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Sample records for photon radiation modifies

  1. Workplace photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, P.H.; Bartlett, D.T.; Ambrosi, P.

    1999-01-01

    The knowledge of workplace radiation fields is essential for measures in radiation protection. Information about the energy and directional distribution of the incident photon radiation was obtained by several devices developed by the National Radiation Protection Board, United Kingdom, by the Statens Stralskyddsinstitut, Sweden, together with EURADOS and by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany. The devices are described and some results obtained at workplaces in nuclear industry, medicine and science in the photon energy range from 20 keV to 7 MeV are given. (author)

  2. Accelerating Photons with Gravitational Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, Graham M

    2001-01-01

    The nature of superluminal photon propagation in the gravitational field describing radiation from a time-dependent, isolated source (the Bondi-Sachs metric) is considered in an effective theory which includes interactions which violate the strong equivalence principle. Such interactions are, for example, generated by vacuum polarisation in conventional QED in curved spacetime. The relation of the resulting light-cone modifications to the Peeling Theorem for the Bondi-Sachs spacetime is explained.

  3. Radiation resistant modified polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojarski, J.; Zimek, Z.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation technology for production of radiation resistant polypropylene for medical use has been presented. The method consists in radiation induced copolymerization of polypropylene with ethylene and addition of small amount of copolymer of polyethylene and vinyl acetate. The material of proposed composition has a very good mechanical properties and elevated radiation resistivity decided on possibility of radiosterilization of products made of this material and designed for medical use. 3 figs, 3 tabs

  4. MEASURING TEMPORAL PHOTON BUNCHING IN BLACKBODY RADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, P. K.; Poh, H. S.; Kurtsiefer, C. [Center for Quantum Technologies, 3 Science Drive 2, 117543 (Singapore); Yeo, G. H.; Chan, A. H., E-mail: pengkian@physics.org, E-mail: phyck@nus.edu.sg [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117551 (Singapore)

    2014-07-01

    Light from thermal blackbody radiators such as stars exhibits photon bunching behavior at sufficiently short timescales. However, with available detector bandwidths, this bunching signal is difficult to observe directly. We present an experimental technique to increase the photon bunching signal in blackbody radiation via spectral filtering of the light source. Our measurements reveal strong temporal photon bunching from blackbody radiation, including the Sun. This technique allows for an absolute measurement of the photon bunching signature g {sup (2)}(0), and thereby a direct statement on the statistical nature of a light source. Such filtering techniques may help revive the interest in intensity interferometry as a tool in astronomy.

  5. Overview of radiation effects research in photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Robert C.; Cohn, Lewis M.; Taylor, Edward W.; Greenwell, Roger A.

    1995-05-01

    A brief overview of ongoing radiation effects research in photonics is presented focusing on integrated optic and acousto-optic components. A short summary of radiation-induced effects in electro-optic modulators, detector arrays, and other photonic technologies is presented along with extensive references. The coordinated radiation effects studies among researchers within the Tri-Service Organizations and international experimental teams are beginning to demonstrate consistent measurements of radiation-induced effects in photonic components and confirming earlier reported data. This paper will present an overview of these coordinated investigations and focus on key research being conducted with the AFMC Phillips Laboratory, Naval Research Laboratory, Defence Nuclear Agency, NATO Nuclear Effects Task Group, and the Tri-Service Photonics Coordinating Committee.

  6. Disulfiram as a radiation modifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.D.; Maners, A.W.; Salari, H.; Baker, M.; Walker, E.M. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The radiation modifying effect and toxicity of tetraethylthiuram disulfide (disulfiram) have been studied. Disulfiram (DSM) inhibits aldehyde dehydrogenase, dopamine-beta-oxygenase, microsomal mixed-function oxidases and cytochrome P-450 enzymes. It is widely used for aversion therapy in alcoholism. Disulfiram also inhibits tumor formation by several known carcinogens. A biphasic toxicity pattern of DSM is reported in the L-929 mouse fibroblast culture system. Disulfiram is 100 percent toxic at 2 X 10(-7) M (0.05 micrograms per ml), 23 percent toxic at 3 X 10(-7) M (0.1 microgram per ml), and 100 percent toxic again at 3.4 X 10(-6) M (1.0 microgram per ml). The pattern is similar to the biphasic toxicity pattern of DMS's major metabolite, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DTC). Reports of both radiation protection and radiation enhancement by DTC exist. Previously, a radioprotective effect by 2 X 10(-6) M DTC (dose modifying factor = 1.26) has been demonstrated in the L-929 cell system. To date, no radiation modifying properties of DSM have been reported. Our investigation of DSM as a radiation modifier at 3 X 10(-7) M (0.1 microgram per ml) did not show significant improvement in survival of irradiated cells treated with DSM relative to the irradiated control group, as determined by absence of a difference in the Do of the two groups. Considering DSM's close structural relationship to DTC, it is possible that DSM may exhibit a radioprotective effect when applied in a different concentration than what was used in our research

  7. Photonic crystal and photonic quasicrystal patterned in PDMS surfaces and their effect on LED radiation properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suslik, Lubos [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26, Zilina (Slovakia); Pudis, Dusan, E-mail: pudis@fyzika.uniza.sk [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26, Zilina (Slovakia); Goraus, Matej [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26, Zilina (Slovakia); Nolte, Rainer [Fakultät für Maschinenbau FG Lichttechnik Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau (Germany); Kovac, Jaroslav [Inst. of Electronics and Photonics, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19, Bratislava (Slovakia); Durisova, Jana; Gaso, Peter [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26, Zilina (Slovakia); Hronec, Pavol [Inst. of Electronics and Photonics, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19, Bratislava (Slovakia); Schaaf, Peter [Chair Materials for Electronics, Institute of Materials Engineering and Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies MacroNano, TU Ilmenau, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 5, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Photonic quasicrystal patterned in the surface of polydimethylsiloxane membrane (left) and radiation pattern of light emitting diode with patterned membrane applied in the surface (right). - Highlights: • We presented fabrication technique of PDMS membranes with patterned surface by photonic crystal (PhC) and photonic quasi-crystal (PQC). • Presented technique is effective for preparation PhC and PQC PDMS membranes easily implementing in the LED chip. • From the goniophotometer measurements, the membranes document effective angular emission due to the diffraction on patterned surfaces. • 12 fold symmetry PQC structure shows homogeneous radiation pattern, while the 2 fold symmetry of square PhC shows evident diffraction lobes. - Abstract: We present results of fabrication and implementation of thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes with patterned surface for the light emitting diode (LED). PDMS membranes were patterned by using the interference lithography in combination with embossing technique. Two-dimensional photonic crystal and photonic quasicrystal structures with different period were patterned in the surface of thin PDMS membranes with depth up to 550 nm. Patterned PDMS membranes placed on the LED chip effectively diffracted light and increased angular emission of LED radiation pattern. We presented effective technique for fabrication of patterned PDMS membranes, which could modify the emission properties of optoelectronic devices and can be applied directly on surface LEDs and small optical devices.

  8. Research of synchrotron radiation by virtual photon and compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Xianzhu

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new theory to explain the synchrotron radiation. When charged particle does circular motion in the accelerator, the magnetic field of the accelerator can be taken as periodic, and equivalent to virtual photon. By Compton scattering of virtual photon and charged particle, the virtual photon can be transformed into photon to radiate out. According to this theory, the formula of photon wavelength in synchrotron radiation is found out, and the calculation results of wavelength is consonant with experimental data. (author)

  9. Temperature-modified photonic bandgap in colloidal photonic crystals fabricated by vinyl functionalized silica spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Tiansong; Zhang Junyan; Zhu Kongtao; Zhang Qifeng; Wu Jinlei

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A thermal annealing procedure was described for fine modifying the photonic bandgap properties of colloidal photonic crystals, which were self-assembled from vinyl-functionalized silica spheres by a gravity sedimentation process. Highlights: → We described a thermal annealing procedure for fine modifying the photonic bandgap properties of colloidal photonic crystals. → The position of its stop band had more than 25% blue shift by annealing the sample from 60 to 600 deg. C. → The annealing temperature and the Bragg peak values have a linear relationship in the 120-440 deg. C range. → The effects provide a simple and controllable method for modifying the photonic bandgap properties of colloidal photonic crystals. - Abstract: A thermal annealing procedure for fine modifying the photonic bandgap properties of colloidal photonic crystals was described. The colloidal photonic crystals were assembled from monodisperse vinyl functionalized silica spheres by a gravity sedimentation process. The samples diffract light following Bragg's law combined with Snell's law. By annealing the sample at temperatures in the range of 60-600 deg. C, the position of its stop band shifted from 943 to 706 nm. It had more than 25% blue shift. In addition, the annealing temperature and the Bragg peak values have a linear relationship in the 120-440 deg. C range. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) curves of vinyl functionalized silica spheres confirmed the above results. The effects provide a simple and controllable method for modifying the photonic bandgap properties of colloidal photonic crystals.

  10. Radiative corrections to two photon physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neervan, W.L. van; Vermaseren, J.A.M.

    1983-06-01

    The authors develop a method to calculate radiative corrections to two photon reactions of the type e + e - →e + e - X where X is an arbitrary final state. To illustrate this they take the example where X stands for a point-like pseudoscalar. It will be shown that the method is an improvement on the standard way in adding real and virtual photon contributions to the (differential) cross-sections. This makes it possible to compute differential and total cross-sections to a very high precision and with a minimum of computer time which is not possible by using more conventional methods. (Auth.)

  11. Photon radiation from quarks at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, J C

    1994-01-01

    Earlier measurements at LEP of isolated hard photons in hadronic zo decays attributed to radiation from primary quark pairs, have been extended in the ALEPH experiment to include their production inside hadron jets. Events are selected where all particles combine "democratically" to form 2 hadron jets, one of which contains a photon with a fractional energy z � 0. 7. After the statistical subtraction of events arising from non-prompt photons, the quark-to-photon fragmentation function, D(z), is extracted directly from the measured prompt production rate. Taking into account the perturbative contributions to D(z) obtained in an O(aa,) MS renormalisation scheme enables the unknown non-perturbative component of D(z) to be determined at high z. This measurement provides a better description of quark bremmstrahlung than hitherto employed in high energy hadron-hadron collisions. A updated analysis is also presented from OPAL of comparisons between 1-jet plus isolated photon rates and different QCD matrix element ...

  12. A method for characterizing photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, J.J.; Hsu, H.H.; Hsieh, F.H.; Borak, T.B.

    1999-01-01

    Uncertainty in dosimetric and exposure rate measurements can increase in areas where multi-directional and low-energy photons (< 100 keV) exist because of variations in energy and angular measurement response. Also, accurate measurement of external exposures in spatially non-uniform fields may require multiple dosimetry. Therefore, knowledge of the photon fields in the workplace is required for full understanding of the accuracy of dosimeters and instruments, and for determining the need for multiple dosimeters. This project was designed to develop methods to characterize photon radiation fields in the workplace, and to test the methods in a plutonium facility. The photon field at selected work locations was characterized using TLDs and a collimated NaI(Tl) detector from which spatial variations in photon energy distributions were calculated from measured spectra. Laboratory results showed the accuracy and utility of the method. Field measurement results combined with observed work patterns suggested the following: (1) workers are exposed from all directions, but not isotropically, (2) photon energy distributions were directionally dependent, (3) stuffing nearby gloves into the glovebox reduced exposure rates significantly, (4) dosimeter placement on the front of the chest provided for a reasonable estimate of the average dose equivalent to workers' torsos, (5) justifiable conclusions regarding the need for multiple dosimetry can be made using this quantitative method, and (6) measurements of the exposure rates with ionization chambers pointed with open beta windows toward the glovebox provided the highest measured rates, although absolute accuracy of the field measurements still needs to be assessed

  13. Coupled electron-photon radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorence, L.; Kensek, R.P.; Valdez, G.D.; Drumm, C.R.; Fan, W.C.; Powell, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Massively-parallel computers allow detailed 3D radiation transport simulations to be performed to analyze the response of complex systems to radiation. This has been recently been demonstrated with the coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo code, ITS. To enable such calculations, the combinatorial geometry capability of ITS was improved. For greater geometrical flexibility, a version of ITS is under development that can track particles in CAD geometries. Deterministic radiation transport codes that utilize an unstructured spatial mesh are also being devised. For electron transport, the authors are investigating second-order forms of the transport equations which, when discretized, yield symmetric positive definite matrices. A novel parallelization strategy, simultaneously solving for spatial and angular unknowns, has been applied to the even- and odd-parity forms of the transport equation on a 2D unstructured spatial mesh. Another second-order form, the self-adjoint angular flux transport equation, also shows promise for electron transport

  14. Photon acceleration-based radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, J. R.; Muggli, P.; Katsouleas, T.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.

    1999-01-01

    The acceleration and deceleration of photons in a plasma provides the means for a series of new radiation sources. Previous work on a DC to AC Radiation Converter (DARC source) has shown variable acceleration of photons having zero frequency (i.e., an electrostatic field) to between 6 and 100 GHz (1-3). These sources all had poor guiding characteristics resulting in poor power coupling from the source to the load. Continuing research has identified a novel way to integrate the DARC source into a waveguide. The so called ''pin structure'' uses stainless steel pins inserted through the narrow side of an X band waveguide to form the electrostatic field pattern (k≠0, ω=0). The pins are spaced such that the absorption band resulting from this additional periodic structure is outside of the X band range (8-12 GHz), in which the normal waveguide characteristics are left unchanged. The power of this X band source is predicted theoretically to scale quadratically with the pin bias voltage as -800 W/(kV) 2 and have a pulse width of -1 ns. Cold tests and experimental results are presented. Applications for a high power, short pulse radiation source extends to the areas of landmine detection, improved radar resolution, and experimental investigations of molecular systems

  15. A Photon Free Method to Solve Radiation Transport Equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, B

    2006-01-01

    The multi-group discrete-ordinate equations of radiation transfer is solved for the first time by Newton's method. It is a photon free method because the photon variables are eliminated from the radiation equations to yield a N group XN direction smaller but equivalent system of equations. The smaller set of equations can be solved more efficiently than the original set of equations. Newton's method is more stable than the Semi-implicit Linear method currently used by conventional radiation codes

  16. QED corrections to Planck's radiation law and photon thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partovi, M.H.

    1994-01-01

    Leading corrections to Planck's radiation formula and other photon thermodynamic functions arising from the pair-mediated photon-photon interaction are calculated. This interaction is found to be attractive and to cause a small increase in occupation number for all modes and a corresponding correction to the equation of state. The results are valid for the range of temperatures well below T e =5.9 GK, the temperature equivalent to the electron mass, a range for which the photon gas is essentially free of pair-produced electrons and positrons. An interesting effect of these corrections is the behavior of the photon gas as an elastic medium and its ability to propagate density perturbations. It is found that the cosmic photon gas subsequent to electron-positron annihilation would have manifested these elastic properties were it not for the presence of the free electrons and their dominance of the photon thermodynamics

  17. Information rates of radiation as a photon gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, A.

    2008-01-01

    The information rates achievable with a photon-gas model of electromagnetic radiation are studied. At any frequency, information rates over the photon-gas model essentially coincide with the Shannon capacity when the signal-to-noise ratio is below a threshold. Only above the threshold does the

  18. A modified hexagonal photonic crystal fiber for terahertz applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. Saiful; Sultana, Jakeya; Faisal, Mohammad; Islam, Mohammad Rakibul; Dinovitser, Alex; Ng, Brian W.-H.; Abbott, Derek

    2018-05-01

    We present a Zeonex based highly birefringent and dispersion flattened porous core photonic crystal fiber (PC-PCF) for polarization preserving applications in the terahertz region. In order to facilitate birefringence, an array of elliptical shaped air holes surrounded by porous cladding is introduced. The porous cladding comprises circular air-holes in a modified hexagonal arrangement. The transmission characteristics of the proposed PCF are investigated using a full-vector finite element method with perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary conditions. Simulation results show a high birefringence of 0.086 and an ultra-flattened dispersion variation of ± 0.03 ps/THz/cm at optimal design parameters. Besides, a number of other important wave-guiding properties including frequency dependence of the effective material loss (EML), confinement loss, and effective area are also investigated to assess the fiber's effectiveness as a terahertz waveguide.

  19. Radiation damage of pixelated photon detector by neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Isamu [KEK, 1-1 Oho Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)], E-mail: isamu.nakamura@kek.jp

    2009-10-21

    Radiation Damage of Pixelated Photon Detector by neutron irradiation is reported. MPPC, one of PPD or Geiger-mode APD, developed by Hamamatsu Photonics, is planned to be used in many high energy physics experiments. In such experiments radiation damage is a serious issue. A series of neutron irradiation tests is performed at the Reactor YAYOI of the University of Tokyo. MPPCs were irradiated at the reactor up to 10{sup 12}neutron/cm{sup 2}. In this paper, the effect of neutron irradiation on the basic characteristics of PPD including gain, noise rate, photon detection efficiency is presented.

  20. Protective properties of radiation-modified polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surnina, N.N.; Saltykova, L.A.; Strochkova, E.M.; Tatarenko, O.F.

    1986-09-01

    A study was made of the mass transfer of corrosive liquids and gases through polyethylene films modified by radiation surface grafting. Studies were performed on an unstabilized type A film with graft adhesion-active layer based on polymethacrylic acid. The protective properties of the polymer coating in corrosive fluids with low vapor tension were estimated by impedance measurements. Steel specimens with a protective coating of radiation-modified polyethylene film were exposed to 10% sulfuric acid at room temperature. The results indicated that the acid did not penetrate through to the metal surface. The films retain their protective properties and protect the metal from the acid. Radiation modification significantly improves the adhesion of polyethylene to metals without reducing physical and mechanical properties of the polymers. 50 references, 1 figure.

  1. Natural radiation exposure modified by human activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Kenzo

    1995-01-01

    We are now living in the radiation environment modified by our technology. It is usually called 'Technologically Enhanced Natural Radiation' and have been discussed in the UNSCEAR Reports as an important source of exposure. The terrestrial radionuclide concentrations as well as the intensity of cosmic rays are considered to have been constant after our ancestors came down from trees and started walking on their two feet. However, we have been changing our environment to be more comfortable for our life and consequently ambient radiation levels are nomore what used to be. In this paper exposures due to natural radiation modified by our following activities are discussed: housing, balneology, cave excursion, mountain climbing, skiing, swimming, smoking and usage of mineral water, well water, coal, natural gas, phosphate rocks and minerals. In the ICRP Publication No. 39, it is clearly mentioned that even natural radiation should be controlled as far as it is controllable. We have to pay more attention to our activities not to enhance the exposure due to unnecessary, avoidable radiation. (author)

  2. Modifiers of radiation effects in the eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Norman J.; Stewart, Fiona A.; Hall, Eric J.

    2017-11-01

    World events, including the threat of radiological terrorism and the fear of nuclear accidents, have highlighted an urgent need to develop medical countermeasures to prevent or reduce radiation injury. Similarly, plans for manned spaceflight to a near-Earth asteroid or journey to Mars raise serious concerns about long-term effects of space radiation on human health and the availability of suitable therapeutic interventions. At the same time, the need to protect normal tissue from the deleterious effects of radiotherapy has driven considerable research into the design of effective radioprotectors. For more than 70 years, animal models of radiation cataract have been utilized to test the short and long-term efficacy of various radiation countermeasures. While some compounds, most notably the Walter Reed (WR) class of radioprotectors, have reported limited effectiveness when given before exposure to low-LET radiation, the human toxicity of these molecules at effective doses limits their usefulness. Furthermore, while there has been considerable testing of eye responses to X- and gamma irradiation, there is limited information about using such models to limit the injurious effects of heavy ions and neutrons on eye tissue. A new class of radioprotector molecules, including the sulfhydryl compound PrC-210, are reported to be effective at much lower doses and with far less side effects. Their ability to modify ocular radiation damage has not yet been examined. The ability to non-invasively measure sensitive, radiation-induced ocular changes over long periods of time makes eye models an attractive option to test the radioprotective and radiation mitigating abilities of new novel compounds.

  3. Photon energy scale determination and commissioning with radiative Z decays

    CERN Document Server

    Bondu, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is composed of 75848 lead-tungstate scintillating crystals. It has been designed to be fast, compact, and radiation-hard, with fine granularity and excellent energy resolution. Obtaining the design resolution is a crucial challenge for the SM Higgs search in the two photon channel at the LHC, and more generally good photon calibration and knowledge of the photon energy scale is required for analyses with photons in the final state. The behavior of photons and electrons in the calorimeter is not identical, making the use of a dedicated standard candle for photons, complementary to the canonical high-yield $Z^0$ decay to electrons, highly desirable. The use of $Z^0$ decays to a pair of muons, where one of the muons emits a Bremstrahlung photon, can be such a standard candle. These events, which can be cleanly selected, are a source of high-purity, relatively high-pt photons. Their kinematics are well-constrained by the $Z^0$ boson mass and the precision on the muon ...

  4. Natural products as radiation response modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin Seymour; Carmel Mothersill

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Protection of cells and organisms against low doses of radiation is a complex issue which must be considered at the level of cells, tissues and organisms. 'Protection' at one level, for example, prevention of cell death, may be adverse at another level, if it allows a damaged cell to survive and form a malignant tumour. Conversely, death of a cell carrying damage can be protective for the organism if it eliminates a damaged cell. Thus, it is important to understand the mechanisms involved in protection against radiation damage at several hierarchical levels. The use of natural products as radiation response modifiers is very attractive. Many of these compounds are readily available and their function and pharmacology is well understood. Some derive from venoms or natural defenses and are currently used in medicine, others include vitamins, antioxidants or cofactors, which are tried and tested nutritional supplements. Radiation effects may be targeted or untargeted. Radiation may interact directly within a cell causing a direct DNA lesion or it may elicit a bystander response from the irradiated cell. A bystander effect is produced when the irradiated cell apparently exhibits no damage from the radiation, but passes on a biochemical signal which induces neighbouring cells to apoptose or undergo a number of other responses usually associated with irradiation such as mutation induction, transformation, induction of ROS responses etc.. Effects induced in progeny of non-targeted cells in receipt of bystander signals include genetic instability, mini and microsatellite mutations and carcinogenesis. A key characteristic of these non targeted effects is that they occur at very low acute doses (of the order of 5mGy) and saturate so that effective prevention requires an agent which can effectively shut off the mechanism. While the mechanism is not fully known, it is thought to involve signals from irradiated cells communicating via

  5. The ENEA calibration service for ionising radiations. Part 1: Photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteventi, F.; Sermenghi, I.

    1999-01-01

    The ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) calibration service for ionizing radiations has been active for 40 years in the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory web. It has been the first center, in 1985, to be acknowledges by the Italian calibration service (SIT) for the two quantities for photons: exposure and air kerma. Since the Institute for the Radiation Protection of ENEA has moved to the new site in Montecuccolino (Bologna, Italy) in 1995, the whole laboratory has been renovated and all irradiation rooms together with radiation source and equipment have been reorganized according to the Χ, γ, β and neutron fields metrology requirements. The aim of this report, as the first part of a report describing all facilities available at the service, is to give a detailed description of all equipment s qualified for photon fields metrology including the secondary standards and the calibration procedures performed for radiation monitoring devices and dosemeters [it

  6. Particle and photon detection for a neutron radiative decay experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, T.R. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)], E-mail: thomas.gentile@nist.gov; Dewey, M.S.; Mumm, H.P.; Nico, J.S.; Thompson, A.K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Chupp, T.E. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Cooper, R.L. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)], E-mail: cooperrl@umich.edu; Fisher, B.M.; Kremsky, I.; Wietfeldt, F.E. [Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Kiriluk, K.G.; Beise, E.J. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2007-08-21

    We present the particle and photon detection methods employed in a program to observe neutron radiative beta-decay. The experiment is located at the NG-6 beam line at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research. Electrons and protons are guided by a 4.6 T magnetic field and detected by a silicon surface barrier detector. Photons with energies between 15 and 750 keV are registered by a detector consisting of a bismuth germanate scintillator coupled to a large area avalanche photodiode. The photon detector operates at a temperature near 80 K in the bore of a superconducting magnet. We discuss CsI as an alternative scintillator, and avalanche photodiodes for direct detection of photons in the 0.1-10 keV range.

  7. Coherent radiation of photon by fast particles in exited matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazanov, M.I.

    1981-01-01

    The review on the theory of coherent photon radiation by fast charged particle interaction with excited by external electromagnetic field atoms of matter is presented. The motive particle excites in the matter longitudinal electric oscillations (plasmons, longitudinal optical phonons, longitudinal excitons). Energy and momentum conservation laws in the course of quantum radiation in the matter by a charged particle are considered taking into account the energy-matter exchange. It follows from the conservation laws that for the processes investigated the quantum angle of escape is stiffly connected with its frequency. The cohe-- rent luminescence processes are considered as generalized Vavilov- Cherenkov radiation [ru

  8. Energy deposition model for I-125 photon radiation in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, M.C.; Garcia, G.; Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C.; Blanco, F.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Williart, A.; Garcia, G.; Huerga, C.; Tellez, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, an electron-tracking Monte Carlo algorithm developed by us is combined with established photon transport models in order to simulate all primary and secondary particle interactions in water for incident photon radiation. As input parameters for secondary electron interactions, electron scattering cross sections by water molecules and experimental energy loss spectra are used. With this simulation, the resulting energy deposition can be modelled at the molecular level, yielding detailed information about localization and type of single collision events. The experimental emission spectrum of I-125 seeds, as used for radiotherapy of different tumours, was used for studying the energy deposition in water when irradiating with this radionuclide. (authors)

  9. Energy deposition model for I-125 photon radiation in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, M.C.; Garcia, G. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Limao-Vieira, P. [Laboratorio de Colisoes Atomicas e Moleculares, Departamento de Fisica, CEFITEC, FCT-Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Williart, A.; Garcia, G. [Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid (Spain); Huerga, C.; Tellez, M. [Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, an electron-tracking Monte Carlo algorithm developed by us is combined with established photon transport models in order to simulate all primary and secondary particle interactions in water for incident photon radiation. As input parameters for secondary electron interactions, electron scattering cross sections by water molecules and experimental energy loss spectra are used. With this simulation, the resulting energy deposition can be modelled at the molecular level, yielding detailed information about localization and type of single collision events. The experimental emission spectrum of I-125 seeds, as used for radiotherapy of different tumours, was used for studying the energy deposition in water when irradiating with this radionuclide. (authors)

  10. Restenosis Prevention Using Photon External Beam Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, M.

    2002-01-01

    During transluminal coronary angioplasty, the balloon procedure is designed to crush the plaque and to support the weakened arterial wall by using the stent (an expandable metallic mesh). This procedure often tears the arterial wall as well. Some of the cells in the blood vessel respond to this injury by initiating repair which often leads to restenosis (reclosing) of the artery. In many cases restenosis occur despite the stent which become incorporated into the poliferative tissue that form around the lesion. But if the lesion is treated with radiation (8-30 Gy) the restenosis effect is inhibited. In this paper, the Adjoint Monte Carlo (AMC) method is used for external radiation treatment planning of the stent volume (the volume covered by the stent during a full cardiac cycle), while minimizing the damage to the organs at risk (OAR) and surrounding healthy tissue

  11. Hawking radiation due to photon and gravitino tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan; Samanta, Saurav

    2010-01-01

    Applying the Hamilton-Jacobi method we investigate the tunneling of photon across the event horizon of a static spherically symmetric black hole. The necessity of the gauge condition on the photon field, to derive the semiclassical Hawking temperature, is explicitly shown. Also, the tunneling of photon and gravitino beyond this semiclassical approximation are presented separately. Quantum corrections of the action for both cases are found to be proportional to the semiclassical contribution. Modifications to the Hawking temperature and Bekenstein-Hawking area law are thereby obtained. Using this corrected temperature and Hawking's periodicity argument, the modified metric for the Schwarzschild black hole is given. This corrected version of the metric, up to h order is equivalent to the metric obtained by including one loop back reaction effect. Finally, the coefficient of the leading order correction of entropy is shown to be related to the trace anomaly.

  12. Possibility of coherent hard x-ray production by pumping with synchrotron radiation and low energy photons. Period covered: November 17, 1976--August 16, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csonka, P.L.

    1977-01-01

    Coherent x-rays in the keV range could be produced by pumping a suitable gas with synchrotron radiation in combination with low energy photon beams in the presence of appropriately arranged mirrors. With a wiggler magnet placed in the low beta section of the PEP machine to be constructed at Stanford, 1020 eV coherent photons could be produced from Ne. Appropriate synchrotron radiation will produce a highly ionized cool gas. Low energy photons modify the outer electron structure of ions to enhance lasing: they modify the lifetime of the inverted state, counterbalance unwanted collisionally induced transitions, reduce Stark line broadening

  13. Development and testing of a thermoluminescent dosemeter for mixed neutron-photon-beta radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zummo, J.J.; Liu, J.C.

    1998-08-01

    A new four-element thermoluminescent (TL) dosemeter and dose evaluation algorithm have been developed and tested to better characterize personnel exposure in mixed neutron-photon-beta radiation fields. The prototype dosemeter is based on a commercially available TL card (with three LiF-7 chips and one LiF-6 chip) and modified filtration elements. The new algorithm takes advantage of the high temperature peak characteristics of the LiF-6 element to better quantify the neutron dose component. The dosemeter was tested in various radiation fields, consisting of mixtures of two radiation types typically used for dosemeter performance testing, as well as mixtures of three radiation types to simulate possible exposure conditions. The new dosemeter gave superior performance, based on the tolerance levels, when using the new algorithm as compared to a conventional algorithm that did not use the high temperature peak methodology. The limitations and further improvements are discussed

  14. Neutron and photon spectrometry in mixed radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jancar, A.; Kopecky, Z.; Veskrna, M.

    2014-01-01

    Spectrometric measurements of the mixed fields of neutron and photon radiation in the workplaces with the L-R-0 research reactor located in the UJV Rez and with the Van de Graaff accelerator, located in the UTEF laboratories Prague, are presented in this paper. The experimental spectrometric measurements were performed using a newly developed digital measuring system, based on the technology of analog-digital converters with a very high sampling frequency (up to 2 GHz), in connection with organic scintillation detector, type BC-501A, and stilbene detector. The results of experimental measurements show high quality of spectrometry mixed fields of neutron and photon radiation across the wide dynamic range of measured energy. (authors)

  15. Extracting and Using Photon Polarization Information in Radiative B Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, Yuval

    2000-05-09

    The authors discuss the uses of conversion electron pairs for extracting photon polarization information in weak radiative B decays. Both cases of leptons produced through a virtual and real photon are considered. Measurements of the angular correlation between the (K-pi) and (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) decay planes in B --> K*(--> K-pi)gamma (*)(--> e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) decays can be used to determine the helicity amplitudes in the radiative B --> K*gamma decays. A large right-handed helicity amplitude in B-bar decays is a signal of new physics. The time-dependent CP asymmetry in the B{sup 0} decay angular correlation is shown to measure sin 2-beta and cos 2-beta with little hadronic uncertainty.

  16. Nanoparticles as multimodal photon transducers of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Edwin C.; Shaffer, Travis M.; Zhang, Qize; Drain, Charles Michael; Grimm, Jan

    2018-05-01

    In biomedical imaging, nanoparticles combined with radionuclides that generate Cerenkov luminescence are used in diagnostic imaging, photon-induced therapies and as activatable probes. In these applications, the nanoparticle is often viewed as a carrier inert to ionizing radiation from the radionuclide. However, certain phenomena such as enhanced nanoparticle luminescence and generation of reactive oxygen species cannot be completely explained by Cerenkov luminescence interactions with nanoparticles. Herein, we report methods to examine the mechanisms of nanoparticle excitation by radionuclides, including interactions with Cerenkov luminescence, β particles and γ radiation. We demonstrate that β-scintillation contributes appreciably to excitation and reactivity in certain nanoparticle systems, and that excitation by radionuclides of nanoparticles composed of large atomic number atoms generates X-rays, enabling multiplexed imaging through single photon emission computed tomography. These findings demonstrate practical optical imaging and therapy using radionuclides with emission energies below the Cerenkov threshold, thereby expanding the list of applicable radionuclides.

  17. EVIDOS: Individual dosimetry in mixed neutron and photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.

    2006-01-01

    The EVIDOS project (partly funded by the European Commission RTD Programme: Nuclear Energy, Euratom Framework Programme V, 1998-2002, Contract No FIKR-CT-2001-00175) aimed at improving individual monitoring in mixed neutron-photon radiation fields by evaluating the performance of routine and novel personal dosimeters for mixed radiation, and by giving guidelines for deriving sufficiently accurate values of personal dose equivalent from the readings of area survey instruments and dosimeters. The main objective of EVIDOS was to evaluate different methods for individual dosimetry in mixed neutron-photon work-places in nuclear industry. This implied a determination of the capabilities and limitations of personal dosimeters and the establishment of methods to enable sufficiently accurate values of personal dose equivalent from spectrometers, area survey instruments and routine personal dosimeters. Also novel electronic personal dosimeters were investigated. To this end spectrometric and dosimetric investigations in selected representative workplaces in nuclear industry where workers can receive significant neutron doses were performed. As part of this project, a number of tasks were executed, in particular: (1) the determination of the energy and direction distribution of the neutron fluence; (2) the derivation of the (conventionally true) values of radiation protection quantities; (3) the determination of the readings of routine and innovative personal dosimeters and of area monitors; and (4) the comparison between dosimeter readings and values of the radiation protection quantities

  18. Technologically modified exposures to natural radiation. Annex C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This Annex deals with some examples of technologically modified exposures to natural radiation. Radiation exposures due to coal-fired power plants, geothermal energy production, exploitation of phosphate rock, aircraft travel, and consumer products are discussed. The present state of knowledge does not allow an accurate estimate of the collective effective dose equivalent from technologically modified exposures to natural radiation to be made. This annex has an extensive bibliography with at least 200 references.

  19. Mitigating radiation damage of single photon detectors for space applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anisimova, Elena; Higgins, Brendon L.; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Cranmer, Miles [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Choi, Eric [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Magellan Aerospace, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Hudson, Danya; Piche, Louis P.; Scott, Alan [Honeywell Aerospace (formerly COM DEV Ltd.), Ottawa, ON (Canada); Makarov, Vadim [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Jennewein, Thomas [University of Waterloo, Institute for Quantum Computing, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Quantum Information Science Program, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2017-12-15

    Single-photon detectors in space must retain useful performance characteristics despite being bombarded with sub-atomic particles. Mitigating the effects of this space radiation is vital to enabling new space applications which require high-fidelity single-photon detection. To this end, we conducted proton radiation tests of various models of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and one model of photomultiplier tube potentially suitable for satellite-based quantum communications. The samples were irradiated with 106 MeV protons at doses approximately equivalent to lifetimes of 0.6, 6, 12 and 24 months in a low-Earth polar orbit. Although most detection properties were preserved, including efficiency, timing jitter and afterpulsing probability, all APD samples demonstrated significant increases in dark count rate (DCR) due to radiation-induced damage, many orders of magnitude higher than the 200 counts per second (cps) required for ground-to-satellite quantum communications. We then successfully demonstrated the mitigation of this DCR degradation through the use of deep cooling, to as low as -86 C. This achieved DCR below the required 200 cps over the 24 months orbit duration. DCR was further reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures of +50 to +100 C. (orig.)

  20. Displacement damage analysis and modified electrical equivalent circuit for electron and photon-irradiated silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjhangmehr, Afshin; Feghhi, Seyed Amir Hossein

    2014-10-01

    Solar modules and arrays are the conventional energy resources of space satellites. Outside the earth's atmosphere, solar panels experience abnormal radiation environments and because of incident particles, photovoltaic (PV) parameters degrade. This article tries to analyze the electrical performance of electron and photon-irradiated mono-crystalline silicon (mono-Si) solar cells. PV cells are irradiated by mono-energetic electrons and poly-energetic photons and immediately characterized after the irradiation. The mean degradation of the maximum power (Pmax) of silicon solar cells is presented and correlated using the displacement damage dose (Dd) methodology. This method simplifies evaluation of cell performance in space radiation environments and produces a single characteristic curve for Pmax degradation. Furthermore, complete analysis of the results revealed that the open-circuit voltage (Voc) and the filling factor of mono-Si cells did not significantly change during the irradiation and were independent of the radiation type and fluence. Moreover, a new technique is developed that adapts the irradiation-induced effects in a single-cell equivalent electrical circuit and adjusts its elements. The "modified circuit" is capable of modeling the "radiation damage" in the electrical behavior of mono-Si solar cells and simplifies the designing of the compensation circuits.

  1. Theorem for the photon asymmetry in radiative muon capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearing, H.W.

    1975-01-01

    I show, for the standard theory of radiative muon capture including all couplings except g/subs/ and all usual diagrams, that the photon asymmetry α and circular polarization β satisfy α=+1+0(1/m 2 ) and β=+1+0(1/m 2 ), where m is the nucleon mass. This may bear on current disagreement between α) and α) since 0(1/m 2 ) terms have never been calculated consistently and since other uncalculated corrections, some of which are discussed, may contribute in the same order

  2. Characterization of undulator radiation at the Photon Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maezawa, Hideki; Kitamura, Hideo; Sasaki, Taizo; Suzuki, Yoshio

    1986-01-01

    Spectra of undulator radiation of the Photon Factory undulator, model PMU-2, were measured in a scale of absolute brightness in the soft X-ray region for various values of the K-parameter from 0.72 to 1.66. A significant reduction of the peak brightness was observed, whereas we also observed a relatively sharp edge at the high energy side of the first harmonic. The results show that the peak brightness and the band width are highly dependent on the beam parameters and the geometry of spectral observation. (orig.)

  3. Characterization of undulator radiation at the photon factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maezawa, Hideki; Suzuki, Yoshio; Kitamura, Hideo; Sasaki, Taizo

    1986-05-01

    Spectra of undulator radiation of the Photon Factory undulator, model PMU-2, were measured in a scale of absolute brightness in the soft X-ray region for various values of the K-parameter from 0.72 to 1.66. A significant reduction of the peak brightness was observed, whereas we also observed a relatively sharp edge at the high energy side of the first harmonic. The results show that the peak brightness and the band width are highly dependent on the beam parameters and the geometry of spectral observation.

  4. A Study of Radiative Bottomonium Transitions using Converted Photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lees, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The authors use (111 ± 1) million Υ(3S) and (89 ± 1) million Υ(2S) events recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-factory at SLAC to perform a study of radiative transitions betwen bottomonium states using photons that have been converted to e + e - pairs by the detector material. They observe Υ(3S) → γχ b0,2 (1P) decay, make precise measurements of the branching fractions for χ b1,2 (1P, 2P) → γΥ(1S) and χ b1,2 (2P) → γΥ(2S) decays, and search for radiative decay to the η b (1S) and η b (2S) states.

  5. Thermophysical properties of polyethylene modified under γ radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shut, N.I.; Musaelyan, I.N.; Besklubenko, Yu.D.; Karpovich, N.B.; Kasperskij, A.V.

    1986-01-01

    Thermophysical properties (thermal conductivity, specific heat) of polyethylene (PE) modified under gamma radiation were studied. Thermophysical parameter dependences on the temperature (-100-+100 deg C) and an absorbed radiation dose are given. Degree of polymere crystallinity using a structural method for determination of the crystallinity degree by density was ascertained. It is shown that the PE thermophysical characteristics correlate to a value of absorbed gamma radiation dose, therefore gamma radiation can be recommended as a modifying factor for the production of polymer materials with the given properties

  6. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man - I. Gustatory tissues response during photon and neutron radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossman, K.L.

    1982-01-01

    Quantitative radiation dose-response curves for normal gustatory tissue in man were studied. Taste function, expressed as taste loss, was evaluated in 84 patients who were given either photon or neutron radiotherapy for tumors in the head and neck region. Patients were treated to average tumor doses of 6600 cGy (photon) or 2200 cGy intervals for photon patients and 320-cGy intervals for neutron patients during radiotherapy. The dose-response curves for photons and neutrons were analyzed by fitting a four-parameter logistic equation to the data. Photon and neutron curves differed principally in their relative position along the dose axis. Comparison of the dose-response curves were made by determination of RBE. At 320 cGy, the lowest neutron dose at which taste measurements were made, RBE = 5.7. If this RBE is correct, then the therapeutic gain factor may be equal to or less than 1, indicating no biological advantage in using neutrons over photons for this normal tissue. These studies suggest measurements of taste function and evaluation of dose-response relationships may also be useful in quantitatively evaluating the efficacy of chemical modifiers of radiation response such as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers and radioprotectors

  7. Emerging applications of radiation-modified carrageenans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abad, Lucille V., E-mail: lvabad@pnri.dost.gov.ph; Aranilla, Charito T.; Relleve, Lorna S.; Dela Rosa, Alumanda M.

    2014-10-01

    The Philippines supplies almost half of the world’s processed carrageenan as ingredient for different applications. In order to maintain the country’s competitive advantage, R and D on radiation processed carrageenan with various potential applications had been undertaken. PVP-carrageenan hydrogels for wound dressing had been developed. A carrageenan-based radiation dose indicator can detect radiation dose of as low as 5 kGy. Irradiated carrageenan has also been tested as plant growth promoter. Irradiated carrageenans have been found have been found to contain some antioxidant properties which increase with increasing dose and concentration. Carboxymethyl carrageenans had also been developed that shows promising effect as super water absorbent for soil conditioner in plants.

  8. Radiation cured and monomer modified silicon elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldred, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for the production of a tear resistant silicone elastomer, which has improved elongation properties. This elastomer is the radiation induced reaction product of a noncured methyl vinyl silicone resin (VMQ) and uniformly dispersed therein a blend of a polyfunctional acrylic crosslinking monomer and a filler

  9. Evaluation of the gamma radiation shielding parameters of bismuth modified quaternary glass system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Parminder; Singh, K. J.; Thakur, Sonika

    2018-05-01

    Glasses modified with heavy metal oxides (HMO) are an interesting area of research in the field of gamma-ray shielding. Bismuth modified lithium-zinc-borate glasses have been studied whereby bismuth oxide is added from 0 to 50 mol%. The gamma ray shielding properties of the glasses were evaluated at photon energy 662 keV with the help of XMuDat computer program by using the Hubbell and Seltzer database. Various gamma ray shielding parameters such as attenuation coefficient, shield thickness in terms of half and tenth value layer, effective atomic number have been studied in this work. A useful comparison of this glass system has been made with standard radiation shielding concretes viz. ordinary, barite and iron concrete. The glass samples containing 20 to 50 mol% bismuth oxide have shown better gamma ray shielding properties and hence have the potential to become good radiation absorbers.

  10. A brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) for probe-type dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Ulrich; Kaulich, Theodor W; Álvarez-Romero, José T; Carlsson Tedgren, Sa; Enger, Shirin A; Medich, David C; Mourtada, Firas; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Rivard, Mark J; Zakaria, G Abu

    2016-06-01

    In photon brachytherapy (BT), experimental dosimetry is needed to verify treatment plans if planning algorithms neglect varying attenuation, absorption or scattering conditions. The detector's response is energy dependent, including the detector material to water dose ratio and the intrinsic mechanisms. The local mean photon energy E¯(r) must be known or another equivalent energy quality parameter used. We propose the brachytherapy photon radiation quality indexQ(BT)(E¯), to characterize the photon radiation quality in view of measurements of distributions of the absorbed dose to water, Dw, around BT sources. While the external photon beam radiotherapy (EBRT) radiation quality index Q(EBRT)(E¯)=TPR10(20)(E¯) is not applicable to BT, the authors have applied a novel energy dependent parameter, called brachytherapy photon radiation quality index, defined as Q(BT)(E¯)=Dprim(r=2cm,θ0=90°)/Dprim(r0=1cm,θ0=90°), utilizing precise primary absorbed dose data, Dprim, from source reference databases, without additional MC-calculations. For BT photon sources used clinically, Q(BT)(E¯) enables to determine the effective mean linear attenuation coefficient μ¯(E) and thus the effective energy of the primary photons Eprim(eff)(r0,θ0) at the TG-43 reference position Pref(r0=1cm,θ0=90°), being close to the mean total photon energy E¯tot(r0,θ0). If one has calibrated detectors, published E¯tot(r) and the BT radiation quality correction factor [Formula: see text] for different BT radiation qualities Q and Q0, the detector's response can be determined and Dw(r,θ) measured in the vicinity of BT photon sources. This novel brachytherapy photon radiation quality indexQ(BT) characterizes sufficiently accurate and precise the primary photon's penetration probability and scattering potential. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Thermal stability of radiation-modified polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradova, T.B.; Sirota, A.G.; Bal'tenas, R.A.; Stanyavichus, V.I.; Knebel'man, A.M.; Sil'chenko, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    In the work reported here, the authors investigated the thermooxidative resistance, at temperatures from 373 to 473 K, of polyethylene that had been cross-linked by exposure to radiation and formulated with various heat stabilizers. Thus, these studies of the thermooxidative resistance of polyethylene-based compositions that have been cross-linked by the radiation-chemical method have shown that, in this particular series of heat-stabilizers, the greatest effect at temperatures of 373-473 K is given by the FAU-13. The DTPhDMI has the greatest heat-stabilizing effect in the temperature interval 448-473 K, whereas the heat resistance of materials containing Diaphen NN or Phenozan-23 is higher at 373-423 K. These comparative results are in agreement with data for unirradiated and chemically cross-linked polyethylene

  12. Photon-Fluence-Weighted let for Radiation Fields Subjected to Epidemiological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Michiya

    2017-08-01

    In order to estimate the uncertainty of the radiation risk associated with the photon energy in epidemiological studies, photon-fluence-weighted LET values were quantified for photon radiation fields with the target organs and irradiation conditions taken into consideration. The photon fluences giving a unit absorbed dose to the target organ were estimated by using photon energy spectra together with the dose conversion coefficients given in ICRP Publication 116 for the target organs of the colon, bone marrow, stomach, lung, skin and breast with three irradiation geometries. As a result, it was demonstrated that the weighted LET values did not show a clear difference among the photon radiation fields subjected to epidemiological studies, regardless of the target organ and the irradiation geometry.

  13. Luminescent polymethyl methacrylate modified by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Guilherme F. [Faculdade de Tecnologia de Sao Paulo (FATEC-ZL), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Forster, Pedro L.; Marchini, Leonardo G.; Lugao, Ademar B.; Parra, Duclerc F., E-mail: dfparra@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Thin films of PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) doped with luminescent complexes have been studied and developed for applications in advanced technologies. The problem of stability of these films is focused in this study. Films stabilization by reaction with fluorinated monomers is a recent study that aims to increase its luminescence properties for long time. The films were prepared by dilution of PMMA in chloroform with addition of europium complex, at proportion of 5% by weight of polymer. The luminescent polymer films were obtained by casting. Thin layer slides of the film were separated in three parts. One was reacted with fluorinated monomers (C{sub 2}F{sub 4}) in closed reactor for 48 hours. A second part was reacted with C{sub 2}F{sub 4} after irradiation in gamma source at 5 kGy in simultaneous process. The last part was used as obtained. The luminescent polymer matrices were characterized using the techniques of infrared (FTIR) and thermogravimetry (TGA/DTG). Samples of the films were, in presence of fluorine monomers, exposed to ionizing radiation in dose of 5 kGy, for react with monomers in the doped polymer surface. In this case the effects of radiation were evaluated on the luminescent films. (author)

  14. Luminescent polymethyl methacrylate modified by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, Guilherme F.; Forster, Pedro L.; Marchini, Leonardo G.; Lugao, Ademar B.; Parra, Duclerc F.

    2011-01-01

    Thin films of PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) doped with luminescent complexes have been studied and developed for applications in advanced technologies. The problem of stability of these films is focused in this study. Films stabilization by reaction with fluorinated monomers is a recent study that aims to increase its luminescence properties for long time. The films were prepared by dilution of PMMA in chloroform with addition of europium complex, at proportion of 5% by weight of polymer. The luminescent polymer films were obtained by casting. Thin layer slides of the film were separated in three parts. One was reacted with fluorinated monomers (C 2 F 4 ) in closed reactor for 48 hours. A second part was reacted with C 2 F 4 after irradiation in gamma source at 5 kGy in simultaneous process. The last part was used as obtained. The luminescent polymer matrices were characterized using the techniques of infrared (FTIR) and thermogravimetry (TGA/DTG). Samples of the films were, in presence of fluorine monomers, exposed to ionizing radiation in dose of 5 kGy, for react with monomers in the doped polymer surface. In this case the effects of radiation were evaluated on the luminescent films. (author)

  15. Radiation Tests of Single Photon Avalanche Diode for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscatelli, Francesco; Marisaldi, Martino; MacCagnani, Piera; Labanti, Claudio; Fuschino, Fabio; Prest, Michela; Berra, Alessandro; Bolognini, Davide; Ghioni, Massimo; Rech, Ivan; hide

    2013-01-01

    Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) have been recently studied as photodetectors for applications in space missions. In this presentation we report the results of radiation hardness test on large area SPAD (actual results refer to SPADs having 500 micron diameter). Dark counts rate as low as few kHz at -10 degC has been obtained for the 500 micron devices, before irradiation. We performed bulk damage and total dose radiation tests with protons and gamma-rays in order to evaluate their radiation hardness properties and their suitability for application in a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) space mission. With this aim SPAD devices have been irradiated using up to 20 krad total dose with gamma-rays and 5 krad with protons. The test performed show that large area SPADs are very sensitive to proton doses as low as 2×10(exp 8) (1 MeV eq) n/cm2 with a significant increase in dark counts rate (DCR) as well as in the manifestation of the "random telegraph signal" effect. Annealing studies at room temperature (RT) and at 80 degC have been carried out, showing a high decrease of DCR after 24-48 h at RT. Lower protons doses in the range 1-10×10(exp 7) (1 MeV eq) n/cm(exp 2) result in a lower increase of DCR suggesting that the large-area SPADs tested in this study are well suitable for application in low-inclination LEO, particularly useful for gamma-ray astrophysics.

  16. Factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-11-01

    The collective influence of biologic and physical factors that modify risks of radiation-induced cancer introduces uncertainties sufficient to deny precision of estimates of human cancer risk that can be calculated for low-dose radiation in exposed populations. The important biologic characteristics include the tissue sites and cell types, baseline cancer incidence, minimum latent period, time-to-tumor recognition, and the influence of individual host (age and sex) and competing etiologic influences. Physical factors include radiation dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Statistical factors include time-response projection models, risk coefficients, and dose-response relationships. Other modifying factors include other carcinogens, and other biological sources (hormonal status, immune status, hereditary factors)

  17. Photon asymmetry from radiative muon capture on 40Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larabee, A.J.; Burnham, R.A.; Gorringe, T.P.; Hasinoff, M.D.; Horvath, D.; Noble, A.J.; Pouladdej, A.; Virtue, C.J.; Azuelos, G.; Robertson, B.C.; Wright, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    The photon asymmetry (α γ) for 40 Ca has been measured at TRIUMF using the muon spin-rotation technique. From the asymmetry measurement, the value of the pseudoscalar coupling constant, g p , can be obtained. A total of 5500 clean photon events were collected. The preliminary value found for the photon asymmetry of 40 Ca is 1.00 ± 0.23

  18. On bolus for megavoltage photon and electron radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyas, Vedang; Palmer, Lisa; Mudge, Ray; Jiang, Runqing; Fleck, Andre; Schaly, Bryan; Osei, Ernest; Charland, Paule

    2013-01-01

    Frequently, in radiation therapy one must treat superficial lesions on cancer patients; these are at or adjacent to the skin. Megavoltage photon radiotherapy penetrates through the skin to irradiate deep-seated tumors, with skin-sparing property. Hence, to treat superficial lesions, one must use a layer of scattering material to feign as the skin surface. Although megavoltage electron beams are used for superficial treatments, one occasionally needs to enhance the dose near the surface. Such is the function of a “bolus,” a natural or synthetically developed material that acts as a layer of tissue to provide a more effective treatment to the superficial lesions. Other uses of boluses are to correct for varying surface contours and to add scattering material around the patient's surface. Materials used as bolus vary from simple water to metal and include various mixtures and compounds. Even with the modernization of the technology for external-beam therapy and the emergence of various commercial boluses, the preparation and utilization of a bolus in clinical radiotherapy remains an art. Considering the varying experiences and practices, this paper briefly summarizes available boluses that have been proposed and are employed in clinical radiotherapy. Although this review is not exhaustive, it provides some initial guidance and answers questions that may arise in clinical practice

  19. Characterization of crumb rubber modified by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faldini, Sonia B.; Terence, Mauro C.; Miranda, Leila F.; Munhoz, Antonio H.; Domingues, Leandro S.; Coghetto, Gregory, E-mail: sfaldini@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: mauroterence@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie (UPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Engenharia de Materiais

    2013-07-01

    The use of crumb rubber from scrap tires has become a common practice in the construction of roads, leading to improved properties of the asphalt and decreasing the environmental pollution. In this study, crumb rubber was modified by gamma radiation to eventually incorporate it into the asphalt and verify potential improvements of their properties. The crumb rubber modified by gamma radiation in the dose 500 kGy and 1000kGy was characterized by thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The dose of radiation used has no effect on degradation temperatures. It is observed that the IV spectra of untreated rubbers and rubbers irradiated have substantially the same profile. The results indicate that despite small morphological changes in the irradiated rubber, they do not influence its degradation temperature and composition. (author)

  20. Characterization of crumb rubber modified by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faldini, Sonia B.; Terence, Mauro C.; Miranda, Leila F.; Munhoz, Antonio H.; Domingues, Leandro S.; Coghetto, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    The use of crumb rubber from scrap tires has become a common practice in the construction of roads, leading to improved properties of the asphalt and decreasing the environmental pollution. In this study, crumb rubber was modified by gamma radiation to eventually incorporate it into the asphalt and verify potential improvements of their properties. The crumb rubber modified by gamma radiation in the dose 500 kGy and 1000kGy was characterized by thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The dose of radiation used has no effect on degradation temperatures. It is observed that the IV spectra of untreated rubbers and rubbers irradiated have substantially the same profile. The results indicate that despite small morphological changes in the irradiated rubber, they do not influence its degradation temperature and composition. (author)

  1. On the γ-photon detection processes and the statistics of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolotti, M.; Sibilia, C.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of detection of γ-photons is treated in the cases of photoelectric and Compton effects. In both cases the probability of detecting a γ-photon is found proportional to the first-order correlation function of the e.m. field. The statistical properties of the γ-radiation can therefore be determined through the methods developed in quantum optics

  2. Radiation doses from radiation sources of neutrons and photons by different computer calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siciliano, F.; Lippolis, G.; Bruno, S.G.

    1995-12-01

    In the present paper the calculation technique aspects of dose rate from neutron and photon radiation sources are covered with reference both to the basic theoretical modeling of the MERCURE-4, XSDRNPM-S and MCNP-3A codes and from practical point of view performing safety analyses of irradiation risk of two transportation casks. The input data set of these calculations -regarding the CEN 10/200 HLW container and dry PWR spent fuel assemblies shipping cask- is frequently commented as for as connecting points of input data and understanding theoric background are concerned

  3. Theoretical and experimental study of an energy-reinforced braking radiation photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertin, Pierre-Yves

    1966-01-01

    This research thesis reports the theoretical study of a photon beam raised towards high energies, its experimental implementation, the definition of a gamma spectrometry method which aimed at checking various hypotheses used in the beam theoretical study. After a presentation of the theory of phenomena of electron braking radiation, of materialisation of photons into positon-negaton pair, and of issues related to multiple Coulomb diffusion, the author reports the study of the different solutions which allow a photon beam to be obtained. A braking radiation of mono-kinetic electron has been used. This braking radiation is reinforced by absorption of low energy protons in a column of lithium hydride. The author describes how the beam is built up, and the experimental approach. He describes how raw data are processed to get rid of the influence of the multiple Coulomb diffusion and of the braking radiation. Experimental results are compared with those obtained by convolution of photon spectra and differential cross section

  4. Applications of photon-in, photon-out spectroscopy with third-generation, synchrotron-radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindle, D.W.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Mother nature's finest test probe; soft x-ray emission spectroscopy with high-brightness synchrotron radiation sources; anisotropy and polarization of x-ray emission from atoms and molecules; valence-hole fluorescence from molecular photoions as a probe of shape-resonance ionization: progress and prospects; structural biophysics on third-generation synchrotron sources; ultra-soft x-ray fluorescence-yield XAFS: an in situ photon-in, photon-out spectroscopy; and x-ray microprobe: an analytical tool for imaging elemental composition and microstructure

  5. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying Biomedical Photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy This volume discusses biomedical photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy, the basic physical principles underlying the technology and its applications. The topics discussed in this volume are: Biophotonics; Fluorescence and Phosphorescence; Medical Photonics; Microscopy; Nonlinear Optics; Ophthalmic Technology; Optical Tomography; Optofluidics; Photodynamic Therapy; Image Processing; Imaging Systems; Sensors; Single Molecule Detection; Futurology in Photonics. Comprehensive and accessible cov

  6. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying the technology instrumentation of photonics This volume discusses photonics technology and instrumentation. The topics discussed in this volume are: Communication Networks; Data Buffers; Defense and Security Applications; Detectors; Fiber Optics and Amplifiers; Green Photonics; Instrumentation and Metrology; Interferometers; Light-Harvesting Materials; Logic Devices; Optical Communications; Remote Sensing; Solar Energy; Solid-State Lighting; Wavelength Conversion Comprehensive and accessible coverage of the whole of modern photonics Emphas

  7. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying thescience and technology of nanophotonics, its materials andstructures This volume presents nanophotonic structures and Materials.Nanophotonics is photonic science and technology that utilizeslight/matter interactions on the nanoscale where researchers arediscovering new phenomena and developing techniques that go wellbeyond what is possible with conventional photonics andelectronics.The topics discussed in this volume are: CavityPhotonics; Cold Atoms and Bose-Einstein Condensates; Displays;E-paper; Graphene; Integrated Photonics; Liquid Cry

  8. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    This book covers modern photonics accessibly and discusses the basic physical principles underlying all the applications and technology of photonicsThis volume covers the basic physical principles underlying the technology and all applications of photonics from statistical optics to quantum optics. The topics discussed in this volume are: Photons in perspective; Coherence and Statistical Optics; Complex Light and Singular Optics; Electrodynamics of Dielectric Media; Fast and slow Light; Holography; Multiphoton Processes; Optical Angular Momentum; Optical Forces, Trapping and Manipulation; Pol

  9. Incidence of Second Malignancies Among Patients Treated With Proton Versus Photon Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Christine S., E-mail: chungc1@sutterhealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Berkeley, California (United States); Yock, Torunn I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nelson, Kerrie [Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Xu, Yang [Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Keating, Nancy L. [Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of General Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Office of the Executive Dean, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Proton radiation, when compared with photon radiation, allows delivery of increased radiation dose to the tumor while decreasing dose to adjacent critical structures. Given the recent expansion of proton facilities in the United States, the long-term sequelae of proton therapy should be carefully assessed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of second cancers in patients treated with proton radiation with a population-based cohort of matched patients treated with photon radiation. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 558 patients treated with proton radiation from 1973 to 2001 at the Harvard Cyclotron in Cambridge, MA and 558 matched patients treated with photon therapy in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer registry. Patients were matched by age at radiation treatment, sex, year of treatment, cancer histology, and site. The main outcome measure was the incidence of second malignancies after radiation. Results: We matched 558 proton patients with 558 photon patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. The median duration of follow-up was 6.7 years (interquartile range, 7.4) and 6.0 years (interquartile range, 9.3) in the proton and photon cohorts, respectively. The median age at treatment was 59 years in each cohort. Second malignancies occurred in 29 proton patients (5.2%) and 42 photon patients (7.5%). After we adjusted for sex, age at treatment, primary site, and year of diagnosis, proton therapy was not associated with an increased risk of second malignancy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.52 [95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.85]; P=.009). Conclusions: The use of proton radiation therapy was not associated with a significantly increased risk of secondary malignancies compared with photon therapy. Longer follow-up of these patients is needed to determine if there is a significant decrease in second malignancies. Given the limitations of the study

  10. Incidence of Second Malignancies Among Patients Treated With Proton Versus Photon Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Christine S.; Yock, Torunn I.; Nelson, Kerrie; Xu, Yang; Keating, Nancy L.; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Proton radiation, when compared with photon radiation, allows delivery of increased radiation dose to the tumor while decreasing dose to adjacent critical structures. Given the recent expansion of proton facilities in the United States, the long-term sequelae of proton therapy should be carefully assessed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of second cancers in patients treated with proton radiation with a population-based cohort of matched patients treated with photon radiation. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 558 patients treated with proton radiation from 1973 to 2001 at the Harvard Cyclotron in Cambridge, MA and 558 matched patients treated with photon therapy in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer registry. Patients were matched by age at radiation treatment, sex, year of treatment, cancer histology, and site. The main outcome measure was the incidence of second malignancies after radiation. Results: We matched 558 proton patients with 558 photon patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. The median duration of follow-up was 6.7 years (interquartile range, 7.4) and 6.0 years (interquartile range, 9.3) in the proton and photon cohorts, respectively. The median age at treatment was 59 years in each cohort. Second malignancies occurred in 29 proton patients (5.2%) and 42 photon patients (7.5%). After we adjusted for sex, age at treatment, primary site, and year of diagnosis, proton therapy was not associated with an increased risk of second malignancy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.52 [95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.85]; P=.009). Conclusions: The use of proton radiation therapy was not associated with a significantly increased risk of secondary malignancies compared with photon therapy. Longer follow-up of these patients is needed to determine if there is a significant decrease in second malignancies. Given the limitations of the study

  11. Establishing personal dosimetry procedure using optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters in photon and mixed photon-neutron radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc Thiem; Bui Duc Ky; Trinh Van Giap; Nguyen Huu Quyet; Ho Quang Tuan; Vu Manh Khoi; Chu Vu Long

    2017-01-01

    According to Vietnamese Law on Atomic Energy, personal dosimetry (PD) for radiation workers is required periodically in order to fulfil the national legal requirements on occupational radiation dose management. Since the radiation applications have become popular in Vietnamese society, the thermal luminescence dosimeters (TLDs) have been used as passive dosimeters for occupational monitoring in the nation. Together with the quick increase in radiation applications and the number of personnel working in radiation fields, the Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dosimeters (OSLDs) have been first introduced since 2015. This work presents the establishment of PD measuring procedure using OSLDs which are used for measuring photons and betas known as Inlight model 2 OSL (OSLDs-p,e) and for measuring mixed radiations of neutrons, photons and betas known as Inlight LDR model 2 (OSLDs-n,p,e). Such following features of OSLDs are investigated: detection limit, energy response, linearity, reproducibility, angular dependency and fading with both types of OSLDs-p,e and OSLDs-n,p,e. The result of an intercomparison in PD using OSLDs is also presented in the work. The research work also indicates that OSL dosimetry can be an alternative method applied in PD and possibly become one of the most popular personal dosimetry method in the future. (author)

  12. Study on radiation modifiers with zebrafish as a vertebrate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Jixiao; Ni Jin; Cai Jianming; Shen Jianliang

    2010-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a vertebrate model system has been used in a series of biomedical experiments by scientists. It offers distinctive benefits as a laboratory model system, especially for embryonic development, gene expression, drug screening and human disease model. In this paper, the typical radiation modifiers, such as Amifostine, DF-1, AG1478, Flavopiridol and DNA repair proteins involved in biomedical process by use of zebrafish have been reviewed. (authors)

  13. Applications of Biopolymers Modified by Radiation Processing. Chapter 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, M. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Radiation processing using quantum beam such as electron beam and gamma rays is a clean process. Using this process, biopolymers with low environmental burden were modified for agricultural and environmental applications. High performance materials such as soil conditioner for arid area, spray coating Washi (Japanese paper), biodegradable dummy lens, chemically-induced biodegradable plastic, biodiesel catalyst, and plant growth promoter were developed by radiationinduced crosslinking, graft polymerization, and degradation. (author)

  14. Transition radiation and coherent electron-photon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, M.J.

    1985-04-01

    Relativistic electron irradiation of thin solid targets is known to generate collimated beams of x-ray photons in the forward direction by a number of different processes. A variety of mechanisms are discussed that share common characteristics in the angular and spectral distributions of the generated photon beams. Some simple physical explanations are offered for the characteristics shared by these processes. Some examples are then given based on experimental results attained at the LLNL electron-positron accelerator

  15. A solution algorithm for calculating photon radiation fields with the aid of the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zappe, D.

    1978-04-01

    The MCTEST program and its subroutines for the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation is presented. The program renders possible to calculate photon radiation fields of point or plane gamma sources. After changing two subroutines the calculation can also be carried out for the case of directed incidence of radiation on plane shields of iron or concrete. (author)

  16. The Role of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy with Photons, Protons and Heavy Ions for Treating Extracranial Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Michael Laine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the ability to deliver large doses of ionizing radiation to a tumor has been limited by radiation induced toxicity to normal surrounding tissues. This was the initial impetus for the development of conventionally fractionated radiation therapy, where large volumes of healthy tissue received radiation and were allowed the time to repair the radiation damage. However, advances in radiation delivery techniques and image guidance have allowed for more ablative doses of radiation to be delivered in a very accurate, conformal and safe manner with shortened fractionation schemes. Hypofractionated regimens with photons have already transformed how certain tumor types are treated with radiation therapy. Additionally, hypofractionation is able to deliver a complete course of ablative radiation therapy over a shorter period of time compared to conventional fractionation regimens making treatment more convenient to the patient and potentially more cost-effective. Recently there has been an increased interest in proton therapy because of the potential further improvement in dose distributions achievable due to their unique physical characteristics. Furthermore, with heavier ions the dose conformality is increased and in addition there is potentially a higher biological effectiveness compared to protons and photons. Due to the properties mentioned above, charged particle therapy has already become an attractive modality to further investigate the role of hypofractionation in the treatment of various tumors. This review will discuss the rationale and evolution of hypofractionated radiation therapy, the reported clinical success with initially photon and then charged particle modalities, and further potential implementation into treatment regimens going forward.

  17. Decay dynamics of radiatively coupled quantum dots in photonic crystal slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mørk, Jesper; Lodahl, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the influence of radiative coupling on light emission in a photonic crystal slab structure. The calculation method is based on a formalism that combines the photon Green's tensor with a self-consistent Dyson equation approach and is applicable to a wide range of probl......’s tensor and show how interference between different light scattering pathways is responsible for this nontrivial detector response...

  18. Modifiers of radiation response in tumor therapy: strategies and expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkind, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    The administration of two (or more) cytotoxic agents to widen the differential between the responses of tumor and normal tissues depends upon the biological properties of the agents in the cells and tissues, their interactive potential, and the strategy employed in their administration. Assuming that one agent is ionizing radiation, and considering response modification in broad terms, the qualitative features of various strategies are developed for physical as well as chemical modifies. The heterogeneity of human tumor cells and the compensatory mechanisms of normal tissues following injury are identified as topical areas requiring sustained research effort. Finally, estimates are developed for the degree of improvement required from a response modifier to effect significant improvements in tumor cure rates

  19. Modifiers of radiation response in tumor therapy: strategies and expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkind, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    The administration of two (or more) cytotoxic agents to widen the differential between the responses of tumor and normal tissues depends upon the biological properties of the agents in the cells and tissues, their interactive potential, and the strategy employed in their administration. Assuming that one agent is ionizing radiation, and considering response modification in broad terms, the qualitative features of various strategies are developed for physical as well as chemical modifiers. The heterogeneity of human tumor cells and the compensatory mechanisms of normal tissues following injury are identified as topical areas requiring sustained research effort. Finally, estimates are developed for the degree of improvement from a response modifier to effect significant improvements in tumor cure rates

  20. Predicted Rates of Secondary Malignancies From Proton Versus Photon Radiation Therapy for Stage I Seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simone, Charles B., E-mail: csimone@alumni.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Kramer, Kevin [Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Rockville, Maryland (United States); O' Meara, William P. [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Belard, Arnaud [Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Rockville, Maryland (United States); McDonough, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); O' Connell, John [Radiation Oncology Service, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Photon radiotherapy has been the standard adjuvant treatment for stage I seminoma. Single-dose carboplatin therapy and observation have emerged as alternative options due to concerns for acute toxicities and secondary malignancies from radiation. In this institutional review board-approved study, we compared photon and proton radiotherapy for stage I seminoma and the predicted rates of excess secondary malignancies for both treatment modalities. Methods and Material: Computed tomography images from 10 consecutive patients with stage I seminoma were used to quantify dosimetric differences between photon and proton therapies. Structures reported to be at increased risk for secondary malignancies and in-field critical structures were contoured. Reported models of organ-specific radiation-induced cancer incidence rates based on organ equivalent dose were used to determine the excess absolute risk of secondary malignancies. Calculated values were compared with tumor registry reports of excess secondary malignancies among testicular cancer survivors. Results: Photon and proton plans provided comparable target volume coverage. Proton plans delivered significantly lower mean doses to all examined normal tissues, except for the kidneys. The greatest absolute reduction in mean dose was observed for the stomach (119 cGy for proton plans vs. 768 cGy for photon plans; p < 0.0001). Significantly more excess secondary cancers per 10,000 patients/year were predicted for photon radiation than for proton radiation to the stomach (4.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.22-5.01), large bowel (0.81; 95% CI, 0.39-1.01), and bladder (0.03; 95% CI, 0.01-0.58), while no difference was demonstrated for radiation to the pancreas (0.02; 95% CI, -0.01-0.06). Conclusions: For patients with stage I seminoma, proton radiation therapy reduced the predicted secondary cancer risk compared with photon therapy. We predict a reduction of one additional secondary cancer for every 50 patients

  1. Photon radiation damage simulations in CZT semiconducting detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva, A.; Pinnera, I.; Cruz, C.; Abreu, Y.; Dona, O.; Diaz, A.

    2009-01-01

    The use of semiconducting devices based on CZT as X and gamma rays detectors has been extended notably in the last decade thanks to their numerous advantages. The medical imagenology is one of the fields where these detectors have been successfully introduced, for example in positron emission tomography (PET). A typical CZT detector employed PET application was studied applying the Monte Carlo statistical method. All structural and geometric characteristics of the detector as well as the different photon energies usually used in the mentioned applications were considered in the simulations. Taking into account the Oen-Cahn-Holmes classical approach, the effective atomic displacement cross-sections and the number of displacements per atoms were calculated for all atom species and considered photon energies

  2. Substance for thermoluminescent dosimetry of photon radiation in adipose tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalmykov, L.Z.; Kandel', T.G.

    1983-01-01

    Substance composition for thermoluminescent photon dosimetry in adipose tissue is proposed which makes it possible to simplify dosimetric measurements and to improve their accuracy. The substance consists of powder-like thermoluminophor Li 2 B 4 O 7 (0.03%Mn) 48-52 mass % and bistriethylammonium dodecahydrododecaborane - 48-52 mass %. The above substance is equivalent in respect to dosimetry to adipose tissue within the 10 keV - 10 MeV energy range

  3. Radiation-hard silicon photonics for high energy physics and beyond

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photonics (SiPh) is currently being investigated as a promising technology for future radiation hard optical links. The possibility of integrating SiPh devices with electronics and/or silicon particle sensors as well as an expected very high resistance against radiation damage make this technology particularly interesting for potential use close to the interaction points in future in high energy physics experiments and other radiation-sensitive applications. The presentation will summarize the outcomes of the research on radiation hard SiPh conducted within the ICE-DIP projected.

  4. Test-beam Results from a RICH Detector Prototype Using Aerogel Radiator and Pixel Hybrid Photon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aglieri-Rinella, G; Van Lysebetten, A; Piedigrossi, D; Wyllie, K; Bellunato, T F; Calvi, M; Matteuzzi, C; Musy, M; Perego, D L; Somerville, L P; Newby, C; Easo, S; Wotton, S

    2006-01-01

    A test-beam study was performed at CERN with a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) prototype using three pixel Hybrid Photon Detectors. Results on the photon yield and Cherenkov angle resolution are presented here, for the Aerogel radiator and also for reference runs taken with Nitrogen radiator.

  5. Survival of tumor bearing mice by sequencing of low dose rate (LDR) neutron and photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onomura, C.I.; Feola, J.M.; Maruyama, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Cf-252 neutron radiation (NT) has been shown to be effective therapy for bulky, hypoxic human tumor and to produce consistent rapid clearance and 5 year cures. NT has been found to be more or less effective depending upon the schedule in which it is used and upon mixing with photon radiation. In an effort to study this scheduling and photon effect, LSA tumor was irradiated in vivo in a hypoxic, advanced state, in different schedules in combination of NT with Co-60 photons. The LSA lymphoma of C57BL/ym mice represents an accurate system to assess dose-response of tumor cells in vivo. Mean survival time was used as endpoint. A high RBE for LDR Cf-252 NT was observed with a RBE(n) of -- 5.0. The effect was not greatly sensitive to sequence in which photons were used. Comparison studies were also tested relative to LDR Cs-137 photon radiation. The results support the high efficacy of LDR NT for destruction of hypoxic tumor in vivo

  6. Experimental validation of GADRAS's coupled neutron-photon inverse radiation transport solver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattingly, John K.; Mitchell, Dean James; Harding, Lee T.

    2010-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed an inverse radiation transport solver that applies nonlinear regression to coupled neutron-photon deterministic transport models. The inverse solver uses nonlinear regression to fit a radiation transport model to gamma spectrometry and neutron multiplicity counting measurements. The subject of this paper is the experimental validation of that solver. This paper describes a series of experiments conducted with a 4.5 kg sphere of α-phase, weapons-grade plutonium. The source was measured bare and reflected by high-density polyethylene (HDPE) spherical shells with total thicknesses between 1.27 and 15.24 cm. Neutron and photon emissions from the source were measured using three instruments: a gross neutron counter, a portable neutron multiplicity counter, and a high-resolution gamma spectrometer. These measurements were used as input to the inverse radiation transport solver to evaluate the solver's ability to correctly infer the configuration of the source from its measured radiation signatures.

  7. Efficient Photon Recycling and Radiation Trapping in Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Waveguides

    KAUST Repository

    Dursun, Ibrahim

    2018-05-26

    Cesium lead halide perovskite materials have attracted considerable attention for potential applications in lasers, light emitting diodes and photodetectors. Here, we provide the experimental and theoretical evidence for photon recycling in CsPbBr3 perovskite microwires. Using two-photon excitation, we recorded photoluminescence (PL) lifetimes and emission spectra as a function of the lateral distance between PL excitation and collection positions along the microwire, with separations exceeding 100 µm. At longer separations, the PL spectrum develops a red-shifted emission peak accompanied by an appearance of well-resolved rise times in the PL kinetics. We developed quantitative modeling that accounts for bimolecular recombination and photon recycling within the microwire waveguide and is sufficient to account for the observed decay modifications. It relies on a high radiative efficiency in CsPbBr3 perovskite microwires and provides crucial information about the potential impact of photon recycling and waveguide trapping on optoelectronic properties of cesium lead halide perovskite materials.

  8. Widely tunable femtosecond solitonic radiation in photonic crystal fiber cladding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, J. H.; Sokolov, A. V.; Benabid, F.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a means to generate tunable ultrashort optical pulses. We demonstrate that dispersive waves generated by solitons within the small-core features of a photonic crystal fiber cladding can be used to obtain femtosecond pulses tunable over an octave-wide spectral range. The generation...... process is highly efficient and occurs at the relatively low laser powers available from a simple Ti:sapphire laser oscillator. The described phenomenon is general and will play an important role in other systems where solitons are known to exist....

  9. Radiation Feedback in ULIRGs: Are Photons Movers and Shakers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Shane W.; Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James M.; Murray, Norman

    2014-12-01

    We perform multidimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations to study the impact of radiation forces on atmospheres composed of dust and gas. Our setup closely follows that of Krumholz & Thompson, assuming that dust and gas are well-coupled and that the radiation field is characterized by blackbodies with temperatures >~ 80 K, as might be found in ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). In agreement with previous work, we find that Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities develop in radiation supported atmospheres, leading to inhomogeneities that limit momentum exchange between radiation and dusty gas, and eventually providing a near balance of the radiation and gravitational forces. However, the evolution of the velocity and spatial distributions of the gas differs significantly from previous work, which utilized a less accurate flux-limited diffusion (FLD) method. Our variable Eddington tensor simulations show continuous net acceleration of the gas and never reach a steady state. In contrast, our FLD results show little net acceleration of the gas and settle into a quasi-steady, turbulent state with low velocity dispersion. The discrepancies result primarily from the inability of FLD to properly model the variation of the radiation field around structures that are less than a few optical depths across. We consider the effect of varying the optical depth and study the differences between two-dimensional and three-dimensional runs. We conclude that radiation feedback remains a plausible mechanism for driving high-Mach number turbulence in ULIRGs with sufficiently high optical depths. We discuss implications for observed systems and galactic-scale numerical simulations of feedback.

  10. Radiation, photon orbits, and torsion in strongly curved spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, V.D.

    1975-01-01

    Four topics on the strong field aspects of general relativity are presented. These are the role of constraining forces for ultrarelativistic particle motion as a source of gravitational radiation, the study of electromagnetic radiation due to space-time oscillations, the light scattering properties of a class of naked singularities, and the relation of gravitation theories with torsion to general relativity. The astrophysical implications and unusual physical phenomena associated with very intense gravitational fields are discussed for these four topics

  11. First Experimental Study of Photon Polarization in Radiative B-s(0) Decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Romeu, J. Arnau; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, I.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Gomez, M. Calvo; Camboni, A.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Perez, D. H. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Sobral, C. M. Costa; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suarez, A. Dosil; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Deleage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Lima, V. Franco; Frei, C.; Furfaro, E.; Farber, C.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Cazon, B. R. Gruberg; Grunberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Gobel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, H.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Lefevre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; Mcnab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, G. D.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Lopez, J. A. Rodriguez; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, I. T.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2017-01-01

    The polarization of photons produced in radiative B-s(0) decays is studied for the first time. The data are recorded by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1) at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. A time-dependent analysis of the B-s(0) ->phi

  12. Optimization of parameters for fitting linear accelerator photon beams using a modified CBEAM model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyangar, K.; Daftari, I.; Palta, J.; Suntharalingam, N.

    1989-01-01

    Measured beam profiles and central-axis depth-dose data for 6- and 25-MV photon beams are used to generate a dose matrix which represents the full beam. A corresponding dose matrix is also calculated using the modified CBEAM model. The calculational model uses the usual set of three parameters to define the intensity at beam edges and the parameter that accounts for collimator transmission. An additional set of three parameters is used for the primary profile factor, expressed as a function of distance from the central axis. An optimization program has been adapted to automatically adjust these parameters to minimize the χ 2 between the measured and calculated data. The average values of the parameters for small (6x6 cm 2 ), medium (10x10 cm 2 ), and large (20x20 cm 2 ) field sizes are found to represent the beam adequately for all field sizes. The calculated and the measured doses at any point agree to within 2% for any field size in the range 4x4 to 40x40 cm 2

  13. Dose determination in radiotherapy for photon beams modified by static intensity modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos Lopez, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    The static intensity modulators, used in radiotherapy, modify the spectral composition of the beam and lead to specific problems of the dose calculation. The aim of this work was to establish a three dimensional calculation, global and accurate, adapted to the primary-diffused separation algorithm and valid for any static modulator type. A theoretical study, experimentally verified, allowed the evaluation of the primary fluence, resulting from metallic sheets placed between photons beams of 6 to 23 MV nominal energy. It has been showed that the diffused, coming from the modulators, could be neglected for weak thickness and for the relative dose variation. In return it leads to significant variations of many % on the absolute dose and must be take into account for the bigger thicknesses. Corrective methods for the primary fluence have been proposed. From the energy spectra of the beam, the metallic modulator influence has been studied on the primary and diffused components of the dose and improvements of the calculation method have been proposed. These improvements are based on the modulator representation as a transmission matrix and on semi-empirical corrective factors. (A.L.B.)

  14. Radiation-hard Silicon Photonics for Future High Energy Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2089774; Troska, Jan

    Collisions of proton beams in the Large Hadron Collider at CERN produce very high radiation levels in the innermost parts of the particle detectors and enormous amounts of measurement data. Thousands of radiation-hard optical links based on directly-modulated laser diodes are thus installed in the particle detectors to transmit the measurement data to the processing electronics. The radiation levels in the innermost regions of future particle detectors will be much higher than they are now. Alternative solutions to laser-based radiation-hard optical links have to be found since the performance of laser diodes decreases beyond the operation margin of the system when irradiated to sufficiently high radiation levels. Silicon Photonics (SiPh) is currently being investigated as a promising alternative technology. First tests have indeed shown that SiPh Mach-Zehnder modulators (MZMs) are relatively insensitive to a high neutron fluence. However, they showed a strong degradation when exposed to ionizing radiation. ...

  15. Radiation modification of swollen and chemically modified cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsa, J.; Toth, T.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Biodegradable hydrogel was produced by radiation-induced crosslinking of water soluble carboxymethyl cellulose. Mobility of the molecular chain was found to play an important role in the crosslinking reaction. In this work the role of cellulose chains' mobility in radiation-induced reactions of fibrous cellulose was studied. Mobility of chains was improved by swelling (in sodium hydroxide and tetramethylammonium hydroxide) and chemical modification (substitution of about 3 % of hydroxyl groups with carboxymethyl groups), respectively. All samples were neutralized after the treatments. Accessibility of cellulose characterized by water adsorption and retention was significantly improved by the treatments in the following order: sodium hydroxide < tetramethylammonium hydroxide < carboxymethylation. Less fibrillar structure of modified fibers was observed by electron microscope. Samples were irradiated in wet form in open air (10 kGy). Untreated sample coated with soluble CMC was also irradiated. Degree of polymerization, FTIR spectra, and water sorption of samples before and after irradiation are presented. Amount of water adsorbed on samples decreased after irradiation. It can be considered the consequence of crosslinks, which might improve the crease recovery ability of cotton fabric. High accessibility improved degradation rather than crosslinking of cellulose chains

  16. The response of film badge dosemeters to high energy photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Playle, T.S.

    1988-12-01

    The sites of the earlier magnox reactor power stations at Berkeley and Bradwell in the United Kingdom are subject to 6 MeV photon radiation from the coolant gas. Since 1966 the Central Electricity Generating Board has included in its film badge personal dosimetry procedures an algorithm for applying a correction for over-response to high energy photon radiation. The correction is based on laboratory irradiations using a source of pure 6 MeV photon radiation. Recently, the opportunity arose to evaluate the response of the film badges at locations around the Berkeley reactors where spectrum-dependent dose equivalent rates had been measured. This report compares the response of the film badge in these characterised radiation environments with the response measured in the calibration laboratory. It is concluded that in the location where measurements were made, the high energy enhancement of measured dose was obscured by the effects of low energy scattered radiation, and it is considered that this will be the case for all practical situations on the power station site. There is therefore no advantage in using the 6 MeV correction factors for routine film badge dosimetry in these locations. (author)

  17. Full control of far-field radiation via photonic integrated circuits decorated with plasmonic nanoantennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Zhi; Feng, Li-Shuang; Bachelot, Renaud; Blaize, Sylvain; Ding, Wei

    2017-07-24

    We theoretically develop a hybrid architecture consisting of photonic integrated circuit and plasmonic nanoantennas to fully control optical far-field radiation with unprecedented flexibility. By exploiting asymmetric and lateral excitation from silicon waveguides, single gold nanorod and cascaded nanorod pair can function as component radiation pixels, featured by full 2π phase coverage and nanoscale footprint. These radiation pixels allow us to design scalable on-chip devices in a wavefront engineering fashion. We numerically demonstrate beam collimation with 30° out of the incident plane and nearly diffraction limited divergence angle. We also present high-numerical-aperture (NA) beam focusing with NA ≈0.65 and vector beam generation (the radially-polarized mode) with the mode similarity greater than 44%. This concept and approach constitutes a designable optical platform, which might be a future bridge between integrated photonics and metasurface functionalities.

  18. RF radiation measurement for the Advanced Photon Source (AS) personnel safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J.J.; Kim, J.; Otocki, R.; Zhou, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) booster and storage ring RF system consists of five 1-MW klystrons, four 5-cell cavities, and sixteen single-cell cavities. The RF power is distributed through many hundreds of feet of WR2300 waveguide with H-hybrids and circulators. In order to protect personnel from the danger of RF radiation due to loose flanges or other openings in the waveguide system, three detector systems were implemented: an RF radiation detector, a waveguide pressure switch, and a Radiax aperture detector (RAD). This paper describes RF radiation measurements on the WR 2300 waveguide system

  19. The exact electromagnetic field description of photon emission, absorption, and radiation pattern. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Dale M; Grimes, Craig A

    2002-10-01

    This is the second of two articles, the first of which contains a proposed explanation of quantum theory based upon electron nonlocality and classical electrodynamics. In this second article classical field theory is used to describe a unique field set for exchange of radiation between an atomic eigenstate and the far field. The radiation satisfies the thermodynamic condition of reversibility as described by Boltzmann, Planck, and Einstein. The exchanged radiation supports the kinematic properties of photons, and it can be emitted or absorbed by a vanishingly small volume.

  20. Radiation-induced conductivity of doped silicon in response to photon, proton and neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, N.; Amekura, H.; Plaksin, O.A.; Stepanov, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    The opto-electronic performance of semiconductors during reactor operation is restricted by radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) and the synergistic effects of neutrons/ions and photons. The RICs of Si due to photons, protons and pulsed neutrons have been evaluated, aiming at radiation correlation. Protons of 17 MeV with an ionizing dose rate of 10 3 Gy/s and/or photons (hν=1.3 eV) were used to irradiate impurity-doped Si (2x10 16 B atoms/cm 3 ) at 300 and 200 K. Proton-induced RIC (p-RIC) and photoconductivity (PC) were intermittently detected in an accelerator device. Neutron-induced RIC (n-RIC) was measured for the same Si in a pulsed fast-fission reactor, BARS-6, with a 70-μs pulse of 2x10 12 n/cm 2 (E>0.01 MeV) and a dose rate of up to 6x10 5 Gy/s. The neutron irradiation showed a saturation tendency in the flux dependence at 300 K due to the strong electronic excitation. Normalization of the electronic excitation, including the pulsed regime, gave a fair agreement among the different radiation environments. Detailed comparison among PC, p-RIC and n-RIC is discussed in terms of radiation correlation including the in-pile condition

  1. Quasi-real-time photon pulse duration measurement by analysis of FEL radiation spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, Robin, E-mail: robin.engel@uni-oldenburg.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Institut für Laser und Optik, Hochschule Emden/Leer, University of Applied Sciences, Constantiaplatz 4, D-26723 Emden (Germany); Düsterer, Stefan; Brenner, Günter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Teubner, Ulrich [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Institut für Laser und Optik, Hochschule Emden/Leer, University of Applied Sciences, Constantiaplatz 4, D-26723 Emden (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    Considering the second-order spectral correlation function of SASE-FEL radiation allows a real-time observation of the photon pulse duration during spectra acquisition. For photon diagnostics at free-electron lasers (FELs), the determination of the photon pulse duration is an important challenge and a complex task. This is especially true for SASE FELs with strongly fluctuating pulse parameters. However, most techniques require an extensive experimental setup, data acquisition and evaluation time, limiting the usability in all-day operation. In contrast, the presented work uses an existing approach based on the analysis of statistical properties of measured SASE FEL spectra and implements it as a software tool, integrated in FLASH’s data acquisition system. This allows the calculation of the average pulse durations from a set of measured spectral distributions with only seconds of delay, whenever high-resolution spectra are recorded.

  2. Two-photon cavity solitons in a laser: radiative profiles, interaction and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrat, C [Departament de FIsica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Colom 1, E-08222 Terrassa (Spain); Torrent, M C [Departament de FIsica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Colom 1, E-08222 Terrassa (Spain); Vilaseca, R [Departament de FIsica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Colom 1, E-08222 Terrassa (Spain); GarcIa-Ojalvo, J [Center for Applied Mathematics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Brambilla, M [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFM, Politecnico di Bari, Via E. Orabona 4, I-70126 Bari (Italy)

    2004-05-01

    We study the properties of two-photon cavity solitons that appear in a broad-area cascade laser. These vectorial solitons consist of islands of two-photon emission emerging over a background of single-photon emission. Analysis of their structural properties reveals singular features such as their short distance radiation of outgoing waves, which can be interpreted in terms of the soliton frequency profile. However, the phase of these solitons is not determined by any external factor, which influences the way in which the structures can be written and erased. We also examine ways of controlling the cavity-soliton position, and analyse the interaction between neighbouring cavity solitons. Finally, investigation of the parameter dependence of these structures shows a route from soliton-dominated to defect-mediated turbulence.

  3. Photonuclear processes in the treatment room and patient during radiation therapy with 50 MV photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudowska, Irena [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics

    1997-10-01

    The objectives of this project were to determine the level of photoneutron radiation around the MM50 Racetrack Microtron at Karolinska Hospital, operating in different modes and to evaluate the photonuclear absorbed dose to the treated volume during therapy with a 50 MV photon beam. The photoneutron radiation has been studied both using a {sup 235}U fission chamber and by computer simulation. The estimated neutron equivalent dose due to accelerator produced neutrons delivered to the tissues inside and outside the treatment volume do not exceed the recommended values. However, there is a potential risk that the sensitive tissues (lens of the eye and gonads), outside the treatment volume, can receive a dose of about 300-500 mSv per photon treatment course of 60 Gy with a slight increase for secondary malignancies. 47 refs, 15 figs, 6 tabs.

  4. L-subshell resolved photon angular distribution of radiative electron capture into He-like uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoehlker, T.; Geissel, H.; Irnich, H.; Kandler, T.; Kozhuharov, C.; Mokler, P.H.; Muenzenberg, G.; Nickel, F.; Scheidenberger, C.; Suzuki, T.; Kucharski, M.; Stachura, Z.; Kriessbach, A.; Shirai, T.

    1994-08-01

    The photon angular distributions for radiative electron capture (REC) into the j=1/2 and j=3/2 L-subshell levels were measured and calculated for U 90+ →C collisions at 89 MeV/u. The experiment provides the first study of the photon angular distribution of REC into a projectile p-state (j=3/2) which was found to exhibit a slight backward peaking in the laboratory frame. For radiative capture to the j=1/2 states the measured angular distribution deviates considerably from symmetry around 90 . The results demonstrate that the usual sin 2 θ lab distribution is not valid in the high-Z regime. (orig.)

  5. Photonuclear processes in the treatment room and patient during radiation therapy with 50 MV photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudowska, Irena

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to determine the level of photoneutron radiation around the MM50 Racetrack Microtron at Karolinska Hospital, operating in different modes and to evaluate the photonuclear absorbed dose to the treated volume during therapy with a 50 MV photon beam. The photoneutron radiation has been studied both using a 235 U fission chamber and by computer simulation. The estimated neutron equivalent dose due to accelerator produced neutrons delivered to the tissues inside and outside the treatment volume do not exceed the recommended values. However, there is a potential risk that the sensitive tissues (lens of the eye and gonads), outside the treatment volume, can receive a dose of about 300-500 mSv per photon treatment course of 60 Gy with a slight increase for secondary malignancies. 47 refs, 15 figs, 6 tabs

  6. Light dark photon and fermionic dark radiation for the Hubble constant and the structure formation

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, P.; Tang, Yong

    2018-01-01

    Motivated by the tensions in the Hubble constant $H_0$ and the structure growth $\\sigma_8$ between $Planck$ results and other low redshift measurements, we discuss some cosmological effects of a dark sector model in which dark matter (DM) interacts with fermionic dark radiation (DR) through a light gauge boson (dark photon). Such kind of models are very generic in particle physics with a dark sector with dark gauge symmetries. The effective number of neutrinos is increased by $\\delta N_{eff} ...

  7. The Physics of Imaging with Remote Sensors : Photon State Space & Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony B.

    2012-01-01

    Standard (mono-pixel/steady-source) retrieval methodology is reaching its fundamental limit with access to multi-angle/multi-spectral photo- polarimetry. Next... Two emerging new classes of retrieval algorithm worth nurturing: multi-pixel time-domain Wave-radiometry transition regimes, and more... Cross-fertilization with bio-medical imaging. Physics-based remote sensing: - What is "photon state space?" - What is "radiative transfer?" - Is "the end" in sight? Two wide-open frontiers! center dot Examples (with variations.

  8. Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Optoelectronic materials and devices are examined. Optoelectronic devices, which generate, detect, modulate, or switch electromagnetic radiation are being developed for a variety of space applications. The program includes spatial light modulators, solid state lasers, optoelectronic integrated circuits, nonlinear optical materials and devices, fiber optics, and optical networking photovoltaic technology and optical processing.

  9. Development of a transition radiation detector and reconstruction of photon conversions in the CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein-Boesing, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the development of a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. In addition, the usage of the TRD in the measurement of direct photons is investigated. CBM will be a fixed-target heavy-ion experiment, which investigates collisions in the beam energy range of 5-35 AGeV and aims to investigate the regime of high baryon densities where the phase transition is expected to be of first order. It will be a multipurpose experiment with the ability to measure leptons, hadrons, and photons. Therein, a TRD will provide the electron identification and - together with a Silicon Tracking System (STS) - the tracking of charged particles. In conjunction with a ring imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector and a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement, the TRD is to provide a sufficient electron identification for the measurements of charmonium and low-mass vector mesons. For the TRD, the required pion suppression is a factor of about 100 at 90% electron efficiency, and the position resolution has to be of the order of 300 to 500 um. Moreover, the material budget in terms of radiation length has to be kept at a minimum in order to minimize multiple scattering and conversions which would limit the precise measurement in following TRD stations and other detectors. The largest and up to now unrivaled challenge for the TRD design is that both (PID and tracking) have to be fulfilled in the context of very high particle rates (event rates of up to 10MHz are envisaged) and at the same time large charged-particle multiplicities of up to 600 per event in the CBM detector acceptance. Small prototypes of the TRD based on multiwire proportional chambers (MWPC) with pad readout were developed and tested. The tracking performance and the electron-pion separation were determined for particle rates of up to 200 kHz/cm 2 . The TRD layout and the detector responses

  10. Development of a transition radiation detector and reconstruction of photon conversions in the CBM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein-Boesing, Melanie

    2009-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the development of a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. In addition, the usage of the TRD in the measurement of direct photons is investigated. CBM will be a fixed-target heavy-ion experiment, which investigates collisions in the beam energy range of 5-35 AGeV and aims to investigate the regime of high baryon densities where the phase transition is expected to be of first order. It will be a multipurpose experiment with the ability to measure leptons, hadrons, and photons. Therein, a TRD will provide the electron identification and - together with a Silicon Tracking System (STS) - the tracking of charged particles. In conjunction with a ring imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector and a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement, the TRD is to provide a sufficient electron identification for the measurements of charmonium and low-mass vector mesons. For the TRD, the required pion suppression is a factor of about 100 at 90% electron efficiency, and the position resolution has to be of the order of 300 to 500 um. Moreover, the material budget in terms of radiation length has to be kept at a minimum in order to minimize multiple scattering and conversions which would limit the precise measurement in following TRD stations and other detectors. The largest and up to now unrivaled challenge for the TRD design is that both (PID and tracking) have to be fulfilled in the context of very high particle rates (event rates of up to 10MHz are envisaged) and at the same time large charged-particle multiplicities of up to 600 per event in the CBM detector acceptance. Small prototypes of the TRD based on multiwire proportional chambers (MWPC) with pad readout were developed and tested. The tracking performance and the electron-pion separation were determined for particle rates of up to 200 kHz/cm{sup 2}. The TRD layout and the detector

  11. Radiation Testing, Characterization and Qualification Challenges for Modern Microelectronics and Photonics Devices and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2008-01-01

    At GOMAC 2007, we discussed a selection of the challenges for radiation testing of modern semiconductor devices focusing on state-of-the-art memory technologies. This included FLASH non-volatile memories (NVMs) and synchronous dynamic random access memories (SDRAMs). In this presentation, we extend this discussion in device packaging and complexity as well as single event upset (SEU) mechanisms using several technology areas as examples including: system-on-a-chip (SOC) devices and photonic or fiber optic systems. The underlying goal is intended to provoke thought for understanding the limitations and interpretation of radiation testing results.

  12. Properties of electret ionization chambers for routine dosimetry in photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.; Pretzsch, G.

    1985-01-01

    The main properties of photon routine dosemeters are their energy and angular dependence as well as their measuring range and accuracy. The determination of radiation exposure from dosemeter response is based on the choice of an appropriate conversion factor taking into account the influence of body backscattering on the dosemeter response. Measuring range and accuracy of an electret ionization chamber first of all depend on electret stability, methods of charge measurement, and geometry of the chamber. The dosemeter performance is described for an electret ionization chamber which was designed for application to routine monitoring of radiation workers. (author)

  13. Radiation-induced changes in gustatory function comparison of effects of neutron and photon irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossman, K.L.; Chencharick, J.D.; Scheer, A.C.; Walker, W.P.; Ornitz, R.D.; Rogers, C.C.; Henkin, R.I.

    1979-01-01

    Changes in gustatory function were measured in 51 patients with various forms of cancer who received radiation to the head and neck region. Forty patients (group I) were treated with conventional photon radiation (e.g. 66 Gy/7 weeks), and 11 patients (group II) were treated with cyclotron produced fast neutrons (e.g. 22 Gy/7 weeks). Taste acuity was measured for four taste qualities (salt, sweet, sour, and bitter) by a forced choice-three stimulus drop technique which measured detection and recognition thresholds and by a forced scaling technique which measured taste intensity responsiveness. Subjective complaints of anorexia, dysgeusia, taste loss, and xerostomia were also recorded. Patients were studied before, during and up to two months after therapy. Prior to therapy, detection and recognition thresholds, intensity responsiveness, and the frequency of subjective complaints in patients from groups I and II were statistically equivalent. During and up to 2 months after therapy, taste impairment and frequency of subjective complaints increased significantly in neutron and photon treated patients, but were statistically equivalent. Results of this study indicate that gustatory tissue response as measured by taste detection and recognition and intensity responsiveness, and the frequency of subjective complaints related to taste are statistically equivalent in patients before, during, or up 2 months after they were given either neutron or photon radiation for tumors of the head and neck

  14. Review of personal monitoring techniques for the measurement of absorbed dose from external beta and low energy photon radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul

    1986-01-01

    The techniques available at present for personal monitoring of doses from external beta and low energy photon radiation are reviewed. The performance of currently used dosimetry systems is compared with that recommended internationally, and developments for improving the actual performance...

  15. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haissinski, J.

    1986-06-01

    The discussions presented in this paper deal with the following points: distinctive features of gamma-gamma collisions; related processes; photon-photon elastic scattering in the continuum and γγ →gg; total cross section; γγ → V 1 V 2 (V=vector meson); radiative width measurements and light meson spectroscopy; exclusive channels at large /t/; jets and inclusive particle distribution in γγ collisions; and, the photon structure function F γ 2

  16. Stabilized soliton self-frequency shift and 0.1- PHz sideband generation in a photonic-crystal fiber with an air-hole-modified core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo-Wen; Hu, Ming-Lie; Fang, Xiao-Hui; Li, Yan-Feng; Chai, Lu; Wang, Ching-Yue; Tong, Weijun; Luo, Jie; Voronin, Aleksandr A; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2008-09-15

    Fiber dispersion and nonlinearity management strategy based on a modification of a photonic-crystal fiber (PCF) core with an air hole is shown to facilitate optimization of PCF components for a stable soliton frequency shift and subpetahertz sideband generation through four-wave mixing. Spectral recoil of an optical soliton by a red-shifted dispersive wave, generated through a soliton instability induced by high-order fiber dispersion, is shown to stabilize the soliton self-frequency shift in a highly nonlinear PCF with an air-hole-modified core relative to pump power variations. A fiber with a 2.3-microm-diameter core modified with a 0.9-microm-diameter air hole is used to demonstrate a robust soliton self-frequency shift of unamplified 50-fs Ti: sapphire laser pulses to a central wavelength of about 960 nm, which remains insensitive to variations in the pump pulse energy within the range from 60 to at least 100 pJ. In this regime of frequency shifting, intense high- and low-frequency branches of dispersive wave radiation are simultaneously observed in the spectrum of PCF output. An air-hole-modified-core PCF with appropriate dispersion and nonlinearity parameters is shown to provide efficient four-wave mixing, giving rise to Stokes and anti-Stokes sidebands whose frequency shift relative to the pump wavelength falls within the subpetahertz range, thus offering an attractive source for nonlinear Raman microspectroscopy.

  17. Radiation doses to children during modified barium swallow studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir, Kelly A.; McMahon, Sandra M.; Long, Gillian; Bunch, Judith A.; Pandeya, Nirmala; Coakley, Kerry S.; Chang, Anne B.

    2007-01-01

    There are minimal data on radiation doses to infants and children undergoing a modified barium swallow (MBS) study. To document screening times, dose area product (DAP) and effective doses to children undergoing MBS and to determine factors associated with increased screening times and effective dose. Fluoroscopic data (screening time, DAP, kVp) for 90 consecutive MBS studies using pulse fluoroscopy were prospectively recorded; effective dose was calculated and data were analyzed for effects of behavior, number of swallow presentations, swallowing dysfunction and medical problems. Mean effective dose for the entire group was 0.0826 ± 0.0544 mSv, screening time 2.48 ± 0.81 min, and DAP 28.79 ± 41.72 cGy cm 2 . Significant differences were found across three age groups (≤1.0, >1.0-3.0 and >3.0 years) for effective dose (mean 0.1188, 0.0651 and 0.0529 mSv, respectively; P < 0.001), but not for screening time or DAP. Effective dose was correlated with screening time (P 0.007), DAP (P < 0.001), number of swallow presentations (P = 0.007), lower age (P = 0.017), female gender (P = 0.004), and height (P < 0.001). Screening time was correlated with total number of swallow presentations (P < 0.001) and DAP (P < 0.001). Screening times, DAP, effective dose, and child and procedural factors associated with higher effective doses are presented for children undergoing MBS studies. (orig.)

  18. Proton radiation therapy (prt) for pediatric optic pathway gliomas: comparison with 3d planned conventional photons and a standard photon technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, Martin; Hug, Eugen B.; Schaefer, Rosemary A.; Nevinny-Stickel, Meinhard; Miller, Daniel W.; Slater, James M.; Slater, Jerry D.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Following adequate therapy, excellent long-term survival rates can be achieved for patients with optic pathway gliomas. Therefore, avoidance of treatment-related functional long-term sequelae is of utmost importance. Optimized sparing of normal tissue is of primary concern in the development of new treatment modalities. The present study compares proton radiation therapy (PRT) with a three-dimensional (3D)-planned multiport photon and a lateral beam photon technique for localized and extensive optic pathway tumors. Methods and Materials: Between February 1992 and November 1997, seven children with optic pathway gliomas underwent PRT. For this study, we computed proton, 3D photon, and lateral photon plans based on the same CT data sets, and using the same treatment planning software for all plans. Radiation exposure for normal tissue and discrete organs at risk was quantified based on dose-volume histograms. Results: Gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 3.9 cm 3 to 127.2 cm 3 . Conformity index (relation of encompassing isodose to GTV volume) was 2.3 for protons, 2.9 for 3D photons, and 7.3 for lateral photons. The relative increase of normal tissue (NT) encompassed at several isodose levels in relation to NT encompassed by the 95% proton isodose volume was computed. Relative NT volume of proton plan isodoses at the 95%, 90%, 80%, 50%, and 25% isodose level increased from 1 to 1.6, 2.8, 6.4, to a maximum of 13.3. Relative volumes for 3D photons were 1.6, 2.4, 3.8, 11.5, and 34.8. Lateral plan relative values were 6, 8.3, 11.5, 19.2, and 26.8. Analysis for small ( 3 ) and larger (> 80 cm 3 ) tumors showed that protons encompassed the smallest volumes of NT at all isodose levels. Comparable conformity and high-dose gradient were achieved for proton and 3D photon plans in small tumors. However, with increasing tumor volume and complexity, differences became larger. At the 50% isodose level, 3D photons were superior to lateral photons for small tumors; this

  19. Radiation resistant modified polypropylene; Polipropylen modyfikowany odporny radiacyjnie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojarski, J; Zimek, Z [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1997-10-01

    Radiation technology for production of radiation resistant polypropylene for medical use has been presented. The method consists in radiation induced copolymerization of polypropylene with ethylene and addition of small amount of copolymer of polyethylene and vinyl acetate. The material of proposed composition has a very good mechanical properties and elevated radiation resistivity decided on possibility of radiosterilization of products made of this material and designed for medical use. 3 figs, 3 tabs.

  20. Treatment of photon radiation in kinematics fits at future e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, M.; List, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); List, B. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik

    2010-05-15

    Kinematic fitting, where constraints such as energy and momentum conservation are imposed on measured four-vectors of jets and leptons, is an important tool to improve the resolution in high-energy physics experiments. At future e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders, photon radiation parallel to the beam carrying away large amounts of energy and momentum will become a challenge for kinematic fitting. A photon with longitudinal momentum p{sub z,{gamma}} ({eta}) is introduced, which is parametrized such that {eta} follows a normal distribution. In the fit, {eta} is treated as having a measured value of zero, which corresponds to p{sub z,{gamma}}, = 0. As a result, fits with constraints on energy and momentum conservation converge well even in the presence of a highly energetic photon, while the resolution of fits without such a photon is retained. A fully simulated and reconstructed e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}q anti qq anti q event sample at {radical}(s)=500 GeV is used to investigate the performance of this method under realistic conditions, as expected at the International Linear Collider. (orig.)

  1. Treatment of photon radiation in kinematics fits at future e+e- colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, M.; List, J.; List, B.

    2010-05-01

    Kinematic fitting, where constraints such as energy and momentum conservation are imposed on measured four-vectors of jets and leptons, is an important tool to improve the resolution in high-energy physics experiments. At future e + e - colliders, photon radiation parallel to the beam carrying away large amounts of energy and momentum will become a challenge for kinematic fitting. A photon with longitudinal momentum p z,γ (η) is introduced, which is parametrized such that η follows a normal distribution. In the fit, η is treated as having a measured value of zero, which corresponds to p z,γ , = 0. As a result, fits with constraints on energy and momentum conservation converge well even in the presence of a highly energetic photon, while the resolution of fits without such a photon is retained. A fully simulated and reconstructed e + e - →q anti qq anti q event sample at √(s)=500 GeV is used to investigate the performance of this method under realistic conditions, as expected at the International Linear Collider. (orig.)

  2. Microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation with associated extremely low photon flux densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, A.; Jain, V. K.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation in extremely low flux density conditions. With wide deployment in mind, potential applications range from nuclear non-proliferation, to hospital radiation-safety. The daunting challenge is the low level of photon flux densities - emerging from a Scintillation Crystal (SC) on to a ~1 mm-square detector, which are a factor of 10000 or so lower than those acceptable to recently reported photonic chips (including `single-photon detection' chips), due to a combination of low Lux, small detector size, and short duration SC output pulses - on the order of 1 μs. These challenges are attempted to be overcome by the design of an innovative `System on a Chip' type microchip, with high detector sensitivity, and effective coupling from the SC to the photodetector. The microchip houses a tiny n+ diff p-epi photodiode (PD) as well as the associated analog amplification and other related circuitry, all fabricated in 0.5micron, 3-metal 2-poly CMOS technology. The amplification, together with pulse-shaping of the photocurrent-induced voltage signal, is achieved through a tandem of two capacitively coupled, double-cascode amplifiers. Included in the paper are theoretical estimates and experimental results.

  3. A Modified Treatment of Sources in Implicit Monte Carlo Radiation Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, N.A.; Trahan, T.J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a modification of the treatment of photon sources in the IMC algorithm. We describe this modified algorithm in the context of thermal emission in an infinite medium test problem at equilibrium and show that it completely eliminates statistical noise.

  4. Multi-photon ionization of atoms in intense short-wavelength radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael

    2015-05-01

    The unprecedented characteristics of XUV and X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) have stimulated numerous investigations focusing on the detailed understanding of fundamental photon-matter interactions in atoms and molecules. In particular, the high intensities (up to 106 W/cm2) giving rise to non-linear phenomena in the short wavelength regime. The basic phenomenology involves the production of highly charged ions via electron emission to which both sequential and direct multi-photon absorption processes contribute. The detailed investigation of the role and relative weight of these processes under different conditions (wavelength, pulse duration, intensity) is the key element for a comprehensive understanding of the ionization dynamics. Here the results of recent investigations are presented, performed at the FELs in Hamburg (FLASH) and Trieste (FERMI) on atomic systems with electronic structures of increasing complexity (Ar, Ne and Xe). Mainly, electron spectroscopy is used to obtain quantitative information about the relevance of various multi-photon ionization processes. For the case of Ar, a variety of processes including above threshold ionization (ATI) from 3p and 3s valence shells, direct 2p two-photon ionization and resonant 2p-4p two-photon excitations were observed and their role was quantitatively determined comparing the experimental ionization yields to ab-initio calculations of the cross sections for the multi-photon processes. Using Ar as a benchmark to prove the reliability of the combined experimental and theoretical approach, the more complex and intriguing case of Xe was studied. Especially, the analysis of the two-photon ATI from the Xe 4d shell reveals new insight into the character of the 4d giant resonance, which was unresolved in the linear one-photon regime. Finally, the influence of intense XUV radiation to the relaxation dynamics of the Ne 2s-3p resonance was investigated by angle-resolved electron spectroscopy, especially be observing

  5. Radiative cooling of solar absorbers using a visibly transparent photonic crystal thermal blackbody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath P.; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-01-01

    A solar absorber, under the sun, is heated up by sunlight. In many applications, including solar cells and outdoor structures, the absorption of sunlight is intrinsic for either operational or aesthetic considerations, but the resulting heating is undesirable. Because a solar absorber by necessity faces the sky, it also naturally has radiative access to the coldness of the universe. Therefore, in these applications it would be very attractive to directly use the sky as a heat sink while preserving solar absorption properties. Here we experimentally demonstrate a visibly transparent thermal blackbody, based on a silica photonic crystal. When placed on a silicon absorber under sunlight, such a blackbody preserves or even slightly enhances sunlight absorption, but reduces the temperature of the underlying silicon absorber by as much as 13 °C due to radiative cooling. Our work shows that the concept of radiative cooling can be used in combination with the utilization of sunlight, enabling new technological capabilities. PMID:26392542

  6. Utilization of a photon transport code to investigate radiation therapy treatment planning quantities and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palta, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    A versatile computer program MORSE, based on neutron and photon transport theory has been utilzed to investigate radiation therapy treatment planning quantities and techniques. A multi-energy group representation of transport equation provides a concise approach in utilizing Monte Carlo numerical techniques to multiple radiation therapy treatment planning problems. Central axis total and scattered dose distributions for homogeneous and inhomogeneous water phantoms are calculated and the correction factor for lung and bone inhomogeneities are also evaluated. Results show that Monte Carlo calculations based on multi-energy group tansport theory predict the depth dose distributions that are in good agreement with available experimental data. Central axis depth dose distributions for a bremsstrahlung spectrum from a linear accelerator is also calculated to exhibit the versatility of the computer program in handling multiple radiation therapy problems. A novel approach is undertaken to study the dosimetric properties of brachytherapy sources

  7. Workplace monitoring of mixed neutron-photon radiation fields and its contribution to external dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuhmacher, H.

    2011-01-01

    Workplace monitoring is a common procedure for determining measures for routine radiation protection in a particular working environment. For mixed radiation fields consisting of neutrons and photons, it is of increased importance because it contributes to the improved accuracy of individual monitoring. An example is the determination of field-specific correction factors, which can be applied to the readings of personal dosemeters. This paper explains the general problems associated with individual dosimetry of neutron radiation, and describes the various options for workplace monitoring. These options cover a range from the elaborate field characterisation using transport calculations or spectrometers to the simpler approach using area monitors. Examples are given for workplaces in nuclear industry, at particle accelerators and at flight altitudes. (authors)

  8. Investigation of photon-magnetic therapy efficacy in prevention and treatment of experimental local radiation skin lesions. Communication 1. The peculiarities of the course of radiation dermatitis in rats at spontaneous healing and at application of photon-magnetic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syimonova, L.Yi.; Byilogurova, L.V.; Gertman, V.Z.; Kurov, O.M.

    2012-01-01

    Local x-ray exposure of the rats at a dose of 50.0 Gy caused development of radiation dermatitis with imperfect skin healing with scars and incomplete restoration of the fleece as a consequence. Administration of photon-magnetic therapy positively influenced healing of skin radiation lesions in locally irradiated animals

  9. The Dose Estimation Formula Of Photon Radiation To Film Badge Of Kodak Type 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohmah, Nur

    2000-01-01

    Study to determine the formula of dose estimation for photon radiation to film badge of Kodak type 2 has been carried out. The irradiation was done by irradiated film badge of Kodak type 2 using photon sources of X-rays machine, 137 Cs and 60 Co. By determining the apparent dose and also the sensitivity values each filters of the calibration curve and the weighting factors of energy dependence curve, the formula of the dose estimation for film badge of Kodak type 2 could be obtained, i.e. H 1cm 2.066761E-02N ADPI-2 + 1.953342N ADAI - 8.946254N ADCu + 24.80611N ADSn/pb

  10. First Experimental Study of Photon Polarization in Radiative B_{s}^{0} Decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Arnau Romeu, J; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Babuschkin, I; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Baszczyk, M; Batozskaya, V; Batsukh, B; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bezshyiko, I; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bitadze, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Boettcher, T; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bossu, F; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Campora Perez, D H; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombs, G; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Costa Sobral, C M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Da Cunha Marinho, F; 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    2017-01-13

    The polarization of photons produced in radiative B_{s}^{0} decays is studied for the first time. The data are recorded by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3  fb^{-1} at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. A time-dependent analysis of the B_{s}^{0}→ϕγ decay rate is conducted to determine the parameter A^{Δ}, which is related to the ratio of right- over left-handed photon polarization amplitudes in b→sγ transitions. A value of A^{Δ}=-0.98_{-0.52}^{+0.46}_{-0.20}^{+0.23} is measured. This result is consistent with the standard model prediction within 2 standard deviations.

  11. First experimental study of photon polarization in radiative $B^{0}_{s}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; 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Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhang, Yu; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2017-01-09

    The polarization of photons produced in radiative $B^{0}_{s}$ decays is studied for the first time. The data are recorded by the LHCb experiment in $pp$ collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3fb$^{-1}$ at center-of-mass energies of $7$ and $8$TeV. A time-dependent analysis of the $B^{0}_{s} \\to \\phi \\gamma$ decay rate is conducted to determine the parameter ${\\mathcal{A}}^\\Delta$, which is related to the ratio of right- over left-handed photon polarization amplitudes in $b \\to s \\gamma$ transitions. A value of ${\\mathcal{A}}^\\Delta=-0.98^{\\,+0.46\\,+0.23}_{\\,-0.52\\,-0.20}$ is measured. This result is consistent with the Standard Model prediction within two standard deviations.

  12. Miniature silicon photodiodes for photon and electron radiation dosimetry in therapeutical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilar, O.; Petr, I.

    1986-01-01

    The silicon diode is manufactured from P type silicon, the P layer is implanted with boron atoms and the N layer with phosphorus atoms. The diode dimensions are 2x2x0.2 mm. It is encased in elastic tissue-equivalent material. The electrodes are from an Al foil. The diode can be used as an in-vivo dosemeter in human body cavities. When irradiated, it supplies information on the instantaneous dose rate at a given point and on the dose cumulated over a certain time. Its current response to gamma radiation kerma rate is linear, directional sensitivity is isotropic. Temperature sensitivity of the photodiode is shown graphically for the range 20 to 40 degC, and the depth dose distribution measured in a water phantom is given for 6, 12 and 20 MeV photons and electrons. The diode energy dependence shows increased sensitivity to low-energy photons. (M.D.)

  13. Comment on ''Modified photon equation of motion as a test for the principle of equivalence''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nityananda, R.

    1992-01-01

    In a recent paper, a modification of the geodesic equation was proposed for spinning photons containing a spin-curvature coupling term. The difference in arrival times of opposite circular polarizations starting simultaneously from a source was computed, obtaining a result linear in the coupling parameter. It is pointed out here that this linear term violates causality and, more generally, Fermat's principle, implying calculational errors. Even if these are corrected, there is a violation of covariance in the way the photon spin was introduced. Rectifying this makes the effect computed vanish entirely

  14. Comparison of Techniques to Reduce Bremsstrahlung Background Radiation from Monoenergetic Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M; McNabb, D

    2006-01-01

    An important applied technology is a tunable mono-energetic photon source [1]. These sources are made of relativistic electron accelerators coupled to low-energy lasers, which produce high-energy, mono-energetic-rays. One challenge associated with systems such as this is a continuum of bremsstrahlung background created when an electron beam passes through an aperture of some sort and the electron bunch or its halo impinges on the aperture pictured in figure 1. For instance, in the current T-REX [1] design for the interaction point between the laser- and electron-beam, the electron-beam passes through the center of a mirror used to reflect the laser. There is a potential with this design that bremsstrahlung radiation may be produced at the edges of the mirror openings and contaminate the mono-energetic photon beam. Certain applications [2] may be sensitive to this contamination. To reduce the bremsstrahlung contaminate a collimator (thickness ∼24in. (calculated from XCOM database [3]) to attenuate by a factor of 10 -3 the 112MeV photons expected in the T-REX demonstration [1]) is situated between the aperture and target. To maximize the brightness of the photon-beam, the collimator opening must be no less than the size of the photon-beam spot size expected to be about 1mm. This fixes the collimator opening. a priori the aperture size must be greater than the collimator opening and is a function distance between the aperture and collimator. In this paper we focus on two approaches to estimate the aperture size, given a collimator and a target whose sizes and distances from the aperture are given. In the next section we will discuss these approaches

  15. Fluorescence lifetime of emitters with broad homogeneous linewidths modified in opal photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; Vos, Willem L.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of spontaneous emission from dye molecules embedded in opal photonic crystals. Fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye were measured as a function of both optical frequency and crystal lattice parameter of the polystyrene opals. Due to the broad...

  16. Radiative decays of the psi' to all-photon final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.A.

    1985-05-01

    A sample of 1.8 x 10 6 produced psi's collected by the Crystal Ball detector at SPEAR is used to measure branching ratios of selected radiative psi' decays to non-charmonium states which decay into photons. A sample of 2.2 x 10 6 produced J/psi's is used to measure the same radiative decays from the J/psi. The ratios BR(psi' → γf)/BR(J/psi → γf) = 9 +- 3%, BR(psi' → γtheta)/BR(J/psi → γtheta) < 10% - 15%, BR(psi' → γeta)/BR(J/psi → γeta) < 1.8%, and BR(psi' → γeta')/BR(J/psi → γeta') < 2.6% have been obtained. (Upper limits are 90% confidence level. The upper limit for the radiative decay to the theta is uncertain due to the possible presence of an f' signal in the J/psi data). Assuming these decays proceed via the annihilation of the initial quark and antiquark to a photon and two gluons, these ratios are predicted by lowest order QCD to be the same as the ratio of leptonic branching ratios of the psi' and J/psi, or 12.0 +- 2.2%. There currently exists no compelling explanation for the discrepancy between the ratios measured for the last two decays and the theoretical expectation

  17. Metrology and quality of radiation therapy dosimetry of electron, photon and epithermal neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosunen, A

    1999-08-01

    In radiation therapy using electron and photon beams the dosimetry chain consists of several sequential phases starting by the realisation of the dose quantity in the Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory and ending to the calculation of the dose to a patient. A similar procedure can be described for the dosimetry of epithermal neutron beams in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). To achieve the required accuracy of the dose delivered to a patient the quality of all steps in the dosimetry procedure has to be considered. This work is focused on two items in the dosimetry chains: the determination of the dose in the reference conditions and the evaluation of the accuracy of dose calculation methods. The issues investigated and discussed in detail are: a)the calibration methods of plane parallel ionisation chambers used in electron beam dosimetry, (b) the specification of the critical dosimetric parameter i.e. the ratio of stopping powers for water to air, (S I ?){sup water} {sub air}, in photon beams, (c) the feasibility of the twin ionization chamber technique for dosimetry in epithermal neutron beams applied to BNCT and (d) the determination accuracy of the calculated dose distributions in phantoms in electron, photon, and epithermal neutron beams. The results demonstrate that up to a 3% improvement in the consistency of dose determinations in electron beams is achieved by the calibration of plane parallel ionisation chambers in high energy electron beams instead of calibrations in {sup 60}Co gamma beams. In photon beam dosimetry (S I ?){sup water} {sub air} can be determined with an accuracy of 0.2% using the percentage dose at the 10 cm depth, %dd(10), as a beam specifier. The use of %odd(10) requires the elimination of the electron contamination in the photon beam. By a twin ionisation chamber technique the gamma dose can be determined with uncertainty of 6% (1 standard deviation) and the total neutron dose with an uncertainty of 15 to 20% (1 standard deviation

  18. Metrology and quality of radiation therapy dosimetry of electron, photon and epithermal neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosunen, A.

    1999-08-01

    In radiation therapy using electron and photon beams the dosimetry chain consists of several sequential phases starting by the realisation of the dose quantity in the Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory and ending to the calculation of the dose to a patient. A similar procedure can be described for the dosimetry of epithermal neutron beams in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). To achieve the required accuracy of the dose delivered to a patient the quality of all steps in the dosimetry procedure has to be considered. This work is focused on two items in the dosimetry chains: the determination of the dose in the reference conditions and the evaluation of the accuracy of dose calculation methods. The issues investigated and discussed in detail are: a)the calibration methods of plane parallel ionisation chambers used in electron beam dosimetry, (b) the specification of the critical dosimetric parameter i.e. the ratio of stopping powers for water to air, (S I ?) water air , in photon beams, (c) the feasibility of the twin ionization chamber technique for dosimetry in epithermal neutron beams applied to BNCT and (d) the determination accuracy of the calculated dose distributions in phantoms in electron, photon, and epithermal neutron beams. The results demonstrate that up to a 3% improvement in the consistency of dose determinations in electron beams is achieved by the calibration of plane parallel ionisation chambers in high energy electron beams instead of calibrations in 60 Co gamma beams. In photon beam dosimetry (S I ?) water air can be determined with an accuracy of 0.2% using the percentage dose at the 10 cm depth, %dd(10), as a beam specifier. The use of %odd(10) requires the elimination of the electron contamination in the photon beam. By a twin ionisation chamber technique the gamma dose can be determined with uncertainty of 6% (1 standard deviation) and the total neutron dose with an uncertainty of 15 to 20% (1 standard deviation). To improve the accuracy

  19. Radiation exposure by man-modified materials containing natural radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, D.E. [Technical Inspection Agency of Bavaria, Munich (Germany); Eder, E. [Government of Bavaria, Ministry for State Development and Environmental Affairs Development, Munich (Germany); Reichelt, A. [Technical Inspection Agency of Bavaria, Munich (Germany)

    1992-07-01

    More than one hundred materials, containing natural radioactive nuclides, are being investigated due to radiation exposure to people. This paper deals with thoriated gas mantles and shows that the radiation exposure by inhalation of radionuclides released while burning and exchange is not negligible. (author)

  20. DWARF GALAXIES WITH IONIZING RADIATION FEEDBACK. I. ESCAPE OF IONIZING PHOTONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji-hoon; Krumholz, Mark R.; Goldbaum, Nathan J.; Wise, John H.; Turk, Matthew J.; Abel, Tom

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new method for simulating ionizing radiation and supernova feedback in the analogs of low-redshift galactic disks. In this method, which we call star-forming molecular cloud (SFMC) particles, we use a ray-tracing technique to solve the radiative transfer equation for ultraviolet photons emitted by thousands of distinct particles on the fly. Joined with high numerical resolution of 3.8 pc, the realistic description of stellar feedback helps to self-regulate star formation. This new feedback scheme also enables us to study the escape of ionizing photons from star-forming clumps and from a galaxy, and to examine the evolving environment of star-forming gas clumps. By simulating a galactic disk in a halo of 2.3 × 10 11 M ☉ , we find that the average escape fraction from all radiating sources on the spiral arms (excluding the central 2.5 kpc) fluctuates between 0.08% and 5.9% during a ∼20 Myr period with a mean value of 1.1%. The flux of escaped photons from these sources is not strongly beamed, but manifests a large opening angle of more than 60° from the galactic pole. Further, we investigate the escape fraction per SFMC particle, f esc (i), and how it evolves as the particle ages. We discover that the average escape fraction f esc is dominated by a small number of SFMC particles with high f esc (i). On average, the escape fraction from an SFMC particle rises from 0.27% at its birth to 2.1% at the end of a particle lifetime, 6 Myr. This is because SFMC particles drift away from the dense gas clumps in which they were born, and because the gas around the star-forming clumps is dispersed by ionizing radiation and supernova feedback. The framework established in this study brings deeper insight into the physics of photon escape fraction from an individual star-forming clump and from a galactic disk

  1. Line photon transport in a non-homogeneous plasma using radiative coupling coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florido, R.; Gil, J.M.; Rodriguez, R.; Rubiano, J.G.; Martel, P.; Florido, R.; Gil, J.M.; Rodriguez, R.; Rubiano, J.G.; Martel, P.; Minguez, E.

    2006-01-01

    We present a steady-state collisional-radiative model for the calculation of level populations in non-homogeneous plasmas with planar geometry. The line photon transport is taken into account following an angle- and frequency-averaged escape probability model. Several models where the same approach has been used can be found in the literature, but the main difference between our model and those ones is that the details of geometry are exactly treated in the definition of coupling coefficients and a local profile is taken into account in each plasma cell. (authors)

  2. Calculation of Bremsstrahlung radiation of electrons on atoms in wide energy range of photons

    CERN Document Server

    Romanikhin, V P

    2002-01-01

    The complete spectra of the Bremsstrahlung radiation on the krypton atoms within the range of the photon energies of 10-25000 eV and lanthanum near the potential of the 4d-shell ionization is carried out. The atoms summarized polarizability is calculated on the basis of the simple semiclassical approximation of the local electron density and experimental data on the photoabsorption. The comparison with the calculational results is carried out through the method of distorted partial waves (PDWA) for Kr and with the experimental data on La

  3. Tight-binding calculation of radiation loss in photonic crystal CROW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Martínez, Luis Javier; Fan, Shanhui; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2013-01-28

    The tight binding approximation (TBA) is used to relate the intrinsic, radiation loss of a coupled resonator optical waveguide (CROW) to that of a single constituent resonator within a light cone picture. We verify the validity of the TBA via direct, full-field simulation of CROWs based on the L2 photonic crystal cavity. The TBA predicts that the quality factor of the CROW increases with that of the isolated cavity. Moreover, our results provide a method to design CROWs with low intrinsic loss across the entire waveguide band.

  4. Low index contrast heterostructure photonic crystal cavities with high quality factors and vertical radiation coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaochen; Minkov, Momchil; Fan, Shanhui; Li, Xiuling; Zhou, Weidong

    2018-04-01

    We report here design and experimental demonstration of heterostructure photonic crystal cavities resonating near the Γ point with simultaneous strong lateral confinement and highly directional vertical radiation patterns. The lateral confinement is provided by a mode gap originating from a gradual modulation of the hole radii. High quality factor resonance is realized with a low index contrast between silicon nitride and quartz. The near surface-normal directional emission is preserved when the size of the core region is scaled down. The influence of the cavity size parameters on the resonant modes is also investigated theoretically and experimentally.

  5. Properties of an electret ionisation chamber for individual dosimetry in photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.; Pretzsch, G.

    1985-01-01

    The main properties of individual photon dosemeters are their energy and angular dependence and their measuring range and measurement accuracy. The determination of radiation exposure from the dosemeter readout is based on the choice of appropriate conversion factors, taking into account the influence of body backscatter on the dosemeter readout. The measurement range and accuracy of an electret ionisation chamber primarily depend on the electret stability and charge state measurement as well as on the chamber geometry. Dosimetric properties are described for an electret ionisation chamber designed for personnel monitoring. (author)

  6. Radiation resistant PIDECα cell using photon intermediate direct energy conversion and a 210Po source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Charles L; Schott, Robert J; Prelas, Mark A; Wisniewski, Denis A; Rothenberger, Jason B; Lukosi, Eric D; Oh, Kyuhak

    2018-02-01

    Radiation damage is a significant concern with both alphavoltaic and betavoltaic cells because their performance degrades, especially with high-energy - (>200keV) beta and alpha particles. Indirect excitation methods, such as the Photon Intermediate Direct Energy Conversion (PIDEC) framework, can protect the transducer from radiation. A nuclear battery using a 90 Sr beta source was constructed by the author's research group, which demonstrated the radiation resistance of a PIDEC cell driven by beta particles (PIDECβ cell). Use of alpha sources to drive nuclear batteries would appear to be much more attractive than beta sources due to higher potential power density. However, they are also subject to higher rates of radiation damage. This paper describes the successful incorporation of alpha particles into the PIDEC framework using the alpha emitter 210 Po to form a PIDECα cell. The PIDECα cell transducer was exposed to alpha particles for over one year without experiencing adverse effects from radiation damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Searches for the Anomalous Photon Polarisation in Radiative B Decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00455305

    This thesis is exploring the measurements of the photon polarisation in radiative $B$ decays at LHCb, which are mediated through $b\\to s\\gamma$ transitions. To ensure optimal physics performance, procedures to align the LHCb detector and to monitor the alignment quality over time are presented. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3~\\text{fb}^{-1}$, collected in the year of 2011 at the centre-of-energy $\\sqrt{s} = 7$~TeV and the year of 2012 at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$~TeV in proton-proton collisions, the photon polarisation parameter $A^\\Delta$, which is related to the ratio of right- over left-handed photon polarisation amplitudes in $b\\to s\\gamma$ transitions, is measured by performing an untagged time-dependent analysis of more than $4000$ $B_s^0\\to \\phi\\gamma$ decays. From an unbinned simultaneous fit to the $B_s^0\\to\\phi\\gamma$ and the control channel $B^0\\to{K^*}^0\\gamma$ data samples, a value of $A^\\Delta = -0.98^{~+0.46}_{~-0.52}\\text{(stat.)}^{~+0.23}_{~-0.20}\\text{(syst.)}$ is measured. T...

  8. Study of two-photon decays of pseudoscalar mesons via J /ψ radiative decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.; Albrecht, M.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Bai, Y.; Bakina, O.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chai, J.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, P. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Fegan, S.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. G.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, X. Q.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Holtmann, T.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jin, Y.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Khan, T.; Khoukaz, A.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Koch, L.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuemmel, M.; Kuhlmann, M.; Kupsc, A.; Kühn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Lavezzi, L.; Leithoff, H.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K. J.; Li, Kang; Li, Ke; Li, Lei; Li, P. L.; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, Huanhuan; Liu, Huihui; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Ke; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Long, Y. F.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Meng, Z. X.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mezzadri, G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Musiol, P.; Mustafa, A.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Papenbrock, M.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Pellegrino, J.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, J. J.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Richter, M.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schnier, C.; Schoenning, K.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, J. J.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Sowa, C.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, L.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. K.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, G. Y.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Tiemens, M.; Tsednee, B.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, Dan; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, Meng; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Zongyuan; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Y. J.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xie, Y. H.; Xiong, X. A.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. H.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; You, Z. Y.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhou, Y. X.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2018-04-01

    Using a sample of 4.48 ×108 ψ (3686 ) events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, we study the two-photon decays of the pseudoscalar mesons π0, η , η', η (1405 ), η (1475 ), η (1760 ), and X (1835 ) in J /ψ radiative decays using ψ (3686 )→π+π-J /ψ events. The π0, η , and η' mesons are clearly observed in the two-photon mass spectra, and the branching fractions are determined to be B (J /ψ →γ π0→3 γ )=(3.57 ±0.12 ±0.16 )×10-5 , B (J /ψ →γ η →3 γ )=(4.42 ±0.04 ±0.18 )×10-4 , and B (J /ψ →γ η'→3 γ )=(1.26 ±0.02 ±0.05 )×10-4 , where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. No clear signal for η (1405 ), η (1475 ), η (1760 ) or X (1835 ) is observed in the two-photon mass spectra, and upper limits at the 90% confidence level on the product branching fractions are obtained.

  9. Resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization of ions by Lyman alpha radiation in gaseous nebulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, S; Letokhov, V

    2001-01-26

    One of the mysteries of nebulae in the vicinity of bright stars is the appearance of bright emission spectral lines of ions, which imply fairly high excitation temperatures. We suggest that an ion formation mechanism, based on resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization (RETPI) by intense H Lyman alpha radiation (wavelength of 1215 angstroms) trapped inside optically thick nebulae, can produce these spectral lines. The rate of such an ionization process is high enough for rarefied gaseous media where the recombination rate of the ions formed can be 10(-6) to 10(-8) per second for an electron density of 10(3) to 10(5) per cubic centimeter in the nebula. Under such conditions, the photo-ions formed may subsequently undergo further RETPI, catalyzed by intense He i and He ii radiation, which also gets enhanced in optically thick nebulae that contain enough helium.

  10. Calibration in photon radiation fields with energies above 3 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueermann, L.

    1997-01-01

    For determination of the response of dosemeters and dose ratemeters for photon energies above 3 MeV, the PTB uses reference radiation fields generated via the nuclear reactions 12 (p, p' γ) 12 C (4.4 MeV) and 19 F(p,αγ) 16 O (6-7 MeV). As a maximum, kerma rates of 1 mGy/h released in air can be achieved at 1 m distance from the target. The air kerma in the reference fields is determined with two different methods, i.e. by spectrometry using a Ge detector, and by ionometry using a graphite cavity ionisation chamber. The total uncertainty of the value determined for the air kerma (collision radiation) in the reference fields is 50% at a confidence level of 68.3%. (orig./CB) [de

  11. Photon beam audits for radiation therapy clinics: A pilot mailed dosemeter study in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yegingil, Z.; DeWerd, L. A.; Davis, S. D.; Hammer, C.; Kunugi, K.

    2012-01-01

    A thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) mailed dose audit programme was performed at five radiotherapy clinics in Turkey. The intercomparison was organised by the Univ. of Wisconsin Radiation Calibration Laboratory (UWRCL), which was responsible for the technical aspects of the study including reference irradiations, distribution, collection and evaluation. The purpose of these audits was to perform an independent dosimetry check of the radiation beams using TLDs sent by mail. Acrylic holders, each with five TLD chips inside and instructions for their irradiation to specified absorbed dose to water of 2 Gy, were mailed to all participating clinics. TLD irradiations were performed with a 6 MV linear accelerator and 60 Co photon beams. The deviations from the TL readings of UWRCL were calculated. Discrepancies inside the limits of ±5 % between the participant-stated dose, and the TLD-measured dose were considered acceptable. One out of 10 beams checked was outside this limit, with a difference of 5.8 %. (authors)

  12. Nanopositioning techniques development for synchrotron radiation instrumentation applications at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu Deming

    2010-01-01

    At modern synchrotron radiation sources and beamlines, high-precision positioning techniques present a significant opportunity to support state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation research. Meanwhile, the required instrument positioning performance and capabilities, such as resolution, dynamic range, repeatability, speed, and multiple axes synchronization are exceeding the limit of commercial availability. This paper presents the current nanopositioning techniques developed for the Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM)/Advanced Photon Source (APS) hard x-ray nanoprobe and high-resolution x-ray monochromators and analyzers for the APS X-ray Operations and Research (XOR) beamlines. Future nanopositioning techniques to be developed for the APS renewal project will also be discussed.

  13. Radiation shielding techniques and applications. 3. Analysis of Photon Streaming Through and Around Shield Doors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, Marvin; Hack, Joe; Nathan, Steve; White, Travis

    2001-01-01

    Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions (Westinghouse SMS) has been tasked with providing radiological engineering design support for the new Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) being constructed at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Remote Handling Building (RHB) of the CLWR-TEF will act as the receiving facility for irradiated targets used in the production of tritium for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Because of the high dose rates, approaching 50 000 rads/h (500 Gy/h) from the irradiated target bundles, significant attention has been made to shielding structures within the facility. One aspect of the design that has undergone intense review is the shield doors. The RHB has six shield doors that needed to be studied with respect to photon streaming. Several aspects had to be examined to ensure that the design meets the radiation dose levels. Both the thickness and streaming issues around the door edges were designed and examined. Photon streaming through and around a shield door is a complicated problem, creating a reliance on computer modeling to perform the analyses. The computer code typically used by the Westinghouse SMS in the evaluation of photon transport through complex geometries is the MCNP Monte Carlo computer code. The complexity of the geometry within the problem can cause problems even with the Monte Carlo codes. Striking a balance between how the code handles transport through the shield door with transport through the streaming paths, particularly with the use of typical variance reduction methods, is difficult when trying to ensure that all important regions of the model are sampled appropriately. The thickness determination used a simple variance reduction technique. In construction, the shield door will not be flush against the wall, so a solid rectangular slab leaves streaming paths around the edges. Administrative controls could be used to control dose to workers; however, 10 CFR 835.1001 states

  14. Photo-induced changes of silicate glasses optical parameters at multi-photon laser radiation absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, O.M.; Glebov, L.B.; Mekryukov, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper the results of investigations of the mechanisms of photo-induced changes of alkali-silicate (crown) and lead-silicate (flint) glasses optical parameters upon the exposure to the intense laser radiation, and the basic regularities of these processes are reported. These investigations were performed in Research Center open-quotes S. I. Vavilov State Optical Instituteclose quotes during last 15 years. The kinetics of stable and unstable CC formation and decay, the effect of widely spread impurity ions on these processes, the characteristics of fundamental and impure luminescence, the kinetics of refractive index change under conditions of multi-photon glass matrix excitation, and other properties are considered. On the basis of analysis of received regularities it was shown that the nonlinear coloration of alkali-silicate glasses (the fundamental absorption edge is nearly 6 eV) takes place only as a result of two-photon absorption. Important efforts were aimed at the detection of three- or more photon matrix ionization of these glasses, but they were failed. However it was established that in the lead silicate glasses the long-wave carriers mobility boundary (> 5.6 eV) is placed considerably higher the fundamental absorption edge (∼ 3.5 eV) of material matrix. This results in that the linear color centers formation in the lead silicate glasses is not observed. The coloration of these glasses arises only from the two- or three-photon matrix ionization, and the excitation occurs through virtual states that are placed in the fundamental absorption region. In the report the available mechanisms of photo-induced changes of glasses optical parameters, and some applied aspects of this problem are discussed

  15. Lorentz Invariance Violation and Modified Hawking Fermions Tunneling Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Zheng Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently the modified Dirac equation with Lorentz invariance violation has been proposed, which would be helpful to resolve some issues in quantum gravity theory and high energy physics. In this paper, the modified Dirac equation has been generalized in curved spacetime, and then fermion tunneling of black holes is researched under this correctional Dirac field theory. We also use semiclassical approximation method to get correctional Hamilton-Jacobi equation, so that the correctional Hawking temperature and correctional black hole’s entropy are derived.

  16. Meshed doped silicon photonic crystals for manipulating near-field thermal radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzouka, Mahmoud; Ndao, Sidy

    2018-01-01

    The ability to control and manipulate heat flow is of great interest to thermal management and thermal logic and memory devices. Particularly, near-field thermal radiation presents a unique opportunity to enhance heat transfer while being able to tailor its characteristics (e.g., spectral selectivity). However, achieving nanometric gaps, necessary for near-field, has been and remains a formidable challenge. Here, we demonstrate significant enhancement of the near-field heat transfer through meshed photonic crystals with separation gaps above 0.5 μm. Using a first-principle method, we investigate the meshed photonic structures numerically via finite-difference time-domain technique (FDTD) along with the Langevin approach. Results for doped-silicon meshed structures show significant enhancement in heat transfer; 26 times over the non-meshed corrugated structures. This is especially important for thermal management and thermal rectification applications. The results also support the premise that thermal radiation at micro scale is a bulk (rather than a surface) phenomenon; the increase in heat transfer between two meshed-corrugated surfaces compared to the flat surface (8.2) wasn't proportional to the increase in the surface area due to the corrugations (9). Results were further validated through good agreements between the resonant modes predicted from the dispersion relation (calculated using a finite-element method), and transmission factors (calculated from FDTD).

  17. The calibration method for personal dosimetry system in photon and neutron radiation fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trousil, J; Plichta, J [CSOD, Prague (Czech Republic); Nikodemova, D [SOD, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    The type testing of dosimetry system was performed with standard photon radiation fields within the energy range 15 keV to 1.25 MeV and electron radiation fields within the range 0.2 MeV to 3 MeV. For type testing of neutron dosimeters {sup 252}Cf and {sup 241}Am-Be radionuclide neutron sources was used, as well as a 14 MeV neutron generator. The neutron sources moderated by various moderating and absorbing materials was also used. The routine calibration of individual photon dosemeters was carried out using a {sup 137}Cs calibration source in the air kerma quality in the dose range 0.2 mGy to 6 Gy. The type testing of neutron dosemeters was performed in collaboration with Nueherberg laboratory on neutron generator with neutron energies -.57; 1.0;; 5.3 and 15.1 MeV. The fading and angular dependence testing was also included in the tests of both dosemeter systems. (J.K.).

  18. On mixed electron-photon radiation therapy optimization using the column generation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Marc-André; Serban, Monica; Seuntjens, Jan

    2017-08-01

    Despite considerable increase in the number of degrees of freedom handled by recent radiotherapy optimisation algorithms, treatments are still typically delivered using a single modality. Column generation is an iterative method for solving large optimisation problems. It is well suited for mixed-modality (e.g., photon-electron) optimisation as the aperture shaping and modality selection problem can be solved rapidly, and the performance of the algorithm scales favourably with increasing degrees of freedom. We demonstrate that the column generation method applied to mixed photon-electron planning can efficiently generate treatment plans and investigate its behaviour under different aperture addition schemes. Column generation was applied to the problem of mixed-modality treatment planning for a chest wall case and a leg sarcoma case. 6 MV beamlets (100 cm SAD) were generated for the photon components along with 5 energies for electron beamlets (6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV), simulated as shortened-SAD (80 cm) beams collimated with a photon MLC. For the chest wall case, IMRT-only, modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT)-only, and mixed electron-photon (MBRT) treatment plans were created using the same planning criteria. For the sarcoma case, MBRT and MERT plans were created to study the behaviour of the algorithm under two different sets of planning criteria designed to favour specific modalities. Finally, the efficiency and plan quality of four different aperture addition schemes was analysed by creating chest wall MBRT treatment plans which incorporate more than a single aperture per iteration of the column generation loop based on a heuristic aperture ranking scheme. MBRT plans produced superior target coverage and homogeneity relative to IMRT and MERT plans created using the same optimisation criteria, all the while preserving the normal tissue-sparing advantages of electron therapy. Adjusting the planning criteria to favour a specific modality in the sarcoma

  19. Diamond photonic crystal slab: leaky modes and modified photoluminescence emission of surface-deposited quantum dots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondič, Lukáš; Babchenko, Oleg; Varga, Marián; Kromka, Alexander; Čtyroký, Jiří; Pelant, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, Dec (2012), s. 1-6 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0794; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA101120804; GA AV ČR KJB100100903; GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/10/0046 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100100902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : photonic crystal * diamond * photoluminescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.927, year: 2012 http://www.nature.com/srep/2012/121203/srep00914/full/srep00914.html

  20. Construction and performance of BL28 of the Photon Factory for circularly polarized synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagoshima, Y.; Muto, S.; Miyahara, T.; Koide, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Kitamura, H.

    1992-01-01

    A branch beamline, BL28A, has been constructed for the application of circularly polarized vacuum ultraviolet radiation. The radiation can be obtained in the helical undulator operation mode of an insertion device, EMPW number-sign 28, which is also cut for elliptically polarized hard x-ray radiation. T first harmonic of the helical undulator radiation can be tuned from 40 to 350 eV with its corresponding K value from 3 to 0.2. A monochromator working basically with constant deviation optics was installed, and has started its operation. A circularly polarized flux of ∼10 10 photons/s has been achieved with energy resolution of around 500--1000 at the first harmonic peak. The circular polarization after the monochromator was estimated to be higher than 70% by comparing theory and experiment on the magnetic circular dichroism of nickel films in the 3p-3d excitation region. The design philosophy of the beamline and recent results on the performance tests are presented

  1. Radiation dose response of N channel MOSFET submitted to filtered X-ray photon beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves Filho, Luiz C.; Monte, David S.; Barros, Fabio R.; Santos, Luiz A. P.

    2018-01-01

    MOSFET can operate as a radiation detector mainly in high-energy photon beams, which are normally used in cancer treatments. In general, such an electronic device can work as a dosimeter from threshold voltage shift measurements. The purpose of this article is to show a new way for measuring the dose-response of MOSFETs when they are under X-ray beams generated from 100kV potential range, which is normally used in diagnostic radiology. Basically, the method consists of measuring the MOSFET drain current as a function of the radiation dose. For this the type of device, it has to be biased with a high value resistor aiming to see a substantial change in the drain current after it has been irradiated with an amount of radiation dose. Two types of N channel device were used in the experiment: a signal transistor and a power transistor. The delivered dose to the device was varied and the electrical curves were plotted. Also, a sensitivity analysis of the power MOSFET response was made, by varying the tube potential of about 20%. The results show that both types of devices have responses very similar, the shift in the electrical curve is proportional to the radiation dose. Unlike the power MOSFET, the signal transistor does not provide a linear function between the dose rate and its drain current. We also have observed that the variation in the tube potential of the X-ray equipment produces a very similar dose-response.

  2. Construction and performance of BL28 of the Photon Factory for circularly polarized synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagoshima, Yasushi; Muto, Sadatsugu; Miyahara, Tsuneaki; Koide, Tsuneharu; Yamamoto, Shigeru; Kitamura, Hideo

    1992-01-01

    A branch beamline, BL28A, has been constructed for the application of circularly polarized vacuum ultraviolet radiation. The radiation can be obtained in the helical undulator operation mode of an insertion device, EMPW♯28, which is also cut for elliptically polarized hard x-ray radiation. T first harmonic of the helical undulator radiation can be tuned from 40 to 350 eV with its corresponding K value from 3 to 0.2. A monochromator working basically with constant deviation optics was installed, and has started its operation. A circularly polarized flux of ˜1010 photons/s has been achieved with energy resolution of around 500-1000 at the first harmonic peak. The circular polarization after the monochromator was estimated to be higher than 70% by comparing theory and experiment on the magnetic circular dichroism of nickel films in the 3p-3d excitation region. The design philosophy of the beamline and recent results on the performance tests are presented.

  3. Preliminary results of the use of photon-magnetic therapy in prevention and treatment of skin radiation reactions of patients with breast cancer with adjuvant radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syimonova, L.Yi.; Gertman, V.Z.; Byilogurova, L.V.; Kulyinyich, G.V.; Lavrik, V.P.

    2012-01-01

    The authors report preliminary findings of the investigation of the effect of combination photon-magnetic therapy with successive application of red and blue light to the skin of breast cancer patients during the course of post-operative radiation therapy. It was established that photonmagnetic therapy positively influenced the state of the skin in the irradiated areas. Addition of the magnetic factor significantly improved the efficacy of phototherapy. The patients receiving photon-magnetic therapy finished the course of radiation therapy with almost unchanged skin.

  4. Modifying EPA radiation risk models based on BEIR VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawel, D.; Puskin, J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes a 'draft White Paper' that provides details on proposed changes in EPA's methodology for estimating radiogenic cancer risks. Many of the changes are based on the contents of a recent National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report (BEIR VII), that addresses cancer and genetic risks from low doses of low-LET radiation. The draft White Paper was prepared for a meeting with the EPA's Science Advisory Board's Radiation Advisory Committee (RAC) in September for seeking advice on the application of BEIR VII and on issues relating to these modifications and expansions. After receiving the Advisory review, we plan to implement the changes by publishing the new methodology in an EPA report, which we expect to submit to the RAC for final review. The revised methodology could then be applied to update the cancer risk coefficients for over 800 radionuclides that are published in EPA's Federal Guidance Report 13. (author)

  5. Structural aspects of crotalic venom proteins modified by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Karina Corleto de

    2010-01-01

    Snake bites are a serious public health problem, especially in subtropical countries. In Brazil, the Ministry of Health notified around 26 000 accidents in 2008. The genus Crotalus (rattlesnakes) accounts for approximately 7% of the total, with a high mortality rate of 72% when untreated with the specific serum, the only effective treatment in case of snake bites. In Brazil, the serum is produced in horses which, despite the large size, have a reduced lifespan due to the high toxicity of the antigen. Ionizing radiation has proven to be an excellent tool for reducing the toxicity of venoms and isolated toxins, resulting in better immunogens for serum production, and contributing to the welfare of serum producing animals. Since the action of gamma radiation on venoms and toxins has not been yet fully clarified from the structural point of view, we proposed in this paper, to characterize two toxins of the species Crotalus durissus terrificus: crotoxin and crotamine. After isolation of the toxins of interest by chromatographic techniques, they were subjected to structural analysis with the application of the following methods: Fluorescence, Circular Dichroism, Differential Calorimetry and Infrared Spectroscopy. These tests showed that both crotamine as crotoxin when subjected to gamma radiation, showed changes in their structural conformation compared with the samples in the native state. Such changes probably occur in the secondary and tertiary structure and may explain the changes on the biological activity of these toxins. (author)

  6. Polypropylene-polyethylene blends modified by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terence, Mauro C.; Ruiz, Francisco C.

    2009-01-01

    One way to obtain a better mechanical property of polypropylene and polyethylene is to increasing the number of polymer chains cross-linked by gamma radiation. After irradiation a network is formed as a result of various chemical reactions and the radicals formed are concentrated in the amorphous phase. With the objective to improve the mechanical properties of PP, blends with PE were prepared and irradiated in doses up to 500 kGy, in atmospheric ambient. The molecular characterization of the blends was made by infrared spectroscopy and the data showed an increase in rigidity and a unique behaviour in Izod impact resistance. (author)

  7. Thermal radiative properties of a photonic crystal structure sandwiched by SiC gratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Weijie; Fu, Ceji; Tan, Wenchang

    2014-01-01

    Spectral and directional control of thermal emission holds substantial importance in applications where heat transfer is predominantly by thermal radiation. In this work, we investigate the spectral and directional properties of thermal emission from a novel structure, which is constituted with a photonic crystal (PC) sandwiched by SiC gratings. Numerical results based on the RCWA algorithm reveal that greatly enhanced emissivity can be achieved in a broad frequency band and in a wide range of angle of emission. This promising emission feature is found to be caused by excitation of surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs), PC mode, magnetic polaritons (MPs) and Fabry–Pérot resonance from high order diffracted waves, as well as the coupling between different resonant modes. We show that the broad enhanced emissivity band can be manipulated by adjusting the dimensional parameters of the structure properly. -- Highlights: ► We propose a novel structure made of a photonic crystal sandwiched by SiC gratings. ► High emissivity can be achieved in a broad spectral band and angle range. ► We explain the result by excitation of multiple excited modes and their coupling

  8. Design of Si-photonic structures to evaluate their radiation hardness dependence on design parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeiler, M.; Detraz, S.; Olantera, L.; Pezzullo, G.; El Nasr-Storey, S. Seif; Sigaud, C.; Soos, C.; Troska, J.; Vasey, F.

    2016-01-01

    Particle detectors for future experiments at the HL-LHC will require new optical data transmitters that can provide high data rates and be resistant against high levels of radiation. Furthermore, new design paths for future optical readout systems for HL-LHC could be opened if there was a possibility to integrate the optical components with their driving electronics and possibly also the silicon particle sensors themselves. All these functionalities could potentially be combined in the silicon photonics technology which currently receives a lot of attention for conventional optical link systems. Silicon photonic test chips were designed in order to assess the suitability of this technology for deployment in high-energy physics experiments. The chips contain custom-designed Mach-Zehnder modulators, pre-designed ''building-block'' modulators, photodiodes and various other passive test structures. The simulation and design flow of the custom designed Mach-Zehnder modulators and some first measurement results of the chips are presented

  9. Photon strength functions in Gd isotopes studied from radiative capture of resonance neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroll J.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The experimental spectra of γ rays following radiative neutron capture on isolated resonances of stable 152,154–158Gd targets were measured by the DANCE calorimeter installed at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center in New Mexico, USA. These spectra were analyzed within the extreme statistical model to get new information on the photon strength functions. Special emphasis was put on study of the scissors vibrational mode present in these isotopes. Our data show that the scissors-mode resonances are built not only on the ground states but also on the excited levels of all studied Gd isotopes. The scissors mode strength observed in 157,159Gd products is significantly higher than in neighboring even-even nuclei 156,158Gd. Such a difference indicates the existence of an odd-even effect in the scissors mode strength. Moreover, there exists no universal parameter-free model of the electric dipole photon strength function describing the experimental data in all of the Gd isotopes studied. The results for the scissors mode are compared with the (γ, γ′ data for the ground-state transitions and with the results from 3He-induced reactions.

  10. Photon radiation in e+e-→hadrons at low energies with carlomat3.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegerlehner, Fred; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin; Kolodziej, Karol

    2017-01-01

    We present a sample of results for the cross sections of several processes of low energetic e + e - annihilation into final states containing pions accompanied by one or two photons, or a light lepton pair. The results, which have been obtained with a new version of a multipurpose Monte Carlo program carlomat, labelled 3.1, demonstrate new capabilities of the program which, among others, include a possibility of taking into account either the initial or final state radiation separately, or both at a time, and a possibility of inclusion of the electromagnetic charged pion form factor for processes with charged pion pairs. We also discuss some problems related to the U(1) electromagnetic gauge invariance.

  11. Cerenkov light spectrum in an optical fiber exposed to a photon or electron radiation therapy beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Jamil; Yin Yongbai; McKenzie, David R.; Law, Sue; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2009-01-01

    A Cerenkov signal is generated when energetic charged particles enter the core of an optical fiber. The Cerenkov intensity can be large enough to interfere with signals transmitted through the fiber. We determine the spectrum of the Cerenkov background signal generated in a poly(methyl methacrylate) optical fiber exposed to photon and electron therapeutic beams from a linear accelerator. This spectral measurement is relevant to discrimination of the signal from the background, as in scintillation dosimetry using optical fiber readouts. We find that the spectrum is approximated by the theoretical curve after correction for the wavelength dependent attenuation of the fiber. The spectrum does not depend significantly on the angle between the radiation beam and the axis of the fiber optic but is dependent on the depth in water at which the fiber is exposed to the beam.

  12. Modifications of radiation detection response of PADC track detectors by photons

    CERN Document Server

    Sinha, D

    1998-01-01

    Photon induced modifications in polyalyldiglycol carbonate (PADC) track detectors have been studied in the dose range of 10 sup 1 -10 sup 6 Gy. It was found that some of the properties like bulk-etch rate, track-etch rate got enhanced at the dose of 10 sup 6 Gy. Activation energy for bulk-etching has been determined for different gamma doses. In order to correlate the high etch rate with the chemical modifications, UV-Vis, IR and ESR studies were carried out. These studies clearly give the indication that radiation damage results into radical formation through bond cleavage. TGA study was performed for understanding the thermal resistance of this detector. The results are presented and discussed.

  13. Tunable photonic crystal for THz radiation in layered superconductors: Strong magnetic-field dependence of the transmission coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savel'ev, Sergey; Rakhmanov, A.L.; Nori, Franco

    2006-01-01

    Josephson plasma waves are scattered by the Josephson vortex lattice. This scattering results in a strong dependence, on the in-plane magnetic-field H ab , of the reflection and transmission of THz radiation propagating in layered superconductors. In particular, a tunable band-gap structure (THz photonic crystal) occurs in such a medium. These effects can be used, by varying H ab , for the selective frequency-filtering of THz radiation

  14. Photon multiplicity in the hard radiation of 150 GeV electrons in an aligned germanium crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkacem, A.; Chevallier, M.; Gaillard, M.J.; Genre, R.; Kirsch, R.; Poizat, J.C.; Remillieux, J.; Bologna, G.; Peigneux, J.P.; Sillou, D.; Spighel, M.; Cue, N.; Kimball, J.C.; Marsh, B.B.; Sun, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    Mean values m of photon multiplicity in the radiation of 150 GeV electrons directed at and near the axis of a 0.185 mm thick Ge crystal cooled to 100 K have been deduced from the measurements of pair conversion probabilities. Depending on the distribution of multiplicity assumed, values of m ranging from 3.8 to 4.3 are obtained for the previously reported anomalous radiation peak. (orig.)

  15. Photon technology. Hard photon technology; Photon technology. Hard photon gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Research results of hard photon technology have been summarized as a part of novel technology development highly utilizing the quantum nature of photon. Hard photon technology refers to photon beam technologies which use photon in the 0.1 to 200 nm wavelength region. Hard photon has not been used in industry due to the lack of suitable photon sources and optical devices. However, hard photon in this wavelength region is expected to bring about innovations in such areas as ultrafine processing and material synthesis due to its atom selective reaction, inner shell excitation reaction, and spatially high resolution. Then, technological themes and possibility have been surveyed. Although there are principle proposes and their verification of individual technologies for the technologies of hard photon generation, regulation and utilization, they are still far from the practical applications. For the photon source technology, the laser diode pumped driver laser technology, laser plasma photon source technology, synchrotron radiation photon source technology, and vacuum ultraviolet photon source technology are presented. For the optical device technology, the multi-layer film technology for beam mirrors and the non-spherical lens processing technology are introduced. Also are described the reduction lithography technology, hard photon excitation process, and methods of analysis and measurement. 430 refs., 165 figs., 23 tabs.

  16. Options for the modified radiation weighting factor of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellerer, A. M.; Leuthold, G.; Mares, V.; Schraube, H.

    2004-01-01

    The recent ICRP Report 92 has noted that the current radiation weighting factor, w R , depends on the energy of the incident neutrons in a manner that differs substantially from the dependence, which results from the current convention, Q(L). At all neutron energies, but most conspicuously below 1 MeV, the values of w R exceed those of the effective quality factor, q E . The discrepancy is largely due to the fact that - in the absence of computed values of the effective quality factor for neutrons - w R has been patterned after the values of the ambient quality factor, which accounts insufficiently for the low-linear energy transfer (LET) gamma ray component from neutron capture in the human body. There are different options to remove the discrepancy. Option 1 is to reduce w R substantially at all neutron energies to make it equal to q E for a standard condition, such as isotropic incidence of the neutrons. Since such a reduction may cause problems in those countries where the current w R values are already legally implemented, ICRP 92 has proposed what is here termed Option 2. It recommended to replace Q(L) by the increased value 1.6 Q(L) - 0.6 and, accordingly, to make the radiation weighting factor equal to 1.6 q E - 0.6. With Option 2 the radiation weighting factor needs to be decreased appreciably at low neutron energies, but for fission neutron spectra the overall changes are minor. To guide - regardless which option is chosen - the selection of the numerical values, the effective quality factor, q E , is computed here for different directional distributions of neutrons incident on the anthropomorphic phantoms ADAM and EVA. None of the sex averaged numerical values is found to deviate much from those for isotropic incidence. Isotropic incidence can, thus, be used as an adequate standard condition. A numerical approximation is proposed for the standard q E that is nearly equivalent to a formula invoked by ICRP 92, but is somewhat simpler and provides realistic

  17. On beam shaping of the field radiated by a line source coupled to finite or infinite photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccuzzi, Silvio; Jandieri, Vakhtang; Baccarelli, Paolo; Ponti, Cristina; Schettini, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Comparison of the beam-shaping effect of a field radiated by a line source, when an ideal infinite structure constituted by two photonic crystals and an actual finite one are considered, has been carried out by means of two different methods. The lattice sums technique combined with the generalized reflection matrix method is used to rigorously investigate the radiation from the infinite photonic crystals, whereas radiation from crystals composed of a finite number of rods along the layers is analyzed using the cylindrical-wave approach. A directive radiation is observed with the line source embedded in the structure. With an increased separation distance between the crystals, a significant edge diffraction appears that provides the main radiation mechanism in the finite layout. Suitable absorbers are implemented to reduce the above-mentioned diffraction and the reflections at the boundaries, thus obtaining good agreement between radiation patterns of a localized line source coupled to finite and infinite photonic crystals, when the number of periods of the finite structure is properly chosen.

  18. Hemostatic foam from radiation-modified carboxymethyl derivative of chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barba, Bin Jeremiah D.; Aranilla, Charito T.; Vista, Jeanina Richelle M.; Relleve, Lorna S.; Abad, Lucille V.

    2015-01-01

    A hemostatic agent or hemostat is intended to accelerate the blood clotting process when applied to a bleeding surface, such as those in military and civilian wound trauma or in surgery. Natural polymers like chitosan (Ch) has been previously used as raw material in developing hemostats owing to their bioavailability and biocompatibility. Hydrogels were made from its carboxymethylated derivate (CMCh) and were crosslinked by gamma irradiation at a dose of 30 kGy. Further processing was done by salt leaching with sodium chloride and lyophilization to produce the foam hemostat. The final products were then radiation-sterilized at 25 kGy. The use of gamma radiation for both the crosslinking and sterilization process preserves the biocompatibility of the product unlike conventional methods that may require the use of harmful and non-biocompatible chemicals. The hemostatic efficacy of the designed foam hemostats was compared to the commercially available foam hemostat, GELFOAM Sterile Compressed Sponge by Pfizer. The results showed a significantly higher efficiency of the designed products using in vitro test to determine blood clotting index and platelet adhesion capacity. Characterization by gel fraction, swelling capacity and SEM imaging indicated a hydrophilic three-dimensional network which can be attributed for the thrombogenicity of the foams produced. The foam structure can act as a physical matrix for platelet adhesion forming the mechanical plug and at the same time, rapidly absorb water thereby locally increasing the concentration of platelets and physiological coagulation factors that will contribute to quick and efficient hemostasis. The designed products will provide the healthcare and military sector with a local alternative to the commercial products which are both expensive (USD 85 per piece) and not readily accessible in the Philippine market. Further animal efficacy and biocompatibility studies are recommended to supplement the positive in vitro

  19. Radiative decays of the psi prime to all-photon final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.A.

    1985-06-01

    Results of studies of selected radiative decays of the psi' to charmonium and non-charmonium states which decay into photons are presented. These studies were performed using a sample of 1.8 x 10 6 produced psi''s collected by the Crystal Ball detector at the SPEAR electron-positron storage ring. The branching ratios of the chi 0 , chi 2 , and eta'/sub c/ to two photons have been measured to be (4.5 +- 2.2 +- 2.0) x 10 -4 , (9.5 +- 2.9 +- 4.5) x 10 -4 (first errors statistical, second systematic), and -2 (90% C.L.). The signal from the decay chain psi' → γchi 0 , chi 0 → π 0 π 0 has been observed with essentially no background. Using the observed line shape of the radiative photon in this reaction, the full width of the psi 0 has been found to be 8.8 +- 1.3 +- 1.5 MeV/c 2 . In addition, the branching ratios of the chi 0 and chi 2 to π 0 π 0 have been measured to be (3.5 +- 0.3 +- 1.2) x 10 -3 and (1.2 +- 0.2 +- 0.4) x 10 -3 ; the branching ratios of the chi 0 and chi 2 to eta eta have been measured to be (2.8 +- 0.9 +- 1.3) x 10 -3 and (8.4 +- 4.2 +- 4.0) x 10 -4 . The decays of the psi' to four non-charmonium states have been investigated. The branching ratios and upper limits of these decays have been normalized to the branching ratios of the corresponding decays from the J/psi which have been measured using a sample of 2.2 x 10 6 produced J/psi's collected by the Crystal Ball detector. The ratios of the psi' branching ratios to the J/psi branching ratios for the final states γeta, γeta', γtheta, and γf have been measured to be <1.8%, <2.6%, <10 to 15%, and 9 +- 3%. These results are compared with the theoretical expectations of lowest-order quantum chromodynamics potential models. Substantial disagreement is found between theory and experiment

  20. A modified Wheeler cap method for radiation efficiency measurement of balanced electrically small antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jiaying; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2010-01-01

    , but not for balanced antennas like loops or dipoles. In this paper, a modified Wheeler cap method is proposed for the radiation efficiency measurement of balanced electrically small antennas and a three-port network model of the Wheeler cap measurement is introduced. The advantage of the modified method...... is that it is wideband, thus does not require any balun, and both the antenna input impedance and radiation efficiency can be obtained. An electrically small loop antenna and a wideband dipole were simulated and measured according to the proposed method and the results of measurements and simulations are presented...

  1. Gallium nitride based thin films for photon and particle radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, Markus

    2012-07-23

    , the measured signals can be calibrated against the corresponding dose rate. The sensors were tested in an X-ray energy regime of 10-200 keV. Although the active sensor volume of the GaN devices is about 10{sup 5} times smaller than ionization chambers, it was possible to produce partially comparable measurement results. By utilizing a two-dimensional electron gas, which is produced inside an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure, a further increase of the amplification factors of the devices was achievable. Therefore, measurement of photon intensities in the range of >10{sup 3} photons/s is possible. Since these structures are also used for the measurement of physiological parameters like the pH value, combined measurements of surface potentials and X-ray dosimetry were investigated. It could be shown that not only a measurement of physiological parameters during an irradiation is possible but also combined simultaneous measurements of radiation and the surface pH, while keeping a sensitivity of 57 mV/pH. Therefore the GaN sensors could be used as biosensing tools in radiation biophysics, in addition to their application as pure dosimeters. Biocompatibility and biofunctionality evaluations of gallium nitride show that no alterations of cellular systems in direct contact with the material are measureable. In summary, this work demonstrates a novel system for radiation detection based on gallium nitride, which possesses characteristics that could overcome difficulties of other technologies, such as these mentioned above. Furthermore, by utilizing a heterostructure, the devices could be used as biosensors, which work during external radiation exposure and allow multi-parameter measurements.

  2. Optimization of two-photon wave function in parametric down conversion by adaptive optics control of the pump radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minozzi, M; Bonora, S; Sergienko, A V; Vallone, G; Villoresi, P

    2013-02-15

    We present an efficient method for optimizing the spatial profile of entangled-photon wave function produced in a spontaneous parametric down conversion process. A deformable mirror that modifies a wavefront of a 404 nm CW diode laser pump interacting with a nonlinear β-barium borate type-I crystal effectively controls the profile of the joint biphoton function. The use of a feedback signal extracted from the biphoton coincidence rate is used to achieve the optimal wavefront shape. The optimization of the two-photon coupling into two, single spatial modes for correlated detection is used for a practical demonstration of this physical principle.

  3. On the origin of very-high-energy photons in astrophysics: a short introduction to acceleration and radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemoine, M.; Pelletier, G.

    2015-01-01

    Powerful astrophysical sources produce non-thermal spectra of very-high-energy photons, with generic power-law distributions, through various radiative processes of charged particles, e.g., synchrotron radiation, inverse Compton processes, and hadronic interactions. Those charged particles have themselves been accelerated to ultra-relativistic energies in intense electromagnetic fields in the source. In many cases, the exact acceleration scheme is not known, but standard scenarios, such as Fermi mechanisms and reconnection processes are generally considered as prime suspects for the conversion of bulk kinetic or electromagnetic energy into a power law of supra-thermal particles. This paper proposes a short introduction to the various acceleration and radiative processes which shape the distributions of very-high-energy photons (E > 100 MeV) in astrophysics. (authors)

  4. Radiation-Resistant Photon-Counting Detector Package Providing Sub-ps Stability for Laser Time Transfer in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochzaka, Ivan; Kodat, Jan; Blazej, Josef; Sun, Xiaoli (Editor)

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting on a design, construction and performance of photon-counting detector packages based on silicon avalanche photodiodes. These photon-counting devices have been optimized for extremely high stability of their detection delay. The detectors have been designed for future applications in fundamental metrology and optical time transfer in space. The detectors have been qualified for operation in space missions. The exceptional radiation tolerance of the detection chip itself and of all critical components of a detector package has been verified in a series of experiments.

  5. Regimes of radiative and nonradiative transitions in transport through an electronic system in a photon cavity reaching a steady state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Vidar; Jonsson, Thorsteinn H.; Bernodusson, Maria Laura; Abdullah, Nzar Rauf; Sitek, Anna; Goan, Hsi-Sheng; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    We analyze how a multilevel many-electron system in a photon cavity approaches the steady state when coupled to external leads. When a plunger gate is used to lower cavity photon dressed one- and two-electron states below the bias window defined by the external leads, we can identify one regime with nonradiative transitions dominating the electron transport, and another regime with radiative transitions. Both transitions trap the electrons in the states below the bias bringing the system into a steady state. The order of the two regimes and their relative strength depends on the location of the bias window in the energy spectrum of the system and the initial conditions.

  6. Transmission microscopy of unmodified biological materials: comparative radiation dosages with electrons and ultrasoft X-ray photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayre, D.; Feder, R.; Spiller, E.; Kirz, J.; Kim, D.M.

    1977-01-01

    The minimum radiation dosage in a specimen consistent with transmission microscopy at resolution d and specimen thickness t is calculated for model specimens resembling biological materials in their natural state. The calculations cover 10 4 -10 7 eV electrons and 1.3-90 A photons in a number of microscopy modes. The results indicate that over a considerable part of the (t,d)-plane transmission microscopy on such specimens can be carried out at lower dosage with photons than with electrons. Estimates of the maximum resolutions obtainable with electrons and photons, consistent with structural survival of the specimen, are obtained, as are data on optimal operating conditions for microscopy with the two particles

  7. Guide to beamline radiation shielding design at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipe, N.; Haeffner, D.R.; Alp, E.E.; Davey, S.C.; Dejus, R.J.; Hahn, U.; Lai, B.; Randall, K.J.; Shu, D.

    1993-11-01

    This document is concerned with the general requirements for radiation shielding common to most Advanced Photon Source (APS) users. These include shielding specifications for hutches, transport, stops, and shutters for both white and monochromatic beams. For brevity, only the results of calculations are given in most cases. So-called open-quotes special situationsclose quotes are not covered. These include beamlines with white beam mirrors for low-pass energy filters (open-quotes pink beamsclose quotes), extremely wide band-pass monochromators (multilayers), or novel insertion devices. These topics are dependent on beamline layout and, as such, are not easily generalized. Also, many examples are given for open-quotes typicalclose quotes hutches or other beamline components. If a user has components that differ greatly from those described, particular care should be taken in following these guidelines. Users with questions on specific special situations should address them to the APS User Technical Interface. Also, this document does not cover specifics on hutch, transport, shutter, and stop designs. Issues such as how to join hutch panels, floor-wall interfaces, cable feed-throughs, and how to integrate shielding into transport are covered in the APS Beamline Standard Components Handbook. It is a open-quotes living documentclose quotes and as such reflects the improvements in component design that are ongoing. This document has the following content. First, the design criteria will be given. This includes descriptions of some of the pertinent DOE regulations and policies, as well as brief discussions of abnormal situations, interlocks, local shielding, and storage ring parameters. Then, the various sources of radiation on the experimental floor are discussed, and the methods used to calculate the shielding are explained (along with some sample calculations). Finally, the shielding recommendations for different situations are given and discussed

  8. Visual outcome of accelerated fractionated radiation for advanced sinonasal malignancies employing photons/protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Damien C.; Chan, Annie W.; Lessell, Simmons; McIntyre, James F.; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Bussiere, Marc R.; Fitzek, Markus M.; Thornton, Allan F.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the visual outcomes of patients with advanced sinonasal malignancies treated with proton/photon accelerated fractionated radiation (AFR). Patients and methods: Between 1991 and 2001, AFR was used to treat 36 patients with advanced stage primary (n = 33) or recurrent (n = 3) nasal or paranasal malignant tumors. Full ophthalmologic follow-up was documented. The median dose to the gross tumor volume (GTV) was 69.6 CGE (range 60.8-77). Visual complications were graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and the late effects of normal tissue (LENT) scoring systems. The median follow-up was 52.4 months (range 17-122.8). Results: Thirteen patients developed late visual/ocular toxicity. Cataracts were LENT grade 1 and 3 in 2 patients and 1 patient, respectively. One LENT grade 1 vascular retinopathy and 1 optic neuropathy were also observed. Three and five patients presented with nasolacrimal duct stenosis (CTC grade 2, 2 patients; CTC grade 3, 1 patient) and dry-eye syndrome (CTC grade 1, 1 patient; CTC grade 2, 4 patients), respectively. The 3- and 5-year probability of LENT/CTC grade ≥2 visual toxicity were 15.8 ± 6.7% and 20.7 ± 7.8%, respectively. Conclusions: AFR for locally advanced nasal cavity and paranasal sinus tumors enables delivery of 70 CGE to the tumor with acceptable ophthalmologic complications

  9. Radiative decay engineering: the role of photonic mode density in biotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R; Malicka, Joanna; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Geddes, Chris D

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence detection is a central technology in biological research and biotechnology. A vast array of fluorescent probes are available with diverse spectral properties. These properties were 'engineered' into fluorophores by modification of the chemical structures. Essentially, all present uses of fluorescence rely on the radiation of energy into optically transparent media, the free space which surrounds the fluorophores. In this paper, we summarize an opportunity for novel fluorescence technology based on modification of the photonic mode density around the fluorophore and thus control of its spectral properties. This modification can be accomplished by proximity of fluorophores to metallic particles of gold, silver and possibly others. By engineering the size and shape of the metal particles, and the location of the fluorophores relative to the surfaces, fluorophores can be quenched, display increases in quantum yield, and changes in lifetime. Fluorophore-metal surface combinations can even display directional rather than isotropic emission. We describe recent experimental results and suggest potential biomedical applications of fluorophore-metal particle interactions. (topical review)

  10. The Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety agency megavoltage photon thermoluminescence dosimetry postal audit service 2007–2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, C.P.; Butler, D.J.; Webb, D.V.

    2012-01-01

    The Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety agency (ARPANSA) has continuously provided a level 1 mailed thermoluminescence dosimetry audit service for megavoltage photons since 2007. The purpose of the audit is to provide an independent verification of the reference dose output of a radiotherapy linear accelerator in a clinical environment. Photon beam quality measurements can also be made as part of the audit in addition to the output measurements. The results of all audits performed between 2007 and 2010 are presented. The average of all reference beam output measurements calculated as a clinically stated dose divided by an ARPANSA measured dose is 0.9993. The results of all beam quality measurements calculated as a clinically stated quality divided by an ARPANSA measured quality is 1.0087. Since 2011 the provision of all auditing services has been transferred from the Ionizing Radiation Standards section to the Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) which is currently housed within ARPANSA.

  11. Updated Outcome and Analysis of Tumor Response in Mobile Spine and Sacral Chordoma Treated With Definitive High-Dose Photon/Proton Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Chen, Yen-Lin; Liebsch, Norbert; Hornicek, Francis J.; Schwab, Joseph H.; Choy, Edwin; Rosenthal, Daniel I.; Niemierko, Andrzej; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment of spine and sacral chordoma generally involves surgical resection, usually in conjunction with radiation therapy. In certain circumstances where resection may result in significant neurologic or organ dysfunction, patients can be treated definitively with radiation therapy alone. Herein, we report the outcome and the assessment of tumor response to definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on 40 patients with unresected chordoma treated with photon/proton radiation therapy. Nineteen patients had complete sets of imaging scans. The soft tissue and bone compartments of the tumor were defined separately. Tumor response was evaluated by the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and volumetric analysis. Results: With a median follow-up time of 50.3 months, the rates of 5-year local control, overall survival, disease-specific survival, and distant failure were 85.4%, 81.9%, 89.4%, and 20.2%, respectively. Eighty-four computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging scans were reviewed. Among the 19 patients, only 4 local failures occurred, and the median tumor dose was 77.4 GyRBE. Analysis at a median follow-up time of 18 months showed significant volumetric reduction of the total target volume (TTV) and the soft tissue target volume (STTV) within the first 24 months after treatment initiation, followed by further gradual reduction throughout the rest of the follow-up period. The median maximum percentage volumetric regressions of TTV and STTV were 43.2% and 70.4%, respectively. There was only a small reduction in bone target volume over time. In comparison with the modified RECIST, volumetric analysis was more reliable, more reproducible, and could help in measuring minimal changes in the tumor volume. Conclusion: These results continue to support the use of high-dose definitive radiation therapy for selected patients with unresected spine and sacral chordomas

  12. Updated Outcome and Analysis of Tumor Response in Mobile Spine and Sacral Chordoma Treated With Definitive High-Dose Photon/Proton Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabolizadeh, Peyman, E-mail: peyman.kabolizadeh@beaumont.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin; Liebsch, Norbert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hornicek, Francis J.; Schwab, Joseph H. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Choy, Edwin [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rosenthal, Daniel I. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej; DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: Treatment of spine and sacral chordoma generally involves surgical resection, usually in conjunction with radiation therapy. In certain circumstances where resection may result in significant neurologic or organ dysfunction, patients can be treated definitively with radiation therapy alone. Herein, we report the outcome and the assessment of tumor response to definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on 40 patients with unresected chordoma treated with photon/proton radiation therapy. Nineteen patients had complete sets of imaging scans. The soft tissue and bone compartments of the tumor were defined separately. Tumor response was evaluated by the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and volumetric analysis. Results: With a median follow-up time of 50.3 months, the rates of 5-year local control, overall survival, disease-specific survival, and distant failure were 85.4%, 81.9%, 89.4%, and 20.2%, respectively. Eighty-four computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging scans were reviewed. Among the 19 patients, only 4 local failures occurred, and the median tumor dose was 77.4 GyRBE. Analysis at a median follow-up time of 18 months showed significant volumetric reduction of the total target volume (TTV) and the soft tissue target volume (STTV) within the first 24 months after treatment initiation, followed by further gradual reduction throughout the rest of the follow-up period. The median maximum percentage volumetric regressions of TTV and STTV were 43.2% and 70.4%, respectively. There was only a small reduction in bone target volume over time. In comparison with the modified RECIST, volumetric analysis was more reliable, more reproducible, and could help in measuring minimal changes in the tumor volume. Conclusion: These results continue to support the use of high-dose definitive radiation therapy for selected patients with unresected spine and sacral chordomas

  13. Comment on “Recent progress in thermodynamics of radiation——exergy of radiation,effective temperature of photon and entropy constant of photon”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Chen et al.proposed the concepts of effective temperature of photon and entropy constant of photon in a recent paper [Chen Z S,Mo S P,Hu P.Recent progress in thermodynamics of radiation―exergy of radiation,effective temperature of photon and entropy constant of photon.Sci China Ser E-Tech Sci,2008,51(8):1096―1109] by enduing a single photon with macroscale thermodynamic parameters such as exergy and entropy.This paper argues that applying these concepts and their inferences to macro-scale thermodynamic system will lead to the results which conflict with macroscale thermodynamic laws.This means that the concepts of effective temperature of photon and entropy constant of photon are not correct.

  14. New ICRU quantities for the environmental and individual monitoring. Standardization of individual dosemeters by using external beams of photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosed, A.; Delgado, A.; Granados, C. E.

    1987-01-01

    The quantities introduced by ICRU for the radiological monitoring are commented, specially those implied in individual protection against external photons. A procedure is proposed in order to standardize the individual dosemeters by using the kerma in air references of CIEMAT-JEN. The reference radiation beams are described in connection with ISO standards. Provisional values are selected for the appropriate conversion and correction factors. (Author) 23 refs

  15. Energy dependent response of plastic scintillation detectors to photon radiation of low to medium energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenau, Melanie; Radeck, Désirée; Bambynek, Markus; Sommer, Holger; Flühs, Dirk; Spaan, Bernhard; Eichmann, Marion

    2016-08-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors are promising candidates for the dosimetry of low- to medium-energy photons but quantitative knowledge of their energy response is a prerequisite for their correct use. The purpose of this study was to characterize the energy dependent response of small scintillation detectors (active volume <1 mm(3)) made from the commonly used plastic scintillator BC400. Different detectors made from BC400 were calibrated at a number of radiation qualities ranging from 10 to 280 kV and at a (60)Co beam. All calibrations were performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, the National Metrology Institute of Germany. The energy response in terms of air kerma, dose to water, and dose to the scintillator was determined. Conversion factors from air kerma to dose to water and to dose to the scintillator were derived from Monte Carlo simulations. In order to quantitatively describe the energy dependence, a semiempirical model known as unimolecular quenching or Birks' formula was fitted to the data and from this the response to secondary electrons generated within the scintillator material BC400 was derived. The detector energy response in terms of air kerma differs for different scintillator sizes and different detector casings. It is therefore necessary to take attenuation within the scintillator and in the casing into account when deriving the response in terms of dose to water from a calibration in terms of air kerma. The measured energy response in terms of dose to water for BC400 cannot be reproduced by the ratio of mean mass energy-absorption coefficients for polyvinyl toluene to water but shows evidence of quenching. The quenching parameter kB in Birks' formula was determined to be kB = (12.3 ± 0.9) mg MeV(-1) cm(-2). The energy response was quantified relative to the response to (60)Co which is the common radiation quality for the calibration of therapy dosemeters. The observed energy dependence could be well explained with the

  16. Energy dependent response of plastic scintillation detectors to photon radiation of low to medium energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebenau, Melanie, E-mail: melanie.ebenau@tu-dortmunde.de; Sommer, Holger; Spaan, Bernhard; Eichmann, Marion [Fakultät Physik, Technische Universität Dortmund, Otto-Hahn Str. 4a, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Radeck, Désirée; Bambynek, Markus [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Flühs, Dirk [Universitätsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45147 Essen (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Plastic scintillation detectors are promising candidates for the dosimetry of low- to medium-energy photons but quantitative knowledge of their energy response is a prerequisite for their correct use. The purpose of this study was to characterize the energy dependent response of small scintillation detectors (active volume <1 mm{sup 3}) made from the commonly used plastic scintillator BC400. Methods: Different detectors made from BC400 were calibrated at a number of radiation qualities ranging from 10 to 280 kV and at a {sup 60}Co beam. All calibrations were performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, the National Metrology Institute of Germany. The energy response in terms of air kerma, dose to water, and dose to the scintillator was determined. Conversion factors from air kerma to dose to water and to dose to the scintillator were derived from Monte Carlo simulations. In order to quantitatively describe the energy dependence, a semiempirical model known as unimolecular quenching or Birks’ formula was fitted to the data and from this the response to secondary electrons generated within the scintillator material BC400 was derived. Results: The detector energy response in terms of air kerma differs for different scintillator sizes and different detector casings. It is therefore necessary to take attenuation within the scintillator and in the casing into account when deriving the response in terms of dose to water from a calibration in terms of air kerma. The measured energy response in terms of dose to water for BC400 cannot be reproduced by the ratio of mean mass energy-absorption coefficients for polyvinyl toluene to water but shows evidence of quenching. The quenching parameter kB in Birks’ formula was determined to be kB = (12.3 ± 0.9) mg MeV{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. Conclusions: The energy response was quantified relative to the response to {sup 60}Co which is the common radiation quality for the calibration of therapy dosemeters. The

  17. Potential of Glassy Carbon and Silicon Carbide Photonic Structures as Electromagnetic Radiation Shields for Atmospheric Re-entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarevskiy,Nikolay; Shklover, Valery; Braginsky, Leonid; Hafner, Christian; Lawson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    During high-velocity atmospheric entries, space vehicles can be exposed to strong electromagnetic radiation from ionized gas in the shock layer. Glassy carbon (GC) and silicon carbide (SiC) are candidate thermal protection materials due to their high melting point and also their good thermal and mechanical properties. Based on data from shock tube experiments, a significant fraction of radiation at hypersonic entry conditions is in the frequency range from 215 to 415 THz. We propose and analyze SiC and GC photonic structures to increase the reflection of radiation in that range. For this purpose, we performed numerical optimizations of various structures using an evolutionary strategy. Among the considered structures are layered, porous, woodpile, inverse opal and guided-mode resonance structures. In order to estimate the impact of fabrication inaccuracies, the sensitivity of the reflectivity to structural imperfections is analyzed. We estimate that the reflectivity of GC photonic structures is limited to 38% in the aforementioned range, due to material absorption. However, GC material can be effective for photonic reflection of individual, strong spectral line. SiC on the other hand can be used to design a good reflector for the entire frequency range.

  18. Effect of Photon Beam Energy, Gold Nanoparticle Size and Concentration on the Dose Enhancement in Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahideh Gharehaghaji

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gold nanoparticles have been used as radiation dose enhancing materials in recent investigations. In the current study, dose enhancement effect of gold nanoparticles on tumor cells was evaluated using Monte Carlo (MC simulation. Methods: We used MCNPX code for MC modeling in the current study. A water phantom and a tumor region with a size of 1×1×1 cm3 loaded with gold nanoparticles were simulated. The macroscopic dose enhancement factor was calculated for gold nanoparticles with sizes of 30, 50, and 100 nm. Also, we simulated different photon beams including mono-energetic beams (50-120 keV, a Cobalt-60 beam, 6 & 18 MV photon beams of a conventional linear accelerator. Results: We found a dose enhancement factor (DEF of from 1.4 to 3.7 for monoenergetic kilovoltage beams, while the DEFs for megavoltage beams were negligible and less than 3% for all GNP sizes and concentrations. The optimum energy for higher DEF was found to be the 90 keV monoenergetic beam. The effect of GNP size was not considerable, but the GNP concentration had a substantial impact on achieved DEF in GNP-based radiation therapy. Conclusion: The results were in close agreement with some previous studies considering the effect of photon energy and GNP concentration on observed DEF. Application of GNP-based radiation therapy using kilovoltage beams is recommended.

  19. Self-modified quasi-stationary model for the radiation ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jun; Pei Wenbing; Gu Peijun; Sui Chengzhi; Chang Tieqiang

    1996-01-01

    The self-modified quasi-stationary model for radiation ablation has been established based on physical picture of numerical simulations. The objective of the model is to predict quantitatively the scaling laws of various ablation parameters driven by soft-X-ray, such as the dependence of ablation depth, pressure on radiation temperature, energy, pulse width, without resorting to complex computer simulations. The computational results are given for some interesting materials in ICF. Scaling laws obtained are simple and effective in target design and analysis of experimental results

  20. Raman spectroscopy of poly (3-hydroxybutyrate) modified with poly (vinyl acetate) by radiation- induced copolymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Maykel; Galego Fernandez, Norma; Ortiz del Toro, Pedro; Rapado, Manuel; Paredes

    2007-01-01

    Poly (3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is an important material used in the field of medicine. However in common conditions, PHB has some deficiencies. It is very brittle and slightly hydrophobic polymer. This somewhat limit its applications. Radiation chemistry can be used to improve its chemical properties. In the present study, the substrate, modified by radiation-induced graft copolymerization with vinyl acetate (VAc), was characterized using FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. FTIR spectroscopy did not reveal any significant bands but Raman spectroscopy revealed the formation of a new band that characterize the material

  1. Laser-Driven Very High Energy Electron/Photon Beam Radiation Therapy in Conjunction with a Robotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new external-beam radiation therapy system using very-high-energy (VHE electron/photon beams generated by a centimeter-scale laser plasma accelerator built in a robotic system. Most types of external-beam radiation therapy are delivered using a machine called a medical linear accelerator driven by radio frequency (RF power amplifiers, producing electron beams with an energy range of 6–20 MeV, in conjunction with modern radiation therapy technologies for effective shaping of three-dimensional dose distributions and spatially accurate dose delivery with imaging verification. However, the limited penetration depth and low quality of the transverse penumbra at such electron beams delivered from the present RF linear accelerators prevent the implementation of advanced modalities in current cancer treatments. These drawbacks can be overcome if the electron energy is increased to above 50 MeV. To overcome the disadvantages of the present RF-based medical accelerators, harnessing recent advancement of laser-driven plasma accelerators capable of producing 1-GeV electron beams in a 1-cm gas cell, we propose a new embodiment of the external-beam radiation therapy robotic system delivering very high-energy electron/photon beams with an energy of 50–250 MeV; it is more compact, less expensive, and has a simpler operation and higher performance in comparison with the current radiation therapy system.

  2. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne, E-mail: mkoritzi@uhnresearch.ca

    2015-10-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers.

  3. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers

  4. Photon and electron data bases and their use in radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.; Perkins, S.T.; Seltzer, S.M.

    1992-02-01

    The ENDF/B-VI photon interaction library includes data to describe the interaction of photons with the elements Z=1 to 100 over the energy range 10 eV to 100 MeV. This library has been designed to meet the traditional needs of users to model the interaction and transport of primary photons. However, this library contains additional information which used in a combination with our other data libraries can be used to perform much more detailed calculations, e.g., emission of secondary fluorescence photons. This paper describes both traditional and more detailed uses of this library

  5. Photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  6. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of α/sub s/ and Λ/sup ms/ from the γ*γ → π 0 form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from γγ → H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub γγ/ from exclusive channels at low W/sub γγ/, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z 0 and W +- beams from e → eZ 0 and e → nu W will become important. 44 references

  7. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The current status, both theoretical and experimental, of two photon collision physics is reviewed with special emphasis on recent experimental results from e + e - storage rings. After a complete presentation of the helicity amplitude formalism for the general process e + e - → Xe + e - , various approximations (transverse photon, Weisaecker Williams) are discussed. Beam polarisation effects and radiative corrections are also briefly considered. A number of specific processes, for which experimental results are now available, are then described. In each case existing theoretical prediction are confronted with experimental results. The processes described include single resonance production, lepton and hadron pair production, the structure functions of the photon, the production of high Psub(T) jets and the total photon photon cross section. In the last part of the review the current status of the subject is summarised and some comments are made on future prospects. These include both extrapolations of current research to higher energy machines (LEP, HERA) as well as a brief mention of both the technical realisation and the physics interest of the real γγ and eγ collisions which may be possible using linear electron colliders in the 1 TeV energy range

  8. Development of a silicon microstrip detector with single photon sensitivity for fast dynamic diffraction experiments at a synchrotron radiation beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakcheev, A.; Aulchenko, V.; Kudashkin, D.; Shekhtman, L.; Tolochko, B.; Zhulanov, V.

    2017-06-01

    Time-resolved experiments on the diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) from crystalline materials provide information on the evolution of a material structure after a heat, electron beam or plasma interaction with a sample under study. Changes in the material structure happen within a microsecond scale and a detector with corresponding parameters is needed. The SR channel 8 of the VEPP-4M storage ring provides radiation from the 7-pole wiggler that allows to reach several tens photons within one μs from a tungsten crystal for the most intensive diffraction peak. In order to perform experiments that allow to measure the evolution of tungsten crystalline structure under the impact of powerful laser beam, a new detector is developed, that can provide information about the distribution of a scattered SR flux in space and its evolution in time at a microsecond scale. The detector is based on the silicon p-in-n microstrip sensor with DC-coupled metal strips. The sensor contains 1024 30 mm long strips with a 50 μm pitch. 64 strips are bonded to the front-end electronics based on APC128 ASICs. The APC128 ASIC contains 128 channels that consist of a low noise integrator with 32 analogue memory cells each. The integrator equivalent noise charge is about 2000 electrons and thus the signal from individual photons with energy above 40 keV can be observed. The signal can be stored at the analogue memory with 10 MHz rate. The first measurements with the beam scattered from a tungsten crystal with energy near 60 keV demonstrated the capability of this prototype to observe the spatial distribution of the photon flux with the intensity from below one photon per channel up to 0~10 photons per channel with a frame rate from 10 kHz up to 1 MHz.

  9. Black hole radiation with modified dispersion relation in tunneling paradigm: Static frame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Tao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available To study possible deviations from the Hawking's prediction, we assume that the dispersion relations of matter fields are modified at high energies and use the Hamilton–Jacobi method to investigate the corresponding effects on the Hawking radiation in this paper. The preferred frame is the static frame of the black hole. The dispersion relation adopted agrees with the relativistic one at low energies but is modified near the Planck mass mp. We calculate the corrections to the Hawking temperature for massive and charged particles to O(mp−2 and massless and neutral particles to all orders. Our results suggest that the thermal spectrum of radiations near horizon is robust, e.g. corrections to the Hawking temperature are suppressed by mp. After the spectrum of radiations near the horizon is obtained, we use the brick wall model to compute the thermal entropy of a massless scalar field near the horizon of a 4D spherically symmetric black hole. We find that the subleading logarithmic term of the entropy does not depend on how the dispersion relations of matter fields are modified. Finally, the luminosities of black holes are computed by using the geometric optics approximation.

  10. Dynamic PET/CT measurements of induced positron activity in a prostate cancer patient after 50-MV photon radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janek Strååt, Sara; Jacobsson, Hans; Noz, Marilyn E; Andreassen, Björn; Näslund, Ingemar; Jonsson, Cathrine

    2013-01-23

    The purpose of this work was to reveal the research interest value of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in visualizing the induced tissue activity post high-energy photon radiation treatment. More specifically, the focus was on the possibility of retrieving data such as tissue composition and physical half-lives from dynamic PET acquisitions, as positron-emitting radionuclides such as 15O, 11C, and 13N are produced in vivo during radiation treatment with high-energy photons (>15 MeV). The type, amount, and distribution of induced positron-emitting radionuclides depend on the irradiated tissue cross section, the photon spectrum, and the possible perfusion-driven washout. A 62-year-old man diagnosed with prostate cancer was referred for palliative radiation treatment of the pelvis minor. A total dose of 8 Gy was given using high-energy photon beams (50 MV) with a racetrack microtron, and 7 min after the end of irradiation, the patient was positioned in a PET/computed tomography (CT) camera, and a list-mode acquisition was performed for 30 min. Two volumes of interests (VOIs) were positioned on the dynamic PET/CT images, one in the urinary bladder and the other in the subcutaneous fat. Analysis of the measured relative count rate was performed in order to compute the tissue compositions and physical half-lives in the two regions. Dynamic analysis from the two VOIs showed that the decay constants of activated oxygen and carbon could be deduced. Calculation of tissue composition from analyzing the VOI containing subcutaneous fat only moderately agreed with that of the tabulated International Commission on Radiation Units & Measurements (ICRU) data of the adipose tissue. However, the same analysis for the bladder showed a good agreement with that of the tabulated ICRU data. PET can be used in visualizing the induced activity post high-energy photon radiation treatment. Despite the very low count rate in this specific application, wherein 7 min after treatment

  11. Wall modified photonic crystal fibre capillaries as porous layer open tubular columns for in-capillary micro-extraction and capillary chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazarian, Artaches A.; Sanz Rodriguez, Estrella; Deverell, Jeremy A.; McCord, James; Muddiman, David C.; Paull, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Wall modified photonic crystal fibre capillary columns for in-capillary micro-extraction and liquid chromatographic separations is presented. Columns contained 126 internal parallel 4 μm channels, each containing a wall bonded porous monolithic type polystyrene-divinylbenzene layer in open tubular column format (PLOT). Modification longitudinal homogeneity was monitored using scanning contactless conductivity detection and scanning electron microscopy. The multichannel open tubular capillary column showed channel diameter and polymer layer consistency of 4.2 ± 0.1 μm and 0.26 ± 0.02 μm respectively, and modification of 100% of the parallel channels with the monolithic polymer. The modified multi-channel capillaries were applied to the in-capillary micro-extraction of water samples. 500 μL of water samples containing single μg L"−"1 levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons were extracted at a flow rate of 10 μL min"−"1, and eluted in 50 μL of acetonitrile for analysis using HPLC with fluorescence detection. HPLC LODs were 0.08, 0.02 and 0.05 μg L"−"1 for acenaphthene, anthracene and pyrene, respectively, with extraction recoveries of between 77 and 103%. The modified capillaries were also investigated briefly for direct application to liquid chromatographic separations, with the retention and elution of a standard protein (cytochrome c) under isocratic conditions demonstrated, proving chromatographic potential of the new column format, with run-to-run retention time reproducibility of below 1%. - Highlights: • Novel PS-DVB modified photonic crystal fibres for in-capillary micro-extraction. • New method for micro-extraction of PAHs and HPLC-FL detection at sub-ppb levels. • Demonstration of PS-DVB modified photonic crystal fibres for capillary bioseparations.

  12. Wall modified photonic crystal fibre capillaries as porous layer open tubular columns for in-capillary micro-extraction and capillary chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazarian, Artaches A. [Australian Centre for Research on Separation Science, School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 75, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); W.M. Keck FT-ICR-MS Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Sanz Rodriguez, Estrella; Deverell, Jeremy A. [Australian Centre for Research on Separation Science, School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 75, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); McCord, James; Muddiman, David C. [W.M. Keck FT-ICR-MS Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Paull, Brett, E-mail: Brett.Paull@utas.edu.au [Australian Centre for Research on Separation Science, School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 75, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 75, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia)

    2016-01-28

    Wall modified photonic crystal fibre capillary columns for in-capillary micro-extraction and liquid chromatographic separations is presented. Columns contained 126 internal parallel 4 μm channels, each containing a wall bonded porous monolithic type polystyrene-divinylbenzene layer in open tubular column format (PLOT). Modification longitudinal homogeneity was monitored using scanning contactless conductivity detection and scanning electron microscopy. The multichannel open tubular capillary column showed channel diameter and polymer layer consistency of 4.2 ± 0.1 μm and 0.26 ± 0.02 μm respectively, and modification of 100% of the parallel channels with the monolithic polymer. The modified multi-channel capillaries were applied to the in-capillary micro-extraction of water samples. 500 μL of water samples containing single μg L{sup −1} levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons were extracted at a flow rate of 10 μL min{sup −1}, and eluted in 50 μL of acetonitrile for analysis using HPLC with fluorescence detection. HPLC LODs were 0.08, 0.02 and 0.05 μg L{sup −1} for acenaphthene, anthracene and pyrene, respectively, with extraction recoveries of between 77 and 103%. The modified capillaries were also investigated briefly for direct application to liquid chromatographic separations, with the retention and elution of a standard protein (cytochrome c) under isocratic conditions demonstrated, proving chromatographic potential of the new column format, with run-to-run retention time reproducibility of below 1%. - Highlights: • Novel PS-DVB modified photonic crystal fibres for in-capillary micro-extraction. • New method for micro-extraction of PAHs and HPLC-FL detection at sub-ppb levels. • Demonstration of PS-DVB modified photonic crystal fibres for capillary bioseparations.

  13. Indomethacin attenuation of radiation-induced hyperthermia does not modify radiation-induced motor hypoactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, J.L.; Kandasamy, S.B.; Harris, A.H.; Davis, H.D.; Landauer, M.R. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Exposure of rats to 5-10 Gy of ionizing radiation produces hyperthermia and reduces motor activity. Previous studies suggested that radiation-induced hyperthermia results from a relatively direct action on the brain and is mediated by prostaglandins. To test the hypothesis that hypoactivity may be, in part, a thermoregulatory response to this elevation in body temperature, adult male rats were given indomethacin (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), a blocker of prostaglandin synthesis, and were either irradiated (LINAC 18.6 MeV (nominal) high-energy electrons, 10 Gy at 10 Gy/min, 2.8 {mu}sec pulses at 2 Hz) or sham-irradiated. The locomotor activity of all rats was then measured for 30 min in a photocell monitor for distance traveled and number of vertical movements. Rectal temperatures of irradiated rats administered vehicle only were elevated by 0.9{+-}0.2degC at the beginning and the end of the activity session. Although indomethacin, at the two higher doses tested, attenuated the hyperthermia in irradiated rats by 52-75%, it did not attenuate radiation-induced reductions in motor activity. These results indicate that motor hypoactivity after exposure to 10 Gy of high-energy electrons is not due to elevated body temperature or to the increased synthesis of prostaglandins. (author)

  14. Indomethacin attenuation of radiation-induced hyperthermia does not modify radiation-induced motor hypoactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.L.; Kandasamy, S.B.; Harris, A.H.; Davis, H.D.; Landauer, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure of rats to 5-10 Gy of ionizing radiation produces hyperthermia and reduces motor activity. Previous studies suggested that radiation-induced hyperthermia results from a relatively direct action on the brain and is mediated by prostaglandins. To test the hypothesis that hypoactivity may be, in part, a thermoregulatory response to this elevation in body temperature, adult male rats were given indomethacin (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), a blocker of prostaglandin synthesis, and were either irradiated (LINAC 18.6 MeV (nominal) high-energy electrons, 10 Gy at 10 Gy/min, 2.8 μsec pulses at 2 Hz) or sham-irradiated. The locomotor activity of all rats was then measured for 30 min in a photocell monitor for distance traveled and number of vertical movements. Rectal temperatures of irradiated rats administered vehicle only were elevated by 0.9±0.2degC at the beginning and the end of the activity session. Although indomethacin, at the two higher doses tested, attenuated the hyperthermia in irradiated rats by 52-75%, it did not attenuate radiation-induced reductions in motor activity. These results indicate that motor hypoactivity after exposure to 10 Gy of high-energy electrons is not due to elevated body temperature or to the increased synthesis of prostaglandins. (author)

  15. Physicomechanical properties of PVC radiation-modified by tridecaethyleneglycol methacrylic ester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomonosova, N.V.

    1988-01-01

    A study was made on physicomechanical properties of radiation-modified system on the basis of PVC and TGM-13 oligomer (dimethacrylic ester of tridecaethyleneglycol, 43.2%). Main physical properties of the composition (maximal stresses, softening point, double refraction value, activation energy, temperature positions of the first and the second maximums on isometric heating diagram) were used to determine its isotropic and oriented states, depending on absorbed radiation dose (0-128 kGy). It is shown that radiation PVC modification by TGM-13 oligomer results in formation of linked 'soft' plastic. In terms of strength it is on a par with isotropic linear PVC, but compare favourably with it with respect to t ρ and ε

  16. Effect of ionizing radiation exposure in the morphology of modified HDPE with amphiphilic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldanha, Ana Luiza M.; Vivas, Viviane; Zylberberg, Marcel P.; Silva, Tamara I.; Cardoso, Andre Luis V.; Pereira, Iaci M.; Patricio, Patricia S.O.

    2015-01-01

    One of the techniques used to improve the properties of high performance polymers is the addition of hybrid particles in the polymer. In this context, amphiphilic particles were synthesized in order to provide surface characteristics that enhance the interaction of the interface with the polymeric matrix of high density polyethylene (HDPE). The amphiphilic particles were added to matrix of HDPE and the modified polymer composites were exposed to ionizing radiation (x-rays) for different times. The changes caused by exposure to ionizing radiation in the composite morphology was observed through the small angle x-ray technique. The results suggest that the addition of amphiphilic particles increased the stability of the composite to degradation by radiation. (author)

  17. Radiative corrections to the beam spin asymmetry in photon electroproduction e polarized p {yields} ep{gamma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonvieille, H.; Bensafa, I. [LPC-Clermont-Fd, Universite Blaise Pascal, F-63170 Aubiere Cedex (France)

    2006-11-15

    We have measured at MAMI the beam single spin asymmetry (SSA) in exclusive photon electroproduction (e polarized p {yields} ep{gamma}) with a longitudinally polarized beam, in the region of the {delta}(1232) resonance. In this document the value of the radiative correction to this asymmetry is obtained for our kinematics. Although the correction is expected to be very small and negligible, its value is needed as a confirmation and for the purpose of systematic error estimate. The parameter of kinematics are given as follows: four-momentum transfer of the virtual photon, Q{sup 2} = 0.35 GeV{sup 2}; total energy in the ({gamma}p) center of mass, W=1.190 GeV; polarization of the virtual photon, {epsilon}=0.48; azimuthal angle (lepton-hadron planes), {phi} = 220 angle; polar angle of Compton scattering in center of mass, {theta}{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}} in [0 angle, 40 angle]; incoming electron beam energy, E{sub e} = 0.88 GeV; scattered electron energy, E{sub 0}' = 0.40 GeV; polar angle of scattered electron {theta}{sub e} = 59.9 angle. The radiative correction is calculated by the radcorr code written by M. Vanderhaeghen, in a version adapted to beam spin asymmetries.In practice, the conclusions are twofold: - the asymmetry that was measured in the VCS channel does not need to be corrected for radiative effects, given the large statistical error bar attached to the experimental values (an asymmetry of 1-10 % with a statistical error bar of 3-4 %); - a systematic error {delta}SSA{sub syst} on the asymmetry will be considered, related to uncertainties in the calculation of the radiative correction (at least two of them have been mentioned here: the cross section model and the soft photon limit). To estimate this error a 100 % variation of the radiative correction was assumed. For the radiative correction itself the maximal value found was taken. Therefore one can take: {delta}SSA{sub syst} = {+-}2.7 x 10{sup -3}.

  18. Radiative corrections to the beam spin asymmetry in photon electroproduction e polarized p → epγ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonvieille, H.; Bensafa, I.

    2006-11-01

    We have measured at MAMI the beam single spin asymmetry (SSA) in exclusive photon electroproduction (e polarized p → epγ) with a longitudinally polarized beam, in the region of the Δ(1232) resonance. In this document the value of the radiative correction to this asymmetry is obtained for our kinematics. Although the correction is expected to be very small and negligible, its value is needed as a confirmation and for the purpose of systematic error estimate. The parameter of kinematics are given as follows: four-momentum transfer of the virtual photon, Q 2 = 0.35 GeV 2 ; total energy in the (γp) center of mass, W=1.190 GeV; polarization of the virtual photon, ε=0.48; azimuthal angle (lepton-hadron planes), φ = 220 angle; polar angle of Compton scattering in center of mass, θ γγ in [0 angle, 40 angle]; incoming electron beam energy, E e = 0.88 GeV; scattered electron energy, E 0 ' = 0.40 GeV; polar angle of scattered electron θ e = 59.9 angle. The radiative correction is calculated by the radcorr code written by M. Vanderhaeghen, in a version adapted to beam spin asymmetries.In practice, the conclusions are twofold: - the asymmetry that was measured in the VCS channel does not need to be corrected for radiative effects, given the large statistical error bar attached to the experimental values (an asymmetry of 1-10 % with a statistical error bar of 3-4 %); - a systematic error ΔSSA syst on the asymmetry will be considered, related to uncertainties in the calculation of the radiative correction (at least two of them have been mentioned here: the cross section model and the soft photon limit). To estimate this error a 100 % variation of the radiative correction was assumed. For the radiative correction itself the maximal value found was taken. Therefore one can take: ΔSSA syst = ±2.7 x 10 -3

  19. Photonic Integrated Circuit (PIC) Device Structures: Background, Fabrication Ecosystem, Relevance to Space Systems Applications, and Discussion of Related Radiation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Electronic integrated circuits are considered one of the most significant technological advances of the 20th century, with demonstrated impact in their ability to incorporate successively higher numbers transistors and construct electronic devices onto a single CMOS chip. Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) exist as the optical analog to integrated circuits; however, in place of transistors, PICs consist of numerous scaled optical components, including such "building-block" structures as waveguides, MMIs, lasers, and optical ring resonators. The ability to construct electronic and photonic components on a single microsystems platform offers transformative potential for the development of technologies in fields including communications, biomedical device development, autonomous navigation, and chemical and atmospheric sensing. Developing on-chip systems that provide new avenues for integration and replacement of bulk optical and electro-optic components also reduces size, weight, power and cost (SWaP-C) limitations, which are important in the selection of instrumentation for specific flight projects. The number of applications currently emerging for complex photonics systems-particularly in data communications-warrants additional investigations when considering reliability for space systems development. This Body of Knowledge document seeks to provide an overview of existing integrated photonics architectures; the current state of design, development, and fabrication ecosystems in the United States and Europe; and potential space applications, with emphasis given to associated radiation effects and reliability.

  20. Silicon diodes as an alternative to diamond detectors for depth dose curves and profile measurements of photon and electron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherf, Christian; Peter, Christiane; Moog, Jussi; Licher, Jörg; Kara, Eugen; Zink, Klemens; Rödel, Claus; Ramm, Ulla

    2009-08-01

    Depth dose curves and lateral dose profiles should correspond to relative dose to water in any measured point, what can be more or less satisfied with different detectors. Diamond as detector material has similar dosimetric properties like water. Silicon diodes and ionization chambers are also commonly used to acquire dose profiles. The authors compared dose profiles measured in an MP3 water phantom with a diamond detector 60003, unshielded and shielded silicon diodes 60008 and 60012 and a 0.125-cm(3) thimble chamber 233642 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) for 6- and 25-MV photons. Electron beams of 6, 12 and 18 MeV were investigated with the diamond detector, the unshielded diode and a Markus chamber 23343. The unshielded diode revealed relative dose differences at the water surface below +10% for 6-MV and +4% for 25-MV photons compared to the diamond data. These values decreased to less than 1% within the first millimeters of water depth. The shielded diode was only required to obtain correct data of the fall-off zones for photon beams larger than 10 x 10 cm(2) because of important contributions of low-energy scattered photons. For electron radiation the largest relative dose difference of -2% was observed with the unshielded silicon diode for 6 MeV within the build-up zone. Spatial resolutions were always best with the small voluminous silicon diodes. Relative dose profiles obtained with the two silicon diodes have the same degree of accuracy as with the diamond detector.

  1. A modified method of planning and delivery for dynamic multileaf collimator intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogan, Nesrin; Leybovich, Leonid B.; Sethi, Anil; Krasin, Matthew; Emami, Bahman

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a modified planning and delivery technique that reduces dose nonuniformity for tomographic delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The NOMOS-CORVUS system delivers IMRT in a tomographic paradigm. This type of delivery is prone to create multiple dose nonuniformity regions at the arc abutment regions. The modified technique was based on the cyclical behavior of arc positions as a function of a target length. With the modified technique, two plans are developed for the same patient, one with the original target and the second with a slightly increased target length and the abutment regions shifted by ∼5 mm compared to the first plan. Each plan is designed to deliver half of the target prescription dose delivered on alternate days, resulting in periodic shifts of abutment regions. This method was experimentally tested in phantoms with and without intentionally introduced errors in couch indexing. Results: With the modified technique, the degree of dose nonuniformity was reduced. For example, with 1 mm error in couch indexing, the degree of dose nonuniformity changed from ∼25% to ∼12%. Conclusion: Use of the modified technique reduces dose nonuniformity due to periodic shifts of abutment regions during treatment delivery

  2. National Cancer Database Analysis of Proton Versus Photon Radiation Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Kristin A., E-mail: kristin.higgins@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); O' Connell, Kelli [Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Liu, Yuan [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Gillespie, Theresa W. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); McDonald, Mark W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Pillai, Rathi N. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Patel, Kirtesh R.; Patel, Pretesh R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Simone, Charles B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Owonikoko, Taofeek K. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Belani, Chandra P. [Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Pennsylvania University, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes and predictors associated with proton radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the National Cancer Database. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Database was queried to capture patients with stage I-IV NSCLC treated with thoracic radiation from 2004 to 2012. A logistic regression model was used to determine the predictors for utilization of proton radiation therapy. The univariate and multivariable association with overall survival were assessed by Cox proportional hazards models along with log–rank tests. A propensity score matching method was implemented to balance baseline covariates and eliminate selection bias. Results: A total of 243,822 patients (photon radiation therapy: 243,474; proton radiation therapy: 348) were included in the analysis. Patients in a ZIP code with a median income of <$46,000 per year were less likely to receive proton treatment, with the income cohort of $30,000 to $35,999 least likely to receive proton therapy (odds ratio 0.63 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44-0.90]; P=.011). On multivariate analysis of all patients, non-proton therapy was associated with significantly worse survival compared with proton therapy (hazard ratio 1.21 [95% CI 1.06-1.39]; P<.01). On propensity matched analysis, proton radiation therapy (n=309) was associated with better 5-year overall survival compared with non-proton radiation therapy (n=1549), 22% versus 16% (P=.025). For stage II and III patients, non-proton radiation therapy was associated with worse survival compared with proton radiation therapy (hazard ratio 1.35 [95% CI 1.10-1.64], P<.01). Conclusions: Thoracic radiation with protons is associated with better survival in this retrospective analysis; further validation in the randomized setting is needed to account for any imbalances in patient characteristics, including positron emission tomography–computed tomography staging.

  3. Efficient Photon Recycling and Radiation Trapping in Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Waveguides

    KAUST Repository

    Dursun, Ibrahim; Zheng, Yangzi; Guo, Tianle; de Bastiani, Michele; Turedi, Bekir; Sinatra, Lutfan; Haque, Mohammed; Sun, Bin; Zhumekenov, Ayan A.; Saidaminov, Makhsud I.; Garcia de Arquer, F. Pelayo; Sargent, Edward H.; Wu, Tao; Gartstein, Yuri N; Bakr, Osman; Mohammed, Omar F.; Malko, Anton V.

    2018-01-01

    . At longer separations, the PL spectrum develops a red-shifted emission peak accompanied by an appearance of well-resolved rise times in the PL kinetics. We developed quantitative modeling that accounts for bimolecular recombination and photon recycling

  4. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H., E-mail: jsmith@magnet.fsu.edu; Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G. [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Cartier, S. [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETHZ, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Medjoubi, K. [Synchrotron Soleil, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin–BP 48, 91192 GIF-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2015-12-15

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10{sup 4} photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm{sup 2} pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm{sup 2}. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  5. A review of treatment planning for precision image-guided photon beam pre-clinical animal radiation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Hoof, Stefan van; Granton, Patrick V.; Trani, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Recently, precision irradiators integrated with a high-resolution CT imaging device became available for pre-clinical studies. These research platforms offer significant advantages over older generations of animal irradiators in terms of precision and accuracy of image-guided radiation targeting. These platforms are expected to play a significant role in defining experiments that will allow translation of research findings to the human clinical setting. In the field of radiotherapy, but also others such as neurology, the platforms create unique opportunities to explore e.g. the synergy between radiation and drugs or other agents. To fully exploit the advantages of this new technology, accurate methods are needed to plan the irradiation and to calculate the three-dimensional radiation dose distribution in the specimen. To this end, dedicated treatment planning systems are needed. In this review we will discuss specific issues for precision irradiation of small animals, we will describe the workflow of animal treatment planning, and we will examine several dose calculation algorithms (factorization, superposition-convolution, Monte Carlo simulation) used for animal irradiation with kilovolt photon beams. Issues such as dose reporting methods, photon scatter, tissue segmentation and motion will also be discussed briefly.

  6. Immobilization of Gibberella fujikuroi cells with carriers modified by radiation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Zhaoxin; Xie Zhongchuan; Wei Qijiang

    1994-01-01

    Gibberella fujikuroi cells were immobilized on modified carriers (gauze) by using the radiation polymerization technique. The mycelium was firmly adhered to the surface of fibril covered with hydrophobic polymer, poly (diethylene glycol dimethyl acrylate) and hydrophobic-hydrophilic copolymer poly (diethylene glycol dimethyl acrylate-sodium acrylate), but it was not immobilized onto the polyethylene net, which has a similar network structure to that of the modified carrier. The weight of immobilized cells was affected by covered polymer. Gibberellic acid productivity in immobilized cells was similar to that of free cells, and the immobilized cells was of good stability. A optimum culture condition for gibberellic acid production was at pH 5.5 and under 20 ∼ 30 degree C

  7. GaN-Based Multiple-Quantum-Well Light-Emitting Diodes Employing Nanotechnology for Photon Management

    KAUST Repository

    Hsiao, Yu Hsuan; Tsai, Meng Lin; He, Jr-Hau

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructures have been proved to be an efficient way of modifying/improving the performance of GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The achievements in photon management include strain relaxation, light extraction enhancement, radiation pattern

  8. Radiation protection measurements with the variance-covariance method in the stray radiation fields from photon and proton therapy facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillhök, J.; Persson, L.; Andersen, Claus E.

    2017-01-01

    , the dose-average lineal energy, the dose-average quality factor and the dose equivalent. The neutron component measured by the detectors at the proton beam was studied through Monte Carlo simulations using the code MCNP6. In the photon beam the stray absorbed dose ranged between 0.3 and 2.4 μGy per monitor...

  9. Quinolone and glycopeptide therapy for infection in mouse following exposure to mixed-field neutron-γ-photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brook, I.; Tom, S.P.; Ledney, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of increased doses of mixed-field neutron-γ-photon irradiation on bacterial translocation and subsequent sepsis, and the influence of antimicrobial therapy on these events, were studied in the C3H/HeN mouse. The results demonstrate a relationship between the doses of mixed-field radiation and the rates of infection due to Enterobacteriaceae. While L-ofloxacin therapy reduces the infection rate, prolongs survival and prevents mortality, the addition of a glycopeptide can enhance systemic infection by resistant bacteria in the irradiated host. (author)

  10. Quinolone and glycopeptide therapy for infection in mouse following exposure to mixed-field neutron-[gamma]-photon radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brook, I. (Naval Medical Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States) Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)); Tom, S.P.; Ledney, G.D. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1993-12-01

    The effects of increased doses of mixed-field neutron-[gamma]-photon irradiation on bacterial translocation and subsequent sepsis, and the influence of antimicrobial therapy on these events, were studied in the C3H/HeN mouse. The results demonstrate a relationship between the doses of mixed-field radiation and the rates of infection due to Enterobacteriaceae. While L-ofloxacin therapy reduces the infection rate, prolongs survival and prevents mortality, the addition of a glycopeptide can enhance systemic infection by resistant bacteria in the irradiated host. (author).

  11. Modelling of neutron and photon transport in iron and concrete radiation shieldings by the Monte Carlo method - Version 2

    CERN Document Server

    Žukauskaite, A; Plukiene, R; Plukis, A

    2007-01-01

    Particle accelerators and other high energy facilities produce penetrating ionizing radiation (neutrons and γ-rays) that must be shielded. The objective of this work was to model photon and neutron transport in various materials, usually used as shielding, such as concrete, iron or graphite. Monte Carlo method allows obtaining answers by simulating individual particles and recording some aspects of their average behavior. In this work several nuclear experiments were modeled: AVF 65 – γ-ray beams (1-10 MeV), HIMAC and ISIS-800 – high energy neutrons (20-800 MeV) transport in iron and concrete. The results were then compared with experimental data.

  12. GREENHOUSE PLASTIC FILMS CAPABLE OF MODIFYING THE SPECTRAL DISTRIBUTION OF SOLAR RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelia Schettini

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to investigate the radiometric properties of innovative covering films for protected cultivation capable of modifying the spectral distribution of the transmitted radiation and thus the vegetative activity. Two photoselective films, three photoluminescent films and one low-density polyethylene film were used as greenhouse coverings for cherry trees and peach trees, grown in pots. The photoselective films were characterised by a reduction of the R/FR ratio in comparison to the natural solar radiation. Tree growth parameters, such as the apical shoot of cherry trees and the shoot of peach trees, were monitored. Different responses to vegetative activities were observed under the films, depending on the species, with a higher shoots growth rate in the peach with respect to the cherry. The photoselective film characterised by the lowest R/FR ratio significantly enhanced the growth of cherry and peach trees in comparison to the trees cultivated under the other greenhouse films

  13. 78 FR 51754 - Request To Modify License by Replacing Security Plan With New Radiation Safety Plan; U.S...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... Replacing Security Plan With New Radiation Safety Plan; U.S. Department of the Army, Jefferson Proving... security plan with a new radiation safety plan. DATES: Submit comments by September 20, 2013. Requests for.... The proposed change is to modify License Condition No. 12 D which refers to the security plan of...

  14. Black hole radiation with modified dispersion relation in tunneling paradigm: free-fall frame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Haitang; Ying, Shuxuan [Sichuan University, Center for Theoretical Physics, College of Physical Science and Technology, Chengdu (China)

    2016-01-15

    Due to the exponential high gravitational red shift near the event horizon of a black hole, it might appear that the Hawking radiation would be highly sensitive to some unknown high energy physics. To study the effects of any unknown physics at the Planck scale on the Hawking radiation, the dispersive field theory models have been proposed, which are variations of Unruh's sonic black hole analogy. In this paper, we use the Hamilton-Jacobi method to investigate the dispersive field theory models. The preferred frame is the free-fall frame of the black hole. The dispersion relation adopted agrees with the relativistic one at low energy but is modified near the Planck mass m{sub p}. The corrections to the Hawking temperature are calculated for massive and charged particles to O(m{sub p}{sup -2}) and neutral and massless particles with λ = 0 to all orders. The Hawking temperature of radiation agrees with the standard one at the leading order. After the spectrum of radiation near the horizon is obtained, we use the brick wall model to compute the thermal entropy of a massless scalar field near the horizon of a 4D spherically symmetric black hole and a 2D one. Finally, the luminosity of a Schwarzschild black hole is calculated by using the geometric optics approximation. (orig.)

  15. Assessment of population external irradiation doses with consideration of Rospotrebnadzor bodies equipment for monitoring of photon radiation dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Stamat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides review of equipment and methodology for measurement of photon radiation dose; analysis of possible reasons for considerable deviation between the Russian Federation population annual effective external irradiation doses and the relevant average global value. Data on Rospotrebnadzor bodies dosimetry equipment used for measurement of gamma radiation dose are collected and systematized. Over 60 kinds of dosimeters are used for monitoring of population external irradiation doses. Most of dosimeters used in the country have gas-discharge detectors (Geiger-Mueller counters, minor biochemical annunciators, etc. which have higher total values of own background level and of space radiation response than the modern dosimeters with scintillation detectors. This feature of dosimeters is apparently one of most plausible reasons of a bit overstating assessment of population external irradiation doses. The options for specification of population external irradiation doses assessment are: correction of gamma radiation dose measurement results with consideration of dosimeters own background level and space radiation response, introduction of more up-to-date dosimeters with scintillation detectors, etc. The most promising direction of research in verification of population external irradiation doses assessment is account of dosimetry equipment.

  16. Photon activation therapy of RG2 glioma carrying Fischer rats using stable thallium and monochromatic synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceberg, Crister; Jönsson, Bo-Anders; Prezado, Yolanda; Pommer, Tobias; Nittby, Henrietta; Englund, Elisabet; Grafström, Gustav; Edvardsson, Anneli; Stenvall, Anna; Strömblad, Susanne; Wingårdh, Karin; Persson, Bertil; Elleaume, Hélène; Baldetorp, Bo; Salford, Leif G; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2012-12-21

    75 RG2 glioma-carrying Fischer rats were treated by photon activation therapy (PAT) with monochromatic synchrotron radiation and stable thallium. Three groups were treated with thallium in combination with radiation at different energy; immediately below and above the thallium K-edge, and at 50 keV. Three control groups were given irradiation only, thallium only, or no treatment at all. For animals receiving thallium in combination with radiation to 15 Gy at 50 keV, the median survival time was 30 days, which was 67% longer than for the untreated controls (p = 0.0020) and 36% longer than for the group treated with radiation alone (not significant). Treatment with thallium and radiation at the higher energy levels were not effective at the given absorbed dose and thallium concentration. In the groups treated at 50 keV and above the K-edge, several animals exhibited extensive and sometimes contra-lateral edema, neuronal death and frank tissue necrosis. No such marked changes were seen in the other groups. The results were discussed with reference to Monte Carlo calculated electron energy spectra and dose enhancement factors.

  17. Stability enhancement of an electrically tunable colloidal photonic crystal using modified electrodes with a large electrochemical potential window

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, HongShik [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gyun Shin, Chang; Heo, Chul-Joon; Jeon, Seog-Jin; Jin, Haishun; Woo Kim, Jung; Jin, YongWan; Lee, SangYoon; Gyu Han, Moon, E-mail: moongyu.han@samsung.com, E-mail: jinklee@snu.ac.kr [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Joohyun; Lee, Jin-Kyu, E-mail: moongyu.han@samsung.com, E-mail: jinklee@snu.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-03

    The color tuning behavior and switching stability of an electrically tunable colloidal photonic crystal system were studied with particular focus on the electrochemical aspects. Photonic color tuning of the colloidal arrays composed of monodisperse particles dispersed in water was achieved using external electric field through lattice constant manipulation. However, the number of effective color tuning cycle was limited due to generation of unwanted ions by electrolysis of the water medium during electrical switching. By introducing larger electrochemical potential window electrodes, such as conductive diamond-like carbon or boron-doped diamond, the switching stability was appreciably enhanced through reducing the number of ions generated.

  18. Heavy quark pair production in polarized photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jikia, G.; Tkabladze, A.

    2000-04-01

    We present the cross sections of the heavy quark-antiquark pair production in polarized photon photon collision for the general case of photon polarizations. The numerical results for top-antitop production cross sections together with production asymmetries are obtained for linearly polarized photon-photon collisions, including QCD radiative corrections. (orig.)

  19. A modeling approach for heat conduction and radiation diffusion in plasma-photon mixture in temperature nonequilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-09

    We present a simple approach for determining ion, electron, and radiation temperatures of heterogeneous plasma-photon mixtures, in which temperatures depend on both material type and morphology of the mixture. The solution technique is composed of solving ion, electron, and radiation energy equations for both mixed and pure phases of each material in zones containing random mixture and solving pure material energy equations in subdivided zones using interface reconstruction. Application of interface reconstruction is determined by the material configuration in the surrounding zones. In subdivided zones, subzonal inter-material energy exchanges are calculated by heat fluxes across the material interfaces. Inter-material energy exchange in zones with random mixtures is modeled using the length scale and contact surface area models. In those zones, inter-zonal heat flux in each material is determined using the volume fractions.

  20. Effect of the time spent by the photon in the absorbed state on the time-dependent transfer of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, D.M.; Rangarajan, K.E.; Peraiah, A.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent transfer equation is derived for a two-level atomic model which takes both bound-bound and bound-free transitions into account. A numerical scheme is proposed for solving the monochromatic time-dependent transfer equation when the time spent by the photon in the absorbed state is significant. The method can be easily extended to solve the problem of time-dependent line formation of the bound-free continuum. It is used here to study three types of boundary conditions of the incident radiation incident on a scattering atmosphere. The quantitative results show that the relaxation of the radiation field depends on the optical depth of the medium and on the ray's angle of emergence. 21 refs

  1. A modeling approach for heat conduction and radiation diffusion in plasma-photon mixture in temperature nonequilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chong

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple approach for determining ion, electron, and radiation temperatures of heterogeneous plasma-photon mixtures, in which temperatures depend on both material type and morphology of the mixture. The solution technique is composed of solving ion, electron, and radiation energy equations for both mixed and pure phases of each material in zones containing random mixture and solving pure material energy equations in subdivided zones using interface reconstruction. Application of interface reconstruction is determined by the material configuration in the surrounding zones. In subdivided zones, subzonal inter-material energy exchanges are calculated by heat fluxes across the material interfaces. Inter-material energy exchange in zones with random mixtures is modeled using the length scale and contact surface area models. In those zones, inter-zonal heat flux in each material is determined using the volume fractions.

  2. Time evolution of photon-pulse propagation in scattering and absorbing media: The dynamic radiative transfer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakopoulos, A.; Politopoulos, K.; Georgiou, E.

    2018-03-01

    A new dynamic-system approach to the problem of radiative transfer inside scattering and absorbing media is presented, directly based on first-hand physical principles. This method, the Dynamic Radiative Transfer System (DRTS), employs a dynamical system formality using a global sparse matrix, which characterizes the physical, optical and geometrical properties of the material-volume of interest. The new system state is generated by the above time-independent matrix, using simple matrix-vector multiplication for each subsequent time step. DRTS is capable of calculating accurately the time evolution of photon propagation in media of complex structure and shape. The flexibility of DRTS allows the integration of time-dependent sources, boundary conditions, different media and several optical phenomena like reflection and refraction in a unified and consistent way. Various examples of DRTS simulation results are presented for ultra-fast light pulse 3-D propagation, demonstrating greatly reduced computational cost and resource requirements compared to other methods.

  3. Skin dose estimation for various beam modifiers and source-to-surface distances for 6MV photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Girigesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to learn the skin dose estimation for various beam modifiers at various source-to-surface distances (SSDs for a 6 MV photon. Surface and buildup region doses were measured with an acrylic slab phantom and Markus 0.055 cc parallel plate (PP ionization chamber. Measurements were carried out for open fields, motorized wedge fields, acrylic block tray fields ranging from 3 x 3 cm 2 to 30 x 30 cm 2 . Twenty-five percent of the field was blocked with a cerrobend block and a Multileaf collimator (MLC. The effect of the blocks on the skin dose was measured for a 20 x 20 cm 2 field size, at 80 cm, 100 cm and 120 cm SSD. During the use of isocentric treatments, whereby the tumor is positioned at 100 cm from the source, depending on the depth of the tumor and size of the patient, the SSD can vary from 80 cm to 100 cm. To achieve a larger field size, the SSD can also be extended up to 120 cm at times. The skin dose increased as field size increased. The skin dose for the open 10 x10 cm 2 field was 15.5%, 14.8% and 15.5% at 80 cm, 100 cm and 120 cm SSDs, respectively. The skin dose due to a motorized 60 0 wedge for the 10 x 10 cm 2 field was 9.9%, 9.5%, and 9.5% at 80 cm, 100 cm and 120 cm SSDs. The skin dose due to acrylic block tray, of thickness 1.0 cm for a 10 x 10 cm 2 field was 27.0%, 17.2% and 16.1% at 80, 100 and 120 cm SSD respectively. Due to the use of an acrylic block tray, the surface dose was increased for all field sizes at the above three SSDs and the percentage skin dose was more dominant at the lower SSD and larger field size. The skin dose for a 30 x 30 cm 2 field size at 80 cm SSD was 38.3% and it was 70.4% for the open and acrylic block tray fields, respectively. The skin doses for motorized wedge fields were lower than for open fields. The effect of SSDs on the surface dose for motorized 60° wedge fields was not significant for a small field size (difference was less than 1% up to a 15 x 15 cm 2 field size

  4. Mapping of trace elements with photon microprobes: x-ray fluorescence with focussed synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Pounds, J.G.; Rivers, M.L.; Schidlovsky, G.

    1985-04-01

    High energy electron synchrotron storage rings provide copious quantities of polarized photons that make possible the mapping of many trace elements with sensitivities at the parts per billion (ppB) level with spatial resolutions in the micrometer range. The brightness of the x-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), presently being commissioned, will be five orders of magnitude larger than that of the bremsstrahlung spectrum of state-of-the-art rotating anode tubes. We will discuss mapping trace elements with a photon microprobe presently being constructed for use at the NSLS. This microprobe will have micrometer spatial resolution

  5. Silicon diodes as an alternative to diamond detectors for depth dose curves and profile measurements of photon and electron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherf, Christian; Moog, Jussi; Licher, Joerg; Kara, Eugen; Roedel, Claus; Ramm, Ulla; Peter, Christiane; Zink, Klemens

    2009-01-01

    Background: Depth dose curves and lateral dose profiles should correspond to relative dose to water in any measured point, what can be more or less satisfied with different detectors. Diamond as detector material has similar dosimetric properties like water. Silicon diodes and ionization chambers are also commonly used to acquire dose profiles. Material and Methods: The authors compared dose profiles measured in an MP3 water phantom with a diamond detector 60003, unshielded and shielded silicon diodes 60008 and 60012 and a 0.125-cm 3 thimble chamber 233642 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) for 6- and 25-MV photons. Electron beams of 6, 12 and 18 MeV were investigated with the diamond detector, the unshielded diode and a Markus chamber 23343. Results: The unshielded diode revealed relative dose differences at the water surface below +10% for 6-MV and +4% for 25-MV photons compared to the diamond data. These values decreased to less than 1% within the first millimeters of water depth. The shielded diode was only required to obtain correct data of the fall-off zones for photon beams larger than 10 x 10 cm 2 because of important contributions of low-energy scattered photons. For electron radiation the largest relative dose difference of -2% was observed with the unshielded silicon diode for 6 MeV within the build-up zone. Spatial resolutions were always best with the small voluminous silicon diodes. Conclusion: Relative dose profiles obtained with the two silicon diodes have the same degree of accuracy as with the diamond detector. (orig.)

  6. Modelling of hand phantoms and optimisation of dose measurements in inhomogeneous beta-photon radiation fields using the MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Frank; Blunck, Christoph; Hegenbart, Lars; Heide, Bernd; Leone, Debora; Nagels, Sven; Schimmelpfeng, Jutta; Urban, Manfred

    2008-01-01

    Inhomogeneous beta-photon radiation fields make a reliable dose difficult to determine. Routine monitoring with dosemeters does not guarantee any accurate determination of the local skin dose. In general, correction factors are used to correct for the measured dose and the maximum exposure. However, strong underestimations of the maximum exposure are possible, depending on the individual handling and the reliability of dose measurements. Simulations provide the possibility to track the points of highest exposure and the origin of the highest dose. In this connection, simulations are performed with MCNPX. In order to investigate the local skin dose, two hand phantoms are used, a model based on geometrical elements and a voxel hand. A typical case of radio synoviorthesis, handling of a syringe filled with 90 Y, is simulated. Another simulation focuses on the selective internal radio therapy, revealing the origin of the main dose component in the mixed beta-photon radiation field of a 90 Y vial in an opened transport container. (author)

  7. COMPUTATIONAL EFFICIENCY OF A MODIFIED SCATTERING KERNEL FOR FULL-COUPLED PHOTON-ELECTRON TRANSPORT PARALLEL COMPUTING WITH UNSTRUCTURED TETRAHEDRAL MESHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JONG WOON KIM

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a modified scattering kernel approach to avoid the unnecessarily repeated calculations involved with the scattering source calculation, and used it with parallel computing to effectively reduce the computation time. Its computational efficiency was tested for three-dimensional full-coupled photon-electron transport problems using our computer program which solves the multi-group discrete ordinates transport equation by using the discontinuous finite element method with unstructured tetrahedral meshes for complicated geometrical problems. The numerical tests show that we can improve speed up to 17∼42 times for the elapsed time per iteration using the modified scattering kernel, not only in the single CPU calculation but also in the parallel computing with several CPUs.

  8. Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon and electron radiation from radionuclides occurring in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    Dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon and electron radiation are calculated for 240 radionuclides of potential importance in routine releases from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Exposure modes considered are immersion in contaminated air, immersion in contaminated water, and irradiation from a contaminated ground surface. For each exposure mode, dose-rate conversion factors for photons and electrons are calculated for tissue-equivalent material at the body surface of an exposed individual. Dose-rate conversion factors for photons only are calculated for 22 body organs. (author)

  9. Modifying factors of radiation induced myeloid leukemia of C3H/He mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Nemoto, Kumie; Seki, Masatoshi

    1989-01-01

    The first experiment examined modifying factors, such as adrenocortical hormones, inflammatory reaction, and surgical stress, for radiation induced myeloid leukemia in C3H/He mice. The incidence of myeloid leukemia was not affected by a solitary subcutaneous injection of one mg of prednisolone acetate (predonine), but increased significantly by whole body irradiation, immediately followed by predonine. Augumentated effects of predonine was found in the 0.47 Gy, 1.42 Gy, and 2.84 Gy irradiated groups, but not found in the 4.73 Gy irradiated group. These results suggest that predonine itself did not have any effect on initiation of leukemogenesis, but promoted the incidence of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. In the next experiment determining whether the incidence of myeloid leukemia was increased with stimulation of hematopoietic tissues, mice were inserted a piece of cellulose acetate membrane (CAM) into the peritoneal cavity. In the non-irradiated group of mice, CAM insertion did not affect the incidence of myeloid leukemia at all. The incidence of leukemia increased significantly by CAM insertion combined with irradiation of 2.84 Gy. Mice suffered from both surgical stress and inflammatory reaction after CAM insertion. Therefore, surgical stress was considered responsible for the development of radiation-induced leukemia. (Namekawa, K)

  10. On the current status of an ISO working document on the calibration and type testing of radiation protection dosemeters for photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, H.M.; Boehm, J.; Iles, W.J.; Thompson, I.M.G.

    1994-01-01

    In October 1992, Working Group 2 'Reference Radiations' of ISO TC85/SC2 'Nuclear Energy/Radiation Protection' officially prepared a first draft of a document with the working title: 'The Calibration of Individual and Area Dosimeters for Photon Radiation and the Determination of their Response as a Function of Photon Energy and Angle of Incidence'. On the basis of existing ISO Standards 4037 'X and γ Reference Radiations ...' and ISO 8963 'Dosimetry of X and γ Reference Radiations ...' and the recent updating of these standards, a first draft of the new working document has been prepared. An overview of its contents is presented, an account of some of the topics as yet open is given and some new data pertinent to this future standard are included. (Author)

  11. Surface dose measurements under stretched, perforated thermoplast sheets and under protective wound dressings for high energy photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudenraus, J.; Christ, G.

    2000-01-01

    Patient fixation masks made of perforated thermoplast sheets are widely used in radiotherapy. These masks in particular serve to immobilize the head and neck region during radiation treatment. We placed samples made of differently stretched, perforated mask material on the surface of a white polystyrene (RW3) phantom and measured for high energy photon beams from Co-60 radiation up to 25 MV bremsstrahlung the dose increase resulting from the build-up under the hole and bridge areas. Depending on the energy of the incident beam and the thickness of the stretched mask material we observed a dose increase under the bridges at the phantom surface of 55% up to 140% compared to the dose without a layer of mask material. Under a hole the dose increase is almost half the value found under a bridge. However, deeper than 1 mm under the phantom surface this difference in dose increase under holes and bridges decreases to less than 10%. The mean dose increase under a perforated thermoplast sheet is lower than the dose increase under a homogeneous sheet made of the same material with the same mean thickness. Radiation induced skin lesions or an ulcerating tumour, respectively, may require a protective wound dressing under a patient fixation mask during radiation therapy. Choosing a thin hydrocolloid wound dressing the additional dose increase of the skin, compared to the dose increase due to the fixation mask, can be kept low. (orig.) [de

  12. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography based on a photon-counting detector: quantitative accuracy and radiation dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwan; Kang, Sooncheol; Eom, Jisoo

    2017-03-01

    Contrast-enhanced mammography has been used to demonstrate functional information about a breast tumor by injecting contrast agents. However, a conventional technique with a single exposure degrades the efficiency of tumor detection due to structure overlapping. Dual-energy techniques with energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) also cause an increase of radiation dose and an inaccuracy of material decomposition due to the limitations of EIDs. On the other hands, spectral mammography with photon-counting detectors (PCDs) is able to resolve the issues induced by the conventional technique and EIDs using their energy-discrimination capabilities. In this study, the contrast-enhanced spectral mammography based on a PCD was implemented by using a polychromatic dual-energy model, and the proposed technique was compared with the dual-energy technique with an EID in terms of quantitative accuracy and radiation dose. The results showed that the proposed technique improved the quantitative accuracy as well as reduced radiation dose comparing to the dual-energy technique with an EID. The quantitative accuracy of the contrast-enhanced spectral mammography based on a PCD was slightly improved as a function of radiation dose. Therefore, the contrast-enhanced spectral mammography based on a PCD is able to provide useful information for detecting breast tumors and improving diagnostic accuracy.

  13. Surface-coupling of Cerenkov radiation from a modified metallic metamaterial slab via Brillouin-band folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Anirban; Barik, Ranjan Kumar; Sattorov, Matlabjon; Kwon, Ohjoon; Min, Sun-Hong; Baek, In-Keun; Kim, Seontae; So, Jin-Kyu; Park, Gun-Sik

    2014-02-10

    Metallic metamaterials with positive dielectric responses are promising as an alternative to dielectrics for the generation of Cerenkov radiation [J.-K. So et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97(15), 151107 (2010)]. We propose here by theoretical analysis a mechanism to couple out Cerenkov radiation from the slab surfaces in the transverse direction. The proposed method based on Brillouin-zone folding is to periodically modify the thickness of the metamaterial slab in the axial direction. Moreover, the intensity of the surface-coupled radiation by this mechanism shows an order-of-magnitude enhancement compared to that of ordinary Smith-Purcell radiation.

  14. The photon Green's function for bounded media: Splitting property and nonequilibrium radiation laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, F; Semkat, D; Henneberger, K

    2010-01-01

    The presence of a medium boundary has been a major obstacle for the theoretical description of the propagation, emission and absorption of light due to the loss of translational invariance. We present a nonequilibrium photon Green's function theory that is valid for bounded (i.e., spatially inhomogeneous) media systems and also yields an energy flow law which can be seen as a generalization of the Kirchhoff and Planck laws to nonequilibrium. With the help of this law, we discuss mechanisms of emission and optical signatures of quantum condensates. An important finding is that the D>< components of the photon GF, which describe field-field fluctuations, decompose universally into two parts related to medium kinetics and external light sources. Thanks to their specific structure, the propagation of arbitrary (even nonclassical) light can be analyzed straightforwardly. These properties are used to demonstrate the energy flux and scattering of squeezed light incident on the medium.

  15. Measurement of the photon polarization in radiative $B^0_s$ decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The photon polarization is studied for the first time in $B_s^0$ decays, using an integrated luminosity of 3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton data recorded by the LHCb experiment. An untagged time-dependent analysis of $B_s^0 \\rightarrow \\phi\\gamma$ decays allows to measure the CPV parameter $\\mathcal{A}^{\\Delta}$, which is sensitive to the left- and right-handed helicity amplitudes. The measured value $\\mathcal{A}^{\\Delta} = -0.98 \\; ^{+0.46}_{-0.52}\\text{(stat.)} ^{+0.23}_{-0.20}\\text{(syst.)}$ is consistent with the Standard Model prediction within two standard deviations. This value can put constraints on the Wilson coefficients $\\mathcal{C}_7$ and $\\mathcal{C}_7^{'}$. With a tagged analysis of the same decay the parameter $S_{\\phi\\gamma}$, also sensitive to the photon polarization, could be measured.

  16. Numerical radiation dosimetry using Monte Carlo photon transport at diagnostic energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioppolo, J.; Buckley, C.; Tuchyna, T.; Price, R.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The Electron Gamma Shower 4 (EGS4) code has been installed on a WinNT workstation to allow the simulation of the dose absorbed in a patient during routine radiological examinations. Several additions to the code were required to form a theoretically sound model for use in the prediction of dose in the diagnostic energy range. Experimental measurements of dose using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) were directly compared with EGS4 simulations. A Philips diagnostic X-ray machine with a field size of 17x17cm was used to irradiate a homogeneous perspex slab 30x30x12cm. TLDs were placed at evenly spaced points symmetrically about the central beam perpendicular to the cathode-anode axis at a number of depths. A diagnostic energy X-ray spectrum was measured from a comparable X-ray machine with similar beam quality and provided as input for the EGS4 code. Diverging point source geometry of the output beam, plus a realistic 3D model of the homogeneous perspex block, were also used in the EGS4 code. The LSCAT low energy photon scattering expansion by Namito et al (KEK internal report 95-10, 1995) was used to incorporate the binding effect that orbital electrons have on incoherent photons with energies less than 100 keV. EGS4 simulations were performed with sufficient numbers of photon histories to produce statistical uncertainties < 5% in the distribution of dose. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  17. Optimization of adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer: Solutions for photon and proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Schoot, A.J.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    In cervical cancer radiation therapy, an adaptive strategy is required to compensate for interfraction anatomical variations in order to achieve adequate dose delivery. In this thesis, we have aimed at optimizing adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer to improve treatment efficiency and

  18. Mechanisms and biological importance of photon-induced bystander responses. Do they have an impact on low-dose radiation responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Masanori; Maeda, Munetoshi

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the biological effect of low linear energy transfer (LET), low-dose and/or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation is essential in ensuring radiation safety. Over the past two decades, non-targeted effects, which are not only a direct consequence of radiation-induced initial lesions produced in cellular DNA but also of intra- and inter-cellular communications involving both targeted and non-targeted cells, have been reported and are currently defining a new paradigm in radiation biology. These effects include radiation-induced adaptive response, low-dose hypersensitivity, genomic instability, and radiation-induced bystander response (RIBR). RIBR is generally defined as a cellular response that is induced in non-irradiated cells that receive bystander signals from directly irradiated cells. RIBR could thus play an important biological role in low-dose irradiation conditions. However, this suggestion was mainly based on findings obtained using high-LET charged-particle radiations. The human population (especially the Japanese, who are exposed to lower doses of radon than the world average) is more frequently exposed to low-LET photons (X-rays or γ-rays) than to high-LET charged-particle radiation on a daily basis. There are currently a growing number of reports describing a distinguishing feature between photon-induced bystander response and high-LET RIBR. In particular, photon-induced by-stander response is strongly influenced by irradiation dose, the irradiated region of the targeted cells, and p53 status. The present review focuses on the photon-induced bystander response, and discusses its impact on the low-dose radiation effect. (author)

  19. A procedure for estimating the dose modifying effect of chemotherapy on radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Y.; Keane, T.

    1994-01-01

    A procedure based on a logistic regression model was used to estimate the dose-modifying effect of chemotherapy on the response of normal tissues to radiation. The DEF in the proposed procedure is expressed as a function of logistic regression coefficients, response levels and values of covariates in the model. The proposed procedure is advantageous as it allows consideration of both the response levels and the values of covariates in calculating the DEF. A plot of the DEF against the response or a covariate describes how the DEF varies with the response levels or the covariate values. Confidence intervals of the DEF were obtained based on the normal approximation of the distribution of the estimated DEF and on a non-parametric Bootstrap method. An example is given to illustrate the proposed procedure. (Author)

  20. Anomalous effects on radiation detectors and capacitance measurements inside a modified Faraday cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milián-Sánchez, V.; Mocholí-Salcedo, A.; Milián, C.; Kolombet, V. A.; Verdú, G.

    2016-08-01

    We present experimental results showing certain anomalies in the measurements performed inside a modified Faraday cage of decay rates of Ra-226, Tl-204 and Sr-90/I-90, of the gamma spectrum of a Cs-137 preparation, and of the capacitance of both a class-I multilayer ceramic capacitor and of the interconnection cable between the radiation detector and the scaler. Decay rates fluctuate significantly up to 5% around the initial value and differently depending on the type of nuclide, and the spectrum photopeak increases in 4.4%. In the case of the capacitor, direct capacitance measurements at 100 Hz, 10 kHz and 100 kHz show variations up to 0.7%, the most significant taking place at 100 Hz. In the case of the interconnection cable, the capacitance varies up to 1%. Dispersion also tends to increase inside the enclosure. However, the measured capacitance variations do not explain the variations observed in decay rates.

  1. Observation of modified radiative properties of cold atoms in vacuum near a dielectric surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V V; Cornelussen, R A; Heuvell, H B van Linden van den; Spreeuw, R J C

    2004-01-01

    We have observed a distance-dependent absorption linewidth of cold 87 Rb atoms close to a dielectric-vacuum interface. This is the first observation of modified radiative properties in vacuum near a dielectric surface. A cloud of cold atoms was created using a magneto-optical trap (MOT) and optical molasses cooling. Evanescent waves (EW) were used to observe the behaviour of the atoms near the surface. We observed an increase of the absorption linewidth by up to 25% with respect to the free-space value. Approximately half the broadening can be explained by cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) as an increase of the natural linewidth and inhomogeneous broadening. The remainder we attribute to local Stark shifts near the surface. By varying the characteristic EW length we have observed a distance dependence characteristic for CQED

  2. Preparation of Sandy Soil Stabilizer for Roads Based on Radiation Modified Polymer Composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elnahas, H.H.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation modified polymer composite (RMPC) was studied to build an extremely durable sandy road, construct a trail or bath, or control dust and erosion. A dilute solution of composite binds sandy soil fines through a coagulation bonding process. The result is a dense soil structure that has superior resistance to cracks and water penetration and can also solve erosion control problems. In erosion control applications, diluted composite is merely sprayed into sandy soil without compaction, effectively sealing the surface to prevent air-born dust or deterioration from erosion. The prepared composite has an elastic and melt-able film formation that imparts thermal compacting to the stabilized sandy soil after full dryness for sandy road leveling, repairing and restoration processes. The prepared composite is environmentally economical when compared with traditional sandy soil stabilizing (SSS) or sealing methods.

  3. A Deterministic Electron, Photon, Proton and Heavy Ion Radiation Transport Suite for the Study of the Jovian System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Badavi, Francis F.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Atwell, William

    2011-01-01

    A deterministic suite of radiation transport codes, developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), which describe the transport of electrons, photons, protons, and heavy ions in condensed media is used to simulate exposures from spectral distributions typical of electrons, protons and carbon-oxygen-sulfur (C-O-S) trapped heavy ions in the Jovian radiation environment. The particle transport suite consists of a coupled electron and photon deterministic transport algorithm (CEPTRN) and a coupled light particle and heavy ion deterministic transport algorithm (HZETRN). The primary purpose for the development of the transport suite is to provide a means for the spacecraft design community to rapidly perform numerous repetitive calculations essential for electron, proton and heavy ion radiation exposure assessments in complex space structures. In this paper, the radiation environment of the Galilean satellite Europa is used as a representative boundary condition to show the capabilities of the transport suite. While the transport suite can directly access the output electron spectra of the Jovian environment as generated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Galileo Interim Radiation Electron (GIRE) model of 2003; for the sake of relevance to the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), the 105 days at Europa mission fluence energy spectra provided by JPL is used to produce the corresponding dose-depth curve in silicon behind an aluminum shield of 100 mils ( 0.7 g/sq cm). The transport suite can also accept ray-traced thickness files from a computer-aided design (CAD) package and calculate the total ionizing dose (TID) at a specific target point. In that regard, using a low-fidelity CAD model of the Galileo probe, the transport suite was verified by comparing with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for orbits JOI--J35 of the Galileo extended mission (1996-2001). For the upcoming EJSM mission with a potential launch date of 2020, the transport suite is used to compute

  4. Radiation shielding techniques and applications. 4. Two-Phase Monte Carlo Approach to Photon Streaming Through Three-Legged Penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Travis; Hack, Joe; Nathan, Steve; Barnett, Marvin

    2001-01-01

    Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions (Westinghouse SMS) has been tasked with providing radiological engineering design support for the new Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) being constructed at the Savannah River Site. The Remote Handling Building (RHB) of the CLWR-TEF will act as the receiving facility for irradiated targets used in the production of tritium for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Because of the high dose rates, approaching 50 000 rads/h (500 Gy/h) from the irradiated target bundles, significant attention has been made to shielding structures within the facility. One aspect of the design that has undergone intense review is the issue of the penetrations through the shield walls of the RHB, which includes heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning ductwork; cylindrical piping penetrations; floor drains; and conduit penetrations. The 'DOE Design Considerations Handbook' suggests that 'straight-line penetration of shield walls should be avoided to prevent radiation streaming', which is a prudent suggestion in this case considering the strength of the source. Therefore, a three-legged penetration approach was adopted for each type of penetration. To incorporate the three-legged penetration approach into the design, certain parameters had to be determined and confirmed as adequate. The main parameter to be determined was a minimum required offset length of the middle leg of the penetration. Additional parameters to be determined were supplemental photon shielding to be added to the interior of the wall to compensate for the void in the concrete created by the penetration, and the minimum necessary overlap dimensions of the supplemental shielding. Further, in cases where the minimum middle-leg offset was not practical, additional shielding requirements were determined for supplemental shielding added to the entrance or exit of the penetration to attenuate radiation scattering down the penetration. Analytical

  5. Towards a quantitative, measurement-based estimate of the uncertainty in photon mass attenuation coefficients at radiation therapy energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, E. S. M.; Spencer, B.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a quantitative estimate is derived for the uncertainty in the XCOM photon mass attenuation coefficients in the energy range of interest to external beam radiation therapy—i.e. 100 keV (orthovoltage) to 25 MeV—using direct comparisons of experimental data against Monte Carlo models and theoretical XCOM data. Two independent datasets are used. The first dataset is from our recent transmission measurements and the corresponding EGSnrc calculations (Ali et al 2012 Med. Phys. 39 5990-6003) for 10-30 MV photon beams from the research linac at the National Research Council Canada. The attenuators are graphite and lead, with a total of 140 data points and an experimental uncertainty of ˜0.5% (k = 1). An optimum energy-independent cross section scaling factor that minimizes the discrepancies between measurements and calculations is used to deduce cross section uncertainty. The second dataset is from the aggregate of cross section measurements in the literature for graphite and lead (49 experiments, 288 data points). The dataset is compared to the sum of the XCOM data plus the IAEA photonuclear data. Again, an optimum energy-independent cross section scaling factor is used to deduce the cross section uncertainty. Using the average result from the two datasets, the energy-independent cross section uncertainty estimate is 0.5% (68% confidence) and 0.7% (95% confidence). The potential for energy-dependent errors is discussed. Photon cross section uncertainty is shown to be smaller than the current qualitative ‘envelope of uncertainty’ of the order of 1-2%, as given by Hubbell (1999 Phys. Med. Biol 44 R1-22).

  6. Effect of gamma radiation on dielectric and mechanical properties of modified fluoroplastic PTFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Boris; Kostromin, Valeriy; Bedenko, Sergey; Knyshev, Vladimir; Mukhnurov, Ilya; Matias, Rodrigo Roman

    2018-03-01

    The influence of gamma radiation on dielectric and mechanical characteristics of modified fluoroplast PTFE-4 MBK is considered in this paper. The material was exposed to Gamma-ray source GU-200 (Joint-stock company «Research Institute of Instruments», Lytkarino, Russia). The results of the research have shown that the relative permittivity and the tangent of the dielectric loss angle of PTFE-4 MBK samples at doses 4.105-1.106 Gy monotonically increase by 2.9 and 9.4%, respectively, compared to un-exposed material. The research of the mechanical properties of PTFE-4 MBK showed a maximum stress of up to 13.8 MPa and a maximum strain of 252% at doses of 8.104 Gy. It has been demonstrated that modified PTFE-4 MBK has good dielectric characteristics and withstanding high mechanical stress. We propose to use the results of the research for choosing cables and wiring location used in nuclear and space industry.

  7. Allogeneic radiation chimeras respond to TNP-modified donor and host targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattime, E.C.; Gershon, H.E.; Stutman, O.

    1980-01-01

    Tolerance to major histocompatibility antigens as well as the ability to mount a cytotoxic response to hapten-modified cells of bone marrow donor and host origin was studied in allogeneic radiation chimeras. Lethally irradiated (C57BL/6 x DBA/2)F1 hosts reconstituted with anti-Thy 1.2 + C-treated bone marrow from (C57BL/6 x CBA)F1 mice showed tolerance to the MHC antigens of the three parental strains as measured by MLC and CML assay. The chimeras responded normally to unrelated allogeneic cells. Chimeric animals generated a cytotoxic response to hapten-modified cells of both donor (CBA) and host (DBA/2) haplotypes, as well as to C57BL/6, demonstrating that tolerance to the hapten-presenting host haplotype is sufficient to allow a cytotoxic antihapten response, and that processing through a semiallogeneic host environment does not affect the ability to generate a response to hapten in conjunction with self-determinants. Chimeras failed to mount a cytotoxic response to hapten presented on nontolerated allogeneic spleen cells

  8. Anomalous effects on radiation detectors and capacitance measurements inside a modified Faraday cage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milián-Sánchez, V., E-mail: vicmisan@iqn.upv.es [Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera, s/n, Valencia (Spain); Mocholí-Salcedo, A., E-mail: amocholi@eln.upv.es [Traffic Control Systems Group, ITACA Institute, Universitat Politécnica de, Camino de Vera, s/n, Valencia (Spain); Milián, C., E-mail: carles.milian@cpht.polytechnique.fr [Centre de Physique Théorique, CNRS, École Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Kolombet, V.A., E-mail: kolombet@iteb.ru [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow Region, Pushchino 142290 (Russian Federation); Verdú, G., E-mail: gverdu@iqn.upv.es [Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera, s/n, Valencia (Spain); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Universitat Politécnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera, s/n, Valencia (Spain)

    2016-08-21

    We present experimental results showing certain anomalies in the measurements performed inside a modified Faraday cage of decay rates of Ra-226, Tl-204 and Sr-90/I-90, of the gamma spectrum of a Cs-137 preparation, and of the capacitance of both a class-I multilayer ceramic capacitor and of the interconnection cable between the radiation detector and the scaler. Decay rates fluctuate significantly up to 5% around the initial value and differently depending on the type of nuclide, and the spectrum photopeak increases in 4.4%. In the case of the capacitor, direct capacitance measurements at 100 Hz, 10 kHz and 100 kHz show variations up to 0.7%, the most significant taking place at 100 Hz. In the case of the interconnection cable, the capacitance varies up to 1%. Dispersion also tends to increase inside the enclosure. However, the measured capacitance variations do not explain the variations observed in decay rates. - Highlights: • Background counts and decay rates changes of different nuclides are described. • Those changes are observed inside a multilayer modified Faraday cage. • Noise in a multichannel analyzer increases inside the multilayer enclosure. • Capacitance of a class-I multilayer ceramic capacitor varies inside the enclosure. • Capacitance changes depend on the used frequency.

  9. Anomalous effects on radiation detectors and capacitance measurements inside a modified Faraday cage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milián-Sánchez, V.; Mocholí-Salcedo, A.; Milián, C.; Kolombet, V.A.; Verdú, G.

    2016-01-01

    We present experimental results showing certain anomalies in the measurements performed inside a modified Faraday cage of decay rates of Ra-226, Tl-204 and Sr-90/I-90, of the gamma spectrum of a Cs-137 preparation, and of the capacitance of both a class-I multilayer ceramic capacitor and of the interconnection cable between the radiation detector and the scaler. Decay rates fluctuate significantly up to 5% around the initial value and differently depending on the type of nuclide, and the spectrum photopeak increases in 4.4%. In the case of the capacitor, direct capacitance measurements at 100 Hz, 10 kHz and 100 kHz show variations up to 0.7%, the most significant taking place at 100 Hz. In the case of the interconnection cable, the capacitance varies up to 1%. Dispersion also tends to increase inside the enclosure. However, the measured capacitance variations do not explain the variations observed in decay rates. - Highlights: • Background counts and decay rates changes of different nuclides are described. • Those changes are observed inside a multilayer modified Faraday cage. • Noise in a multichannel analyzer increases inside the multilayer enclosure. • Capacitance of a class-I multilayer ceramic capacitor varies inside the enclosure. • Capacitance changes depend on the used frequency.

  10. Application of the modified Wheeler cap method for radiation efficiency measurement of balanced electrically small antennas in complex environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jiaying; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, application of a modified Wheeler cap method for the radiation efficiency measurement of balanced electrically small antennas is presented. It is shown that the limitations on the cavity dimension can be overcome and thus measurement in a large cavity is possible. The cavity loss...... is investigated, and a modified radiation efficiency formula that includes the cavity loss is introduced. Moreover, a modification of the technique is proposed that involves the antenna working complex environment inside the Wheeler Cap and thus makes possible measurement of an antenna close to a hand or head...

  11. The radiation chemistry of the Cs-7SB modifier used in Cs and Sr extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swancutt, Katy L.; Cullen, Thomas D.; Mezyk, Stephen P.; Elias, Gracy; Bauer, William F.; Peterman, Dean R.; Riddle, Catherine L.; Ball, R. Duane; Mincher, Bruce J.; Muller, James J.

    2011-01-01

    The compound 1-(2,2,3,3,-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol, also called Cs-7SB, is used as a solvent modifier in formulations containing calixarenes and crown ethers for cesium and/or strontium extraction from nuclear waste solutions. The compound solvates complexes of both metals and concentration decreases result in lowered extraction efficiency for both. The use of Cs-7SB in nuclear solvent extraction ensures that it will be exposed to high radiation doses, and thus its radiation chemical robustness is a matter of interest in the design of extraction systems employing it. The behavior of the compound in irradiated solution, both in the presence and absence of a nitric acid aqueous phase was investigated here using steady state and pulsed radiolysis techniques. The rate constants for the aqueous reactions of Cs-7SB with H, OH, NO 3 and NO 2 radicals are reported. UPLC-UV-MS results were used to identify major products of the radiolysis of Cs-7SB in contact with nitric acid, and revealed the production of hydroxylated nitro-derivatives. Reaction mechanisms are proposed and it is concluded that the aryl ether configuration of this molecule makes it especially susceptible to nitration in the presence of radiolytically-produced nitrous acid. Fluoride yields are also given under various conditions.

  12. Analyses of susceptibility to radiation-induced tumors: Prkdc, a candidate modifier of lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Nobuko; Okumoto, Masaaki; Nakao, Ren

    2003-01-01

    BALB/cHeA (BALB/c) mice are susceptible to radiation-induced lymphomas, while STS/A (STS) mice are resistant. To analyze the difference in susceptibility between these two strains of mice, we have performed 3 independent studies: 1) mapping of apoptosis susceptibility gene Rapopl (chromosome 16) and identification of Prkdc as a candidate modifier of apoptosis as well as lymphomas, 2) analysis of congenic lines for Lyr, a gene responsible for the lymphoma resistance of STS mice on chromosome 4, 3) genetic analyses of lymphoma susceptibility using a backcross [(BALB/c x STS)F 1 x STS]. Analysis of Rapopl congenic lines indicated a minor contribution of the STS allele at the Rapopl (Prkdc) locus to the lymphoma resistance of STS mice. On the other hand, homozygous STS alleles at Lyr had a substantial, but less potent, effect on radiation lymphomagenesis. Furthermore, there was no single marker where the potent resistance of the STS mice was achieved with the homozygous STS alleles. These results suggest potential involvement of another loci in the resistance of STS mice. (author)

  13. Waste Tire Particles and Gamma Radiation as Modifiers of the Mechanical Properties of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Sadot Herrera-Sosa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In polymer reinforced concrete, the Young’s modulus of both polymers and cement matrix is responsible for the detrimental properties of the concrete, including compressive and tensile strength, as well as stiffness. A novel methodology for solving such problems is based on use of ionizing radiation, which has proven to be a good tool for improvement on physical and chemical properties of several materials including polymers, ceramics, and composites. In this work, particles of 0.85 mm and 2.80 mm obtained from waste tire were submitted at 250 kGy of gamma radiation in order to modify their physicochemical properties and then used as reinforcement in Portland cement concrete for improving mechanical properties. The results show diminution on mechanical properties in both kinds of concrete without (or with irradiated tire particles with respect to plain concrete. Nevertheless such diminutions (from 2 to 16% are compensated with the use of high concentration of waste tire particles (30%, which ensures that the concrete will not significantly increase the cost.

  14. Photon Activation Analysis Of Light Elements Using 'Non-Gamma' Radiation Spectroscopy - The Instrumental Determination Of Phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segebade, Christian; Goerner, Wolf

    2011-01-01

    Unlike metal determinations the analysis of light elements (e.g., carbon, oxygen, phosphorus) is frequently problematic, in particular if analysed instrumentally. In photon activation analysis (PAA) the respective activation products do not emit gamma radiation in the most cases. Usually, annihilation quanta counting and subsequent decay curve analysis have been used for determinations of C, N, O, and F. However, radiochemical separation of the respective radioisotopes mostly is indispensable. For several reasons, some of the light elements cannot be analysed following this procedure, e.g. phosphorus. In this contribution the instrumental PAA of phosphorus in organic matrix by activation with bremsstrahlung of an electron linear accelerator and subsequent beta spectroscopy is described. The accuracy of the results was excellent as obtained by analysis of a BCR Reference Material.

  15. Photon radiation in e{sup +}e{sup -}→hadrons at low energies with carlomat3.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegerlehner, Fred [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Kolodziej, Karol [Univ. of Silesia, Katowice (Poland). Inst. of Physics

    2017-04-25

    We present a sample of results for the cross sections of several processes of low energetic e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation into final states containing pions accompanied by one or two photons, or a light lepton pair. The results, which have been obtained with a new version of a multipurpose Monte Carlo program carlomat, labelled 3.1, demonstrate new capabilities of the program which, among others, include a possibility of taking into account either the initial or final state radiation separately, or both at a time, and a possibility of inclusion of the electromagnetic charged pion form factor for processes with charged pion pairs. We also discuss some problems related to the U(1) electromagnetic gauge invariance.

  16. Photon radiation in e{sup +}e{sup -} → hadrons at low energies with carlomat3.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegerlehner, Fred [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Kolodziej, Karol [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland)

    2017-04-15

    We present a sample of results for the cross sections of several processes of low energetic e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation into final states containing pions accompanied by one or two photons, or a light lepton pair. The results, which have been obtained with a new version of a multipurpose Monte Carlo program carlomat, labelled 3.1, demonstrate new capabilities of the program which, among others, include a possibility of taking into account either the initial or final state radiation separately, or both at a time, and a possibility of inclusion of the electromagnetic charged pion form factor for processes with charged pion pairs. We also discuss some problems related to the U(1) electromagnetic gauge invariance. (orig.)

  17. Modeling of neutron and photon transport in iron and concrete radiation shields by using Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Žukauskaitėa, A; Plukienė, R; Ridikas, D

    2007-01-01

    Particle accelerators and other high energy facilities produce penetrating ionizing radiation (neutrons and γ-rays) that must be shielded. The objective of this work was to model photon and neutron transport in various materials, usually used as shielding, such as concrete, iron or graphite. Monte Carlo method allows obtaining answers by simulating individual particles and recording some aspects of their average behavior. In this work several nuclear experiments were modeled: AVF 65 (AVF cyclotron of Research Center of Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Japan) – γ-ray beams (1-10 MeV), HIMAC (heavy-ion synchrotron of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba, Japan) and ISIS-800 (ISIS intensive spallation neutron source facility of the Rutherford Appleton laboratory, UK) – high energy neutron (20-800 MeV) transport in iron and concrete. The calculation results were then compared with experimental data.compared with experimental data.

  18. Polarization effects in coherent and incoherent photon scattering: survey of measurements and theory relevant to radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbell, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    This report reviews available information on polarization effects arising when photons in the X-ray and gamma-ray energy regime undergo coherent (Rayleigh) scattering and incoherent (Compton) scattering by atomic electrons. In addition to descriptions and discussions of these effects, including estimates of their magnitudes as they apply to radiation transport calculations, an annotated bibliography of 102 selected works covering the period 1905-1991 is provided, with particularly relevant works for the purpose of this report flagged with asterisks (*). A major resource for this report is a 1948 unpublished informal report by L.V. Spencer which has been quoted here almost in its entirety, since, of all the works cited in the annotated bibliography, it appears to be the only one which explicitly and directly addresses the purpose of this report. Hence this valuable material should be re-introduced into the available and current literature. (author). 119 refs., 7 figs

  19. VHMPID RICH prototype using pressurized C{sub 4}F{sub 8}O radiator gas and VUV photon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acconcia, T.V. [UNICAMP, University of Campinas, Campinas (Brazil); Agócs, A.G. [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Barile, F. [INFN Sezione di Bari and Universitá degli Studi di Bari, Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica M. Merlin, Bari (Italy); Barnaföldi, G.G. [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Bellwied, R. [University of Houston, Houston (United States); Bencédi, G. [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Bencze, G., E-mail: Gyorgy.Bencze@cern.ch [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Berényi, D.; Boldizsár, L. [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Chattopadhyay, S. [Saha Institute, Kolkata (India); Chinellato, D.D. [University of Houston, Houston (United States); Cindolo, F. [University of Salerno, Salerno (Italy); Cossyleon, K. [Chicago State University, Chicago, IL (United States); Das, D.; Das, K.; Das-Bose, L. [Saha Institute, Kolkata (India); Dash, A.K. [UNICAMP, University of Campinas, Campinas (Brazil); D' Ambrosio, S. [University of Salerno, Salerno (Italy); De Cataldo, G. [INFN Sezione di Bari and Universitá degli Studi di Bari, Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica M. Merlin, Bari (Italy); De Pasquale, S. [University of Salerno, Salerno (Italy); and others

    2014-12-11

    A small-size prototype of a new Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector using for the first time pressurized C4F8O radiator gas and a photon detector consisting of MWPC equipped with a CsI photocathode has been built and tested at the PS accelerator at CERN. It contained all the functional elements of the detector proposed as Very High Momentum Particle Identification (VHMPID) upgrade for the ALICE experiment at LHC to provide charged hadron track-by-track identification in the momentum range starting from 5 potentially up to 25 GeV/c. In the paper the equipment and its elements are described and some characteristic test results are shown.

  20. Uncooled Radiation Hard SiC Schottky VUV Detectors Capable of Single Photon Sensing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project seeks to design, fabricate, characterize and commercialize very large area, uncooled and radiative hard 4H-SiC VUV detectors capable of near single...

  1. Image analysis of the nano DDS using photon radiation in SPring-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Nobuo; Koide, Kazuharu; Nemoto, Tetsuya; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Makino, Ken-ichi; Nakano, Masahiro; Ju, Dong-Ying; Bian, Pei

    2007-01-01

    Recently, technology to handle a molecule of nano scale advances, and an applied technology is developed in every area. Development of nano-drug delivery system (DDS) is performed worldwide in the med-tech area. We try the effectiveness of nano-DDS. The dynamic behavior of nano-scale magnet in biomaterials is not well known. Therefore it is necessary we perform direct observation, and to get information of the behavior. Using strong photon beams in Spring-8 facility, we trace the magnets and investigate the leaf or the egg. (author)

  2. X and gamma reference radiation for calibrating dosemeters and doserate meters and for determining their response as a function of photon energy - Part 4: Calibration of area and personal dosemeters in low energy X reference radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    ISO 4037 consists of the following parts, under the general title X and gamma reference radiation for calibrating dosemeters and doserate meters and for determining their response as a function of photon energy: Part 1: Radiation characteristics and production methods; Part 2: Dosimetry for radiation protection over the energy ranges from 8 keV to 1,3 MeV and 4 MeV to 9 MeV; Part 3: Calibration of area and personal dosemeters and the measurement of their response as a function of energy and angle of incidence; Part 4: Calibration of area and personal dosemeters in low energy X reference radiation fields. This part 4. of ISO 4037 gives guidelines on additional aspects of the characterization of low energy photon radiations. This part of ISO 4037 also describes procedures for calibration and determination of the response of area and personal dose(rate)meters as a function of photon energy and angle of incidence. This part of ISO 4037 concentrates on the accurate determination of conversion coefficients from air kerma to Hp(10) and H*(10) for the spectra of low energy photon radiations. As an alternative to the use of conversion coefficients, the direct calibration in terms of these quantities by means of appropriate reference instruments is described

  3. The measurement of attenuation coefficients at low photon energies using fluorescent x-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peaple, L.H.J.; White, D.R.

    1978-03-01

    A rapid and accurate method has been developed to measure low energy attenuation coefficients for materials of importance in radiation dosimetry. It employs a collimated beam of fluorescent x-rays from which the required radiation is selected by means of a high resolution germanium detector and multi-channel analyser. The method is described in detail and its accuracy and application outlined with reference to the results from nine different materials. (author)

  4. Characterization of radiation modified κ-carrageenan oligomers for bio-based materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abad, Lucille V.; Relleve, Lorna S.; Aranilla, Charito T.; Racadio, Darwin T.; Dela Rosa, Alumanda M.

    2011-01-01

    κ-carrageenan oligomers are known to have several biological activities such as anti-HIV, anti-herpes, antitumor and antioxidant properties. Recent progress in the development of radiation modified κ-carrageenan has resulted in new applications such as plant growth promoter, radiation dose indicator and hydrogels for wound dressing. This presentation would touch on the changes in chemical structure, gelation and conformational transition behavior and molecular size of κ-carrageenan at doses from 0 to 200 kGy and would be correlated to these functions for the development of bio-based materials. Chemical and spectral analyses were carried out using UV-Vis spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, reducing sugar analysis, free sulfate and carboxylic acid analysis. The chemical and spectral analyses of the radiolytic products indicated increasing reducing sugars, carbonyl, carboxylic acids, and sulfates with increasing doses which reached a maximum level at a certain dose depending on the irradiation condition. Values were very much lower in solid irradiation (in vacuum and in air) as compared to aqueous irradiation. NMR data also revealed an intact structure of the oligomer irradiated at 100 kGy in the specific fraction that contains an Mw = (3-10) kDa. κ-carrageenan oligomers exhibited antioxidant properties as determined by hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, reducing power and DPPH radical scavenging capacity assay. The degree of oxidative inhibition increased with increasing dose which can be attributed to higher reducing sugar. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments showed that a dose of up to 50 kGy, sol-gelation transition was still observed. Beyond 50 kGy, no gelation took place, instead appearance of fast relax-carrageenan mode in characteristic decay time function was observed at doses of (75-150) kGy. Optimum peak intensity was found at 100 kGy (mol wt. 5-10 kDa) which coincides with the optimum plant growth promoter effect in κ

  5. Improved radiative corrections for (e,e'p) experiments: Beyond the peaking approximation and implications of the soft-photon approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissbach, F.; Hencken, K.; Rohe, D.; Sick, I.; Trautmann, D.

    2006-01-01

    Analyzing (e,e ' p) experimental data involves corrections for radiative effects which change the interaction kinematics and which have to be carefully considered in order to obtain the desired accuracy. Missing momentum and energy due to bremsstrahlung have so far often been incorporated into the simulations and the experimental analyses using the peaking approximation. It assumes that all bremsstrahlung is emitted in the direction of the radiating particle. In this article we introduce a full angular Monte Carlo simulation method which overcomes this approximation. As a test, the angular distribution of the bremsstrahlung photons is reconstructed from H(e,e ' p) data. Its width is found to be underestimated by the peaking approximation and described much better by the approach developed in this work. The impact of the soft-photon approximation on the photon angular distribution is found to be minor as compared to the impact of the peaking approximation. (orig.)

  6. Personal monitoring for external sources of beta and low energy photon radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, P.; Herbaut, Y.; Marshall, T.O.

    1987-01-01

    In general, the dosemeters currently used for personal monitoring of beta and low energy photon doses suffer from an energy threshold problem because the detector and/or filter is too thick. Furthermore, current non-tissue-equivalent dosemeters, e.g. film dosemeters, are not provided with the filters needed to evaluate beta ray and low energy photon doses separately. To improve the present state of film dosemeters the thickness of the film wrapping paper should be reduced significantly and the badge should be provided with a number of pairs of thin filters. The dose evaluation from such a dosemeter is, however, complex and inaccurate and it seems unlikely that the required improvement is achievable at a reasonable cost. Improvement of tissue-equivalent dosemeters is possible by further development of multi-element dosemeters and thin detectors. The multi-element method has the advantage of using existing detectors, however the dose estimation is encumbered with high random error and the dosemeter design may become prohibitively expensive. The use of thin tissue-equivalent detectors implies a very simple badge design and an inherently accurate and uncomplicated dose evaluation. The development of adequate, thin, tissue-equivalent detectors suited for automated processing should therefore be encouraged.

  7. Personal monitoring for external sources of beta and low energy photon radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, P.; Herbaut, Y.; Marshall, T.O.

    1987-01-01

    In general, the dosemeters currently used for personal monitoring of beta and low energy photon doses suffer from an energy threshold problem because the detector and/or filter is too thick. Furthermore, current non-tissue-equivalent dosemeters, e.g. film dosemeters, are not provided with the filters needed to evaluate beta ray and low energy photon doses separately. To improve the present state of film dosemeters the thickness of the film wrapping paper should be reduced significantly and the badge should be provided with a number of pairs of thin filters. The dose evaluation from such a dosemeter is, however, complex and inaccurate and it seems unlikely that the required improvement is achievable at a reasonable cost. Improvement of tissue-equivalent dosemeters is possible by further development of multi-element dosemeters and thin detectors. The multi-element method has the advantage of using existing detectors, however the dose estimation is encumbered with high random error and the dosemeter design may become prohibitively expensive. The use of thin tissue-equivalent detectors implies a very simple badge design and an inherently accurate and uncomplicated dose evaluation. The development of adequate, thin, tissue-equivalent detectors suited for automated processing should therefore be encouraged. (author)

  8. The two-photon self-energy and other QED radiative corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zschocke, S.

    2001-07-01

    One of the main issues in current nuclear physics is the precise measurement of the Lamb shift of strongly bound electrons in quantum electrodynamic (QED) tests in strong fields in highly charged ions. The currently performed high-precision measurements require extreme accuracy in the theoretical calculation of Lamb shift. This requires consideration of all α and α 2 order QED corrections as well as of precisely all orders in Zα. In the past years most of these QED corrections have been calculated both in 1st order and in 2nd order interference theory. As yet however, it has not been possible to assess the contribution of the two-photon self-energy, which has therefore been the greatest uncertainty factor in predicting Lamb shift in hydrogen-like systems. This study examines the contribution of these processes to Lamb shift. It also provides the first ever derivation of renormalized terms of two-photon vacuum polarisation and self-energy vacuum polarisation. Until now it has only been possible to evaluate these contributions by way of an Uehling approximation [de

  9. High energy photon reference for radiation protection: technical design of the LINAC beam and ionization chambers; and calculation of monoenergetic conversion coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusciac D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the results of the first part of a research project aimed at offering a complete response to dosimeters providers and nuclear physicists’ demands for high-energy (6 – 9 MeV photon beams for radiation protection purposes. Classical facilities allowing the production of high-energy photonic radiation (proton accelerators, nuclear reactors are very rare and need large investment for development and use. A novel solution is proposed, consisting in the use of a medical linear accelerator, allowing a significant decrease of all costs.Using Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP5 and PENELOPE codes, a specifically designed electron-photon conversion target allowing for obtaining a high energy photon beam (with an average energy weighted by fluence of about 6 MeV has been built for radiation protection purposes. Due to the specific design of the target, this “realistic” radiation protection high-energy photon beam presents a uniform distribution of air kerma rate at a distance of 1 m, over a 30 × 30 cm2 surface. Two graphite cavity ionizing chambers for ionometric measurements have been built. For one of these chambers, the charge collection volume has been measured allowing for its use as a primary standard. The second ionizing chamber is used as a transfer standard; as such it has been calibrated in a 60Co beam, and in the high energy photon beam for radiation protection.The measurements with these ionizing chambers allowed for an evaluation of the air kerma rate in the LINAC based high-energy photon beam for radiation protection: the values cover a range between 36 mGy/h and 210 mGy/h, compatible with radiation protection purposes.Finally, using Monte Carlo simulations, conversion coefficients from air kerma to dose equivalent quantities have been calculated in the range between 10 keV and 22.4 MeV, for the spectral distribution of the fluence corresponding to the beam produced by the linear accelerator of the LNE-LNHB.

  10. Direct ion storage dosimetry systems for photon, beta and neutron radiation with instant readout capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernli, C.; Kahilainen, J.

    2001-01-01

    The direct ion storage (DIS) dosemeter is a new type of electronic dosemeter from which the dose information for both H p (10) and H p (0.07) can be obtained instantly at the workplace by using an electronic reader unit. The number of readouts is unlimited and the stored information is not affected by the readout procedure. The accumulated dose can also be electronically reset by authorised personnel. The DIS dosemeter represents a potential alternative for replacing the existing film and thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) used in occupational monitoring due to its ease of use and low operating costs. The standard version for normal photon and beta dosimetry, as well as a developmental version for neutron dosimetry, have been characterised in several field studies. Two new small size variations are also introduced including a contactless readout device and a militarised version optimised for field use. (author)

  11. Dosimetric evaluation of spectrophotometric response of alanine gel solution for gamma, photons, electrons and thermal neutrons radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Cleber Feijo

    2009-01-01

    Alanine Gel Dosimeter is a new gel material developed at IPEN that presents significant improvement on Alanine system developed by Costa. The DL-Alanine (C 3 H 7 NO 2 ) is an amino acid tissue equivalent that improves the production of ferric ions in the solution. This work aims to analyse the main dosimetric characteristics this new gel material for future application to measure dose distribution. The performance of Alanine gel solution was evaluated to gamma, photons, electrons and thermal neutrons radiations using the spectrophotometry technique. According to the obtained results for the different studied radiation types, the reproducibility intra-batches and inter-batches is better than 4% and 5%, respectively. The dose response presents a linear behavior in the studied dose range. The response dependence as a function of dose rate and incident energy is better 2% and 3%, respectively. The lower detectable dose is 0.1 Gy. The obtained results indicate that the Alanine gel dosimeter presents good performance and can be useful as an alternative dosimeter in the radiotherapy area, using MRI technique for tridimensional dose distribution evaluation. (author)

  12. Measurement assurance studies of high-energy electron and photon dosimetry in radiation-therapy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrlich, M; Soares, C G [National Bureau of Standards, Washington, DC (USA)

    1981-08-01

    This is a brief review of surveys on the dosimetry of radiation-therapy beams by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS). Covered are the NBS ferrous-sulfate (Fricke) dosimetry service, a recently completed survey carried out with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) on the dosimetry in cobalt-60 teletherapy beams, and plans for a TLD survey of dosimetry in high-energy bremsstrahlung beams.

  13. Polypropylene (P P) /polystyrene (P S) blends modified by radiation induced methods. I. transparency and structure morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Nagger, A.M.; Ibrahim, M.S.; Said, H.M.; Zahran, A.H.

    2002-01-01

    The compatibility of polypropylene (P P)/polystyrene (P S) polymer blends modified through gamma radiation or accelerated electrons has been investigated. Two methods were suggested; either by exposing pp component or by exposing the melt extruded mixed polymers to both type of radiation. The modified blends were characterized by measuring the colour interceptions and observing the structure morphology by scanning electron microscope (SEM). A method was proposed depending on the measurement of the transparency (L * ) of the films of pure polymers and their blend before and after they had been modified by high-energy radiation. The transparency values were used to calculate quantitatively the percentage compatibility of pp/ps blends. The results showed that irradiation process through the two methods used in this work improved the compatibility of P P/P S blends. However, modification through exposing the mixed polymers is more effective than exposing pp component prior to melt extrusion mixing. The modification through irradiating mixed blends gamma radiation tends to yield improved modification than with E B radiation. On the other hand, the fracture surfaces of the blends examined by SEM gives further supports to the results of transparency measurements

  14. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Induced Radiation Sensitization Effects on Human Cancer Cells after Photon and Hadron Radiation Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariungerel Gerelchuluun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA is a histone deacetylase inhibitor, which has been widely utilized throughout the cancer research field. SAHA-induced radiosensitization in normal human fibroblasts AG1522 and lung carcinoma cells A549 were evaluated with a combination of γ-rays, proton, and carbon ion exposure. Growth delay was observed in both cell lines during SAHA treatment; 2 μM SAHA treatment decreased clonogenicity and induced cell cycle block in G1 phase but 0.2 μM SAHA treatment did not show either of them. Low LET (Linear Energy Transfer irradiated A549 cells showed radiosensitization effects on cell killing in cycling and G1 phase with 0.2 or 2 μM SAHA pretreatment. In contrast, minimal sensitization was observed in normal human cells after low and high LET radiation exposure. The potentially lethal damage repair was not affected by SAHA treatment. SAHA treatment reduced the rate of γ-H2AX foci disappearance and suppressed RAD51 and RPA (Replication Protein A focus formation. Suppression of DNA double strand break repair by SAHA did not result in the differences of SAHA-induced radiosensitization between human cancer cells and normal cells. In conclusion, our results suggest SAHA treatment will sensitize cancer cells to low and high LET radiation with minimum effects to normal cells.

  15. SSDL quality assurance for environmental dose/dose rate monitoring of photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Member states of IAEA have recently approved an expanded Nuclear Safety Programme and two International Conventions have been signed. One concerns early notification of a nuclear accident, and the other concerns assistance in the case of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency. In the course of the implementation of these conventions an international system will be established by the Agency for the reception and dissemination of data following a nuclear accident. Such data should include the results of radiation measurements obtained by radiation monitoring. These data must be reliable, and comparable. This assures that numerical values of measured quantities obtained at different times, sites and countries, and with different instruments, can be compared in order that the competent authorities may draw conclusions. Such measurements may also have legal consequences. This implies that the instruments used for the measurement should comply with the relevant international specifications, and that the readings of these instruments be traceable to the international measurement system. At a meeting of an expert working group on International Cooperation in Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection held in November 1986, a proposal to produce a technical document on ''The role of SSDLs in the quality assurance programme relating to the use of dose and dose rate meters for personal and environmental measurements'' received high priority, and at a subsequent meeting of the Board of Governors the proposal was approved. Prior to these proposals the SSDL Scientific Committee at its annual meeting in May 1986 also advised the IAEA to promote measures to ensure world wide reliability and traceability of dose measurements in the field of radiation protection. On 26-30 January 1987 an Advisory Group Meeting on ''The role of SSDLs in the dosimetry of unintentional radiation exposures'' was organized by the IAEA. This Advisory Group assisted the Agency in the formulation of a

  16. Guidelines for beamline and front-end radiation shielding design at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; X-Ray Science Division

    2008-01-01

    Shielding for the APS will be such that the individual radiation worker dose will be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). The ALARA goals for the APS are to keep the total of the work-related radiation exposure (exposure coming from other than natural or medical sources) as far below 500 person-mrem per year, collective total effective dose equivalent, as reasonably achievable. For an individual APS radiation worker, the goal is to keep the maximum occupational total effective dose equivalent of any one employee as far below 200 mrem/yr as reasonably achievable. The ALARA goal for APS beamline scientists is to keep the total of the work-related radiation exposure (exposure coming from other than natural or medical sources) as far below 100 person-mrem per year, collective total effective dose equivalent, as reasonably achievable. For an individual APS beamline scientist, the goal is to keep the maximum occupational total effective dose equivalent of any one scientist as far below 50 mrem/yr as reasonably achievable. The dose is actively monitored by the radiation monitors on the storage ring wall in each sector and by the frequent area surveys performed by the health physics personnel. For cases in which surveys indicate elevated hourly dose rates that may impact worker exposure, additional local shielding is provided to reduce the radiation field to an acceptable level. Passive area monitors are used throughout the facility to integrate doses in various areas. The results are analyzed for trends of increased doses, and shielding in these areas is evaluated and improved, as appropriate. The APS policy for on-site nonradiation workers in the vicinity of the APS facilities requires that the average nonradiation worker dose be below 0.2 mSv/yr (20 mrem/yr). In addition, the dose at the site boundary from all pathways is required to be below 0.1 mSv/yr (10 mrem/yr). For future modifications of the facility, the doses shall be evaluated and additional shielding

  17. Higher operation temperature quadrant photon detectors of 2-11 μm wavelength radiation with large photosensitive areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawluczyk, J.; Sosna, A.; Wojnowski, D.; Koźniewski, A.; Romanis, M.; Gawron, W.; Piotrowski, J.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the quadrant photon HgCdTe detectors optimized for 2-11 μm wavelength spectral range and Peltier or no cooling, and photosensitive area of a quad-cell of 1×1 to 4×4 mm. The devices are fabricated as photoconductors or multiple photovoltaic cells connected in series (PVM). The former are characterized by a relatively uniform photosensitive area. The PVM photovoltaic cells are distributed along the wafer surface, comprising a periodical stripe structure with a period of 20 μm. Within each period, there is an insensitive gap/trench spot of size close to the period, but becomes negligible for the optimal spot size comparable to a quadrant-cell area. The photoconductors produce 1/f noise with about 10 kHz knee frequency, due to bias necessary for their operation. The PVM photodiodes are typically operated at 0 V bias, so they generate no 1/f noise and operation from DC is enabled. At 230 K, upper corner frequency of 16 to 100 MHz is obtained for photoconductor and 60 to 80 MHz for PVM, normalized detectivity D* 6×107 cm×Hz1/2/W to >1.4×108 cm×Hz1/2/W for photoconductor and >1.7×108 cm·Hz1/2/W for PVM, allowing for position control of the radiation beam with submicron accuracy at 16 MHz, 10.6 μm wavelength of pulsed radiation spot of 0.8 mm dia at the close-to-maximal input radiation power density in a range of detector linear operation.

  18. Dose measurement techniques for high-energy photon and electron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlfeld, K.; Roos, M.

    1992-08-01

    By law the Federal Institute of Physics and Technology (PTB) has been assigned the tasks of representing, preserving and passing on dose units. The analogous continuation of these tasks consists in improving, at the user level, dosimetry techniques in radiation therapy for the benefit of patients. The PTB had an essential share in working out the scientific foundations of dosimetry for high-energy radiation, and the corresponding DIN standards were established with the PTB playing a prominent part. The seminar aimed at presenting the measuring techniques fixed in the new DIN standard 6800 part 2 'Dose measurement techniques according to the probe method - ionization dosimetry', to discuss their physical background and practical implications resulting from them. (orig.) [de

  19. Measurement assurance studies of high-energy electron and photon dosimetry in radiation-therapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, M.; Soares, C.G.

    1981-01-01

    This is a brief review of surveys on the dosimetry of radiation-therapy beams by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS). Covered are the NBS ferrous-sulfate (Fricke) dosimetry service, a recently completed survey carried out with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) on the dosimetry in cobalt-60 teletherapy beams, and plans for a TLD survey of dosimetry in high-energy bremsstrahlung beams. (author)

  20. Q-PYTHIA: a medium-modified implementation of final state radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armesto, Néstor; Cunqueiro, Leticia; Salgado, Carlos A.

    2009-10-01

    We present a Monte Carlo implementation, within PYTHIA, of medium-induced gluon radiation in the final state branching process. Medium effects are introduced through an additive term in the splitting functions computed in the multiple-soft scattering approximation. The observable effects of this modification are studied for different quantities as fragmentation functions and the hump-backed plateau, and transverse momentum and angular distributions. The anticipated increase of intra-jet multiplicities, energy loss of the leading particle and jet broadening are observed as well as modifications of naive expectations based solely on analytical calculations. This shows the adequacy of a Monte Carlo simulator for jet analyses. Effects of hadronization are found to wash out medium effects in the soft region, while the main features remain. To show the performance of the implementation and the feasibility of our approach in realistic experimental situations we provide some examples: fragmentation functions, nuclear suppression factors, jet shapes and jet multiplicities. The package containing the modified routines is available for public use. This code, which is not an official PYTHIA release, is called Q-PYTHIA. We also include a short manual to perform the simulations of jet quenching.

  1. Comparison of gamma radiation effects on natural corn and potato starches and modified cassava starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Bruna S.; Garcia, Rafael H. L.; Takinami, Patricia Y. I.; del Mastro, Nelida L.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of irradiation treatment on physicochemical properties of three natural polymers, i.e. native potato and corn starches and a typical Brazilian product, cassava starch modified through fermentation -sour cassava- and also to prepare composite hydrocolloid films based on them. Starches were irradiated in a 60Co irradiation chamber in doses up to 15 kGy, dose rate about 1 kGy/h. Differences were found in granule size distribution upon irradiation, mainly for corn and cassava starch but radiation did not cause significant changes in granule morphology. The viscosity of the potato, corn and cassava starches hydrogels decreased as a function of absorbed dose. Comparing non-irradiated and irradiated starches, changes in the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra in the 2000-1500 cm-1 region for potato and corn starches were observed but not for the cassava starch. Maximum rupture force of the starch-based films was affected differently for each starch type; color analysis showed that doses of 15 kGy promoted a slight rise in the parameter b* (yellow color) while the parameter L* (lightness) was not significantly affected; X-ray diffraction patterns remained almost unchanged by irradiation.

  2. Using gEUD based plan analysis method to evaluate proton vs. photon plans for lung cancer radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiyan; Zou, Wei J; Chen, Ting; Yue, Ning J; Jabbour, Salma K; Parikh, Rahul; Zhang, Miao

    2018-03-01

    The goal of this study was to exam the efficacy of current DVH based clinical guidelines draw from photon experience for lung cancer radiation therapy on proton therapy. Comparison proton plans and IMRT plans were generated for 10 lung patients treated in our proton facility. A gEUD based plan evaluation method was developed for plan evaluation. This evaluation method used normal lung gEUD(a) curve in which the model parameter "a" was sampled from the literature reported value. For all patients, the proton plans delivered lower normal lung V 5 Gy with similar V 20 Gy and similar target coverage. Based on current clinical guidelines, proton plans were ranked superior to IMRT plans for all 10 patients. However, the proton and IMRT normal lung gEUD(a) curves crossed for 8 patients within the tested range of "a", which means there was a possibility that proton plan would be worse than IMRT plan for lung sparing. A concept of deficiency index (DI) was introduced to quantify the probability of proton plans doing worse than IMRT plans. By applying threshold on DI, four patients' proton plan was ranked inferior to the IMRT plan. Meanwhile if a threshold to the location of curve crossing was applied, 6 patients' proton plan was ranked inferior to the IMRT plan. The contradictory ranking results between the current clinical guidelines and the gEUD(a) curve analysis demonstrated there is potential pitfalls by applying photon experience directly to the proton world. A comprehensive plan evaluation based on radio-biological models should be carried out to decide if a lung patient would really be benefit from proton therapy. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  3. Definition of parameters for quality assurance of flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogliata, A.; Garcia, R.; Knöös, T.; Nicolini, G.; Clivio, A.; Vanetti, E.; Khamphan, C.; Cozzi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Flattening filter free (FFF) beams generated by medical linear accelerators have recently started to be used in radiotherapy clinical practice. Such beams present fundamental differences with respect to the standard filter flattened (FF) beams, making the generally used dosimetric parameters and definitions not always viable. The present study will propose possible definitions and suggestions for some dosimetric parameters for use in quality assurance of FFF beams generated by medical linacs in radiotherapy. Methods: The main characteristics of the photon beams have been analyzed using specific data generated by a Varian TrueBeam linac having both FFF and FF beams of 6 and 10 MV energy, respectively. Results: Definitions for dose profile parameters are suggested starting from the renormalization of the FFF with respect to the corresponding FF beam. From this point the flatness concept has been translated into one of “unflatness” and other definitions have been proposed, maintaining a strict parallelism between FFF and FF parameter concepts. Conclusions: Ideas for quality controls used in establishing a quality assurance program when introducing FFF beams into the clinical environment are given here, keeping them similar to those used for standard FF beams. By following the suggestions in this report, the authors foresee that the introduction of FFF beams into a clinical radiotherapy environment will be as safe and well controlled as standard beam modalities using the existing guidelines.

  4. Contribution à la calibration des photons par les désintégrations radiatives $Z --> \

    CERN Document Server

    Bâty, Clément

    The LHC has started, since november 2009 taking data. This started a new era of discovery in particle physics. The CMS detector is one of the main experiment at the LHC (CERN). One goal of this experiment is the Higgs's boson discovery, that can be related to the electroweak symmetry breaking. After a contextual replacement of the LHC and CMS within the nowdays's particle physics, I will explain the whole chain allowing to go from the physical event to the nal analysis, in order to extract the reconstructed particles and the informations allowing, at the end, the discovery of new particles like the Higgs's boson. A rst part of my works was about the measurement and the study of the acquisition electronics's gains-ratios. This work aimed to have a precise measurement of the photons energy on the whole available energy band (35 MeV -> 1.7 TeV). In particular, my works were upon the validation of the dierent calibration methods for the VFE acquisition cards within the detector. A second part of my work was about...

  5. Photonic generation of FCC-compliant UWB pulses based on modified Gaussian quadruplet and incoherent wavelength-to-time conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Hongqian; Wang, Muguang; Tang, Yu; Zhang, Jing; Jian, Shuisheng

    2018-03-01

    A novel scheme for the generation of FCC-compliant UWB pulse is proposed based on modified Gaussian quadruplet and incoherent wavelength-to-time conversion. The modified Gaussian quadruplet is synthesized based on linear sum of a broad Gaussian pulse and two narrow Gaussian pulses with the same pulse-width and amplitude peak. Within specific parameter range, FCC-compliant UWB with spectral power efficiency of higher than 39.9% can be achieved. In order to realize the designed waveform, a UWB generator based on spectral shaping and incoherent wavelength-to-time mapping is proposed. The spectral shaper is composed of a Gaussian filter and a programmable filter. Single-mode fiber functions as both dispersion device and transmission medium. Balanced photodetection is employed to combine linearly the broad Gaussian pulse and two narrow Gaussian pulses, and at same time to suppress pulse pedestals that result in low-frequency components. The proposed UWB generator can be reconfigured for UWB doublet by operating the programmable filter as a single-band Gaussian filter. The feasibility of proposed UWB generator is demonstrated experimentally. Measured UWB pulses match well with simulation results. FCC-compliant quadruplet with 10-dB bandwidth of 6.88-GHz, fractional bandwidth of 106.8% and power efficiency of 51% is achieved.

  6. Low dose out-of-field radiotherapy, part 2: Calculating the mean photon energy values for the out-of-field photon energy spectrum from scattered radiation using Monte Carlo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrobala, A; Adamczyk, S; Kruszyna-Mochalska, M; Skórska, M; Konefał, A; Suchorska, W; Zaleska, K; Kowalik, A; Jackowiak, W; Malicki, J

    2017-08-01

    During radiotherapy, leakage from the machine head and collimator expose patients to out-of-field irradiation doses, which may cause secondary cancers. To quantify the risks of secondary cancers due to out-of-field doses, it is first necessary to measure these doses. Since most dosimeters are energy-dependent, it is essential to first determine the type of photon energy spectrum in the out-of-field area. The aim of this study was to determine the mean photon energy values for the out-of-field photon energy spectrum for a 6 MV photon beam using the GEANT 4-Monte Carlo method. A specially-designed large water phantom was simulated with a static field at gantry 0°. The source-to-surface distance was 92cm for an open field size of 10×10cm2. The photon energy spectra were calculated at five unique positions (at depths of 0.5, 1.6, 4, 6, 8, and 10cm) along the central beam axis and at six different off-axis distances. Monte Carlo simulations showed that mean radiation energy levels drop rapidly beyond the edge of the 6 MV photon beam field: at a distance of 10cm, the mean energy level is close to 0.3MeV versus 1.5MeV at the central beam axis. In some cases, the energy level actually increased even as the distance from the field edge increased: at a depth of 1.6cm and 15cm off-axis, the mean energy level was 0.205MeV versus 0.252MeV at 20cm off-axis. The out-of-field energy spectra and dose distribution data obtained in this study with Monte Carlo methods can be used to calibrate dosimeters to measure out-of-field radiation from 6MV photons. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. A robust method for determining the absorbed dose to water in a phantom for low-energy photon radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, T, E-mail: thorsten.schneider@ptb.de [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-06-07

    The application of more and more low-energy photon radiation in brachytherapy-either in the form of low-dose-rate radioactive seeds such as Pd-103 or I-125 or in the form of miniature x-ray tubes-has induced greater interest in determining the absorbed dose to water in water in this energy range. As it seems to be hardly feasible to measure the absorbed dose with calorimetric methods in this low energy range, ionometric methods are the preferred choice. However, the determination of the absorbed dose to water in water by ionometric methods is difficult in this energy range. With decreasing energy, the relative uncertainty of the photon cross sections increases and as the mass energy transfer coefficients show a steep gradient, the spectra of the radiation field must be known precisely. In this work two ionometric methods to determine the absorbed dose to water are evaluated with respect to their sensitivity to the uncertainties of the spectra and of the atomic database. The first is the measurement of the air kerma free in air and the application of an MC-based conversion factor to the absorbed dose to water. The second is the determination of the absorbed dose to water by means of an extrapolation chamber as an integral part of a phantom. In the complementing MC-calculations, two assortments of spectra each of which is based on a separate unfolding procedure were used as well as two kinds of databases: the standard PEGS and the recently implemented NIST database of EGSnrc. Experimental results were obtained by using a parallel-plate graphite extrapolation chamber and a free-air chamber. In the case when the water kerma in a phantom is determined from the measurements of air kerma free in air, differences in the order of 10% were found, according to which the database or the kind of spectrum is used. In contrast to this, for the second method, the differences found were about 0.5%.

  8. Artificial semi-rigid tissue sensitized with natural pigments: Effect of photon radiations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Jaradat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A new approach for evaluating the optical penetration depth and testing its validity with Monte Carlo simulations and Kubelka-Munk theory is used for artificial semi-rigid tissue sensitized with natural pigments. Photodynamic therapy is a promising cancer treatment in which a photosensitizing drug concentrates in malignant cells and is activated by visible light at certain wavelength. Materials and Methods: Cheap artificial semi-rigid tissue incorporated with scattering and absorbing materials along with some other composites comparable to normal human tissue has been performed. The optical parameters as measured with different conditions and calculated with various techniques are investigated. Results: The probability of interaction of light with tissue is very high when exposed to light in presence of Cichorium pumilum and RBCs followed by photohemolysis or/and photodegradation. The optical penetration depth calculated by linear absorption coefficient ranges from 0.63 to 2.85 mm is found to be comparable to those calculated using Kubelka-Munk theory or Monte Carlo simulation (range from 0.78 to 2.42 mm. The ratio of absorption to the scattering is independent of thickness and decreases with increasing irradiation time. Moreover, the optical parameters as well as their ratios are in very good agreement in the two approaches of calculation. The values of absorption and scattering coefficients are independent of thickness. Furthermore, the average photon ranges in the samples containing no scattering and absorbing materials are about three times greater than those samples containing scattering materials. Conclusion: Our results suggest that light propagation with optical properties presented in this work could be applicable in diagnostic and therapeutic of the human biological tissue for photodynamic therapy.

  9. Development of new photon detection device for Cherenkov and fluorescence radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinti A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress on the development of a new solid state detector allowed the use of finely pixelled photocathodes obtained from silicon semiconductors. SiPM detectors seem to be an ideal tool for the detection of Cherenkov and fluorescence light in spite of their not yet resolved criticism for operating temperature and intrinsic noise. The main disadvantage of SiPM in this case is the poor sensitivity in the wavelength range 300-400 nm, where the Cherenkov light and fluorescence radiation are generated. We report on the possibility to realize a new kind of pixelled photodetector based on the use of silicon substrate with carbon nanotube compounds, more sensitive to the near UV radiation. Also if at the very beginning, the development of such detector appears very promising and useful for astroparticle physics, both in the ground based arrays and in the space experiments. The detectors are ready to be operated in conditions of measurements without signal amplification.

  10. Photon management of GaN-based optoelectronic devices via nanoscaled phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Tsai, Yu-Lin

    2016-09-06

    Photon management is essential in improving the performances of optoelectronic devices including light emitting diodes, solar cells and photo detectors. Beyond the advances in material growth and device structure design, photon management via nanoscaled phenomena have also been demonstrated as a promising way for further modifying/improving the device performance. The accomplishments achieved by photon management via nanoscaled phenomena include strain-induced polarization field management, crystal quality improvement, light extraction/harvesting enhancement, radiation pattern control, and spectrum management. In this review, we summarize recent development, challenges and underlying physics of photon management in GaN-based light emitting diodes and solar cells. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical Outcomes Among Children With Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma Treated With Proton and Photon Radiation Therapy: A Comparison of Disease Control and Overall Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Bree R; Esiashvili, Natia; Kim, Sungjin; Weyman, Elizabeth A; Thornton, Lauren T; Mazewski, Claire; MacDonald, Tobey; Ebb, David; MacDonald, Shannon M; Tarbell, Nancy J; Yock, Torunn I

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare long-term disease control and overall survival between children treated with proton and photon radiation therapy (RT) for standard-risk medulloblastoma. This multi-institution cohort study includes 88 children treated with chemotherapy and proton (n=45) or photon (n=43) RT between 2000 and 2009. Overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and patterns of failure were compared between the 2 cohorts. Median (range) age was 6 years old at diagnosis (3-21 years) for proton patients versus 8 years (3-19 years) for photon patients (P=.011). Cohorts were similar with respect to sex, histology, extent of surgical resection, craniospinal irradiation (CSI) RT dose, total RT dose, whether the RT boost was delivered to the posterior fossa (PF) or tumor bed (TB), time from surgery to RT start, or total duration of RT. RT consisted of a median (range) CSI dose of 23.4 Gy (18-27 Gy) and a boost of 30.6 Gy (27-37.8 Gy). Median follow-up time is 6.2 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.1-6.6 years) for proton patients versus 7.0 years (95% CI: 5.8-8.9 years) for photon patients. There was no significant difference in RFS or OS between patients treated with proton versus photon RT; 6-year RFS was 78.8% versus 76.5% (P=.948) and 6-year OS was 82.0% versus 87.6%, respectively (P=.285). On multivariate analysis, there was a trend for longer RFS with females (P=.058) and higher CSI dose (P=.096) and for longer OS with females (P=.093). Patterns of failure were similar between the 2 cohorts (P=.908). Disease control with proton and photon radiation therapy appears equivalent for standard risk medulloblastoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube

  13. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube.

  14. Radial Photonic Crystal for detection of frequency and position of radiation sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, J; Díaz-Rubio, A; Torrent, D; Cervera, F; Kirleis, M A; Piqué, A; Sánchez-Dehesa, J

    2012-01-01

    Based on the concepts of artificially microstructured materials, i.e. metamaterials, we present here the first practical realization of a radial wave crystal. This type of device was introduced as a theoretical proposal in the field of acoustics, and can be briefly defined as a structured medium with radial symmetry, where the constitutive parameters are invariant under radial geometrical translations. Our practical demonstration is realized in the electromagnetic microwave spectrum, because of the equivalence between the wave problems in both fields. A device has been designed, fabricated and experimentally characterized. It is able to perform beam shaping of punctual wave sources, and also to sense position and frequency of external radiators. Owing to the flexibility offered by the design concept, other possible applications are discussed.

  15. Radiobiological risk estimates of adverse events and secondary cancer for proton and photon radiation therapy of pediatric medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodin, N. Patrik (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Inst., Faculty of Sciences, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)), e-mail: brodin.patrik@gmail.com; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Aznar, Marianne C.; Vogelius, Ivan R. (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)); Kiil-Berthelsen, Anne (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark); Dept. of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Centre of Diagnostic Investigations, Rigshospitalet, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)); Nilsson, Per; Bjoerk-Eriksson, Thomas (Dept. of Oncology, Skaane Univ. Hospital and Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)); Lannering, Birgitta (Dept. of Paediatric Oncology, The Queen Silvia Children' s Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden))

    2011-08-15

    Introduction. The aim of this model study was to estimate and compare the risk of radiation-induced adverse late effects in pediatric patients with medulloblastoma (MB) treated with either three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT), inversely-optimized arc therapy (RapidArc (RA)) or spot-scanned intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The aim was also to find dose-volume toxicity parameters relevant to children undergoing RT to be used in the inverse planning of RA and IMPT, and to use in the risk estimations. Material and methods. Treatment plans were created for all three techniques on 10 pediatric patients that have been treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI) at our institution in 2007-2009. Plans were generated for two prescription CSI doses, 23.4 Gy and 36 Gy. Risk estimates were based on childhood cancer survivor data when available and secondary cancer (SC) risks were estimated as a function of age at exposure and attained age according to the organ-equivalent dose (OED) concept. Results. Estimates of SC risk was higher for the RA plans and differentiable from the estimates for 3D CRT at attained ages above 40 years. The risk of developing heart failure, hearing loss, hypothyroidism and xerostomia was highest for the 3D CRT plans. The risks of all adverse effects were estimated as lowest for the IMPT plans, even when including secondary neutron (SN) irradiation with high values of the neutron radiation weighting factors (WR{sub neutron}). Conclusions. When comparing RA and 3D CRT treatment for pediatric MB it is a matter of comparing higher SC risk against higher risks of non-cancer adverse events. Considering time until onset of the different complications is necessary to fully assess patient benefit in such a comparison. The IMPT plans, including SN dose contribution, compared favorably to the photon techniques in terms of all radiobiological risk estimates

  16. Radiobiological risk estimates of adverse events and secondary cancer for proton and photon radiation therapy of pediatric medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodin, N. Patrik; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Aznar, Marianne C.; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Kiil-Berthelsen, Anne; Nilsson, Per; Bjoerk-Eriksson, Thomas; Lannering, Birgitta

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this model study was to estimate and compare the risk of radiation-induced adverse late effects in pediatric patients with medulloblastoma (MB) treated with either three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT), inversely-optimized arc therapy (RapidArc (RA)) or spot-scanned intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The aim was also to find dose-volume toxicity parameters relevant to children undergoing RT to be used in the inverse planning of RA and IMPT, and to use in the risk estimations. Material and methods. Treatment plans were created for all three techniques on 10 pediatric patients that have been treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI) at our institution in 2007-2009. Plans were generated for two prescription CSI doses, 23.4 Gy and 36 Gy. Risk estimates were based on childhood cancer survivor data when available and secondary cancer (SC) risks were estimated as a function of age at exposure and attained age according to the organ-equivalent dose (OED) concept. Results. Estimates of SC risk was higher for the RA plans and differentiable from the estimates for 3D CRT at attained ages above 40 years. The risk of developing heart failure, hearing loss, hypothyroidism and xerostomia was highest for the 3D CRT plans. The risks of all adverse effects were estimated as lowest for the IMPT plans, even when including secondary neutron (SN) irradiation with high values of the neutron radiation weighting factors (WR neutron ). Conclusions. When comparing RA and 3D CRT treatment for pediatric MB it is a matter of comparing higher SC risk against higher risks of non-cancer adverse events. Considering time until onset of the different complications is necessary to fully assess patient benefit in such a comparison. The IMPT plans, including SN dose contribution, compared favorably to the photon techniques in terms of all radiobiological risk estimates

  17. On the uncertainties of photon mass energy-absorption coefficients and their ratios for radiation dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreo, Pedro; Burns, David T.; Salvat, Francesc

    2012-04-01

    A systematic analysis of the available data has been carried out for mass energy-absorption coefficients and their ratios for air, graphite and water for photon energies between 1 keV and 2 MeV, using representative kilovoltage x-ray spectra for mammography and diagnostic radiology below 100 kV, and for 192Ir and 60Co gamma-ray spectra. The aim of this work was to establish ‘an envelope of uncertainty’ based on the spread of the available data. Type A uncertainties were determined from the results of Monte Carlo (MC) calculations with the PENELOPE and EGSnrc systems, yielding mean values for µen/ρ with a given statistical standard uncertainty. Type B estimates were based on two groupings. The first grouping consisted of MC calculations based on a similar implementation but using different data and/or approximations. The second grouping was formed by various datasets, obtained by different authors or methods using the same or different basic data, and with different implementations (analytical, MC-based, or a combination of the two); these datasets were the compilations of NIST, Hubbell, Johns-Cunningham, Attix and Higgins, plus MC calculations with PENELOPE and EGSnrc. The combined standard uncertainty, uc, for the µen/ρ values for the mammography x-ray spectra is 2.5%, decreasing gradually to 1.6% for kilovoltage x-ray spectra up to 100 kV. For 60Co and 192Ir, uc is approximately 0.1%. The Type B uncertainty analysis for the ratios of µen/ρ values includes four methods of analysis and concludes that for the present data the assumption that the data interval represents 95% confidence limits is a good compromise. For the mammography x-ray spectra, the combined standard uncertainties of (µen/ρ)graphite,air and (µen/ρ)graphite,water are 1.5%, and 0.5% for (µen/ρ)water,air, decreasing gradually down to uc = 0.1% for the three µen/ρ ratios for the gamma-ray spectra. The present estimates are shown to coincide well with those of Hubbell (1977 Rad. Res

  18. The effect of a metal hip prosthesis on the radiation dose in therapeutic photon beam irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, S.-Y.; Chu, T.-C.; Lin, J.-P.; Liu, M.-T.

    2002-01-01

    Prostate and cervical cancer patients are often treated with external X-ray beams of bi-lateral incidence. Such treatment may incur some dose effect that cannot be predicted precisely in commercial treatment planning systems (TPS) for patients having undergone total hip replacement. This study performs a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and an analytical calculation (convolution superposition algorithm which is implemented in ADAC TPS) of a 6 MV, 5x5 cm 2 X-ray beam incident into water with the existence of hip prosthesis, e.g. Ti6Al4V and CoCrMo alloy. The results indicate that ADAC TPS cannot precisely account for the scatter and backscatter radiation that a metal hip prosthesis causes. For percent depth dose (PDD) curves, the maximum underdosage of ADAC TPS up to 5 mm above the interface between dense material and water is 5%, 20% and 27% for PDD Bone , PDD Ti and PDD Co , respectively. The dose re-buildup, which occurs behind the hip region, becomes more and more obvious for denser medium existed in water. Increasing inhomogeneity also enhances the underdosage of ADAC for greater depth (>10 cm), as the figures of nearly 2% in PDD Bone , PDD Ti and 4-5% in PDD Co reveal. Overestimating the attenuated power of high-density non-water material in ADAC TPS causes this underdosage. For dose profiles, no significant differences were found in Profile Bone at any depth. Profile Ti reveals that MC slightly exceeds ADAC at off-axis position 1.0-2.0 cm. Profile Co reveals this more obviously. This finding means that scatter radiation from these denser materials is significant and cannot be predicted precisely in ADAC

  19. The effect of a metal hip prosthesis on the radiation dose in therapeutic photon beam irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.-Y.; Chu, T.-C. E-mail: tcchu@mx.nthu.edu.tw; Lin, J.-P.; Liu, M.-T

    2002-07-01

    Prostate and cervical cancer patients are often treated with external X-ray beams of bi-lateral incidence. Such treatment may incur some dose effect that cannot be predicted precisely in commercial treatment planning systems (TPS) for patients having undergone total hip replacement. This study performs a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and an analytical calculation (convolution superposition algorithm which is implemented in ADAC TPS) of a 6 MV, 5x5 cm{sup 2} X-ray beam incident into water with the existence of hip prosthesis, e.g. Ti6Al4V and CoCrMo alloy. The results indicate that ADAC TPS cannot precisely account for the scatter and backscatter radiation that a metal hip prosthesis causes. For percent depth dose (PDD) curves, the maximum underdosage of ADAC TPS up to 5 mm above the interface between dense material and water is 5%, 20% and 27% for PDD{sub Bone}, PDD{sub Ti} and PDD{sub Co}, respectively. The dose re-buildup, which occurs behind the hip region, becomes more and more obvious for denser medium existed in water. Increasing inhomogeneity also enhances the underdosage of ADAC for greater depth (>10 cm), as the figures of nearly 2% in PDD{sub Bone}, PDD{sub Ti} and 4-5% in PDD{sub Co} reveal. Overestimating the attenuated power of high-density non-water material in ADAC TPS causes this underdosage. For dose profiles, no significant differences were found in Profile{sub Bone} at any depth. Profile{sub Ti} reveals that MC slightly exceeds ADAC at off-axis position 1.0-2.0 cm. Profile{sub Co} reveals this more obviously. This finding means that scatter radiation from these denser materials is significant and cannot be predicted precisely in ADAC.

  20. Photon-photon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief summary of the present status of photon-photon interactions is presented. Stress is placed on the use of two-photon collisions to test present ideas on the quark constituents of hadrons and on the theory of strong interactions

  1. 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2 increases survival of murine intestinal stem cells when given before photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, W.R.; Thomas, C.

    1983-01-01

    A variety of prostaglandins (PG) protect the gastric and intestinal mucosa when given before damaging agents as absolute ethanol, acidified taurocholate, boiling water, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAI). A synthetic prostaglandin, 16,16-dimethyl PGE 2 , shown to be cytoprotective at physiologic levels to the above agents was given to mice 1 h before or 15 min after 137 Cs gamma(γ) whole-body irradiation. The survival of intestinal stem cells measured by their ability to form in situ colonies of regenerating epithelium was increased stem cells measured by their ability to form in situ colonies of regenerating epithelium was increased when 16,16-dimethyl PGE 2 was given before but not after 137 Cs γ irradiation. The maximum degree of 16,16-dimethyl PGE 2 -induced radioprotection was seen when the drug was given 1 h before irradiation. No radioprotection was seen when the interval between drug and irradiation was 3 h or longer. When the time between 16,16-dimethyl PGE 2 and irradiation was kept at 1 h, the degree of radioprotection was dependent on the PG drug dose. There was a steep rise in the number of surviving cells at low doses of PG. These results imply that tumors which secrete PGE 2 may in part be protected from the lethal effects of ionizing photon radiation

  2. The use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy photon beams for improving the dose uniformity of electron beams shaped with MLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosalaei, Homeira; Karnas, Scott; Shah, Sheel; Van Doodewaard, Sharon; Foster, Tim; Chen, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Electrons are ideal for treating shallow tumors and sparing adjacent normal tissue. Conventionally, electron beams are collimated by cut-outs that are time-consuming to make and difficult to adapt to tumor shape throughout the course of treatment. We propose that electron cut-outs can be replaced using photon multileaf collimator (MLC). Two major problems of this approach are that the scattering of electrons causes penumbra widening because of a large air gap, and available commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) do not support MLC-collimated electron beams. In this study, these difficulties were overcome by (1) modeling electron beams collimated by photon MLC for a commercial TPS, and (2) developing a technique to reduce electron beam penumbra by adding low-energy intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) photons (4 MV). We used blocks to simulate MLC shielding in the TPS. Inverse planning was used to optimize boost photon beams. This technique was applied to a parotid and a central nervous system (CNS) clinical case. Combined photon and electron plans were compared with conventional plans and verified using ion chamber, film, and a 2D diode array. Our studies showed that the beam penumbra for mixed beams with 90 cm source to surface distance (SSD) is comparable with electron applicators and cut-outs at 100 cm SSD. Our mixed-beam technique yielded more uniform dose to the planning target volume and lower doses to various organs at risk for both parotid and CNS clinical cases. The plans were verified with measurements, with more than 95% points passing the gamma criteria of 5% in dose difference and 5 mm for distance to agreement. In conclusion, the study has demonstrated the feasibility and potential advantage of using photon MLC to collimate electron beams with boost photon IMRT fields. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A radiobiological approach to cancer treatment. Possible chemical and physical agents modifying radiosensitivity in comparison with high LET radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugahara, T.

    1982-01-01

    Biological characteristics of high LET radiations are summarized to be low oxygen enhancement ratio, high RBE, low repair and low cell cycle dependency of radiosensitivity. Various chemical modifiers of radiosensitivity and radiological effect of hyperthermia are classified into these four properties. It is evident that we have now various means to mimic high LET radiations as far as biological response is concerned though some of them are still in experimental stage. Among them, the means to cope with hypoxia and repair which are assumed to be the most important causes of radioresistance of human tumors are discussed in some detail. It is expected that through the present seminar we would have consensus to concentrate our effort of development for new modifying means available and useful in developing countries. (author)

  4. Experimental investigation of the generation of harmonic photons from the interaction of free electrons with intense laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englert, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the generation of second harmonic photons through the interaction of free electrons with an intense laser beam has been performed. Second harmonic photons with a wavelength of 530nm generated from the interaction of free electrons with 1060nm photons from a neodymium-glass laser are implied by observing Doppler shifted photons with wavelengths of 490nm and 507nm. The observed photon wavelengths results from a Doppler shift of the laser photon wavelengths as viewed in the rest frame of the electrons combined with a Doppler shift of the second harmonic photons emitted from 1600eV and 500eV electrons. Comparison of experimental results with those predicted by cross sections, derived using classical and quantum electrodynamics, shows reasonable agreement with both theories. Although second harmonic photons are created, the dynamics of second harmonic photon generation (accelerated electron motion due to the electromagnetic field or actual two-photon interaction with the electron) cannot be resolved without further experiment

  5. A modified technique for craniospinal irradiation in children designed to reduce acute and late radiation toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Claire; Sexton, Maree

    2004-01-01

    Craniospinal irradiation is an important technique for the treatment of a number of paediatric malignancies. The conventional technique uses photons for all fields and does not exploit the benefits of CT and computer planning systems. The present paper describes a modification of the conventional technique in which both photons and electrons are used for the spinal field (mixed-beam technique). Computed tomography images and a planning computer are used for the selection of field junctions, electron beam energy and dosimetry. The intention of the technique is to reduce radiotherapy toxicity. A discussion of the potential benefits is presented Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  6. Radiation Therapy of Large Intact Breasts Using a Beam Spoiler or Photons with Mixed Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lief, Eugene P.; Hunt, Margie A.; Hong, Linda X.; Amols, Howard I.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation treatment of large intact breasts with separations of more than 24 cm is typically performed using x-rays with energies of 10 MV and higher, to eliminate high-dose regions in tissue. The disadvantage of the higher energy beams is the reduced dose to superficial tissue in the buildup region. We evaluated 2 methods of avoiding this underdosage: (1) a beam spoiler: 1.7-cm-thick Lucite plate positioned in the blocking tray 35 cm from the isocenter, with 15-MV x-rays; and (2) combining 6- and 15-MV x-rays through the same portal. For the beam with the spoiler, we measured the dose distribution for normal and oblique incidence using a film and ion chamber in polystyrene, as well as a scanning diode in a water tank. In the mixed-energy approach, we calculated the dose distributions in the buildup region for different proportions of 6- and 15-MV beams. The dose enhancement due to the beam spoiler exhibited significant dependence upon the source-to-skin distance (SSD), field size, and the angle of incidence. In the center of a 20 x 20-cm 2 field at 90-cm SSD, the beam spoiler raises the dose at 5-mm depth from 77% to 87% of the prescription, while maintaining the skin dose below 57%. Comparison of calculated dose with measurements suggested a practical way of treatment planning with the spoiler-usage of 2-mm 'beam' bolus-a special option offered by in-house treatment planning system. A second method of increasing buildup doses is to mix 6- and 15-MV beams. For example, in the case of a parallel-opposed irradiation of a 27-cm-thick phantom, dose to D max for each energy, with respect to midplane, is 114% for pure 6-, 107% for 15-MV beam with the spoiler, and 108% for a 3:1 mixture of 15- and 6-MV beams. Both methods are practical for radiation therapy of large intact breasts

  7. Tumor Cells Surviving Exposure to Proton or Photon Radiation Share a Common Immunogenic Modulation Signature, Rendering Them More Sensitive to T Cell–Mediated Killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gameiro, Sofia R.; Malamas, Anthony S. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bernstein, Michael B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tsang, Kwong Y. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Vassantachart, April; Sahoo, Narayan; Tailor, Ramesh; Pidikiti, Rajesh [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Guha, Chandan P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Hahn, Stephen M.; Krishnan, Sunil [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hodge, James W., E-mail: jh241d@nih.gov [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To provide the foundation for combining immunotherapy to induce tumor antigen–specific T cells with proton radiation therapy to exploit the activity of those T cells. Methods and Materials: Using cell lines of tumors frequently treated with proton radiation, such as prostate, breast, lung, and chordoma, we examined the effect of proton radiation on the viability and induction of immunogenic modulation in tumor cells by flow cytometric and immunofluorescent analysis of surface phenotype and the functional immune consequences. Results: These studies show for the first time that (1) proton and photon radiation induced comparable up-regulation of surface molecules involved in immune recognition (histocompatibility leukocyte antigen, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and the tumor-associated antigens carcinoembryonic antigen and mucin 1); (2) proton radiation mediated calreticulin cell-surface expression, increasing sensitivity to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte killing of tumor cells; and (3) cancer stem cells, which are resistant to the direct cytolytic activity of proton radiation, nonetheless up-regulated calreticulin after radiation in a manner similar to non-cancer stem cells. Conclusions: These findings offer a rationale for the use of proton radiation in combination with immunotherapy, including for patients who have failed radiation therapy alone or have limited treatment options.

  8. Sacral chordomas: Impact of high-dose proton/photon-beam radiation therapy combined with or without surgery for primary versus recurrent tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Lily; De Laney, Thomas F.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Goldberg, Saveli; Mankin, Henry; Rosenberg, Andrew E.; Rosenthal, Daniel I.; Suit, Herman D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of definitive treatment of sacral chordoma by high-dose proton/photon-beam radiation therapy alone or combined with surgery. Methods and Materials: The records of 16 primary and 11 recurrent sacral chordoma patients treated from November 1982 to November 2002 by proton/photon radiation therapy alone (6 patients) or combined with surgery (21 patients) have been analyzed for local control, survival, and treatment-related morbidity. The outcome analysis is based on follow-up information as of 2005. Results: Outcome results show a large difference in local failure rate between patients treated for primary and recurrent chordomas. Local control results by surgery and radiation were 12/14 vs. 1/7 for primary and recurrent lesions. For margin-positive patients, local control results were 10 of 11 and 0 of 5 in the primary and recurrent groups, respectively; the mean follow-up on these locally controlled patients was 8.8 years (4 at 10.3, 12.8, 17, and 21 years). Radiation alone was used in 6 patients, 4 of whom received ≥73.0 Gy (E); local control was observed in 3 of these 4 patients for 2.9, 4.9, and 7.6 years. Conclusion: These data indicate a high local control rate for surgical and radiation treatment of primary (12 of 14) as distinct from recurrent (1 of 7) sacral chordomas. Three of 4 chordomas treated by ≥73.0 Gy (E) of radiation alone had local control; 1 is at 91 months. This indicates that high-dose proton/photon therapy offers an effective treatment option

  9. Thermal radiation transfer calculations in combustion fields using the SLW model coupled with a modified reference approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbandi, Masoud; Abrar, Bagher

    2018-01-01

    The spectral-line weighted-sum-of-gray-gases (SLW) model is considered as a modern global model, which can be used in predicting the thermal radiation heat transfer within the combustion fields. The past SLW model users have mostly employed the reference approach to calculate the local values of gray gases' absorption coefficient. This classical reference approach assumes that the absorption spectra of gases at different thermodynamic conditions are scalable with the absorption spectrum of gas at a reference thermodynamic state in the domain. However, this assumption cannot be reasonable in combustion fields, where the gas temperature is very different from the reference temperature. Consequently, the results of SLW model incorporated with the classical reference approach, say the classical SLW method, are highly sensitive to the reference temperature magnitude in non-isothermal combustion fields. To lessen this sensitivity, the current work combines the SLW model with a modified reference approach, which is a particular one among the eight possible reference approach forms reported recently by Solovjov, et al. [DOI: 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2017.01.034, 2017]. The combination is called "modified SLW method". This work shows that the modified reference approach can provide more accurate total emissivity calculation than the classical reference approach if it is coupled with the SLW method. This would be particularly helpful for more accurate calculation of radiation transfer in highly non-isothermal combustion fields. To approve this, we use both the classical and modified SLW methods and calculate the radiation transfer in such fields. It is shown that the modified SLW method can almost eliminate the sensitivity of achieved results to the chosen reference temperature in treating highly non-isothermal combustion fields.

  10. Lethal effect after whole-body irradiation on mouse with various photon radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohda, Shizuo

    1976-01-01

    The dependence of mortality on the quality of radiation was investigated in ICR mice after wholebody irradiation with 200 kV x-ray, 60 Co γ-ray, or 10 MV x-ray. With respect to the 30 day mortality, LD 50 values were estimated as 606 rad for 200 kV x-ray and as 713 rad both for 60 Co γ-ray and for 10 MV x-ray. Hence, the value of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) to that for 200 kV x-ray was 0.850, while the value decreased with increasing the mortality rate. The value extrapolated to 100% mortality was estimated as 0.6. These results were valid for either 7 or 8 week mice, but the life span of 7 week mice after the irradiation was 3 days shorter than that of 8 week mice. These findings resulted in following conclusions: 1) There are no qualitative differences between 10 MV x-ray and 60 Co γ-ray irradiations. 2) The biological effects after 10 MV x-ray and 60 Co γ-ray irradiations are reduced with increased killing rate, compared with that after 200 kV x-ray irradiations. (Evans, J.)

  11. Results of the 1996-1998 IAEA co-ordinated research project on intercomparison for individual monitoring of external exposure to photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouvrard, R.; Boehm, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the conclusions drawn at the end of the intercomparison, the purpose of which was to examine the performance of the dosimetry systems in radiation fields similar to those encountered in practical routine monitoring. These fields included, for a range of doses, mixed normally incident and wide angle fields of simulated direct source and room scatter radiation for some typical energy distributions and high-energy photons (6-7 MeV) with and without secondary electron equilibrium. Almost all of the participating services satisfied the evaluation criteria on overall accuracy for all fields. (author)

  12. Report of the evaluation by the ad hoc review committee on advanced photon and synchrotron radiation research. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Photon and Synchrotron Radiation Research in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2002 at Advanced Photon Research Center and at Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Kansai Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of ten specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from May to July 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advanced and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 21, 2001, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on July 12, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Photon and Synchrotron Radiation Research. (author)

  13. Proton Arc Reduces Range Uncertainty Effects and Improves Conformality Compared With Photon Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seco, Joao, E-mail: jseco@partners.org [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gu, Guan; Marcelos, Tiago; Kooy, Hanne; Willers, Henning [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To describe, in a setting of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the theoretical dosimetric advantages of proton arc stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in which the beam penumbra of a rotating beam is used to reduce the impact of range uncertainties. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with proton SBRT underwent repeat planning with photon volumetric modulated arc therapy (Photon-VMAT) and an in-house-developed arc planning approach for both proton passive scattering (Passive-Arc) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT-Arc). An arc was mimicked with a series of beams placed at 10° increments. Tumor and organ at risk doses were compared in the context of high- and low-dose regions, represented by volumes receiving >50% and <50% of the prescription dose, respectively. Results: In the high-dose region, conformality index values are 2.56, 1.91, 1.31, and 1.74, and homogeneity index values are 1.29, 1.22, 1.52, and 1.18, respectively, for 3 proton passive scattered beams, Passive-Arc, IMPT-Arc, and Photon-VMAT. Therefore, proton arc leads to a 30% reduction in the 95% isodose line volume to 3-beam proton plan, sparing surrounding organs, such as lung and chest wall. For chest wall, V30 is reduced from 21 cm{sup 3} (3 proton beams) to 11.5 cm{sup 3}, 12.9 cm{sup 3}, and 8.63 cm{sup 3} (P=.005) for Passive-Arc, IMPT-Arc, and Photon-VMAT, respectively. In the low-dose region, the mean lung dose and V20 of the ipsilateral lung are 5.01 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE]), 4.38 Gy(RBE), 4.91 Gy(RBE), and 5.99 Gy(RBE) and 9.5%, 7.5%, 9.0%, and 10.0%, respectively, for 3-beam, Passive-Arc, IMPT-Arc, and Photon-VMAT, respectively. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy with proton arc and Photon-VMAT generate significantly more conformal high-dose volumes than standard proton SBRT, without loss of coverage of the tumor and with significant sparing of nearby organs, such as chest wall. In addition

  14. Evaluation of the ICRU operational magnitudes implantation for the photon radiation at the Angra I and Angra II nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, Ronaldo do Nascimento

    2006-01-01

    The measurements of photon radiation field intensity are usually performed by a radiation protection technician trained and having skill in using radiation rate meters. Nowadays, these measurements are reported on exposure quantity and used to protect exposed individuals against the radiation risks while executing their activities. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements - ICRU - defined the operational quantity ambient equivalent dose H * (10). This quantity is accepted by the scientific community as the best estimative of the protection quantity effective dose, which can not be directly measured. The operational quantity H * (10) was introduced in Brazilian rules by the National Commission of Nuclear Energy - CNEN (2005a), although its adoption was conditioned to studies of convenience and applicability of implementation. The present work may contribute to these studies, as it presents the evaluation of H * (10)'s implementation at the Nuclear Central Almirante Alvaro Alberto - CNAAA. The evaluation involved radiological tests - the energy dependence and angular dependence - applied to six types of photon radiation rate meters utilized at the CNAAA, with represent around 83% of the total number of rate meters in use by CNAAA. The result of this evaluation is favorable to the quantity H * (10)'s implementation. Suggestions are presented in order to update de rate meters and the technical and administrative procedures related to the Laboratory of Calibration of Rate Meters - LCMR, belonging to CNAAA. Thus, it could be possible to perform the calibration of the rate meters at the nuclear installation. The results obtained allows to carry out new evaluations of H * (10)'s implementation on installations that perform measurements with radiation rate meters on the practice of radiation protection, in order to adopt the H * (10) quantity in our country. (author)

  15. Intercomparison for individual monitoring of external exposure from photon radiation. Results of a co-ordinated research project 1996-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    This TECDOC presents the results of a Co-ordinated Research Project on Intercomparison for Individual Monitoring of External Exposure from photon radiation. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) have endorsed the use of the operational quantities for monitoring purposes. Specifically, personal dose equivalent, H p (d), is to be used for individual dosimetry to demonstrate compliance with the exposure limit recommendations, while for workplace area monitoring the ambient dose equivalent and the directional dose equivalent are recommended. In view of the technical difficulties associated with the introduction of these operational quantities the IAEA decided to assist Member States in their provision of appropriate dosimetry for occupational protection. In this respect, intercomparisons have proven to be a cost effective method of providing such support. A Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) was started in 1997 on Intercomparison for Individual Monitoring of External Exposure from photon radiation, involving more than twenty laboratories from eastern Europe and the countries of the former Soviet Union, and focusing on personnel dosimetry services for nuclear power plants. This CRP was part of the activities of the IAEA Occupational Protection Programme, the objective4s of which are to promote and internationally harmonized approach for optimizing occupational radiation protection through: the development of guides, within the IAEA activities for establishing standards for radiation protection, for restricting radiation exposures in the workplace and for applying current occupational radiation protection techniques, and the promotion of the application of these guidelines. The preparatory phase included, in May 1997, a workshop aimed at familiarizing the participants with the new operational quantities

  16. Thermosetting materials of the radiation-modified polymer compositions. 3. Development of thermoplastic thermosetting materials from polymeric blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkis, V.; Zicans, J.; Bocoka, T.; Ivanova, T.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental studies of blends consisting of chemically and radiation modified polyethylene and ethylene-propylene-diene copolymers have been carried out. Measurements of crystallinity, toughness, viscoelastic, adhesion and thermorelaxation properties as well as scanning electron-microscopic studies have shown that the blends chemically vulcanized by elastomer phase crosslinking system possess a typical double-phase structure within the whole composition range and characteristics specific for rubber, whereas, in radiation-vulcanized blends where crosslinking of both disperse phases takes part, formation of chemical bonds between these phases was observed. Consequently, the radiation treatment improves the properties of the blends, and materials formed by such a system can be successfully used, e.g., as elastic and adhesion active thermosetting materials if the polymer is previously oriented. (author)

  17. Attenuation of Neutron and Gamma Radiation by a Composite Material Based on Modified Titanium Hydride with a Varied Boron Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yastrebinskii, R. N.

    2018-04-01

    The investigations on estimating the attenuation of capture gamma radiation by a composite neutron-shielding material based on modified titanium hydride and Portland cement with a varied amount of boron carbide are performed. The results of calculations demonstrate that an introduction of boron into this material enables significantly decreasing the thermal neutron flux density and hence the levels of capture gamma radiation. In particular, after introducing 1- 5 wt.% boron carbide into the material, the thermal neutron flux density on a 10 cm-thick layer is reduced by 11 to 176 factors, and the capture gamma dose rate - from 4 to 9 times, respectively. The difference in the degree of reduction in these functionals is attributed to the presence of capture gamma radiation in the epithermal region of the neutron spectrum.

  18. A modified index for monitoring of radiation protection programmes with special reference to Nuclear Medicine Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, M.M.; Nagaratnam, A.

    1988-01-01

    In India, the Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences was established with the main objective of developing radioisotopic methodologies for diagnosis, therapy, biomedical research and training. The steady progress in India's atomic energy program gave impetus to rapid growth in the application of nuclear medicine techniques at the Institute and now it is one of the largest users of unsealed radiation sources in the country. Right from the beginning adequate attention has been devoted to the radiation safety of the staff and personnel management techniques have been successfully employed to assess performance of the radiation protection staff. A significant positive correlation (p 0.02) between performance and job satisfaction of radiation protection personnel of the Institute has been demonstrated. Efforts are also directed to evolve a parameter that may throw light on the effectiveness of radiation protection staff and subsequently that may be helpful to monitor the radiation protection program of other establishments

  19. Automatic commissioning of a GPU-based Monte Carlo radiation dose calculation code for photon radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B; Graves, Yan Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is commonly considered as the most accurate method for radiation dose calculations. Commissioning of a beam model in the MC code against a clinical linear accelerator beam is of crucial importance for its clinical implementation. In this paper, we propose an automatic commissioning method for our GPU-based MC dose engine, gDPM. gDPM utilizes a beam model based on a concept of phase-space-let (PSL). A PSL contains a group of particles that are of the same type and close in space and energy. A set of generic PSLs was generated by splitting a reference phase-space file. Each PSL was associated with a weighting factor, and in dose calculations the particle carried a weight corresponding to the PSL where it was from. Dose for each PSL in water was pre-computed, and hence the dose in water for a whole beam under a given set of PSL weighting factors was the weighted sum of the PSL doses. At the commissioning stage, an optimization problem was solved to adjust the PSL weights in order to minimize the difference between the calculated dose and measured one. Symmetry and smoothness regularizations were utilized to uniquely determine the solution. An augmented Lagrangian method was employed to solve the optimization problem. To validate our method, a phase-space file of a Varian TrueBeam 6 MV beam was used to generate the PSLs for 6 MV beams. In a simulation study, we commissioned a Siemens 6 MV beam on which a set of field-dependent phase-space files was available. The dose data of this desired beam for different open fields and a small off-axis open field were obtained by calculating doses using these phase-space files. The 3D γ-index test passing rate within the regions with dose above 10% of d max dose for those open fields tested was improved averagely from 70.56 to 99.36% for 2%/2 mm criteria and from 32.22 to 89.65% for 1%/1 mm criteria. We also tested our commissioning method on a six-field head-and-neck cancer IMRT plan. The

  20. Electron and Photon ID

    CERN Document Server

    Hryn'ova, Tetiana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The identification of prompt photons and the rejection of background coming mostly from photons from hadron decays relies on the high granularity of the ATLAS calorimeter. The electron identification used in ATLAS for run 2 is based on a likelihood discrimination to separate isolated electron candidates from candidates originating from photon conversions, hadron misidentification and heavy flavor decays. In addition, isolation variables are used as further handles to separate signal and background. Several methods are used to measure with data the efficiency of the photon identification requirements, to cover a broad energy spectrum. At low energy, photons from radiative Z decays are used. In the medium energy range, similarities between electrons and photon showers are exploited using Z->ee decays. At high energy, inclusive photon samples are used. The measurement of the efficiencies of the electron identification and isolation cuts are performed with the data using tag and probe techniques with large statis...

  1. The equidosemeter ED-02 as a device for dose equivalent measurements in mixed neutron and photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrosimov, A.I.; Alekseev, A.G.; Antipov, V.A.; Golovachik, V.T.

    1985-01-01

    The equidosemeter ED-02 is to be used for simultaneous measurements of the dose equivalent, absorbed dose, and mean quality factor of mixed radiations. The detector is a tissue equivalent spherical low-pressure proportional counter tube the signal of which is simultaneously recorded in two channels - a current channel and a pulse one. The current channel is linear and its response proportional to the absorbed dose. The pulse channel includes a nonlinear pulse amplitude converter the characteristic of which, taking into account the required dependence of the mean quality factor on linear energy transfer, has been chosen in such a way that in final counting the pulse channel response is proportional to the difference between dose equivalent and absorbed dose. On the basis of calculations of event spectra in the sensitive volume of the detector, the energy dependence of the dosemeter sensitivity is analysed for neutron energies up to 20 MeV. The characteristic of the nonlinear converter has been calculated on the basis of the construction parameters of the detector and optimized with respect to a representative sample of neutron spectra beyond the shields of nuclear plants. The heterogeneity of the detector, i.e. the difference between the atomic composition of wall and filling and the composition of soft biological tissue as well as the effect of the conducting coating of the case cathode, has been taken into consideration. Moreover, the test results of the device in mixed neutron-photon fields of 60 Co, 239 Pu-α-Be and 252 Cf radioisotope sources are presented. The main measuring error of dose characteristics is shown to be less than 20% in the dose range 1 x 10 -3 to 4 x 10 -3 Sv/h. (author)

  2. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e#betta# scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by #betta##betta# collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F 2 /sup #betta#/(x,Q 2 ) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved

  3. Photon-photon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R ampersand D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy

  4. Molecular desorption of a nonevaporable getter St 707 irradiated at room temperature with synchrotron radiation of 194 eV critical photon energy

    CERN Document Server

    Le Pimpec, F; Laurent, Jean Michel

    2003-01-01

    Photon stimulated molecular desorption from a nonevaporable getter (NEG) St 707(R) (SAES Getters TM ) surface after conditioning and after saturation with isotopic carbon monoxide Ýcf. nomenclature in Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 74th edition, edited by D. R. Lide (CRC Press, Boca Raton, 1994)¿ /sup 13/C/sup 18/O, has been studied on a dedicated beamline at the EPA ring at CERN. The synchrotron radiation of 194 eV critical energy and with an average photon intensity of ~1 * 10/sup 17/ photons s/sup -1/ was impinging on the sample at perpendicular incidence. It is found that the desorption yields eta (molecules/photon) of the characteristic gases in an UHV system (hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide) for a freshly activated NEG and for a NEG fully saturated with /sup 13/C /sup 18/O are lower than that of 300 degrees C baked stainless steel. (22 refs). Fully activated NEG was studied and found to desorb less as compared to a 300 degree c baked stainless-steel surface. Furthermore, it ...

  5. Special topics. Advances of radiation biology in heavy particle therapy- review. Effects of photon and heavy particle irradiation on metastasis and angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Toshiyuki; Teshima, Teruki; Takahashi, Yutaka; Matsuura, Nariaki; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2009-01-01

    Described are effects of photon and heavy particle (HP) irradiation on the process of tumor metastasis (MT) and accompanying angiogenesis (AG) at molecular, cellular and animal levels. Recent animal studies of molecular mechanistic elucidation of increased MT by photon have revealed the participation of activated proteins like matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and integrins, of increased secretion of growth factors, of up-regulation of receptors like for that of urokinase-type plasminogen activator under hypoxia, and so on. Authors have studied the effect of HP on cellular MMP and integrins and on MT in tumor-bearing mice, and suggested a suppression of MT by HP. Vascular endothelial cells, playing a major role in AG, are resistant to low dose (e.g., 3 Gy) radiation and sensitive to higher dose (9-20 Gy), which has resulted in various complicating findings on MT. There are also many findings on MT and/or AG relations with various treatments like surgical or photon treatment of the primary tumor and AG suppressive substances, where further examinations are necessary for practical use of photon/drug therapy to prevent MT through AG participation. Authors have implicated in vitro that HP, even at low dose (0.1 Gy, sublethal), can suppress MT through AG mechanism. Thus prevention of MT by HP is thought promising in future when their mutual interaction is elucidated more clearly. (K.T.)

  6. High-field electron-photon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartemann, F V.

    1999-01-01

    Recent advances in novel technologies (including chirped-pulse amplification, femtosecond laser systems operating in the TW-PW range, high-gradient rf photoinjectors, and synchronized relativistic electron bunches with subpicosecond durations and THz bandwidths) allow experimentalists to study the interaction of relativistic electrons with ultrahigh-intensity photon fields. Ponderomotive scattering can accelerate these electrons with extremely high gradients in a three-dimensional vacuum laser focus. The nonlinear Doppler shift induced by relativistic radiation pressure in Compton backscattering is shown to yield complex nonlinear spectra which can be modified by using temporal laser pulse shaping techniques. Colliding laser pulses, where ponderomotive acceleration and Compton backscattering are combined, could also yield extremely short wavelength photons. Finally, one expects strong radiative corrections when the Doppler-upshifted laser wavelength approaches the Compton scale. These are discussed within the context of high-field classical electrodynamics, a new discipline borne out of the aforementioned innovations

  7. Gas sensing based on detection of light radiation from a region of modified cladding (nanocrystalline ZnO) of an optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendiran, S.; Sastikumar, D.

    2017-03-01

    A new type of fiber optic gas sensor is proposed by detecting a light radiated from a region of cladding modified with metal oxide (nanocrystalline ZnO). The intensity of radiated light is found to vary with different gasses and concentrations. Sensing characteristics are studied for ammonia, methanol, ethanol and acetone gasses. Gas sensitivity of the proposed sensor is compared with clad-modified fiber optic gas sensor. The new sensor exhibits enhanced sensitivity. Time response characteristics of the sensor are reported.

  8. Properties and use of construction plastics modified by ioni-- zing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandur, Ya.

    1983-01-01

    The change of material structure both during irradiation of ready details and preliminary irradiation of granulate before heat treatment has been studied. The change of mechanical and thermal chracteristics of polyamides of the brand ultramide AZK and ultramide BZK, as well as of propylene of the brand pro-fax 6523 (PP) and polyethylene of the brand liten 7006 (PE), irradiated with γ-rays and electrons, depending on radiation dose absorbed, has been considered. The polymer materials considered possess the optimum physicomechanical properties at the following radiation doses absorbed (in MGy): PE and PP 0.70 and 0.15 during γ-radiation and 0.20 and 0.10 during electron radiation. As a result of irradiation mechanical characteristics of the polymers except impact strength and ultimate stress during bending are increased

  9. The impact on radiation risk estimates of effect modifiers and confounders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, G.B.; Cologne, J.B.; Pierce, D.A.; Tokuoka, S.

    2003-01-01

    We have conducted studies of the joint effects of radiation with other risk factors for liver, lung, and breast cancer in the cohort of Japanese survivors of the 1945 atomic bombings. Based on follow-up of 45,113 subjects from 1958 through 1994, of whom 592 developed lung cancer, we found the effects of smoking and radiation to be significantly non-multiplicative and consistent with additivity. Adjustment for smoking reduced the female:male ratio of radiation risk estimates for lung cancer in this cohort from 5.8 to 1.6, a ratio more similar to that for all solid cancers. We conducted cross sectional and case control studies within the A-bomb survivor cohort to assess the joint effects of radiation with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and C virus (HCV) infections on the etiology of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our study of 268 pathologist-confirmed cirrhosis cases and 843 subjects without cirrhosis, found no relationship between A-bomb radiation and cirrhosis after adjustment for viral hepatitis. In terms of HCC, our study of 238 pathologist-confirmed cases and 894 controls showed super-multiplicative interaction between radiation and HCV infections. Our results suggest that while chronic radiation exposure acts as a complete carcinogen for HCC, acute irradiation may act in concert with an agent such as HCV that is associated with liver cell proliferation. Studies in progress of the joint effects of radiation with insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF Binding Protein 3 (IGFBP-3), and total estradiol on the etiology of breast cancer, a particularly radiogenic tumor, will also be discussed

  10. Communication as a tool to modify the negative perception of radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, L.; Prieto, D.; Sanchez, K.; Ferrer, N.; Arranz, L.

    2011-01-01

    The radiation risks are probably for historical reasons related to their military origin, the paradigm of subjectivity and its perception by the population has become increasingly of interest to those responsible for management and management of any applications of ionizing radiation. This interest is positive because the more you know, the better will the conditions to try to change attitudes and approaches to the problem, particularly from the point of view of communication with society.

  11. On the evaluation of modified Bessel functions of the second kind and fractional order for synchrotron radiation calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutt, H.N.

    2003-01-01

    The modified Bessel functions of the second kind and fractional order K 1/3 (x) and K 2/3 (x) are of importance in the calculation of the frequency spectrum of synchrotron radiation. The parameter range of interest is typically 10 -6 x10. Recently, there has been particular interest in the generation of 'terahertz' radiation, which can be coherently enhanced by many orders of magnitude when the electron bunch length is shorter than the terahertz wavelength. This requires evaluation of the Bessel functions for small values of the argument. It is shown that the series commonly used to evaluate these functions has poor convergence properties under these conditions. An alternative series is derived which has much better convergence for x1

  12. Clinical Outcomes Among Children With Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma Treated With Proton and Photon Radiation Therapy: A Comparison of Disease Control and Overall Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, Bree R.; Esiashvili, Natia; Kim, Sungjin; Weyman, Elizabeth A.; Thornton, Lauren T.; Mazewski, Claire; MacDonald, Tobey; Ebb, David; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare long-term disease control and overall survival between children treated with proton and photon radiation therapy (RT) for standard-risk medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: This multi-institution cohort study includes 88 children treated with chemotherapy and proton (n=45) or photon (n=43) RT between 2000 and 2009. Overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and patterns of failure were compared between the 2 cohorts. Results: Median (range) age was 6 years old at diagnosis (3-21 years) for proton patients versus 8 years (3-19 years) for photon patients (P=.011). Cohorts were similar with respect to sex, histology, extent of surgical resection, craniospinal irradiation (CSI) RT dose, total RT dose, whether the RT boost was delivered to the posterior fossa (PF) or tumor bed (TB), time from surgery to RT start, or total duration of RT. RT consisted of a median (range) CSI dose of 23.4 Gy (18-27 Gy) and a boost of 30.6 Gy (27-37.8 Gy). Median follow-up time is 6.2 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.1-6.6 years) for proton patients versus 7.0 years (95% CI: 5.8-8.9 years) for photon patients. There was no significant difference in RFS or OS between patients treated with proton versus photon RT; 6-year RFS was 78.8% versus 76.5% (P=.948) and 6-year OS was 82.0% versus 87.6%, respectively (P=.285). On multivariate analysis, there was a trend for longer RFS with females (P=.058) and higher CSI dose (P=.096) and for longer OS with females (P=.093). Patterns of failure were similar between the 2 cohorts (P=.908). Conclusions: Disease control with proton and photon radiation therapy appears equivalent for standard risk medulloblastoma.

  13. Locally challenging osteo- and chondrogenic tumors of the axial skeleton: results of combined proton and photon radiation therapy using three-dimensional treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, Eugen B; Fitzek, Markus M; Liebsch, Norbert J; Munzenrider, John E

    1995-02-01

    Purpose: Tumors of the axial skeleton are at high risk for local failure. Total surgical resection is rarely possible. Critical normal tissues limit the efficacy of conventional photon therapy. This study reviews our experience of using combined high dose proton and photon radiation therapy following three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Between December 1980 and September 1992, 47 patients were treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory for primary or recurrent chordomas and chondrosarcomas (group 1, 20 patients), osteogenic sarcomas (group 2, 15 patients) and giant cell tumors, osteo- or chondroblastomas (group 3, 12 patients). Radiation treatment was given postoperatively in 23 patients, pre- and postoperatively in 17 patients, and 7 patients received radiation therapy as definitive treatment modality following biopsy only. The proton radiation component was delivered using a 160 MeV proton beam and the photon component using megavoltage photons up to 23 MV energy with 1.8-2.0 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) per fraction, once a day. Total external beam target dose ranged from 55.3 CGE to 82.0 CGE with mean target doses of 73.9 CGE (group 1), 69.8 CGE (group 2), and 61.8 CGE (group 3). Results: Group 1 (chordoma and chondrosarcoma): Five of 14 patients (36%) with chordoma recurred locally, and 2 out of 5 patients developed distant metastasis, resulting in 1 death from disease. A trend for improved local control was noted for primary vs. recurrent tumors, target doses > 77 CGE and gross total resection. All patients with chondrosarcoma achieved and maintained local control and disease-free status. Five-year actuarial local control and overall survival rates were 53% and 50% for chordomas and 100% and 100% for chondrosarcomas, respectively. Group 2 (osteogenic sarcoma): Three of 15 patients (20%) never achieved local control and died within 6 months of completion of radiation treatment. Only 1 out of 12

  14. Investigation of the mixed beta-photon radiation field in plant areas of the heat steam generator of the Obrigheim nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgkhardt, B.; Piesch, E.

    1988-10-01

    The investigations of the beta-photon radiation field in parts of the plant in the primary circuit were performed by irradiation experiments in different distances of exhausted disks of the heat steam generator using LiF-TLDs. The depth dose distribution for a detector free of mass is found on the basis of the measurement results by using a standardized extrapolation procedure. The measurement results show that the depth dose distribution is more or less independent of the detector-to-source distance if the absorption in air and the detector is taken into account. Thus low energy beta-photon fields can be analyzed, in general, using the results found in one distance of about 5 cm from the source. For the purpose of radiation protection at working places transmission factors for protective clothes and detectors of different thicknesses were determined. The estimation of the dose equivalents H'(0.07) and H'(10) and the dose equivalents in the lens of the eye and the testes shows that the low energy beta radiation component contributes only to the partial dose equivalent H'(0.07) and will be absorbed by a protective layer of 100 mg.cm -2 . (orig.) [de

  15. Absorbed dose to water determination with ionization chamber dosimetry and calorimetry in restricted neutron, photon, proton and heavy-ion radiation fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brede, H J; Greif, K-D; Hecker, O; Heeg, P; Heese, J; Jones, D T L; Kluge, H; Schardt, D

    2006-08-07

    Absolute dose measurements with a transportable water calorimeter and ionization chambers were performed at a water depth of 20 mm in four different types of radiation fields, for a collimated (60)Co photon beam, for a collimated neutron beam with a fluence-averaged mean energy of 5.25 MeV, for collimated proton beams with mean energies of 36 MeV and 182 MeV at the measuring position, and for a (12)C ion beam in a scanned mode with an energy per atomic mass of 430 MeV u(-1). The ionization chambers actually used were calibrated in units of air kerma in the photon reference field of the PTB and in units of absorbed dose to water for a Farmer-type chamber at GSI. The absorbed dose to water inferred from calorimetry was compared with the dose derived from ionometry by applying the radiation-field-dependent parameters. For neutrons, the quantities of the ICRU Report 45, for protons the quantities of the ICRU Report 59 and for the (12)C ion beam, the recommended values of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) protocol (TRS 398) were applied. The mean values of the absolute absorbed dose to water obtained with these two independent methods agreed within the standard uncertainty (k = 1) of 1.8% for calorimetry and of 3.0% for ionometry for all types and energies of the radiation beams used in this comparison.

  16. Investigation of the thermoluminescent response of K2GdF5:Dy3+ crystals to photon radiation and neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Edna C.; Faria, Luiz O.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.

    2009-01-01

    The thermoluminescent (TL) properties of undoped and Dy 3+ doped K 2 GdF 5 crystals were investigated from the point of view of gamma and neutron dosimetry. Crystalline K 2 GdF 5 platelets with thickness of about 1 mm and doped with 0.0, 0.2, 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 at.% Dy 3+ ions, synthesized under hydrothermal conditions, were irradiated in order to study TL sensitivity, as well as dose and energy response, reproducibility and fading. As it has been turned out, crystals doped with 5.0 at% Dy 3+ show the most efficient TL response and demonstrate a linear response to doses for all the radiation fields. TL glow curves from Dy 3+ doped K 2 GdF 5 crystals can be deconvoluted into four individual TL peaks centered at 153, 185, 216 and 234 deg C. Concerning the photon fields studied, the maximum TL response has been found for the 52.5 keV photons. The intensity is 15 times more than that of the response for the 662 keV photons from a Cs-137 source. On the other hand, the K 2 GdF 5 crystals doped with 5.0 at % Dy 3+ have also been found to have the better TL response for fast neutron radiation, among all dopants studied. For fast neutron radiation produced by a 241 Am-Be source, the TL responses for doses were also linear and comparable to that of commercial TLD-600, irradiated at same conditions. It has been established that the gamma sensitivity of the crystals is about 0.07% of the neutron sensitivity and the fast neutron sensitivity is about 4.5 % of the thermal neutron sensitivity. These results points out that K 2 Gd 0.95 Dy 0.05 F 5 crystals are good candidates for use in neutron dosimetry applications. (author)

  17. Graphene-based photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Oleg L.; Boyko, Vladimir S.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Kolesnikov, Anton A.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2010-01-01

    A novel type of photonic crystal formed by embedding a periodic array of constituent stacks of alternating graphene and dielectric discs into a background dielectric medium is proposed. The photonic band structure and transmittance of such photonic crystal are calculated. The graphene-based photonic crystals can be used effectively as the frequency filters and waveguides for the far infrared region of electromagnetic spectrum. Due to substantial suppression of absorption of low-frequency radiation in doped graphene the damping and skin effect in the photonic crystal are also suppressed. The advantages of the graphene-based photonic crystal are discussed.

  18. Single-photon imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Seitz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition and interpretation of images is a central capability in almost all scientific and technological domains. In particular, the acquisition of electromagnetic radiation, in the form of visible light, UV, infrared, X-ray, etc. is of enormous practical importance. The ultimate sensitivity in electronic imaging is the detection of individual photons. With this book, the first comprehensive review of all aspects of single-photon electronic imaging has been created. Topics include theoretical basics, semiconductor fabrication, single-photon detection principles, imager design and applications of different spectral domains. Today, the solid-state fabrication capabilities for several types of image sensors has advanced to a point, where uncoooled single-photon electronic imaging will soon become a consumer product. This book is giving a specialist´s view from different domains to the forthcoming “single-photon imaging” revolution. The various aspects of single-photon imaging are treated by internati...

  19. The effect of impact modifier and of nucleating agent on the radiation tolerance of polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Dongyuan (Beijing Normal Univ., BJ (China)); Czvikovszky, T.; Dobo, J.; Somogyi, A. (Research Inst. for the Plastics Industry, Budapest (Hungary))

    1990-01-01

    The effect of two types of additives was investigated with respect to the oxidative post-irradiation stability of polypropylene: SBS thermoplastic rubbers as impact modifiers and benzoic acid as nucleating agent. Testing was performed by ultimate deformation on bending. The thermoplastic rubber additive increased the post-irradiation stability of polypropylene substantially. (author).

  20. The effect of impact modifier and of nucleating agent on the radiation tolerance of polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dongyuan; Czvikovszky, T.; Dobo, J.; Somogyi, A.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of two types of additives was investigated with respect to the oxidative post-irradiation stability of polypropylene: SBS thermoplastic rubbers as impact modifiers and benzoic acid as nucleating agent. Testing was performed by ultimate deformation on bending. The thermoplastic rubber additive increased the post-irradiation stability of polypropylene substantially. (author)

  1. First corrections to hyperfine splitting and the Lamb shift induced by diagrams with two external photons and second-order radiative insertions in the electron line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eides, M.I.; Karshenboim, S.G.; Shelyuto, V.A.

    1994-01-01

    Contributions to hyperfine splitting (HFS) and to the Lamb shift on the order of α 2 (Zα) 5 induced by graphs with two radiative photons inserted into the electron line are considered. It is shown that this gauge-invariant set of diagrams, which give corrections of the considered order, consists of nineteen topologically different diagrams. Contributions to both HFS and the Lamb shift induced by graphs containing the one-loop electron self-energy as a subgraph and by the graph containing two one-loop vertices are obtained. 15 refs., 3 figs

  2. X-ray photoemission analysis of chemically modified TlBr surfaces for improved radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A. J.; Voss, L. F.; Beck, P. R.; Graff, R. T.; Conway, A. M.; Nikolic, R. J.; Payne, S. A.; Lee, J.-S.; Kim, H.; Cirignano, L.; Shah, K.

    2013-01-01

    We subjected device-grade TlBr to various chemical treatments used in room temperature radiation detector fabrication to determine the resulting surface composition and electronic structure. As-polished TlBr was treated separately with HCl, SOCl 2 , Br:MeOH and HF solutions. High-resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure and Tl 4f, Br 3d, Cl 2p and S 2p core lines were used to evaluate surface chemistry and shallow heterojunction formation. Surface chemistry and valence band electronic structure were correlated with the goal of optimizing the long-term stability and radiation response

  3. Radiation processing of indigenous natural polymers. Properties of radiation modified blends from sago-starch for biodegradable composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazali, Z.; Dahlan, K.Z.; Wongsuban, B.; Idris, S.; Muhammad, K.

    2001-01-01

    Research and development on biodegradable polymer blends and composites have gained wider interest to offer alternative eco-friendly products. Natural polysaccharide such as sago-starch offers the most promising raw material for the production of biodegradable composites. The potential of sago, which is so abundant in Malaysia, to produce blends for subsequent applications in composite material, was evaluated and explored. Blends with various formulations of sago starch and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) polymers were prepared and subjected to radiation modification using electron beam irradiation. The effect of irradiation on the sago and its blends was evaluated and their properties were characterized. The potential of producing composite from sago blends was explored. Foams from these blends were produced using microwave oven while films were produced through casting method. The properties such as mechanical, water absorption, expansion ratio, and biodegradability were characterized and reported in this paper. (author)

  4. Radiation processing of indigenous natural polymers. Properties of radiation modified blends from sago-starch for biodegradable composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazali, Z.; Dahlan, K.Z. [Malaysian Institute for Nuclear and Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, Kajang (Malaysia); Wongsuban, B.; Idris, S.; Muhammad, K. [Universiti Putra Malaysia, Faculty of Food Science and Biotechnology, Department of Food Science, Serdang (Malaysia)

    2001-03-01

    Research and development on biodegradable polymer blends and composites have gained wider interest to offer alternative eco-friendly products. Natural polysaccharide such as sago-starch offers the most promising raw material for the production of biodegradable composites. The potential of sago, which is so abundant in Malaysia, to produce blends for subsequent applications in composite material, was evaluated and explored. Blends with various formulations of sago starch and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) polymers were prepared and subjected to radiation modification using electron beam irradiation. The effect of irradiation on the sago and its blends was evaluated and their properties were characterized. The potential of producing composite from sago blends was explored. Foams from these blends were produced using microwave oven while films were produced through casting method. The properties such as mechanical, water absorption, expansion ratio, and biodegradability were characterized and reported in this paper. (author)

  5. Synthesis and properties of radiation modified thermally cured castor oil based polyurethanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortley, Aba [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, P.O. Box 17000, Stn Forces, Kingston, ON, K7K 7B4 (Canada)], E-mail: aba.mortley@rmc.ca; Bonin, H.W.; Bui, V.T. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, P.O. Box 17000, Stn Forces, Kingston, ON, K7K 7B4 (Canada)

    2007-12-15

    Thermally cured polyurethanes were prepared from castor oil and hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI). Due to the long aliphatic chain of the castor oil component of polyurethane, thermal curing of castor oil based polyurethane (COPU) is limited by increasing polymer viscosity. To enhance further crosslinking, COPUs were exposed to doses up to 3.0 MGy produced by the mixed ionizing radiation field of a SLOWPOKE-2 research nuclear reactor. The physico-mechanical properties of castor oil based polyurethanes (COPU), unirradiated and irradiated, were characterized by mechanical tensile tests. A four-fold increase in modulus and tensile strength values from 0.930 to 4.365 MPa and 0.149 to 0.747 MPa, respectively, suggests improved physico-mechanical properties resulting from radiation. The changing areas of the carbonyl and the NH absorbance peaks and the disappearance of the isocyanate peak in the FTIR spectra as radiation progressed, indicates increased hydrogen bonding and intermolecular crosslinking, which is in agreement with the mechanical tests. Unchanging {sup 13}C solid state NMR spectra imply limited sample degradation with increasing radiation.

  6. Modified Exponential (MOE) Models: statistical Models for Risk Estimation of Low dose Rate Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, H.; Furukawa, C.; Kawakami, Y.; Magae, J.

    2004-01-01

    Simultaneous inclusion of dose and dose-rate is required to evaluate the risk of long term irradiation at low dose-rates, since biological responses to radiation are complex processes that depend both on irradiation time and total dose. Consequently, it is necessary to consider a model including cumulative dose,dose-rate and irradiation time to estimate quantitative dose-response relationship on the biological response to radiation. In this study, we measured micronucleus formation and (3H) thymidine uptake in U2OS, human osteosarcoma cell line, as indicators of biological response to gamma radiation. Cells were exposed to gamma ray in irradiation room bearing 50,000 Ci 60Co. After irradiation, they were cultured for 24h in the presence of cytochalasin B to block cytokinesis, and cytoplasm and nucleus were stained with DAPI and propidium iodide. The number of binuclear cells bearing a micronucleus was counted under a florescence microscope. For proliferation inhibition, cells were cultured for 48 h after the irradiation and (3h) thymidine was pulsed for 4h before harvesting. We statistically analyzed the data for quantitative evaluation of radiation risk at low dose/dose-rate. (Author)

  7. CALIBRATION OF MODIFIED LIULIN DETECTOR FOR COSMIC RADIATION MEASUREMENTS ON-BOARD AIRCRAFT

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyselová, Dagmar; Ambrožová, Iva; Krist, Pavel; Kubančák, Ján; Uchihori, Y.; Kitamura, H.; Ploc, Ondřej

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 164, č. 4 (2015), s. 489-492 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Liulin detector * on-board aircraft * cosmic radiation measurement Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.894, year: 2015

  8. Synthesis and properties of radiation modified thermally cured castor oil based polyurethanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortley, Aba; Bonin, H.W.; Bui, V.T.

    2007-01-01

    Thermally cured polyurethanes were prepared from castor oil and hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI). Due to the long aliphatic chain of the castor oil component of polyurethane, thermal curing of castor oil based polyurethane (COPU) is limited by increasing polymer viscosity. To enhance further crosslinking, COPUs were exposed to doses up to 3.0 MGy produced by the mixed ionizing radiation field of a SLOWPOKE-2 research nuclear reactor. The physico-mechanical properties of castor oil based polyurethanes (COPU), unirradiated and irradiated, were characterized by mechanical tensile tests. A four-fold increase in modulus and tensile strength values from 0.930 to 4.365 MPa and 0.149 to 0.747 MPa, respectively, suggests improved physico-mechanical properties resulting from radiation. The changing areas of the carbonyl and the NH absorbance peaks and the disappearance of the isocyanate peak in the FTIR spectra as radiation progressed, indicates increased hydrogen bonding and intermolecular crosslinking, which is in agreement with the mechanical tests. Unchanging 13 C solid state NMR spectra imply limited sample degradation with increasing radiation

  9. Photon iso-effective dose for cancer treatment with mixed field radiation based on dose-response assessment from human and an animal model: clinical application to boron neutron capture therapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S J; Pozzi, E C C; Monti Hughes, A; Provenzano, L; Koivunoro, H; Carando, D G; Thorp, S I; Casal, M R; Bortolussi, S; Trivillin, V A; Garabalino, M A; Curotto, P; Heber, E M; Santa Cruz, G A; Kankaanranta, L; Joensuu, H; Schwint, A E

    2017-10-03

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality that combines different radiation qualities. Since the severity of biological damage following irradiation depends on the radiation type, a quantity different from absorbed dose is required to explain the effects observed in the clinical BNCT in terms of outcome compared with conventional photon radiation therapy. A new approach for calculating photon iso-effective doses in BNCT was introduced previously. The present work extends this model to include information from dose-response assessments in animal models and humans. Parameters of the model were determined for tumour and precancerous tissue using dose-response curves obtained from BNCT and photon studies performed in the hamster cheek pouch in vivo models of oral cancer and/or pre-cancer, and from head and neck cancer radiotherapy data with photons. To this end, suitable expressions of the dose-limiting Normal Tissue Complication and Tumour Control Probabilities for the reference radiation and for the mixed field BNCT radiation were developed. Pearson's correlation coefficients and p-values showed that TCP and NTCP models agreed with experimental data (with r  >  0.87 and p-values  >0.57). The photon iso-effective dose model was applied retrospectively to evaluate the dosimetry in tumours and mucosa for head and neck cancer patients treated with BNCT in Finland. Photon iso-effective doses in tumour were lower than those obtained with the standard RBE-weighted model (between 10% to 45%). The results also suggested that the probabilities of tumour control derived from photon iso-effective doses are more adequate to explain the clinical responses than those obtained with the RBE-weighted values. The dosimetry in the mucosa revealed that the photon iso-effective doses were about 30% to 50% higher than the corresponding RBE-weighted values. While the RBE-weighted doses are unable to predict mucosa toxicity, predictions based on the proposed

  10. Photon iso-effective dose for cancer treatment with mixed field radiation based on dose-response assessment from human and an animal model: clinical application to boron neutron capture therapy for head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S. J.; Pozzi, E. C. C.; Monti Hughes, A.; Provenzano, L.; Koivunoro, H.; Carando, D. G.; Thorp, S. I.; Casal, M. R.; Bortolussi, S.; Trivillin, V. A.; Garabalino, M. A.; Curotto, P.; Heber, E. M.; Santa Cruz, G. A.; Kankaanranta, L.; Joensuu, H.; Schwint, A. E.

    2017-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality that combines different radiation qualities. Since the severity of biological damage following irradiation depends on the radiation type, a quantity different from absorbed dose is required to explain the effects observed in the clinical BNCT in terms of outcome compared with conventional photon radiation therapy. A new approach for calculating photon iso-effective doses in BNCT was introduced previously. The present work extends this model to include information from dose-response assessments in animal models and humans. Parameters of the model were determined for tumour and precancerous tissue using dose-response curves obtained from BNCT and photon studies performed in the hamster cheek pouch in vivo models of oral cancer and/or pre-cancer, and from head and neck cancer radiotherapy data with photons. To this end, suitable expressions of the dose-limiting Normal Tissue Complication and Tumour Control Probabilities for the reference radiation and for the mixed field BNCT radiation were developed. Pearson’s correlation coefficients and p-values showed that TCP and NTCP models agreed with experimental data (with r  >  0.87 and p-values  >0.57). The photon iso-effective dose model was applied retrospectively to evaluate the dosimetry in tumours and mucosa for head and neck cancer patients treated with BNCT in Finland. Photon iso-effective doses in tumour were lower than those obtained with the standard RBE-weighted model (between 10% to 45%). The results also suggested that the probabilities of tumour control derived from photon iso-effective doses are more adequate to explain the clinical responses than those obtained with the RBE-weighted values. The dosimetry in the mucosa revealed that the photon iso-effective doses were about 30% to 50% higher than the corresponding RBE-weighted values. While the RBE-weighted doses are unable to predict mucosa toxicity, predictions based on the proposed

  11. Photon mass attenuation coefficients of a silicon resin loaded with WO3, PbO, and Bi2O3 Micro and Nano-particles for radiation shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdipoor, Khatibeh; Alemi, Abdolali; Mesbahi, Asghar

    2018-06-01

    Novel shielding materials for photons based on silicon resin and WO3, PbO, and Bi2O3 Micro and Nano-particles were designed and their mass attenuation coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo (MC) method. Using lattice cards in MCNPX code, micro and nanoparticles with sizes of 100 nm and 1 μm was designed inside a silicon resin matrix. Narrow beam geometry was simulated to calculate the attenuation coefficients of samples against mono-energetic beams of Co60 (1.17 and 1.33 MeV), Cs137 (663.8 KeV), and Ba133 (355.9 KeV). The shielding samples made of nanoparticles had higher mass attenuation coefficients, up to 17% relative to those made of microparticles. The superiority of nano-shields relative to micro-shields was dependent on the filler concentration and the energy of photons. PbO, and Bi2O3 nanoparticles showed higher attenuation compared to WO3 nanoparticles in studied energies. Fabrication of novel shielding materials using PbO, and Bi2O3 nanoparticles is recommended for application in radiation protection against photon beams.

  12. Modified gravity (MOG), the speed of gravitational radiation and the event GW170817/GRB170817A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M. A.; Moffat, J. W.; Toth, V. T.

    2018-05-01

    Modified gravity (MOG) is a covariant, relativistic, alternative gravitational theory whose field equations are derived from an action that supplements the spacetime metric tensor with vector and scalar fields. Both gravitational (spin 2) and electromagnetic waves travel on null geodesics of the theory's one metric. MOG satisfies the weak equivalence principle and is consistent with observations of the neutron star merger and gamma ray burster event GW170817/GRB170817A.

  13. The ENEA calibration service for ionising radiations. Part 1: Photons; Il centro di taratura per la radiazioni ionizzanti di Bologna. Parte 1: Fotoni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteventi, F.; Sermenghi, I. [ENEA Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1999-07-01

    The ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) calibration service for ionizing radiations has been active for 40 years in the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory web. It has been the first center, in 1985, to be acknowledges by the Italian calibration service (SIT) for the two quantities for photons: exposure and air kerma. Since the Institute for the Radiation Protection of ENEA has moved to the new site in Montecuccolino (Bologna, Italy) in 1995, the whole laboratory has been renovated and all irradiation rooms together with radiation source and equipment have been reorganized according to the {chi}, {gamma}, {beta} and neutron fields metrology requirements. The aim of this report, as the first part of a report describing all facilities available at the service, is to give a detailed description of all equipment s qualified for photon fields metrology including the secondary standards and the calibration procedures performed for radiation monitoring devices and dosemeters. [Italian] Il centro di taratura dell'ENEA di Bologna opera nel campo della metrologia secpndaria da quasi 40 anni ed e' stato il primo centro nel 1985 ad essere riconosciuto dal SIT (Servizio di Taratura in Italia) per le grandezze esposizione e Kerma in aria. Con l'insediamento di tutto l'Istituto per la Radioprotezione nella nuova sede di Montecuccolino sono state ricostruite e riorganizzate anche tutte le sale di irraggiamento e tutti gli impianti radiogeni a disposizione per la metrologia delle radiazioni X, gamma, beta e neutroni. Intenzione di questo primo rapporto e' descrivere le attrezzature qualificate per la metrologia fotonica, dei campioni di misura e delle procedure adottate per la taratura degli strumenti e dei dosimetri.

  14. Radiation Transport Around Axisymmetric Blunt Body Vehicles Using a Modified Differential Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Lin C.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    A moment method for computing 3-D radiative transport is applied to axisymmetric flows in thermochemical nonequilibrium. Such flows are representative of proposed aerobrake missions. The method uses the P-1 approximation to reduce the governing system of integro-di erential equations to a coupled set of partial di erential equations. A numerical solution method for these equations given actual variations of the radiation properties in thermochemical nonequilibrium blunt body flows is developed. Initial results from the method are shown and compared to tangent slab calculations. The agreement between the transport methods is found to be about 10 percent in the stagnation region, with the difference increasing along the flank of the vehicle.

  15. Chronic restraint-induced stress has little modifying effect on radiation hematopoietic toxicity in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Katsube, Takanori; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Vares, Guillaume; Nakajima, Tetsuo; Nenoi, Mitsuru; Liu Qiang; Morita, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    Both radiation and stresses cause detrimental effects on humans. Besides possible health effects resulting directly from radiation exposure, the nuclear plant accident is a cause of social psychological stresses. A recent study showed that chronic restraint-induced stresses (CRIS) attenuated Trp53 functions and increased carcinogenesis susceptibility of Trp53-heterozygous mice to total-body X-irradiation (TBXI), having a big impact on the academic world and a sensational effect on the public, especially the residents living in radioactively contaminated areas. It is important to investigate the possible modification effects from CRIS on radiation-induced health consequences in Trp53 wild-type (Trp53wt) animals. Prior to a carcinogenesis study, effects of TBXI on the hematopoietic system under CRIS were investigated in terms of hematological abnormality in the peripheral blood and residual damage in the bone marrow erythrocytes using a mouse restraint model. Five-week-old male Trp53wt C57BL/6J mice were restrained 6 h per day for 28 consecutive days, and TBXI (4 Gy) was given on the 8th day. Results showed that CRIS alone induced a marked decrease in the red blood cell (RBC) and the white blood cell (WBC) count, while TBXI caused significantly lower counts of RBCs, WBCs and blood platelets, and a lower concentration of hemoglobin regardless of CRIS. CRIS alone did not show any significant effect on erythrocyte proliferation and on induction of micronucleated erythrocytes, whereas TBXI markedly inhibited erythrocyte proliferation and induced a significant increase in the incidences of micronucleated erythrocytes, regardless of CRIS. These findings suggest that CRIS does not have a significant impact on radiation-induced detrimental effects on the hematopoietic system in Trp53wt mice. (author)

  16. Some physico-chemical characteristics of a modified histone H2b on acute radiation affection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrapunov, S.N.; Mel'nik, G.G.; Blyum, Ya.B.; Tsudzevich, B.A.; Kucherenko, N.E.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made of optical characteristics of histone H2b isolated from liver nuclei 12 h following irradiation in a dose of 0.21 C/kg. It was demonstrated that under similar conditions, the control and exposed histones H2b have different steric organization which correlates with radiation-induced modifications of lateral radicals in H2b histone molecules

  17. Treating Radiation Induced Skin Injury and Fibrosis Using Small Molecule Thiol Modifying Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    necrosis after the animals were sacrificed 1 week postop. Findings confirmed RTA-408 when delivered during radiation resulted in significant...irradiation induces extensive flap necrosis at the distal end of the skin flap 5 . In all experiments irradiation was performed using external beam...collagen deposition, vascular density, and mRNA expression of mediators of chronic inflammation and fibrosis. Figure1: A) Initial wound at

  18. Progress on the Design of the Storage Ring Vacuum System for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillwell, B.; Billett, B.; Brajuskovic, B.; Carter, J.; Kirkus, E.; Lale, M.; Lerch, J.; Noonan, J.; O' Neill, M.; Rocke, B.; Suthar, K.; Walters, D.; Wiemerslage, G.; Zientek, J.

    2017-06-20

    Recent work on the design of the storage ring vacuum system for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project (APS-U) includes: revising the vacuum system design to accommodate a new lattice with reverse bend magnets, modifying the designs of vacuum chambers in the FODO sections for more intense incident synchrotron radiation power, modifying the design of rf-shielding bellows liners for better performance and reliability, modifying photon absorber designs to make better use of available space, and integrated planning of components needed in the injection, extraction and rf cavity straight sections. An overview of progress in these areas is presented.

  19. Structural aspects of crotoxin modified by ionizing radiation; Aspectos estruturais da crotoxina modificada pela radiacao ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Karina Corleto de; Albero, Felipe Guimaraes; Zezell, Denise Maria; Spencer, Patrick Jack; Nascimento, Nanci do, E-mail: kcorleto@usp.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-03-15

    Ionizing radiation has proven to be an excellent tool for reducing the toxicity of venoms and isolated toxins, resulting in better immunogens for serum production, the only effective treatment in case of snake bites, and contributing to the welfare of serum-producing animals. Since the action of gamma radiation of venoms and toxins has not been yet fully clarified from the structural point of view, we proposed in this paper, to characterize the crotoxin, a venom protein of the species Crotalus durissus terrificus by Circular Dichroism (CD) and Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. After chromatographic techniques, crotoxin was irradiated with 2.0 kGy ({sup 60}Co source). The CD spectra obtained of native and irradiated crotoxin solutions showed changes between the samples in characteristic regions of -sheet and-helix . The Infrared analyse showed expressive changes in the spectra of the native and irradiated crotoxin (amide I band region). These tests showed that crotoxin when subjected to gamma radiation, showed changes in their structural conformation compared with the samples in the native state. Such changes probably occur in the secondary structure and may explain its neurotoxic activity loss. (author)

  20. Radiation-modified blends of the basis of polyethylene terephthalate and polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mery-Meri, R.; Revyakin, O.; Zicans, J.

    2000-01-01

    The binary composite systems on the basis of post-consumer poly-(ethylene terephthalate) and polypropylene have been investigated. Mechanical properties of the compositions were studied in detail in order to expand the application possibilities of tested binary composites. Structural changes of the poly (ethylene terephthalate) / polypropylene blends depending on the concentration of the components were investigated also. Additionally, the optimum processing conditions were established. Particular attention was paid to study the influence of the ionizing γ-radiation on the structural and mechanical properties of the composition systems tested. The magnitude of the adsorbed dose od γ-radiation was established to affect differently the structure of poly(ethylene terephalate) and polypropylene. At small absorbed doses (50 kGy) crosslinking of the polymer was observed for both poly(ethylene terephthalate) and polypropylene resulting in the increase of some mechanical properties of pure materials as well of their compositions, whereas the absorbed dose of 300 kGy caused the destruction of the tested materials. It is important to mention that the rate of radiation-chemical destruction of polypropylene is higher than poly(ethylene terephthalate) destruction rate. (author)

  1. Radiation grafting processes and properties of leathers modified with butyl acrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrucha, K.

    1982-01-01

    Conditions for radiation induced grafting with butyl acrylate dispersed in water emulsion onto chrome-tanned pig skins have been worked out for γ-rays and electron beam irradiations. The highest yield of grafting was observed at monomer concentration approximately 25% (w/w), dose equal to 25 kGy and dose rate not exceeding 10 MGy/h. At these conditions the yield of grafting attained a value approximately 25% and content of homopolymer in the leather amounted to 6%. The efficiency of monomer to polymer conversion decreases when the concentration of monomer in emulsion and dose rate increases. Yield of homopolymer is independent of the dose rate. An explanation of the observed relations has been proposed. The physical and used properties of grafted leathers were tested. Radiation processed leathers were found superior to samples finished by traditional methods. One has to point to better tolerance against chemical cleaning and reduced water take-up without loss of high permeability of water vapour, responsible for good hygienic properties of leather products. Recommendations for industrial scale radiation grafting are given. (author)

  2. Gamma radiation effects of 60 Co on Bombyx mori (Lep., Bombycidae) modifying the silk fiber production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro Junior, Francisco; Bendassolli, Jose A.

    1997-01-01

    The present work aimed to verify the biological effects of the application of different doses of gamma radiation during the fifth instar of the silkworm catepillar. Sevently eight silkworm caterpillars (Bombyx mori) were irradiated with γ 60 Co radiation at the initial period of the fifth instar. The caterpillars were divided and classified in six batches of thirteen individuals each. Treatments 1 through 5 received 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 Gy, respectively, and the control, also consisted of thirteen caterpillars, was not irradiated. The results showed a general increase in the silk fiber content in the irradiated batches compared to the control. The weight of the silk cocoons was higher with increasing doses of irradiation, from 20 to 80 Gy, respectively, followed by a decrease in weight in the treatment irradiated with 100 Gy. the results obtained in this experiment enable the conclusion that the radiation applied to the caterpillars significantly influenced the production of silk fiber in this species. (author). 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Properties of cellulose derivatives produced from radiation-Modified cellulose pulps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iller, Edward; Stupinska, Halina; Starostka, Pawel

    2007-01-01

    The aim of project was elaboration of radiation methods for properties modification of cellulose pulps using for derivatives production. The selected cellulose pulps were exposed to an electron beam with energy 10 MeV in a linear accelerator. After irradiation pulps underwent the structural and physico-chemical investigations. The laboratory test for manufacturing carboxymethylocellulose (CMC), cellulose carbamate (CC) and cellulose acetate (CA) with cellulose pulps irradiated dose 10 and 15 kGy have been performed. Irradiation of the pulp influenced its depolimerisation degree and resulted in the drop of viscosity of CMC. However, the expected level of cellulose activation expressed as a rise of the substitution degree or increase of the active substance content in the CMC sodium salt was not observed. In the case of cellulose esters (CC, CA) formation, the action of ionising radiation on cellulose pulps with the dose 10 and 15 kGy enables obtaiment of the average values of polimerisation degree as required for CC soluble in aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. The properties of derivatives prepared by means of radiation and classic methods were compared

  4. Combination of photon and proton radiation therapy for chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the skull base: the Centre de Protontherapie D'Orsay experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noeel, Georges; Habrand, Jean-Louis; Mammar, Hamid; Pontvert, Dominique; Haie-Meder, Christine; Hasboun, Dominique; Moisson, Patricia; Ferrand, Regis; Beaudre, Anne; Boisserie, Gilbert; Gaboriaud, Genevieve; Mazal, Alexandre; Kerody, Katia; Schlienger, Michel; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Prospective analysis of local tumor control, survival, and treatment complications in 44 consecutive patients treated with fractionated photon and proton radiation for a chordoma or chondrosarcoma of the skull base. Methods and Materials : Between December 1995 and December 1998, 45 patients with a median age of 55 years (14-85) were treated using a 201-MeV proton beam at the Centre de Protontherapie d'Orsay, 34 for a chordoma and 11 for a chondrosarcoma. Irradiation combined high-energy photons and protons. Photons represented two-thirds of the total dose and protons one-third. The median total dose delivered within the gross tumor volume was 67 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE) (range: 60-70). Results: With a mean follow-up of 30.5 months (range: 2-56), the 3-year local control rates for chordomas and chondrosarcomas were 83.1% and 90%, respectively, and 3-year overall survival rates were 91% and 90%, respectively. Eight patients (18%) failed locally (7 within the clinical tumor volume and 1 unknown). Four patients died of tumor and 2 others of intercurrent disease. In univariate analysis, young age at time of radiotherapy influenced local control positively (p < 0.03), but not in multivariate analysis. Only 2 patients presented Grade 3 or 4 complications. Conclusion: In skull-base chordomas and chondrosarcomas, the combination of photons with a proton boost of one-third the total dose offers an excellent chance of cure at the price of an acceptable toxicity. These results should be confirmed with a longer follow-up

  5. Comparative Investigation of Ce3+ Doped Scintillators in a Wide Range of Photon Energies Covering X-ray CT, Nuclear Medicine and Megavoltage Radiation Therapy Portal Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valais, Ioannis G.; Michail, Christos M.; David, Stratos L.; Liaparinos, Panagiotis F.; Fountos, George P.; Paschalis, Theodoros V.; Kandarakis, Ioannis S.; Panayiotakis, George S.

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the performance of scintillators currently used in PET and animal PET systems, under conditions met in radiation therapy and PET/CT imaging. The results of this study will be useful in applications where both CT and PET photons as well as megavoltage cone beam CT (MV CBCT) photons could be detected using a common detector unit. To this aim crystal samples of GSO, LSO, LYSO, LuYAP and YAP scintillators, doped with cerium (Ce+3) were examined under a wide energy range of photon energies. Evaluation was performed by determining the absolute luminescence efficiency (emitted light flux over incident X-ray exposure) in the energy range employed in X-ray CT, in Nuclear Medicine (70 keV up to 662 keV) and in radiotherapy 6 MV (approx. 2.0 MeV mean energy)-18 MV (approx. 4.5 MeV mean energy). Measurements were performed using an experimental set-up based on a photomultiplier coupled to a light integration sphere. The emission spectrum under X-ray excitation was measured, using an optical grating monochromator, to determine the spectral compatibility to optical photon detectors incorporated in medical imaging systems. Maximum absolute luminescence efficiency values were observed at 70 keV for YAP:Ce and LuYAP:Ce and at 140 keV for LSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce and GSO:Ce. Highest absolute efficiency between the scintillators examined was observed for LSO:Ce, followed by LYSO:Ce. The detector optical gain (DOG) exhibited a significant variation with the increase of energy between 70 keV to 2.0 MeV. All scintillators exhibited low compatibility when combined with GaAsP (G5645) photodetector.

  6. EURADOS intercomparisons in external radiation dosimetry: similarities and differences among exercises for whole-body photon, whole-body neutron, extremity, eye-lens and passive area dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Ana M.; Grimbergen, Tom; McWhan, Andrew; Stadtmann, Hannes; Fantuzzi, Elena; Clairand, Isabelle; Neumaier, Stefan; Dombrowski, Harald; Figel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) has been organising dosimetry intercomparisons for many years in response to an identified requirement from individual monitoring services (IMS) for independent performance tests for dosimetry systems. The participation in intercomparisons gives IMS the opportunity to show compliance with their own quality management system, compare results with other participants and develop plans for improving their dosimetry systems. In response to growing demand, EURADOS has increased the number of intercomparisons for external radiation dosimetry. Most of these fit into the programme of self-financing intercomparisons for dosemeters routinely used by IMS. This programme is being coordinated by EURADOS working group 2 (WG2). Up to now, this programme has included four intercomparisons for whole-body dosemeters in photon fields, one for extremity dosemeters in photon and beta fields, and one for whole-body dosemeters in neutron fields. Other EURADOS working groups have organised additional intercomparisons including events in 2014 for eye-lens dosemeters and passive area dosemeters for environmental monitoring. In this paper, the organisation and achievements of these intercomparisons are compared in detail focusing on the similarities and differences in their execution. (authors)

  7. Optimal calculational schemes for solving multigroup photon transport problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinin, A.A.; Kurachenko, Yu.A.

    1987-01-01

    A scheme of complex algorithm for solving multigroup equation of radiation transport is suggested. The algorithm is based on using the method of successive collisions, the method of forward scattering and the spherical harmonics method, and is realized in the FORAP program (FORTRAN, BESM-6 computer). As an example the results of calculating reactor photon transport in water are presented. The considered algorithm being modified may be used for solving neutron transport problems

  8. Phase I study of neoadjuvant accelerated short course radiation therapy with photons and capecitabine for resectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wo, Jennifer Y.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Ryan, David P.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Tseng, Yolanda D.; Napolitano, Brian N.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Swanson, Richard S.; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-del; Hong, Theodore S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this phase I study, we sought to determine the feasibility and tolerability of neoadjuvant short course radiotherapy (SC-CRT) delivered with photon RT with concurrent capecitabine for resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Materials and methods: Ten patients with localized, resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma were enrolled from December 2009 to August 2011. In dose level I, patients received 3 Gy × 10. In dose level 2, patients received 5 Gy × 5 (every other day). In dose level 3, patients received 5 Gy × 5 (consecutive days). Capecitabine was given during weeks 1 and 2. Surgery was performed 1–3 weeks after completion of chemotherapy. Results: With an intended accrual of 12 patients, the study was closed early due to unexpected intraoperative complications. Compared to the companion phase I proton study, patients treated with photons had increased intraoperative RT fibrosis reported by surgeons (27% vs. 63%). Among those undergoing a Whipple resection, increased RT fibrosis translated to an increased mean OR time of 69 min. Dosimetric comparison revealed significantly increased low dose exposure to organs at risk for patients treated with photon RT. Conclusions: This phase I experience evaluating the tolerability of neoadjuvant SC-CRT with photon RT closed early due to unexpected intraoperative complications

  9. Compton's Kinematics and Einstein - Ehrenfest's radiation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, A.V.; Franca, H.M.

    1988-09-01

    The Compton Kinematic relations are obtained from entirely classical arguments, that is, without the corpuscular concept of the photon. The calculations are nonrelativistic and result from Einstein and Ehrenfest's radiation theory modified in order to introduce the effects of the classical zero-point fileds characteristic of Stochastic Electrodynamics. (author) [pt

  10. SEM studies of the structure of the gels prepared from untreated and radiation modified potato starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cieśla, Krystyna; Sartowska, Bożena; Królak, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Potato starch was irradiated with a 60 Co gamma rays using doses of 5, 10, 20 and 30 kGy. Gels containing ca. 9.1% of starch were prepared by heating the starch suspensions in the heating chamber stabilized at 100 °C. Four procedures were applied for preparation of the samples in regard to SEM studies and the ability to observe the radiation effect by SEM was assessed for each method. Differences were observed between the SEM images recorded for the non-irradiated samples prepared using all the methods, and those irradiated. Images of the non-irradiated gels indicate generally a honey-comb structure, while smooth areas but with oriented fractures has appeared after irradiation. Modification of gel structure corresponds to the applied dose. The results were related to the process of gel formation (as observed by means of the hot stage microscope) to decrease in swelling power of the irradiated starch and to decreased viscosity of the resulting gels. It can be concluded that the differences in structural properties of gels shown by SEM result probably due to the better homogenization of the gels formed after radiation induced degradation. - Highlights: • Four procedures of the preservation of starch gels for SEM studies were applied. • The ability to observe the radiation effect by SEM was assessed for each method. • Dose dependent changes in the gel structure were discovered. • It was related to decrease in the swelling power and decreased viscosity of the gels. • A hot-stage microscope was applied in order to follow the gelatinization process

  11. On the structural-optical correlations in radiation-modified chalcogenide glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavetskyy, T; Tsmots, V [Solid State Microelectronics Laboratory, Drohobych Ivan Franko State Pedagogical University, 24 I. Franko Str., Drohobych, 82100 (Ukraine); Kaban, I; Hoyer, W [Institute of Physics, Chemnitz University of Technology, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Shpotyuk, O, E-mail: kavetskyy@yahoo.com [Institute of Materials, Scientific Research Company ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska Str., Lviv, 79031 (Ukraine)

    2011-04-01

    In this work, we report our recent results on the gamma-irradiation-induced structural transformations in the Ge-Sb-S glasses as observed from the structural studies using high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction and extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in comparison with the optical measurements using VIS/IR spectroscopy techniques. The structural-optical correlations in the radiation-induced effects are established. The structural changes upon irradiation are explained in the frames of the concept of coordination topological defects formation.

  12. On the structural-optical correlations in radiation-modified chalcogenide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavetskyy, T; Tsmots, V; Kaban, I; Hoyer, W; Shpotyuk, O

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we report our recent results on the gamma-irradiation-induced structural transformations in the Ge-Sb-S glasses as observed from the structural studies using high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction and extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in comparison with the optical measurements using VIS/IR spectroscopy techniques. The structural-optical correlations in the radiation-induced effects are established. The structural changes upon irradiation are explained in the frames of the concept of coordination topological defects formation.

  13. Mechanical properties in polypropylene-polyethylene blends modified by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, F.C.; Terence, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    One of the way to obtain a better mechanical property of polypropylene and polyethylene is related to increase the number polymer chains cross-linked by gamma radiation. After irradiation a network is formed which is the result of various chemical reactions occurred during this process, where the radicals formed are concentrated in the amorphous phase. With the objective to increase the mechanical properties of PP, blends with PE were prepared and irradiated in doses up to 100kGy, in atmospheric ambient. The tests showed increase in rigidity and a particular behaviour in Izod impact resistance. (author)

  14. Coupled radiative transfer equation and diffusion approximation model for photon migration in turbid medium with low-scattering and non-scattering regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarvainen, Tanja; Vauhkonen, Marko; Kolehmainen, Ville; Arridge, Simon R; Kaipio, Jari P

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a coupled radiative transfer equation and diffusion approximation model is extended for light propagation in turbid medium with low-scattering and non-scattering regions. The light propagation is modelled with the radiative transfer equation in sub-domains in which the assumptions of the diffusion approximation are not valid. The diffusion approximation is used elsewhere in the domain. The two equations are coupled through their boundary conditions and they are solved simultaneously using the finite element method. The streamline diffusion modification is used to avoid the ray-effect problem in the finite element solution of the radiative transfer equation. The proposed method is tested with simulations. The results of the coupled model are compared with the finite element solutions of the radiative transfer equation and the diffusion approximation and with results of Monte Carlo simulation. The results show that the coupled model can be used to describe photon migration in turbid medium with low-scattering and non-scattering regions more accurately than the conventional diffusion model

  15. Fetal dose from radiotherapy photon beams: Physical basis, techniques to estimate radiation dose outside of the treatment field, biological effects and professional considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stovell, Marilyn; Blackwell, C. Robert

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The presentation will review: 1. The physical basis of radiation dose outside of the treatment field. 2. Techniques to estimate and reduce fetal dose. 3. Clinical examples of fetal dose estimation and reduction. 4. Biological effects of fetal irradiation. 5. Professional considerations. Approximately 4000 women per year in the United States require radiotherapy during pregnancy. This report presents data and techniques that allow the medical physicist to estimate the radiation dose the fetus will receive and to reduce this dose with appropriate shielding. Out-of-beam data are presented for a variety of photon beams, including cobalt-60 gamma rays and x rays from 4 to 18 MV. Designs for simple and inexpensive to more complex and expensive types of shielding equipment are described. Clinical examples show that proper shielding can reduce the radiation dose to the fetus by 50%. In addition, a review of the biological aspects of irradiation enables estimates of the risks of lethality, growth retardation, mental retardation, malformation, sterility, cancer induction, and genetic defects to the fetus. A summary of professional considerations/recommendations is also provided as a guide for the radiation oncologist and medical physicist

  16. antimicrobial properties of some natural and synthetic fabrics modified by radiation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, R.M.A.

    2008-01-01

    natural and synthetic fabrics have been treated with different antimicrobial metal complexes under the effect of gamma radiation . in this regard, cotton, cotton/PET blend and PET were grafted with acrylic acid by gamma radiation and this grafted fabrics were complexed with Cu(ll),Ni(ll)and Co(ll) metal ions . the antimicrobial properties were evaluated by the measurement of tensile strength of fabrics after burring in a soil for one and two weeks as well as the effect of this treatment on the growth of certain bacteria and fungi incubated on a culture for 48 hours. the results showed that the highest protection to cotton, cotton/PET blend and PET fabrics by using Cu(ll) ion in the complexation process, where the order of protection by metals is Cu(ll) > Co(ll)> Ni(ll), moreover, the more grafted fabrics the more complexed fabrics with metal ions and is higher protection against microorganisms . the treatment with the metal ions has nearly no effect on the chemical and physical properties of the natural or the synthetic fabrics as indicated from the analysis by TGA, sem, ion exchange testing and wettability testing.

  17. Evaluation of domperidone as a modifier of gamma-radiation-induced emesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordts, R.E.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Hardy, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    The D2 antidopaminergic drug domperidone was evaluated, singly and in combination with synthetic adrenocorticoid and an H2 antihistamine, for its ability to reduce the acute emetic effects of 60 Co whole-body radiation. Random-source adult male dogs were fasted 12 hr, fed a standard meal, injected 44 min later, and irradiated 47 min after that. Four groups of dogs were irradiated after drug injections as follows: saline (Con), domperidone (Dom), cimetidine + thiethylperazine (Cim + Thi), and dexamethasone + domperidone + cimetidine (Dex + Dom + Cim). Drug quantities given the dogs represented 10 mg Dom, 10 mg Thi, 20 mg Dex, and 300 mg Cim for an average human (70 kg, 1.8 m2). Subjects were exposed on an up-down schedule to determine the radiation necessary to produce vomiting in 50% (ED50) of each group. Emesis onset and offset times and number of episodes were recorded. The Dom group had more emetic episodes than any other. The Dex + Dom + Cim combination significantly raised the emetic threshold while maintaining episodes at a low incidence

  18. Radiation chemical and photochemical study of Z-DNA modified by 2-aminopurine and 8- bromodeoxyguanosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, T.; Kawai, K.; Majima, T.

    2003-01-01

    DNA is able to take a number of local conformations. (CG) n repeats have the highest potential to Z-DNA which has a left-handed zig-zag backbone and unusual syn-conformation purine base. Because of the polymorphic nature of dinucleotide repeats, it seems possible that Z-DNA forming sequences may provide a source of genetic variation if they occur in regions that are important for the regulation of gene activity. Here, we investigated structural properties of Z-DNA compared with those of B-DNA with respects to one-electron attachment reaction of 8-bromodeoxyguanosine (dBrG) and fluorescence properties of 2-aminopurine (Ap). To investigate one-electron attachment reaction of Z-DNA, we synthesized oligodeoxynucleotides modified by dBrG in which syn-conformation deoxyguanosine was stabilized by steric repulsion between 8-bromo group of dBrG and sugar moiety in Z-DNA. Debromination from the dBrG modified oligodeoxynucleotides occurred from the one-electron attachment during the gamma-ray irradiation. The structural dependence of B- and Z-DNA was observed in the one-electron attachment reaction. Interestingly, the higher conversion of dBrG were observed in the Z-DNA than in the B-DNA. Since the solvent accessibility to purine base in Z-DNA increases compared with that in B-DNA, it is suggested that the electron attachment is enhanced in Z-DNA than in B-DNA. Next we studied the fluorescence properties of Ap in left-handed Z-DNA and compared with those in B-DNA. Since photoexcited adenine analogue Ap can serve as a sensitive probe of DNA structural dynamics, we synthesized Ap- and dBrG-modified oligodeoxynucleotides. Higher intensity was observed in the steady-state fluorescence of Ap in Z-DNA than in B-DNA. A new peak at 275 nm was observed in the excitation spectrum measured at the Ap emission wavelength 370 nm in Z-DNA. This has been explained by the energy transfer from the excited nucleobases to Ap. It is found that Ap is a useful fluorescence probe of Z-DNA

  19. Radiation-induced evolution of austenite matrix in silicon-modified AISI 316 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    The microstructures of a series of silicon-modified AISI 316 alloys irradiated to fast neutron fluences of about 2-3 and 10 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV at temperatures ranging from 400 0 C to 600 0 C have been examined. The irradiation of AISI 316 leads to an extensive repartition of several elements, particularly nickel and silicon, between the matrix and various precipitate phases. The segregation of nickel at void and grain boundary surfaces at the expense of other faster-diffusing elements is a clear indication that one of the mechanisms driving the microchemical evolution is the Inverse Kirkendall effect. There is evidence that at one sink this mechanism is in competition with the solute drag process associated with interstitial gradients

  20. Radiation doses from radiation sources of neutrons and photons by different computer calculation; Tecniche di calcolo di intensita` di dose da sorgenti di radiazione neutronica e fotonica con l`uso di codici basati su metodologie diverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siciliano, F.; Lippolis, G.; Bruno, S.G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, Rotondella (Italy)

    1995-11-01

    In the present paper the calculation technique aspects of dose rate from neutron and photon radiation sources are covered with reference both to the basic theoretical modeling of the MERCURE-4, XSDRNPM-S and MCNP-3A codes and from practical point of view performing safety analyses of irradiation risk of two transportation casks. The input data set of these calculations -regarding the CEN 10/200 HLW container and dry PWR spent fuel assemblies shipping cask- is frequently commented as for as connecting points of input data and understanding theoretic background are concerned.

  1. Ultraviolet-B radiation modifies the quantitative and qualitative profile of flavonoids and amino acids in grape berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lüscher, J; Torres, N; Hilbert, G; Richard, T; Sánchez-Díaz, M; Delrot, S; Aguirreolea, J; Pascual, I; Gomès, E

    2014-06-01

    Grapevine cv. Tempranillo fruit-bearing cuttings were exposed to supplemental ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation under controlled conditions, in order to study its effect on grape traits, ripening, amino acids and flavonoid profile. The plants were exposed to two doses of UV-B biologically effective (5.98 and 9.66kJm(-2)d(-1)), applied either from fruit set to ripeness or from the onset of veraison to ripeness. A 0kJm(-2)d(-1) treatment was included as a control. UV-B did not significantly modify grape berry size, but increased the relative mass of berry skin. Time to reach ripeness was not affected by UV-B, which may explain the lack of changes in technological maturity. The concentration of must extractable anthocyanins, colour density and skin flavonols were enhanced by UV-B, especially in plants exposed from fruit set. The quantitative and qualitative profile of grape skin flavonols were modified by UV-B radiation. Monosubstituted flavonols relative abundance increased proportionally to the accumulated UV-B doses. Furthermore, trisubstituted forms, which where predominant in non-exposed berries, were less abundant as UV-B exposure increased. Although total free amino acid content remained unaffected by the treatments, the increased levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), as well as the decrease in threonine, isoleucine, methionine, serine and glycine, revealed a potential influence of UV-B on the GABA-mediated signalling and amino acid metabolism. UV-B had an overall positive impact on grape berry composition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Thermomechanical and adhesive properties of radiation-modified polymer composites for thermosetting products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkis, V.; Maksimov, R.D.; Kalnins, M.; Zicans, J.; Bocoka, T.; Revjakin, O.

    2000-01-01

    The gamma-irradiated blends of polyethylene (PE) with ethylene / propylene / diene copolymer (Epdm) and thermotropic liquid crystalline polymer (LCP) are investigated. The radiation dose absorbed does not exceed 150 kGy (10 kGy=1 Mrad). It is shown that the even small amounts of LCP added to PE improve the mechanical and operational properties of composites and the thermosetting products made of them. The temperature dependences of the elastics modulus, tension diagrams at a temperature above the PE melting point, and recovery curves of the oriented specimens are presented. The kinetics of thermorelaxation and residual setting stresses upon isometric heating and cooling of the previously oriented composites is studied. The data on the influence of LCP on the adhesion interaction of the blend with steel are obtained. The features of thermomechanical and adhesive properties are discussed and the results of morphological and calorimetric tests are given. (author)

  3. Method of modifying a vinyl chloride resin by utilizing radiation cross-linking polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagiya, T; Fujimoto, T; Hosoi, F; Tsuneta, K; Atogawa, M

    1970-08-26

    The polyvinyl chloride is improved in its mechanical, thermal and chemical properties, with particular advantages gained in dimensional stability at temperatures higher than the plasticizing temperature. The process comprises irradiating a vinyl chloride resin with ionizing radiations in the presence of a vinyl acetate monomer. In this process, the irradiation of vinyl acetate effects cross-linking and the polymerization of the monomer simultaneously. The vinyl chloride resin may be a copolymer along with another monomer, a polyvinyl chloride derivative, a graft polymer of polyvinyl chloride, a mixture of vinyl chloride with another resin and a graft copolymer of vinyl chloride on another resin in any form. The addition of the vinyl acetate monomer to the vinyl chloride is not limited to any particular procedure. The vinyl acetate monomer may be added to the polyvinyl chloride in a quantity ranging from a trace to 200% by weight. The radiation dose may be 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 9/, but preferably 10/sup 3/ roentgen. In one example, 36 parts by weight of market available vinyl acetate monomer immersed in 100 parts by weight of hard vinyl tube were placed in a stainless reacting vessel. After the replacement of inner air with nitrogen, the vessel was exposed to ..gamma.. beams of 4.8 x 10 roentgen from a Co-60 source. After dipping the exposed samples in boiled tetrahydrofuran for 48 hours, the insoluble substance in the samjle was 78.9% by weight. In addition, after heating at 180/sup 0/C for 30 minutes, the sample did not show any deformation.

  4. Secondary electron radiation from different targets exposed to photons with energy 0.1 to 3 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkerman, A.F.; Botvin, V.A.; Chernov, G.Ya.

    1982-01-01

    Differential and integral yields of secondary electrons from different targets bombarded by monoenergetic photon beams are calculated using the Monte Carlo method. The results are compared to experimental data and values calculated by other authors. The discovered 20 to 30% decrease of calculated backward yields according to experimental data for heavy elements is explained by the limited applicability of Sauter's formula for the description of photoelectron angular distribution. (author)

  5. Radiation Hard Silicon Photonics Mach-Zehnder Modulator for HEP applications: all-Synopsys Sentaurus™ Pre-Irradiation Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Cammarata, Simone

    2017-01-01

    Silicon Photonics may well provide the opportunity for new levels of integration between detectors and their readout electronics. This technology is thus being evaluated at CERN in order to assess its suitability for use in particle physics experiments. In order to check the agreement with measurements and the validity of previous device simulations, a pure Synopsys Sentaurus™ simulation of an un-irradiated Mach-Zehnder silicon modulator has been carried out during the Summer Student project.

  6. arXiv Axion-photon conversion caused by dielectric interfaces: quantum field calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Ioannisian, Ara N.; Millar, Alexander J.; Raffelt, Georg G.

    2017-09-05

    Axion-photon conversion at dielectric interfaces, immersed in a near-homogeneous magnetic field, is the basis for the dielectric haloscope method to search for axion dark matter. In analogy to transition radiation, this process is possible because the photon wave function is modified by the dielectric layers ("Garibian wave function") and is no longer an eigenstate of momentum. A conventional first-order perturbative calculation of the transition probability between a quantized axion state and these distorted photon states provides the microwave production rate. It agrees with previous results based on solving the classical Maxwell equations for the combined system of axions and electromagnetic fields. We argue that in general the average photon production rate is given by our result, independently of the detailed quantum state of the axion field. Moreover, our result provides a new perspective on axion-photon conversion in dielectric haloscopes because the rate is based on an overlap integral between unpertu...

  7. Radiation Dose Reduction in CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Cervical Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection by Modifying Scout and Planning Steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, Nam Chull, E-mail: pncspine@gmail.com [Arumdaun Wooldul Spine Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Background and PurposeIn CT fluoroscopy (CTF)-guided cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI), the majority of radiation dose is contributed by the planning CT scan rather than the CTF procedure itself. We replaced the planning helical CT with a spot CTF and accordingly changed the patient posture during scout and planning scans. The aim of this study was to test whether radiation dose reduction would be achieved by this protocol modification while still maintaining technical performance.MethodsOverall, 338 consecutive procedures before (control group: n = 163) and after (study group: n = 175) instituting the above-mentioned protocol modification were analyzed retrospectively, comparing patient characteristics (age, sex, neck diameter, and level injected) and technical performance [technical success rate, dose-length product (DLP), inadvertent contrast flow incidence, number of CTF acquisitions, and procedural time] between the two groups.ResultsAll injections were technically successful at every level from C3–C4 to C7–T1 without serious complications in both groups. The median DLP of the study group (7.92 mGy·cm) was significantly reduced compared to that of the control group (39.05 mGy·cm, P < 0.001). There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the incidence of inadvertent contrast flow (20.6 vs. 17.2 %, P = 0.426), number of CTF acquisitions (median 5 vs. 4, P = 0.123), and the procedural time (median 6.62 vs. 6.90 min, P = 0.100).ConclusionsWhen conducting CTF-guided cervical TFESIs, a significant radiation dose reduction (median 79.7 % in DLP) can be achieved by modifying scout and planning steps, without compromising the technical performance.

  8. Modifiers of hemoglobin/oxygen affinity as sensitizers of tumors to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirst, D.G.; Wood, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    A powerful mechanism in the control of oxygen delivery to tissues is the allosteric modification of hemoglobin. Increased or decreased release of oxygen can be achieved by altering the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen. Several studies have shown that tumor radiosensitivity is dependent on this relationship. The authors studied affinity changes produced in two distinctly different ways. Tumor bearing mice were given isovolemic exchange blood transfusions with the blood from donor mice which had been exposed to abnormal oxygen tensions, leading to increased or slightly decreased levels of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3 DPG) in their blood. When the recipient mice were irradiated, those receiving the blood with higher 2,3 DPG levels showed greater tumor sensitivity to radiation. An alternative strategy is the use of drugs which directly alter hemoglobin/oxygen affinity. The authors studied three antihyperlipoproteinemia drugs, all of which have produced markedly reduced affinities in vivo. Preliminary data indicate that the radiosensitization produced by at least one of these compounds is less than would have been expected from the 2,3 DPG experiments

  9. The relationship between cellular adhesion and surface roughness in polystyrene modified by microwave plasma radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biazar E

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Esmaeil Biazar1, Majid Heidari2, Azadeh Asefnezhad2, Naser Montazeri11Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Tonekabon Branch, Mazandaran; 2Department of Biomaterial Engineering, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, IranBackground: Surface modification of medical polymers can improve biocompatibility. Pure polystyrene is hydrophobic and cannot provide a suitable environment for cell cultures. The conventional method for surface modification of polystyrene is treatment with plasma. In this study, conventional polystyrene was exposed to microwave plasma treatment with oxygen and argon gases for 30, 60, and 180 seconds.Methods and results: Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectra investigations of irradiated samples indicated clearly the presence of functional groups. Atomic force microscopic images of samples irradiated with inert and active gases indicated nanometric surface topography. Samples irradiated with oxygen plasma showed more roughness (31 nm compared with those irradiated with inert plasma (16 nm at 180 seconds. Surface roughness increased with increasing duration of exposure, which could be due to reduction of the contact angle of samples irradiated with oxygen plasma. Contact angle analysis showed reduction in samples irradiated with inert plasma. Samples irradiated with oxygen plasma showed a lower contact angle compared with those irradiated by argon plasma.Conclusion: Cellular investigations with unrestricted somatic stem cells showed better adhesion, cell growth, and proliferation for samples radiated by oxygen plasma with increasing duration of exposure than those of normal samples.Keywords: surface topography, polystyrene, plasma treatment, argon, oxygen

  10. Azidothymidine (AZT) as a potential modifier of radiation response in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copaceanu, M.L.; Coucke, P.A.; Cottin, E.; Paschoud, N.; Mirimanoff, R.O.

    1995-01-01

    The potential effect of AZT as a thymidine analogue on radiation response in vitro was investigated. Two human cell lines (WiDr and HeLa) were used. The effect of 10 μM AZT on exponentially growing cells was studied after different exposure times (24, 48 and 72 h). The surviving fraction (clonogenic assay) or metabolic activity (MTT assay) after irradiation of AZT-exposed cells, was compared to unexposed irradiated controls. Flow cytometry was used to assess the cell-cycle effect of pre-exposure of exponentially growing cells to AZT. AZT had a radioprotective effect for all experimental time points as far as WiDr was concerned. For HeLa the effect was signicifant at 24 h. Cell-cylce analysis showed a significant accumulation in S-phase at 72 h for WiDr. For HeLa there was a significant accumulation in S-phase at 48 h. We conclude that under the reported experimental conditions, AZT as a thymidine analogue seems to reduce the cytotoxic effect of irradiation. (orig.)

  11. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-01-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter ∼200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  12. CONFERENCE: Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Despite being difficult to observe, photon-photon collisions have opened up a range of physics difficult, or even impossible, to access by other methods. The progress which has been made in this field was evident at the fifth international workshop on photon-photon collisions, held in Aachen from 13-16 April and attended by some 120 physicists

  13. Radiation hardness tests and characterization of the CLARO-CMOS, a low power and fast single-photon counting ASIC in 0.35 micron CMOS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, M.; Andreotti, M.; Baldini, W.; Calabrese, R.; Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Giachero, A.; Gotti, C.; Luppi, E.; Maino, M.; Malaguti, R.; Pessina, G.; Tomassetti, L.

    2014-01-01

    The CLARO-CMOS is a prototype ASIC that allows fast photon counting with 5 ns peaking time, a recovery time to baseline smaller than 25 ns, and a power consumption of less than 1 mW per channel. This chip is capable of single-photon counting with multi-anode photomultipliers and finds applications also in the read-out of silicon photomultipliers and microchannel plates. The prototype is realized in AMS 0.35 micron CMOS technology. In the LHCb RICH environment, assuming 10 years of operation at the nominal luminosity expected after the upgrade in Long Shutdown 2 (LS2), the ASIC must withstand a total fluence of about 6×10 12 1 MeV n eq /cm 2 and a total ionizing dose of 400 krad. A systematic evaluation of the radiation effects on the CLARO-CMOS performance is therefore crucial to ensure long term stability of the electronics front-end. The results of multi-step irradiation tests with neutrons and X-rays up to the fluence of 10 14 cm −2 and a dose of 4 Mrad, respectively, are presented, including measurement of single event effects during irradiation and chip performance evaluation before and after each irradiation step. - Highlights: • CLARO chip capable of single-photon counting with 5 ns peaking time. • Chip irradiated up to very high neutron, proton and X-rays fluences, as expected for upgraded LHCb RICH detectors. • No significant performance degradation is observed after irradiation

  14. Photon beam position monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.; Shu, Deming

    1995-01-01

    A photon beam position monitor for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade "shadowing". Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation.

  15. A new XUV optical end-station to characterize compact and flexible photonic devices using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelli, A.; Mazuritskiy, M. I.; Dabagov, S. B.; Hampai, D.; Lerer, A. M.; Izotova, E. A.; D'Elia, A.; Turchini, S.; Zema, N.; Zuccaro, F.; de Simone, M.; Javad Rezvani, S.; Coreno, M.

    2018-03-01

    In this contribution we present the new experimental end-station to characterize XUV diffractive optics, such as Micro Channel Plates (MCPs) and other polycapillary optics, presently under commission at the Elettra synchrotron radiation laboratory (Trieste, Italy). To show the opportunities offered by these new optical devices for 3rd and 4th generation radiation sources, in this work we present also some patterns collected at different energies of the primary XUV radiation transmitted by MCP optical devices working in the normal incidence geometry.

  16. The relationship between cellular adhesion and surface roughness for polyurethane modified by microwave plasma radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidari S

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Saeed Heidari Keshel1, S Neda Kh Azhdadi2, Azadeh Asefnezhad2, Mohammad Sadraeian3, Mohamad Montazeri4, Esmaeil Biazar51Stem Cell Preparation Unit, Eye Research Center, Farabi Eye Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences; 2Department of Biomaterial Engineering, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch - Islamic Azad University; 3Young Researchers Club, Islamic Azad University, North Tehran Branch, Tehran; 4Faculty of Medical Sciences, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol; 5Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Tonekabon, IranAbstract: Surface modification of medical polymers is carried out to improve biocompatibility. In this study, conventional polyurethane was exposed to microwave plasma treatment with oxygen and argon gases for 30 seconds and 60 seconds. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectra investigations of irradiated samples indicated the presence of functional groups. Atomic force microscope images of samples irradiated with inert and active gases indicated the nanometric topography of the sample surfaces. Samples irradiated by oxygen plasma indicated high roughness compared with those irradiated by inert plasma for the different lengths of time. In addition, surface roughness increased with time, which can be due to a reduction of contact angle of samples irradiated by oxygen plasma. Contact angle analysis indicated a reduction in samples irradiated with both types of plasma. However, samples irradiated with oxygen plasma indicated lower contact angle compared with those irradiated by argon plasma. Cellular investigations with unrestricted somatic stem cells showed better adhesion, cell growth, and proliferation among samples radiated by oxygen plasma for longer than for normal samples.Keywords: surface topography, polyurethane, plasma treatment, cellular investigation

  17. CdTe Timepix detectors for single-photon spectroscopy and linear polarimetry of high-flux hard x-ray radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, C; Weber, G; Märtin, R; Höfer, S; Kämpfer, T; Stöhlker, Th

    2016-04-01

    Single-photon spectroscopy of pulsed, high-intensity sources of hard X-rays - such as laser-generated plasmas - is often hampered by the pileup of several photons absorbed by the unsegmented, large-volume sensors routinely used for the detection of high-energy radiation. Detectors based on the Timepix chip, with a segmentation pitch of 55 μm and the possibility to be equipped with high-Z sensor chips, constitute an attractive alternative to commonly used passive solutions such as image plates. In this report, we present energy calibration and characterization measurements of such devices. The achievable energy resolution is comparable to that of scintillators for γ spectroscopy. Moreover, we also introduce a simple two-detector Compton polarimeter setup with a polarimeter quality of (98 ± 1)%. Finally, a proof-of-principle polarimetry experiment is discussed, where we studied the linear polarization of bremsstrahlung emitted by a laser-driven plasma and found an indication of the X-ray polarization direction depending on the polarization state of the incident laser pulse.

  18. Frequency-selective near-field radiative heat transfer between photonic crystal slabs: a computational approach for arbitrary geometries and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Ilic, Ognjen; Bermel, Peter; Celanovic, Ivan; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin; Johnson, Steven G

    2011-09-09

    We demonstrate the possibility of achieving enhanced frequency-selective near-field radiative heat transfer between patterned (photonic-crystal) slabs at designable frequencies and separations, exploiting a general numerical approach for computing heat transfer in arbitrary geometries and materials based on the finite-difference time-domain method. Our simulations reveal a tradeoff between selectivity and near-field enhancement as the slab-slab separation decreases, with the patterned heat transfer eventually reducing to the unpatterned result multiplied by a fill factor (described by a standard proximity approximation). We also find that heat transfer can be further enhanced at selective frequencies when the slabs are brought into a glide-symmetric configuration, a consequence of the degeneracies associated with the nonsymmorphic symmetry group.

  19. R&D studies of a RICH detector using pressurized C$_{4}$F$_{8}$O radiator gas and a CsI-based gaseous photon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Agócs, A.G; Barnaföldi, G.G; Bellwied, R; Bencédi, G; Bencze, G; Berényi, D; Boldizsár, L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chinellato, D.D; Cindolo, F; Das-Bose, L; Das, D; Das, K; De Cataldo, G; Di Bari, D; Di Mauro, A; Futó, E; Garcia, E; Hamar, G; Harton, A; Jimenez, R.T; Kim, D.W; Kim, J.S; Knospe, A; Kovacs, L; Lévai, P; Markert, C; Martinengo, P; Molnar, L; Nappi, E; Olah, L; Paic, G; Pastore, C; Patino, M.E; Peskov, V; Pinsky, L; Piuz, F; Pochybova, S; Sgura, I; Sinha, T; Song, J; Timmins, A; Van Beelen, J.B; Varga, D; Volpe, G; Weber, M; Xaplanteris, L; Yi, J; Yoo, I.-K

    2013-01-01

    We report on studies of layout and performance of a new Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector using for the fi rst time pressurized C 4 F 8 O radiator gas and a photon detector consisting of a MWPC equipped with a CsI photocathode. In particular, we present here the results of beam tests of a MWPC having an adjustable anode – cathode gap, aiming at the optimization of single photoelectron detection and Cherenkov angle resolution. This system was proposed as a Very High Momentum Particle Identi fi cation (VHMPID) upgrade for the ALICE experiment at LHC to provide charged hadron track-by-track identi fi cation in the momentum range 5 – 25 GeV/c.

  20. Measurable position-sensitive wide-angle interference effects of single photons radiated by a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandor Varro

    2014-01-01

    Single-photon wide-angle interference phenomena have been studied theoretically for glass-diamond-oil (air) layered structures. As a single optical radiator, one NV-center has been assumed close to the upper surface of a diamond plate, and it was represented by a Hertzian dipole of arbitrary orientation. It has been shown that the far-field interference pattern (of 3/5 or 100% visibility) is sensitive to the vertical position of the NV-center, to that extent that ∼2 nm difference in distance from the upper surface of the diamond results in ∼0.01 degree shift of the pattern, which should be a measurable effect. (author)

  1. Study of radiative leptonic events with hard photons and search for excited charged leptons at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Pindo, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solokov, A; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1996-01-01

    During the last 1995 data acquisition period at LEP, the DELPHI experiment collected an integrated luminosity of $5.9$ pb$^{-1}$ at centre-of-mass energies of 130 GeV and 136 GeV. Radiative leptonic events ($e, \\mu, \\tau$) with high energy photons were studied and compared to Standard Model predictions. The data were used to search for charged excited leptons decaying through an electromagnetic transition. No significant signal was found. From the search for pair produced excited leptons, the limits $m_{e^*} > 62.5$ GeV/$c^2$, $m_{\\mu^*} > 62.6$ GeV/$c^2$ and $m_{\\tau^*} > 62.2$ GeV/$c^2$ at 95\\% confidence level were established. For single excited lepton production, upper limits on the ratio $\\lambda/m_{\\ell^*}$ of the coupling of the excited charged lepton to its mass were derived.

  2. Estimated radiation pneumonitis risk after photon versus proton therapy alone or combined with chemotherapy for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Westerly, David C; Aznar, Marianne Camille

    2011-01-01

    Background. Traditionally, radiation therapy plans are optimized without consideration of chemotherapy. Here, we model the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in the presence of a possible interaction between chemotherapy and radiation dose distribution. Material and methods. Three alternative......-radiation combinations could be an interesting indication for selecting patients for proton therapy. It is likely that the IMRT plans would perform better if the CERD was accounted for during optimization, but more clinical data is required to facilitate evidence-based plan optimization in the multi-modality setting....... treatment plans are compared in 18 non-small cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy; the tomotherapy plan, an intensity modulated proton therapy plan (IMPT) and a three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan. All plans are optimized without consideration...

  3. Measurement of the radiative width of the A/sub 2/(1320) in two-photon interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althoff, M; Braunschweig, W; Gerhards, R; Kirschfink, F J; Martyn, H U; Rosskamp, P; Wallraff, W; Bock, B; Eisenmann, J; Fischer, H M

    1986-04-01

    The reaction e/sup +/e/sup -/->e/sup +/e/sup -/A/sub 2/(1320) has been observed by detecting the decay A/sub 2/->..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup 0/. The two-photon width of the A/sub 2/ has been measured to be GAMMA(A/sub 2/->..gamma gamma..) = (0.90 +- 0.27 (stat.) +- 0.16 (syst.)) keV. The cross section sigma(..gamma gamma..->..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup 0/) has been determined outside the A/sub 2/ resonance region.

  4. Measurement of the radiative width of the A/sub 2/(1320) in two-photon interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althoff, M; Braunschweig, W; Gerhards, R; Kirschfink, F J; Martyn, H U; Rosskamp, P; Wallraff, W; Bock, B; Eisenmann, J; Fischer, H M

    1986-08-01

    The reaction e/sup +/e/sup -/->e/sup +/e/sup -/A/sub 2/(1320) has been observed by detecting the decay A/sub 2/->..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup 0/. The two-photon width of the A/sub 2/ has been measured to be GAMMA(A/sub 2/->..gamma gamma..)=(0.90 +- 0.27(stat) +- 0.16(syst)) keV. The cross section sigma(..gamma gamma..->..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup 0/) has been determined outside the A/sub 2/ resonance region.

  5. Minority carrier lifetime in mid-wavelength infrared InAs/InAsSb superlattices: Photon recycling and the role of radiative and Shockley-Read-Hall recombination mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Höglund, L.; Ting, D. Z.; Soibel, A.; Fisher, A.; Khoshakhlagh, A.; Hill, C. J.; Keo, S.; Gunapala, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of radiative recombination on the minority carrier lifetime in mid-wavelength InAs/InAsSb superlattices was investigated. From the lifetime's dependence on temperature, photon recycling, and carrier concentration, it was demonstrated that radiative lifetime dominates for carrier concentrations >5 × 10 14  cm −3 , and Shockley-Read-Hall recombination starts to dominate the minority carrier lifetime for carrier concentrations <5 × 10 14  cm −3 . An observed increase of the minority carrier lifetime with increasing superlattice thickness was attributed to photon recycling, and good agreement between measured and theoretical values of the photon recycling factor was obtained

  6. Two photon absorption energy transfer in the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) modified with organic boron dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Rui; Feng, Jiao; Wang, Shuangqing; Li, Shayu; Yang, Chunhong; Yang, Guoqiang

    2014-07-01

    The plant light-harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHC-II) play important roles in collecting solar energy and transferring the energy to the reaction centers of photosystems I and II. A two photon absorption compound, 4-(bromomethyl)-N-(4-(dimesitylboryl)phenyl)-N-phenylaniline (DMDP-CH2Br), was synthesized and covalently linked to the LHC-II in formation of a LHC-II-dye complex, which still maintained the biological activity of LHC-II system. Under irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses at 754 nm, the LHC-II-dye complex can absorb two photons of the laser light effectively compared with the wild type LHC-II. The absorbed excitation energy is then transferred to chlorophyll a with an obvious fluorescence enhancement. The results may be interesting and give potentials for developing hybrid photosystems.

  7. Designing of Metallic Photonic Structures and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong-Sung Kim

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis our main interest has been to investigate metallic photonic crystal and its applications. We explained how to solve a periodic photonic structure with transfer matrix method and when and how to use modal expansion method. Two different coating methods were introduced, modifying a photonic structure's intrinsic optical properties and rigorous calculation results are presented. Two applications of metallic photonic structures are introduced. For thermal emitter, we showed how to design and find optimal structure. For conversion efficiency increasing filter, we calculated its efficiency and the way to design it. We presented the relation between emitting light spectrum and absorption and showed the material and structural dependency of the absorption spectrum. By choosing a proper base material and structural parameters, we can design a selective emitter at a certain region we are interested in. We have developed a theoretical model to analyze a blackbody filament enclosed by a metallic mesh which can increase the efficiency of converting a blackbody radiation to visible light. With this model we found that a square lattice metallic mesh enclosing a filament might increase the efficiency of incandescent lighting sources. Filling fraction and thickness dependency were examined and presented. Combining these two parameters is essential to achieve the maximum output result

  8. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Morgan C.

    2000-01-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V and V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second, the ability to

  9. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Morgan C. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V&V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second

  10. Atoms, radiation, and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes basic atomic and nuclear structure, the physical processes that result in the emission of ionizing radiations, and external and internal radiation protection criteria, standards, and practices from the standpoint of their underlying physical and biological basis. The sources and properties of ionizing radiation-charged particles, photons, and neutrons-and their interactions with matter are discussed in detail. The underlying physical principles of radiation detection and systems for radiation dosimetry are presented. Topics considered include atomic physics and radiation; atomic structure and radiation; the nucleus and nuclear radiation; interaction of heavy charged particles with matter; interaction of beta particles with matter; phenomena associated with charged-particle tracks; interaction of photons with matter; neutrons, fission and criticality; methods of radiation detection; radiation dosimetry; chemical and biological effects of radiation; radiation protection criteria and standards; external radiation protection; and internal dosimetry and radiation protection

  11. Numerical simulations of a coupled radiative?conductive heat transfer model using a modified Monte Carlo method

    KAUST Repository

    Kovtanyuk, Andrey E.; Botkin, Nikolai D.; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Radiative-conductive heat transfer in a medium bounded by two reflecting and radiating plane surfaces is considered. This process is described by a nonlinear system of two differential equations: an equation of the radiative heat transfer

  12. REVIEW: Optics of globular photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, V. S.

    2007-05-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter ~200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported.

  13. Photonic-crystal fibers gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Muse Haider

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we proposed to use of a photonic crystal fiber with an inner hollow defect. The use of such fibers is not affected by a material medium on the propagation of optical radiation. Photonic crystal fibers present special properties and capabilities that lead to an outstanding potential for sensing applications

  14. Photonic Free-Electron Lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Denis, T.; Lee, J.H.H.; van Dijk, M.W.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2012-01-01

    A photonic free-electron laser (pFEL) produces coherent Cerenkov radiation from a set of parallel electron beams streaming through a photonic crystal. The function of the crystal is to slow down the phase velocity of a copropagating electromagnetic wave, such that also mildly relativistic electrons

  15. Polychromatic photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Ole

    2002-01-01

    train quantum electrodynamics. A brief description of particle (photon) position operators is given, and it is shown that photons usually are only algebraically confined in an emission process. Finally, it is demonstrated that the profile of the birth domain of a radio-frequency photon emitted...

  16. Decision diagram for neutron and photon dose estimation and for classification of persons involved in radiation accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The relation is described between monitoring and health care measures taken during a radiation accident. The decision-making chart for the assessment of exposure and the classification of people involved are presented, the risks of the respective decision-making are discussed and the flow charts and explanations for the diagrams are given. (H.S.)

  17. Radiobiological risk estimates of adverse events and secondary cancer for proton and photon radiation therapy of pediatric medulloblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodin, N Patrik; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per Martin; Aznar, Marianne C

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this model study was to estimate and compare the risk of radiation-induced adverse late effects in pediatric patients with medulloblastoma (MB) treated with either three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT), inversely-optimized arc therapy (RapidArc(®) (RA)) or spot...

  18. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  19. Evaluation of individual dosimetry in mixed neutron and photon radiation fields (EVIDOS). Part II: conclusions and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuhmacher, H.; Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Reginatto, M.; Bartlett, D.; Tanner, R.; Bolognese-Milsztajn, T.; Lacoste, V.; Boschung, M.; Fiechtner, A.; Coeck, M.; Vanhavere, F.; Curzio, G.; Errico d', F.; Kylloenen, J.-E.; Lindborg, L.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The EVIDOS project, supported by the European Commission within the 5th Framework Programme, aims at evaluating state of the art dosimetry techniques in representative work-places of the nuclear industry. Seven European institutes with recognized expertise in radiation protection instruments and methods joined efforts with end users at nuclear power plants, at fuel processing and reprocessing plants, and at transport and storage facilities. A particular task of the project was to develop methods to characterize the neutron component of mixed radiation fields at workplaces and to derive reference values of radiation protection quantities from energy and direction distributions of the neutron fluence. While other presentations at this workshop describe the methods developed and the instruments used, this presentation will summarize the main results, draw conclusions and discuss recommendations relevant to routine monitoring. The final results from the project include a catalogue with spectra and dosimetric data for 14 different workplace fields (boiling water reactor, pressurized water reactor, research reactor, fuel processing, storage of spent fuel), instruments and procedures to derive reference values for personal dose equivalent and other radiation protection quantities, and novel personal dosemeters for mixed radiation and results on their dosimetric and technical performance. A number of questions will be addressed in the presentation, including: which methods allow to determine H*(10) and H p (10) in complex mixed n/γ radiation fields with acceptable uncertainty?; what is the influence of the energy and direction distributions of neutrons on the ratios between H*(10), H p (10) and E?; how much do the readings of area monitors deviate from H*(10) and do they give conservative estimates of H p (10) and E?; how much do the readings of personal dosemeters deviate from H p (10) and do they give conservative estimates of E?; do new active (electronic

  20. Differences in Normal Tissue Response in the Esophagus Between Proton and Photon Radiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using In Vivo Imaging Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielski, Joshua S; Yang, Jinzhong; Mohan, Radhe; Titt, Uwe; Mirkovic, Dragan; Stingo, Francesco; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel R; Martel, Mary K; Briere, Tina M; Court, Laurence E

    2017-11-15

    To determine whether there exists any significant difference in normal tissue toxicity between intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton therapy for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. A total of 134 study patients (n=49 treated with proton therapy, n=85 with IMRT) treated in a randomized trial had a previously validated esophageal toxicity imaging biomarker, esophageal expansion, quantified during radiation therapy, as well as esophagitis grade (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0), on a weekly basis during treatment. Differences between the 2 modalities were statically analyzed using the imaging biomarker metric value (Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance), as well as the incidence and severity of esophagitis grade (χ 2 and Fisher exact tests, respectively). The dose-response of the imaging biomarker was also compared between modalities using esophageal equivalent uniform dose, as well as delivered dose to an isotropic esophageal subvolume. No statistically significant difference in the distribution of esophagitis grade, the incidence of grade ≥3 esophagitis (15 and 11 patients treated with IMRT and proton therapy, respectively), or the esophageal expansion imaging biomarker between cohorts (P>.05) was found. The distribution of imaging biomarker metric values had similar distributions between treatment arms, despite a slightly higher dose volume in the proton arm (P>.05). Imaging biomarker dose-response was similar between modalities for dose quantified as esophageal equivalent uniform dose and delivered esophageal subvolume dose. Regardless of treatment modality, there was high variability in imaging biomarker response, as well as esophagitis grade, for similar esophageal doses between patients. There was no significant difference in esophageal toxicity from either proton- or photon-based radiation therapy as quantified by esophagitis grade or the esophageal expansion imaging biomarker. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  1. Quantification of ultraviolet photon emission from interaction of charged particles in materials of interest in radiation biology research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal, E-mail: ahmadsb@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan); McNeill, Fiona E., E-mail: fmcneill@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Prestwich, William V., E-mail: prestwic@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Byun, Soo Hyun, E-mail: soohyun@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Seymour, Colin, E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Mothersill, Carmel E., E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    In radiation biology experiments often cells are irradiated using charged particles with the intention that only a specified number of cells are hit by the primary ion track. However, in doing so several other materials such as the cell container and the growth media etc. are also irradiated, and UV radiation emitted from these materials can potentially interact with the cells. We have hypothesized that some “bystander effects” that are thought to be chemically mediated, may be, in fact, a physical effect, where UV is interacting with non-targeted cells. Based upon our hypothesis we quantified the emission of UV from Polypropylene, Mylar, Teflon, and Cellophane which are all commonly used materials in radiation biology experiments. Additionally we measured the NIST standard materials of Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves as these powdered materials are derived from living cells. Protons accelerated up to an energy of 2.2 MeV, in a 3 MV Van de Graff accelerator, were used for irradiation. Beam current was kept to 10 nA, which corresponds to a proton fluence rate of 2.7 × 10{sup 10} protons mm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. All the materials were found to emit light at UV frequencies and intensities that were significant enough to conduct a further investigation for their biological consequences. Mylar and polypropylene are commonly used in radiation induced bystander effect studies and are considered to be non-fluorescent. However our study showed that this is not the case. Significant luminescence observed from the irradiated NIST standard reference materials for Oyster tissue and Citrus leaves verified that the luminescence emission is not restricted only to the polymeric materials that are used to contain cells. It can also occur from ion interactions within the cells as well.

  2. Reconfigurable topological photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaev, Mikhail I.; Desnavi, Sameerah; Walasik, Wiktor; Litchinitser, Natalia M.

    2018-02-01

    Topological insulators are materials that conduct on the surface and insulate in their interior due to non-trivial topology of the band structure. The edge states on the interface between topological (non-trivial) and conventional (trivial) insulators are topologically protected from scattering due to structural defects and disorders. Recently, it was shown that photonic crystals (PCs) can serve as a platform for realizing a scatter-free propagation of light waves. In conventional PCs, imperfections, structural disorders, and surface roughness lead to significant losses. The breakthrough in overcoming these problems is likely to come from the synergy of the topological PCs and silicon-based photonics technology that enables high integration density, lossless propagation, and immunity to fabrication imperfections. For many applications, reconfigurability and capability to control the propagation of these non-trivial photonic edge states is essential. One way to facilitate such dynamic control is to use liquid crystals (LCs), which allow to modify the refractive index with external electric field. Here, we demonstrate dynamic control of topological edge states by modifying the refractive index of a LC background medium. Background index is changed depending on the orientation of a LC, while preserving the topology of the system. This results in a change of the spectral position of the photonic bandgap and the topological edge states. The proposed concept might be implemented using conventional semiconductor technology, and can be used for robust energy transport in integrated photonic devices, all-optical circuity, and optical communication systems.

  3. Lowering Whole-Body Radiation Doses in Pediatric Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Through the Use of Unflattened Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashmore, Jason; Ramtohul, Mark; Ford, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been linked with an increased risk of secondary cancer induction due to the extra leakage radiation associated with delivery of these techniques. Removal of the flattening filter offers a simple way of reducing head leakage, and it may be possible to generate equivalent IMRT plans and to deliver these on a standard linear accelerator operating in unflattened mode. Methods and Materials: An Elekta Precise linear accelerator has been commissioned to operate in both conventional and unflattened modes (energy matched at 6 MV) and a direct comparison made between the treatment planning and delivery of pediatric intracranial treatments using both approaches. These plans have been evaluated and delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: Plans generated in unflattened mode are clinically identical to those for conventional IMRT but can be delivered with greatly reduced leakage radiation. Measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom at clinically relevant positions including the thyroid, lung, ovaries, and testes show an average reduction in peripheral doses of 23.7%, 29.9%, 64.9%, and 70.0%, respectively, for identical plan delivery compared to conventional IMRT. Conclusions: IMRT delivery in unflattened mode removes an unwanted and unnecessary source of scatter from the treatment head and lowers leakage doses by up to 70%, thereby reducing the risk of radiation-induced second cancers. Removal of the flattening filter is recommended for IMRT treatments.

  4. Dirac tensor with heavy photon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bytev, V.V.; Kuraev, E.A. [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation). Bogoliubov Lab. of Theoretical Physics; Scherbakova, E.S. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 1. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2012-01-15

    For the large-angles hard photon emission by initial leptons in process of high energy annihilation of e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} to hadrons the Dirac tensor is obtained, taking into account the lowest order radiative corrections. The case of large-angles emission of two hard photons by initial leptons is considered. This result is being completed by the kinematics case of collinear hard photons emission as well as soft virtual and real photons and can be used for construction of Monte-Carlo generators. (orig.)

  5. Formation and accumulation of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in modified lithium orthosilicate pebbles with additions of titanium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarins, Arturs, E-mail: arturs.zarins@lu.lv [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); University of Latvia, Faculty of Chemistry, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); Valtenbergs, Oskars [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); University of Latvia, Faculty of Chemistry, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); Kizane, Gunta; Supe, Arnis [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); Knitter, Regina; Kolb, Matthias H.H.; Leys, Oliver [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-KWT), 76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Baumane, Larisa [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); Latvian Institute of Organic Synthesis, Aizkraukles Street 21, LV-1006, Riga (Latvia); Conka, Davis [University of Latvia, Institute of Chemical Physics, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia); University of Latvia, Faculty of Chemistry, Jelgavas Street 1, LV-1004, Riga (Latvia)

    2016-03-15

    Lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) pebbles with 2.5 wt.% excess of silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) are the European Union's designated reference tritium breeding ceramics for the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Module (TBM). However, the latest irradiation experiments showed that the reference Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles may crack and form fragments under operation conditions as expected in the HCPB TBM. Therefore, it has been suggested to change the chemical composition of the reference Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles and to add titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), to obtain lithium metatitanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) as a second phase. The aim of this research was to investigate the formation and accumulation of radiation-induced defects (RD) and radiolysis products (RP) in the modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with different contents of TiO{sub 2} for the first time, in order to estimate and compare radiation stability. The reference and the modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles were irradiated with accelerated electrons (E = 5 MeV) up to 5000 MGy absorbed dose at 300–990 K in a dry argon atmosphere. By using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy it was determined that in the modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles, several paramagnetic RD and RP are formed and accumulated, like, E' centres (SiO{sub 3}{sup 3−}/TiO{sub 3}{sup 3−}), HC{sub 2} centres (SiO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/TiO{sub 3}{sup −}) etc. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that the modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with TiO{sub 2} additions have comparable radiation stability with the reference pebbles. - Highlights: • Formation of RD and RP in modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with additions of TiO{sub 2} is analysed for the first time. • Due to additions of TiO{sub 2}, concentration of paramagnetic RD slightly increased in modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles. • Modified Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles have good radiation stability compared to

  6. SU-F-T-661: Dependence of Gold Nano Particles Cluster Morphology On Dose Enhancement of Photon Radiation Therapy Apply for Radiation Biology Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, S [Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University (Korea, Republic of); Chung, K; Han, Y; Park, H [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine radiation oncology (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Injected gold nano particles (GNPs) to a body for dose enhancement are known to form in the tumorcell cluster morphology. We investigated the dependence of dose enhancement on the morphology characteristic with an approximated morphology model by using Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: For MC simulation, TOPAS version 2.0P-03 was used. GNP cluster morphology was approximated as a body center cubic(BCC) model by placing 8 GNPs at the corner and one at the center of cube with length from 2.59 µm to 0.25 µm located in a 4 µm length water filled cube phantom. 4 µm length square shaped beams of poly-energetic 50, 260 kVp photons were irradiated to the water filled cube phantom with 100 nm diameter GNPs in it. Dose enhancement ratio(DER) was computed as a function of distance from the surface of the GNP at the cube center for 18 cubes geometries. For scoring particles, 10 nm width of concentric shell shaped detector was constructed up to 100 nm from the center. Total dose in a sphere of 100 nm radius of detector were normalized to 2.59 µm length cube morphology. To verified biological effect of BCC model applied to cell survival curve fitting. Results: DER increase as the distance of the GNPs reduces. DER was largest for 0.25 µm length cube. Dependence of GNP distance DER increment was 1.73, 1.60 for 50 kVp, 260 kVp photons, respectively. Also, Using BCC model applied to cell survival curve was well prediction. Conclusion: DER with GNPs was larger when they are closely packed in the phantom. Therefore, better therapeutic effects can be expected with close-packed GNPs. This research was supported by the NRF funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (2012M3A9B6055201 and 2012R1A1A2042414), Samsung Medical Center grant[GFO1130081].

  7. Einstein-Ehrenfest's radiation theory and Compton-Debye's kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, A.V.; Franca, H.M.

    1990-01-01

    Einstein and Ehrenfest's radiation theory is modified in order to introduce the efeects of random zero-point fields, characteristics of classical stochastic electrodynamics. As a result, the Compton and Debye's kinematic relations are obtained within the realm of a completely undulatory theory, that is, without having to consider the corpuscular character of the photon. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  8. Photon-Electron Interaction and Condense Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss beams of charged particles and radiation from multiple perspectives. These include fundamental acceleration and radiation mechanisms, underlying electron-photon interaction, various classical and quantum phase-space concepts and fluctuational interpretations

  9. Corrosion product behaviour in the Loviisa nuclear power plant primary coolant: measures taken to lower radiation levels by modified shutdown procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaernstroem, R.T.

    1983-01-01

    The primary circuit chemistry of the Loviisa nuclear power plant differs in some respects from the concepts commonly used in PWRs. In general, Loviisa 1, which is now in its sixth cycle, and Loviisa 2, which is in its second refuelling and maintenance shutdown (October 1982), are very clean compared with several other PWRs and it seems to be possible to keep the radiation levels low and even reduce them by using correct chemistry during operation; the shutdown conditions seem to have great influence on this matter. These modified shutdown conditions and their influence on radiation levels, dose rates and radwaste buildup are discussed. (author)

  10. Testing different brain metastasis grading systems in stereotactic radiosurgery: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group's RPA, SIR, BSBM, GPA, and modified RPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serizawa, Toru; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Nagano, Osamu; Hirai, Tatsuo; Ono, Junichi; Saeki, Naokatsu; Miyakawa, Akifumi

    2012-12-01

    The authors conducted validity testing of the 5 major reported indices for radiosurgically treated brain metastases- the original Radiation Therapy Oncology Group's Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA), the Score Index for Radiosurgery in Brain Metastases (SIR), the Basic Score for Brain Metastases (BSBM), the Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA), and the subclassification of RPA Class II proposed by Yamamoto-in nearly 2500 cases treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS), focusing on the preservation of neurological function as well as the traditional endpoint of overall survival. The authors analyzed data from 2445 cases treated with GKS by the first author (T.S.), the primary surgeon. The patient group consisted of 1716 patients treated between January 1998 and March 2008 (the Chiba series) and 729 patients treated between April 2008 and December 2011 (the Tokyo series). The interval from the date of GKS until the date of the patient's death (overall survival) and impaired activities of daily living (qualitative survival) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, while the absolute risk for two adjacent classes of each grading system and both hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model. For overall survival, there were highly statistically significant differences between each two adjacent patient groups characterized by class or score (all p values RPA appeared to be better than the original RPA and GPA. The modified RPA subclassification, proposed by Yamamoto, is well balanced in scoring simplicity with respect to case number distribution and statistical results for overall survival. However, a new or revised grading system is necessary for predicting qualitative survival and for selecting the optimal treatment for patients with brain metastasis treated by GKS.

  11. Single-photon imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, Peter; Theuwissen, Albert J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition and interpretation of images is a central capability in almost all scientific and technological domains. In particular, the acquisition of electromagnetic radiation, in the form of visible light, UV, infrared, X-ray, etc. is of enormous practical importance. The ultimate sensitivity in electronic imaging is the detection of individual photons. With this book, the first comprehensive review of all aspects of single-photon electronic imaging has been created. Topics include theoretical basics, semiconductor fabrication, single-photon detection principles, imager design and applications of different spectral domains. Today, the solid-state fabrication capabilities for several types of image sensors has advanced to a point, where uncooled single-photon electronic imaging will soon become a consumer product. This book is giving a specialist's view from different domains to the forthcoming ''single-photon imaging'' revolution. The various aspects of single-photon imaging are treated by internationally renowned, leading scientists and technologists who have all pioneered their respective fields. (orig.)

  12. Photonic Hypercrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenii E. Narimanov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new “universality class” of artificial optical media—photonic hypercrystals. These hyperbolic metamaterials, with periodic spatial variation of dielectric permittivity on subwavelength scale, combine the features of optical metamaterials and photonic crystals. In particular, surface waves supported by a hypercrystal possess the properties of both the optical Tamm states in photonic crystals and surface-plasmon polaritons at the metal-dielectric interface.

  13. Microwave photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chi H

    2006-01-01

    Wireless, optical, and electronic networks continue to converge, prompting heavy research into the interface between microwave electronics, ultrafast optics, and photonic technologies. New developments arrive nearly as fast as the photons under investigation, and their commercial impact depends on the ability to stay abreast of new findings, techniques, and technologies. Presenting a broad yet in-depth survey, Microwave Photonics examines the major advances that are affecting new applications in this rapidly expanding field.This book reviews important achievements made in microwave photonics o

  14. Animal mortality resulting from uniform exposures to photon radiations: Calculated LD50s and a compilation of experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Wells, S.M.; Young, R.W.

    1986-12-01

    Studies conducted during the 1950s and 1960s of radiation-induced mortality to diverse animal species under various exposure protocols were compiled into a mortality data base. Some 24 variables were extracted and recomputed from each of the published studies, which were collected from a variety of available sources, primarily journal articles. Two features of this compilation effort are (1) an attempt to give an estimate of the uniform dose received by the bone marrow in each treatment so that interspecies differences due to body size were minimized and (2) a recomputation of the LD 50 where sufficient experimental data are available. Exposure rates varied in magnitude from about 10 -2 to 10 3 R/min. This report describes the data base, the sources of data, and the data-handling techniques; presents a bibliography of studies compiled; and tabulates data from each study. 103 refs., 44 tabs

  15. Skull base chordomas: treatment outcome and prognostic factors in adult patients following conformal treatment with 3D planning and high dose fractionated combined proton and photon radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munzenrider, J E; Hug, E; McManus, P; Adams, J; Efird, J; Liebsch, N J

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: To report treatment outcome and prognostic factors for local recurrence-free survival and overall survival in adult patients with skull base chordomas treated with 3D planning and high dose fractionated combined proton and photon radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: From 1975 through 1993, 132 adult patients with skull base chordomas were treated with fractionated combined proton and photon radiation therapy. Seventy five patients (57%) were male and 57 (43%) female. Age ranged from 19 to 80 years (median 45.5 years). All pathology was verified at MGH by a single pathologist. Ninety six had non-chondroid (NCC) and 36 chondroid chordomas (CC), respectively. Median prescribed dose was 68.7 CGE (CGE, Cobalt Gray-equivalent: proton Gy X RBE 1.1 + photon Gy), ranging from 36 to 79.2 CGE; 95% received {>=} 66.6 CGE. Between 70 and 100% of the dose was given with the 160 MeV proton beam at the Harvard Cyclotron. 3D CT-based treatment planning has been employed in all patients treated since 1980. Median follow-up was 46 months (range 2-158 months). Results: Treatment outcome was evaluated in terms of local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and disease specific survival (DSS), as well as treatment-related morbidity. Local failure (LF), defined as progressive neurological deficit with definite increase in tumor volume on CT or MRI scan, occurred in 39 patients (29.5%). LF was more common among women than among men:(26(57)) (46%) vs (13(75)) (17%), respectively. Thirty three of the 39 LF were seen in non-chondroid chordoma patients, with 6 occurring in patients with the chondroid variant (34% of NCC and 17% of CC), respectively. Distant metastasis was documented in 8 patients. LRFS was 81 {+-} 5.8%, 59 {+-} 8.3%, and 43 {+-} 10.4%, and DSS was 94 {+-} 3.6%, 80 {+-} 6.7%, and 50 {+-} 10.7% at 36, 60, and 96 months, respectively, for the total group. LRFS and DSS were not significantly different for patients with NCC than those with CC (p > .05). Gender was

  16. Procedures in external radiation therapy dosimetry with electron and photon beams with maximum energies between 1 and 50 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) has published general recommendations on dosimetry procedures for photons (ICRU 1969) and for electrons (ICRU 1972). These should preferably be supplemented by national or regional suggestions covering practical details of routine dosimetry procedures and taking into account the particular requirements and provisions of the country and region. Local recommendations have been prepared for the United Kingdom, the USA, West Germany and the Nordic countries. The present report contains a revised Nordic protocol. Several reasons have motivated this revision. After publication of the first protocol several reports have been published giving new data on various effects which can change the factors used with ionization chamber dosimetry. The SI-units for the radiologic quantities should be applied. Another important reason is that the former Nordic recommendations were mainly based on investigations with betatrons, while within the Nordic countries now several other kinds of accelerators are used (standing wave and travelling wave linear accelerators and microtrons) with usually different properties, which have to be considered. Improved concepts for stating beam quality and beam uniformity etc are therefore introduced in the present report. (Auth.)

  17. New approach to the dosimetry of ionizing radiations by fluorescence measurement, according to the single photon counting technique, correlated in time at the nanosecond scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohier, Till

    2011-01-01

    This research thesis reports the first fundamental study of the dosimetry of charged and gamma radiations by measurement of fluorescence resolved in time at a nanosecond scale, in organic matter. This method allows an in-depth and real-time analysis of the deposited dose, while taking ionisation as well as excitation processes into account. The author describes mechanisms of interaction and deposition of energy on dense matter, reports the detailed study of the ion-matter interaction, and the interaction of secondary electrons produced within traces. He addresses mechanisms of energy relaxation, and more particularly the study or organic scintillators. Then, he presents the adopted experimental approach: experimental observation with a statistic reconstitution of the curve representing the intensity of the emitted fluorescence in time and with a nanosecond resolution by using a scintillating sensor for time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC). The next part reports the development of an experimental multi-modal platform for dosimetry by TCSPC aimed at the measurement of fluorescence decays under pulsed excitation (nanosecond pulsed ion beams) and continuous flow excitation (non pulsed beams and radioactive sources). Experimental results are then presented for fluorescence measurements, and compared with measurements obtained by using an ionization chamber under the same irradiation conditions: dose deposited by hellions and carbon ions within polyvinyl toluene and polyethylene terephthalate, use of scintillating optic fibers under gamma irradiation of Caesium 137 and Cobalt 60. A new experimental approach is finally presented to perform dosimetry measurements while experimentally ignoring luminescence produced by Cerenkov effect [fr

  18. 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E/sub 2/ increases survival of murine intestinal stem cells when given before photon radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, W.R.; Thomas, C.

    1983-11-01

    A variety of prostaglandins (PG) protect the gastric and intestinal mucosa when given before damaging agents as absolute ethanol, acidified taurocholate, boiling water, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAI). A synthetic prostaglandin, 16,16-dimethyl PGE/sub 2/, shown to be cytoprotective at physiologic levels to the above agents was given to mice 1 h before or 15 min after /sup 137/Cs gamma(..gamma..) whole-body irradiation. The survival of intestinal stem cells measured by their ability to form in situ colonies of regenerating epithelium was increased stem cells measured by their ability to form in situ colonies of regenerating epithelium was increased when 16,16-dimethyl PGE/sub 2/ was given before but not after /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. irradiation. The maximum degree of 16,16-dimethyl PGE/sub 2/-induced radioprotection was seen when the drug was given 1 h before irradiation. No radioprotection was seen when the interval between drug and irradiation was 3 h or longer. When the time between 16,16-dimethyl PGE/sub 2/ and irradiation was kept at 1 h, the degree of radioprotection was dependent on the PG drug dose. There was a steep rise in the number of surviving cells at low doses of PG. These results imply that tumors which secrete PGE/sub 2/ may in part be protected from the lethal effects of ionizing photon radiation.

  19. Evaluation of the efficacy of radiation-modifying compounds using γH2AX as a molecular marker of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Li-Jeen; Orlowski, Christian; Ververis, Katherine; Vasireddy, Raja S; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2011-01-25

    Radiation therapy is a widely used therapeutic approach for cancer. To improve the efficacy of radiotherapy there is an intense interest in combining this modality with two broad classes of compounds, radiosensitizers and radioprotectors. These either enhance tumour-killing efficacy or mitigate damage to surrounding non-malignant tissue, respectively. Radiation exposure often results in the formation of DNA double-strand breaks, which are marked by the induction of H2AX phosphorylation to generate γH2AX. In addition to its essential role in DDR signalling and coordination of double-strand break repair, the ability to visualize and quantitate γH2AX foci using immunofluorescence microscopy techniques enables it to be exploited as an indicator of therapeutic efficacy in a range of cell types and tissues. This review will explore the emerging applicability of γH2AX as a marker for monitoring the effectiveness of radiation-modifying compounds.

  20. Effect of ionizing radiation exposure in the morphology of modified HDPE with amphiphilic particles; Efeito da exposicao a radiacao ionizante na morfologia de PEAD modificado com particulas anfifilicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldanha, Ana Luiza M. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Vivas, Viviane; Zylberberg, Marcel P.; Silva, Tamara I.; Cardoso, Andre Luis V.; Pereira, Iaci M., E-mail: iacipere@gmail.com [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (CTEx), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Patricio, Patricia S.O. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerias (CEFET), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    One of the techniques used to improve the properties of high performance polymers is the addition of hybrid particles in the polymer. In this context, amphiphilic particles were synthesized in order to provide surface characteristics that enhance the interaction of the interface with the polymeric matrix of high density polyethylene (HDPE). The amphiphilic particles were added to matrix of HDPE and the modified polymer composites were exposed to ionizing radiation (x-rays) for different times. The changes caused by exposure to ionizing radiation in the composite morphology was observed through the small angle x-ray technique. The results suggest that the addition of amphiphilic particles increased the stability of the composite to degradation by radiation. (author)

  1. New ICRU quantities for the environmental and individual monitoring. Standardization of individual dosemeters by using external beams of photon radiation; Nuevas magnitudes ICRU para la vigilancia radiologica ambiental e individual. Calibracion de dosimetros personales usando haces externos de fotones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosed, A; Delgado, A; Granados, C E

    1987-07-01

    The quantities introduced by ICRU for the radiological monitoring are commented, specially those implied in individual protection against external photons. A procedure is proposed in order to standardize the individual dosemeters by using the kerma in air references of CIEMAT-JEN. The reference radiation beams are described in connection with ISO standards. Provisional values are selected for the appropriate conversion and correction factors. (Author) 23 refs.

  2. Applications of anomalous diffraction systems, generation of attosecond electron and photon pulses and Raman amplification by stimulated emission of radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartak, Sameer Dinkar

    1998-10-01

    efficient delivery of this power to the screen. We describe a method based on optical rectification to create an electron acceleration process which can act simultaneously on a femtosecond photo-electron pulse as well as cancel space-charge effects. This method can be used to produce attosecond electron and photon pulses. Narrow linewidth high intensity tunable light pulses are very useful for applications such as spectroscopic studies and remote sensing. Tunable lasers and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) process are commonly used for this purpose. SRS process has high threshold because of small spontaneous Raman scattering cross-sections. We combined amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from dye molecules with SRS process in solvent molecules in which dye molecules are dissolved. ASE seeds SRS process and SRS peak is further amplified by stimulated emission gain. We got amplifications ~100 over SRS from pure solvent. This peak can be tuned over gain bandwidth of dye molecules.

  3. Resonant Photonic States in Coupled Heterostructure Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabarinathan J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors.

  4. Microscopic theory of multiple-phonon-mediated dephasing and relaxation of quantum dots near a photonic band gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Chiranjeeb; John, Sajeev

    2010-02-01

    We derive a quantum theory of the role of acoustic and optical phonons in modifying the optical absorption line shape, polarization dynamics, and population dynamics of a two-level atom (quantum dot) in the “colored” electromagnetic vacuum of a photonic band-gap (PBG) material. This is based on a microscopic Hamiltonian describing both radiative and vibrational processes quantum mechanically. We elucidate the extent to which phonon-assisted decay limits the lifetime of a single photon-atom bound state and derive the modified spontaneous emission dynamics due to coupling to various phonon baths. We demonstrate that coherent interaction with undamped phonons can lead to an enhanced lifetime of a photon-atom bound state in a PBG. This results in reduction of the steady-state atomic polarization but an increase in the fractionalized upper state population in the photon-atom bound state. We demonstrate, on the other hand, that the lifetime of the photon-atom bound state in a PBG is limited by the lifetime of phonons due to lattice anharmonicities (breakup of phonons into lower energy phonons) and purely nonradiative decay. We also derive the modified polarization decay and dephasing rates in the presence of such damping. This leads to a microscopic, quantum theory of the optical absorption line shapes. Our model and formalism provide a starting point for describing dephasing and relaxation in the presence of external coherent fields and multiple quantum dot interactions in electromagnetic reservoirs with radiative memory effects.

  5. Microscopic theory of multiple-phonon-mediated dephasing and relaxation of quantum dots near a photonic band gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Chiranjeeb; John, Sajeev

    2010-01-01

    We derive a quantum theory of the role of acoustic and optical phonons in modifying the optical absorption line shape, polarization dynamics, and population dynamics of a two-level atom (quantum dot) in the ''colored'' electromagnetic vacuum of a photonic band-gap (PBG) material. This is based on a microscopic Hamiltonian describing both radiative and vibrational processes quantum mechanically. We elucidate the extent to which phonon-assisted decay limits the lifetime of a single photon-atom bound state and derive the modified spontaneous emission dynamics due to coupling to various phonon baths. We demonstrate that coherent interaction with undamped phonons can lead to an enhanced lifetime of a photon-atom bound state in a PBG. This results in reduction of the steady-state atomic polarization but an increase in the fractionalized upper state population in the photon-atom bound state. We demonstrate, on the other hand, that the lifetime of the photon-atom bound state in a PBG is limited by the lifetime of phonons due to lattice anharmonicities (breakup of phonons into lower energy phonons) and purely nonradiative decay. We also derive the modified polarization decay and dephasing rates in the presence of such damping. This leads to a microscopic, quantum theory of the optical absorption line shapes. Our model and formalism provide a starting point for describing dephasing and relaxation in the presence of external coherent fields and multiple quantum dot interactions in electromagnetic reservoirs with radiative memory effects.

  6. Optical properties of photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Sakoda, Kazuaki

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between the radiation field and matter is the most fundamen­ tal source of dynamics in nature. It brings about the absorption and emission of photons, elastic and inelastic light scattering, the radiative lifetime of elec­ tronic excited states, and so on. The huge amount of energy carried from the sun by photons is the source of all activities of creatures on the earth. The absorption of photons by chlorophylls and the successive electronic excita­ tion initiate a series of chemical reactions that are known as photosynthesis, which support all life on the earth. Radiative energy is also the main source of all meteorological phenomena. The fundamentals of the radiation field and its interaction with matter were clarified by classical electromagnetism and quantum electrodynamics. These theories, we believe, explain all electromagnetic phenomena. They not only provide a firm basis for contemporary physics but also generate a vast range of technological applications. These include television, ...

  7. Formation and accumulation of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in modified lithium orthosilicate pebbles with additions of titanium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarins, Arturs; Valtenbergs, Oskars; Kizane, Gunta; Supe, Arnis; Knitter, Regina; Kolb, Matthias H. H.; Leys, Oliver; Baumane, Larisa; Conka, Davis

    2016-03-01

    Lithium orthosilicate (Li4SiO4) pebbles with 2.5 wt.% excess of silicon dioxide (SiO2) are the European Union's designated reference tritium breeding ceramics for the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Module (TBM). However, the latest irradiation experiments showed that the reference Li4SiO4 pebbles may crack and form fragments under operation conditions as expected in the HCPB TBM. Therefore, it has been suggested to change the chemical composition of the reference Li4SiO4 pebbles and to add titanium dioxide (TiO2), to obtain lithium metatitanate (Li2TiO3) as a second phase. The aim of this research was to investigate the formation and accumulation of radiation-induced defects (RD) and radiolysis products (RP) in the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles with different contents of TiO2 for the first time, in order to estimate and compare radiation stability. The reference and the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles were irradiated with accelerated electrons (E = 5 MeV) up to 5000 MGy absorbed dose at 300-990 K in a dry argon atmosphere. By using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy it was determined that in the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles, several paramagnetic RD and RP are formed and accumulated, like, E' centres (SiO33-/TiO33-), HC2 centres (SiO43-/TiO3-) etc. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles with TiO2 additions have comparable radiation stability with the reference pebbles.

  8. Antigravity Acts on Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brynjolfsson, Ari

    2002-04-01

    Einstein's general theory of relativity assumes that photons don't change frequency as they move from Sun to Earth. This assumption is correct in classical physics. All experiments proving the general relativity are in the domain of classical physics. This include the tests by Pound et al. of the gravitational redshift of 14.4 keV photons; the rocket experiments by Vessot et al.; the Galileo solar redshift experiments by Krisher et al.; the gravitational deflection of light experiments by Riveros and Vucetich; and delay of echoes of radar signals passing close to Sun as observed by Shapiro et al. Bohr's correspondence principle assures that quantum mechanical theory of general relativity agrees with Einstein's classical theory when frequency and gravitational field gradient approach zero, or when photons cannot interact with the gravitational field. When we treat photons as quantum mechanical particles; we find that gravitational force on photons is reversed (antigravity). This modified theory contradicts the equivalence principle, but is consistent with all experiments. Solar lines and distant stars are redshifted in accordance with author's plasma redshift theory. These changes result in a beautiful consistent cosmology.

  9. Prostate Cancer (Radiation Therapy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be considered carefully, balancing the advantages against the disadvantages as they relate to the individual man's age, ... therapy with photon or x-rays: Uses advanced technology to tailor the x-ray or photon radiation ...

  10. Photon technology. Hard photon technology; Photon technology. Hard photon gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For the application of photon to industrial technologies, in particular, a hard photon technology was surveyed which uses photon beams of 0.1-200nm in wavelength. Its features such as selective atom reaction, dense inner shell excitation and spacial high resolution by quantum energy are expected to provide innovative techniques for various field such as fine machining, material synthesis and advanced inspection technology. This wavelength region has been hardly utilized for industrial fields because of poor development of suitable photon sources and optical devices. The developmental meaning, usable time and issue of a hard photon reduction lithography were surveyed as lithography in ultra-fine region below 0.1{mu}m. On hard photon analysis/evaluation technology, the industrial use of analysis, measurement and evaluation technologies by micro-beam was viewed, and optimum photon sources and optical systems were surveyed. Prediction of surface and surface layer modification by inner shell excitation, the future trend of this process and development of a vacuum ultraviolet light source were also surveyed. 383 refs., 153 figs., 17 tabs.

  11. Inverse photon-photon processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carimalo, C.; Crozon, M.; Kesler, P.; Parisi, J.

    1981-12-01

    We here consider inverse photon-photon processes, i.e. AB → γγX (where A, B are hadrons, in particular protons or antiprotons), at high energies. As regards the production of a γγ continuum, we show that, under specific conditions the study of such processes might provide some information on the subprocess gg γγ, involving a quark box. It is also suggested to use those processes in order to systematically look for heavy C = + structures (quarkonium states, gluonia, etc.) showing up in the γγ channel. Inverse photon-photon processes might thus become a new and fertile area of investigation in high-energy physics, provided the difficult problem of discriminating between direct photons and indirect ones can be handled in a satisfactory way

  12. Fuel Effective Photonic Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, N.; Srivarshini, S.

    2017-09-01

    With the entry of miniaturization in electronics and ultra-small light-weight materials, energy efficient propulsion techniques for space travel can soon be possible. We need to go for such high speeds so that the generation’s time long interstellar missions can be done in incredibly short time. Also renewable energy like sunlight, nuclear energy can be used for propulsion instead of fuel. These propulsion techniques are being worked on currently. The recently proposed photon propulsion concepts are reviewed, that utilize momentum of photons generated by sunlight or onboard photon generators, such as blackbody radiation or lasers, powered by nuclear or solar power. With the understanding of nuclear photonic propulsion, in this paper, a rough estimate of nuclear fuel required to achieve the escape velocity of Earth is done. An overview of the IKAROS space mission for interplanetary travel by JAXA, that was successful in demonstrating that photonic propulsion works and also generated additional solar power on board, is provided; which can be used as a case study. An extension of this idea for interstellar travel, termed as ‘Star Shot’, aims to send a nanocraft to an exoplanet in the nearest star system, which could be potentially habitable. A brief overview of the idea is presented.

  13. Multiple photon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, C.J.; Feldman, B.J.

    1979-02-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis is presented of the interaction of intense near-resonant monochromatic radiation with an N-level anharmonic oscillator. In particular, the phenomenon of multiple photon resonance, the process by which an N-level system resonantly absorbs two or more photons simultaneously, is investigated. Starting from the Schroedinger equation, diagrammatic techniques are developed that allow the resonant process to be analyzed quantitatively, in analogy with well-known two-level coherent phenomena. In addition, multiple photon Stark shifts of the resonances, shifts absent in two-level theory, are obtained from the diagrams. Insights into the nature of multiple photon resonances are gained by comparing the quantum mechanical system with classical coupled pendulums whose equations of motion possess identical eigenvalues and eigenvectors. In certain limiting cases, including that of the resonantly excited N-level harmonic oscillator and that of the equally spaced N-level system with equal matrix elements, analytic results are derived. The influence of population relaxation and phase-disrupting collisions on the multiple photon process are also analyzed, the latter by extension of the diagrammatic technique to the density matrix equations of motion. 11 figures

  14. Microwave radiation improves biodiesel yields from waste cooking oil in the presence of modified coal fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulin Xiang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper studied the effects of using modified coal fly ash as a catalyst to convert waste cooking oil (WCO into biodiesel under microwave-strengthened action. Coal fly ash was modified with sodium sulphate and sodium hydroxide, and the obtained catalyst was characterized using FT-IR and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The experimental results showed that the modified coal fly ash catalyst improved biodiesel yields under the microwave-assisted system, and the maximum biodiesel yield from waste cooking oil reached 94.91% at a molar ratio of methanol to WCO of 9.67:1 with 3.99% wt% of modified coal fly ash catalyst (based on oil weight at a 66.20 °C reaction temperature. The reusability of the modified coal fly ash catalyst was excellent, and the conversion yield remained greater than 90% after the catalyst was reused 8 times. The produced biodiesel met the main parameters of the ASTM D-6751 and EN14214 standards. Keywords: Biodiesel, Modified coal fly ash, Microwave assisted system, Waste cooking oil

  15. Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Photon Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: First Comparative Results of Patient-Reported Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sio, Terence T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Lin, Huei-Kai; Shi, Qiuling [Department of Symptom Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gunn, G. Brandon [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cleeland, Charles S. [Department of Symptom Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, J. Jack; Hernandez, Mike [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Blanchard, Pierre; Thaker, Nikhil G.; Phan, Jack; Rosenthal, David I.; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Fuller, C. David [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mendoza, Tito R. [Department of Symptom Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xin Shelley [Department of Symptom Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: We hypothesized that patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) would have lower symptom burdens, as measured by patient-reported outcome (PRO) surveys, than patients treated with intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated for oropharyngeal cancer from 2006 to 2015 through prospective registries with concurrent chemotherapy and IMPT or chemotherapy and IMRT and completed the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory for Head and Neck Cancer (MDASI-HN) module at various times before treatment (baseline), during treatment (acute phase), within the first 3 months after treatment (subacute phase), and afterward (chronic phase). Individual symptoms and the top 5 and top 11 most severe symptoms were summarized and compared between the radiation therapy modalities. Results: PRO data were collected and analyzed from 35 patients treated with chemotherapy and IMPT and from 46 treated with chemotherapy and IMRT. The baseline symptom burdens were similar between both groups. The overall top 5 symptoms were food taste problems (mean score 4.91 on a 0-10 scale), dry mouth (4.49), swallowing/chewing difficulties (4.26), lack of appetite (4.08), and fatigue (4.00). Among the top 11 symptoms, changes in taste and appetite during the subacute and chronic phases favored IMPT (all P<.048). No differences in symptom burden were detected between modalities during the acute and chronic phases by top-11 symptom scoring. During the subacute phase, the mean (±standard deviation) top 5 MDASI scores were 5.15 ± 2.66 for IMPT versus 6.58 ± 1.98 for IMRT (P=.013). Conclusions: According to the MDASI-HN, symptom burden was lower among the IMPT patients than among the IMRT patients during the subacute recovery phase after treatment. A prospective randomized clinical trial is underway to define the value of IMPT for the management of head and neck tumors.

  16. Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Photon Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: First Comparative Results of Patient-Reported Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sio, Terence T.; Lin, Huei-Kai; Shi, Qiuling; Gunn, G. Brandon; Cleeland, Charles S.; Lee, J. Jack; Hernandez, Mike; Blanchard, Pierre; Thaker, Nikhil G.; Phan, Jack; Rosenthal, David I.; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Fuller, C. David; Mendoza, Tito R.; Mohan, Radhe; Wang, Xin Shelley; Frank, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We hypothesized that patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) would have lower symptom burdens, as measured by patient-reported outcome (PRO) surveys, than patients treated with intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated for oropharyngeal cancer from 2006 to 2015 through prospective registries with concurrent chemotherapy and IMPT or chemotherapy and IMRT and completed the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory for Head and Neck Cancer (MDASI-HN) module at various times before treatment (baseline), during treatment (acute phase), within the first 3 months after treatment (subacute phase), and afterward (chronic phase). Individual symptoms and the top 5 and top 11 most severe symptoms were summarized and compared between the radiation therapy modalities. Results: PRO data were collected and analyzed from 35 patients treated with chemotherapy and IMPT and from 46 treated with chemotherapy and IMRT. The baseline symptom burdens were similar between both groups. The overall top 5 symptoms were food taste problems (mean score 4.91 on a 0-10 scale), dry mouth (4.49), swallowing/chewing difficulties (4.26), lack of appetite (4.08), and fatigue (4.00). Among the top 11 symptoms, changes in taste and appetite during the subacute and chronic phases favored IMPT (all P<.048). No differences in symptom burden were detected between modalities during the acute and chronic phases by top-11 symptom scoring. During the subacute phase, the mean (±standard deviation) top 5 MDASI scores were 5.15 ± 2.66 for IMPT versus 6.58 ± 1.98 for IMRT (P=.013). Conclusions: According to the MDASI-HN, symptom burden was lower among the IMPT patients than among the IMRT patients during the subacute recovery phase after treatment. A prospective randomized clinical trial is underway to define the value of IMPT for the management of head and neck tumors.

  17. Experimental studies on the radiation-modifying effect of bleomycin in malignant and normal mouse tissue in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molin, J.; Sogaard, P.E.; Overgaard, J.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction between bleomycin (BLM) and radiation was studied in a C3H mammary carcinoma and its surrounding normal skin. In the skin, single and fractionated doses of sequential treatment with BLM (25 mg/kg) 24 hours prior to radiation therapy did not influence the response to irradiation, whereas simultaneous treatment with BLM given 15 minutes before radiation therapy enhanced the reaction to irradiation by a factor of 1.2 or 1.4 following treatment with one fraction or five fractions, respectively. The tumor response to irradiation was not influenced by a single sequential treatment, but five daily fractions of radiation therapy following five daily dose fractions of BLM increased the radiation dose needed to control 50% of the tumors, probably because the tumors continued to grow during the BLM treatment. Simultaneous treatment enhanced the response to irradiation by a factor of 1.2 after both single-dose and fractionated therapy. Based on these data it was concluded that none of the combined treatment schedules were able to produce a better therapeutic effect than radiation therapy alone. Furthermore, mortality due to lung fibrosis in mice treated with BLM indicated the marked toxicity of the drug. This toxicity was most pronounced after fractionated treatment and when radiation therapy and BLM were given simultaneously

  18. Photon-activation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) is a technique in which radiation dose to tumor is enhanced via introduction of stable 127 I in the form of iodinated deoxyuridine (IdUrd). Stimulation of cytotoxic effects from IdUrd is accomplished by activation with external (or implanted) radiation sources. Thus, accumulations of this nucleoside in actively competing cellpools do not preclude therapy in so far as such tissues can be excluded from the radiation field. Calculations show that 5% replacement of thymidine (Tyd) in tumor DNA should enhance the biological effectiveness of a given photon radiotherapy dose by a factor of approx. 3. Proportionally higher gains would result from higher replacements of Tyd and IdUrd. In addition, biological response is enhanced by chemical sensitization with IdUrd. The data indicate that damage from photon activation as well as chemical sensitization does not repair. Thus, at low dose rates, a further increase in therapeutic gain should accrue as normal tissues are allowed to repair and regenerate. A samarium-145 source has been developed for PAT, with activating x-ray energies of from 38 to 45 keV. Favorable clinical results can be expected through the use of IdUrd and protracted irradiations with low energy x-rays. In particular, PAT may provide unique advantages at selected sites such as brain, or head and neck tumors

  19. Photon factory activity report, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This issue is the annual report of the Photon Factory, National laboratory of High Energy Physics. First, the outline of the Photon Factory is presented. Injector linac, light source, beamlines and instrumentation, the Tristan synchrotron radiation facility at the accumulation ring, and the Tristan super light facility are described in detail. The facility is open to researchers. The user's reports are collected as well. (J.P.N.) (435 refs.)

  20. Photon factory activity report, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This issue is the annual report of the Photon Factory, National Laboratory of High Energy Physics. First the outline of the Photon Factory is presented. Injector linac, light source, beamlines and instrumentation, synchrotron radiation facility at the Tristan accumulation ring, and the Tristan super light facility are described in detail. The facility is open to researchers. The user's reports are collected as well. (J.P.N.)

  1. Modelling and design of complete photonic band gaps in two ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Photonic crystal; complete photonic band gap; plane-wave expansion method. ... lies in the possibility of the substantial control of the radiation field by means of ... research. To prevent the propagation of the waves, whatever its direction is, the.

  2. Photon generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  3. Numerical simulations of a coupled radiative?conductive heat transfer model using a modified Monte Carlo method

    KAUST Repository

    Kovtanyuk, Andrey E.

    2012-01-01

    Radiative-conductive heat transfer in a medium bounded by two reflecting and radiating plane surfaces is considered. This process is described by a nonlinear system of two differential equations: an equation of the radiative heat transfer and an equation of the conductive heat exchange. The problem is characterized by anisotropic scattering of the medium and by specularly and diffusely reflecting boundaries. For the computation of solutions of this problem, two approaches based on iterative techniques are considered. First, a recursive algorithm based on some modification of the Monte Carlo method is proposed. Second, the diffusion approximation of the radiative transfer equation is utilized. Numerical comparisons of the approaches proposed are given in the case of isotropic scattering. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fireproofing and heat insulating performance improvement of EG/ATH modified intumescent flame retardant coating treated under Co-60 radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuehong; Luan, Weiling; Jiang, Tao

    2017-12-01

    New intumescent flame retardant (IFR) coatings with different fire retardants were prepared in this paper. Expandable graphite (EG) and Aluminium hydroxide (ATH) were respectively added into the conventional IFR coating system, which included ammonium polyphosphate (APP) / pentaerythritol (PER) / melamine (MEL). The fireproofing time and heat insulating properties of the additives acted as fire retardants were investigated via thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and fire resistance test of homemade big panel test. The morphology of the char layer structure was achieved by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The highlight of the paper was that the coating samples were pretreated under Co-60 radiation. The influence of radiation on the fire resistance time and char layer height was investigated. The results showed that the prepared IFR coatings can be used in Co-60 radiation for more than 90 min when encountering fire. It would be a reference for radiation shielding in nuclear environment.

  5. Studies on the physicochemical properties of bacterial toxins by different radiation sources and utilization of modified toxin by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Y. C.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, S. S.; Yang, H. S.; Kim, S. Y.

    2009-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of irradiation technology to induce natural immunity/resistance has been best preserved when ionizing radiation (Co-60) has been used for detoxification. The result of SDS-PAGE showed that the treatment of LPS with an ionizing radiation dose destroyed most of the minor bands, including the more intensively staining ones in the slow-moving region. Increasing radiation doses caused further destruction of the bands, eliminating first the ones with lower migration ability. In the infrared spectrum, the qualitative change of functional groups were found in LPS by irradiation, and the patterns indicate some quantitative differences between the parent endotoxin and the irradiated derivative. Furthermore, scanning endotoxin in the UV range, we found that a complex absorption pattern was changed dependent upon increasing exposure of ionizing radiation to endotoxin LPS. Our results showed dose-dependent detoxification when LPS in water is exposed to ionizing radiation at ambient temperature. The harmful effects of LPS decrease after radiation, whereas its capacity to induce tolerance, to function as an the proliferation of immune cells and their cytokine/chemokine release such as TNF-α and Nitric Oxide (NO) to protect against shock and to stimulate natural resistance are preserved to a large extent. In conclusion, the present study demonstrate that in vitro or in vivo exposure to irradiated-LPS reduces the induction of inflammatory factors in response to stimulation by a high-dose treatment of intact LPS

  6. Improving the pair separation of WW/ZZ at the ILC by consideration of photon radiation in kinematic fits; Verbesserung der WW/ZZ-Unterscheidung am ILC durch Beruecksichtigung von Photonabstrahlung in kinematischen Fits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, Moritz

    2010-04-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is intended for high precision measurements. This places enormous demands on detector precision in the ongoing detector development program. Precision can be further improved by application of a kinematic fit to the data, forcing energy and momentum conservation. However, this requires all energies and momenta to be considered. Initial state radiation and beamstrahlung are two processes which emit photons predominantly in the beam direction and which escape detection. Due to higher center-of-mass energy and stronger focussing of the beam, these processes will have more impact at the ILC than at earlier colliders. This thesis investigates the effects of these processes on kinematic fits at the example of the separation of events with WW/ZZ pair production events. Different approaches in consideration of these processes are pointed out. A kinematic fit was performed on a sample of simulated e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} u anti dd anti u events, forcing energy and momentum conservation and equal boson masses. It is shown that 25% more events can be covered in this fit, if photon radiation is taken into consideration using a basic approximation of the momentum spectrum of the photons. This method obtains even a further increase in resolution. Thus, a mass resolution of 1.9 GeV (without decay width) can be obtained. (orig.)

  7. A study about the effects of gamma radiation and electron beam irradiation in the detection of genetically modified maize (Zea Mays)