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Sample records for phosphor computed radiography

  1. Computer radiography - indirect digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jezierski, G.

    2008-01-01

    Implementation of the new European standards for industrial radiography with the use of storage phosphor imaging plates will result in the arousing of interest among numerous laboratories in non-destructive testing with application of the new method of testing to replace conventional radiography used so far, i.e. film radiography. Computer radiography is quite commonly used for medical radiography, where the fundamental problem consists in reduction of the radiation dose during the examination of a patient. However, it must be kept in mind that industrial applications have a little bit different requirements when compared with medical radiography. The article describes only new method for radiographic testing. (author)

  2. Computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupchek, G.

    2004-01-01

    Computed radiography (CR) is an image acquisition process that is used to create digital, 2-dimensional radiographs. CR employs a photostimulable phosphor-based imaging plate, replacing the standard x-ray film and intensifying screen combination. Conventional radiographic exposure equipment is used with no modification required to the existing system. CR can transform an analog x-ray department into a digital one and eliminates the need for chemicals, water, darkrooms and film processor headaches. (author)

  3. Industrial radiography with phosphor screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, P.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental system that comprises a film of low silver content and a pair of high resolution phosphor intensifying screens and a commercial industrial X-ray film of similar speed are compared for image quality. It is concluded that the use of phosphor screens offers an increase in image quality when the information is limited by the graininess or quantum mottle of a radiograph which is frequently the case in practical radiography. (author)

  4. An in vitro comparison of diagnostic abilities of conventional radiography, storage phosphor, and cone beam computed tomography to determine occlusal and approximal caries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayipmaz, Saadettin, E-mail: kayipmaz@ktu.edu.tr [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Farabi, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Sezgin, Omer Said, E-mail: omersaidsezgin@gmail.com [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Farabi, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Saricaoglu, Senem Tugra, E-mail: senem_tugra@hotmail.com [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology, Farabi, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Can, Gamze, E-mail: gcanktu@yahoo.com [Karadeniz Technical University Faculty of Medicine Department of Public Health (Turkey)

    2011-11-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare conventional radiography, storage phosphor plate, and cone beam computed tomography for in vitro determination of occlusal and approximal caries. Methods: A total of 72 extracted human premolar and molar teeth were selected. Teeth were radiographed with conventional intraoral radiography, a storage phosphor plate system, and cone beam computed tomography and evaluated by two observers. The teeth were then separated and examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanner at approximately 8x magnification. Results: CBCT was statistically superior to conventional radiography and phosphor plate for determining occlusal caries. No significant difference from CBCT, conventional radiography and the phosphor plate system for determining approximal caries was found. Conclusion: The CBCT system may be used as an auxiliary method for the detection of caries.

  5. An in vitro comparison of diagnostic abilities of conventional radiography, storage phosphor, and cone beam computed tomography to determine occlusal and approximal caries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayipmaz, Saadettin; Sezgin, Omer Said; Saricaoglu, Senem Tugra; Can, Gamze

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare conventional radiography, storage phosphor plate, and cone beam computed tomography for in vitro determination of occlusal and approximal caries. Methods: A total of 72 extracted human premolar and molar teeth were selected. Teeth were radiographed with conventional intraoral radiography, a storage phosphor plate system, and cone beam computed tomography and evaluated by two observers. The teeth were then separated and examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanner at approximately 8x magnification. Results: CBCT was statistically superior to conventional radiography and phosphor plate for determining occlusal caries. No significant difference from CBCT, conventional radiography and the phosphor plate system for determining approximal caries was found. Conclusion: The CBCT system may be used as an auxiliary method for the detection of caries.

  6. Computed radiography in paediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, C.

    1996-01-01

    Computed radiography has also been called storage phosphor technology, digital luminescence radiography and scintillation phosphor technology, since it relies on phosphor imaging plate as an alternative to screen-film. One of the major advantages in the use of computed radiography (CR) is the consistent image quality independence of the radiographer and exposure used. And secondly a marked reduction in the need for repeat films was achieved and thus a decrease in dose to the patient. In some cases, dose was able to be reduced further due to the fact that the plates respond to lower doses and still provide adequate image quality. Digitalising the Cr image allows it to be transmitted to an imaging console. The images can then be stored on optical disc. 7 refs

  7. Computed radiography in NDT application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deprins, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Computed Radiography, or digital radiography by use of reusable Storage Phosphor screens, offers a convenient and reliable way to replace film. In addition to the reduced cost on consumables, the return on investment of CR systems is strongly determined by savings in exposure time, processing times and archival times. But also intangible costs like plant shutdown, environment safety and longer usability of isotopes are increasingly important when considering replacing film by Storage Phosphor systems. But mote than in traditional radiography, the use of digital images is a trade-off between the speed and the required quality. Better image quality is obtained by longer exposure times, slower phosphor screens and higher scan resolutions. Therefore, different kinds of storage phosphor screens are needed in order to cover every application. Most operations have the data, associated with the tests to be performed, centrally stored in a database. Using a digital radiography system gives not only the advantages of the manipulation of digital images, but also the digital data that is associated with it. Smart methods to associate cassettes and Storage screens with exposed images enhance the workflow of the NDT processes, and avoid human error. Automated measurements tools increase the throughput in different kinds of operations. This paper gives an overview of the way certain operations have decided to replace film by Computed Radiography, and what the major benefits for them have been.

  8. Computed radiography imaging plates and associated methods of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Nathaniel F.; Moses, Alex K.

    2015-08-18

    Computed radiography imaging plates incorporating an intensifying material that is coupled to or intermixed with the phosphor layer, allowing electrons and/or low energy x-rays to impart their energy on the phosphor layer, while decreasing internal scattering and increasing resolution. The radiation needed to perform radiography can also be reduced as a result.

  9. Direct digital radiography versus storage phosphor radiography in the detection of wrist fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peer, Siegfried; Neitzel, Ulrich; Giacomuzzi, Salvatore M.; Pechlaner, Sigurd; KUenzel, Karl Heinz; Peer, Regina; Gassner, Eva; Steingruber, Iris; Gaber, O.; Jaschke, Werner

    2002-04-01

    AIM: To define the value of digital radiography with a clinical flat panel detector system for evaluation of wrist fractures in comparison with state of the art storage phosphor radiography. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Hard copy images of 26 fractured wrist specimens were acquired with the same exposure dose on a state of the art storage phosphor radiography system and a clinical flat panel detector. Image features like cortical bone surface, trabecular bone, soft tissues and fracture delineation were independently analysed by 4 observers using a standardised protocol. Image quality ratings were evaluated with an analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS: Flat panel detector radiographs were rated superior with respect to cortical and trabecular bone representation as well as fracture evaluation, while storage phosphor radiographs produced better soft tissue detail. CONCLUSION: In some of the observed image quality aspects, the performance of caesium iodide/amorphous silicon flat panel detector exceeds state of the art storage phosphor radiography. This makes it well suited for skeletal imaging particularly in trauma as seen in the detection of wrist fractures. Peer, S. et al. (2002)

  10. Direct digital radiography versus storage phosphor radiography in the detection of wrist fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peer, Siegfried; Neitzel, Ulrich; Giacomuzzi, Salvatore M.; Pechlaner, Sigurd; KUenzel, Karl Heinz; Peer, Regina; Gassner, Eva; Steingruber, Iris; Gaber, O.; Jaschke, Werner

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To define the value of digital radiography with a clinical flat panel detector system for evaluation of wrist fractures in comparison with state of the art storage phosphor radiography. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Hard copy images of 26 fractured wrist specimens were acquired with the same exposure dose on a state of the art storage phosphor radiography system and a clinical flat panel detector. Image features like cortical bone surface, trabecular bone, soft tissues and fracture delineation were independently analysed by 4 observers using a standardised protocol. Image quality ratings were evaluated with an analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS: Flat panel detector radiographs were rated superior with respect to cortical and trabecular bone representation as well as fracture evaluation, while storage phosphor radiographs produced better soft tissue detail. CONCLUSION: In some of the observed image quality aspects, the performance of caesium iodide/amorphous silicon flat panel detector exceeds state of the art storage phosphor radiography. This makes it well suited for skeletal imaging particularly in trauma as seen in the detection of wrist fractures. Peer, S. et al. (2002)

  11. A preliminary investigation of the imaging performance of photostimulable phosphor computed radiography using a new design of mammographic quality control test object

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowen, A.R.; Brettle, D.S.; Coleman, N.J.; Parkin, G.J.S.

    1992-01-01

    Leeds Test Object TOR[MAM] has been designed to supplement the current FAXIL mammography test object TOR[MAX]. It contains a range of details that have a more natural radiographic appearance and has been designed as a test that more closely approximates the image quality achieved in clinical mammography. Physical aspects of the design and implementation of TOR[MAM] are presented. The TOR[MAM] has been used in a preliminary physical evaluation of the comparative image qualities produced by conventional (screen-film) and phostostimulable phosphor computed mammography and the results are discussed. TOR[MAX] results are also presented. The influence of digital image processing (enhancement) on the image quality of computed mammograms is also considered. The results presented indicate the sensitivity of TOR[MAM]. (author)

  12. Chest X ray effective doses estimation in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, Esra Abdalrhman Dfaalla

    2013-06-01

    Conventional chest radiography is technically difficult because of wide in tissue attenuations in the chest and limitations of screen-film systems. Computed radiography (CR) offers a different approach utilizing a photostimulable phosphor. photostimulable phosphors overcome some image quality limitations of chest imaging. The objective of this study was to estimate the effective dose in computed radiography at three hospitals in Khartoum. This study has been conducted in radiography departments in three centres Advanced Diagnostic Center, Nilain Diagnostic Center, Modern Diagnostic Center. The entrance surface dose (ESD) measurement was conducted for quality control of x-ray machines and survey of operators experimental techniques. The ESDs were measured by UNFORS dosimeter and mathematical equations to estimate patient doses during chest X rays. A total of 120 patients were examined in three centres, among them 62 were males and 58 were females. The overall mean and range of patient dosed was 0.073±0.037 (0.014-0.16) mGy per procedure while the effective dose was 3.4±01.7 (0.6-7.0) mSv per procedure. This study compared radiation doses to patients radiographic examinations of chest using computed radiology. The radiation dose was measured in three centres in Khartoum- Sudan. The results of the measured effective dose showed that the dose in chest radiography was lower in computed radiography compared to previous studies.(Author)

  13. Comparative study between computed radiography and conventional radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noorhazleena Azaman; Khairul Anuar Mohd Salleh; Sapizah Rahim; Shaharudin Sayuti; Arshad Yassin; Abdul Razak Hamzah

    2010-01-01

    In Industrial Radiography, there are many criteria that need to be considered based on established standards to accept or reject the radiographic film. For conventional radiography, we need to consider the optical density by using the densitometer when viewing the film on the viewer. But in the computed radiography (CR) we need to evaluate and performed the analysis from the quality of the digital image through grey value. There are many factors that affected the digital image quality. One of the factors which are affected to the digital image quality in the image processing is grey value that related to the contrast resolution. In this work, we performed grey value study measurement on digital radiography systems and compared it with exposed films in conventional radiography. The test sample is a steel step wedge. We found out the contrast resolution is higher in Computed Radiography compared with Conventional Radiography. (author)

  14. Computed radiography for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Tatsuya; Muramatsu, Yukio

    1990-01-01

    In order to evaluate the possibility of using computed radiographic mammography in mass surveys of the breast, we have retrospectively examined 71 breast cancer lesions in 71 patients using computed radiographic and conventional non-screen mammographies and have carried out comparative studies on tumor detection rate and calcification. A 95.8% detection rate was obtained for the tumor image (n 71) using computed radiography (CR) and one of 93.0% using non-screen techniques. Three lesions remained undetected by either study. A 100% detection rate was obtained for calcification associated with cancer (n 33) from each method. No significant differences in either detection rate or calcification were seen between the two images. On the other hand, the ability to recognize tumor images (n 66) was as follows; CR superior to non-screen radiography in 53 lesions (80.3%), equal in eight lesions (12.1%) and inferior in five lesions (7.6%). For the calcification images (n 18), CR was superior to non-screen radiography in all 18 lesions. Obviously, CR gives better results than non-screen radiography. Furthermore, an adequate image can be obtained using CR even although the X-ray dosage is only a twentieth of that required for non-screen radiography. It can therefore be applied not only to mass surveys for breast cancer but also to routine clinical diagnoses. (author)

  15. Image characterization of computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candeias, Janaina P.; Saddock, Aline; Oliveira, Davi F.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2007-01-01

    The digital radiographic image became a reality as of the 80's decade. Since then, several works have been developed with the aim of reducing the exposure time to ionizing radiation obtaining in this way an excellent image quality with a minimum exposure. In the Computerized Radiography, the conventional film is substituted for Image Plate (IP) which consists of a radiosensitive layer of phosphor crystals on a polyester backing plate. The unique design makes it reusable and easy to handle. When exposed, the IP accumulates and stores the irradiated radioactive energy. In order to qualify a computerized radiography system it is necessary to evaluate the Image Plate. In this work it was performed a series of experimental procedures with the aim of evaluating the responses characteristics for different plates. For this purpose it was used a computerized radiographic system CR Tower Scanner - GE, with three different types of IPs, all of them manufactured by GE, whose nomenclatures are IPC, IPX and IPS. It was used the Rhythm Acquire and Review programs for image acquisition and treatment, respectively. (author)

  16. Performance evaluation of a computed radiography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussilhe, J.; Fallet, E. [Carestream Health France, 71 - Chalon/Saone (France); Mango, St.A. [Carestream Health, Inc. Rochester, New York (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Computed radiography (CR) standards have been formalized and published in Europe and in the US. The CR system classification is defined in those standards by - minimum normalized signal-to-noise ratio (SNRN), and - maximum basic spatial resolution (SRb). Both the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast sensitivity of a CR system depend on the dose (exposure time and conditions) at the detector. Because of their wide dynamic range, the same storage phosphor imaging plate can qualify for all six CR system classes. The exposure characteristics from 30 to 450 kV, the contrast sensitivity, and the spatial resolution of the KODAK INDUSTREX CR Digital System have been thoroughly evaluated. This paper will present some of the factors that determine the system's spatial resolution performance. (authors)

  17. Dose optimisation in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner-Karoussou, A.

    2005-01-01

    After the installation of computed radiography (CR) systems in three hospitals in Luxembourg a patient dose survey was carried out for three radiographic examinations, thorax, pelvis and lumbar spine. It was found that the patient doses had changed in comparison with the patient doses measured for conventional radiography in the same three hospitals. A close collaboration between the manufacturers of the X-ray installations, the CR imaging systems and the medical physicists led to the discovery that the speed class with which each radiographic examination was to be performed, had been ignored, during installation of the digital imaging systems. A number of procedures were carried out in order to calibrate and program the X-ray installations in conjunction with the CR systems. Following this optimisation procedure, a new patient dose survey was carried out for the three radiographic examinations. It was found that patient doses for the three hospitals were reduced. (authors)

  18. Computational radiology in skeletal radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peloschek, Ph.; Nemec, S.; Widhalm, P.; Donner, R.; Birngruber, E.; Thodberg, H.H.; Kainberger, F.; Langs, G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have brought rapid developments in computational image analysis in musculo-skeletal radiology. Meanwhile the algorithms have reached a maturity that makes initial clinical use feasible. Applications range from joint space measurement to erosion quantification, and from fracture detection to the assessment of alignment angles. Current results of computational image analysis in radiography are very promising, but some fundamental issues remain to be clarified, among which the definition of the optimal trade off between automatization and operator-dependency, the integration of these tools into clinical work flow and last not least the proof of incremental clinical benefit of these methods.

  19. Computer radiography-X-ray with vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waitiki, C.

    2006-01-01

    Computer radiography describes an entire process of creating a digital image including acquiring, processing, presenting and managing the image data. the cassettes are special in that they use an imaging plate instead of films. the imaging plate is coated with storage phosphors which captures x-ray as they pass through the patient. the imaging plate is read with a bar code reader and the imaging plate number recorded in the computer. The cassette is then loaded in the reader unit where it is read using infra-red light which excites the particles on the plate which in turn illuminates and picked by photo-sensors which converts the signal into digital pulses. the pulses then run through a board which converts it into an image which is then displayed on the control console. The plate then runs through the erasure section where it is exposed to yellow light, which erases the plate. The IP is then put back in the cassette and locked and can be reused for the next episode

  20. Compact, open-architecture computed radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.K.; Lim, A.; Kangarloo, H.; Eldredge, S.; Loloyan, M.; Chuang, K.S.

    1990-01-01

    Computed radiography (CR) was introduced in 1982, and its basic system design has not changed. Current CR systems have certain limitations: spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratios are lower than those of screen-film systems, they are complicated and expensive to build, and they have a closed architecture. The authors of this paper designed and implemented a simpler, lower-cost, compact, open-architecture CR system to overcome some of these limitations. The open-architecture system is a manual-load-single-plate reader that can fit on a desk top. Phosphor images are stored in a local disk and can be sent to any other computer through standard interfaces. Any manufacturer's plate can be read with a scanning time of 90 second for a 35 x 43-cm plate. The standard pixel size is 174 μm and can be adjusted for higher spatial resolution. The data resolution is 12 bits/pixel over an x-ray exposure range of 0.01-100 mR

  1. Application of computed radiography to ERCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shigeki; Mochizuki, Fukuji; Fujita, Naotaka; Itoh, Shoichiro; Ikeda, Takashi; Toyohara, Tokiaki; Matsumoto, Kyoichi

    1984-01-01

    Computed radiography technic was applied to ERCP. Fuji Computed Radiography System was used. The pancreatogram obtained by this method was compared with that of conventional screen-film radiograph. The much finer changes of the pancreatogram can be delineated by the new method. The diagnostic ability of ERCP is thus enhanced by the introduction of FCR. (author)

  2. Computed Radiography Exposure Indices in Mammography | Koen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computed Radiography Exposure Indices in Mammography. L Koen, C Herbst, W Rae. Abstract. Background. Studies indicate that computed radiography (CR) can lead to increased radiation dose to patients. It is therefore important to relate the exposure indicators provided by CR manufacturers to the radiation dose ...

  3. Computed radiography systems performance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xavier, Clarice C.; Nersissian, Denise Y.; Furquim, Tania A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of a computed radiography system was evaluated, according to the AAPM Report No. 93. Evaluation tests proposed by the publication were performed, and the following nonconformities were found: imaging p/ate (lP) dark noise, which compromises the clinical image acquired using the IP; exposure indicator uncalibrated, which can cause underexposure to the IP; nonlinearity of the system response, which causes overexposure; resolution limit under the declared by the manufacturer and erasure thoroughness uncalibrated, impairing structures visualization; Moire pattern visualized at the grid response, and IP Throughput over the specified by the manufacturer. These non-conformities indicate that digital imaging systems' lack of calibration can cause an increase in dose in order that image prob/ems can be so/ved. (author)

  4. Standard guide for computed radiography

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides general tutorial information regarding the fundamental and physical principles of computed radiography (CR), definitions and terminology required to understand the basic CR process. An introduction to some of the limitations that are typically encountered during the establishment of techniques and basic image processing methods are also provided. This guide does not provide specific techniques or acceptance criteria for specific end-user inspection applications. Information presented within this guide may be useful in conjunction with those standards of 1.2. 1.2 CR techniques for general inspection applications may be found in Practice E2033. Technical qualification attributes for CR systems may be found in Practice E2445. Criteria for classification of CR system technical performance levels may be found in Practice E2446. Reference Images Standards E2422, E2660, and E2669 contain digital reference acceptance illustrations. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the st...

  5. Corrosion Surveillance In Pipe By Computed Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen The Man; Dao Duy Dung; Dang Thu Hong; Le Duc Thinh; Ha Hong Thu; Nguyen Trong Nghia

    2014-01-01

    Computed Radiography (CR) is a technique of digital industrial radiology which is developed to replace conventional radiography. With a CR system, the detection of the outer and inner wall surface of the pipe is done usually by edge detection and filter algorithms of the profile line at the position under investigation. Applying in industries, radiographic examination shall be performed in accordance with a written procedure. This paper summarizes collected knowledge and experimental results to establish a procedure for radiography applications in monitoring corrosion in small bore pipes. (author)

  6. Quality comparison of direct digital panoramic radiography and computed radiography panoramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariush Goodarzipour

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Digital panoramic X-ray images can be captured using photostimulable phosphors or solid-state detectors (i.e. charge-coupled devices and Flat-Panels. The first category is defined as computed radiography (CR or semi-direct radiography. The second technology that uses solid-state detectors is known as direct digital radiography (DDR. Both of these technologies have their own advantages and disadvantages. One of the most important fields in comparison of these systems is their resultant image quality. The purpose of this study was to compare the subjective image quality of DDR and CR digital panoramic system, and to assess the overall density and contrast of their images. METHODS: 200 patients were randomly allocated to two digital systems: Promax [central control digital (CCD] and XC [photostimulable phosphor plates (PSP]. Image quality was evaluated in six regions on a 3-point scale by three oral and maxillofacial radiologists independently. In addition, observers assessed overall density and contrast of each image on a 3-point scale. RESULTS: Using chi-square test, no statistically significant differences were found (P >0.05 in subjective image quality of anatomic structures between the two radiographic systems. But DDR system outperformed CR system in overall density and contrast of the image. P values for both overall density and contrast of the images was less than 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: The subjective image quality of CR and DDR panoramic systems in specified anatomic regions were found statistically comparable in this study. In overall density and contrast of the radiographs, DDR system proved better than CR system.

  7. Advances in computed radiography systems and their physical imaging characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowen, A.R.; Davies, A.G.; Kengyelics, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    Radiological imaging is progressing towards an all-digital future, across the spectrum of medical imaging techniques. Computed radiography (CR) has provided a ready pathway from screen film to digital radiography and a convenient entry point to PACS. This review briefly revisits the principles of modern CR systems and their physical imaging characteristics. Wide dynamic range and digital image enhancement are well-established benefits of CR, which lend themselves to improved image presentation and reduced rates of repeat exposures. However, in its original form CR offered limited scope for reducing the radiation dose per radiographic exposure, compared with screen film. Recent innovations in CR, including the use of dual-sided image readout and channelled storage phosphor have eased these concerns. For example, introduction of these technologies has improved detective quantum efficiency (DQE) by approximately 50 and 100%, respectively, compared with standard CR. As a result CR currently affords greater scope for reducing patient dose, and provides a more substantive challenge to the new solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors

  8. Computed and conventional chest radiography: a comparison of image quality and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramli, K.; Abdullah, B.J.J.; Ng, K-H.; Hussain, A.F.; Mahmud, R.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the image quality and entrance skin dose (ESD) for film-screen and computed chest radiography. Analysis of the image quality and dose on chest radiography was carried out on a conventional X-ray unit using film-screen, storage phosphor plates and selenium drum direct chest radiography. For each receptor, ESD was measured in 60 patients using thermoluminescent dosemeters. Images were printed on 35 x 43 cm films. Image quality was assessed subjectively by evaluation of anatomic features and estimation of the image quality, following the guidelines established by the protocols of the Commission of the European Communities. There was no statistically significant difference noted between the computed and conventional images (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P>0.05). Imaging of the mediastinum and peripheral lung structures were better visualized with the storage phosphor and selenium drum technique than with the film-screen combination. The patients' mean ESD for chest radiography using the storage phosphor, film-screen combination and selenium drum was 0.20, 0.20 and 0.25 mGy, respectively, with no statistically significant difference with P > 0.05 (χ 2 tests) Copyright (2005) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  9. Digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Shoichi

    1993-01-01

    Firstly, from an historic point of view, fundamental concepts on digital imaging were reviewed to provide a foundation for discussion of digital radiography. Secondly, this review summarized the results of ongoing research in computed radiography that replaces the conventional film-screen system with a photo-stimulable phosphor plate; and thirdly, image quality, radiation protection, and image processing techniques were discussed with emphasis on picture archiving and communication system environment as our final goal. Finally, future expansion of digital radiography was described based on the present utilization of computed tomography at the National Defense Medical College Hospital. (author) 60 refs

  10. Storage phosphor radiography of wrist fractures: a subjective comparison of image quality at varying exposure levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peer, Regina; Giacomuzzi, Salvatore M.; Bodner, Gerd; Jaschke, Werner; Peer, Siegfried [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Lanser, Anton [Academy of Radiology Technicians, Innsbruck (Austria); Pechlaner, Sigurd [Department of Traumatology, University Hospital, Innsbruck (Austria); Kuenzel, Karl Heinz; Gaber, O. [Department of Anatomy and Histology, University Hospital, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2002-06-01

    Image quality of storage phosphor radiographs acquired at different exposure levels was compared to define the minimal radiation dose needed to achieve images which allow for reliable detection of wrist fractures. In a study on 33 fractured anatomical wrist specimens image quality of storage phosphor radiographs was assessed on a diagnostic PACS workstation by three observers. Images were acquired at exposure levels corresponding to a speed classes 100, 200, 400 and 800. Cortical bone surface, trabecular bone, soft tissues and fracture delineation were judged on a subjective basis. Image quality was rated according to a standard protocol and statistical evaluation was performed based on an analysis of variance (ANOVA). Images at a dose reduction of 37% were rated sufficient quality without loss in diagnostic accuracy. Sufficient trabecular and cortical bone presentation was still achieved at a dose reduction of 62%. The latter images, however, were considered unacceptable for fracture detection. To achieve high-quality storage phosphor radiographs, which allow for a reliable evaluation of wrist fractures, a minimum exposure dose equivalent to a speed class of 200 is needed. For general-purpose skeletal radiography, however, a dose reduction of up to 62% can be achieved. A choice of exposure settings according to the clinical situation (ALARA principle) is recommended to achieve possible dose reductions. (orig.)

  11. Computed Radiography: An Innovative Inspection Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, William A.; Councill, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    Florida Power and Light Company's (FPL) Nuclear Division combined two diverse technologies to create an innovative inspection technique, Computed Radiography, that improves personnel safety and unit reliability while reducing inspection costs. This technique was pioneered in the medical field and applied in the Nuclear Division initially to detect piping degradation due to flow-accelerated corrosion. Component degradation can be detected by this additional technique. This approach permits FPL to reduce inspection costs, perform on line examinations (no generation curtailment), and to maintain or improve both personnel safety and unit reliability. Computed Radiography is a very versatile tool capable of other uses: - improving the external corrosion program by permitting inspections underneath insulation, and - diagnosing system and component problems such as valve positions, without the need to shutdown or disassemble the component. (authors)

  12. Direct detector radiography versus dual reading computed radiography: feasibility of dose reduction in chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, Michael; Uffmann, Martin; Weber, Michael; Balassy, Csilla; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Prokop, Mathias

    2006-01-01

    The image quality of dual-reading computed radiography and dose-reduced direct radiography of the chest was compared in a clinical setting. The study group consisted of 50 patients that underwent three posteroanterior chest radiographs within minutes, one image obtained with a dual read-out computed radiography system (CR; Fuji 5501) at regular dose and two images with a flat panel direct detector unit (DR; Diagnost, Philips). The DR images were obtained with the same and with 50% of the dose used for the CR images. Images were evaluated in a blinded side-by-side comparison. Eight radiologists ranked the visually perceivable difference in image quality using a three-point scale. Then, three radiologists scored the visibility of anatomic landmarks in low and high attenuation areas and image noise. Statistical analysis was based on Friedman tests and Wilcoxon rank sum tests at a significance level of P<0.05. DR was judged superior to CR for the delineation of structures in high attenuation areas of the mediastinum even when obtained with 50% less dose (P<0.001). The visibility of most pulmonary structures was judged equivalent with both techniques, regardless of acquisition dose and speed level. Scores for image noise were lower for DR compared with CR, with the exception of DR obtained at a reduced dose. Thus, in this clinical preference study, DR was equivalent or even superior to the most modern dual read-out CR, even when obtained with 50% dose. A further dose reduction does not appear to be feasible for DR without significant loss of image quality. (orig.)

  13. Radiological protection procedures for industrial applications of computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, Josilto Oliveira de

    2009-03-01

    Due to its very particular characteristics, industrial radiography is responsible for roughly half of the relevant accidents in nuclear industry, in developed as well as in developing countries, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Thus, safety and radiological protection in industrial gamma radiography have been receiving especial treatment by regulatory authorities of most Member States. The main objective of the present work was to evaluate, from the radioprotection point of view, the main advantages of computed radiography (CR) for filmless industrial radiography. In order to accomplish this, both techniques, i.e. conventional and filmless computed radiography were evaluated and compared through practical studies. After the studies performed at the present work it was concluded that computed radiography significantly reduces the inherent doses, reflecting in smaller restricted areas and costs, with consequent improvement in radiological protection and safety. (author)

  14. PENGGUNAAN COMPUTED RADIOGRAPHY UNTUK IDENTIFIKASI MADU LEBAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRI MAIYENA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Research on identification of honey bee using Computed Radiography has been done. The testing was carried out by providing digital radiograph of the three types of honey bee. The voltage of the x-ray generator was varied at 50 kV, 60 kV and 70 kV, while filament current was set at 100 mA and exposure time was at 5 ms. Honey bee was identified based on the image line profile that indicated the distribution of linear absorption coefficient (µ for each sample. The analyses on the image line profile showed that at the voltage of 50 kV and 70 kV the three kinds of the honey bee can be distinguished. However, at the voltage of 60 kV the difference among honey bee was unable to be identified.

  15. Computed radiography in neonatal intensive care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlo, L.; Bighi, S.; Cervi, P.M.; Lupi, L.

    1991-01-01

    The Authors report their experience in the employment of a computerized digital radiographic system in Neonatal Intensive Care. The analog screen-film system is replaced by photosensitive imaging plates, scanned after X-ray exposure by a laser that releases the digital image, which can then be manipulated on computer work-stations. In a period of twelve months about 200 chest-abdomen X-ray examinations in Neonatal Intensive Care have been performed using this method with good technical and diagnostic results. The use of digital radiography in the neonatal area is of high interest: this system produces good quality images, there is a reduction in radiation dose and 'retakes', the system allows selective enhancement of different structures and their magnification. (orig.)

  16. Portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-11-01

    This user manual describes the function and use of the portable digital radiography and computed tomography (DRCT) scanner. The manual gives a general overview of x-ray imaging systems along with a description of the DRCT system. An inventory of the all the system components, organized by shipping container, is also included. In addition, detailed, step-by-step procedures are provided for all of the exercises necessary for a novice user to successfully collect digital radiographs and tomographic images of an object, including instructions on system assembly and detector calibration and system alignment. There is also a short section covering the limited system care and maintenance needs. Descriptions of the included software packages, the DRCT Digital Imager used for system operation, and the DRCT Image Processing Interface used for image viewing and tomographic data reconstruction are given in the appendixes. The appendixes also include a cheat sheet for more experienced users, a listing of known system problems and how to mitigate them, and an inventory check-off sheet suitable for copying and including with the machine for shipment purposes.

  17. Some malpractices in application of computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ruihong; Jia Shaotian; Wang Yusheng; Li Baohua; Chen Lin; Wang Zhenguang; Liu Jianxin; Gong Jingyue; Liu Daoyong; Xie Xuesong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To improve the CR image quality and to promote the digital image standard constitution by analyzing the common problems and malpractices in application of computed radiography. Methods: Phenomenon and reasons of 107 CR junk-films from nine three-'A'-hospitals were analyzed, discussed, recorded, and statistised by 20 radiologists, radiographers and engineers. Results: Among 107 junk films, there are 36 cases (33.64%) of incorrect operations, 29 cases (27.10%) of artifacts in reading and transferring the data of IP, 15 cases (14.02%) of artifacts in IP system, and 13 cases (12.15%) of selection of inappropriate radiographic parameters, and 9 cases (8.41%) of printer-failures, and 5 cases (4.67%) of inappropriate post-processing techniques. By analyzing the reasons of 107 junk films we found that 60.74% were due to less responsibilities and incorrect operations, and 35.51% were due to new problems in CR techniques, and other were due to inappropriate post-processing techniques. Conclusion: Responsibilities, operation regulations, digital image quality standards, studying of new techniques and appropriate use of the post-processing techniques are the key points for improving the CR image quality and the diagnosis level. (authors)

  18. Performance characteristics of a Kodak computed radiography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, C D; Peppler, W W; Dobbins, J T

    1999-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a photostimulable phosphor based computed radiographic (CR) system were studied. The modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the Kodak Digital Science computed radiography (CR) system (Eastman Kodak Co.-model 400) were measured and compared to previously published results of a Fuji based CR system (Philips Medical Systems-PCR model 7000). To maximize comparability, the same measurement techniques and analysis methods were used. The DQE at four exposure levels (30, 3, 0.3, 0.03 mR) and two plate types (standard and high resolution) were calculated from the NPS and MTF measurements. The NPS was determined from two-dimensional Fourier analysis of uniformly exposed plates. The presampling MTF was determined from the Fourier transform (FT) of the system's finely sampled line spread function (LSF) as produced by a narrow slit. A comparison of the slit type ("beveled edge" versus "straight edge") and its effect on the resulting MTF measurements was also performed. The results show that both systems are comparable in resolution performance. The noise power studies indicated a higher level of noise for the Kodak images (approximately 20% at the low exposure levels and 40%-70% at higher exposure levels). Within the clinically relevant exposure range (0.3-3 mR), the resulting DQE for the Kodak plates ranged between 20%-50% lower than for the corresponding Fuji plates. Measurements of the presampling MTF with the two slit types have shown that a correction factor can be applied to compensate for transmission through the relief edges.

  19. Phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This invention relates to phosphors that can be used in fluorescent lamps and display devices. The phosphor is comprised of a halophosphate of calcium and/or strontium of apatite crystal structure activated with trivalent cerium and trivalent terbium. The phosphor can further include manganese. Preferably, the phosphor includes up to 10% by weight of one or more of the alkali metals lithium, sodium and potassium in the form of a compound or compounds thereof. The emissions appear as a number of fairly narrow discrete bands. The temperature of preparation is 1000degC (as opposed to the usual 1450degC), therefore reducing costs (less energy is needed, more crucibles are readily obtainable and there is no need for special conditions to enable crucibles to overcome thermal shock)

  20. Nuclear imaging using Fuji Computed Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yodono, Hiraku; Tarusawa, Nobuko; Katto, Keiichi; Miyakawa, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Sadao; Shinozaki, Tatsuyo

    1988-01-01

    We studied the feasibility of the Fuji Computed Radiography system (FCR) in nuclear medicine. The basic principle of the system is the conversion of the X-ray energy pattern into digital signals utilizing scanning laser stimulated luminescence. A Rollo phantom filled with 12 mCi of Tc-99m pertechnetate was used in this study. In imaging by the FCR, a low energy high resolution parallel hole collimator for a gamma camera was placed over the phantom and photons through the collimator were stored on a single imaging plate (IP) or 3 IPs covered by the lead plate, 0.3 mm in thickness. For imaging, it took 30 minutes by a single IP and 20 minutes by 3 IPs with the lead plate respectively. Each image of the phantom by the FCR was compared with that of obtained by a gamma camera. The image by a single IP was inferior in quality than that of by a gamma camera. However using 3 IPs with the lead plate, same quality image as by a gamma camera was obtained. The image by 3 IPs is similar to that of by 3 IPs with the lead plate. Based on the results, we performed liver and lung imaging by FCR using 3 IPs. The imaging time is twenty minutes. The images obtained with FCR are as good as the scinticamera image. However it has two major flawes in that the sensitivity is poor and the imaging time is long. Furthermore, at present this method can only be employed for static imaging. However we feel that future improvements in the FCR system will overcome these problems. (author)

  1. Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, C. G.

    1973-01-01

    Radiography is discussed as a method for nondestructive evaluation of internal flaws of solids. Gamma ray and X-ray equipment are described along with radiographic film, radiograph interpretation, and neutron radiography.

  2. Study of check image using computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    There are two image forming methods both a check image and a portal image in the linacogram. It has been established the image forming method in the check image using computed radiography (CR). On the other hand, it is not established the image forming method in the portal image using CR yet. Usually, in the electric portal imaging device (EPID) is mainly used just before radiotherapy start. The usefulness of the portal image forming method by CR using in place of EPID is possible to confirm the precision for determining to specific position at the irradiate part and to the irradiate method for the human organs. There are some technical problems that, since in the early time, the linac graphy (LG) image have low resolution power. In order to improve to the resolution power in LG image, CR image technologies have been introduced to the check image forming method. Heavy metallic sheet (HMS) is used to the front side of CR-IP cassette, and high contactness sponge is used to the back side of the cassette. Improved contactness between HMS and imaging plate (IP) by means of the high contactness sponge contributed to improve the resolution power in the check images. A lot of paper which is connected with these information have been reported. Imaging plate ST-III should be used to maintain high sensitivity in the check film image forming method. The same image forming method in the check image established by CR has been introduced into the portal image forming method in order to improve the resolution power. However, as a result, it couldn't acquired high resolution image forming in the portal images because of the combination of ST-III and radiotherapy dose. After several trials, it has been recognized that HR-V imaging plate for mammography is the most useful application to maintain high resolution power in the portal images. Also, it is possible to modify the image quality by changing GS parameter which is one of image processing parameters in CR. Furthermore, in case

  3. Validation of Computed Radiography (CR) Exposure Chart for Stainless Steel and Aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassir, M.A.; Khairul Anuar Mohd Salleh; Arshad Yassin

    2015-01-01

    Computed radiography (CR) is a technique that is currently used to complement the conventional radiography in Non Destructive Testing (NDT). With CR, phosphorous base imaging plate (IP) is used to acquire digital radiographic images. The degree of absorption by the IP is proportional to the intensity of the dose received. The IP stores latent image which subsequently digitized by the CR reader. Prior to radiography exposure, the radiation dosage is determined by referring to the exposure chart. Exposure chart is one of the most important tools for achieving acceptable quality radiographs. Therefore, it is important to have a reliable and accurate exposure chart. The aim of this study is to test and validate exposure charts that were developed based on the statistical analysis of the digital radiographic grey values. The charts produced were for stainless steel and aluminum. According to EN 14784-2:2005, acceptable normalized signal-to-noise ratio (SNR N ) for testing class A and class B shall have minimum 70 and 120 respectively. (author)

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of phosphor plate systems and conventional radiography in the detection of simulated internal root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Karla de Faria; Rovaris, Karla; Nascimento, Eduarda Helena Leandro; Oliveira, Matheus Lima; Távora, Débora de Melo; Bóscolo, Frab Norberto

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the performance of conventional radiography and photostimulable phosphor (PSP) plate in the detection of simulated internal root resorption (IRR) lesions in early stages. Twenty single-rooted teeth were X-rayed before and after having a simulated IRR early lesion. Three imaging systems were used: Kodak InSight dental film and two PSPs digital systems, Digora Optime and VistaScan. The digital images were displayed on a 20.1″ LCD monitor using the native software of each system, and the conventional radiographs were evaluated on a masked light box. Two radiologists were asked to indicate the presence or absence of IRR and, after two weeks, all images were re-evaluated. Cohen's kappa coefficient was calculated to assess intra- and interobserver agreement. The three imaging systems were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test. For interexaminer agreement, overall kappa values were 0.70, 0.65 and 0.70 for conventional film, Digora Optima and VistaScan, respectively. Both the conventional and digital radiography presented low sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values with no significant difference between imaging systems (p = .0725). The performance of conventional and PSP was similar in the detection of simulated IRR lesions in early stages with low accuracy.

  5. Does transitioning from computed radiography (CR) to direct radiography (DR) with portable imaging systems affect workflow efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali, Raja L.; Roth, Christopher G.; Smith, Elizabeth; Dave, Jaydev K.

    2018-03-01

    In digital radiography, computed radiography (CR) technology is based on latent image capture by storage phosphors whereas direct radiography (DR) technology is based either on indirect conversion using a scintillator or direct conversion using a photoconductor. DR-based portable imaging systems may enhance workflow efficiency. The purpose of this work was to investigate changes in workflow efficiency at a tertiary healthcare center after transitioning from CR to DR technology for imaging with portable x-ray units. An IRB exemption was obtained. Data for all inpatient-radiographs acquired with portable x-ray units from July-2014 till June-2015 (period 1) with CR technology (AMX4 or AMX4+ portable unit from GE Healthcare, NX workstation from Agfa Healthcare for digitization), from July-2015 till June-2016 (period 2) with DR technology (Carestream DRX-Revolution x-ray units and DRX-1C image receptors) and from July-2016 till January-2017 (period 3; same DR technology) were extracted using Centricity RIS-IC (GE Healthcare). Duration between the imaging-examination scheduled time and completed time (timesch-com) was calculated and compared using non-parametric tests (between the three time periods with corrections for multiple comparisons; three time periods were used to identify if there were any other potential temporal trends not related to transitioning from CR to DR). IBM's SPSS package was used for statistical analysis. Overall data was obtained from 33131, 32194, and 18015 cases in periods 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Independent-Samples Kruskal-Wallis test revealed a statistically significant difference in timesch-com across the three time periods (χ2(2, n= 83,340) = 2053, p < 0.001). The timesch-com was highest for period 1 i.e., radiographs acquired with CR technology (median: 64 minutes) and it decreased significantly for radiographs acquired with DR technology in periods 2 (median: 49 minutes; p < 0.001) and 3 (median∶ 44 minutes; p < 0.001). Overall

  6. Phantom examination for reduction of radiation dose using new needle screen storage phosphor radiography and add beam filter in digital thoracic radiography on adolescents and larger children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyne, J.P.; Mentzel, H.J.; Neumann, R.; Lopatta, E.; Zimmermann, U.; Kaiser, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: how much can the radiation dose be reduced in thoracic radiography on adolescents and larger children by using needle screen storage phosphor (NIP) radiography and add beam filtration? Materials and methods: a chest phantom with typical anatomical structures, pathological findings, added catheters, and simulated nodules, tumors, and calcifications was X-rayed digitally (DX-S, Agfa Healthcare) in posterior-anterior (p.a.) orientation with and without add beam filter. While keeping the voltage constant, the tube current time product was reduced gradually. In addition to LgM, the surface entrance dose (ED) and the dose area product (DAP) were measured by the Dosimax sensor and Kerma X-plus (both Wellhoefer). Five investigators evaluated the images for characteristics and critical features, pathological findings, and catheter recognizability. Results: the ED of the digital chest radiogram p.a. with 115 kV and 0.71 mAs was 27 μGy, the DAP 3.6 μGy x m 2 , the LgM value 1.56. This initial radiogram was able to be evaluated very well and conforms to the quality guidelines. The dose-reduced chest radiograms with the add beam filter Al 1.0 mm/Cu 0.1 mm were evaluated as sufficiently reduced to a dose of 63% of the initial dose, with the add beam filter Al 1.0 mm/Cu 0.2 mm reduced to 50% (0.52 mAs, DAP 1.82 μGy x m 2 , LgM 1.35). P.a. radiograms were able to be X-rayed on 115 kV with 0.52 mAs. (orig.)

  7. Computed radiography versus mobile direct radiography for bedside chest radiographs: impact of dose on image quality and reader agreement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boo, D. W.; Weber, M.; Deurloo, E. E.; Streekstra, G. J.; Freling, N. J.; Dongelmans, D. A.; Schaefer-Prokop, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    To asses the image quality and potential for dose reduction of mobile direct detector (DR) chest radiography as compared with computed radiography (CR) for intensive care unit (ICU) chest radiographs (CXR). Three groups of age-, weight- and disease-matched ICU patients (n=114 patients; 50 CXR per

  8. Two K versus 4 K storage phosphor chest radiography: detection performance and image quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelblinger, Claus; Prokop, Mathias; Weber, Michael; Sailer, Johannes; Cartes-Zumelzu, Fabiola; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of matrix size (4-K versus 2-K) in digital storage phosphor chest radiographs on image quality and on the detection of CT-proven thoracic abnormalities. In 85 patients who underwent a CT of the thorax, we obtained two additional posteroanterior

  9. Phantom gastric mucosa for evaluating computed radiography in double-contrast upper gastrointestinal examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, M.; Watanabe, H.; Nakata, H.

    1996-01-01

    To test the clinical usefulness of computed radiography (CR) with a storage phosphor plate in upper gastrointestinal radiographic examinations, a newly devised phantom gastric mucosa was used. Simulated small elevated and depressed lesions were created on a phantom gastric mucosa made from a styrofoam 'plate'. Twenty-four sets of each CR and screen-film radiographs (SR) were obtained using phototimed exposures. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study and visual ranking using these images were performed. There was no significant difference between the ROC curves of CR and SR. By visual ranking, CR was equal to or better than SR in most cases. In no case was SR definitely superior to CR. CR can be safely applied in upper gastrointestinal roentgenologic examinations. (orig.)

  10. Digital chest radiography with an amorphous silicon flat-panel-detector versus a storage-phosphor system: comparison of soft-copy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Ju; Im, Jung Gi; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Chang Hyun

    2006-01-01

    We compared the soft-copy images produced by an amorphous silicon flat-panel-detector system with the images produced by a storage-phosphor radiography system for their ability to visualize anatomic regions of the chest. Two chest radiologists independently analyzed 234 posteroanterior chest radiographs obtained from 78 patients on high-resolution liquid crystal display monitors (2560 x 2048 x 8 bits). In each patient, one radiograph was obtained with a storage-phosphor system, and two radiographs were obtained via amorphous silicon flat-panel-detector radiography with and without spatial frequency filtering. After randomizing the 234 images, the interpreters rated the visibility and radiographic quality of 11 different anatomic regions. Each image was ranked on a five-point scale (1 = not visualized, 2 = poor visualization, 3 = fair visualization, 4 = good visualization, and 5 = excellent visualization). The statistical difference between each system was determined using the Wilcoxon's signed rank test. The visibility of three anatomic regions (hilum, heart border and ribs), as determined by the chest radiologist with 14 years experience (ρ < 0.05) and the visibility of the thoracic spine, as determined by the chest radiologist with 8 years experience (ρ = 0.036), on the amorphous silicon flat-panel-detector radiography prior to spatial frequency filtering were significantly superior to that on the storage-phosphor radiography. The visibility of 11 anatomic regions, as determined by the chest radiologist with 14 years experience (ρ < 0.0001) and the visibility of five anatomic regions (unobscured lung, rib, proximal airway, thoracic spine and overall appearance), as determined by the chest radiologist with 8 years experience (ρ < 0.05), on the amorphous silicon flat-panel-detector radiography after spatial frequency filtering were significantly superior to that on the storage-phosphor radiography. The amorphous silicon flat-panel-detector system depicted the

  11. Computed radiography dose optimization in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juste, B.; Verdu, G.; Tortosa, R.; Villaescusa, J.I.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation dose reduction in pediatric X-ray imaging is especially important because of children radiation sensitivity. For any radiographic examination performed at a fixed radiographic tube potential, the patient absorbed dose is directly proportional to the value of milliampere-seconds (mAs) selected by the operator. Nevertheless, reducing X-ray exposure has the unavoidable disadvantage of increasing the quantum noise in the resultant image. The objective of this work is to identify the minimum tube current setting required for maintaining accurate examinations, to modify, if required, the daily protocols applied at La Fe de Valencia Universitary Hospital. To accomplish this goal, a noise addition software has been developed in order to study the diagnostic accuracy as a function of reducing dose by artificially increasing the image noise. The noise addition tool has been applied to several thorax images acquired from pediatric unit to simulate new lower dose radiographies and allow medical researchers to study how lower dose affects the patient pneumonia diagnosis. (author)

  12. Computer processing techniques in digital radiography research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickens, D.R.; Kugel, J.A.; Waddill, W.B.; Smith, G.D.; Martin, V.N.; Price, R.R.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    In the Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and the Center for Medical Imaging Research, Nashville, TN, there are several activities which are designed to increase the information available from film-screen acquisition as well as from direct digital acquisition of radiographic information. Two of the projects involve altering the display of images after acquisition, either to remove artifacts present as a result of the acquisition process or to change the manner in which the image is displayed to improve the perception of details in the image. These two projects use methods which can be applied to any type of digital image, but are being implemented with images digitized from conventional x-ray film. One of these research endeavors involves mathematical alteration of the image to correct for motion artifacts or registration errors between images that will be subtracted. Another applies well-known image processing methods to digital radiographic images to improve the image contrast and enhance subtle details in the image. A third project involves the use of dual energy imaging with a digital radiography system to reconstruct images which demonstrate either soft tissue details or the osseous structures. These projects are discussed in greater detail in the following sections of this communication

  13. Two K versus 4 K storage phosphor chest radiography: detection performance and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelblinger, Claus; Weber, Michael; Sailer, Johannes; Cartes-Zumelzu, Fabiola; Prokop, Mathias; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of matrix size (4-K versus 2-K) in digital storage phosphor chest radiographs on image quality and on the detection of CT-proven thoracic abnormalities. In 85 patients who underwent a CT of the thorax, we obtained two additional posteroanterior storage phosphor chest radiographs, one with a matrix size of 3,520 x 4,280 (=4-K) and the other with a matrix size of 1,760 x 2,140 (=2-K). Acquisition, processing and presentation parameters were identical for all radiographs. Two radiologists evaluated the presence of mediastinal, pleural, and pulmonary abnormalities on hard copies of the radiographs, applying ROC analysis. In addition, four radiologists were asked to subjectively rank differences in image quality and to assess the demarcation of anatomic landmarks comparing the images in a blinded side-by-side manner. These data were analyzed using a two-sided binomial test with a significance level of P<0.05. Both tests, the ROC analysis of the detection performance and the binomial test of the subjective quality ratings, did not reveal significant differences between the two matrix sizes. Compared to 2-K radiographs, 4-K storage phosphor chest radiographs do not provide superior detection performance or image quality when evaluated in identical hard copy formats. (orig.)

  14. Studies on the Fuji computed radiography depended on the panoramic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Satoshi; Shiota, Satoru; Takazawa, Kazuyoshi; Yoshida, Toru; Takagi, Yoshiko; Funamoto, Choichiro

    1986-01-01

    The Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) developed recently involves the following procedures; photography in the same way as the hitherto radiography, printing auto imaging plate of photostimulable phospher, conversion to electric signals, and recording reproduced images by computerization. Highly valuable images for diagnoses in the medical field have already been obtained by the FCR. Then, we attempted to study FCR images panoramically radiographed for jaw lesions in the field of oral surgery. Method for study: As the samples to be studied, the selected subjects were cases of periodontal diseases, fracture of the jaw, odontogenic cyst and tumor, etc. In the present study the FCR images of panoramic radiography were compared with hitherto panoramic flat radiograms. Result of study: Although the images of the FCR vary depending on the methods of treatment, that is, on how gradient processing and spatial frequency enhancement are, the method of purpose-fitting treatment provided diagnostically significant images for grasping bone lesions. The images obtained from this FCR permitted us to grasp more distinctly condition of alveolar bone resorption in periodontal diseases, running of minute fracture lines in fracture of the jaw, and characteristic images of bone resorption in odontogenic cysts and tumor, etc. Thus the images of the FCR are highly useful in diagnosing bone lesions, but granularity of the images themselves have still been questioned, and additionally the images vary depending on the methods of gradient processing and spatial frequency enhancement. Therefore further repeat studies are probably needed for these questions. (author)

  15. Physical image quality of computed radiography in mammography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norriza Mohd Isa; Muhammad Jamal Isa; Wan Muhamad Saridan Wan Hassan; Fatimah Othman

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: Mammography is a screening procedure that mostly used for early detection of breast cancer. In digital imaging system, Computed Radiography is a cost-effective technology that applied indirect conversion detector. The paper presents physical image quality parameter measurements namely modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of Computed Radiography in mammography system. MTF was calculated from two different orientations of slanted images of an edge test device and NNPS was estimated using flat-field image. Both images were acquired using a standard mammography beam quality. DQE was determined by applying the MTF and NNPS values into our developed software program. Both orientations have similar DQE characteristics. (author)

  16. Digital computed radiography in industrial X-ray testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterloh, K.; Onel, Y.; Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U.

    2001-01-01

    Computed radiography is used for X-ray testing in many industrial applications. There are different systems depending on the application, e.g. fast systems for detection of material inhomogeneities and slower systems with higher local resolution for detection of cracks and fine details, e.g. in highly stressed areas or in welded seams. The method is more dynamic than film methods, and digital image processing is possible during testing [de

  17. Computed radiography simulation using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, S.C.A.; Souza, E.M.; Silva, A.X.; Lopes, R.T.

    2009-01-01

    Simulating x-ray images has been of great interest in recent years as it makes possible an analysis of how x-ray images are affected owing to relevant operating parameters. In this paper, a procedure for simulating computed radiographic images using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX is proposed. The sensitivity curve of the BaFBr image plate detector as well as the characteristic noise of a 16-bit computed radiography system were considered during the methodology's development. The results obtained confirm that the proposed procedure for simulating computed radiographic images is satisfactory, as it allows obtaining results comparable with experimental data. (author)

  18. Computed radiography simulation using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, S.C.A. [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Universitario Estadual da Zona Oeste (CCMAT)/UEZO, Av. Manuel Caldeira de Alvarenga, 1203, Campo Grande, 23070-200, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, E.M. [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, A.X., E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.b [PEN/COPPE-DNC/Poli CT, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cassiano, D.H. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria/CNEN Av. Salvador Allende, s/n, Recreio, 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, R.T. [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-09-15

    Simulating X-ray images has been of great interest in recent years as it makes possible an analysis of how X-ray images are affected owing to relevant operating parameters. In this paper, a procedure for simulating computed radiographic images using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX is proposed. The sensitivity curve of the BaFBr image plate detector as well as the characteristic noise of a 16-bit computed radiography system were considered during the methodology's development. The results obtained confirm that the proposed procedure for simulating computed radiographic images is satisfactory, as it allows obtaining results comparable with experimental data.

  19. Performance evaluation of a 'dual-side read' dedicated mammography computed radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterly, Kenneth A.; Schueler, Beth A.

    2003-01-01

    The image quality of a dedicated mammography computed radiography (CR) system was characterized. A unique feature of this system is that it collects image signals from both sides of the storage phosphor. Measurements of the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were made. This work included improvements in our measurement methods to specifically account for the detrimental effects of system glare on the MTF and to accurately characterize the low-frequency NPS components. Image quality measurements were performed using a 25 kVp beam filtered with 2 mm Al and an exposure range of 1 to 100 mR (87 to 870 μGy). The DQE was found to decrease with increasing exposure due to an increased contribution of storage phosphor structure noise. The DQE of this system was compared to similar measurements made using a standard CR system. The dual-side read system demonstrated superior DQE compared to the standard system. The decrease in DQE with increasing exposure was more severe for the standard system than the dual-side read system. This finding suggests that the CR system noise was reduced for the dual-side read system compared to the standard system

  20. Fuji computed radiography (FCR) for the diagnosis of spinal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Yoshichika; Waga, Shiro; Kojima, Tadashi

    1987-01-01

    Since April, 1985, we have, in co-operation with the Fuji Film Co., Ltd., used Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) in the diagnosis of spinal disorders. FCR is a new computed radiographic system which uses an energy-storage phosphorus panel called an ''Imaging Plate'' as an image sensor. The ''Imaging Plate'' can be used to obtain radiographs in exactly the same way as the screen-film combination used in conventional radiography; X-rays are exposed on the ''Imaging Plate'' instead of X-ray film in the conventional fashion, and then the ''Imaging Plate'' is calculated. The processed digital data from the scans is transformed into a picture by means of digital-to-analogue conversion. The pictures are always clear and beautiful. Plain films of the spine taken by FCR are even clearer, even in the cervicothoracic region, where it is usually difficult to obtain clear cervicothoracic films in conventional radiography. We can obtain much precise information about the spinal posterior osteophytes and grafted bone, even when the patients are immobilized in a Halo apparatus. In myelography, the pictures are also clearer; we can see how the root or roots are compressed, how the dura and cord are involved in patients with cervical disc disease, and even the very narrow space between the cord and an intradural tumor. FCR is thus very useful in observing spinal disorders, either in plain films or myelography. (author)

  1. Comparison of cone - beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography in detection of recurrent caries under composite restorations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasraei, Shahin; Shokri, Abbas; Poorolajal, Jalal; Rahmani, Hamid, E-mail: Dr.a.shokri@gmail.com [Hamadan University of Medical Sciences Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khajeh, Samira [Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Secondary caries is the most common cause of dental restoration failures. This study aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of conventional and digital intraoral radiography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for detection of recurrent caries around composite restorations mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities were prepared using bur on 45 extracted sound human molar teeth. The teeth were divided into 3 groups. In the control group, cavities were restored with composite resin after etching and bonding (n=15). In Group 2, 500-μm thick wax was placed over the buccal, lingual and gingival walls and the cavities were restored with composite resin. Group 3 specimens were subjected to pH cycling and artificial caries were created on the buccal, lingual and gingival walls. The cavities were restored with composite. Conventional and digital photo-stimulable phosphor (PSP; Optime) radiographs and two CBCTs images (NewTom 3G and Cranex 3D) were obtained from them. Presence or absence of caries in the cavity walls was assessed on these images. Data were analyzed using Kappa statistic. The diagnostic accuracy of CBCT was significantly higher than that of digital and conventional intraoral radiography (p<0.05). The accuracy was 0.83, 0.78, 0.55 and 0.49 for CBCT Cranex 3D, CBCT NewTom 3G, conventional and digital intraoral radiography, respectively. CBCT has a higher diagnostic accuracy than digital and conventional intraoral radiography for detection of secondary caries around composite restorations. (author)

  2. Comparison of cone - beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography in detection of recurrent caries under composite restorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasraei, Shahin; Shokri, Abbas; Poorolajal, Jalal; Rahmani, Hamid; Khajeh, Samira

    2017-01-01

    Secondary caries is the most common cause of dental restoration failures. This study aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of conventional and digital intraoral radiography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for detection of recurrent caries around composite restorations mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities were prepared using bur on 45 extracted sound human molar teeth. The teeth were divided into 3 groups. In the control group, cavities were restored with composite resin after etching and bonding (n=15). In Group 2, 500-μm thick wax was placed over the buccal, lingual and gingival walls and the cavities were restored with composite resin. Group 3 specimens were subjected to pH cycling and artificial caries were created on the buccal, lingual and gingival walls. The cavities were restored with composite. Conventional and digital photo-stimulable phosphor (PSP; Optime) radiographs and two CBCTs images (NewTom 3G and Cranex 3D) were obtained from them. Presence or absence of caries in the cavity walls was assessed on these images. Data were analyzed using Kappa statistic. The diagnostic accuracy of CBCT was significantly higher than that of digital and conventional intraoral radiography (p<0.05). The accuracy was 0.83, 0.78, 0.55 and 0.49 for CBCT Cranex 3D, CBCT NewTom 3G, conventional and digital intraoral radiography, respectively. CBCT has a higher diagnostic accuracy than digital and conventional intraoral radiography for detection of secondary caries around composite restorations. (author)

  3. Miniature, mobile X-ray computed radiography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Scott A; Rose, Evan A

    2017-03-07

    A miniature, portable x-ray system may be configured to scan images stored on a phosphor. A flash circuit may be configured to project red light onto a phosphor and receive blue light from the phosphor. A digital monochrome camera may be configured to receive the blue light to capture an article near the phosphor.

  4. A method to optimize the processing algorithm of a computed radiography system for chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C S; Liney, G P; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2007-09-01

    A test methodology using an anthropomorphic-equivalent chest phantom is described for the optimization of the Agfa computed radiography "MUSICA" processing algorithm for chest radiography. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the lung, heart and diaphragm regions of the phantom, and the "system modulation transfer function" (sMTF) in the lung region, were measured using test tools embedded in the phantom. Using these parameters the MUSICA processing algorithm was optimized with respect to low-contrast detectability and spatial resolution. Two optimum "MUSICA parameter sets" were derived respectively for maximizing the CNR and sMTF in each region of the phantom. Further work is required to find the relative importance of low-contrast detectability and spatial resolution in chest images, from which the definitive optimum MUSICA parameter set can then be derived. Prior to this further work, a compromised optimum MUSICA parameter set was applied to a range of clinical images. A group of experienced image evaluators scored these images alongside images produced from the same radiographs using the MUSICA parameter set in clinical use at the time. The compromised optimum MUSICA parameter set was shown to produce measurably better images.

  5. Internal anatomy of the hornbill casque described by radiography, contrast radiography, and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Kathryn C

    2007-03-01

    Hornbills are distinguished from most other avian taxa by the presence of a casque on the dorsal maxillary beak, which, in all but 1 of the 54 extant hornbill species, is described as essentially an air-filled cavity enclosed by minimal cancellous bone. The external casque has been described in detail, but little has been described about its internal anatomy and the communications between the casque and the paranasal sinuses. In this study, 10 intact casque and skull specimens of 7 hornbill species were collected opportunistically at necropsy. The anatomy of the casque and the skull for each of the specimens was examined by radiography, contrast radiography, and computed tomography. After imaging, 8 specimens were submitted for osteologic preparation to directly visualize the casque and the skull interior. Through this standardized review, the baseline anatomy of the internal casque was described, including identification of a novel casque sinus within the paranasal sinus system. These observations will assist clinicians in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the casque in hornbill species.

  6. Integrating photo-stimulable phosphor plates into dental and dental hygiene radiography curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tax, Cara L; Robb, Christine L; Brillant, Martha G S; Doucette, Heather J

    2013-11-01

    It is not known whether the integration of photo-stimulable phosphor (PSP) plates into dental and dental hygiene curricula creates unique learning challenges for students. The purpose of this two-year study was to determine if dental hygiene students had more and/or different types of errors when using PSP plates compared to film and whether the PSP imaging plates had any particular characteristics that needed to be addressed in the learning process. Fifty-nine first-year dental hygiene students at one Canadian dental school were randomly assigned to two groups (PSP or film) before exposing their initial full mouth series on a teaching manikin using the parallel technique. The principal investigator determined the number and types of errors based on a specific set of performance criteria. The two groups (PSP vs. film) were compared for total number and type of errors made. Results of the study indicated the difference in the total number of errors made using PSP or film was not statistically significant; however, there was a difference in the types of errors made, with the PSP group having more horizontal errors than the film group. In addition, the study identified a number of unique characteristics of the PSP plates that required special consideration for teaching this technology.

  7. Digital and analogue industrial radiography, application fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willems, Peter; Millord, Erik Yardin

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Reusable phosphor screens for computer radiography (CR), amorphous selenium screens for direct radiography (DR), film digitalisation (FD) constitute imaging methods accepted by industry and are used for non-destructive radiographic testing (RT). Economic pressures are involving and affecting digital RT technology. Standards and codes for film radiography and radioscopy qualification do no longer cover the wide range of digital RT applications. It will be our task to optimise the performance of digital RT characterisation and to create appropriate examination methods to use all these new and existent technologies. In the meantime, an increasing automation and control of manual methods of analogue radiography can as well be expected. (author)

  8. Computers in dental radiography: a scenario for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webber, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The recent emergence of cost-effective computing power makes it possible to integrate sophisticated data-sampling and image-interpretation techniques into dental radiography for the first time. A prototype system is being developed to permit clinical information expressed in three dimensions--plus time--to be made visible almost instantly. The associated X-ray dose for a complete three-dimensional survey of a selected dental region is predicted to be less than that required for a single conventional periapical radiograph exposed on D-speed film

  9. Real-time radiography, digital radiography, and computed tomography for nonintrusive waste drum characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martz, H.E.; Schneberk, D.J.; Roberson, G.P.

    1994-07-01

    We are investigating and developing the application of x-ray nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and gamma-ray nondestructive assay (NDA) methods to nonintrusively characterize 208-liter (55-gallon) mixed waste drums. Mixed wastes contain both hazardous and radioactive materials. We are investigating the use of x-ray NDE methods to verify the content of documented waste drums and determine if they can be used to identify hazardous and nonconforming materials. These NDE methods are also being used to help waste certification and hazardous waste management personnel at LLNL to verify/confirm and/or determine the contents of waste. The gamma-ray NDA method is used to identify the intrinsic radioactive source(s) and to accurately quantify its strength. The NDA method may also be able to identify some hazardous materials such as heavy metals. Also, we are exploring techniques to combine both NDE and NDA data sets to yield the maximum information from these nonintrusive, waste-drum characterization methods. In this paper, we report an our x-ray NDE R ampersand D activities, while our gamma-ray NDA activities are reported elsewhere in the proceedings. We have developed a data, acquisition scanner for x-ray NDE real-time radiography (RTR), as well as digital radiography transmission computed tomography (TCT) along with associated computational techniques for image reconstruction, analysis, and display. We are using this scanner and real-waste drums at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In this paper, we discuss some issues associated with x-ray imaging, describe the design construction of an inexpensive NDE drum scanner, provide representative DR and TCT results of both mock- and real-waste drums, and end with a summary of our efforts and future directions. The results of these scans reveal that RTR, DR, and CT imaging techniques can be used in concert to provide valuable information about the interior of low-level-, transuranic-, and mock-waste drums without

  10. Fuji computed radiography (FCR) for the diagnosis of spinal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Yoshichika; Waga, Shiro; Kojima, Tadashi

    1987-04-01

    Since April, 1985, we have, in co-operation with the Fuji Film Co., Ltd., used Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) in the diagnosis of spinal disorders. FCR is a new computed radiographic system which uses an energy-storage phosphorus panel called an ''Imaging Plate'' as an image sensor. The ''Imaging Plate'' can be used to obtain radiographs in exactly the same way as the screen-film combination used in conventional radiography; X-rays are exposed on the ''Imaging Plate'' instead of X-ray film in the conventional fashion, and then the ''Imaging Plate'' is calculated. The processed digital data from the scans is transformed into a picture by means of digital-to-analogue conversion. The pictures are always clear and beautiful. Plain films of the spine taken by FCR are even clearer, even in the cervicothoracic region, where it is usually difficult to obtain clear cervicothoracic films in conventional radiography. We can obtain much precise information about the spinal posterior osteophytes and grafted bone, even when the patients are immobilized in a Halo apparatus. In myelography, the pictures are also clearer; we can see how the root or roots are compressed, how the dura and cord are involved in patients with cervical disc disease, and even the very narrow space between the cord and an intradural tumor. FCR is thus very useful in observing spinal disorders, either in plain films or myelography.

  11. Improvement of the clinical use of computed radiography for mobile chest imaging: Image quality and patient dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rill, Lynn Neitzey

    Chest radiography is technically difficult because of the wide variation of tissue attenuations in the chest and limitations of screen-film systems. Mobile chest radiography, performed bedside on hospital inpatients, presents additional difficulties due to geometrical and equipment limitations inherent to mobile x-ray procedures and the severity of illness in patients. Computed radiography (CR) offers a new approach for mobile chest radiography by utilizing a photostimulable phosphor. Photostimulable phosphors are more efficient in absorbing lower-energy x-rays than standard intensifying screens and overcome some image quality limitations of mobile chest imaging, particularly because of the inherent latitude. This study evaluated changes in imaging parameters for CR to take advantage of differences between CR and screen-film radiography. Two chest phantoms, made of acrylic and aluminum, simulated x-ray attenuation for average-sized and large- sized adult chests. The phantoms contained regions representing the lungs, heart and subdiaphragm. Acrylic and aluminum disks (1.9 cm diameter) were positioned in the chest regions to make signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements for different combinations of imaging parameters. Disk thicknesses (contrast) were determined from disk visibility. Effective dose to the phantom was also measured for technique combinations. The results indicated that using an anti-scatter grid and lowering x- ray tube potential improved the SNR significantly; however, the dose to the phantom also increased. An evaluation was performed to examine the clinical applicability of the observed improvements in SNR. Parameter adjustments that improved phantom SNRs by more than 50% resulted in perceived image quality improvements in the lung region of clinical mobile chest radiographs. Parameters that produced smaller improvements in SNR had no apparent effect on clinical image quality. Based on this study, it is recommended that a 3:1 grid be used for

  12. Computed Tomography and Computed Radiography of late Bronze Age Cremation Urns from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvig, Lise Lock; Lynnerup, Niels; Amsgaard Ebsen, Jannie

    2012-01-01

    To improve methods used to study prehistoric cremation rituals, cremation urns from the Danish late Bronze Age were examined using Computed Tomography and Computed Radiography (Digital X-ray). During microexcavation, the digital images were used as registration tool. Our results suggest...

  13. Infection control in digital intraoral radiography: evaluation of microbiological contamination of photostimulable phosphor plates in barrier envelopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, David S; Waterfield, J Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The detectors (both solid-state sensors and photostimulable phosphor [PSP] plates) used for digital intraoral radiography cannot be autoclaved, and barriers are typically used to prevent the spread of infection. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a barrier envelope system for PSP plates. Disinfected PSP plates were aseptically inserted into barrier envelopes and placed in a periapical location. One PSP plate was placed in each of 28 patients, and 12 plates in each of 2 volunteers (D.S.M., J.D.W.). After retrieval, each PSP plate was removed from its barrier envelope, immersed in trypticase soy broth and aliquots were plated on trypticase soy agar. Bacterial colonies were counted 2 days later. Fifty-two PSP plates in barrier envelopes were evaluated for contamination. Quality assurance of the PSP plates before clinical placement revealed defects in the integrity of 4 barrier envelopes, caused by forceps-related damage or failure to achieve a uniform seal. These defects allowed substantial contamination. Contamination also occurred as a result of failure to extract the PSP plate from the barrier envelope cleanly. Of the 44 barriers with no obvious defects that were placed by either final-year dental students or a radiologist, only 3 allowed bacterial contamination of the PSP plate. Detectors contained in barrier envelopes remain a potential source of contamination. PSP plates must be disinfected between removal from a contaminated barrier envelope and placement in a new barrier envelope. In addition, placement into the barrier envelope should ideally be carried out under aseptic conditions. Finally, the integrity of each sealed barrier envelope must be verified visually before release to the clinic.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed radiography in Achilles tendon rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenaga, Tateo; Hachiya, Junichi; Miyasaka, Yasuo

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Radiography (CR) were performed in 15 patients with complete Achilles tendon rupture who were treated conservatively without surgery. MRI was obtained using Toshiba MRT 50 A superconductive machine, operaing at 0.5 Tesla. CR was performed by CR-101, Fuji Medical System. In fresh cases, ruptured tendons showed intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high intensity on T2-weighted images. Thickening of the tendon was observed in all cases except in very acute stage. Configuration of thickend tendons tends to be dumbbell shape in subacute stage and fusiform in chronic stage of more than six months after the initial trauma. In cases which showed high signal intensity at the ruptured area both on T1 and T2 weighted images, migration of fat into the sapces between the ruptured tendons was considered to be the major source of increased signal intensity. Computed radiography showed thickening of the tendon, blurring of anterior margin of the tendon, and decreased translucency of pre-Achilles fat pad. However, MRI better demonstrated the details of ruptured tendons when compared to CR, and thought to be an usefull way of following up the healing process of the ruptured tendon to facilitate more reasonable judgement of the time of removing plaster casts and stating exercise. (author)

  15. Quality assurance of computed and digital radiography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, C.; Gorman, D.; Byrne, P.; Larkin, A.; Dowling, A.; Malone, J. F.

    2008-01-01

    Computed radiography (CR) and digital radiography (DR) are replacing traditional film screen radiography as hospitals move towards digital imaging and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). Both IPEM and KCARE have recently published quality assurance and acceptance testing guidelines for DR. In this paper, the performance of a range of CR and DR systems is compared. Six different manufacturers are included. Particular attention is paid to the performance of the systems under automatic exposure control (AEC). The patient is simulated using a range of thicknesses of tissue equivalent material. Image quality assessment was based on detector assessment protocols and includes pixel value measures as well as subjective assessment using Leeds Test Objects. The protocols for detector assessment cover a broad range of tests and in general detectors (whether DR or CR) performed satisfactorily. The chief limitation in performing these tests was that not all systems provided ready access to pixel values. Subjective tests include the use of the Leeds TO20. As part of this work, suggested reference values are provided to calculate the TO20 image quality factor. One consequence of moving from film screen to digital technologies is that the dynamic range of digital detectors is much wider, and increased exposures are no longer evident from changes in image quality. As such, AEC is a key parameter for CR and DR. Dose was measured using a standard phantom as a basic means of comparing systems. In order to assess the AEC performance, exit doses were also measured while varying phantom thickness. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were calculated on a number of systems where pixel values were available. SNR was affected by the selection of acquisition protocol. Comparisons between different technologies and collation of data will help refine acceptance thresholds and contribute to optimising dose and image quality. (authors)

  16. Industrial radiography with Ir-192 using computed radiographic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngernvijit, Narippawaj; Punnachaiya, Suvit; Chankow, Nares; Sukbumperng, Ampai; Thong-Aram, Decho

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this research is to study the utilization of a low activity Ir-192 gamma source for industrial radiographic testing using the Computed Radiography (CR) system. Due to a photo-salbutamol Imaging Plate (I P) using in CR is much more radiation sensitive than a type II film with lead foil intensifying screen, the exposure time with CR can be significantly reduced. For short-lived gamma-ray source like Ir-192 source, the exposure time must be proportionally increased until it is not practical particularly for thick specimens. Generally, when the source decays to an activity of about 5 Ci or less, it will be returned to the manufacturer as a radioactive waste. In this research, the optimum conditions for radiography of a 20 mm thick welded steel sample with 2.4 Ci Ir-192 was investigated using the CR system with high resolution image plate, i.e. type Bas-SR of the Fuji Film Co. Ltd. The I P was sandwiched by a pair of 0.25 mm thick Pb intensifying sere en. Low energy scattered radiations was filtered by placing another Pb sheet with a thickness of 3 mm under the cassette. It was found that the CR image could give a contrast sensitivity of 2.5 % using only 3-minute exposure time which was comparable to the image taken by the type II film with Pb intensifying screen using the exposure time of 45 minutes

  17. Conventional radiography and computed tomography of cardiac assist devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffel, Hans; Stolzmann, Paul; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Schertler, Thomas; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Wilhelm, Markus J.; Lachat, Mario [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2009-09-15

    Patients intended for circulatory support by cardiac assist devices (CAD) usually suffer from end-stage acute or chronic heart failure. Since the introduction of CAD in 1963 by DeBakey and coworkers, the systems have gone through a substantial evolution and have been increasingly used in the intervening decades. The spectrum of CAD includes a variety of systems serving to assist the systolic function of the left ventricle, the right ventricle, or both. Conventional radiography and multislice spiral computed tomography (CT) are the most commonly used radiological techniques for imaging patients with a CAD. CT is very useful for evaluating CAD systems by using both two- and three-dimensional reconstructions of the volumetric data sets. The two techniques together allow for the comprehensive assessment of patients with devices by imaging the in- and outflow cannulae, the anastomoses, the position of the pump, as well as associated complications. A close collaboration with cardiac surgeons with expertise in the field of circulatory support is deemed necessary for adequate image interpretation. This article describes the technical diversity of the currently available CAD systems. The imaging characteristics on conventional radiography and multislice spiral CT as well as the typical complications of their use are demonstrated. (orig.)

  18. Management of pediatric radiation dose using Fuji computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacCutcheon, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the technical details of Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) and its use as it relates to managing pediatric dose for X-ray examinations. Since its introduction in 1983, Fuji (Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.) has developed an extensive set of menu selections with default processing algorithms and corresponding display processing parameters modified for all pediatric exam types. Continued development of imaging plate technology, FCR reader design and image processing have all contributed to improving image quality and creating the opportunity to lower the dose required for pediatric exams. Fuji continues to advance CR and electronic imaging technologies; some of these developments, that may enable lower dose examinations for pediatric imaging in the future, are also described in this paper. (orig.)

  19. Characteristics of high-energy X-rays using computed radiography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Mori, Yoshinobu

    1993-01-01

    A computed radiography (CR) with storage phosphor technology has advanced remarkably. Its application has been also discussed regarding the field of radiotherapy and studies have been made to shift from the film/screen system to the portal film using the CR system. The authors started to research CR portal imaging with high energy X-ray (10MV) on a regular scale in 1989. This paper deals with characteristics of high energy X-rays using the CR system. The digital characteristic curve corresponded with calculated value for dynamic range (L-value). The monitor unit (MU) counts at pixel (digital) value saturation point were L-value 0.5:28 MU, L-value 1.0:50 MU, L-value 2.0:167 MU, L-value 3.0:450 MU, L-value 4.0:1614 MU. The image contrast with the Mix-Dp phantom was L-value 0.5: about a 300 pixel value and L-value 4.0: about a 30 pixel value by a phantom 10 to 18 cm in thickness. Optimum L-value was 0.5, and tone-scale was the straight type of CR portal imaging using the graphy count mode. Optimum L-value was 4.0, and tone-scale was a rectangular wave type of CR portal imaging using therapeutic doses, and those were also described by the histogram analysis. (author)

  20. Assessment of weld thickness loss in offshore pipelines using computed radiography and computational modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, S.C.A.; Souza, E.M.; Oliveira, D.F.; Silva, A.X.; Lopes, R.T.; Marinho, C.; Camerini, C.S.

    2009-01-01

    In order to guarantee the structural integrity of oil plants it is crucial to monitor the amount of weld thickness loss in offshore pipelines. However, in spite of its relevance, this parameter is very difficult to determine, due to both the large diameter of most pipes and the complexity of the multi-variable system involved. In this study, a computational modeling based on Monte Carlo MCNPX code is combined with computed radiography to estimate the weld thickness loss in large-diameter offshore pipelines. Results show that computational modeling is a powerful tool to estimate intensity variations in radiographic images generated by weld thickness variations, and it can be combined with computed radiography to assess weld thickness loss in offshore and subsea pipelines.

  1. Comparison of computed tomography and radiography for detecting changes induced by malignant nasal neoplasia in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, R.D.; Beck, E.R.; LeCouteur, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of computed tomography and radiography to detect changes associated with nasal neoplasia was compared in dogs. Eighteen areas or anatomic structures were evaluated in 21 dogs for changes indicative of neoplasia. Computed tomography was superior (P < or = 0.05) to radiography for detecting changes in 14 of 18 areas. Radiography was not superior for detecting changes in any structure or area. Computed tomography reveals vital information not always detected radiographically to assist in providing a prognosis and in planning treatment for nasal neoplasms in dogs

  2. MYTHS vesus reality in computed radiography image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mango, Steve; Castro, Luiz

    2009-01-01

    As NDE operation - particularly radiographic testing - ransition form analog to digital technologies such as computed radiography (CR), users are learning that there's more to digital image quality than meets the eye. In fact, there are ultiple factors that determine the final perceived image quality of a computed radiograph. Many of these factors are misunderstood, and some are touted as the ''key parameter'' or ''magic bullet'' in producing optiumum image quality, In reality, such claims are oversimplified, and are more marketing hype than reality. The truth?. Perceived image quality results form the cascaded effects of many factor - such as sharpness, system noise, spot size and pixel size, subject contrast, bit depth, radiographic technique, and so on. Many of these factors are within the control of rdiographers or designers of equipment and media. This paper will explain some of these key factors, dispel some of the myths surrounding them, and will show that qualities such as bigger, smaller, more, or less are not always better when it comes to CR image quality. (authors)

  3. Clinical Evaluation of a Dual-Side Readout Technique Computed Radiography System in Chest Radiography of Premature Neonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlander, A.; Hansson, J.; Soederberg, J.; Steneryd, K.; Baath, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Recently, the dual-side readout technique has been introduced in computed radiography, leading to an increase in detective quantum efficiency (DQE) compared with the single-side readout technique. Purpose: To evaluate if the increase in DQE with the dual-side readout technique results in a higher clinical image quality in chest radiography of premature neonates at no increase in radiation dose. Material and Methods: Twenty-four chest radiographs of premature neonates were collected from both a single-side readout technique system and a double-side readout technique system. The images were processed in the same image-processing station in order for the comparison to be only dependent on the difference in readout technique. Five radiologists rated the fulfillment of four image quality criteria, which were based on important anatomical landmarks. The given ratings were analyzed using visual grading characteristics (VGC) analysis. Results: The VGC analysis showed that the reproduction of the carina with the main bronchi and the thoracic vertebrae behind the heart was better with the dual-side readout technique, whereas no significant difference for the reproduction of the central vessels or the peripheral vessels could be observed. Conclusions: The results indicate that the higher DQE of the dual-side readout technique leads to higher clinical image quality in chest radiography of premature neonates at no increase in radiation dose. Keywords: Digital radiography; lung; observer performance; pediatrics; thorax

  4. Temporal digital subtraction radiography with a personal computer digital workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kircos, L.; Holt, W.; Khademi, J.

    1990-01-01

    Technique have been developed and implemented on a personal computer (PC)-based digital workstation to accomplish temporal digital subtraction radiography (TDSR). TDSR is useful in recording radiologic change over time. Thus, this technique is useful not only for monitoring chronic disease processes but also for monitoring the temporal course of interventional therapies. A PC-based digital workstation was developed on a PC386 platform with add-in hardware and software. Image acquisition, storage, and processing was accomplished using 512 x 512 x 8- or 12-bit frame grabber. Software and hardware were developed to accomplish image orientation, registration, gray scale compensation, subtraction, and enhancement. Temporal radiographs of the jaws were made in a fixed and reproducible orientation between the x-ray source and image receptor enabling TDSR. Temporal changes secondary to chronic periodontal disease, osseointegration of endosseous implants, and wound healing were demonstrated. Use of TDSR for chest imaging was also demonstrated with identification of small, subtle focal masses that were not apparent with routine viewing. The large amount of radiologic information in images of the jaws and chest may obfuscate subtle changes that TDSR seems to identify. TDSR appears to be useful as a tool to record temporal and subtle changes in radiologic images

  5. Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography (DRCT) Product Improvement Plan (PIP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Roney; Bob Pink; Karen Wendt; Robert Seifert; Mike Smith

    2010-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing and deploying x-ray inspection systems for chemical weapons containers for the past 12 years under the direction of the Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM). In FY-10 funding was provided to advance the capabilities of these systems through the DRCT (Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography) Product Improvement Plan (PIP), funded by the PMNSCM. The DRCT PIP identified three research tasks; end user study, detector evaluation and DRCT/PINS integration. Work commenced in February, 2010. Due to the late start and the schedule for field inspection of munitions at various sites, it was not possible to spend sufficient field time with operators to develop a complete end user study. We were able to interact with several operators, principally Mr. Mike Rowan who provided substantial useful input through several discussions and development of a set of field notes from the Pueblo, CO field mission. We will be pursuing ongoing interactions with field personnel as opportunities arise in FY-11.

  6. Digital radiography: are the manufacturers' settings too high? Optimisation of the Kodak digital radiography system with aid of the computed radiography dose index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Sinead E.; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2002-01-01

    Manufacturers offer exposure indices as a safeguard against overexposure in computed radiography, but the basis for recommended values is unclear. This study establishes an optimum exposure index to be used as a guideline for a specific CR system to minimise radiation exposures for computed mobile chest radiography, and compares this with manufacturer guidelines and current practice. An anthropomorphic phantom was employed to establish the minimum milliamperes consistent with acceptable image quality for mobile chest radiography images. This was found to be 2 mAs. Consecutively, 10 patients were exposed with this optimised milliampere value and 10 patients were exposed with the 3.2 mAs routinely used in the department of the study. Image quality was objectively assessed using anatomical criteria. Retrospective analyses of 717 exposure indices recorded over 2 months from mobile chest examinations were performed. The optimised milliampere value provided a significant reduction of the average exposure index from 1840 to 1570 (p<0.0001). This new ''optimum'' exposure index is substantially lower than manufacturer guidelines of 2000 and significantly lower than exposure indices from the retrospective study (1890). Retrospective data showed a significant increase in exposure indices if the examination was performed out of hours. The data provided by this study emphasise the need for clinicians and personnel to consider establishing their own optimum exposure indices for digital investigations rather than simply accepting manufacturers' guidelines. Such an approach, along with regular monitoring of indices, may result in a substantial reduction in patient exposure. (orig.)

  7. Correlation of the clinical and physical image quality in chest radiography for average adults with a computed radiography imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C S; Wood, T J; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the quality of visually graded patient (clinical) chest images and a quantitative assessment of chest phantom (physical) images acquired with a computed radiography (CR) imaging system. The results of a previously published study, in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer-simulated postero-anterior chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme, were used for the clinical image quality measurement. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and effective dose efficiency (eDE) were used as physical image quality metrics measured in a uniform chest phantom. Although optimal values of these physical metrics for chest radiography were not derived in this work, their correlation with VGAS in images acquired without an antiscatter grid across the diagnostic range of X-ray tube voltages was determined using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Clinical and physical image quality metrics increased with decreasing tube voltage. Statistically significant correlations between VGAS and CNR (R=0.87, pchest CR images acquired without an antiscatter grid. A statistically significant correlation has been found between the clinical and physical image quality in CR chest imaging. The results support the value of using CNR and eDE in the evaluation of quality in clinical thorax radiography.

  8. Development of computer-aided auto-ranging technique for a computed radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, M.; Shimura, K.; Nakajima, N.; Kato, H.

    1988-01-01

    For a computed radiography system, the authors developed a computer-aided autoranging technique in which the clinically useful image data are automatically mapped to the available display range. The preread image data are inspected to determine the location of collimation. A histogram of the pixels inside the collimation is evaluated regarding characteristic values such as maxima and minima, and then the optimal density and contrast are derived for the display image. The effect of the autoranging technique was investigated at several hospitals in Japan. The average rate of films lost due to undesirable density or contrast was about 0.5%

  9. Manual of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant cost model and computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C. Y.; Alkasab, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    Cost analysis of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant includes two parts: a method for estimation of system capital costs, and an economic analysis which determines the levelized annual cost of operating the system used in the capital cost estimation. A FORTRAN computer has been developed for this cost analysis.

  10. Heavy-ion radiography and heavy-ion computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Holley, W.R.; McFarland, E.W.; Tobias, C.a.

    1982-02-01

    Heavy-ion projection and CT radiography is being developed into a safe, low-dose, noninvasive radiological procedure that can quantitate and image small density differences in human tissues. The applications to heavy-ion mammography and heavy-ion CT imaging of the brain in clinical patients suggest their potential value in cancer diagnosis

  11. Method and Apparatus for Computed Imaging Backscatter Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedlock, Daniel (Inventor); Meng, Christopher (Inventor); Sabri, Nissia (Inventor); Dugan, Edward T. (Inventor); Jacobs, Alan M. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Systems and methods of x-ray backscatter radiography are provided. A single-sided, non-destructive imaging technique utilizing x-ray radiation to image subsurface features is disclosed, capable of scanning a region using a fan beam aperture and gathering data using rotational motion.

  12. Digital radiography is promising in industrial testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Fabbro, F.

    2015-01-01

    Digital radiography has recently entered the industrial world as a tool for non-destructive testing. There are 3 types of digital radiography: computed radiography (CR), direct radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT). In computed radiography, traditional silver-halide films are replaced by photostimulable phosphor imaging plates that are activated through laser scanning and digitized. Direct radiography uses a flat panel detector (FPD) composed of X-ray detectors that performs an immediate digital conversion of the image that can be read by a computer. DR is a perfect tool for industrial testing but the fragility of the FPD panels reduces its uses. Computed tomography is based on the principle of DR to get data corresponding to successive cross-section images of the object. These data are processed by a software to get a 3-dimensional image of the object. CT was first developed for medical use but requires some improvement to become more accurate, faster, particularly for big objects. In recent years DR has enjoyed the highest growth rate in digital radiography. (A.C.)

  13. Computed radiography versus mobile direct radiography for bedside chest radiographs: Impact of dose on image quality and reader agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Boo, D.W.; Weber, M.; Deurloo, E.E.; Streekstra, G.J.; Freling, N.J.; Dongelmans, D.A.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To asses the image quality and potential for dose reduction of mobile direct detector (DR) chest radiography as compared with computed radiography (CR) for intensive care unit (ICU) chest radiographs (CXR). Methods and materials: Three groups of age-, weight- and disease-matched ICU patients (n = 114 patients; 50 CXR per acquisition technique) underwent clinically indicated bedside CXR obtained with either CR (single read-out powder plates) or mobile DR (GOS-TFT detectors) at identical or 50% reduced dose (DR 50% ). Delineation of anatomic structures and devices used for patient monitoring, overall image quality and disease were scored by four readers. In 12 patients pairs of follow-up CR and DR images were available, and in 15 patients pairs of CR and DR 50% images were available. In these pairs the overall image quality was also compared side-by-side. Results: Delineation of anatomy in the mediastinum was scored better with DR or DR 50% than with CR. Devices used for patient monitoring were seen best with DR, with DR 50% being superior to CR. In the side-by-side comparison, the overall image quality of DR and DR 50% was rated better than CR in 96% (46/48) and 87% (52/60), respectively. Inter-observer agreement for the assessment of pathology was fair for CR and DR 50% (κ = 0.33 and κ = 0.39, respectively) and moderate for DR (κ = 0.48). Conclusion: Mobile DR units offer better image quality than CR for bedside chest radiography and allow for 50% dose reduction. Inter-observer agreement increases with image quality and is superior with DR, while DR 50% and CR are comparable.

  14. Radiological protection procedures for industrial applications of computed radiography; Procedimentos de protecao radiologica em aplicacoes industriais da radiografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquino, Josilto Oliveira de

    2009-03-15

    Due to its very particular characteristics, industrial radiography is responsible for roughly half of the relevant accidents in nuclear industry, in developed as well as in developing countries, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Thus, safety and radiological protection in industrial gamma radiography have been receiving especial treatment by regulatory authorities of most Member States. The main objective of the present work was to evaluate, from the radioprotection point of view, the main advantages of computed radiography (CR) for filmless industrial radiography. In order to accomplish this, both techniques, i.e. conventional and filmless computed radiography were evaluated and compared through practical studies. After the studies performed at the present work it was concluded that computed radiography significantly reduces the inherent doses, reflecting in smaller restricted areas and costs, with consequent improvement in radiological protection and safety. (author)

  15. Computed simulation of radiographies of pipes - validation of techniques for wall thickness measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellon, C.; Tillack, G.R.; Nockemann, C.; Wenzel, L.

    1995-01-01

    A macroscopic model of radiographic NDE methods and applications is given. A computer-aided approach for determination of wall thickness from radiographs is presented, guaranteeing high accuracy and reproducibility of wall thickness determination by means of projection radiography. The algorithm was applied to computed simulations of radiographies. The simulation thus offers an effective means for testing such automated wall thickness determination as a function of imaging conditions, pipe geometries, coatings, and media tracking, and likewise is a tool for validation and optimization of the method. (orig.) [de

  16. The clinical application of computed radiography in bedside photography of newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Sen; Guo Tianchang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the computed radiography in bedside photography of newborn, especially in chest radiography. Methods: Bedside CR images were selected in 100 cases randomly. The exposure parameters were optimized using the large latitude of CR. The details of images were post-processed and adjusted using spatial tuning technique. Then CR photography was compared with conventional X-ray photography. Results: The images acquired with CR had good contrast, high definition, and little distortion, in which the condemned image rate was 1%. While in conventional X-ray photography, the unsuccessful imaging rate is 9%. Conclusion: Bedside computed radiography of new-born, especially the chest imaging, is very helpful to improve image quality and positive rate of the diagnosis. (authors)

  17. Progress in digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappelle, A.

    2016-01-01

    Because of its practical aspect digital radiography is more and more used in the industrial sector. There are 2 kinds of digital radiography. First, the 'computed radiography' that uses a photon-stimulated screen, and after radiation exposure this screen must be read by an analyser to get a digit image. The second type is the 'direct radiography' that allows one to get a digit radiograph of the object directly. Digital radiography uses the same radioactive nuclides as radiography with silver films: cobalt, iridium or selenium. The spatial resolution of digital radiography is less good than with classical silver film radiography but digital radiography offers a better visual contrast. (A.C.)

  18. Observer training for computer-aided detection of pulmonary nodules in chest radiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boo, Diederick W.; van Hoorn, François; van Schuppen, Joost; Schijf, Laura; Scheerder, Maeke J.; Freling, Nicole J.; Mets, Onno; Weber, Michael; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M.

    2012-01-01

    To assess whether short-term feedback helps readers to increase their performance using computer-aided detection (CAD) for nodule detection in chest radiography. The 140 CXRs (56 with a solitary CT-proven nodules and 84 negative controls) were divided into four subsets of 35; each were read in a

  19. Rib Radiography versus Chest Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Atsushi

    2018-05-01

     The accurate diagnosis of rib fractures is important in chest trauma. Diagnostic images following chest trauma are usually obtained via chest X-ray, chest computed tomography, or rib radiography. This study evaluated the diagnostic characteristics of rib radiography and chest computed tomography.  Seventy-five rib fracture patients who underwent both chest computed tomography and rib radiography between April 2008 and December 2013 were included. Rib radiographs, centered on the site of pain, were taken from two directions. Chest computed tomography was performed using a 16-row multidetector scanner with 5-mm slice-pitch without overlap, and axial images were visualized in a bone window.  In total, 217 rib fractures were diagnosed in 75 patients. Rib radiography missed 43 rib fractures in 24 patients. The causes were overlap with organs in 15 cases, trivial fractures in 21 cases, and injury outside the imaging range in 7 cases. Left lower rib fractures were often missed due to overlap with the heart, while middle and lower rib fractures were frequently not diagnosed due to overlap with abdominal organs. Computed tomography missed 21 rib fractures in 17 patients. The causes were horizontal fractures in 10 cases, trivial fractures in 9 cases, and insufficient breath holding in 1 case.  In rib radiography, overlap with organs and fractures outside the imaging range were characteristic reasons for missed diagnoses. In chest computed tomography, horizontal rib fractures and insufficient breath holding were often responsible. We should take these challenges into account when diagnosing rib fractures. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Diagnostic Imaging of the Lower Respiratory Tract in Neonatal Foals: Radiography and Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascola, Kara M; Joslyn, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays an essential role in the diagnosis and monitoring of lower respiratory disease in neonatal foals. Radiography is most widely available to equine practitioners and is the primary modality that has been used for the characterization of respiratory disease in foals. Computed tomography imaging, although still limited in availability to the general practitioner, offers advantages over radiography and has been used diagnostically in neonatal foals with respiratory disease. Recognition of appropriate imaging protocols and patient-associated artifacts is critical for accurate image interpretation regardless of the modality used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Intramodality and intermodality agreement in radiography and computed tomography of equine distal limb fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crijns, C P; Martens, A; Bergman, H-J; van der Veen, H; Duchateau, L; van Bree, H J J; Gielen, I M V L

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is increasingly accessible in equine referral hospitals. To document the level of agreement within and between radiography and CT in characterising equine distal limb fractures. Retrospective descriptive study. Images from horses that underwent radiographic and CT evaluation for suspected distal limb fractures were reviewed, including 27 horses and 3 negative controls. Using Cohen's kappa and weighted kappa analysis, the level of agreement among 4 observers for a predefined set of diagnostic characteristics for radiography and CT separately and for the level of agreement between the 2 imaging modalities were documented. Both CT and radiography had very good intramodality agreement in identifying fractures, but intermodality agreement was lower. There was good intermodality and intramodality agreement for anatomical localisation and the identification of fracture displacement. Agreement for articular involvement, fracture comminution and fracture fragment number was towards the lower limit of good agreement. There was poor to fair intermodality agreement regarding fracture orientation, fracture width and coalescing cracks; intramodality agreement was higher for CT than for radiography for these features. Further studies, including comparisons with surgical and/or post mortem findings, are required to determine the sensitivity and specificity of CT and radiography in the diagnosis and characterisation of equine distal limb fractures. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  2. Imaging suspected cervical spine injury: Plain radiography or computed tomography? Systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, Gavin [Diagnostic Radiographer, Colchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust, Colchester General Hospital, Turner Road, Colchester, CO4 5JL Essex (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gavincain8@hotmail.com; Shepherdson, Jane; Elliott, Vicki; Svensson, Jon [Faculty of Health and Social Care, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge, CB1 9PT Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom); Brennan, Patrick [UCD School of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Health Science Building, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2010-02-15

    Aim: (1) to establish which modality offers the greatest accuracy in the detection of cervical spine injury (CSI) Following trauma: plain radiography or computed tomography (CT), and (2) make an evidence-based recommendation for the initial imaging modality of choice. Method: A systematic literature review was performed to identify primary research studies which compare the diagnostic accuracy of plain radiography and CT with the results of a reference standard in the detection of CSI. A search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Science Direct and Pubmed Central databases was conducted. Results: Ten studies were identified. Critical appraisal identified limitations among all studies. There was heterogeneity in the sensitivity estimates for plain radiography, whereas estimates for CT were consistently high. Examination of the reported sensitivities shows that CT outperforms plain radiography in the detection of CSI. Conclusion: CT is superior to plain radiography in the detection of CSI. However, the optimal imaging strategy depends on the patients' relative risk of injury. If at high-risk cervical CT is indicated. If at low-risk the increased cost and radiation exposure mean that screening CT may not be warranted, good-quality plain radiographs are sufficient.

  3. Development of computer assisted learning program using cone beam projection for head radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazeko, Kazuma; Araki, Misao; Kajiwara, Hironori; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Kuwayama, Jun; Karube, Shuhei; Hashimoto, Takeyuki; Shinohara, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    We present a computer assisted learning (CAL) program to simulate head radiography. The program provides cone beam projections of a target volume, simulating three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) of a head phantom. The generated image is 512 x 512 x 512 pixels with each pixel 0.6 mm on a side. The imaging geometry, such as X-ray tube orientation and phantom orientation, can be varied. The graphical user interface (GUI) of the CAL program allows the study of the effects of varying the imaging geometry; each simulated projection image is shown quickly in an adjoining window. Simulated images with an assigned geometry were compared with the image obtained using the standard geometry in clinical use. The accuracy of the simulated image was verified through comparison with the image acquired using radiography of the head phantom, subsequently processed with a computed radiography system (CR image). Based on correlation coefficient analysis and visual assessment, it was concluded that the CAL program can satisfactorily simulate the CR image. Therefore, it should be useful for the training of head radiography. (author)

  4. Digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zani, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    X-ray radiography is a very common technique used to check the homogeneity of a material or the inside of a mechanical part. Generally the radiation that goes through the material to check, produced an image on a sensitized film. This method requires time because the film needs to be developed, digital radiography has no longer this inconvenient. In digital radiography the film is replaced by digital data and can be processed as any computer file. This new technique is promising but its main inconvenient is that today its resolution is not so good as that of film radiography. (A.C.)

  5. Simplified techniques of cerebral angiography using a mobile X-ray unit and computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondo, Gakuji; Ishiwata, Yusuke; Yamashita, Toshinori; Iida, Takashi; Moro, Yutaka

    1989-01-01

    Simplified techniques of cerebral angiography using a mobile X-ray unit and computed radiography (CR) are discussed. Computed radiography is a digital radiography system in which an imaging plate is used as an X-ray detector and a final image is displayed on the film. In the angiograms performed with CR, the spatial frequency components can be enhanced for the easy analysis of fine blood vessels. Computed radiography has an automatic sensitivity and a latitude-setting mechanism, thus serving as an 'automatic camera.' This mechanism is useful for radiography with a mobile X-ray unit in hospital wards, intensive care units, or operating rooms where the appropriate setting of exposure conditions is difficult. We applied this mechanism to direct percutaneous carotid angiography and intravenous digital subtraction angiography with a mobile X-ray unit. Direct percutaneous carotid angiography using CR and a mobile X-ray unit were taken after the manual injection of a small amount of a contrast material through a fine needle. We performed direct percutaneous carotid angiography with this method 68 times on 25 cases from August 1986 to December 1987. Of the 68 angiograms, 61 were evaluated as good, compared with conventional angiography. Though the remaining seven were evaluated as poor, they were still diagnostically effective. This method is found useful for carotid angiography in emergency rooms, intensive care units, or operating rooms. Cerebral venography using CR and a mobile X-ray unit was done after the manual injection of a contrast material through the bilateral cubital veins. The cerebral venous system could be visualized from 16 to 24 seconds after the beginning of the injection of the contrast material. We performed cerebral venography with this method 14 times on six cases. These venograms were better than conventional angiograms in all cases. This method may be useful in managing patients suffering from cerebral venous thrombosis. (J.P.N.)

  6. Analyze image quality and comparative study between conventional and computed radiography applied to the inspection of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, Alessandra S.; Oliveira, Davi F.; Silva, Aline S.S.; Nascimento, Joseilson R.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2011-01-01

    Piping system design takes into account relevant factors such as: internal coating, dimensioning, vibration system, adequate supports and principally, piping material. Cost is a decisive factor in the phase of material selection. The non-destructive testing method most commonly employed in industry to analyze the structure of an object is radiographic testing. Computed radiography (CR) is a quicker and much more efficient alternative to conventional radiography but, although CR presents numerous advantages, testing procedures are still largely based on trial and error, due to the lack of a consecrated methodology to choose parameters as it exists for conventional radiography. Notwithstanding, this paper presents a study that uses the technique of computed radiography to analyze metal alloys. These metal alloys are used as internal pipe coating aiming to protect against corrosion and cracks. This study seeks to evaluate parameters such as basic spatial resolution, Normalized Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNRN), contrast, intensity and also to compare conventional radiography with CR. (author)

  7. Flash X-Ray Apparatus With Spectrum Control Functions For Medical Use And Fuji Computed Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, H.; Sato, E.; Hayasi, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Arima, H.; Hoshino, F.

    1985-02-01

    Flash radiographic bio-medical studies at sub-microsecond intervals were performed by using both a new type of flash X-ray(FX) apparatus with spectrum control functions and Fuji Computed Radiography(FCR). This single flasher tends to have a comparatively long exposure time and the electric pulse width of the FX wave form is about 0.3,usec. The maximum FX dose is about 50mR at 1m per pulse, and the effective focal spot varies according to condenser charging voltage, A-C distance, etc., ranging from 1.0 to 3.0mm in diameter, but in the low dose rate region it can be reduced to less than 1.0mm in diameter. The FX dose is determined by the condenser charging voltage and the A-C distance, while the FX spectrum is determined by the average voltage of the FX tube and filters. Various clear FX images were obtained by controlling the spectrum and dose. FCR is a new storage medium for medical radiography developed by the Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd. and this apparatus has various image forming functions: low dose radiography, film density control, image contrast control, subtraction management and others. We have used this new apparatus in conjunction with our FX radiography and have obtained some new and interesting biomedical radiograms: the edge enhancement image, the instantaneous enlarged image, and the single exposure energy subtraction image using the FX spectrum distribution.

  8. Fine tuning of work practices of common radiological investigations performed using computed radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingstone, Roshan S.; Timothy Peace, B.S.; Sunny, S.; Victor Raj, D.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The advent of the computed radiography (CR) has brought about remarkable changes in the field of diagnostic radiology. A relatively large cross-section of the human population is exposed to ionizing radiation on account of common radiological investigations. This study is intended to audit radiation doses imparted to patients during common radiological investigations involving the use of CR systems. Method: The entrance surface doses (ESD) were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) for various radiological investigations performed using the computed radiography (CR) systems. Optimization of radiographic techniques and radiation doses was done by fine tuning the work practices. Results and conclusion: Reduction of radiation doses as high as 47% was achieved during certain investigations with the use of optimized exposure factors and fine-tuned work practices

  9. Cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography for diagnosis of dental abnormalities in dogs and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roza, Marcello R.; Fioravanti, Maria Clorinda S.; Silva, Luiz Antonio F.; Barriviera, Mauricio; Januario, Alessandro L.; Bezerra, Ana Cristina B.

    2011-01-01

    The development of veterinary dentistry has substantially improved the ability to diagnose canine and feline dental abnormalities. Consequently, examinations previously performed only on humans are now available for small animals, thus improving the diagnostic quality. This has increased the need for technical qualification of veterinary professionals and increased technological investments. This study evaluated the use of cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography as complementary exams for diagnosing dental abnormalities in dogs and cats. Cone beam computed tomography was provided faster image acquisition with high image quality, was associated with low ionizing radiation levels, enabled image editing, and reduced the exam duration. Our results showed that radiography was an effective method for dental radiographic examination with low cost and fast execution times, and can be performed during surgical procedures

  10. Automatic measurement system for congenital hip dislocation using a computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, M.; Minato, K.; Hirakawa, A.; Kuwahara, M.

    1988-01-01

    Acetabular angle which is a diagnostic parameter of congenital hip dislocation has been measured manually in conventional X-ray film system. Using digital image directly provided from a computed radiography, an automatic measurement system was developed for this parameter. The process of the measurement was completed within a reasonable time, and accurate enough. The system was combined with an image database, so that it would be a measurement tool of PACS

  11. Effect of grinding on photostimuable phosphors for x-ray screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Luminescence efficiency of a phosphor can be improved by minimizing the energy losses during excitation. The loss of excitation energy in the case of powdered samples is mainly due to scattering of incident radiation by the particles of phosphor. Thus, while considering the industrial applications of polycrystalline phosphors in lamps, screens, paints, etc., the effect of particle size on the light output has to be specially studied. It is very well established that the radiographic imaging with photostimuable (PS) phosphors has many advantages over conventional photographic film screens. In the new type of computer radiography, PS phosphors are to be used as memory materials for temporary storage of the x-ray image. Eu(2+) doped barium fluorohalide phosphors are most suitable for this purpose. The spatial resolution from the image plate can be improved to a certain extent with phosphors comprising fine particles. The fineness of the particles can be achieved by various means such as grinding, fast cooling after firing or incorporation of some flux materials during the firing processes. But the efficiency of the phosphor deteriorates with grinding. Fast cooling is a complicated process in the case of Eu(2+) doped phosphors. Incorporation of flux materials may change the characteristics of phosphor materials. In the present investigation, effect of grinding (ball milling) on particle size distribution, shape of the particles and luminescent properties of BaFCl phosphors have been studied

  12. Accuracy of cone beam computed tomography, intraoral radiography, and periodontal probing for periodontal bone defects measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eskandarlo A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT produces high-quality data about diagnosis and periodontal treatment. To date, there is not enough research regarding periodontal bone measurement using CBCT. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of CBCT in measuring periodontal defects to that of intraoral radiography and probing methods."nMaterials and Methods: Two-hundred and eighteen artificial osseous defects (buccal and lingual infrabony, interproximal, horizontal, crater, dehiscence and fenestration defects were created on 13 mandibles of dry skulls. The mandibles were put into a plexiglass box full of water to simulate soft tissue. CBCT images, radiographic images taken with parallel technique and direct measurements using a WHO periodontal probe were recorded and compared to a standard reference (digital caliper. Inter and intra observe consistencies were assessed using Intra class correlation coefficient and pearson correlation."nResults: Inter and intra observer consistencies were high for CBCT and probing methods (ICC- Intra class correlation coefficient>88%, but moderate for intraoral radiography (ICC-Intra class correlation coefficient > 54%. There were not any significant differences between observers for all techniques (P>0/05. According to paired T-test analysis, mean difference for CBCT technique (0.01 mm was lower than that for probing (0.04 mm and radiography (0.62 mm. CBCT was able to measure all kinds of lesions, but radiography could not measure defects in the buccal and lingual sites."nConclusion: All three modalities are useful for identifying periodontal defects. Compared to probing and radiography, the CBCT technique has the most accuracy in measuring periodontal defects.

  13. Computed tomography and plain radiography in experimental fracture healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, E.M.; Goldstein, S.A.; Ku, J.; Smith, P.; Matthews, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    We evaluated the relative contribution of plain radiographs and computed tomography to the assessment of fracture healing under experimental circumstances. In 15 sheep, we performed midshaft femoral osteotomies and internal fixation of the resultant segmental fractures. Radiographs were obtained preoperatively and immediately postoperatively. Animals were sacrificed at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, 24 weeks, and 36 weeks after surgery, and the femoral specimens radiographed. After removal of the internal fixation devices, computed tomographic scans of the specimens were performed. Computed tomography may be of value in the evaluation of fractures of long bones in those cases in which clinical examination and plain radiographs fail to give adequate information as to the status of healing. (orig./SHA)

  14. Computed radiography and the workstation in a study of the cervical spine. Technical and cost implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, J. M.; Lopez-Galiacho, N.; Martinez, M.

    1999-01-01

    To demonstrate the advantages of computed radiography and the workstation in assessing the images acquired in a study of the cervical spine. Lateral projections of cervical spine obtained using a computed radiography system in 63 ambulatory patients were studied in a workstation. Images of the tip of the odontoid process. C1-C2, basion-opisthion and C7 were visualized prior to and after their transmission and processing, and the overall improvement in their diagnostic quality was assessed. The rate of detection of the tip of the odontoid process, C1-C2, the foramen magnum and C/ increased by 17,6, 11 and 14 percentage points, respectively. Image processing improved the diagnostic quality in over 75% of cases. Image processing in a workstation improved the visualization of the anatomical points being studied and the diagnostic quality of the images. These advantages as well as the possibility of transferring the images to a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) are convincing reasons for using digital radiography. (Author) 7 refs

  15. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiation Dose-Equivalent Radiography, Multidetector Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Fractures of Adult Cadaveric Wrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Reidelbach, Carolin; Krauß, Tobias; Lampert, Florian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Fiebich, Martin; Goerke, Sebastian M

    2016-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of radiography, to radiography equivalent dose multidetector computed tomography (RED-MDCT) and to radiography equivalent dose cone beam computed tomography (RED-CBCT) for wrist fractures. As study subjects we obtained 10 cadaveric human hands from body donors. Distal radius, distal ulna and carpal bones (n = 100) were artificially fractured in random order in a controlled experimental setting. We performed radiation dose equivalent radiography (settings as in standard clinical care), RED-MDCT in a 320 row MDCT with single shot mode and RED-CBCT in a device dedicated to musculoskeletal imaging. Three raters independently evaluated the resulting images for fractures and the level of confidence for each finding. Gold standard was evaluated by consensus reading of a high-dose MDCT. Pooled sensitivity was higher in RED-MDCT with 0.89 and RED-MDCT with 0.81 compared to radiography with 0.54 (P = radiography (P radiography. Readers are more confident in their reporting with the cross sectional modalities. Dose equivalent cross sectional computed tomography of the wrist could replace plain radiography for fracture diagnosis in the long run.

  16. Computer-aided diagnosis of pulmonary diseases using x-ray darkfield radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsdottir, Hildur; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    In this work we develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme for classification of pulmonary disease for grating-based x-ray radiography. In addition to conventional transmission radiography, the grating-based technique provides a dark-field imaging modality, which utilizes the scattering...... properties of the x-rays. This modality has shown great potential for diagnosing early stage emphysema and fibrosis in mouse lungs in vivo. The CAD scheme is developed to assist radiologists and other medical experts to develop new diagnostic methods when evaluating grating-based images. The scheme consists...... of three stages: (i) automatic lung segmentation; (ii) feature extraction from lung shape and dark-field image intensities; (iii) classification between healthy, emphysema and fibrosis lungs. A study of 102 mice was conducted with 34 healthy, 52 emphysema and 16 fibrosis subjects. Each image was manually...

  17. Non-destructive evaluation utilizing imaging plates for field radiography applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Brian S.

    2016-01-01

    The oil and gas industry has utilized film radiography for the evaluation of pipeline welds for many years. The world has evolved, and today people are easily sharing digital images as part of the information revolution. Computed radiography is ready to replace film radiography for portable outdoor use applications. Computed radiography technology adoption has been contingent upon achieving acceptable image quality and getting enough imaging plate use cycles to be profitable. Image quality is dependent upon shot conditions, imaging plate type, reader settings, and scatter control. Likewise, the number of achievable use cycles is dependent upon the imaging plate design for durability and the user's operating environment. This presentation reviews the basic principles of storage phosphor imaging plates. Usage criteria and guidelines for optimum image quality and maximized overall use cycles will be discussed for various imaging plate types. A comparison of film and computed radiography imaging plate technology will be presented.

  18. Differentiating lung abscess and empyema: radiography and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, D.D.; Federle, M.P.; Goodman, P.C.; Podrasky, A.E.; Webb, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) scans of 70 inflammatory thoracic lesions in 63 patients were reviewed and scored for diagnostic features. Pathologic confirmation of the final diagnosis was available in 42% (5/12) of lung abscesses and 31% (18/58) of empyemas. CT alone was sufficient to correctly diagnose 100% (70/70) of cases. Diagnostic information not available from conventional chest radiographs was obtained in 47% (33/70) of cases; in an additional 34% of patients, CT more accurately defined the extent of disease. The most reliable CT features for the differential diagnosis of lung abscess and empyema were wall characteristics, pleural separation, and lung compression. Conventional radiographic features such as size, shape, and the angle of the lesion with the chest wall were less helpful, though also best assessed by CT

  19. Validation od computational model ALDERSON/EGSnrc for chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, Bianca C.; Santos, André L. dos; Menezes, Claudio J.M.

    2017-01-01

    To perform dose studies in situations of exposure to radiation, without exposing individuals, the numerical dosimetry uses Computational Exposure Models (ECM). Composed essentially by a radioactive source simulator algorithm, a voxel phantom representing the human anatomy and a Monte Carlo code, the ECMs must be validated to determine the reliability of the physical array representation. The objective of this work is to validate the ALDERSON / EGSnrc MCE by through comparisons between the experimental measurements obtained with the ionization chamber and virtual simulations using Monte Carlo Method to determine the ratio of the input and output radiation dose. Preliminary results of these comparisons showed that the ECM reproduced the results of the experimental measurements performed with the physical phantom with a relative error of less than 10%, validating the use of this model for simulations of chest radiographs and estimates of radiation doses in tissues in the irradiated structures

  20. Tomosynthesis for the early detection of pulmonary emphysema: diagnostic performance compared with chest radiography, using multidetector computed tomography as reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yoshitake; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Shiomi, Eisuke; Abe, Takayuki; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Ogawa, Kenji

    2013-08-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis with that of chest radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema, using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as reference. Forty-eight patients with and 63 without pulmonary emphysema underwent chest MDCT, tomosynthesis and radiography on the same day. Two blinded radiologists independently evaluated the tomosynthesis images and radiographs for the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Axial and coronal MDCT images served as the reference standard and the percentage lung volume with attenuation values of -950 HU or lower (LAA-950) was evaluated to determine the extent of emphysema. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and generalised estimating equations model were used. ROC analysis revealed significantly better performance (P pulmonary emphysema. The average sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of tomosynthesis were 0.875, 0.968, 0.955 and 0.910, respectively, whereas the values for radiography were 0.479, 0.913, 0.815 and 0.697, respectively. For both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity increased with increasing LAA-950. The diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis was significantly superior to that of radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. In both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity was affected by the LAA-950. • Tomosynthesis showed significantly better diagnostic performance for pulmonary emphysema than radiography. • Interobserver agreement for tomosynthesis was significantly higher than that for radiography. • Sensitivity increased with increasing LAA -950 in both tomosynthesis and radiography. • Tomosynthesis imparts a similar radiation dose to two projection chest radiography. • Radiation dose and cost of tomosynthesis are lower than those of MDCT.

  1. A comparison of digital tomosynthesis and chest radiography in evaluating airway lesions using computed tomography as a reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Ji Yung; Lee, Ki Yeol; Yu, Ami; Kim, Je-Hyeong; Lee, Seung Heon; Choi, Jung Won; Kang, Eun-Young; Oh, Yu Whan

    2016-09-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and chest radiography for detecting airway abnormalities, using computed tomography (CT) as a reference. We evaluated 161 data sets from 149 patients (91 with and 70 without airway abnormalities) who had undergone radiography, DTS, and CT to detect airway problems. Radiographs and DTS were evaluated to localize and score the severity of the airway abnormalities, and to score the image quality using CT as a reference. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC), McNemar's test, weighted kappa, and the paired t-test were used for statistical analysis. The sensitivity of DTS was higher (reader 1, 93.51 %; reader 2, 94.29 %) than chest radiography (68.83 %; 71.43 %) in detecting airway lesions. The diagnostic accuracy of DTS (90.91 %; 94.70 %) was also significantly better than that of radiography (78.03 %; 82.58 %, all p chest radiography (1.83, 2.74; p < 0.05) in the results of both readers. The inter-observer agreement with respect to DTS findings was moderate and superior when compared to radiography findings. DTS is a more accurate and sensitive modality than radiography for detecting airway lesions that are easily obscured by soft tissue structures in the mediastinum. • Digital tomosynthesis offers new diagnostic options for airway lesions. • Digital tomosynthesis is more sensitive and accurate than radiography for airway lesions. • Digital tomosynthesis shows better image quality than radiography. • Assessment of lesion severity, via tomosynthesis is comparable to computed tomography.

  2. Probability of detection - Comparative study of computed and film radiography for high-energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatachalam, R.; Venugopal, M.; Prasad, T.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Suitability of computed radiography with Ir-192, Co-60 and up to 9 MeV x-rays for weld inspections is of importance to many heavy engineering and aerospace industries. CR is preferred because of lesser exposure and processing time as compared to film based radiography and also digital images offers other advantages such as image enhancements, quantitative measurements and easier archival. This paper describes systemic experimental approaches and image quality metrics to compare imaging performance of CR with film-based radiography. Experiments were designed using six-sigma methodology to validate performance of CR for steel thickness up to 160 mm with Ir- 192, Co-60 and x-ray energies varying from 100 kV up to 9 MeV. Weld specimens with defects such as lack of fusion, penetration, cracks, concavity, and porosities were studied for evaluating radiographic sensitivity and imaging performance of the system. Attempts were also made to quantify probability of detection using specimens with artificial and natural defects for various experimental conditions and were compared with film based systems. (authors)

  3. Diagnostic sensitivity of ultrasound, radiography and computed tomography for gender determination in four species of lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ianni, Francesco; Volta, Antonella; Pelizzone, Igor; Manfredi, Sabrina; Gnudi, Giacomo; Parmigiani, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Gender determination is frequently requested by reptile breeders, especially for species with poor or absent sexual dimorphism. The aims of the current study were to describe techniques and diagnostic sensitivities of ultrasound, radiography, and computed tomography for gender determination (identification of hemipenes) in four species of lizards. Nineteen lizards of known sex, belonging to four different species (Pogona vitticeps, Uromastyx aegyptia, Tiliqua scincoides, Gerrhosaurus major) were prospectively enrolled. With informed owner consent, ultrasound, noncontrast CT, contrast radiography, and contrast CT (with contrast medium administered into the cloaca) were performed in conscious animals. Imaging studies were reviewed by three different operators, each unaware of the gender of the animals and of the results of the other techniques. The lizard was classified as a male when hemipenes were identified. Nineteen lizards were included in the study, 10 females and nine males. The hemipenes were seen on ultrasound in only two male lizards, and appeared as oval hypoechoic structures. Radiographically, hemipenes filled with contrast medium appeared as spindle-shaped opacities. Noncontrast CT identified hemipenes in only two lizards, and these appeared as spindle-shaped kinked structures with hyperattenuating content consistent with smegma. Hemipenes were correctly identified in all nine males using contrast CT (accuracy of 100%). Accuracy of contrast radiography was excellent (94.7%). Accuracy of ultrasound and of noncontrast CT was poor (64.3% and 63.1%, respectively). Findings from the current study supported the use of contrast CT or contrast radiography for gender determination in lizards. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  4. Tomosynthesis for the early detection of pulmonary emphysema: diagnostic performance compared with chest radiography, using multidetector computed tomography as reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yoshitake [Keio University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Nippon Koukan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa (Japan); Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Shiomi, Eisuke; Kuribayashi, Sachio [Keio University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Abe, Takayuki [Keio University School of Medicine, Center for Clinical Research, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Kenji [Nippon Koukan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis with that of chest radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema, using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as reference. Forty-eight patients with and 63 without pulmonary emphysema underwent chest MDCT, tomosynthesis and radiography on the same day. Two blinded radiologists independently evaluated the tomosynthesis images and radiographs for the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Axial and coronal MDCT images served as the reference standard and the percentage lung volume with attenuation values of -950 HU or lower (LAA{sub -950}) was evaluated to determine the extent of emphysema. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and generalised estimating equations model were used. ROC analysis revealed significantly better performance (P < 0.0001) of tomosynthesis than radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. The average sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of tomosynthesis were 0.875, 0.968, 0.955 and 0.910, respectively, whereas the values for radiography were 0.479, 0.913, 0.815 and 0.697, respectively. For both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity increased with increasing LAA{sub -950}. The diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis was significantly superior to that of radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. In both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity was affected by the LAA{sub -950}. (orig.)

  5. A comparison of digital tomosynthesis and chest radiography in evaluating airway lesions using computed tomography as a reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Ji Yung; Lee, Ki Yeol; Choi, Jung Won; Yu, Ami; Kim, Je-Hyeong; Lee, Seung Heon; Kang, Eun-Young; Oh, Yu Whan

    2016-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and chest radiography for detecting airway abnormalities, using computed tomography (CT) as a reference. We evaluated 161 data sets from 149 patients (91 with and 70 without airway abnormalities) who had undergone radiography, DTS, and CT to detect airway problems. Radiographs and DTS were evaluated to localize and score the severity of the airway abnormalities, and to score the image quality using CT as a reference. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC), McNemar's test, weighted kappa, and the paired t-test were used for statistical analysis. The sensitivity of DTS was higher (reader 1, 93.51 %; reader 2, 94.29 %) than chest radiography (68.83 %; 71.43 %) in detecting airway lesions. The diagnostic accuracy of DTS (90.91 %; 94.70 %) was also significantly better than that of radiography (78.03 %; 82.58 %, all p < 0.05). DTS image quality was significantly better than chest radiography (1.83, 2.74; p < 0.05) in the results of both readers. The inter-observer agreement with respect to DTS findings was moderate and superior when compared to radiography findings. DTS is a more accurate and sensitive modality than radiography for detecting airway lesions that are easily obscured by soft tissue structures in the mediastinum. (orig.)

  6. Phosphorous vacancy nearest neighbor hopping induced instabilities in InP capacitors II. Computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juang, M.T.; Wager, J.F.; Van Vechten, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Drain current drift in InP metal insulator semiconductor devices display distinct activation energies and pre-exponential factors. The authors have given evidence that these result from two physical mechanisms: thermionic tunneling of electrons into native oxide traps and phosphorous vacancy nearest neighbor hopping (PVNNH). They here present a computer simulation of the effect of the PVNHH mechanism on flatband voltage shift vs. bias stress time measurements. The simulation is based on an analysis of the kinetics of the PVNNH defect reaction sequence in which the electron concentration in the channel is related to the applied bias by a solution of the Poisson equation. The simulation demonstrates quantitatively that the temperature dependence of the flatband shift is associated with PVNNH for temperatures above room temperature

  7. Receiver operating characteristic analysis of chest radiographs with computed radiography and conventional analog films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, C.; Brown, K.; Dalter, S.; Milos, M.J.; Huang, H.K.; Kangarloo, H.; Boechat, I.M.; Batra, P.

    1988-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic is used to compare the image quality of films obtained digitally using computed radiography (CR) and conventionally using analog film following fluoroscopic examination. Twenty-four cases, some with a solitary noncalcified nodule and/or pneumothorax, were collected. Ten radiologists have been tested viewing analog and CR digital films separately. Preliminary results indicate that there is no significant difference in the ability to detect either a pneumothorax or a solitary noncalcified nodule when comparing CR digital film with conventional analog film. A comparison of the CR digital image displayed on a 2,048-line monitor against analog and CR digital film is in progress

  8. Effect of exposure time reduction towards sensitivity and SNR for computed radiography (CR) application in NDT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapizah Rahim; Khairul Anuar Mohd Salleh; Noorhazleena Azaman; Shaharudin Sayuti; Siti Madiha Muhammad Amir; Arshad Yassin; Abdul Razak Hamzah

    2010-01-01

    Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity study of Computed Radiography (CR) system with reduction of exposure time is presented. The purposes of this research are to determine the behavior of SNR toward three different thicknesses (step wedge; 5, 10 and 15 mm) and the ability of CR system to recognize hole type penetrameter when the exposure time decreased up to 80 % according to the exposure chart (D7; ISOVOLT Titan E). It is shown that the SNR is decreased with decreasing of exposure time percentage but the high quality image is achieved until 80 % reduction of exposure time. (author)

  9. Constancy tests radiography X-ray devices with CR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durdikova, M.; Zakova, M.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the changes in QAP (Quality Assurance Program) as consequence of digitalisation of medical facilities. Digitalisation brings many advantages - more comfort for personal use, images are easy achievable and transferable to workstation, fine quality images by postprocessing are easily achievable. But it must be taken into account that due to simplicity of image make it is sometimes taken more images then necessary .There are two possible ways of digitalisation in radiography: to exchange conventional developer machine by Computer Radiography (CR), that means to use CR reader and cassette with phosphor plate - un-direct digitalisation or to use special radiography X-ray devices with flat-panel detector -direct radiography. (authors)

  10. Tomosynthesis for the early detection of pulmonary emphysema: diagnostic performance compared with chest radiography, using multidetector computed tomography as reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yoshitake; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Shiomi, Eisuke; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Abe, Takayuki; Ogawa, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis with that of chest radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema, using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as reference. Forty-eight patients with and 63 without pulmonary emphysema underwent chest MDCT, tomosynthesis and radiography on the same day. Two blinded radiologists independently evaluated the tomosynthesis images and radiographs for the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Axial and coronal MDCT images served as the reference standard and the percentage lung volume with attenuation values of -950 HU or lower (LAA -950 ) was evaluated to determine the extent of emphysema. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and generalised estimating equations model were used. ROC analysis revealed significantly better performance (P -950 . The diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis was significantly superior to that of radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. In both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity was affected by the LAA -950 . (orig.)

  11. Tropical pulmonary eosinophilia: a comparative evaluation of plain chest radiography and computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu Manavijit; Mukhopadhyay Sima; Sharma, S.K. [All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    1996-02-01

    Plain chest radiography and computed tomography (CT) of the chest were performed on 10 patients with tropical pulmonary eosinophilia (TPE). Chest radiographs revealed bilateral diffuse lesions in the lungs of all the patients with relative sparing of lower lobes in one patient. However, computed tomography revealed bilateral diffuse lung lesions in all of the patients with relative sparing of lower lobes in three patients. In seven (70%) of the 10 patients, CT provided additional information. Computed tomography was found to be superior for the detection of reticulonodular pattern, bronchiectasis, air trapping, calcification and mediastinal adenopathy. No correlation was found between pulmonary function and gas exchange data using CT densities. There was also no correlation between the absolute eosinophil count (AEC) and the radiological severity of lesions. In six patients, high-resolution CT (HRCT) was performed in addition to conventional CT (CCT), and nodularity of lesions was better appreciated in these patients. It is concluded from this study that CT is superior to plain radiography for the evaluation of patients with TPE. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  12. Phosphor plate mammography: contrast studies and clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.H.J.; Martin, N.L.; Templeton, A.W.; Cook, L.T.; Harrison, L.A.; McFadden, M.A.; Dwyer, S.J. III; Spicer, J.; Crystal, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    Mammography and accurate microcalcification detection require very good spatial resolution. We have compared the diagnostic capabilities of reduced-exposure, third-generation, 5 cycles/mm computed radiography (CR) phosphor plates with conventional screen-film in 67 patients. No difference in diagnostic accuracy was detected. The digital characteristics of storage phosphor plates erabled us to study the relationship between contrast and spatial resolution. We developed a computer program to identify a single 100 μm pixel in a digital image and assign various gray levels to that pixel. Using this model, we determined that, for our 5 cycles/mm CR system, the imaged contrast of a 100 μm object was 62% of the original contrast. Current 5 cycles/mm phosphor plate systems cannot adequately detect microcalcifications that approximate 100 μm or smaller unless a magnification technique is used. (orig.)

  13. Observer training for computer-aided detection of pulmonary nodules in chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boo, Diederick W; van Hoorn, François; van Schuppen, Joost; Schijf, Laura; Scheerder, Maeke J; Freling, Nicole J; Mets, Onno; Weber, Michael; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M

    2012-08-01

    To assess whether short-term feedback helps readers to increase their performance using computer-aided detection (CAD) for nodule detection in chest radiography. The 140 CXRs (56 with a solitary CT-proven nodules and 84 negative controls) were divided into four subsets of 35; each were read in a different order by six readers. Lesion presence, location and diagnostic confidence were scored without and with CAD (IQQA-Chest, EDDA Technology) as second reader. Readers received individual feedback after each subset. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve (AUC) were calculated for readings with and without CAD with respect to change over time and impact of CAD. CAD stand-alone sensitivity was 59 % with 1.9 false-positives per image. Mean AUC slightly increased over time with and without CAD (0.78 vs. 0.84 with and 0.76 vs. 0.82 without CAD) but differences did not reach significance. The sensitivity increased (65 % vs. 70 % and 66 % vs. 70 %) and specificity decreased over time (79 % vs. 74 % and 80 % vs. 77 %) but no significant impact of CAD was found. Short-term feedback does not increase the ability of readers to differentiate true- from false-positive candidate lesions and to use CAD more effectively. • Computer-aided detection (CAD) is increasingly used as an adjunct for many radiological techniques. • Short-term feedback does not improve reader performance with CAD in chest radiography. • Differentiation between true- and false-positive CAD for low conspicious possible lesions proves difficult. • CAD can potentially increase reader performance for nodule detection in chest radiography.

  14. An investigation of automatic exposure control calibration for chest imaging with a computed radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C S; Wood, T J; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R; Avery, G; Balcam, S; Needler, L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the use of three physical image quality metrics in the calibration of an automatic exposure control (AEC) device for chest radiography with a computed radiography (CR) imaging system. The metrics assessed were signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean effective noise equivalent quanta (eNEQ m ), all measured using a uniform chest phantom. Subsequent calibration curves were derived to ensure each metric was held constant across the tube voltage range. Each curve was assessed for its clinical appropriateness by generating computer simulated chest images with correct detector air kermas for each tube voltage, and grading these against reference images which were reconstructed at detector air kermas correct for the constant detector dose indicator (DDI) curve currently programmed into the AEC device. All simulated chest images contained clinically realistic projected anatomy and anatomical noise and were scored by experienced image evaluators. Constant DDI and CNR curves do not appear to provide optimized performance across the diagnostic energy range. Conversely, constant eNEQ m  and SNR do appear to provide optimized performance, with the latter being the preferred calibration metric given as it is easier to measure in practice. Medical physicists may use the SNR image quality metric described here when setting up and optimizing AEC devices for chest radiography CR systems with a degree of confidence that resulting clinical image quality will be adequate for the required clinical task. However, this must be done with close cooperation of expert image evaluators, to ensure appropriate levels of detector air kerma. (paper)

  15. An investigation of automatic exposure control calibration for chest imaging with a computed radiography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C S; Wood, T J; Avery, G; Balcam, S; Needler, L; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2014-05-07

    The purpose of this study was to examine the use of three physical image quality metrics in the calibration of an automatic exposure control (AEC) device for chest radiography with a computed radiography (CR) imaging system. The metrics assessed were signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean effective noise equivalent quanta (eNEQm), all measured using a uniform chest phantom. Subsequent calibration curves were derived to ensure each metric was held constant across the tube voltage range. Each curve was assessed for its clinical appropriateness by generating computer simulated chest images with correct detector air kermas for each tube voltage, and grading these against reference images which were reconstructed at detector air kermas correct for the constant detector dose indicator (DDI) curve currently programmed into the AEC device. All simulated chest images contained clinically realistic projected anatomy and anatomical noise and were scored by experienced image evaluators. Constant DDI and CNR curves do not appear to provide optimized performance across the diagnostic energy range. Conversely, constant eNEQm and SNR do appear to provide optimized performance, with the latter being the preferred calibration metric given as it is easier to measure in practice. Medical physicists may use the SNR image quality metric described here when setting up and optimizing AEC devices for chest radiography CR systems with a degree of confidence that resulting clinical image quality will be adequate for the required clinical task. However, this must be done with close cooperation of expert image evaluators, to ensure appropriate levels of detector air kerma.

  16. A linear programming computational framework integrates phosphor-proteomics and prior knowledge to predict drug efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhiwei; Wang, Bing; Yan, Ke; Dong, Ligang; Meng, Guanmin; Shi, Lei

    2017-12-21

    In recent years, the integration of 'omics' technologies, high performance computation, and mathematical modeling of biological processes marks that the systems biology has started to fundamentally impact the way of approaching drug discovery. The LINCS public data warehouse provides detailed information about cell responses with various genetic and environmental stressors. It can be greatly helpful in developing new drugs and therapeutics, as well as improving the situations of lacking effective drugs, drug resistance and relapse in cancer therapies, etc. In this study, we developed a Ternary status based Integer Linear Programming (TILP) method to infer cell-specific signaling pathway network and predict compounds' treatment efficacy. The novelty of our study is that phosphor-proteomic data and prior knowledge are combined for modeling and optimizing the signaling network. To test the power of our approach, a generic pathway network was constructed for a human breast cancer cell line MCF7; and the TILP model was used to infer MCF7-specific pathways with a set of phosphor-proteomic data collected from ten representative small molecule chemical compounds (most of them were studied in breast cancer treatment). Cross-validation indicated that the MCF7-specific pathway network inferred by TILP were reliable predicting a compound's efficacy. Finally, we applied TILP to re-optimize the inferred cell-specific pathways and predict the outcomes of five small compounds (carmustine, doxorubicin, GW-8510, daunorubicin, and verapamil), which were rarely used in clinic for breast cancer. In the simulation, the proposed approach facilitates us to identify a compound's treatment efficacy qualitatively and quantitatively, and the cross validation analysis indicated good accuracy in predicting effects of five compounds. In summary, the TILP model is useful for discovering new drugs for clinic use, and also elucidating the potential mechanisms of a compound to targets.

  17. A comparison of radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of palmar process fractures in foals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneps, A.J.; Koblik, P.D.; Freeman, D.M.; Pool, R.R.; O'Brien, T.R.

    1995-01-01

    The relative sensitivity of radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for detecting palmar process fractures of the distal phalanx in foals was determined and the imaging findings were compared with histomorphologic evaluations of the palmar processes. Compared to radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging did not improve the sensitivity for detection of palmar process fractures. Statistical agreement for palmar process fracture diagnosis was excellent among the three imaging modalities. Histomorphologic evaluations were more sensitive for diagnosis of palmar process fracture than any of the imaging modalities. Three-dimensional image reconstructions and volume measurements of distal phalanges and palmar process fracture fragments from computed tomography studies provided more complete anatomical information than radiography. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed that the deep digital flexor tendon insertion on the distal phalanx is immediately axial to the site where palmar process fractures occur, and differentiated cartilage, bone, and soft tissue structures of the hoof

  18. Development of a computer simulation system of intraoral radiography using perspective volume rendering of CT data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Kazutoshi; Tanaka, Takemasa; Yoshiura, Kazunori; Tokumori, Kenji; Kanda, Shigenobu

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a computer simulation system for intraoral radiography as an educational aid for radiographic training for dental students. A dried skull was scanned with a multidetector CT, and the series of slice data was transferred to a workstation. A software AVS Express Developer was used to construct the x-ray projected images from the CT slice data. Geometrical reproducibilities were confirmed using numerical phantoms. We simulated images using the perspective projection method with an average value algorithm on this software. Simulated images were compared with conventional film images projected from the same geometrical positions, including eccentric projection. Furthermore, to confirm the changes of the image depending on the projection angles of the x-ray beam, we constructed simulation images in which the root apexes were enhanced with the maximum value algorithm. Using this method, high resolution simulated images with perspective projection, as opposed to parallel, were constructed. Comparing with conventional film images, all major anatomic components could be visualized easily. Any intraoral radiographs at an arbitrary angular projection could be simulated, which was impossible in the conventional training schema for radiographic technique. Therefore, not only standard projected images but also eccentric projections could be displayed. A computer simulation system of intraoral radiography with this method may be useful for training in intraoral radiographic technique for dental students. (author)

  19. X-ray fluorescence and computed radiography analysis of a famous brazilian painting from XIX century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calza, Cristiane; Oliveira, Davi F.; Rocha, Henrique S.; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu

    2009-01-01

    This work used Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) and Computed Radiography (CR) to evaluate the general conditions of the painting 'Gioventu' (Eliseu Visconti, 1898), identifying possible problems, areas that revealed signs of previous retouchings and the pigments used by the artist. EDXRF measurements were carried out with a portable system consisting of an X-ray tube Oxford TF3005 with W anode, operating at 25 kV and 100 μA, and a Si-PIN XR-100CR detector from Amptek. Several spectra were obtained in each color, with an acquisition time of 300 s and a beam collimation of 2 mm. The spectra were analyzed using the software QXAS-AXIL (IAEA). The results revealed that the drawings were made over a preparatory layer of lead white. Some pigments identified were: yellow, red and brown ochre; umbra; vermilion; cobalt blue; etc. The experimental setup used in the CR analysis consisted of an Oxford X-ray source, operating at 50 kV and 200 μA, placed at 85 cm from the painting, a GE CR 50P portable computed radiography scanner and a Fuji imaging plate detector. The exposure time was 600 s. The radiographic images revealed that the painting was in a good state of conservation and also a complete composition hidden underneath the visible paint layer.(author)

  20. Estimation of dose to patients undergoing computed radiography x-ray examinations in some Khartoum hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badri, Fatima Abulgasiem Abdulrhman

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the entrance surface air kerma to the patient during x-ray examination to (chest PA, lumbar spine AP and Lat, pelvis AP) by using computed radiography (CR) in different three hospitals in Khartoum. Three x-ray machines were covered. A total of 135 patients were evaluated. The entrance surface air kerma was calculated for each patient from the exposure parameters using cal dose software version 3.5. The obtained results showed that, the entrance surface air kerma range founded to be (0.28-1.59) for chest PA, (1.98-2.62) for lumbar spine and (0.438-2.47) for pelvis AP. The higher entrance surface air kerma for all projections were observed in Center 1, except for pelvis it is higher in center 2. And the lower entrance surface air kerma were observed in center 3. This study recommends that CR operator must to be used to achieve optimize the patient dose by use the best strategies available for reducing radiation dose, computed radiography must be used with high level of training for medical staff to reduce the dose, each radiology department should implement a patient dose measurement quality assurance programme, doses to the patients should be regularly monitored and the proposed national DRLs should be taken as guidance for optimization.(Author)

  1. Daily quality control in computed radiography mammography using the manufacturer phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubiak, Rosangela R.; Messias, Pricila C.; Oliveira, Carlla M.

    2011-01-01

    The quality control (QC) in mammography system involves a large amount of test tools, which implies a large space for storage and a high number of exposure. This work describes a QC system using a phantom, Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) One Shot Phantom M Plus, that evaluates several parameters with just one exposure. The software offers tests with annual, semi-annual, quarterly, weekly and daily periodicity, and analyzes the conformities of the mammography equipment, image plate and cassettes. Because of the high number of tests, it was evaluated the daily test only for seven months in two mammography equipment. The test, through the software and its image, allows the analysis of ten parameters in QC. The evaluation of these parameters was realized by the average of the values provided by the software. Only one of the evaluated items showed not conformity, but this was observed and the necessary corrections were realized. The monitoring of use of FCR Mammography QC software with the FCR One Shot Phantom M Plus was realized and through this we could investigate that the quality program provided by the system is appropriate for the radiology services that has the Fuji Computed Radiography system. (author)

  2. X-ray fluorescence and computed radiography analysis of a famous brazilian painting from XIX century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calza, Cristiane; Oliveira, Davi F.; Rocha, Henrique S.; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear], e-mail: ccalza@lin.ufrj.br; Pedreira, Andrea [Museu Nacional de Belas Artes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work used Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) and Computed Radiography (CR) to evaluate the general conditions of the painting 'Gioventu' (Eliseu Visconti, 1898), identifying possible problems, areas that revealed signs of previous retouchings and the pigments used by the artist. EDXRF measurements were carried out with a portable system consisting of an X-ray tube Oxford TF3005 with W anode, operating at 25 kV and 100 {mu}A, and a Si-PIN XR-100CR detector from Amptek. Several spectra were obtained in each color, with an acquisition time of 300 s and a beam collimation of 2 mm. The spectra were analyzed using the software QXAS-AXIL (IAEA). The results revealed that the drawings were made over a preparatory layer of lead white. Some pigments identified were: yellow, red and brown ochre; umbra; vermilion; cobalt blue; etc. The experimental setup used in the CR analysis consisted of an Oxford X-ray source, operating at 50 kV and 200 {mu}A, placed at 85 cm from the painting, a GE CR 50P portable computed radiography scanner and a Fuji imaging plate detector. The exposure time was 600 s. The radiographic images revealed that the painting was in a good state of conservation and also a complete composition hidden underneath the visible paint layer.(author)

  3. Comparative study on computed orthopantomography and film radiographic techniques in the radiography of temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Tao; Ning Lixia; Liu Yuai; Li Ningyi; Chen Feng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the computed orthopantomography (COPT) with Shriller radiography(SR), film orthopantomography (FOPT) and other traditional radiographic techniques in the radiography of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Methods: Ninty-eight cases were randomly divided into 3 groups, and the open and close positions of TMJs of both sides were examined with SR, FOPT, and COPT, respectively. The satisfactory rates of the X-ray pictures were statistically analyzed with Pearson chi-square in SPSS10.0, and the satisfactory rates were analyzed with q test between the groups. Results: One hundred and forty-four of the open and close positions of 144 TMJ pictures of the COPT group, 128 of 128 of the FOPT group, and 6 of 120 of the SR group were satisfactory in the mandible ramus of the TMJ, with satisfactory rate being 100%, 100%, and 5%, respectively (P 0.01), respectively between FOPT and COPT groups. The difference was not statistically significant. The exposure was as follows: COPT, 99-113 mAs; FOPT, 210-225 mAs; and SR, 48-75 mAs. Therefore, COPT and FOPT were superior to SR in the pictures of the mandible ramus, coronoid process, and incisure, but inferior in the joint space pictures. The satisfactory rates of the condylar process and articular tubercle were same in the 3 groups. The exposure of the FOPT group was greater than that of the COPT and SR groups. Conclusion: COPT is superior to SR and FOPT in TMJ radiography, and should be applied widely in the clinic. (authors)

  4. Acute Knee Trauma: Analysis of Multidetector Computed Tomography Findings and Comparison with Conventional Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustonen, A.O.T.; Kiuru, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings of acute knee trauma and to compare radiography with MDCT in patients referred ta level 1 trauma center. Material and Methods: During a 5-year period, a total of 415 MDCT examinations were performed on 409 patients with acute knee trauma to reveal complex fracture anatomy or rule out a fracture. MDCT and primary radiographs were re-evaluated with respect to fracture location and trauma mechanism. Tibial plateau fractures were further analyzed depending on anatomical location: anterior-medial, anterior-lateral, posterior-lateral, and posterior-medial regions. Maximal depression of the tibial articular surface was measured. Findings on the primary knee radiographs were compared with MDCT findings. Results: Of the 409 patients, 356 (87%) had a knee fracture. A total of 451 fractures were found in all anatomic regions: distal femur ( n = 49), proximal tibia ( n 307), patella ( n = 23), and proximal fibula ( n = 72). Primary radiographs were available in 316 (76%) cases. Of these, 225 (71%) had MDCT in order to reveal the fracture anatomy better, and 91 (29%) had a subsequent MDCT after negative plain radiographs. Overall sensitivity of radiography was 83%, while negative predictive value was 49%. On radiography, tibial plateau articular depression was underestimated in all regions except when the fracture consisted of the whole half of the anterior or posterior plateau. The three main injury mechanisms were traffic accident, a simple fall, and sport. In 49 cases (15%), primary radiographs were suboptimal due to positioning. Conclusion: In severely injured patients, diagnostically sufficient radiographs are difficult to obtain, and therefore a negative radiograph is not reliable in ruling out a fracture. In these patients, MDCT is a fast and accurate examination and is also recommended in patients with tibial plateau fractures or complex knee injuries in order to evaluate the fracture adequately

  5. Basilar skull fracture in a Thoroughbred colt: Radiography or computed tomography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Kin Lim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A two-year-old Thoroughbred colt was presented to the Equine Clinic, Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital for head trauma after rearing and falling backwards, hitting his head on the ground. Following medical therapy for acute onset neurological impairment secondary to a suspected basilar skull fracture, the horse was anaesthetised and computed tomography of the skull was performed. A diagnosis of a comminuted basilar skull fracture was made and skull radiographs were taken for comparison. The horse was subsequently euthanased owing to the poor prognosis; necropsy findings were compatible with imaging findings. The value and limitation of computed tomography versus radiography for the diagnosis of basilar skull fracture are discussed in this report. Introduction

  6. Basilar skull fracture in a Thoroughbred colt: Radiography or computed tomography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Kin Lim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A two-year-old Thoroughbred colt was presented to the Equine Clinic, Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital for head trauma after rearing and falling backwards, hitting his head on the ground. Following medical therapy for acute onset neurological impairment secondary to a suspected basilar skull fracture, the horse was anaesthetised and computed tomography of the skull was performed. A diagnosis of a comminuted basilar skull fracture was made and skull radiographs were taken for comparison. The horse was subsequently euthanased owing to the poor prognosis; necropsy findings were compatible with imaging findings. The value and limitation of computed tomography versus radiography for the diagnosis of basilar skull fracture are discussed in this report.

  7. Comparative study of mesothelioma and asbestosis using computed tomography and conventional chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinowitz, T.G.; Efremidis, S.C.; Cohen, B.; Dan, S.; Efremidis, A.; Chahinian, A.P.; Teirstein, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    A comparative study using computed tomography and conventional posteroanterior radiography was performed on 27 patients with mesothelioma and 13 patients with advanced asbestosis. The major pathologic features of both asbestosis and mesothelioma were well demonstrated by both modalities; computed tomography demonstrated the findings more frequently and in greater detail. No distinguishing features could be established based on configuration and size of the lesion. Many pleural plaques associated with advanced asbestosis were large and irregular and resembled those associated with mesothelioma. However, nodular involvement of the pleural fissures, pleural effusion, and ipsilateral volume loss with a fixed mediastinum were features predominating in mesothelioma. Growth determination of the plaques associated with asbestosis may be of minimal value since such plaques also undergo growth due to active inflammatory changes

  8. Accuracy of digital peripical radiography and cone-beam computed tomography in detecting external root resorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creanga, Adriana Gabriela [Division of Dental Diagnostic Science, Rutgers School of Dental Medicine, Newark (United States); Geha, Hassem; Sankar, Vidya; Mcmahan, Clyde Alex; Noujeim, Marcel [University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio (United States); Teixeira, Fabrico B. [Dept. of Endodontics, University of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital intraoral radiography in diagnosing simulated small external root resorption cavities. Cavities were drilled in 159 roots using a small spherical bur at different root levels and on all surfaces. The teeth were imaged both with intraoral digital radiography using image plates and with CBCT. Two sets of intraoral images were acquired per tooth: orthogonal (PA) which was the conventional periapical radiograph and mesioangulated (SET). Four readers were asked to rate their confidence level in detecting and locating the lesions. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the accuracy of each modality in detecting the presence of lesions, the affected surface, and the affected level. Analysis of variation was used to compare the results and kappa analysis was used to evaluate interobserver agreement. A significant difference in the area under the ROC curves was found among the three modalities (P=0.0002), with CBCT (0.81) having a significantly higher value than PA (0.71) or SET (0.71). PA was slightly more accurate than SET, but the difference was not statistically significant. CBCT was also superior in locating the affected surface and level. CBCT has already proven its superiority in detecting multiple dental conditions, and this study shows it to likewise be superior in detecting and locating incipient external root resorption.

  9. Dose reduction using non lineal diffusion and smoothing filters in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez, M.G.; Juste, B.; Vidal, V.; Verdú, G.; Mayo, P.; Rodenas, F.

    2014-01-01

    The use of Computed Radiography (CR) into clinical practice has been followed by a high increase in the number of examinations performed and overdose cases in patients, especially children in pediatric applications. Computed radiographic images are corrupted by noise because either data acquisition or data transmission. The level of this inherent noise is related with the X-ray dose exposure: lower radiation exposure involves higher noise level. The main aim of this work is to reduce the noise present in a low radiation dose CR image in order to the get a CR image of the same quality as a higher radiation exposure image. In this work, we use a non lineal diffusion filtering method to reduce the noise level in a CR, this means that we are able to reduce the exposure, milliampere-second (mAs), and the dose absorbed by the patients. In order to get an optimal result, the diffusive filter is complemented with a smoothing filter with edge detection in order to preserve edges. Therefore, the proposed method consists in obtaining a good quality CR image for diagnostic purposes by selection of lower X-ray exposure jointly with a reduction of the noise. We conclude that a good solution to minimize the dose to patients, especially children in pediatric applications, in X-ray computed radiography consists in decreasing the mAs of the X-ray exposure and then processing the image with the proposed method. - Highlights: • We have investigated the techniques to obtain the image quality to make a confident diagnosis. • We have used diffusion and smoothing filter in order to reduce the exposure. • Reducing CR doses, especially in pediatric applications. • The new CR images allow medical researchers to analyze how low dose affects the patient diagnosis

  10. Comparison of clinical and physical measures of image quality in chest and pelvis computed radiography at different tube voltages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandborg, Michael; Tingberg, Anders; Ullman, Gustaf; Dance, David R.; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the dependence of image quality in digital chest and pelvis radiography on tube voltage, and to explore correlations between clinical and physical measures of image quality. The effect on image quality of tube voltage in these two examinations was assessed using two methods. The first method relies on radiologists' observations of images of an anthropomorphic phantom, and the second method was based on computer modeling of the imaging system using an anthropomorphic voxel phantom. The tube voltage was varied within a broad range (50-150 kV), including those values typically used with screen-film radiography. The tube charge was altered so that the same effective dose was achieved for each projection. Two x-ray units were employed using a computed radiography (CR) image detector with standard tube filtration and antiscatter device. Clinical image quality was assessed by a group of radiologists using a visual grading analysis (VGA) technique based on the revised CEC image criteria. Physical image quality was derived from a Monte Carlo computer model in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio, SNR, of anatomical structures corresponding to the image criteria. Both the VGAS (visual grading analysis score) and SNR decrease with increasing tube voltage in both chest PA and pelvis AP examinations, indicating superior performance if lower tube voltages are employed. Hence, a positive correlation between clinical and physical measures of image quality was found. The pros and cons of using lower tube voltages with CR digital radiography than typically used in analog screen-film radiography are discussed, as well as the relevance of using VGAS and quantum-noise SNR as measures of image quality in pelvis and chest radiography

  11. Practical considerations and effects of metallic screen fluorescence and backscatter control in gamma computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mango, Steven

    2016-01-01

    It is a fairly common misconception that the role of metallic screens used with computed radiography is primarily that of scatter control, and that any amplification of the image signal is minimal. To the contrary, this paper shows how the physical interaction between gamma rays and front metallic screens can yield a significant boost in signal and whether that increased signal is, in fact, beneficial or detrimental to image quality. For rear metallic screens, this signal boost is differentiated from backscatter, and image quality considerations should be more carefully thought out because of the separation between the screen and the imaging layer provided by the imaging plate support. Various physical interactions are explained, and a series of practical experiments show the various changes in signal level and image quality with various thicknesses of lead and copper screens. Recommendations are made for the configuration of the imaging plate and screens for optimum image quality and for the control and monitoring of scatter.

  12. Computed radiography systems performance evaluation;Avaliacao de desempenho de sistemas de radiografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, Clarice C.; Nersissian, Denise Y.; Furquim, Tania A.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IEE/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia

    2009-07-01

    The performance of a computed radiography system was evaluated, according to the AAPM Report No. 93. Evaluation tests proposed by the publication were performed, and the following nonconformities were found: imaging p/ate (lP) dark noise, which compromises the clinical image acquired using the IP; exposure indicator uncalibrated, which can cause underexposure to the IP; nonlinearity of the system response, which causes overexposure; resolution limit under the declared by the manufacturer and erasure thoroughness uncalibrated, impairing structures visualization; Moire pattern visualized at the grid response, and IP Throughput over the specified by the manufacturer. These non-conformities indicate that digital imaging systems' lack of calibration can cause an increase in dose in order that image prob/ems can be so/ved. (author)

  13. Evaluation of an image receptor for computed radiography system in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Marcelino V.A.; Rosado, Paulo H.G.; Santana, Priscila C.; Alvarenga, Frederico L.; Nogueira, Maria S.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the performance of an image receptor for computed radiography system, Kodak CR850, was assessed through tests, recommended by the European protocol, with a specific image plate for mammography where were analyzed the Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and uniformity and linearity of detector. The CNRs were 14.1, 11.7, 10.3, 8.4, 7.1 and 5.9 for 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 cm polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thickness, respectively. The linearity between detector response and dose, obtained a correlation coefficient (R 2 ) greater than 0.99, and the maximum variation found in the detector uniformity calculation was 3.94 in the lower right corner. (author)

  14. Standard practice for digital imaging and communication nondestructive evaluation (DICONDE) for computed radiography (CR) test methods

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice facilitates the interoperability of computed radiography (CR) imaging and data acquisition equipment by specifying image data transfer and archival storage methods in commonly accepted terms. This practice is intended to be used in conjunction with Practice E2339 on Digital Imaging and Communication in Nondestructive Evaluation (DICONDE). Practice E2339 defines an industrial adaptation of the NEMA Standards Publication titled Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM, see http://medical.nema.org), an international standard for image data acquisition, review, storage and archival storage. The goal of Practice E2339, commonly referred to as DICONDE, is to provide a standard that facilitates the display and analysis of NDE results on any system conforming to the DICONDE standard. Toward that end, Practice E2339 provides a data dictionary and a set of information modules that are applicable to all NDE modalities. This practice supplements Practice E2339 by providing information objec...

  15. Computed radiography utilizing laser-stimulated luminescence: detectability of simulated low-contrast radiographic objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashida, Y; Moribe, N; Hirata, Y; Morita, K; Doudanuki, S; Sonoda, Y; Katsuda, N; Hiai, Y; Misumi, W; Matsumoto, M

    1988-01-01

    Threshold contrasts of low-contrast objects with computed radiography (CR) images were compared with those of blue and green emitting screen-film systems by employing the 18-alternative forced choice (18-AFC) procedure. The dependence of the threshold contrast on the incident X-ray exposure and also the object size was studied. The results indicated that the threshold contrasts of CR system were comparable to those of blue and green screen-film systems and decreased with increasing object size, and increased with decreasing incident X-ray exposure. The increase in threshold contrasts was small when the relative incident exposure decreased from 1 to 1/4, and was large when incident exposure was decreased further.

  16. Initial quantitative evaluation of computed radiography in an intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillis, D.J.; McDonald, I.G.; Kelly, W.J.

    1996-01-01

    The first computed radiography (CR) unit in Australia was installed at St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, in February 1994. An initial qualitative evaluation of the attitude of the intensive care unit (ICU) physicians to the CR unit was conducted by use of a survey. The results of the survey of ICU physicians indicated that images were available faster than under the previous system and that the use of the CR system was preferred to evaluate chest tubes and line placements. While it is recognized that a further detailed radiological evaluation of the CR system is required to establish the diagnostic performance of CR compared with conventional film, some comments on the implementation of the system and ICU physician attitudes to the CR system are put forward for consideration by other hospitals examining the possible use of CR systems. 11 refs., 1 tab

  17. Subtraction radiography and computer assisted densitometric analyses of standardized radiographs. A comparison study with /sup 125/I absorptiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortmann, L.F.; Dunford, R.; McHenry, K.; Hausmann, E.

    1985-01-01

    A standardized radiographic series of incrementally increasing alveolar crestal defects in skulls were subjected to analyses by subtraction radiography and computer assisted quantitative densitometric analysis. Subjects were able to detect change using subtraction radiography in alveolar bone defects with bone loss in the range of 1-5 percent as measured by /sup 125/I absorptiometry. Quantitative densitometric analyses utilizing radiographic pairs adjusted for differences in contrast (gamma corrected) can be used to follow longitudinal changes at a particular alveolar bone site. Such measurements correlate with change observed by /sup 125/I absorptiometry (r=0.82-0.94). (author).

  18. Diagnostic value of computed tomography, radiography and ultrasonography in metacarpophalangeal joint disorders in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M.V. Machado

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In modern society the work and athletic performance of horses has led to a very important animal production sector in which Brazil possesses the third largest horse stock. Among all equine lesions described, metacarpophalangeal (fetlock joint lesions are considered one of the main causes of lameness. Consequently, there is a need to improve the understanding and diagnosis of these injuries. The most efficient imaging diagnostic methods for the fetlock region are computed tomography, radiography and ultrasound. Imaging studies of the anatomical structures involving this joint are extremely important to obtain a more precise diagnose. The present study was performed in order to evaluate the capacity of different imaging diagnostic modalities to detect a variety of lesions in different fetlock structures. Twenty horses (Equus caballus used for horsemanship activities were referred to the Department of Animal Reproduction and Veterinary Radiology of São Paulo State University, Botucatu campus, with clinical signs of metacarpophalangeal joint injuries. Horses were submitted to radiographic and ultrasonographic exam and computed tomography scan. Image analysis revealed a significant capacity of these methods to characterize lesions in this region. However, computed tomography provided broader and better evaluation of lesions in bones and adjacent structures, because it allows the analysis to be performed on three-dimensional projections, with attenuation coefficients (window selections and tissue density measurement through Hounsfield Units (HU.

  19. Initial quality performance results using a phantom to simulate chest computed radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhogora Wilbroad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a homemade phantom for quantitative quality control in chest computed radiography (CR. The phantom was constructed from copper, aluminium, and polymenthylmethacrylate (PMMA plates as well as Styrofoam materials. Depending on combinations, the literature suggests that these materials can simulate the attenuation and scattering characteristics of lung, heart, and mediastinum. The lung, heart, and mediastinum regions were simulated by 10 mm x 10 mm x 0.5 mm, 10 mm x 10 mm x 0.5 mm and 10 mm x 10 mm x 1 mm copper plates, respectively. A test object of 100 mm x 100 mm and 0.2 mm thick copper was positioned to each region for CNR measurements. The phantom was exposed to x-rays generated by different tube potentials that covered settings in clinical use: 110-120 kVp (HVL=4.26-4.66 mm Al at a source image distance (SID of 180 cm. An approach similar to the recommended method in digital mammography was applied to determine the CNR values of phantom images produced by a Kodak CR 850A system with post-processing turned off. Subjective contrast-detail studies were also carried out by using images of Leeds TOR CDR test object acquired under similar exposure conditions as during CNR measurements. For clinical kVp conditions relevant to chest radiography, the CNR was highest over 90-100 kVp range. The CNR data correlated with the results of contrast detail observations. The values of clinical tube potentials at which CNR is the highest are regarded to be optimal kVp settings. The simplicity in phantom construction can offer easy implementation of related quality control program.

  20. Computer-aided diagnosis of pulmonary diseases using x-ray darkfield radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einarsdóttir, Hildur; Larsen, Rasmus; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Hellbach, Katharina; Auweter, Sigrid; Meinel, Felix G; Reiser, Maximilian; Yildirim, Önder; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    In this work we develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme for classification of pulmonary disease for grating-based x-ray radiography. In addition to conventional transmission radiography, the grating-based technique provides a dark-field imaging modality, which utilizes the scattering properties of the x-rays. This modality has shown great potential for diagnosing early stage emphysema and fibrosis in mouse lungs in vivo. The CAD scheme is developed to assist radiologists and other medical experts to develop new diagnostic methods when evaluating grating-based images. The scheme consists of three stages: (i) automatic lung segmentation; (ii) feature extraction from lung shape and dark-field image intensities; (iii) classification between healthy, emphysema and fibrosis lungs. A study of 102 mice was conducted with 34 healthy, 52 emphysema and 16 fibrosis subjects. Each image was manually annotated to build an experimental dataset. System performance was assessed by: (i) determining the quality of the segmentations; (ii) validating emphysema and fibrosis recognition by a linear support vector machine using leave-one-out cross-validation. In terms of segmentation quality, we obtained an overlap percentage (Ω) 92.63  ±  3.65%, Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) 89.74  ±  8.84% and Jaccard Similarity Coefficient 82.39  ±  12.62%. For classification, the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of diseased lung recognition was 100%. Classification between emphysema and fibrosis resulted in an accuracy of 93%, whilst the sensitivity was 94% and specificity 88%. In addition to the automatic classification of lungs, deviation maps created by the CAD scheme provide a visual aid for medical experts to further assess the severity of pulmonary disease in the lung, and highlights regions affected. (paper)

  1. Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of conventional and digital periapical radiography, panoramic radiography, and cone-beam computed tomography in the assessment of alveolar bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Wilton Mitsunari; Vessoni Iwaki, Lilian Cristina; Da Silva, Mariliani Chicarelli; Tonin, Renata Hernandes

    2014-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of different radiographic methods in the assessment of proximal alveolar bone loss (ABL). Materials and Methods: ABL, the distance between cement-enamel junction and alveolar bone crest, was measured in 70 mandibular human teeth – directly on the mandibles (control), using conventional periapical radiography with film holders (Rinn XCP and Han-Shin), digital periapical radiography with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor, conventional panoramic, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Three programs were used to measure ABL on the images: Image tool 3.0 (University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA), Kodak Imaging 6.1 (Kodak Dental Imaging 6.1, Carestream Health®, Rochester, NY, USA), and i-CAT vision 1.6.20. Statistical analysis used ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. Results: The tomographic images showed the highest means, whereas the lowest were found for periapical with Han-Shin. Controls differed from periapical with Han-Shin (P digital periapical (P = 0.0027). Conventional periapicals with film holders differed from each other (P = 0.0007). Digital periapical differed from conventional periapical with Han-Shin (P = 0.0004). Conclusions: Conventional periapical with Han-Shin film holder was the only method that differed from the controls. CBCT had the closest means to the controls. PMID:25191066

  2. Evaluation of the map accuracy thickness defects by computer analysis of the radiography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawszczak, J.; Wocial, A.

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of the sensitivity map radiography for the local profiles of the surface steel plate with artificial of the thickness defects were presented of the paper. Errors of these method estimation and they sources were presented also. Usefulness of this mapping radiography during field investigations for paper and film carriers were discussed and concluded. (author)

  3. SU-F-P-06: Moving From Computed Radiography to Digital Radiography: A Collaborative Approach to Improve Image Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval, D; Mlady, G; Selwyn, R [University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Valenti, D; Bateman, T; Norris, V [University of New Mexico Hospital, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To bring together radiologists, technologists, and physicists to utilize post-processing techniques in digital radiography (DR) in order to optimize image acquisition and improve image quality. Methods: Sub-optimal images acquired on a new General Electric (GE) DR system were flagged for follow-up by radiologists and reviewed by technologists and medical physicists. Various exam types from adult musculoskeletal (n=35), adult chest (n=4), and pediatric (n=7) were chosen for review. 673 total images were reviewed. These images were processed using five customized algorithms provided by GE. An image score sheet was created allowing the radiologist to assign a numeric score to each of the processed images, this allowed for objective comparison to the original images. Each image was scored based on seven properties: 1) overall image look, 2) soft tissue contrast, 3) high contrast, 4) latitude, 5) tissue equalization, 6) edge enhancement, 7) visualization of structures. Additional space allowed for additional comments not captured in scoring categories. Radiologists scored the images from 1 – 10 with 1 being non-diagnostic quality and 10 being superior diagnostic quality. Scores for each custom algorithm for each image set were summed. The algorithm with the highest score for each image set was then set as the default processing. Results: Images placed into the PACS “QC folder” for image processing reasons decreased. Feedback from radiologists was, overall, that image quality for these studies had improved. All default processing for these image types was changed to the new algorithm. Conclusion: This work is an example of the collaboration between radiologists, technologists, and physicists at the University of New Mexico to add value to the radiology department. The significant amount of work required to prepare the processing algorithms, reprocessing and scoring of the images was eagerly taken on by all team members in order to produce better quality

  4. SU-F-P-06: Moving From Computed Radiography to Digital Radiography: A Collaborative Approach to Improve Image Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval, D; Mlady, G; Selwyn, R; Valenti, D; Bateman, T; Norris, V

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To bring together radiologists, technologists, and physicists to utilize post-processing techniques in digital radiography (DR) in order to optimize image acquisition and improve image quality. Methods: Sub-optimal images acquired on a new General Electric (GE) DR system were flagged for follow-up by radiologists and reviewed by technologists and medical physicists. Various exam types from adult musculoskeletal (n=35), adult chest (n=4), and pediatric (n=7) were chosen for review. 673 total images were reviewed. These images were processed using five customized algorithms provided by GE. An image score sheet was created allowing the radiologist to assign a numeric score to each of the processed images, this allowed for objective comparison to the original images. Each image was scored based on seven properties: 1) overall image look, 2) soft tissue contrast, 3) high contrast, 4) latitude, 5) tissue equalization, 6) edge enhancement, 7) visualization of structures. Additional space allowed for additional comments not captured in scoring categories. Radiologists scored the images from 1 – 10 with 1 being non-diagnostic quality and 10 being superior diagnostic quality. Scores for each custom algorithm for each image set were summed. The algorithm with the highest score for each image set was then set as the default processing. Results: Images placed into the PACS “QC folder” for image processing reasons decreased. Feedback from radiologists was, overall, that image quality for these studies had improved. All default processing for these image types was changed to the new algorithm. Conclusion: This work is an example of the collaboration between radiologists, technologists, and physicists at the University of New Mexico to add value to the radiology department. The significant amount of work required to prepare the processing algorithms, reprocessing and scoring of the images was eagerly taken on by all team members in order to produce better quality

  5. Accuracy of chest radiography versus chest computed tomography in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chardoli Mojtaba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: Thoracic injuries are respon- sible for 25% of deaths of blunt traumas. Chest X-ray (CXR is the first diagnostic method in patients with blunt trauma. The aim of this study was to detect the accuracy of CXR versus chest computed tomograpgy (CT in hemodynami- cally stable patients with blunt chest trauma. Methods: Study was conducted at the emergency department of Sina Hospital from March 2011 to March 2012. Hemodynamically stable patients with at least 16 years of age who had blunt chest trauma were included. All patients underwent the same diagnostic protocol which consisted of physical examination, CXR and CT scan respectively. Results: Two hundreds patients (84% male and 16% female were included with a mean age of (37.9±13.7 years. Chin J Traumatol 2013;16(6:351-354 Rib fracture was the most common finding of CXR (12.5% and CT scan (25.5%. The sensitivity of CXR for hemothorax, thoracolumbar vertebra fractures and rib fractures were 20%, 49% and 49%, respectively. Pneumothorax, foreign body, emphysema, pulmonary contusion, liver hematoma and ster- num fracture were not diagnosed with CXR alone. Conclusion: Applying CT scan as the first-line diag- nostic modality in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma can detect pathologies which may change management and outcome. Key words: Radiography; Thoracic injuries; Tomography, X-ray computed

  6. A Versatile Image Processor For Digital Diagnostic Imaging And Its Application In Computed Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, H.; Alexandru, R.; Applegate, R.; Giordano, T.; Kamiya, K.; Kresina, R.

    1986-06-01

    In a digital diagnostic imaging department, the majority of operations for handling and processing of images can be grouped into a small set of basic operations, such as image data buffering and storage, image processing and analysis, image display, image data transmission and image data compression. These operations occur in almost all nodes of the diagnostic imaging communications network of the department. An image processor architecture was developed in which each of these functions has been mapped into hardware and software modules. The modular approach has advantages in terms of economics, service, expandability and upgradeability. The architectural design is based on the principles of hierarchical functionality, distributed and parallel processing and aims at real time response. Parallel processing and real time response is facilitated in part by a dual bus system: a VME control bus and a high speed image data bus, consisting of 8 independent parallel 16-bit busses, capable of handling combined up to 144 MBytes/sec. The presented image processor is versatile enough to meet the video rate processing needs of digital subtraction angiography, the large pixel matrix processing requirements of static projection radiography, or the broad range of manipulation and display needs of a multi-modality diagnostic work station. Several hardware modules are described in detail. For illustrating the capabilities of the image processor, processed 2000 x 2000 pixel computed radiographs are shown and estimated computation times for executing the processing opera-tions are presented.

  7. Measurements of Wiener spectra of laser printer in a computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Syuichi; Ueda, Katsuhiko; Nishihara, Sadamitsu; Ohtsuka, Akiyoshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Morishita, Junji; Fujikawa, Tsuyoshi.

    1992-01-01

    Sources of noise in a computed radiography (CR) were investigated by measuring three different Wiener spectra: 1) laser printer Wiener spectra including CR film, 2) Wiener spectrum of CR film (single emulsion), and 3) overall Wiener spectra. To measure the noise contributed by the laser printer, 'image data' (i.e., image having a constant pixel value) were produced on a personal computer and were sent to the laser printer in the CR system. The noise level of laser printer was comparable to that of the CR film at low spatial frequencies ( 4 cycle/mm) was higher than that of the film. Laser printer Wiener spectra obtained in the perpendicular direction relative to the laser beam scanning direction were comparable at low spatial frequencies, but greater at high spatial frequencies, to those obtained in the parallel direction. And a spectral peak around 10 cycle/mm was obtained in the Wiener spectrum in the perpendicular direction. The peak is caused mainly by a banding artifact. Overall Wiener spectra in the parallel and perpendicular directions show the same tendency as those of the laser printer, but the noise level of the overall Wiener spectrum was increased mainly by X-ray quantum mottle at low spatial frequencies. In conclusion, the noise of laser printer greatly increases the overall Wiener spectrum at high spatial frequencies. (author)

  8. Comparison of radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of sacroiliitis accompanying ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Wei; Feng Feng; Yang Hongzen; Jiang Ming; Dion, E.; Genant, H.K.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To compare magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, computed tomography (CT), and radiography in the detection of sacroiliitis accompanying ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Design and subjects. Nine volunteers and 24 patients were recruited. Radiography, CT, and MR imaging were completed within a 1-week period in 24 patients with AS. In precontrast MR examination, spin-echo T1, fast spin-echo T2, and gradient echo with rephasing T2* images were obtained without fat saturation using a 0.3-T imager for all volunteers and patients. Postcontrast MR examination was performed using the same precontrast SE T1 sequence for patients with AS. Results and conclusions. MR imaging directly showed the normal cartilage in all 16 sacroiliac joints of the 8 volunteers. In the 24 patients with AS, cartilage abnormalities were observed in 42 sacroiliac joints. More diagnoses of sacroiliitis were made using MR and CT imaging than using radiography (P<0.001). Therefore, low-field-strength MR can be useful in detecting early sacroiliitis in patients with AS. MR imaging was able to reveal early cartilage changes and bone marrow edema, which could not be found by either CT or radiography. (orig.)

  9. Post-operative observation of ilio-apophyseal transplants on the basis of radiography, computed tomography, autoradiography and histological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klatt, U.

    1987-01-01

    A study in 25 rabbits, in which the acetabular roof was reinforced by inserting a wedge-shaped autologous tissue fragment of the apophysis, led to the following conclusions: That complete healing and ossification of the implant took place within the observation period; that radiography, computed tomography, autoradiography and histology consistently provided evidence in confirmation of ossification; that a wedge-shaped fragment of apophyseal cartilage is a suitable material for plastic surgery in the acetabular roof. (TRV) [de

  10. Studies on the correlation between photograph condition and image quality on computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Wenhong; Zhang Weimin; Ding Xingfa

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate how to use reasonably the combination of exposure dose and speed class on the base of imaging quality on computed radiography (CB). Methods: Based on threshold contrast- detail detectability (TCCD)technique, phantom TO. 16 photography was done with 55, 65 and 75 kV, and combination with three kinds of different exposure dose and speed class respectively. Three radiologists scored each image sequence using double blind method and calculated the threshold detection index (H T ). The imaging quality of knee joint, chest and lumbarspine was also evaluated by these radiologists on the base of diagnostic quality and the different combination of exposure close and speed class. Results: Exposure dose was increased by using lower kV value, and Hr value was increased by lower exposure grade rather than higher kV value. Exposure dose was decreased obviously and speed class was increased in the good contrast location at the same kV value. Conclusions: Based on the demand of diagnostic quality and the contrast of the checked location, the speed class should be carefully selected to decrease the radiation dose exposure to patients, without any decrease of the diagnostic quality. (authors)

  11. Comparison of low-contrast detectability of computed radiography and screen/ film mammography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriah Jamal; Kwan-Hoong Ng; McLean, D.; McLean, D.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare low-contrast detectability of computed radiography (CR) and screen/ film (SF) mammography systems. The Nijimegen contrast detail test object (CDMAM type 3.4) was imaged at 28 kV, in automatic exposure control mode separately. Six medical imaging physicists read each CDMAM phantom image. Contrast detail curves were plotted to compare low-contrast detectability of CR (soft copy and hard copy) and SF mammography systems. Effect of varying exposure parameters, namely kV, object position inside the breast phantom, and entrance surface exposure (ESE) on the contrast detail curve were also investigated using soft copy CR. The significance of the difference in contrast between CR and SF, and for each exposure parameter, was tested using non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test. The low-contrast detectability of the CR (soft copy and hard copy) system was found to be not significantly different to that of the SF system (p> 0.05, Kruskal-Wallis test).For CR soft copy, no significant relationship (p>0.05, Kruskal-Wallis test) was seen for variation of kV, object position inside the breast phantom and ESE. This indicates that CR is comparable with SF for useful detection and visualization of low-contrast objects such as small low-contrast areas corresponding to breast pathology. (Author)

  12. Receiver operating characteristic curve evaluation on computed radiography: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zixi; Wang Changyuan; Xu Yue; Xie Jindong; Zhang Menglong; Wang Jian

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To get the maximum information from computed radiography (CR) output images by changing post-processing parameters. Methods: Six experimental photos of polypropylene balls of 2.0 mm in diameter were taken by means of one time X-ray exposing on an imaging plate (IP) with different post-processing parameters including rotation amount (GA), gray gradation type (GT), rotation center (GC), shifting amount (GS), frequency rank (RN), frequency type (RT), and degree of enhancement (RE). 6 photos were viewed by three students and one radiologist on a 6000 lx illuminance viewbox. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were made by means of 5-value-differentiation method. Results: The largest mean area value (Az) below ROC curves of a low contrast experimental photo with post-processing parameters GA=1.0, GT=A, GC=1.6, GS=0.3, RN=4.0, RT=R and RE=3.0 was 0.96, and the maximum information was obtained. The smallest mean area value (Az) was 0.78 with changed post-processing parameters GA=0.8, GS=-0.2 and RE=0.5 while other parameters were not changed. The minimum information was obtained from this photo. Conclusion: In order to get the maximum information from a CR output image, the post-processing parameters should be suitably selected

  13. Computational Analysis Supporting the Design of a New Beamline for the Mines Neutron Radiography Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C.; King, J.

    The Colorado School of Mines installed a neutron radiography system at the United States Geological Survey TRIGA reactor in 2012. An upgraded beamline could dramatically improve the imaging capabilities of this system. This project performed computational analyses to support the design of a new beamline, with the major goals of minimizing beam divergence and maximizing beam intensity. The new beamline will consist of a square aluminum tube with an 11.43 cm (4.5 in) inner side length and 0.635 cm (0.25 in) thick walls. It is the same length as the original beam tube (8.53 m) and is composed of 1.22 m (4 ft) and 1.52 m (5 ft) flanged sections which bolt together. The bottom 1.22 m of the beamline is a cylindrical aluminum pre-collimator which is 0.635 cm (0.25 in) thick, with an inner diameter of 5.08 cm (2 in). Based on Monte Carlo model results, when a pre-collimator is present, the use of a neutron absorbing liner on the inside surface of the beam tube has almost no effect on the angular distribution of the neutron current at the collimator exit. The use of a pre-collimator may result in a non-uniform flux profile at the image plane; however, as long as the collimator is at least three times longer than the pre-collimator, the flux distortion is acceptably low.

  14. Patient dose, gray level and exposure index with a computed radiography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, T. R.; Yoshimura, E. M.

    2014-02-01

    Computed radiography (CR) is gradually replacing conventional screen-film system in Brazil. To assess image quality, manufactures provide the calculation of an exposure index through the acquisition software of the CR system. The objective of this study is to verify if the CR image can be used as an evaluator of patient absorbed dose too, through a relationship between the entrance skin dose and the exposure index or the gray level values obtained in the image. The CR system used for this study (Agfa model 30-X with NX acquisition software) calculates an exposure index called Log of the Median (lgM), related to the absorbed dose to the IP. The lgM value depends on the average gray level (called Scan Average Level (SAL)) of the segmented pixel value histogram of the whole image. A Rando male phantom was used to simulate a human body (chest and head), and was irradiated with an X-ray equipment, using usual radiologic techniques for chest exams. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF, TLD100) were used to evaluate entrance skin dose and exit dose. The results showed a logarithm relation between entrance dose and SAL in the image center, regardless of the beam filtration. The exposure index varies linearly with the entrance dose, but the angular coefficient is beam quality dependent. We conclude that, with an adequate calibration, the CR system can be used to evaluate the patient absorbed dose.

  15. Optimal steel thickness combined with computed radiography for portal imaging of nasopharyngeal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shixiu; Jin Xiance; Xie Congying; Cao Guoquan

    2005-01-01

    The poor image quality of conventional metal screen-film portal imaging system has long been of concern, and various methods have been investigated in an attempt to enhance the quality of portal images. Computed radiography (CR) used in combination with a steel plate displays image enhancement. The optimal thickness of the steel plate had been studied by measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) characteristics. Portal images of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients were taken by both a conventional metal screen-film system and this optimal steel and CR plate combination system. Compared with a conventional metal screen-film system, the CR-metal screen system achieves a much higher image contrast. The measured modulation transfer function (MTF) of the CR combination is greater than conventional film-screen portal imaging systems and also results in superior image performance, as demonstrated by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. This optimal combination steel CR plate portal imaging system is capable of producing high contrast portal images conveniently

  16. Verification of Radiation Isocenter on Linac Beam 6 MV using Computed Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsal, Muhammad; Hidayanto, Eko; Sutanto, Heri

    2017-06-01

    Radiation isocenter is more important part of quality assurance for the linear accelerator (Linac) due to radiation isocenter is a main location in irradiation radiotherapy, isocenter can shift when the gantry and collimator rotation. In general, the radiation isocenter verification using a special film. This research was conducted radiation isocenter verification using computed radiography with digital image processing techniques. Image acquisition was done using the modalities of Linac 6 MV with star shot method is star-shaped beam due to rotation of the collimator, gantry and couch. Then do the delineation on each beam to determine the centroid and beam diameter. By the results of verification of radiation isocenter performed on collimator and the couch, it shows that the size diameter for rotational collimator is 0.632 mm and 0.458 mm for the couch. Based on AAPM report 40 about the size of the Linac radiation isocenter diameter used in this study is still in good condition and worth to be operated because the value of the radiation isocenter diameter is below 2 mm.

  17. Comparative adoption of cone beam computed tomography and panoramic radiography machines across Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A; Critchley, S; Monsour, P A

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the current adoption of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and panoramic radiography (PR) machines across Australia. Information regarding registered CBCT and PR machines was obtained from radiation regulators across Australia. The number of X-ray machines was correlated with the population size, the number of dentists, and the gross state product (GSP) per capita, to determine the best fitting regression model(s). In 2014, there were 232 CBCT and 1681 PR machines registered in Australia. Based on absolute counts, Queensland had the largest number of CBCT and PR machines whereas the Northern Territory had the smallest number. However, when based on accessibility in terms of the population size and the number of dentists, the Australian Capital Territory had the most CBCT machines and Western Australia had the most PR machines. The number of X-ray machines correlated strongly with both the population size and the number of dentists, but not with the GSP per capita. In 2014, the ratio of PR to CBCT machines was approximately 7:1. Projected increases in either the population size or the number of dentists could positively impact on the adoption of PR and CBCT machines in Australia. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  18. Visualisation of uric acid renal calculi (UARC) using computed radiography (CR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dom, Sulaiman M.; Yusoff, Nadzri M.; Amin, Zulkifli M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the capability of CR to visualise UARC through inverse image post-processing technique. Methods. A patient-equivalent phantom (PEP) consisting of six 2.5-cm thick Perspex layers and one 1-mm thick aluminium layer was used to represent human tissues and bones respectively. A total of eight exposures were made on PEP to radiograph 1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm UARC located between three layers of 2-cm thick cattle muscle, positioned inside the PEP. After each exposure, a layer of Perspex was removed, and another exposure was made until only one Perspex layer and one layer of muscle (containing the three UARC) remained. For each exposure, two images (a positive and an inverse image) were produced for comparison using Fuji XG1 computed radiography system with IP0 type C-ST-VI Fuji imaging plate (equivalent to 400 speed radiographic screen-film systems). Results: In positive image, UARC of all three sizes (1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm) located in the cattle muscle, cannot be visualised when the PEP consists of more than one layer of Perspex. In inverse image, the 3-mm UARC can be seen even when the PEP consists of five layers of Perspex. Conclusion: This study revealed the post-processing capability of CR to increase the visualisation of UARC which has been categorised as radiolucent. A further study of clinical image quality should be performed using blinded observers to test diagnostic accuracy, which was not included in this study.

  19. Verification of Radiation Isocenter on Linac Beam 6 MV using Computed Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irsal, Muhammad; Hidayanto, Eko; Sutanto, Heri

    2017-01-01

    Radiation isocenter is more important part of quality assurance for the linear accelerator (Linac) due to radiation isocenter is a main location in irradiation radiotherapy, isocenter can shift when the gantry and collimator rotation. In general, the radiation isocenter verification using a special film. This research was conducted radiation isocenter verification using computed radiography with digital image processing techniques. Image acquisition was done using the modalities of Linac 6 MV with star shot method is star-shaped beam due to rotation of the collimator, gantry and couch. Then do the delineation on each beam to determine the centroid and beam diameter. By the results of verification of radiation isocenter performed on collimator and the couch, it shows that the size diameter for rotational collimator is 0.632 mm and 0.458 mm for the couch. Based on AAPM report 40 about the size of the Linac radiation isocenter diameter used in this study is still in good condition and worth to be operated because the value of the radiation isocenter diameter is below 2 mm. (paper)

  20. Comparison of the new and the used imaging plates on computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Weihong; Zhang Weimin; Wang Jiawei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare image quality and radiation dose of the new imaging plate (IP) with the used IP on computed radiography (CR), and to investigate the using principle in the two kinds of IP. Methods: The dark noise, uniformity and erasure thoroughness of the new and the used IP were measured respectively. Based on threshold contrast-detail detectability (TCCD) technique, the phantom TO, 16 photography was done at 75 kV, and with the two kinds of IP respectively. Three observers scored each image sequence using double blind method, calculated the threshold detection index (H T ). The volunteers were randomly divided into three groups: the knee joint group, the chest group and the lumbar group. Each group had 50 cases and checked with the same condition as the phantom. Three radiologists using double blind method evaluated the imaging quality of knee joint, chest and lumbar. Results: The physical characteristic indexes of the new and the used IP were similar to each other. Under the same condition, the detection ability of the new IP was better than that of the used one. When the dose of exposure was raised about 20%, the detection ability of the used IP was close to that of the new one. Conclusions: The dose of exposure can be raised to keep the same imaging quality with the increase times of IP used. The detection ability of IP can decrease with the same dose as before, and the image quality decreases too. (authors)

  1. Analysis of edentulous maxillae using computed tomography and panoramic radiography in the surgical planning of dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahuinco, Humberto Lazaro Choquepuma; Souza, Ricardo Pires de

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to determine agreement of three observers on analysis of linear measurements of edentulous maxillae using computed tomography and panoramic radiography in the surgical planning of dental implants. Material and Method: the samples of 17 patients were analyzed with computed tomography and panoramic radiography. Linear measurements obtained from both methods were made at the following anatomical points: left tuberosity, left canine pillar, incisive foramen, right canine pillar and right tuberosity. Kendall's W test was applied to assess the level of agreement. Results: measured W-values from the samples of the anatomical points mentioned above, analyzed with panoramic radiography and computed tomography, were: 0.75 and 0.901; 0.916 and 0.956; 0.843 and 0.964; 0.963 and 0.931; 0.95 and 0.89 respectively. Statistical analysis showed that there was no statistically significant difference. Conclusion: agreement occurred in the measurements of variables.That means that if the three observers were to select an implant to be placed in each of the anatomical regions studied, there would be a good chance whey would choose the same type. (author)

  2. Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of conventional and digital periapical radiography, panoramic radiography, and cone-beam computed tomography in the assessment of alveolar bone loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilton Mitsunari Takeshita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of different radiographic methods in the assessment of proximal alveolar bone loss (ABL. Materials and Methods: ABL, the distance between cement-enamel junction and alveolar bone crest, was measured in 70 mandibular human teeth - directly on the mandibles (control, using conventional periapical radiography with film holders (Rinn XCP and Han-Shin, digital periapical radiography with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor, conventional panoramic, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT. Three programs were used to measure ABL on the images: Image tool 3.0 (University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA, Kodak Imaging 6.1 (Kodak Dental Imaging 6.1, Carestream Health ® , Rochester, NY, USA, and i-CAT vision 1.6.20. Statistical analysis used ANOVA and Tukey′s test at 5% significance level. Results: The tomographic images showed the highest means, whereas the lowest were found for periapical with Han-Shin. Controls differed from periapical with Han-Shin (P < 0.0001. CBCT differed from panoramic (P = 0.0130, periapical with Rinn XCP (P = 0.0066, periapical with Han-Shin (P < 0.0001, and digital periapical (P = 0.0027. Conventional periapicals with film holders differed from each other (P = 0.0007. Digital periapical differed from conventional periapical with Han-Shin (P = 0.0004. Conclusions: Conventional periapical with Han-Shin film holder was the only method that differed from the controls. CBCT had the closest means to the controls.

  3. Improvements relating to radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollen, R.H.; Vandenabeele, H.

    1977-01-01

    An improved combination of photosensitive materials suitable for use in radiography is described, with particular reference to a combination for an X-ray intensifying screen of the fluorescent type and a silver halide recorder. The intensifying material comprises a phosphor consisting wholly or mainly of a rare earth metal activated lanthanum oxyhalide, having more than half its spectral energy emission > 410 nm wavelength, more than half its visible light spectral energy emission in the range 400 to 500 nm, and its maximum energy emission peak in the range 400 to 450 nm. The phosphor should have a coverage of at least 200 to 800 g of the oxyhalide per sq. m. The screen material also contains a dye or pigment that absorbs light within the emission spectrum of the phosphor. The photosensitive recording material incorporates at least one silver halide emulsion layer. The combination should give a screen intensification factor of at least 20 to 40 kV. (U.K.)

  4. Physical and Clinical Comparison between a Screen-Film System and a Dual-Side Reading Mammography-Dedicated Computed Radiography System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivetti, S.; Canossi, B.; Battista, R.; Vetruccio, E.; Torricelli, P.; Lanconelli, N.; Danielli, C.; Borasi, G.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Digital mammography systems, thanks to a physical performance better than conventional screen-film units, have the potential of reducing the dose to patients, without decreasing the diagnostic accuracy. Purpose: To achieve a physical and clinical comparison between two systems: a screen-film plate and a dual-side computed radiography system (CRM; FUJIFILM FCR 5000 MA). Material and Methods: A unique feature of the FCR 5000 MA system is that it has a clear support medium, allowing light emitted during the scanning process to be detected on the 'back' of the storage phosphor plate, considerably improving the system's efficiency. The system's physical performance was tested by means of a quantitative analysis, with calculation of the modulation transfer function, detective quantum efficiency, and contrast-detail analysis; subsequently, the results were compared with those achieved using a screen-film system (SFM; Eastmann Kodak MinR-MinR 2000). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was then performed on 120 paired clinical images obtained in a craniocaudal projection with the conventional SFM system under standard exposure conditions and also with the CRM system working with a dose reduced by 35% (average breast thickness: 4.3 cm; mean glandular dose: 1.45 mGy). CRM clinical images were interpreted both in hard copy and in soft copy. Results: The ROC analysis revealed that the performances of the two systems (SFM and CRM with reduced dose) were similar (P>0.05): the diagnostic accuracy of the two systems, when valued in terms of the area underneath the ROC curve, was found to be 0.74 for the SFM, 0.78 for the CRM (hard copy), and 0.79 for the CRM (soft copy). Conclusion: The outcome obtained from our experiments shows that the use of the dual-side CRM system is a very good alternative to the screen-film system

  5. Fully automatic and reference-marker-free image stitching method for full-spine and full-leg imaging with computed radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David H.; Doran, James; Rogers, Michael K.

    2004-05-01

    Full-leg and full-spine imaging with standard computed radiography (CR) systems requires several cassettes/storage phosphor screens to be placed in a staggered arrangement and exposed simultaneously to achieve an increased imaging area. A method has been developed that can automatically and accurately stitch the acquired sub-images without relying on any external reference markers. It can detect and correct the order, orientation, and overlap arrangement of the subimages for stitching. The automatic determination of the order, orientation, and overlap arrangement of the sub-images consists of (1) constructing a hypothesis list that includes all cassette/screen arrangements, (2) refining hypotheses based on a set of rules derived from imaging physics, (3) correlating each consecutive sub-image pair in each hypothesis and establishing an overall figure-of-merit, (4) selecting the hypothesis of maximum figure-of-merit. The stitching process requires the CR reader to over scan each CR screen so that the screen edges are completely visible in the acquired sub-images. The rotational displacement and vertical displacement between two consecutive sub-images are calculated by matching the orientation and location of the screen edge in the front image and its corresponding shadow in the back image. The horizontal displacement is estimated by maximizing the correlation function between the two image sections in the overlap region. Accordingly, the two images are stitched together. This process is repeated for the newly stitched composite image and the next consecutive sub-image until a full-image composite is created. The method has been evaluated in both phantom experiments and clinical studies. The standard deviation of image misregistration is below one image pixel.

  6. Digital radiography of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Kenji; Hachiya, Junichi; Korenaga, Tateo; Nitatori, Toshiaki; Miyasaka, Yasuo; Furuya, Yoshiro

    1984-01-01

    Initial clinical experience in digital chest radiography utilizing photostimulable phosphor and scanning laser stimulated luminescence was reported. Image quality of conventional film/screen radiography and digital radiography was compared in 30 normal cases. Reflecting wide dynamic range of the system, improved image quality was confirmed in all 30 cases, particularly in visibility of various mediastinal structures and pulmonary vessels. High sensor sensitivity of the system enabled digital radiography to reduce radiation dose requirement significantly. Diagnostically acceptable chest images were obtained with approximately 1/5 of routine dose for conventional radiography without significant image quality degradation. Some artifact created by digital processing were mostly overcome by a routine use of simultaneous display of two different types of image processing and therefore was not an actual drawback from diagnostic standpoint. Further technical advancement of the system to be seen for digital storage, retrieval and tranceference of images. (author)

  7. The clinical significance of Fuji computed radiography on lateral chest radiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kifune, Kouichi

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the benefits of digital lateral chest radiogram. In the basic study, the modulation transfer factor (MTF) and the wiener spectra (WS) of conventional screen film (CSF) and Fuji computed radiography (FCR) were measured. The visibility of the simulated nodules on FCR using 3 human bodies was subjectively compared with that on CSF by 13 observers. In the clinical study, the visibility of the normal structures on FCR was subjectively compared with that on CSF using 50 lateral chest radiograms by 10 observers. The diagnostic performance to detect pulmonary nodules on FCR was also compared with that on CSF using each 30 positive and negative cases by 8 observers. In the basic study, the MTF of FCR was superior to that of CSF, and the WS of FCR displayed in half size was superior to that of CSF. In all exposure conditions, the visibility of the nodules on FCR in the pulmonary apex was inferior to that on CSF, while FCR was superior to CSF in the other lung field. However, the visibility of the nodules on FCR in the pulmonary apex was improved when the exposure condition was increased. In the clinical study, the visibility of the normal structures on FCR was comparable or superior to that on CSF except for interlobar fissure due to resolution properties. The diagnostic performance of pulmonary nodules on FCR was comparable to that on CSF especially in classifying the marginal character and diameter of the nodules. According to the location of the nodules, the detectability of FCR was superior to that of CSF in the retrosternal space and tended to be inferior to that of CSF in the pulmonary apex. An adequate exposure condition should be considered before discussing the visibility and detectability of abnormal shadow in the lateral chest radiogram. In conclusion, the digital lateral chest radiogram is superior to the CSF images, mainly because of wide latitude in FCR. (author)

  8. Extremity exams optimization for computed radiography; Otimizacao de exames de extremidade para radiologia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavan, Ana Luiza M.; Alves, Allan Felipe F.; Velo, Alexandre F.; Miranda, Jose Ricardo A., E-mail: analuiza@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Biociencias. Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica; Pina, Diana R. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2013-08-15

    The computed radiography (CR) has become the most used device for image acquisition, since its introduction in the 80s. The detection and early diagnosis, obtained through CR examinations, are important for the successful treatment of diseases of the hand. However, the norms used for optimization of these images are based on international protocols. Therefore, it is necessary to determine letters of radiographic techniques for CR system, which provides a safe medical diagnosis, with doses as low as reasonably achievable. The objective of this work is to develop an extremity homogeneous phantom to be used in the calibration process of radiographic techniques. In the construction process of the simulator, it has been developed a tissues' algorithm quantifier using Matlab®. In this process the average thickness was quantified from bone and soft tissues in the region of the hand of an anthropomorphic simulator as well as the simulators' material thickness corresponding (aluminum and Lucite) using technique of mask application and removal Gaussian histogram corresponding to tissues of interest. The homogeneous phantom was used to calibrate the x-ray beam. The techniques were implemented in a calibrated hand anthropomorphic phantom. The images were evaluated by specialists in radiology by the method of VGA. Skin entrance surface doses were estimated (SED) corresponding to each technique obtained with their respective tube charge. The thicknesses of simulators materials that constitute the homogeneous phantom determined in this study were 19.01 mm of acrylic and 0.81 mm of aluminum. A better picture quality with doses as low as reasonably achievable decreased dose and tube charge around 53.35% and 37.78% respectively, compared normally used by radiology diagnostic routine clinical of HCFMB-UNESP. (author)

  9. SU-E-I-27: Establishing Target Exposure Index Values for Computed Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, N; Tchou, P; Belcher, K; Scott, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a standard set of target exposure index (TEI) values to be applied to Agfa Computed Radiography (CR) readers in accordance with International Electrotechnical Committee 62494-1 (ed. 1.0). Methods: A large data cohort was collected from six USAF Medical Treatment Facilities that exclusively use Agfa CR Readers. Dose monitoring statistics were collected from each reader. The data was analyzed based on anatomic region, view, and processing speed class. The Agfa specific exposure metric, logarithmic mean (LGM), was converted to exposure index (EI) for each data set. The optimum TEI value was determined by minimizing the number of studies that fell outside the acceptable deviation index (DI) range of +/− 2 for phototimed techniques or a range of +/−3 for fixed techniques. An anthropomorphic radiographic phantom was used to corroborate the TEI recommendations. Images were acquired of several anatomic regions and views using standard techniques. The images were then evaluated by two radiologists as either acceptable or unacceptable. The acceptable image with the lowest exposure and EI value was compared to the recommended TEI values using a passing DI range. Results: Target EI values were determined for a comprehensive list of anatomic regions and views. Conclusion: Target EI values must be established on each CR unit in order to provide a positive feedback system for the technologist. This system will serve as a mechanism to prevent under or overexposures of patients. The TEI recommendations are a first attempt at a large scale process improvement with the goal of setting reasonable and standardized TEI values. The implementation and effectiveness of the recommended TEI values should be monitored and adjustments made as necessary

  10. COMPARISON OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY AND ABDOMINAL RADIOGRAPHY FOR DETECTION OF CANINE MECHANICAL INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, Wm Tod; Green, Eric M; Zekas, Lisa J; Aarnes, Turi K; Su, Lillian; Habing, Gregory G

    2016-07-01

    Vomiting, often caused by mechanical intestinal obstruction, is common in dogs. Equivocal radiographic signs often necessitate repeat radiographs or additional imaging procedures. For our prospective, case-controlled, accuracy study, we hypothesized the following: (1) using computed tomography (CT), radiologists will be more sensitive and specific for detecting mechanical intestinal obstruction and recommending surgery compared to using radiographs; and (2) using measurements, radiologists will be more sensitive and specific using radiographs or CT for detecting mechanical intestinal obstruction and recommending surgery. Twenty dogs had abdominal radiographs and abdominal CT. Seventeen dogs had abdominal surgery and three dogs were not obstructed based on clinical follow-up. Confidence levels (five-point scale) of three experienced radiologists for mechanical intestinal obstruction and recommending surgery were recorded before and after making selected measurements. Eight dogs had surgically confirmed mechanical intestinal obstruction, and 12 dogs did not have obstruction. For detecting mechanical intestinal obstruction, CT was more sensitive (95.8% vs. 79.2%) and specific (80.6% vs. 69.4%) compared to radiographs, but the difference was not statistically significant. For recommending surgery, radiography was more sensitive (91.7% vs. 83.3%) and specific (83.3% vs. 72.2%) than using CT, but differences were not statistically significant. We reported objective CT measurements for predicting small mechanical intestinal obstruction. By incorporating these objective data, the diagnosis of mechanical intestinal obstruction changed in five of 120 instances (radiographs and CT). In no instance (0/120), did the objective data change the recommendation for surgery. Using CT or abdominal radiographs for the detection of canine mechanical intestinal obstruction is sensitive and specific when evaluated by experienced veterinary radiologists. © 2016 American College of

  11. Quantitative evaluation of anatomical noise in chest digital tomosynthesis, digital radiography, and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.; Kim, D.; Choi, S.; Kim, H.-J.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is currently the worldwide leading cause of death from cancer. Thus, detection of lung cancer at its early stages is critical for improving the survival rate of patients. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently developed imaging modality, combining many advantages of digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT). This method has the potential to be widely used in the clinical setting. In this study, we introduce a developed CDT R/F system and compare its image quality with those of DR and CT, especially with respect to anatomical noise and lung nodule conspicuity, for LUNGMAN phantoms. The developed CDT R/F system consists of a CsI scintillator flat panel detector, X-ray tube, and tomosynthesis data acquisition geometry. For CDT R/F imaging, 41 projections were acquired at different angles, over the ± 20° angular range, in a linear translation geometry. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the CDT R/F system, the acquired images were compared with CT (Philips brilliance CT 64, Philips healthcare, U.S.) and DR (ADR-M, LISTEM, Korea) phantom images in terms of the anatomical noise power spectrum (aNPS). DR images exhibited low conspicuity for a small-size lung nodule, while CDT R/F and CT exhibited relatively high sensitivity for all lung nodule sizes. The aNPS of the CDT R/F system was better than that of DR, by resolving anatomical overlapping problems. In conclusion, the developed CDT R/F system is likely to contribute to early diagnosis of lung cancer, while requiring a relatively low patient dose, compared with CT.

  12. Quantitative evaluation of anatomical noise in chest digital tomosynthesis, digital radiography, and computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.; Kim, D.; Choi, S.; Kim, H.-J.

    2017-04-01

    Lung cancer is currently the worldwide leading cause of death from cancer. Thus, detection of lung cancer at its early stages is critical for improving the survival rate of patients. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently developed imaging modality, combining many advantages of digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT). This method has the potential to be widely used in the clinical setting. In this study, we introduce a developed CDT R/F system and compare its image quality with those of DR and CT, especially with respect to anatomical noise and lung nodule conspicuity, for LUNGMAN phantoms. The developed CDT R/F system consists of a CsI scintillator flat panel detector, X-ray tube, and tomosynthesis data acquisition geometry. For CDT R/F imaging, 41 projections were acquired at different angles, over the ± 20° angular range, in a linear translation geometry. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the CDT R/F system, the acquired images were compared with CT (Philips brilliance CT 64, Philips healthcare, U.S.) and DR (ADR-M, LISTEM, Korea) phantom images in terms of the anatomical noise power spectrum (aNPS). DR images exhibited low conspicuity for a small-size lung nodule, while CDT R/F and CT exhibited relatively high sensitivity for all lung nodule sizes. The aNPS of the CDT R/F system was better than that of DR, by resolving anatomical overlapping problems. In conclusion, the developed CDT R/F system is likely to contribute to early diagnosis of lung cancer, while requiring a relatively low patient dose, compared with CT.

  13. Assessment of clinical image quality in feline chest radiography with a needle-image plate (NIP) storage phosphor system. An approach to the evaluation of image quality in neonatal radiography; Untersuchungen zur Qualitaet von Thoraxaufnahmen bei Katzen mit einem auf einer Nadelstruktur basierenden Speicherfoliensystem. Modelluntersuchungen zur Bewertung der Bildqualitaet bei Neugeborenen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewig, E.; Bosch, B.; Gaebler, K.; Succow, D.; Werrmann, A. [Klinik fuer Kleintiere, Univ. Leipzig (Germany); Hirsch, W.; Sorge, I. [Abt. Paediatrische Radiologie, Univ. Leipzig (Germany); Gosch, D. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Univ. Leipzig (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Is the image quality of thoracic radiographs of cats obtained with a needle-based storage phosphor (NIP) system superior to conventional (PIP) storage phosphor radiography? Is it possible to decrease the mAs by 50% with the NIP system without significant loss of information? Materials and Methods: From each of the 20 animals, three lateral radiographs were acquired. The assessment of the exposure level was based on the generated IgM-values. Images were acquired 1. with the NIP system and exposure settings equivalent to an IgM of 1.9, 2. with the PIP system and identical settings, and 3. with the NIP system and 50% of the mAs. Six blinded readers used a 5-step scale to assess the reproducibility of five anatomical structures and image noise sensation. Data were analysed using Visual Grading Characteristics Analysis (VGC). Results: While applying identical exposure values the NIP system for all features revealed superior ratings to those of the PIP system (AUC{sub VGC} values ranged from 0.81 for ''cardiac silhouette'' to 0.92 for ''trachea''). Even when reducing mAs by 50% in the NIP images all features were rated better compared with the PIP images and original settings (AUC{sub VGC} values ranged from 0.60 for ''cardiac silhouette'' to 0.74 for ''trachea'' and ''caudal thoracic field''). Conclusion: The NIP system demonstrates clearly better image quality compared to the reference PIP system. A dose reduction of 50% seems to be possible without relevant detraction from image quality. The results obtained in the animal model are valid for simulating conditions in neonatal radiological practise. (orig.)

  14. Improvements in phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabatin, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    For X-ray image converter applications, especially when used in medical radiography, it is desirable to improve the speed and brightness of response for conversion of X-rays in phosphors. The rare earth oxyhalide phosphors coactivated with a combination of rare earth activators described in this patent are capable of exhibiting low afterglow with high ultraviolet emission. They have the general formula Lnsub(1-y-w)OX:Tbsub(y)Tmsub(w) where Ln is lanthanum or gadolinium, X is chlorine and/or bromine, y is from 0.0005 to 0.010 moles per mole and w is from 0.00005 to 0.005 moles per mole of the Lnsub(1-y-w)OX host. The method of preparation and characteristics of speed, afterglow and UV emission are described. (U.K.)

  15. Chest radiography and thoracic computed tomography findings in children who have family members with active pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzum, Kazim; Karahan, Okkes I.; Dogan, Sukru; Coskun, Abdulhakim; Topcu, Faik

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The chest radiography and TCT findings in children who had contacted with adult family members with active pulmonary tuberculosis were compared. The contributions of thoracic computed tomography to the diagnosis of tuberculosis were investigated. Methods and material: The children who were 0-16 years old (n=173) and children of families with an adult member which was diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis were evaluated. The children were considered in two groups based on the absence (n=125) or presence (n=48) of complaints and/or ambiguous symptoms such as lack of appetite, mild cough, sweating, history of lung infection, low body weight and those with suspicious chest radiography findings (12 cases) were included in this study. Asymptomatic patients (n=125) did not undergo TCT. Patients who had positive PPD skin tests only received isoniazid. If the TCT demonstrated enlarged lymph nodes or parenchymal lesions, minimally active pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed and antituberculous treatment was given. Results and discussions: TCT revealed lymph node enlargement or parenchymal lesions in 39 children (81.2%). Of the 12 children whose CXRs revealed suspicious lymph node enlargement and/or infiltration, five had normal findings in TCT whereas the initial findings were confirmed in the remaining seven. These data suggest that there is a correlation between the presence of ambiguous symptoms in exposed children and TCT findings; chest radiography and TCT findings do not yield parallel findings. All the patients who received anti-TB treatment were resolved in the control examinations. Conclusion: In this study there is a correlation between presence of ambiguous symptoms and TCT findings, but the chest radiography and TCT findings do not yield harmony in exposed children with ambiguous symptoms (suspicious tuberculosis cases). These observations should be considered in children with symptoms similar to those of exposed children, but with no definite history of

  16. Thermoluminescent phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, Jerome B.; Moran, Paul R.

    1978-01-01

    A thermoluminescent phosphor comprising LiF doped with boron and magnesium is produced by diffusion of boron into a conventional LiF phosphor doped with magnesium. Where the boron dopant is made to penetrate only the outer layer of the phosphor, it can be used to detect shallowly penetrating radiation such as tritium beta rays in the presence of a background of more penetrating radiation.

  17. Comparison between film-screen and computed radiography systems in Brazilian mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, L.A.; Oliveira, J.R.; Carvalho, L.A.P.; César, A.C.Z.; Nogueira, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2004 the Public Health Office of the State of Minas Gerais in Brazil has established the Image Quality Control Program in Mammography. It evaluates the image quality based on an accredited phantom of the Brazilian College of Radiology (CBR). This phantom follows international standards such as masses, specks, fibers, contrast details and spatial resolution. The contrast index (CI) is accessed through optical density (OD) measurements. Although OD is defined under film-screen (FS) scope, among all accessible mammographic systems under the health office surveillance, almost 80% are computed radiography (CR) based. A necessity to adapt the protocol has emerged to consider OD as a conformity parameter. Objective: To verify the OD accessibility under CR´s printed out films and the feasibility to calculate contrast index, in comparison with FS´s. Results: A total of 56 images were evaluated with three different CBR phantoms. They were equally divided into FS and CR systems and a densitometer was used to read out their OD values. The correlation between their contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was found to be in the order of 0.77 (±0.14). The samples were not significantly different (inside 5% incertitude) for every phantom. The CNR correlation coefficient was 0.871. For OD, correlation coefficient was 0.989 and a log-fit function has shown good agreement with detector response. The OD-normalized standard deviation difference between CR and FS for every different phantom was 36.6%, 2.8% and 20.2%. A CI range for CR´s lying between 0.13 and 0.69 was found. Conclusions: Different phantoms were successfully tested in both CR and FS to evaluate the feasibility in use contrast index as a conformity parameter since their correlations are strictly related to calibration curve, as provided by phantom manufacturer. The relative CR-FS OD σ-difference provides a spreading indicator, where the first and last phantoms are considerably out of expectation. Such differences are

  18. Finding-specific display presets for computed radiography soft-copy reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriole, K P; Gould, R G; Webb, W R

    1999-05-01

    Much work has been done to optimize the display of cross-sectional modality imaging examinations for soft-copy reading (i.e., window/level tissue presets, and format presentations such as tile and stack modes, four-on-one, nine-on-one, etc). Less attention has been paid to the display of digital forms of the conventional projection x-ray. The purpose of this study is to assess the utility of providing presets for computed radiography (CR) soft-copy display, based not on the window/level settings, but on processing applied to the image optimized for visualization of specific findings, pathologies, etc (i.e., pneumothorax, tumor, tube location). It is felt that digital display of CR images based on finding-specific processing presets has the potential to: speed reading of digital projection x-ray examinations on soft copy; improve diagnostic efficacy; standardize display across examination type, clinical scenario, important key findings, and significant negatives; facilitate image comparison; and improve confidence in and acceptance of soft-copy reading. Clinical chest images are acquired using an Agfa-Gevaert (Mortsel, Belgium) ADC 70 CR scanner and Fuji (Stamford, CT) 9000 and AC2 CR scanners. Those demonstrating pertinent findings are transferred over the clinical picture archiving and communications system (PACS) network to a research image processing station (Agfa PS5000), where the optimal image-processing settings per finding, pathologic category, etc, are developed in conjunction with a thoracic radiologist, by manipulating the multiscale image contrast amplification (Agfa MUSICA) algorithm parameters. Soft-copy display of images processed with finding-specific settings are compared with the standard default image presentation for 50 cases of each category. Comparison is scored using a 5-point scale with the positive scale denoting the standard presentation is preferred over the finding-specific processing, the negative scale denoting the finding

  19. Accuracy of digital radiography and cone beam computed tomography on periapical radiolucency detection in endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venskutonis, Tadas; Daugela, Povilas; Strazdas, Marijus; Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of intraoral digital periapical radiography and cone beam computed tomography in the detection of periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. Radiographic images (cone beam computed tomography [CBCT] scans and digital periapical radiography [PR] images) from 60 patients, achieved from September 2008 to July 2013, were retrieved from databases of the Department of Oral Diseases, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Twenty patients met inclusion criteria and were selected for further evaluation. In 20 patients (42.4 [SD 12.1] years, 65% men and 35% women) a total of 35 endodontically treated teeth (1.75 [SD 0.91]; 27 in maxilla and 8 in mandible) were evaluated. Overall, it was observed a statistical significant difference between the number of periapical lesions observed in the CBCT (n = 42) and radiographic (n = 24) examinations (P cone beam computed tomography scans were more accurate compared to digital periapical radiographs for detecting periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. The difference was more pronounced in molar teeth.

  20. Digital radiography in NDT applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deprins, E.

    2004-01-01

    A lot of film radiography could be replaced by today's technologies in the field of digital radiography. Only few of these applications have indeed replaced film. The choice to go digital depends on cost, quality requirement, workflow and throughput. Digital images offer a lot of advantages in terms of image manipulation and workflow. But despite the many advantages, a lot of considerations are needed before someone can decide to convert his organization from conventional to digital radiography. This paper gives an overview of all different modalities that can be used in digital radiography with today's technologies, together with the experiences of the pioneers of digital radiography. Film Scanning, Computed Radiography and Digital Radiography by using of different kinds of flat panel detectors all have their specific application fields and customers. What is the status of the technology today, which advantages brings digital radiography, and which are the limitations radiographers have to consider when replacing film by digital systems. (author)

  1. Assessment of survey radiography and comparison with x-ray computed tomography for detection of hyperfunctioning adrenocortical tumors in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorhout, G.; Stolp, R.; Rijnberk, A.; Waes, P.F.G.M. van

    1990-01-01

    Results of abdominal survey radiography and x-ray computed tomography (CT) were compared in 13 dogs with hyperadrenocorticism histologically attributed to adrenocortical tumors. X-ray computed tomography enabled accurate localization of the tumor in all 13 dogs. Apart from 2 poorly demarcated irregular-shaped and mineralized carcinomas, there were no differences between adenoma (n = 3) and carcinoma (n = 10) on CT images. In 1 dog, invasion of the caudal vena cava by the tumor was suggested on CT images and was confirmed during surgery. Suspicion of adhesions between tumors of the right adrenal gland and the caudal vena cava on the basis of CT images was confirmed during surgery in only 2 of 6 dogs. Survey radiography allowed accurate localization of the tumor in 7 dogs (4 on the right side and 3 on the left). In 6 of these dogs, the tumor was visible as a well-demarcated soft tissue mass and, in the other dog, as a poorly demarcated mineralized mass. The smallest tumor visualized on survey radiographs had a diameter of 20 mm on CT images. Six tumors with diameter less than or equal to 20 mm were not visualized on survey radiographs. In 1 of these dogs, a mineralized nodule was found in the left adrenal region, without evidence of a mass. In a considerable number of cases, survey radiography can provide presurgical localization of adrenocortical tumors in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism; CT is redundant in these instances. In the absence of positive radiographic findings, CT is valuable for localization of adrenocortical tumors

  2. Three-dimensional biplanar radiography as a new means of accessing femoral version: a comparitive study of EOS three-dimensional radiography versus computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomerantz, M.L. [University of California San Diego School of Medicine, Orthopaedic Surgery Department, San Diego, CA (United States); Glaser, Diana [Aurora Spine, Carlsbad, CA (United States); Doan, Josh [Orthopedic Biomechanics Research Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Kumar, Sita [University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Edmonds, Eric W. [University of California San Diego School of Medicine, Orthopaedic Surgery Department, San Diego, CA (United States); Rady Children' s Hospital San Diego, Division of Orthopedic Surgery, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-10-17

    To validate femoral version measurements made from biplanar radiography (BR), three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions (EOS imaging, France) were made in differing rotational positions against the gold standard of computed tomography (CT). Two cadaveric femurs were scanned with CT and BR in five different femoral versions creating ten total phantoms. The native version was modified by rotating through a mid-diaphyseal hinge twice into increasing anteversion and twice into increased retroversion. For each biplanar scan, the phantom itself was rotated -10, -5, 0, +5 and +10 . Three-dimensional CT reconstructions were designated the true value for femoral version. Two independent observers measured the femoral version on CT axial slices and BR 3D reconstructions twice. The mean error (upper bound of the 95 % confidence interval), inter- and intraobserver reliability, and the error compared to the true version were determined for both imaging techniques. Interobserver intraclass correlation for CT axial images ranged from 0.981 to 0.991, and the intraobserver intraclass correlation ranged from 0.994 to 0.996. For the BR 3D reconstructions these values ranged from 0.983 to 0.998 and 0.982 to 0.998, respectively. For the CT measurements the upper bound of error from the true value was 5.4-7.5 , whereas for BR 3D reconstructions it was 4.0-10.1 . There was no statistical difference in the mean error from the true values for any of the measurements done with axial CT or BR 3D reconstructions. BR 3D reconstructions accurately and reliably provide clinical data on femoral version compared to CT even with rotation of the patient of up to 10 from neutral. (orig.)

  3. Central axis dose verification in patients treated with total body irradiation of photons using a Computed Radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio Rivero, A.; Caballero Pinelo, R.; Gonzalez Perez, Y.

    2015-01-01

    To propose and evaluate a method for the central axis dose verification in patients treated with total body irradiation (TBI) of photons using images obtained through a Computed Radiography (CR) system. It was used the Computed Radiography (Fuji) portal imaging cassette readings and correlate with measured of absorbed dose in water using 10 x 10 irradiation fields with ionization chamber in the 60 Co equipment. The analytical and graphic expression is obtained through software 'Origin8', the TBI patient portal verification images were processed using software ImageJ, to obtain the patient dose. To validate the results, the absorbed dose in RW3 models was measured with ionization chamber with different thickness, simulating TBI real conditions. Finally it was performed a retrospective study over the last 4 years obtaining the patients absorbed dose based on the reading in the image and comparing with the planned dose. The analytical equation obtained permits estimate the absorbed dose using image pixel value and the dose measured with ionization chamber and correlated with patient clinical records. Those results are compared with reported evidence obtaining a difference less than 02%, the 3 methods were compared and the results are within 10%. (Author)

  4. Peri-implant assessment via cone beam computed tomography and digital periapical radiography: an ex vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolau Silveira-Neto

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This research evaluated detail registration in peri-implant bone using two different cone beam computer tomography systems and a digital periapical radiograph. METHODS: Three different image acquisition protocols were established for each cone beam computer tomography apparatus, and three clinical situations were simulated in an ex vivo fresh pig mandible: buccal bone defect, peri-implant bone defect, and bone contact. Data were subjected to two analyses: quantitative and qualitative. The quantitative analyses involved a comparison of real specimen measures using a digital caliper in three regions of the preserved buccal bone – A, B and E (control group – to cone beam computer tomography images obtained with different protocols (kp1, kp2, kp3, ip1, ip2, and ip3. In the qualitative analyses, the ability to register peri-implant details via tomography and digital periapical radiography was verified, as indicated by twelve evaluators. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=0.05. RESULTS: The quantitative assessment showed means statistically equal to those of the control group under the following conditions: buccal bone defect B and E with kp1 and ip1, peri-implant bone defect E with kp2 and kp3, and bone contact A with kp1, kp2, kp3, and ip2. Qualitatively, only bone contacts were significantly different among the assessments, and the p3 results differed from the p1 and p2 results. The other results were statistically equivalent. CONCLUSIONS: The registration of peri-implant details was influenced by the image acquisition protocol, although metal artifacts were produced in all situations. The evaluators preferred the Kodak 9000 3D cone beam computer tomography in most cases. The evaluators identified buccal bone defects better with cone beam computer tomography and identified peri-implant bone defects better with digital periapical radiography.

  5. Phosphor Scanner For Imaging X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Hecht, Diana L.; Witherow, William K.

    1992-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic scanning apparatus generates digitized image of x-ray image recorded in phosphor. Scanning fiber-optic probe supplies laser light stimulating luminescence in areas of phosphor exposed to x rays. Luminescence passes through probe and fiber to integrating sphere and photomultiplier. Sensitivity and resolution exceed previously available scanners. Intended for use in x-ray crystallography, medical radiography, and molecular biology.

  6. Skeletal imaging following reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament: in vivo comparison of fluoroscopy, radiography, and computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osti, Michael; Benedetto, Karl Peter [Academic Hospital Feldkirch, Department for Trauma Surgery and Sports Traumatology, Feldkirch (Austria); Krawinkel, Alessa [Academic Hospital Feldkirch, Department for Radiology, Feldkirch (Austria)

    2014-12-15

    Intra- and postoperative validation of anatomic footprint replication in posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction can be conducted using fluoroscopy, radiography, or computed tomography (CT) scans. However, effectiveness and exposure to radiation of these imaging modalities are unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of fluoroscopy, radiography, and CT in detecting femoral and tibial tunnel positions following an all-inside reconstruction of the PCL ligament in vivo. The study design was a retrospective case series. Intraoperative fluoroscopic images, postoperative radiographs, and CT scans were obtained in 50 consecutive patients following single-bundle PCL reconstruction. The centers of the tibial and femoral tunnel apertures were identified and correlated to measurement grid systems. The results of fluoroscopic, radiographic, and CT measurements were compared to each other and accumulated radiation dosages were calculated. Comparing the imaging groups, no statistically significant difference could be detected for the reference of the femoral tunnel to the intercondylar depth and height, for the reference of the tibial tunnel to the mediolateral diameter of the tibial plateau and for the superoinferior distance of the tibial tunnel entry to the tibial plateau and to the former physis line. Effective doses resulting from fluoroscopic, radiographic, and CT exposure averaged 2.9 mSv, standard deviation (±SD) 4.1 mSv, to 1.3 ± 0.8 mSv and to 3.6 ± 1.0 mSv, respectively. Fluoroscopy, radiography, and CT yield approximately equal effectiveness in detecting parameters used for quality validation intra- and postoperatively. An accumulating exposure to radiation must be considered. (orig.)

  7. Image quality and dose management in digital radiography: A new paradigm for optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, H. P.; Faulkner, K.

    2005-01-01

    The advent of digital imaging in radiology, combined with the explosive growth of technology, has dramatically improved imaging techniques. This has led to the expansion of diagnostic capabilities, both in terms of the number of procedures and their scope. Throughout the world, film/ screen radiography systems are being rapidly replaced with digital systems. Many progressive medical institutions have acquired, or are considering the purchase of computed radiography systems with storage phosphor plates or direct digital radiography systems with flat panel detectors. However, unknown to some users, these devices offer a new paradigm of opportunity and challenges. Images can be obtained at a lower dose owing to the higher detective quantum efficiency (DQE). These fundamental differences in comparison to conventional film/screens necessitate the development of new strategies for dose and quality optimisations. A set of referral criteria based upon three dose levels is proposed. (authors)

  8. High-resolution computed tomography versus chest radiography in the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Ana Beatriz Cordeiro de; Calderaro, Debora; Moreira, Caio; Guimaraes, Silvana Mangeon Meirelles; Tavares Junior, Wilson Campos; Leao Filho, Hilton Muniz; Andrade, Diego Correa de; Ferreira, Cid Sergio; Vieira, Jose Nelson Mendes

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with chest radiography in the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Materials And Methods: HRCT scans and chest radiographs in postero-anterior and lateral views were performed in 34 patients with systemic sclerosis, according to the American College of Rheumatology preliminary criteria for the diagnosis of SSc. The prevalence of radiological findings suggestive of interstitial lung disease in SSc seen on both imaging methods was compared. Results: Interstitial disease was observed on HRCT images of 31 patients (91%) and in the chest radiographs of 16 patients (47%). The most frequent findings observed on HRCT were septal lines (74%), honeycombing (56%) and parenchymal bands (26%). Chest radiographs showed reticular areas of attenuation in 11 patients (32%) and parenchymal distortion in 12% of the patients. In 18 patients (53%) with normal chest radiographs HRCT showed septal lines in 55%, ground glass in 44%, honeycombing in 38.5% and cysts in 33%. Conclusion: HRCT is more sensitive than chest radiography in the evaluation of incipient interstitial lung involvement in patients with SSc and can provide a justification for immunosuppressive therapy in patients with early disease. (author)

  9. A Comparison of Plain Radiography with Computer Tomography in Determining Coronal and Sagittal Alignments following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solayar GN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Optimal coronal and sagittal component positioning is important in achieving a successful outcome following total knee arthroplasty (TKA. Modalities to determine post-operative alignment include plain radiography and computer tomography (CT imaging. This study aims to determine the accuracy and reliability of plain radiographs in measuring coronal and sagittal alignment following TKA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective, consecutive study of 58 patients undergoing TKA was performed comparing alignment data from plain radiographs and CT imaging. Hip- knee-angle (HKA, sagittal femoral angle (SFA and sagittal tibial angle (STA measurements were taken by two observers from plain radiographs and compared with CT alignment. Intra- and inter-observer correlation was calculated for each measurement. RESULTS: Intra-observer correlation was excellent for HKA (r>0.89 with a mean difference of 0.95 and STA (r>0.8 compared to SFA (r=0.5. When comparing modalities (radiographs vs CT, HKA estimations for both observers showed the least maximum and mean differences while SFA observations were the least accurate. CONCLUSION: Radiographic estimation of HKA showed excellent intra- and inter-observer correlation and corresponds well with CT imaging. However, radiographic estimation of sagittal plane alignment was less reliably measured and correlated less with CT imaging. Plain radiography was found to be inferior to CT for estimation of biplanar prosthetic alignment following TKA.

  10. Accuracy of Digital Radiography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography on Periapical Radiolucency Detection in Endodontically Treated Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Venskutonis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of intraoral digital periapical radiography and cone beam computed tomography in the detection of periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. Material and Methods: Radiographic images (cone beam computed tomography [CBCT] scans and digital periapical radiography [PR] images from 60 patients, achieved from September 2008 to July 2013, were retrieved from databases of the Department of Oral Diseases, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Twenty patients met inclusion criteria and were selected for further evaluation. Results: In 20 patients (42.4 [SD 12.1] years, 65% men and 35% women a total of 35 endodontically treated teeth (1.75 [SD 0.91]; 27 in maxilla and 8 in mandible were evaluated. Overall, it was observed a statistical significant difference between the number of periapical lesions observed in the CBCT (n = 42 and radiographic (n = 24 examinations (P < 0.05. In molar teeth, CBCT identify a significantly higher amount of periapical lesions than with the radiographic method (P < 0.05. There were significant differences between CBCT and PR in the mean number of lesions identified per tooth (1.2 vs 0.66, P = 0.03, number of teeth with lesions (0.71 vs 0.46, P = 0.03 and number of lesions identified per canal (0.57 vs 0.33, P = 0.005. Considering CBCT as “gold standard” in lesion detection with the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy considering as score 1, then the same parameters of PR were 0.57, 1 and 0.76 respectively. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that cone beam computed tomography scans were more accurate compared to digital periapical radiographs for detecting periapical radiolucencies in endodontically treated teeth. The difference was more pronounced in molar teeth.

  11. Neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrdlicka, Z.

    1977-01-01

    Neutron radiography is a radiographic method using a neutron beam of a defined geometry. The neutron source usually consists of a research reactor, a specialized neutron radiography reactor or the 252 Cf radioisotope source. There are two types of the neutron radiography display system, viz., a system producing neutron radiography images by a photographic process or a system allowing a visual display, eg., using a television monitor. The method can be used wherever X-ray radiography is used except applications in the radiography of humans. The neutron radiography unit at UJV uses the WWR-S reactor as the neutron source and both types of the above mentioned display system. (J.P.)

  12. Comparison of plain radiography, conventional tomography, and computed tomography in detecting intrathoracic lymph node metastases from lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, D.R.; Korobkin, M.; Ravin, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    Forty-two patients with T2 bronchogenic carcinoma were evaluated with plain radiography, conventional 55 0 oblique hilar and anteroposterior mediastinal tomography, and computed tomography (CT) to compare their accuracy in assessing mediastinal and hilar nodal metastases. Definitive staging was achieved by thoracotomy and histopathological evaluation of resected specimens. All modalities demonstrated about the same accuracy, however, in the 25 patients with hilar and/or mediastinal lymphadenopathy, CT of the mediastinum was more sensitive but not more specific than the other two and conventional tomography was no more accurate than CT for hilar evaluation. Overall, no technicue was accurate enough for routine staging; their value may lie in directing biopsy or in treatment planning in patients with inoperable disease

  13. Performance evaluation of three computed radiography systems using methods recommended in American Association of Physicists in Medicine Report 93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhogora, Wilbroad; Padovani, Renato; Bonutti, Faustino; Msaki, Peter; Kazema, R.

    2011-01-01

    The performances of three clinical computed radiography (CR) systems (Agfa CR 75 (with CRMD 4. 0 image plates), Kodak CR 850 (with Kodak GP plates) and Kodak CR 850A (with Kodak GP plates) were evaluated using six tests recommended in American Association of Physicists in Medicine Report 93. The results indicated variable performances with majority being within acceptable limits. The variations were mainly attributed to differences in detector formulations, plate readers' characteristics, and aging effects. The differences of the mean low contrast scores between the imaging systems for three observers were statistically significant for Agfa and Kodak CR 850A (P=0.009) and for Kodak CR systems (P=0.006) probably because of the differences in ages. However, the differences were not statistically significant between Agfa and Kodak CR 850 (P=0.284) suggesting similar perceived image quality. The study demonstrates the need to implement quality control program regularly. (author)

  14. Performance evaluation of three computed radiography systems using methods recommended in American Association of Physicists in Medicine Report 93

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilbroad Muhogora

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The performances of three clinical computed radiography (CR systems, (Agfa CR 75 (with CRMD 4.0 image plates, Kodak CR 850 (with Kodak GP plates and Kodak CR 850A (with Kodak GP plates were evaluated using six tests recommended in American Association of Physicists in Medicine Report 93. The results indicated variable performances with majority being within acceptable limits. The variations were mainly attributed to differences in detector formulations, plate readers′ characteristics, and aging effects. The differences of the mean low contrast scores between the imaging systems for three observers were statistically significant for Agfa and Kodak CR 850A (P=0.009 and for Kodak CR systems (P=0.006 probably because of the differences in ages. However, the differences were not statistically significant between Agfa and Kodak CR 850 (P=0.284 suggesting similar perceived image quality. The study demonstrates the need to implement quality control program regularly.

  15. Influence of imaging factors on image quality in bovine computed radiography (CR) using portable X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, M.; Sumiya, T.; Lee, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of X-ray tube-cassette distance and image scanning time on image quality to establish the benefit of Computed Radiography (CR) in bovine clinical practice. The tube-cassette distance had no effect on the visual evaluation score (graininess and sharpness). The image scanning time correlated with graininess but not sharpness. From these results, it was concluded that accidental variations in the tube-cassette distance and variations in image scanning time of several hours will not be major problems in clinical practice. CR is considered a useful X-ray system in bovine clinical imaging in which the maintenance of reproducible tube-cassette distance is difficult and variations in image scanning time is assumed

  16. Evaluation of an edge method for computed radiography and an electronic portal imaging device in radiotherapy: image quality measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Soon-Yong [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Bo-Young [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Woo [Konkuk University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Min [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi-Woun [The Baekseok Culture University College of Korea, Cheon-an (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ham-Gyum; Kim, Wha-Sun [The Ansan University College of Korea, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Lyu, Kwang-Yeul; Min, Jung-Whan [The Shingu University College of Korea, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki-Won [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Regular quality assurance (QA) of image quality is essential for reasonable patient dose and accurate treatment. Thus, QA should be performed as a routine for correction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the computed radiography (CR) system and the digital radiography (DR) system by using the edge method in megavoltage X-ray imaging (MVI). We used an edge block, which consisting of tungsten with dimensions of 19 (thickness) x 10 (length) x 1 (width) cm{sup 3} and measured the pre-sampling MTF by using a 6-megavolt (MV) energy. Computed radiography with an image plate (CR-IP) showed the values of 0.4 mm{sup -1} and 1.19 mm{sup -1} for MTF 0.5 and 0.1. In the DR group, Elekta iViewGT showed the highest value of 0.27 mm{sup -1} for MTF 0.5, and Siemens BEAMVIEW{sup PLUS} showed the highest value of 0.98 mm{sup -1} for MTF 0.1. In CR, the NPS of CR-IP showed a favorable noise distribution. Thus, in the DR group, the NPS of Elekta iViewGT showed the highest noise distribution. CR-IP showed values at peak DQE and 1 mm{sup -1} DQE of 0.0013 and 0.00011, respectively. In the DR group, Elekta iViewGT showed the best efficiency at a peak DQE of 0.0009, and Siemens BEAMVIEW{sup PLUS} showed the best efficiency at a 1-mm{sup -1} DQE of 0.000008. The edge method produced fast assessments of the MTF and the DQE. We could validate the evaluation of the edge method by comparing of the CR system to the DR system. This study demonstrated that the edge method can be used for not only traditional QA imaging but also quantitative MTF, NPS and DQE measurements in detector development.

  17. neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron radiography (or radiology) is a diverse filed that uses neutrons of various energies, subthermal, thermal, epithermal or fast in either steady state or pulsed mode to examine objects for industrial, medical, or other purposes, both microscopic and macroscopic. The applications include engineering design, biological studies, nondestructive inspection and materials evaluation. In the past decade, over 100 different centers in some 30 countries have published reports of pioneering activities using reactors, accelerators and isotopic neutron sources. While film transparency and electronic video are most common imaging methods for static or in motion objects respectively, there are other important data gathering techniques, including track etch, digital gauging and computed tomography. A survey of the world-wide progress shows the field to be gaining steadily in its diversity, its sophistication and its importance. (author)

  18. Quality comparison between DEF-10 digital image from simulation technique and Computed Tomography (CR) technique in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Nur Syatirah Ismail

    2012-01-01

    The study was conducted to make comparison of digital image quality of DEF-10 from the techniques of simulation and computed radiography (CR). The sample used is steel DEF-10 with thickness of 15.28 mm. In this study, the sample is exposed to radiation from X-ray machine (ISOVOLT Titan E) with certain parameters. The parameters used in this study such as current, volt, exposure time and distance are specified. The current and distance of 3 mA and 700 mm respectively are specified while the applied voltage varies at 140, 160, 180 and 200 kV. The exposure time is reduced at a rate of 0, 20, 40, 60 and 80 % for each sample exposure. Digital image of simulation produced from aRTist software whereas digital image of computed radiography produced from imaging plate. Therefore, both images were compared qualitatively (sensitivity) and quantitatively (Signal to-Noise Ratio; SNR, Basic Spatial Resolution; SRb and LOP size) using Isee software. Radiographic sensitivity is indicated by Image Quality Indicator (IQI) which is the ability of the CR system and aRTist software to identify IQI of wire type when the time exposure is reduced up to 80% according to exposure chart ( D7; ISOVOLT Titan E). The image of the thinnest wire diameter achieved by radiograph from simulation and CR are the wire numbered 7 rather than the wire numbered 8 required by the standard. In quantitative comparison, this study shows that the SNR values decreases with reducing exposure time. SRb values increases for simulation and decreases for CR when the exposure time decreases and the good image quality can be achieved at 80% reduced exposure time. The high SNR and SRb values produced good image quality in CR and simulation techniques respectively. (author)

  19. Pediatric radiation dose management in digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neitzel, U.

    2004-01-01

    Direct digital radiography (DR) systems based on flat-panel detectors offer improved dose management in pediatric radiography. Integration of X-ray generation and detection in one computer-controlled system provides better control and monitoring

  20. Optimization of digital chest radiography using computer modeling and voxels phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, S.C.A.; Souza, E.M.; Silva, A.X.; Lopes, R.T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to use the Monte Carlo code MCNPX and the Female Adult voxel (FAX) and Male Adult voxel (MAX) phantoms to investigate how the dose and image quality in digital chest radiography vary with tube voltage (70-150 kV), anti-scatter methods (grid and air gap) and gender of the patient. The effective dose was calculated by ICRP60 and image quality was quantified by calculating the signal-difference-to-noise ratio for pathological details (calcifications) positioned at different locations in the anatomy. Calculated quantities were normalized to a fixed value of air kerma (5 μGy) at the automatic exposure control chambers. The results obtained in this work show that the air gap technique and lower tube voltages provide an increase in the digital image quality. Furthermore, this study has also shown that the detection of pathological details vary with the gender of the patient. (author)

  1. Basic studies of radiation image diagnosis in veterinary medicine, 1: Comparison of the resolution of computed tomography, scanography and conventional radiography in an equine thoracic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shida, T.; Suganuma, T.; Hashizume, T.

    1984-01-01

    In radiography of the thorax and abdomen of a large animal, the extreme thickness of the body causes a large amount of scattered radiation, which makes it difficult to obtain sharp images. The image resolutions of radiographs obtained by applying conventional radiography, scanography and computed tomography [CT] on an equine thoracic phantom were compared. Tubes of various inside diameters, used to simulate the pulmonary vessels were placed in an equine thoracic phantom and radiographed by CT, scanography and conventional radiography so as to compare the various degrees of resolution of the images of the tubes obtained by these methods. CT and scanography both gave a higher resolution index than conventional radiography, and both provided recognizable images of tubes < 2 mm in diameter, which conventional radiography failed to do. Scanography and CT can be used to obtain high-quality images of the thorax and abdomen of large animals. The image quality was compared using the resolution index (RI). The RI would be a wholly practical and comprehensive index for resolution because it includes 3 factors, contrast, sharpness and magnification, and yet is easy to calculate

  2. Digital radiography using scintillating screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvini, E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the technical features of a digital radiographic system based on the principle of scanning laser stimulated luminescence. Such aspects as the physics of the stimulable phosphor detector are dealt with, and image acquisition, processing, and hard-copy output. Automatic analysis of pixel histograms is described, in a qualitative way, together with contrast modifications and spatial filtering. Physical image characteristics are reported. The overall performance of digital radiography is examined, together with the current requirements and its eventual developments

  3. Assessment of dose to patients undergoing computed radiography and film screen x-ray examinations in some Khartoum Hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed Khair, Haiffa Daffa Allah Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    Medical ionizing radiation sources give by far the largest contribution to the population dose from man made sources and most of the contribution comes from diagnostic x-rays. The optimization principle of radiation protection requires the minimization of radiation dose to patients while acquiring diagnostic quality images in radiology. In radiography, the extent of patient dose reduction is limited by the characteristics of the system used and the quality (or penetrating ability) of the x-ray beam. In this study, the entrance surface air kerma doses (ESA Ks) to patients undergoing 7 selected x-ray examinations were estimated. The study was conducted in eight hospitals in Khartoum State, comprising nine x-ray units and a total of 1200 patients were involved. Four of the hospitals involved in this study use computed radiography (CR) technology while the other four use film screen (FS) technology. The selected examinations were, abdomen (AP), chest (PA), pelvis (AP), skull (AP/PA), skull (LAT), thoracic spine (AP) and thoracic spine (LAT). The entrance surface air kerma was calculated by two methods, utilizing software CAL Dose X-3.5 and a mathematical model. Average ESAK values calculated using the two methods for hospitals using (CR) technology in mGy were 2.99 and 2.98, 0.34 and 0.31, 2.79 and 2.58, 0.76 and 0.71, 0.94 and 0.79, 3.4 and 3,2 and 5.9 and 5.03, for the above mentioned selected investigations respectively. And average ESAK values calculated using two methods for hospital using FS technology in mGy were found 4.98 and 4.19, 0.37 and 0.34, 4.15 and 3.95, 2.2 and 2. 1.3 and 1.1, 3.9 and 3.9, 9.4 and 8.3 for the above mentioned selected investigations respectively. Average ESAK values obtained by two methods for FS were higher values than the obtained by CR by 37 and 29%, 50 and 25%, 8%, 32 and 34%, 65 and 64%, 27 and 28%, 12% and 73% and 39% for the above mentioned selected investigations, respectively. This shows that CR technique allows diagnostically

  4. Diagnostic Accuracy of Periapical Radiography and Cone-beam Computed Tomography in Identifying Root Canal Configuration of Human Premolars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Thiago Oliveira; Haiter-Neto, Francisco; Nascimento, Eduarda Helena Leandro; Peroni, Leonardo Vieira; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz; Hassan, Bassam

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of periapical radiography (PR) and cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging in the detection of the root canal configuration (RCC) of human premolars. PR and CBCT imaging of 114 extracted human premolars were evaluated by 2 oral radiologists. RCC was recorded according to Vertucci's classification. Micro-computed tomographic imaging served as the gold standard to determine RCC. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were calculated. The Friedman test compared both PR and CBCT imaging with the gold standard. CBCT imaging showed higher values for all diagnostic tests compared with PR. Accuracy was 0.55 and 0.89 for PR and CBCT imaging, respectively. There was no difference between CBCT imaging and the gold standard, whereas PR differed from both CBCT and micro-computed tomographic imaging (P < .0001). CBCT imaging was more accurate than PR for evaluating different types of RCC individually. Canal configuration types III, VII, and "other" were poorly identified on CBCT imaging with a detection accuracy of 50%, 0%, and 43%, respectively. With PR, all canal configurations except type I were poorly visible. PR presented low performance in the detection of RCC in premolars, whereas CBCT imaging showed no difference compared with the gold standard. Canals with complex configurations were less identifiable using both imaging methods, especially PR. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A comparative study of cone-beam computed tomography and digital periapical radiography in detecting mandibular molars root perforations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghanifar, Sina; Moudi, Ehsan; Mesgarani, Abbas; Abbaszadeh, Naghi [Dental Material Research Center, Dental Faculty, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bijani, Ali [Non-Communicable Pediatric Diseases Research Center, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital periapical radiography in the detection of mesial root perforations of mandibular molars. In this in vitro study, 48 mandibular molars were divided into 4 groups. First, the mesial canals of all the 48 teeth were endodontically prepared. In 2 groups (24 teeth each), the roots were axially perforated in the mesiolingual canal 1-3 mm below the furcation region, penetrating the root surface ({sup r}oot perforation{sup )}. Then, in one of these 2 groups, the mesial canals were filled with gutta-percha and AH26 sealer. Mesial canals in one of the other 2 groups without perforation (control groups) were filled with the same materials. The CBCT and periapical radiographs with 3 different angulations were evaluated by 2 oral and maxillofacial radiologists. The specificity and sensitivity of the two methods were calculated, and P<0.05 was considered significant. The sensitivity and specificity of CBCT scans in the detection of obturated root canal perforations were 79% and 96%, respectively, and in the case of three-angled periapical radiographs, they were 92% and 100%, respectively. In non-obturated root canals, the sensitivity and specificity of CBCT scans in perforation detection were 92% and 100%, respectively, and for three-angled periapical radiographs, they were 50% and 96%, respectively. For perforation detection in filled-root canals, periapical radiography with three different horizontal angulations would be trustworthy, but it is recommended that CBCT be used for perforation detection before obturating root canals.

  6. Dual energy radiography using active detector technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibert, J.A.; Poage, T.F.; Alvarez, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    A new technology has been implemented using an open-quotes active-detectorclose quotes comprised of two computed radiography (CR) imaging plates in a sandwich geometry for dual-energy radiography. This detector allows excellent energy separation, short exposure time, and high signal to noise ratio (SNR) for clinically robust open-quotes bone-onlyclose quotes and open-quotes soft-tissue onlyclose quotes images with minimum patient motion. Energy separation is achieved by two separate exposures at widely different kVp's: the high energy (120 kVp + 1.5 mm Cu filter) exposure is initiated first, followed by a short burst of intense light to erase the latent image on the front plate, and then a 50 kVp (low energy) exposure. A personal computer interfaced to the x-ray generator, filter wheel, and active detector system orchestrates the acquisition sequence within a time period of 150 msec. The front and back plates are processed using a CR readout algorithm with fixed speed and wide dynamic range. open-quotes Bone-onlyclose quotes and open-quotes soft-tissue onlyclose quotes images are calculated by geometric alignment of the two images and application of dual energy decomposition algorithms on a pixel by pixel basis. Resultant images of a calibration phantom demonstrate an increase of SNR 2 / dose by ∼73 times when compared to a single exposure open-quotes passive-detectorclose quotes comprised of CR imaging plates, and an ∼8 fold increase compared to a screen-film dual-energy cassette comprised of different phosphor compounds. In conclusion, dual energy imaging with open-quotes active detectorclose quotes technology is clinically feasible and can provide substantial improvements over conventional methods for dual-energy radiography

  7. Digital radiography of the chest: state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souto, M.; Malagari, K.S.; Tucker, D.; Tahoces, P.G.; Correa, J.; Benakis, V.S.; Roussos, C.; Strigaris, K.A.; Vidal, J.J.; Barnes, G.T.; Fraser, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    Digital image acquisition possesses a number of advantages over conventional systems in radiographic examination of the chest, the most important of which is its greater dynamic range. In addition, once digital images are acquired, they can be processed by computer in ways that cannot be rivalled by conventional analog techniques. Finally, digital images can be stored, retrieved and transmitted to local or remote sites. Here the status of the different digital systems employed in chest radiology and commonly used image processing techniques are reviewed. Also discussed are the current clinical applications of integrating digital chest radiography with a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) along with the difficulties typically encountered. Studies with a variety of digital techniques have been carried out on several fronts. Computed radiography based on photostimulable phosphor (CR) has replaced screen-film imaging in certain applications (i.e. bedside imaging). However, CR has limitations, namely its poor X-ray utilisation efficiency at high X-ray tube voltages and sensitivity to scatter; therefore, it is not ideal for all applications. Recently, a dedicated digital chest unit with excellent X-ray utilisation efficiency at high X-ray tube potentials has been introduced. On the basis of the state-of-the-art capabilities and research during the past decade, recommendations are made regarding the most desirable equipment specifications for dedicated and bedside digital chest radiography. (orig.)

  8. Military radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Historic military uses of radiography are discussed in this chapter: Battle of Adowa in 1986 was the first. Besides describing the early campaigns in which radiography was used, the author discusses the problems faced: a reliable source of electricity; the problems of extreme heat; moving and breakage of equipment. Numerous historical photographs are included. 9 refs

  9. Influence of estrogen deficiency and tibolone therapy on trabecular and cortical bone evaluated by computed radiography system in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Ana Carolina Bergmann de; Henriques, Helene Nara [Postgraduate Program in Pathology, Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Fernandes, Gustavo Vieira Oliveira [Postgraduate Program in Medical Sciences, Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Lima, Inaya; Oliveira, Davi Ferreira de; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu [Nuclear Engineering Program, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Pantaleao, Jose Augusto Soares [Maternal and Child Department, Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Granjeiro, Jose Mauro [Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Maria Angelica Guzman [Department of Pathology, Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To verify the effects of tibolone administration on trabecular and cortical bone of ovariectomized female rats by computed radiography system (CRS). Methods: The experiment was performed on two groups of rats previously ovariectomized, one received tibolone (OVX+T) while the other did not (OVX), those groups were compared to a control group (C) not ovariectomized. Tibolone administration (1 mg/day) began thirty days after the ovariectomy and the treatment remained for five months. At last, the animals were euthanized and femurs and tibias collected. Computed radiographs of the bones were obtained and the digital images were used to determine the bone optical density and cortical thickness on every group. All results were statistically evaluated with significance set at P<0.05%. Results: Tibolone administration was shown to be beneficial only in the densitometric analysis of the femoral head, performing higher optical density compared to OVX. No difference was found in cortical bone thickness. Conclusion: Ovariectomy caused bone loss in the analyzed regions and tibolone administered in high doses over a long period showed not to be fully beneficial, but preserved bone mass in the femoral head. (author)

  10. Digital chest radiography: flat-panel detectors or conventional radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer-Prokop, C.; Uffmann, M.; Sailer, J.; Kabalan, N.; Herold, C.; Prokop, M.

    2003-01-01

    Flat panel detectors are characterized by improved handling and increased dose efficiency. This allows for increasing of work flow efficiency and for reducing the exposure dose by about 50% compared to current systems with a sensitivity of 400. Whether the increased dose efficiency should be used to reduce acquisition dose or to increase image quality in the chest, will be shown by further clinical experience and will be also determined by the subjective preference of the radiologists. The decreased level of image noise opens new perspectives for image processing that way that elaborated multifrequency processing allows for optimizing the display of very small and low contrast structures that was so far limited by overlying image noise. Specialized applications of dual energy subtraction and temporal subtraction will also profit by the new detector technology and will be further driven forward in context with applications such as computed assisted diagnosis even though this is currently not yet broadly applied. Storage phosphor radiography still represents an important alternative technique based on its larger flexibility with respect to equipment configuration, its broader application options in intensive care and emergency radiology and due to economic reasons. These facts are further underlined by the fact that image quality also in storage phosphor radiography could be constantly increased by improving detector technology and image processing and consequently has a high standard. (orig.) [de

  11. Radiation doses in examination of lower third molars with computed tomography and conventional radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohman, A; Kull, L; Andersson, J; Flygare, L

    2008-12-01

    To measure organ doses and calculate effective doses for pre-operative radiographic examination of lower third molars with CT and conventional radiography (CR). Measurements of organ doses were made on an anthropomorphic head phantom with lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosemeters. The dosemeters were placed in regions corresponding to parotid and submandibular glands, mandibular bone, thyroid gland, skin, eye lenses and brain. The organ doses were used for the calculation of effective doses according to proposed International Commission on Radiological Protection 2005 guidelines. For the CT examination, a Siemens Somatom Plus 4 Volume Zoom was used and exposure factors were set to 120 kV and 100 mAs. For conventional radiographs, a Scanora unit was used and panoramic, posteroanterior, stereographic (scanogram) and conventional spiral tomographic views were exposed. The effective doses were 0.25 mSv, 0.060 mSv and 0.093 mSv for CT, CR without conventional tomography and CR with conventional spiral tomography, respectively. The effective dose is low when CT examination with exposure factors optimized for the examination of bone structures is performed. However, the dose is still about four times as high as for CR without tomography. CT should therefore not be a standard method for the examination of lower third molars. In cases where there is a close relationship between the tooth and the inferior alveolar nerve the advantages of true sectional imaging, such as CT, outweighs the higher effective dose and is recommended. Further reduction in the dose is feasible with further optimization of examination protocols and the development of newer techniques.

  12. Anthropomorphic chest phantom imaging – The potential for dose creep in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, W.K.; Hogg, P.; Tootell, A.; Manning, D.; Thomas, N.; Kane, T.; Kelly, J.; McKenzie, M.; Kitching, J.

    2013-01-01

    For film-based radiography the operator had to be exact in the selection of acquisition parameters or the image could easily become under- or over-exposed. By contrast, digital technology allows for a much greater tolerance of acquisition factor selection which would still give an image of acceptable diagnostic quality. In turn this greater tolerance allows for the operator to increase effective dose for little or no penalty in image quality. The purpose of this article is to determine how image quality and lesion visibility vary with effective dose (E) in order to identify how much overexposure could be tolerated within the radiograph. Using an anthropomorphic chest phantom with ground glass lesions we determined how perceptual image quality and E varied over a wide range of acquisition conditions. Perceptual image quality comprised of image quality and lesion visibility. E was calculated using Monte Carlo method; image quality was determined using a two alternative forced choice (2AFC) method and the quality criteria were partly informed from European guidelines. Five clinicians with significant experience in image reading scored the images for quality (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.869). Image quality and lesion visibility had a close correlation (R 2 > 0.8). The tolerance for over-exposure, whilst still acquiring an image of acceptable quality, increases with decreasing kV and increasing source to image distance (SID). The maximum over-exposure factor (ratio of maximum E to minimum E that produce images of acceptable quality) possible was 139 (at 125 cm and 60 kV). Given the phantom had characteristics similar to the human thorax we propose that that potential for overexposure in a human whilst still obtaining an image of acceptable perceptual image quality is very high. Further research into overexposure tolerance and dose creep should be undertaken

  13. A Comparison of Angular Values of the Pelvic Limb with Normal and Medial Patellar Luxation Stifles in Chihuahua Dogs Using Radiography and Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phetkaew, Thitaporn; Kalpravidh, Marissak; Penchome, Rampaipat; Wangdee, Chalika

    2018-02-01

     This article aimed to determine and compare the angular values of the pelvic limb in normal and medial patellar luxation (MPL) stifles in Chihuahuas using radiography and computed tomographic (CT) scan, to identify the relationship between pelvic limb angles and severity of MPL. In addition, radiographic and CT images were compared to determine the more suitable method of limb deformity assessment.  Sixty hindlimbs of Chihuahuas were divided into normal and grade 1, 2, 3 and 4 MPL groups. The pelvic limb angles in frontal and sagittal planes were evaluated on radiography and CT scan. Femoral and tibial torsion angles (FTA and TTA) were evaluated only by CT scan. All angles were compared among normal and MPL stifles and between radiography and CT scan.  Based on the CT scan, the mechanical lateral distal femoral angle (mLDFA), anatomical caudal proximal femoral angle (aCdPFA), and TTA were related to the severity of MPL. The mLDFA and TTA were significantly increased ( p  Chihuahuas are aLDFA, mLDFA, aCdPFA and TTA. Radiography had some limitations for evaluating pelvic limb angles. The caudocranial radiograph is recommended for the assessment of the distal femoral angles, while the craniocaudal radiograph is for the tibial angles. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  14. Incremental cost of department-wide implementation of a picture archiving and communication system and computed radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, H M; Langlotz, C P; Feingold, E R; Schwartz, J S; Kundel, H L

    1998-01-01

    To determine the incremental cash flows associated with department-wide implementation of a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and computed radiography (CR) at a large academic medical center. The authors determined all capital and operational costs associated with PACS implementation during an 8-year time horizon. Economic effects were identified, adjusted for time value, and used to calculate net present values (NPVs) for each section of the department of radiology and for the department as a whole. The chest-bone section used the most resources. Changes in cost assumptions for the chest-bone section had a dominant effect on the department-wide NPV. The base-case NPV (i.e., that determined by using the initial assumptions) was negative, indicating that additional net costs are incurred by the radiology department from PACS implementation. PACS and CR provide cost savings only when a 12-year hardware life span is assumed, when CR equipment is removed from the analysis, or when digitized long-term archives are compressed at a rate of 10:1. Full PACS-CR implementation would not provide cost savings for a large, subspecialized department. However, institutions that are committed to CR implementation (for whom CR implementation would represent a sunk cost) or institutions that are able to archive images by using image compression will experience cost savings from PACS.

  15. Comparative examinations of serum pepsinogen I, II and gastric area using computed radiography in the atrophic gastritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsu, Yoshimitsu; Ogura, Yasuharu; Yamazaki, Kouichi [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    The relationship between serum PG I, PG II levels and extent of atrophic gastritis was examined. The subjects were 64 patients (male: 32, female: 32, 51.9 years old on average) with established diagnosis of either atrophic gastritis or normal. In the X-ray gastric examination, Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) was used to obtain clear-cut images of the gastric area. Concerning the serum PG I level, patients in the group with atrophic gastritis showed lower levels than those of the people in the group with no atrophic change, but the variation was wide, and no definite tendency was seen in the relationship between the atrophic change and the serum PG I levels. Concerning the serum PG II level, as the atrophic change progresses, the serum PG II level tended to increase gradually. A significant reduction in the PG I/II ratio was seen in the group with atrophic changes (p<0.01) in comparison with the group with no atrophic changes, and the PG I/II value tended to decrease. In conclusion, as a relationship between the atrophic change and the serum PG levels had a wide variation, we considered it to be difficult to understand the presence and extent of the atrophic gastritis by measuring serum PG levels. (author).

  16. Comparative examinations of serum pepsinogen I, II and gastric area using computed radiography in the atrophic gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsu, Yoshimitsu; Ogura, Yasuharu; Yamazaki, Kouichi

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between serum PG I, PG II levels and extent of atrophic gastritis was examined. The subjects were 64 patients (male: 32, female: 32, 51.9 years old on average) with established diagnosis of either atrophic gastritis or normal. In the X-ray gastric examination, Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) was used to obtain clear-cut images of the gastric area. Concerning the serum PG I level, patients in the group with atrophic gastritis showed lower levels than those of the people in the group with no atrophic change, but the variation was wide, and no definite tendency was seen in the relationship between the atrophic change and the serum PG I levels. Concerning the serum PG II level, as the atrophic change progresses, the serum PG II level tended to increase gradually. A significant reduction in the PG I/II ratio was seen in the group with atrophic changes (p<0.01) in comparison with the group with no atrophic changes, and the PG I/II value tended to decrease. In conclusion, as a relationship between the atrophic change and the serum PG levels had a wide variation, we considered it to be difficult to understand the presence and extent of the atrophic gastritis by measuring serum PG levels. (author)

  17. Quality study of portal images acquired by computed radiography and screen-film system under megavoltage ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Guoquan; Jin Xiance; Wu Shixiu; Xie Congying; Zhang Li; Yu Jianyi; Li Yueqing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the quality of the portal images acquired by computed radiography (CR) system and conventional screen-film system, respectively. Methods: Imaging plates (IP) and X-ray films ora home-devised lead phantom with a leakage of 6.45% were acquired, and modulation transfer function (MTF) curves of the both images were measured using edge method. Portal images of 40 nasopharyngeal cancer patients were acquired by IP and screen-film system respectively. Two doctors with similar experience evaluated the damage degree of petrosal bone, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of CR images and general images were drawn according to two doctors evaluation results. Results: The identification frequency of CR system and screen-film system were 1.159 and 0.806 Lp/mm respectively. For doctor one, the area under ROC curve of CR images and general images were 0.802 and 0.742 respectively. For doctor two, the area under ROC curve of CR images and general images were 0.751 and 0.600 respectively. The MTF curve and ROC curve of CR are both better than those of screen-film system. Conclusion: The image quality of CR portal imaging is much better than that of screen-film system. The utility of CR in linear accelerator for portal imaging is promising in clinic. (authors)

  18. Interobserver agreement and performance score comparison in quality control using a breast phantom: screen-film mammography vs computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Satake, Hiroko; Ishigaki, Satoko; Sawaki, Akiko; Ishigaki, Takeo

    2002-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate interobserver agreement and to compare the performance score in quality control of screen-film mammography and computed radiography (CR) using a breast phantom. Eleven radiologists interpreted a breast phantom image (CIRS model X) by four viewing methods: (a) original screen-film; (b) soft-copy reading of the digitized film image; (c) hard-copy reading of CR using an imaging plate; and (d) soft-copy reading of CR. For the soft-copy reading, a 17-in. CRT monitor (1024 x 1536 x 8 bits) was used. The phantom image was evaluated using a scoring system outlined in the instruction manual, and observers judged each object using a three-point rating scale: (a) clearly seen; (b) barely seen; and (c) not seen. For statistical analysis, the kappa statistic was employed. For ''mass'' depiction, interobserver agreement using CR was significantly lower than when using screen-film (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in the kappa value for detecting ''microcalcification''; however, the performance score of ''microcalcification'' on CR hard-copy was significantly lower than on the other three viewing methods (p<0.05). Viewing methods (film or CR, soft-copy or hard-copy) could affect how the phantom image is judged. Paying special attention to viewing conditions is recommended for quality control of CR mammograms. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of four-view radiography and conventional computed tomography analysing sacral and pelvic fractures in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger-Vanegas, S M; Senthirajah, S K J; Nemanic, S; Baltzer, W; Warnock, J; Bobe, G

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was (1) to determine whether four-view radiography of the pelvis is as reliable and accurate as computed tomography (CT) in diagnosing sacral and pelvic fractures, in addition to coxofemoral and sacroiliac joint subluxation or luxation, and (2) to evaluate the effect of the amount of training in reading diagnostic imaging studies on the accuracy of diagnosing sacral and pelvic fractures in dogs. Sacral and pelvic fractures were created in 11 canine cadavers using a lateral impactor. In all cadavers, frog-legged ventro-dorsal, lateral, right and left ventro-45°-medial to dorsolateral oblique frog leg ("rollover 45-degree view") radiographs and a CT of the pelvis were obtained. Two radiologists, two surgeons and two veterinary students classified fractures using a confidence scale and noted the duration of evaluation for each imaging modality and case. The imaging results were compared to gross dissection. All evaluators required significantly more time to analyse CT images compared to radiographic images. Sacral and pelvic fractures, specifically those of the sacral body, ischiatic table, and the pubic bone, were more accurately diagnosed using CT compared to radiography. Fractures of the acetabulum and iliac body were diagnosed with similar accuracy (at least 86%) using either modality. Computed tomography is a better method for detecting canine sacral and some pelvic fractures compared to radiography. Computed tomography provided an accuracy of close to 100% in persons trained in evaluating CT images.

  20. Neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Eiichi

    1988-01-01

    The thermal neutron absorption coefficient is essentially different from the X-ray absorption coefficient. Each substance has a characteristic absorption coefficient regardless of its density. Neutron deams have the following features: (1) neutrons are not transmitted efficiently by low molecular weight substances, (2) they are transmitted efficiently by heavy metals, and (3) the transmittance differs among isotopes. Thus, neutron beams are suitable for cheking for foreign matters in heavy metals and testing of composites consisting of both heavy and light materials. A neutron source generates fast neutrons, which should be converted into thermal neutrons by reducing their energy. Major neutron souces include nuclear reactors, radioisotopes and particle accelerators. Photographic films and television systems are mainly used to observe neutron transmission images. Computers are employed for image processing, computerized tomography and three-dimensional analysis. The major applications of neutron radiography include inspection of neclear fuel; evaluation of material for airplane; observation of fuel in the engine and oil in the hydraulic systems in airplanes; testing of composite materials; etc. (Nogami, K.)

  1. Detection of bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis wrist joints with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døhn, Uffe Møller; Ejbjerg, Bo J; Hasselquist, Maria

    2008-01-01

    , specificity and accuracy (concordance) of MRI for detecting erosions were 61%, 93% and 77%, respectively, while the respective values were 24%, 99% and 63% for radiography. The intramodality agreements when measuring erosion volumes were high for both CT and MRI (Spearman correlation coefficients 0.92 and 0...... sensitivity and good specificity and accuracy for detection of erosions in rheumatoid arthritis and healthy wrist bones, while radiography showed very low sensitivity. The tested volumetric method was highly reproducible and correlated to scores of erosions....... measuring volumes of erosions on CT and MRI is reproducible and correlated to semiquantitative assessments (scores) of erosions on CT, MRI and radiography. METHODS: Seventeen patients with rheumatoid arthritis and four healthy control individuals underwent CT, MRI and radiography of one wrist, performed...

  2. Filmless radiography - present possibilities and direction of future developing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wocial, A.; Wojciechowski, Z.A.; Rozenblicki, Z.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents introduction for new filmless radiography like CR Computed Radiography and DR Digital Radiography direct and non direct. The main factors are considered, which determine classification to different type of radiography. For each technique authors describe advantages and disadvantages supporting by practice examples. Paper contains a lot of practical information about a most of existing radiographic equipment at the NDT market. (author)

  3. Comparison of Computed Tomography and Chest Radiography in the Detection of Rib Fractures in Abused Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Walton, John W.; Rosas, Angela J.; Coulter, Kevin P.; Rogers, Kristen K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Chest radiographs (CXR) are the standard method for evaluating rib fractures in abused infants. Computed tomography (CT) is a sensitive method to detect rib fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare CT and CXR in the evaluation of rib fractures in abused infants. Methods: This retrospective study included all 12 abused infants…

  4. Neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayon, G.

    1989-01-01

    Neutronography or neutron radiography, a non-destructive test method which is similar in its principle to conventional X-ray photography, presently occupies a marginal position among non-destructive test methods (NDT) (no source of suitable performance or cost). Neutron radiography associated with the ORPHEE reactor permits industrial testing; it can very quickly meet a cost requirement comparable to that of conventional test methods. In 1988, 2500 parts were tested on this unit [fr

  5. Industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Health and Safety Executive Information Sheet on industrial radiography aims to inform directors and managers of industrial radiography companies on the safety precautions necessary to ensure that their personnel do not exceed dose guidelines for exposure to ionizing radiation. The Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 (IRR85) require that exposure doses for radiographers are kept as low reasonably practicable. Equipment maintenance, and the employment of proper emergency procedures will help to ensure personnel safety. (UK)

  6. Signal differential-to-noise ratio (SdNR) in the evaluation of radiography techniques for optimisation of the industrial computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saddock, Aline; Candeias, Janaina P.; Oliveira, Davi F.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2007-01-01

    The transition from analog to digital operation which the radiography has gone through, has provided new and important challenges in the way the images are acquired and displayed. There is several acquisition system of digital image, such as for example, the computerized system, which uses Image Plates (IP). This system was used in the accomplishment of this work with the aim to study a technique capable of optimizing the acquisition of digital image. A methodology for the evaluation of image quality is through the parameter signal differential-to- noise ratio (SdNR). However, in order to compare different radiographic techniques through this system it is also necessary to calculate the Figure of Merit (FOM) that in this in case, it is given by the square of the SdNR per unit of applied dose. The method proposed in this work is about the use of IP to carry out SdNR experimental measurements and consequently FOM measurements in applications of the x-ray of pieces in aluminum. This proceeding was performed varying some specific parameters of the system, as high voltage, exposition and the use of filters in the X-rays tube exit. As a result, an SdNR was obtained for each technique, allowing in this way, to verify the behavior of the FOM in each one of them. (author)

  7. Oxidizer in phosphoric reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Benedetto, J. dos

    1985-01-01

    Oxidation during the manufacture of wet-process phosphoric acid affected the distribution of uranium and impurities between phosphoric acid and gypsum, by decreasing the uranium loss to gypsum and the impurities solubilization in phosphoric acid. (Author) [pt

  8. Broadening the radiography spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waswa, L.; Mutwasi, O.; Kioko, J.

    2006-05-01

    The text discuses the mammography in breast screening and evaluation of breast cancer; Small parts ultrasounds at plaza imaging solutions; role of a Radiographer in mammography-new perspective; Medical imaging education in africa; Caring for the paediatric patient as to broaden radiotherapy spectrum; Problems and challenges in care for children undergoing radiotherapy; Paediatric radiotherapy, management and side effects; The principles of pattern recognition of skeletal structures; the place of distance learning education in broadening the radiography spectrum; the curriculum and budgeting image; sonographer's guide; Computed radiography- X-Ray with vision; digital Radiography in Kenya today; Particle Therapy at Ithemba Labs; The role of lung perfusion and ventilation study in the evaluation of the pulmonary embolism and lastly, an overview of Head and neck treatment at Kenyatta National hospital radiotherapy

  9. Visibility of Different Intraorbital Foreign Bodies Using Plain Radiography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadrashid, Reza; Golamian, Masoud; Shahrzad, Maryam; Hajalioghli, Parisa; Shahmorady, Zahra; Fouladi, Daniel F; Sadrarhami, Shohreh; Akhoundzadeh, Leila

    2017-05-01

    The study sought to compare the usefulness of 4 imaging modalities in visualizing various intraorbital foreign bodies (IOFBs) in different sizes. Six different materials including metal, wood, plastic, stone, glass. and graphite were cut in cylindrical shapes in 4 sizes (dimensions: 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mm) and placed intraorbitally in the extraocular space of fresh sheep's head. Four skilled radiologists rated the visibility of the objects individually using plain radiography, spiral computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in accordance with a previously described grading system. Excluding wood, all embedded foreign bodies were best visualized in CT and CBCT images with almost equal accuracies. Wood could only be detected using MRI, and then only when fragments were more than 2 mm in size. There were 3 false-positive MRI reports, suggesting air bubbles as wood IOFBs. Because of lower cost and using less radiation in comparison with conventional CT, CBCT can be used as the initial imaging technique in cases with suspected IOFBs. Optimal imaging technique for wood IOFBs is yet to be defined. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection of simulated pulmonary nodules by single-exposure dual-energy computed radiography of the chest: effect of a computer-aided diagnosis system (Part 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Shoji; Kuriyama, Keiko; Kuroda, Chikazumi; Nakamura, Hironobu; Ito, Wataru; Shimura, Kazuo; Kato, Hisatoyo

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme on the detection of pulmonary nodules (PNs) in single-exposure dual-energy subtraction computed radiography (CR) images of the chest, and to evaluate the effect of this CAD scheme on radiologists' detectabilities. Methods and material: We compared the detectability by the CAD scheme with the detectability by 12 observers by using conventional CR (C-CR) and bone-subtracted CR (BS-CR) images of 25 chest phantoms with a low-contrast nylon nodule. Results: Both in the CAD scheme and for the observers, the detectability of BS-CR images was superior to that of C-CR images (P<0.005). The detection performance of the CAD scheme was equal to that of the observers. The nodules detected by the CAD did not necessarily coincide with those by the observers. Thus, if observers can use the results of the CAD system as a 'second opinion', their detectabilities increase. Conclusion: The CAD system for detection of PNs in the single-exposure dual-energy subtraction method is promising for improving radiologists' detectabilities of PNs

  11. Painful spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis studied by radiography and single-photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, B.D.; Johnson, R.P.; Carrera, G.F.

    1985-01-01

    Planar bone scintigraphy (PBS) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were compared in 19 adults with radiographic evidence of spondylolysis and/or spondylolisthesis. SPECT was more sensitive than PBS when used to identify symptomatic patients and sites of painful defects in the pars interarticularis. In addition, SPECT allowed more accurate localization than PBS. In 6 patients, spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis was unrealted to low back pain, and SPECT images of the posterior neural arch were normal. The authors conclude that when spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis is the cause of low back pain, pars defects are frequently heralded by increased scintigraphic activity which is best detected and localized by SPECT

  12. Painful spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis studied by radiography and single-photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, B.D.; Johnson, R.P.; Carrera, G.F.; Meyer, G.A.; Schwab, J.P.; Flatley, T.J.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Zielonka, J.S.; Knobel, J.

    1985-01-01

    Planar bone scintigraphy (PBS) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were compared in 19 adults with radiographic evidence of spondylolysis and/or spondylolisthesis. SPECT was more sensitive than PBS when used to identify symptomatic patients and sites of painful defects in the pars interarticularis. In addition, SPECT allowed more accurate localization than PBS. In 6 patients, spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis was unrealted to low back pain, and SPECT images of the posterior neural arch were normal. The authors conclude that when spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis is the cause of low back pain, pars defects are frequently heralded by increased scintigraphic activity which is best detected and localized by SPECT.

  13. Comparison of cone beam computed tomography and conventional panoramic radiography in assessing the topographic relationship between the mandibular canal and impacted third molars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyung Soo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2008-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy and value in an imaging technique field through the comparison of cone beam computed tomography and conventional panoramic radiography in assessing the topographic relationship between the mandibular canal and impacted third molars. Participants consisted of 100 patients offered the images through cone beam computed tomography and panoramic radiography. PSR-9000TM Dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd, Japan) was used as the unit of cone beam computed tomography. CE-II (Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd, Japan) and Pro Max (Planmeca Oy, Finland) were used as the unit of panoramic radiography. The images obtained through panoramic radiography were classified into 3 types according to the distance between mandibular canal and root of mandibular third molar. And they were classified into 4 types according to the proximity of radiographic feature. The images obtained through cone beam computed tomography based on the classification above were classified into 4 types according to the location between the mandibular canal and the root and were analyzed. And they were classified into buccal, inferior, lingual, and between roots, according to the location between mandibular canal and root. The data were statistically analyzed and estimated by x2-test. 1. There was no statistical significance according to 3 types (type I, type II, type III) through CBCT. 2. The results of 4 types (type A, type B, type C, type D) through CBCT were as high prevalence of CBCT 1 in type A, CBCT 2 in type B, CBCT 3 in type C, and CBCT1 in type D and those of which showed statistical significance (P value=0.03). 3. The results according to location between mandibular canal and root through CBCT recorded each 49, 25, 17, 9 as buccal, inferior, lingual, between roots. When estimating the mandibular canal and the roots through the panoramic radiography, it could be difficult to drive the views of which this estimation was considerable. Thus it is required to

  14. Industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Industrial radiography is a non-destructive testing (NDT) method which allows components to be examined for flaws without interfering with their usefulness. It is one of a number of inspection methods which are commonly used in industry to control the quality of manufactured products and to monitor their performance in service. Because of its involvement in organizing training courses in all the common NDT methods in regional projects in Asia and the Pacific and Latin America and the Caribbean and in many country programmes, the Agency is aware of the importance of standardizing as far as possible the syllabi and training course notes used by the many experts who are involved in presenting the training courses. IAEA-TECDOC-628 ''Training Guidelines in Non-destructive Testing'' presents syllabi which were developed by an Agency executed UNDP project in Latin America and the Caribbean taking into account the developmental work done by the International Committee for Non-destructive Testing. Experience gained from using the radiography syllabi from TECDOC-628 at national and regional radiography training courses in the Agency executed UNDP project in Asia and the Pacific (RAS/86/073) showed that some guidance needed to be given to radiography experts engaged in teaching at these courses on the material which should be covered. The IAEA/UNDP Asia and Pacific Project National NDT Coordinators therefore undertook to prepare Radiography Training Course Notes which could be used by experts to prepare lectures for Level 1,2 and 3 radiography personnel. The notes have been expanded to cover most topics in a more complete manner than that possible at a Level 1, 2 or 3 training course and can now be used as source material for NDT personnel interested in expanding their knowledge of radiography. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. A new characterization procedure for computed radiography performance levels based on EPS, SNR and basic spatial resolution measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewert, Uwe; Zscherpel, Uwe; Baer, Sylke

    2016-01-01

    The standards EN 14784-1:2005 and ISO 16371-1:2011 describe the classification of Computed Radiography systems for industrial applications. After 10 years of classification experience, it can be concluded that all certified NDT CR systems achieve the best classification result: IP 1. The measured basic spatial resolution is different depending on the manufacturer's brand and the IP used. Therefore, a revision was recommended to obtain a better gradation for the different brands. Users in USA and Europe classify the CR systems based on different parameters. Consequently, a new revision of ASTM E 2446-15 was finalized in 2015, which describes the characterization of CR systems based on CR performance levels. The key parameters are the normalized Signal to Noise Ratio (SNRN), the interpolated basic spatial resolution (iSR b detector ) and the achieved equivalent penetrameter sensitivity (aEPS). A series of further tests is required for complete characterization by manufacturers or certifying laboratories. This includes e.g.: geometric distortion, laser jitter, PMT non-linearity, scanner slippage, shading or banding, erasure, burn-In, spatial linearity, artefacts, imaging plate response variation and imaging plate fading. ASTM E 2445-15 describes several tests, for users to perform periodic quality assurance. The measurement procedures are described and the resulting values as CR speed, achieved contrast sensitivity and efficiency are discussed. The results will be presented graphically in a spider net graph in the qualification/certification statement. A revision of the related CEN and ISO standards is discussed.

  16. Radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging at 0.5 Tesla of mechanically induced osteoarthritis in rabbit knees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torelli, S.R.; Rahal, R.S.; Volpi, R.S.; Yamashita, S.; Mamprim, M.J.; Crocci, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    In the present experimental study we assessed induced osteoarthritis data in rabbits, compared three diagnostic methods, i.e., radiography (XR), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and correlated the imaging findings with those obtained by macroscopic evaluation. Ten young female rabbits of the Norfolk breed were used. Seven rabbits had the right knee immobilized in extension for a period of 12 weeks (immobilized group), and three others did not have a limb immobilized and were maintained under the same conditions (control group). Alterations observed by XR, CT and MRI after the period of immobilization were osteophytes, osteochondral lesions, increase and decrease of joint space, all of them present both in the immobilized and non-immobilized contralateral limbs. However, a significantly higher score was obtained for the immobilized limbs (XT: P = 0.016, CT: P 0.031, MRI: P = 0.0156). All imaging methods were able to detect osteoarthritis changes after the 12 weeks of immobilization. Macroscopic evaluation identified increased thickening of joint capsule, proliferative and connective tissue in the femoropatellar joint, and irregularities of articular cartilage, especially in immobilized knees. The differences among XR, CT and MRI were not statistically significant for the immobilized knees. However, MRI using a 0.5 Tesla scanner was statistically different from CT and XR for the non-immobilized contralateral knees. We conclude that the three methods detected osteoarthritis lesions in rabbit knees, but MRI was less sensitive than XR and CT in detecting lesions compatible with initial osteoarthritis. Since none of the techniques revealed all the lesions, it is important to use all methods to establish an accurate diagnosis. (author)

  17. COMPARISONS AMONG RADIOGRAPHY, ULTRASONOGRAPHY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY FOR EX VIVO CHARACTERIZATION OF STIFLE OSTEOARTHRITIS IN THE HORSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lasalle, Julie; Alexander, Kate; Olive, Julien; Laverty, Sheila

    2016-09-01

    A better understanding of imaging characteristics of equine stifle osteoarthritis (OA) may allow earlier detection and improve prognosis. Objectives of this ex vivo, prospective, methods comparison study were to (1) describe the location and severity of naturally acquired OA lesions in the equine stifle using ultrasound (US), radiography (XR), computed tomography (CT), and macroscopic evaluation (ME); (2) compare the diagnostic performance of each imaging modality with ME; and (3) describe subchondral bone mineral density (BMD) in equine stifle joints with OA using CT. Radiographic, CT, and US evaluations were performed on 23 equine cadaver stifles and compared with ME. Significant associations were found between osteophyte global scores for all imaging modalities (CT, P ˂ 0.0001; XR, P = 0.005; US, P = 0.04) vs. ME osteophyte global scores. Osteophytes were detected most frequently in the medial femorotibial (MFT) joint. A specific pattern of osteophytes was observed, with a long ridge of new bone at the insertion of the MFT joint capsule cranially on the medial femoral condyle. A novel caudo-10°proximo-5°lateral-cranio-disto-medial oblique radiographic projection was helpful for detection of intercondylar osteophytes. Multiplanar CT reformatted images were helpful for characterizing all osteophytes. Osteophyte grades at most sites did not differ among modalities. Low sensitivity/specificity for subchondral bone sclerosis and flattening of femoral condyles suggested that these signs may not be reliable radiographic and CT indicators of equine stifle OA. Equine stifle OA was associated with a decrease in BMD and specific sites of focal subchondral bone resorption/cyst formation were found in some specimens. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  18. Application of off-line image processing for optimization in chest computed radiography using a low cost system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhogora, Wilbroad E; Msaki, Peter; Padovani, Renato

    2015-03-08

     The objective of this study was to improve the visibility of anatomical details by applying off-line postimage processing in chest computed radiography (CR). Four spatial domain-based external image processing techniques were developed by using MATLAB software version 7.0.0.19920 (R14) and image processing tools. The developed techniques were implemented to sample images and their visual appearances confirmed by two consultant radiologists to be clinically adequate. The techniques were then applied to 200 chest clinical images and randomized with other 100 images previously processed online. These 300 images were presented to three experienced radiologists for image quality assessment using standard quality criteria. The mean and ranges of the average scores for three radiologists were characterized for each of the developed technique and imaging system. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to test the difference of details visibility between the images processed using each of the developed techniques and the corresponding images processed using default algorithms. The results show that the visibility of anatomical features improved significantly (0.005 ≤ p ≤ 0.02) with combinations of intensity values adjustment and/or spatial linear filtering techniques for images acquired using 60 ≤ kVp ≤ 70. However, there was no improvement for images acquired using 102 ≤ kVp ≤ 107 (0.127 ≤ p ≤ 0.48). In conclusion, the use of external image processing for optimization can be effective in chest CR, but should be implemented in consultations with the radiologists.

  19. Radiation Effects in Paediatric radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutwasi, O.

    2006-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging has evolved from single technique to a field which we have a choice from many modalities. Some without radiation. Radiation producing modalities include plain films (low dose), Fluoroscopy (mid range dose), Computed tomography (high dose). Radiography dose can significantly be influenced in plain radiography by varying speed of screens, cassette construction and type of radiography. E.g. digital or computed. In computed or digital radiography we are no longer able to tell h igh dose b y the quality of images. The final image is by great extend a product of post processing algorithms. It's for this reasons that the basic understanding of the sensitivity and specifying of various types of examinations and of specifically radiation effects is mandatory for a paediatric imager

  20. High-resolution computed tomography in silicosis: correlation with chest radiography and pulmonary function tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Agnaldo Jose [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Pedro Ernesto Univ. Hospital. Dept. of Respiratory Function]. E-mail: phel.lop@uol.com.br; Mogami, Roberto; Capone, Domenico; Jansen, Jose Manoel [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). School of Medical Sciences; Tessarollo, Bernardo [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Image; Melo, Pedro Lopes de [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. of Biology

    2008-05-15

    Objective: To correlate tomographic findings with pulmonary function findings, as well as to compare chest X-ray findings with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings, in patients with silicosis. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 44 non-smoking patients without a history of tuberculosis. Chest X-ray findings were classified according to the International Labour Organization recommendations. Using a semiquantitative system, the following HRCT findings were measured: the full extent of pulmonary involvement; parenchymal opacities; and emphysema. Spirometry and forced oscillation were performed. Pulmonary volumes were evaluated using the helium dilution method, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide was assessed. Results: Of the 44 patients studied, 41 were male. The mean age was 48.4 years. There were 4 patients who were classified as category 0 based on X-ray findings and as category 1 based on HRCT findings. Using HRCT scans, we identified progressive massive fibrosis in 33 patients, compared with only 23 patients when X-rays were used. Opacity score was found to correlate most closely with airflow, DLCO and compliance. Emphysema score correlated inversely with volume, DLCO and airflow. In this sample of patients presenting a predominance of large opacities (75% of the individuals), the deterioration of pulmonary function was associated with the extent of structural changes. Conclusions: In the early detection of silicosis and the identification of progressive massive fibrosis, HRCT scans are superior to X-rays. (author)

  1. High-resolution computed tomography in silicosis: correlation with chest radiography and pulmonary function tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Agnaldo Jose; Mogami, Roberto; Capone, Domenico; Jansen, Jose Manoel; Tessarollo, Bernardo; Melo, Pedro Lopes de

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To correlate tomographic findings with pulmonary function findings, as well as to compare chest X-ray findings with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings, in patients with silicosis. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 44 non-smoking patients without a history of tuberculosis. Chest X-ray findings were classified according to the International Labour Organization recommendations. Using a semiquantitative system, the following HRCT findings were measured: the full extent of pulmonary involvement; parenchymal opacities; and emphysema. Spirometry and forced oscillation were performed. Pulmonary volumes were evaluated using the helium dilution method, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide was assessed. Results: Of the 44 patients studied, 41 were male. The mean age was 48.4 years. There were 4 patients who were classified as category 0 based on X-ray findings and as category 1 based on HRCT findings. Using HRCT scans, we identified progressive massive fibrosis in 33 patients, compared with only 23 patients when X-rays were used. Opacity score was found to correlate most closely with airflow, DLCO and compliance. Emphysema score correlated inversely with volume, DLCO and airflow. In this sample of patients presenting a predominance of large opacities (75% of the individuals), the deterioration of pulmonary function was associated with the extent of structural changes. Conclusions: In the early detection of silicosis and the identification of progressive massive fibrosis, HRCT scans are superior to X-rays. (author)

  2. Computer-aided detection system for chest radiography: reducing report turnaround times of examinations with abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, E-Fong; Liu, Gin-Chung; Lee, Lo-Yeh; Tsai, Huei-Yi; Jaw, Twei-Shiun

    2015-06-01

    The ability to give high priority to examinations with pathological findings could be very useful to radiologists with large work lists who wish to first evaluate the most critical studies. A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for identifying chest examinations with abnormalities has therefore been developed. To evaluate the effectiveness of a CAD system on report turnaround times of chest examinations with abnormalities. The CAD system was designed to automatically mark chest examinations with possible abnormalities in the work list of radiologists interpreting chest examinations. The system evaluation was performed in two phases: two radiologists interpreted the chest examinations without CAD in phase 1 and with CAD in phase 2. The time information recorded by the radiology information system was then used to calculate the turnaround times. All chest examinations were reviewed by two other radiologists and were divided into normal and abnormal groups. The turnaround times for the examinations with pathological findings with and without the CAD system assistance were compared. The sensitivity and specificity of the CAD for chest abnormalities were 0.790 and 0.697, respectively, and use of the CAD system decreased the turnaround time for chest examinations with abnormalities by 44%. The turnaround times required for radiologists to identify chest examinations with abnormalities could be reduced by using the CAD system. This system could be useful for radiologists with large work lists who wish to first evaluate the most critical studies. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Study of distribution dose for chest radiography using the computational model ALDERSON/EGSnrc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, B.C.; Menezes, C.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Numerical dosimetry uses Computational Exposure Models (MCE) to perform dose studies in situations of radiation exposure without the need for individuals to be exposed. MCEs are essentially composed of a simulator of the radioactive source, a Monte Carlo code, and a phantom of voxels representing the human anatomy. The objective of this work was to perform a study of the dose distribution in the thoracic region in radiographic exams using the MCE ALDERSON / EGSnrc. For that, virtual simulations were performed using Monte Carlo Method techniques to calculate the dose in the simulator of voxels representative of the thoracic region. The results show that most beam energy was deposited in the skeleton for all simulated radiological techniques, while smaller fractions were deposited in the lungs and soft tissue. For example, at 90 kV voltage, 14% of the energy was deposited in the bone medium, while lungs and soft tissue receive only 5 and 3%, respectively. It is concluded that the ALDERSON / EGSnrc MCE can be used for studies of the dose distribution on chest radiographs used in radiodiagnosis practice, thus optimizing dose absorbed in the patient in clinical exams

  4. Pulmonary infections in the late period after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: chest radiography versus computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller, Gerd; Matzek, Wolfgang; Kalhs, Peter; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the capabilities of chest roentgenogram (CXR) and computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of pulmonary infectious disease in the late period (>100 days) after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Methods: Ninety-four matched CXR and CT examinations were performed for clinical suspicion of infectious lung disease. The time gap between CXR and CT was 48 h at maximum. The image pairs were correlated with the patients' clinical course and with the results of diagnostic bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). An unremarkable clinical course over the subsequent seven days after imaging and/or negative microbiological culture served as the basis for excluding infectious lung disease. Positive microbiological culture and/or improvement of symptoms after antibiotic therapy were considered as evidence of infectious disease. Results: The correlation with the clinical course and/or BAL revealed a significantly higher sensitivity, negative predictive value, and accuracy for CT than for CXR (89% versus 58%, P < 0.0001; 78% versus 47%, P < 0.0001; 90% versus 68%, P < 0.0001, respectively). CT was significantly more diagnostic in BAL verified fungal and bacterial infections (P < 0.05). Conclusion: CT is significantly superior to CXR in the evaluation of infectious pulmonary disease in the late phase after BMT. Therefore, an unremarkable CXR should be followed by a CT scan to reliably detect or to accurately exclude early pulmonary infection in these patients

  5. High energy x-ray radiography and computed tomography of bridge pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R E; Logan, C M; Martz, H E; Updike, E; Waters, A M

    1999-01-01

    Bridge pins were used in the hanger assemblies for some multi-span steel bridges built prior to the 1980's, and are sometimes considered fracture critical elements of a bridge. During a test on a bridge conducted by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), ultrasonic field inspection results indicated that at least two pins contained cracks. Several pins were removed and selected for further examination. This provided an excellent opportunity to learn more about these pins and the application of x-ray systems at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), as well as to learn more about the application of different detectors recently obtained by LLNL. Digital radiographs and computed tomography (CT) were used to characterize the bridge pins, using a LINAC x-ray source with a 9-MV bremsstrahlung spectrum. We will describe the performance of two different digital radiographic detectors. One is a detector system frequently used at LLNL consisting of a scintillator glass optically coupled to a CCD camera. The other detector is a new amorphous silicon detector recently acquired by LLNL

  6. Indications for computed tomography (CT-) diagnostics in proximal humeral fractures: a comparative study of plain radiography and computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Weise Kuno; Pereira Philippe L; Dietz Klaus; Eingartner Christoph; Schmal Hagen; Südkamp Norbert P; Rolauffs Bernd; Bahrs Christian; Lingenfelter Erich; Helwig Peter

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Precise indications for computed tomography (CT) in proximal humeral fractures are not established. The purpose of this study was a comparison of conventional radiographic views with different CT reconstructions with 2 D and 3 D imaging to establish indications for additional CT diagnostics depending on the fractured parts. Methods In a prospective diagnostic study in two level 1 trauma centers, 44 patients with proximal humeral fractures were diagnosed with conventional X...

  7. Computer-aided detection as a decision assistant in chest radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samulski, Maurice R. M.; Snoeren, Peter R.; Platel, Bram; van Ginneken, Bram; Hogeweg, Laurens; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2011-03-01

    Background. Contrary to what may be expected, finding abnormalities in complex images like pulmonary nodules in chest radiographs is not dominated by time-consuming search strategies but by an almost immediate global interpretation. This was already known in the nineteen-seventies from experiments with briefly flashed chest radiographs. Later on, experiments with eye-trackers showed that abnormalities attracted the attention quite fast but often without further reader actions. Prolonging one's search seldom leads to newly found abnormalities and may even increase the chance of errors. The problem of reading chest radiographs is therefore not dominated by finding the abnormalities, but by interpreting them. Hypothesis. This suggests that readers could benefit from computer-aided detection (CAD) systems not so much by their ability to prompt potential abnormalities, but more from their ability to 'interpret' the potential abnormalities. In this paper, this hypothesis was investigated by an observer experiment. Experiment. In one condition, the traditional CAD condition, the most suspicious CAD locations were shown to the subjects, without telling them the levels of suspiciousness according to CAD. In the other condition, interactive CAD condition, levels of suspiciousness were given, but only when readers requested them at specified locations. These two conditions focus on decreasing search errors and decision errors, respectively. Results of reading without CAD were also recorded. Six subjects, all non-radiologists, read 223 chest radiographs in both conditions. CAD results were obtained from the OnGuard 5.0 system developed by Riverain Medical (Miamisburg, Ohio). Results. The observer data were analyzed by Location Response Operating Characteristic analysis (LROC). It was found that: 1) With the aid of CAD, the performance is significantly better than without CAD; 2) The performance with interactive CAD is significantly better than with traditional CAD at low false

  8. Analysis on imaging features of mammography in computer radiography and investigation on gray scale transform and energy subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Shuli

    2003-01-01

    In this dissertation, a novel transform method based on human visual response features for gray scale mammographic imaging in computer radiography (CR) is presented. The parameters for imaging quality on CR imaging for mammography were investigated experimentally. In addition, methods for image energy subtraction and a novel method of image registration for mammography of CR imaging are presented. Because the images are viewed and investigated by humans, the method of displaying differences in gray scale images is more convenient if the gray scale differences are displayed in a manner commensurate with human visual response principles. Through transformation of image gray scale with this method, the contrast of the image will be enhanced and the capability for humans to extract the useful information from the image will be increased. Tumors and microcalcifications are displayed in a form for humans to view more simply after transforming the image. The method is theoretically and experimentally investigated. Through measurement of the parameters of a geometrically blurred image, MTF, DQE, and ROC on CR imaging, and also comparison with the imaging quality of screen-film systems, the results indicate that CR imaging qualities in DQE and ROC are better than those of screen-film systems. In geometric blur of the image and MTF, the differences in image quality between CR and the screen-film system are very small. The results suggest that the CR system can replace the screen-film system for mammography imaging. In addition, the results show that the optimal imaging energy for CR mammography is about 24 kV. This condition indicates that the imaging energy of the CR system is lower than that of the screen-film system and, therefore, the x-ray dose to the patient for mammography with the CR system is lower than that with the screen-film system. Based on the difference of penetrability of x ray with different wavelength, and the fact that the part of the x-ray beam will pass

  9. Relationships among measurements obtained by use of computed tomography and radiography and scores of cartilage microdamage in hip joints with moderate to severe joint laxity of adult dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mandi J; Lewis, Brooke P; Swaab, Megan E; Markel, Mark D

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate correlations among measurements on radiographic and computed tomography (CT) images with articular cartilage microdamage in lax hip joints of dogs. 12 adult mixed-breed hounds. Pelvic CT and radiography were performed. Hip joints were harvested following euthanasia. Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) and PennHIP radiograph reports were obtained. Norberg angle (NA) and radiographic percentage femoral head coverage (RPC) were determined. Center-edge angle (CEA), horizontal toit externe angle (HTEA), ventral acetabular sector angle (VASA), dorsal acetabular sector angle (DASA), horizontal acetabular sector angle (HASA), acetabular index (AI), and CT percentage femoral head coverage (CPC) were measured on 2-dimensional CT images. Femoral head-acetabular shelf percentage was measured on sagittal 3-dimensional CT (SCT) and transverse 3-dimensional CT (TCT) images. Light microscopy was used to score joint cartilage. Relationships of OFA confirmation and PennHIP osteoarthritis scores with radiography, CT, and cartilage variables and relationships of cartilage scores with radiography and CT measurements were evaluated with Spearman rank correlations. Pearson correlation was used for relationships of distraction index (DI) with radiography, CT, and cartilage variables. Significant relationships included PennHIP osteoarthritis score with cartilage score, CEA, HTEA, DASA, AI, CPC, and TCT; OFA confirmation score with cartilage score, NA, RPC, CEA, HTEA, DASA, AI, CPC, and TCT; cartilage score with NA, RPC, CEA, HTEA, DASA, HASA, AI, and TCT; and DI with cartilage score, CEA, HTEA, DASA, HASA, AI, and CPC. CT appeared to be a valuable imaging modality for predicting cartilage microdamage in canine hip joints.

  10. Diagnostic Accuracy of Cone-beam Computed Tomography and Conventional Radiography on Apical Periodontitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi Dutra, Kamile; Haas, Letícia; Porporatti, André Luís; Flores-Mir, Carlos; Nascimento Santos, Juliana; Mezzomo, Luis André; Corrêa, Márcio; De Luca Canto, Graziela

    2016-03-01

    Endodontic diagnosis depends on accurate radiographic examination. Assessment of the location and extent of apical periodontitis (AP) can influence treatment planning and subsequent treatment outcomes. Therefore, this systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the diagnostic accuracy of conventional radiography and cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging on the discrimination of AP from no lesion. Eight electronic databases with no language or time limitations were searched. Articles in which the primary objective was to evaluate the accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of any type of radiographic technique to assess AP in humans were selected. The gold standard was the histologic examination for actual AP (in vivo) or in situ visualization of bone defects for induced artificial AP (in vitro). Accuracy measurements described in the studies were transformed to construct receiver operating characteristic curves and forest plots with the aid of Review Manager v.5.2 (The Nordic Cochrane Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark) and MetaDisc v.1.4. software (Unit of Clinical Biostatistics Team of the Ramón y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, Spain). The methodology of the selected studies was evaluated using the Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2. Only 9 studies met the inclusion criteria and were subjected to a qualitative analysis. A meta-analysis was conducted on 6 of these articles. All of these articles studied artificial AP with induced bone defects. The accuracy values (area under the curve) were 0.96 for CBCT imaging, 0.73 for conventional periapical radiography, and 0.72 for digital periapical radiography. No evidence was found for panoramic radiography. Periapical radiographs (digital and conventional) reported good diagnostic accuracy on the discrimination of artificial AP from no lesions, whereas CBCT imaging showed excellent accuracy values. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekhdar, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dental radiography must comply with the same regulations with which conventional radiography complies. Radiation doses to individual patients are low but, because of the large number of patients X-rayed, the collective dose to the population is not negligible. Care in siting and regular maintenance of the equipment will reduce doses to both staff and patients. To produce X-ray films with a good image quality using a low radiation dose requires attention to film processing; this is often a neglected area. (Author)

  12. Digital radiography: a survey of pediatric dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Julie M; Russo, James A; Guelmann, Marcio

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine the popularity of digital radiography among members of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD); and (2) report the most common systems in use. An AAPD-approved, voluntary, and anonymous electronic survey was developed and sent to 923 board certified pediatric dentists. Years in practice and in-office x-ray technology (digital or conventional) were inquired about initially. If negative for the use of digital radiography, future consideration for converting to digital radiography was ascertained. For positive responses, more in-depth information was requested. Information on type of system (sensor or phosphor plate), user friendliness, diagnostic ability, patient's comfort, general costs, durability, and parental and overall satisfaction was collected. For most of the questions, a 5-point assessment scale was used. Opportunity for additional comments was provided upon survey completion. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. A 32% (296/923) response rate was obtained. Twenty-six percent of practitioners (78/296) implemented digital radiography in their practices, whereas 71% considered future acquisition. Similar distribution for sensor and phosphor plate users was found. Sensor technology was reported to produce faster images, but was less tolerable by young children due to size and thickness. Phosphor plates were considered more children friendly, less expensive, and less durable. Parental satisfaction was very high with great marketing value. Picture quality was comparable to conventional film. Overall, digital radiography users would recommend it to other pediatric dentists. Digital radiography is not yet popular among pediatric dentists. Cost reduction and technology advancement may enhance utilization.

  13. Industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aloni, A.; Magal, O.

    1992-02-01

    This publication is meant to be a manual for industrial radiography. As such the manual concentrates on the practical aspects, presenting existing radiographic system and techniques of operation to satisfy specified quality requirements. The manual also reviews the safety aspect of performing radiographic work. (author) systems

  14. Radiography technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panaiotov, L N

    1951-10-23

    A new method of hollow articles radiography is presented enabling to eliminate shortcomings coupled with medical personnel irradiation when the ampoule incorporating radioactive substance is removed from the protective container and adjusted in the article. The method presented permits to transport the ampoule from the protective container immediately into the inner cavity of the article.

  15. Skull Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    What you need to know about… Skull Radiography X-ray images of the skull are taken when it is necessary to see the cranium, facial bones or jaw bones. ... Among other things, x-ray exams of the skull can show fractures. Patient Preparation Before the examination, ...

  16. Single source dual-energy computed tomography in the diagnosis of gout: Diagnostic reliability in comparison to digital radiography and conventional computed tomography of the feet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, Tobias; Diekhoff, Torsten [Department of Radiology, Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Freie Universität, Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Hermann, Sandra [Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Freie Universität Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Stroux, Andrea [Department of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Mews, Jürgen; Blobel, Jörg [Toshiba Medical Systems Europe, BV, Zilverstraat 1, 2701 RP Zoetermeer (Netherlands); Hamm, Bernd [Department of Radiology, Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Freie Universität, Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Hermann, Kay-Geert A., E-mail: kghermann@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Freie Universität, Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Objectives: To investigate the diagnostic value of single-source dual-energy computed tomography (SDECT) in gouty arthritis and to compare its capability to detect urate depositions with digital radiography (DR) and conventional computed tomography (CT). Methods: Forty-four patients who underwent SDECT volume scans of the feet for suspected gouty arthritis were retrospectively analyzed. SDECT, CT (both n = 44) and DR (n = 36) were scored by three blinded readers for presence of osteoarthritis, erosions, and tophi. A diagnosis was made for each imaging modality. Results were compared to the clinical diagnosis using the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria. Results: The patient population was divided into a gout (n = 21) and control (n = 23) group based on final clinical diagnosis. Osteoarthritis was evident in 15 joints using CT and 30 joints using DR (p = 0.165). There were 134 erosions detected by CT compared to 38 erosions detected by DR (p < 0.001). In total 119 tophi were detected by SDECT, compared to 85 tophi by CT (p = 0.182) and 25 tophi by DR (p < 0.001). SDECT had best diagnostic value for diagnosis of gout compared to DR and conventional CT (sensitivity and specificity for SDECT: 71.4% and 95.7%, CT: 71.4% and 91.3% and DR: 44.4% and 83.3%, respectively). For all three readers, Cohen’s kappa for DR and conventional CT were substantial for all scoring items and ranged from 0.75 to 0.77 and 0.72–0.76, respectively. For SDECT Cohen’s kappa was good to almost perfect with 0.77–0.84. Conclusions: SDECT is capable to detect uric acid depositions with good sensitivity and high specificity in feet, therefore diagnostic confidence is improved. Using SDECT, inter-reader variance can be markedly reduced for the detection of gouty tophi.

  17. Single source dual-energy computed tomography in the diagnosis of gout: Diagnostic reliability in comparison to digital radiography and conventional computed tomography of the feet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, Tobias; Diekhoff, Torsten; Hermann, Sandra; Stroux, Andrea; Mews, Jürgen; Blobel, Jörg; Hamm, Bernd; Hermann, Kay-Geert A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the diagnostic value of single-source dual-energy computed tomography (SDECT) in gouty arthritis and to compare its capability to detect urate depositions with digital radiography (DR) and conventional computed tomography (CT). Methods: Forty-four patients who underwent SDECT volume scans of the feet for suspected gouty arthritis were retrospectively analyzed. SDECT, CT (both n = 44) and DR (n = 36) were scored by three blinded readers for presence of osteoarthritis, erosions, and tophi. A diagnosis was made for each imaging modality. Results were compared to the clinical diagnosis using the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria. Results: The patient population was divided into a gout (n = 21) and control (n = 23) group based on final clinical diagnosis. Osteoarthritis was evident in 15 joints using CT and 30 joints using DR (p = 0.165). There were 134 erosions detected by CT compared to 38 erosions detected by DR (p < 0.001). In total 119 tophi were detected by SDECT, compared to 85 tophi by CT (p = 0.182) and 25 tophi by DR (p < 0.001). SDECT had best diagnostic value for diagnosis of gout compared to DR and conventional CT (sensitivity and specificity for SDECT: 71.4% and 95.7%, CT: 71.4% and 91.3% and DR: 44.4% and 83.3%, respectively). For all three readers, Cohen’s kappa for DR and conventional CT were substantial for all scoring items and ranged from 0.75 to 0.77 and 0.72–0.76, respectively. For SDECT Cohen’s kappa was good to almost perfect with 0.77–0.84. Conclusions: SDECT is capable to detect uric acid depositions with good sensitivity and high specificity in feet, therefore diagnostic confidence is improved. Using SDECT, inter-reader variance can be markedly reduced for the detection of gouty tophi.

  18. Computed vs. conventional radiography for detecting fatigue cracks in riveted lap joints of aeronautical grade hybrid fiber-metal laminate Glare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarpani, J.R.; Hideki Shinohara, A.; Da Silva, R.R.; Do Val Lacerda, N.

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the capability of three different radiographic approaches (two computed or digital, and one conventional or analogous) for imaging fatigue cracks in riveted lap joints of composite fiber-metal laminate Glare. These structural joints are unique in the sense that fatigue cracks develop mainly at the faying surfaces of Glare sheets, so that visual detection is largely prevented and nondestructive inspection becomes mandatory. For this purpose, a round-robin programme comprising several industrial and research centers that employ X-ray radiography routinely to inspect high-demanding equipments, components and structures was conducted. (authors)

  19. Neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alaa eldin, M.T.

    2011-01-01

    The digital processing of the neutron radiography images gives the possibility for data quantification. In this case an exact relation between the measured neutron attenuation and the real macroscopic attenuation coefficient for every point of the sample is required. The assumption that the attenuation of the neutron beam through the sample is exponential is valid only in an ideal case where a monochromatic beam, non scattering sample and non background contribution are assumed. In the real case these conditions are not fulfilled and in dependence on the sample material we have more or less deviation from the exponential attenuation law. Because of the high scattering cross-sections of hydrogen (σs=80.26 barn) for thermal neutrons, the problem with the scattered neutrons at quantitative radiography investigations of hydrogenous materials (as PE, Oil, H 2 O, etc) is not trivial. For these strong scattering materials the neutron beam attenuation is no longer exponential and a dependence of the macroscopic attenuation coefficient on the material thickness and on the distance between the sample and the detector appears. When quantitative radiography (2 D) or tomography investigations (3 D) are performed, some image correction procedures for a description of the scattering effect are required. This thesis presents a method that can be used to enhance the neutron radiography image for objects with high scattering materials like hydrogen, carbon and other light materials. This method uses the Monte Carlo code, MCNP5, to simulate the neutron radiography process and get the flux distribution for each pixel of the image and determine the scattered neutrons distribution that causes the image blur and then subtract it from the initial image to improve its quality.

  20. Efficacy of plain radiography and computer tomography in localizing the site of pelvic arterial bleeding in trauma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormagen, Johann B. (Dept. of Radiology, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway)), e-mail: johannd@medisin.uio.no; Toetterman, Anna (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Uppsala Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)); Roeise, Olav (Div. of Neuroscience and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway)); Sandvik, Leiv (Center for Clinical Research, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway)); Kloew, Nils-E. (Dept. of Cardiovascular Radiology, Oslo Univ. Hospital - Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway))

    2010-01-15

    Background: Immediate angiography is warranted in pelvic trauma patients with suspected arterial injury (AI) in order to stop ongoing bleeding. Prior to angiography, plain pelvic radiography (PPR) and abdominopelvic computer tomography (CT) are performed to identify fracture and hematoma sites. Purpose: To investigate if PPR and CT can identify the location of AI in trauma patients undergoing angiography. Material and Methods: 95 patients with pelvic fractures on PPR (29 women, 66 men), at a mean age of 44 (9-92) years, underwent pelvic angiography for suspected AI. Fifty-six of them underwent CT additionally. Right and left anterior and posterior fractures on PPR were registered, and fracture displacement was recorded for each quadrant. Arterial blush on CT was registered, and the size of the hematoma in each region was measured in cm2. AIs were registered for anterior and posterior segments of both internal iliac arteries. Presence of fractures, arterial blush, and hematomas were correlated with AI. Results: Presence of fracture in the corresponding skeletal segment on PPR showed sensitivity and specificity of 0.86 and 0.58 posteriorly, and 0.87 and 0.44 anteriorly. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.77 and 0.69, respectively. Fracture displacement on PPR >0.9 cm posteriorly and >1.9 cm anteriorly revealed specificity of 0.84. Sensitivities of arterial blush and hematoma on CT were 0.38 and 0.82 posteriorly, and 0.24 and 0.82 anteriorly. The specificities were 0.96 and 0.58 posteriorly, and 0.79 and 0.53 anteriorly, respectively. For hematomas, the AUC was 0.79 posteriorly and 0.75 anteriorly. Size of hematoma >22 cm2 posteriorly and >29 cm2 anteriorly revealed specificity of 0.85 and 0.86, respectively. Conclusion: CT findings of arterial blush and hematoma predicted site of arterial bleeding on pelvic angiography. Also, PPR predicted the site of bleeding using location of fracture and size of displacement. In the hemodynamically unstable patient, PPR may

  1. Efficacy of plain radiography and computer tomography in localizing the site of pelvic arterial bleeding in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormagen, Johann B; Tötterman, Anna; Røise, Olav; Sandvik, Leiv; Kløw, Nils-E

    2010-02-01

    Immediate angiography is warranted in pelvic trauma patients with suspected arterial injury (AI) in order to stop ongoing bleeding. Prior to angiography, plain pelvic radiography (PPR) and abdominopelvic computer tomography (CT) are performed to identify fracture and hematoma sites. To investigate if PPR and CT can identify the location of AI in trauma patients undergoing angiography. 95 patients with pelvic fractures on PPR (29 women, 66 men), at a mean age of 44 (9-92) years, underwent pelvic angiography for suspected AI. Fifty-six of them underwent CT additionally. Right and left anterior and posterior fractures on PPR were registered, and fracture displacement was recorded for each quadrant. Arterial blush on CT was registered, and the size of the hematoma in each region was measured in cm(2). AIs were registered for anterior and posterior segments of both internal iliac arteries. Presence of fractures, arterial blush, and hematomas were correlated with AI. Presence of fracture in the corresponding skeletal segment on PPR showed sensitivity and specificity of 0.86 and 0.58 posteriorly, and 0.87 and 0.44 anteriorly. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.77 and 0.69, respectively. Fracture displacement on PPR >0.9 cm posteriorly and >1.9 cm anteriorly revealed specificity of 0.84. Sensitivities of arterial blush and hematoma on CT were 0.38 and 0.82 posteriorly, and 0.24 and 0.82 anteriorly. The specificities were 0.96 and 0.58 posteriorly, and 0.79 and 0.53 anteriorly, respectively. For hematomas, the AUC was 0.79 posteriorly and 0.75 anteriorly. Size of hematoma >22 cm(2) posteriorly and >29 cm(2) anteriorly revealed specificity of 0.85 and 0.86, respectively. CT findings of arterial blush and hematoma predicted site of arterial bleeding on pelvic angiography. Also, PPR predicted the site of bleeding using location of fracture and size of displacement. In the hemodynamically unstable patient, PPR may contribute equally to effective assessment of injured arteries.

  2. Indications for computed tomography (CT- diagnostics in proximal humeral fractures: a comparative study of plain radiography and computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weise Kuno

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Precise indications for computed tomography (CT in proximal humeral fractures are not established. The purpose of this study was a comparison of conventional radiographic views with different CT reconstructions with 2 D and 3 D imaging to establish indications for additional CT diagnostics depending on the fractured parts. Methods In a prospective diagnostic study in two level 1 trauma centers, 44 patients with proximal humeral fractures were diagnosed with conventional X-rays (22 AP + axillary views, 22 AP + scapular Y-views and CT (multi-planar reconstruction (MPR and maximum intensity projection (MIP with 2 D and 3 D imaging. 3 observers assessed the technical image quality, the assessment of the relevant anatomical structures (2-sample-t-test and the percentage of the osseous overlap of the proximal humerus (Welch-test using a scoring system. The quality of the different diagnostic methods was assessed according to the number of fractured parts (Bonferroni-Holm adjustment. Results There was significantly more overlap of the fractured region on the scapular Y-views (mean 71.5%, range 45–90% than on axillary views (mean 56.2%, range 10.5–100%. CT-diagnostics allowed a significantly better assessment of the relevant structures than conventional diagnostics (p Conclusion Conventional X-rays with AP view and a high-quality axillary view are useful for primary diagnostics of the fracture and often but not always show a clear presentation of the relevant bony structures such as both tuberosities, the glenoid and humeral head. CT with thin slices technology and additional 3 D imaging provides always a clear presentation of the fractured region. Clinically, a CT should be performed – independently of the number of fractured parts – when the proximal humerus and the shoulder joint are not presented with sufficient X-ray-quality to establish a treatment plan.

  3. [The reduction of the radiation dosage by means of storage phosphor-film radiography compared to a conventional film-screen system with a grid cassette on a skull phantom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyne, J P; Merbold, H; Sehner, J; Neumann, R; Freesmeyer, M; Jonetz-Mentzel, L; Kaiser, W A

    1999-07-01

    How much can the radiation dose be reduced for skull radiography by using digital luminescence radiography (DLR) compared to a conventional screen film system with a grid cassette? A skull phantom (3M) was x-rayed in anterior-posterior orientation using both a conventional screen film system with grid cassette and DLR (ADC-70, Agfa). The tube current time product (mAs) was diminished gradually while keeping the voltage constant. The surface entrance dose was measured by a sensor of Dosimax (Wellhöfer). Five investigators evaluated the images by characteristic and critical features, spatial resolution and contrast. The surface entrance dose at 73 kV/22 mAs was 0.432 mGy in conventional screen film system and 0.435 mGy in DLR. The images could be evaluated very well down to an average dose of 71% (0.308 mGy; SD 0.050); sufficient images were obtained down to an average dose of 31% (0.136 mGy; SD 0.065). The resolution of the line pairs were reduced down to 2 levels depending on the investigator. Contrast was assessed as being very good to sufficient. The acceptance of the postprocessed images (MUSICA-software) was individually different and resulted in an improvement of the assessment of bone structures and contrast in higher dose ranges only. For the sufficient assessment of a possible fracture/of paranasal sinuses/of measurement of the skull the dose can be reduced to at least 56% (phi 31%; SD 14.9%)/40% (phi 27%; SD 9.3%)/18% (phi 14%; SD 4.4%). Digital radiography allows question-referred exposure parameters with clearly reduced dose, so e.g. for fracture exclusion 73 kV/12.5 mAs and to skull measurement 73 kV/4 mAs.

  4. Analisis gambaran histogramdan densitas kamar pulpa pada gigi suspek pulpitis reversibel dan ireversibel dengan menggunakan radiografi cone beam computed tomography (Histogram and density analysis of irreversible and reversible pulpitissuspected tooth using cone beam computed tomography radiography)

    OpenAIRE

    Lusi Epsilawati; Suhardjo Sitam; Sam Belly; Fahmi Oscandar

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation of the pulp is most common and difficult to diagnose. For it radiographs is necessary. One attempt to do is to assess its histogram and density. Radiography equipment that has the ability to analyze is cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The purpose of this study is to analyze radiograph of the pulp chamber histogram: peak value, grayscale and trends , as well as the density on the condition reversible and irreversible pulpitis condition. The population of this ...

  5. Practical applications of phosphors

    CERN Document Server

    Yen, William M; Yamamoto, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    Drawn from the second edition of the best-selling Phosphor Handbook, Practical Applications of Phosphors outlines methods for the production of various phosphors and discusses a broad spectrum of applications. Beginning with methods for synthesis and related technologies, the book sets the stage by classifying and then explaining practical phosphors according to usage. It describes the operating principle and structure of phosphor devices and the phosphor characteristics required for a given device, then covers the manufacturing processes and characteristics of phosphors. The book discusses research and development currently under way on phosphors with potential for practical usage and touches briefly on phosphors that have played a historical role, but are no longer of practical use. It provides a comprehensive treatment of applications including lamps and cathode-ray tubes, x-ray and ionizing radiation, and for vacuum fluorescent and field emission displays and covers inorganic and organic electroluminescen...

  6. Digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brody, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    Digital Radiography begins with an orderly introduction to the fundamental concepts of digital imaging. The entire X-ray digital imagining system is described, from an overall characterization of image quality to specific components required for a digital radiographic system. Because subtraction is central to digital radiographic systems, the author details the use of various subtraction methods for image enhancement. Complex concepts are illustrated with numerous examples and presented in terms that can readily be understood by physicians without an advanced mathematics background. The second part of the book discusses implementations and applications of digital imagining systems based on area and scanned detector technologies. This section includes thorough coverage of digital fluoroscopy, scanned projection radiography, and film-based digital imaging systems, and features a state-of-the-art synopsis of the applications of digital subtraction angiography. The book concludes with a timely assessment of anticipated technological advances

  7. Morphology of the pelvis and hind limb of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) evidenced by gross osteology, radiography and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makungu, M; du Plessis, W M; Groenewald, H B; Barrows, M; Koeppel, K N

    2015-12-01

    The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is a quadrupedal arboreal animal primarily distributed in the Himalayas and southern China. It is a species commonly kept in zoological collections. This study was carried out to describe the morphology of the pelvis and hind limb of the red panda evidenced by gross osteology, radiography and computed tomography as a reference for clinical use and identification of skeletons. Radiography of the pelvis and right hind limb was performed in nine and seven animals, respectively. Radiographic findings were correlated with bone specimens from three adult animals. Computed tomography of the torso and hind limb was performed in one animal. The pelvic bone had a wide ventromedial surface of the ilium. The trochlea of the femur was wide and shallow. The patella was similar to that seen in feline species. The medial fabella was not seen radiographically in any animal. The cochlea grooves of the tibia were shallow with a poorly defined intermediate ridge. The trochlea of the talus was shallow and presented with an almost flattened medial ridge. The tarsal sesamoid bone was always present. The lateral process of the base of the fifth metatarsal (MT) bone was directed laterally. The MT bones were widely spaced. The morphology of the pelvis and hind limb of the red panda indicated flexibility of the pelvis and hind limb joints as an adaptation to an arboreal quadrupedal lifestyle. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Ambulating radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, K.

    1989-01-01

    Strong gamme or X-ray sources are utilized for non-destructive testing of i.e. bridges. The activities involve certain risks of accident that might lead to serious injuries caused by radiation. The National Institute of Radiation Protection has during the laste decade greatly yhe inspection rate in this area. It has today made controls of most enterprieses running ambulating radiography. (O.S.)

  9. Magnification radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genant, H.K.; Resnick, D.

    1988-01-01

    The relative clinical value of magnification compared with conventional radiography for skeletal applications is presented qualitatively. The presentation is based on the authors' experience with over 25,000 cases in which magnification has been used. For most areas in which magnification (optical or geometric) proves useful, subtle abnormalities of clinical importance are present at bone surfaces or at host-lesion interfaces. This is particularly true for arthritis and metabolic and infectious disorders of bone. In additional instances, serial assessment of the progression of disease or its response to therapy is enhanced by magnification. When gross abnormalities are present, as in most instances of trauma and bone dysplasia, the findings are obvious on conventional radiography, and magnification is not necessary. Thus, the magnification techniques appear to provide important diagnostic information, depending upon the anatomic part that is studied and the clinical question that is posed. It is also apparent that the demonstration of subtle skeletal abnormalities to clinical colleagues for educational purposes is greatly enhanced by magnification radiography

  10. Computed tomography scout views vs. conventional radiography in body-packers – Delineation of body-packs and radiation dose in a porcine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegeler, Edvard, E-mail: edvard.ziegeler@campus.lmu.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Grimm, Jochen M., E-mail: jochen.grimm@med.lmu.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Wirth, Stefan, E-mail: tefan.wirth@med.lmu.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Uhl, Michael, E-mail: michael.uhl@polizei.bayern.de [Bavarian State Criminal Police Office, Maillingerstrasse 15, 80636 Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F., E-mail: Maximilian.Reiser@med.lmu.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Scherr, Michael K., E-mail: Michael.Scherr@med.lmu.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Objective: To compare abdominal computed tomography (CT) scout views with conventional radiography regarding radiation dose and delineation of drug packages in a porcine body-packer model. Materials and methods: Nine samples of illicit drugs packed in ovoid plastic containers were consecutively placed in the rectum of a 121.5 kg pig cadaver. Antero-posterior and lateral scout views were obtained at 120 kVp and 80 mA, 150 mA and 200 mA, respectively, using a 64-row MDCT. Scout views were compared with conventional abdominal antero-posterior radiographs (77 kV and 106 ± 13 mAs). Visibility of three body pack characteristics (wrapping, content, shape) was rated independently by two radiologists and summarized to a delineation score ranging from 0 to 9 with a score ≥6 representing sufficient delineation. Mean delineation scores were calculated for each conventional radiography and single plane scout view separately and for a combined rating of antero-posterior and lateral scout views. Results: Even the lowest single plane scout view delineation score (5.3 ± 2.0 for 80 mA lateral; 0.4 mSv; sensitivity = 44%) was significantly higher than for conventional radiographs (3.1 ± 2.5, p < 0.001; 2.4 ± 0.3 mSv; sensitivity = 11%). Combined reading of antero-posterior and lateral scout views 80 mA yielded sufficient delineation (6.2 ± 1.4; 0.8 mSv; sensitivity = 56%). Conclusions: All CT scout views showed significantly better delineation ratings and sensitivity than conventional radiographs. Scout views in two planes at 80 mA provided a sufficient level of delineation and a sensitivity five times higher than conventional radiography at less than one third of the radiation dose. In case of diagnostic insecurity, CT can be performed without additional logistical effort.

  11. Rhinoceros feet step out of a rule-of-thumb: a wildlife imaging pioneering approach of synchronized computed tomography-digital radiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Galateanu

    Full Text Available Currently, radiography is the only imaging technique used to diagnose bone pathology in wild animals situated under "field conditions". Nevertheless, while chronic foot disease in captive mega-herbivores is widely reported, foot radiographic imaging is confronted with scarcity of studies. Numerous hindrances lead to such limited numbers and it became very clear that the traditional perspective on bone imaging in domestic animals based on extensive studies and elaborated statistical evaluations cannot be extrapolated to their non-domestic relatives. For these reasons, the authors initiated a multi-modality imaging study and established a pioneering approach of synchronized computed tomography (CT and digital radiography (DR, based on X-ray projections derived from three-dimensional CT reconstructed images. Whereas this approach can be applied in any clinical field, as a case of outstanding importance and great concern for zoological institutions, we selected foot bone pathologies in captive rhinoceroses to demonstrate the manifold applications of the method. Several advances were achieved, endowing the wildlife clinician with all-important tools: prototype DR exposure protocols and a modus operandi for foot positioning, advancing both traditional projections and, for the first-time, species-related radiographic views; assessment of radiographic diagnostic value for the whole foot and, in premiere, for each autopodial bone; together with additional insights into radiographic appearance of bone anatomy and pathology with a unique, simultaneous CT-DR correlation. Based on its main advantages in availing a wide range of keystone data in wildlife imaging from a limited number of examined subjects and combining advantages of CT as the golden standard method for bone diseases' diagnostic with DR's clinical feasibility under field conditions, synchronized CT-DR presents a new perspective on wildlife's health management. With this we hope to provide

  12. Rhinoceros feet step out of a rule-of-thumb: a wildlife imaging pioneering approach of synchronized computed tomography-digital radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galateanu, Gabriela; Hermes, Robert; Saragusty, Joseph; Göritz, Frank; Potier, Romain; Mulot, Baptiste; Maillot, Alexis; Etienne, Pascal; Bernardino, Rui; Fernandes, Teresa; Mews, Jurgen; Hildebrandt, Thomas Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Currently, radiography is the only imaging technique used to diagnose bone pathology in wild animals situated under "field conditions". Nevertheless, while chronic foot disease in captive mega-herbivores is widely reported, foot radiographic imaging is confronted with scarcity of studies. Numerous hindrances lead to such limited numbers and it became very clear that the traditional perspective on bone imaging in domestic animals based on extensive studies and elaborated statistical evaluations cannot be extrapolated to their non-domestic relatives. For these reasons, the authors initiated a multi-modality imaging study and established a pioneering approach of synchronized computed tomography (CT) and digital radiography (DR), based on X-ray projections derived from three-dimensional CT reconstructed images. Whereas this approach can be applied in any clinical field, as a case of outstanding importance and great concern for zoological institutions, we selected foot bone pathologies in captive rhinoceroses to demonstrate the manifold applications of the method. Several advances were achieved, endowing the wildlife clinician with all-important tools: prototype DR exposure protocols and a modus operandi for foot positioning, advancing both traditional projections and, for the first-time, species-related radiographic views; assessment of radiographic diagnostic value for the whole foot and, in premiere, for each autopodial bone; together with additional insights into radiographic appearance of bone anatomy and pathology with a unique, simultaneous CT-DR correlation. Based on its main advantages in availing a wide range of keystone data in wildlife imaging from a limited number of examined subjects and combining advantages of CT as the golden standard method for bone diseases' diagnostic with DR's clinical feasibility under field conditions, synchronized CT-DR presents a new perspective on wildlife's health management. With this we hope to provide veterinary clinicians

  13. Rhinoceros Feet Step Out of a Rule-of-Thumb: A Wildlife Imaging Pioneering Approach of Synchronized Computed Tomography-Digital Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragusty, Joseph; Göritz, Frank; Potier, Romain; Mulot, Baptiste; Maillot, Alexis; Etienne, Pascal; Bernardino, Rui; Fernandes, Teresa; Mews, Jurgen; Hildebrandt, Thomas Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Currently, radiography is the only imaging technique used to diagnose bone pathology in wild animals situated under “field conditions”. Nevertheless, while chronic foot disease in captive mega-herbivores is widely reported, foot radiographic imaging is confronted with scarcity of studies. Numerous hindrances lead to such limited numbers and it became very clear that the traditional perspective on bone imaging in domestic animals based on extensive studies and elaborated statistical evaluations cannot be extrapolated to their non-domestic relatives. For these reasons, the authors initiated a multi-modality imaging study and established a pioneering approach of synchronized computed tomography (CT) and digital radiography (DR), based on X-ray projections derived from three-dimensional CT reconstructed images. Whereas this approach can be applied in any clinical field, as a case of outstanding importance and great concern for zoological institutions, we selected foot bone pathologies in captive rhinoceroses to demonstrate the manifold applications of the method. Several advances were achieved, endowing the wildlife clinician with all-important tools: prototype DR exposure protocols and a modus operandi for foot positioning, advancing both traditional projections and, for the first-time, species-related radiographic views; assessment of radiographic diagnostic value for the whole foot and, in premiere, for each autopodial bone; together with additional insights into radiographic appearance of bone anatomy and pathology with a unique, simultaneous CT-DR correlation. Based on its main advantages in availing a wide range of keystone data in wildlife imaging from a limited number of examined subjects and combining advantages of CT as the golden standard method for bone diseases' diagnostic with DR's clinical feasibility under field conditions, synchronized CT-DR presents a new perspective on wildlife's health management. With this we hope to provide veterinary

  14. Contribution of computed tomography in patients with lung metastases of differentiated thyroid carcinoma not apparent on plain radiography who were treated with radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosario, Pedro W.S.; Purisch, Saulo; Barroso, Alvarao L.; Rezende, Leonardo L.; Padrao, Eduardo L.

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT or CAT Scan) of the chest is more sensitive than radiography in the detection of lung metastases of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), but little information is available regarding the aggregated value of this method. The present study evaluated the response of patients with lung metastases of DTC not apparent on radiography to treatment with 131 I and the value of CT in these cases. Twenty-five patients with lung metastases not apparent on radiography, who initially received 100-200 mCi I 151 , were evaluated and those presenting pulmonary uptake on post-therapy WBS were submitted to a new treatment after 6 to 12 months, and so on. The chance of detection of pulmonary uptake on post-therapy WBS did not differ between patients with negative and positive CT (100% versus 91.5%). Mean serum Tg levels were higher in patients with positive CT (108 ng/ml versus 52 ng/ml). Negative post-therapy WBS was achieved in 82% of patients with positive CT and in 92.3% with negative CT and the cumulative I 131 activity necessary to achieve this outcome did not differ between the two groups (mean = 300 mCi). Stimulated Tg was undetectable in 47% of patients with negative CT at the end of treatment, but in none of the patients whose CT continued to be positive. In patients with elevated Tg, the CT result apparently did not change the indication of therapy or the I 131 activity to be administered. In cases with lung metastases, the persistence of micronodules on CT was associated with the persistence of detectable Tg in patients presenting negative post-therapy WBS. (author)

  15. Developments in digital radiography: an equipment update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, J.J.; O'Connor, P.J.; Davies, A.G.; Cowen, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Digital X-ray imaging technology has advanced rapidly over the past few years. This review, particularly aimed at those involved in using and purchasing such technology, is an attempt to unravel some of the complexities of this potentially confusing subject. The main groups of X-ray imaging devices that are considered are digitisers of conventional radiographs, image-intensifier-based fluorography systems, photostimulable phosphor computed radiography, amorphous selenium-based technology for thorax imaging and flat-panel systems. As well as describing these different systems, we look at ways of objectively assessing their image quality. Concepts that are used and explained include spatial resolution, grey-scale bit resolution, signal-to-noise ratio and detective quantum efficiency. An understanding of these basic parameters is vital in making a scientific assessment of a system's performance. Image processing and techniques are also briefly discussed, particularly with reference to their potential effects on image quality. This review aims to provide a basic understanding of digital X-ray imaging technology and enables the reader to make an independent and educated assessment of the relative merits of each system. (orig.)

  16. Apparatus for proton radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors. 10 claims, 7 drawing figures

  17. Prevalence and Clinical Import of Thoracic Injury Identified by Chest Computed Tomography but Not Chest Radiography in Blunt Trauma: Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdorf, Mark I; Medak, Anthony J; Hendey, Gregory W; Nishijima, Daniel K; Mower, William R; Raja, Ali S; Baumann, Brigitte M; Anglin, Deirdre R; Anderson, Craig L; Lotfipour, Shahram; Reed, Karin E; Zuabi, Nadia; Khan, Nooreen A; Bithell, Chelsey A; Rowther, Armaan A; Villar, Julian; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2015-12-01

    Chest computed tomography (CT) diagnoses more injuries than chest radiography, so-called occult injuries. Wide availability of chest CT has driven substantial increase in emergency department use, although the incidence and clinical significance of chest CT findings have not been fully described. We determine the frequency, severity, and clinical import of occult injury, as determined by changes in management. These data will better inform clinical decisions, need for chest CT, and odds of intervention. Our sample included prospective data (2009 to 2013) on 5,912 patients at 10 Level I trauma center EDs with both chest radiography and chest CT at physician discretion. These patients were 40.6% of 14,553 enrolled in the parent study who had either chest radiography or chest CT. Occult injuries were pneumothorax, hemothorax, sternal or greater than 2 rib fractures, pulmonary contusion, thoracic spine or scapula fracture, and diaphragm or great vessel injury found on chest CT but not on preceding chest radiography. A priori, we categorized thoracic injuries as major (having invasive procedures), minor (observation or inpatient pain control >24 hours), or of no clinical significance. Primary outcome was prevalence and proportion of occult injury with major interventions of chest tube, mechanical ventilation, or surgery. Secondary outcome was minor interventions of admission rate or observation hours because of occult injury. Two thousand forty-eight patients (34.6%) had chest injury on chest radiography or chest CT, whereas 1,454 of these patients (71.0%, 24.6% of all patients) had occult injury. Of these, in 954 patients (46.6% of injured, 16.1% of total), chest CT found injuries not observed on immediately preceding chest radiography. In 500 more patients (24.4% of injured patients, 8.5% of all patients), chest radiography found some injury, but chest CT found occult injury. Chest radiography found all injuries in only 29.0% of injured patients. Two hundred and two

  18. Rare earth phosphors and phosphor screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Maple, T.G.; Sklensky, A.F.

    1981-01-01

    Advances in the use of stabilized rare earth phosphors and of conversion screens using these materials are examined. In particular the new phosphors discussed in this invention consist of oxybromides of yttrium, lanthanum and gadolinium with a luminescent activator ion stabilized by an oxychloride or oxyfluoride surface layer and the conversion screens include trivalent cerium as the activator ion. (U.K.)

  19. Cholesteatoma: computed tomography and radiography in a dog; Colesteatoma: tomografia computadorizada e radiografia em cao com otite cronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belotta, Alexandra Frey; Babicsak, Viviam Rocco; Mamprim, Maria Jaqueline; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos, E-mail: a_fbelotta@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMVZ/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia . Dept. de Reproducao Animal e Radiologia Veterinaria; Arruda, Vanesa Kutz de; Amorim, Rogerio Martins [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMVZ/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia. Dept. de Clinica Veterinaria

    2012-07-01

    Cholesteatoma, a rare and/or misdiagnosed disease, results of a serious complication in dogs with chronic otitis. This article describes a case of a dachshund sent to the veterinary hospital presenting signs of cognitive dysfunction associated to peripheral neuropathy of the facial nerve on the right side. At radiography, an enlargement and thickness of the contours associated with loss of anatomical definition of the right tympanic bulla compared to the left was seen. At tomography, this enlargement and thickness were seen with better definition, besides the fulfilling by hyperdense calcified content, bullae osteolysis and temporal bone sclerosis at the same side. (author)

  20. Neutron radiography and X-ray computed tomography for quantifying weathering and water uptake processes inside porous limestone used as building material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewanckele, J.; De Kock, T.; Fronteau, G.; Derluyn, H.; Vontobel, P.; Dierick, M.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Jacobs, P.; Cnudde, V.

    2014-01-01

    Euville and Savonnières limestones were weathered by acid test and this resulted in the formation of a gypsum crust. In order to characterize the crystallization pattern and the evolution of the pore structure below the crust, a combination of high resolution X-ray computed tomography and SEM–EDS was used. A time lapse sequence of the changing pore structure in both stones was obtained and afterwards quantified by using image analysis. The difference in weathering of both stones by the same process could be explained by the underlying microstructure and texture. Because water and moisture play a crucial role in the weathering processes, water uptake in weathered and non-weathered samples was characterized based on neutron radiography. In this way the water uptake was both visualized and quantified in function of the height of the sample and in function of time. In general, the formation of a gypsum crust on limestone slows down the initial water uptake in the materials. - Highlights: • Time lapse sequence in 3D of changing pore structures inside limestone • A combination of X-ray CT, SEM and neutron radiography was used. • Quantification of water content in function of time, height and weathering • Characterization of weathering processes due to gypsum crystallization

  1. Digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulomb, M.; Dal Soglio, S.; Pittet-Barbier, L.; Ranchoup, Y.; Thony, F.; Ferretti, G.; Robert, F.

    1992-01-01

    Digital projection radiography may replace conventional radiography some day, provided it can meet several requirements: equal or better diagnostic effectiveness of the screen-film systems; reasonable image cost; real improvement in the productivity of the Departments of Imaging. All digital radiographic systems include an X-ray source, an image acquisition and formatting sub-system, a display and manipulation sub-system, and archiving subsystem and a laser editing system, preferably shared by other sources of digital images. Three digitization processes are available: digitization of the radiographic film, digital fluorography and phospholuminescent detectors with memory. The advantages of digital fluoroscopy are appealing: real-time image acquisition, suppression of cassettes; but its disadvantages are far from negligible: it cannot be applied to bedside radiography, the field of examination is limited, and the wide-field spatial resolution is poor. Phospholuminescent detectors with memory have great advantages: they can be used for bedside radiographs and on all the common radiographic systems; spatial resolution is satisfactory; its current disadvantages are considerable. These two systems, have common properties making up the entire philosophy of digital radiology and specific features that must guide our choice according to the application. Digital fluorography is best applied in pediatric radiology. However, evaluation works have showed that it was applicable with sufficient quality to many indications of general radiology in which a fluoroscopic control and fast acquisition of the images are essential; the time gained on the examination may be considerable, as well as the savings on film. Detectors with memory are required for bedside radiographs, in osteoarticular and thoracic radiology, in all cases of traumatic emergency and in the resuscitation and intensive care departments

  2. Radiography shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmayne, I.

    1985-11-27

    Apparatus for the inspection of a pipe weld by radiography comprises a radiation source contained in a housing having a first collimator for defining the exit beam and a second collimator mountable on the pipe in the region of the weld to define with the first collimator a predetermined volume enclosing the radiation beam passing through the second collimator when the housing is in a predetermined position relative to the second collimator. The arrangement is such that if the housing is slightly displaced from the predetermined position the radiation beam still falls within the predetermined volume.

  3. Radiography shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmayne, I.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus for the inspection of a pipe weld by radiography comprises a radiation source contained in a housing having a first collimator for defining the exit beam and a second collimator mountable on the pipe in the region of the weld to define with the first collimator a predetermined volume enclosing the radiation beam passing through the second collimator when the housing is in a predetermined position relative to the second collimator. The arrangement is such that if the housing is slightly displaced from the predetermined position the radiation beam still falls within the predetermined volume. (author)

  4. Digital Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    System One, a digital radiography system, incorporates a reusable image medium (RIM) which retains an image. No film is needed; the RIM is read with a laser scanner, and the information is used to produce a digital image on an image processor. The image is stored on an optical disc. System allows the radiologist to "dial away" unwanted images to compare views on three screens. It is compatible with existing equipment and cost efficient. It was commercialized by a Stanford researcher from energy selective technology developed under a NASA grant.

  5. Digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elander, S.; Hellesnes, J.; Reitan, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    The technology of radiography is developing rapidly, both regarding imaging technology and data hardware, and software technology. More and more advanced systems are marketed by the radiological companies. The wide product range makes it difficult to get an overview over principles and components. By closer inspection, however, the number of basic components and technologies is limited. Moreover, the components seem rather well known from other technologies, due to the long times of development in radiology. This report gives a survey of some new principles and components in the video chain. As components may deteriorate or age fast by irradiation, the radiation levels in the chain are evaluated. 13 refs

  6. Radiography apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sashin, D.; Sternglass, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention provides radiography apparatus wherein the use of a flat, generally rectangular beam or a fan-shaped beam of radiation in combination with a collimator, scintillator and device for optically coupling a self-scanning array of photodiodes to the scintillator means will permit production of images or image data with high contrast sensitivity and detail. It is contemplated that the self-scanning array of photodiodes may contain from about 60 to 2048, and preferably about 256 to 2048, individual photodiode elements per inch of object width, thereby permitting maximum data collection to produce a complete image or complete collection of image data

  7. Fundamentals of phosphors

    CERN Document Server

    Yen, William M; Yamamoto, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    Drawing from the second edition of the best-selling Handbook of Phosphors, Fundamentals of Phosphors covers the principles and mechanisms of luminescence in detail and surveys the primary phosphor materials as well as their optical properties. The book addresses cutting-edge developments in phosphor science and technology including oxynitride phosphors and the impact of lanthanide level location on phosphor performance.Beginning with an explanation of the physics underlying luminescence mechanisms in solids, the book goes on to interpret various luminescence phenomena in inorganic and organic materials. This includes the interpretation of the luminescence of recently developed low-dimensional systems, such as quantum wells and dots. The book also discusses the excitation mechanisms by cathode-ray and ionizing radiation and by electric fields to produce electroluminescence. The book classifies phosphor materials according to the type of luminescence centers employed or the class of host materials used and inte...

  8. EFFECTS OF X-RAY BEAM ANGLE AND GEOMETRIC DISTORTION ON WIDTH OF EQUINE THORACOLUMBAR INTERSPINOUS SPACES USING RADIOGRAPHY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djernaes, Julie D.; Nielsen, Jon V.; Berg, Lise C.

    2017-01-01

    The widths of spaces between the thoracolumbar processi spinosi (interspinous spaces) are frequently assessed using radiography in sports horses; however effects of varying X-ray beam angles and geometric distortion have not been previously described. The aim of this prospective, observational...... study was to determine whether X-ray beam angle has an effect on apparent widths of interspinous spaces. Thoracolumbar spine specimens were collected from six equine cadavers and left-right lateral radiographs and sagittal and dorsal reconstructed computed tomographic (CT) images were acquired...... measurements. Effect of geometric distortion was evaluated by comparing the interspinous space in radiographs with sagittal and dorsal reconstructed CT images. A total of 49 interspinous spaces were sampled, yielding 274 measurements. X-ray beam angle significantly affected measured width of interspinous...

  9. Electron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Christopher

    2005-05-17

    A system capable of performing radiography using a beam of electrons. Diffuser means receive a beam of electrons and diffuse the electrons before they enter first matching quadrupoles where the diffused electrons are focused prior to the diffused electrons entering an object. First imaging quadrupoles receive the focused diffused electrons after the focused diffused electrons have been scattered by the object for focusing the scattered electrons. Collimator means receive the scattered electrons and remove scattered electrons that have scattered to large angles. Second imaging quadrupoles receive the collimated scattered electrons and refocus the collimated scattered electrons and map the focused collimated scattered electrons to transverse locations on an image plane representative of the electrons' positions in the object.

  10. Filmless Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Technology initially prototyped under a Small Business Innovation Research contract between Quantex Corporation and Langley Research Center was licensed to Liberty Technology and incorporated into RADView, a new filmless radiography technology. The NASA-sponsored work involved the investigation of Electron Trapping, which led to a solid-state film that uses a special class of photoluminescent materials to capture radiographic images. RadView is a total imaging solution for the conversion of radiographic film records to digital format and digital acquisitions of radiographs. With the RADView technology, there is a reduction of exposure times and errors; film waste is eliminated; and the efficiency of data management and precise image analysis is boosted. The solid-state film can be exposed, read, erased, and re- exposed indefinitely until mechanical replacement is required. Digital images can be stored to optical media for up to 100 years and beyond without information loss.

  11. Efficacy of daily bedside chest radiography as visualized by digital luminescence radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, J.; Stueckle, C.A.; Schilling, E.M.; Peters, J.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic impact of daily bedside chest radiography in comparison with digital luminescence technique (DLR; storage phosphor radiography) and conventional film screen radiography, a prospective randomized study was completed in 210 mechanically ventilated patients with a total of 420 analysed radiographs. The patients were allocated to two groups: 150 patients underwent DLR, and 60 patients underwent conventional film screen radiography. Radiological analysis was performed consensually and therapeutic efficacy was assessed by the clinicians. There was no statistical significant difference between the frequency of abnormal findings seen on DLR and conventional film screen radiography. In total, 448 abnormal findings were present in 249 of 300 DLR and 97 of 120 conventional film screen radiographs. The most common findings were signs of overhydration (41 %), pleural effusion (31%), partial collapse of the lung (11%) and pneumothorax (2%). One hundred and twenty-three of 448 (27%) of these abnormal findings were thought to have a considerable impact on patient management. The high rate of abnormal findings with significant impact on patient management suggests that the use of daily bedside chest radiography may be reasonable. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  12. MO-G-18A-01: Radiation Dose Reducing Strategies in CT, Fluoroscopy and Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahesh, M; Gingold, E; Jones, A

    2014-01-01

    Advances in medical x-ray imaging have provided significant benefits to patient care. According to NCRP 160, there are more than 400 million x-ray procedures performed annually in the United States alone that contributes to nearly half of all the radiation exposure to the US population. Similar growth trends in medical x-ray imaging are observed worldwide. Apparent increase in number of medical x-ray imaging procedures, new protocols and the associated radiation dose and risk has drawn considerable attention. This has led to a number of technological innovations such as tube current modulation, iterative reconstruction algorithms, dose alerts, dose displays, flat panel digital detectors, high efficient digital detectors, storage phosphor radiography, variable filters, etc. that are enabling users to acquire medical x-ray images at a much lower radiation dose. Along with these, there are number of radiation dose optimization strategies that users can adapt to effectively lower radiation dose in medical x-ray procedures. The main objectives of this SAM course are to provide information and how to implement the various radiation dose optimization strategies in CT, Fluoroscopy and Radiography. Learning Objectives: To update impact of technological advances on dose optimization in medical imaging. To identify radiation optimization strategies in computed tomography. To describe strategies for configuring fluoroscopic equipment that yields optimal images at reasonable radiation dose. To assess ways to configure digital radiography systems and recommend ways to improve image quality at optimal dose

  13. Orthopaedic measurements with computed radiography: Methodological development, accuracy, and radiation dose with special reference to the weight-bearing lower extremity and the dislocating patella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanfridsson, J.

    2001-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a measurement system for computed radiography and Picture Archiving and Communication Systems, permitting measurements of long distances and angles in and between related images. The developed measurement system, which was based on the QUESTOR Precision Radiography system, was applied to the weight-bearing knee with special reference to the dislocating patella. The QPR system modified for CR fulfilled the criteria for measuring the weight-bearing knee. The special measuring assistance tools that were developed were important for the implementation of CR and PACS, particularly in workstations programmed for musculoskeletal radiology. The energy imparted to the patient was reduced by 98% at the lowest exposure of the CR-system, compared with our conventional analogue method, without loss of diagnostic accuracy. The CR technique creates a possibility, to an extent not previously feasible, to differentiate the exposure parameters (and thus minimise the radiation dose to the patient) by carefully considering the purpose of the examination. A radiographic method for measuring the rotation of the femur and the tibia, and the patellar translation was developed and applied to healthy volunteers. The introduced patellar variables have yielded new insights into the complex sequence of motions between the femur, tibia, and patella. The patients with a dislocating patella were subdivided into one 'clean' group of spontaneous dislocations and one group with various traumas in the history, which thus resulted in two groups with distinct radiographic differences. The Q-angle was decreased in knees that had suffered dislocations, and the traditional surgical treatment with a further reduction of the Q-angle must be challenged. The use of clinical measurements of the Q-angle was not an optimal way to evaluate the mechanical alignment in the patellofemoral joint under physiological conditions. In this study, we have proved

  14. Phosphor scintillator structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cusano, D.A.; Prener, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    A method of fabricating scintillators is described in which the phosphor is distributed within the structure in such a way as to enhance the escape of the visible wavelength radiation that would otherwise be dissipated within the scintillator body. Two embodiments of the present invention are disclosed: one in which the phosphor is distributed in a layered structure and another in which the phosphor is dispersed throughout a transparent matrix. (U.K.)

  15. Portable digital electronic radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicka, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    Radiography is a standard nondestructive technique in the industrial testing of materials and components. It is routinely used during the construction, maintenance and repair of nuclear plants. Traditionally, radiography is performed using photographic film (film radiography, FR). Recent developments in solid-state area imaging radiation detectors, miniature electronics and computer software/hardware techniques have brought electronic alternatives to FR. In recent years various electronic radiography (ER) techniques have served as alternatives to FR, these proved beneficial in some applications. While originally developed to provide real time imaging, ER may offer other advantages over FR, depending on the application. Work was undertaken at CRL to review progress in ER techniques and evaluate the possibility of constructing a portable DER (digital electronic radiography) system, for the inspection of power plant components. A suitable DER technique has been developed and a proof of principle portable system constructed. As this paper demonstrates, a properly designed ER system can be small and compact, while providing radiographic examination with acceptable image quality and the benefits of ER imaging. The CRL DER system can operate with radioactive sources typical of FR. While it does not replace FR, our DER system is expected to be beneficial in specific applications for Candu maintenance, reducing cost, labour and time. Practical, cost saving applications of this system are expected to include valve monitoring and foreign object location during maintenance at Candu reactors

  16. Validation and Application of Computed Radiography (CR) Tangential Technique for Wall Thickness Measurement of 10 Inch Carbon Steel Pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norhazleena Azaman; Khairul Anuar Mohd Salleh; Amry Amin Abas; Arshad Yassin; Sukhri Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Oil and gas industry requires Non Destructive Testing (NDT) to ensure each components, in-service and critical, are fit-for-purpose. Pipes that are used to transfer oil or gas are amongst the critical component that needs to be well maintained and inspected. Typical pipe discontinuities that may lead to unintended incidents are erosion, corrosion, dent, welding defects, etc. Wall thickness assessment, with Radiography Testing (RT) is normally used to inspect such discontinuities and can be performed with two approaches; (a) center line beam tangential technique (b) offset from the centre pipe tangential technique. The latter is a method of choice for this work because of the pipe dimension and limited radiation safe distance at site. Two successful validation approaches (simulation and experimental) were performed to determine the probability of successfulness before the actual RT work with tangential technique is carried out. The pipe was a 10 inch diameter in-service wrapped carbon steel. A 9 Ci Ir-192 and white Imaging Plate (IP) were used as a gamma radiation source and to record the radiographic image. Result of this work suggest that RT with tangential technique for 10 inch wrapped in-service carbon steel pipe can be successfully performed. (author)

  17. Industrial radiographies

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The Radiation Protection group wishes to remind CERN staff responsible for contractors performing X-ray inspections on the CERN sites that the firms must apply the legislation in force in their country of origin, in particular with regard to the prevention of risks relating to ionizing radiation. Industrial radiography firms called on to work on the CERN sites must also comply with the rules laid down in CERN's Radiation Safety Manual and be registered in the relevant CERN database. Since CERN is responsible for safety on its own site, a number of additional rules have been laid down for this kind of work, as set out in Radiation Protection Procedure PRP30 https://edms.cern.ch/file/346848/LAST_RELEASED/PRP30.pdf The CERN Staff Member responsible for the contract shall register the company and issue notification that an X-ray inspection is to be performed via the web interface at the following address: http://cern.ch/rp-radio

  18. Sonography of the chest using linear-array versus sector transducers: Correlation with auscultation, chest radiography, and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasci, Ozlem; Hatipoglu, Osman Nuri; Cagli, Bekir; Ermis, Veli

    2016-07-08

    The primary purpose of our study was to compare the efficacies of two sonographic (US) probes, a high-frequency linear-array probe and a lower-frequency phased-array sector probe in the diagnosis of basic thoracic pathologies. The secondary purpose was to compare the diagnostic performance of thoracic US with auscultation and chest radiography (CXR) using thoracic CT as a gold standard. In total, 55 consecutive patients scheduled for thoracic CT were enrolled in this prospective study. Four pathologic entities were evaluated: pneumothorax, pleural effusion, consolidation, and interstitial syndrome. A portable US scanner was used with a 5-10-MHz linear-array probe and a 1-5-MHz phased-array sector probe. The first probe used was chosen randomly. US, CXR, and auscultation results were compared with the CT results. The linear-array probe had the highest performance in the identification of pneumothorax (83% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 99% diagnostic accuracy) and pleural effusion (100% sensitivity, 97% specificity, and 98% diagnostic accuracy); the sector probe had the highest performance in the identification of consolidation (89% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 95% diagnostic accuracy) and interstitial syndrome (94% sensitivity, 93% specificity, and 94% diagnostic accuracy). For all pathologies, the performance of US was superior to those of CXR and auscultation. The linear probe is superior to the sector probe for identifying pleural pathologies, whereas the sector probe is superior to the linear probe for identifying parenchymal pathologies. Thoracic US has better diagnostic performance than CXR and auscultation for the diagnosis of common pathologic conditions of the chest. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 44:383-389, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. International Neutron Radiography Newsletter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    At the First World Conference on Neutron Radiography i t was decided to continue the "Neutron Radiography Newsletter", published previously by J.P. Barton, as the "International Neutron Radiography Newsletter" (INRNL), with J.C. Doraanus as editor. The British Journal of Non-Destructive Testing...

  20. An alternative approach to industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, P.

    1981-01-01

    An alternative to industrial X-ray film for industrial radiography is described. The experimental system uses film containing approximately 35% of the silver in an industrial type film, which makes the film easier to process, and uses high resolution phosphor screens, which improves the absorption of X-ray photons. Those properties that affect image quality, namely contrast, modulation transfer function and granularity, are discussed in detail for both types of system. A study of low contrast detail in radiographs indicates that for noise limited information the experimental system offers a higher quality than industrial X-ray film of similar speed. (author)

  1. Comparison of panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography for qualitative and quantitative measurements regarding localization of permanent impacted maxillary canines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çiğdem Sarıkır

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare the correlation between digital panoramic radiography (DPR and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT evaluations for localization of impacted permanent maxillary canines (IPMCs and for other qualitative and quantitative parameters. Materials and Method: DPR and CBCT images of 60 patients (17 men and 43 women were examined independently by two observers. Correlations between DPR and CBCT images were evaluated regarding qualitative (bucco-palatal positioning of IPMCs, morphology and presence of root resorption of adjacent permanent lateral incisors, and contact relationship between IPMCs and adjacent permanent lateral incisors and quantitative (angle measurements variables. All evaluations were repeated 1 month later by each observer. Chi-square and t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Kappa statistics were used to assess intra- and interobserver agreement (Cohen’s κ. Results: No correlation was observed for determination of bucco-palatal positioning of IPMCs between DPR and CBCT images (p>0.05. Correlations were observed for other qualitative variables (p<0.05. Differences between DPR and CBCT images were seen for all examined quantitative variables (p<0.01. Intra- and interobserver agreements were substantial to almost-perfect. Conclusion: No significant correlation was found between DPR and CBCT images for determination of bucco-palatal positioning of IPMCs. All quantitative measurements performed on DPR and CBCT images significantly differed from each other.

  2. The application of anatomical side markers during abdominal and IVU examinations: An investigation of practice prior to and post-installation of computed radiography (CR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platt, Jane M.; Strudwick, Ruth M.

    2009-01-01

    Professionally, radiographers are accountable for their practice. Available literature highlights the ramifications of not using anatomical side markers within the primary beam. It was thought by the authors that the installation of a computed radiography (CR) system could potentially cause a change in practice due to the ease of adding anatomical side markers manually/electronically during post-processing. This study assessed anatomical marker use within the primary beam at a district general hospital in East Anglia, one-year pre-CR installation and one-year post-CR installation. 100 abdominal images were evaluated from each time period and the presence of anatomical side markers was recorded and compared to establish any significant change. The study showed that although there was a decline in use of anatomical side markers used within the primary beam post-CR installation (from 32% to 25%), the changes were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). However, the agreed standard of 100% images having the primary beam side marker present was not met. There is a conflict of opinion about the necessity for anatomical side markers to be used within the primary beam. However, the researchers believe there is a case for recommending alterations and improvements to practice to comply with 'best practice' requirements.

  3. A simple quality assurance test tool for the visual verification of light and radiation field congruent using electronic portal images device and computed radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Njeh Christopher F

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The radiation field on most megavoltage radiation therapy units are shown by a light field projected through the collimator by a light source mounted inside the collimator. The light field is traditionally used for patient alignment. Hence it is imperative that the light field is congruent with the radiation field. Method A simple quality assurance tool has been designed for rapid and simple test of the light field and radiation field using electronic portal images device (EPID or computed radiography (CR. We tested this QA tool using Varian PortalVision and Elekta iViewGT EPID systems and Kodak CR system. Results Both the single and double exposure techniques were evaluated, with double exposure technique providing a better visualization of the light-radiation field markers. The light and radiation congruency could be detected within 1 mm. This will satisfy the American Association of Physicists in Medicine task group report number 142 recommendation of 2 mm tolerance. Conclusion The QA tool can be used with either an EPID or CR to provide a simple and rapid method to verify light and radiation field congruence.

  4. A simple quality assurance test tool for the visual verification of light and radiation field congruent using electronic portal images device and computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njeh, Christopher F; Caroprese, Blas; Desai, Pushkar

    2012-01-01

    The radiation field on most megavoltage radiation therapy units are shown by a light field projected through the collimator by a light source mounted inside the collimator. The light field is traditionally used for patient alignment. Hence it is imperative that the light field is congruent with the radiation field. A simple quality assurance tool has been designed for rapid and simple test of the light field and radiation field using electronic portal images device (EPID) or computed radiography (CR). We tested this QA tool using Varian PortalVision and Elekta iViewGT EPID systems and Kodak CR system. Both the single and double exposure techniques were evaluated, with double exposure technique providing a better visualization of the light-radiation field markers. The light and radiation congruency could be detected within 1 mm. This will satisfy the American Association of Physicists in Medicine task group report number 142 recommendation of 2 mm tolerance. The QA tool can be used with either an EPID or CR to provide a simple and rapid method to verify light and radiation field congruence

  5. Development of an imaging-planning program for screen/film and computed radiography mammography for breasts with short chest wall to nipple distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, S L; Su, J L; Yeh, Y H; Chu, T C; Lin, Y C; Chuang, K S

    2011-04-01

    Imaging breasts with a short chest wall to nipple distance (CWND) using a traditional mammographic X-ray unit is a technical challenge for mammographers. The purpose of this study is the development of an imaging-planning program to assist in determination of imaging parameters of screen/film (SF) and computed radiography (CR) mammography for short CWND breasts. A traditional mammographic X-ray unit (Mammomat 3000, Siemens, Munich, Germany) was employed. The imaging-planning program was developed by combining the compressed breast thickness correction, the equivalent polymethylmethacrylate thickness assessment for breasts and the tube loading (mAs) measurement. Both phantom exposures and a total of 597 exposures were used for examining the imaging-planning program. Results of the phantom study show that the tube loading rapidly decreased with the CWND when the automatic exposure control (AEC) detector was not fully covered by the phantom. For patient exposures with the AEC fully covered by breast tissue, the average fractional tube loadings, defined as the ratio of the predicted mAs using the imaging-planning program and mAs of the mammogram, were 1.10 and 1.07 for SF and CR mammograms, respectively. The predicted mAs values were comparable to the mAs values, as determined by the AEC. By applying the imaging-planning program in clinical practice, the experiential dependence of the mammographer for determination of the imaging parameters for short CWND breasts is minimised.

  6. The Reliability of Panoramic Radiography Versus Cone Beam Computed Tomography when Evaluating the Distance to the Alveolar Nerve in the Site of Lateral Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Česaitienė, Gabrielė; Česaitis, Kęstutis; Junevičius, Jonas; Venskutonis, Tadas

    2017-07-04

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to compare the reliability of panoramic radiography (PR) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the evaluation of the distance of the roots of lateral teeth to the inferior alveolar nerve canal (IANC). MATERIAL AND METHODS 100 PR and 100 CBCT images that met the selection criteria were selected from the database. In PR images, the distances were measured using an electronic caliper with 0.01 mm accuracy and white light x-ray film reviewer. Actual values of the measurements were calculated taking into consideration the magnification used in PR images (130%). Measurements on CBCT images were performed using i-CAT Vision software. Statistical data analysis was performed using R software and applying Welch's t-test and the Wilcoxon test. RESULTS There was no statistically significant difference in the mean distance from the root of the second premolar and the mesial and distal roots of the first molar to the IANC between PR and CBCT images. The difference in the mean distance from the mesial and distal roots of the second and the third molars to the IANC measured in PR and CBCT images was statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS PR may be uninformative or misleading when measuring the distance from the mesial and distal roots of the second and the third molars to the IANC.

  7. Orthopaedic measurements with computed radiography: Methodological development, accuracy, and radiation dose with special reference to the weight-bearing lower extremity and the dislocating patella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfridsson, J. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    2001-03-01

    The overall aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a measurement system for computed radiography and Picture Archiving and Communication Systems, permitting measurements of long distances and angles in and between related images. The developed measurement system, which was based on the QUESTOR Precision Radiography system, was applied to the weight-bearing knee with special reference to the dislocating patella. The QPR system modified for CR fulfilled the criteria for measuring the weight-bearing knee. The special measuring assistance tools that were developed were important for the implementation of CR and PACS, particularly in workstations programmed for musculoskeletal radiology. The energy imparted to the patient was reduced by 98% at the lowest exposure of the CR-system, compared with our conventional analogue method, without loss of diagnostic accuracy. The CR technique creates a possibility, to an extent not previously feasible, to differentiate the exposure parameters (and thus minimise the radiation dose to the patient) by carefully considering the purpose of the examination. A radiographic method for measuring the rotation of the femur and the tibia, and the patellar translation was developed and applied to healthy volunteers. The introduced patellar variables have yielded new insights into the complex sequence of motions between the femur, tibia, and patella. The patients with a dislocating patella were subdivided into one 'clean' group of spontaneous dislocations and one group with various traumas in the history, which thus resulted in two groups with distinct radiographic differences. The Q-angle was decreased in knees that had suffered dislocations, and the traditional surgical treatment with a further reduction of the Q-angle must be challenged. The use of clinical measurements of the Q-angle was not an optimal way to evaluate the mechanical alignment in the patellofemoral joint under physiological conditions. In this study, we have

  8. Optimization of the radiological protection of patients undergoing radiography, fluoroscopy and computed tomography. Final report of a coordinated research project in Africa, Asia and eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-12-01

    Although radiography has been an established imaging modality for over a century, continuous developments have led to improvements in technique resulting in improved image quality at reduced patient dose. If one compares the technique used by Roentgen with the methods used today, one finds that a radiograph can now be obtained at a dose which is smaller by a factor of 100 or more. Nonetheless, some national surveys, particularly in the United Kingdom and in the United States of America in the 1980s and 1990s, have indicated large variations in patient doses for the same diagnostic examination, in some cases by a factor of 20 or more. This arises not only owing to the various types of equipment and accessories used by the different health care providers, but also because of operational factors. The IAEA has a statutory responsibility to establish standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionising radiation and to provide for the worldwide application of those standards. A fundamental requirement of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS), issued by the IAEA in cooperation with the FAO, ILO, WHO, PAHO and NEA, is the optimization of radiological protection of patients undergoing medical exposure. Towards its responsibility of implementation of standards and under the subprogramme of radiation safety, in 1995, the IAEA launched a coordinated research project (CRP) on radiological protection in diagnostic radiology in some countries in the Eastern European, African and Asian region. Initially, the CRP addressed radiography only and it covered wide aspects of optimisation of radiological protection. Subsequently, the scope of the CRP was extended to fluoroscopy and computed tomography (CT), but it covered primarily situation analysis of patient doses and equipment quality control. It did not cover patient dose reduction aspects in fluoroscopy and CT. The project

  9. Imaging in rheumatoid arthritis--status and recent advances for magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, computed tomography and conventional radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Morten; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Dohn, U.M.

    2008-01-01

    , and have several documented and potential applications in RA patients. This chapter will review key aspects of the current status and recent important advances in imaging in RA, briefly discussing X-ray and computed tomography, and particularly focusing on MRI and US. Suggestions for use in clinical trials...

  10. Radiography - A new field among health sciences in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakarinen, Ritva; Jussila, Aino-Liisa

    2007-01-01

    In order to secure high quality X-ray services and efficient operation of clinical radiography, a study programme in radiography science was implemented at the University of Oulu in 1999. The need for a specific field of science has emerged as a result of social changes, such as the aging population, and the fast development of technology that has caused significant changes in the radiological working environment and clinical radiography. A need for a new, research-based informational foundation of clinical radiography is the basis for the programme. As service producers, radiographers need vast knowledge as well as specific expertise. The research object of radiography science is clinical radiography. If it was studied from the viewpoint of other sciences, the key professional skills of a radiographer would remain unexplored. Implementing an own field of science has enabled the development of radiography from its own bases. Basic research in the field is represented, for example, by the concept analysis of radiography in health sciences. Radiography science should produce research results for both clinical radiography and the instruction of radiography. So far, research results have dealt with the professional decision-making of a radiographer, the influences of computer technology on a radiographer's work and measuring the radiation exposure of a population

  11. Unactivated yttrium tantalate phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, V.B.; Cheung, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes an unactivated yttrium tantalate phosphor having M prime monoclinic structure and containing one or more additives of Rb and Al in an amount of between about 0.001 to 0.1 moles per mole of yttrium tantalate to improve brightness under X-radiation. This patent also describes an unactivated yttrium tantalate phosphor having M prime monoclinic structure and containing additives of Sr in an amount of between 0.001 to 0.1 moles per mole of yttrium tantalate and one or more of Rb and Al in an amount of between 0.001 to 0.1 moles per mole of yttrium tantalate the phosphor exhibiting a greater brightness under X-radiation than the phosphor absent Rb and Al

  12. Low lag luminescent phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The addition of potassium or rubidium salts to europium-activated fluorohalide phosphors produces X-ray screens with low lag, even at very low europium concentrations. The chemical preparation and afterglow test results are described

  13. Identification of the Procedural Accidents During Root Canal Preparation Using Digital Intraoral Radiography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Csinszka K.-Ivácson A.-; Maria Monea Adriana; Monica Monea; Mihai Pop; Angela Borda

    2016-01-01

    Crown or root perforation, ledge formation, fractured instruments and perforation of the roots are the most important accidents which appear during endodontic therapy. Our objective was to evaluate the value of digital intraoral periapical radiographs compared to cone beam computed tomography images (CBCT) used to diagnose some procedural accidents. Material and methods: Eleven extracted molars were used in this study. A total of 18 perforations and 13 ledges were created artifically and 10 i...

  14. Phosphors for LED lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, James Edward; Manepalli, Satya Kishore; Kumar, Prasanth Nammalwar

    2013-08-13

    A phosphor, a phosphor blend including the phosphor, a phosphor prepared by a process, and a lighting apparatus including the phosphor blend are disclosed. The phosphor has the formula (Ca.sub.1-p-qCe.sub.pK.sub.q).sub.xSc.sub.y(Si.sub.1-rGa.sub.r).sub.zO.su- b.12+.delta. or derived from a process followed using disclosed amounts of reactants. In the formula, (0

  15. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Stephen W.; Cates, Michael R.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Gillies, George T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  16. Technical Note: A direct ray-tracing method to compute integral depth dose in pencil beam proton radiography with a multilayer ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Deffet, Sylvain; Meijers, Arturs; Vander Stappen, Francois

    2016-12-01

    To introduce a fast ray-tracing algorithm in pencil proton radiography (PR) with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) for in vivo range error mapping. Pencil beam PR was obtained by delivering spots uniformly positioned in a square (45 × 45 mm 2 field-of-view) of 9 × 9 spots capable of crossing the phantoms (210 MeV). The exit beam was collected by a MLIC to sample the integral depth dose (IDD MLIC ). PRs of an electron-density and of a head phantom were acquired by moving the couch to obtain multiple 45 × 45 mm 2 frames. To map the corresponding range errors, the two-dimensional set of IDD MLIC was compared with (i) the integral depth dose computed by the treatment planning system (TPS) by both analytic (IDD TPS ) and Monte Carlo (IDD MC ) algorithms in a volume of water simulating the MLIC at the CT, and (ii) the integral depth dose directly computed by a simple ray-tracing algorithm (IDD direct ) through the same CT data. The exact spatial position of the spot pattern was numerically adjusted testing different in-plane positions and selecting the one that minimized the range differences between IDD direct and IDD MLIC . Range error mapping was feasible by both the TPS and the ray-tracing methods, but very sensitive to even small misalignments. In homogeneous regions, the range errors computed by the direct ray-tracing algorithm matched the results obtained by both the analytic and the Monte Carlo algorithms. In both phantoms, lateral heterogeneities were better modeled by the ray-tracing and the Monte Carlo algorithms than by the analytic TPS computation. Accordingly, when the pencil beam crossed lateral heterogeneities, the range errors mapped by the direct algorithm matched better the Monte Carlo maps than those obtained by the analytic algorithm. Finally, the simplicity of the ray-tracing algorithm allowed to implement a prototype procedure for automated spatial alignment. The ray-tracing algorithm can reliably replace the TPS method in MLIC PR for in

  17. Evidence-based radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafslund, Bjorg; Clare, Judith; Graverholt, Birgitte; Wammen Nortvedt, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) offers the integration of the best research evidence with clinical knowledge and expertise and patient values. EBP is a well known term in health care. This paper discusses the implementation of EBP into radiography and introduces the term evidence-based radiography. Evidence-based radiography is radiography informed and based on the combination of clinical expertise and the best available research-based evidence, patient preferences and resources available. In Norway, EBP in radiography is being debated and radiographers are discussing the challenges of implementing EBP in both academic and clinical practice. This discussion paper explains why EBP needs to be a basis for a radiography curriculum and a part of radiographers' practice. We argue that Norwegian radiographers must increase participation in research and developing practice within their specific radiographic domain

  18. Experimental study of the X-ray spectra optimization for computed radiography mammography systems; Investigacao experimental da otimizacao do espectro de raios X em sistemas de mamografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomal, Alessandra, E-mail: atomal@ifi.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin; Cunha, Diego M. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), Uberlandia, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Nogueira, Maria S. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Gaspar, Fabio [Vigilancia Sanitaria, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Poletti, Martin E. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Departamento de Fisica

    2013-12-15

    Digital mammography is replacing screen-film mammography due to several advantages of digital receptors. The use of Computed Radiography (CR) mammography systems has been considered an alternative to achieve digital images with a low cost. Besides, the optimization of the X-ray spectrum, characterized by the anode/filter combination and tube potential, is an important step in order to improve the image quality with the lower dose to the breast. In this work, we investigated the optimal X-ray spectra using a figure of merit for two mammography equipment: Senographe DMR (General Electric Medical Systems) and Mammomat 3000 Nova (Siemens), both using an image plate Kodak EHR-M2 (Kodak DirectView). A PMMA phantom, simulating breast with thicknesses of 5 cm, was used. The anode/filter combinations evaluated were: Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh, Rh/Rh and Rh/Al for the Senographe system, and Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh, W/Rh for the Mammomat system, for all the intervals of tube potential range from 24 to 35 kVp. Results demonstrate that the higher values of FOM were achieved with the Rh/Rh at 29 kVp and Rh/Al at 26 kVp for the Senographe system, and for the W/Rh at 28 kVp in the Mammomat one. The reduction in the dose associated with the optimum spectra was 13 and 26% for the Senographe and Mammomat systems, respectively. Finally, our results suggest that anode/filter combinations of more energetic spectra than the standard Mo/Mo combination are recommended for thicker breast, in order to reduce the breast dose levels. (author)

  19. Detection of furcation involvement using periapical radiography and 2 cone-beam computed tomography imaging protocols with and without a metallic post: An animal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salineiro, Fernanda Cristina Sales; Gialain, Ivan Onone; Kobayashi-Velasco, Solange; Pannuti, Claudio Mendes; Cavalcanti, Marcelo Gusmao Paraiso [Dept. of Stomatology, School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the diagnosis of incipient furcation involvement with periapical radiography (PR) and 2 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging protocols, and to test metal artifact interference. Mandibular second molars in 10 macerated pig mandibles were divided into those that showed no furcation involvement and those with lesions in the furcation area. Exams using PR and 2 different CBCT imaging protocols were performed with and without a metallic post. Each image was analyzed twice by 2 observers who rated the absence or presence of furcation involvement according to a 5-point scale. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the observations. The accuracy of the CBCT imaging protocols ranged from 67.5% to 82.5% in the images obtained with a metallic post and from 72.5% to 80% in those without a metallic post. The accuracy of PR ranged from 37.5% to 55% in the images with a metallic post and from 42.5% to 62.5% in those without a metallic post. The area under the ROC curve values for the CBCT imaging protocols ranged from 0.813 to 0.802, and for PR ranged from 0.503 to 0.448. Both CBCT imaging protocols showed higher accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity than PR in the detection of incipient furcation involvement. Based on these results, CBCT may be considered a reliable tool for detecting incipient furcation involvement following a clinical periodontal exam, even in the presence of a metallic post.

  20. Comparison of Combined X-Ray Radiography and Magnetic Resonance (XMR) Imaging-Versus Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry for the Evaluation of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acher, Peter; Rhode, Kawal; Morris, Stephen; Gaya, Andrew; Miquel, Marc; Popert, Rick; Tham, Ivan; Nichol, Janette; McLeish, Kate; Deehan, Charles; Dasgupta, Prokar; Beaney, Ronald; Keevil, Stephen F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To present a method for the dosimetric analysis of permanent prostate brachytherapy implants using a combination of stereoscopic X-ray radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (XMR) in an XMR facility, and to compare the clinical results between XMR- and computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Patients who had received nonstranded iodine-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy implants underwent XMR and CT imaging 4 weeks later. Four observers outlined the prostate gland on both sets of images. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were derived, and agreement was compared among the observers and between the modalities. Results: A total of 30 patients were evaluated. Inherent XMR registration based on prior calibration and optical tracking required a further automatic seed registration step that revealed a median root mean square registration error of 4.2 mm (range, 1.6-11.4). The observers agreed significantly more closely on prostate base and apex positions as well as outlining contours on the MR images than on those from CT. Coefficients of variation were significantly higher for observed prostate volumes, D90, and V100 parameters on CT-based dosimetry as opposed to XMR. The XMR-based dosimetry showed little agreement with that from CT for all observers, with D90 95% limits of agreement ranges of 65, 118, 79, and 73 Gy for Observers 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Conclusions: The study results showed that XMR-based dosimetry offers an alternative to other imaging modalities and registration methods with the advantages of MR-based prostate delineation and confident three-dimensional reconstruction of the implant. The XMR-derived dose-volume histograms differ from the CT-derived values and demonstrate less interobserver variability

  1. JRR-3 neutron radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubayashi, M.; Tsuruno, A.

    1992-01-01

    JRR-3 neutron radiography facility consists of thermal neutron radiography facility (TNRF) and cold neutron radiography facility (CNRF). TNRF is installed in JRR-3 reactor building. CNRF is installed in the experimental beam hall adjacent to the reactor building. (author)

  2. Quantitative radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brase, J.M.; Martz, H.E.; Waltjen, K.E.; Hurd, R.L.; Wieting, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    Radiographic techniques have been used in nondestructive evaluation primarily to develop qualitative information (i.e., defect detection). This project applies and extends the techniques developed in medical x-ray imaging, particularly computed tomography (CT), to develop quantitative information (both spatial dimensions and material quantities) on the three-dimensional (3D) structure of solids. Accomplishments in FY 86 include (1) improvements in experimental equipment - an improved microfocus system that will give 20-μm resolution and has potential for increased imaging speed, and (2) development of a simple new technique for displaying 3D images so as to clearly show the structure of the object. Image reconstruction and data analysis for a series of synchrotron CT experiments conducted by LLNL's Chemistry Department has begun

  3. Proton nuclear scattering radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchazeaubeneix, J.C.; Faivre, J.C.; Garreta, D.

    1982-10-01

    Nuclear scattering of protons allows to radiograph objects with specific properties: direct 3- dimensional radiography, different information as compared to X-ray technique, hydrogen radiography. Furthermore, it is a well adapted method to gating techniques allowing the radiography of fast periodic moving systems. Results obtained on different objects (light and heavy materials) are shown and discussed. The dose delivery is compatible with clinical use, but at the moment, the irradiation time is too long between 1 and 4 hours. Perspectives to make the radiography faster and to get a practical method are discussed

  4. Proton nuclear scattering radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saudinos, J.

    1982-04-01

    Nuclear scattering of protons allows to radiograph objects with specific properties: 3-dimensional radiography, different information as compared to X-ray technique, hydrogen radiography. Furthermore the nuclear scattering radiography (NSR) is a well adapted method to gating techniques allowing the radiography of fast periodic moving objects. Results obtained on phantoms, formalin fixed head and moving object are shown and discussed. The dose delivery is compatible with clinical use, but at the moment, the irradiation time is too long between 1 and 4 hours. Perspectives to make the radiograph faster and to get a practical method are discussed

  5. Specific radiography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    Beside radiography testing using x-ray machine and gamma source, there are several technique that developed specifically to complete the testing that cannot be done with the two earlier. This technique was specific based on several factor, for the example, the advantages of neutron and electron using to show the image was unique compare to x-ray and gamma. Besides that, these special radiography techniques maybe differ in how to detect the radiation get through the object. These technique can used to inspect thin or specimen that contained radioactive material. There are several technique will discussed in this chapter such as neutron radiography, electron radiography, fluoroscopy and also autoradiography.

  6. Computed tomography vs. digital radiography assessment for detection of osteolysis in asymptomatic patients with uncemented cups: a proposal for a new classification system based on computer tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandgren, Buster; Crafoord, Joakim; Garellick, Göran; Carlsson, Lars; Weidenhielm, Lars; Olivecrona, Henrik

    2013-10-01

    Digital radiographic images in the anterior-posterior and lateral view have been gold standard for evaluation of peri-acetabular osteolysis for patients with an uncemented hip replacement. We compared digital radiographic images and computer tomography in detection of peri-acetabular osteolysis and devised a classification system based on computer tomography. Digital radiographs were compared with computer tomography on 206 hips, with a mean follow up 10 years after surgery. The patients had no clinical signs of osteolysis and none were planned for revision surgery. On digital radiographs, 192 cases had no osteolysis and only 14 cases had osteolysis. When using computer tomography there were 184 cases showing small or large osteolysis and only 22 patients had no osteolysis. A classification system for peri-acetabular osteolysis is proposed based on computer tomography that is easy to use on standard follow up evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Detectability of the mediastinal lines : comparison of conventional film-screen radiography and digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hye Young; Park, Kyung Joo; Kang, Doo Kyung; Lee, Kang Lai; Han, Chaing Jin; Suh, Jung Ho

    1998-01-01

    Using dynamic range compression (DRC) processing, this study compared the detectability of mediastinal lines by conventional film screen radiography (FS) and by storage phosphor digital radiography (DR). We selected 200 normal consecutive chest radiographs (100 FS, 100 DR); dynamic range compression was applied to DR processing and moving grids were used in both systems. Seven mediastinal lines (left paraspinal, right paraspinal, azygoesophageal, left para-aortic, posterio junctional, anterior junctional and right paratracheal) were scored from 0 point to 3 point (0: not visible, 1 : suspiciously visible, 2 : visible, but not clear, 3: clearly visible) according to visibility and sharpness, as agreed by a radiologist and a resident. The differences between the two modalities were compared and analyzed by chi-square test. DR processed with DRC visualizes mediastinal lines more frequently and clearly than conventional FS, and is therefore thought to be useful for the evaluation of mediastinal diseases. (author). 14 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  8. Digital radiography and caries diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, A

    1998-01-01

    Direct digital acquisition of intra-oral radiographs has been possible only in the last decade. Several studies have shown that, theoretically, there are a number of advantages of direct digital radiography compared with conventional film. Laboratory as well as controlled clinical studies are needed to determine whether new digital imaging systems alter diagnosis, treatment and prognosis compared with conventional methods. Most studies so far have evaluated their diagnostic performance only in laboratory settings. This review concentrates on what evidence we have for the diagnostic efficacy of digital systems for caries detection. Digital systems are compared with film and those studies which have evaluated the effects on diagnostic accuracy of contrast and edge enhancement, image size, variations in radiation dose and image compression are reviewed together with the use of automated image analysis for caries diagnosis. Digital intra-oral radiographic systems seem to be as accurate as the currently available dental films for the detection of caries. Sensitivities are relatively high (0.6-0.8) for detection of occlusal lesions into dentine with false positive fractions of 5-10%. A radiolucency in dentine is recognised as a good predictor for demineralisation. Radiography is of no value for the detection of initial (enamel) occlusal lesions. For detection of approximal dentinal lesions, sensitivities, specificities as well as the predictive values are fair, but are very poor for lesions known to be confined to enamel. Very little documented information exists, however, on the utilization of digital systems in the clinic. It is not known whether dose is actually reduced with the storage phosphor system, or whether collimator size is adjusted to fit sensor size in the CCD-based systems. There is no evidence that the number of retakes have been reduced. It is not known how many images are needed with the various CCD systems when compared with a conventional bitewing

  9. A comparative study of cone beam computed tomography and conventional radiography in diagnosing the extent of root resorptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Alamadi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Root resorptions are assessed and diagnosed using different radiographical techniques. A comparison of the ability to assess resorptions on two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D radiographs is, hitherto, lacking. The aims of this study were to evaluate the accuracy of 2D (periapical radiographs, PA and panoramic radiograph, PAN and 3D (cone beam computed tomography, CBCT radiographic techniques in measuring slanted root resorptions compared to the true resorptions, a histological gold standard, in addition to a comparison of all the radiographic techniques to each other. Methods Radiographs (CBCT, PA, and PAN, in addition to histological sections, of extracted deciduous canines from thirty-four patients were analyzed. Linear measurements of the most and least resorbed side of the root, i.e., “slanted” resorptions, were measured using an analyzing software (Facad ®. For classification of slanted root resorptions, a modified Malmgren index was used. Results PAN underestimated the root length on both the least and most resorbed side. Small resorptions, i.e., low modified Malmgren scores, were more difficult to record and were only assessed accurately using CBCT. The root resorption scores were underestimated using PA and PAN. In assessment of linear measures, PAN differed significantly from both CBCT and PA. Conclusions CBCT is the most accurate technique when measuring and scoring slanted root resorptions.

  10. Identification of the Procedural Accidents During Root Canal Preparation Using Digital Intraoral Radiography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csinszka K.-Ivácson A.-

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crown or root perforation, ledge formation, fractured instruments and perforation of the roots are the most important accidents which appear during endodontic therapy. Our objective was to evaluate the value of digital intraoral periapical radiographs compared to cone beam computed tomography images (CBCT used to diagnose some procedural accidents. Material and methods: Eleven extracted molars were used in this study. A total of 18 perforations and 13 ledges were created artifically and 10 instruments were fractured in the root canals. Digital intraoral periapical radiographs from two angles and CBCT scans were made with the teeth fixed in position. The images were evaluated and the number of detected accidents were stated in percentages. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi square-test. Results: On digital periapical radiographs the evaluators identified 12 (66.66% perforations, 10 (100 % separated instruments and 10 (76.9% created ledges. The CBCT scans made possible the recognition of 17 (94.66 % perforations, 9 (90 % separated instruments and 13 (100% ledges. The totally recognized accidental procedures showed significant differences between the two groups. (p<0.05 Conclusion: Digital periapical radiographs are the most common imaging modalities used during endodontic treatments. Though, the CBCT allows a better identification of the procedural accidents.

  11. An evaluation of the periapical status of teeth with necrotic pulps using periapical radiography and cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, F; Patel, S; Durán-Sindreu, F; Mercadé, M; Bueno, R; Roig, M

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the presence or absence of periapical (PA) radiolucencies on individual roots of teeth with necrotic pulps, as assessed with digital PA radiographs and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Digital PA radiographs and CBCT scans were taken from 161 endodontically untreated teeth (from 155 patients) diagnosed with non-vital pulps (pulp necrosis with normal PA tissue, symptomatic apical periodontitis, asymptomatic apical periodontitis, acute apical abscess and chronic apical abscess). Images were assessed by two calibrated endodontists to analyse the radiographic PA status of the teeth. A consensus was reached in the event of any disagreement. The data were analysed using a McNemar's test, and significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Three hundred and forty paired images of roots were assessed with both digital PA radiographs and CBCT images. Fifteen additional roots were identified with CBCT. PA radiolucencies were present in 132 (38.8%) roots when assessed with PA radiographs, and in 196 (57.6%) roots when assessed with CBCT. This difference was statistically significant (P apical periodontitis or acute apical abscess, CBCT images revealed a statistically larger number of PA radiolucencies than did PA radiographs (P asymptomatic apical periodontitis (P = 0.31) or chronic apical abscess (P = 1). Unlike PA radiographs, CBCT revealed a higher prevalence of PA radiolucencies when endodontically untreated teeth with non-vital pulps were examined. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Comparison of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Periapical Radiography in Predicting Treatment Decision for Periapical Lesions: A Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Balasundaram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare the ability of endodontists to determine the size of apical pathological lesions and select the most appropriate choice of treatment based on lesions’ projected image characteristics using 2 D and 3 D images. Study Design. Twenty-four subjects were selected. Radiographic examination of symptomatic study teeth with an intraoral periapical radiograph revealed periapical lesions equal to or greater than 3 mm in the greatest diameter. Cone-beam Computed tomography (CBCT images were made of the involved teeth after the intraoral periapical radiograph confirmed the size of lesion to be equal to greater than 3 mm. Six observers (endodontists viewed both the periapical and CBCT images. Upon viewing each of the images from the two imaging modalities, observers (1 measured lesion size and (2 made decisions on treatment based on each radiograph. Chi-square test was used to look for differences in the choice of treatment among observers. Results. No significant difference was noted in the treatment plan selected by observers using the two modalities (χ2(3=.036, P>0.05. Conclusion. Lesion size and choice of treatment of periapical lesions based on CBCT radiographs do not change significantly from those made on the basis of 2 D radiographs.

  13. Quantitative neutron radiography using neutron absorbing honeycomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Masayoshi; Oda, Masahiro; Takahashi, Kenji; Ohkubo, Kohei; Tasaka, Kanji; Tsuruno, Akira; Matsubayashi, Masahito.

    1993-01-01

    This investigation concerns quantitative neutron radiography and computed tomography by using a neutron absorbing honeycomb collimator. By setting the neutron absorbing honeycomb collimator between object and imaging system, neutrons scattered in the object were absorbed by the honeycomb material and eliminated before coming to the imaging system, but the neutrons which were transmitted the object without interaction could reach the imaging system. The image by purely transmitted neutrons gives the quantitative information. Two honeycombs were prepared with coating of boron nitride and gadolinium oxide and evaluated for the quantitative application. The relation between the neutron total cross section and the attenuation coefficient confirmed that they were in a fairly good agreement. Application to quantitative computed tomography was also successfully conducted. The new neutron radiography method using the neutron-absorbing honeycomb collimator for the elimination of the scattered neutrons improved remarkably the quantitativeness of the neutron radiography and computed tomography. (author)

  14. Correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) and clinical image quality for chest imaging with a computed radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C S; Wood, T J; Saunderson, J R; Beavis, A W

    2015-01-01

    This work assessed the appropriateness of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (K SNR ) as a metric for the optimisation of computed radiography (CR) of the chest. The results of a previous study in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer simulated chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme to quantify the benefit of using an anti-scatter grid were used for the clinical image quality measurement (number of simulated patients  =  80). The K SNR was used to calculate the improvement in physical image quality measured in a physical chest phantom. K SNR correlation with VGAS was assessed as a function of chest region (lung, spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragm), and as a function of x-ray tube voltage in a given chest region. The correlation of the latter was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. VGAS and K SNR image quality metrics demonstrated no correlation in the lung region but did show correlation in the spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragmatic regions. However, there was no correlation as a function of tube voltage in any region; a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of  −0.93 (p  =  0.015) was found for lung, a coefficient (R) of  −0.95 (p  =  0.46) was found for spine, and a coefficient (R) of  −0.85 (p  =  0.015) was found for diaphragm. All demonstrate strong negative correlations indicating conflicting results, i.e. K SNR increases with tube voltage but VGAS decreases. Medical physicists should use the K SNR metric with caution when assessing any potential improvement in clinical chest image quality when introducing an anti-scatter grid for CR imaging, especially in the lung region. This metric may also be a limited descriptor of clinical chest image quality as a function of tube voltage when a grid is used routinely. (paper)

  15. Comparison of the image quality of digital radiography system and film screen system - Radiologist' rating of the visibility of normal anatomic - Structures in chest PA, Skull radiograph and K. U. B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kounn Sik; Kim, Young Goo; Lee, Jong Beum; Kim, Kun Sang

    1987-01-01

    Digital image acquisition and display is widely used in computed tomography, ultrasonography, digital subtraction angiography, nuclear medicine and magnetic resonance image. But most of the radiological examinations performed in radiology department are made by using conventional system. The development of the digital radiography system is essential if totally digitized radiology department is desired. The advantages of digitizing the radiographic information are usually discussed in terms of PACS (picture archiving and communication system), furthermore there are many other advantages such as contrast modification, spatial filtering subtraction and superimposition of the images through the image processing by computer. Currently several approaches are under development or in clinical use, the most promising approach is the use of imaging plate composed of photostimulate phosphors such as barium fluorohalide crystal read with a He-Ne laser to produce digital radiographic images. Another promising approach is scan projection radiography. The authors performed the clinical study of comparing the image qualities of digital radiography system using scanning laser luminescence (FCR) and conventional film-screen system in chest PA, skull radiography and K. U. B. in terms of the visibility of the normal anatomic structure rating those (qualities) on a scale of 0 to 3 and obtained the following results. Normal contrast digital images are comparable to conventional film-screen images, but the images of high frequency enhancement is far superior to conventional film-screen especially in peripherally located structures such as skin, subcutaneous fat, musculoskeletal systems, nasal bone, inner and outer table of the skull including the diploic space, paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and larynx, trachea and main bronchi, mediastinal structures, retrocardiac and subphrenic vascular markings. Another promising aspects of digital radiography system is its wide exposure latitude and

  16. Digital radiography: description and user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthel, A.; Bonin, Th.; Cadilhon, S.; Thiery, Ch.; Chatellier, L.; Kaftandjian, V.; Honorat, Ph.; Torrent, J.; Le Brun, A.; Maglaive, J.C.; Moreau, Ph.; Pettier, J.L.; Rebuffel, V.; Roenelle, P.; Roussilhe, J.; Staat, St.; Tahon, M.

    2007-01-01

    The presented document arises from the work of the group 'Digital Radiography and sensors' of COFREND. It is a collective work of synthesis aimed to analyze the quality parameters of digital images influencing the answer and the diagnosis brought to a given industrial problem. Five families of digital sensors have been studied: 1. Image Intensifier coupled with CCD devices - 2. scintillators coupled with a CCD device- 3. Flat Panels with indirect conversion - 4. Flat Panels with direct electric conversion - 5. Photostimulable Storage Phosphor Screens). In particular, concerning a complete imaging chain, it deals with the notions of magnification, blur (unsharpness) (geometrical, kinetic or internal to the very sensor), noises, scattered radiation, spatial resolution, which is different from the one of analog detectors such as films, Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR), sensitivity using IQIs, dynamic range, detection quantum efficiency, persistence and temporal resolution. This document is not a standard; it must be understood as a user's guide, and it approaches some essentials corrections to bring to a sensor in order to optimize his efficiency without losing information during the pre-processing phase in the radiographic acquisition. It also introduces some image processing tools commonly used. It can be used as a source document to the future elaboration of a standardisation document. It augurs not at all of the choice of a digital sensor with regard to the traditional radiographic film, but gives bases of reflection to a radio user for a sensible transfer from the classic radiography to the digital radiography. (authors)

  17. Radiography - A conceptual approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahonen, Sanna-Mari [Department of Nursing Science and Health Administration, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 (Finland)], E-mail: sanna-mari.ahonen@oulu.fi

    2008-11-15

    Aim: The purpose of this article is to describe interdisciplinary comparison of the attributes of the concept of radiography in health sciences, physics and technology on the grounds of concept analysis. Background: The concept of radiography is widely used in health sciences, physics and technology. However, the content of the concept may vary. In order to clarify the concept of radiography, the concept must be systematically examined and defined in linguistic form. Method: The concept of radiography was analysed by using the evolutionary method of concept analysis. The data were collected through discretionary sampling and consisted of literature and Internet pages. Qualitative content analysis was employed for analysing the data. Findings: As a result of concept analysis, the concept of radiography in health sciences was determined as expertise of radiographers in the use of radiation, which is dual, dynamic, social and situation-related in nature, and typically based on versatile synthesis. Regarding the attributes identified, the concept of radiography has both similarities and differences between health sciences, physics and technology. Conclusions: The concept of radiography was found to be more abstract, wider, more complex and more radiographer-centred in health sciences than in other disciplines. The content of the concept of radiography seems to vary according to the discipline.

  18. Radiography - A conceptual approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahonen, Sanna-Mari

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this article is to describe interdisciplinary comparison of the attributes of the concept of radiography in health sciences, physics and technology on the grounds of concept analysis. Background: The concept of radiography is widely used in health sciences, physics and technology. However, the content of the concept may vary. In order to clarify the concept of radiography, the concept must be systematically examined and defined in linguistic form. Method: The concept of radiography was analysed by using the evolutionary method of concept analysis. The data were collected through discretionary sampling and consisted of literature and Internet pages. Qualitative content analysis was employed for analysing the data. Findings: As a result of concept analysis, the concept of radiography in health sciences was determined as expertise of radiographers in the use of radiation, which is dual, dynamic, social and situation-related in nature, and typically based on versatile synthesis. Regarding the attributes identified, the concept of radiography has both similarities and differences between health sciences, physics and technology. Conclusions: The concept of radiography was found to be more abstract, wider, more complex and more radiographer-centred in health sciences than in other disciplines. The content of the concept of radiography seems to vary according to the discipline

  19. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Thomsen, Henrik

    on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years...

  20. Patient-Specific Instruments Based on Knee Joint Computed Tomography and Full-Length Lower Extremity Radiography in Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Tian

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: The use of PSIs based on knee joint CT and standing full-length lower extremity radiography in TKR resulted in acceptable alignment compared with the use of conventional instruments, although the marginal advantage was not statistically different. Surgical time and clinical results were also similar between the two groups. However, the PSI group had less postoperative drainage.

  1. Technical Note : A direct ray-tracing method to compute integral depth dose in pencil beam proton radiography with a multilayer ionization chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Deffet, Sylvain; Meijers, Arturs; Vander Stappen, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce a fast ray-tracing algorithm in pencil proton radiography (PR) with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) for in vivo range error mapping. Methods: Pencil beam PR was obtained by delivering spots uniformly positioned in a square (45x45 mm(2) field-of-view) of 9x9 spots capable

  2. Need for New Optimisation Strategies in CR and Direct Digital Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    Digital imaging techniques such as Digital Image Intensifier Radiography and Digital Storage Phosphor (Selenium) Radiography are replacing conventional film-screen radiography more and more. The aim of this development is the extension of diagnostic capabilities and the reduction of side effects such as radiation dose. Conventional film-screen radiography and digital radiography are very different ways of imaging. For digital radiography specific post-processing is the link between imaging conditions and film documentation. Optimisation of the images includes new possibilities of post-processing and a broad range for variation of the dose. Especially in fluoroscopy, dose can be reduced significantly by new technical features like pulsed fluoroscopy. For digital radiography the European guidelines on quality criteria have to be applied to projection radiography, digital subtraction radiography and to fluoroscopy. Further work should lead to a definition of reference values for the dose and the image quality. This has to be done first for single exposures and fluoroscopic mode and secondly for diagnostic and interventional procedures. (author)

  3. SU-F-T-299: An Experimental 2D Computed Radiography (CR) Dosimeter for IMRT. Are In-Field Measurements Affected by the Low Energy Photon Overresponse?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crijns, W [University Hospital Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Vandenbroucke, D; Leblans, P [Agfa Healthcare N.V., Mortsel (Belgium); Depuydt, T

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Computed Radiography (CR) dosimetry could offer film dosimetry resolution and flexibility but with reusability and instantaneous processing. For an experimental CR-plate, designed for radiotherapy (Zeff=18), CR’s typical out-of-field over-response to low energy photons was previously reduced to 8%. The present work assesses the impact of the residual over-response when open-fields are combined or when intensity modulated fields are used. Methods: Agfa Healthcare’s experimental CRplate was scanned and erased 4min after each irradiation using a flying-spot CR-15-X-engine based reader, which was adapted for radiotherapy dosimetry. A CR-plate specific calibration and uniformity correction was used.For open-fields two abutting half beams (5×10cm{sup 2}) captured out-offield and in-field doses in a single image. Additionally, both half beams were measured individually as well as a 3×18Gy open-field SBRT-lung treatment. For intensity modulated fields standard test patterns (Chair and Pyramid) and a clinical 5×5Gy rectal VMAT plan were captured. All measurements were compared to the corresponding dose calculations. Results: For open-fields the out-of-field overdose was clearly larger than the in-field overdose (10% vs. 4%). The sum of the individual measurements corresponded well with the combined measurement (dose difference, ΔD<−2.2%). The SBRT case had no overdose in the high dose region; ΔD=−5.6%±3.3%, the deviation was attributed to CR-fading effects (−0.3%/min) which were not corrected for.Compared to open-fields, intensity modulated deliveries had a further increased over-response out-offield (ΔD=+58% to +125% [Chair] +43% [Pyramid]), due to the increased amount of low energy photons for IMRT. However, this effect was not measured in-field where even decreased dose signals were observed (ΔD=−0.3% to +2.25% [Chair], −4.5% to −0.1% [Pyramid]). The rectal VMAT treatment had a dose difference +2.4%±6.0%. The in-field deviations were

  4. Phosphates and phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, P [Compagnie Francaise de l' Azote, Paris (France)

    1983-01-01

    In chapter 8.5 the following aspects of uranium recovery are treated: basis of extraction process, extraction principle, solvents, strength of the acid to be treated, technology, main processes in use, impact of uranium recovery on phosphoric acid plants, and economics of uranium recovery plants.

  5. Neutron radiography, techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1987-10-01

    After describing the principles of the ''in pool'' and ''dry'' installations, techniques used in neutron radiography are reviewed. Use of converter foils with silver halide films for the direct and transfer methods is described. Advantages of the use of nitrocellulose film for radiographying radioactive objects are discussed. Dynamic imaging is shortly reviewed. Standardization in the field of neutron radiography (ASTM and Euratom Neutron Radiography Working Group) is described. The paper reviews main fields of use of neutron radiography. Possibilities of use of neutron radiography at research reactors in various scientific, industrial and other fields are mentioned. Examples are given of application of neutron radiography in industry and the nuclear field. (author)

  6. Recent developments in radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Harold

    1982-01-01

    Advances in radiography are reviewed and eighty-one references are cited to provide additional information. The review includes information on x-ray sources in terms of output, portability and imaging geometry and detectors in terms of films and screens, electrostatic methods, real-time techniques and solid state devices. Inspection methods utilizing radiations other than x-rays, neutrons and charged particles, expand the inspection problems suitable for radiography. Techniques such as tomography, digital radiography and image enhancement are described. Tomography, in particular, provides excellent capability to characterize materials and discontinuities

  7. Transitioning to digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, F., E-mail: Francisco.Miranda@pwc.ca [Pratt & Whitney Canada, Longueuil, Quebec (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    This article provides insight on the technical and business considerations necessary to implement or to transition to digital radiography Continued refinements in digital radiography technology have resulted in significant improvements in image quality and detectability of indications. These improvements have resulted in the acceptance of the technology by users and aerospace primes for final product inspection and disposition. Digital radiography has also been identified as an interesting cost reduction initiative with the potential of providing gains in productivity through increased throughput and decreased inspection lead-times and resulting costs. (author)

  8. Qualitative discussion of quantitative radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.; Motz, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    Since radiography yields an image that can be easily related to the tested object, it is superior to many nondestructive testing techniques in revealing the size, shape, and location of certain types of discontinuities. The discussion is limited to a description of the radiographic process, examination of some of the quantitative aspects of radiography, and an outline of some of the new ideas emerging in radiography. The advantages of monoenergetic x-ray radiography and neutron radiography are noted

  9. Modeling granular phosphor screens by Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaparinos, Panagiotis F.; Kandarakis, Ioannis S.; Cavouras, Dionisis A.; Delis, Harry B.; Panayiotakis, George S.

    2006-01-01

    The intrinsic phosphor properties are of significant importance for the performance of phosphor screens used in medical imaging systems. In previous analytical-theoretical and Monte Carlo studies on granular phosphor materials, values of optical properties, and light interaction cross sections were found by fitting to experimental data. These values were then employed for the assessment of phosphor screen imaging performance. However, it was found that, depending on the experimental technique and fitting methodology, the optical parameters of a specific phosphor material varied within a wide range of values, i.e., variations of light scattering with respect to light absorption coefficients were often observed for the same phosphor material. In this study, x-ray and light transport within granular phosphor materials was studied by developing a computational model using Monte Carlo methods. The model was based on the intrinsic physical characteristics of the phosphor. Input values required to feed the model can be easily obtained from tabulated data. The complex refractive index was introduced and microscopic probabilities for light interactions were produced, using Mie scattering theory. Model validation was carried out by comparing model results on x-ray and light parameters (x-ray absorption, statistical fluctuations in the x-ray to light conversion process, number of emitted light photons, output light spatial distribution) with previous published experimental data on Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb phosphor material (Kodak Min-R screen). Results showed the dependence of the modulation transfer function (MTF) on phosphor grain size and material packing density. It was predicted that granular Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb screens of high packing density and small grain size may exhibit considerably better resolution and light emission properties than the conventional Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb screens, under similar conditions (x-ray incident energy, screen thickness)

  10. Industrial Radiography Safety in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hockings, Colin

    2006-01-01

    The first applications of the imaging capability of X-rays were non-medical. Roentgen produced images of his shotgun, a compass and a set of weights in a closed box to show his colleagues. Prior to 1912, X-rays were used little outside the realms of medicine and dentistry because the X-ray tubes failed under the higher voltages required for industrial purposes. However, that changed in 1913 when high vacuum X-ray tubes designed by Coolidge became available. In 1922, industrial radiography took another step forward with the advent of the 200,000-volt X-ray tube that allowed radiographs of thick steel parts to be produced in a reasonable amount of time. In 1931 the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) permitted approval of fusion welded pressure vessels by x-ray, which promoted an acceptance and use of the method. That application continues. Radium became the initial gamma ray source for industrial radiography. The material allowed radiography of castings up to 30cm thick. During World War II, industrial radiography grew significantly as part of the US Navy's shipbuilding-program, and in 1946 gamma ray sources such as cobalt 60 and iridium 192 became available. These new sources gained rapid popularity because they emitted more intense radiation than radium and were less expensive. Present state: the majority of industrial radiography techniques have changed little since their inception. An image is captured, processed and analysed for evidence of fault or defect. Today however, the images are of higher quality and greater sensitivity, through the use of better quality films, smaller radiation sources and automated processing. Developments in electronics and computers now allow technicians to create a digital image, enhance it, transmit it or store it indefinitely. The most noticeable change in industrial radiography equipment from the technician's view would be the reduction in weight of the equipment for a given kV output. Never the less it remains

  11. Patient risk from interproximal radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, S.J.; Pujol, A. Jr.; Chen, T.S.; Malcolm, A.W.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Computer simulation methods for determining patient dose from dental radiography have demonstrated that patient risk from a two-film interproximal examination ranges from 1.1 X 10(-8) to 3.4 X 10(-7) using 90-kVp beams, depending on film speed, projection technique, and age and sex of the patient. Further, changing from a short-cone round-beam to a long-cone technique with rectangular collimation reduces risk by a factor of 2.9, independent of other factors

  12. Neutron radiography in metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rant, J.; Ilic, R.

    1977-01-01

    The review surveys microneutronographic and neutron-induced autoradiographic techniques and their applications in metallurgy. A brief survey of applications of neutron radiography as a method of non-destructive testing to some macroscopic problems in metallurgy is included. (author)

  13. High energy neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-01-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos

  14. Charged Particle Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Chris

    2004-01-01

    The Coulomb multiple scattering of charged particles as they pass through material allows them to be used as a radiographic probe. This forms the basis for a new kind of radiography that is finding application where conventional x-ray radiography is limited by flux or backgrounds. Charged-particle radiography is providing a versatile new probe that has advantages over conventional x-ray radiography for some unique application. Proton radiography has been used to make quantitative motion pictures of high explosive driven experiments and proves to be of great value for radiographing experiments that mock up nuclear weapon primaries for stockpile certification. By taking advantage of magnetic lens to magnify images and by using the very bright beams that can be made with electrons, charged-particle radiography may be useful for studying the fine spatial detail and very fast motion in laser driven implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Finally, radiographs can be made using cosmic-ray muons for searching vehicles and cargo containers for surreptitious cargo of high z materials such as uranium or plutonium.

  15. Diagnostic Accuracy of CBCT with Different Voxel Sizes and Intraoral Digital Radiography for Detection of Periapical Bone Lesions: An Ex-Vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Sakhdari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study sought to assess the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT with different voxel sizes and intraoral digital radiography with photostimulable phosphor (PSP plate for detection of periapical (PA bone lesions.Materials and Methods: In this ex vivo diagnostic study, one-millimeter defects were created in the alveolar sockets of 15 bone blocks, each with two posterior teeth. A no-defect control group was also included. Digital PA radiographs with PSP plates and CBCT scans with 200, 250 and 300μ voxel sizes were obtained. Four observers evaluated the possibility of lesion detection using a 5-point scale. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predicative value (NPV were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane’s post hoc test. Kappa and weighted kappa statistics were applied to assess intraobserver and interobserver agreements.Results: Cochrane Q test showed no significant difference between PSP and CBCT imaging modalities in terms of kappa and weighted kappa statistics (P=0.675. The complete sensitivity and complete NPV for 200 and 250 μ voxel sizes were higher than those of 300 μ voxel size and digital radiography (P<0.001. No significant difference was noted in other parameters among other imaging modalities (P=0.403.Conclusions: The results showed that high-resolution CBCT scans had higher diagnostic accuracy than PSP digital radiography for detection of artificially created PA bone lesions. Voxel size (field of view must be taken into account to minimize patient radiation dose.Keywords: Diagnosis; Cone-Beam Computed Tomography; Radiography, Dental, Digital; Periapical Periodontitis

  16. Evaluation of images in a DR system (KD-1000) with new photostimulable phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshita, Hisashi; Kuranishi, Makoto; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kato, Syosuke; Matsui, Mitate.

    1994-01-01

    The Konica Direct Digitizer KD-1000 is a compact chest acquisition unit in digital radiography. The KD-1000 system uses a photostimulable phosphor detector (RbBr: Tl) and directly converts X-ray quantum into digitized information. We have studied the physical characteristics of the KD-1000, which consists of input-output relationship, spatial resolution and noise. Additionally, we have made a comparison of visual detectability between images from the KD-1000 system and those from a film/screen system (KO-380/HRL), which is used for chest radiography. We have quantified these basic characteristics and established the advantage of the KD-1000 system. (author)

  17. Evaluation of images in a DR system (KD-1000) with new photostimulable phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshita, Hisashi; Kuranishi, Makoto; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kato, Syosuke (Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan). Hospital); Matsui, Mitate

    1994-01-01

    The Konica Direct Digitizer KD-1000 is a compact chest acquisition unit in digital radiography. The KD-1000 system uses a photostimulable phosphor detector (RbBr: Tl) and directly converts X-ray quantum into digitized information. We have studied the physical characteristics of the KD-1000, which consists of input-output relationship, spatial resolution and noise. Additionally, we have made a comparison of visual detectability between images from the KD-1000 system and those from a film/screen system (KO-380/HRL), which is used for chest radiography. We have quantified these basic characteristics and established the advantage of the KD-1000 system. (author).

  18. Investigation of physical imaging properties in various digital radiography systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hoi Woun [Dept. of Radiological Science, Baekseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung Hwan [Dept. of Radiological technology, Shingu University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yong Su [Dept. of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Kyushu (Japan); Kim, Jung Min [Dept. of Health and Environmental Science, College of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    We aimed to evaluate the physical imaging properties in various digital radiography systems with charged coupled device (CCD), computed radiography (CR), and indirect flat panel detector (FPD). The imaging properties measured in this study were modulation transfer function (MTF) wiener spectrum (WS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) to compare the performance of each digital radiography system. The system response of CCD were in a linear relationship with exposure and that of CR and FPD were proportional to the logarithm of exposure. The MTF of both CR and FPD indicated a similar tendency but in case of CCD, it showed lower MTF than that of CR and FPD. FPD showed the lowest WS and also indicated the highest DQE among three systems. According to the results, digital radiography system with different type of image receptor had its own image characteristics. Therefore, it is important to know the physical imaging characteristics of the digital radiography system accurately to obtain proper image quality.

  19. Proceedings of 7th short conference on neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Eiichi; Katsurayama, Kousuke; Tsujimoto, Tadashi

    1986-10-01

    The first short period conference on neutron radiography was held in 1970, and now the 7th meeting was held. The works to develop neutron radiography in Japan are as active as those in western countries, and the research is in progress by using neutrons from reactors, radioisotopes and accelerators in order to achieve the technology of high standard. In this conference, 26 papers and six comments were presented, and the themes covered the equipment for radiography, the practical application, and the related research. The second World Conference on Neutron Radiography will be held in Paris in June, 1986, and the further promotion of the spread of neutron radiography can be expected. The proceedings of the conference is published with the hope that joint effort and information exchange are further enhanced in coming years to develop the neutron radiography in Japan. The neutron radiography using the Kinki University reactor, the Rikkyo Triga-2 reactor, the Musashi reactor, the Kyoto research reactor, a 3MV Van de Graaff accelerator in Toyota, a subcompact cyclotron in Sumitomo, a baby cyclotron-dual collimator in National Space Development Agency and so on, Cf-252 based thermal neutron radiography, CT with Sb-124/Be neutrons, pulse power neutron source, imaging converters, neutron radiographic image processing, computed tomography using neutron television systems and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  20. Radiography at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    What is industrial radiography? It is a non-destructive method with a wide variety of applications, such as inspecting the quality of a weld. It uses high-energy radioactive sources or an X-ray generator.   Is this inspection technique used at CERN? Yes, it is widely used at CERN by the EN-MME Group, which outsources the work to one or more companies, depending on the workload. Is it possible to carry out radiography anywhere at CERN? Yes, it is possible to carry out radiography in any building/accelerator/experiment area at CERN (including in areas which are not normally subject to radiological hazards). When is radiography carried out? It normally takes place outside of working hours (7 p.m. to 6 a.m.). How will I know if radiography is taking place in my building? If this activity is planned in a CERN building, notices will be affixed to all of its main entrance doors at least 24 hours in advance. What are the risks? There is a risk of exposure to very high levels of radiation, dep...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray ( ... leg (shin), ankle or foot. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ...

  2. Are radiography lecturers, leaders?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendry, Julie Anne

    2013-01-01

    This review article aims to explore the concept of radiography lecturers acting as leaders to their student followers. Through a brief review of the literature, a definition of leadership is suggested and some leadership theories explored. The path-goal theory, leader–member exchange theory and the contemporary theory of transformational leadership are examined more closely. Links between lecturer-leader behaviour and student motivation and learning are tentatively suggested with transformational leadership appearing to offer the optimal leadership style for lecturers to adopt. The paucity of literature relating directly to radiography is acknowledged and areas for further research are suggested. The article concludes with some of the author's practical ideas for incorporating transformational leadership styles and behaviours into radiography education today

  3. Spatially coded backscatter radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thangavelu, S.; Hussein, E.M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Conventional radiography requires access to two opposite sides of an object, which makes it unsuitable for the inspection of extended and/or thick structures (airframes, bridges, floors etc.). Backscatter imaging can overcome this problem, but the indications obtained are difficult to interpret. This paper applies the coded aperture technique to gamma-ray backscatter-radiography in order to enhance the detectability of flaws. This spatial coding method involves the positioning of a mask with closed and open holes to selectively permit or block the passage of radiation. The obtained coded-aperture indications are then mathematically decoded to detect the presence of anomalies. Indications obtained from Monte Carlo calculations were utilized in this work to simulate radiation scattering measurements. These simulated measurements were used to investigate the applicability of this technique to the detection of flaws by backscatter radiography

  4. Real-time radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossi, R.H.; Oien, C.T.

    1981-01-01

    Real-time radiography is used for imaging both dynamic events and static objects. Fluorescent screens play an important role in converting radiation to light, which is then observed directly or intensified and detected. The radiographic parameters for real-time radiography are similar to conventional film radiography with special emphasis on statistics and magnification. Direct-viewing fluoroscopy uses the human eye as a detector of fluorescent screen light or the light from an intensifier. Remote-viewing systems replace the human observer with a television camera. The remote-viewing systems have many advantages over the direct-viewing conditions such as safety, image enhancement, and the capability to produce permanent records. This report reviews real-time imaging system parameters and components

  5. SIMPLE for industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhar Azmi; Abd Nassir Ibrahim; Siti Madiha Muhammad Amir; Glam Hadzir Patai Mohamad; Saidi Rajab

    2004-01-01

    The first thing industrial radiographers have to do before commencing radiography works is to determine manually the amount of correct exposure that the film need to be exposed in order to obtain the right density. The amount of exposure depends on many variables such as type of radioisotope, type of film, nature of test-object and its orientation, and specific arrangement related to object location and configuration. In many cases radiography works are rejected because of radiographs fail to meet certain reference criteria as defined in the applicable standard. One of the main reasons of radiograph rejection is due to inadequate exposure received by the films. SIMPLE is a software specially developed to facilitate the calculation of gamma-radiography exposure. By using this software and knowing radiographic parameters to be encountered during the work, it is expected that human error will be minimized, thus enhancing the quality and productivity of NDT jobs. (Author)

  6. Practical radiography. 11. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoxter, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    After a brief explanation of the basics of electricity, the fundamentals of radiography are dealt with in more detail - the discovery of X-rays, their nature and properties, the production of the X-ray image and ways of improving the image. A chapter is devoted to the important subject of radiation protection. Explanations are given of the use of the Siemens exposure tables, which make it simpler to modify exposures from the values given in the tables. There is also a section on some of the standard radiographic positioning for patients. The most common medical terms used in radiography and fluoroscopy are listed and an Appendix gives details of the major items of Siemens X-ray equipment. There is a list of literature recommended for further study. Theoretical explanations have been kept to a minimum so that information that is important to radiography can be emphasized. (orig./MG)

  7. Radiography of pressure ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstroem, P.S.; Ekberg, O.; Lasson, A.

    1988-01-01

    In patients with longstanding and/or deep pressure ulcers radiology is usually consulted. Survey radiography and sinography in 14 patients with pressure ulcers (6 over the tuber ischii and 8 over the femoral trochanter) were evaluated. Osteomyelitic involvement of adjacent bone was revealed in 9 patients on survey radiography. However, it was usually impossible to assess whether or not bony involvement represents healed or active osteomyelitis. Sinography did not contribute to the assessment of whether or not adjacent cortical bone was involved. However, when a fistulation to an adjacent joint was revealed this contributed substantially to the preoperative planning of resection. We therefore recommend that survey radiography and sinography should be included in the evaluation of these patients but that the results from such examinations are critically evaluated. Joint involvement should be taken seriously as progression of septic arthritis usually occurs rapidly. (orig.)

  8. Satisfaction of Search in Chest Radiography 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbaum, Kevin S; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Schartz, Kevin M; Caldwell, Robert T; Madsen, Mark T; Hur, Seung; Laroia, Archana T; Thompson, Brad H; Mullan, Brian F; Franken, Edmund A

    2015-11-01

    Two decades have passed since the publication of laboratory studies of satisfaction of search (SOS) in chest radiography. Those studies were performed using film. The current investigation tests for SOS effects in computed radiography of the chest. Sixty-four chest computed radiographs half demonstrating various "test" abnormalities were read twice by 20 radiologists, once with and once without the addition of a simulated pulmonary nodule. Receiver-operating characteristic detection accuracy and decision thresholds were analyzed to study the effects of adding the nodule on detecting the test abnormalities. Results of previous studies were reanalyzed using similar modern techniques. In the present study, adding nodules did not influence detection accuracy for the other abnormalities (P = .93), but did induce a reluctance to report them (P chest radiography (P chest radiography has changed, but it is not clear why. SOS may be changing as a function of changes in radiology education and practice. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Compton radiography, 4. Magnification compton radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuyama, S; Sera, K; Shishido, F; Fukuda, H [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Tuberculosis and Cancer; Mishina, H

    1978-03-01

    Compton radiography permits an acquisition of direct magnification Compton radiograms by use of a pinhole collimator, rendering it feasible to overcome the resolution of the scinticamera being employed. An improvement of resolution was attained from 7 mm to 1 mm separation. Usefulness of its clinical application can be seen in orientation of puncture and biopsy in deep structures and detection of various foreign bodies penetrated by blasts and so on under the ''magnification Compton fluoroscopy'' which can be developed on this principle in the near future.

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose ... limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  15. Digital radiography of the chest in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, S.

    2003-01-01

    The hopes placed in digital radiography have been fulfilled only partly in pediatric radiology. Specifically, the option of gaining reduced radiation exposure in combination with a similar or even improved image quality was hard to realize. The only portable digital system available for a long time were storage phosphors which were disadvantaged by an extremely limited dose-quantum-efficiency (DQE) in comparison to digital flat panel detectors. New developments and the introduction of the dual-reading system led to image qualities comparable to film-screen-systems with high resolution and achievable without dose increase, sometimes even with dose reduction. A study using an animal model suggests that these systems can even be used in preterm infants with very low birth weights. A new portable flat panel detector by Canon may improve digital chest radiography in pediatric patients. (orig.) [de

  16. Recovering uranium from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Wet-process phosphoric acid contains a significant amount of uranium. This uranium totals more than 1,500 tons/yr in current U.S. acid output--and projections put the uranium level at 8,000 tons/yr in the year 2000. Since the phosphoric acid is a major raw material for fertilizers, uranium finds its way into those products and is effectively lost as a resource, while adding to the amount of radioactive material that can contaminate the food chain. So, resource-conservation and environmental considerations both make recovery of the uranium from phosphoric acid desirable. This paper describes the newly developed process for recovering uranium from phosphoric acid by using solvent-extraction technique. After many extractants had been tested, the researchers eventually selected the combination of di (2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEPA) and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as the most suitable. The flowscheme of the process is included

  17. Cross-sectional void fraction distribution measurements in a vertical annulus two-phase flow by high speed X-ray computed tomography and real-time neutron radiography techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvel, G.D.; Hori, K.; Kawanishi, K.

    1995-01-01

    A Real-Time Neutron Radiography (RTNR) system and a high speed X-ray Computed tomography (X-CT) system are compared for measurement of two-phase flow. Each system is used to determine the flow regime, and the void fraction distribution in a vertical annulus flow channel. A standard optical video system is also used to observe the flow regime. The annulus flow channel is operated as a bubble column and measurements obtained for gas flow rates from 0.0 to 30.01/min. The flow regimes observed by all three measurement systems through image analysis shows that the two-dimensional void fraction distribution can be obtained. The X-CT system is shown to have a superior temporal resolution capable of resolving the void fraction distribution in an (r,θ) plane in 33.0 ms. Void fraction distribution for bubbly flow and slug flow is determined

  18. Cross-sectional void fraction distribution measurements in a vertical annulus two-phase flow by high speed X-ray computed tomography and real-time neutron radiography techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvel, G.D. [McMaster Univ., Ontario (Canada)]|[Combustion and Heat Transfer Lab., Takasago (Japan); Hori, K.; Kawanishi, K. [Combustion and Heat Transfer Lab., Takasago (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    A Real-Time Neutron Radiography (RTNR) system and a high speed X-ray Computed tomography (X-CT) system are compared for measurement of two-phase flow. Each system is used to determine the flow regime, and the void fraction distribution in a vertical annulus flow channel. A standard optical video system is also used to observe the flow regime. The annulus flow channel is operated as a bubble column and measurements obtained for gas flow rates from 0.0 to 30.01/min. The flow regimes observed by all three measurement systems through image analysis shows that the two-dimensional void fraction distribution can be obtained. The X-CT system is shown to have a superior temporal resolution capable of resolving the void fraction distribution in an (r,{theta}) plane in 33.0 ms. Void fraction distribution for bubbly flow and slug flow is determined.

  19. Optimizing digital radiography of children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric projection imaging differs from imaging of the adult patient. Children are smaller, more radiosensitive, and less compliant than their adult counterparts. Their characteristics affect the way projection imaging is practiced and how dose is optimized. Computed radiography (CR) and digital radiography (DR) have been embraced by pediatric practitioners in order to reduce dose and improve image quality. Unfortunately, dose optimization with CR and DR has been hampered by a lack of definition of appropriate exposure levels, a lack of standardization in exposure factor feedback, and a lack of understanding of the fundamentals of CR and DR technology. The potential for over-exposure exists with both CR and DR. Both the Society for Pediatric Radiology and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine recognize the promise and shortcomings of CR and DR technology and have taken steps to join with manufacturers in improving the practice of CR and DR imaging. Although the risks inherent in pediatric projection imaging with CR and DR are low, efforts to reduce dose are worthwhile, so long as diagnostic quality is maintained. Long-standing recommendations for limiting radiation dose in pediatric projection imaging are still applicable to CR and DR.

  20. Glandular dose and image quality control in mammography facilities with computerized radiography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Marcelino Vicente de Almeida

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, and early detection is critical to its diagnosis and treatment. To date, the most effective method for early detection of breast cancer has been x-ray mammography for which the screen/film (SF) technique has been the gold standard. However, even though SF combinations have been improved and optimized over the years for breast imaging, there are some critical limitations, including a narrow exposure range, image artifacts, film processing problems, and inflexibility in image processing and film management. In recent years, digital mammography has been introduced in cancer screening programmes with the screen/film techniques gradually being phased out. Computed radiography (CR), also commonly known as photostimulable phosphor (PSP) imaging or storage phosphor, employs reusable imaging plates and associated hardware and software to acquire and to display digital projection radiographs. In this work, a protocol model was tested for performing image quality control and average glandular dose (AGD) evaluation in 19 institutions with computed radiography systems for mammography. The protocol was validated through tests at the Laboratorio de Radioprotecao Aplicada a Mamografia (LARAM) from the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN). The image quality visual evaluation of CDMAM phantom showed that 53% of the facilities were able to produce images of excellent quality. Furthermore, the automated evaluation of image quality, using the analyze software cdcom.exe, showed that 57% of the images were considered to be of good quality. The detector linearity test showed that the CR response is very linear, where 95% of facilities evaluated were considered to be compliant. For the image noise was found that only 20% of facilities are in agreement with the parameters established for this test. The average glandular doses, which patients may be getting to perform an examination, were below the action levels

  1. The stationary neutron radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, A.A.; Newell, D.L.; Heidel, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    To provide the high intensity neutron beam and support systems necessary for radiography, the Stationary Neutron Radiography System was constructed at McClellan Air Force Base. The Stationary Neutron Radiography System utilizes a one megawatt TRIGA reactor contained in an Aluminium tank surrounded by eight foot thick concrete walls. There are four neutron beam tubes at inclined angles from the reactor core to separate radiography bays. In three of the bays, robotic systems manipulate aircraft components in the neutron beam, while real-time imaging systems provide images concurrent with the irradiation. Film radiography of smaller components is performed in the remaining bay

  2. Ultrasonography X gamma radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello Campos, A.M. de

    1989-01-01

    The accumulated experience in the last ten years of substitution to essays by gamma radiography to essay by ultrasonography, starting of the systematic comparison and tabulation of the results obtained by both essays applied in welding joints, in field, in steel pipelines of the SABESP. (V.R.B.)

  3. Manual on industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    This manual is intended as a source of educational material to personnel seeking certification as industrial radiographers, and as a guide and reference text for educational organizations that are providng courses in industrial radiography. It covers the basic principles of x-ray and gamma radiation, radiation safety, films and film processing, welding, casting and forging, aircraft structures and components, radiographic techniques, and records

  4. Compton radiography, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Shinichi; Sera, Koichiro; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Shishido, Fumio; Mishina, Hitoshi.

    1977-01-01

    Compton radiography, a tomographic technic with Compton-scattered rays of a monochromatic gamma ray beam, was feasible of tomographing a chest phantom. The result suggested that the technic could be extended to imaging of the lung and the surrounding structures of the chest wall, mediastinum and liver in Compton tomographic mode. (auth.)

  5. Neutron radiography in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron radiography studies being carried out in reactor centres in Brazil are discussed. These research projects are under way using the 5 MW swimming pool reactor at the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN) in Sao Paulo and the Argonaut reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Engineering (IEN) in Rio de Janeiro. (Auth.)

  6. Neutron induced electron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Marcos Leandro Garcia

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper a new radiography technique, the 'Neutron Induced Electron Radiography' - NIER, to inspect low thickness samples on the order of micra, has been developed. This technique makes use of low energy electrons as penetrating radiation generated from metallic gadolinium screens when irradiated by thermal neutrons. The conditions to obtain the best image for the conventional X-ray film Kodak-AA were determined by using a digital system to quantify the darkening level of the film. The irradiations have been performed at a radiography equipment installed at the beam-hole no. 8 of the 5 MW IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP. The irradiation time to obtain the best radiography was 100 seconds and for such condition the technique was able to discern 1 μm in 24 μm of aluminum at a resolution of 32 μm. By visual comparison the images obtained by the NIER shown a higher quality when compared with the ones from other usual techniques the make use of electrons a penetrating radiation and films for image registration. Furthermore the use of the digital system has provided a smaller time for data acquisition and data analysis as well as an improvement in the image visualization. (author)

  7. Basic principles of industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bestbier, P.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray radiography and gamma radiography are used in industrial radiography. X-rays and gamma rays have the ability to penetrate materials and be absorbed by different densities. This characteristic makes them useful tools in industrial and medical radiography. The sources used for the generation of x-rays, gamma rays and radioisotopes are discussed. Films are one of the recording methods of x-radiography. The article also deals with advantages and disadvantages of radiography. Factors governing radiation exposure includes: the type of radiation source, material to be radiographed, distance, film, and the method for development. International specifications are also responsible for strict control over the standard of workmanship in industrial radiography

  8. Artifacts in digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Whan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shin Gu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Min [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Beakseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Digital Radiography is a big part of diagnostic radiology. Because uncorrected digital radiography image supported false effect of Patient’s health care. We must be manage the correct digital radiography image. Thus, the artifact images can have effect to make a wrong diagnosis. We report types of occurrence by analyzing the artifacts that occurs in digital radiography system. We had collected the artifacts occurred in digital radiography system of general hospital from 2007 to 2014. The collected data had analyzed and then had categorize as the occurred causes. The artifacts could be categorized by hardware artifacts, software artifacts, operating errors, system artifacts, and others. Hardware artifact from a Ghost artifact that is caused by lag effect occurred most frequently. The others cases are the artifacts caused by RF noise and foreign body in equipments. Software artifacts are many different types of reasons. The uncorrected processing artifacts and the image processing error artifacts occurred most frequently. Exposure data recognize (EDR) error artifacts, the processing error of commissural line, and etc., the software artifacts were caused by various reasons. Operating artifacts were caused when the user did not have the full understanding of the digital medical image system. System artifacts had appeared the error due to DICOM header information and the compression algorithm. The obvious artifacts should be re-examined, and it could result in increasing the exposure dose of the patient. The unclear artifact leads to a wrong diagnosis and added examination. The ability to correctly determine artifact are required. We have to reduce the artifact occurrences by understanding its characteristic and providing sustainable education as well as the maintenance of the equipments.

  9. Artifacts in digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Whan; Kim, Jung Min; Jeong, Hoi Woun

    2015-01-01

    Digital Radiography is a big part of diagnostic radiology. Because uncorrected digital radiography image supported false effect of Patient’s health care. We must be manage the correct digital radiography image. Thus, the artifact images can have effect to make a wrong diagnosis. We report types of occurrence by analyzing the artifacts that occurs in digital radiography system. We had collected the artifacts occurred in digital radiography system of general hospital from 2007 to 2014. The collected data had analyzed and then had categorize as the occurred causes. The artifacts could be categorized by hardware artifacts, software artifacts, operating errors, system artifacts, and others. Hardware artifact from a Ghost artifact that is caused by lag effect occurred most frequently. The others cases are the artifacts caused by RF noise and foreign body in equipments. Software artifacts are many different types of reasons. The uncorrected processing artifacts and the image processing error artifacts occurred most frequently. Exposure data recognize (EDR) error artifacts, the processing error of commissural line, and etc., the software artifacts were caused by various reasons. Operating artifacts were caused when the user did not have the full understanding of the digital medical image system. System artifacts had appeared the error due to DICOM header information and the compression algorithm. The obvious artifacts should be re-examined, and it could result in increasing the exposure dose of the patient. The unclear artifact leads to a wrong diagnosis and added examination. The ability to correctly determine artifact are required. We have to reduce the artifact occurrences by understanding its characteristic and providing sustainable education as well as the maintenance of the equipments

  10. Neutron radiography with the cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazawa, Shuichi; Asada, Yorihisa; Yano, Munehiko; Nakanii, Takehiko.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron radiography is well recognized as a powerful tool in nondestructive testing, but not widely used yet owing to lack of high intense thermal neutron source convenient for practical use. This article presents a new neutron radiograph facility, utilizing a sub-compact cyclotron as neutron source and is equipped with vertical and horizontal irradiation ports. The article describes a series of experiments, we conducted using beams of a variable energy cyclotron at Tohoku University to investigate the characteristics of thermal neutron obtained from 9 Be(p, n) reaction and thermalized by elastic scattering process. The article also describes a computer simulation of neutron moderator to analyze conditions getting maximal thermal neutron flux. Further, some of practical neutron radiograph examinations of aero-space components and museum art objects of classic bronze mirror and an attempt realizing real time imaging technique, are introduced in the article. (author)

  11. Industrial radiography on radiographic paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1977-11-01

    An investigation was performed to compare the quality of radiographic paper with that of X-ray film, after a review had been made of the rather scarce literature on the subject. The equipment used throughout the investigation is described, and characteristic curves for Agfa-Gevaert and Kodak papers exposed with different intensifying screens in the low and intermediate voltage range are reproduced. The relative speed, contrast and exposure latitude were computed from these curves. The quality of the radiographic image was checked on U/Al blocks and plates, Al and Fe blocks, and fiber-reinforced composites. Exposure charts for Al and Fe were made for various paper and screen combinations. Both the sharpness of the radiographic image as well as the influence of processing on speed and contrast were checked. Examples are given of the practical application of the paper for radiography of castings, weldings, solderings, assemblies, etc. (author)

  12. “Drug mules” as a radiological challenge: Sensitivity and specificity in identifying internal cocaine in body packers, body pushers and body stuffers by computed tomography, plain radiography and Lodox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, Patricia M., E-mail: patricia.flach@irm.uzh.ch [Centre for Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Buehlstrasse 20, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Department of Neuroradiology, Inselspital Bern, University of Bern, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Centre for Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Department of Radiology, University Hospital USZ, University of Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Ross, Steffen G. [Centre for Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Buehlstrasse 20, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Ebert, Lars [Centre for Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Buehlstrasse 20, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Centre for Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Germerott, Tanja; Hatch, Gary M. [Centre for Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Buehlstrasse 20, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Thali, Michael J. [Centre for Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Buehlstrasse 20, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Centre for Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190/52, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Patak, Michael A. [Department of Radiology, Inselspital Bern, University of Bern, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Department of Radiology, University Hospital USZ, University of Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of computed tomography (CT), digital radiography (DR) and low-dose linear slit digital radiography (LSDR, Lodox{sup ®}) in the detection of internal cocaine containers. Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained. The study collectively consisted of 83 patients (76 males, 7 females, 16–45 years) suspected of having incorporated cocaine drug containers. All underwent radiological imaging; a total of 135 exams were performed: nCT = 35, nDR = 70, nLSDR = 30. An overall calculation of all “drug mules” and a specific evaluation of body packers, pushers and stuffers were performed. The gold standard was stool examination in a dedicated holding cell equipped with a drug toilet. Results: There were 54 drug mules identified in this study. CT of all drug carriers showed the highest diagnostic accuracy 97.1%, sensitivity 100% and specificity 94.1%. DR in all cases was 71.4% accurate, 58.3% sensitive and 85.3% specific. LSDR of all patients with internal cocaine was 60% accurate, 57.9% sensitive and 63.4% specific. Conclusions: CT was the most accurate test studied. Therefore, the detection of internal cocaine drug packs should be performed by CT, rather than by conventional X-ray, in order to apply the most sensitive exam in the medico-legal investigation of suspected drug carriers. Nevertheless, the higher radiation applied by CT than by DR or LSDR needs to be considered. Future studies should include evaluation of low dose CT protocols in order to address germane issues and to reduce dosage.

  13. “Drug mules” as a radiological challenge: Sensitivity and specificity in identifying internal cocaine in body packers, body pushers and body stuffers by computed tomography, plain radiography and Lodox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flach, Patricia M.; Ross, Steffen G.; Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Ebert, Lars; Germerott, Tanja; Hatch, Gary M.; Thali, Michael J.; Patak, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of computed tomography (CT), digital radiography (DR) and low-dose linear slit digital radiography (LSDR, Lodox ® ) in the detection of internal cocaine containers. Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained. The study collectively consisted of 83 patients (76 males, 7 females, 16–45 years) suspected of having incorporated cocaine drug containers. All underwent radiological imaging; a total of 135 exams were performed: nCT = 35, nDR = 70, nLSDR = 30. An overall calculation of all “drug mules” and a specific evaluation of body packers, pushers and stuffers were performed. The gold standard was stool examination in a dedicated holding cell equipped with a drug toilet. Results: There were 54 drug mules identified in this study. CT of all drug carriers showed the highest diagnostic accuracy 97.1%, sensitivity 100% and specificity 94.1%. DR in all cases was 71.4% accurate, 58.3% sensitive and 85.3% specific. LSDR of all patients with internal cocaine was 60% accurate, 57.9% sensitive and 63.4% specific. Conclusions: CT was the most accurate test studied. Therefore, the detection of internal cocaine drug packs should be performed by CT, rather than by conventional X-ray, in order to apply the most sensitive exam in the medico-legal investigation of suspected drug carriers. Nevertheless, the higher radiation applied by CT than by DR or LSDR needs to be considered. Future studies should include evaluation of low dose CT protocols in order to address germane issues and to reduce dosage

  14. [Digital radiography in young children. Considerations based on experiences in practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkhout, W E R; Mileman, P A; Weerheijm, K L

    2004-10-01

    In dentistry, digital radiology techniques, such as a charge-coupled device and a storage phosphor plate, are gaining popularity. It was the objective of this study to assess the importance of the advantages and disadvantages of digital radiology techniques for bitewing radiography in young children, when compared to conventional film. A group of dentists received a questionnaire regarding their experiences with digital radiology techniques or conventional films among young children. Using the Simple Multi-Attributive Rating Technique (SMART) a final weighted score was calculated for the charge-coupled device, the phosphor plate, and conventional film. The scores were 7.40, 7.38, and 6.98 respectively. The differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.47). It could be concluded that, on the basis of experiences in practice, there are no statistically significant preferences for the use of digital radioogy techniques for bitewing radiography in young children.

  15. Digital detection systems for projection radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, R.F.

    2001-01-01

    This article gives a survey of digital X-ray detection systems for projection radiography. The different principles are compared and some general characteristics are derived. The basic conversion mechanisms in the absorption layers are described. The basic principles of solid state X-ray detectors and their general characteristics are elucidated as well as some similarities with detectors for computed tomography. Some important application and system aspects are considered. An outlook on further possible developments in this field is given. (orig.) [de

  16. Radiography – How do students understand the concept of radiography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, S.M.; Lundén, M.; Andersson, B.T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Radiography as a concept has mainly been associated with the functional role of the radiographer. The concept has been studied from a theoretical point of view. However, there is a lack of a theoretical foundation and research on the actual substance of the term radiography used in education. It is therefore important to undertake an investigation in order to determine how students after three years education understand the subject of radiography. Aim: The aim of this study was to analyse how students in the Swedish radiographers' degree program understand the concept of radiography. Method: A concept analysis was made according to the hybrid model, which combines theoretical, fieldwork and analytical phases. A summative content analysis was used to identify the number and content of statements. The empirical data were collected from questionnaires answered by radiography students at four universities in Sweden. Findings: All radiography students' exemplified radiography with statements related to the practical level although some of them also identified radiography at an abstract level, as a subject within a discipline. The attribute ‘An interdisciplinary area of knowledge’ emerged, which is an attribute on the abstract level. The practical level was described by four attributes: Mastering Medical Imaging’, ‘To accomplish images for diagnosis and interventions’, ‘Creating a caring environment’ and ‘Enabling fruitful encounters’. Conclusion: The hybrid model used was a versatile model of concept development. The results of this study have increased the understanding of what characterizes the concept of radiography in a Swedish context. - Highlights: • This concept analysis of radiography was undertaken according to a hybrid model. • In radiography humanistic aspects are emphasized, a shift from the technological perspective. • The attributes demonstrate the essence and interdisciplinary nature of radiography. • This

  17. Uranium extraction from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lounis, A.

    1983-05-01

    A study has been carried out for the extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid produced in Algeria. First of all, the Algerian phosphoric acid produced in Algeria by SONATRACH has been characterised. This study helped us to synthesize a phosphoric acid that enabled us to pass from laboratory tests to pilot scale tests. We have then examined extraction and stripping parameters: diluent, DZEPHA/TOPO ratio and oxidising agent. The laboratory experiments enabled us to set the optimum condition for the choice of diluent, extractant concentration, ratio of the synergic mixture, oxidant concentration, redox potential. The equilibrium isotherms lead to the determination of the number of theoretical stages for the uranium extraction and stripping of uranium, then the extraction from phosphoric acid has been verified on a pilot scale (using a mixer-settler)

  18. Heavy-ion radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Tobias, C.A.; Holley, W.R.; Benton, E.V.

    1981-01-01

    Heavy-particle radiography has clinical potential as a newly developed noninvasive low-dose imaging procedure that provides increased resolution of minute density differences in soft tissues of the body. The method utilizes accelerated high-energy ions, primarily carbon and neon, at the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The research program for medicine utilizes heavy-ion radiography for low-dose mammography, for treatment planning for cancer patients, and for imaging and accurate densitometry of skeletal structures, brain and spinal neoplasms, and the heart. The potential of heavy-ion imaging, and particularly reconstruction tomography, is now proving to be an adjunct to existing diagnostic imaging procedures in medicine, both for applications to the diagnosis, management and treatment of clinical cancer in man, and for the early detection of small soft-tissue tumors at low radiation dose

  19. Projection radiography and tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Benton, E.V.; Holley, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    Our program on heavy-ion radiography began soon after heavy ions were accelerated to high energies. Heavy ions are capable of very high electron density discrimination combined with good radial image resolution and low dose. Since heavy-ion beams produce many secondries, plastic nuclear detectors have an advantage for recording heavy-ion images. Projection imaging is now a practical technique that can resolve density differences between normal tissue and tumor tissue in some cases in which X rays could not make a distinction. Initial attempts at heavy-ion tomography also indicate potential for high resolution in this field. The physical basis for heavy-ion radiography and tomographic reconstruction studies are discussed in detail

  20. Dose in conventional radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acuna D, E.; Padilla R, Z. P.; Escareno J, E.; Vega C, H. R.

    2011-10-01

    It has been pointed out that medical exposures are the most significant sources of exposure to ionizing radiation for the general population. Inside the medical exposures the most important is the X-ray use for diagnosis, which is by far the largest contribution to the average dose received by the population. From all studies performed in radiology the chest radiography is the most abundant. In an X-ray machine, voltage and current are combined to obtain a good image and a reduce dose, however due to the workload in a radiology service individual dose is not monitored. In order to evaluate the dose due to chest radiography in this work a plate phantom was built according to the ISO recommendations using methylmethacrylate walls and water. The phantom was used in the Imaging department of the Zacatecas General Hospital as a radiology patient asking for a chest study; using thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLD 100 the kerma at the surface entrance was determined. (Author)

  1. Quantitative film radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devine, G.; Dobie, D.; Fugina, J.; Hernandez, J.; Logan, C.; Mohr, P.; Moss, R.; Schumacher, B.; Updike, E.; Weirup, D.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a system of quantitative radiography in order to produce quantitative images displaying homogeneity of parts. The materials that we characterize are synthetic composites and may contain important subtle density variations not discernible by examining a raw film x-radiograph. In order to quantitatively interpret film radiographs, it is necessary to digitize, interpret, and display the images. Our integrated system of quantitative radiography displays accurate, high-resolution pseudo-color images in units of density. We characterize approximately 10,000 parts per year in hundreds of different configurations and compositions with this system. This report discusses: the method; film processor monitoring and control; verifying film and processor performance; and correction of scatter effects

  2. Uranium extraction from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Figueiredo, C. de

    1984-01-01

    The recovery of uranium from phosphoric liquor by two extraction process is studied. First, uranium is reduced to tetravalent condition and is extracted by dioctypyrophosphoric acid. The re-extraction is made by concentrated phosphoric acid with an oxidizing agent. The re-extract is submitted to the second process and uranium is extracted by di-ethylhexilphosphoric acid and trioctylphosphine oxide. (M.A.C.) [pt

  3. Patient care in radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, R.A.; McCloskey, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book focuses on patient care procedures for radiographers. The authors focus on the role of the radiographer as a member of the health care team. The authors report on such topics as communication in patient care: safety, medico-legal considerations, transfer and positioning; physical needs; infection control; medication; CPR standards, acute situations; examination of the GI tract; contrast media; special imaging techniques and bedside radiography

  4. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian; Thomsen, Henrik

    ,3 mAs and SID SID of 180 centimetres using a phantom and lithium fluoride thermo luminescence dosimeter (TLD). Dose to risk organs mamma, thyroid and colon are measured at different collimations with one-centimetre steps. TLD results are used to estimate dose reduction for different collimations...... at the conference. Conclusion: Collimation improvement in basic chest radiography can reduce the radiation to female patients at chest x-ray examinations....

  5. Digital radiography in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Rob; Campbell, Mark R

    2002-06-01

    With the permanent habitation of the International Space Station, the planning of longer duration exploration missions, and the possibility of space tourism, it is likely that digital radiography will be needed in the future to support medical care in space. Ultrasound is currently the medical imaging modality of choice for spaceflight. Digital radiography in space is limited because of prohibitive launch costs (in the region of $20,000/kg) that severely restrict the volume, weight, and power requirements of medical care hardware. Technological increases in radiography, a predicted ten-fold decrease in future launch costs, and an increasing clinical need for definitive medical care in space will drive efforts to expand the ability to provide medical care in space including diagnostic imaging. Normal physiological responses to microgravity, in conjunction with the high-risk environment of spaceflight, increase the risk of injury and could imply an extended recovery period for common injuries. The advantages of gravity on Earth, such as the stabilization of patients undergoing radiography and the drainage of fluids, which provide radiographic contrast, are unavailable in space. This creates significant difficulties in patient immobilization and radiographic positioning. Gravity-dependent radiological signs, such as lipohemarthrosis in knee and shoulder trauma, air or fluid levels in pneumoperitoneum, pleural effusion, or bowel obstruction, and the apical pleural edge in pneumothorax become unavailable. Impaired healing processes such as delayed callus formation following fracture will have implications on imaging, and recovery time lines are unknown. The confined nature of spacecraft and the economic impossibility of launching lead-based personal protective equipment present significant challenges to crew radiation safety. A modified, free-floating radiographic C-arm device equipped with a digital detector and utilizing teleradiology support is proposed as a

  6. Panoramic dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushman, R.H.; Kircher, D.R.; Hart, F.W.; Ciavattoni, A.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus is described for improving the handling rate of patients in panoramic dental radiography when tube head-camera assembly of a low silhouette panoramic dental X-ray machine is rotated for a scan in one direction only. This is effected by fast return of the tube head-camera assembly with its simultaneous elevation, thus facilitating the radiographed patient's exit from the machine and the entrance of another patient. Fast speed is about twice the scanning speed. (author)

  7. Compton radiography, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Shinichi; Sera, Koichiro; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Shishido, Fumio; Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1977-01-01

    Tomographic images of an object are obtainable by irradiating it with a collimated beam of monochromatic gamma rays and recording the resultant Compton rays scattered upward at right angles. This is the scattered-ray principle of the formation of a radiation image that differs from the traditional ''silhouette principle'' of radiography, and that bears prospects of stereopsis as well as cross-section tomography. (Evans, J.)

  8. An overview of digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aweligiba, S. A.

    2013-04-01

    The medical application of radiography has gained wider study since diagnostic radiology plays a very important role in modern medicine for fast diagnosis and therapy. Digital radiography is a relatively new technology that promises greater accuracy, lesser dose and better manipulation of patient radiology images in hospitals. In this study, a general discussion on digital radiography has been presented. The presentation focuses on the optimisation of doses to patients in the medical application of digital radiography, quality control and quality assurance. A brief presentation on performance indicators in digital radiography has also been presented. The advantages of digital radiography over the conventional film/screen system have been elaborated and its limitations are also outlined. (author)

  9. Electron-beam-pumped phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhar, J.; Krupke, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    Electron-beam excitation of solid-state scintillators, or phosphors, can result in efficient generation of visible light confined to relatively narrow regions of the spectrum. The conversion efficiency can exceed 20%, and, with proper choice of phosphors, radiation can be obtained anywhere from the near infrared (IR) to the near ultraviolet (UV). These properties qualify the phosphors as a potentially useful pump source for new solid-state lasers. New phosphors are being developed for high-brightness television tubes that are capable of higher power dissipation. Here, an epitaxial film of fluorescing material is grown on a crystalline substrate with good thermal properties. For example, researchers at North American Philips Laboratories have developed a cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) grown on a YAG substrate, which has operated at 1 A/cm 2 at 20 kV without observed thermal quenching. The input power is higher by almost two orders of magnitude than that which can be tolerated by a conventional television phosphor. The authors describe tests of these new phosphors

  10. Introduction to industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    For the first topic in this book, more on introduction to nondestructive testing, also a little bit on another technique such as magnetic testing, liquid penetrated, ultrasonic testing and others. This book mentions more on radiographic testing and for that, more details on this topic such as history, definition and devices that use in this technique. This radiography testing firstly started with the discovering of x-ray by Wilhelm Roentgen (1895). So, on 1913, David Coolidge successfully invented and developed x-ray tube that could made x-ray more intensified and produced highly penetration forces. Radiography in Malaysia firstly started two years after the discovery made by Wilhelm Roentgen when one hospital here used the x-ray machine for medical purposes. Besides using x-ray, radiography also used gamma rays, and for these purpose, they used Co-60 and Ir-192. Now, more company based on NDT established to provide a service on inspection pipe and others. For filled these requirement, radiographer must take an exam to make them expert and trained well to work in this field. There is no advantage using this technique or other technique. So that's why this book was published to make people understand what is radiographic testing truly.

  11. Apparatus for gamma radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    The aim of the present standard is to fix the rules for the construction of gamma radiography instrumentation without prejudice to the present regulations. These apparatus have to be fitted with only sealed sources conformable to the experimental standard M 61-002. The present standard agrees with the international standard ISO 3999 of 1977 dealing with the same subject. Nevertheless, it is different on the three main following points: it does not accept the same limits of absorbed dose rates in the air calculated on the external surface of projectors; it precribes tightness, bending, crushing and tensile tests for some components of the gamma radiography it prescribes tests of endurance and resistance to breaking for the locking systems of the gamma radiography apparatus. The present standard also specifies the following points: symbols and indications to put on projectors and on the source-holder; identification of the source contained in the projector; and, accompanying documents. The regulation references are given in annexe [fr

  12. First experience with digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmann, F.

    1987-01-01

    The digital radiogram is explained, its advantages being the various possibilities of image processing, loss-free transmission, recording and storage capabilities, and in special cases, prompt availability of processed images. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and the high-resolution method of digital, luminescent radiography, which replaced the conventional film-foil radiography, are explained as the first developments for the introduction of digital radiography, which today already is an applicable technique. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Neutron radiography of Apollo ordnance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golliher, K.G.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron radiography played an important role in the successful Apollo missions. Neutron radiography was used, for the first time, on a production basis to examine the internal details of ordnance devices employed in the Apollo Program. Ordnance devices ranged from charges which separated the massive booster stages to those which triggered the release of re-entry parachutes. Discussed are the early developments in neutron radiography and the conversion of this infant nondestructive technology into production capabilities. (Auth.)

  14. Double beam neutron radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.C.

    1977-09-01

    The DR1 reactor at Risoe is used as a neutron source for neutron radiography. In the double-beam neutron radiography facility a neutron flux of an intensity of 1.4 and 1.8 x 10 6 n. cm -2 . s -1 reaches the object to be radiographed. The transport and exposure container used for neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel rods is described, and the exposure technique and procedure are reviewed. The mode by which single neutron radiographs are assembled and assessed is described. This report will be published in the ''Neutron Radiography Newsletter''. (author)

  15. Quality assurance in digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, H.P.; Lehmann, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    At present, there is no standard way of evaluating performance characteristics of digital radiography systems. Continuous measurements of performance parameters are necessary in order to obtain images of high quality. Parameters of quality assurance in digital radiography, which can be evaluated with simple, quick methods, are spatial resolution, low-contrast detectability, dynamic range and exposure dose. Spatial resolution was determined by a lead bar pattern, whereas the other parameters were measured by commercially available phantoms. Performance measurements of 10 digital subtraction angiography (DSA) units and one digital radiography system for unsubtracted digital radiography were assessed. From these results, recommendations for performance parameter levels will be discussed. (author)

  16. Análise de carcinomas epidermóides por meio de radiografia panorâmica e tomografia computadorizada Analysis of squamous cell carcinomas by means of panoramic radiography and computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Cáceres PEREIRA

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo correlacionar aspectos radiográficos como, localização e extensão do tumor, infiltração óssea e de tecidos moles e destruição das corticais, obtidos nas radiografias panorâmicas com os encontrados nas tomografias computadorizadas (TCs. Os aspectos radiográficos de 48 pacientes com diagnóstico histopatológico de carcinomas epidermóides, localizados em várias regiões do complexo buco-maxilo-facial, foram analisados por 4 radiologistas. As radiografias panorâmicas e as tomografias computadorizadas foram realizadas nos hospitais e clínicas da Universidade de Iowa (EUA, FUNDECTO - USP e Hospital Universitário da Universidade de São Paulo (SP, Brasil. Como resultados, obtivemos a grande limitação da radiografia panorâmica em determinar a localização e extensão do tumor, com delimitações bastante imprecisas da lesão. Já as TCs ofereceram resultados mais direcionados como: invasão do tumor em direção a estruturas moles adjacentes, extensão da destruição óssea, bem como a profundidade da lesão, que foram confirmados com os achados cirúrgicos. Concluímos que a tomografia computadorizada demonstrou ser uma técnica bastante sensível na detecção do comprometimento ósseo e do envolvimento de tecidos moles, proporcionando, assim, o auxílio no diagnóstico e no planejamento do tratamento. No entanto, a radiografia panorâmica foi muito pouco sensível e eficaz, por mostrar apenas margens imprecisas e pouco nítidas da lesão, não avaliando o envolvimento de tecidos moles.The purpose of this work was to compare radiographic findings, such as localization and extension of tumors toward the bone and soft tissues, in panoramic radiography and computed tomography (CT. Four radiologists assessed the radiographic findings of 48 patients with the histopathological diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma in different sites of the maxillofacial region. Panoramic radiographs and computed

  17. Gamma radiography and its technological application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtois, G.

    1962-01-01

    After the presentation of gamma radiography and X-ray radiography, the author compare both techniques showing, in particular, the greater utility of gamma radiography in industrial diagnostic and more particularly on works site diagnostic. Problem of using radiography and safety consideration will be studied. Figures shows two radiography equipment which have been designed for gamma radiography respecting the safety regulations required by the Radioisotope Inter-ministerial Commission. In the second part, different techniques and uses of gamma radiography are briefly described : xerography, neutron radiography, fluoroscopy and imaging amplifier, tomography, betatrons and linear accelerators. Cost analysis will discussed in conclusion. (M.P.)

  18. Discussion of ALTERNATIVE systems for industrial radiography using X-ray films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaessen B.; Perdieus, P.; Proegler, H.

    1995-01-01

    Industrial radiography using X-ray films is an established method of NDE. In the last few years, ''novel developments'' have been put on the market as ''alternatives'' to conventional radiography, as e.g. fluorescent screen/film systems, cost-saving films, wide-latitude films, and storage phosphor films. AGFA as a market leader in the sector of X-ray films for industrial radiography has been testing these alternatives, taking into account image quality, sensitivity, handling in terms of portability, reliability, and the essential functions for NDE: (1) Detection of X-radiation; (2) conversion to optical image; (3) evaluation and validation; (4) documentation and archivation. The advantages and drawbacks, the information transfer capabilities, and the performance from the applications point of view are discussed primarily for fluorescent screen/film systems and storage phophor systems. (orig./MM) [de

  19. Applicaton of fluorometallic screens for paper radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, J.D.

    1983-07-01

    After the description of the fluorometallic screens and their spectral sensitivity their sensitometric properties are reviewed. Characteristic curves and exposure charts were computed for the structurix IC paper, exposed with ordinary fluorescent IC 2 as well as luorometallic RCF screens. From them relative speed, contrast and exposure latitude were computed. Radiographic image quality was investigated using ISO wire IQI's and ASTM penetrometers and the constant exposure methods. The investigation has shown that it is possible and advantageous to use fluorometallic screens for paper radiography, especially above the low kilovoltage range. (author)

  20. Mass chest radiography in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papavasiliou, C.

    1987-01-01

    In Greece mass chest radiography has been performed regularly on various population groups as a measure to control tuberculosis. Routine chest radiography is performed in most Greek hospitals on admission. In this report available data-admittedly inadequate-directly or indirectly addressing the problem of benefit versus the risk or cost associated with this examination is presented

  1. Student Incivility in Radiography Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kevin R

    2017-07-01

    To examine student incivility in radiography classrooms by exploring the prevalence of uncivil behaviors along with the classroom management strategies educators use to manage and prevent classroom disruptions. A survey was designed to collect data on the severity and frequency of uncivil student behaviors, classroom management strategies used to address minor and major behavioral issues, and techniques to prevent student incivility. The participants were educators in radiography programs accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. Findings indicated that severe uncivil student behaviors in radiography classrooms do not occur as often as behaviors classified as less severe. Radiography educators in this study used a variety of strategies and techniques to manage and prevent student incivility; however, radiography educators who received formal training in classroom management reported fewer incidents of student incivility than those who had not received formal training. The participants in this study took a proactive approach to addressing severe behavioral issues in the classroom. Many radiography educators transition from the clinical environment to the classroom setting with little to no formal training in classroom management. Radiography educators are encouraged to attend formal training sessions to learn how to manage the higher education classroom effectively. Student incivility is present in radiography classrooms. This study provides a foundation for future research on incivility. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  2. Functioning of industrial radiography services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, R.N.; Costa, H.M. da; Bianchini, F.G.; Arrieta, L.A.I.

    1988-12-01

    The objective of this norm is establish the necessary requirements for the functioning of industrial radiography services, as well as the procedures for acquisition and transfer of radioactive sources and/or X-ray equipments used in industrial radiography [pt

  3. Radiography with polarised neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Michael L.

    2010-08-20

    In this thesis I present a new technique for the spatially resolved investigation of the magnetic properties of bulk samples. Standard one dimensional neutron depolarisation analysis is combined with neutron radiography to a method we call Neutron Depolarisation Imaging (NDI). The experimental setup which was installed at the neutron radiography beam line ANTARES at FRM II consists of a double crystal monochromator, neutron polariser, spin flipper, polarisation analyser and a position sensitive CCD detector. A comprehensive discussion of the requirements for these components is given and the limitations of the method are shown. The maximum spatial resolution which can be achieved with a neutron radiography setup is determined by the collimation of the neutron beam and the distance between sample and detector. Different types of polarisers have been tested and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. A double crystal monochromator and a new type of polariser employing polarising neutron supermirrors based on the principle of an optical periscope were developed and tested during this work. Furthermore, NDI measurements on various samples of the weakly ferromagnetic materials Pd{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x} and Ni{sub 3}Al are presented. Neutron depolarisation radiography and tomography measurements were conducted with a spatial resolution as high as 0.3 mm on Pd{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x} and Ni{sub 3}Al samples. The feasibility of NDI experiments under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 kbar was shown on a sample of Ni{sub 3}Al using a modified Cu:Be clamp cell. A decrease of the ordering temperature by 2 K under hydrostatic pressure was determined from the NDI measurements and shows the potential of the method for further high pressure experiments. Additionally a method was developed which in principle allows to obtain the intrinsic dependence of the ordering temperature T{sub C} on the ordered moment Ms from NDI measurements on inhomogeneous samples containing regions with

  4. Radiography with polarised neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis I present a new technique for the spatially resolved investigation of the magnetic properties of bulk samples. Standard one dimensional neutron depolarisation analysis is combined with neutron radiography to a method we call Neutron Depolarisation Imaging (NDI). The experimental setup which was installed at the neutron radiography beam line ANTARES at FRM II consists of a double crystal monochromator, neutron polariser, spin flipper, polarisation analyser and a position sensitive CCD detector. A comprehensive discussion of the requirements for these components is given and the limitations of the method are shown. The maximum spatial resolution which can be achieved with a neutron radiography setup is determined by the collimation of the neutron beam and the distance between sample and detector. Different types of polarisers have been tested and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. A double crystal monochromator and a new type of polariser employing polarising neutron supermirrors based on the principle of an optical periscope were developed and tested during this work. Furthermore, NDI measurements on various samples of the weakly ferromagnetic materials Pd 1-x Ni x and Ni 3 Al are presented. Neutron depolarisation radiography and tomography measurements were conducted with a spatial resolution as high as 0.3 mm on Pd 1-x Ni x and Ni 3 Al samples. The feasibility of NDI experiments under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 kbar was shown on a sample of Ni 3 Al using a modified Cu:Be clamp cell. A decrease of the ordering temperature by 2 K under hydrostatic pressure was determined from the NDI measurements and shows the potential of the method for further high pressure experiments. Additionally a method was developed which in principle allows to obtain the intrinsic dependence of the ordering temperature T C on the ordered moment Ms from NDI measurements on inhomogeneous samples containing regions with different ordering temperatures. This

  5. Whole-body low-dose computed tomography in multiple myeloma staging: Superior diagnostic performance in the detection of bone lesions, vertebral compression fractures, rib fractures and extraskeletal findings compared to radiography with similar radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Lukas; Ourednicek, Petr; Meckova, Zuzana; Gavelli, Giampaolo; Straub, Jan; Spicka, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    The primary objective of the present prospective study was to compare the diagnostic performance of conventional radiography (CR) and whole-body low-dose computed tomography (WBLDCT) with a comparable radiation dose reconstructed using hybrid iterative reconstruction technique, in terms of the detection of bone lesions, skeletal fractures, vertebral compressions and extraskeletal findings. The secondary objective was to evaluate lesion attenuation in relation to its size. A total of 74 patients underwent same-day skeletal survey by CR and WBLDCT. In CR and WBLDCT, two readers assessed the number of osteolytic lesions at each region and stage according to the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) criteria. A single reader additionally assessed extraskeletal findings and their significance, the number of vertebral compressions and bone fractures. The radiation exposure was 2.7±0.9 mSv for WBLDCT and 2.5±0.9 mSv for CR (P=0.054). CR detected bone involvement in 127 out of 486 regions (26%; Prib fractures compared with CR (188 vs. 47; Pfractures, vertebral compressions and extraskeletal findings, which results in up- or downstaging in 24% patients according to the IMWG criteria. The attenuation of osteolytic lesions can be measured with the avoidance of the partial volume effect.

  6. 21 CFR 182.1073 - Phosphoric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Phosphoric acid. 182.1073 Section 182.1073 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1073 Phosphoric acid. (a) Product. Phosphoric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1073 - Phosphoric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phosphoric acid. 582.1073 Section 582.1073 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1073 Phosphoric acid. (a) Product. Phosphoric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  8. Digital radiography versus conventional radiography during excretory urography: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervi, P.M.; Bighi, S.; Merlo, L.; Lupi, L.; Vita, G.

    1990-01-01

    The authors describe a computed radiographic system employed to generate and archive digital images in intravenous urography. For each exposure the system produces two digital images: the first (left image) simulates a conventional screen-film radiograph, the second (right image); enhances some spatial frequencies and emphasizes the margins of the structures. These images can be modified in their chief parameters and then printed by a laser-printer and archived on optical disks. Four experienced radiologists evaluated digital images with regard to some chief diagnostic parameters and, in 50 patients, they compared digital images with conventional screen-film radiographs and submitted the results to statistical analysis. For some of the chosen parameters, particularly for the evaluation of renal margins before and after contrast medium injection, digital images gave statistically better results than conventional films, while, no statistically significant different was observed for the other parameters. From the results of this preliminary study digital radiography was found to be useful in intravenous urography by reducing the patient's exposition dose, by always obtaining images of good quality, and by enhancing some particular features of the standard image; on the other hand there were many unsolved problems regarding the communicating and archiving system (PACS), because of the slowness of the image transfer procedure, difficulties in data transmission and complexity of referential procedures

  9. Pretreatment of phosphoric acid of Annaba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kada, R.

    1990-03-01

    The most important step in the process of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid is the pretreatment operation. In this study, the adsorption of organic matters on activated carbon was carried out in a batch process and in a fixed bed column. First, the chemical and physical characterization of phosphoric acid, activated carbon and gypsum were performed. In addition, the organic matters were qualitatively analysed and a new and original quantitative method was experimented. Next, the various operating parameters such as agitation speed, granulometry, temperature, solid/liquid ratio, initial concentration, acid flowrate, and bed height were optimized. The experimental equilibrium isotherm was compared to the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson theoretical isotherms. It was noticed that the three models did not fit the experimental isotherm in the total concentration range. Thus, an original bilinear model was proposed. The influence of the operating conditions on the adsorption kinetics was also investigated. As a result of that, a new mathematical model was proposed to determine both the liquid and solid phases mass transfer and the solid phase diffusion coefficient. Finally, adsorption of organic matters on a fixed bed process allowed computation of the number of transfer units (NTU), the height of adsorption zone and the degree of saturation of activated carbon

  10. Recovering uranium from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abodishish, H.A.; Ritchey, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    Precipitation of Fe 3 HN 4 H 8 (PO 4 ) 6 is prevented in the second cycle extractor, in a two cycle uranium recovery process, by washing ammonia laden organic solvent stream, from the second cycle stripper, with first cycle raffinate iron stream containing phosphoric acid, prior to passing the solvent stream into the second cycle extractor. (author)

  11. Digital radiography: study of an alternative technique to conventional radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banchet, J.; Tisseur, D.; Thomas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Digital radiography, already in use in many industrial applications, appears as a potential alternative technique to conventional radiography in the nuclear field (and more especially to the inspection of welded joints). The advantages of digital radiography are a reduced explosion risk (due to the use of lower energy and activity sources), a lower installation time, a reduced exclusion zone, and the absence of effluents. However, to the contrary of the US case, this technique may not be used in France as it is not referenced in the regulating codes (RCCM, etc.). Areva has launched a R and D study in order to characterize the equivalencies between digital and conventional radiography. First results of this study are given

  12. Report based on fiscal 2000 diagnostic X-ray equipment questionnaire survey. Conditions of radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Mitsuo [Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Allied Health Sciences; Matsuura, Takatoshi [Sekishinkai Sayama Hospital, Saitama (Japan); Okuaki, Tomoyuki; Imai, Yoshio; Tsukamoto, Atsuko [Kanto Medical Center NTT EC, Tokyo (Japan); Ide, Toshinori [Kajima Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Kajima Clinic; Shinohara, Fuminori [Nippon Medical School, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). Second Hospital; Miyazaki, Shigeru [Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Ohashi Hospital

    2002-08-01

    X-ray equipment has seen advances in inverters and the digitalization of reception systems. The X-ray Systems Study Group, in order to examine changes in the conditions of radiography, including pediatric radiography, variations in shortest irradiation time, and standardization of the conditions of radiography, carried out investigative research using a questionnaire survey that was sent to 400 facilities. The recovery rate was 33%. In terms of the reception system, half of the general radiography systems were using computed radiography (CR). Seventy percent of respondents used an intensifying screen and film (SEF) in stomach double-contrast radiography. About 80% used digital radiography (DR) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in aorta abdominalis angiography. At least 70% of high-voltage generators were of the inverter type. The conditions of radiography were not greatly influenced by changes in reception systems and X-ray equipment. Many pediatric radiographies were carried out by radiological technologists. We consider it useful to conduct such survey investigations. (author)

  13. [Report based on fiscal 2000 diagnostic x-ray equipment questionnaire survey(conditions of radiography)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Mitsuo; Matsuura, Takatoshi; Okuaki, Tomiyuki; Imai, Yoshio; Tsukamoto, Atsuko; Ide, Toshinori; Shinohara, Fuminori; Miyazaki, Shigeru

    2002-08-01

    X-ray equipment has seen advances in inverters and the digitalization of reception systems. The X-ray Systems Study Group, in order to examine changes in the conditions of radiography, including pediatric radiography, variations in shortest irradiation time, and standardization of the conditions of radiography, carried out investigative research using a questionnaire survey that was sent to 400 facilities. The recovery rate was 33%. In terms of the reception system, half of the general radiography systems were using computed radiography (CR). Seventy percent of respondents used an intensifying screen and film(S EF)in stomach double-contrast radiography. About 80% used digital radiography (DR) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in aorta abdominalis angiography. At least 70% of high-voltage generators were of the inverter type. The conditions of radiography were not greatly influenced by changes in reception systems and X-ray equipment. Many pediatric radiographies were carried out by radiological technologists. We consider it useful to conduct such survey investigations.

  14. Radiography geometry principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    If one object placed in the field under the sun, we can see the shadow of that object in two dimensional where that object was placed. Nevertheless, the sun cannot penetrate deeply so that it will produce the shadow with same object. This principal also same as radiography, however, with ionizing radiation, it can penetrate through the object so that the image that produced not only the shadow of the object but also what are inside the object. So this can give advantages for the radiographer to make inspection what are inside this object. The images that produce depend with the shape, density, thickness and distance between the object, film and source. The reader also will introduce with some term such as Distance source to film, distance source to object, and distance object to film also some basic on DIN standard and API 1104 Standard.

  15. Applications of image plates in neutron radiography and neutron diffraction at BARC, Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Neutron radiography techniques based on Gd, Dy and In metallic foils and X-ray film have been used at this centre since early seventies for various NDT and R and D work in nuclear, defence and aerospace industries. In recent years use of photostimulated luminescence based phosphor imaging plate has been introduced in our work. This has enabled to achieve higher sensitivities and dynamic ranges of recording radiographs with acceptable spatial resolution. It also provides digital image information which is more convenient for quantitative evaluations. Neutron image plates have been used in variety of radiography techniques such as conventional neutron radiography (NR), neutron induced beta radiography (NIBR), hydrogen sensitive epithermal neutron radiography (HYSEN) and for neutron powder diffractometry using Apsara, CIRUS and Dhruva reactors as neutron sources. Recently the image plates have also been used for characterization of thermalized neutron beam from a plasma focus neutron source and recording neutron radiographs. Prior to the utilization image plates have been characterised for their performance. Details of the measurements and applications will be presented. (author)

  16. Application of strong phosphoric acid to radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Kikuo

    1977-01-01

    Not only inorganic and organic compounds but also natural substrances, such as accumulations in soil, are completely decomposed and distilled by heating with strong phosphoric acid for 30 to 50 minutes. As applications of strong phosphoric acid to radiochemistry, determination of uranium and boron by use of solubilization effect of this substance, titration of uranyl ion by use of sulfuric iron (II) contained in this substance, application to tracer experiment, and determination of radioactive ruthenium in environmental samples are reviewed. Strong phosphoric acid is also applied to activation analysis, for example, determination of N in pyrographite with iodate potassium-strong phosphoric acid method, separation of Os and Ru with sulfuric cerium (IV) - strong phosphoric acid method or potassium dechromate-strong phosphoric acid method, analysis of Se, As and Sb rocks and accumulations with ammonium bromide, sodium chloride and sodium bromide-strong phosphoric acid method. (Kanao, N.)

  17. Axial Tomography from Digitized Real Time Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolnay, A. S.; McDonald, W. M.; Doupont, P. A.; McKinney, R. L.; Lee, M. M.

    1985-01-18

    Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

  18. Euratom Neutron Radiography Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    reactor fuel as well as establish standards for radiographic image quality of neutron radiographs. The NRWG meets once a year in each of the neutron radiography centers to review the progress made and draw plans for the future. Besides, ad-hoc sub-groups or. different topics within the field of neutron......In 1979 a Neutron Radiography Working Group (NRWG) was constituted within Buratom with the participation of all centers within the European Community at which neutron facilities were available. The main purpose of NRWG was to standardize methods and procedures used in neutron radiography of nuclear...... radiography are constituted. This paper reviews the activities and achievements of the NRWG and its sub-groups....

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of ... exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician , who ... Medicine Radiation Safety How to Read Your Radiology Report Images related to X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Sponsored ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  2. Proton Radiography (pRad)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose more than 300 dynamic experiments in support...

  3. Absorbed doses for patients undergoing panoramic radiography, cephalometric radiography and CBCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Wrzesień

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Contemporary dental radiology offers a wide spectrum of imaging methods but it also contributes to an increase in the participation of dental radiological diagnosis in the patient’s exposure to ionizing radiation. The aim of this study is to determine the absorbed doses of the brain, spinal column, thyroid and eye lens for patients during panoramic radiography, cephalometric radiography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT. Material and Methods: The thermoluminescent dosimetry and anthropomorphic phantom was used for measuring the doses. The 15 panoramic, 4 cephalometric and 4 CBCT exposures were performed by placing high-sensitivity thermoluminescent detectors (TLD in 18 anatomical points of the phantom. Results: The maximum absorbed dose recorded during performed measurements corresponds to the point representing the brainstem and it is 10 mGy. The dose value recorded by the TLD placed in the thyroid during CBCT imaging in relation to the panoramic radiography differs by a factor of 13.5. Conclusions: Cone beam computed tomography, in comparison with panoramic or cephalometric imaging technique, provides higher radiation doses to the patients. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(5:705–713

  4. Validation od computational model ALDERSON/EGSnrc for chest radiography; Validação do modelo computacional Alderson/EGSnrc para radiografias de tórax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz, Bianca C. [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia de Pernambuco - IFPE, Recife, PE (Brazil); Santos, André L. dos; Menezes, Claudio J.M., E-mail: andre.luiz_76@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: cjmm@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    To perform dose studies in situations of exposure to radiation, without exposing individuals, the numerical dosimetry uses Computational Exposure Models (ECM). Composed essentially by a radioactive source simulator algorithm, a voxel phantom representing the human anatomy and a Monte Carlo code, the ECMs must be validated to determine the reliability of the physical array representation. The objective of this work is to validate the ALDERSON / EGSnrc MCE by through comparisons between the experimental measurements obtained with the ionization chamber and virtual simulations using Monte Carlo Method to determine the ratio of the input and output radiation dose. Preliminary results of these comparisons showed that the ECM reproduced the results of the experimental measurements performed with the physical phantom with a relative error of less than 10%, validating the use of this model for simulations of chest radiographs and estimates of radiation doses in tissues in the irradiated structures.

  5. Cone-beam computed tomography versus digital periapical radiography in the detection of artificially created periapical lesions: A pilot study of the diagnostic accuracy of endodontists using both techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campello, Abdrea Fagundes; Goncalves, Lucio Souza; Marques, Fabio vidal [Faculty of Dentistry, Estacio de Sa University, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Guedes, Fabio Ribeiro [Faculty of Dentistry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of previously trained endodontists in the detection of artificially created periapical lesions using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital periapical radiography (DPR). An ex vivo model using dry skulls was used, in which simulated apical lesions were created and then progressively enlarged using no.1/2, no.2, no.4, and no.6 round burs. A total of 11 teeth were included in the study, and 110 images were obtained with CBCT and with an intraoral digital periapical radiographic sensor (Instrumentarium dental, Tuusula, Finland) initially and after each bur was used. Specificity and sensitivity were calculated. All images were evaluated by 10 previously trained, certified endodontists. Agreement was calculated using the kappa coefficient. The accuracy of each method in detecting apical lesions was calculated using the chi-square test. The kappa coefficient between examiners showed low agreement (range, 0.17-0.64). No statistical difference was found between CBCT and DPR in teeth without apical lesions (P=.15). The accuracy for CBCT was significantly higher than for DPR in all corresponding simulated lesions (P<.001). The correct diagnostic rate for CBCT ranged between 56.9% and 73.6%. The greatest difference between CBCT and DPR was seen in the maxillary teeth (CBCT, 71.4%; DPR, 28.6%; P<.01) and multi-rooted teeth (CBCT, 83.3%; DPR, 33.3%; P<.01). CBCT allowed higher accuracy than DPR in detecting simulated lesions for all simulated lesions tested. Endodontists need to be properly trained in interpreting CBCT scans to achieve higher diagnostic accuracy.

  6. A methodology for radiological accidents analysis in industrial gamma radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.C.A. da.

    1990-01-01

    A critical review of 34 published severe radiological accidents in industrial gamma radiography, that happened in 15 countries, from 1960 to 1988, was performed. The most frequent causes, consequences and dose estimation methods were analysed, aiming to stablish better procedures of radiation safety and accidents analysis. The objective of this work is to elaborate a radiological accidents analysis methodology in industrial gamma radiography. The suggested methodology will enable professionals to determine the true causes of the event and to estimate the dose with a good certainty. The technical analytical tree, recommended by International Atomic Energy Agency to perform radiation protection and nuclear safety programs, was adopted in the elaboration of the suggested methodology. The viability of the use of the Electron Gamma Shower 4 Computer Code System to calculate the absorbed dose in radiological accidents in industrial gamma radiography, mainly at sup(192)Ir radioactive source handling situations was also studied. (author)

  7. Evaluation of the effect of platelet rich plasma (PRP) on enhancement of bone healing in diaphyseal bone defects by radiography and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Özak, Ahmet; Yardimci, Cenk; Nİsbet, Özlem H.; Bayrak, İlkay Koray; Nİsbet, Cevat

    2010-01-01

    The effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) with autogenous cancellous bone graft on enhancement of bone healing in diaphyseal bone defects was evaluated. A 4-mm defect was created in the middiaphysis of the tibias of 20 rabbits. Rabbits were divided into two groups of ten animals each: only autogenous cancellous graft, PRP and autogenous cancellous graft. In animals of group 1, only autogenous cancellous grafts, and to those in group 2, PRP and autogenous cancellous grafts, were applied to the defect. Radiographical and computed tomography (CT) views were taken and evaluated on postoperative days 0, 15, 30, 60, and 90. According to the bone formation, union, and remodeling scores, group 1 had better scores than group 2 on days 30, 60, and 90. The density was significantly increased on day 60 than on days 0, 15, and 30 in group 1. In conclusion, it was evaluated that PRP could not enhance the bone regeneration in diaphyseal defects when used with autogenous cancellous bone graft

  8. A comparison of 3-D computed tomography versus 2-D radiography measurements of ulnar variance and ulnolunate distance during forearm rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Y; Moritomo, H; Omori, S; Kataoka, T; Murase, T; Sugamoto, K

    2014-06-01

    Positive ulnar variance is associated with ulnar impaction syndrome and ulnar variance is reported to increase with pronation. However, radiographic measurement can be affected markedly by the incident angle of the X-ray beam. We performed three-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography measurements of ulnar variance and ulnolunate distance during forearm rotation and compared these with plain radiographic measurements in 15 healthy wrists. From supination to pronation, ulnar variance increased in all cases on the radiographs; mean ulnar variance increased significantly and mean ulnolunate distance decreased significantly. However on 3-D imaging, ulna variance decreased in 12 cases on moving into pronation and increased in three cases; neither the mean ulnar variance nor mean ulnolunate distance changed significantly. Our results suggest that the forearm position in which ulnar variance increased varies among individuals. This may explain why some patients with ulnar impaction syndrome complain of wrist pain exacerbated by forearm supination. It also suggests that standard radiographic assessments of ulnar variance are unreliable. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Radioluminescent nuclear batteries with different phosphor layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Liang; Tang, Xiao-Bin; Xu, Zhi-Heng; Liu, Yun-Peng; Chen, Da

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We present and test the electrical properties of the nuclear battery. • The best thickness range for ZnS:Cu phosphor layer is 12–14 mg cm −2 for 147 Pm radioisotope. • The best thickness range for Y 2 O 2 S:Eu phosphor layer is 17–21 mg cm −2147 Pm radioisotope. • The battery with ZnS:Cu phosphor layer can provide higher energy conversion efficiency. • The mechanism affecting the nuclear battery output performance is revealed. - Abstract: A radioluminescent nuclear battery based on the beta radioluminescence of phosphors is presented, and which consists of 147 Pm radioisotope, phosphor layers, and GaAs photovoltaic cell. ZnS:Cu and Y 2 O 2 S:Eu phosphor layers for various thickness were fabricated. To investigate the effect of phosphor layer parameters on the battery, the electrical properties were measured. Results indicate that the optimal thickness ranges for the ZnS:Cu and Y 2 O 2 S:Eu phosphor layers are 12 mg cm −2 to 14 mg cm −2 and 17 mg cm −2 to 21 mg cm −2 , respectively. ZnS:Cu phosphor layer exhibits higher fluorescence efficiency compared with the Y 2 O 2 S:Eu phosphor layer. Its spectrum properly matches the spectral response of GaAs photovoltaic cell. As a result, the battery with ZnS:Cu phosphor layer indicates higher energy conversion efficiency than that with Y 2 O 2 S:Eu phosphor layer. Additionally, the mechanism of the phosphor layer parameters that influence the output performance of the battery is discussed through the Monte Carlo method and transmissivity test

  10. Multi-Institutional Evaluation of Digital Tomosynthesis, Dual-Energy Radiography, and Conventional Chest Radiography for the Detection and Management of Pulmonary Nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, James T; McAdams, H Page; Sabol, John M; Chakraborty, Dev P; Kazerooni, Ella A; Reddy, Gautham P; Vikgren, Jenny; Båth, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To conduct a multi-institutional, multireader study to compare the performance of digital tomosynthesis, dual-energy (DE) imaging, and conventional chest radiography for pulmonary nodule detection and management. Materials and Methods In this binational, institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant prospective study, 158 subjects (43 subjects with normal findings) were enrolled at four institutions. Informed consent was obtained prior to enrollment. Subjects underwent chest computed tomography (CT) and imaging with conventional chest radiography (posteroanterior and lateral), DE imaging, and tomosynthesis with a flat-panel imaging device. Three experienced thoracic radiologists identified true locations of nodules (n = 516, 3-20-mm diameters) with CT and recommended case management by using Fleischner Society guidelines. Five other radiologists marked nodules and indicated case management by using images from conventional chest radiography, conventional chest radiography plus DE imaging, tomosynthesis, and tomosynthesis plus DE imaging. Sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy were measured by using the free-response receiver operating characteristic method and the receiver operating characteristic method for nodule detection and case management, respectively. Results were further analyzed according to nodule diameter categories (3-4 mm, >4 mm to 6 mm, >6 mm to 8 mm, and >8 mm to 20 mm). Results Maximum lesion localization fraction was higher for tomosynthesis than for conventional chest radiography in all nodule size categories (3.55-fold for all nodules, P chest radiography for all nodules (1.49-fold, P chest radiography, as given by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (1.23-fold, P chest radiography or tomosynthesis. Conclusion Tomosynthesis outperformed conventional chest radiography for lung nodule detection and determination of case management; DE imaging did not show significant differences over conventional chest

  11. Phosphorous loads evaluation from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezzanotte, V.

    1996-01-01

    With reference to the well known difficulty of quantifying non point phosphorous loads, as well as to their growing relative importance where point source leads decrease, a literature review has been carried out concerning soil export coefficients. On such basis, the values which seem to be the most appropriate for Italy have been estimated for different land use categories. The main mechanisms determining non point phosphorous load generation and the factors affecting their importance are also described. In the end, criteria for estimating the importance of non point sources in a basin are suggested to be used for deciding whether a traditional, parametric assessment (inevitably involving a certain error) can be acceptable or experimental measures are needed

  12. Uranium extraction in phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Figueiredo, C. de

    1984-01-01

    Uranium is recovered from the phosphoric liquor produced from the concentrate obtained from phosphorus-uraniferous mineral from Itataia mines (CE, Brazil). The proposed process consists of two extraction cycles. In the first one, uranium is reduced to its tetravalent state and then extracted by dioctylpyrophosphoric acid, diluted in Kerosene. Re-extraction is carried out with concentrated phosphoric acid containing an oxidising agent to convert uranium to its hexavalent state. This extract (from the first cycle) is submitted to the second cycle where uranium is extracted with DEPA-TOPO (di-2-hexylphosphoric acid/tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide) in Kerosene. The extract is then washed and uranium is backextracted and precipitated as commercial concentrate. The organic phase is recovered. Results from discontinuous tests were satisfactory, enabling to establish operational conditions for the performance of a continuous test in a micro-pilot plant. (Author) [pt

  13. Comparison of chest radiography and high-resolution computed tomography findings in early and low-grade coal worker's pneumoconiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savranlar, A.; Altin, R.; Mahmutyazicioglu, K.; Ozdemir, H.; Kart, L.; Ozer, T.; Gundogdu, S. [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey). Faculty of Medicine

    2004-08-01

    High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is more sensitive than chest X-ray (CXR) in the depiction of parenchymal abnormalities. The paper presents and compares CXR and HRCT findings in coal workers with and without early and low-grade coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP). 71 coal workers were enrolled in the study. HRCT's were graded according to Hosoda and Shida's Japanese classification. After grading, 67 workers with CXR profusion 0/0-2/2 were included in the study. Four patients with major opacity were excluded. Profusion 0/1 to 1/1 cases were accepted as early and profusion and 2/2 cases as low-grade pneumoconiosis. Discordance rate was found to be higher in the early pneumoconiosis cases with negative CXR than low-grade pneumoconiosis (60, 36 and 8%, respectively). When coal miners with normal CXR were evaluated by HRCT, six out of 10 cases were diagnosed as positive. In low-grade pneumoconiosis group, the number of patients with positive CXR but negative HRCT were low in comparison to patients with CXR negative and early pneumoconiosis findings. Most of the CXR category 0 patients (10/16) were diagnosed as category 1 by HRCT. Eleven cases diagnosed as CXR category 1 were diagnosed as category 0 (7/11) and category 2 (4/11) by HRCT. In CXR category 2 (eight cases), there were four cases diagnosed as category 1 by HRCT. Overall, discordance between CXR and HRCT was high, especially for CXR negative and early pneumoconiosis cases. The role of CXR in screening coal workers to detect early pneumoconiosis findings should be questioned. The authors suggest using HRCT as a standard screening method instead of CXR to distinguish between normal and early pneumoconiosis.

  14. Luminescence studies on phosphor screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayiotakis, G.; Nomikos, C.; Bakas, A.; Proimos, B.

    1994-01-01

    We report our results on x-ray phosphor screens prepared of some new materials focusing attention on their efficiency under fluoroscopy conditions, on optimization conditions and on comparisons among the various materials. All data are presented in absolute values. A theoretical model is presented, that takes into account the granular structure of the screens, permitting the explanation and prediction of the luminescence properties of the screens. (authors)

  15. Luminescence studies on phosphor screens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panayiotakis, G; Nomikos, C; Bakas, A; Proimos, B [Medical Physics Department, University of Patras, 265 00 Patras, Greece (Greece)

    1994-12-31

    We report our results on x-ray phosphor screens prepared of some new materials focusing attention on their efficiency under fluoroscopy conditions, on optimization conditions and on comparisons among the various materials. All data are presented in absolute values. A theoretical model is presented, that takes into account the granular structure of the screens, permitting the explanation and prediction of the luminescence properties of the screens. (authors). 12 refs, 3 figs.

  16. Digital luminescent radiography: A substitute for conventional chest radiography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufang, K.F.R.; Krug, B.; Lorenz, R.; Steinbrich, W.

    1990-01-01

    The image quality of digital luminescent radiography (DLR) is sufficient for routine biplane chest radiography and for follow-up studies of heart size, pulmonary congestion, coin lesions, infiltrations, atelectasis, pleural effusions, and mediastinal and hilar lymph node enlargement. Chest radiography in the intensive care unit may in most cases be performed using the DLR technique. there is no need for repeat shots because of incorrect exposure, and the position of catheters, tubes, pacemakers, drains and artificial heart valves, the mediastinum, and the retrocardiac areas of the left lung are more confidently assessed on the edge-enhanced DLR films than on conventional films. Nevertheless, DLR is somewhat inferior to conventional film-screen radiography of the chest as it can demonstrate or rule out subtle pulmonary interstitial disease less confidently. There is no reduction of radiation exposure of the chest in DLR compared with modern film-screen systems. As a consequence, DLR is presently not in a position to replace traditional film-screen radiography of the chest completely. (orig.) [de

  17. Heavy-ion radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Tobias, C.A.; Holley, W.R.; Benton, E.V.; Woodruff, K.H.; MacFarland, E.W.

    1983-01-01

    High energy, heavy-ion beams offer superior discrimination of tissue electron densities at very low radiation doses. This characteristic has potential for diagnostic medical imaging of neoplasms arising in the soft tissues and organs because it can detect smaller inhomogeneities than x rays. Heavy-ion imaging may also increase the accuracy of cancer radiotherapy planning involving use of accelerated charged particles. In the current physics research program of passive heavy-ion imaging, critical modulation transfer function tests are being carried out in heavy-ion projection radiography and heavy-ion computerized tomography. The research goal is to improve the heavy-ion imaging method until it reaches the limits of its theoretical resolution defined by range straggling, multiple scattering, and other factors involved in the beam quality characteristics. Clinical uses of the imaging method include the application of heavy-ion computerized tomography to heavy-ion radiotherapy planning, to the study of brain tumors and other structures of the head, and to low-dose heavy-ion projection mammography, particularly for women with dense breasts where other methods of diagnosis fail. The ions used are primarily 300 to 570 MeV/amu carbon and neon ions accelerated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac

  18. Dose audit for patients undergoing two common radiography examinations with digital radiology systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnal, Tolga; Ataç, Gökçe

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to determine the radiation doses delivered to patients undergoing general examinations using computed or digital radiography systems in Turkey. MATERIALS AND METHODS Radiographs of 20 patients undergoing posteroanterior chest X-ray and of 20 patients undergoing anteroposterior kidney-ureter-bladder radiography were evaluated in five X-ray rooms at four local hospitals in the Ankara region. Currently, almost all radiology departments in Turkey have switched from conventional radiography systems to computed radiography or digital radiography systems. Patient dose was measured for both systems. The results were compared with published diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) from the European Union and International Atomic Energy Agency. RESULTS The average entrance surface doses (ESDs) for chest examinations exceeded established international DRLs at two of the X-ray rooms in a hospital with computed radiography. All of the other ESD measurements were approximately equal to or below the DRLs for both examinations in all of the remaining hospitals. Improper adjustment of the exposure parameters, uncalibrated automatic exposure control systems, and failure of the technologists to choose exposure parameters properly were problems we noticed during the study. CONCLUSION This study is an initial attempt at establishing local DRL values for digital radiography systems, and will provide a benchmark so that the authorities can establish reference dose levels for diagnostic radiology in Turkey. PMID:24317331

  19. Dose audit for patients undergoing two common radiography examinations with digital radiology systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnal, Tolga; Ataç, Gökçe

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the radiation doses delivered to patients undergoing general examinations using computed or digital radiography systems in Turkey. Radiographs of 20 patients undergoing posteroanterior chest X-ray and of 20 patients undergoing anteroposterior kidney-ureter-bladder radiography were evaluated in five X-ray rooms at four local hospitals in the Ankara region. Currently, almost all radiology departments in Turkey have switched from conventional radiography systems to computed radiography or digital radiography systems. Patient dose was measured for both systems. The results were compared with published diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) from the European Union and International Atomic Energy Agency. The average entrance surface doses (ESDs) for chest examinations exceeded established international DRLs at two of the X-ray rooms in a hospital with computed radiography. All of the other ESD measurements were approximately equal to or below the DRLs for both examinations in all of the remaining hospitals. Improper adjustment of the exposure parameters, uncalibrated automatic exposure control systems, and failure of the technologists to choose exposure parameters properly were problems we noticed during the study. This study is an initial attempt at establishing local DRL values for digital radiography systems, and will provide a benchmark so that the authorities can establish reference dose levels for diagnostic radiology in Turkey.

  20. Consumption of Pt anode in phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, N.; Urata, K.; Motohira, N.; Ota, K. [Yokohama National University, Yokohama (Japan)

    1997-12-05

    Consumption of Pt anode was investigated in phosphoric acid of various concentration. In 30-70wt% phosphoric acid, Pt dissolved at the rate of 19{mu}gcm{sup -2}h{sup -1}. On the other hand, in 85 wt% phosphoric acid, the amount increased to 0.91 mgcm{sup -2}h{sup -1} which is ca. 180 and 1800 times as much as in 1M sulfuric acid and 1M alkaline solution, respectively. In the diluted phosphoric acid solution, the Pt surface was covered with Pt oxides during the electrolysis, which would prevent the surface from corrosion. However, in the concentrated phosphoric acid, no such oxide surface was observed. Concentrated phosphoric acid might form stable complex with Pt species, therefore the uncovered bare Pt surface is situated in the serious corrosion condition under the high overvoltage and Pt would dissolve into the solution directly instead of forming the Pt oxides. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Method of preparing a thermoluminescent phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, Jerome B.; Moran, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    A thermoluminescent phosphor comprising LiF doped with boron and magnesium is produced by diffusion of boron into a conventional LiF phosphor doped with magnesium. Where the boron dopant is made to penetrate only the outer layer of the phosphor, it can be used to detect shallowly penetrating radiation such as tritium beta ays in the presence of a background of more penetrating radiation.

  2. Dose area product measurement for diagnostic reference levels and analysis of patient dose in dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, S.; Lee, B.; Shin, G.; Choi, J.; Kim, J.; Park, C.; Park, H.; Lee, K.; Kim, Y.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were suggested and patient doses were analysed through the dose-area product value in dental radiography. In intraoral radiography, at three sites, i.e. molar, premolar and incisor on the maxilla and acquired third quartile values: 55.5, 46 and 36.5 mGy cm 2 , respectively, were measured. In panoramic, cephalo-metric and cone beam computed tomography, the values were 120.3, 146 and 3203 mGy cm 2 (16 x 18 cm), respectively. It has been shown that, in intraoral radiography, the patient dose changes proportionally to the value of mA s, but the change in extra-oral radiography in response to mA s could not be confirmed. The authors could confirm, however, the difference in dose according to the manufacturer in all dental radiography examinations, except for panoramic radiography. Depending on the size of hospital, there were some differences in patient dose in intraoral radiography, but no difference in patient dose in extra-oral radiography. (authors)

  3. Digital portal radiography in mantle-field irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheck, R.J.; Wendt, T.; Panzer, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper evaluates the potential of digital luminescence radiography to improve image quality of portal films in mantle-field irradiation. Conventional and digital verification films of an anthropomorphic phantom and 20 patients treated for Hodgkin disease with mantle radiation therapy were obtained with high-energy photon beams. Both conventional films and storage phosphor screens were placed into a cassette with steel intensifier screens. Exposed storage phosphor screens were processed in a semiautomatic mode, with an optimized contrast curve with moderate edge enhancement, and printed as hard copies in a double-image output format. Images were evaluated according to contrast resolution, delineation of anatomic structures, and accuracy of field alignment. Digital portal radiographs were superior to conventional ones with regard to contrast resolution. Thus, they allowed quick and easy detection of relevant structures, although delineation of anatomic structures and field alignments were judged to be equivalent with both techniques. Shorter exposure times for digital images resulted in a reduction in motion artifacts

  4. Digital Radiography in Kenya today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omenta, E.N.

    2006-01-01

    Its nearly one year and a half since digital imaging/radiography was introduced in Kenya mainly in Nairobi. the technology is becoming an increasingly effective and acceptable modality of producing radiographs from the traditional conventional radiography in use to date. the digital radiography offers numerous advantages that have been noted for the short period over the conventional way. For instance radiographs are produced in real time (less than 3 minutes), by so doing the technology has eliminated the wait for the processing period. the radiation exposure to the patient under the radiological examination is reduced as much as 90% from the traditional conventional film taking. The cost, labour and record-keeping necessary to maintain a chemical processor and darkroom operations are as well eliminated. The cost of purchasing and disposing of film wastes/darkroom processing chemicals, which are environmentally hazardous, also become unnecessary.digital radiography technology makes the digital images comparable to other images on the screen at that instant making both the patient and the clinician easily access images when needed. digital receptors have also replaced the cassette containing intensifying screens and film that is used in conventional radiography

  5. A note on digital dental radiography in forensic odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiam, Sher-Lin

    2014-09-01

    Digital dental radiography, intraoral and extraoral, is becoming more popular in dental practice. It offers convenience, such as lower exposure to radiation, ease of storing of images, and elimination of chemical processing. However, it also has disadvantages and drawbacks. One of these is the potential for confusion of the orientation of the image. This paper outlines one example of this, namely, the lateral inversion of the image. This source of confusion is partly inherent in the older model of phosphor storage plates (PSPs), as they allow both sides to be exposed without clue to the fact that the image is acquired on the wrong side. The native software allows digital manipulation of the X-ray image, permitting both rotation and inversion. Attempts to orientate the X-ray according to the indicator incorporated on the plate can then sometimes lead to inadvertent lateral inversion of the image. This article discusses the implications of such mistakes in dental digital radiography to forensic odontology and general dental practice.

  6. Phosphors for X-ray intensification screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebatin, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    An improved rare earth oxyhalide phosphor for x-ray intensification screens is described. The phosphors, of formula LnOX.T where Ln = La or Gd, X = Cl or Br and T = Tm or Tb, are mixed with a small amount of a trivalent antimony compound. The addition of antimony overcomes ageing due to attack by atmospheric moisture and renders the phosphor freeflowing so that dispersions can be readily made. Preferably the phosphor is washed with an aqueous solution of the antimony compound and the compound is the fluoride, chloride or butoxide, or potassium antimony tartrate. (U.K.)

  7. Industrial Radiography | Radiation Protection | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Manufacturers use a method called industrial radiography to check for cracks or flaws in materials. Radiation is used in industrial radiography to show problems not visible from the outside without damaging the material.

  8. Neutron radiography using a transportable superconducting cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D.A. (School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)); Hawkesworth, M.R. (School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)); Beynon, T.D. (School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)); Green, S. (School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)); Rogers, J.D. (Rolls-Royce, Derby (United Kingdom)); Allen, M.J. (Rolls-Royce, Derby (United Kingdom)); Plummer, H.C. (Rolls-Royce, MatEval, Derby (United Kingdom)); Boulding, N.J. (Oxford Instruments (United Kingdom)); Cox, M. (Oxford Instruments (United Kingdom)); McDougall, I. (Oxford Instruments (United Kingdom))

    1994-12-30

    A thermal neutron radiography system based on a compact 12 MeV superconducting proton cyclotron is described. Neutrons are generated using a thick beryllium target and moderated in high density polyethylene. Monte Carlo computer simulations have been used to model the neutron and photon transport in order to optimise the performance of the system. With proton beam currents in excess of 100 [mu]A, it can provide high thermal neutron fluxes with L/D ratios of between 50 and 300 for various applications. Both film and electronic imaging are used to produce radiographs. The electronic imaging system consists of a [sup 6]Li-loaded ZnS intensifier screen, and a low light CCD or SIT camera. High resolution images can be recorded and computer-controlled data processing, analysis and display are possible. ((orig.))

  9. Image Acquisition and Quality in Digital Radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    Medical imaging has undergone dramatic changes and technological breakthroughs since the introduction of digital radiography. This article presents information on the development of digital radiography and types of digital radiography systems. Aspects of image quality and radiation exposure control are highlighted as well. In addition, the article includes related workplace changes and medicolegal considerations in the digital radiography environment. ©2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  10. Digital radiography: description and user's guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthel, A. [Cryospace, 78 - Les Mureaux (France); Bonin, Th. [CEA Valduc, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France); Cadilhon, S.; Thiery, Ch. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France); Chatellier, L. [Electricite de France (EDF-RD), Recherche et Developpement, 78 - Chatou (France); Kaftandjian, V. [Lyon Univ., INSA Lab. Controle Non Destructif par Rayonnements Ionisants (CNDRI), 69 (France); Honorat, Ph.; Torrent, J. [SNECMA, 75 - Paris (France); Le Brun, A. [Electricite de France, 78 - Chatou (France); Maglaive, J.C. [Euromev, 78 - Buc (France); Moreau, Ph. [General Electric Industrial Inspection Technologies, 69 - Limonest (France); Pettier, J.L. [CEA Cadarach, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Rebuffel, V. [CEA Grenoble, Lab. d' Electronique et de Technologie de l' Informatique (LETI), 38 (France); Roenelle, P. [Centre d' Etudes Techniques de l' Equipement, 69 - Bron Lyon (France); Roussilhe, J. [Carestream Health France SA, 71 - Chalon/Saone (France); Staat, St.; Tahon, M. [Cegelec, 91 - Bretigny sur Orge (France)

    2007-07-01

    The presented document arises from the work of the group 'Digital Radiography and sensors' of COFREND. It is a collective work of synthesis aimed to analyze the quality parameters of digital images influencing the answer and the diagnosis brought to a given industrial problem. Five families of digital sensors have been studied: 1. Image Intensifier coupled with CCD devices - 2. scintillators coupled with a CCD device- 3. Flat Panels with indirect conversion - 4. Flat Panels with direct electric conversion - 5. Photostimulable Storage Phosphor Screens). In particular, concerning a complete imaging chain, it deals with the notions of magnification, blur (unsharpness) (geometrical, kinetic or internal to the very sensor), noises, scattered radiation, spatial resolution, which is different from the one of analog detectors such as films, Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR), sensitivity using IQIs, dynamic range, detection quantum efficiency, persistence and temporal resolution. This document is not a standard; it must be understood as a user's guide, and it approaches some essentials corrections to bring to a sensor in order to optimize his efficiency without losing information during the pre-processing phase in the radiographic acquisition. It also introduces some image processing tools commonly used. It can be used as a source document to the future elaboration of a standardisation document. It augurs not at all of the choice of a digital sensor with regard to the traditional radiographic film, but gives bases of reflection to a radio user for a sensible transfer from the classic radiography to the digital radiography. (authors)

  11. Neutron radiography for nondestructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, J.

    1979-01-01

    Neutron radiography is similar to X-ray inspection in that both depend upon use of radiation that penetrates some materials and is absorbed by others to provide a contrast image of conditions not readily available for visual inspection. X-rays are absorbed by dense materials, such as metals, whereas neutrons readily penetrate metals, but are absorbed by materials containing hydrogen. The neutron radiography has been successfully applied to a number of inspection situations. These include the inspection of explosives, advanced composites, adhesively bonded structures and a number of aircraft engine components. With the availability of Californium-252, it has become feasible to construct mobile neutron radiography systems suitable for field use. Such systems have been used for in-situ inspection of flight line aircraft, particularly to locate and measure hidden corrosion

  12. Neutron radiography of fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, C.N. Jr.; Powers, H.G.; Burgess, C.A.

    1975-01-01

    Neutron radiography performed with a reactor source has been shown to be a superior radiographic method for the examination of unirradiated mixed oxide fuel pins at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. Approximately 1,700 fuel pins were contained in a sample that demonstrated the capability of the method for detecting laminations, structural flaws, fissile density variation, hydrogenous inclusions and voids in assembled fuel pins. The nature, extent, and importance of the detected conditions are substantiated by gamma autoradiography and by destructive analysis employing alpha autoradiography, electron microprobe and visual inspection. Also, a series of radiographs illustrate the response of neutron radiography as compared to low voltage and high voltage x-ray and gamma source Iridium 192 radiography. (U.S.)

  13. Organ dose variability and trends in tomosynthesis and radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoye, Jocelyn; Zhang, Yakun; Agasthya, Greeshma; Sturgeon, Greg; Kapadia, Anuj; Segars, W Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between patient attributes and organ dose for a population of computational phantoms for 20 tomosynthesis and radiography protocols. Organ dose was estimated from 54 adult computational phantoms (age: 18 to 78 years, weight 52 to 117 kg) using a validated Monte-Carlo simulation (PENELOPE) of a system capable of performing tomosynthesis and radiography. The geometry and field of view for each exam were modeled to match clinical protocols. For each protocol, the energy deposited in each organ was estimated by the simulations, converted to dose units, and then normalized by exposure in air. Dose to radiosensitive organs was studied as a function of average patient thickness in the region of interest and as a function of body mass index. For tomosynthesis, organ doses were also studied as a function of x-ray tube position. This work developed comprehensive information for organ dose dependencies across a range of tomosynthesis and radiography protocols. The results showed a protocol-dependent exponential decrease with an increasing patient size. There was a variability in organ dose across the patient population, which should be incorporated in the metrology of organ dose. The results can be used to prospectively and retrospectively estimate organ dose for tomosynthesis and radiography.

  14. Neutron-induced alpha radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Marco Antonio Stanojev

    2008-01-01

    A new radiography technique to inspect thin samples was developed. Low energy alpha particles, generated by a boron based screen under thermal neutron irradiation, are used as penetrating radiation. The solid state nuclear track detector CR-39 has been used to register the image. The interaction of the α - particles with the CR-39 gives rise to damages which under an adequate chemical etching became tracks the basic units forming the image. A digital system was developed for data acquisition and data analysis as well as for image processing. The irradiation and etching conditions to obtain the best radiography are 1,3 hours and 25 minutes at 70 deg C respectively. For such conditions samples having 10 μm in thickness can be inspected with a spatial resolution of 32 μm. The use of the digital system has reduced the time spent for data acquisition and data analysis and has improved the radiography image visualization. Furthermore, by using the digital system, it was possible to study several new parameters regarding the tracks which are very important to understand and study the image formation theory in solid state nuclear track detectors, the one used in this thesis. Some radiography images are also shown which demonstrate the potential of the proposed radiography technique. When compared with the other radiography techniques already in use to inspect thin samples, the present one developed in the present paper allows a smaller time to obtain the image, it is not necessary to handle liquid radioactive substances, the detector is insensitive to β, γ, X-ray and visible light. (author)

  15. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Chest Chest x-ray uses a very small dose ... Radiography? What is a Chest X-ray (Chest Radiography)? The chest x-ray is the most commonly performed diagnostic ...

  16. A range of equipment for dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, G.P.M.; Clement, S.L.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review of the history of dental radiography is followed by a description of the latest Philips equipment, ranging from compact units for intra-oral radiography to advanced systems for panoramic techniques and skull radiography. The advantages of automatic exposure control and automatic film processing are also discussed. In conclusion, some probable future trends are forecast. (Auth.)

  17. Development of tungsten collimators for industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varkey, P.A.; Verma, P.B.; Jayakumar, T.K.; Mammachan, M.K.

    2001-01-01

    Collimators are essential components of industrial radiography set up as it provides radiation safety to persons involved in the radiography work. A collimator with optimum design features also helps in reducing the scattered radiation which in turn results in radiographs having better sensitivity. This papers describes the salient design features of the tungsten collimators developed by the BRIT, for industrial radiography. (author)

  18. Radioisotopes - their applications in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, H.R.S.

    1977-01-01

    The nature of radioisotopes and their industrial applications with special reference to industrial radiography are outlined. The various aspects of industrial radiography such as source size, source containers, films, density of radiography, radiographic quality and applications are discussed in brief. (M.G.B.)

  19. New medical application: nuclear scattering radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saudinos, J.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear scattering of 1 GeV protons is used to obtain three dimensional radiographies with a volume resolution of about 1 mm 3 . The information is different from the one given by X-ray radiographies and in particular one may get radiographies of the hydrogen included in objects. Results on a vertebral column and a 'sella turcica' are presented [fr

  20. TREAT neutron-radiography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    The TREAT reactor was built as a transient irradiation test reactor. By taking advantage of built-in system features, it was possible to add a neutron-radiography facility. This facility has been used over the years to radiograph a wide variety and large number of preirradiated fuel pins in many different configurations. Eight different specimen handling casks weighing up to 54.4 t (60 T) can be accommodated. Thermal, epithermal, and track-etch radiographs have been taken. Neutron-radiography service can be provided for specimens from other reactor facilities, and the capacity for storing preirradiated specimens also exists