are so similar that it is not possible to poise the proteins in a state where both the [4Fe-4S](+) cluster and the flavoquinone are fully in the paramagnetic form. Inversion recovery was used to measure the electron spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S](+) between 8 and 18K and for semiquinone between 25 and 65K. At higher temperatures the spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S](+) were calculated from the temperature-dependent contributions to the continuous wave linewidths. Although mixtures of the redox states are present, it was possible to analyze the enhancement of the electron spin relaxation of the FAD semiquinone signal due to dipolar interaction with the more rapidly relaxing [4Fe-4S](+) and obtain point-dipole interspin distances of 18.6+/-1A for the three proteins. The point-dipole distances are within experimental uncertainty of the value calculated based on the crystal structure of porcine ETF-QO when spin delocalization is taken into account. The results demonstrate that electron spin relaxation enhancement can be used to measure distances in redox poised proteins even when several redox states are present.

  15. Laser pulse control of bridge mediated heterogeneous electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Luxia; May, Volkhard

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer from surface attached dye molecules into semiconductor band states is analyzed. The focus is on systems where the dye is separated from the surface by different bridge anchor groups. To simulate the full quantum dynamics of the transfer process a model of reduced dimensionality is used. It comprises the electronic levels of the dye, the bridge anchor group electronic levels and the continuum of semiconductor band states, all defined versus a single intramolecular vibrational coordinate. The effect of the bridge states is demonstrated, firstly, in studying the injection dynamics following an impulsive excitation of the dye. Then, by discussing different control tasks it is demonstrate in which way the charge injection process can be influenced by tailored laser pulses. To highlight the importance of electron wave function interference emphasis is put on asymmetric two-bridge molecule systems which are also characterized by different and complex valued electronic transfer matrix elements.

  16. The magnetism and spin-dependent electronic transport properties of boron nitride atomic chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Yipeng; Zhang, Mengjun; Wang, Tianxing; Jiao, Zhaoyong; Wu, Dapeng; Fu, Zhaoming; Wang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Very recently, boron nitride atomic chains were successively prepared and observed in experiments [O. Cretu et al., ACS Nano 8, 11950 (2015)]. Herein, using a first-principles technique, we study the magnetism and spin-dependent electronic transport properties of three types of BN atomic chains whose magnetic moment is 1 μ B for B n N n−1 , 2 μ B for B n N n , and 3 μ B for B n N n+1 type atomic chains, respectively. The spin-dependent electronic transport results demonstrate that the short B n N n+1 chain presents an obvious spin-filtering effect with high spin polarization ratio (>90%) under low bias voltages. Yet, this spin-filtering effect does not occur for long B n N n+1 chains under high bias voltages and other types of BN atomic chains (B n N n−1 and B n N n ). The proposed short B n N n+1 chain is predicted to be an effective low-bias spin filters. Moreover, the length-conductance relationships of these BN atomic chains were also studied.

  17. Diel tuning of photosynthetic systems in ice algae at Saroma-ko Lagoon, Hokkaido, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Shimpei; Hattori, Hiroshi; Gomi, Yasushi; Watanabe, Kentaro; Kudoh, Sakae; Kashino, Yasuhiro; Satoh, Kazuhiko

    Ice algae are the major primary producers in seasonally ice-covered oceans during the cold season. Diurnal change in solar radiation is inevitable for ice algae, even beneath seasonal sea ice in lower-latitude regions. In this work, we focused on the photosynthetic response of ice algae under diurnally changing irradiance in Saroma-ko Lagoon, Japan. Photosynthetic properties were assessed by pulse-amplitude modulation (PAM) fluorometry. The species composition remained almost the same throughout the investigation. The maximum electron transport rate ( rETRmax), which indicates the capacity of photosynthetic electron transport, increased from sunrise until around noon and decreased toward sunset, with no sign of the afternoon depression commonly observed in other photosynthetic organisms. The level of non-photochemical quenching, which indicates photoprotection activity by dissipating excess light energy via thermal processes, changed with diurnal variations in irradiance. The pigment composition appeared constant, except for xanthophyll cycle pigments, which changed irrespective of irradiance. These results indicate that ice algae tune their photosynthetic system harmonically to achieve efficient photosynthesis under diurnally changing irradiance, while avoiding damage to photosystems. This regulation system may be essential for productive photosynthesis in ice algae.

  18. Coupled sensitizer-catalyst dyads: electron-transfer reactions in a perylene-polyoxometalate conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odobel, Fabrice; Séverac, Marjorie; Pellegrin, Yann; Blart, Errol; Fosse, Céline; Cannizzo, Caroline; Mayer, Cédric R; Elliott, Kristopher J; Harriman, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafast discharge of a single-electron capacitor: A variety of intramolecular electron-transfer reactions are apparent for polyoxometalates functionalized with covalently attached perylene monoimide chromophores, but these are restricted to single-electron events. (et=electron transfer, cr=charge recombination, csr=charge-shift reaction, PER=perylene, POM=polyoxometalate).A new strategy is introduced that permits covalent attachment of an organic chromophore to a polyoxometalate (POM) cluster. Two examples are reported that differ according to the nature of the anchoring group and the flexibility of the linker. Both POMs are functionalized with perylene monoimide units, which function as photon collectors and form a relatively long-lived charge-transfer state under illumination. They are reduced to a stable pi-radical anion by electrolysis or to a protonated dianion under photolysis in the presence of aqueous triethanolamine. The presence of the POM opens up an intramolecular electron-transfer route by which the charge-transfer state reduces the POM. The rate of this process depends on the molecular conformation and appears to involve through-space interactions. Prior reduction of the POM leads to efficient fluorescence quenching, again due to intramolecular electron transfer. In most cases, it is difficult to resolve the electron-transfer products because of relatively fast reverse charge shift that occurs within a closed conformer. Although the POM can store multiple electrons, it has not proved possible to use these systems as molecular-scale capacitors because of efficient electron transfer from the one-electron-reduced POM to the excited singlet state of the perylene monoimide.

  19. Transfer of lead (Pb) in the soil-plant-mealybug-ladybird beetle food chain, a comparison between two host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Wang, Xingmin; Ashraf, Umair; Qiu, Baoli; Ali, Shaukat

    2017-09-01

    Contamination of soil with heavy metals has become an issue of concern on global scale. This study investigates the translocation of lead (Pb) along the soil - plant (eggplant and tomato) - mealybug (Dysmicoccus neobrevipes) - ladybird beetle (Cryptolaemus montrouzieri) food chain. Soil amendments used for this study were adjusted to 0, 25, 50 and 100mg/kg of Pb (w/w). The results revealed significantly higher transfer of Pb in tomato when compared to eggplant. Bio-magnification of Pb (2-4 times) was observed for soil - root transfer whereas Pb was bio-minimized in later part of food chain (shoot - mealybug - ladybird transfer). A dose dependent increase in transfer of Pb across the multi-trophic food chain was observed for both host plants. A decrease in coefficients of Pb transfer (from root - shoot and shoot - mealybug) was observed with increase in Pb concentrations. Our results also showed removal of Pb from the bodies of ladybird beetle during metamorphosis. Further studies are required to explain the mechanisms or physiological pathways involved in the bio-minimization of Pb across the food chain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Electron transfer oxidation of DNA radicals by paranitroacetophenone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whillans, D W; Adams, G E [Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (UK)

    1975-12-01

    The reaction of a typical electron-affinic sensitizer, paranitroacetophenone (PNAP) with the model compounds thymine, thymidine, thymidylic acid, deoxyribose and single and double-stranded DNA has been investigated by pulse radiolysis. Radicals formed by one-electron reduction of the bases and of DNA reacted rapidly and efficiently with PNAP by electron transfer. A small yield of transfer (< 10 per cent) was also observed arising from oxidation of the radicals formed by the small proportion of OH which reacted at the sugar moieties in DNA. In contrast, electron transfer oxidation by PNAP of radicals formed by the addition of OH to the base moieties, e.g. thymine, was not an efficient process. Further, addition of the sensitizer to the thymine OH-adduct proceeded at a rate that was too low to measure the pulse radiolysis. We conclude that, since the major sites of OH reaction by DNA are the heterocyclic bases (> 80 per cent), oxidation of the resultant radicals is unlikely to be a major step in the mechanism of sensitization by this typical hypoxic-cell sensitizer.

  1. Electron Transfer Mechanisms of DNA Repair by Photolyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dongping

    2015-04-01

    Photolyase is a flavin photoenzyme that repairs two DNA base damage products induced by ultraviolet (UV) light: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts. With femtosecond spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis, investigators have recently made significant advances in our understanding of UV-damaged DNA repair, and the entire enzymatic dynamics can now be mapped out in real time. For dimer repair, six elementary steps have been characterized, including three electron transfer reactions and two bond-breaking processes, and their reaction times have been determined. A unique electron-tunneling pathway was identified, and the critical residues in modulating the repair function at the active site were determined. The dynamic synergy between the elementary reactions for maintaining high repair efficiency was elucidated, and the biological nature of the flavin active state was uncovered. For 6-4 photoproduct repair, a proton-coupled electron transfer repair mechanism has been revealed. The elucidation of electron transfer mechanisms and two repair photocycles is significant and provides a molecular basis for future practical applications, such as in rational drug design for curing skin cancer.

  2. PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niederman, Robert A. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Blankenship, Robert E. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Frank, Harry A. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-02-07

    represented a diverse international and multidisciplinary group, with over 160 individuals attending from a total of 17 different countries. Attendees came from a wide range of fields assuring that the widest possible interdisciplinary exchanges. They included prominent biochemists, biophysicists, plant physiologists, chemical physicists, as well as theoretical and computational physical chemists, who presented their research findings or to hear the latest advances in this very dynamic field. In the choice of speakers, a balance was created between established scientists and young, emerging researchers, given this opportunity to showcase their results. Sessions were held on electronic and vibrational coherence including coherent sharing of excitations among donor and acceptor molecules during excitation energy transfer, nonphotochemical quenching, acclimation to light environments, evolution, adaptation and biodiversity of light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes, their structure and membrane organization, spectroscopy and dynamics, as well as artificial antenna systems. A joint session was also held with the participants from the Cyanobacterial Satellite Conference. A special issue of Photosynthesis Research devoted to light harvesting (Volume 121, Issue No. 1, July 2014) has recently appeared which contains peer-reviewed original research contributions arising from talks and posters presented at the PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems. Edited by the Organizers of the Workshop, Robert E. Blankenship, Harry A. Frank and Robert A. Niederman, it includes topics ranging from the isolation of new bacteriochlorophyll species from green bacteria, temperature effects on the excited states of the newly discovered chlorophyll (Chl) ƒ, new architectures for enhancing energy capture by biohybrid light-harvesting complexes, forces governing the formation of light-harvesting rings, spectroscopy of carotenoids of algae and diatoms and the supramolecular

  3. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westereng, Bjorge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane

    2015-01-01

    in biological systems are only partly understood. We show here that insoluble high molecular weight lignin functions as a reservoir of electrons facilitating LPMO activity. The electrons are donated to the enzyme by long-range electron transfer involving soluble low molecular weight lignins present in plant...... cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds...

  4. Intramolecular electron transfer in single-site-mutated azurins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Skov, L K; Pascher, T

    1993-01-01

    . Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 6968-6972]. The RSSR- radical produced in the above reaction was reoxidized in a slower intramolecular electron-transfer process (30-70 s-1 at 298 K) concomitant with a further reduction of the Cu(II) ion. The temperature dependence of the latter rates was determined......, lambda = 135 kJ mol-1 for the reorganization energy was derived. When Trp48, situated midway between the donor and the acceptor, was replaced by Leu or Met, only a small change in the rate of intramolecular electron transfer was observed, indicating that the aromatic residue in this position...... is apparently only marginally involved in electron transfer in wild-type azurin. Pathway calculations also suggest that a longer, through-backbone path is more efficient than the shorter one involving Trp48. The former pathway yields an exponential decay factor, beta, of 6.6 nm-1. Another mutation, raising...

  5. Photoinduced electron transfer through peptide-based self-assembled monolayers chemisorbed on gold electrodes: directing the flow-in and flow-out of electrons through peptide helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venanzi, Mariano; Gatto, Emanuela; Caruso, Mario; Porchetta, Alessandro; Formaggio, Fernando; Toniolo, Claudio

    2014-08-21

    Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) experiments have been carried out on peptide self-assembled monolayers (SAM) chemisorbed on a gold substrate. The oligopeptide building block was exclusively formed by C(α)-tetrasubstituted α-aminoisobutyric residues to attain a helical conformation despite the shortness of the peptide chain. Furthermore, it was functionalized at the C-terminus by a pyrene choromophore to enhance the UV photon capture cross-section of the compound and by a lipoic group at the N-terminus for linking to gold substrates. Electron transfer across the peptide SAM has been studied by photocurrent generation experiments in an electrochemical cell employing a gold substrate modified by chemisorption of a peptide SAM as a working electrode and by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence experiments in solution and on a gold-coated glass. The results show that the electronic flow through the peptide bridge is strongly asymmetric; i.e., PET from the C-terminus to gold is highly favored with respect to PET in the opposite direction. This effect arises from the polarity of the Au-S linkage (Au(δ+)-S(δ-), junction effect) and from the electrostatic field generated by the peptide helix.

  6. Bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jing-Xin; Cheng, Yan; Sanvito, Stefano; Chen, Xiang-Rong

    2012-01-01

    The bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains sandwiched between gold electrodes is investigated with density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method. At zero bias, in contrast to the typical odd-even oscillations observed in most metallic chains, we find that the conductance oscillates with a period of four atoms. However, as the bias voltage is increased the current displays a two-atom periodicity. This emerges gradually, first for the longer chains and then, at voltages larger than 0.7 V, for lengths. The oscillatory behaviors are analyzed by the density of states and the energy-dependent and bias-dependent transmission coefficients. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jing-Xin

    2012-01-01

    The bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains sandwiched between gold electrodes is investigated with density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method. At zero bias, in contrast to the typical odd-even oscillations observed in most metallic chains, we find that the conductance oscillates with a period of four atoms. However, as the bias voltage is increased the current displays a two-atom periodicity. This emerges gradually, first for the longer chains and then, at voltages larger than 0.7 V, for lengths. The oscillatory behaviors are analyzed by the density of states and the energy-dependent and bias-dependent transmission coefficients. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Monitoring sequential electron transfer with EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurnauer, M.C.; Feezel, L.L.; Snyder, S.W.; Tang, J.; Norris, J.R.; Morris, A.L.; Rustandi, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    A completely general model which treats electron spin polarization (ESP) found in a system in which radical pairs with different magnetic interactions are formed sequentially has been described. This treatment has been applied specifically to the ESP found in the bacterial reaction center. Test cases show clearly how parameters such as structure, lifetime, and magnetic interactions within the successive radical pairs affect the ESP, and demonstrate that previous treatments of this problem have been incomplete. The photosynthetic bacterial reaction center protein is an ideal system for testing the general model of ESP. The radical pair which exhibits ESP, P 870 + Q - (P 870 + is the oxidized, primary electron donor, a bacteriochlorophyll special pair and Q - is the reduced, primary quinone acceptor) is formed via sequential electron transport through the intermediary radical pair P 870 + I - (I - is the reduced, intermediary electron acceptor, a bacteriopheophytin). In addition, it is possible to experimentally vary most of the important parameters, such as the lifetime of the intermediary radical pair and the magnetic interactions in each pair. It has been shown how selective isotopic substitution ( 1 H or 2 H) on P 870 , I and Q affects the ESP of the EPR spectrum of P 870 + Q - , observed at two different microwave frequencies, in Fe 2+ -depleted bacterial reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26. Thus, the relative magnitudes of the magnetic properties (nuclear hyperfine and g-factor differences) which influence ESP development were varied. The results support the general model of ESP in that they suggest that the P 870 + Q - radical pair interactions are the dominant source of ESP production in 2 H bacterial reaction centers

  9. Electron transfer reactions involving porphyrins and chlorophyll a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neta, P.; Scherz, A.; Levanon, H.

    1979-01-01

    Electron transfer reactions involving porphyrins (P) and quinones (Q) have been studied by pulse radiolysis. The porphyrins used were tetraphenylporphyrin (H 2 TPP), its tetracarboxy derivative (H 2 TCPP), the sodium and zinc compounds (Na 2 TPP and ZnTPP), and chlorophyll a (Chl a). These compounds were found to be rapidly reduced by electron transfer from (CH 3 ) 2 CO - . Reduction by (CH 3 ) 2 COH was rapid in aqueous solutions but relatively slow in i-PrOH solutions. Transient spectra of the anion radicals were determined and, in the case of H 2 TCPP - ., a pK = 9.7 was derived for its protonation. Electron-transfer reactions from the anion radical of H 2 TCPP to benzoquinone, duroquinone, 9,10-anthraquinone 2-sulfonate, and methylviologen occur in aqueous solutions with rate constants approx. 10 7 -10 9 M -1 s -1 which depend on the pH and the quinone reduction potential. Reactions of Na 2 TPP - ., ZnTPP - ., and Chl a - . with anthraquinone in basic i-PrOH solutions occur with rate constants approx. 10 9 M -1 s -1 . The spectral changes associated with these electron-transfer reactions as observed over a period of approx. 1 ms indicated, in some cases, the formation of an intermediate complex [P...Q - .]. 8 figures, 2 tables

  10. Extension of Light-Harvesting Ability of Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2) through Ultrafast Energy Transfer from Covalently Attached Artificial Chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Yusuke; Noji, Tomoyasu; Katayama, Tetsuro; Mizutani, Naoto; Komori, Daisuke; Nango, Mamoru; Miyasaka, Hiroshi; Itoh, Shigeru; Nagasawa, Yutaka; Dewa, Takehisa

    2015-10-14

    Introducing appropriate artificial components into natural biological systems could enrich the original functionality. To expand the available wavelength range of photosynthetic bacterial light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2 from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila 10050), artificial fluorescent dye (Alexa Fluor 647: A647) was covalently attached to N- and C-terminal Lys residues in LH2 α-polypeptides with a molar ratio of A647/LH2 ≃ 9/1. Fluorescence and transient absorption spectroscopies revealed that intracomplex energy transfer from A647 to intrinsic chromophores of LH2 (B850) occurs in a multiexponential manner, with time constants varying from 440 fs to 23 ps through direct and B800-mediated indirect pathways. Kinetic analyses suggested that B800 chromophores mediate faster energy transfer, and the mechanism was interpretable in terms of Förster theory. This study demonstrates that a simple attachment of external chromophores with a flexible linkage can enhance the light harvesting activity of LH2 without affecting inherent functions of energy transfer, and can achieve energy transfer in the subpicosecond range. Addition of external chromophores, thus, represents a useful methodology for construction of advanced hybrid light-harvesting systems that afford solar energy in the broad spectrum.

  11. Reversal of local spins in transport of electrons through a one-dimensional chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, D.-S.; Xiong, S.-J.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the spin reversal of two coupled magnetic impurities in the transport processes of electrons in a one-dimensional chain. The impurities are side coupled to the chain and the electrons are injected and tunneling through it. The transmission coefficient of electrons and the polarization of impurities are calculated by the use of the equivalent single-particle network method for the correlated system. It is found that both the transmission coefficient and the polarization of impurities depend on the initial state of impurities and the impurity spins can be converted into the direction of electron spin if the injected electrons are polarized and the number of electrons is large enough. The evolution of the spin-reversal processes is studied in details

  12. Anticancer Drugs Targeting the Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rohlena, Jakub; Dong, L.-F.; Ralph, S.J.; Neužil, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 12 (2011), s. 2951-2974 ISSN 1523-0864 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200520703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Targets for anticancer drugs * mitochondrial electron transport chain * mitocans Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.456, year: 2011

  13. Photo-driven electron transfer from the highly reducing excited state of naphthalene diimide radical anion to a CO 2 reduction catalyst within a molecular triad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jose F. [Department of Chemistry and Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center; Northwestern University; Evanston; USA; La Porte, Nathan T. [Department of Chemistry and Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center; Northwestern University; Evanston; USA; Mauck, Catherine M. [Department of Chemistry and Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center; Northwestern University; Evanston; USA; Wasielewski, Michael R. [Department of Chemistry and Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center; Northwestern University; Evanston; USA

    2017-01-01

    The naphthalene-1,4:5,8-bis(dicarboximide) radical anion (NDI-˙), which is easily produced by mild chemical or electrochemical reduction (-0.5 Vvs.SCE), can be photoexcited at wavelengths as long as 785 nm, and has an excited state (NDI-˙*) oxidation potential of -2.1 Vvs.SCE, making it a very attractive choice for artificial photosynthetic systems that require powerful photoreductants, such as CO2 reduction catalysts. However, once an electron is transferred from NDI-˙* to an acceptor directly bound to it, a combination of strong electronic coupling and favorable free energy change frequently make the back electron transfer rapid. To mitigate this effect, we have designed a molecular triad system comprising an NDI-˙ chromophoric donor, a 9,10-diphenylanthracene (DPA) intermediate acceptor, and a Re(dmb)(CO)3carbon dioxide reduction catalyst, where dmb is 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine, as the terminal acceptor. Photoexcitation of NDI-˙ to NDI-˙* is followed by ultrafast reduction of DPA to DPA-˙, which then rapidly reduces the metal complex. The overall time constant for the forward electron transfer to reduce the metal complex is τ = 20.8 ps, while the time constant for back-electron transfer is six orders of magnitude longer, τ = 43.4 μs. Achieving long-lived, highly reduced states of these metal complexes is a necessary condition for their use as catalysts. The extremely long lifetime of the reduced metal complex is attributed to careful tuning of the redox potentials of the chromophore and intermediate acceptor. The NDI-˙–DPA fragment presents many attractive features for incorporation into other photoinduced electron transfer assemblies directed at the long-lived photosensitization of difficult-to-reduce catalytic centers.

  14. 76 FR 709 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 40 and 301 [TD 9507] RIN 1545-BJ13 Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS...) providing guidance relating to Federal tax deposits (FTDs) by Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT). The temporary...

  15. 76 FR 708 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1, 31, 40, and 301 [TD 9507] RIN 1545-BJ13 Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service... Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT). The temporary and final regulations provide rules under which depositors...

  16. Effect of proton transfer on the electronic coupling in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rak, Janusz; Makowska, Joanna; Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of single and double proton transfer within Watson-Crick base pairs on donor-acceptor electronic couplings, V da , in DNA are studied on the bases of quantum chemical calculations. Four dimers [AT,AT], [GC,GC], [GC,AT] and [GC,TA)] are considered. Three techniques - the generalized Mulliken-Hush scheme, the fragment charge method and the diabatic states method - are employed to estimate V da for hole transfer between base pairs. We show that both single- and double proton transfer (PT) reactions may substantially affect the electronic coupling in DNA. The electronic coupling in [AT,AT] is predicted to be most sensitive to PT. Single PT within the first base pair in the dimer leads to increase in the hole transfer efficiency by a factor of 4, while proton transfer within the second pair should substantially, by 2.7 times, decrease the rate of charge transfer. Thus, directional asymmetry of the PT effects on the electronic coupling is predicted. The changes in the V da matrix elements correlate with the topological properties of orbitals of donor and acceptor and can be qualitatively rationalized in terms of resonance structures of donor and acceptor. Atomic pair contributions to the V da matrix elements are also analyzed

  17. Distinguishing the Roles of Thylakoid Respiratory Terminal Oxidases in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakova, Maria; Huokko, Tuomas; Richaud, Pierre; Bersanini, Luca; Howe, Christopher J; Lea-Smith, David J; Peltier, Gilles; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut

    2016-06-01

    Various oxygen-utilizing electron sinks, including the soluble flavodiiron proteins (Flv1/3), and the membrane-localized respiratory terminal oxidases (RTOs), cytochrome c oxidase (Cox) and cytochrome bd quinol oxidase (Cyd), are present in the photosynthetic electron transfer chain of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. However, the role of individual RTOs and their relative importance compared with other electron sinks are poorly understood, particularly under light. Via membrane inlet mass spectrometry gas exchange, chlorophyll a fluorescence, P700 analysis, and inhibitor treatment of the wild type and various mutants deficient in RTOs, Flv1/3, and photosystem I, we investigated the contribution of these complexes to the alleviation of excess electrons in the photosynthetic chain. To our knowledge, for the first time, we demonstrated the activity of Cyd in oxygen uptake under light, although it was detected only upon inhibition of electron transfer at the cytochrome b6f site and in ∆flv1/3 under fluctuating light conditions, where linear electron transfer was drastically inhibited due to impaired photosystem I activity. Cox is mostly responsible for dark respiration and competes with P700 for electrons under high light. Only the ∆cox/cyd double mutant, but not single mutants, demonstrated a highly reduced plastoquinone pool in darkness and impaired gross oxygen evolution under light, indicating that thylakoid-based RTOs are able to compensate partially for each other. Thus, both electron sinks contribute to the alleviation of excess electrons under illumination: RTOs continue to function under light, operating on slower time ranges and on a limited scale, whereas Flv1/3 responds rapidly as a light-induced component and has greater capacity. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Characterizing Plasmonic Excitations of Quasi-2D Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Emily; Bryant, Garnett

    A quantum description of the optical response of nanostructures and other atomic-scale systems is desirable for modeling systems that use plasmons for quantum information transfer, or coherent transport and interference of quantum states, as well as systems small enough for electron tunneling or quantum confinement to affect the electronic states of the system. Such a quantum description is complicated by the fact that collective and single-particle excitations can have similar energies and thus will mix. We seek to better understand the excitations of nanosystems to identify which characteristics of the excitations are most relevant to modeling their behavior. In this work we use a quasi 2-dimensional linear atomic chain as a model system, and exact diagonalization of the many-body Hamiltonian to obtain its excitations. We compare this to previous work in 1-d chains which used a combination of criteria involving a many-body state's transfer dipole moment, balance, transfer charge, dynamical response, and induced-charge distribution to identify which excitations are plasmonic in character.

  19. Strong-coupling behaviour of two t - J chains with interchain single-electron hopping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guangming; Feng Shiping; Yu Lu.

    1994-01-01

    Using the fermion-spin transformation to implement spin-charge separation of constrained electrons, a model of two t - J chains with interchain single-electron hopping is studied by abelian bosonization. After spin-charge decoupling the charge dynamics can be trivially solved, while the spin dynamics is determined by a strong-coupling fixed point where the correlation functions can be calculated explicitly. This is a generalization of the Luther-Emery line for two-coupled t - J chains. The interchain single-electron hopping changes the asymptotic behaviour of the interchain spin-spin correlation functions and the electron Green function, but their exponents are independent of the coupling strength. (author). 25 refs

  20. Overpotential-induced lability of the electronic overlap factor in long-range electrochemical electron transfer: charge and distance dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornyshev, A. A.; Kuznetsov, A. M.; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2000-01-01

    Long-distance electrochemical electron transfer exhibits approximately exponential dependence on the electron transfer distance. On the basis of a jellium model of the metal surface we show that the slope of the logarithm of the current vs. the transfer distance also depends strongly...

  1. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Wilson [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2018-02-03

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes. Specifically, interfacial ET in TiO2-based systems is important to solar energy technology, catalysis, and environmental remediation technology. However, the microscopic mechanism of interfacial ET is not well understood with regard to atomic surface structure, molecular structure, bonding, orientation, and motion. In this project, we used two complementary methodologies; single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and scanning-tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) to address this scientific need. The goal of this project was to integrate these techniques and measure the molecular dependence of ET between adsorbed molecules and TiO2 semiconductor surfaces and the ET induced reactions such as the splitting of water. The scanning probe techniques, STM and STS, are capable of providing the highest spatial resolution but not easily time-resolved data. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is capable of good time resolution but requires further development to match the spatial resolution of the STM. The integrated approach involving Peter Lu at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) and Wilson Ho at the University of California, Irvine (UC Irvine) produced methods for time and spatially resolved chemical imaging of interfacial electron transfer dynamics and photocatalytic reactions. An integral aspect of the joint research was a significant exchange of graduate students to work at the two institutions. This project bridged complementary approaches to investigate a set of common problems by working with the same molecules on a variety of solid surfaces, but using appropriate techniques to probe under ambient (BGSU) and ultrahigh vacuum (UCI) conditions. The molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes obtained in this joint project will be important for developing efficient light harvesting

  2. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westereng, Bjorge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane

    2015-01-01

    cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds...

  3. Facile Interfacial Electron Transfer of Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhai Fan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We herein describe a method of depositing hemoglobin (Hb and sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN on GC electrodes that facilitate interfacial protein electron transfer. Well-defined, reproducible, chemically reversible peaks of Hb and SPAN can be obtained in our experiments. We also observed enhanced peroxidase activity of Hb in SPAN films. These results clearly showed that SPAN worked as molecular wires and effectively exchanged electrons between Hb and electrodes.Mediated by Conjugated Polymers

  4. Disruption management in a two-period three-tier electronics supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Danusantoso

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We study strategies to manage demand disruptions in a three-tier electronics supply chain consisting of an Electronics Manufacturing Services provider, an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM, and a Retailer. We model price sensitivity of consumer demand with the two functions commonly used for this purpose, linear and exponential, and introduce disruptions in the demand function. We assume each supply chain member faces an increasing marginal unit cost function. Our decentralized supply chain setting is governed by a wholesale price contract. The OEM possesses greater bargaining power and therefore is the Stackelberg leader. A penalty cost incurred by the Retailer is introduced to capture the cost of deviation from the original plan. We find exact analytical solutions of the effectiveness of managing the disruption when the consumer demand function is linear, and we provide numerical examples as an illustration when the consumer demand function is either linear or exponential. We show that the original production quantity exhibits some robustness under disruptions in both centralized and decentralized supply chains, while the original optimal pricing does not. We show that supply chain managers should not automatically react to an individual disruption, in certain cases it is best to leave the production plan unchanged.

  5. Quantum electron transfer processes induced by thermo-coherent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Thermo-coherent state; electron transfer; quantum rate. 1. Introduction. The study ... two surfaces,16 namely, one electron two-centered exchange problem,7–10 many ... temperature classical regime for the single and the two-mode cases have ...

  6. Electron detachment of the hydrogen-bonded amino acid side-chain guanine complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Jiande; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2007-07-01

    The photoelectron spectra of the hydrogen-bonded amino acid side-chain-guanine complexes has been studied at the partial third order (P3) self-energy approximation of the electron propagator theory. The correlation between the vertical electron detachment energy and the charge distributions on the guanine moiety reveals that the vertical electron detachment energy (VDE) increases as the positive charge distribution on the guanine increases. The low VDE values determined for the negatively charged complexes of the guanine-side-chain-group of Asp/Glu suggest that the influence of the H-bonded anionic groups on the VDE of guanine could be more important than that of the anionic backbone structure. The even lower vertical electron detachment energy for guanine is thus can be expected in the H-bonded protein-DNA systems.

  7. Mapping bright and dark modes in gold nanoparticle chains using electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Steven J; Rossouw, David; Funston, Alison M; Botton, Gianluigi A; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-07-09

    We present a scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) investigation of gold nanosphere chains with lengths varying from 1 to 5 particles. We show localized EELS signals from the chains and identify energy-loss peaks arising due to l = 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 plasmon modes through the use of EELS mapping. We also show the evolution of the energy of these modes as the length of a given chain increases, and we find that a chain containing N particles can accommodate at least N experimentally observable modes, in addition to the transverse mode. As the chain length is increased by the addition of one more gold particle to the chain, the new N + 1 mode becomes the highest energy mode, while the existing modes lower their energy and eventually asymptote as they delocalize along the chain. We also show that modes become increasingly difficult to detect with the EELS technique as l approaches N. The data are compared to numerical simulations.

  8. [On the influence of local molecular environment on the redox potential of electron transfer cofactors in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasil'nikov, P M; Noks, P P; Rubin, A B

    2011-01-01

    The addition of cryosolvents (glycerol, dimethylsulfoxide) to a water solution containing bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers changes the redox potential of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer, but does not affect the redox potential of the quinone primary acceptor. It has been shown that the change in redox potential can be produced by changes of the electrostatic interactions between cofactors and the local molecular environment modified by additives entered into the solution. The degree of influence of a solvent on the redox potential of various cofactors is determined by degree of availability of these cofactors for molecules of solvent, which depends on the arrangement of cofactors in the structure of reaction centers.

  9. Accurate calculation of the differential cross section of compton scattering with electron mixed chain propagator in SM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xuewen; Fang Zhenyun; Shi Chengye

    2012-01-01

    By using the electroweak standard model (SM), we analyzed the framework of electron mixed chain propagator which composed of serious of different physical loops participating in electroweak interaction and completed the relevant analytical calculation. Then, we obtained the analytical result of electron mixed chain propagator. By applying our result to Compton scattering, the differential cross section of Compton scattering dσ SM (chain) /dcosθ is counted accurately. This result is compared with the lowest order differential cross section dσ (tree) /dcosθ and the electronic chain propagator Compton scattering differential cross section dσ QED (chain) /dcosθ in quantum electrodynamics (QED). It can be seen that dσ SM (chain ) /dcosθ can show the radiation correction more subtly than dσ QED (chain) /dcosθ. (authors)

  10. Long-term drought modifies the fundamental relationships between light exposure, leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity in leaves of the lychee tree (Litchi chinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damour, Gaëlle; Vandame, Marc; Urban, Laurent

    2008-09-08

    Drought has dramatic negative effects on plants' growth and crop productivity. Although some of the responses and underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood, there is increasing evidence that drought may have a negative effect on photosynthetic capacity. Biochemical models of leaf photosynthesis coupled with models of radiation transfer have been widely used in ecophysiological studies, and, more recently, in global change modeling. They are based on two fundamental relationships at the scale of the leaf: (i) nitrogen content-light exposure and (ii) photosynthetic capacity-nitrogen content. Although drought is expected to increase in many places across the world, such models are not adapted to drought conditions. More specifically, the effects of drought on the two fundamental relationships are not well documented. The objective of our study was to investigate the effects of a long-term drought imposed slowly on the nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity of leaves similarly exposed to light, from 3-year-old lychee trees cv. Kwaï Mi. Leaf nitrogen and non-structural carbohydrate concentrations were measured along with gas exchanges and the light-saturated rate of photosynthetic electron transport (J(max)) after a 5.5-month-long period of drought. Leaf nitrogen content on a mass basis remained stable, while the leaf mass-to-area ratio (LMA) increased with increasing water stress. Consequently, the leaf nitrogen content on an area basis (N(a)) increased in a non-linear fashion. The starch content decreased, while the soluble sugar content increased. Stomata closed and net assimilation decreased to zero, while J(max) and the ratio J(max)/N(a) decreased with increasing water stress. The drought-associated decrease in photosynthetic capacity can be attributed to downregulation of photosynthetic electron transport and to reallocation of leaf nitrogen content. It is concluded that modeling photosynthesis in drought conditions will require, first, the modeling

  11. Magnetic irone oxide nanoparticles in photosynthetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalilov, R.I.; Nasibova, A.N.; Khomutov, G.B.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : It was found and studied the effect of biogenic formation of magnetic inclusions in photosynthetic systems - in various higher plants under the influence of some external stress factors (radiation impact, moisture deficit) and in a model system - a suspension of chloroplasts. For registration and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles in the samples used EPR spectrometer because superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic nanoparticles have a chcracteristic signals of electron magnetic resonance. For direct visualization of magnetic nanoparticles it was used the method of transmission electron microscopy

  12. Interference of Cd2+ in functioning of the photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Baszyński

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The actual opinions concerning the role of Cd2+ in inhibition of photosynthesis have been reviewed. The light phase of photosynthesis, particularly the site of Cd2+ action in the photosynthetic transport chain has been given the greatest attention. Cd2+-induced inhibition of Photosystem II activity as the result of thylakoid membrane degradation has been discussed. The present studies on Cd2+-inhibited dark reactions occurring in stroma has been analysed. Attention has been drawn to the fact that the results of studies in vitro are not always compatible with the changes found in the photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants growing in a Cd2 containing medium.

  13. Control of Electron Transfer from Lead-Salt Nanocrystals to TiO 2

    KAUST Repository

    Hyun, Byung-Ryool; Bartnik, A. C.; Sun, Liangfeng; Hanrath, Tobias; Wise, F. W.

    2011-01-01

    The roles of solvent reorganization energy and electronic coupling strength on the transfer of photoexcited electrons from PbS nanocrystals to TiO 2 nanoparticles are investigated. We find that the electron transfer depends only weakly

  14. Spin-state transfer in laterally coupled quantum-dot chains with disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Song; Bayat, Abolfazl; Bose, Sougato

    2010-01-01

    Quantum dot arrays are a promising medium for transferring quantum information between two distant points without resorting to mobile qubits. Here we study the two most common disorders, namely hyperfine interaction and exchange coupling fluctuations, in quantum dot arrays and their effects on quantum communication through these chains. Our results show that the hyperfine interaction is more destructive than the exchange coupling fluctuations. The average optimal time for communication is not affected by any disorder in the system and our simulations show that antiferromagnetic chains are much more resistive than the ferromagnetic ones against both kind of disorders. Even when time modulation of a coupling and optimal control is employed to improve the transmission, the antiferromagnetic chain performs much better. We have assumed the quasistatic approximation for hyperfine interaction and time-dependent fluctuations in the exchange couplings. Particularly for studying exchange coupling fluctuations we have considered the static disorder, white noise, and 1/f noise.

  15. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  16. Electron Transfer and Solvent-Mediated Electronic Localization in Molecular Photocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Asmus Ougaard; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Harlang, Tobias B.

    2016-01-01

    This work provides a detailed mechanism for electron transfer in a heterodinuclear complex designed as a model system in which to study homogeneous molecular photocatalysis. With efficient Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, we show how intermediate, charge-separated states can mediate...

  17. Supply chain collaboration and responsiveness : a comparison between Thai automotive and electronics industries

    OpenAIRE

    Ueki, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines factors that promote firms to develop supply chain collaborations (SCC) with their partners and relationships between SCC and supply chain operational performances (SCOP), using a questionnaire survey on Thai automotive and electronics industries in 2012. This paper also carries out a comparative study on these questions between the electronics and automotive industries. Two-stage least squares (2SLS) regressions verifY that supplier evaluation and audit is a foundation fo...

  18. Allosteric control of internal electron transfer in cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Kroneck, Peter M H; Zumft, Walter G

    2003-01-01

    Cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase is a bifunctional multiheme enzyme catalyzing the one-electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide and the four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the internal electron transfer process in the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme have...... been studied and found to be dominated by pronounced interactions between the c and the d1 hemes. The interactions are expressed both in dramatic changes in the internal electron-transfer rates between these sites and in marked cooperativity in their electron affinity. The results constitute a prime...... example of intraprotein control of the electron-transfer rates by allosteric interactions....

  19. Quinone reduction via secondary B-branch electron transfer in mutant bacterial reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Philip D; Kirmaier, Christine; Udawatte, Chandani S M; Hofman, Samuel J; Holten, Dewey; Hanson, Deborah K

    2003-02-18

    Symmetry-related branches of electron-transfer cofactors-initiating with a primary electron donor (P) and terminating in quinone acceptors (Q)-are common features of photosynthetic reaction centers (RC). Experimental observations show activity of only one of them-the A branch-in wild-type bacterial RCs. In a mutant RC, we now demonstrate that electron transfer can occur along the entire, normally inactive B-branch pathway to reduce the terminal acceptor Q(B) on the time scale of nanoseconds. The transmembrane charge-separated state P(+)Q(B)(-) is created in this manner in a Rhodobacter capsulatus RC containing the F(L181)Y-Y(M208)F-L(M212)H-W(M250)V mutations (YFHV). The W(M250)V mutation quantitatively blocks binding of Q(A), thereby eliminating Q(B) reduction via the normal A-branch pathway. Full occupancy of the Q(B) site by the native UQ(10) is ensured (without the necessity of reconstitution by exogenous quinone) by purification of RCs with the mild detergent, Deriphat 160-C. The lifetime of P(+)Q(B)(-) in the YFHV mutant RC is >6 s (at pH 8.0, 298 K). This charge-separated state is not formed upon addition of competitive inhibitors of Q(B) binding (terbutryn or stigmatellin). Furthermore, this lifetime is much longer than the value of approximately 1-1.5 s found when P(+)Q(B)(-) is produced in the wild-type RC by A-side activity alone. Collectively, these results demonstrate that P(+)Q(B)(-) is formed solely by activity of the B-branch carriers in the YFHV RC. In comparison, P(+)Q(B)(-) can form by either the A or B branches in the YFH RC, as indicated by the biexponential lifetimes of approximately 1 and approximately 6-10 s. These findings suggest that P(+)Q(B)(-) states formed via the two branches are distinct and that P(+)Q(B)(-) formed by the B side does not decay via the normal (indirect) pathway that utilizes the A-side cofactors when present. These differences may report on structural and energetic factors that further distinguish the functional

  20. Electronic structures and band gaps of chains and sheets based on phenylacetylene units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Masakazu; Nozaki, Daijiro; Tachibana, Masamitsu; Yumura, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Kazunari

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the electronic structures of polymers composed of π-conjugated phenylacetylene (PA) units, m-PA-based and p-PA-based wires, at the extended Hueckel level of theory. It is demonstrated that these conjugated systems should have a variety of electric conductance. All of the one-dimensional (1D) chains and the two-dimensional (2D) sheet based on the m-PA unit are insulators with large band gaps of 2.56 eV because there is no effective orbital interaction with neighboring chains. On the other hand, p-PA-based 1D chains have relatively small band gaps that decrease with an increase in chain width (1.17-1.74 eV) and are semiconductive. The p-PA-based sheet called 'graphyne', a 2D-limit of the p-PA-based 1D chains, shows a small band gap of 0.89 eV. The variety of band electronic structures is discussed in terms of frontier crystal orbitals

  1. Synthetic system mimicking the energy transfer and charge separation of natural photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gust, D.; Moore, T.A.

    1985-05-01

    A synthetic molecular triad consisting of a porphyrin P linked to both a quinone Q and a carotenoid polyene C has been prepared as a mimic of natural photosynthesis for solar energy conversion purposes. Laser flash excitation of the porphyrin moiety yields a charge-separated state Csup(+.)-P-Qsup(-.) within 100 ps with a quantum yield of more than 0.25. This charge-separated state has a lifetime on the microsecond time scale in suitable solvents. The triad also models photosynthetic antenna function and photoprotection from singlet oxygen damge. The successful biomimicry of photosynthetic charge separation is in part the result of multistep electron transfers which rapidly separate the charges and leave the system at high potential, but with a considerable barrier to recombination.

  2. Molecular Computational Investigation of Electron Transfer Kinetics across Cytochrome-Iron Oxide Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Dupuis, Michel; Valiev, Marat

    2007-01-01

    The interface between electron transfer proteins such as cytochromes and solid phase mineral oxides is central to the activity of dissimilatory-metal reducing bacteria. A combination of potential-based molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio electronic structure calculations are used in the framework of Marcus' electron transfer theory to compute elementary electron transfer rates from a well-defined cytochrome model, namely the small tetraheme cytochrome (STC) from Shewanella oneidensis, to surfaces of the iron oxide mineral hematite (a-Fe2O3). Room temperature molecular dynamics simulations show that an isolated STC molecule favors surface attachment via direct contact of hemes I and IV at the poles of the elongated axis, with electron transfer distances as small as 9 Angstroms. The cytochrome remains attached to the mineral surface in the presence of water and shows limited surface diffusion at the interface. Ab initio electronic coupling matrix element (VAB) calculations of configurations excised from the molecular dynamics simulations reveal VAB values ranging from 1 to 20 cm-1, consistent with nonadiabaticity. Using these results, together with experimental data on the redox potential of hematite and hemes in relevant cytochromes and calculations of the reorganization energy from cluster models, we estimate the rate of electron transfer across this model interface to range from 1 to 1000 s-1 for the most exothermic driving force considered in this work, and from 0.01 to 20 s-1 for the most endothermic. This fairly large range of electron transfer rates highlights the sensitivity of the rate upon the electronic coupling matrix element, which is in turn dependent on the fluctuations of the heme configuration at the interface. We characterize this dependence using an idealized bis-imidazole heme to compute from first principles the VAB variation due to porphyrin ring orientation, electron transfer distance, and mineral surface termination. The electronic

  3. Toddlers' word learning and transfer from electronic and print books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouse, Gabrielle A; Ganea, Patricia A

    2017-04-01

    Transfer from symbolic media to the real world can be difficult for young children. A sample of 73 toddlers aged 17 to 23months were read either an electronic book displayed on a touchscreen device or a traditional print book in which a novel object was paired with a novel label. Toddlers in both conditions learned the label within the context of the book. However, only those who read the traditional format book generalized and transferred the label to other contexts. An older group of 28 toddlers aged 24 to 30months did generalize and transfer from the electronic book. Across ages, those children who primarily used screens to watch prerecorded video at home transferred less from the electronic book than those with more diverse home media experiences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Photoinduced electron transfer for an eosin-tyrosine conjugate. Activity of the tyrosinate anion in long-range electron transfer in a protein-like polymer matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G. II; Feng, Z.; Oh, C. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1995-03-23

    The Xanthene dye eosin Y has been modified via a thiohydantoin link to the amine terminus of the amino acid L-tyrosine. Photochemical electron transfer involving the singlet state of the dye and the attached phenol-containing residue led to a reduction in eosin fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime for aqueous solutions at elevated pH. The conjugate provided an electron transfer product of relatively long lifetime (1 {mu}s range) observed by flash photolysis of solutions at pH 12.0, conditions under which the tyrosine moiety is ionized. The effects of binding of the conjugate in the polymer poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) on the rates of electron transfer of species of different charge type were examined. 30 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Direct electron transfer from glucose oxidase immobilized on a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghighi, Behzad; Tabrizi, Mahmoud Amouzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A direct electron transfer reaction of glucose oxidase was observed on the surface of a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode. → A pair of well-defined and reversible redox peaks was observed at the formal potential of approximately -0.439 V. → The apparent electron transfer rate constant was measured to be 5.27 s -1 . → A mechanism for the observed direct electron transfer reaction was proposed, which consists of a two-electron and a two-proton transfer. - Abstract: A pair of well-defined and reversible redox peaks was observed for the direct electron transfer (DET) reaction of an immobilized glucose oxidase (GOx) on the surface of a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode at the formal potential (E o ') of -0.439 V versus Ag/AgCl/saturated KCl. The electron transfer rate constant (k s ) was calculated to be 5.27 s -1 . The dependence of E o ' on pH indicated that the direct electron transfer of the GOx was a two-electron transfer process, coupled with two-proton transfer. The results clearly demonstrate that the nano-porous glassy carbon electrode is a cost-effective and ready-to-use scaffold for the fabrication of a glucose biosensor.

  6. Direct electron transfer from glucose oxidase immobilized on a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghighi, Behzad, E-mail: haghighi@iasbs.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Gava Zang, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tabrizi, Mahmoud Amouzadeh [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Gava Zang, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: > A direct electron transfer reaction of glucose oxidase was observed on the surface of a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode. > A pair of well-defined and reversible redox peaks was observed at the formal potential of approximately -0.439 V. > The apparent electron transfer rate constant was measured to be 5.27 s{sup -1}. > A mechanism for the observed direct electron transfer reaction was proposed, which consists of a two-electron and a two-proton transfer. - Abstract: A pair of well-defined and reversible redox peaks was observed for the direct electron transfer (DET) reaction of an immobilized glucose oxidase (GOx) on the surface of a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode at the formal potential (E{sup o}') of -0.439 V versus Ag/AgCl/saturated KCl. The electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) was calculated to be 5.27 s{sup -1}. The dependence of E{sup o}' on pH indicated that the direct electron transfer of the GOx was a two-electron transfer process, coupled with two-proton transfer. The results clearly demonstrate that the nano-porous glassy carbon electrode is a cost-effective and ready-to-use scaffold for the fabrication of a glucose biosensor.

  7. Doping Phosphorene with Holes and Electrons through Molecular Charge Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnoi, Pratap; Rajesh, S; Manjunatha, S; Bandyopadhyay, Arkamita; Barua, Manaswee; Pati, Swapan K; Rao, C N R

    2017-11-03

    An important aspect of phosphorene, the novel two-dimensional semiconductor, is whether holes and electrons can both be doped in this material. Some reports found that only electrons can be preferentially doped into phosphorene. There are some theoretical calculations showing charge-transfer interaction with both tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). We have carried out an investigation of chemical doping of phosphorene by a variety of electron donor and acceptor molecules, employing both experiment and theory, Raman scattering being a crucial aspect of the study. We find that both electron acceptors and donors interact with phosphorene by charge-transfer, with the acceptors having more marked effects. All the three Raman bands of phosphorene soften and exhibit band broadening on interaction with both donor and acceptor molecules. First-principles calculations establish the occurrence of charge-transfer between phosphorene with donors as well as acceptors. The absence of electron-hole asymmetry is noteworthy. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Syntrophic growth with direct interspecies electron transfer as the primary mechanism for energy exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Aklujkar, Muktak

    2013-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) through biological electrical connections is an alternative to interspecies H2 transfer as a mechanism for electron exchange in syntrophic cultures. However, it has not previously been determined whether electrons received via DIET yield energy...... dehydrogenase, the pilus-associated c-type cytochrome OmcS and pili consistent with electron transfer via DIET. These results suggest that electrons transferred via DIET can serve as the sole energy source to support anaerobic respiration....

  9. Syntrophic Growth via Quinone-Mediated Interspecies Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Smith

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which microbial species exchange electrons are of interest because interspecies electron transfer can expand the metabolic capabilities of microbial communities. Previous studies with the humic substance analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS suggested that quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer (QUIET is feasible, but it was not determined if sufficient energy is available from QUIET to support the growth of both species. Furthermore, there have been no previous studies on the mechanisms for the oxidation of anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AHQDS. A co-culture of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate much faster in the presence of AQDS, and there was an increase in cell protein. G. sulfurreducens was more abundant, consistent with G. sulfurreducens obtaining electrons from acetate that G. metallireducens produced from ethanol, as well as from AHQDS. Cocultures initiated with a citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens that was unable to use acetate as an electron donor also metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate and cell growth, but acetate accumulated over time. G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens were equally abundant in these co-cultures reflecting the inability of the citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens to metabolize acetate. Evaluation of the mechanisms by which G. sulfurreducens accepts electrons from AHQDS demonstrated that a strain deficient in outer-surface c-type cytochromes that are required for AQDS reduction was as effective at QUIET as the wild-type strain. Deletion of additional genes previously implicated in extracellular electron transfer also had no impact on QUIET. These results demonstrate that QUIET can yield sufficient energy to support the growth of both syntrophic partners, but that the mechanisms by which electrons are derived from extracellular hydroquinones require

  10. 2D Spin-Dependent Diffraction of Electrons From Periodical Chains of Nanomagnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teshome Senbeta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The scattering of the unpolarized beams of electrons by nanomagnets in the vicinity of some scattering angles leads to complete spin polarized electrons. This result is obtained with the help of the perturbation theory. The dipole-dipole interaction between the magnetic moment of the nanomagnet and the magnetic moment of electron is treated as perturbation. This interaction is not spherically symmetric. Rather it depends on the electron spin variables. It in turn results in spinor character of the scattering amplitudes. Due to the smallness of the magnetic interactions, the scattering length of this process is very small to be proved experimentally. To enhance the relevant scattering lengths, we considered the diffraction of unpolarized beams of electrons by linear chains of nanomagnets. By tuning the distance between the scatterers it is possible to obtain the diffraction maximum of the scattered electrons at scattering angles which corresponds to complete spin polarization of electrons. It is shown that the total differential scattering length is proportional to N2 (N is a number of scatterers. Even small number of nanomagnets in the chain helps to obtain experimentally visible enhancement of spin polarization of the scattered electrons.

  11. Use of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence to estimate photosynthetic activity and biomass productivity in microalgae grown in different culture systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix L Figueroa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In vivo chlorophyll fluorescence associated to Photosystem II is being used to evaluate photosynthetic activity of microalgae grown in different types of photobioreactors; however, controversy on methodology is usual. Several recommendations on the use of chlorophyll fluorescence to estimate electron transport rate and productivity of microalgae grown in thin-layer cascade cultivators and methacrylate cylindrical vessels are included. Different methodologies related to the measure of photosynthetic activity in microalgae are discussed: (1 measurement of light absorption, (2 determination of electron transport rates versus irradiance and (3 use of simplified devices based on pulse amplitude modulated (PAM fluorescence as Junior PAM or Pocket PAM with optical fiber and optical head as measuring units, respectively. Data comparisons of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence by using these devices and other PAM fluorometers as Water-PAM in the microalga Chlorella sp. (Chlorophyta are presented. Estimations of carbon production and productivity by transforming electron transport rate to gross photosynthetic rate (as oxygen evolution using reported oxygen produced per photons absorbed values and carbon photosynthetic yield based on reported oxygen/carbon ratio are also shown. The limitation of ETR as estimator of photosynthetic and biomass productivity is discussed. Low cost:quality PAMs can promote monitoring of chlorophyll fluorescence in algal biotechnology to estimate the photosynthetic activity and biomass productivity.

  12. Femtosecond dynamics of electron transfer in a neutral organic mixed-valence compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimenka, Raman; Margraf, Markus; Koehler, Juliane; Heckmann, Alexander; Lambert, Christoph; Fischer, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    In this article we report a femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption study of a neutral organic mixed-valence (MV) compound with the aim to gain insight into its charge-transfer dynamics upon optical excitation. The back-electron transfer was investigated in five different solvents, toluene, dibutyl ether, methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE), benzonitrile and n-hexane. In the pump step, the molecule was excited at 760 nm and 850 nm into the intervalence charge-transfer band. The resulting transients can be described by two time constant. We assign one time constant to the rearrangement of solvent molecules in the charge-transfer state and the second time constant to back-electron transfer to the electronic ground state. Back-electron transfer rates range from 1.5 x 10 12 s -1 in benzonitrile through 8.3 x 10 11 s -1 in MTBE, around 1.6 x 10 11 s -1 in dibutylether and toluene and to 3.8 x 10 9 s -1 in n-hexane

  13. Transfer coefficient study of Sr-90 in the soil-grass-milk chain for Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerquera, J. T.; Sarria P, R.

    1996-01-01

    One of the most important problems in modern radioecology is the lack of able information about the features of radionuclide migration in tropical and subtropical environment. The development of nuclear energy and the enhancing in the applications of nuclear techniques in those latitudes indicate that studies in this area are necessary. Cuba is carrying out studies on radioecological characterization of the principal food chains in the country. One of the objectives of these studies is to define the values of the transfer coefficients to be used in the evaluation programs for the assessment of the radiological impact of practices which involve ionizing radiation. This paper shows the results obtained in the determination of Sr-90 transfer coefficients in soil-grass-milk food chain in 'La Quebrada', a place near the Havana City where an important part of the milk that the citizens consume is produced. Transfer coefficients for Sr-90 were calculated on the basis of data collected during 5 years in the region. Soil-grass transfer coefficients are in the range 0.18-5 while grass-milk coefficients are in the range of 1.2x10 -4 - 6x10 -3 day/L. These values are in accordance with values reported by other authors in the literature. (authors). 4 refs., 2 tabs

  14. Quantum effects in biological electron transfer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de la Lande, A.; Babcock, N. S.; Řezáč, Jan; Levy, B.; Sanders, B. C.; Salahub, D.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 17 (2012), s. 5902-5918 ISSN 1463-9076 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : electron transfer * tunnelling * decoherence * semi-classical molecular dynamics * density functional theory Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.829, year: 2012

  15. Traceability and Risk Analysis Strategies for Addressing Counterfeit Electronics in Supply Chains for Complex Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMase, Daniel; Collier, Zachary A; Carlson, Jinae; Gray, Robin B; Linkov, Igor

    2016-10-01

    Within the microelectronics industry, there is a growing concern regarding the introduction of counterfeit electronic parts into the supply chain. Even though this problem is widespread, there have been limited attempts to implement risk-based approaches for testing and supply chain management. Supply chain risk management tends to focus on the highly visible disruptions of the supply chain instead of the covert entrance of counterfeits; thus counterfeit risk is difficult to mitigate. This article provides an overview of the complexities of the electronics supply chain, and highlights some gaps in risk assessment practices. In particular, this article calls for enhanced traceability capabilities to track and trace parts at risk through various stages of the supply chain. Placing the focus on risk-informed decision making through the following strategies is needed, including prioritization of high-risk parts, moving beyond certificates of conformance, incentivizing best supply chain management practices, adoption of industry standards, and design and management for supply chain resilience. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  16. Conduction mechanism studies on electron transfer of disordered system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐慧; 宋祎璞; 李新梅

    2002-01-01

    Using the negative eigenvalue theory and the infinite order perturbation theory, a new method was developed to solve the eigenvectors of disordered systems. The result shows that eigenvectors change from the extended state to the localized state with the increase of the site points and the disordered degree of the system. When electric field is exerted, the electrons transfer from one localized state to another one. The conductivity is induced by the electron transfer. The authors derive the formula of electron conductivity and find the electron hops between localized states whose energies are close to each other, whereas localized positions differ from each other greatly. At low temperature the disordered system has the character of the negative differential dependence of resistivity and temperature.

  17. Photovoltaic concepts inspired by coherence effects in photosynthetic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2016-12-20

    The past decade has seen rapid advances in our understanding of how coherent and vibronic phenomena in biological photosynthetic systems aid in the efficient transport of energy from light-harvesting antennas to photosynthetic reaction centres. Such coherence effects suggest strategies to increase transport lengths even in the presence of structural disorder. Here we explore how these principles could be exploited in making improved solar cells. We investigate in depth the case of organic materials, systems in which energy and charge transport stand to be improved by overcoming challenges that arise from the effects of static and dynamic disorder-structural and energetic-and from inherently strong electron-vibration couplings. We discuss how solar-cell device architectures can evolve to use coherence-exploiting materials, and we speculate as to the prospects for a coherent energy conversion system. We conclude with a survey of the impacts of coherence and bioinspiration on diverse solar-energy harvesting solutions, including artificial photosynthetic systems.

  18. Preparation of polystyrene brush film by radical chain-transfer polymerization and micromechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Jing [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Chen Miao [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)], E-mail: miaochen99@yahoo.com; An Yanqing [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Liu Jianxi [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yan Fengyuan [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)], E-mail: fyyan@lzb.ac.cn

    2008-12-30

    A radical chain-transfer polymerization technique has been applied to graft-polymerize brushes of polystyrene (PSt) on single-crystal silicon substrates. 3-Mercapto-propyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS), as a chain-transfer agent for grafting, was immobilized on the silicon surface by a self-assembling process. The structure and morphology of the graft-functionalized silicon surfaces were characterized by the means of contact-angle measurement, ellipsometric thickness measurement, Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The nanotribological and micromechanical properties of the as-prepared polymer brush films were investigated by frictional force microscopy (FFM), force-volume analysis and scratch test. The results indicate that the friction properties of the grafted polymer films can be improved significantly by the treatment of toluene, and the chemically bonded polystyrene film exhibits superior scratch resistance behavior compared with the spin-coated polystyrene film. The resultant polystyrene brush film is expected to develop as a potential lubrication coating for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)

  19. Transfer coating by electron initiated polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nablo, S.V.

    1985-01-01

    The high speed and depth of cure possible with electron initiated monomer/oligomer coating systems provide many new opportunities for approaches to product finishing. Moreover, the use of transfer or cast coating using films or metallic surfaces offers the ability to precisely control the surface topology of liquid film surfaces during polymerization. Transfer coating such as with textiles has been a commercial process for many years and the synergistic addition of EB technology permits the manufacture of unusual new products. One of these, the casting paper used in the manufacture of vinyl and urethane fabrics, is the first EB application to use a drum surface for pattern replication in the coating. In this case the coated paper is cured against, and then released from, an engraved drum surface. Recent developments in the use of plastic films for transfer have been applied to the manufacture of transfer metallized and coated paper and paperboard products for packaging. Details of these and related processes will be presented as well as a discussion of the typical product areas using this high speed transfer technology. (author)

  20. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Studies of Energy Transfer Dynamics in Antenna Complexes of Photosynthetic Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoshi Matsuzaki

    2002-01-01

    Burn wavelength (λ B )-dependent nonphotochemical hole spectra are reported for the lowest energy Q y -absorption band of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) trimer complex from Prosthecochloris aestuarii. This band at 825 nm is contributed to by three states that stem from the lowest energy state of the subunit of the trimer. The spectra reveal unusually rich and quite sharp low energy satellite structure that consists of holes at 18, 24, 36, 48, 72, 120 and 165 cm -1 as measured relative to the resonant hole at λ B . The possibility that some of these holes are due to correlated downward energy transfer from the two higher energy states that contribute to the 825 nm band could be rejected. Thus, the FMO complex is yet another example of a photosynthetic complex for which structural heterogeneity results in distributions for the values of the energy gaps between Q y -states. The results of theoretical simulations of the hole spectra are consistent with the above holes being due to intermolecular phonons and low energy intramolecular vibrations of the bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecule. The 36 cm -1 and higher energy modes are most likely due to the intramolecular BChl a modes. The simulations lead to the determination of the Huang-Rhys (S) factor for all modes

  1. Aromatic Side Chain Water-to-Lipid Transfer Free Energies Show a Depth Dependence across the Membrane Normal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Sarah K; Fleming, Karen G

    2016-06-29

    Quantitating and understanding the physical forces responsible for the interactions of biomolecules are fundamental to the biological sciences. This is especially challenging for membrane proteins because they are embedded within cellular bilayers that provide a unique medium in which hydrophobic sequences must fold. Knowledge of the energetics of protein-lipid interactions is thus vital to understand cellular processes involving membrane proteins. Here we used a host-guest mutational strategy to calculate the Gibbs free energy changes of water-to-lipid transfer for the aromatic side chains Trp, Tyr, and Phe as a function of depth in the membrane. This work reveals an energetic gradient in the transfer free energies for Trp and Tyr, where transfer was most favorable to the membrane interfacial region and comparatively less favorable into the bilayer center. The transfer energetics follows the concentration gradient of polar atoms across the bilayer normal that naturally occurs in biological membranes. Additional measurements revealed nearest-neighbor coupling in the data set are influenced by a network of aromatic side chains in the host protein. Taken together, these results show that aromatic side chains contribute significantly to membrane protein stability through either aromatic-aromatic interactions or placement at the membrane interface.

  2. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Bimolecular Donor-Acceptor Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana A.

    2016-11-30

    The efficiency of photoconversion systems, such as organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, is largely controlled by a series of fundamental photophysical processes occurring at the interface before carrier collection. A profound understanding of ultrafast interfacial charge transfer (CT), charge separation (CS), and charge recombination (CR) is the key determinant to improving the overall performances of photovoltaic devices. The discussion in this dissertation primarily focuses on the relevant parameters that are involved in photon absorption, exciton separation, carrier transport, carrier recombination and carrier collection in organic photovoltaic devices. A combination of steady-state and femtosecond broadband transient spectroscopies was used to investigate the photoinduced charge carrier dynamics in various donor-acceptor systems. Furthermore, this study was extended to investigate some important factors that influence charge transfer in donor-acceptor systems, such as the morphology, energy band alignment, electronic properties and chemical structure. Interestingly, clear correlations among the steady-state measurements, time-resolved spectroscopy results, grain alignment of the electron transporting layer (ETL), carrier mobility, and device performance are found. In this thesis, we explored the significant impacts of ultrafast charge separation and charge recombination at donor/acceptor (D/A) interfaces on the performance of a conjugated polymer PTB7-Th device with three fullerene acceptors: PC71BM, PC61BM and IC60BA. Time-resolved laser spectroscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy can illustrate the basis for fabricating solar cell devices with improved performances. In addition, we studied the effects of the incorporation of heavy metals into π-conjugated chromophores on electron transfer by monitoring the triplet state lifetime of the oligomer using transient absorption spectroscopy, as understanding the mechanisms controlling intersystem crossing and

  3. Photoinduced energy and electron transfer in rubrene-benzoquinone and rubrene-porphyrin systems

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Jafar Iqbal

    2014-11-01

    Excited-state electron and energy transfer from singlet excited rubrene (Ru) to benzoquinone (BQ) and tetra-(4-aminophenyl) porphyrin (TAPP) were investigated by steady-state absorption and emission, time-resolved transient absorption, and femtosecond (fs)-nanosecond (ns) fluorescence spectroscopy. The low reduction potential of BQ provides the high probability of electron transfer from the excited Ru to BQ. Steady-state and time-resolved results confirm such an excited electron transfer scenario. On the other hand, strong spectral overlap between the emission of Ru and absorption of TAPP suggests that energy transfer is a possible deactivation pathway of the Ru excited state.

  4. One-electron transfer reactions of the couple NAD./NADH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grodkowski, J.; Neta, P.; Carlson, B.W.; Miller, L.

    1983-01-01

    One-electron transfer reactions involving nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide in its oxidized and reducd forms (NAD./NADH) were studied by pulse radiolysis in aqueous solutions. One-electron oxidation of NADH by various phenoxyl radicals and phenothiazine cation radicals was found to take place with rate constants in the range of 10 5 to 10 8 M -1 s -1 , depending on the redox potential of the oxidizing species. In all cases, NAD. is formed quantitatively with no indication for the existence of the protonated form (NADH + .). The spectrum of NAD., as well as the rates of oxidation of NADH by phenoxyl and by (chlorpromazine) + . were independent of pH between pH 4.5 and 13.5. Reaction of deuterated NADH indicated only a small kinetic isotope effect. All these findings point to an electron transfer mechanism. On the other hand, attempts to observe the reverse electron transfer, i.e., one-electron reduction of NAD. to NADH by radicals such as semiquinones, showed that k was less than 10 4 to 10 5 M -1 s -1 , so that it was unobservable. Consequently, it was not possible to achieve equilibrium conditions which would have permitted the direct measurement of the redox potential for NAD./NADH. One-electron reduction of NAD. appears to be an unlikely process. 1 table

  5. Comparison of dynamical aspects of nonadiabatic electron, proton, and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, Elizabeth; Soudackov, Alexander; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    The dynamical aspects of a model proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction in solution are analyzed with molecular dynamics simulations. The rate for nonadiabatic PCET is expressed in terms of a time-dependent probability flux correlation function. The impact of the proton donor-acceptor and solvent dynamics on the probability flux is examined. The dynamical behavior of the probability flux correlation function is dominated by a solvent damping term that depends on the energy gap correlation function. The proton donor-acceptor motion does not impact the dynamical behavior of the probability flux correlation function but does influence the magnitude of the rate. The approximations previously invoked for the calculation of PCET rates are tested. The effects of solvent damping on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational motion are found to be negligible, and the short-time solvent approximation, in which only equilibrium fluctuations of the solvent are considered, is determined to be valid for these types of reactions. The analysis of PCET reactions is compared to previous analyses of single electron and proton transfer reactions. The dynamical behavior is qualitatively similar for all three types of reactions, but the time scale of the decay of the probability flux correlation function is significantly longer for single proton transfer than for PCET and single electron transfer due to a smaller solvent reorganization energy for proton transfer

  6. RADAL: a dynamic model for the transfer of radionuclides through agricultural food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerez Vegueria, S.F.; Frometa Suarez, I.; Jerez Vegueria, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    The contamination of agricultural products by radionuclides is a mechanism which results in radiation dose commitment to the population, following fallout deposits from the atmosphere to the landscape. This paper describes the structure of the dynamic food chain model RADAL. This model simulates an acute environmental transport of fallout radionuclides through agricultural food chains to man and estimates the levels of radiation doses resulting from consumption of contaminated food. The development of RADAL was based on different existing models. For mathematical representation the transport of radionuclides was modeled through compartments representing environmental elements and/or food products. The model solves a set of linear, first-order, differential equations to estimate the concentrations of radionuclides in soil, vegetation, animal tissues and animal products as a function of time following their deposition. Dynamic physico-chemical processes of the model include the following: deposition and foliar interception, weathering, foliar absorption, soil resuspension, transfer from soil surface to the root zone, absorption by plant roots, transfer to deep soil, transfer to animal products, and human consumption of agricultural products. A parameter sensitivity analyses, performed for the main parameters of the model, showed that the foliar interception constant and resuspension factor are the most influential parameters over the radiation doses / model output. (author)

  7. On the physics of electron transfer (drift) in the substance: about the reason of “abnormal” fast transfer of electrons in the plasma of tokamak and at known Bohm’s diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriev, I. A.

    2018-03-01

    An analysis of the problem of so-called “abnormal” fast transfer of electrons in tokamak plasma, which turned out much faster than the result of accepted calculation, is given. Such transfer of hot electrons leads to unexpectedly fast destruction of the inner tokamak wall with ejection of its matter in plasma volume, what violates a condition of plasma confinement for controlled thermonuclear fusion. It is shown, taking into account real physics of electron drift in the gas (plasma) and using the conservation law for momentum of electron transfer (drift), that the drift velocity of elastically scattered electrons should be significantly greater than that of accepted calculation. The reason is that the relaxation time of the momentum of electron transfer, to which the electron drift velocity is proportional, is significantly greater (from 16 up to 4 times) than the electron free path time. Therefore, generally accepted replacement of the relaxation time, which is unknown a priori, by the electron free path time, leads to significant (16 times for thermal electrons) underestimation of electron drift velocity (mobility). This result means, that transfer of elastically (and isotropically) scattered electrons in the gas phase should be so fast, and corresponds to multiplying coefficient (16), introduced by D. Bohm to explain the observed by him “abnormal” fast diffusion of electrons.

  8. Hydrated Electron Transfer to Nucleobases in Aqueous Solutions Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Fu, Aiyun; Yang, Hongfang; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-08-03

    We present an ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation study into the transfer dynamics of an excess electron from its cavity-shaped hydrated electron state to a hydrated nucleobase (NB)-bound state. In contrast to the traditional view that electron localization at NBs (G/A/C/T), which is the first step for electron-induced DNA damage, is related only to dry or prehydrated electrons, and a fully hydrated electron no longer transfers to NBs, our AIMD simulations indicate that a fully hydrated electron can still transfer to NBs. We monitored the transfer dynamics of fully hydrated electrons towards hydrated NBs in aqueous solutions by using AIMD simulations and found that due to solution-structure fluctuation and attraction of NBs, a fully hydrated electron can transfer to a NB gradually over time. Concurrently, the hydrated electron cavity gradually reorganizes, distorts, and even breaks. The transfer could be completed in about 120-200 fs in four aqueous NB solutions, depending on the electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs and the structural fluctuation of the solution. The transferring electron resides in the π*-type lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the NB, which leads to a hydrated NB anion. Clearly, the observed transfer of hydrated electrons can be attributed to the strong electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs over the hydrated electron cavity, which is the driving force, and the transfer dynamics is structure-fluctuation controlled. This work provides new insights into the evolution dynamics of hydrated electrons and provides some helpful information for understanding the DNA-damage mechanism in solution. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Photosynthetic water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, E.

    1981-01-01

    The photosynthetic unit of hydrogen evolution, the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production, and hydrogenic photosynthesis are discussed in the section on previous work. Recent results are given on simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen, kinetic studies, microscopic marine algae-seaweeds, and oxygen profiles.

  10. Molecular weight control in emulsion polymerization by catalytic chain transfer : a reaction engineering approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, N.M.B.; Meda, U.S.; Heuts, J.P.A.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.; Herk, van A.M.; Meuldijk, J.

    2007-01-01

    For the application of catalytic chain transfer in (mini)emulsion polymerization, catalyst partitioning and deactivation are key parameters that govern the actual catalyst concentration at the locus of polymerization and consequently the final molecular weight distribution. A global model, based on

  11. Impact of undamped and damped intramolecular vibrations on the efficiency of photosynthetic exciton energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, Imre Benedek; Csurgay, Árpád I.

    2018-04-01

    In recent years, the role of molecular vibrations in exciton energy transfer taking place during the first stage of photosynthesis attracted increasing interest. Here, we present a model formulated as a Lindblad-type master equation that enables us to investigate the impact of undamped and especially damped intramolecular vibrational modes on the exciton energy transfer, particularly its efficiency. Our simulations confirm the already reported effects that the presence of an intramolecular vibrational mode can compensate the energy detuning of electronic states, thus promoting the energy transfer; and, moreover, that the damping of such a vibrational mode (in other words, vibrational relaxation) can further enhance the efficiency of the process by generating directionality in the energy flow. As a novel result, we show that this enhancement surpasses the one caused by pure dephasing, and we present its dependence on various system parameters (time constants of the environment-induced relaxation and excitation processes, detuning of the electronic energy levels, frequency of the intramolecular vibrational modes, Huang-Rhys factors, temperature) in dimer model systems. We demonstrate that vibrational-relaxation-enhanced exciton energy transfer (VREEET) is robust against the change of these characteristics of the system and occurs in wide ranges of the investigated parameters. With simulations performed on a heptamer model inspired by the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex, we show that this mechanism can be even more significant in larger systems at T = 300 K. Our results suggests that VREEET might be prevalent in light-harvesting complexes.

  12. Photochemical reactions of electron-deficient olefins with N,N,N',N'-tetramethylbenzidine via photoinduced electron-transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan Yang [Laboratory of Bond-selective Chemistry, Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, No. 96 of Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhao Junshu [Laboratory of Bond-selective Chemistry, Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, No. 96 of Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Ji Yuanyuan [Laboratory of Bond-selective Chemistry, Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, No. 96 of Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Yan Lei [Laboratory of Bond-selective Chemistry, Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, No. 96 of Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Yu Shuqin [Laboratory of Bond-selective Chemistry, Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, No. 96 of Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)], E-mail: sqyu@ustc.edu.cn

    2006-01-05

    Photoinduced electron transfer reactions of several electron-deficient olefins with N,N,N',N'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in acetonitrile solution have been studied by using laser flash photolysis technique and steady-state fluorescence quenching method. Laser pulse excitation of TMB yields {sup 3}TMB* after rapid intersystem crossing from {sup 1}TMB*. The triplet which located at 480 nm is found to undergo fast quenching with the electron acceptors fumaronitrile (FN), dimethyl fumarate (DMF), diethyl fumarate (DEF), cinnamonitrile (CN), {alpha}-acetoxyacrylonitrile (AAN), crotononitrile (CrN) and 3-methoxyacrylonitrile (MAN). Substituents binding to olefin molecule own different electron-donating/withdrawing powers, which determine the electron-deficient property ({pi}-cloud density) of olefin molecule as well as control the electron transfer rate constant directly. The detection of ion radical intermediates in the photolysis reactions confirms the proposed electron transfer mechanism, as expected from thermodynamics. The quenching rate constants of triplet TMB by these olefins have been determined at 510 nm to avoid the disturbance of formed TMB cation radical around 475 nm. All the k{sub q}{sup T} values approach or reach to the diffusion-controlled limit. In addition, fluorescence quenching rate constants k{sub q}{sup S} have been also obtained by calculating with Stern-Volmer equation. A correlation between experimental electron transfer rate constants and free energy changes has been explained by Marcus theory of adiabatic outer-sphere electron transfer. Disharmonic k{sub q} values for CN and CrN in endergonic region may be the disturbance of exciplexs formation. e of exciplex formation.

  13. Identification of the 2-hydroxyglutarate and isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenases as alternative electron donors linking lysine catabolism to the electron transport chain of Arabidopsis mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Wagner L; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Larson, Tony R; Tohge, Takayuki; Krahnert, Ina; Witt, Sandra; Obata, Toshihiro; Schauer, Nicolas; Graham, Ian A; Leaver, Christopher J; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2010-05-01

    The process of dark-induced senescence in plants is relatively poorly understood, but a functional electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF/ETFQO) complex, which supports respiration during carbon starvation, has recently been identified. Here, we studied the responses of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants deficient in the expression of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase and 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase to extended darkness and other environmental stresses. Evaluations of the mutant phenotypes following carbon starvation induced by extended darkness identify similarities to those exhibited by mutants of the ETF/ETFQO complex. Metabolic profiling and isotope tracer experimentation revealed that isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase is involved in degradation of the branched-chain amino acids, phytol, and Lys, while 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase is involved exclusively in Lys degradation. These results suggest that isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase is the more critical for alternative respiration and that a series of enzymes, including 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase, plays a role in Lys degradation. Both physiological and metabolic phenotypes of the isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase and 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase mutants were not as severe as those observed for mutants of the ETF/ETFQO complex, indicating some functional redundancy of the enzymes within the process. Our results aid in the elucidation of the pathway of plant Lys catabolism and demonstrate that both isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase and 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase act as electron donors to the ubiquinol pool via an ETF/ETFQO-mediated route.

  14. Correlation between morphology, electron band structure, and resistivity of Pb atomic chains on the Si(5 5 3)-Au surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jałochowski, M; Kwapiński, T; Łukasik, P; Nita, P; Kopciuszyński, M

    2016-01-01

    Structural and electron transport properties of multiple Pb atomic chains fabricated on the Si(5 5 3)-Au surface are investigated using scanning tunneling spectroscopy, reflection high electron energy diffraction, angular resolved photoemission electron spectroscopy and in situ electrical resistance. The study shows that Pb atomic chains growth modulates the electron band structure of pristine Si(5 5 3)-Au surface and hence changes its sheet resistivity. Strong correlation between chains morphology, electron band structure and electron transport properties is found. To explain experimental findings a theoretical tight-binding model of multiple atomic chains interacting on effective substrate is proposed. (paper)

  15. Excitation of bond-alternating spin-1/2 Heisenberg chains by tunnelling electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauyacq, J-P; Lorente, N

    2014-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectra (IETS) are evaluated for spin-1/2 Heisenberg chains showing different phases of their spin ordering. The spin ordering is controlled by the value of the two different Heisenberg couplings on the two sides of each of the chain's atoms (bond-alternating chains). The perfect anti-ferromagnetic phase, i.e. a unique exchange coupling, marks a topological quantum phase transition (TQPT) of the bond-alternating chain. Our calculations show that the TQPT is recognizable in the excited states of the chain and hence that IETS is in principle capable of discriminating the phases. We show that perfectly symmetric chains, such as closed rings mimicking infinite chains, yield the same spectra on both sides of the TQPT and IETS cannot reveal the nature of the spin phase. However, for finite size open chains, both sides of the TQPT are associated with different IETS spectra, especially on the edge atoms, thus outlining the transition. (paper)

  16. Analysis of knowledge tacitness in the transfer of food and beverage practices: Evidence from new chain hotels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desiderio García-Almeida

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is a valuable resource that can provide a firm competitive advantages. Food and beverage practices require the existence of knowledge to effectively perform the activities in this key department for many hotels. When hotel firms grow by integrating new hotels in the organizational structure, managers usually want to transfer the knowledge underlying the key practices. However, the transfer is affected by the level of knowledge tacitness, since this characteristic is considered to render the transfer more difficult. With data from 93 new chain hotels where F&B knowledge has been transferred, the results shed some light about the tacitness of F&B knowledge and its transfer. Thus, customer service knowledge is the knowledge with the lowest degree of tacitness, and food planning, production and preparation is the most tacit. The most frequent mechanism to transfer the knowledge on food planning, production and preparation and the knowledge on management and control of purchases and consumption is the use of staff from the headquarters or other chain hotels in long-term assignments; the preferred method for F&B customer service is training courses, lectures and seminars. Moreover, the tacitness of knowledge about F&B customer service negatively affects the knowledge transfer process in several success dimensions.

  17. Promoting interspecies electron transfer with biochar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar...... biochar may enhance methane production from organic wastes under anaerobic conditions....

  18. Probing the Energy Transfer Dynamics of Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complexes Through Hole-Burning and Single-Complex Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Kerry Joseph [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Photosynthesis is the process by which light energy is used to drive reactions that generate sugars to supply energy for cellular processes. It is one of the most important fundamental biological reactions and occurs in both prokaryotic (e.g. bacteria) and eukaryotic (e.g. plants and algae) organisms. Photosynthesis is also remarkably intricate, requiring the coordination of many different steps and reactions in order to successfully transform absorbed solar energy into a biochemical usable form of energy. However, the net reaction for all photosynthetic organisms can be reduced to the following, deceptively general, equation developed by Van Niel[1] H2 - D + Aimplieshv A - H2 + D where H2-D is the electron donor, e.g. H2O, H2S. A is the electron acceptor, e.g. CO2, and A-H2 is the synthesized sugar. Amazingly, this simple net equation is responsible for creating the oxidizing atmosphere of Earth and the recycling of CO2, both of which are necessary for the sustainment of the global ecosystem.

  19. INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartoloni, Fernando Heering; Monteiro Leite Ciscato, Luiz Francisco; Augusto, Felipe Alberto; Baader, Wilhelm Josef

    2010-01-01

    INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS. Chemiluminescence properties of the peroxyoxalate reaction in the presence of activators bearing electron withdrawing substituents were studied, to evaluate the possible occurrence of an inverse electron

  20. Effects of medium-chain fatty acids and oleic acid on blood lipids, lipoproteins, glucose, insulin, and lipid transfer protein activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tholstrup, T.; Ehnholm, C.; Jauhiainen, M.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Dietary medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) are of nutritional interest because they are more easily absorbed from dietary medium-chain triacylglycerols (MCTs) than are long-chain fatty acids from, for example, vegetable oils. It has generally been claimed that MCFAs do not increase plasma...... cholesterol, although this claim is poorly documented. Objective: We compared the effects of a diet rich in either MCFAs or oleic acid on fasting blood lipids, lipoproteins, glucose, insulin, and lipid transfer protein activities in healthy men. Design: In a study with a double-blind, randomized, crossover...... plasma total triacylglycerol (P = 0.0361), and higher plasma glucose (P = 0.033). Plasma HDL-cholesterol and insulin concentrations and activities of cholesterol ester transfer protein and phospholipid transfer protein did not differ significantly between the diets. Conclusions: Compared with fat high...

  1. Parameters on the radionuclide transfer in crop plants for Korean food chain dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Ho; Lim, K. M.; Cho, Y. H.

    2001-12-01

    For more realistic assessment of Korean food chain radiation doses due to the operation of nuclear facilities, it is required to use domestically produced data for radionuclide transfer parameters in crop plants. In this report, results of last about 15 years' studies on radionuclide transfer parameters in major crop plants by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, were summarized and put together. Soil-to-plant transfer factors, parameters quantifying the root uptake of radionuclides, were measured through greenhouse experiments and field studies. In addition to traditional transfer factors, which are based on the activity in unit weight of soil, those based on the activity applied to unit area of soil surface were also investigated. Interception factors, translocation factors and weathering half lives, parameters in relation to direct plant contamination, were investigated through greenhouse experiments. The levels of initial plant contamination with HTO and I2 vapor were described with absorption factors. Especially for HTO vapor, 3H levels in crop plants at harvest were expressed with TFWT (tissue free water tritium) reduction factors and OBT (organically bound tritium) production factors. The above-mentioned parameters generally showed great variations with soils, crops and radionuclide species and application times. On the basis of summarized results, the points to be amended or improved in food chain dose assessment models were discussed both for normal operation and for accidental release

  2. A single origin of the photosynthetic organelle in different Paulinella lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishida Ken-ichiro

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gaining the ability to photosynthesize was a key event in eukaryotic evolution because algae and plants form the base of the food chain on our planet. The eukaryotic machines of photosynthesis are plastids (e.g., chloroplast in plants that evolved from cyanobacteria through primary endosymbiosis. Our knowledge of plastid evolution, however, remains limited because the primary endosymbiosis occurred more than a billion years ago. In this context, the thecate "green amoeba" Paulinella chromatophora is remarkable because it very recently (i.e., minimum age of ≈ 60 million years ago acquired a photosynthetic organelle (termed a "chromatophore"; i.e., plastid via an independent primary endosymbiosis involving a Prochlorococcus or Synechococcus-like cyanobacterium. All data regarding P. chromatophora stem from a single isolate from Germany (strain M0880/a. Here we brought into culture a novel photosynthetic Paulinella strain (FK01 and generated molecular sequence data from these cells and from four different cell samples, all isolated from freshwater habitats in Japan. Our study had two aims. The first was to compare and contrast cell ultrastructure of the M0880/a and FK01 strains using scanning electron microscopy. The second was to assess the phylogenetic diversity of photosynthetic Paulinella to test the hypothesis they share a vertically inherited plastid that originated in their common ancestor. Results Comparative morphological analyses show that Paulinella FK01 cells are smaller than M0880/a and differ with respect to the number of scales per column. There are more distinctive, multiple fine pores on the external surface of FK01 than in M0880/a. Molecular phylogenetic analyses using multiple gene markers demonstrate these strains are genetically distinct and likely comprise separate species. The well-supported monophyly of the Paulinella chromatophora strains analyzed here using plastid-encoded 16S rRNA suggests strongly

  3. Dynamics of electronic dephasing in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, Dugan; Panitchayangkoon, Gitt; Fransted, Kelly A; Caram, Justin R; Freed, Karl F; Engel, Gregory S; Wen Jianzhong

    2010-01-01

    Electronic coherence has been shown to persist in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) antenna complex from green sulfur bacteria at 77 K for at least 660 fs, several times longer than the typical lifetime of a coherence in a dynamic environment at this temperature. Such long-lived coherence was proposed to improve energy transfer efficiency in photosynthetic systems by allowing an excitation to follow a quantum random walk as it approaches the reaction centre. Here we present a model for bath-induced electronic transitions, demonstrating that the protein matrix protects coherences by globally correlating fluctuations in transition energies. We also quantify the dephasing rates for two particular electronic coherences in the FMO complex at 77 K using two-dimensional Fourier transform electronic spectroscopy and find that the lifetimes of individual coherences are distinct. Within the framework of noise-assisted transport, this result suggests that the FMO complex has been locally tuned by natural selection to optimize transfer efficiency by exploiting quantum coherence.

  4. Transfer coating by electron initiated polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nablo, S.V.

    1984-01-01

    The high speed and depth of cure possible with electron initiated monomer/oligomer coating systems provide many new opportunities for approaches to product finishing. Moreover, the use of transfer or cast coating using films or metallic surfaces offers the ability to precisely control the surface topology of liquid film surfaces during polymerization. Transfer coating such as with textiles has been a commercial process for many years and the synergistic addition of EB technology permits the manufacture of unusual new products. One of these, the casting paper used in the manufacture of vinyl and urethane fabrics, is the first EB application to use a drum surface for pattern replication in the coating. In this case the coated paper is cured against, and then released from, an engraved drum surface. Recent developments in the use of plastic films for transfer have been applied to the manufacture of transfer metallized and coated paper and paperboard products for packaging. Details of these and related processes are presented as well as a discussion of the typical product areas (e.g. photographic papers, release papers, magnetic media) using this high speed transfer technology

  5. Artemisinin inhibits chloroplast electron transport activity: mode of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adyasha Bharati

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a secondary metabolite produced in Artemisia plant species, besides having antimalarial properties is also phytotoxic. Although, the phytotoxic activity of the compound has been long recognized, no information is available on the mechanism of action of the compound on photosynthetic activity of the plant. In this report, we have evaluated the effect of artemisinin on photoelectron transport activity of chloroplast thylakoid membrane. The inhibitory effect of the compound, under in vitro condition, was pronounced in loosely and fully coupled thylakoids; being strong in the former. The extent of inhibition was drastically reduced in the presence of uncouplers like ammonium chloride or gramicidin; a characteristic feature described for energy transfer inhibitors. The compound, on the other hand, when applied to plants (in vivo, behaved as a potent inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. The major site of its action was identified to be the Q(B; the secondary quinone moiety of photosystemII complex. Analysis of photoreduction kinetics of para-benzoquinone and duroquinone suggest that the inhibition leads to formation of low pool of plastoquinol, which becomes limiting for electron flow through photosystemI. Further it was ascertained that the in vivo inhibitory effect appeared as a consequence of the formation of an unidentified artemisinin-metabolite rather than by the interaction of the compound per se. The putative metabolite of artemisinin is highly reactive in instituting the inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow eventually reducing the plant growth.

  6. ''adding'' algorithm for the Markov chain formalism for radiation transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, L.W.

    1979-01-01

    The Markov chain radiative transfer method of Esposito and House has been shown to be both efficient and accurate for calculation of the diffuse reflection from a homogeneous scattering planetary atmosphere. The use of a new algorithm similar to the ''adding'' formula of Hansen and Travis extends the application of this formalism to an arbitrarily deep atmosphere. The basic idea for this algorithm is to consider a preceding calculation as a single state of a new Markov chain. Successive application of this procedure makes calculation possible for any optical depth without increasing the size of the linear system used. The time required for the algorithm is comparable to that for a doubling calculation for a homogeneous atmosphere, but for a non-homogeneous atmosphere the new method is considerably faster than the standard ''adding'' routine. As with he standard ''adding'' method, the information on the internal radiation field is lost during the calculation. This method retains the advantage of the earlier Markov chain method that the time required is relatively insensitive to the number of illumination angles or observation angles for which the diffuse reflection is calculated. A technical write-up giving fuller details of the algorithm and a sample code are available from the author

  7. Modelling of radiocesium transfer in the lichen-reindeer/caribou-wolf food chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. F. Holleman

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available The environmental contaminate radiocesium (cesium-137 has been shown to be of value as a marker in food selection and intake studies. Its greatest potential value as a food marker is in the subarctic/arctic regions, particularly in the lichen to reindeer/caribou to wolf food chain. A kinetic model describing the movement of radiocesium through the food chain has been developed using the SAAM computer program and is presented here. The program has been written so that the various paramenters affecting the transfer of radiocesium in the food chain can be altered more realistically to describe the system being modeled. The values of the parameters as given in this example are realistic for interior Alaska, however caution should be exercised in the application of the present results to regions that may be vastly different from the Alaskan interior without first evaluating the parameters and assumptions of the model.

  8. Ultrafast Energy Transfer in an Artificial Photosynthetic Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Grondelle R.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We temporally resolved energy transfer kinetics in an artificial light-harvesting dyad composed of a phthalocyanine covalently linked to a carotenoid. Upon carotenoid photo-excitation, energy transfers within ≈100fs (≈52% efficiency to the phthalocyanine.

  9. Electron transfer reactions of ruthenium(II) complexes with polyphenolic acids in micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeswari, Angusamy [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India); Department of Chemistry, Fatima College, Madurai 625 018 (India); Ramdass, Arumugam [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India); Research Department of Chemistry, Aditanar College of Arts and Science, Tiruchendur 628 216 (India); Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India); Department of Industrial Chemistry, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630 003 (India); Rajagopal, Seenivasan, E-mail: rajagopalseenivasan@yahoo.com [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India)

    2016-02-15

    The electron transfer in a microhetrogeneous system is a perfect mimic of biological electron transfer. The electron transfer between biologically important phenolic acids and ruthenium (II) complexes is systematically studied in the presence of anionic and cationic micelles. The photophysical properties of these ruthenium (II) complexes with anionic and cationic micelles and their binding abilities with these two type of micelles are also studies using absorption, emission and excited state lifetime spectral techniques. Pseudophase Ion Exchange (PIE) Model is applied to derive mechanism of electron transfer in two types of micelles. - Highlights: • Effect of microhetrogeneous system is studied using ruthenium (II) complexes and gallic acid is studied. • Pseudophase Ion exchange model is applied to derive the mechanism. • Binding constants are in the range of 10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} M{sup −1}.

  10. Legal Risk Associated with Electronic Funds Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulah, Samahir

    2014-01-01

    The past thirty years have seen rapid advances in the technological component of banking services and as a consequence new legal issues have come to the fore, especially with regard to Electronic Fund Transfers (EFTs) which are now used to transfer money around the world, and have made fund transactions between payers and payees easier, faster and more secure. The method involves risks for both banks and customers, due to the possibility of unauthorized payments risks, credit and insolvency p...

  11. Transferring Knowledge of Electrocatalysis to Photocatalysis: Photocatalytic Water Splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2017-06-24

    One of the most attractive features of photocatalytic reactions is the ability to achieve energetically uphill (photosynthetic) reactions. In many photocatalytic reactions, the reactions involve multielectron transfers with the adsorbed intermediates. In this case, photocatalysis is nothing but electrocatalysis initiated and driven by the electron potential shift caused by the photocatalyst (photon absorber). This condition is indeed true for photocatalysts for water splitting, which are also electrocatalysts because both the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) require multiple electron transfers at the active surfaces. This chapter deals with the product-side in the six-gear concept. It shows the electrocatalytic performance when using an electrocatalyst on the surface. The chapter further shows the current-potential curve for an electrocatalytic process isolated from the photocatalyst process. For an electrocatalyst to achieve electrochemical reactions, the potential of the catalyst must be shifted at the interface of the semiconductor, providing electromotive force or overpotential for redox reactions.

  12. Transferring Knowledge of Electrocatalysis to Photocatalysis: Photocatalytic Water Splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    One of the most attractive features of photocatalytic reactions is the ability to achieve energetically uphill (photosynthetic) reactions. In many photocatalytic reactions, the reactions involve multielectron transfers with the adsorbed intermediates. In this case, photocatalysis is nothing but electrocatalysis initiated and driven by the electron potential shift caused by the photocatalyst (photon absorber). This condition is indeed true for photocatalysts for water splitting, which are also electrocatalysts because both the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) require multiple electron transfers at the active surfaces. This chapter deals with the product-side in the six-gear concept. It shows the electrocatalytic performance when using an electrocatalyst on the surface. The chapter further shows the current-potential curve for an electrocatalytic process isolated from the photocatalyst process. For an electrocatalyst to achieve electrochemical reactions, the potential of the catalyst must be shifted at the interface of the semiconductor, providing electromotive force or overpotential for redox reactions.

  13. Layered Black Phosphorus: Strongly Anisotropic Magnetic, Electronic, and Electron-Transfer Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, Zdeněk; Sedmidubský, David; Huber, Štěpán; Luxa, Jan; Bouša, Daniel; Boothroyd, Chris; Pumera, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Layered elemental materials, such as black phosphorus, exhibit unique properties originating from their highly anisotropic layered structure. The results presented herein demonstrate an anomalous anisotropy for the electrical, magnetic, and electrochemical properties of black phosphorus. It is shown that heterogeneous electron transfer from black phosphorus to outer- and inner-sphere molecular probes is highly anisotropic. The electron-transfer rates differ at the basal and edge planes. These unusual properties were interpreted by means of calculations, manifesting the metallic character of the edge planes as compared to the semiconducting properties of the basal plane. This indicates that black phosphorus belongs to a group of materials known as topological insulators. Consequently, these effects render the magnetic properties highly anisotropic, as both diamagnetic and paramagnetic behavior can be observed depending on the orientation in the magnetic field. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Charge transfer and bond lengths in YBa2Cu3-xMxO6+y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, J.D.; Rhyne, J.J.; Neumann, D.A.; Miceli, P.F.; Tarascon, J.M.; Greene, L.H.; Barboux, P.

    1989-01-01

    We discuss the effects of doping on the Cu chain sites in YBa 2 Cu 3-x M x O 6+y . The relationship between bond lengths obtained from neutron scattering and charge transfer is evaluated in terms of bond valence. In particular, it is concluded that removing an oxygen from the chains transfers one electron to the planes. 24 refs., 3 figs

  15. A short comparison of electron and proton transfer processes in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    The main differences between electron and proton transfers that take place in biological systems are examined. The relation between the distance dependence of the rate constant and the mass of the transferred particle is analyzed in detail. Differences between the two processes have important consequences at the experimental level, which are discussed. The various mechanisms that ensure the coupling between electron and proton transfers are briefly described

  16. Multidimensional Quantum Mechanical Modeling of Electron Transfer and Electronic Coherence in Plant Cryptochromes: The Role of Initial Bath Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendive-Tapia, David; Mangaud, Etienne; Firmino, Thiago; de la Lande, Aurélien; Desouter-Lecomte, Michèle; Meyer, Hans-Dieter; Gatti, Fabien

    2018-01-11

    A multidimensional quantum mechanical protocol is used to describe the photoinduced electron transfer and electronic coherence in plant cryptochromes without any semiempirical, e.g., experimentally obtained, parameters. Starting from a two-level spin-boson Hamiltonian we look at the effect that the initial photoinduced nuclear bath distribution has on an intermediate step of this biological electron transfer cascade for two idealized cases. The first assumes a slow equilibration of the nuclear bath with respect to the previous electron transfer step that leads to an ultrafast decay with little temperature dependence; while the second assumes a prior fast bath equilibration on the donor potential energy surface leading to a much slower decay, which contrarily displays a high temperature dependence and a better agreement with previous theoretical and experimental results. Beyond Marcus and semiclassical pictures these results unravel the strong impact that the presence or not of equilibrium initial conditions has on the electronic population and coherence dynamics at the quantum dynamics level in this and conceivably in other biological electron transfer cascades.

  17. Proton Transfer in Perfluorosulfonic Acid Fuel Cell Membranes with Differing Pendant Chains and Equivalent Weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaz, Joseph E; Lawler, Christian M; Fayer, Michael D

    2017-05-04

    Proton transfer in the nanoscopic water channels of polyelectrolyte fuel cell membranes was studied using a photoacid, 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid sodium salt (HPTS), in the channels. The local environment of the probe was determined using 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid sodium salt (MPTS), which is not a photoacid. Three fully hydrated membranes, Nafion (DuPont) and two 3M membranes, were studied to determine the impact of different pendant chains and equivalent weights on proton transfer. Fluorescence anisotropy and excited state population decay data that characterize the local environment of the fluorescent probes and proton transfer dynamics were measured. The MPTS lifetime and anisotropy results show that most of the fluorescent probes have a bulk-like water environment with a relatively small fraction interacting with the channel wall. Measurements of the HPTS protonated and deprotonated fluorescent bands' population decays provided information on the proton transport dynamics. The decay of the protonated band from ∼0.5 ns to tens of nanoseconds is in part determined by dissociation and recombination with the HPTS, providing information on the ability of protons to move in the channels. The dissociation and recombination is manifested as a power law component in the protonated band fluorescence decay. The results show that equivalent weight differences between two 3M membranes resulted in a small difference in proton transfer. However, differences in pendant chain structure did significantly influence the proton transfer ability, with the 3M membranes displaying more facile transfer than Nafion.

  18. Deterministic assembly of linear gold nanorod chains as a platform for nanoscale applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rey, Antje; Billardon, Guillaume; Loertscher, Emanuel

    2013-01-01

    target substrate, thus establishing a platform for a variety of nanoscale electronic and optical applications ranging from molecular electronics to optical and plasmonic devices. As a first example, electrical measurements are performed on contacted gold nanorod chains before and after their immersion......We demonstrate a method to assemble gold nanorods highly deterministically into a chain formation by means of directed capillary assembly. This way we achieved straight chains consisting of end-to-end aligned gold nanorods assembled in one specific direction with well-controlled gaps of similar...... to 6 nm between the individual constituents. We determined the conditions for optimum quality and yield of nanorod chain assembly by investigating the influence of template dimensions and assembly temperature. In addition, we transferred the gold nanorod chains from the assembly template onto a Si/SiO2...

  19. Copolymerization of Styrene and Methacrylates in the presence of Catalytic Chain Transfer Agents (Cacti's)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, M.Sakhawat; Khan, M.A.; Ahmad, Shafique

    2005-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the use of a Co (II) complex, [Co(afdo-H)] as a catalytic chain transfer agent (CCTA) for controlling molecular weight in copolymerization of styrene (STY) with butyl methacrylate (BMA) and methylmethacrylate (MMA). The catalyst is structurally similar to [co(dmg-H) (BF)] patented by Du Pont as a CCTA. Average catalytic chain transfer constant, C8 of [co(afdo-H) (BF)] for coplymerization of STY with BMA and MMA determined from Maya plot, was found to be in the range of 10-10.This value is lower than the value reported for the [Co(dmg-H)(BF)). In the case of STY-BMA or STY-MMA copolymerization, a considerable reduction in the viscosity average molecular weights (Mv) was observed in the copolymers. The average molecular weight of poly (MMA-BMA) was reduced by a factor of ten compared to the reduction in poly (STY-MMA) and poly (STY-BMA) for the same concentration of the CCTA. (author)

  20. Photoinduced electron-transfer from imidazole derivative to nano-semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, C; Jayabharathi, J; Jayamoorthy, K; Devi, K Brindha

    2012-04-01

    Bioactive imidazole derivative absorbs in the UV region at 305 nm. The interaction of imidazole derivative with nanoparticulate WO3, Fe2O3, Fe3O4, CuO, ZrO2 and Al2O3 has been studied by UV-visible absorption, FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopies. The imidazole derivative adsorbs strongly on the surfaces of nanosemiconductor, the apparent binding constants for the association between nanomaterials and imidazole derivative have been determined from the fluorescence quenching. In the case of nanocrystalline insulator, fluorescence quenching through electron transfer from the excited state of the imidazole derivative to alumina is not possible. However, a possible mechanism for the quenching of fluorescence by the insulator is energy transfer, that is, energy transferred from the organic molecule to the alumina lattice. Based on Forster's non-radiation energy transfer theory, the distance between the imidazole derivative and nanoparticles (r0∼2.00 nm) as well as the critical energy transfer distance (R0∼1.70 nm) has been calculated. The interaction between the imidazole derivative and nanosurfaces occurs through static quenching mechanism. The free energy change (ΔGet) for electron transfer process has been calculated by applying Rehm-Weller equation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Transfer of radionuclides at the uranium and thorium decay chains in aquatic and terrestrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, C.

    1987-04-01

    This report examines the transfer of radionuclides from the uranium and thorium decay chains (U-238, Ra-226, Th-232, Th-230, Po-210 and Pb-210) through the aquatic and terrestrial environment. This transfer is characterized by a transfer coefficient; environmental and experimental factors which cause this coefficient to vary are presented and discussed in this report. Furthermore, based on a literature survey, the report indicates the range of coefficients found for the aquatic sector (that is, sediment and freshwater and marine organisms) and for the terrestrial sector (that is, plants and domestic and wild animals). Afterwards, generalisations are formulated on the transfer of the different radionuclides through the multiple environmental compartments. 75 refs

  2. A single arginine residue is required for the interaction of the electron transferring flavoprotein (ETF) with three of its dehydrogenase partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Antony R

    2003-12-01

    The interaction of several dehydrogenases with the electron transferring flavoprotein (ETF) is a crucial step required for the successful transfer of electrons into the electron transport chain. The exact determinants regarding the interaction of ETF with its dehydrogenase partners are still unknown. Chemical modification of ETF with arginine-specific reagents resulted in the loss, to varying degrees, of activity with medium chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (MCAD). The kinetic profiles showed the inactivations followed pseudo-first-order kinetics for all reagents used. For activity with MCAD, maximum inactivation of ETF was accomplished by 2,3-butanedione (4% residual activity after 120 min) and it was shown that modification of one arginine residue was responsible for the inactivation. Almost 100% restoration of this ETF activity was achieved upon incubation with free arginine. However, the same 2,3-butanedione modified ETF only possessed decreased activity with dimethylglycine-(DMGDH, 44%) and sarcosine- (SDH, 27%) dehydrogenases unlike the abolition with MCAD. Full protection of ETF from arginine modification by 2,3-butanedione was achieved using substrate-protected DMGDH, MCAD and SDH respectively. Cross-protection studies of ETF with the three dehydrogenases implied use of the same single arginine residue in the binding of all three dehydrogenases. These results lead us to conclude that this single arginine residue is essential in the binding of the ETF to MCAD, but only contributes partially to the binding of ETF to SDH and DMGDH and thus, the determinants of the dehydrogenase binding sites overlap but are not identical.

  3. Hybrid artificial photosynthetic systems comprising semiconductors as light harvesters and biomimetic complexes as molecular cocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fuyu; Li, Can

    2013-11-19

    Solar fuel production through artificial photosynthesis may be a key to generating abundant and clean energy, thus addressing the high energy needs of the world's expanding population. As the crucial components of photosynthesis, the artificial photosynthetic system should be composed of a light harvester (e.g., semiconductor or molecular dye), a reduction cocatalyst (e.g., hydrogenase mimic, noble metal), and an oxidation cocatalyst (e.g., photosystem II mimic for oxygen evolution from water oxidation). Solar fuel production catalyzed by an artificial photosynthetic system starts from the absorption of sunlight by the light harvester, where charge separation takes place, followed by a charge transfer to the reduction and oxidation cocatalysts, where redox reaction processes occur. One of the most challenging problems is to develop an artificial photosynthetic solar fuel production system that is both highly efficient and stable. The assembly of cocatalysts on the semiconductor (light harvester) not only can facilitate the charge separation, but also can lower the activation energy or overpotential for the reactions. An efficient light harvester loaded with suitable reduction and oxidation cocatalysts is the key for high efficiency of artificial photosynthetic systems. In this Account, we describe our strategy of hybrid photocatalysts using semiconductors as light harvesters with biomimetic complexes as molecular cocatalysts to construct efficient and stable artificial photosynthetic systems. We chose semiconductor nanoparticles as light harvesters because of their broad spectral absorption and relatively robust properties compared with a natural photosynthesis system. Using biomimetic complexes as cocatalysts can significantly facilitate charge separation via fast charge transfer from the semiconductor to the molecular cocatalysts and also catalyze the chemical reactions of solar fuel production. The hybrid photocatalysts supply us with a platform to study the

  4. Influence of intra-pigment vibrations on dynamics of photosynthetic exciton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yoshihiro; Doolittle, Brian

    2014-11-14

    We have numerically investigated the effect of an underdamped intra-pigment vibrational mode on an exciton's quantum coherence and energy transfer efficiency. Our model describes a bacteriochlorophyll a pigment-protein dimer under the conditions at which photosynthetic energy transfer occurs. The dimer is modeled using a theoretical treatment of a vibronic exciton, and its dynamics are numerically analyzed using a non-Markovian and non-perturbative method. We examined the system's response to various values of the Huang-Rhys factor, site energy difference, reorganization energy, and reorganization energy difference. We found that the inclusion of the intra-pigment vibronic mode allows for long-lived oscillatory quantum coherences to occur. This excitonic coherence is robust against static site-energy disorder. The vibrational mode also promotes exciton transfer along the site-energy landscape thus improving the overall energy transfer efficiency.

  5. Influence of intra-pigment vibrations on dynamics of photosynthetic exciton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yoshihiro; Doolittle, Brian

    2014-01-01

    We have numerically investigated the effect of an underdamped intra-pigment vibrational mode on an exciton's quantum coherence and energy transfer efficiency. Our model describes a bacteriochlorophyll a pigment-protein dimer under the conditions at which photosynthetic energy transfer occurs. The dimer is modeled using a theoretical treatment of a vibronic exciton, and its dynamics are numerically analyzed using a non-Markovian and non-perturbative method. We examined the system's response to various values of the Huang-Rhys factor, site energy difference, reorganization energy, and reorganization energy difference. We found that the inclusion of the intra-pigment vibronic mode allows for long-lived oscillatory quantum coherences to occur. This excitonic coherence is robust against static site-energy disorder. The vibrational mode also promotes exciton transfer along the site-energy landscape thus improving the overall energy transfer efficiency

  6. Influence of intra-pigment vibrations on dynamics of photosynthetic exciton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yoshihiro, E-mail: sato.yoshihiro77@nihon-u.ac.jp, E-mail: ysato.colby@gmail.com; Doolittle, Brian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Colby College, Waterville, Maine 04901 (United States)

    2014-11-14

    We have numerically investigated the effect of an underdamped intra-pigment vibrational mode on an exciton's quantum coherence and energy transfer efficiency. Our model describes a bacteriochlorophyll a pigment-protein dimer under the conditions at which photosynthetic energy transfer occurs. The dimer is modeled using a theoretical treatment of a vibronic exciton, and its dynamics are numerically analyzed using a non-Markovian and non-perturbative method. We examined the system's response to various values of the Huang-Rhys factor, site energy difference, reorganization energy, and reorganization energy difference. We found that the inclusion of the intra-pigment vibronic mode allows for long-lived oscillatory quantum coherences to occur. This excitonic coherence is robust against static site-energy disorder. The vibrational mode also promotes exciton transfer along the site-energy landscape thus improving the overall energy transfer efficiency.

  7. Nitric Oxide Synthases Reveal a Role for Calmodulin in Controlling Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Soud, Husam M.; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    1993-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized within the immune, vascular, and nervous systems, where it acts as a wide-ranging mediator of mammalian physiology. The NO synthases (EC 1.14.13.39) isolated from neurons or endothelium are calmodulin dependent. Calmodulin binds reversibly to neuronal NO synthase in response to elevated Ca2+, triggering its NO production by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that calmodulin binding allows NADPH-derived electrons to pass onto the heme group of neuronal NO synthase. Calmodulin-triggered electron transfer to heme was independent of substrate binding, caused rapid enzymatic oxidation of NADPH in the presence of O_2, and was required for NO synthesis. An NO synthase isolated from cytokine-induced macrophages that contains tightly bound calmodulin catalyzed spontaneous electron transfer to its heme, consistent with bound calmodulin also enabling electron transfer within this isoform. Together, these results provide a basis for how calmodulin may regulate NO synthesis. The ability of calmodulin to trigger electron transfer within an enzyme is unexpected and represents an additional function for calcium-binding proteins in biology.

  8. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization of 2-chloro-1,3-butadiene

    OpenAIRE

    Pullan, Nikki; Liu, Max; Topham, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Controlled polymerization of 2-chloro-1,3-butadiene using reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization has been demonstrated for the first time. 2-Chloro-1,3-butadiene, more commonly known as chloroprene, has significant industrial relevance as a crosslinked rubber, with uses ranging from adhesives to integral automotive components. However, problems surrounding the inherent toxicity of the lifecycle of the thiourea-vulcanized rubber have led to the need for control ...

  9. Synergistic electron transfer effect-based signal amplification strategy for the ultrasensitive detection of dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiujun; Chen, Xiaogen; Liu, Dan; Wu, Cuiyan; Liu, Meiling; Li, Haitao; Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2018-05-15

    The selective and sensitive detection of dopamine (DA) is of great significance for the identification of schizophrenia, Huntington's disease, and Parkinson's disease from the perspective of molecular diagnostics. So far, most of DA fluorescence sensors are based on the electron transfer from the fluorescence nanomaterials to DA-quinone. However, the limited electron transfer ability of the DA-quinone affects the level of detection sensitivity of these sensors. In this work, based on the DA can reduce Ag + into AgNPs followed by oxidized to DA-quinone, we developed a novel silicon nanoparticles-based electron transfer fluorescent sensor for the detection of DA. As electron transfer acceptor, the AgNPs and DA-quinone can quench the fluorescence of silicon nanoparticles effectively through the synergistic electron transfer effect. Compared with traditional fluorescence DA sensors, the proposed synergistic electron transfer-based sensor improves the detection sensitivity to a great extent (at least 10-fold improvement). The proposed sensor shows a low detection limit of DA, which is as low as 0.1 nM under the optimal conditions. This sensor has potential applicability for the detection of DA in practical sample. This work has been demonstrated to contribute to a substantial improvement in the sensitivity of the sensors. It also gives new insight into design electron transfer-based sensors. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. A μSR study of the metamagnetic phase transition in the electron-transfer salt [FeCp2*][TCNQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blundell, Stephen J.; Lancaster, Tom; Brooks, Michael L.; Pratt, Francis L.; Taliaferro, Michelle L.; Miller, Joel S.

    2006-01-01

    We have used muon-spin rotation (μSR) to study the metamagnetic transition in [FeCp 2 *][TCNQ] where Cp*=C 5 Me 5 and TCNQ is 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane. This electron-transfer salt contains parallel chains of alternating [FeCp 2 *] + cations and [TCNQ] - anions. Our zero-field μSR data show the 2.5K transition and show that a static, but disordered, internal field distribution develops below this. High-transverse-field μSR has also been used to study the metamagnetic transition and the data illustrate how the internal field distribution changes through this transition

  11. Investigating and comparing uranium and gamma radiation induced effects on photosynthetic parameters for Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhoudt, Nathalie; Horemans, Nele; Saenen, Eline; Biermans, Geert; Nauts, Robin; Wannijn, Jean; Van Hees, May; Vandenhove, Hildegarde [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, 2400, Mol (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    resulted in a diminution of the saturating phase and is therefore suggested to be related to zeaxanthin production, uranium exposure caused a decrease of the transient phase and is thus suggested to be linked with the formation of antheraxanthin. NO values remained unaltered under gamma radiation exposure. A rapid light curve (RLC), which measures φPSII as a function of irradiance, can provide additional information on the saturation characteristics of the electron transport rate (ETR). In the first part of the RLC, the light-limited region, photosynthesis is limited by the light and the rate of this curve (α) is proportional to φPSII. Further on is the photosynthesis limited by the capacity of the electron transport chain and the curve reaches a plateau where the maximum electron transport rate occurs (ETR{sub max}). For uranium exposed leaves, ETR{sub max} remained unaltered but α increased. Under gamma radiation exposure the opposite pattern was visible as α remained unaltered, but ETR{sub max} increased. Based on these results it can be concluded that under both stress conditions plants start to increase φPSII and decrease NPQ while NO remains unaltered. The difference in response between uranium and gamma radiation lies within the NPQ kinetics and the RLC. (authors)

  12. Morphological and photosynthetic adaptations of Tabebuia aurea seedlings in the nursery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo R Gonçalves

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tabebuia aurea (Benth. & Hook. f. ex S. Moore (Bignoniaceae is a boreal species common in Brazil. It is used for ornamental parks and along sidewalks. Its timber is also used for furniture. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of nursery shading on the growth and photosynthesis of T. aurea and their photosynthetic adaptation after being transferred to direct sunlight. The T. aurea seedlings were grown under 0, 50, 70 or 95% shade. The photosynthetic active radiation and leaf gas exchange were measured over two distinct periods: 51 (young seedlings and 70 days after having been sown under each shade treatment. Immediately after the measurements were taken, the seedlings were transferred into full sunlight and the measurements were repeated two times after 15 min and 3 days under ambient sunlight. T. aurea seedlings showed satisfactory growth up to 50% shade in the nursery, which could be verified both by growth measurement and by total biomass accumulation. Shading greater than 70% reduced the number of leaves, the leaf area and the stem diameter in relation to plants exposed to full sunlight. The results suggest that T. aurea seedlings should be grown under full sunlight or under shading up to 50% to maximize their growth in the nursery and to minimize stress when transferring the seedlings to their final planting sites.

  13. Identification and evaluation of modularization practices in an automotive supplier: progressivity analysis of transferring activities in the supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Prieto

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The automotive value chain has more and more been making room to a strategy of which activities of product design and production have been transferred to the module suppliers. The transfer of value-added activities occurs from assembler to the module suppliers. The former assume the role of integrators within the supply chain. The supply chain participants have started to strengths their competencies in order to obtain advantages in the economy of scale and scope. In this context, the present work aims at investigating the valued-added transfer between first and second tiers of automotive supply chain in new product development and production. The work was carried out from an evaluation of a supplier with regard to modularization. The theoretical background considers the concepts of integrated and modular architecture as well as the progressiveness of competencies among suppliers. It adopts single cased as the research methodological approach. The literature points out that the process of modularization either in product development or in production offer benefits for both sides: assemblers and suppliers. The results from the investigated supplier shows inherent benefits due to the acquisition of new technologies that enable an increase of technical and management learning in projects of new products. Therefore, it demonstrates that in this modularity environment, the potential of value-added transfer is associated to the level of progressiveness of competencies that are incorporated to deliver module solutions to assemblers; the investigated supplier can be categorized in an “embrionary” stage.

  14. Electron Transfer in Donor-Bridge-Acceptor Systems and Derived Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterbaan, W.D.

    2002-01-01

    Some aspects of photoinduced electron transfer (ET) in (electron donor)-bridge-(electron acceptor) compounds (D-B-A) and derived materials are investigated. Aim I is to determine how and to which extent non-conjugated double bonds in an otherwise saturated hydrocarbon bridge affect the rate of

  15. Biochemical factors affecting the quantum efficiency of hydrogen production by membranes of green photosynthetic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, J.D.; Olson, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Photohydrogen production, 200-700 ..mu..mol H/sub 2/ h/sup -1/ (mg bacteriochlorophyll a)/sup -1/ has been obtained in a system containing unit membrane vesicles (Complex I) from the green photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobium limicola f. thiosulfatophilum, ascorbate, N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine, dithioerythritol, an oxygen scavenging mixture, either methyl viologen (MV) or clostridial ferredoxin (CPS Fd) as electron carrier, and either CPS hydrogenase or platinum asbestos as catalyst. All components are necessary for maximum activity, and spinach Fd cannot be substituted for CPS Fd. Higher rates of photohydrogen production are obtained using MV or CPS Fd with hydrogenase than with MV and Pt asbestos. The highest quantum efficiencies (7-10% at 0.2-0.9 mW absorbed light and over 20% at lower light) were obtained with CPS Fd, hydrogenase and non-saturating 812 nm light. With saturating white light, however, rates of photohydrogen production varied relatively little among the various combinations of electron carrier and catalyst tested. The reaction rate is unaffected by 0.03% Triton X-100, and is insensitive to treatment with antimycin a or m-chloro-carbonyl cyanide phenylhydrazone.This indicates that neither electron flow through an endogenous cyclic chain, nor maintenance of a proton gradient are involved in this process.

  16. Bi-directional magnetic resonance based wireless power transfer for electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, Durga P.; Nayak, Praveen P.; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan; Mishra, Debasish

    2015-01-01

    In order to power or charge electronic devices wirelessly, a bi-directional wireless power transfer method has been proposed and experimentally investigated. In the proposed design, two receiving coils are used on both sides of a transmitting coil along its central axis to receive the power wirelessly from the generated magnetic fields through strongly coupled magnetic resonance. It has been observed experimentally that the maximum power transfer occurs at the operating resonant frequency for optimum electric load connected across the receiving coils on both side. The optimum wireless power transfer efficiency is 88% for the bi-directional power transfer technique compared 84% in the one side receiver system. By adopting the developed bi-directional power transfer method, two electronic devices can be powered up or charged simultaneously instead of a single device through usual one side receiver system without affecting the optimum power transfer efficiency

  17. Bi-directional magnetic resonance based wireless power transfer for electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kar, Durga P.; Nayak, Praveen P.; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan; Mishra, Debasish [Department of Electronics and Instrumentation Engineering, Institute of Technical Education and Research, Siksha ‘O’ Anushandhan University, Bhubaneswar 751030 (India)

    2015-09-28

    In order to power or charge electronic devices wirelessly, a bi-directional wireless power transfer method has been proposed and experimentally investigated. In the proposed design, two receiving coils are used on both sides of a transmitting coil along its central axis to receive the power wirelessly from the generated magnetic fields through strongly coupled magnetic resonance. It has been observed experimentally that the maximum power transfer occurs at the operating resonant frequency for optimum electric load connected across the receiving coils on both side. The optimum wireless power transfer efficiency is 88% for the bi-directional power transfer technique compared 84% in the one side receiver system. By adopting the developed bi-directional power transfer method, two electronic devices can be powered up or charged simultaneously instead of a single device through usual one side receiver system without affecting the optimum power transfer efficiency.

  18. Identification of the 2-Hydroxyglutarate and Isovaleryl-CoA Dehydrogenases as Alternative Electron Donors Linking Lysine Catabolism to the Electron Transport Chain of Arabidopsis Mitochondria[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Wagner L.; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Larson, Tony R.; Tohge, Takayuki; Krahnert, Ina; Witt, Sandra; Obata, Toshihiro; Schauer, Nicolas; Graham, Ian A.; Leaver, Christopher J.; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2010-01-01

    The process of dark-induced senescence in plants is relatively poorly understood, but a functional electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF/ETFQO) complex, which supports respiration during carbon starvation, has recently been identified. Here, we studied the responses of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants deficient in the expression of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase and 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase to extended darkness and other environmental stresses. Evaluations of the mutant phenotypes following carbon starvation induced by extended darkness identify similarities to those exhibited by mutants of the ETF/ETFQO complex. Metabolic profiling and isotope tracer experimentation revealed that isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase is involved in degradation of the branched-chain amino acids, phytol, and Lys, while 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase is involved exclusively in Lys degradation. These results suggest that isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase is the more critical for alternative respiration and that a series of enzymes, including 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase, plays a role in Lys degradation. Both physiological and metabolic phenotypes of the isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase and 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase mutants were not as severe as those observed for mutants of the ETF/ETFQO complex, indicating some functional redundancy of the enzymes within the process. Our results aid in the elucidation of the pathway of plant Lys catabolism and demonstrate that both isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase and 2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase act as electron donors to the ubiquinol pool via an ETF/ETFQO-mediated route. PMID:20501910

  19. Directing the path of light-induced electron transfer at a molecular fork using vibrational excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delor, Milan; Archer, Stuart A.; Keane, Theo; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Greetham, Gregory M.; Towrie, Michael; Weinstein, Julia A.

    2017-11-01

    Ultrafast electron transfer in condensed-phase molecular systems is often strongly coupled to intramolecular vibrations that can promote, suppress and direct electronic processes. Recent experiments exploring this phenomenon proved that light-induced electron transfer can be strongly modulated by vibrational excitation, suggesting a new avenue for active control over molecular function. Here, we achieve the first example of such explicit vibrational control through judicious design of a Pt(II)-acetylide charge-transfer donor-bridge-acceptor-bridge-donor 'fork' system: asymmetric 13C isotopic labelling of one of the two -C≡C- bridges makes the two parallel and otherwise identical donor→acceptor electron-transfer pathways structurally distinct, enabling independent vibrational perturbation of either. Applying an ultrafast UVpump(excitation)-IRpump(perturbation)-IRprobe(monitoring) pulse sequence, we show that the pathway that is vibrationally perturbed during UV-induced electron transfer is dramatically slowed down compared to its unperturbed counterpart. One can thus choose the dominant electron transfer pathway. The findings deliver a new opportunity for precise perturbative control of electronic energy propagation in molecular devices.

  20. Ultrafast electron and energy transfer in dye-sensitized iron oxide and oxyhydroxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Katz, Jordan E.; Huse, Nils

    2013-01-01

    photo-initiated interfacial electron transfer. This approach enables time-resolved study of the fate and mobility of electrons within the solid phase. However, complete analysis of the ultrafast processes following dye photoexcitation of the sensitized iron(iii) oxide nanoparticles has not been reported....... We addressed this topic by performing femtosecond transient absorption (TA) measurements of aqueous suspensions of uncoated and DCF-sensitized iron oxide and oxyhydroxide nanoparticles, and an aqueous iron(iii)–dye complex. Following light absorption, excited state relaxation times of the dye of 115...... a four-state model of the dye-sensitized system, finding electron and energy transfer to occur on the same ultrafast timescale. The interfacial electron transfer rates for iron oxides are very close to those previously reported for DCF-sensitized titanium dioxide (for which dye–oxide energy transfer...

  1. 5,5'-Dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) as a probe for a non-essential cysteine residue at the medium chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase binding site of the human 'electron transferring flavoprotein' (ETF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, A; Engel, P C

    1999-01-01

    Human 'electron transferring flavoprotein' (ETF) was inactivated by the thiol-specific reagent 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB). The kinetic profile showed the reaction followed pseudo-first-order kinetics during the initial phase of inactivation. Monitoring the release of 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoate (TNB) showed that modification of 1 cysteine residue was responsible for the loss of activity. The inactivation of ETF by DTNB could be reversed upon incubation with thiol-containing reagents. The loss of activity was prevented by the inclusion of medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) and octanoyl-CoA. Cyanolysis of the DTNB modified-ETF with KCN led to the release of TNB accompanied presumably by the formation of the thio-cyano enzyme and with almost full recovery of activity. Conservation studies and the lack of 100% inactivation, however, suggested that this cysteine residue is not essential for the interaction with MCAD.

  2. Plastid genome structure and loss of photosynthetic ability in the parasitic genus Cuscuta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revill, Meredith J W; Stanley, Susan; Hibberd, Julian M

    2005-09-01

    The genus Cuscuta (dodder) is composed of parasitic plants, some species of which appear to be losing the ability to photosynthesize. A molecular phylogeny was constructed using 15 species of Cuscuta in order to assess whether changes in photosynthetic ability and alterations in structure of the plastid genome relate to phylogenetic position within the genus. The molecular phylogeny provides evidence for four major clades within Cuscuta. Although DNA blot analysis showed that Cuscuta species have smaller plastid genomes than tobacco, and that plastome size varied significantly even within one Cuscuta clade, dot blot analysis indicated that the dodders possess homologous sequence to 101 genes from the tobacco plastome. Evidence is provided for significant rates of DNA transfer from plastid to nucleus in Cuscuta. Size and structure of Cuscuta plastid genomes, as well as photosynthetic ability, appear to vary independently of position within the phylogeny, thus supporting the hypothesis that within Cuscuta photosynthetic ability and organization of the plastid genome are changing in an unco-ordinated manner.

  3. Heat conduction in chain polymer liquids: molecular dynamics study on the contributions of inter- and intramolecular energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Taku; Yuan, Tan Chia; Torii, Daichi; Kikugawa, Gota; Kosugi, Naohiro

    2011-07-21

    In this paper, the molecular mechanisms which determine the thermal conductivity of long chain polymer liquids are discussed, based on the results observed in molecular dynamics simulations. Linear n-alkanes, which are typical polymer molecules, were chosen as the target of our studies. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of bulk liquid n-alkanes under a constant temperature gradient were performed. Saturated liquids of n-alkanes with six different chain lengths were examined at the same reduced temperature (0.7T(c)), and the contributions of inter- and intramolecular energy transfer to heat conduction flux, which were identified as components of heat flux by the authors' previous study [J. Chem. Phys. 128, 044504 (2008)], were observed. The present study compared n-alkane liquids with various molecular lengths at the same reduced temperature and corresponding saturated densities, and found that the contribution of intramolecular energy transfer to the total heat flux, relative to that of intermolecular energy transfer, increased with the molecular length. The study revealed that in long chain polymer liquids, thermal energy is mainly transferred in the space along the stiff intramolecular bonds. This finding implies a connection between anisotropic thermal conductivity and the orientation of molecules in various organized structures with long polymer molecules aligned in a certain direction, which includes confined polymer liquids and self-organized structures such as membranes of amphiphilic molecules in water.

  4. Application of Degenerately Doped Metal Oxides in the Study of Photoinduced Interfacial Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnum, Byron H; Morseth, Zachary A; Brennaman, M Kyle; Papanikolas, John M; Meyer, Thomas J

    2015-06-18

    Degenerately doped In2O3:Sn semiconductor nanoparticles (nanoITO) have been used to study the photoinduced interfacial electron-transfer reactivity of surface-bound [Ru(II)(bpy)2(4,4'-(PO3H2)2-bpy)](2+) (RuP(2+)) molecules as a function of driving force over a range of 1.8 eV. The metallic properties of the ITO nanoparticles, present within an interconnected mesoporous film, allowed for the driving force to be tuned by controlling their Fermi level with an external bias while their optical transparency allowed for transient absorption spectroscopy to be used to monitor electron-transfer kinetics. Photoinduced electron transfer from excited-state -RuP(2+*) molecules to nanoITO was found to be dependent on applied bias and competitive with nonradiative energy transfer to nanoITO. Back electron transfer from nanoITO to oxidized -RuP(3+) was also dependent on the applied bias but without complication from inter- or intraparticle electron diffusion in the oxide nanoparticles. Analysis of the electron injection kinetics as a function of driving force using Marcus-Gerischer theory resulted in an experimental estimate of the reorganization energy for the excited-state -RuP(3+/2+*) redox couple of λ* = 0.83 eV and an electronic coupling matrix element, arising from electronic wave function overlap between the donor orbital in the molecule and the acceptor orbital(s) in the nanoITO electrode, of Hab = 20-45 cm(-1). Similar analysis of the back electron-transfer kinetics yielded λ = 0.56 eV for the ground-state -RuP(3+/2+) redox couple and Hab = 2-4 cm(-1). The use of these wide band gap, degenerately doped materials provides a unique experimental approach for investigating single-site electron transfer at the surface of oxide nanoparticles.

  5. Study on transfer coefficients of 90Sr, 137Cs, natural U, 226Ra and 239Pu in terrestrial food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Suyun; Qi Yong; Li Shuqin; Zhou Caiyun; Zhang Jingjuan; Li Jikai; Li Xuequn

    1995-01-01

    The aim of study was to provide values of transfer parameter of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, Natural U, 226 Ra and 239 Pu in terrestrial food chains, more applicable for Chinese socio-natural conditions. Data of radionuclides contents in agricultural crops and in associated soils, in sheep tissues and in associated grasses were collected in couples. The transfer coefficients in terrestrial food chains (soil-crops, grasses-sheep tissues) were calculated. On basis of statistical analysis, the representative values and 95% ranges of transfer coefficient for 5 radionuclides in 7 kind of agricultural products for southern moist areas and north dry areas were given. Regression analysis showed that relation between the transfer coefficients and the radionuclide contents in their associated soils present a negative correlation, it could be described with a equation: Y = aX -b

  6. Ethylene homo- and copolymerization chain-transfers: A perspective from supported (n BuCp) 2 ZrCl 2 catalyst active centre distribution

    KAUST Repository

    Atiqullah, Muhammad

    2015-04-01

    Polymerization chain termination reactions and unsaturation of the polymer backbone end are related. Therefore, in this study, the parameters resulting from the modelling of the active centre distribution of the supported catalyst - silica/MAO/(nBuCp)2ZrCl2 - were applied to evaluate the active-centre-dependent ethylene homo- and copolymerization rates, as well as the corresponding chain termination rates. This approach, from a microkinetic mechanistic viewpoint, elucidates better the 1-hexene-induced positive comonomer effect and chain transfer phenomenon. The kinetic expressions, developed on the basis of the proposed polymerization mechanisms, illustrate how the active site type-dependent chain transfer phenomenon is influenced by the different apparent termination rate constants and momoner concentrations. The active centre-specific molecular weight M ni (for the above homo- and copolymer), as a function of chain transfer probability, p CTi, varied as follows: log (p C Ti) = log (mwru) - log (Mn i), where mw ru is the molecular weight of the repeat unit. The physical significance of this finding has been explained. The homo- and copolymer backbones showed all the three chain end unsaturations (vinyl, vinylidene, and trans-vinylene). The postulated polymerization mechanisms reveal the underlying polymer chemistry. The results of the present study will contribute to develop in future supported metallocene catalysts that will be useful to synthesize polyethylene precursors having varying chain end unsaturations, which can be eventually used to prepare functional polyethylenes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2015 Indian Academy of Sciences.

  7. Dipole and Coulomb forces in electron capture dissociation and electron transfer dissociation mass spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świerszcz, Iwona; Skurski, Piotr; Simons, Jack

    2012-02-23

    Ab initio electronic structure calculations were performed on a doubly charged polypeptide model H(+)-Lys(Ala)(19)-CO-CH(NH(2))-CH(2)-SS-CH(2)-(NH(2))CH-CO-(Ala)(19)-Lys-H(+) consisting of a C-terminal protonated Lys followed by a 19-Ala α-helix with a 20th Ala-like unit whose side chain is linked by a disulfide bond to a corresponding Ala-like unit connected to a second 19-Ala α-helix terminated by a second C-terminal-protonated Lys. The Coulomb potentials arising from the two charged Lys residues and dipole potentials arising from the two oppositely directed 72 D dipoles of the α-helices act to stabilize the SS bond's σ* orbital. The Coulomb potentials provide stabilization of 1 eV, while the two large dipoles generate an additional 4 eV. Such stabilization allows the SS σ* orbital to attach an electron and thereby generate disulfide bond cleavage products. Although calculations are performed only on SS bond cleavage, discussion of N-C(α) bond cleavage caused by electron attachment to amide π* orbitals is also presented. The magnitudes of the stabilization energies as well as the fact that they arise from Coulomb and dipole potentials are supported by results on a small model system consisting of a H(3)C-SS-CH(3) molecule with positive and negative fractional point charges to its left and right designed to represent (i) two positive charges ca. 32 Å distant (i.e., the two charged Lys sites of the peptide model) and (ii) two 72 D dipoles (i.e., the two α-helices). Earlier workers suggested that internal dipole forces in polypeptides could act to guide incoming free electrons (i.e., in electron capture dissociation (ECD)) toward the positive end of the dipole and thus affect the branching ratios for cleaving various bonds. Those workers argued that, because of the huge mass difference between an anion donor and a free electron, internal dipole forces would have a far smaller influence over the trajectory of a donor (i.e., in electron transfer dissociation

  8. Responsibility Tokens in Supply Chain Management

    OpenAIRE

    Evan L. Porteus

    2000-01-01

    The decentralized supply chain management scheme of Lee and Whang (1999) can be viewed as operationalizing the decentralized management scheme implicit in Clark and Scarf (1960). This paper proposes the use of what are called responsibility tokens (RTs) to further facilitate that operationalization. The proposal assumes that a management information system, presumably electronic, is established to monitor inventories and shipment quantities, and to carry out transfer payments between players....

  9. Reactive Oxygen Species Production by Forward and Reverse Electron Fluxes in the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selivanov, Vitaly A.; Votyakova, Tatyana V.; Pivtoraiko, Violetta N.; Zeak, Jennifer; Sukhomlin, Tatiana; Trucco, Massimo; Roca, Josep; Cascante, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) are primary signals that modulate cellular adaptation to environment, and are also destructive factors that damage cells under the conditions of hypoxia/reoxygenation relevant for various systemic diseases or transplantation. The important role of ROS in cell survival requires detailed investigation of mechanism and determinants of ROS production. To perform such an investigation we extended our rule-based model of complex III in order to account for electron transport in the whole RC coupled to proton translocation, transmembrane electrochemical potential generation, TCA cycle reactions, and substrate transport to mitochondria. It fits respiratory electron fluxes measured in rat brain mitochondria fueled by succinate or pyruvate and malate, and the dynamics of NAD+ reduction by reverse electron transport from succinate through complex I. The fitting of measured characteristics gave an insight into the mechanism of underlying processes governing the formation of free radicals that can transfer an unpaired electron to oxygen-producing superoxide and thus can initiate the generation of ROS. Our analysis revealed an association of ROS production with levels of specific radicals of individual electron transporters and their combinations in species of complexes I and III. It was found that the phenomenon of bistability, revealed previously as a property of complex III, remains valid for the whole RC. The conditions for switching to a state with a high content of free radicals in complex III were predicted based on theoretical analysis and were confirmed experimentally. These findings provide a new insight into the mechanisms of ROS production in RC. PMID:21483483

  10. Surface molecular imprinting onto fluorescein-coated magnetic nanoparticlesvia reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization: A facile three-in-one system for recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Dong, Cunku; Chu, Jia; Qi, Jingyao; Li, Xin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we present a general protocol for the making of surface-imprinted magnetic fluorescence beads viareversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The resulting composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The as-synthesized beads exhibited homogeneous polymer films (thickness of about 5.7 nm), spherical shape, high fluorescence intensity and magnetic property (Magnetization (Ms) = 3.67 emu g-1). The hybrids bind the original template 17β-estradiol with an appreciable selectivity over structurally related compounds. In addition, the resulting hybrids performed without obvious deterioration after five repeated cycles. This study therefore demonstrates the potential of molecularly imprinted polymers for the recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals.In this study, we present a general protocol for the making of surface-imprinted magnetic fluorescence beads viareversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The resulting composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The as-synthesized beads exhibited homogeneous polymer films (thickness of about 5.7 nm), spherical shape, high fluorescence intensity and magnetic property (Magnetization (Ms) = 3.67 emu g-1). The hybrids bind the original template 17β-estradiol with an appreciable selectivity over structurally related compounds. In addition, the resulting hybrids performed without obvious deterioration after five repeated cycles. This study therefore demonstrates the potential of molecularly imprinted polymers for the recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals. Electronic

  11. Positronium Inhibition and Quenching by Organic Electron Acceptors and Charge Transfer Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, P.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Jensen, Bror Skytte

    1975-01-01

    Positron lifetime measurements were performed on a series of organic electron acceptors and charge-transfer complexes in solution. The acceptors cause both positronium (Ps) inhibition (with maybe one exception) and quenching, but when an acceptor takes part in a charge-transfer complex...... in terms of the spur reaction model of Ps formation. Correlation was also made to gas phase reaction between electron acceptors and free electron, as well as to pulse radiolysis data....

  12. Theoretical aspects of electron transfer reactions of complex molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    Features of electron transfer involving complex molecules are discussed. This notion presently refers to molecular reactants where charge transfer is accompanied by large molecular reorganization, and commonly used displaced harmonic oscillator models do not apply. It is shown that comprehensive...... theory of charge transfer in polar media offers convenient tools for the treatment of experimental data for such systems, with due account of large-amplitude strongly anharmonic intramolecular reorganization. Equations for the activation barrier and free energy relationships are provided, incorporating...

  13. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom and ion-ion collisions are studied. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-ion core can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. At intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He + collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), many electronic states are strongly coupled during the collision, a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. At higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies) the coupling is weaker with, however, many more states being coupled together, so that high-order perturbation theory is essential

  14. Promoting Interspecies Electron Transfer with Biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Liu, Fanghua; Fan, Wei; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were attached to the biochar, yet not in close contact, suggesting that electrons were likely conducted through the biochar, rather than biological electrical connections. The finding that biochar can stimulate DIET may be an important consideration when amending soils with biochar and can help explain why biochar may enhance methane production from organic wastes under anaerobic conditions. PMID:24846283

  15. Ab Initio Analysis of Auger-Assisted Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Kim, Joonghan; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-01-15

    Quantum confinement in nanoscale materials allows Auger-type electron-hole energy exchange. We show by direct time-domain atomistic simulation and analytic theory that Auger processes give rise to a new mechanism of charge transfer (CT) on the nanoscale. Auger-assisted CT eliminates the renown Marcus inverted regime, rationalizing recent experiments on CT from quantum dots to molecular adsorbates. The ab initio simulation reveals a complex interplay of the electron-hole and charge-phonon channels of energy exchange, demonstrating a variety of CT scenarios. The developed Marcus rate theory for Auger-assisted CT describes, without adjustable parameters, the experimental plateau of the CT rate in the region of large donor-acceptor energy gap. The