WorldWideScience

Sample records for phoenix missile hypersonic

  1. Lateral control strategy for a hypersonic cruise missile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Fan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypersonic cruise missile always adopts the configuration of waverider body with the restraint of scramjet. As a result, the lateral motion exhibits serious coupling, and the controller design of the lateral lateral system cannot be conducted separately for yaw channel and roll channel. A multiple input and multiple output optimal control method with integrators is presented to design the lateral combined control system for hypersonic cruise missile. A hypersonic cruise missile lateral model is linearized as a multiple input and multiple output plant, which is coupled by kinematics and fin deflection between yaw and roll. In lateral combined controller, the integrators are augmented, respectively, into the loop of roll angle and lateral overload to ensure that the commands are tracked with zero steady-state error. Through simulation, the proposed controller demonstrates good performance in tracking the command of roll angle and lateral overload.

  2. Hyperheat: a thermal signature model for super- and hypersonic missiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Binsbergen, S. A.; van Zelderen, B.; Veraar, R. G.; Bouquet, F.; Halswijk, W. H. C.; Schleijpen, H. M. A.

    2017-10-01

    In performance prediction of IR sensor systems for missile detection, apart from the sensor specifications, target signatures are essential variables. Very often, for velocities up to Mach 2-2.5, a simple model based on the aerodynamic heating of a perfect gas was used to calculate the temperatures of missile targets. This typically results in an overestimate of the target temperature with correspondingly large infrared signatures and detection ranges. Especially for even higher velocities, this approach is no longer accurate. Alternatives like CFD calculations typically require more complex sets of inputs and significantly more computing power. The MATLAB code Hyperheat was developed to calculate the time-resolved skin temperature of axisymmetric high speed missiles during flight, taking into account the behaviour of non-perfect gas and proper heat transfer to the missile surface. Allowing for variations in parameters like missile shape, altitude, atmospheric profile, angle of attack, flight duration and super- and hypersonic velocities up to Mach 30 enables more accurate calculations of the actual target temperature. The model calculates a map of the skin temperature of the missile, which is updated over the flight time of the missile. The sets of skin temperature maps are calculated within minutes, even for >100 km trajectories, and can be easily converted in thermal infrared signatures for further processing. This paper discusses the approach taken in Hyperheat. Then, the thermal signature of a set of typical missile threats is calculated using both the simple aerodynamic heating model and the Hyperheat code. The respective infrared signatures are compared, as well as the difference in the corresponding calculated detection ranges.

  3. Guidance Law and Neural Control for Hypersonic Missile to Track Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxing Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypersonic technology plays an important role in prompt global strike. Because the flight dynamics of a hypersonic vehicle is nonlinear, uncertain, and highly coupled, the controller design is challenging, especially to design its guidance and control law during the attack of a maneuvering target. In this paper, the sliding mode control (SMC method is used to develop the guidance law from which the desired flight path angle is derived. With the desired information as control command, the adaptive neural control in discrete time is investigated ingeniously for the longitudinal dynamics of the hypersonic missile. The proposed guidance and control laws are validated by simulation of a hypersonic missile against a maneuvering target. It is demonstrated that the scheme has good robustness and high accuracy to attack a maneuvering target in the presence of external disturbance and missile model uncertainty.

  4. Hyperheat: A thermal signature model for super-and hypersonic missiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binsbergen, S.A. van; Zelderen, B. van; Veraar, R.G.; Bouquet, F.; Halswijk, W.H.C.; Schleijpen, H.M.A.

    2017-01-01

    In performance prediction of IR sensor systems for missile detection, apart from the sensor specifications, target signatures are essential variables. Very often, for velocities up to Mach 2-2.5, a simple model based on the aerodynamic heating of a perfect gas was used to calculate the temperatures

  5. Test Methods for Short-Range Lethality Evaluation of Full-Scale Hypersonic Kinetic-Energy Missiles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, G. L; Brooks, L. M; Morton, J. L

    2004-01-01

    .... Variables such as terminal dive angle, impact velocity, missile orientation at impact, hit-point on the target, and shot-line through the target all must be carefully controlled and documented...

  6. Phoenix Production

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Phoenix is a commercial off-the-shelf, web-based financial management system configured for USAID. Phoenix provides information about commitments, obligations, and...

  7. Phoenix Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Phoenix Traffic and Mobile Data. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Baldauf , R., V. Isakov , P. Deshmukh, and A. Venkatram. Influence of...

  8. Phoenix Trenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a stereo pair [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a stereo pair This image is a stereo, panoramic view of various trenches dug by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. The images that make up this panorama were taken by Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager at about 4 p.m., local solar time at the landing site, on the 131st, Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Oct. 7, 2008). In figure 1, the trenches are labeled in orange and other features are labeled in blue. Figures 2 and 3 are the left- and right-eye members of a stereo pair. For scale, the 'Pet Donkey' trench just to the right of center is approximately 38 centimeters (15 inches) long and 31 to 34 centimeters (12 to 13 inches) wide. In addition, the rock in front of it, 'Headless,' is about 11.5 by 8.5 centimeters (4.5 by 3.3 inches), and about 5 centimeters (2 inches) tall. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Missile Aerodynamics (Aerodynamique des Missiles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    of missiles, and therefore, less money for new developments. New types of international conflicts demand new kinds of missiles and a higher flexibility...us a lower production rate of missiles and, ods, while visualization helps in the development of therefore, less money for new developments. New...du mod~le de turbulence. Plusieurs Lauder [1 ~ 3].maillages distincts ont 6t 6tudi6s. Ils different essentiellement par le nombre de points dans la

  10. Hyper Velocity Missiles For Defence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faqir Minhas

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the history of technical development in the field of hypervelocity missiles. It highlights the fact that the development of anti-ballistic systems in USA, Russia, France, UK, Sweden, and Israel is moving toward the final deployment stage; that USA and Israel are trying to sell PAC 2 and Arrow 2 to India; and that India’s Agni and Prithvi missiles have improved their accuracy, with assistance from Russia. Consequently, the paper proposes enhanced effort for development in Pakistan of a basic hypersonic tactical missile, with 300 KM range, 500 KG payload, and multi-rolecapability. The author argues that a system, developed within the country, at the existing or upgraded facilities, will not violate MTCR restrictions, and would greatly enhance the country’s defense capability. Furthermore, it would provide high technology jobs toPakistani citizens. The paper reinforces the idea by suggesting that evolution in the field of aviation and electronics favors the development of ballistic, cruise and guided missile technologies; and that flight time of short and intermediate range missiles is so short that its interception is virtually impossible.

  11. Missile proliferation and missile defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarif, M. Javad

    2002-01-01

    The global security environment is becoming increasingly volatile and dangerous. A new arms race is looming in the horizon ... [Missiles have] become the strong weapon of the poor and the discriminated against who find themselves vulnerable to outside threat. They believe missiles may prove instrumental in deterring the enemy from beginning a full scale war ... the engagement of all states at the United Nations in the issue of missiles, through the panel of governmental experts, and the new idea of exploring the subject in the Conference on Disarmament do provide a dim light at the end of the tunnel. ... Efforts at non-proliferation of missiles are more likely to succeed when viewed as an integral part of a global and comprehensive negotiation and progress in other areas of disarmament. (author)

  12. Conventional Prompt Global Strike and Long Range Ballistic Missiles: Background and Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-03

    These include bombers, cruise missiles, ballistic missiles, and boost-glide technologies that would mate a rocket booster with a hypersonic glide...the early stages of development. They are envisioned to launch from air bases, like aircraft, but to travel at speeds that far exceed those of U.S...prototype rocket engine in 2005. 39 According to the Defense Science Board Task Force, this missile might have delivered a 2,000- pound payload over a

  13. Missile proliferation and missile defence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin-Bosch, Miguel

    2002-01-01

    Nothing should serve to justify the acquisition and development of ballistic missiles. The solution to this problem is similar to that of all weapons of mass destruction, including nuclear weapons, i.e., a total ban of their use, testing, manufacture and development. Unfortunately, given the present international climate, ballistic missiles will continue to be an important component of the arsenals of several countries for years to come. ...what you invent today to enhance your security has a tendency to reappear later elsewhere as a threat. (author)

  14. GMAP Phoenix 2013 data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — mobile monitoring data from the 2013 Phoenix study. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Venkatram, A., V. Isakov , P. Deshmukh, and R....

  15. City of Phoenix - Energize Phoenix Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laloudakis, Dimitrios J.

    2014-09-29

    Energize Phoenix (EPHX) was designed as an ambitious, large-scale, three-year pilot program to provide energy efficiency upgrades in buildings, along Phoenix’s new Light Rail Corridor – part of a federal effort to reduce energy consumption and stimulate job growth, while simultaneously reducing the country’s carbon footprint and promoting a shift towards a green economy. The program was created through a 2010 competitive grant awarded to the City of Phoenix who managed the program in partnership with Arizona State University (ASU), the state’s largest university, and Arizona Public Service (APS), the state’s largest electricity provider. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 provided $25M in funding for the EPHX program. The Light Rail Corridor runs through the heart of downtown Phoenix, making most high-rise and smaller commercial buildings eligible to participate in the EPHX program, along with a diverse mix of single and multi-family residential buildings. To ensure maximum impact and deeper market penetration, Energize Phoenix was subdivided into three unique parts: i. commercial rebate program, ii. commercial financing program, and iii. residential program Each component was managed by the City of Phoenix in partnership with APS. Phoenix was fortunate to partner with APS, which already operated robust commercial and residential rebate programs within its service territory. Phoenix tapped into the existing utility contractor network, provided specific training to over 100 contracting firms, and leveraged the APS rebate program structure (energy efficiency funding) to launch the EPHX commercial and residential rebate programs. The commercial finance program was coordinated and managed through a contract with National Bank of Arizona, NBAZ, which also provided project capital leveraging EPHX finance funds. Working in unison, approved contractors

  16. Phoenix's Workplace Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the spacecraft's recent activity site as of the 23rd Martian day of the mission, or Sol 22 (June 16, 2008), after the spacecraft touched down on the Red Planet's northern polar plains. The mosaic was taken by the lander's Surface Stereo Imager (SSI). Phoenix's solar panels are seen in the foreground. The trench informally called 'Snow White' was dug by Phoenix's Robotic Arm in a patch of Martian soil near the center of a polygonal surface feature, nicknamed 'Cheshire Cat.' The 'dump pile' is located at the top of the trench, and has been dubbed 'Croquet Ground.' The digging site has been nicknamed 'Wonderland.' Snow White, seen here in an SSI image from Sol 22 (June 16, 2008) is about 2 centimeters (.8 inches) deep and 30 centimeters (12 inches) long. As of Sol 24 (June 18, 2008), the trench is 5 centimeters (2 inches deep) and the trench has been renamed 'Snow White 1,' as a second trench has been dug to its right and nicknamed 'Snow White 2.' The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. Advanced Missile Signature Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Missile Signature Center (AMSC) is a national facility supporting the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and other DoD programs and customers with analysis,...

  18. Cruise Missile Defense

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hichkad, Ravi R; Bolkcom, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Congress has expressed interest in cruise missile defense for years. Cruise missiles (CMs) are essentially unmanned attack aircraft -- vehicles composed of an airframe, propulsion system, guidance system, and weapons payload...

  19. Cruise Missile Defense

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hichkad, Ravi R; Bolkcom, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Congress has expressed interest in cruise missile defense for years. Cruise missiles (CMs) are essentially unmanned attack aircraft -- vehicles composed of an airframe, propulsion system, guidance system, and weapons payload...

  20. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Laboratory Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows four Wet Chemistry Laboratory units, part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument on board NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. This image was taken before Phoenix's launch on August 4, 2007. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. Global strike hypersonic weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mark J.

    2017-11-01

    Beginning in the 1940's, the United States has pursued the development of hypersonic technologies, enabling atmospheric flight in excess of five times the speed of sound. Hypersonic flight has application to a range of military and civilian applications, including commercial transport, space access, and various weapons and sensing platforms. A number of flight tests of hypersonic vehicles have been conducted by countries around the world, including the United States, Russia, and China, that could lead the way to future hypersonic global strike weapon systems. These weapons would be especially effective at penetrating conventional defenses, and could pose a significant risk to national security.

  2. Curved electromagnetic missiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, J.M.; Shen, H.M.; Wu, T.T.

    1989-01-01

    Transient electromagnetic fields can exhibit interesting behavior in the limit of great distances from their sources. In situations of finite total radiated energy, the energy reaching a distant receiver can decrease with distance much more slowly than the usual r - 2 . Cases of such slow decrease have been referred to as electromagnetic missiles. All of the wide variety of known missiles propagate in essentially straight lines. A sketch is presented here of a missile that can follow a path that is strongly curved. An example of a curved electromagnetic missile is explicitly constructed and some of its properties are discussed. References to details available elsewhere are given

  3. Tactical missile aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsch, Michael J. (Editor); Nielsen, Jack N. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present conference on tactical missile aerodynamics discusses autopilot-related aerodynamic design considerations, flow visualization methods' role in the study of high angle-of-attack aerodynamics, low aspect ratio wing behavior at high angle-of-attack, supersonic airbreathing propulsion system inlet design, missile bodies with noncircular cross section and bank-to-turn maneuvering capabilities, 'waverider' supersonic cruise missile concepts and design methods, asymmetric vortex sheding phenomena from bodies-of-revolution, and swept shock wave/boundary layer interaction phenomena. Also discussed are the assessment of aerodynamic drag in tactical missiles, the analysis of supersonic missile aerodynamic heating, the 'equivalent angle-of-attack' concept for engineering analysis, the vortex cloud model for body vortex shedding and tracking, paneling methods with vorticity effects and corrections for nonlinear compressibility, the application of supersonic full potential method to missile bodies, Euler space marching methods for missiles, three-dimensional missile boundary layers, and an analysis of exhaust plumes and their interaction with missile airframes.

  4. Ballistic missile defense effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, George N.

    2017-11-01

    The potential effectiveness of ballistic missile defenses today remains a subject of debate. After a brief discussion of terminal and boost phase defenses, this chapter will focus on long-range midcourse defenses. The problems posed by potential countermeasures to such midcourse defenses are discussed as are the sensor capabilities a defense might have available to attempt to discriminate the actual missile warhead in a countermeasures environment. The role of flight testing in assessing ballistic missile defense effectiveness is discussed. Arguments made about effectiveness by missile defense supporters and critics are summarized.

  5. Hypersonic phononic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorishnyy, T; Ullal, C K; Maldovan, M; Fytas, G; Thomas, E L

    2005-03-25

    In this Letter we propose the use of hypersonic phononic crystals to control the emission and propagation of high frequency phonons. We report the fabrication of high quality, single crystalline hypersonic crystals using interference lithography and show that direct measurement of their phononic band structure is possible with Brillouin light scattering. Numerical calculations are employed to explain the nature of the observed propagation modes. This work lays the foundation for experimental studies of hypersonic crystals and, more generally, phonon-dependent processes in nanostructures.

  6. Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, non-vitiated (clean air) free-jet wind tunnel capable of testing large-scale, propulsion systems at Mach 5, 6,...

  7. The PHOENIX Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tuyle, G.J.; Takahashi, H.; Todosow, M.; Aronson, A.L.; Slovik, G.C.; Horak, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    A proposed means of transmuting key long-lived radioactive isotopes, primarily the so-called minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm), using a hybrid proton-accelerator-sub-critical lattice, is described. It is argued that by partitioning the components of the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and by transmuting key elements, such as the plutonium, the minor actinides, and a few of the long-lived fission products, that some of the most significant challenges in building a waste repository can be substantially reduced. If spent fuel partitioning and transmutation were fully implemented, the time required to reduce the waste stream toxicity below that of uranium ore would be reduced from more than 10,000 years to approximately 30 years. The proposed machine, based on the described PHOENIX Concept, would transmute the minor actinides and much of the iodine produced by 75 LWRs, and would generate usable electricity (beyond that required to run the large accelerator) of 850 MW e . 14 refs., 29 figs

  8. Characteristics of tornado generated missiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, A.K.; Boritz, R.C.; Niyogi, P.K.

    1975-10-01

    The development of techniques designed to calculate tornado missile velocities is traced. It is shown that there is a need for a consistent method for obtaining missile velocities for a variety of tornado parameters. A consistent method for determination of trajectories and velocities of missiles generated by a tornado is described. The effects of plant layout upon missile impact velocity at a given building are discussed from the point of view of determining the necessary missile barrier characteristics. 19 references

  9. CFD for hypersonic airbreathing aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay

    1989-01-01

    A general discussion is given on the use of advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in analyzing the hypersonic flow field around an airbreathing aircraft. Unique features of the hypersonic flow physics are presented and an assessment is given of the current algorithms in terms of their capability to model hypersonic flows. Several examples of advanced CFD applications are then presented.

  10. Pegasus hypersonic flight research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Robert E.; Meyer, Robert R., Jr.; Budd, Gerald D.

    1992-01-01

    Hypersonic aeronautics research using the Pegasus air-launched space booster is described. Two areas are discussed in the paper: previously obtained results from Pegasus flights 1 and 2, and plans for future programs. Proposed future research includes boundary-layer transition studies on the airplane-like first stage and also use of the complete Pegasus launch system to boost a research vehicle to hypersonic speeds. Pegasus flight 1 and 2 measurements were used to evaluate the results of several analytical aerodynamic design tools applied during the development of the vehicle as well as to develop hypersonic flight-test techniques. These data indicated that the aerodynamic design approach for Pegasus was adequate and showed that acceptable margins were available. Additionally, the correlations provide insight into the capabilities of these analytical tools for more complex vehicles in which design margins may be more stringent. Near-term plans to conduct hypersonic boundary-layer transition studies are discussed. These plans involve the use of a smooth metallic glove at about the mid-span of the wing. Longer-term opportunities are proposed which identify advantages of the Pegasus launch system to boost large-scale research vehicles to the real-gas hypersonic flight regime.

  11. RDHWT/MARIAH II Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Summary of Baseline Design Concepts SSTO : Single Stage to Orbit TSTO: Two Stage to Orbit RBCC: Rocket-Based Combined Cycle ODWE: Oblique Detonation...for most other hypersonic air-breathing propulsion applications. Required test times for the Mach 8 Cruise and SSTO type vehicles are shown in Table 3...Air-BreathingMach Range Length, m (ft) Propulsion Mach 8 Cruise Missile 4 to 8 4.3 (14) Hydrocarbon Scramjet SSTO Space Access with RBCC 0 to 14 62.8

  12. Employment of hypersonic glide vehicles: Proposed criteria for use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olguin, Abel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Hypersonic Glide Vehicles (HGVs) are a type of reentry vehicle that couples the high speed of ballistic missiles with the maneuverability of aircraft. The HGV has been in development since the 1970s, and its technology falls under the category of Conventional Prompt Global Strike (CPGS) weapons. As noted by James M. Acton, a senior associate in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment, CPGS is a “missile in search of a mission.” With the introduction of any significant new military capability, a doctrine for use—including specifics regarding how, when and where it would be used, as well as tactics, training and procedures—must be clearly defined and understood by policy makers, military commanders, and planners. In this paper, benefits and limitations of the HGV are presented. Proposed criteria and four scenarios illustrate a possible method for assessing when to use an HGV.

  13. Ballistic Missile Defense

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    At the 2010 NATO summit in Lisbon, the alliance decided to move forward on the development of a territorial ballistic missile defense (BMD) system and explore avenues for cooperation with Russia in this endeavor. Substantial progress on BMD has been made over the past decade, but some questions remain regarding the ultimate strategic utility of such a system and whether its benefi ts outweigh the possible opportunity costs. Missile defense has been a point of contention between the US and its...

  14. Nanotechnology for missiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Paul B.

    2004-07-01

    Nanotechnology development is progressing very rapidly. Several billions of dollars have been invested in nanoscience research since 2000. Pioneering nanotechnology research efforts have been primarily conducted at research institutions and centers. This paper identifies developments in nanoscience and technology that could provide significant advances in missile systems applications. Nanotechnology offers opportunities in the areas of advanced materials for coatings, including thin-film optical coatings, light-weight, strong armor and missile structural components, embedded computing, and "smart" structures; nano-particles for explosives, warheads, turbine engine systems, and propellants to enhance missile propulsion; nano-sensors for autonomous chemical detection; and nano-tube arrays for fuel storage and power generation. The Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) is actively collaborating with academia, industry, and other Government agencies to accelerate the development and transition of nanotechnology to favorably impact Army Transformation. Currently, we are identifying near-term applications and quantifying requirements for nanotechnology use in Army missile systems, as well as monitoring and screening research and developmental efforts in the industrial community for military applications. Combining MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) and nanotechnology is the next step toward providing technical solutions for the Army"s transformation. Several research and development projects that are currently underway at AMRDEC in this technology area are discussed. A top-level roadmap of MEMS/nanotechnology development projects for aviation and missile applications is presented at the end.

  15. Phoenix's Lay of the Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the spacecraft's recent activity site as of the 23rd Martian day of the mission, or Sol 22 (June 16, 2008), after the spacecraft touched down on the Red Planet's northern polar plains. The mosaic was taken by the lander's Surface Stereo Imager (SSI). Parts of Phoenix can be seen in the foreground. The first two trenches dug by the lander's Robotic Arm, called 'Dodo' and 'Goldilocks,' were enlarged on the 19th Martian day of the mission, or Sol 18 (June 12, 2008), to form one trench, dubbed 'Dodo-Goldilocks.' Scoops of material taken from those trenches are informally called 'Baby Bear' and 'Mama Bear.' Baby Bear was carried to Phoenix's Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer, or TEGA, instrument for analysis, while Mama Bear was delivered to Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer instrument suite, or MECA, for a closer look. The color inset picture of the Dodo-Goldilocks trench, also taken with Phoenix's SSI, reveals white material thought to be ice. More recently, on Sol 22 (June 16, 2008), Phoenix's Robotic Arm began digging a trench, dubbed 'Snow White,' in a patch of Martian soil near the center of a polygonal surface feature, nicknamed 'Cheshire Cat.' The 'dump pile' is located at the top of the trench, and has been dubbed 'Croquet Ground.' The digging site has been nicknamed 'Wonderland.' The Snow White trench, seen here in an SSI image from Sol 22 (June 16, 2008) is about 2 centimeters (.8 inches) deep and 30 centimeters (12 inches) long. As of Sol 25 (June 19, 2008), the trench is 5 centimeters (2 inches deep) and the trench has been renamed 'Snow White 1,' as a second trench has been dug to its right and nicknamed 'Snow White 2.' The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Hypersonic Materials and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) and hot structures are required for a range of hypersonic vehicles ranging from ballistic reentry to hypersonic cruise vehicles, both within Earth's atmosphere and non-Earth atmospheres. The focus of this presentation is on air breathing hypersonic vehicles in the Earth's atmosphere. This includes single-stage to orbit (SSTO), two-stage to orbit (TSTO) accelerators, access to space vehicles, and hypersonic cruise vehicles. This paper will start out with a brief discussion of aerodynamic heating and thermal management techniques to address the high heating, followed by an overview of TPS for rocket-launched and air-breathing vehicles. The argument is presented that as we move from rocket-based vehicles to air-breathing vehicles, we need to move away from the insulated airplane approach used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter to a wide range of TPS and hot structure approaches. The primary portion of the paper will discuss issues and design options for CMC TPS and hot structure components, including leading edges, acreage TPS, and control surfaces. The current state-of-the-art will be briefly discussed for some of the components.

  17. Japan and Ballistic Missile Defense

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swaine, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Spurred by a perceived growing ballistic missile threat from within the Asia-Pacific region and requests from the United States to support research and development on components of a missile defense...

  18. Phoenix I energy extraction experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, J.M.; Patterson, E.L.; Tisone, G.C.; Moreno, J.B.

    1980-07-01

    Energy extraction experiments are reported for the Phoenix I amplifier driven by a discharge-initiated oscillator-preamplifier system operating on mixtures of either SF 6 -HI or SF 6 -C 2 H 6 and an electron-beam-initiated intermediate amplifer (lambda-3) fueled with H 2 and F 2 mixtures. When the oscillator-preamplifier system operated with mixtures of SF 6 -HI the input spectrum to the Phoenix I amplifier contained approx. 28 P-branch vibrational-rotational lines which were almost identical to the input spectrum from the H 2 -F 2 fueled oscillator. In this case the energy extraction measurements were essentially the same as the results obtained with the spectrum produced using H 2 and F 2 mixtures. For an input intensity of 10 7 W/cm 2 , 170 J were extracted from the amplifier. With the SF 6 -C 2 H 6 spectrum, extraction was only obtained from the first three excited vibrational levels. This result indicates that most of the energy in the amplifier could be extracted on the first three excited vibrational levels. It is shown that the extraction results can be fit with a simple two level model. The radius of curvature of the beam was estimated using a lateral shearing interferometer. It was found that the Phoenix I amplifier altered the radius of curvature

  19. Martian Surface as Seen by Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This anaglyph, acquired by NASA's Phoenix Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 36, the 36th Martian day of the mission (July 1, 2008), shows a stereoscopic 3D view of a trench informally called 'Snow White' dug by Phoenix's Robotic Arm. Phoenix's solar panel is seen in the bottom right corner of the image. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  20. Missile defence : An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weimar, P.W.L.

    2012-01-01

    At the present day, an unparalleled number of international actors, be it national governments or non-state groups, have acquired or are seeking to acquire both weapons of mass destruction and the means to deliver them. Those means of delivery can be Ballistic Missiles that can bridge vast – even

  1. Tornado missile impact study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    UCRL-15910 specifies wind and tornado missiles for moderate- and high-hazard DOE facilities. Wall-barrier specimens have been tested at the Tornado Missile Impact Facility at Texas Tech University. The facility has an air-activated tornado missile cannon capable of firing 2x4 timber planks weighing 12 lb at speeds up to 150 mph and 3-in-diameter steel pipes weighing 75 lb at speeds to 7 5 mph. Wall barriers tested to date include reinforced concrete walls from 4-in. to 10-in. thick; 8-in. and 12-in. walls of reinforced concrete masonry units (CMU); two other masonry wall configurations consisting of an 8-in. CMU with a 4-in. clay-brick veneer and a 10-in. composite wall with two wythes of 4-in. clay brick. The impact test series is designed to determine the impact speed that will produce backface spall of each wall barrier. A set of 15 wall sections has been constructed and tested at this time. Preliminary finding suggest that all cells of CMU walls must be grouted to prevent missile penetration. Walls recommended in the workshop on UCRL-15910 provide acceptable protection if cracking can be accepted

  2. CFD for hypersonic propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of research activity on the application of computational fluid dynamics (CDF) for hypersonic propulsion systems. After the initial consideration of the highly integrated nature of air-breathing hypersonic engines and airframe, attention is directed toward computations carried out for the components of the engine. A generic inlet configuration is considered in order to demonstrate the highly three dimensional viscous flow behavior occurring within rectangular inlets. Reacting flow computations for simple jet injection as well as for more complex combustion chambers are then discussed in order to show the capability of viscous finite rate chemical reaction computer simulations. Finally, the nozzle flow fields are demonstrated, showing the existence of complex shear layers and shock structure in the exhaust plume. The general issues associated with code validation as well as the specific issue associated with the use of CFD for design are discussed. A prognosis for the success of CFD in the design of future propulsion systems is offered.

  3. Evaluating missile fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmont, Antoine; Goekalp, Iskender [Laboratoire de Combustion et Systemes Reactifs (LCSR), CNRS, 1C, Orleans (France); Catoire, Laurent [University of Orleans, BP6749, 45067 Orleans (France); Laboratoire de Combustion et Systemes Reactifs (LCSR), CNRS, 1C, Orleans (France)

    2006-10-15

    This paper presents simple and relatively efficient methods to estimate some physical and chemical properties of polycyclic alkanes. These properties are melting point, normal boiling point, standard enthalpy of vaporization at 298 K, standard enthalpy of formation at 298 K, standard enthalpy of combustion at 298 K, density (specific gravity) and flash point. These methods are validated, despite the scarcity of experimental data, with several tens of polycyclic alkanes. Then the methods are used to estimate properties of some polycyclic alkanes, which are currently in use as missile fuels: JP-10, RJ-4 and RJ-5. Estimates and experimental data are found in good agreement for these fuels. This methodology is then used to evaluate missile fuel candidates to be used pure or as additive to JP-10 or to blends such as RJ-6. Several compounds are probably of interest for this task and their advantages and drawbacks are discussed. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Whither Ballistic Missile Defense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-30

    important that technology today is placing enormous power in the many camps-not only information that enables timely decision-making, but also the...WHITHER BALLISTIC MISSILE DEFENSE? BY AMBASSADOR HENRY F. COOPER NOVEMBER 30,1992 TECHNICAL MARKETING SOCIETY OF AMERICA WASHINGTON, DC...Conference on Technical Marketing 2000: Opportunities and Strategies for a Changing World) I intend to discuss the prospects for SDI in a changing

  5. Ballistic Missile Defense in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Sarihan, Ali; Bush, Amy; Summers, Lawrence; Thompson, Brent; Tomasszewski, Steven

    2009-01-01

    This paper will build on ballistic missile defense in Europe. In the first part, a brief historical overview will place the current public management issue into light. This is followed by a discussion of the main actors in the international debate, the problems that arise and the available options and recommendations to address missile defense. In the second part, differences between George W. Bush and Barack H. Obama will analyze under the title “Ballistic Missile Defense in Europe: Evolving...

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Phoenix Cleans Up with Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix Cleans Up with Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center : Phoenix Cleans Up with Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Phoenix Cleans Up with Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Phoenix Cleans Up with Natural

  7. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an entry and descent technology to enhance and enable robotic and scientific missions to destinations with atmospheres.The Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic...

  8. Fired missile projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, K.D.; Gieszl, R.; Keller, P.J.; Drayer, B.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports ferromagnetic properties of fired missile projectiles (bullets, BBs, etc) investigated. Projectile samples were obtained from manufactures, police, and commercial sources. Deflection measurements at the portal of a 1.5-T magnetic field were performed for 47 projectiles. Sixteen bullets were examined in gelatin phantoms for rotation-translation movements as well. Ferromagnetic bullets displayed considerable deflection forces in the presence of the magnetic field and could be rotated to 80 degrees from their previous alignments when introduced perpendicular to the magnetic field in our gelatin phantom experiments. Military bullet calibers appear to pose the greatest ferromagnetic risk. Commercial sporting ammunition is generally nonferromagnetic

  9. Strategic Missile Defense & Nuclear Deterrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grego, Laura

    The United States has pursued defenses against nuclear-armed long-range ballistic missiles since at least the 1950s. At the same time, concerns that missile defenses could undermine nuclear deterrence and potentially spark an arms race led the United States and Soviet Union to negotiate limits on these systems. The 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty constrained strategic missile defenses for thirty years. After abandoning the treaty in 2002, President George W. Bush began fielding the Ground-based Midcourse Defense (GMD) homeland missile defense system on an extremely aggressive schedule, nominally to respond to threats from North Korea and Iran. Today, nearly fifteen years after its initial deployment, the potential and the limits of this homeland missile defense are apparent. Its test record is poor and it has no demonstrated ability to stop an incoming missile under real-world conditions. No credible strategy is in place to solve the issue of discriminating countermeasures. Insufficient oversight has not only exacerbated the GMD system's problems, but has obscured their full extent, which could encourage politicians and military leaders to make decisions that actually increase the risk of a missile attack against the United States. These are not the only costs. Both Russia and China have repeatedly expressed concerns that U.S. missile defenses adversely affect their own strategic capabilities and interests, particularly taken in light of the substantial US nuclear forces. This in turn affects these countries' nuclear modernization priorities. This talk will provide a technical overview of the US strategic missile defense system, and how it relates to deterrence against non-peer adversaries as well as how it affects deterrence with Russia and China and the long-term prospects for nuclear reductions

  10. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Phoenix, AZ EnviroAtlas area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  11. Phoenix v. 1.0-SNAPSHOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-09-21

    Phoenix is a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) based library for performing mathematical and astrodynamics calculations. It consists of two primary sub-modules, phoenix-math and phoenix-astrodynamics. The mathematics package has a variety of mathematical classes for performing 3D transformations, geometric reasoning, and numerical analysis. The astrodynamics package has various classes and methods for computing locations, attitudes, accesses, and other values useful for general satellite modeling and simulation. Methods for computing celestial locations, such as the location of the Sun and Moon, are also included. Phoenix is meant to be used as a library within the context of a larger application. For example, it could be used for a web service, desktop client, or to compute simple values in a scripting environment.

  12. 15 CFR 742.5 - Missile technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Missile technology. 742.5 Section 742... BASED CONTROLS § 742.5 Missile technology. (a) License requirements. (1) In support of U.S. foreign... establish the existence of a contract. (d) Missile Technology Control Regime. Missile Technology Control...

  13. A review of electromagnetic missiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.T.; Shen, H.M.; Myers, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical results are reviewed pertaining to the behavior of transient electromagnetic fields in the limit of great distances from their sources. In 1985 it was shown that pulses of finite total radiated energy could propagate to a distant receiver, delivering energy that decreases much more slowly than the usual r - 2 . Such pulses have been referred to as electromagnetic (EM) missiles. The types first discovered propagate along a straight line with a monotonically (though slowly) decreasing time-integrated flux. Other types are now known. One type can be made to rise and fall with increasing distance; another is the curved EM missile. Early efforts to classify EM missiles are reviewed

  14. CFD applications in hypersonic flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    Design studies are underway for a variety of hypersonic flight vehicles. The National Aero-Space Plane will provide a reusable, single-stage-to-orbit capability for routine access to low earth orbit. Flight-capable satellites will dip into the atmosphere to maneuver to new orbits, while planetary probes will decelerate at their destination by atmospheric aerobraking. To supplement limited experimental capabilities in the hypersonic regime, CFD is being used to analyze the flow about these configurations. The governing equations include fluid dynamic as well as chemical species equations, which are solved with robust upwind differencing schemes. Examples of CFD applications to hypersonic vehicles suggest an important role this technology will play in the development of future aerospace systems. The computational resources needed to obtain solutions are large, but various strategies are being exploited to reduce the time required for complete vehicle simulations.

  15. TBCC Discipline Overview. Hypersonics Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    The "National Aeronautics Research and Development Policy" document, issued by the National Science and Technology Council in December 2006, stated that one (among several) of the guiding objectives of the federal aeronautics research and development endeavors shall be stable and long-term foundational research efforts. Nearly concurrently, the National Academies issued a more technically focused aeronautics blueprint, entitled: the "Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics - Foundations for the Future." Taken together these documents outline the principles of an aeronautics maturation plan. Thus, in response to these overarching inputs (and others), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) organized the Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP), a program within the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD). The FAP initiated foundational research and technology development tasks to enable the capability of future vehicles that operate across a broad range of Mach numbers, inclusive of the subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic flight regimes. The FAP Hypersonics Project concentrates on two hypersonic missions: (1) Air-breathing Access to Space (AAS) and (2) the (Planetary Atmospheric) Entry, Decent, and Landing (EDL). The AAS mission focuses on Two-Stage-To-Orbit (TSTO) systems using air-breathing combined-cycle-engine propulsion; whereas, the EDL mission focuses on the challenges associated with delivering large payloads to (and from) Mars. So, the FAP Hypersonic Project investments are aligned to achieve mastery and intellectual stewardship of the core competencies in the hypersonic-flight regime, which ultimately will be required for practical systems with highly integrated aerodynamic/vehicle and propulsion/engine technologies. Within the FAP Hypersonics, the technology management is further divided into disciplines including one targeting Turbine-Based Combine-Cycle (TBCC) propulsion. Additionally, to obtain expertise and support from outside

  16. Heat removing under hypersonic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semenov Mikhail E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider the heat transfer properties of the axially symmetric body with parabolic shape at hypersonic speeds (with a Mach number M > 5. We use the numerical methods based on the implicit difference scheme (Fedorenko method with direct method based on LU-decomposition and iterative method based on the Gauss-Seigel method. Our numerical results show that the heat removing process should be performed in accordance with the nonlinear law of heat distribution over the surface taking into account the hypersonic conditions of motion.

  17. Retooling CFD for hypersonic aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwoyer, Douglas L.; Kutler, Paul; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1987-01-01

    The CFD facility requirements of hypersonic aircraft configuration design development are different from those thus far employed for reentry vehicle design, because (1) the airframe and the propulsion system must be fully integrated to achieve the desired performance; (2) the vehicle must be reusable, with minimum refurbishment requirements between flights; and (3) vehicle performance must be optimized for a wide range of Mach numbers. An evaluation is presently made of flow resolution within shock waves, transition and turbulence phenomenon tractability, chemical reaction modeling, and hypersonic boundary layer transition, with state-of-the-art CFD.

  18. 'Rosy Red' Soil in Phoenix's Scoop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows fine-grained material inside the Robotic Arm scoop as seen by the Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander on June 25, 2008, the 30th Martian day, or sol, of the mission. The image shows fine, fluffy, red soil particles collected in a sample called 'Rosy Red.' The sample was dug from the trench named 'Snow White' in the area called 'Wonderland.' Some of the Rosy Red sample was delivered to Phoenix's Optical Microscope and Wet Chemistry Laboratory for analysis. The RAC provides its own illumination, so the color seen in RAC images is color as seen on Earth, not color as it would appear on Mars. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Increased Range/Mini-Cruise Missile

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    Technical Directions Inc. (TDI), Ortonville, Michigan, was asked by the U.S. Army and the U.S. Air Force to improve the efficiency of their J-45 missile engine for the NLOS-LS LAM Loitering Attack Missile...

  20. Laser Options for National Missile Defense

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leonard, Steven

    1998-01-01

    The Cold War threat that was characterized by a USSR launch of a large number of ballistic missiles towards the United States has been replaced today by an even less stable ballistic missile security environment...

  1. Missile defense in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Heurlin, Bertil

    2004-01-01

    The basic arguments of this paper are, first, that the current US-missile defense, being operative from fall 2004, is based upon the former experiences with missile defense, second, that missile defense closely associated with weapons of mass destruction has gained the highest priority in American national security policy due to the 9.11 attacks, and third, that the superior argument for establishing an American missile defense is to maintain global, long term political-strategic superiority....

  2. Missile Defense: Ballistic Missile Defense System Testing Delays Affect Delivery of Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-28

    Page 1 GAO-16-339R Ballistic Missile Defense 441 G St. N.W. Washington, DC 20548 April 28, 2016 Congressional Committees Missile Defense... Ballistic Missile Defense System Testing Delays Affect Delivery of Capabilities For over half a century, the Department of Defense (DOD) has been...funding efforts to develop a system to detect, track, and defeat enemy ballistic missiles. The current system—the Ballistic Missile Defense System

  3. Winds at the Phoenix landing site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, C.; Gunnlaugsson, H.P.; Merrison, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Wind speeds and directions were measured on the Phoenix Lander by a mechanical anemometer, the so-called Telltale wind indicator. Analysis of images of the instrument taken with the onboard imager allowed for evaluation of wind speeds and directions. Daily characteristics of the wind data are hig...

  4. Discovery Learning: Zombie, Phoenix, or Elephant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Arthur

    2018-01-01

    Discovery learning continues to be a topic of heated debate. It has been called a zombie, and this special issue raises the question whether it may be a phoenix arising from the ashes to which the topic was burnt. However, in this commentary I propose it is more like an elephant--a huge topic approached by many people who address different…

  5. Digibaro pressure instrument onboard the Phoenix Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, A.-M.; Polkko, J.; Kahanpää, H. H.; Schmidt, W.; Genzer, M. M.; Haukka, H.; Savijarv1, H.; Kauhanen, J.

    2009-04-01

    The Phoenix Lander landed successfully on the Martian northern polar region. The mission is part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Scout program. Pressure observations onboard the Phoenix lander were performed by an FMI (Finnish Meteorological Institute) instrument, based on a silicon diaphragm sensor head manufactured by Vaisala Inc., combined with MDA data processing electronics. The pressure instrument performed successfully throughout the Phoenix mission. The pressure instrument had 3 pressure sensor heads. One of these was the primary sensor head and the other two were used for monitoring the condition of the primary sensor head during the mission. During the mission the primary sensor was read with a sampling interval of 2 s and the other two were read less frequently as a check of instrument health. The pressure sensor system had a real-time data-processing and calibration algorithm that allowed the removal of temperature dependent calibration effects. In the same manner as the temperature sensor, a total of 256 data records (8.53 min) were buffered and they could either be stored at full resolution, or processed to provide mean, standard deviation, maximum and minimum values for storage on the Phoenix Lander's Meteorological (MET) unit.The time constant was approximately 3s due to locational constraints and dust filtering requirements. Using algorithms compensating for the time constant effect the temporal resolution was good enough to detect pressure drops associated with the passage of nearby dust devils.

  6. Numerical simulation of hypersonic flight experiment vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Yukimitsu; Yoshioka, Minako; 山本 行光; 吉岡 美菜子

    1994-01-01

    Hypersonic aerodynamic characteristics of Hypersonic FLight EXperiment (HYFLEX vehicle were investigated by numerical simulations using Navier-Stokes CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) code of NAL. Numerical results were compared with experimental data obtained at Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at NAL. In order to investigate real flight aerodynamic characteristics. numerical calculations corresponding to the flight conditions suffering from maximum aero thermodynamic heating were also made and the d...

  7. Historical development of world wide guided missiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper attempts to put in perspective the development of missiles from early history to present time. The influence of World War II in accelerating the development of guided missiles, particularly through German scientists, is discussed. The dispersion of German scientists to other countries and the coupling of their work with native talent to develop guided missiles is traced. Particular emphasis is placed on the evolution of the missile in the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. Since the Soviets possess what is probably the world's most complete array of dedicated missile system types, their known inventory is reviewed in some detail.

  8. Embedded Systems - Missile Detection/Interception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Cintron

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Missile defense systems are often related to major military resources aimed at shielding a specific region from incoming attacks. They are intended to detect, track, intercept, and destruct incoming enemy missiles. These systems vary in cost, efficiency, dependability, and technology. In present times, the possession of these types of systems is associated with large capacity military countries. Demonstrated here are the mathematical techniques behind missile systems which calculate trajectories of incoming missiles and potential intercept positions after initial missile detection. This procedure involved the use of vector-valued functions, systems of equations, and knowledge of projectile motion concepts.

  9. Tornado-borne missile speeds. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simiu, E.; Cordes, M.

    1976-04-01

    An investigation of the question of tornado-borne missile speeds was carried out, with a view to identify pertinent areas of uncertainty and to estimate credible tornado-borne missile speeds - within the limitations inherent in the present state of the art. The investigation consists of two parts: (1) a study in which a rational model for the missile motion is proposed, and numerical experiments are carried out corresponding to various assumptions on the initial conditions of the missile motion, the structure of the tornado flow, and the aerodynamic properties of the missile; (2) a theoretical and experimental study of tornado-borne missile aerodynamics, conducted by Colorado State Univ. (CSU) to be covered in a separate report by CSU. In the present report, the factors affecting missile motion and their influence upon such motion are examined

  10. Generation of missiles by tornadoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-11-01

    Available data on tornado wind velocities and wind distribution are incorporated into a mathematical model of the tornado wind field. The mathematical model is then used to predict the time-history of motion of a potential missile in a tornado wind field. (U.S.)

  11. Standard Missile-6 (SM-6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    attack or Anti-Ship Cruise Missiles in flight. The SM-6 ERAM program is an evolutionary, capabilities based acquisition program that will use spiral ...Prior SAR Total O&S Estimates - Dec 2014 SAR 460.3 Programmatic/Planning Factors 0.0 Cost Estimating Methodology 0.0 Cost Data Update 0.0 Labor Rate

  12. Acceleration effects on missile aerodynamics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gledhill, Irvy MA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Practical requirements are now arising in which significant acceleration takes place during flight; 5th generation missiles, such as A-Darter, execute turns at 100 g, where g is the acceleration due to gravity, and thrust from propulsion systems may...

  13. European Missile Defense and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Moskovskiy Komsomolets, September 18, 2009. 27. U.S. Department of State website, available from www. state.gov/t/ avc /rls/162447.htm. 28. BBC Monitoring (BBCM...see www.state.gov/t/ avc /c52028.htm and www. slideshare.net/rusemblon/russian-mod-views-on-nato-missile-defence- in-europe, respectively. 67

  14. Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Deliveries: 1 JBMD BLK 04 Computer Program, Peripherals, and SM-3 BLK IA Missiles. Japan 8/13/2004 0 21.3 FMS Case JA-P-BGQ: Proof of Principle (PoP...Estimate Econ Qty Sch Eng Est Oth Spt Total 0.000 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 0.000 An APUC Unit Cost History is not available, since no Initial APUC Estimate

  15. Hypersonic modes in nanophononic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepplestone, S P; Srivastava, G P

    2008-09-05

    Frequency gaps and negative group velocities of hypersonic phonon modes in periodically arranged composite semiconductors are presented. Trends and criteria for phononic gaps are discussed using a variety of atomic-level theoretical approaches. From our calculations, the possibility of achieving semiconductor-based one-dimensional phononic structures is established. We present results of the location and size of gaps, as well as negative group velocities of phonon modes in such structures. In addition to reproducing the results of recent measurements of the locations of the band gaps in the nanosized Si/Si{0.4}Ge{0.6} superlattice, we show that such a system is a true one-dimensional hypersonic phononic crystal.

  16. Analysis of Hypersonic Vehicle Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    Fraction of Cyanide throughout the Flowfield ................................... 131 Figure 122. Mass Fraction of Cyanide at the Nose...hypersonic flow is that as M increases the conservation equations cannot be linearized. The flow properties must be modeled in a complex fashion and can no...ablation present to react with as well. These products of ablation, along with the dissociation and ionization of the gas, gives rise to complex

  17. Systems Challenges for Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, James L.; Laruelle, Gerard; Wagner, Alain

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the system challenges posed by fully reusable hypersonic cruise airplanes and access to space vehicles. Hydrocarbon and hydrogen fueled airplanes are considered with cruise speeds of Mach 5 and 10, respectively. The access to space matrix is examined. Airbreathing and rocket powered, single- and two-stage vehicles are considered. Reference vehicle architectures are presented. Major systems/subsystems challenges are described. Advanced, enhancing systems concepts as well as common system technologies are discussed.

  18. Hypersonic Threats to the Homeland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-28

    ADAM) system . This ground based system protects 7 soldiers against rocket threats and utilizes a 10 kW laser with an effective range out to...early warning systems for response to hypersonic threats . The integration of directed energy defensive systems with Space Based Infrared Sensors (SBIRS...and early warning radars already in operation will save costs. By capitalizing on Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system capabilities

  19. Assessing Habitability: Lessons from the Phoenix Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, Carol R.

    2013-01-01

    The Phoenix mission's key objective was to search for a habitable zone. The Phoenix lander carried a robotic arm with digging scoop to collect soil and icy material for analysis with an instrument payload that included volatile mineral and organic analysis(3) and soil ionic chemistry analysis (4). Results from Phoenix along with theoretical modeling and other previous mission results were used to evaluate the habitability of the landing site by considering four factors that characterize the environments ability to support life as we know it: the presence of liquid water, the presence of an energy source to support metabolism, the presence of nutrients containing the fundamental building blocks of life, and the absence of environmental conditions that are toxic to or preclude life. Phoenix observational evidence for the presence of liquid water (past or present) includes clean segregated ice, chemical etching of soil grains, calcite minerals in the soil and variable concentrations of soluble salts5. The maximum surface temperature measured was 260K so unfrozen water can form only in adsorbed films or saline brines but warmer climates occur cyclically on geologically short time scales due to variations in orbital parameters. During high obliquity periods, temperatures allowing metabolism extend nearly a meter into the subsurface. Phoenix discovered 1%w/w perchlorate salt in the soil, a chemical energy source utilized by a wide range of microbes. Nutrient sources including C, H, N, O, P and S compounds are supplied by known atmospheric sources or global dust. Environmental conditions are within growth tolerance for terrestrial microbes. Summer daytime temperatures are sufficient for metabolic activity, the pH is 7.8 and is well buffered and the projected water activity of a wet soil will allow growth. In summary, martian permafrost in the north polar region is a viable location for modern life. Stoker et al. presented a formalism for comparing the habitability of

  20. Overview of hypersonic CFD code calibration studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Charles G.

    1987-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: definitions of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code validation; climate in hypersonics and LaRC when first 'designed' CFD code calibration studied was initiated; methodology from the experimentalist's perspective; hypersonic facilities; measurement techniques; and CFD code calibration studies.

  1. Phoenix Robotic Arm's Workspace After 90 Sols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    During the first 90 Martian days, or sols, after its May 25, 2008, landing on an arctic plain of Mars, NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander dug several trenches in the workspace reachable with the lander's robotic arm. The lander's Surface Stereo Imager camera recorded this view of the workspace on Sol 90, early afternoon local Mars time (overnight Aug. 25 to Aug. 26, 2008). The shadow of the the camera itself, atop its mast, is just left of the center of the image and roughly a third of a meter (one foot) wide. The workspace is on the north side of the lander. The trench just to the right of center is called 'Neverland.' The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. Digging Movie from Phoenix's Sol 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander recorded the images combined into this movie of the lander's Robotic Arm enlarging and combining the two trenches informally named 'Dodo' (left) and 'Goldilocks.' The 21 images in this sequence were taken over a period of about 2 hours during Phoenix's Sol 18 (June 13, 2008), or the 18th Martian day since landing. The main purpose of the Sol 18 dig was to dig deeper for learning the depth of a hard underlying layer. A bright layer, possibly ice, was increasingly exposed as the digging progressed. Further digging and scraping in the combined Dodo-Goldilocks trench was planned for subsequent sols. The combined trench is about 20 centimeters (about 8 inches) wide. The depth at the end of the Sol 18 digging is 5 to 6 centimeters (about 2 inches). The Goldilocks trench was the source of soil samples 'Baby Bear' and 'Mama Bear,' which were collected on earlier sols and delivered to instruments on the lander deck. The Dodo trench was originally dug for practice in collecting and depositing soil samples. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. 'Dodo-Goldilocks' Trench Dug by Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This color image was acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on the 19th day of the mission, or Sol 19 (June 13, 2008), after the May 25, 2008, landing. This image shows one trench informally called 'Dodo-Goldilocks' after two digs (dug on Sol 18, or June 12, 2008) by Phoenix's Robotic Arm. The trench is 22 centimeters (8.7 inches) wide and 35 centimeters (13.8 inches) long. At its deepest point, the trench is 7 to 8 centimeters (2.7 to 3 inches) deep. White material, possibly ice, is located only at the upper portion of the trench, indicating that it is not continuous throughout the excavated site. According to scientists, the trench might be exposing a ledge, or only a portion of a slab, of the white material. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. HOMA: Israel's National Missile Defense Strategy (Abridged Version)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lailari, Guermantes

    2002-01-01

    ... (Hebrew for Fortress Wall), Chapter 1 discusses the fundamentals of missile defense and the reason why Israel's missile defense system affects US national security interests, Chapter 2 describes Israel's missile defense...

  5. Cost Effective Regional Ballistic Missile Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-16

    deploying advanced air defense systems18, such as the Russian S-300 and S-500, and concealing them in hardened, camouflaged sites, such as extensive... Russian objections to the European Phased Adaptive Approach (EPAA) and fund homeland defense priorities.39 Furthermore, the PTSS system was also... Theatre Ballistic Missile Defence Capability Becomes Operational,” Jane’s Missiles & Rockets, 1 February 2011. 55 Joseph W. Kirschbaum, REGIONAL MISSILE

  6. Ship Anti Ballistic Missile Response (SABR)

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Allen P.; Breeden, Bryan; Duff, Willard Earl; Fishcer, Paul F.; Hornback, Nathan; Leiker, David C.; Carlisle, Parker; Diersing, Michael; Devlin, Ryan; Glenn, Christopher; Hoffmeister, Chris; Chong, Tay Boon; Sing, Phang Nyit; Meng, Low Wee; Meng, Fann Chee

    2006-01-01

    Includes supplementary material. Based on public law and Presidential mandate, ballistic missile defense development is a front-burner issue for homeland defense and the defense of U.S. and coalition forces abroad. Spearheaded by the Missile Defense Agency, an integrated ballistic missile defense system was initiated to create a layered defense composed of land-, air-, sea-, and space-based assets. The Ship Anti-Ballistic Response (SABR) Project is a systems engineering approach t...

  7. Soviet debate on missile defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrott, B.

    1987-04-01

    Although the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) is meant to cope with the danger of a Soviet nuclear attack, the recent US debate over SDI has paid surprisingly little attention to Soviet views of ballistic missile defense. Despite the existence of a substantial body of pertinent scholarship, the debate has failed to take adequate account of major changes in Soviet ballistic missile defense policy since the mid-1960s. It has also neglected the links between current Soviet military policy and broader Soviet political and economic choices. The Soviets regard SDI not as a novel undertaking to reduce the risks of nuclear war but as an extension of the geopolitical competition between the superpowers. This competition has been dominated in the 1980s, in the Soviet view, by sharply increased US assertiveness and the decline of detente. Viewing SDI as a manifestation of these general trends, Soviet decision makers find the prospect of an unregulated race in ballistic missile defenses and military space technologies deeply unsettling. The deterioration of superpower relations has raised serious doubts in Moscow about the wisdom of Soviet external policy during the 1970s and has provoked sharp internal differences over policy toward the US. Already highly suspicious of the Reagan administration, the elite is united by a general conviction that SDI is an American gambit that may ultimately undercut past Soviet strategic gains and pose a grave new threat to Soviet security. 14 references.

  8. Probabilistic methodology for turbine missile risk analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twisdale, L.A.; Dunn, W.L.; Frank, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology has been developed for estimation of the probabilities of turbine-generated missile damage to nuclear power plant structures and systems. Mathematical models of the missile generation, transport, and impact events have been developed and sequenced to form an integrated turbine missile simulation methodology. Probabilistic Monte Carlo techniques are used to estimate the plant impact and damage probabilities. The methodology has been coded in the TURMIS computer code to facilitate numerical analysis and plant-specific turbine missile probability assessments. Sensitivity analyses have been performed on both the individual models and the integrated methodology, and probabilities have been estimated for a hypothetical nuclear power plant case study. (orig.)

  9. Missile Electro-Optical Countermeasures Simulation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory comprises several hardware-in-the-loop missile flight simulations designed specifically to evaluate the effectiveness of electro-optical air defense...

  10. X-43 Hypersonic Vehicle Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voland, Randall T.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; McClinton, Charles R.

    2005-01-01

    NASA recently completed two major programs in Hypersonics: Hyper-X, with the record-breaking flights of the X-43A, and the Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) Program. The X-43A flights, the culmination of the Hyper-X Program, were the first-ever examples of a scramjet engine propelling a hypersonic vehicle and provided unique, convincing, detailed flight data required to validate the design tools needed for design and development of future operational hypersonic airbreathing vehicles. Concurrent with Hyper-X, NASA's NGLT Program focused on technologies needed for future revolutionary launch vehicles. The NGLT was "competed" by NASA in response to the President s redirection of the agency to space exploration, after making significant progress towards maturing technologies required to enable airbreathing hypersonic launch vehicles. NGLT quantified the benefits, identified technology needs, developed airframe and propulsion technology, chartered a broad University base, and developed detailed plans to mature and validate hypersonic airbreathing technology for space access. NASA is currently in the process of defining plans for a new Hypersonic Technology Program. Details of that plan are not currently available. This paper highlights results from the successful Mach 7 and 10 flights of the X-43A, and the current state of hypersonic technology.

  11. Comparison of some Phoenix and gusev soil types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter..[], Goetz; Hviid, S.F.; Madsen, Morten Bo

    2010-01-01

    The comparison of soil particles at the Phoenix landing site and in Gusev Crater provides clues on their origin and global distribution. Some unusual Phoenix particles are possibly of (more) local origin, as they appear to be absent in Gusev dunes....

  12. The Cooperative Ballistic Missile Defence Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, L.; Barros, A.I.; Monsuur, H.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing proliferation of ballistic missiles and weapons of mass destruction poses new risks worldwide. For a threatened nation and given the characteristics of this threat a layered ballistic missile defence system strategy appears to be the preferred solution. However, such a strategy

  13. Hypersonic Air Flow with Finite Rate Chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boyd, Ian

    1997-01-01

    ... describe the effects of non-equilibrium flow chemistry, shock interaction, and turbulent mixing and combustion on the performance of vehicles and air breathing engines designed to fly in the hypersonic flow...

  14. Progress in modeling hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Otto

    1993-01-01

    A good knowledge of the turbulence structure, wall heat transfer, and friction in turbulent boundary layers (TBL) at high speeds is required for the design of hypersonic air breathing airplanes and reentry space vehicles. This work reports on recent progress in the modeling of high speed TBL flows. The specific research goal described here is the development of a second order closure model for zero pressure gradient TBL's for the range of Mach numbers up to hypersonic speeds with arbitrary wall cooling requirements.

  15. The Phoenix Mars Lander Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonitz, Robert; Shiraishi, Lori; Robinson, Matthew; Carsten, Joseph; Volpe, Richard; Trebi-Ollennu, Ashitey; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Chu, P. C.; Wilson, J. J.; Davis, K. R.

    2009-01-01

    The Phoenix Mars Lander Robotic Arm (RA) has operated for over 150 sols since the Lander touched down on the north polar region of Mars on May 25, 2008. During its mission it has dug numerous trenches in the Martian regolith, acquired samples of Martian dry and icy soil, and delivered them to the Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) and the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The RA inserted the Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) into the Martian regolith and positioned it at various heights above the surface for relative humidity measurements. The RA was used to point the Robotic Arm Camera to take images of the surface, trenches, samples within the scoop, and other objects of scientific interest within its workspace. Data from the RA sensors during trenching, scraping, and trench cave-in experiments have been used to infer mechanical properties of the Martian soil. This paper describes the design and operations of the RA as a critical component of the Phoenix Mars Lander necessary to achieve the scientific goals of the mission.

  16. Vertical Distribution of Water at Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamppari, L. K.; Lemmon, M. T.

    2011-01-01

    Phoenix results, combined with coordinated observations from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter of the Phoenix lander site, indicate that the water vapor is nonuniform (i.e., not well mixed) up to a calculated cloud condensation level. It is important to understand the mixing profile of water vapor because (a) the assumption of a well-mixed atmosphere up to a cloud condensation level is common in retrievals of column water abundances which are in turn used to understand the seasonal and interannual behavior of water, (b) there is a long history of observations and modeling that conclude both that water vapor is and is not well-mixed, and some studies indicate that the water vapor vertical mixing profile may, in fact, change with season and location, (c) the water vapor in the lowest part of the atmosphere is the reservoir that can exchange with the regolith and higher amounts may have an impact on the surface chemistry, and (d) greater water vapor abundances close to the surface may enhance surface exchange thereby reducing regional transport, which in turn has implications to the net transport of water vapor over seasonal and annual timescales.

  17. Hypersonic sliding target tracking in near space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-yu Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To improve the tracking accuracy of hypersonic sliding target in near space, the influence of target hypersonic movement on radar detection and tracking is analyzed, and an IMM tracking algorithm is proposed based on radial velocity compensating and cancellation processing of high dynamic biases under the earth centered earth fixed (ECEF coordinate. Based on the analysis of effect of target hypersonic movement, a measurement model is constructed to reduce the filter divergence which is caused by the model mismatch. The high dynamic biases due to the target hypersonic movement are approximately compensated through radial velocity estimation to achieve the hypersonic target tracking at low systematic biases in near space. The high dynamic biases are further eliminated by the cancellation processing of different radars, in which the track association problem can be solved when the dynamic biases are low. An IMM algorithm based on constant acceleration (CA, constant turning (CT and Singer models is used to achieve the hypersonic sliding target tracking in near space. Simulation results show that the target tracking in near space can be achieved more effectively by using the proposed algorithm.

  18. Recombination Catalysts for Hypersonic Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinitz, W.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of commercially-viable access to space will require technologies that reduce propulsion system weight and complexity, while extracting maximum energy from the products of combustion. This work is directed toward developing effective nozzle recombination catalysts for the supersonic and hypersonic aeropropulsion engines used to provide such access to space. Effective nozzle recombination will significantly reduce rk=le length (hence, propulsion system weight) and reduce fuel requirements, further decreasing the vehicle's gross lift-off weight. Two such catalysts have been identified in this work, barium and antimony compounds, by developing chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for these materials and determining the engine performance enhancement for a typical flight trajectory. Significant performance improvements are indicated, using only 2% (mole or mass) of these compounds in the combustor product gas.

  19. Rarefaction Effects in Hypersonic Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    2011-05-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) technique is used for numerical analysis of rarefied-gas hypersonic flows near a blunt plate, wedge, two side-by-side plates, disk, torus, and rotating cylinder. The role of various similarity parameters (Knudsen and Mach numbers, geometrical and temperature factors, specific heat ratios, and others) in aerodynamics of the probes is studied. Important kinetic effects that are specific for the transition flow regime have been found: non-monotonic lift and drag of plates, strong repulsive force between side-by-side plates and cylinders, dependence of drag on torus radii ratio, and the reverse Magnus effect on the lift of a rotating cylinder. The numerical results are in a good agreement with experimental data, which were obtained in a vacuum chamber at low and moderate Knudsen numbers from 0.01 to 10.

  20. Power lines Phoenix and the making of the modern southwest

    CERN Document Server

    Needham, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In 1940, Phoenix was a small, agricultural city of sixty-five thousand, and the Navajo Reservation was an open landscape of scattered sheepherders. Forty years later, Phoenix had blossomed into a metropolis of 1.5 million people and the territory of the Navajo Nation was home to two of the largest strip mines in the world. Five coal-burning power plants surrounded the reservation, generating electricity for export to Phoenix, Los Angeles, and other cities. Exploring the postwar developments of these two very different landscapes, Power Lines tells the story of the far-reaching environmental a

  1. A Potent Vector: Assessing Chinese Cruise Missile Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    likelihood that they will successfully penetrate defenses.1 Employed in salvos, perhaps in tandem with ballistic missiles, cruise missiles could...series cruise missiles for export.4 Finally, for three decades China has marketed a wide range of indig- enously produced cruise missiles (and other...distances and thus more vulnerable to at- tacks from advanced air defense systems, such as Aegis. Both missiles execute sea- skimming attacks at an

  2. The 1 × 1 m hypersonic wind tunnel Kochel/Tullahoma 1940-1960

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, Dietrich

    2015-03-01

    Peenemünde and Cape Canaveral mark cornerstones of space history. Kochel in Southern Germany and Tullahoma in Tennessee, USA also belong in this category. The technically unique Kochel wind tunnel was part of the German long-distance missile development strategy, planned and prepared in secret before the beginning of World War II. A 57 MW closed-circuit wind tunnel facility with 1 × 1 m measuring section was planned for continuous-flow simulation at high Mach numbers Ma 7-10. In the early 1940 s a site beside the Walchensee Power Station at Kochel am See in Upper Bavaria, Germany was chosen to provide the required altitude difference of 200 m for the hydraulic turbine drives. The preparatory activities for the erection of this impressive hypersonic wind tunnel facility were pushed ahead until an enforced temporary pause in September 1944. In early May 1945 US troops occupied the area and, in due course, scientists of General Arnold's Scientific Advisory Group, the `von Kármán team', ordered the transfer to the USA of available equipment, design materials and other paperwork. Here, at the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) Tullahoma, TN this `Tunnel A' was built to begin operation around 1957. The testing was conducted on the Mach 7 experimental aircraft X-15, space shuttle developments and still secret investigations on unmanned hypersonic vehicles.

  3. Barrier design for tornado-generated missiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, A.K.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear power plant facilities and many other structures need protection against missiles generated by tornados and explosions. The missile impacts result in both local and overall effects on barriers or targets. The local effects are characterized by penetration, perforation and backface spalling or scabbing of the target material. The overall effects of missile impact on structural stability are commonly evaluated in terms of the flexural and shear behaviour of the target. Empirical formulas are presented to determine the local effects on concrete and steel barriers. Procedures are given for determining the design loads for overall effects. Design methods are described. (Auth.)

  4. Barrier design for tornado-generated missiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, A.K.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear powerplant facilities and many other structures need protection against missiles generated by tornadoes and explosions. The missile impacts result in both local and overall effects on barriers or targets. The local effects are characterized by penetration, perforation, and backface spalling or scabbing of the target material. The overall effects of missile impact on structural stability are commonly evaluated in terms of the flexural and shear behavior of the target. Empirical formulas are presented to determine the local effects on concrete and steel barriers. Procedures are given for determining the design loads for overall effects. Design methods are described

  5. Missile rolling tail brake torque system. [simulating bearing friction on canard controlled missiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, W. T. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for simulating varying levels of friction in the bearings of a free rolling tail afterbody on a canard-controlled missile to determine friction effects on aerodynamic control characteristics is described. A ring located between the missile body and the afterbody is utilized in a servo system to create varying levels of friction between the missile body and the afterbody to simulate bearing friction.

  6. Project Phoenix and beyond. Pesek Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarter, J

    1997-01-01

    Although there are no federally funded projects at this time, SETI (the search for extraterrestrial intelligence) is a vigorous exploratory science. There are currently eight observational programs on telescopes around the world, of which the Phoenix Project is the most comprehensive. Most of these projects are rooted in the conclusions of the pioneering studies of the early 1970's that are summarized in the Cyclops Report. Technology has experienced an exponential growth over the past two and a half decades. It is reasonable to reassess the Cyclops conclusions as SETI enters the next century. Listening for radio signals is still the preferred method of searching, however new technologies are making searches at other wavelengths possible and are modifying the ways in which the radio searches can and should be conducted. It may be economically feasible to undertake the construction of very large telescopes that can simultaneously provide multiple beams on the sky for use by SETI and the radioastronomy community.

  7. Pesek lecture project Phoenix and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarter, Jill

    Although there are no federally funded projects at this time, SETI (the search for extraterrestrial intelligence) is a vigorous exploratory science. There are currently eight observational programs on telescopes around the world, of which the Phoenix Project is the most comprehensive. Most of these projects are rooted in the conclusions of the pioneering studies of the early 1970's that are summarized in the Cyclops Report1. Technology has experienced an exponential growth over the past two and a half decades. It is reasonable to reassess the Cyclops conclusions as SETI enters the next century. Listening for radio signals is still the preferred method of searching, however new technologies are making searches at other wavelengths possible and are modifying the ways in which the radio searches can and should be conducted. It may be economically feasible to undertake the construction of very large telescopes that can simultaneously provide multiple beams on the sky for use by SETI and the radioastronomy community.

  8. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Baker, Phoenix Islands, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 3 sites at Baker in the Phoenix...

  9. Telecommunications Relay Support of the Mars Phoenix Lander Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Charles D., Jr.; Erickson, James K.; Gladden, Roy E.; Guinn, Joseph R.; Ilott, Peter A.; Jai, Benhan; Johnston, Martin D.; Kornfeld, Richard P.; Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; McSmith, Gaylon W.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Phoenix Lander, first of NASA's Mars Scout missions, arrived at the Red Planet on May 25, 2008. From the moment the lander separated from its interplanetary cruise stage shortly before entry, the spacecraft could no longer communicate directly with Earth, and was instead entirely dependent on UHF relay communications via an international network of orbiting Mars spacecraft, including NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey (ODY) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft, as well as ESA's Mars Express (MEX) spacecraft. All three orbiters captured critical event telemetry and/or tracking data during Phoenix Entry, Descent and Landing. During the Phoenix surface mission, ODY and MRO provided command and telemetry services, far surpassing the original data return requirements. The availability of MEX as a backup relay asset enhanced the robustness of the surface relay plan. In addition to telecommunications services, Doppler tracking observables acquired on the UHF link yielded an accurate position for the Phoenix landing site.

  10. Commissioning of Theratron phoenix telecobalt machine and its performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajendran, M.; Reddy, K.D.; Reddy, R.M.; Reddy, J.M.; Reddy, B.V.N.; Kumar, K.; Gopi, S.; Rajan, Dharani; Janardhanan

    2002-01-01

    Teletherapy machines like cobalt-60 unit and linear accelerator are extensively used for radiotherapy. Theratron phoenix machines have been installed. A brief report on the performance of this machine is presented

  11. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Ecosystem Services by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset presents environmental benefits of the urban forest in 2,434 block groups in Phoenix, Arizona. Carbon attributes, pollution removal and value, and...

  12. Manufacturing and Design Engineering Students St. Mary's Hospital, Phoenix Park.

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Leah

    2012-01-01

    Poster with details of project to improve ease of movement for Kirton Stirling chairs in St. Mary's Hospital, Phoenix Park, Dublin. Third year students in the B Eng (Honours) Manufacturing and Design Engineering course at Bolton St. completed a project in conjunction with St. Mary‟s Hospital, Phoenix Park. The staff in St Mary‟s were experiencing difficulty in moving the Kirton Stirling chairs (pictured above). These chairs are used to transport elderly patients from one location to another. ...

  13. Tornado missile simulation and risk analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twisdale, L.A.; Dunn, W.L.; Chu, J.

    1978-01-01

    Mathematical models of the contributing events to the tornado missile hazard at nuclear power plants have been developed in which the major sources of uncertainty have been considered in a probabilistic framework. These models have been structured into a sequential event formalism which permits the treatment of both single and multiple missile generation events. A simulation computer code utilizing these models has been developed to obtain estimates of tornado missile event likelihoods. Two case studies have been analyzed; the results indicate that the probability of a single missile from the sampling population impacting any of the plant's targets is less then about 10 -7 per reactor-year. Additional work is needed for verification and sensitivity study

  14. Pipe missile impact experiments on concrete models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, S.; Gupta, Y.; Seaman, L.

    1981-06-01

    The experiments described in this study are a part of SRI studies for EPRI on the local response of reinforced concrete panels to missile impacts. The objectives of this task were to determine the feasibility of using scale model tests to reproduce the impact response of reinforced concrete panels observed in full-scale tests with pipe missiles and to evaluate the effect of concrete strength on the impact response. The experimental approach consisted of replica scaling: the missile and target materials were similar to those used in the full-scale tests, with all dimensions scaled by 5/32. Four criteria were selected for comparing the scaled and full-scale test results: frontface penetration, backface scabbing threshold, internal cracking in the panel, and missile deformation

  15. Ballistic Missile Defense and ABM Treaty Limitations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robinson, Brian

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. must critically evaluate our current ballistic missile defense (BMD) strategy. In today's geostrategic context, is it sound strategy to continue to impose 1972 ABM Treaty restrictions on BMD systems development...

  16. De Nederlandse missile defence capaciteit: Strategisch onmisbaar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weimar, P.W.L.

    2013-01-01

    Surface based air & missile defence behelst enerzijds de verdediging tegen conventionele luchtdreigingen, zoals vliegtuigen, helikopters en onbemande vliegtuigen (luchtverdediging). Aan de andere kant houdt het de verdediging tegen ballistische raketten en kruisraketten in (raketverdediging). De

  17. Deploying Missile Defense: Major Operational Challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bunn, M

    2004-01-01

    By October 2004, the United States will have begun initial deployment of a missile defense capability albeit a modest, limited, and not completely proven one to defend the homeland against a limited...

  18. Space Shuttle and Hypersonic Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Gerstenmaier, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years of human spaceflight have been characterized by the aerospace operations of the Soyuz, of the Space Shuttle and, more recently, of the Shenzhou. The lessons learned of this past half decade are important and very significant. Particularly interesting is the scenario that is downstream from the retiring of the Space Shuttle. A number of initiatives are, in fact, emerging from in the aftermath of the decision to terminate the Shuttle program. What is more and more evident is that a new era is approaching: the era of the commercial usage and of the commercial exploitation of space. It is probably fair to say, that this is the likely one of the new frontiers of expansion of the world economy. To make a comparison, in the last 30 years our economies have been characterized by the digital technologies, with examples ranging from computers, to cellular phones, to the satellites themselves. Similarly, the next 30 years are likely to be characterized by an exponential increase of usage of extra atmospheric resources, as a result of more economic and efficient way to access space, with aerospace transportation becoming accessible to commercial investments. We are witnessing the first steps of the transportation of future generation that will drastically decrease travel time on our Planet, and significantly enlarge travel envelope including at least the low Earth orbits. The Steve Jobs or the Bill Gates of the past few decades are being replaced by the aggressive and enthusiastic energy of new entrepreneurs. It is also interesting to note that we are now focusing on the aerospace band, that lies on top of the aeronautical shell, and below the low Earth orbits. It would be a mistake to consider this as a known envelope based on the evidences of the flights of Soyuz, Shuttle and Shenzhou. Actually, our comprehension of the possible hypersonic flight regimes is bounded within really limited envelopes. The achievement of a full understanding of the hypersonic flight

  19. DDG-1000 Missile Integration: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Systems. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Systems Engineering, Integration 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 137 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT...military tasks. These range from detection and engagement of sea- skimming anti-ship cruise missiles to discrimination of a ballistic missile warhead...is affordable, funding is available, market research was conducted, an 32 analysis of alternatives was completed, the JROC is in agreement

  20. Design trade-offs for homing missiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Allen; Moore, William

    1992-05-01

    Major design considerations, trade-offs and technology issues for future hypervelocity, anti-missile interceptors are presented in an overview format. Two classes of interceptors are considered: a low altitude interceptor using an active radar seeker for defense against tactical ballistic missiles (TBMs) and a higher altitude interceptor using a passive infra-red seeker for defense against ICBMs. Considerations are presented in the areas of mission requirements, seeker selection, aerodynamic and aerothermal environments, control systems, and guidance performance.

  1. Missile non-proliferation: an alternative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delory, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    In this report, the author first proposes an overview of the notion of missile prohibition. He notices that the association between weapons of mass destruction and missiles is a prelude to the legitimacy of missile control, notably within the framework of the Missile Technology Control Regime or MTCR. He also comments the notion of total ban. In a second part, the author analyses and discusses the limitations of the control of technology diffusion. He discusses the role of the MTCR, comments the evolution of this regime with the taking of China and Russia into consideration, the impacts of national implementations of export regimes on the MTCR, and economic aspects of control implementation. In the next part, the author addresses other kinds of limitations, i.e. those related with capacity evolutions of proliferating States. The last part addresses the evolution towards a new definition of approach to missile non-proliferation, notably in terms of perception of missile roles and of technology transfer controls

  2. Improved Dutch Roll Approximation for Hypersonic Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Liang Yin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An improved dutch roll approximation for hypersonic vehicle is presented. From the new approximations, the dutch roll frequency is shown to be a function of the stability axis yaw stability and the dutch roll damping is mainly effected by the roll damping ratio. In additional, an important parameter called roll-to-yaw ratio is obtained to describe the dutch roll mode. Solution shows that large-roll-to-yaw ratio is the generate character of hypersonic vehicle, which results the large error for the practical approximation. Predictions from the literal approximations derived in this paper are compared with actual numerical values for s example hypersonic vehicle, results show the approximations work well and the error is below 10 %.

  3. Aerothermodynamic shape optimization of hypersonic blunt bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyi, Sinan; Yumuşak, Mine

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a reliable and efficient design tool that can be used in hypersonic flows. The flow analysis is based on the axisymmetric Euler/Navier-Stokes and finite-rate chemical reaction equations. The equations are coupled simultaneously and solved implicitly using Newton's method. The Jacobian matrix is evaluated analytically. A gradient-based numerical optimization is used. The adjoint method is utilized for sensitivity calculations. The objective of the design is to generate a hypersonic blunt geometry that produces the minimum drag with low aerodynamic heating. Bezier curves are used for geometry parameterization. The performances of the design optimization method are demonstrated for different hypersonic flow conditions.

  4. Issues Associated with a Hypersonic Maglev Sled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Joseph W.; Lenzo, J.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic levitation has been explored for application from motors to transportation. All of these applications have been at velocities where the physics of the air or operating fluids are fairly well known. Application of Maglev to hypersonic velocities (Mach greater than 5) presents many opportunities, but also issues that require understanding and resolution. Use of Maglev to upgrade the High Speed Test Track at Holloman Air Force Base in Alamogordo New Mexico is an actual hypersonic application that provides the opportunity to improve test capabilities. However, there are several design issues that require investigation. This paper presents an overview of the application of Maglev to the test track and the issues associated with developing a hypersonic Maglev sled. The focus of this paper is to address the issues with the Maglev sled design, rather than the issues with the development of superconducting magnets of the sled system.

  5. Conjugate Heat Transfer Study in Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Niranjan; Kulkarni, Vinayak; Peetala, Ravi Kumar

    2018-04-01

    Coupled and decoupled conjugate heat transfer (CHT) studies are carried out to imitate experimental studies for heat transfer measurement in hypersonic flow regime. The finite volume based solvers are used for analyzing the heat interaction between fluid and solid domains. Temperature and surface heat flux signals are predicted by both coupled and decoupled CHT analysis techniques for hypersonic Mach numbers. These two methodologies are also used to study the effect of different wall materials on surface parameters. Effectiveness of these CHT solvers has been verified for the inverse problem of wall heat flux recovery using various techniques reported in the literature. Both coupled and decoupled CHT techniques are seen to be equally useful for prediction of local temperature and heat flux signals prior to the experiments in hypersonic flows.

  6. Heating Augmentation for Short Hypersonic Protuberances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Ali R.; Wood, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Computational aeroheating analyses of the Space Shuttle Orbiter plug repair models are validated against data collected in the Calspan University of Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) 48 inch shock tunnel. The comparison shows that the average difference between computed heat transfer results and the data is about 9.5%. Using CFD and Wind Tunnel (WT) data, an empirical correlation for estimating heating augmentation on short hypersonic protuberances (k/delta less than 0.3) is proposed. This proposed correlation is compared with several computed flight simulation cases and good agreement is achieved. Accordingly, this correlation is proposed for further investigation on other short hypersonic protuberances for estimating heating augmentation.

  7. Influence of Missile Fusillade Engagement Mode on Operation Efficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BU Xian-jin; REN Yi-guang; SHA Ji-chang

    2008-01-01

    Shoot efficiency is one of the most important evaluation indexes of the operation efficiency of weapon system. In this paper, based on definitions of the probability and the expected number of missed attacking missiles, the expected numbers of anti-missiles and attacking missiles hit by single anti-missile, fusillade mechanism of multi-missile is analyzed systematically. The weapon operation efficiency in various engagement patterns is also studied. The results show that double missiles fusillade is the most feasible manner for increasing the weapon operation efficiency.

  8. DNS Studies of Transitional Hypersonic Reacting Flows Over 3-D Hypersonic Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhong, Xiaolin

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this research project are to develop CFD techniques and to conduct DNS studies of fundamental flow physics leading to boundary-layer instability and transition in hypersonic flows...

  9. New Hypersonic Shock Tunnel at the Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics Prof. Henry T. Nagamatsu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toro, P. G. P.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Oliveira, A. C.; Gomes, F. A. A.; Myrabo, L. N.; Nagamatsu, Henry T.

    2008-01-01

    The new 0.60-m. nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel was designed to study advanced air-breathing propulsion system such as supersonic combustion and/or laser technologies. In addition, it may be used for hypersonic flow studies and investigations of the electromagnetic (laser) energy addition for flow control. This new hypersonic shock tunnel was designed and installed at the Laboratory for of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics Prof. Henry T. Nagamatsu, IEAv-CTA, Brazil. The design of the tunnel enables relatively long test times, 2-10 milliseconds, suitable for the experiments performed at the laboratory. Free stream Mach numbers ranging from 6 to 25 can be produced and stagnation pressures and temperatures up to 360 atm. and up to 9,000 K, respectively, can be generated. Shadowgraph and schlieren optical techniques will be used for flow visualization

  10. Missile sizing for ascent-phase intercept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, D.G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics; Salguero, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-11-01

    A computer code has been developed to determine the size of a ground-launched, multistage missile which can intercept a theater ballistic missile before it leaves the atmosphere. Typical final conditions for the inteceptor are 450 km range, 60 km altitude, and 80 sec flight time. Given the payload mass (35 kg), which includes a kinetic kill vehicle, and achievable values for the stage mass fractions (0.85), the stage specific impulses (290 sec), and the vehicle density (60 lb/ft{sup 3}), the launch mass is minimized with respect to the stage payload mass ratios, the stage burn times, and the missile angle of attack history subject to limits on the angle of attack (10 deg), the dynamic pressure (60,000 psf), and the maneuver load (200,000 psf deg). For a conical body, the minimum launch mass is approximately 1900 kg. The missile has three stages, and the payload coasts for 57 sec. A trade study has been performed by varying the flight time, the range, and the dynamic pressure Emits. With the results of a sizing study for a 70 lb payload and q{sub max} = 35,000 psf, a more detailed design has been carried out to determine heat shield mass, tabular aerodynamics, and altitude dependent thrust. The resulting missile has approximately 100 km less range than the sizing program predicted primarily because of the additional mass required for heat protection. On the other hand, launching the same missile from an aircraft increases its range by approximately 100 km. Sizing the interceptor for air launch with the same final conditions as the ground-launched missile reduces its launch mass to approximately 1000 kg.

  11. Troubles continue for the Phoenix VA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. According to the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (Joint Commission, JCAHO, an independent organization that reviews hospitals, the Phoenix VA does not comply with U.S. standards for safety, patient care and management (1. The hospital was at the epicenter of the national scandal over the quality of care being afforded to the nation's veterans where the now notorious practice of double-booking patient appointments was first exposed. The hospital's indifferent management provoked congressional investigations that uncovered still more system-wide abuses leading to the removal of the hospital director and the resignation of then VA secretary, Eric Shinseki. The hospital maintains its accreditation but with a follow-up survey in 1-6 months where it must show that it has successfully addressed the 13 identified problems (1. Inspectors who conducted the review in July found that VA employees were unable to report concerns "without retaliatory action from the hospital." Other alarming ...

  12. Ovate pontics: Phoenixing the gingival contour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medha Vivek Bhuskute

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In today's busy world, most patients do not have time for long, drawn-out dental treatment. The time span between extraction and healing after loss of tooth in the anterior esthetic zone can be esthetically and psychologically devastating on the part of the patient. Especially, when a maxillary anterior tooth must be extracted and replaced, immediate tooth replacement with an ovate pontic on a provisional bridge is a good alternative. Ovate pontic helps in preservation of the interdental papilla, which in turn preserves the natural gingival contour that would have otherwise been lost after extraction. An immediate tooth replacement using ovate pontic not only eliminates the psychologically disturbing partially edentulous phase but also results in a much more esthetically pleasing replacement of tooth that is both hygienic and natural in appearance. Another added advantage of the use of ovate pontic is that it rules out the dissatisfaction resulting from an unesthetic ridge lap pontic placed directly over edentulous ridge. Just like the long-lived bird “Phoenix,” arising out of its own ashes, the ovate pontic creates an illusion that the pontic is emerging from the gingiva, even after tooth loss. This case report discusses how an integrated approach of fabricating heat cure provisional bridge with ovate pontics before extractions, benefitted a young patient in whom fractured anterior teeth were proposed for extraction.

  13. Efficient multigrid computation of steady hypersonic flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koren, B.; Hemker, P.W.; Murthy, T.K.S.

    1991-01-01

    In steady hypersonic flow computations, Newton iteration as a local relaxation procedure and nonlinear multigrid iteration as an acceleration procedure may both easily fail. In the present chapter, same remedies are presented for overcoming these problems. The equations considered are the steady,

  14. Detached Eddy Simulations of Hypersonic Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, S.; Barnhardt, M.; Candler, G.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) of hypersonic transistion. The objective of the study was to investigate the feasibility of using CFD in general, DES in particular, for prediction of roughness-induced boundary layer transition to turbulence and the resulting increase in heat transfer.

  15. Hypersonic drone vehicle design: A multidisciplinary experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    UCLA's Advanced Aeronautic Design group focussed their efforts on design problems of an unmanned hypersonic vehicle. It is felt that a scaled hypersonic drone is necesary to bridge the gap between present theory on hypersonics and the future reality of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) for two reasons: (1) to fulfill a need for experimental data in the hypersonic regime, and (2) to provide a testbed for the scramjet engine which is to be the primary mode of propulsion for the NASP. The group concentrated on three areas of great concern to NASP design: propulsion, thermal management, and flight systems. Problem solving in these areas was directed toward design of the drone with the idea that the same design techniques could be applied to the NASP. A 70 deg swept double-delta wing configuration, developed in the 70's at the NASA Langley, was chosen as the aerodynamic and geometric model for the drone. This vehicle would be air launched from a B-1 at Mach 0.8 and 48,000 feet, rocket boosted by two internal engines to Mach 10 and 100,000 feet, and allowed to cruise under power of the scramjet engine until burnout. It would then return to base for an unpowered landing. Preliminary energy calculations based on flight requirements give the drone a gross launch weight of 134,000 pounds and an overall length of 85 feet.

  16. Hypersonic drone design: A multidisciplinary experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Efforts were focused on design problems of an unmanned hypersonic vehicle. It is felt that a scaled hypersonic drone is necessary to bridge the gap between present theory on hypersonics and the future reality of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) for two reasons: to fulfill a need for experimental data in the hypersonic regime, and to provide a testbed for the scramjet engine which is to be the primary mode of propulsion for the NASP. Three areas of great concern to NASP design were examined: propulsion, thermal management, and flight systems. Problem solving in these areas was directed towards design of the drone with the idea that the same design techniques could be applied to the NASP. A seventy degree swept double delta wing configuration, developed in the 70's at NASA Langley, was chosen as the aerodynamic and geometric model for the drone. This vehicle would be air-launched from a B-1 at Mach 0.8 and 48,000 feet, rocket boosted by two internal engines to Mach 10 and 100,000 feet, and allowed to cruise under power of the scramjet engine until burnout. It would then return to base for an unpowered landing. Preliminary energy calculations based upon the flight requirements give the drone a gross launch weight of 134,000 lb. and an overall length of 85 feet.

  17. Hypersonic - Model Analysis as a Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acretoaie, Vlad; Störrle, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Hypersonic is a Cloud-based tool that proposes a new approach to the deployment of model analysis facilities. It is implemented as a RESTful Web service API o_ering analysis features such as model clone detection. This approach allows the migration of resource intensive analysis algorithms from...

  18. NPS Faculty, Students Develop Strategic Missile Defense Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Dionne, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    News Stories Archive In May 2017, the United States successfully intercepted an intercontinental ballistic missile in the first-ever test of the U.S.'s long-range, anti-missile capabilities. While impactful, it is just th...

  19. Information Management Principles Applied to the Ballistic Missile Defense System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koehler, John M

    2007-01-01

    .... Similarly several military systems with the single mission of missile defense have evolved in service stovepipes, and are now being integrated into a national and global missile defense architecture...

  20. Acquisition: Acquisition of Targets at the Missile Defense Agency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ugone, Mary L; Meling, John E; James, Harold C; Haynes, Christine L; Heller, Brad M; Pomietto, Kenneth M; Bobbio, Jaime; Chang, Bill; Pugh, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    Who Should Read This Report and Why? Missile Defense Agency program managers who are responsible for the acquisition and management of targets used to test the Ballistic Missile Defense System should be interested in this report...

  1. China Sanctions for Missile Proliferation: A Bureaucratic Compromise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    St. Amand, Gerard A

    1994-01-01

    On 12 August 26, 1993, the State Department announced that the United States would impose sanctions against China for transferring missile technology to Pakistan in violation of the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR...

  2. Turbine-missile casing exit tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, H.R.; Sliter, G.E.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear power plant designers are required to provide safety-related components with adequate protection against hypothetical turbine-missile impacts. In plants with a ''peninsula'' arrangement, protection is provided by installing the turbine axis radially from the reactor building, so that potential missile trajectories are not in line with the plant. In plants with a ''non-peninsula'' arrangement (turbine axis perpendicular to a radius), designers rely on the low probability of a missile strike and on the protection provided by reinforced concrete walls in order to demonstrate an adequate level of protection USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.115). One of the critical first steps in demonstrating adequacy is the determination of the energy and spin of the turbine segments as they exit the turbine casing. The spin increases the probability that a subsequent impact with a protective barrier will be off-normal and therefore less severe than the normal impact assumed in plant designs. Two full-scale turbine-missile casing exit tests which were conducted by Sandia Laboratories at their rocket-sled facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are described. Because of wide variations in turbine design details, postulated failure conditions, and missile exit scenarios, the conditions for the two tests were carefully selected to be as prototypical as possible, while still maintaining the well-controlled and well-characterized test conditions needed for generating benchmark data

  3. Impact load time histories for viscoelastic missiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoykovich, M.

    1977-01-01

    Generation of the impact load time history at the contact point between a viscoelastic missile and its targets is presented. In the past, in the case of aircraft striking containment shell structure, the impact load history was determined on the basis of actual measurements by subjecting a rigid wall to aircraft crash. The effects of elastic deformation of the target upon the impact load time history is formulated in this paper. The missile is idealized by a linear mass-spring-dashpot combination using viscoelastic models. These models can readily be processed taking into account the elastic as well as inelastic deformations of the missiles. The target is assumed to be either linearly elastic or rigid. In the case of the linearly elastic target, the normal mode theory is used to express the time-dependent displacements of the target which is simulated by lumped masses, elastic properties and dashpots in discrete parts. In the case of Maxwell viscoelastic model, the time-dependent displacements of the missile and the target are given in terms of the unknown impact load time history. This leads to an integral equation which may be solved by Laplace transformation. The normal mode theory is provided. Examples are given for bricks with viscoelastic materials as missiles against a rigid target. (Auth.)

  4. Probability and containment of turbine missiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, G.C.K.

    1976-01-01

    With the trend toward ever larger power generating plants with large high-speed turbines, an important plant design consideration is the potential for and consequences of mechanical failure of turbine rotors. Such rotor failure could result in high-velocity disc fragments (turbine missiles) perforating the turbine casing and jeopardizing vital plant systems. The designer must first estimate the probability of any turbine missile damaging any safety-related plant component for his turbine and his plant arrangement. If the probability is not low enough to be acceptable to the regulatory agency, he must design a shield to contain the postulated turbine missiles. Alternatively, the shield could be designed to retard (to reduce the velocity of) the missiles such that they would not damage any vital plant system. In this paper, some of the presently available references that can be used to evaluate the probability, containment and retardation of turbine missiles are reviewed; various alternative methods are compared; and subjects for future research are recommended. (Auth.)

  5. Hypersonic Control Modeling and Simulation Tool for Lifting Towed Ballutes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global Aerospace Corporation proposes to develop a hypersonic control modeling and simulation tool for hypersonic aeroassist vehicles. Our control and simulation...

  6. Uncertainty Propagation in Hypersonic Vehicle Aerothermoelastic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamorte, Nicolas Etienne

    Hypersonic vehicles face a challenging flight environment. The aerothermoelastic analysis of its components requires numerous simplifying approximations. Identifying and quantifying the effect of uncertainties pushes the limits of the existing deterministic models, and is pursued in this work. An uncertainty quantification framework is used to propagate the effects of identified uncertainties on the stability margins and performance of the different systems considered. First, the aeroelastic stability of a typical section representative of a control surface on a hypersonic vehicle is examined. Variability in the uncoupled natural frequencies of the system is modeled to mimic the effect of aerodynamic heating. Next, the stability of an aerodynamically heated panel representing a component of the skin of a generic hypersonic vehicle is considered. Uncertainty in the location of transition from laminar to turbulent flow and the heat flux prediction is quantified using CFD. In both cases significant reductions of the stability margins are observed. A loosely coupled airframe--integrated scramjet engine is considered next. The elongated body and cowl of the engine flow path are subject to harsh aerothermodynamic loading which causes it to deform. Uncertainty associated with deformation prediction is propagated to the engine performance analysis. The cowl deformation is the main contributor to the sensitivity of the propulsion system performance. Finally, a framework for aerothermoelastic stability boundary calculation for hypersonic vehicles using CFD is developed. The usage of CFD enables one to consider different turbulence conditions, laminar or turbulent, and different models of the air mixture, in particular real gas model which accounts for dissociation of molecules at high temperature. The system is found to be sensitive to turbulence modeling as well as the location of the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Real gas effects play a minor role in the

  7. The probability of a tornado missile hitting a target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.; Koch, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that tornado missile transportation is a diffusion Markovian process. Therefore, the Green's function method is applied for the estimation of the probability of hitting a unit target area. This propability is expressed through a joint density of tornado intensity and path area, a probability of tornado missile injection and a tornado missile height distribution. (orig.)

  8. 2015 Assessment of the Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Director, Operational Test and Evaluation 2015 Assessment of the Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS...Evaluation (DOT&E) as they pertain to the Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS). Congress specified these requirements in the fiscal year 2002 (FY02...systems are the Ground-based Midcourse Defense (GMD), Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (Aegis BMD), Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense (THAAD), and

  9. MODELING THE FLIGHT TRAJECTORY OF OPERATIONAL-TACTICAL BALLISTIC MISSILES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Filipchenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article gives the basic approaches to updating the systems of combat operations modeling in the part of enemy missile attack simulation taking into account the possibility of tactical ballistic missile maneuvering during the flight. The results of simulation of combat tactical missile defense operations are given. 

  10. 75 FR 43156 - Federal Advisory Committee; Missile Defense Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Missile Defense Advisory Committee AGENCY: Missile Defense Agency (MDA), DoD. ACTION: Notice of closed meeting. SUMMARY: Under the... Defense announces that the Missile Defense Advisory Committee will meet on August 4 and 5, 2010, in...

  11. 75 FR 17692 - Foreign-Trade Zone 75 -- Phoenix, Arizona, Application for Reorganization under Alternative Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ...'' in the context of the Board's standard 2,000-acre activation limit for a general-purpose zone project... terminal at the Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, Phoenix; Site 2 (18 acres) CC&F South Valley..., 4747 West Buckeye Road, Phoenix; Site 4 (18 acres) - Santa Fe Business Park, 47th Avenue and Campbell...

  12. Animation of Panorama of Phoenix's Solar Panel and Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This is an animation of panorama images of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's solar panel and the lander's Robotic Arm with a sample in the scoop. The image was taken just before the sample was delivered to the Optical Microscope. The images making up this animation were taken by the lander's Surface Stereo Imager looking west during Phoenix's Sol 16 (June 10, 2008), or the 16th Martian day after landing. This view is a part of the 'mission success' panorama that will show the whole landing site in color. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Mathematical modeling of the Phoenix Rising pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Liu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a tightly controlled process in mammalian cells. It is important for embryogenesis, tissue homoeostasis, and cancer treatment. Apoptosis not only induces cell death, but also leads to the release of signals that promote rapid proliferation of surrounding cells through the Phoenix Rising (PR pathway. To quantitatively understand the kinetics of interactions of different molecules in this pathway, we developed a mathematical model to simulate the effects of various changes in the PR pathway on the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, a key factor for promoting cell proliferation. These changes include activation of caspase 3 (C3, caspase 7 (C7, and nuclear factor κB (NFκB. In addition, we simulated the effects of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2 inhibition and C3 knockout on the level of secreted PGE2. The model predictions on PGE2 in MEF and 4T1 cells at 48 hours after 10-Gray radiation were quantitatively consistent with the experimental data in the literature. Compared to C7, the model predicted that C3 activation was more critical for PGE2 production. The model also predicted that PGE2 production could be significantly reduced when COX2 expression was blocked via either NFκB inactivation or treatment of cells with exogenous COX2 inhibitors, which led to a decrease in the rate of conversion from arachidonic acid to prostaglandin H2 in the PR pathway. In conclusion, the mathematical model developed in this study yielded new insights into the process of tissue regrowth stimulated by signals from apoptotic cells. In future studies, the model can be used for experimental data analysis and assisting development of novel strategies/drugs for improving cancer treatment or normal tissue regeneration.

  14. Dinosaur or Phoenix: Nuclear Bombers in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    REPORT DATE 02-04-10 2. REPORT TYPE Master’s Thesis 3. DATES COVERED 31-07-09 to 16-06-10 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dinosaur or Phoenix: Nuclear...WARFIGHTING SCHOOL DINOSAUR OR PHOENIX: NUCLEAR BOMBERS IN THE 21ST CENTURY by John W. Morehead Colonel, United States Air Force A paper...can argue Secretary Gates’ decision to halt development of a follow-on bomber indicates the DOD views nuclear bombers as dinosaurs no longer needed as

  15. Exposure assessment of JAVELIN missile combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy, Donald O.; Langford, Roland E.

    1994-02-01

    Characterization and analysis of combustion products resulting from firing the JAVELIN missile were performed. Of those combustion products analyzed, it was determined that airborne lead concentrations exceeded the OSHA PEL of 50 micrograms each time the missile was fired while in the enclosure. Since the OSHA PEL standard is based upon a continuous rather than a short-term exposures blood lead concentrations were sought to ascertain the relationship between a short duration airborne exposure and its physiological effect on the body. Blood lead levels were taken on 49 test subjects prior to various JAVELIN missile test firings. Of those 49, 21 were outfitted With personal sampling equipment to determine airborne concentrations at the Assistant Gunner and Gunner positions. Periodic blood sampling after a single exposure showed an average increase of 2.27 micrograms/dL for all test subjects. Recommendations were made to consider changes in the positioning of the enclosure inhabitants to minimize airborne lead concentrations, to limit the number of missiles fired (situation dependent), and replacement of the lead B-resorcyolate with a non-lead containing burn rate modifier for the launch motor.

  16. CFD on hypersonic flow geometries with aeroheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail, Muhammad Amjad; Chao, Yan; Hui, Zhang Hui; Ullah, Rizwan

    2012-11-01

    The hypersonic flowfield around a blunted cone and cone-flare exhibits some of the major features of the flows around space vehicles, e.g. a detached bow shock in the stagnation region and the oblique shock wave/boundary layer interaction at the cone-flare junction. The shock wave/boundary layer interaction can produce a region of separated flow. This phenomenon may occur, for example, at the upstream-facing corner formed by a deflected control surface on a hypersonic entry vehicle, where the length of separation has implications for control effectiveness. Computational fluid-dynamics results are presented to show the flowfield around a blunted cone and cone-flare configurations in hypersonic flow with separation. This problem is of particular interest since it features most of the aspects of the hypersonic flow around planetary entry vehicles. The region between the cone and the flare is particularly critical with respect to the evaluation of the surface pressure and heat flux with aeroheating. Indeed, flow separation is induced by the shock wave boundary layer interaction, with subsequent flow reattachment, that can dramatically enhance the surface heat transfer. The exact determination of the extension of the recirculation zone is a particularly delicate task for numerical codes. Laminar flow and turbulent computations have been carried out using a full Navier-Stokes solver, with freestream conditions provided by the experimental data obtained at Mach 6, 8, and 16.34 wind tunnel. The numerical results are compared with the measured pressure and surface heat flux distributions in the wind tunnel and a good agreement is found, especially on the length of the recirculation region and location of shock waves. The critical physics of entropy layer, boundary layers, boundary layers and shock wave interaction and flow behind shock are properly captured and elaborated.. Hypersonic flows are characterized by high Mach number and high total enthalpy. An elevated

  17. Hypersonic Vehicle Propulsion System Simplified Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Raitano, Paul; Le, Dzu K.; Ouzts, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This document addresses the modeling task plan for the hypersonic GN&C GRC team members. The overall propulsion system modeling task plan is a multi-step process and the task plan identified in this document addresses the first steps (short term modeling goals). The procedures and tools produced from this effort will be useful for creating simplified dynamic models applicable to a hypersonic vehicle propulsion system. The document continues with the GRC short term modeling goal. Next, a general description of the desired simplified model is presented along with simulations that are available to varying degrees. The simulations may be available in electronic form (FORTRAN, CFD, MatLab,...) or in paper form in published documents. Finally, roadmaps outlining possible avenues towards realizing simplified model are presented.

  18. Thermophysical Properties of the Phoenix Mars Landing Site Study Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzig, N. E.; Mellon, M. T.; Golombek, M. P.; Arvidson, R. E.

    2006-03-01

    Analysis of Phoenix Mars study regions places 4 of 5 in a previously-identified duricrust-dominated thermophysical unit which also contains the Viking and Spirit landing sites. Extrapolation of lander-observed properties to the study regions may be complicated by surface heterogeneity.

  19. The Phoenix galaxy as seen by NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masini, A.; Comastri, A.; Puccetti, S.

    2017-01-01

    Aims. We study the long-term variability of the well-known Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 1210 (also known as UGC 4203, or the Phoenix galaxy). Methods. The source was observed by many X-ray facilities in the last 20 yr. Here we present a NuSTAR observation and put the results in the context of previously ...

  20. The Flight of the Phoenix: Interpersonal Aspects of Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Brian J.; Kilian, Claire McCarty

    2012-01-01

    Although many classroom exercises use movies to focus on management and organizational behavior issues, none of those do so in the context of project management. This article presents such an exercise using "The Flight of the Phoenix", an incredibly rich story for any management class, which provides clear examples of organizational behavior…

  1. Assessment of genetic diversity for some Iraqi date palms ( Phoenix ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) were used to evaluate the genetic diversity between 18 date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) varieties (11 females and 7 males) collected from the center of Iraq. Six primer pairs were applied to detect polymorphism between varieties. A total of 83 polymorphic AFLP fragments ...

  2. Gender Roles in Chika Unigwe's The Phoenix | Akani | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines gender roles in Chika Unigwe's The Phoenix (2007). In examining these gender roles, the paper focuses on the roles of both female and male genders in the novel in order to tease out issues that border on the marriage institution and gender complementarity in a multicultural setting. As we have ...

  3. Telltale wind indicator for the Mars Phoenix lander

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnlaugsson, H.P.; Honstein-Rathlou, C.; Merrison, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    The Telltale wind indicator is a mechanical anemometer designed to operate on the Martian surface as part of the meteorological package on the NASA Phoenix lander. It consists of a lightweight cylinder suspended by Kevlar fibers and is deflected under the action of wind. Imaging of the Telltale...

  4. Ethnobotanical survey of Phoenix dactylifera L. Pollen used for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Phoenix dactylifera L. (date palm) is known for its traditional medicinal properties across the history of native population in Algerian Sahara. There is a large trend of consumption of date palm pollen preparations in many human infertility cases in our country. However, the validity has not been scientifically ...

  5. Experimental Investigation of Hypersonic Flow and Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Quan; Cheng Bangqin; Li Yinghong; Cui Wei; Yu Yonggui; Jie Junhun

    2013-01-01

    For hypersonic flow, it was found that the most effective plasma actuator is derived from an electromagnetic perturbation. An experimental study was performed between hypersonic flow and plasma aerodynamic actuation interaction in a hypersonic shock tunnel, in which a Mach number of 7 was reached. The plasma discharging characteristic was acquired in static flows. In a hypersonic flow, the flow field can affect the plasma discharging characteristics. DC discharging without magnetic force is unstable, and the discharge channel cannot be maintained. When there is a magnetic field, the energy consumption of the plasma source is approximately three to four times larger than that without a magnetic field, and at the same time plasma discharge can also affect the hypersonic flow field. Through schlieren pictures and pressure measurement, it was found that plasma discharging could induce shockwaves and change the total pressure and wall pressure of the flow field

  6. Unstart coupling mechanism analysis of multiple-modules hypersonic inlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jichao; Chang, Juntao; Wang, Lei; Cao, Shibin; Bao, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The combination of multiplemodules in parallel manner is an important way to achieve the much higher thrust of scramjet engine. For the multiple-modules scramjet engine, when inlet unstarted oscillatory flow appears in a single-module engine due to high backpressure, how to interact with each module by massflow spillage, and whether inlet unstart occurs in other modules are important issues. The unstarted flowfield and coupling characteristic for a three-module hypersonic inlet caused by center module II and side module III were, conducted respectively. The results indicate that the other two hypersonic inlets are forced into unstarted flow when unstarted phenomenon appears on a single-module hypersonic inlet due to high backpressure, and the reversed flow in the isolator dominates the formation, expansion, shrinkage, and disappearance of the vortexes, and thus, it is the major factor of unstart coupling of multiple-modules hypersonic inlet. The coupling effect among multiple modules makes hypersonic inlet be more likely unstarted.

  7. Probabilistic assessment of tornado-borne missile speeds. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simiu, E.; Cordes, M.R.

    1980-09-01

    A procedure was developed for estimating speeds with which postulated missiles hit any given set of targets in a nuclear power plant or similar installation. Hit speeds corresponding to probabilities of occurrence of .0000001 were calculated for a given nuclear power plant under various assumptions concerning the magnitude of the force opposing missile take-off, direction of tornado axis of translation, number and location of missiles, and size of target area. The results of the calculations are shown to depend upon the parameters: CDA/m, where CD = drag coefficient, A = projected area, m = mass of missiles, and the ratio, k, between the minimum aerodynamic force required to cause missile take-off, and the weight of the missile

  8. Detection technique of targets for missile defense system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hua-ling; Deng, Jia-hao; Cai, Ke-rong

    2009-11-01

    Ballistic missile defense system (BMDS) is a weapon system for intercepting enemy ballistic missiles. It includes ballistic-missile warning system, target discrimination system, anti-ballistic-missile guidance systems, and command-control communication system. Infrared imaging detection and laser imaging detection are widely used in BMDS for surveillance, target detection, target tracking, and target discrimination. Based on a comprehensive review of the application of target-detection techniques in the missile defense system, including infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPA), ground-based radar detection technology, 3-dimensional imaging laser radar with a photon counting avalanche photodiode (APD) arrays and microchip laser, this paper focuses on the infrared and laser imaging detection techniques in missile defense system, as well as the trends for their future development.

  9. The Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platt, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that in late May 1972 former President Richard M. Nixon went to Moscow and signed, among other documents, a Treaty to Limit Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Systems. Under this agreement, both the United States and the Soviet Union made a commitment not to build nationwide ABM defenses against the other's intercontinental and submarine-launched ballistic missiles. They agreed to limit ABM deployments to a maximum of two sites, with no more than 100 launchers per site. Thirteen of the treaty's sixteen articles are intended to prevent any deviation from this. In addition, a joint Standing Consultative Commission to monitor compliance was created. National technical means --- sophisticated monitoring devices on land, sea, and in space --- were to be the primary instruments used to monitor compliance with the treaty. The ABM Treaty was signed in conjunction with an Interim Agreement to Limit Strategic Offensive Arms

  10. Ballistic Missile Defense: New Plans, Old Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Zolotukhina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available On September 17, 2009—the 70th anniversary of the Soviet invasion of Poland in 1939 that marked the beginning of World War II—the Obama Administration announced its intention to shelve plans for the U.S. Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD that had been developed under former President George W. Bush. Pointing to a new intelligence assessment, President Obama argued that his predecessor's plan to deploy an X-band radar station outside of Prague, Czech Republic, and 10 two-stage interceptor missiles in Poland would not adequately protect America and its European allies from the Iranian threat and reiterated his opposition to utilizing unproven technology in any European BMD architecture.

  11. Multiradar tracking for theater missile defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviestins, Egils

    1995-09-01

    A prototype system for tracking tactical ballistic missiles using multiple radars has been developed. The tracking is based on measurement level fusion (`true' multi-radar) tracking. Strobes from passive sensors can also be used. We describe various features of the system with some emphasis on the filtering technique. This is based on the Interacting Multiple Model framework where the states are Free Flight, Drag, Boost, and Auxiliary. Measurement error modeling includes the signal to noise ratio dependence; outliers and miscorrelations are handled in the same way. The launch point is calculated within one minute from the detection of the missile. The impact point, and its uncertainty region, is calculated continually by extrapolating the track state vector using the equations of planetary motion.

  12. The Evolution of the Cruise Missile

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    Fallersleben four times, the gyro factory at Weimar once, hydrogen peroxide facilities (used in the V-I’s booster) at Peenemunde, Holliegelshreuth, and...uirilar attitudes towards RPVs see William Wagner , bgAtnim Bugs a.’ O0 erReconissance•Drowes (Falibrook, Calif.: Aero, 1982), (iii, ivy. 54. General...of the cruise missile. Shown taking the oath of office from Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara (right) on 1 October 1965 wre (left to right) Norman

  13. Impact load time histories for viscoelastic missiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoykovich, M.

    1977-01-01

    Generation of the impact load time history at the contact point between a viscoelastic missile and its targets is presented. In the past, in the case of aircraft striking containment shell structure, the impact load time history was determined on the basis of actual measurements by subjecting a rigid wall to aircraft crash. The effects of elastic deformation of the target upon the impact load time history is formulated in this paper. The missile is idealized by a linear mass-spring-dashpot combination using viscoelastic models. These models can readily be processed taking into account the elastic as well as inelastic deformations of the missiles. The target is assumed to be either linearly elastic or rigid. In the case of the linearly elastic target, the normal mode theory is used to express the time-dependent displacements of the target which is simulated by lumped masses, elastic properties and dashpots in discrete parts. In the case of Maxwell viscoelastic model, the time-dependent displacements of the missile and the target are given in terms of the unknown impact load time history. This leads to an integral equation which may be solved by Laplace transformation. The normal mode theory is provided. The target structure may be composed of different materials with different components. Concrete and steel structural components have inherently different viscous friction damping properties. Hence, the equivalent modal damping depends on the degree of participation of these components in the modal response. An approximate rule for determining damping in any vibration mode by weighting the damping of each component according to the modal energy stored in each component is considered

  14. Strategic nuclear policy and ballistic missile defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The article explains the problems of the antirockets (ABM) as they were part of the presentation Salt I 1972. It is a translation from the English of a publication of the Foreign Affairs Research Institute in London. A topical analysis of the strategic nuclear policy of the two superpowers and their attitudes in the question of ballistic missile defense are given by means of two monographies. (orig./HSCH) [de

  15. Dictionary of Missile and Artillery Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-20

    missile and projectile control. Remote control is used widely in military affairs. TEMPERATURA VSPYShKI VZRYVChATYKh VEShchESTV (Explosive Flash Point... TEMPERATURA GORENIYa POROKhA [Powder Combustion Temperature] (T 1 ) -. combustion (formation) temperature of powder computed from 00 K (absolute scale...234 // TEMPERATURA OBYChNOGO VZRYVA [Normal Burst Temperature] - maximum temperature to which gaseous products are heated during the explosion of a

  16. How to optimize joint theater ballistic missile defense

    OpenAIRE

    Diehl, Douglas D.

    2004-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited Many potential adversaries seek, or already have theater ballistic missiles capable of threatening targets of interest to the United States. The U.S. Missile Defense Agency and armed forces are developing and fielding missile interceptors carried by many different platforms, including ships, aircraft, and ground units. Given some exigent threat, the U.S. must decide where to position defensive platforms and how they should engage poten...

  17. Space-based ballistic-missile defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethe, H.A.; Garwin, R.L.; Gottfried, K.; Kendall, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    This article, based on a forthcoming book by the Union for Concerned Scientists, focuses on the technical aspects of the issue of space-based ballistic-missile defense. After analysis, the authors conclude that the questionable performance of the proposed defense, the ease with which it could be overwhelmed or circumvented, and its potential as an antisatellite system would cause grievous damage to the security of the US if the Strategic Defense Initiative were to be pursued. The path toward greater security lies in quite another direction, they feel. Although research on ballistic-missile defense should continue at the traditional level of expenditure and within the constraints of the ABM Treaty, every effort should be made to negotiate a bilateral ban on the testing and use of space weapons. The authors think it is essential that such an agreement cover all altitudes, because a ban on high-altitude antisatellite weapons alone would not viable if directed energy weapons were developed for ballistic-missile defense. Further, the Star Wars program, unlikely ever to protect the entire nation against a nuclear attack, would nonetheless trigger a major expansion of the arms race

  18. Veiled Normalization: The Implications of Japanese Missile Defense

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, Timothy L

    2008-01-01

    Japan's development of a missile defense system has been accompanied by the acquisition of potentially offensive military assets, an increased command and control capability, significant restructuring...

  19. Solar Panel Buffeted by Wind at Phoenix Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Winds were strong enough to cause about a half a centimeter (.19 inch) of motion of a solar panel on NASA's Phoenix Mars lander when the lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this picture on Aug. 31, 2008, during the 96th Martian day since landing. The lander's telltale wind gauge has been indicating wind speeds of about 4 meters per second (9 miles per hour) during late mornings at the site. These conditions were anticipated and the wind is not expected to do any harm to the lander. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  20. Algorithm For Hypersonic Flow In Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Grant

    1989-01-01

    Implicit, finite-difference, shock-capturing algorithm calculates inviscid, hypersonic flows in chemical equilibrium. Implicit formulation chosen because overcomes limitation on mathematical stability encountered in explicit formulations. For dynamical portion of problem, Euler equations written in conservation-law form in Cartesian coordinate system for two-dimensional or axisymmetric flow. For chemical portion of problem, equilibrium state of gas at each point in computational grid determined by minimizing local Gibbs free energy, subject to local conservation of molecules, atoms, ions, and total enthalpy. Major advantage: resulting algorithm naturally stable and captures strong shocks without help of artificial-dissipation terms to damp out spurious numerical oscillations.

  1. Aerodynamic Performance Predictions of a SA- 2 Missile Using Missile DATCOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    transformation that is given by Eqs. (4) and (5). Eqs. (8)–(10) show the formulation in the body and wind axis terminology. 2,0D AC C kC   L (8) 10 cos...by Teo (2008) using Missile LAB code. However, the missile geometry then was set up from a rudimentary drawing and not one that represented a high...provided by MSIC. These particular cases were run forcing turbulent flow with a surface roughness of 0.001016 cm, which was found by Teo (2008) to

  2. Patient deaths blamed on long waits at the Phoenix VA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. This morning the lead article in the Arizona Republic was a report blaming as many as 40 deaths at the Phoenix VA on long waits (1. Yesterday, Rep. Jeff Miller, the chairman of the House Committee on Veterans Affairs, held a hearing titled “A Continued Assessment of Delays in VA Medical Care and Preventable Veteran Deaths.” “It appears as though there could be as many as 40 veterans whose deaths could be related to delays in care,” Miller announced to a stunned audience. The committee has spent months investigating patient-care scandals and allegations at VA facilities in Pittsburgh, Atlanta, Miami and other cities. said that dozens of VA hospital patients in Phoenix may have died while awaiting medical care. He went on to say that staff investigators have evidence that the Phoenix VA Health Care System keeps two sets of records to conceal prolonged waits that patients must endure for ...

  3. Pitot pressure analyses in CO2 condensing rarefied hypersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, T.; Suzuki, T.; Fujita, K.

    2016-11-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of rarefied aerodynamic prediction, a hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel (HRWT) was developed at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. While this wind tunnel has been limited to inert gases, such as nitrogen or argon, we recently extended the capability of HRWT to CO2 hypersonic flows for several Mars missions. Compared to our previous N2 cases, the condensation effect may not be negligible for CO2 rarefied aerodynamic measurements. Thus, in this work, we have utilized both experimental and numerical approaches to investigate the condensation and rarefaction effects in CO2 hypersonic nozzle flows.

  4. PHOENIX MARS MECA NON-IMAGING EDR V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) experiment on the Mars Phoenix Lander consists of four instrument components plus command...

  5. PHOENIX MARS MECA OPTICAL MICROSCOPE 3 RADIOMETRIC SCI V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) experiment on the Mars Phoenix Lander consists of four instrument components plus command...

  6. PHOENIX MARS MECA OPTICAL MICROSCOPE 2 EDR VERSION 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) experiment on the Mars Phoenix Lander consists of four instrument components plus command...

  7. Photometric Properties of Soils at the Mars Phoenix Landing Site: Preliminary Analysis from CRISM EPF Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull, S. C.; Arvidson, R. E.; Seelos, F.; Wolff, M. J.

    2010-03-01

    Using data from CRISM's Emission Phase Function observations, we attempt to constrain Phoenix soil scattering properties, including soil grain size, single-scattering albedo, and surface phase function.

  8. IR sensor design insight from missile-plume prediction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapanotti, John L.; Gilbert, Bruno; Richer, Guy; Stowe, Robert

    2002-08-01

    Modern anti-tank missiles and the requirement of rapid deployment have significantly reduced the use of passive armour in protecting land vehicles. Vehicle survivability is becoming more dependent on sensors, computers and countermeasures to detect and avoid threats. An analysis of missile propellants suggests that missile detection based on plume characteristics alone may be more difficult than anticipated. Currently, the passive detection of missiles depends on signatures with a significant ultraviolet component. This approach is effective in detecting anti-aircraft missiles that rely on powerful motors to pursue high-speed aircraft. The high temperature exhaust from these missiles contains significant levels of carbon dioxide, water and, often, metal oxides such as alumina. The plumes emits strongest in the infrared, 1 to 5micrometers , regions with a significant component of the signature extending into the ultraviolet domain. Many anti-tank missiles do not need the same level of propulsion and radiate significantly less. These low velocity missiles, relying on the destructive force of shaped-charge warhead, are more difficult to detect. There is virtually no ultraviolet component and detection based on UV sensors is impractical. The transition in missile detection from UV to IR is reasonable, based on trends in imaging technology, but from the analysis presented in this paper even IR imagers may have difficulty in detecting missile plumes. This suggests that the emphasis should be placed in the detection of the missile hard body in the longer wavelengths of 8 to 12micrometers . The analysis described in this paper is based on solution of the governing equations of plume physics and chemistry. These models will be used to develop better sensors and threat detection algorithms.

  9. Cost of space-based laser ballistic missile defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, G; Spergel, D

    1986-03-21

    Orbiting platforms carrying infrared lasers have been proposed as weapons forming the first tier of a ballistic missile defense system under the President's Strategic Defense Initiative. As each laser platform can destroy a limited number of missiles, one of several methods of countering such a system is to increase the number of offensive missiles. Hence it is important to know whether the cost-exchange ratio, defined as the ratio of the cost to the defense of destroying a missile to the cost to the offense of deploying an additional missile, is greater or less than 1. Although the technology to be used in a ballistic missile defense system is still extremely uncertain, it is useful to examine methods for calculating the cost-exchange ratio. As an example, the cost of an orbiting infrared laser ballistic missile defense system employed against intercontinental ballistic missiles launched simultaneously from a small area is compared to the cost of additional offensive missiles. If one adopts lower limits to the costs for the defense and upper limits to the costs for the offense, the cost-exchange ratio comes out substantially greater than 1. If these estimates are confirmed, such a ballistic missile defense system would be unable to maintain its effectiveness at less cost than it would take to proliferate the ballistic missiles necessary to overcome it and would therefore not satisfy the President's requirements for an effective strategic defense. Although the method is illustrated by applying it to a space-based infrared laser system, it should be straightforward to apply it to other proposed systems.

  10. On Challenges for Hypersonic Turbulent Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, H.C.; Sjogreen, B.

    2009-01-01

    This short note discusses some of the challenges for design of suitable spatial numerical schemes for hypersonic turbulent flows, including combustion, and thermal and chemical nonequilibrium flows. Often, hypersonic turbulent flows in re-entry space vehicles and space physics involve mixed steady strong shocks and turbulence with unsteady shocklets. Material mixing in combustion poses additional computational challenges. Proper control of numerical dissipation in numerical methods beyond the standard shock-capturing dissipation at discontinuities is an essential element for accurate and stable simulations of the subject physics. On one hand, the physics of strong steady shocks and unsteady turbulence/shocklet interactions under the nonequilibrium environment is not well understood. On the other hand, standard and newly developed high order accurate (fourth-order or higher) schemes were developed for homogeneous hyperbolic conservation laws and mixed hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs) (without source terms). The majority of finite rate chemistry and thermal nonequilibrium simulations employ methods for homogeneous time-dependent PDEs with a pointwise evaluation of the source terms. The pointwise evaluation of the source term might not be the best choice for stability, accuracy and minimization of spurious numerics for the overall scheme

  11. The Intercontinental Ballistic Missile and Post Cold War Deterrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-17

    Bonnetain, Hugues and Philippe Mazzoni. " Histoire De Missiles...Le 1er GMS Du Plateau D’Albion." http://www.capcomespace.net/dossiers/espace_europeen...Mazzoni, " Histoire De Missiles...Le 1er GMS Du Plateau D’Albion," http://www.capcomespace.net/dossiers/espace_europeen/albion/; Ministère de la Défense

  12. Replica scaling studies of hard missile impacts on reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, P.; Carter, P.G.; Howe, W.D.; Neilson, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Missile and target combinations at three different liners scales have been used in an experimental assessment of the applicability of replica scaling to the dynamic behaviour of reinforced concrete structures impacted by rigid missiles. Experimental results are presented for models with relative linear scales of 1, 0.37 and 0.12. (orig.) [de

  13. Civilian casualties of Iraqi ballistic missile attack to

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaji Ali

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To determine the pattern of causalities of Iraqi ballistic missile attacks on Tehran, the capital of Iran, during Iraq-Iran war. Methods: Data were extracted from the Army Staff Headquarters based on daily reports of Iranian army units during the war. Results: During 52 days, Tehran was stroked by 118 Al-Hussein missiles (a modified version of Scud missile. Eighty-six missiles landed in populated areas. During Iraqi missile attacks, 422 civilians died and 1 579 injured (4.9 deaths and 18.3 injuries per missile. During 52 days, 8.1 of the civilians died and 30.4 injured daily. Of the cases that died, 101 persons (24% were excluded due to the lack of information. Among the remainders, 179 (55.8% were male and 142 (44.2% were female. The mean age of the victims was 25.3 years±19.9 years. Our results show that the high accuracy of modified Scud missiles landed in crowded ar-eas is the major cause of high mortality in Tehran. The pres-ence of suitable warning system and shelters could reduce civilian casualties. Conclusion: The awareness and readiness of civilian defense forces, rescue services and all medical facilities for dealing with mass casualties caused by ballistic missile at-tacks are necessary. Key words: Mortality; War; Mass casualty incidents; Wounds and injuries

  14. Internal Shear Forging Processes for Missile Primary Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-20

    Growth in Shear Forming," Trans. ASME, J. Eng. ind., Vol. 90, 1968, pp. 63-70. 1 28. H. J. Dreikandt, "Untersuchung Uber das DrUckwalzen zylindrisher...10 US Army Missile Command ATTN: DRSMI-RLM Redstone Arsenal, AL 35809 Comma nder 12 US Army Missile Command + camera-ready master ATTN: DRDMI- EAT

  15. Experimental Studies on Hypersonic Stagnation Point Chemical Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chazot, O

    2006-01-01

    Development of space transportation is a very challenging task. Hypersonic flight should be investigated in details to allow designing spacecraft according to the severe environment of their flight conditions...

  16. Aeroelasticity, Aerothermoelasticity and Aeroelastic Scaling of Hypersonic Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freidmann, Peretz P; Powell, Kenneth G

    2004-01-01

    ...) the behavior of a complete generic hypersonic vehicle. For problems (a) the unsteady airloads were computed using third order piston theory, as well a CFD based Euler and Navier-Stokes loads. For case (b...

  17. Advanced Control System Design for Hypersonic Vehicles, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Guidance and control system design for hypersonic vehicles is more challenging than their subsonic and supersonic counterparts. Some of these challenges are (i)...

  18. Development of an aerodynamic measurement system for hypersonic rarefied flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, T; Fujita, K; Suzuki, T

    2015-01-01

    A hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel (HRWT) has lately been developed at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency in order to improve the prediction of rarefied aerodynamics. Flow characteristics of hypersonic rarefied flows have been investigated experimentally and numerically. By conducting dynamic pressure measurements with pendulous models and pitot pressure measurements, we have probed flow characteristics in the test section. We have also improved understandings of hypersonic rarefied flows by integrating a numerical approach with the HRWT measurement. The development of the integration scheme between HRWT and numerical approach enables us to estimate the hypersonic rarefied flow characteristics as well as the direct measurement of rarefied aerodynamics. Consequently, this wind tunnel is capable of generating 25 mm-core flows with the free stream Mach number greater than 10 and Knudsen number greater than 0.1.

  19. Robust Switching Control for Hypersonic Vehicles, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Flight in the hypersonic regime is critical to NASA's goals because access to earth orbit and re-entry from orbit to earth or to other planets with atmospheres...

  20. Defense Strategy of Aircraft Confronted with IR Guided Missile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesong Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface-type infrared (IR decoy can simulate the IR characteristics of the target aircraft, which is one of the most effective equipment to confront IR guided missile. In the air combat, the IR guided missile poses a serious threat to the aircraft when it comes from the front of target aircraft. In this paper, firstly, the model of aircraft and surface-type IR decoy is established. To ensure their authenticity, the aircraft maneuver and radiation models based on real data of flight and exhaust system radiation in the state of different heights and different speeds are established. Secondly, the most effective avoidance maneuver is simulated when the missile comes from the front of the target aircraft. Lastly, combining maneuver with decoys, the best defense strategy is analysed when the missile comes from the front of aircraft. The result of simulation, which is authentic, is propitious to avoid the missile and improve the survivability of aircraft.

  1. Guidance Optimization for Tactical Homing Missiles and Air Defense Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunes Sh. ALQUDSI

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to develop a functional approach to optimize the engagement effectiveness of the tactical homing missiles and air defense systems by utilizing the differential geometric concepts. In this paper the engagement geometry of the interceptor and the target is developed and expressed in differential geometric terms in order to demonstrate the possibilities of the impact triangles and specify the earliest interception based on the direct intercept geometry. Optimizing the missile heading angle and suitable missile velocity against the target velocity is then examined to achieve minimum missile latax, minimum time-to-go (time-to-hit and minimum appropriate missile velocity that is guaranteed a quick and precise interception for the given target. The study terminates with different scenarios of engagement optimization with two-dimensional simulation to demonstrate the applicability of the DG approach and to show its properties.

  2. Structural adhesives for missile external protection material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, F. L.; Garzolini, J. A.

    1981-07-01

    Two basic rubber materials are examined as possible external substrate protection materials (EPM) for missiles. The analysis provided a data base for selection of the optimum adhesives which are compatible with the substrate, loads applied and predicted bondline temperatures. Under the test conditions, EA934/NA was found to be the optimum adhesive to bond VAMAC 2273 and/or NBR/EPDM 9969A to aluminum substrate. The optimum adhesive for composite structures was EA956. Both of these adhesives are two-part epoxy systems with a pot life of approximately two hours. Further research is suggested on field repair criteria, nuclear hardness and survivability effects on bondline, and ageing effects.

  3. The science, technology, and politics of ballistic missile defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Philip E.

    2014-05-01

    America's missile defense systems are deployed at home and abroad. This includes the Groundbased Missile Defense (GMD) system in Alaska and California, the Phased Adaptive Approach in Europe (EPAA), and regional systems in the Middle East and Asia. Unfortunately these systems lack workable architectures, and many of the required elements either don't work or are missing. Major review and reconsideration is needed of all elements of these systems. GMD performance in tests has gotten worse with time, when it ought to be getting better. A lack of political support is not to blame as the DoD spends about 10 billion per year, and proposes to add about 5 billion over the next five years. Russia objects to the EPAA as a threat to its ICBM forces, and to the extensive deployment of U.S. military forces in countries such as Poland, the Czech Republic and Romania, once part of the Soviet Union. Going forward the U.S. should keep working with Russia whose cooperation will be key to diplomatic gains in the Middle East and elsewhere. Meanwhile, America's missile defenses face an enduring set of issues, especially target discrimination in the face of attacks designed to overwhelm the defenses, stage separation debris, chaff, decoys, and stealth. Dealing with target discrimination while also replacing, upgrading, or adding to the many elements of U.S. missiles defenses presents daunting budget priorities. A new look at the threat is warranted, and whether the U.S. needs to consider every nation that possesses even short-range missiles a threat to America. The proliferation of missiles of all sizes around the world is a growing problem, but expecting U.S. missile defenses to deal with all those missiles everywhere is unrealistic, and U.S. missile defenses, effective or not, are justifying more and more offensive missiles.

  4. The science, technology, and politics of ballistic missile defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coyle, Philip E.

    2014-01-01

    America's missile defense systems are deployed at home and abroad. This includes the Groundbased Missile Defense (GMD) system in Alaska and California, the Phased Adaptive Approach in Europe (EPAA), and regional systems in the Middle East and Asia. Unfortunately these systems lack workable architectures, and many of the required elements either don't work or are missing. Major review and reconsideration is needed of all elements of these systems. GMD performance in tests has gotten worse with time, when it ought to be getting better. A lack of political support is not to blame as the DoD spends about $10 billion per year, and proposes to add about $5 billion over the next five years. Russia objects to the EPAA as a threat to its ICBM forces, and to the extensive deployment of U.S. military forces in countries such as Poland, the Czech Republic and Romania, once part of the Soviet Union. Going forward the U.S. should keep working with Russia whose cooperation will be key to diplomatic gains in the Middle East and elsewhere. Meanwhile, America's missile defenses face an enduring set of issues, especially target discrimination in the face of attacks designed to overwhelm the defenses, stage separation debris, chaff, decoys, and stealth. Dealing with target discrimination while also replacing, upgrading, or adding to the many elements of U.S. missiles defenses presents daunting budget priorities. A new look at the threat is warranted, and whether the U.S. needs to consider every nation that possesses even short-range missiles a threat to America. The proliferation of missiles of all sizes around the world is a growing problem, but expecting U.S. missile defenses to deal with all those missiles everywhere is unrealistic, and U.S. missile defenses, effective or not, are justifying more and more offensive missiles

  5. The science, technology, and politics of ballistic missile defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coyle, Philip E. [Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-05-09

    America's missile defense systems are deployed at home and abroad. This includes the Groundbased Missile Defense (GMD) system in Alaska and California, the Phased Adaptive Approach in Europe (EPAA), and regional systems in the Middle East and Asia. Unfortunately these systems lack workable architectures, and many of the required elements either don't work or are missing. Major review and reconsideration is needed of all elements of these systems. GMD performance in tests has gotten worse with time, when it ought to be getting better. A lack of political support is not to blame as the DoD spends about $10 billion per year, and proposes to add about $5 billion over the next five years. Russia objects to the EPAA as a threat to its ICBM forces, and to the extensive deployment of U.S. military forces in countries such as Poland, the Czech Republic and Romania, once part of the Soviet Union. Going forward the U.S. should keep working with Russia whose cooperation will be key to diplomatic gains in the Middle East and elsewhere. Meanwhile, America's missile defenses face an enduring set of issues, especially target discrimination in the face of attacks designed to overwhelm the defenses, stage separation debris, chaff, decoys, and stealth. Dealing with target discrimination while also replacing, upgrading, or adding to the many elements of U.S. missiles defenses presents daunting budget priorities. A new look at the threat is warranted, and whether the U.S. needs to consider every nation that possesses even short-range missiles a threat to America. The proliferation of missiles of all sizes around the world is a growing problem, but expecting U.S. missile defenses to deal with all those missiles everywhere is unrealistic, and U.S. missile defenses, effective or not, are justifying more and more offensive missiles.

  6. A Statistical Approach for Gain Bandwidth Prediction of Phoenix-Cell Based Reflect arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Salti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A new statistical approach to predict the gain bandwidth of Phoenix-cell based reflectarrays is proposed. It combines the effects of both main factors that limit the bandwidth of reflectarrays: spatial phase delays and intrinsic bandwidth of radiating cells. As an illustration, the proposed approach is successfully applied to two reflectarrays based on new Phoenix cells.

  7. 75 FR 52732 - Renewal of Department of Defense Federal Advisory Committee; Missile Defense Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ... Committee; Missile Defense Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Defense (DoD). ACTION: Renewal of..., the Department of Defense gives notice that it is renewing the charter for the Missile Defense... Director, Missile Defense Agency, independent advice and recommendations on all matters relating to missile...

  8. CT analysis of missile head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besenski, N.; Jadro-Santel, D.; Jelavic-Koic, F.; Pavic, D.; Mikulic, D.; Glavina, K.; Maskovic, J.

    1995-01-01

    Between August 1991 and December 1992, CT was performed in 154 patients who had suffered missile head injury during the war in the Republic of Croatia. In 54% CT was performed 1-24 h after injury, and in 27% follow-up CT was also obtained. The wounds were penetrating, tangential or perforating (45%, 34% and 21%, respectively). Haemorrhage was the most frequent lesion in the brain (84%). Follow-up CT evolution of haemorrhage, oedema, cerebritis, abscess, secondary vascular lesions, necrosis, encephalomalacia and hydrocephalus. The most dynamic changes occurred 7-14 days after injury. In 14% of cases, deep cerebral lesions were found in the corpus callosum, septum pellucidum periventricular region and pons, although bone and shell fragments were in a different part of the brain parenchyma. Such lesions were found in penetrating injuries only. CT proved very useful for assessing the extent and type of lesions. Although different mechanisms of brain damage in missile head injury are known, here they are, to the best of our knowledge, shown for the first time by CT. (orig.)

  9. Modelling cavitating flow around underwater missiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Petitpas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The diffuse interface model of Saurel et al. (2008 is used for the computation of compressible cavitating flows around underwater missiles. Such systems use gas injection and natural cavitation to reduce drag effects. Consequently material interfaces appear separating liquid and gas. These interfaces may have a really complex dynamics such that only a few formulations are able to predict their evolution. Contrarily to front tracking or interface reconstruction method the interfaces are computed as diffused numerical zones, that are captured in a routinely manner, as is done usually with gas dynamics solvers for shocks and contact discontinuity. With the present approach, a single set of partial differential equations is solved everywhere, with a single numerical scheme. This leads to very efficient solvers. The algorithm derived in Saurel et al. (2009 is used to compute cavitation pockets around solid bodies. It is first validated against experiments done in cavitation tunnel at CNU. Then it is used to compute flows around high speed underwater systems (Shkval-like missile. Performance data are then computed showing method ability to predict forces acting on the system.

  10. Photogrammetry of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Laura Kathryn; Littell, Justin D.; Cassell, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, two large-scale models of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic decelerator were tested in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center. One of the objectives of this test was to measure model deflections under aerodynamic loading that approximated expected flight conditions. The measurements were acquired using stereo photogrammetry. Four pairs of stereo cameras were mounted inside the NFAC test section, each imaging a particular section of the HIAD. The views were then stitched together post-test to create a surface deformation profile. The data from the photogram- metry system will largely be used for comparisons to and refinement of Fluid Structure Interaction models. This paper describes how a commercial photogrammetry system was adapted to make the measurements and presents some preliminary results.

  11. Cavity-type hypersonic phononic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, A; Fytas, G; Pennec, Y; Djafari-Rouhani, B; Yanagishita, T; Masuda, H; Knoll, W

    2012-01-01

    We report on the engineering of the phonon dispersion diagram in monodomain anodic porous alumina (APA) films through the porosity and physical state of the material residing in the nanopores. Lattice symmetry and inclusion materials are theoretically identified to be the main factors which control the hypersonic acoustic wave propagation. This involves the interaction between the longitudinal and the transverse modes in the effective medium and a flat band characteristic of the material residing in the cavities. Air and filled nanopores, therefore, display markedly different dispersion relations and the inclusion materials lead to a locally resonant structural behavior uniquely determining their properties under confinement. APA films emerge as a new platform to investigate the rich acoustic phenomena of structured composite matter. (paper)

  12. Neutron radiography at the University of Michigan's Phoenix Memorial Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, J.T.; Elam, S.; Koblish, T.; Lee, P.; McAuliffe, D.

    1990-01-01

    Real-time neutron radiography (RTNR) is rapidly becoming a valuable tool for nondestructive testing and basic research with a wide variety of applications. The Phoenix Memorial Laboratory (PML) at the University of Michigan has developed an RTNR facility and has been using this facility to study several phenomena of interest to researchers in many areas. These phenomena include imaging of the internal fluid flow in gas turbine engine nozzles and coking and debris deposition in several gas turbine nozzles. This paper presents a summary of the technique and facilities involved in these applications

  13. Phoenix type concepts for transmutation of LWR waste minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segev, M.

    1994-01-01

    A number of variations on the original Phoenix theme were studied. The basic rationale of the Phoenix incinerator is making oxide fuel of the LWR waste minor actinides, loading it in an FFTF-like subcritical core, then bombarding the core with the high current beam accelerated protons to generate considerable energy through spallation and fission reactions. As originally assessed, if the machine is fed with 1600 MeV protons in a 102 mA current, then 8 core modules are driven to transmute the yearly minor actinides waste of 75 1000 MW LWRs into Pu 238 and fission products; in a 2 years cycle the energy extracted is 100000 MW d/T. This performance cannot be substantiated in a rigorous analysis. A calculational consistent methodology, based on a combined execution of the Hermes, NCNP, and Korigen codes, shows, nonetheless that changes in the original Phoenix parameters can upgrade its performance.The original Phoenix contains 26 tons minor actinides in 8 core modules; 1.15 m 3 module is shaped for 40% neutron leakage; with a beam of 102 mA the 8 modules are driven to 100000 MW/T in 10.5 years, burning out the yearly minor actinide waste of 15 LWRs; the operation must be assisted by grid electricity. If the 1.15 m 3 module is shaped to allow only 28% leakage, then a beam of 102 mA will drive the 8 modules to 100000 MW/T in 3.5 years, burning out the yearly minor actinides waste of 45 LWRs. Some net grid electricity will be generated. If 25 tons minor actinides are loaded into 5 modules, each 1.72 m 3 in volume and of 24% leakage, then a 97 mA beam will drive the module to 100000 MW/T in 2.5 years, burning out the yearly minor actinides waste of 70 LWRs. A considerable amount of net grid electricity will be generated. If the lattice is made of metal fuel, and 26 tons minor actinides are loaded into 32 small modules, 0.17 m 3 each, then a 102 mA beam will drive the modules to 100000 MW/T in 2 years, burning out the yearly minor actinides waste of 72 LWRs. A considerable

  14. Prevention of heavy missiles during severe PWR accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, R.

    1994-01-01

    For future pressurized water reactors, which should be designed against core melt down accidents, missiles generated inside the containment present a severe problem for its integrity. The masses and geometries of the missiles as well as their velocities may vary to a great extend. Therefore, a reliable proof of the containment integrity is very difficult. To overcome this problem the potential sources of missiles are discussed. In section 5 it is concluded that the generation of heavy missiles must be prevented. Steam explosions must not damage the reactor vessel head. Thus fragments of the head cannot become missiles endangering the containment shell. Furthermore, during a melt-through failure of the reactor vessel under high pressure the resulting forces must not catapult the whole vessel against the containment shell. Only missiles caused by hydrogen explosions might be tolerable, but shielding structures which protect the containment shell might be required. Here further investigations are necessary. Finally, measures are described showing that the generation of heavy missiles can indeed be prevented. In section 6 investigations are explained which will confirm the strength of the reactor vessel head. In section 7 a device is discussed keeping the fragments of a failing reactor vessel at its place. (author). 12 refs., 8 figs

  15. The proliferation of ballistic missiles: an aggravating factor of crises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, Valery

    2015-01-01

    After a brief recall of the history of the development of ballistic missiles from World War II, the author discusses the various uses of these missiles, on the one hand by major powers, and on the other hand by other countries like Israel, Pakistan and India, and also Egypt and Iraq. He recalls the uses of these missiles during regional conflicts (Scuds by Iraq) and then discusses the issue of proliferation of ballistic missiles. He notices that most of these weapons are present in the arsenal of major powers under the form of intercontinental missiles, intermediate range weapons or theatre weapons. On the Third World side, proliferation concerns short- and medium-range missiles produced from technology transfers or national programmes. Mobile systems are now present in all conflicts (notably Libya, Syria) and are now based on more advanced technologies for propellers as well as for control and guidance systems. In the last part, the author discusses the perspectives associated with these missiles which are a strong offensive weapon, and are also modernised to carry nuclear warheads or multiple warheads. These evolutions could put the western superiority into question again

  16. Time-to-impact estimation in passive missile warning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahıngıl, Mehmet Cihan

    2017-05-01

    A missile warning system can detect the incoming missile threat(s) and automatically cue the other Electronic Attack (EA) systems in the suit, such as Directed Infrared Counter Measure (DIRCM) system and/or Counter Measure Dispensing System (CMDS). Most missile warning systems are currently based on passive sensor technology operating in either Solar Blind Ultraviolet (SBUV) or Midwave Infrared (MWIR) bands on which there is an intensive emission from the exhaust plume of the threatening missile. Although passive missile warning systems have some clear advantages over pulse-Doppler radar (PDR) based active missile warning systems, they show poorer performance in terms of time-to-impact (TTI) estimation which is critical for optimizing the countermeasures and also "passive kill assessment". In this paper, we consider this problem, namely, TTI estimation from passive measurements and present a TTI estimation scheme which can be used in passive missile warning systems. Our problem formulation is based on Extended Kalman Filter (EKF). The algorithm uses the area parameter of the threat plume which is derived from the used image frame.

  17. Numerical simulation of tornado-borne missile impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, D.K.; Murray, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of using a finite element procedure to examine the impact phenomenon of a tornado-borne missile impinging on a reinforced concrete barrier was assessed. The major emphasis of this study was to simulate the impact of a nondeformable missile. Several series of simulations were run, using an 8-in.-dia steel slug as the impacting missile. The numerical results were then compared with experimental field tests and empirical formulas. The work is in support of tornado design practices for fuel reprocessing and fuel fabrication plants

  18. Modeling and conduct of turbine missile concrete impact experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodfin, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The overall objective of the subject experiments was to provide full scale data on the response of reinforced concrete containment walls to impact and penetration by postulated turbine-produced missiles. These data can be used to validate analytical or scale modeling methods and to assess the applicability of current design formulas to penetration by large, irregularly shaped missiles. These data and results will be used in providing more realistic estimates of turbine missile damage probability in nuclear power plants with a non-peninsula arrangement. This paper describes the derivation of the test matrix and the method of conducting the experiments. (orig./HP)

  19. Physics Simulations of fluids - a brief overview of Phoenix FD

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Nikolov, Svetlin

    2014-01-01

    The presentation will briefly describe the simulation and rendering of fluids with Phoenix FD, and then proceed into implementation details. We will present our methods of parallelizing the core simulation algorithms and our utilization of the GPU. We will also show how we take advantage of computational fluid dynamics specifics in order to speed up the preview and final rendering, thus achieving a quick pipeline for the creation of various visual effects. About the speakers Ivaylo Iliev is a Senior Software developer at Chaos Group and is the creator of the Phoenix FD simulator for fluid effects. He has a strong interest in physics and has worked on military simulators before focusing on visual effects. He has a Master?s degree from the Varna Technical University. Svetlin Nikolov is a Senior Software developer at Chaos Group with keen interest in physics and artificial intelligence and 7 years of experience in the software industry. He comes from a game development background with a focu...

  20. Morning Frost in Trench Dug by Phoenix, Sol 113

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image from the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows morning frost inside the 'Snow White' trench dug by the lander, in addition to subsurface ice exposed by use of a rasp on the floor of the trench. The camera took this image at about 9 a.m. local solar time during the 113th Martian day of the mission (Sept. 18, 2008). Bright material near and below the four-by-four set of rasp holes in the upper half of the image is water-ice exposed by rasping and scraping in the trench earlier the same morning. Other bright material especially around the edges of the trench, is frost. Earlier in the mission, when the sun stayed above the horizon all night, morning frost was not evident in the trench. This image is presented in approximately true color. The trench is 4 to 5 centimeters (about 2 inches) deep, about 23 centimeters (9 inches) wide. Phoenix landed on a Martian arctic plain on May 25, 2008. The mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. The Thermal Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Cobos, Doug R.; Campbell, Gaylon S.; Campbell, Colin S.; Cardell, Greg; Foote, Marc C.; Wood, Stephen E.; Mehta, Manish

    2009-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) is a component of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) payload on the Phoenix Lander. TECP will measure the temperature, thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of the regolith. It will also detect and quantify the population of mobile H2O molecules in the regolith, if any, throughout the polar summer, by measuring the electrical conductivity of the regolith, as well as the dielectric permittivity. In the vapor phase, TECP is capable of measuring the atmospheric H2O vapor abundance, as well as augment the wind velocity measurements from the meteorology instrumentation. TECP is mounted near the end of the 2.3 m Robotic Arm, and can be placed either in the regolith material or held aloft in the atmosphere. This paper describes the development and calibration of the TECP. In addition, substantial characterization of the instrument has been conducted to identify behavioral characteristics that might affect landed surface operations. The greatest potential issue identified in characterization tests is the extraordinary sensitivity of the TECP to placement. Small gaps alter the contact between the TECP and regolith, complicating data interpretation. Testing with the Phoenix Robotic Arm identified mitigation techniques that will be implemented during flight. A flight model of the instrument was also field tested in the Antarctic Dry Valleys during the 2007-2008 International Polar year. 2

  2. Hard missile impacts on metal tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    The UKAEA has been conducting a programme of experiments at AEE Winfrith to determine the response of typical nuclear reactor structures to impact loads and provide data for the validation of numerical assessment methods. These structures include flat panels of steel representing, for example, specifically designed impact shields or sections of large pressure-vessels and also lengths of steel piping representing, for example, primary circuit pipes or penetrations into pressure vessels. In these cases impact velocities have been approximately 100 m/s and the experimental simulations have used a compressed-air-driven missile launcher. This paper describes the analytical work completed to date with the code DYNA3D for the impact of a billet on a pipe using the Boeing Computer Services CRAY-1S facility. With this facility it was possible to produce a 16 mm film of the impact as well as the more conventional 3D graphics and time-history plots. (author)

  3. Reinforced concrete behavior due to missile impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alderson, M.A.H.G.; Bartley, R.; O'Brien, T.P.

    1977-01-01

    The assessment of the safety of nuclear reactors has necessitated the study of the effect of missiles on reinforced concrete containment structures. Two simple theoretical calculational methods have been developed to provide basic information. The first is based on a crude energy balance approach in which that part of the kinetic energy of the missile which is transferred into the containment structure, is absorbed only as bending strain energy. To determine the energy transferred into the structure it is assumed that during the loading the target does not respond. The energy input to the structure is thus equal to the kinetic energy it will possess immediately the impulse has been removed. The boundary of the responding zone is defined by the distance travelled by the shear stress wave during the time in which the impact force increases to the load at which the shear capacity reaches the ultimate shear resistance. The second method is based on the equation of motion for an equivalent one-degree-of-freedom system assuming that only the peak value of deflection is important and that damping can be ignored. The spring stiffness of the equivalent system has been based upon the stiffness of the actual disc configuration responding in the flexural mode only. The boundaries of the disc have been defined by using the elastic plate formulae and equating those positive and negative moments which will produce a specified yield line pattern which may be inferred from plastic plate formulae. The equation of motion is solved to indicate how the quantity of reinforcement included in the structure may modify the peak deflection. By limiting the ductility ratio of the reinforcement to some prescribed level it is possible to indicate the quantity of reinforcement w

  4. Unstart Coupling Mechanism Analysis of Multiple-Modules Hypersonic Inlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jichao Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of multiplemodules in parallel manner is an important way to achieve the much higher thrust of scramjet engine. For the multiple-modules scramjet engine, when inlet unstarted oscillatory flow appears in a single-module engine due to high backpressure, how to interact with each module by massflow spillage, and whether inlet unstart occurs in other modules are important issues. The unstarted flowfield and coupling characteristic for a three-module hypersonic inlet caused by center module II and side module III were, conducted respectively. The results indicate that the other two hypersonic inlets are forced into unstarted flow when unstarted phenomenon appears on a single-module hypersonic inlet due to high backpressure, and the reversed flow in the isolator dominates the formation, expansion, shrinkage, and disappearance of the vortexes, and thus, it is the major factor of unstart coupling of multiple-modules hypersonic inlet. The coupling effect among multiple modules makes hypersonic inlet be more likely unstarted.

  5. Efficacy of Phoenix dactylifera L. (Date Palm Creams on Healthy Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Meer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The date palm fruit (Phoenix dactylifera L. Arecaceae is used in most of the countries of the world and is an essential part of the diet, especially in many Arabian countries. Phoenix dactylifera L. fruits are a rich source of sugars (glucose and fructose, vitamins (A, C, and B complex, fibers, minerals, and phenolic compounds having antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This study is designed to explore the Phoenix dactylifera L. fruit for skin care. A single-blinded, placebo control trial was conducted, including 11 healthy female volunteers after their informed consent. The efficacy of the Phoenix dactylifera L. extract (4% was evaluated in cream form after one, two, three, four, six, and eight weeks of treatment compared with the baseline. Prior to the study, the composition of the extract was analyzed to understand the underlying mechanisms by which the extract affects skin. Treating facial skin with the Phoenix dactylifera L. extract significantly improved all parameters investigated, such as skin elasticity, pigmentation, redness, brightness, and hydration and led to the improvement of the facial skin. There were no adverse reactions noted during the course of the patch test, demonstrating that the extract could be safe to apply on the skin. The Phoenix dactylifera L. fruit extract serves as a skin care ingredient that significantly improves characteristics important for perception of skin ageing and health. The efficacy of the treatment is possibly due to a combination of numerous active substances found in the Phoenix dactylifera L. extract.

  6. PIC Simulations of Hypersonic Plasma Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehoff, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Niemann, C.; Decyk, V.; Schriver, D.; Clark, E.

    2013-12-01

    The plasma sheaths formed around hypersonic aircraft (Mach number, M > 10) are relatively unexplored and of interest today to both further the development of new technologies and solve long-standing engineering problems. Both laboratory experiments and analytical/numerical modeling are required to advance the understanding of these systems; it is advantageous to perform these tasks in tandem. There has already been some work done to study these plasmas by experiments that create a rapidly expanding plasma through ablation of a target with a laser. In combination with a preformed magnetic field, this configuration leads to a magnetic "bubble" formed behind the front as particles travel at about Mach 30 away from the target. Furthermore, the experiment was able to show the generation of fast electrons which could be due to instabilities on electron scales. To explore this, future experiments will have more accurate diagnostics capable of observing time- and length-scales below typical ion scales, but simulations are a useful tool to explore these plasma conditions theoretically. Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations are necessary when phenomena are expected to be observed at these scales, and also have the advantage of being fully kinetic with no fluid approximations. However, if the scales of the problem are not significantly below the ion scales, then the initialization of the PIC simulation must be very carefully engineered to avoid unnecessary computation and to select the minimum window where structures of interest can be studied. One method of doing this is to seed the simulation with either experiment or ion-scale simulation results. Previous experiments suggest that a useful configuration for studying hypersonic plasma configurations is a ring of particles rapidly expanding transverse to an external magnetic field, which has been simulated on the ion scale with an ion-hybrid code. This suggests that the PIC simulation should have an equivalent configuration

  7. Design and Manufacturing Process for a Ballistic Missile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaharia Sebastian Marian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Designing a ballistic missile flight depends on the mission and the stress to which the missile is subject. Missile’s requests are determined by: the organization of components; flight regime type, engine configuration and aerodynamic performance of the rocket flight. In this paper has been developed a ballistic missile with a smooth fuselage type, 10 control surfaces, 8 directional surfaces for cornering execution, 2 for maneuvers of execution to change the angle of incidence and 4 stabilizers direction. Through the technology of gluing and clamping of the shell and the use of titanium components, mass of ballistic missile presented a significant decrease in weight and a structure with high strength.

  8. Health Management Issues and Strategy for Air Force Missiles (POSTPRINT)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruderman, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    ... ideal application for health monitoring. However, solid rocket motors that serve as the propulsion system for these missiles present a number of unique challenges for the development of integrated vehicle health monitoring systems...

  9. Health Management Issues and Strategy for Air Force Missiles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruderman, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    ... ideal application for health monitoring. However, solid rocket motors that serve as the propulsion system for these missiles present a number of unique challenges for the development of integrated vehicle health monitoring systems...

  10. Acquisition: Acquisition of Targets at the Missile Defense Agency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ugone, Mary L; Meling, John E; James, Harold C; Haynes, Christine L; Heller, Brad M; Pomietto, Kenneth M; Bobbio, Jaime; Chang, Bill; Pugh, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    .... This audit was performed in response to allegations made to the DoD Hotline in March 2003. This report addresses 10 allegations about the effectiveness of the process that the Missile Defense Agency used to manage and acquire targets...

  11. NATO Pallet with Javelin Missiles, MIL-STD-1660 Tests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Army Defense Ammunition Center (DAC), Validation Engineering Division (SJMAC-DEV) conducted tests in accordance with MIL-STD-1660, "Design Criteria for Ammunition Unit Loads" on the NATO pallet with Javelin missiles...

  12. Shipborne Laser Beam Weapon System for Defence against Cruise Missiles

    OpenAIRE

    J.P. Dudeja; G.S. Kalsey

    2000-01-01

    Sea-skim~ing cruise missiles pose the greatest threat to a surface ship in the present-day war scenario. The convenitional close-in-weapon-systems (CIWSs) are becoming less reliable against these new challenges requiring extremely fast reaction time. Naval Forces see a high energy laser as a feasible andjeffective directed energy weapon against sea-skimming antiship cruise missiles becauseof its .ability to deliver destructive energy at the speed of light on to a distant target. The paper com...

  13. An Efficient Missile Loadout Planning Tool for Operational Planners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    dictionaries to access values for penalties and feasibility checks. VBA user-defined types are created to identify the base set of missions and base...Missile Defense TLAM Tomahawk Land Attack Missiles TSC Tomahawk Strike Coordinator USN United States Navy VBA Visual Basic for Applications VLP... accessible and usable form, we can start basing our loadouts on actual operational plans (OPLAN) and concept plans (CONPLAN). This will give fleet

  14. Precession feature extraction of ballistic missile warhead with high velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huixia

    2018-04-01

    This paper establishes the precession model of ballistic missile warhead, and derives the formulas of micro-Doppler frequency induced by the target with precession. In order to obtain micro-Doppler feature of ballistic missile warhead with precession, micro-Doppler bandwidth estimation algorithm, which avoids velocity compensation, is presented based on high-resolution time-frequency transform. The results of computer simulations confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method even with low signal-to-noise ratio.

  15. The assessment of tornado missile hazard to nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.; Koch, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical methods and computer codes for assessing tornado missile hazards to nuclear power plants are developed. Due to the uncertainty and randomness of tornado and tornado-generated missiles' characteristics, the damage probability of targets has a highly spread distribution. The proposed method is useful for assessing the risk of not providing protection to some nonsafety-related targets whose failure can create a hazard to the safe operation of nuclear power plants

  16. Information Management Principles Applied to the Ballistic Missile Defense System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    of a BMDS. From this, the Army produced the Nike -Zeus system comprised of four radars, the Zeus missile, and a computer fire control system (General...made the Nike -Zeus our first National Missile Defense (NMD) system named Sentinel. The architecture was to cover 14 locations, 10 of which were...1999). Additionally, there are cultural impacts (Gordon & Gordon, 1999). A company choosing an Apple OS may have to wage a big fight against the

  17. Design of DOE facilities for wind-generated missiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuilanoff, G.; Drake, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents criteria and procedures for the design of structures and components for wind-generated missiles. Methods for determining missile-induced loading, calculated structural response, performance requirements, and design considerations are covered. The presented criteria is applicable to Safety-Related concrete buildings as a whole and to all their exposed external components including walls, roofs, and supporting structural systems and elements

  18. Animated Optical Microscope Zoom in from Phoenix Launch to Martian Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This animated camera view zooms in from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander launch site all the way to Phoenix's Microscopy and Electrochemistry and C Eonductivity Analyzer (MECA) aboard the spacecraft on the Martian surface. The final frame shows the soil sample delivered to MECA as viewed through the Optical Microscope (OM) on Sol 17 (June 11, 2008), or the 17th Martian day. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Controlling ballistic missiles: How important? How to do it?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, J.R.; Rubin, U.

    1992-01-01

    Missiles themselves are not weapons of mass destruction; they do not give states the ability to wreak unimaginable destruction, or to radically shift the balance of power, as nuclear weapons do. Hence, the primary focus of nonproliferation efforts should remain on weapons of mass destruction, particularly nuclear weapons, rather than on one of the many possible means of delivering them. Moreover, as discussed in more detail below, advanced strike aircraft can also be effective in delivering nuclear weapons, and are generally more effective than ballistic missiles for delivering conventional or chemical ordnance. Ultimately, if the industrialized nations seriously desire to control the spread of delivery means for weapons of mass destruction, they need to consider bringing controls over ballistic missiles and advanced strike aircraft more into balance. At the same time, while efforts to control ballistic missile proliferation - centered on the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) - have had some successes and could be strengthened, US policy will be most effective if it recognizes two key realities: the spread of ballistic missiles cannot be as comprehensively controlled as the spread of nuclear weapons, nor need it be as comprehensively controlled

  20. Results of the Phoenix Relative Humidity Sensor Recalibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, G.; Fischer, E.; Renno, N. O.

    2017-12-01

    We show results of the recalibration of the Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) relative humidity (RH) sensor of the Phoenix Mars lander [Zent et al., 2009]. Due to uncertainties in its pre-flight calibration, which partially overlapped the environmental conditions found at the Phoenix landing site [Tamppari et al., 2010], only the raw, unprocessed output of the TECP RH sensor is available in NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS). The sensor's calibration was revised in 2016 to correct for inaccuracies at the lowest temperatures [Zent et al., 2016], but the new processed RH values were not posted in the PDS. We have been using a spare engineering unit of the TECP to recalibrate the sensor in the full range of Phoenix landing site conditions in the Michigan Mars Environmental Chamber (MMEC) [Fischer et al., 2016]. We compare raw output data of the engineering unit in the MMEC with that of the flight unit from the preflight calibration. We observed that the engineering unit's RH sensor output was shifted to higher values compared to the flight unit's output at the same conditions of temperature and humidity. Based on this shift, we use a translation function that fits the in-situ measurements of the flight unit into the engineering unit output space. To improve the accuracy of this function, we use additional observations corresponding to saturated conditions when near-surface fog was observed [Whiteway et al., 2009], as well as observations around noon when the RH is expected to be below 5%. The entire range of conditions observed on the Martian surface is covered in our recalibration. The raw output of the sensor is used to obtain a new calibration function. This allows us to obtain high-level RH data at Martian polar conditions. The recalibrated data will be posted in the PDS. REFERENCES: Fischer, E., et al. (2016), Astrobiology, 16, 12, doi: 10.1089/ast.2016.1525. Tamppari, L. K., et al. (2010), J. Geophys. Res., 115, E00E17, doi:10.1029/2009JE003415

  1. CFD analysis of hypersonic, chemically reacting flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    Design studies are underway for a variety of hypersonic flight vehicles. The National Aero-Space Plane will provide a reusable, single-stage-to-orbit capability for routine access to low earth orbit. Flight-capable satellites will dip into the atmosphere to maneuver to new orbits, while planetary probes will decelerate at their destination by atmospheric aerobraking. To supplement limited experimental capabilities in the hypersonic regime, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used to analyze the flow about these configurations. The governing equations include fluid dynamic as well as chemical species equations, which are being solved with new, robust numerical algorithms. Examples of CFD applications to hypersonic vehicles suggest an important role this technology will play in the development of future aerospace systems. The computational resources needed to obtain solutions are large, but solution adaptive grids, convergence acceleration, and parallel processing may make run times manageable.

  2. Design of adaptive switching control for hypersonic aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Jiao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a novel adaptive switching control of hypersonic aircraft based on type-2 Takagi–Sugeno–Kang fuzzy sliding mode control and focuses on the problem of stability and smoothness in the switching process. This method uses full-state feedback to linearize the nonlinear model of hypersonic aircraft. Combining the interval type-2 Takagi–Sugeno–Kang fuzzy approach with sliding mode control keeps the adaptive switching process stable and smooth. For rapid stabilization of the system, the adaptive laws use a direct constructive Lyapunov analysis together with an established type-2 Takagi–Sugeno–Kang fuzzy logic system. Simulation results indicate that the proposed control scheme can maintain the stability and smoothness of switching process for the hypersonic aircraft.

  3. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Molecular Physics and Hypersonic Flows

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Molecular Physics and Hypersonic Flows bridges the gap between the fluid dynamics and molecular physics communities, emphasizing the role played by elementary processes in hypersonic flows. In particular, the work is primarily dedicated to filling the gap between microscopic and macroscopic treatments of the source terms to be inserted in the fluid dynamics codes. The first part of the book describes the molecular dynamics of elementary processes both in the gas phase and in the interaction with surfaces by using quantum mechanical and phenomenological approaches. A second group of contributions describes thermodynamics and transport properties of air components, with special attention to the transport of internal energy. A series of papers is devoted to the experimental and theoretical study of the flow of partially ionized gases. Subsequent contributions treat modern computational techniques for 3-D hypersonic flow. Non-equilibrium vibrational kinetics are then described, together with the coupling of vibra...

  4. Three-Dimensional Aeroelastic and Aerothermoelastic Behavior in Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Jack J.; Friedmann, Peretz P.; Powell, Kenneth G.; Thuruthimattam, Biju J.; Bartels, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    The aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic behavior of three-dimensional configurations in hypersonic flow regime are studied. The aeroelastic behavior of a low aspect ratio wing, representative of a fin or control surface on a generic hypersonic vehicle, is examined using third order piston theory, Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics. The sensitivity of the aeroelastic behavior generated using Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics to parameters governing temporal accuracy is also examined. Also, a refined aerothermoelastic model, which incorporates the heat transfer between the fluid and structure using CFD generated aerodynamic heating, is used to examine the aerothermoelastic behavior of the low aspect ratio wing in the hypersonic regime. Finally, the hypersonic aeroelastic behavior of a generic hypersonic vehicle with a lifting-body type fuselage and canted fins is studied using piston theory and Euler aerodynamics for the range of 2.5 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 28, at altitudes ranging from 10,000 feet to 80,000 feet. This analysis includes a study on optimal mesh selection for use with Euler aerodynamics. In addition to the aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic results presented, three time domain flutter identification techniques are compared, namely the moving block approach, the least squares curve fitting method, and a system identification technique using an Auto-Regressive model of the aeroelastic system. In general, the three methods agree well. The system identification technique, however, provided quick damping and frequency estimations with minimal response record length, and therefore o ers significant reductions in computational cost. In the present case, the computational cost was reduced by 75%. The aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic results presented illustrate the applicability of the CFL3D code for the hypersonic flight regime.

  5. CFD Validation Studies for Hypersonic Flow Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A series of experiments to measure pressure and heating for code validation involving hypersonic, laminar, separated flows was conducted at the Calspan-University at Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) in the Large Energy National Shock (LENS) tunnel. The experimental data serves as a focus for a code validation session but are not available to the authors until the conclusion of this session. The first set of experiments considered here involve Mach 9.5 and Mach 11.3 N2 flow over a hollow cylinder-flare with 30 degree flare angle at several Reynolds numbers sustaining laminar, separated flow. Truncated and extended flare configurations are considered. The second set of experiments, at similar conditions, involves flow over a sharp, double cone with fore-cone angle of 25 degrees and aft-cone angle of 55 degrees. Both sets of experiments involve 30 degree compressions. Location of the separation point in the numerical simulation is extremely sensitive to the level of grid refinement in the numerical predictions. The numerical simulations also show a significant influence of Reynolds number on extent of separation. Flow unsteadiness was easily introduced into the double cone simulations using aggressive relaxation parameters that normally promote convergence.

  6. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Ground Test Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Corso, Jospeh A.; Hughes, Stephen; Cheatwood, Neil; Johnson, Keith; Calomino, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology readiness levels have been incrementally matured by NASA over the last thirteen years, with most recent support from NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development Program (GCDP). Recently STMD GCDP has authorized funding and support through fiscal year 2015 (FY15) for continued HIAD ground developments which support a Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) study. The Mars study will assess the viability of various EDL architectures to enable a Mars human architecture pathfinder mission planned for mid-2020. At its conclusion in November 2014, NASA's first HIAD ground development effort had demonstrated success with fabricating a 50 W/cm2 modular thermal protection system, a 400 C capable inflatable structure, a 10-meter scale aeroshell manufacturing capability, together with calibrated thermal and structural models. Despite the unquestionable success of the first HIAD ground development effort, it was recognized that additional investment was needed in order to realize the full potential of the HIAD technology capability to enable future flight opportunities. The second HIAD ground development effort will focus on extending performance capability in key technology areas that include thermal protection system, lifting-body structures, inflation systems, flight control, stage transitions, and 15-meter aeroshell scalability. This paper presents an overview of the accomplishments under the baseline HIAD development effort and current plans for a follow-on development effort focused on extending those critical technologies needed to enable a Mars Pathfinder mission.

  7. Scaled Rocket Testing in Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrene, Aaron; MacLean, Matthew; Carr, Zakary; Parker, Ron; Holden, Michael; Mehta, Manish

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) uses four clustered liquid rocket engines along with two solid rocket boosters. The interaction between all six rocket exhaust plumes will produce a complex and severe thermal environment in the base of the vehicle. This work focuses on a recent 2% scale, hot-fire SLS base heating test. These base heating tests are short-duration tests executed with chamber pressures near the full-scale values with gaseous hydrogen/oxygen engines and RSRMV analogous solid propellant motors. The LENS II shock tunnel/Ludwieg tube tunnel was used at or near flight duplicated conditions up to Mach 5. Model development was strongly based on the Space Shuttle base heating tests with several improvements including doubling of the maximum chamber pressures and duplication of freestream conditions. Detailed base heating results are outside of the scope of the current work, rather test methodology and techniques are presented along with broader applicability toward scaled rocket testing in supersonic and hypersonic flow.

  8. Optimal Growth in Hypersonic Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2016-01-01

    The linear form of the parabolized linear stability equations is used in a variational approach to extend the previous body of results for the optimal, nonmodal disturbance growth in boundary-layer flows. This paper investigates the optimal growth characteristics in the hypersonic Mach number regime without any high-enthalpy effects. The influence of wall cooling is studied, with particular emphasis on the role of the initial disturbance location and the value of the spanwise wave number that leads to the maximum energy growth up to a specified location. Unlike previous predictions that used a basic state obtained from a self-similar solution to the boundary-layer equations, mean flow solutions based on the full Navier-Stokes equations are used in select cases to help account for the viscous- inviscid interaction near the leading edge of the plate and for the weak shock wave emanating from that region. Using the full Navier-Stokes mean flow is shown to result in further reduction with Mach number in the magnitude of optimal growth relative to the predictions based on the self-similar approximation to the base flow.

  9. Assessment of CFD capability for prediction of hypersonic shock interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Doyle; Longo, José; Drikakis, Dimitris; Gaitonde, Datta; Lani, Andrea; Nompelis, Ioannis; Reimann, Bodo; Walpot, Louis

    2012-01-01

    The aerothermodynamic loadings associated with shock wave boundary layer interactions (shock interactions) must be carefully considered in the design of hypersonic air vehicles. The capability of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software to accurately predict hypersonic shock wave laminar boundary layer interactions is examined. A series of independent computations performed by researchers in the US and Europe are presented for two generic configurations (double cone and cylinder) and compared with experimental data. The results illustrate the current capabilities and limitations of modern CFD methods for these flows.

  10. Hypersonic flow past slender bodies in dispersive hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El, G.A.; Khodorovskii, V.V.; Tyurina, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    The problem of two-dimensional steady hypersonic flow past a slender body is formulated for dispersive media. It is shown that for the hypersonic flow, the original 2+0 boundary-value problem is asymptotically equivalent to the 1+1 piston problem for the fully nonlinear flow in the same physical system, which allows one to take advantage of the analytic methods developed for one-dimensional systems. This type of equivalence, well known in ideal Euler gas dynamics, has not been established for dispersive hydrodynamics so far. Two examples pertaining to collisionless plasma dynamics are considered

  11. Flow visualization of a low density hypersonic flow field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, B.S.; Jumper, E.J.; Walters, E.; Segalman, T.Y.; Founds, N.D.

    1989-01-01

    Characteristics of laser induced iodine fluorescence (LIIF) in low density hypersonic flows are being investigated for use as a diagnostic technique. At low pressures, doppler broadening dominates the iodine absorption profile producing a fluorescence signal that is primarily temperature and velocity dependent. From this dependency, a low pressure flow field has the potential to be mapped for its velocity and temperature fields. The theory for relating iodine emission to the velocity and temperature fields of a hypersonic flow is discussed in this paper. Experimental observations are made of a fluorescencing free expansion and qualitatively related to the theory. 7 refs

  12. MPD model for radar echo signal of hypersonic targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Xuefei

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The stop-and-go (SAG model is typically used for echo signal received by the radar using linear frequency modulation pulse compression. In this study, the authors demonstrate that this model is not applicable to hypersonic targets. Instead of SAG model, they present a more realistic echo signal model (moving-in-pulse duration (MPD for hypersonic targets. Following that, they evaluate the performances of pulse compression under the SAG and MPD models by theoretical analysis and simulations. They found that the pulse compression gain has an increase of 3 dB by using the MPD model compared with the SAG model in typical cases.

  13. Multi-Exciter Vibroacoustic Simulation of Hypersonic Flight Vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREGORY, DANNY LYNN; CAP, JEROME S.; TOGAMI, THOMAS C.; NUSSER, MICHAEL A.; HOLLINGSHEAD, JAMES RONALD

    1999-01-01

    Many aerospace structures must survive severe high frequency, hypersonic, random vibration during their flights. The random vibrations are generated by the turbulent boundary layer developed along the exterior of the structures during flight. These environments have not been simulated very well in the past using a fixed-based, single exciter input with an upper frequency range of 2 kHz. This study investigates the possibility of using acoustic ardor independently controlled multiple exciters to more accurately simulate hypersonic flight vibration. The test configuration, equipment, and methodology are described. Comparisons with actual flight measurements and previous single exciter simulations are also presented

  14. Developing Carbon Budgets for Cities: Phoenix as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, M. R.; Baker, L. A.; Koerner, B. A.; Grimm, N. B.

    2008-12-01

    Studies have shown that cities can alter regional carbon dynamics through changing ecosystem productivity, overall carbon cycling rate, and total carbon storage in vegetation and soils. Furthermore, people in urban regions import a large amount of carbon in food and fuel, as well as release an exceptional amount of CO2 into the atmosphere. Numerous studies have attempted to quantify some sources and sinks of carbon in urban areas, although a complete carbon budget for a city that accounts for total inputs, outputs, and storage within the ecosystem has yet to be fully accomplished. One challenge is associated with attaining the data necessary to accurately account for all carbon dynamics in these heterogeneous and complex ecosystems. Our goal was to estimate a budget for the Phoenix metropolitan area while developing methodology to calculate carbon dynamics in urban systems that can be applied to cities across the US. Only with comparable carbon budgets for multiple cities will we finally begin to understand the influence of urbanization on carbon dynamics. Our analysis shows when calculating certain variables like transportation emissions, results can vary radically (up to 250%) depending on the data source and methodology implemented (i.e. bottom-up vs. top-down). A common assumption is that productivity and carbon storage will increase with urbanization in arid systems due to water and nutrient inputs, as well as changes in vegetation structure; however, our results indicated that this may not actually be the case in Phoenix where a large number of residents design landscapes to conserve water. Even if all urban expansion was dedicated to landscapes designed for carbon sequestration and storage, vegetation and soils will unlikely have a large effect on the C budget without significant changes in transportation and lifestyle choices.

  15. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - BenMAP Results by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset demonstrates the effect of changes in pollution concentration on local populations in 2,434 block groups in Phoenix, AZ. The US EPA's...

  16. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Howland, Phoenix Islands, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 4 sites at Howland, Phoenix...

  17. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Meter-Scale Urban Land Cover (MULC) Data (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EnviroAtlas Phoenix, AZ Meter-Scale Urban Land Cover (MULC) data and map were generated from USDA NAIP (National Agricultural Imagery Program) four band (red,...

  18. How Neoliberal Imperialism is Expressed by Programming Strategies of Phoenix TV: A Critical Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Xie

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This project is a case study of Phoenix Television, which is a Hong Kong-based satellite TV network broadcasting to the global Chinese-speaking community, primarily to the mainland of China. In the theoretical framework of media imperialism and neoliberal imperialism, this study focuses on the programming strategies of Phoenix TV and examines how the global trend of neoliberalism, the Chinese government’s tight control of the media, and the sophisticated ownership of Phoenix TV intertwined to influence on its programming. The analysis of the format, content, naming, and scheduling reveals that US-inspired neoliberalism is expressed in the network’s programming strategies. This expression, in fact, is the balance that Phoenix found between the tension of global and Chinese interests, the tension between revenue making and public service, and the tension between Party-control and profit seeking.

  19. Phoenix light - Heating and cooling with phase-change materials; Phoenix light: Heizen und Kuehlen mit PCM - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haechler, E. [Suiselectra Ingenieurunternehmung AG, Basel (Switzerland); Schneider, B. [Hochschule Esslingen, University of Applied Sciences, Esslingen (Germany)

    2002-12-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) deals with the use of phase-change materials (PCM) in buildings in order to help provide cooling in summer and heating in winter. General information on PCM and its use in the automotive industry, clothing, heating systems and office materials as well as in the electronics industry is provided. The physical and chemical basics are discussed and examples of PCM use in practice are provided. Also, work done in research institutes is mentioned. PCM systems from various manufacturers are noted. The 'phoenix light' system concept is discussed. The 'comfort cooler' concept is introduced and laboratory measurements made at the University of Applied Sciences in Esslingen, Germany, are discussed. Further, measurements made at an installation in an existing building are presented and discussed. Knowledge gained and the optimisation of the system are discussed. Finally, proposals for further work to be done are noted.

  20. China's nuclear arsenal and missile defence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rappai, M.V.

    2002-01-01

    Over the last few years, major focus of the nuclear debate has been turned towards the United States' proposal to erect a National Missile Defence (NMD) shield for itself. Of the existing nuclear weapon powers, China has been the most vociferous critic of this proposal. As and when this shield does become a reality, China will be the first to lose credibility as a deterrent against USA's existing nuclear arsenal. Therefore taking countermeasures against such a proposal is quite natural. China's approach towards non-proliferation mechanisms is steeped in realpolitik and its ability to manoeuvre them in its favour as a P5 and N5 power. Further, the Chinese leadership have been clear about the capabilities and limitations of nuclear weapons and treated them as diplomatic and political tools. The underlying aim is to preserve China's status as a dominant player in the international system while checkmating other possible challengers. Such a pragmatic approach is of far-reaching significance to all nations, especially those that possess nuclear weapons themselves. It will also be in India's long-term strategic interest to assess and take necessary corrective measures in its national security strategy, and make the composition of Indian nuclear strategy meet the desired goal. (author)

  1. Efficient Numerical Simulation of Aerothermoelastic Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klock, Ryan J.

    Hypersonic vehicles operate in a high-energy flight environment characterized by high dynamic pressures, high thermal loads, and non-equilibrium flow dynamics. This environment induces strong fluid, thermal, and structural dynamics interactions that are unique to this flight regime. If these vehicles are to be effectively designed and controlled, then a robust and intuitive understanding of each of these disciplines must be developed not only in isolation, but also when coupled. Limitations on scaling and the availability of adequate test facilities mean that physical investigation is infeasible. Ever growing computational power offers the ability to perform elaborate numerical simulations, but also has its own limitations. The state of the art in numerical simulation is either to create ever more high-fidelity physics models that do not couple well and require too much processing power to consider more than a few seconds of flight, or to use low-fidelity analytical models that can be tightly coupled and processed quickly, but do not represent realistic systems due to their simplifying assumptions. Reduced-order models offer a middle ground by distilling the dominant trends of high-fidelity training solutions into a form that can be quickly processed and more tightly coupled. This thesis presents a variably coupled, variable-fidelity, aerothermoelastic framework for the simulation and analysis of high-speed vehicle systems using analytical, reduced-order, and surrogate modeling techniques. Full launch-to-landing flights of complete vehicles are considered and used to define flight envelopes with aeroelastic, aerothermal, and thermoelastic limits, tune in-the-loop flight controllers, and inform future design considerations. A partitioned approach to vehicle simulation is considered in which regions dominated by particular combinations of processes are made separate from the overall solution and simulated by a specialized set of models to improve overall processing

  2. Molecular Diagnostics for the Study of Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-04-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADPO10744 TITLE: Molecular Diagnostics for the Study of Hypersonic Flows...following component part numbers comprise the compilation report: ADP010736 thru ADPO10751 UNCLASSIFIED 5-1 Molecular Diagnostics for the Study of

  3. Quantifying Non-Equilibrium in Hypersonic Flows Using Entropy Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    do this, two experimental cases performed at the Calspan- University of Buffalo Research Center ( CUBRC ) were modeled using Navier-Stokes based CFD...data provided by the CUBRC hypersonic wind tunnel facility (Holden and Wadhams, 2004). The wall data in Figure 9 and Figure 10 reveals some difference

  4. Shock stand off Calculations for Hemisphere in Hypersonic Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanif, M.; Ghaffar, A.; Bilal, S.; Zahir, S.; Khan, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The shape and location of shock has been studied by solving the axi symmetric Navier Stokes Equations for a hemisphere in hypersonic flow. The effect of Mach number on shock stand-off distance has been investigated. It is found that the shock location varies with Mach number and the free stream conditions at a given nose radius. (author)

  5. Radiation from channeled positrons in a hypersonic wave field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mkrtchyan, A.R.; Gasparyan, R.A.; Gabrielyan, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation emitted by channeled positrons in a longitudinal or transverse standing hypersonic wave field is considered. In the case of plane channeling the spectral distribution of the radiation intensity is shown to be of a resonance nature depending on the hypersound frequency

  6. Hypersonic drift-tearing magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, R.; Waelbroeck, F. L.

    2007-01-01

    A two-fluid theory of long wavelength, hypersonic, drift-tearing magnetic islands in low-collisionality, low-β plasmas possessing relatively weak magnetic shear is developed. The model assumes both slab geometry and cold ions, and neglects electron temperature and equilibrium current gradient effects. The problem is solved in three asymptotically matched regions. The 'inner region' contains the island. However, the island emits electrostatic drift-acoustic waves that propagate into the surrounding 'intermediate region', where they are absorbed by the plasma. Since the waves carry momentum, the inner region exerts a net force on the intermediate region, and vice versa, giving rise to strong velocity shear in the region immediately surrounding the island. The intermediate region is matched to the surrounding 'outer region', in which ideal magnetohydrodynamic holds. Isolated hypersonic islands propagate with a velocity that lies between those of the unperturbed local ion and electron fluids, but is much closer to the latter. The ion polarization current is stabilizing, and increases with increasing island width. Finally, the hypersonic branch of isolated island solutions ceases to exist above a certain critical island width. Hypersonic islands whose widths exceed the critical width are hypothesized to bifurcate to the so-called 'sonic' solution branch

  7. Solution-Space Screening of a Hypersonic Endurance Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudoba, Bernd; Coleman, Gary; Oza, Amit; Gonzalez, Lex; Czysz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This report documents a parametric sizing study performed to develop a program strategy for research and development and procurement of a feasible next-generation hypersonic air-breathing endurance demonstrator. Overall project focus has been on complementing technical and managerial decision-making during the earliest conceptual design phase towards minimization of operational, technical, and managerial risks.

  8. NATO and U.S. Ballistic Missile Defense Programs: Divergent or Convergent Paths?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Toms, Kevin E

    2008-01-01

    ...) information network to support the Theater Missile Defense (TMD) capabilities of specific Allies for the protection of forward deployed troops, and studies of the feasibility and political-military implications of Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD...

  9. By Land or By Sea: An Analysis of National Missile Defense Options

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Altman, Bern J

    2000-01-01

    In conformance with the National Missile Defense (NMD) Act of 1999, the United States is pursuing the path to fielding a system capable of providing protection for all of the United States against a limited ballistic missile attack...

  10. Optimal Fixed-Interval Integrated Guidance-Control Laws for Hit-to-Kill Missiles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Menon, P. K; Sweriduk, G. D; Ohlmeyer, E. J

    2003-01-01

    Due to their potential for reducing the weapon size and efficiency, design methods for realizing hit-to- kill capabilities in missile systems are of significant research interest in the missile flight control community...

  11. What Should Be the United States Policy towards Ballistic Missile Defense for Northeast Asia?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delgado, Roberto L

    2005-01-01

    .... The threat of ballistic missiles from Northeast Asia is especially high. China and North Korea are seen as the top threats in the region when it comes to the delivery of WMD through ballistic missiles...

  12. Extending U.S. Theater Missile Defense to Northeast Asia: Ramifications for Regional Security

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Attenweiler, Steven

    2001-01-01

    The absence of a formidable U.S. and allied Theater Missile Defense (TMD) capability in the East Asian region has encouraged a build-up in offensive missile capability on the part of the People's Republic of China (PRC...

  13. Elimination of the Roll Bias Caused by Wrap Around Fins for the FMTI Missile

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McKerley, C

    1998-01-01

    The Future Missile Technology Integration (FMTI) Missile System is an attempt to design an Army tactical weapon that can effectively attack both fixed and rotary wing aircraft and armor of all types...

  14. Liquid Missile Fuels as Means of Chemical Terrorist Attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superina, V.; Orehovec, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Modern world is faced with numerous terrorist attacks whose goals, methods and means of the conduct are various. It seems that we have entered the era when terrorism, one's own little terrorism, is the easiest and the most painless way of achieving a goal. That is why that such a situation has contributed to the necessity for strengthening individual and collective protection and safety, import and export control, control of the production and illegal sale of the potential means for delivering terrorist act. It has also contributed to the necessity for devising means of the delivery. For more than 10 years, a series of congresses on CB MTS Industry has pointed at chemicals and chemical industry as potential means and targets of terrorism. The specialization and experience of different authors in the field of the missile technology and missile fuels, especially those of Eastern origin, and the threat that was the reality of the war conflicts in 1990s was the reason for making a scientific and expert analysis of the liquid missile fuels as means of terrorism. There are not many experts in the field of NBC protection who are familiar with the toxicity and reaction of liquid missile fuels still lying discarded and unprotected in abandoned barracks all over Europe and Asia. The purpose of this paper is to draw public attention to possible different abuses of liquid missile fuels for a terrorist purpose, as well as to possible consequences and prevention measures against such abuses. (author)

  15. The role of strategic missile defence in the global architecture de ballistic non proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautecouverture, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    Whereas some think that missile defence is a proliferation agent by nature and therefore undermines the already fragile regime of ballistic non proliferation, some others think that missile defence could underpin the non proliferation regime. The author thus discusses these issues and both points of view by commenting the ambiguous discursive relationships between missile defence and arms control, and by highlighting the various roles and missions given to missile defence, notably in treaties (like the ABM treaty) and postures adopted by concerned countries

  16. Hypersonic evanescent waves generated with a planar spiral coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, A C; Araya-Kleinsteuber, B; Sethi, R S; Mehta, H M; Lowe, C R

    2003-09-01

    A planar spiral coil has been used to induce hypersonic evanescent waves in a quartz substrate with the unique ability to focus the acoustic wave down onto the chemical recognition layer. These special sensing conditions were achieved by investigating the application of a radio frequency current to a coaxial waveguide and spiral coil, so that wideband repeating electrical resonance conditions could be established over the MHz to GHz frequency range. At a selected operating frequency of 1.09 GHz, the evanescent wave depth of a quartz crystal hypersonic resonance is reduced to 17 nm, minimising unwanted coupling to the bulk fluid. Verification of the validity of the hypersonic resonance was carried out by characterising the system electrically and acoustically: Impedance calculations of the combined coil and coaxial waveguide demonstrated an excellent fit to the measured data, although above 400 MHz a transition zone was identified where unwanted impedance is parasitic of the coil influence efficiency, so the signal-to-noise ratio is reduced from 3000 to 300. Acoustic quartz crystal resonances at intervals of precisely 13.2138 MHz spacing, from the 6.6 MHz ultrasonic range and onto the desired hypersonic range above 1 GHz, were incrementally detected. Q factor measurements demonstrated that reductions in energy lost from the resonator to the fluid interface were consistent with the anticipated shrinkage of the evanescent wave with increasing operating frequency. Amplitude and frequency reduction in contact with a glucose solution was demonstrated at 1.09 GHz. The complex physical conditions arising at the solid-liquid interface under hypersonic entrainment are discussed with respect to acceleration induced slippage, rupture, longitudinal and shear radiation and multiphase relaxation affects.

  17. 77 FR 34357 - Missile Defense Advisory Committee; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Missile Defense Advisory Committee; Notice of Closed Meeting AGENCY: Missile Defense Agency (MDA), Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice of closed meeting... Missile Defense Advisory Committee will take place. DATES: Tuesday, June 12, 2012 through Wednesday, June...

  18. 75 FR 77849 - Closed Meeting of the Missile Defense Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Closed Meeting of the Missile Defense Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Defense; Missile Defense Agency (MDA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Under the... Defense announces that the following Federal advisory committee meeting of the Missile Defense Advisory...

  19. 76 FR 4322 - Availability of the Fiscal Year 2009 Missile Defense Agency Services Contracts Inventory Pursuant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Availability of the Fiscal Year 2009 Missile Defense... Act AGENCY: Missile Defense Agency (MDA), DoD. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: In accordance... for Fiscal Year 2008 (NDAA 08) Section 807, the Director of the Missile Defense Agency and the Office...

  20. 75 FR 77848 - Closed Meeting of the Missile Defense Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Closed Meeting of the Missile Defense Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Defense; Missile Defense Agency (MDA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Under the... Defense announces that the following Federal advisory committee meeting of the Missile Defense Advisory...

  1. 76 FR 16736 - Closed Meeting of the Missile Defense Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Closed Meeting of the Missile Defense Advisory Committee AGENCY: Missile Defense Agency (MDA), DoD. ACTION: Notice of closed meeting. SUMMARY: Under the...: Missile Defense Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: Thursday, March 24, 2011. Times: 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m...

  2. 76 FR 71556 - Missile Defense Advisory Committee; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Missile Defense Advisory Committee; Notice of Closed Meeting AGENCY: Missile Defense Agency (MDA), Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice of closed meeting... Missile Defense Advisory Committee will take place. DATES: Tuesday, December 13, 2011 through Wednesday...

  3. 76 FR 14589 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Repeal of Restriction on Ballistic Missile...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ...-AH18 Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Repeal of Restriction on Ballistic Missile...). Section 222 repeals the restriction on purchase of Ballistic Missile Defense research, development, test... Ballistic Missile Defense research, development, test, and evaluation that was required by section 222 of...

  4. 76 FR 45783 - Missile Defense Advisory Committee; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Missile Defense Advisory Committee; Notice of Closed Meeting AGENCY: Department of Defense; Missile Defense Agency (MDA). ACTION: Notice of closed meeting... Missile Defense Advisory Committee will take place. DATES: Tuesday, August 16, 2011 through Thursday...

  5. Response of buried pipes to missile impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vardanega, C.; Cremonini, M.G.; Mirone, M.; Luciani, A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology and results of the analyses carried out to determine an effective layout and the dynamic response of safety related cooling water pipes, buried in backfill, for the Alto Lazio Nuclear Power Plant in Italy, subjected to missile impact loading at the backfill surface. The pipes are composed of a steel plate encased in two layers of high-quality reinforced concrete. The methodology comprises three steps. The first step is the definition of the 'free-field' dynamic response of the backfill soil, not considering the presence of the pipes, through a dynamic finite element direct integration analysis utilizing an axisymmetric model. The second step is the pipe-soil interaction analysis, which is conducted by utilizing the soil displacement and stress time-histories obtained in the previous steps. Soil stress time-histories, combined with the geostatic and other operational stresses (such as those due to temperature and pressure), are used to obtain the actions in the pipe walls due to ring type deformation. For the third step, the analysis of the beam type response, a lumped parameter model is developed which accounts for the soil stiffness, the pipe characteristics and the position of the pipe with respect to the impact area. In addition, the effect of the presence of large concrete structures, such as tunnels, between the ground surface and the pipe is evaluated. The results of the structural analyses lead to defining the required steel thickness and also allow the choice of appropriate embedment depth and layout of redundant lines. The final results of the analysis is not only the strength verification of the pipe section, but also the definition of an effective layout of the lines in terms of position, depth, steel thickness and joint design. (orig.)

  6. Full-scale tornado-missile impact tests. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, A.E.

    1976-04-01

    Seven completed initial tests are described with 4 types of hypothetical tornado-borne missiles (impacting reinforced concrete panels that are typical of walls in nuclear power facilities). The missiles were rocket propelled to velocities currently postulated as being attainable by debris in tornadoes. (1500-pound 35-foot long utility pole; 8-pound 1-inch Grade 60 reinforcing bar; 78-pound 3-inch Schedule 40 pipe; and 743-pound 12-inch Schedule 40 pipe;) The results show that a minimum thickness of 24 inches is sufficient to prevent backface scabbing from normal impacts of currently postulated tornado missiles and that existing power plant walls are adequate for the most severe conditions currently postulated by regulatory agencies. This report gives selected detailed data on the tests completed thus far, including strain, panel velocity, and reaction histories

  7. Flexible missile autopilot design studies with PC-MATLAB/386

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a responsive, high-bandwidth missile autopilot for airframes which have structural modes of unusually low frequency presents a challenging design task. Such systems are viable candidates for modern, state-space control design methods. The PC-MATLAB interactive software package provides an environment well-suited to the development of candidate linear control laws for flexible missile autopilots. The strengths of MATLAB include: (1) exceptionally high speed (MATLAB's version for 80386-based PC's offers benchmarks approaching minicomputer and mainframe performance); (2) ability to handle large design models of several hundred degrees of freedom, if necessary; and (3) broad extensibility through user-defined functions. To characterize MATLAB capabilities, a simplified design example is presented. This involves interactive definition of an observer-based state-space compensator for a flexible missile autopilot design task. MATLAB capabilities and limitations, in the context of this design task, are then summarized.

  8. Effect of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators on Non-equilibrium Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-28

    results for MIG with the US3D code devel- oped at the University of Minnesota.61 US3D is an unstruc- tured CFD code for hypersonic flow solution used...Effect of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators on non-equilibrium hypersonic flows Ankush Bhatia,1 Subrata Roy,1 and Ryan Gosse2 1Applied...a cylindrical body in Mach 17 hypersonic flow is presented. This application focuses on using sinusoidal dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators

  9. Numerical analysis of a hypersonic turbulent and laminar flow using a commercial CFD solver

    OpenAIRE

    Pajčin Miroslav P.; Simonović Aleksandar M.; Ivanov Toni D.; Komarov Dragan M.; Stupar Slobodan N.

    2017-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics computations for two hypersonic flow cases using the commercial ANSYS FLUENT 16.2 CFD software were done. In this paper, an internal and external hypersonic flow cases were considered and analysis of the hypersonic flow using different turbulence viscosity models available in ANSYS FLUENT 16.2 as well as the laminar viscosity model were done. The obtained results were after compared and commented upon. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Tec...

  10. The Secret of Guided Missile Re-Entry,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-25

    I RD-PAI169 598 THE SECRET OF GUIDED MISSILE RE-ENTRY(U) FOREIGN / I TECHNOLOGY DIV NRIGHT-PATTERSON RFB OH J CHEN ET AL. I 25 JUN 96 FTD-ID(RS)T...TECHNOLOGY DIVISION THE SECRET OF GUIDED MISSILE RE-ENTRY by Chen Jingzhong, An Sehua J L 0 7 ’:;85’ ’ 0 *Approved for public release; Distribution...unlimite t d. :. 86 7 034.. FTD- ID(RS)T-0459-86 HUMAN TRANSLATION FTD-ID(RS)T-0459-86 25 June 1986 MICROFICHE NR: F - - 0Q 9? THE SECRET OF GUIDED

  11. Missile impacts as sources of seismic energy on the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, G.V.; McDonald, W.G.; Moore, H.J.

    1970-01-01

    Seismic signals recorded from impacts of missiles at the White Sands Missile Range are radically different from the signal recorded from the Apollo 12 lunar module impact. This implies that lunar structure to depths of at least 10 to 20 kilometers is quite different from the typical structure of the earth's crust. Results obtained from this study can be used to predict seismic wave amplitudes from future man-made lunar impacts. Seismic energy and crater dimensions from impacts are compared with measurements from chemical explosions.

  12. The Phoenix TECP Relative Humidity Sensor: Revised Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zent, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    The original calibration function of the RH sensor on the Phoenix mission's Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Sensor (TECP), has been revised to correct the erroneously-published original calibration equation, to demonstrate the value of this unique data set, and to improve characterization of H2O exchange between the martian regolith and atmosphere. TECP returned two data streams, the temperature of the electronics analog board (Tb) and the digital 12-bit output of the RH sensor (DN), both of which are required to uniquely specify the H2O abundance. Because the original flight instrument calibration was performed against a pair of hygrometers that measured frost point (Tf), the revised calibration equation is also cast in terms of frost point. The choice of functional form for the calibration function is minimally constrained. A series of profiles across the calibration data cloud at constant DN and Tb does not reveal any evidence of a complex functional form. Therefore, a series of polynomials in both DN and Tb was investigated, along with several non-linear functions of DN and Tb.

  13. Knox named Phoenix associate dean of faculty affairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix has announced the appointment of nationally recognized physician-scientist Kenneth S. Knox, MD, as the associate dean of faculty affairs. Dr. Knox who has been at the University of Arizona-Tucson since 2008, will oversee the Faculty Affairs Office whose charge is to promote an engaged, diverse community of faculty and scholars that sustain a culture of engagement, professionalism and inclusion. He also will serve as director of research at the Banner Lung Institute. Dr. Knox is a pulmonologist known for his research in sarcoidosis, fungal diagnostics and immunologic lung disease. His work includes developing treatments for HIV, AIDS and valley fever. The division chief of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine in Tucson, Knox was responsible for dramatic growth. His accomplishments include increasing the number of clinical and basic science faculty from five to 30 and fellowship trainings from six to 20, rekindling …

  14. Anther development and microsporogenesis in date palm (phoenix dactylifera l.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jazinizadeh, E.; Majd, A.; Pourpak, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Microsporogenesis and pollen morphology of Phoenix dactylifera L. was studied in this study. Anther, in different developmental stages, was removed, fixed in Formalin-glacial acetic acid-alcohol (FAA), stored in 70% ethanol, embedded in paraffin and then sliced at 8-10mu m by rotary microtome. Staining was carried out with Hematoxylin-Eozin. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to analyze the mature pollen grains. The pollen protein extracts of date palm were obtained from pollen by phosphate buffer saline (PBS). They were separated by 10% SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The anther wall is constituted of five cellular strata: epidermis, monostratified endothecium, middle layer formed by two cellular strata and the secretory tapetum. The microspore mother cells begin meiosis and form tetrads of tetragonal microspores. The mature anther wall consists of an epidermis and an endothecium. Mature pollen grains are two-celled and monosulcate, semitectate -reticulate. SDS- PAGE analysis of mature pollen grains showed protein bands of 10-110 kDa regions. (author)

  15. Propulsive Maneuver Design for the 2007 Mars Phoenix Lander Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raofi, Behzad; Bhat, Ramachandra S.; Helfrich, Cliff

    2008-01-01

    On May 25, 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander (PHX) successfully landed in the northern planes of Mars in order to continue and complement NASA's "follow the water" theme as its predecessor Mars missions, such as Mars Odyssey (ODY) and Mars Exploration Rovers, have done in recent years. Instruments on the lander, through a robotic arm able to deliver soil samples to the deck, will perform in-situ and remote-sensing investigations to characterize the chemistry of materials at the local surface, subsurface, and atmosphere. Lander instruments will also identify the potential history of key indicator elements of significance to the biological potential of Mars, including potential organics within any accessible water ice. Precise trajectory control and targeting were necessary in order to achieve the accurate atmospheric entry conditions required for arriving at the desired landing site. The challenge for the trajectory control maneuver design was to meet or exceed these requirements in the presence of spacecraft limitations as well as other mission constraints. This paper describes the strategies used, including the specialized targeting specifically developed for PHX, in order to design and successfully execute the propulsive maneuvers that delivered the spacecraft to its targeted landing site while satisfying the planetary protection requirements in the presence of flight system constraints.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Brazilian 14-X B Hypersonic Scramjet Aerospace Vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    de Araujo Martos, João Felipe; da Silveira Rêgo, Israel; Pachon Laiton, Sergio Nicholas; Lima, Bruno Coelho; Costa, Felipe Jean; de Paula Toro, Paulo Gilberto

    2017-01-01

    The Brazilian hypersonic scramjet aerospace vehicle 14-X B is a technological demonstrator of a hypersonic airbreathing propulsion system based on the supersonic combustion (scramjet) to be tested in flight into the Earth’s atmosphere at an altitude of 30 km and Mach number 7. The 14-X B has been designed at the Prof. Henry T. Nagamatsu Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics, Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv), Brazil. The IEAv T3 Hypersonic Shock Tunnel is a ground-test facility...

  17. High-Fidelity Kinetics and Radiation Transport for NLTE Hypersonic Flows, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The modeling of NLTE hypersonic flows combines several disciplines: chemistry, kinetics, radiation transport, fluid mechanics, and surface science. No single code or...

  18. Material Characterization for Hypersonic Vehicles by the Fast Mutipole Boundary Element Method, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hypersonic aircraft are subjected to extreme conditions with respect to mechanical thermal and acoustic loads. Materials with complex microstructure, such as...

  19. The Integrated Computational Environment for Airbreathing Hypersonic Flight Vehicle Modeling and Design Evaluation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An integrated computational environment for multidisciplinary, physics-based simulation and analyses of airbreathing hypersonic flight vehicles will be developed....

  20. Anisotropic power spectrum of refractive-index fluctuation in hypersonic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangting; Yang, Shaofei; Guo, Lixin; Cheng, Mingjian

    2016-11-10

    An anisotropic power spectrum of the refractive-index fluctuation in hypersonic turbulence was obtained by processing the experimental image of the hypersonic plasma sheath and transforming the generalized anisotropic von Kármán spectrum. The power spectrum suggested here can provide as good a fit to measured spectrum data for hypersonic turbulence as that recorded from the nano-planar laser scattering image. Based on the newfound anisotropic hypersonic turbulence power spectrum, Rytov approximation was employed to establish the wave structure function and the spatial coherence radius model of electromagnetic beam propagation in hypersonic turbulence. Enhancing the anisotropy characteristics of the hypersonic turbulence led to a significant improvement in the propagation performance of electromagnetic beams in hypersonic plasma sheath. The influence of hypersonic turbulence on electromagnetic beams increases with the increase of variance of the refractive-index fluctuation and the decrease of turbulence outer scale and anisotropy parameters. The spatial coherence radius was much smaller than that in atmospheric turbulence. These results are fundamental to understanding electromagnetic wave propagation in hypersonic turbulence.

  1. Tornado missile simulation and design methodology. Volume 2: model verification and data base updates. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twisdale, L.A.; Dunn, W.L.

    1981-08-01

    A probabilistic methodology has been developed to predict the probabilities of tornado-propelled missiles impacting and damaging nuclear power plant structures. Mathematical models of each event in the tornado missile hazard have been developed and sequenced to form an integrated, time-history simulation methodology. The models are data based where feasible. The data include documented records of tornado occurrence, field observations of missile transport, results of wind tunnel experiments, and missile impact tests. Probabilistic Monte Carlo techniques are used to estimate the risk probabilities. The methodology has been encoded in the TORMIS computer code to facilitate numerical analysis and plant-specific tornado missile probability assessments

  2. Department of the Army Justification of Estimates for Fiscal Year 1983 Submitted to Congress February 1982. Part 2 (Missiles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    is req’uested to procure 376 missiles and 12 fire units (or the PATRIOT missile system. PATRIOT Is an improved system which will replace NIKE -HERCULES...tifl UPrOveflts will be retofittd by Utetil work orders to be apple olwd yAm eo em 2-4S yebrary � MISSILE MODIFVICATION propriation: Missile

  3. White Sands Missile Range 2011 Drinking Water Quality Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    acerca de su agua potable . Haga que alguien lo traduzca para usted, o hable con alguien que lo entienda. Main Post White Sands Missile Range 2011...standards. What is This Water Quality Report? Este informe contiene informacion importante acerca de su agua potable . Haga que alguien lo traduzca

  4. Aerodynamic heating of ballistic missile including the effects of gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The aerodynamic heating of a ballistic missile due to only convection is analysed taking into consideration the effects of gravity. The amount of heat transferred to the wetted area and to the nose region has been separately determined, unlike A Miele's treatise without consideration of gravity. The peak heating rates ...

  5. Toward New Horizons. Volume 8. Guided Missiles and Pilotless Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-05-01

    wings required for sustentation at high speeds than for normal aircraft in which take-off and landing requirements must be met. Thus aerodynamic data...the Langley Memorial Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. 13 (2) Free-flight tests of missiles instrumented to give

  6. Missile Defense: LBJ's Bid To Curb Arms Race Gains Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, L J

    1967-04-14

    In the article of 31 March on antiballistic missile defense, the last sentence of paragraph 2, p. 1654, should read: "Manpower for producing . . . but the outer limit would be about 200,000, or half the number of contractor employees and civil servants working for NASA at the peak of the Apollo program."

  7. Full-scale Tornado-missile impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-04-01

    Initial tests with four types of hypothetical tornado-borne missiles impacting reinforced concrete panels have been completed. Panel thicknesses are typical of walls in nuclear power facilities. In the seven tests, the missiles were rocket propelled to velocities currently postulated as being attainable by debris in tornadoes. The objective of the 18-test program is to ascertain the vulnerability of test panels to penetration and backface scabbing. The four missile types being tested are: a 1500-pound 35-foot long utility pole, an 8-pound 1-inch Grade 60 reinforcing bar, a 78-pound 3-inch Schedule 40 pipe, and a 743-pound 12-inch Schedule 40 pipe. The test panels are 12, 18, and 24 inches thick with 15 by 15 foot free spans. They were constructed to current minimum ACI standards: 3000 psi design strength (actual strength about 3600 psi) and 0.2 percent reinforcing steel area each way, each face (actual area is about 0.27 percent with bars on 12-inch centers). The 12-inch pipe has been identified as the critical missile for design of nuclear facility walls under currently specified impact conditions. The utility poles splintered upon impact causing virtually no impact damage, and the 3-inch pipe and 1-inch rebar were comparatively ineffectual because of their light weight

  8. Aerodynamic heating of ballistic missile including the effects of gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aerodynamic heating of a ballistic missile due to only convection is analysed taking into consideration the effects of gravity. The amount of heat transferred to the wetted area and to the nose region has been separately determined, unlike A Miele's treatise without consideration of gravity. The peak heating ratesto the ...

  9. Modeling, Measurements, and Fundamental Database Development for Nonequilibrium Hypersonic Aerothermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    The design of entry vehicles requires predictions of aerothermal environment during the hypersonic phase of their flight trajectories. These predictions are made using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes that often rely on physics and chemistry models of nonequilibrium processes. The primary processes of interest are gas phase chemistry, internal energy relaxation, electronic excitation, nonequilibrium emission and absorption of radiation, and gas-surface interaction leading to surface recession and catalytic recombination. NASAs Hypersonics Project is advancing the state-of-the-art in modeling of nonequilibrium phenomena by making detailed spectroscopic measurements in shock tube and arcjets, using ab-initio quantum mechanical techniques develop fundamental chemistry and spectroscopic databases, making fundamental measurements of finite-rate gas surface interactions, implementing of detailed mechanisms in the state-of-the-art CFD codes, The development of new models is based on validation with relevant experiments. We will present the latest developments and a roadmap for the technical areas mentioned above

  10. Downstream Effects on Orbiter Leeside Flow Separation for Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Gregory M.; Pulsonetti, Maria V.; Weilmuenster, K. James

    2005-01-01

    Discrepancies between experiment and computation for shuttle leeside flow separation, which came to light in the Columbia accident investigation, are resolved. Tests were run in the Langley Research Center 20-Inch Hypersonic CF4 Tunnel with a baseline orbiter model and two extended trailing edge models. The extended trailing edges altered the wing leeside separation lines, moving the lines toward the fuselage, proving that wing trailing edge modeling does affect the orbiter leeside flow. Computations were then made with a wake grid. These calculations more closely matched baseline experiments. Thus, the present findings demonstrate that it is imperative to include the wake flow domain in CFD calculations in order to accurately predict leeside flow separation for hypersonic vehicles at high angles of attack.

  11. Assessment of predictive capabilities for aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Doyle; Chazot, Olivier; Austin, Joanna; Badr, Mohammad Ali; Candler, Graham; Celik, Bayram; Rosa, Donato de; Donelli, Raffaele; Komives, Jeffrey; Lani, Andrea; Levin, Deborah; Nompelis, Ioannis; Panesi, Marco; Pezzella, Giuseppe; Reimann, Bodo; Tumuklu, Ozgur; Yuceil, Kemal

    2017-04-01

    The capability for CFD prediction of hypersonic shock wave laminar boundary layer interaction was assessed for a double wedge model at Mach 7.1 in air and nitrogen at 2.1 MJ/kg and 8 MJ/kg. Simulations were performed by seven research organizations encompassing both Navier-Stokes and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) methods as part of the NATO STO AVT Task Group 205 activity. Comparison of the CFD simulations with experimental heat transfer and schlieren visualization suggest the need for accurate modeling of the tunnel startup process in short-duration hypersonic test facilities, and the importance of fully 3-D simulations of nominally 2-D (i.e., non-axisymmmetric) experimental geometries.

  12. Hypersonic nozzle/afterbody CFD code validation. I - Experimental measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaid, Frank W.; Keener, Earl R.

    1993-01-01

    This study was conducted to obtain a detailed experimental description of the flow field created by the interaction of a single-expansion-ramp-nozzle flow with a hypersonic external stream. Data were obtained from a generic nozzle/afterbody model in the 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel of the NASA Ames Research Center in a cooperative experimental program involving Ames and the McDonnell Douglas Research Laboratories. This paper presents experimental results consisting primarily of surveys obtained with a five-hole total-pressure/flow-direction probe and a total-temperature probe. These surveys were obtained in the flow field created by the interaction between the underexpanded jet plume and the external flow.

  13. Application of CFD to a generic hypersonic flight research study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael J.; Lawrence, Scott L.; Dilley, Arthur D.; Hawkins, Richard W.; Walker, Mary M.; Oberkampf, William L.

    1993-01-01

    Computational analyses have been performed for the initial assessment of flight research vehicle concepts that satisfy requirements for potential hypersonic experiments. Results were obtained from independent analyses at NASA Ames, NASA Langley, and Sandia National Labs, using sophisticated time-dependent Navier-Stokes and parabolized Navier-Stokes methods. Careful study of a common problem consisting of hypersonic flow past a slightly blunted conical forebody was undertaken to estimate the level of uncertainty in the computed results, and to assess the capabilities of current computational methods for predicting boundary-layer transition onset. Results of this study in terms of surface pressure and heat transfer comparisons, as well as comparisons of boundary-layer edge quantities and flow-field profiles are presented here. Sensitivities to grid and gas model are discussed. Finally, representative results are presented relating to the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics in the vehicle design and the integration/support of potential experiments.

  14. Hypersonic CFD applications for the National Aero-Space Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Pamela F.; Mcclinton, Charles R.; Bittner, Robert D.; Dilley, A. Douglas; Edwards, Kelvin W.

    1989-01-01

    Design and analysis of the NASP depends heavily upon developing the critical technology areas that cover the entire engineering design of the vehicle. These areas include materials, structures, propulsion systems, propellants, integration of airframe and propulsion systems, controls, subsystems, and aerodynamics areas. Currently, verification of many of the classical engineering tools relies heavily on computational fluid dynamics. Advances are being made in the development of CFD codes to accomplish nose-to-tail analyses for hypersonic aircraft. Additional details involving the partial development, analysis, verification, and application of the CFL3D code and the SPARK combustor code are discussed. A nonequilibrium version of CFL3D that is presently being developed and tested is also described. Examples are given of portion calculations for research hypersonic aircraft geometries and comparisons with experiment data show good agreement.

  15. Portable Fluorescence Imaging System for Hypersonic Flow Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, J. A.; Alderfer, D. W.; Jones, S. B.; Danehy, P. M.

    2003-01-01

    A portable fluorescence imaging system has been developed for use in NASA Langley s hypersonic wind tunnels. The system has been applied to a small-scale free jet flow. Two-dimensional images were taken of the flow out of a nozzle into a low-pressure test section using the portable planar laser-induced fluorescence system. Images were taken from the center of the jet at various test section pressures, showing the formation of a barrel shock at low pressures, transitioning to a turbulent jet at high pressures. A spanwise scan through the jet at constant pressure reveals the three-dimensional structure of the flow. Future capabilities of the system for making measurements in large-scale hypersonic wind tunnel facilities are discussed.

  16. Progress with multigrid schemes for hypersonic flow problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radespiel, R.; Swanson, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    Several multigrid schemes are considered for the numerical computation of viscous hypersonic flows. For each scheme, the basic solution algorithm employs upwind spatial discretization with explicit multistage time stepping. Two-level versions of the various multigrid algorithms are applied to the two-dimensional advection equation, and Fourier analysis is used to determine their damping properties. The capabilities of the multigrid methods are assessed by solving three different hypersonic flow problems. Some new multigrid schemes based on semicoarsening strategies are shown to be quite effective in relieving the stiffness caused by the high-aspect-ratio cells required to resolve high Reynolds number flows. These schemes exhibit good convergence rates for Reynolds numbers up to 200 X 10 6 and Mach numbers up to 25. 32 refs., 31 figs., 1 tab

  17. Anisotropic hypersonic phonon propagation in films of aligned ellipsoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltramo, Peter J; Schneider, Dirk; Fytas, George; Furst, Eric M

    2014-11-14

    A material with anisotropic elastic mechanical properties and a direction-dependent hypersonic band gap is fabricated using ac electric field-directed convective self-assembly of colloidal ellipsoids. The frequency of the gap, which is detected in the direction perpendicular to particle alignment and entirely absent parallel to alignment, and the effective sound velocities can be tuned by the particle aspect ratio. We hypothesize that the band gap originates from the primary eigenmode peak, the m-splitted (s,1,2) mode, of the particle resonating with the effective medium. These results reveal the potential for powerful control of the hypersonic phononic band diagram by combining anisotropic particles and self-assembly.

  18. Examination of uniform momentum zones in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Owen; Helm, Clara; Martin, Pino

    2017-11-01

    The presence of uniform momentum zones (UMZs) separated by regions of high shear is now well-established in incompressible flows, with the mean number of such zones increasing in a log-linear fashion with Reynolds number. While known to be present in supersonic and hypersonic boundary layers, the properties of these UMZs and the appropriate Reynolds number for comparison with incompressible results have not previously been investigated. A large, previously published DNS database of hypersonic boundary layers is used in this investigation, with Mach numbers up to 12 and wall temperatures from cold to adiabatic, resulting in a wide range of outer layer Reynolds numbers. UMZs are examined using a range of parameters in both conventional inner and semi-local scalings, and Reynolds number trends examined.

  19. 77 FR 74457 - Foreign-Trade Zone 75-Phoenix, Arizona Application for Expansion (New Magnet Site) Under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ..., Arizona Application for Expansion (New Magnet Site) Under Alternative Site Framework An application has...) adopted by the Board (15 CFR 400.2(c)) to include a new magnet site in Phoenix, Arizona. The application... zone project includes the following magnet sites: Site 1 (338 acres)--within the 550-acre Phoenix Sky...

  20. The behavior of reinforced concrete barriers subjected to the impact of tornado generated deformable missiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, P.M.; Meyers, B.L.; Buchert, K.P.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents a general model for the evaluation of local effects damage including, penetration and backface spalling, of reinforced concrete barriers subjected to the impact of deformable tornado generated missiles. The model is based on an approximte force time history which assumes: 1) the initial penetration of the missile occurs without significant deformation of the missile if the strength of the missile is greater than that of the barrier. This portion of the time history is represented by a linear and finite rise time; 2) wrinkling or collapse of the missile occurs when the critical stress of the missile is exceeded. This portion of the time histroy is represented by a constant force-time relationship, although a decreaseing force might be more accurate; 3) while the missile is penetrating and wrinkling both elastic and plastic stress waves are developed in the missile, and compressive and shear stress waves are generated in he target. When the shear waves reach the backface of the slab, doagonal cracks initiating at the end of the penetrating missile are formed. These cracks propagate to the backface reinforcing where splitting cracks are formed. Finally, yield hinge lines form in the plane of reinforcing; 4) repenetration of the missile occurs after the wrinkling has caused a change in missile cross section. This repenetration results from moving the failure cone described in three above, and is also represented by the costant force time history. Using the assumptions, relationships for the penetration depth of the missile the wrinkling length of the missile, the critical missile stress, the time history of the impact and the spalling of the target are developed. (Auth.)

  1. Acoustic properties of a porous glass (vycor) at hypersonic frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levelut, C; Pelous, J

    2007-01-01

    Brillouin scattering experiments have been performed from 5 to 1600 K in vycor, a porous silica glass. The acoustic velocity and attenuation at hypersonic frequencies are compared to those of bulk silica and others porous silica samples. The experimental evidence for the influence of porosity on the scattering by acoustic waves is compared to calculations. The correlation between internal friction and thermal conductivity at low temperature is discussed

  2. Hypersonic Transition and Turbulence with Non-Equilibrium Thermochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-31

    from the literamre. In summary, this AFOSR MURI project has resulted in the production of new knowledge that should significantly improve the accuracy...behavior. The accumulated knowledge and understanding are expected to help development of better dissipation models for compressible flow fields. 2.23.2...8ffipüC<Pressurt Modieung suggestions from physics study <T acautttc Hypersonic Mach numbers Supersonic Mach numbers * skier * *a Subsonic

  3. Simulation of hypersonic shock wave - laminar boundary layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianvashrad, N.; Knight, D.

    2017-06-01

    The capability of the Navier-Stokes equations with a perfect gas model for simulation of hypersonic shock wave - laminar boundary layer interactions is assessed. The configuration is a hollow cylinder flare. The experimental data were obtained by Calspan-University of Buffalo (CUBRC) for total enthalpies ranging from 5.07 to 21.85 MJ/kg. Comparison of the computed and experimental surface pressure and heat transfer is performed and the computed §ow¦eld structure is analyzed.

  4. Minimum weight passive insulation requirements for hypersonic cruise vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical solutions are derived for two representative cases of the transient heat conduction equation to determine the minimum weight requirements for passive insulation systems of hypersonic cruise vehicles. The cases discussed are the wet wall case with the interior wall temperature held to that of the boiling point of the fuel throughout the flight, and the dry wall case where the heat transferred through the insulation is absorbed by the interior structure whose temperature is allowed to rise.

  5. Airbreathing Hypersonic Systems Focus at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, James L.; Rausch, Vincent L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the status of the airbreathing hypersonic airplane and space-access vehicle design matrix, reflects on the synergies and issues, and indicates the thrust of the effort to resolve the design matrix and to focus/advance systems technology maturation. Priority is given to the design of the vision operational vehicles followed by flow-down requirements to flight demonstrator vehicles and their design for eventual consideration in the Future-X Program.

  6. Molecular-Based Optical Diagnostics for Hypersonic Nonequilibrium Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul; Bathel, Brett; Johansen, Craig; Winter, Michael; O'Byrne, Sean; Cutler, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This presentation package consists of seven different talks rolled up into one. These talks are all invited orals presentations in a special session at the Aviation 2015 conference and represent contributions that were made to a recent AIAA book that will be published entitled 'Hypersonic Nonequilibrium Flows: Fundamentals and Recent Advances'. Slide 5 lists the individual presentations that will be given during the special session.

  7. Hypersonic expansion of the Fokker--Planck equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Feria, R.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic study of the hypersonic limit of a heavy species diluted in a much lighter gas is made via the Fokker--Planck equation governing its velocity distribution function. In particular, two different hypersonic expansions of the Fokker--Planck equation are considered, differing from each other in the momentum equation of the heavy gas used as the basis of the expansion: in the first of them, the pressure tensor is neglected in that equation while, in the second expansion, the pressure tensor term is retained. The expansions are valid when the light gas Mach number is O(1) or larger and the difference between the mean velocities of light and heavy components is small compared to the light gas thermal speed. They can be applied away from regions where the spatial gradient of the distribution function is very large, but it is not restricted with respect to the temporal derivative of the distribution function. The hydrodynamic equations corresponding to the lowest order of both expansions constitute two different hypersonic closures of the moment equations. For the subsequent orders in the expansions, closed sets of moment equations (hydrodynamic equations) are given. Special emphasis is made on the order of magnitude of the errors of the lowest-order hydrodynamic quantities. It is shown that if the heat flux vanishes initially, these errors are smaller than one might have expected from the ordinary scaling of the hypersonic closure. Also it is found that the normal solution of both expansions is a Gaussian distribution at the lowest order

  8. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Technology Development Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen J.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Calomino, Anthony M.; Wright, Henry S.; Wusk, Mary E.; Hughes, Monica F.

    2013-01-01

    The successful flight of the Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE)-3 has further demonstrated the potential value of Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology. This technology development effort is funded by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development Program (GCDP). This paper provides an overview of a multi-year HIAD technology development effort, detailing the projects completed to date and the additional testing planned for the future.

  9. Effects of hypersonic field and anharmonic interactions on channelling radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, Juby; Pathak, Anand P; Goteti, L N S Prakash; Nagamani, G

    2007-01-01

    The effects of a hypersonic field on positron channelling radiation are considered. Anharmonic effects of the transverse potential induced by these longitudinal fields are incorporated and the wavefunction of the planar channelled positron is found by the solution of Dirac equation under the resonant influence of hypersound. An expression for the resonant frequency is estimated. The transition probabilities and the intensity of the channelling radiation are also calculated. It is found that the anharmonic effects change the spectral distributions considerably

  10. Hypersonic Technology Developments with EU Co-Funded Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    and Hypersonic Systems and Technologies Conference, AIAA-2006-8109, 06-09/11 2006, Canberra, Australia. [18] Karl S., Hannemann K., Steelant J. and...Canberra, Australia. [23] Haidn, O., Ciezki, H., Hannemann , K. and Karl., S., Selected Supersonic Combustion Activities at DLR within the European...LAPCAT Project, 2nd European Conference for Aerospace Sciences (EUCASS), July 2007, Brussels, Belgium. [24] Martinez-Schram J. , Karl S., Hannemann K

  11. Update of PHOENIX-P 42 group library from CENDL-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Baocheng

    1998-01-01

    PHOENIX-P is a lattice physics code system, developed by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation (WEC), which was transplanted and used at Dayabay Nuclear Power Plant (DNPJVC). The associated multi-group (42-group) library was derived from the evaluated nuclear data of ENDF/B-5. Since the original library is from the old evaluated nuclear data, it can not meet all the requirements of reactor physics calculations of the nuclear power plant. So it is necessary to update the library with the latest version of evaluated nuclear data. To do so, based on the investigation of the old library and the information about the library, some programs were developed at China Nuclear Data Center (CNDC) to produce PHOENIX-P format data sets mainly from CENDL-2 and the new data were used to supersede the old ones of the PHOENIX-P library

  12. ALPHA/PHOENIX-P/ANC system validation for Angra-1 neutronic calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzoni Filho, Pedro; Sato, Sadakatu; Santos, Teresinha Ipojuca Cardoso; Fernandes, Vanderlei Borba; Fetterman, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The ALPHA/PHOENIX-P/ANC (APA) code package is an advanced neutronic calculation system for pressurized water reactor (PWR). PHOENIX-P generates the required cross sections for the fuel, burnable absorbers, control rods and baffle/reflector region. The ALPHA code is used to automate the generation of these cross-sections as well as process the PHOENIX-P results to generate the ANC model input. ANC is a three dimensional advanced nodal code used for the modeling of the, depletion of the fuel in the core, and for the calculation of power distributions, rod worths and other reactivity parameters. This paper provides brief overview of the APA methodology for reload core design of Angra Unit 1 Cycles 1 and 2. Results included are predicted power distributions, control rod worths and other reactivity parameters compared to plant measurements. These results demonstrate that the APA system can be used for the reload core design. (author). 7 refs, 9 figs

  13. First plasma of the A-PHOENIX electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thuillier, T.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Angot, J.

    2008-01-01

    A-PHOENIX is a new compact hybrid electron cyclotron resonance ion source using a large permanent magnet hexapole (1.92 T at the magnet surface) and high temperature superconducting Solenoids (3 T) to make min-vertical bar B vertical bar structure suitable for 28 GHz cw operation. The final assembly of the source was achieved at the end of June 2007. The first plasma of A-PHOENIX at 18 GHz was done on the 16th of August, 2007. The technological specificities of A-PHOENIX are presented. The large hexapole built is presented and experimental magnetic measurements show that it is nominal with respect to simulation. A fake plasma chamber prototype including thin iron inserts showed that the predicted radial magnetic confinement can be fulfilled up to 2.15 T at the plasma chamber wall. Scheduled planning of experiments until the end of 2008 is presented

  14. ALPHA/PHOENIX-P/ANC system validation for Angra-1 neutronic calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponzoni Filho, Pedro; Sato, Sadakatu; Santos, Teresinha Ipojuca Cardoso; Fernandes, Vanderlei Borba [FURNAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Fetterman, R.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The ALPHA/PHOENIX-P/ANC (APA) code package is an advanced neutronic calculation system for pressurized water reactor (PWR). PHOENIX-P generates the required cross sections for the fuel, burnable absorbers, control rods and baffle/reflector region. The ALPHA code is used to automate the generation of these cross-sections as well as process the PHOENIX-P results to generate the ANC model input. ANC is a three dimensional advanced nodal code used for the modeling of the, depletion of the fuel in the core, and for the calculation of power distributions, rod worths and other reactivity parameters. This paper provides brief overview of the APA methodology for reload core design of Angra Unit 1 Cycles 1 and 2. Results included are predicted power distributions, control rod worths and other reactivity parameters compared to plant measurements. These results demonstrate that the APA system can be used for the reload core design. (author). 7 refs, 9 figs.

  15. Establishment, management, and maintenance of the phoenix islands protected area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotjan, Randi; Jamieson, Regen; Carr, Ben; Kaufman, Les; Mangubhai, Sangeeta; Obura, David; Pierce, Ray; Rimon, Betarim; Ris, Bud; Sandin, Stuart; Shelley, Peter; Sumaila, U Rashid; Taei, Sue; Tausig, Heather; Teroroko, Tukabu; Thorrold, Simon; Wikgren, Brooke; Toatu, Teuea; Stone, Greg

    2014-01-01

    The Republic of Kiribati's Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA), located in the equatorial central Pacific, is the largest and deepest UNESCO World Heritage site on earth. Created in 2008, it was the first Marine Protected Area (MPA) of its kind (at the time of inception, the largest in the world) and includes eight low-lying islands, shallow coral reefs, submerged shallow and deep seamounts and extensive open-ocean and ocean floor habitat. Due to their isolation, the shallow reef habitats have been protected de facto from severe exploitation, though the surrounding waters have been continually fished for large pelagics and whales over many decades. PIPA was created under a partnership between the Government of Kiribati and the international non-governmental organizations-Conservation International and the New England Aquarium. PIPA has a unique conservation strategy as the first marine MPA to use a conservation contract mechanism with a corresponding Conservation Trust established to be both a sustainable financing mechanism and a check-and-balance to the oversight and maintenance of the MPA. As PIPA moves forward with its management objectives, it is well positioned to be a global model for large MPA design and implementation in similar contexts. The islands and shallow reefs have already shown benefits from protection, though the pending full closure of PIPA (and assessments thereof) will be critical for determining success of the MPA as a refuge for open-ocean pelagic and deep-sea marine life. As global ocean resources are continually being extracted to support a growing global population, PIPA's closure is both timely and of global significance.

  16. An engineering code to analyze hypersonic thermal management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangriethuysen, Valerie J.; Wallace, Clark E.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal loads on current and future aircraft are increasing and as a result are stressing the energy collection, control, and dissipation capabilities of current thermal management systems and technology. The thermal loads for hypersonic vehicles will be no exception. In fact, with their projected high heat loads and fluxes, hypersonic vehicles are a prime example of systems that will require thermal management systems (TMS) that have been optimized and integrated with the entire vehicle to the maximum extent possible during the initial design stages. This will not only be to meet operational requirements, but also to fulfill weight and performance constraints in order for the vehicle to takeoff and complete its mission successfully. To meet this challenge, the TMS can no longer be two or more entirely independent systems, nor can thermal management be an after thought in the design process, the typical pervasive approach in the past. Instead, a TMS that was integrated throughout the entire vehicle and subsequently optimized will be required. To accomplish this, a method that iteratively optimizes the TMS throughout the vehicle will not only be highly desirable, but advantageous in order to reduce the manhours normally required to conduct the necessary tradeoff studies and comparisons. A thermal management engineering computer code that is under development and being managed at Wright Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, is discussed. The primary goal of the code is to aid in the development of a hypersonic vehicle TMS that has been optimized and integrated on a total vehicle basis.

  17. High speed digital holographic interferometry for hypersonic flow visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, G. M.; Jagdeesh, G.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2013-06-01

    Optical imaging techniques have played a major role in understanding the flow dynamics of varieties of fluid flows, particularly in the study of hypersonic flows. Schlieren and shadowgraph techniques have been the flow diagnostic tools for the investigation of compressible flows since more than a century. However these techniques provide only the qualitative information about the flow field. Other optical techniques such as holographic interferometry and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) have been used extensively for extracting quantitative information about the high speed flows. In this paper we present the application of digital holographic interferometry (DHI) technique integrated with short duration hypersonic shock tunnel facility having 1 ms test time, for quantitative flow visualization. Dynamics of the flow fields in hypersonic/supersonic speeds around different test models is visualized with DHI using a high-speed digital camera (0.2 million fps). These visualization results are compared with schlieren visualization and CFD simulation results. Fringe analysis is carried out to estimate the density of the flow field.

  18. On air-chemistry reduction for hypersonic external flow applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Ashraf; Suman, Sawan; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The existence of the slow manifold for the air-mixture system is shown. • The QSSA estimate of the slow manifold is fairly accurate. • For mid-temperature range the reduction mechanisms could be useful. - Abstract: In external hypersonic flows, viscous and compressibility effects generate very high temperatures leading to significant chemical reactions among air constituents. Therefore, hypersonic flow computations require coupled calculations of flow and chemistry. Accurate and efficient computations of air-chemistry kinetics are of much importance for many practical applications but calculations accounting for detailed chemical kinetics can be prohibitively expensive. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of applying chemical kinetics reduction schemes for hypersonic air-chemistry. We consider two chemical kinetics sets appropriate for three different temperature ranges: 2500 K to 4500 K; 4500 K to 9000 K; and above 9000 K. By demonstrating the existence of the so-called the slow manifold in each of the chemistry sets, we show that judicious chemical kinetics reduction leading to significant computational savings is possible without much loss in accuracy

  19. Status of Turbulence Modeling for Hypersonic Propulsion Flowpaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Yoder, Dennis A.; Vyas, Manan A.; Engblom, William A.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of current turbulent flow calculation methods for hypersonic propulsion flowpaths, particularly the scramjet engine. Emphasis is placed on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods, but some discussion of newer meth- ods such as Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is also provided. The report is organized by considering technical issues throughout the scramjet-powered vehicle flowpath including laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition, shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interactions, scalar transport modeling (specifically the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers) and compressible mixing. Unit problems are primarily used to conduct the assessment. In the combustor, results from calculations of a direct connect supersonic combustion experiment are also used to address the effects of turbulence model selection and in particular settings for the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. It is concluded that RANS turbulence modeling shortfalls are still a major limitation to the accuracy of hypersonic propulsion simulations, whether considering individual components or an overall system. Newer methods such as LES-based techniques may be promising, but are not yet at a maturity to be used routinely by the hypersonic propulsion community. The need for fundamental experiments to provide data for turbulence model development and validation is discussed.

  20. Investigation of piloting aids for manual control of hypersonic maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, David L.; Phillips, Michael R.; Person, Lee H., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of piloting aids designed to provide precise maneuver control for an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle is described. Stringent constraints and nonintuitive high-speed flight effects associated with maneuvering in the hypersonic regime raise the question of whether manual control of such a vehicle should even be considered. The objectives of this research were to determine the extent of manual control that is desirable for a vehicle maneuvering in this regime and to identify the form of aids that must be supplied to the pilot to make such control feasible. A piloted real-time motion-based simulation of a hypersonic vehicle concept was used for this study, and the investigation focused on a single representative cruise turn maneuver. Piloting aids, which consisted of an auto throttle, throttle director, autopilot, flight director, and two head-up display configurations, were developed and evaluated. Two longitudinal control response types consisting of a rate-command/attitude-hold system and a load factor-rate/load-factor-hold system were also compared. The complete set of piloting aids, which consisted of the autothrottle, throttle director, and flight director, improved the average Cooper-Harper flying qualities ratings from 8 to 2.6, even though identical inner-loop stability and control augmentation was provided in all cases. The flight director was determined to be the most critical of these aids, and the cruise turn maneuver was unachievable to adequate performance specifications in the absence of this flight director.

  1. Hypersonic Navier Stokes Comparisons to Orbiter Flight Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Nompelis, Ioannis; Candler, Graham; Barnhart, Michael; Yoon, Seokkwan

    2009-01-01

    Hypersonic chemical nonequilibrium simulations of low earth orbit entry flow fields are becoming increasingly commonplace as software and computational capabilities become more capable. However, development of robust and accurate software to model these environments will always encounter a significant barrier in developing a suite of high quality calibration cases. The US3D hypersonic nonequilibrium Navier Stokes analysis capability has been favorably compared to a number of wind tunnel test cases. Extension of the calibration basis for this software to Orbiter flight conditions will provide an incremental increase in confidence. As part of the Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment and the Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements project, NASA is performing entry flight testing on the Orbiter to provide valuable aerothermodynamic heating data. An increase in interest related to orbiter entry environments is resulting from this activity. With the advent of this new data, comparisons of the US3D software to the new flight testing data is warranted. This paper will provide information regarding the framework of analyses that will be applied with the US3D analysis tool. In addition, comparisons will be made to entry flight testing data provided by the Orbiter BLT Flight Experiment and HYTHIRM projects. If data from digital scans of the Orbiter windward surface become available, simulations will also be performed to characterize the difference in surface heating between the CAD reference OML and the digitized surface provided by the surface scans.

  2. Pyrolysis Characteristics and Kinetics of Phoenix Tree Residues as a Potential Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available By using a thermogravimetric analyser under argon atmosphere, the pyrolysis process and the kinetic model of phoenix tree residues (the little stem, middle stem, and leaf at a 30 °C min−1 heating rate and the phoenix tree mix at three different heating rates (10 °C min−1, 30 °C min−1, and 50 °C min−1 were examined. The catalyst and the co-pyrolysis samples were at a 30 °C min−1 heating rate. The catalysts were Na2CO3, ZnCl2 and CaO in a mass fraction of 5 %. The experimental results revealed that the phoenix tree residues pyrolysis process consisted of three stages: dehydration stage, main pyrolysis stage, and the slow decomposition of residues. As the heating rate increased, the pyrolysis characteristic temperature of the phoenix tree grew, there was a backward-shift of the pyrolysis rate curve, and the mass loss rate gradually increased. The phoenix tree residues’ activation energy changed throughout the whole pyrolysis process, and the pyrolysis temperature ranges of the three main components (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin existed in overlapping phenomenon. As compared to the little stem, middle stem, and leaf, the phoenix tree mix was more likely to be pyrolysed under the same heating rate. Different catalysts had a different impact on the pyrolysis: ZnCl2 moved the start point of the reaction to the lower temperatures, but did not speed up the reaction; Na2CO3 speeded up the reaction without changing the start point of the reaction; CaO speeded up the reaction, moved the start point of the reaction to higher temperatures.

  3. Rhizosphere effects of PAH-contaminated soil phytoremediation using a special plant named Fire Phoenix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Xiao, Nan; Wei, Shuhe; Zhao, Lixing; An, Jing

    2014-03-01

    The rhizosphere effect of a special phytoremediating species known as Fire Phoenix on the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was investigated, including changes of the enzymatic activity and microbial communities in rhizosphere soil. The study showed that the degradation rate of Σ8PAHs by Fire Phoenix was up to 99.40% after a 150-day culture. The activity of dehydrogenase (DHO), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) increased greatly, especially after a 60-day culture, followed by a gradual reduction with an increase in the planting time. The activity of these enzymes was strongly correlated to the higher degradation performance of Fire Phoenix growing in PAH-contaminated soils, although it was also affected by the basic characteristics of the plant species itself, such as the excessive, fibrous root systems, strong disease resistance, drought resistance, heat resistance, and resistance to barren soil. The activity of polyphenoloxidase (PPO) decreased during the whole growing period in this study, and the degradation rate of Σ8PAHs in the rhizosphere soil after having planted Fire Phoenix plants had a significant (R(2)=0.947) negative correlation with the change in the activity of PPO. Using an analysis of the microbial communities, the results indicated that the structure of microorganisms in the rhizosphere soil could be changed by planting Fire Phoenix plants, namely, there was an increase in microbial diversity compared with the unplanted soil. In addition, the primary advantage of Fire Phoenix was to promote the growth of flora genus Gordonia sp. as the major bacteria that can effectively degrade PAHs. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Iranian Ballistic Missile Threat and a Phased, Adaptive Approach for Missile Defense in Europe: Perceptions, Policies and Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    vii ACRONYMS AA Aegis Ashore ABL Airborne Laser ABM Anti-Ballistic Missile ADCF Air Defense Command Frigates AEOI ...in September 2002 at the IAEA’s General Conference in Vienna, Iran’s Vice President and President of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran ( AEOI

  5. The chloroplast DNA locus psbZ-trnfM as a potential barcode marker in Phoenix L. (Arecaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ballardini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Phoenix (Arecaceae comprises 14 species distributed from Cape Verde Islands to SE Asia. It includes the economically important species Phoenix dactylifera. The paucity of differential morphological and anatomical useful characters, and interspecific hybridization, make identification of Phoenix species difficult. In this context, the development of reliable DNA markers for species and hybrid identification would be of great utility. Previous studies identified a 12 bp polymorphic chloroplast minisatellite in the trnG(GCC-trnfM(CAU spacer, and showed its potential for species identification in Phoenix. In this work, in order to develop an efficient DNA barcode marker for Phoenix, a longer cpDNA region (700 bp comprising the mentioned minisatellite, and located between the psbZ and trnfM(CAU genes, was sequenced. One hundred and thirty-six individuals, representing all Phoenix species except P. andamanensis, were analysed. The minisatellite showed 2-7 repetitions of the 12 bp motif, with 1-3 out of seven haplotypes per species. Phoenix reclinata and P. canariensis had species-specific haplotypes. Additional polymorphisms were found in the flanking regions of the minisatellite, including substitutions, indels and homopolymers. All this information allowed us to identify unambiguously eight out of the 13 species, and overall 80% of the individuals sampled. Phoenix rupicola and P. theophrasti had the same haplotype, and so had P. atlantica, P. dactylifera, and P. sylvestris (the “date palm complex” sensu Pintaud et al. 2013. For these species, additional molecular markers will be required for their unambiguous identification. The psbZ-trnfM(CAU region therefore could be considered as a good basis for the establishment of a DNA barcoding system in Phoenix, and is potentially useful for the identification of the female parent in Phoenix hybrids.

  6. A Combined CFD/Characteristic Method for Prediction and Design of Hypersonic Inlet with Nose Bluntness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenzhi; Li, Zhufei; Yang, Jiming

    Leading edge bluntness is widely used in hypersonic inlet design for thermal protection[1]. Detailed research of leading edge bluntness on hypersonic inlet has been concentrated on shock shape correlation[2], boundary layer flow[3], inlet performance[4], etc. It is well known that blunted noses cause detached bow shocks which generate subsonic regions around the noses and entropy layers in the flowfield.

  7. A reduced order aerothermodynamic modeling framework for hypersonic vehicles based on surrogate and POD

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Xin; Liu Li; Long Teng; Yue Zhenjiang

    2015-01-01

    Aerothermoelasticity is one of the key technologies for hypersonic vehicles. Accurate and efficient computation of the aerothermodynamics is one of the primary challenges for hypersonic aerothermoelastic analysis. Aimed at solving the shortcomings of engineering calculation, computation fluid dynamics (CFD) and experimental investigation, a reduced order modeling (ROM) framework for aerothermodynamics based on CFD predictions using an enhanced algorithm of fast maximin Latin hypercube design ...

  8. Parametric Analysis of a Hypersonic Inlet using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliden, Daniel

    For CFD validation, hypersonic flow fields are simulated and compared with experimental data specifically designed to recreate conditions found by hypersonic vehicles. Simulated flow fields on a cone-ogive with flare at Mach 7.2 are compared with experimental data from NASA Ames Research Center 3.5" hypersonic wind tunnel. A parametric study of turbulence models is presented and concludes that the k-kl-omega transition and SST transition turbulence model have the best correlation. Downstream of the flare's shockwave, good correlation is found for all boundary layer profiles, with some slight discrepancies of the static temperature near the surface. Simulated flow fields on a blunt cone with flare above Mach 10 are compared with experimental data from CUBRC LENS hypervelocity shock tunnel. Lack of vibrational non-equilibrium calculations causes discrepancies in heat flux near the leading edge. Temperature profiles, where non-equilibrium effects are dominant, are compared with the dissociation of molecules to show the effects of dissociation on static temperature. Following the validation studies is a parametric analysis of a hypersonic inlet from Mach 6 to 20. Compressor performance is investigated for numerous cowl leading edge locations up to speeds of Mach 10. The variable cowl study showed positive trends in compressor performance parameters for a range of Mach numbers that arise from maximizing the intake of compressed flow. An interesting phenomenon due to the change in shock wave formation for different Mach numbers developed inside the cowl that had a negative influence on the total pressure recovery. Investigation of the hypersonic inlet at different altitudes is performed to study the effects of Reynolds number, and consequently, turbulent viscous effects on compressor performance. Turbulent boundary layer separation was noted as the cause for a change in compressor performance parameters due to a change in Reynolds number. This effect would not be

  9. The Threat from European Missile Defence System to Russian National Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey I. Podberezkin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the political and military aspects of progress in the dialogue between Russia and the U.S./NATO on cooperation in missile defense; investigates the past experiences and current state of cooperation between Russia and the Alliance on missile defense issues; examines the technical features of American missile defence systems today; finds a solution to question whether or not the European Missile Defence Program actually threatens Russia's nuclear deterrent and strategic stability in general; identifies both potential benefits and possible losses for Russia stemming from the development of cooperation with the United States and NATO in countering ballistic missile threats, or from refusal to have such cooperation. Evidently, the initiative of creation of a missile defense in Europe surely belongs to the USA. Washington has enormous technological, financial, economic, military and institutional capabilities in the field of a missile defense, exceeding by far other NATO member-states. In February 2010, the President of the United States B. Obama adopted a project "European Phased Adaptive Approach" (EPAA as an alternative to G. Bush's global strategic missile defense plan. The first two stages of the Phased Adaptive Approach are focused on creating a system capable of intercepting small, medium and intermediate-range ballistic missiles. The possibility of intercepting long-range missiles is postponed to the third (2018 and forth phases (2020. Moscow finds especially troublesome the third and the fourth phases of Washington's project of creating a European segment of the global antiballistic missile system, considering prospective capabilities of the U.S. interceptor missiles 61 and the envisioned areas of their deployment. The U.S. counter-evidence is that phase four interceptors do not exist yet. Russia insists on getting the political and legal guarantees from the U.S. and NATO that their missile defense systems will not slash

  10. (Ca,Mg)-Carbonate and Mg-Carbonate at the Phoenix Landing Site: Evaluation of the Phoenix Lander's Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) Data Using Laboratory Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Niles, P. B.; Morris, R. V.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium carbonate (4.5 wt. %) was detected in the soil at the Phoenix Landing site by the Phoenix Lander s The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer [1]. TEGA operated at 12 mbar pressure, yet the detection of calcium carbonate is based on interpretations derived from thermal analysis literature of carbonates measured under ambient (1000 mbar) and vacuum (10(exp -3) mbar) conditions [2,3] as well as at 100 and 30 mbar [4,5] and one analysis at 12 mbar by the TEGA engineering qualification model (TEGA-EQM). Thermodynamics (Te = H/ S) dictate that pressure affects entropy ( S) which causes the temperature (Te) of mineral decomposition at one pressure to differ from Te obtained at another pressure. Thermal decomposition analyses of Fe-, Mg-, and Ca-bearing carbonates at 12 mbar is required to enhance the understanding of the TEGA results at TEGA operating pressures. The objectives of this work are to (1) evaluate the thermal and evolved gas behavior of a suite of Fe-, Mg-, Ca-carbonate minerals at 1000 and 12 mbar and (2) discuss possible emplacement mechanisms for the Phoenix carbonate.

  11. CARDIOVASCULAR MORTALITY IN PHOENIX: PM1 IS A BETTER INDICATOR THAN PM2.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has obtained a 3-year database of particulate matter (PM) in Phoenix, AZ from 1995 - 1997 that includes elemental analysis by XRF of daily PM2.5. During this time period PM1 and PM2.5 TEOMs were run simultaneously for about 7 months during two periods of the year. Regressio...

  12. Phoenix dactylifera L. spathe essential oil: Chemical composition and repellent activity against the yellow fever mosquito

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date palm, Phoenix dactylifera L. (Arecaceae), grows commonly in the Arabian Peninsula and is traditionally used to treat various diseases. The aim of the present study was to identify chemical composition of the essential oil and to investigate the repellent activity. The essential oil of P. dacty...

  13. Status of the PHOENIX electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder at ISOLDE, CERN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Charles; Cederkall, Joakim; Delahaye, Pierre; Kester, Oliver; Lamy, Thierry; Marie-Jeanne, Mélanie

    2008-02-01

    We report here on the last progresses made with the PHOENIX electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder test bench at ISOLDE. Recently, an experiment was performed to test the trapping of (61)Fe daughter nuclides from the decay of (61)Mn nuclides. Preliminary results are given.

  14. Industrial Design: A Phoenix Reborn from the Ashes of Technology Education--A Case History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Martin; Feigler, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Like the "phoenix," technology education (TE) can, under the right circumstances, give life to new programs--curricula with different emphases and directions from technology education, yet sharing a common heritage: the belief that applied technology will continue to shape the world. How that shaping process takes place--and the problems that it…

  15. Tuhast tõusnud Phoenix jõudis Marsile elu võimalikkust uurima / Liisi Poll

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Poll, Liisi, 1980-

    2008-01-01

    Vt. ka Postimees : na russkom jazõke 27. mai, lk. 8. Marsile jõudnud NASA automaatjaam Phoenix maandus naaberplaneedi põhjapoolusele lähemale kui ükski inimese leiutatud masin kunagi varem. Lisa: Marsi uurimiste ajalugu

  16. 78 FR 24158 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 75-Phoenix, Arizona; Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [B-33-2013] Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 75-Phoenix... benefits on such items. Public comment is invited from interested parties. Submissions shall be addressed... Executive Secretary, Foreign-Trade Zones Board, Room 21013, U.S. Department of Commerce, 1401 Constitution...

  17. Historical evidence of the Spanish introduction of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L., Arecaceae) into the Americas

    Science.gov (United States)

    America’s date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) groves can be found from 36o N Lat. (USA) to 21o S Lat. (Chile) and from 63o W Long. (Venezuela) to 117o W Long. (USA), at elevations from sea level 2000 m (Colombia). However, successful production of ripe dates is possible only in the arid regions of Pe...

  18. Geologie study off gravels of the Agua Fria River, Phoenix, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W.H.; Dewitt, E.; Adams, D.T.; O'Briens, T.

    2010-01-01

    The annual consumption of sand and gravel aggregate in 2006 in the Phoenix, AZ metropolitan area was about 76 Mt (84 million st) (USGS, 2009), or about 18 t (20 st) per capita. Quaternary alluvial deposits in the modern stream channel of the Agua Fria River west of Phoenix are mined and processed to provide some of this aggregate to the greater Phoenix area. The Agua Fria drainage basin (Fig. 1) is characterized by rugged mountains with high elevations and steep stream gradients in the north, and by broad alluvial filled basins separated by elongated faultblock mountain ranges in the south. The Agua Fria River, the basin’s main drainage, flows south from Prescott, AZ and west of Phoenix to the Gila River. The Waddel Dam impounds Lake Pleasant and greatly limits the flow of the Agua Fria River south of the lake. The southern portion of the watershed, south of Lake Pleasant, opens out into a broad valley where the river flows through urban and agricultural lands to its confluence with the Gila River, a tributary of the Colorado River.

  19. Status of the PHOENIX electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder at ISOLDE, CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, Charles; Cederkall, Joakim; Delahaye, Pierre; Kester, Oliver; Lamy, Thierry; Marie-Jeanne, Melanie

    2008-01-01

    We report here on the last progresses made with the PHOENIX electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder test bench at ISOLDE. Recently, an experiment was performed to test the trapping of 61 Fe daughter nuclides from the decay of 61 Mn nuclides. Preliminary results are given

  20. Multi-Mode Electric Actuator Dynamic Modelling for Missile Fin Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhimashankar Gurav

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Linear first/second order fin direct current (DC actuator model approximations for missile applications are currently limited to angular position and angular velocity state variables. Furthermore, existing literature with detailed DC motor models is decoupled from the application of interest: tail controller missile lateral acceleration (LATAX performance. This paper aims to integrate a generic DC fin actuator model with dual-mode feedforward and feedback control for tail-controlled missiles in conjunction with the autopilot system design. Moreover, the characteristics of the actuator torque information in relation to the aerodynamic fin loading for given missile trim velocities are also provided. The novelty of this paper is the integration of the missile LATAX autopilot states and actuator states including the motor torque, position and angular velocity. The advantage of such an approach is the parametric analysis and suitability of the fin actuator in relation to the missile lateral acceleration dynamic behaviour.

  1. Conditional probability of the tornado missile impact given a tornado occurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.; Koch, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Using an approach based on statistical mechanics, an expression for the probability of the first missile strike is developed. The expression depends on two generic parameters (injection probability eta(F) and height distribution psi(Z,F)), which are developed in this study, and one plant specific parameter (number of potential missiles N/sub p/). The expression for the joint probability of simultaneous impact of muitiple targets is also developed. This espression is applicable to calculation of the probability of common cause failure due to tornado missiles. It is shown that the probability of the first missile strike can be determined using a uniform missile distribution model. It is also shown that the conditional probability of the second strike, given the first, is underestimated by the uniform model. The probability of the second strike is greatly increased if the missiles are in clusters large enough to cover both targets

  2. Application of Pontryagin’s Minimum Principle in Optimum Time of Missile Manoeuvring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Cahyaningtias

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Missile is a guided weapon and designed to protect outermost island from a thread of other country. It, commonly, is used as self defense. This research presented surface-to-surface missile in final dive manoeuvre for fixed target. Furthermore, it was proposed manoeuvring based on unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV, autopilot system, which needs accuration and minimum both time and thrust of missile while attacking object. This paper introduced pontryagin’s Minimum Principle, which is useable to solve the problem. The numerical solution showed that trajectory of the missile is split it up in three sub-intervals; flight, climbing, and diving. The numerical simulation showed that the missile must climb in order to satisfy the final dive condition and the optimum time of a missile depend on initial condition of the altitude and the terminal velocity

  3. Assessment of Containment Structures Against Missile Impact Threats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Q M

    2006-01-01

    In order to ensure the highest safety requirements,nuclear power plant structures (the containment structures,the fuel storages and transportation systems) should be assessed against all possible internal and external impact threats.The internal impact threats include kinetic missiles generated by the failure of high pressure vessels and pipes,the failure of high speed rotating machineries and accidental drops.The external impact threats may come from airborne missiles,aircraft impact,explosion blast and fragments.The impact effects of these threats on concrete and steel structures in a nuclear power plant are discussed.Methods and procedures for the impact assessment of nuclear power plants are introduced.Recent studies on penetration and perforation mechanics as well as progresses on dynamic properties of concrete-like materials are presented to increase the understanding of the impact effects on concrete containment structures.

  4. THE WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE PULSED REACTOR FACILITY, MAY 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Robert L.; Boor, R. A.; Cole, W. M.; Elder, G. E.

    1963-05-15

    A brief statement of the mission of the White Sands Missile Range Nuclear Effects Laboratory is given. The new Nuclear Effects Laboratory Facility is described. This facility consists of two buildings-a laboratory and a reactor building. The White Sands Missile Range bare critical assembly, designated as the MoLLY-G, is described. The MoLLY-G, an unreflected, unmoderated right circular cylinder of uranium-molybdenum alloy designed for pulsed operation, will have a maximum burst capability of approximately 2 x 10/sup 17/ fissions with a burst width of 50 microseconds. The reactor construction and operating procedures are described. As designed, the MoLLY-G will provide an intense source of pulsed neutron and gamma radiation for a great variety of experimental and test arrangements. (auth)

  5. Full scale turbine-missile casing exit tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, H.R.; Schamaun, J.T.; Sliter, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    Two full-scale tests have simulated the impact of a fragment from a failed turbine disk upon the steel casing of a low-pressure steam turbine with the objective of providing data for making more realistic assessments of turbine missile effects for nuclear power plant designers. Data were obtained on both the energy-absorbing mechanisms of the impact process and the post-impact trajectory of the fragment. (orig.)

  6. MISSILE DATA COMPENDIUM (DATCOM) User Manual 2014 Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    constrained) KARMAN - von Karman (L-D Haack; length-diameter constrained) • If DAFT < DCENTR the afterbody is a boattail. • If DAFT > DCENTR the...or 1> (tangent ogive) - CONICAL LAFT - Afterbody length L 0. DAFT - Afterbody diameter at base (must be > 0 and not equal to...DCENTR, LAFT, DAFT , and DEXIT should also be defined when using the AXIBOD option 2 input scheme. If they are not specified, Missile Datcom will use

  7. Analyzing and designing object-oriented missile simulations with concurrency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randorf, Jeffrey Allen

    2000-11-01

    A software object model for the six degree-of-freedom missile modeling domain is presented. As a precursor, a domain analysis of the missile modeling domain was started, based on the Feature-Oriented Domain Analysis (FODA) technique described by the Software Engineering Institute (SEI). It was subsequently determined the FODA methodology is functionally equivalent to the Object Modeling Technique. The analysis used legacy software documentation and code from the ENDOSIM, KDEC, and TFrames 6-DOF modeling tools, including other technical literature. The SEI Object Connection Architecture (OCA) was the template for designing the object model. Three variants of the OCA were considered---a reference structure, a recursive structure, and a reference structure with augmentation for flight vehicle modeling. The reference OCA design option was chosen for maintaining simplicity while not compromising the expressive power of the OMT model. The missile architecture was then analyzed for potential areas of concurrent computing. It was shown how protected objects could be used for data passing between OCA object managers, allowing concurrent access without changing the OCA reference design intent or structure. The implementation language was the 1995 release of Ada. OCA software components were shown how to be expressed as Ada child packages. While acceleration of several low level and other high operations level are possible on proper hardware, there was a 33% degradation of 4th order Runge-Kutta integrator performance of two simultaneous ordinary differential equations using Ada tasking on a single processor machine. The Defense Department's High Level Architecture was introduced and explained in context with the OCA. It was shown the HLA and OCA were not mutually exclusive architectures, but complimentary. HLA was shown as an interoperability solution, with the OCA as an architectural vehicle for software reuse. Further directions for implementing a 6-DOF missile modeling

  8. Maintenance cost control at the Pacific Missile Test Center.

    OpenAIRE

    Jenson, Richard J.

    1980-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The Pacific Missile Test Center (PMTC) is the Navy's largest Major Range and Test Facility Base, with an investment of over one billion dollars. The majority of this investment is in range test equipment and facilities including radar, telemetry, communication and command/ control systems. Concern is growing over the "excessively obsolete condition of PMTC technical equipment." Improvement of factors concerned with...

  9. Missile Defense Acquisition: Failure Is Not An Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-26

    Guard in 1988. During his enlistment, he attended Oregon State University where he earned a BS in Economics and subsequently received his...communications system, linking sensor and interceptor networks together to detect and defend the homeland from inbound ballistic missile threats. The GMD...network of sensors to intercept inbound threat ICBMs. MDA refers to the GMD system as, “A network of advanced sensors, radars and command, control

  10. System Architecture for Anti-Ship Ballistic Missile Defense (ASBMD)

    OpenAIRE

    Hobgood, Jean; Madison, Kimberly; Pawlowski, Geoffrey; Nedd, Steven; Roberts, Michael; Rumberg, Paige

    2009-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Recent studies suggest that China is developing a new class of ballistic missiles that can be used against moving targets, such as ships. One such technology is anticipated to cover a range of 2,000 kilometers and operate at a speed of Mach 10. The threat is also capable of maneuvering both during the midcourse and terminal flight phases for the purposes of guidance, target acquisition, and countermeasures. This threat could greatl...

  11. Composite steel panels for tornado missile barrier walls. Topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    A composite steel panel wall system is defined as a wall system with concrete fill sandwiched between two steel layers such that no concrete surface is exposed on the interior or the exterior wall surface. Three full scale missile tests were conducted on two specific composite wall systems. The results of the full scale tests were in good agreement with the finalized theory. The theory is presented, and the acceptance of the theory for design calculations is discussed

  12. Experimental Flight Characterization of a Canard-Controlled, Subsonic Missile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Frankfort mount was used to place the gun between stations 5 and 6 in the spark range building. The propelling charge was contained within a plastic ...additive manufacturing housing and used 83 g of M38 propellant with about 2 g of black powder wrapped around an electric match. A shot-start link was...ARL-TR-8086 ● AUG 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Experimental Flight Characterization of a Canard-Controlled, Subsonic Missile

  13. Feasibility Study On Missile Launch Detection And Trajectory Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Feature (SURF) detection, and Kalman filtering are frequently used for object tracking. These methods have been applied frequently on video records...missile by processing the thermal imagery from the thermal-imaging sensor, which captures the temperature gradient of the surroundings within its field of...view. As the missile’s propulsion motor emits gases at high temperature to generate the thrust required for its flight, the heat 2 signature of

  14. Siting Report for Theater Missile Defense Mid-Range Test Launch Complex at Ft. Wingate Depot Activity, NM: Based on Sit Survey, 14-18 February 1994

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1994-01-01

    This study is provided to assess the capability of Ft. Wingate Depot Activity to act as a Ballistic Missile Defense Test Support Complex for the launch of target missiles toward White Sands Missile Range...

  15. A Numerical Method for Blast Shock Wave Analysis of Missile Launch from Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Heimbs

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient empirical approach was developed to accurately represent the blast shock wave loading resulting from the launch of a missile from a military aircraft to be used in numerical analyses. Based on experimental test series of missile launches in laboratory environment and from a helicopter, equations were derived to predict the time- and position-dependent overpressure. The method was finally applied and validated in a structural analysis of a helicopter tail boom under missile launch shock wave loading.

  16. Application of a Complex Lead Compensator for a Laser Guided Missile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhila, M. R.; Gopika, S.; Abraham, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of a lead compensator with complex pole and complex zero for a missile. It is compared with a lead compensator with real pole and real zero. A typical laser guided missile control system is considered for the performance comparison of both the compensators. Simulation studies carried out with MATLAB brings out the scope of using complex compensator in missile guided systems.

  17. The Development of the US National Missile Defense and its Impact on the International Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yu. Parshkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reflects the US officials' point of view on the development of its national missile defense. The major threat to international security is the proliferation of ballistic missiles and weapons of mass destruction. The United States and the former Soviet Union made huge efforts to reduce and limit offensive arms. However, presently the proliferation of ballistic missiles spreads all over the world, especially in the Middle East, because of the ballistic missile technology falling into the hands of hostile non-state groups. Missile defenses can provide a permanent presence in a region and discourage adversaries from believing they can use ballistic missiles to coerce or intimidate the U.S. or its allies. With the possible attack regional missile defense systems will be promptly mobilized to enhance an effective deterrent. The ultimate goal of such large-scale missile defense deployment is to convince the adversaries that the use of ballistic missiles is useless in military terms and that any attack on the United States and its allies is doomed to failure. The United States has missile defense cooperative programs with a number of allies, including United Kingdom, Japan, Australia, Israel, Denmark, Germany, Netherlands, Czech Republic, Poland, Italy and many others. The Missile Defense Agency also actively participates in NATO activities to maximize opportunities to develop an integrated NATO ballistic missile defense capability. The initiative of the development of US BMD naturally belongs to the United States. That country has enormous technological, financial, economic, military and institutional capabilities, exceeding by far those of the other NATO members combined.

  18. Potential hazard to secondary containment from HCDA-generated missiles and sodium fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romander, C.M.

    1979-02-01

    The potential hazard of HCDA-generated missiles is analyzed, and the current status of the potential hazards of sodium fires is summarized. Simple analyses are performed to determine lower bounds on the HCDA energetics required to generate missiles that could reach the secondary containment structure of a 1000-MWe LMFBR. The potential missiles considered include the vessel head, components mounted on the head, and conrol rods

  19. A Low-Visibility Force Multiplier: Assessing China’s Cruise Missile Ambitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    small radar signature, and very low altitude flight profile of cruise missiles stress air defense systems and airborne surveillance and tracking radars...for engines powering longer-range or large payload cruise missiles and requires a range of disciplines in metallurgy, air flow dynamics, heat ...Beijing-Mos- cow fallout, the Chinese persevered and conducted their first successful missile test in November 1960.3 The Soviets provided China with the

  20. The art and science of missile defense sensor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, Brian K.

    2014-06-01

    A Missile Defense Sensor is a complex optical system, which sits idle for long periods of time, must work with little or no on-­board calibration, be used to find and discriminate targets, and guide the kinetic warhead to the target within minutes of launch. A short overview of the Missile Defense problem will be discussed here, as well as, the top-level performance drivers, like Noise Equivalent Irradiance (NEI), Acquisition Range, and Dynamic Range. These top-level parameters influence the choice of optical system, mechanical system, focal plane array (FPA), Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC), and cryogenic system. This paper will not only discuss the physics behind the performance of the sensor, but it will also discuss the "art" of optimizing the performance of the sensor given the top level performance parameters. Balancing the sensor sub-­systems is key to the sensor's performance in these highly stressful missions. Top-­level performance requirements impact the choice of lower level hardware and requirements. The flow down of requirements to the lower level hardware will be discussed. This flow down directly impacts the FPA, where careful selection of the detector is required. The flow down also influences the ROIC and cooling requirements. The key physics behind the detector and cryogenic system interactions will be discussed, along with the balancing of subsystem performance. Finally, the overall system balance and optimization will be discussed in the context of missile defense sensors and expected performance of the overall kinetic warhead.

  1. Assessment of Turbulence-Chemistry Interactions in Missile Exhaust Plume Signature Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calhoon, W

    2002-01-01

    ... components and missile defense systems. Current engineering level models neglect turbulence chemistry interactions and typically underpredict the intensity of plume afterburning and afterburning burnout...

  2. Flowfield and Radiation Analysis of Missile Exhaust Plumes Using a Turbulent-Chemistry Interaction Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calhoon, W. H; Kenzakowski, D. C

    2000-01-01

    ... components and missile defense systems. Current engineering level models neglect turbulent-chemistry interactions and typically underpredict the intensity of plume afterburning and afterburning burnout...

  3. Study on combat effectiveness of air defense missile weapon system based on queuing theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z. Q.; Hao, J. X.; Li, L. J.

    2017-01-01

    Queuing Theory is a method to analyze the combat effectiveness of air defense missile weapon system. The model of service probability based on the queuing theory was constructed, and applied to analyzing the combat effectiveness of "Sidewinder" and "Tor-M1" air defense missile weapon system. Finally aimed at different targets densities, the combat effectiveness of different combat units of two types' defense missile weapon system is calculated. This method can be used to analyze the usefulness of air defense missile weapon system.

  4. Supersonic Combustion of Hydrogen Jets System in Hypersonic Stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhapbasbaev, U.K.; Makashev, E.P.

    2003-01-01

    The data of calculated theoretical investigations of diffusive combustion of plane supersonic hydrogen jets in hypersonic stream received with Navier-Stokes parabola equations closed by one-para metrical (k-l) model of turbulence and multiply staged mechanism of hydrogen oxidation are given. Combustion mechanisms depending on the operating parameters are discussing. The influences of air stream composition and ways off fuel feed to the length of ignition delay and level quantity of hydrogen bum-out have been defined. The calculated theoretical results of investigations permit to make the next conclusions: 1. The diffusive combustion of the system of plane supersonic hydrogen jets in hypersonic flow happens in the cellular structures with alternation zones of intensive running of chemical reactions with their inhibition zones. 2. Gas dynamic and heat Mach waves cause a large - scale viscous formation intensifying mixing of fuel with oxidizer. 3. The system ignition of plane supersonic hydrogen jets in hypersonic airy co-flow happens with the formation of normal flame front of hydrogen airy mixture with transition to the diffusive combustion. 4. The presence of active particles in the flow composition initiates the ignition of hydrogen - airy mixture, provides the intensive running of chemical reactions and shortens the length of ignition delay. 5. The supersonic combustion of hydrogel-airy mixture is characterized by two zones: the intensive chemical reactions with an active energy heat release is occurring in the first zone and in the second - a slow hydrogen combustion limited by the mixing of fuel with oxidizer. (author)

  5. Frequencies of inaudible high-frequency sounds differentially affect brain activity: positive and negative hypersonic effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariko Fukushima

    Full Text Available The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10-13 Hz of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG, which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC. When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect, while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect. These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC.

  6. Experimental Investigation of Brazilian 14-X B Hypersonic Scramjet Aerospace Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Felipe de Araujo Martos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian hypersonic scramjet aerospace vehicle 14-X B is a technological demonstrator of a hypersonic airbreathing propulsion system based on the supersonic combustion (scramjet to be tested in flight into the Earth’s atmosphere at an altitude of 30 km and Mach number 7. The 14-X B has been designed at the Prof. Henry T. Nagamatsu Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics, Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv, Brazil. The IEAv T3 Hypersonic Shock Tunnel is a ground-test facility able to produce high Mach number and high enthalpy flows in the test section close to those encountered during the flight of the 14-X B into the Earth’s atmosphere at hypersonic flight speeds. A 1 m long stainless steel 14-X B model was experimentally investigated at T3 Hypersonic Shock Tunnel, for freestream Mach numbers ranging from 7 to 8. Static pressure measurements along the lower surface of the 14-X B, as well as high-speed Schlieren photographs taken from the 5.5° leading edge and the 14.5° deflection compression ramp, provided experimental data. Experimental data was compared to the analytical theoretical solutions and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations, showing good qualitative agreement and in consequence demonstrating the importance of these methods in the project of the 14-X B hypersonic scramjet aerospace vehicle.

  7. Frequencies of inaudible high-frequency sounds differentially affect brain activity: positive and negative hypersonic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Ariko; Yagi, Reiko; Kawai, Norie; Honda, Manabu; Nishina, Emi; Oohashi, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs) above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz) activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz) of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz) to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10-13 Hz) of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG), which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC). When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect), while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect). These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC.

  8. Effects of shock on hypersonic boundary layer stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, F.; Rambaud, P.

    2013-06-01

    The design of hypersonic vehicles requires the estimate of the laminar to turbulent transition location for an accurate sizing of the thermal protection system. Linear stability theory is a fast scientific way to study the problem. Recent improvements in computational capabilities allow computing the flow around a full vehicle instead of using only simplified boundary layer equations. In this paper, the effect of the shock is studied on a mean flow provided by steady Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computations and simplified boundary layer calculations.

  9. A local-velocity meter for hypersonic plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyazev, A.A.; Lerner, N.B.; Svinolupov, K.I.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a system for a resonant laser Doppler meter for the local velocity in a hypersonic plasma flow. Preliminary test results on the prototype are reported for a jet of air containing sodium at 1100 degrees K, air pressure in the working region 20-200 Pa, and jet speed 6-8 km/sec. Measured speeds agree with theoretical predictions. The prototype and the method do not impose constraints on the working conditions but can be extended to wide ranges in temperature and pressure, such as ones in which the line width does not exceed the Doppler shift

  10. Filtering of elastic waves by opal-based hypersonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salasyuk, Alexey S; Scherbakov, Alexey V; Yakovlev, Dmitri R; Akimov, Andrey V; Kaplyanskii, Alexander A; Kaplan, Saveliy F; Grudinkin, Sergey A; Nashchekin, Alexey V; Pevtsov, Alexander B; Golubev, Valery G; Berstermann, Thorsten; Brüggemann, Christian; Bombeck, Michael; Bayer, Manfred

    2010-04-14

    We report experiments in which high quality silica opal films are used as three-dimensional hypersonic crystals in the 10 GHz range. Controlled sintering of these structures leads to well-defined elastic bonding between the submicrometer-sized silica spheres, due to which a band structure for elastic waves is formed. The sonic crystal properties are studied by injection of a broadband elastic wave packet with a femtosecond laser. Depending on the elastic bonding strength, the band structure separates long-living surface acoustic waves with frequencies in the complete band gap from bulk waves with band frequencies that propagate into the crystal leading to a fast decay.

  11. Numerical simulation of air hypersonic flows with equilibrium chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelyanov, Vladislav; Karpenko, Anton; Volkov, Konstantin

    2018-05-01

    The finite volume method is applied to solve unsteady three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured meshes. High-temperature gas effects altering the aerodynamics of vehicles are taken into account. Possibilities of the use of graphics processor units (GPUs) for the simulation of hypersonic flows are demonstrated. Solutions of some test cases on GPUs are reported, and a comparison between computational results of equilibrium chemically reacting and perfect air flowfields is performed. Speedup of solution on GPUs with respect to the solution on central processor units (CPUs) is compared. The results obtained provide promising perspective for designing a GPU-based software framework for practical applications.

  12. Hypersonic aerodynamics on thin bodies with interaction and upstream influence

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, F. T.; Khorrami, A. F.

    1994-01-01

    In the fundamental configuration studied here, a steady hypersonic free stream flows over a thin sharp aligned airfoil or flat plate with a leading-edge shock wave, and the flow field in the shock layer (containing a viscous and an inviscid layer) is steady laminar and two-dimensional, for a perfect gas without real and high-temperature gas effects. The viscous and inviscid layers are analysed and computed simultaneously in the region from the leading edge to the trailing edge, including the ...

  13. The Apache Longbow-Hellfire Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground: Ecological Risk Assessment for Missile Firing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Daniel Steven; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; Hargrove, William Walter; Suter, Glenn; Pater, Larry

    2008-01-01

    A multiple stressor risk assessment was conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, as a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework. The focus was a testing program at Cibola Range, which involved an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, M60-A1 tanks. This paper describes the ecological risk assessment for the missile launch and detonation. The primary stressor associated with this activity was sound. Other minor stressors included the detonation impact, shrapnel, and fire. Exposure to desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) was quantified using the Army sound contour program BNOISE2, as well as distances from the explosion to deer. Few effects data were available from related studies. Exposure-response models for the characterization of effects consisted of human 'disturbance' and hearing damage thresholds in units of C-weighted decibels (sound exposure level) and a distance-based No Observed Adverse Effects Level for moose and cannonfire. The risk characterization used a weight-of-evidence approach and concluded that risk to mule deer behavior from the missile firing was likely for a negligible number of deer, but that no risk to mule deer abundance and reproduction is expected

  14. Numerical analysis of a hypersonic turbulent and laminar flow using a commercial CFD solver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajčin Miroslav P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational fluid dynamics computations for two hypersonic flow cases using the commercial ANSYS FLUENT 16.2 CFD software were done. In this paper, an internal and external hypersonic flow cases were considered and analysis of the hypersonic flow using different turbulence viscosity models available in ANSYS FLUENT 16.2 as well as the laminar viscosity model were done. The obtained results were after compared and commented upon. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 35035

  15. Martian Multimedia: The Agony and Ecstasy of Communicating Real-Time, Authentic Science During the Phoenix Mars Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitter, C.; Buxner, S. R.

    2009-03-01

    The Phoenix Mars Mission faced robust communication challenges requiring real-time solutions. Managing the message from Mars and ensuring the highest quality of science data and news releases were our top priorities during mission surface operations.

  16. Simplified Thermo-Chemical Modelling For Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Jorge; Alvarez, Paula; Gonzalez, Ezequiel; Rodriguez, Manuel

    2011-05-01

    Hypersonic flows are connected with high temperatures, generally associated with strong shock waves that appear in such flows. At high temperatures vibrational degrees of freedom of the molecules may become excited, the molecules may dissociate into atoms, the molecules or free atoms may ionize, and molecular or ionic species, unimportant at lower temperatures, may be formed. In order to take into account these effects, a chemical model is needed, but this model should be simplified in order to be handled by a CFD code, but with a sufficient precision to take into account the physics more important. This work is related to a chemical non-equilibrium model validation, implemented into a commercial CFD code, in order to obtain the flow field around bodies in hypersonic flow. The selected non-equilibrium model is composed of seven species and six direct reactions together with their inverse. The commercial CFD code where the non- equilibrium model has been implemented is FLUENT. For the validation, the X38/Sphynx Mach 20 case is rebuilt on a reduced geometry, including the 1/3 Lref forebody. This case has been run in laminar regime, non catalytic wall and with radiative equilibrium wall temperature. The validated non-equilibrium model is applied to the EXPERT (European Experimental Re-entry Test-bed) vehicle at a specified trajectory point (Mach number 14). This case has been run also in laminar regime, non catalytic wall and with radiative equilibrium wall temperature.

  17. Wind-Tunnel Balance Characterization for Hypersonic Research Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Keith C.; Commo, Sean A.; Parker, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Wind-tunnel research was recently conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center s 31-Inch Mach 10 Hypersonic Facility in support of the Mars Science Laboratory s aerodynamic program. Researchers were interested in understanding the interaction between the freestream flow and the reaction control system onboard the entry vehicle. A five-component balance, designed for hypersonic testing with pressurized flow-through capability, was used. In addition to the aerodynamic forces, the balance was exposed to both thermal gradients and varying internal cavity pressures. Historically, the effect of these environmental conditions on the response of the balance have not been fully characterized due to the limitations in the calibration facilities. Through statistical design of experiments, thermal and pressure effects were strategically and efficiently integrated into the calibration of the balance. As a result of this new approach, researchers were able to use the balance continuously throughout the wide range of temperatures and pressures and obtain real-time results. Although this work focused on a specific application, the methodology shown can be applied more generally to any force measurement system calibration.

  18. Biofouling Removal and Protein Detection Using a Hypersonic Resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shuting; Zhang, Hongxiang; Liu, Wenpeng; Wang, Yanyan; Pang, Wei; Duan, Xuexin

    2017-08-25

    Nonspecific binding (NSB) is a general issue for surface based biosensors. Various approaches have been developed to prevent or remove the NSBs. However, these approaches either increased the background signals of the sensors or limited to specific transducers interface. In this work, we developed a hydrodynamic approach to selectively remove the NSBs using a microfabricated hypersonic resonator with 2.5 gigahertz (GHz) resonant frequency. The high frequency device facilitates generation of multiple controlled microvortexes which then create cleaning forces at the solid-liquid interfaces. The competitive adhesive and cleaning forces have been investigated using the finite element method (FEM) simulation, identifying the feasibility of the vortex-induced NSB removal. NSB proteins have been selectively removed experimentally both on the surface of the resonator and on other substrates which contact the vortexes. Thus, the developed hydrodynamic approach is believed to be a simple and versatile tool for NSB removal and compatible to many sensor systems. The unique feature of the hypersonic resonator is that it can be used as a gravimetric sensor as well; thus a combined NSB removal and protein detection dual functional biosensor system is developed.

  19. A model for supersonic and hypersonic impactors for nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abouali, Omid; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2005-01-01

    In this study the performance of supersonic and hypersonic impactors for collection efficiency of nanoparticles (in the size range of 2-100 nm) under various operating conditions is analyzed. Axisymmetric forms of the compressible Navier-Stokes and energy equations are solved and the airflow and thermal condition in the impactor are evaluated. A Lagrangian particle trajectory analysis procedure is used and the deposition rates of different size particles under various operating conditions are studied. For dilute particle concentrations, the assumption of one-way interaction is used and the effect of particles on gas flow field is ignored. The importance of drag, lift and Brownian forces on particle motions in supersonic impactors is discussed. Sensitivity of the simulation results to the use of different assumptions for the Cunningham correction coefficient is studied. It is shown that accurate evaluation of the gas mean free path and the Cunningham correction factor is important for accurate simulation of nano-particle transport and deposition in supersonic/hypersonic impactors. The computer simulation results are compared favorably with the available experimental data

  20. Cosmic Radiation Exposure of Future Hypersonic Flight Missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koops, L

    2017-06-15

    Cosmic radiation exposure in air traffic grows with flight altitude, geographical latitude and flight time. For future high-speed intercontinental point-to-point travel, the trade-off between reduced flight time and enhanced dose rate at higher flight altitudes is investigated. Various representative (partly) hypersonic cruise missions are considered and in dependence on solar activity the integral route dose is calculated for envisaged flight profiles and trajectories. Our results are compared to those for corresponding air connections served by present day subsonic airliners. During solar maximum, we find a significant reduction in route dose for all considered high-speed missions compared to the subsonic reference. However, during solar minimum, comparable or somewhat larger doses result on transpolar trajectories with (partly) hypersonic cruise at Mach 5. Both solar activity and routing are hence found to determine, whether passengers can profit from shorter flight times in terms of radiation exposure, despite of altitude-induced higher dose rates. Yet, aircrews with fixed number of block hours are always subject to larger annual doses, which in the considered cases take values up to five times the reference. We comment on the implications of our results for route planning and aviation decision-making in the absence of radiation shielding solutions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Hypersonic MHD Propulsion System Integration for the Mercury Lightcraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myrabo, L.N.; Rosa, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Introduced herein are the design, systems integration, and performance analysis of an exotic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) slipstream accelerator engine for a single-occupant 'Mercury' lightcraft. This ultra-energetic, laser-boosted vehicle is designed to ride a 'tractor beam' into space, transmitted from a future orbital network of satellite solar power stations. The lightcraft's airbreathing combined-cycle engine employs a rotary pulsed detonation thruster mode for lift-off and landing, and an MHD slipstream accelerator mode at hypersonic speeds. The latter engine transforms the transatmospheric acceleration path into a virtual electromagnetic 'mass-driver' channel; the hypersonic momentum exchange process (with the atmosphere) enables engine specific impulses in the range of 6000 to 16,000 seconds, and propellant mass fractions as low as 10%. The single-stage-to-orbit, highly reusable lightcraft can accelerate at 3 Gs into low Earth orbit with its throttle just barely beyond 'idle' power, or virtually 'disappear' at 30 G's and beyond. The objective of this advanced lightcraft design is to lay the technological foundations for a safe, very low cost (e.g., 1000X below chemical rockets) air and space transportation for human life in the mid-21st Century - a system that will be completely 'green' and independent of Earth's limited fossil fuel reserves

  2. Further analysis of MHD acceleration for a hypersonic wind tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, M.J.; Schmidt, H.J.; Chapman, J.N.

    1995-01-01

    A previously completed MHD study of the use of an MHD accelerator with seeded air from a state-of-the-art arc heater, was generally hailed as showing that the system studied has some promise of meeting the most critical hypersonic testing requirements. However, some concerns existed about certain aspects of the results. This paper discusses some of these problems and presents analysis of potential solutions. Specifically the problems addressed are; reducing the amount of seed in the flow, reducing test chamber temperatures, and reducing the oxygen dissociation. Modeling techniques are used to study three design variables of the MHD accelerator. The accelerator channel inlet Mach number, the accelerator channel divergence angle, and the magnetic field strength are all studied. These variables are all optimized to meet the goals for seed, temperature, and dissociated oxygen reduction. The results of this paper are encouraging, showing that all three goals can be met. General relationships are observed as to how the design variables affect the performance of the MHD accelerator facility. This paper expands on the results presented in the UTSI report and further supports the feasibility of MHD acceleration as a means to provide hypersonic flight simulation

  3. Impulse Force Balance for Ultrashort Duration Hypersonic Test Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the measurement of side force, pitching, and yawing moments on a model, using an accelerometer force balance, in a short duration hypersonic shock tunnel. The test model is a blunt-nosed, flapped delta wing, mounted on a support sting through a force balance. The flexible rubber bushes constituting the balance allow the model to float freely on the sting during the test. The accelerometers were located in the model to record accelerations in the directions of interest. The model was tested in shock tunnel at Mach 8 at different angles of incidence with the freestream. Dynamic calibration of the test assembly was carried out for the acquisition of impulse response functions for the above components of force and moments, using an impulse hammer. The convolution technique was applied to derive the impulse response functions. The accelerometer outputs from the model in the hypersonic freestream were processed using the respective impulse response functions to derive the unknown aerodynamic force and moments. The newly adopted convolution technique has been found very effective for data reduction from accelerometer force balances developed for shock tunnel applications.

  4. Nonlinear evolution of Mack modes in a hypersonic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokani, Ndaona

    2005-01-01

    In hypersonic boundary layer flows the nonlinear disturbance evolution occurs relatively slowly over a very long length scale and has a profound effect on boundary layer transition. In the case of low-level freestream disturbances and negligible surface roughness, the transition is due to the modal growth of exponentially growing Mack modes that are destabilized by wall cooling. Cross-bicoherence measurements, derived from hot-wire data acquired in a quiet hypersonic tunnel, are used to identify and quantify phase-locked, quadratic sum and difference interactions involving the Mack modes. In the early stages of the nonlinear disturbance evolution, cross-bicoherence measurements indicate that the energy exchange between the Mack mode and the mean flow first occurs to broaden the sidebands; this is immediately followed by a sum interaction of the Mack mode to generate the first harmonic. In the next stages of the nonlinear disturbance evolution, there is a difference interaction of the first harmonic, which is also thought to contribute to the mean flow distortion. This difference interaction, in the latter stages, is also accompanied by a difference interaction between Mack mode and first harmonic, and a sum interaction, which forces the second harmonic. Analysis using the digital complex demodulation technique, shows that the low-frequency, phase-locked interaction that is identified in the cross bicoherence when the Mack mode and first harmonic have large amplitudes, arises due to the amplitude modulation of Mack mode and first harmonic.

  5. Numerical analysis of hypersonic turbulent film cooling flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. S.; Chen, C. P.; Wei, H.

    1992-01-01

    As a building block, numerical capabilities for predicting heat flux and turbulent flowfields of hypersonic vehicles require extensive model validations. Computational procedures for calculating turbulent flows and heat fluxes for supersonic film cooling with parallel slot injections are described in this study. Two injectant mass flow rates with matched and unmatched pressure conditions using the database of Holden et al. (1990) are considered. To avoid uncertainties associated with the boundary conditions in testing turbulence models, detailed three-dimensional flowfields of the injection nozzle were calculated. Two computational fluid dynamics codes, GASP and FDNS, with the algebraic Baldwin-Lomax and k-epsilon models with compressibility corrections were used. It was found that the B-L model which resolves near-wall viscous sublayer is very sensitive to the inlet boundary conditions at the nozzle exit face. The k-epsilon models with improved wall functions are less sensitive to the inlet boundary conditions. The testings show that compressibility corrections are necessary for the k-epsilon model to realistically predict the heat fluxes of the hypersonic film cooling problems.

  6. Cosmic radiation exposure of future hypersonic flight missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koops, L.

    2017-01-01

    Cosmic radiation exposure in air traffic grows with flight altitude, geographical latitude and flight time. For future high-speed intercontinental point-to-point travel, the trade-off between reduced flight time and enhanced dose rate at higher flight altitudes is investigated. Various representative (partly) hypersonic cruise missions are considered and in dependence on solar activity the integral route dose is calculated for envisaged flight profiles and trajectories. Our results are compared to those for corresponding air connections served by present day subsonic airliners. During solar maximum, we find a significant reduction in route dose for all considered high-speed missions compared to the subsonic reference. However, during solar minimum, comparable or somewhat larger doses result on transpolar trajectories with (partly) hypersonic cruise at Mach 5. Both solar activity and routing are hence found to determine, whether passengers can profit from shorter flight times in terms of radiation exposure, despite of altitude-induced higher dose rates. Yet, air crews with fixed number of block hours are always subject to larger annual doses, which in the considered cases take values up to five times the reference. We comment on the implications of our results for route planning and aviation decision-making in the absence of radiation shielding solutions. (author)

  7. Hypersonic MHD Propulsion System Integration for the Mercury Lightcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrabo, L. N.; Rosa, R. J.

    2004-03-01

    Introduced herein are the design, systems integration, and performance analysis of an exotic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) slipstream accelerator engine for a single-occupant ``Mercury'' lightcraft. This ultra-energetic, laser-boosted vehicle is designed to ride a `tractor beam' into space, transmitted from a future orbital network of satellite solar power stations. The lightcraft's airbreathing combined-cycle engine employs a rotary pulsed detonation thruster mode for lift-off & landing, and an MHD slipstream accelerator mode at hypersonic speeds. The latter engine transforms the transatmospheric acceleration path into a virtual electromagnetic `mass-driver' channel; the hypersonic momentum exchange process (with the atmosphere) enables engine specific impulses in the range of 6000 to 16,000 seconds, and propellant mass fractions as low as 10%. The single-stage-to-orbit, highly reusable lightcraft can accelerate at 3 Gs into low Earth orbit with its throttle just barely beyond `idle' power, or virtually `disappear' at 30 G's and beyond. The objective of this advanced lightcraft design is to lay the technological foundations for a safe, very low cost (e.g., 1000X below chemical rockets) air and space transportation for human life in the mid-21st Century - a system that will be completely `green' and independent of Earth's limited fossil fuel reserves.

  8. X-43A Hypersonic Experimental Vehicle - Artist Concept in Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    An artist's conception of the X-43A Hypersonic Experimental Vehicle, or 'Hyper-X' in flight. The X-43A was developed to flight test a dual-mode ramjet/scramjet propulsion system at speeds from Mach 7 up to Mach 10 (7 to 10 times the speed of sound, which varies with temperature and altitude). Hyper-X, the flight vehicle for which is designated as X-43A, is an experimental flight-research program seeking to demonstrate airframe-integrated, 'air-breathing' engine technologies that promise to increase payload capacity for future vehicles, including hypersonic aircraft (faster than Mach 5) and reusable space launchers. This multiyear program is currently underway at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Hyper-X schedule calls for its first flight later this year (2000). Hyper-X is a joint program, with Dryden sharing responsibility with NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Dryden's primary role is to fly three unpiloted X-43A research vehicles to validate engine technologies and hypersonic design tools as well as the hypersonic test facility at Langley. Langley manages the program and leads the technology development effort. The Hyper-X Program seeks to significantly expand the speed boundaries of air-breathing propulsion by being the first aircraft to demonstrate an airframe-integrated, scramjet-powered free flight. Scramjets (supersonic-combustion ramjets) are ramjet engines in which the airflow through the whole engine remains supersonic. Scramjet technology is challenging because only limited testing can be performed in ground facilities. Long duration, full-scale testing requires flight research. Scramjet engines are air-breathing, capturing their oxygen from the atmosphere. Current spacecraft, such as the Space Shuttle, are rocket powered, so they must carry both fuel and oxygen for propulsion. Scramjet technology-based vehicles need to carry only fuel. By eliminating the need to carry oxygen, future hypersonic vehicles will

  9. The Air Campaign vs. Ballistic Missiles: Seeking the Strategic Win in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    combined knowledge of air power history provided ample fodder from which to pick and develop a topic of great interest to me. I owe a special debt...Scud missile campaign, the Great Scud Chase. The cases show that while both Germany and Iraq’s missile campaigns failed to win their wars for them...68 Illustrations Table 1 Summarized Comparison

  10. A laws of war review of contemporary land-based missile defence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Automated precise guided missile defence has been around for some years, and is a modern-day mechanism used frequently since 2011 to defend against rocket attacks penetrating national airspace. Israel's automated Iron Dome Missile Defence System has intercepted over 1 000 rockets during two recent military ...

  11. A modular ducted rocket missile model for threat and performance assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayer, A.E.H.J.; Halswijk, W.H.C.; Komduur, H.J.; Lauzon, M.; Stowe, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    A model was developed to predict the thrust of throttled ramjet propelled missiles. The model is called DRCORE and fulfils the growing need to predict the performance of air breathing missiles. Each subsystem of the propulsion unit of this model is coded by using engineering formulae and enables the

  12. Study on the perforation of reinforced concrete slabs by rigid missiles. General introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueraud, R.; Sokolovsky, A.

    1975-01-01

    Problems encountered in computing nuclear plant protective devices against the impact of a given rigid missile (e.g. turbine disc fragments) are emphasized. The experimental program of balistic tests (missile velocities between 90m.s -1 and 170m.s -2 ) and reduced scale tests carried out in France is briefly outlined [fr

  13. Slender body treatment of some specialized problems associated with elliptic-cross-section missile configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Slender body methods were applied to some specialized problems associated with missile configurations with elliptic cross sections. Expressions are derived for computing the velocity distribution on the nose section when the ellipse eccentricity is varying longitudinally on the missile. The cross flow velocity on a triform fin section is also studied.

  14. 48 CFR 225.7016 - Restriction on Ballistic Missile Defense research, development, test, and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Missile Defense research, development, test, and evaluation. 225.7016 Section 225.7016 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS... Acquisition 225.7016 Restriction on Ballistic Missile Defense research, development, test, and evaluation. [68...

  15. THE DEVELOPMENT OF AUTOMATION MANAGEMENT TOOLS BY THE DIVISIONS OF TACTICAL MISSILE DEFENSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Voronin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes the basic directions of automation for planning and management of combat by the divisions of tactical missile defense. The article focuses on the problem of the automated choice of rational option for combat order and fire control carried out by the divisions of tactical missile defense during operation.

  16. The National Research Council study: "Making sense of ballistic missile defense"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, Dean A.

    2014-05-01

    This chapter explains and summarizes the main findings of a recent National Research Council study entitled Making Sense of Ballistic Missile Defense: An Assessment of Concepts and Systems for U.S. Boost-Phase Missile Defense in Comparison to Other Alternatives.

  17. Conventional Prompt Global Strike and Long-Range Ballistic Missiles: Background and Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-24

    FY2008, Congress rejected the requested funding for this program, but the Navy has continued to consider the possibility of deploying intermediate ...10 Submarine-Launched Intermediate -Range Global Strike .................................................. 11 Air Force Programs...Missiles............................................................................ 36 Submarine-Launched Intermediate -Range Ballistic Missiles

  18. Real-Time Target Motion Animation for Missile Warning System Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    T. Perkins, R. Sundberg, J. Cordell, Z. Tun , and M. Owen, Real-time Target Motion Animation for Missile Warning System Testing, Proc. SPIE Vol 6208...Z39-18 Real-time target motion animation for missile warning system testing Timothy Perkins*a, Robert Sundberga, John Cordellb, Zaw Tunb, Mark

  19. Key considerations in infrared simulations of the missile-aircraft engagement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Willers, MS

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available is required to steer the missile towards the target, using the seeker-provided target sight-line for missile guidance.These requirements are satisfied by detailed models for aerodynamics, flight control servos, the auto-pilot and guidance and navigation...

  20. Mode Transition Variable Geometry for High Speed Inlets for Hypersonic Aircraft, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hypersonic propulsion research has been a focus of the NASA aeronautics program for years. Previous high-speed cruise and space access programs have examined the...

  1. Direct Numerical Simulation and Experimental Validation of Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Receptivity and Instability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhong, Xiaolin

    2007-01-01

    .... During the three-year period, we have conducted extensive DNS studies on the receptivity of hypersonic boundary layer flows over a sharp wedge, a flat plate, a blunt cone, and the FRESH aeroshell...

  2. Computational Tool for Coupled Simulation of Nonequilibrium Hypersonic Flows with Ablation, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this SBIR project is to develop a predictive computational tool for the aerothermal environment around ablation-cooled hypersonic atmospheric entry...

  3. Toward a CFD nose-to-tail capability - Hypersonic unsteady Navier-Stokes code validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Thomas A.; Flores, Jolen

    1989-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research for hypersonic flows presents new problems in code validation because of the added complexity of the physical models. This paper surveys code validation procedures applicable to hypersonic flow models that include real gas effects. The current status of hypersonic CFD flow analysis is assessed with the Compressible Navier-Stokes (CNS) code as a case study. The methods of code validation discussed to beyond comparison with experimental data to include comparisons with other codes and formulations, component analyses, and estimation of numerical errors. Current results indicate that predicting hypersonic flows of perfect gases and equilibrium air are well in hand. Pressure, shock location, and integrated quantities are relatively easy to predict accurately, while surface quantities such as heat transfer are more sensitive to the solution procedure. Modeling transition to turbulence needs refinement, though preliminary results are promising.

  4. Technologies for propelled hypersonic flight: Technologies des vols hypersoniques propulsés

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    These reports document the results of the Applied Vehicle Technology Panel Working Group 10, Subgroups 1, 2, and 3, who aimed to address selected critical issues related to propelled hypersonic flight...

  5. RTO WG 10: Test Cases for CFD Validation of Hypersonic Flight

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knight, Doyle

    2006-01-01

    .... An overview of Subgroup 3 (SG 3) is presented in this paper. The SG 3 participants defined six topical areas for which validation of CFD methodologies was deemed essential for effective analysis and design of propelled hypersonic vehicles...

  6. Experimental Studies of Shock Interaction Phenomena Associated with Hypersonic Airbreathing Propulsion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holden, Michael

    2001-01-01

    ... and double cone configurations in hypersonic flow. In the best Navier-Stokes solutions the structure and density of the flowfield was captured exactly over both the hollow cylinder/flare and double cone models...

  7. Optimization of the Upper Surface of Hypersonic Vehicle Based on CFD Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, T. Y.; Cui, K.; Hu, S. C.; Wang, X. P.; Yang, G. W.

    2011-09-01

    For the hypersonic vehicle, the aerodynamic performance becomes more intensive. Therefore, it is a significant event to optimize the shape of the hypersonic vehicle to achieve the project demands. It is a key technology to promote the performance of the hypersonic vehicle with the method of shape optimization. Based on the existing vehicle, the optimization to the upper surface of the Simplified hypersonic vehicle was done to obtain a shape which suits the project demand. At the cruising condition, the upper surface was parameterized with the B-Spline curve method. The incremental parametric method and the reconstruction technology of the local mesh were applied here. The whole flow field was been calculated and the aerodynamic performance of the craft were obtained by the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technology. Then the vehicle shape was optimized to achieve the maximum lift-drag ratio at attack angle 3°, 4° and 5°. The results will provide the reference for the practical design.

  8. SiC Matrix Composites for High Temperature Hypersonic Vehicle Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Durable high temperature materials are required for hypersonic engine and structural thermal protection systems. In particular, 2700ºF or greater capable structural...

  9. Advanced Metal Rubber Sensors for Hypersonic Decelerator Entry Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NanoSonic proposes to design and develop light-weight, low-modulus, and durable Metal Rubber™ sensors for aeroelastic analysis of Hypersonic Decelerator Entry...

  10. High quality ceramic coatings sprayed by high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Sheng; Xu Binshi; Yao JiuKun

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduced the structure of the high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying gun and the effects of hypersonic plasma jet on the sprayed particles. The optimised spraying process parameters for several ceramic powders such as Al 2 O 3 , Cr 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 , Cr 3 C 2 and Co-WC were listed. The properties and microstructure of the sprayed ceramic coatings were investigated. Nano Al 2 O 3 -TiO 2 ceramic coating sprayed by using the high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying was also studied. Compared with the conventional air plasma spraying, high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying improves greatly the ceramic coatings quality but at low cost. (orig.)

  11. Hypersonic Free-Flight Measurement of Aeroshell Forces and Flowfields, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Hypersonic Gun Tunnel and laser based high speed imaging systems will be used to generate a unique, free flight, aerodynamic data base of potential Mars aeroshell...

  12. On nitrogen condensation in hypersonic nozzle flows: Numerical method and parametric study

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Longyuan; Cheng, Wan; Luo, Xisheng; Qin, Fenghua

    2013-01-01

    A numerical method for calculating two-dimensional planar and axisymmetric hypersonic nozzle flows with nitrogen condensation is developed. The classical nucleation theory with an empirical correction function and the modified Gyarmathy model

  13. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Sensors for Hypersonic Flows (7274-050), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ground test facilities are used by NASA to simulate the conditions present during flight at hypersonic velocities, to test thermal protection materials for existing...

  14. A Laser-Based Diagnostic Suite for Hypersonic Test Facilities, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop a suite of laser-based diagnostics for the study of reactive and non-reactive hypersonic flows....

  15. 33 CFR 334.1130 - Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones. 334.1130 Section 334.1130 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1130 Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB... (WSMC) at Vandenberg AFB, California. (3) The impacting of missile debris from launch operations will...

  16. 77 FR 64564 - Implementation of Regulatory Guide 1.221 on Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ...-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Proposed interim...-ISG-024, ``Implementation of Regulatory Guide 1.221 on Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles....221, ``Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles for Nuclear Power Plants.'' DATES: Submit...

  17. Distributed cooperative guidance for multiple missiles with fixed and switching communication topologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qilun ZHAO

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates cooperative guidance problems for multiple missiles with fixed and switching directed communication topologies. A two-step guidance strategy is proposed to realize the simultaneous attack. In the first step, a distributed cooperative guidance law is designed using local neighboring information for multiple missiles to achieve consensus on range-to-go and leading angle. The second step begins when the consensus of multiple missiles is realized. During the second step, multiple missiles disconnect from each other and hit the target using the proportional navigation guidance law. First, based on the local neighboring communications, a sufficient condition for multiple missiles to realize simultaneous attack with a fixed communication topology is presented, where the topology is only required to have a directed spanning tree. Then, the results are extended to the case of switching communication topologies. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to validate the theoretical results.

  18. Destruction of the Phoenix/Hibiscus and Barringtonia racemosa Communities at Richards Bay, Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Weisser

    1982-10-01

    Full Text Available The destruction of the Phoenix!Hibiscus and Barringtonia racemosa Communities described by Venter in 1972 on the southern shores of Richards Bay is reported. The cause was the artificial openingof a new mouth about 5,5 km south of the original mouth, which increased tidal range and salinity. These swamp communities occupied a narrow band about 6 ha in area behind the Bruguiera gymnorrhiza Community. An estimated 95 % of the communities was affected and only on the landward border were some isolated remnants of species such as Acrostichum aureum, Hibiscus tiliaceus and Phoenix reclinata detected .Young stands of  Phragmites australis, seedlings of  Bruguiera gymnorrhiza and Avicennia marina and epipelic algae are recoIonizing the affected area.

  19. Implementation of a quality management system at the PHOENIX facility (CryoMaK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbach, Elisabeth; Bagrets, Nadezda; Weiss, Klaus-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Within a variety of mechanical tests in the Cryogenic Material Test Facility Karlsruhe (CryoMaK) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) the PHOENIX facility was prepared for multiple standard tensile tests in liquid helium, liquid nitrogen and at room temperature. With the multiple specimens holder 10 specimens can be tested within one cool down one after another. A quality management system is needed for ensuring reproducible preconditions. For the guarantee of the competence of the laboratory and the measurement equipment, a quality management system was implemented and prepared for accreditation according to DIN EN ISO/IEC 17025 (ISO 17025). The implementation of a quality management system allows high precision test results included the estimation of measurement uncertainty. This paper gives an overview of the management and technical requirements for the accreditation of the PHOENIX testing facility

  20. Implementation of a quality management system at the PHOENIX facility (CryoMaK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, Elisabeth, E-mail: elisabeth.urbach@kit.edu; Bagrets, Nadezda; Weiss, Klaus-Peter

    2013-10-15

    Within a variety of mechanical tests in the Cryogenic Material Test Facility Karlsruhe (CryoMaK) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) the PHOENIX facility was prepared for multiple standard tensile tests in liquid helium, liquid nitrogen and at room temperature. With the multiple specimens holder 10 specimens can be tested within one cool down one after another. A quality management system is needed for ensuring reproducible preconditions. For the guarantee of the competence of the laboratory and the measurement equipment, a quality management system was implemented and prepared for accreditation according to DIN EN ISO/IEC 17025 (ISO 17025). The implementation of a quality management system allows high precision test results included the estimation of measurement uncertainty. This paper gives an overview of the management and technical requirements for the accreditation of the PHOENIX testing facility.

  1. Tornado missile risk analysis. Topical report No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, W.L.; Lew, S.T.; Davis, R.L.; Hsu, J.C.; McConnell, B.S.

    1976-01-01

    Literature reviews, preliminary models, methodology descriptions, and general progress appraisal corresponding to the first 12 weeks of the research and approximately 14% of the budget expenditures are presented. Consequently, much of the methodology discussed in the various tasks is tentative and dependent upon further investigation as noted. The objective of this project is to develop a probabilistic formalism for characterizing the effects of the tornado generated missiles on the plant safety. The state-of-the-art nnd the R/D efforts needed to accomplish the stated objective are summarized

  2. Renewable Energy Opportunities at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chvala, William D.; Solana, Amy E.; States, Jennifer C.; Warwick, William M.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2008-09-01

    The document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 DoD Renewable Energy Assessment. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) for heating and cooling buildings, as directed by IMCOM.

  3. Full-scale tornado-missile impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, A.E.; Sliter, G.E.; Burdette, E.G.

    1978-01-01

    Full-scale poles, pipes, and rods, representing postulated tornado-borne missiles, were rocket-propelled into reinforced concrete panels with thicknesses typical of walls and roofs in the auxillary buildings of nuclear power plants. Data from the 18 tests can be used directly for structural design or for validating design and analysis techniques. The test panels, constructed with 3000-psi design strength concrete and minimum allowable reinforcement, were 12, 18 and 24 in. thick with 15 X 15-ft unsupported spans. (Auth.)

  4. Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile (JASSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    6.1.3) All Ops All Ops Joint Critical Ops All Ops All Ops Missile Reliability (KSA) (CPD para 6.2.8) 4th Lot .91 4th Lot .91 IOT &E .80 4th Lot .85 IOT &E...the ORD 303-95-III dated January 20, 2004 Change Explanations None Acronyms and Abbreviations IOT &E - Initial Operational Test and Evaluation KSA... Actuator Control Card, Lots 12 and 4 Systems Engineering Program Support/Program Tooling and Test Equipment, and JASSM-ER Standard Data Protocol (DS

  5. Predictions of Aerodynamic Heating on Tactical Missile Domes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-25

    A . Martellucci W. Daskin J. D. Cresswell J. B. Arnaiz L. A . Marshall J. Cassanto R. Hobbs C. Harris F. George P.O. Box 8555 Philadelphia, PA J9101... A LEVELs NSWC TR 79-21 i PREDICTIONS OF AERODYNAMIC HEATING ON TACTICAL MISSILE DOMES A wo BY T. F. ZIEN W. C. RAGSDALE RESEARCH TECHNOLOGY...DOMES SAUTHOR( a ) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER() T. F. ZiendW.C jRagsale 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT. TASK

  6. Hezbollah Rockets and Missiles: Deployment and Defence Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Kulhánek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the issue of the proliferation of the rocket technology deployed in guerrilla warfare throughout the Near East. It evaluates assumptions and identifies potential regressions with respect to the most recent hot phase in the violent conflict between Hezbollah and Israel, with a focus on primary methods based on rocket shelling and resistance efforts. In comparing the two military forces, Israel emerges as the stronger, even if artillery and tactical ballistic missiles with warheads containing substances defined as weapons of mass destruction were to be deployed as an extreme first measure by Hezbollah, in which case an Israeli or American response would destroy at least parts of Lebanon.

  7. Generation of missiles and destructive shock fronts and their consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.H.L.

    1980-01-01

    A general review is given of the generation of missiles and shock fronts from vessels and turbines and the formation and generation of deflagration and detonation waves in the atmosphere after the release of inflammable material. The considerations involved in evaluation the penetration of steel and concrete structures and the effects of pressure waves are presented with particular emphasis on dimensional analysis. The formation and ignition of flammable vapour clouds is considered and the distinction drawn between simple combustion, deflagration and detonation. The rates of release and impulse loadings on vessels resulting from holes or splits are also reviewed. (author)

  8. Reserve lithium-thionyl chloride battery for missile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchat, J. P.; Descroix, J. P.; Sarre, G.

    A comparative performance study has been conducted for silver-zinc, thionyl chloride, and thermal batteries designed for such missile applications as ICBM guidance system power supplies. Attention is given to each of the three candidates' conformity to requirements concerning mechanical configuration, electrochemical design, electrolyte reservoir, external case, and gas generator. The silver-zinc and Li-SOCl2 candidates employ similar cell configurations and yield comparable performance. The thermal battery is found to be incapable of meeting battery case temperature-related requirements.

  9. Analysis and optimization of trajectories for Ballistic Missiles Interception

    OpenAIRE

    Montero Yéboles, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles are capable of placing a nuclear warhead at more than 5,000 km away from its launching base. With the lethal power of a nuclear warhead a whole city could be wiped out by a single weapon causing millions of deaths. This means that the threat posed to any country from a single ICBM captured by a terrorist group or launched by a 'rogue' state is huge. This threat is increasing as more countries are achieving nuclear and advanced launcher capabilities. In orde...

  10. MILITARY RESEARCH: Researchers Target Flaws in Ballistic Missile Defense Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakoff, D; Cho, A

    2000-06-16

    More than three dozen scientists journeyed to Washington, D.C., this week to warn lawmakers that a proposed $60 billion U.S. missile defense system, designed to knock incoming warheads out of the sky, is technically flawed because it can't pick out real warheads from decoys. Pentagon officials heatedly deny a new report by one scientist that contractors have rigged trials to hide the problem, although they admit that some tests were simplified to save time. In the wake of these events, a leading Democrat is urging President Bill Clinton to delay a pending decision on building the system.

  11. On two special values of temperature factor in hypersonic flow stagnation point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilchenko, G. G.; Bilchenko, N. G.

    2018-03-01

    The hypersonic aircraft permeable cylindrical and spherical surfaces laminar boundary layer heat and mass transfer control mathematical model properties are investigated. The nonlinear algebraic equations systems are obtained for two special values of temperature factor in the hypersonic flow stagnation point. The mappings bijectivity between heat and mass transfer local parameters and controls is established. The computation experiments results are presented: the domains of allowed values “heat-friction” are obtained.

  12. Computation of hypersonic flows with finite rate condensation and evaporation of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrell, Eric R.; Candler, Graham V.; Erickson, Wayne D.; Wieting, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    A computer program for modelling 2D hypersonic flows of gases containing water vapor and liquid water droplets is presented. The effects of interphase mass, momentum and energy transfer are studied. Computations are compared with existing quasi-1D calculations on the nozzle of the NASA Langley Eight Foot High Temperature Tunnel, a hypersonic wind tunnel driven by combustion of natural gas in oxygen enriched air.

  13. Analysis of Windward Side Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition on Blunted Cones at Angle of Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-09

    correlated with PSE/LST N-Factors. 15. SUBJECT TERMS boundary layer transition, hypersonic, ground test 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION ...Maccoll) solution e condition at boundary layer edge w condition at wall, viscous ∞ condition in freestream Conventions LST Linear Stability Theory PSE...STATES AIR FORCE AFRL-RQ-WP-TP-2017-0169 ANALYSIS OF WINDWARD SIDE HYPERSONIC BOUNDARY LAYER TRANSITION ON BLUNTED CONES AT ANGLE OF ATTACK Roger

  14. Genetic Diversity of Iraqi Date Palm (Phoenix ‎dactylifera L.) by using RAPD Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Muhanned Abdul Hasan Kareem; Ali Hmood Al-Saadi ‎; Hassan Fadhil Naji

    2018-01-01

    In this study provided all molecular markers of Random amplified polymorphic (RAPD) successfully with the sixty five Iraqi date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) cultivars, which collected from Hilla city in Iraq, to determine fingerprinting, polymorphic value, and relationships among varieties of date palm cultivars, and also with the same type of cultivars. Data analysis of ten RAPD has been revealed. Number of amplified DNA fragments were (592) bands, polymorphism per all primers were (%64.2),...

  15. Genetic Diversity of Iraqi Date Palm (Phoenix ‎dactylifera L.) by using RAPD Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Muhanned Abdul Hasan; Ali ‎ Hmood Al-Saadi; Hassan Fadhil Naji

    2017-01-01

    In this study provided all molecular markers of Random amplified polymorphic (RAPD) successfully with the sixty five Iraqi date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) cultivars, which collected from Hilla city in Iraq, to determine fingerprinting, polymorphic value, and relationships among varieties of date palm cultivars, and also with the same type of cultivars. Data analysis of ten RAPD has been revealed. Number of amplified DNA fragments were (592) bands, polymorphism per all primers were (%64.2),...

  16. Phoenix Miracles in Emerging Markets: Recovering without Credit from Systemic Financial Crises

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo A. Calvo; Alejandro Izquierdo; Ernesto Talvi

    2006-01-01

    Using a sample of emerging markets that are integrated into global bond markets, we analyze the collapse and recovery phase of output collapses that coincide with systemic sudden stops, defined as periods of skyrocketing aggregate bond spreads and large capital flow reversals. Our findings indicate the presence of a very similar pattern across different episodes: output recovers with virtually no recovery in either domestic or foreign credit, a phenomenon that we call Phoenix Miracle, where o...

  17. Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera)dispersal to the Americas: Historical evidence of the Spanish introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) groves are found in the Americas from the south-west USA (36°N lat.) to Chile (21°S lat.) and eastward to the Caribbean Islands; from Venezuela, 63°W long. to 117°W long. (USA) and at elevations from 0-2,000 m. However, successful production of ripe dates is possible ...

  18. The ecological importance of mixed-severity fires: Nature's phoenix [Book Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolyn H. Sieg

    2016-01-01

    The stated goal of a recent book, The Ecological Importance of Mixed-Severity Fires: Nature’s Phoenix, edited by Dominick A. DellaSala and Chad T. Hansen, is to provide a global reference on the benefits of mixed- and high-severity fires. Note that the goal is not to provide an objective reference on the ecological aspects of mixed- and high-severity fires. Rather, the...

  19. Local impact effects on concrete target due to missile: An empirical and numerical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranjan, Rajiv; Banerjee, Sauvik; Singh, R.K.; Banerji, Pradipta

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Local impact effect of hard missile on reinforced concrete targets has been studied. • Review of empirical formulation for predicting local response carried out. • Numerical simulation of experimental test of Kojima (1991) carried out. • Divergence of FE results with those obtained using emperical formulations. • Close match of numerical simulation results with experimental data. - Abstract: Concrete containment walls and internal concrete barrier walls of a Nuclear Power Plant safety related structures are often required to be designed for externally and internally generated missiles. Potential missiles include external extreme wind generated missiles, aircraft crash and internal accident generated missiles such as impact due to turbine blade failure and steel pipe missiles resulting from pipe break. The objective of the present paper is to compare local missile impact effects on reinforced concrete target using available empirical formulations with those obtained using LS-DYNA numerical simulation. The use of numerical simulations for capturing the transient structural response has become increasingly used for structural design against impact loads. They overcome the limits of applicability of the empirical formulae and also provide information on stress and deformation fields, which may be used to improve the resistance of the concrete. Finite element (FE) analyses of an experimental impact problem reported by Kojima (1991) are carried out that are able to capture the missile impact effects; in terms of local and global damage. The continuous surface cap model has been used for modelling concrete behaviour. A range of missile velocity has been considered to simulate local missile impact phenomenon and modes of failure and to capture the concrete response from elastic to plastic fracture. A comparison is then made between the empirical formulations, numerical simulation results, and available experimental results of slab impact tests

  20. Visual Analytics for the Food-Water-Energy Nexus in the Phoenix Active Management Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, R.; Mascaro, G.; White, D. D.; Ruddell, B. L.; Aggarwal, R.; Sarjoughian, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Phoenix Active Management Area (AMA) is an administrative region of 14,500 km2 identified by the Arizona Department of Water Resources with the aim of reaching and maintaining the safe yield (i.e. balance between annual amount of groundwater withdrawn and recharged) by 2025. The AMA includes the Phoenix metropolitan area, which has experienced a dramatic population growth over the last decades with a progressive conversion of agricultural land into residential land. As a result of these changes, the water and energy demand as well as the food production in the region have significantly evolved over the last 30 years. Given the arid climate, a crucial role to support this growth has been the creation of a complex water supply system based on renewable and non-renewable resources, including the energy-intensive Central Arizona Project. In this talk, we present a preliminary characterization of the evolution in time of the feedbacks between food, water, and energy in the Phoenix AMA by analyzing secondary data (available from water and energy providers, irrigation districts, and municipalities), as well as satellite imagery and primary data collected by the authors. A preliminary visual analytics framework is also discussed describing current design practices and ideas for exploring networked components and cascading impacts within the FEW Nexus. This analysis and framework represent the first steps towards the development of an integrated modeling, visualization, and decision support infrastructure for comprehensive FEW systems decision making at decision-relevant temporal and spatial scales.

  1. In aftermath of financial investigation Phoenix VA employee demoted after her testimony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A previous Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care Journal editorial commented on fiscal mismanagement at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA Medical Center in Phoenix (1. Now Paula Pedene, the former Phoenix VA public affairs officer, claims she was demoted for testimony she gave to the VA Inspector General’s Office (OIG regarding that investigation (2. In 2011, the OIG investigated the Phoenix VA for excess spending on private care of patients (3. The report blamed systemic failures for controls so weak that $56 million in medical fees were paid during 2010 without adequate review. The report particularly focused on one clinician assigned by the Chief of Staff to review hundreds of requests per week and the intensive care unit physicians for transferring patients to chronic ventilator units (1,3. After the investigation, the director and one of the associate directors left the VA and the chief of staff was promoted …

  2. Benchmarking of the PHOENIX-P/ANC [Advanced Nodal Code] advanced nuclear design system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.Q.; Liu, Y.S.; Durston, C.; Casadei, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    At Westinghouse, an advanced neutronic methods program was designed to improve the quality of the predictions, enhance flexibility in designing advanced fuel and related products, and improve design lead time. Extensive benchmarking data is presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the Advanced Nodal Code (ANC) and the PHOENIX-P advanced lattice code. Qualification data to demonstrate the accuracy of ANC include comparison of key physics parameters against a fine-mesh diffusion theory code, TORTISE. Benchmarking data to demonstrate the validity of the PHOENIX-P methodologies include comparison of physics predictions against critical experiments, isotopics measurements and measured power distributions from spatial criticals. The accuracy of the PHOENIX-P/ANC Advanced Design System is demonstrated by comparing predictions of hot zero power physics parameters and hot full power core follow against measured data from operating reactors. The excellent performance of this system for a broad range of comparisons establishes the basis for implementation of these tools for core design, licensing and operational follow of PWR [pressurized water reactor] cores at Westinghouse

  3. McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica - A Mars Phoenix Mission Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamppari, L. K.; Anderson, R. M.; Archer, D.; Douglas, S.; Kounaves, S. P.; McKay, C. P.; Ming, Douglas W.; Moore, Q.; Quinn, J. E.; Smith, P. H.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Phoenix mission (PHX; May 25 - Nov. 2, 2008) studied the north polar region of Mars (68deg N) to understand the history of water and potential for habitability. Phoenix carried with it a wet chemistry lab (WCL) capable of determining the basic solution chemistry of the soil and the pH value, a thermal and evolved-gas analyzer capable of determining the mineralogy of the soil and detecting ice, microscopes capable of seeing soil particle shapes, sizes and colors at very high resolution, and a soil probe (TECP) capable of detecting unfrozen water in the soil. PHX coincided with an international effort to study the Earth s polar regions named the International Polar Year (IPY; 2007-2008). The best known Earth analog to the Martian high-northern plains, where Phoenix landed, are the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV), Antarctica (Fig. 1). Thus, the IPY afforded a unique opportunity to study the MDV with the same foci - history of water and habitability - as PHX. In austral summer 2007, our team took engineering models of WCL and TECP into the MDV and performed analgous measurements. We also collected sterile samples and analyzed them in our home laboratories using state-of-the-art tools. While PHX was not designed to perform biologic analyses, we were able to do so with the MDV analog samples collected.

  4. Phoenix : Complex Adaptive System of Systems (CASoS) engineering version 1.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Thomas W.; Quach, Tu-Thach; Detry, Richard Joseph; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton; Kelic, Andjelka; Starks, Shirley J.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Brodsky, Nancy S.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Sunderland, Daniel J.; Mitchell, Michael David; Ames, Arlo Leroy; Maffitt, S. Louise; Finley, Patrick D.; Russell, Eric Dean; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Reedy, Geoffrey E.; Mitchell, Roger A.; Corbet, Thomas Frank, Jr.; Linebarger, John Michael

    2011-08-01

    Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex ecological, sociological, economic and/or technical systems which we must understand to design a secure future for the nation and the world. Perturbations/disruptions in CASoS have the potential for far-reaching effects due to pervasive interdependencies and attendant vulnerabilities to cascades in associated systems. Phoenix was initiated to address this high-impact problem space as engineers. Our overarching goals are maximizing security, maximizing health, and minimizing risk. We design interventions, or problem solutions, that influence CASoS to achieve specific aspirations. Through application to real-world problems, Phoenix is evolving the principles and discipline of CASoS Engineering while growing a community of practice and the CASoS engineers to populate it. Both grounded in reality and working to extend our understanding and control of that reality, Phoenix is at the same time a solution within a CASoS and a CASoS itself.

  5. Effects of the Phoenix Lander descent thruster plume on the Martian surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plemmons, D. H.; Mehta, M.; Clark, B. C.; Kounaves, S. P.; Peach, L. L.; Renno, N. O.; Tamppari, L.; Young, S. M. M.

    2008-08-01

    The exhaust plume of Phoenix's hydrazine monopropellant pulsed descent thrusters will impact the surface of Mars during its descent and landing phase in the northern polar region. Experimental and computational studies have been performed to characterize the chemical compounds in the thruster exhausts. No undecomposed hydrazine is observed above the instrument detection limit of 0.2%. Forty-five percent ammonia is measured in the exhaust at steady state. Water vapor is observed at a level of 0.25%, consistent with fuel purity analysis results. Moreover, the dynamic interactions of the thruster plumes with the ground have been studied. Large pressure overshoots are produced at the ground during the ramp-up and ramp-down phases of the duty cycle of Phoenix's pulsed engines. These pressure overshoots are superimposed on the 10 Hz quasi-steady ground pressure perturbations with amplitude of about 5 kPa (at touchdown altitude) and have a maximum amplitude of about 20-40 kPa. A theoretical explanation for the physics that causes these pressure perturbations is briefly described in this article. The potential for soil erosion and uplifting at the landing site is also discussed. The objectives of the research described in this article are to provide empirical and theoretical data for the Phoenix Science Team to mitigate any potential problem. The data will also be used to ensure proper interpretation of the results from on-board scientific instrumentation when Martian soil samples are analyzed.

  6. Computational Study of Hypersonic Boundary Layer Stability on Cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronvall, Joel Edwin

    Due to the complex nature of boundary layer laminar-turbulent transition in hypersonic flows and the resultant effect on the design of re-entry vehicles, there remains considerable interest in developing a deeper understanding of the underlying physics. To that end, the use of experimental observations and computational analysis in a complementary manner will provide the greatest insights. It is the intent of this work to provide such an analysis for two ongoing experimental investigations. The first focuses on the hypersonic boundary layer transition experiments for a slender cone that are being conducted at JAXA's free-piston shock tunnel HIEST facility. Of particular interest are the measurements of disturbance frequencies associated with transition at high enthalpies. The computational analysis provided for these cases included two-dimensional CFD mean flow solutions for use in boundary layer stability analyses. The disturbances in the boundary layer were calculated using the linear parabolized stability equations. Estimates for transition locations, comparisons of measured disturbance frequencies and computed frequencies, and a determination of the type of disturbances present were made. It was found that for the cases where the disturbances were measured at locations where the flow was still laminar but nearly transitional, that the highly amplified disturbances showed reasonable agreement with the computations. Additionally, an investigation of the effects of finite-rate chemistry and vibrational excitation on flows over cones was conducted for a set of theoretical operational conditions at the HIEST facility. The second study focuses on transition in three-dimensional hypersonic boundary layers, and for this the cone at angle of attack experiments being conducted at the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 quiet tunnel at Purdue University were examined. Specifically, the effect of surface roughness on the development of the stationary crossflow instability are investigated

  7. Lightweight Ultrahigh Temperature CMC-Encased C/C Structure for Reentry and Hypersonic Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future reentry and hypersonic vehicles require advanced lightweight leading edge thermal protection systems that can provide the dual functionality of...

  8. Missiles for Asia The Need for Operational Analysis of U.S. Theater Ballistic Missiles in the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    durability of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty is in doubt. • China’s rapid military modernization could threaten U.S. forces. • Theater...conventional land-based theater ballistic missiles (TBMs) could add to the U.S. portfolio of strike capabilities. In particular, the U.S. Army should ana- lyze...the potential military value of TBMs in the Pacific and whether they might plausibly help the U.S. offset China’s military modernization . TBMs could

  9. Six-degree-of-freedom missile simulation using the ADI AD 100 digital computer and ADSIM simulation language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaanenburg, Koos

    1989-01-01

    The use of an AD 100 computer and the ADSIM language in the six-degree-of-freedom digital simulation of an air-to-ground missile is illustrated. The missile is launched from a moving platform, typically a helicopter, and is capable of striking a mobile target up to 10 kilometers away. The missile could be any tactical missile. The performance numbers of the AD 100 show that it is possible to implement a high performance missile model in a real-time simulation without the problems associated with an implementation on a general purpose computer using FORTRAN.

  10. A new temperature threshold detector - Application to missile monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coston, C. J.; Higgins, E. V.

    Comprehensive thermal surveys within the case of solid propellant ballistic missile flight motors are highly desirable. For example, a problem involving motor failures due to insulator cracking at motor ignition, which took several years to solve, could have been identified immediately on the basis of a suitable thermal survey. Using conventional point measurements, such as those utilizing typical thermocouples, for such a survey on a full scale motor is not feasible because of the great number of sensors and measurements required. An alternate approach recognizes that temperatures below a threshold (which depends on the material being monitored) are acceptable, but higher temperatures exceed design margins. In this case hot spots can be located by a grid of wire-like sensors which are sensitive to temperature above the threshold anywhere along the sensor. A new type of temperature threshold detector is being developed for flight missile use. The considered device consists of KNO3 separating copper and Constantan metals. Above the KNO3 MP, galvanic action provides a voltage output of a few tenths of a volt.

  11. Heat Transfer Analysis of Thermal Protection Structures for Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chen; Wang, Zhijin; Hou, Tianjiao

    2017-11-01

    This research aims to develop an analytical approach to study the heat transfer problem of thermal protection systems (TPS) for hypersonic vehicles. Laplace transform and integral method are used to describe the temperature distribution through the TPS subject to aerodynamic heating during flight. Time-dependent incident heat flux is also taken into account. Two different cases with heat flux and radiation boundary conditions are studied and discussed. The results are compared with those obtained by finite element analyses and show a good agreement. Although temperature profiles of such problems can be readily accessed via numerical simulations, analytical solutions give a greater insight into the physical essence of the heat transfer problem. Furthermore, with the analytical approach, rapid thermal analyses and even thermal optimization can be achieved during the preliminary TPS design.

  12. Basic materials and structures aspects for hypersonic transport vehicles (HTV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinheil, E.; Uhse, W.

    A Mach 5 transport design is used to illustrate structural concepts and criteria for materials selections and also key technologies that must be followed in the areas of computational methods, materials and construction methods. Aside from the primary criteria of low weight, low costs, and conceivable risks, a number of additional requirements must be met, including stiffness and strength, corrosion resistance, durability, and a construction adequate for inspection, maintenance and repair. Current aircraft construction requirements are significantly extended for hypersonic vehicles. Additional consideration is given to long-duration temperature resistance of the airframe structure, the integration of large-volume cryogenic fuel tanks, computational tools, structural design, polymer matrix composites, and advanced manufacturing technologies.

  13. Prediction and Validation of Mars Pathfinder Hypersonic Aerodynamic Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Braun, Robert D.; Weilmuenster, K. James; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Engelund, Walter C.; Powell, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    Postflight analysis of the Mars Pathfinder hypersonic, continuum aerodynamic data base is presented. Measured data include accelerations along the body axis and axis normal directions. Comparisons of preflight simulation and measurements show good agreement. The prediction of two static instabilities associated with movement of the sonic line from the shoulder to the nose and back was confirmed by measured normal accelerations. Reconstruction of atmospheric density during entry has an uncertainty directly proportional to the uncertainty in the predicted axial coefficient. The sensitivity of the moment coefficient to freestream density, kinetic models and center-of-gravity location are examined to provide additional consistency checks of the simulation with flight data. The atmospheric density as derived from axial coefficient and measured axial accelerations falls within the range required for sonic line shift and static stability transition as independently determined from normal accelerations.

  14. Engineering the hypersonic phononic band gap of hybrid Bragg stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Dirk; Liaqat, Faroha; El Boudouti, El Houssaine; El Hassouani, Youssef; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Tremel, Wolfgang; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Fytas, George

    2012-06-13

    We report on the full control of phononic band diagrams for periodic stacks of alternating layers of poly(methyl methacrylate) and porous silica combining Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. These structures exhibit large and robust on-axis band gaps determined by the longitudinal sound velocities, densities, and spacing ratio. A facile tuning of the gap width is realized at oblique incidence utilizing the vector nature of the elastic wave propagation. Off-axis propagation involves sagittal waves in the individual layers, allowing access to shear moduli at nanoscale. The full theoretical description discerns the most important features of the hypersonic one-dimensional crystals forward to a detailed understanding, a precondition to engineer dispersion relations in such structures.

  15. Numerical study on aerodynamic heat of hypersonic flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Haiming

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate prediction of the shock wave has a significant effect on the development of space transportation vehicle or exploration missions. Taking Lobb sphere as the example, the aerodynamic heat of hypersonic flight in different Mach numbers is simulated by the finite volume method. Chemical reactions and non-equilibrium heat are taken into account in this paper, where convective flux of the space term adopts the Roe format, and discretization of the time term is achieved by backward Euler algorithm. The numerical results reveal that thick mesh can lead to accurate prediction, and the thickness of the shock wave decreases as grid number increases. Furthermore, most of kinetic energy converts into internal energy crossing the shock wave.

  16. SINS/CNS Nonlinear Integrated Navigation Algorithm for Hypersonic Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-jun Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Celestial Navigation System (CNS has characteristics of accurate orientation and strong autonomy and has been widely used in Hypersonic Vehicle. Since the CNS location and orientation mainly depend upon the inertial reference that contains errors caused by gyro drifts and other error factors, traditional Strap-down Inertial Navigation System (SINS/CNS positioning algorithm setting the position error between SINS and CNS as measurement is not effective. The model of altitude azimuth, platform error angles, and horizontal position is designed, and the SINS/CNS tightly integrated algorithm is designed, in which CNS altitude azimuth is set as measurement information. GPF (Gaussian particle filter is introduced to solve the problem of nonlinear filtering. The results of simulation show that the precision of SINS/CNS algorithm which reaches 130 m using three stars is improved effectively.

  17. Weakly Ionized Plasmas in Hypersonics: Fundamental Kinetics and Flight Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macheret, Sergey

    2005-01-01

    The paper reviews some of the recent studies of applications of weakly ionized plasmas to supersonic/hypersonic flight. Plasmas can be used simply as means of delivering energy (heating) to the flow, and also for electromagnetic flow control and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation. Plasma and MHD control can be especially effective in transient off-design flight regimes. In cold air flow, nonequilibrium plasmas must be created, and the ionization power budget determines design, performance envelope, and the very practicality of plasma/MHD devices. The minimum power budget is provided by electron beams and repetitive high-voltage nanosecond pulses, and the paper describes theoretical and computational modeling of plasmas created by the beams and repetitive pulses. The models include coupled equations for non-local and unsteady electron energy distribution function (modeled in forward-back approximation), plasma kinetics, and electric field. Recent experimental studies at Princeton University have successfully demonstrated stable diffuse plasmas sustained by repetitive nanosecond pulses in supersonic air flow, and for the first time have demonstrated the existence of MHD effects in such plasmas. Cold-air hypersonic MHD devices are shown to permit optimization of scramjet inlets at Mach numbers higher than the design value, while operating in self-powered regime. Plasma energy addition upstream of the inlet throat can increase the thrust by capturing more air (Virtual Cowl), or it can reduce the flow Mach number and thus eliminate the need for an isolator duct. In the latter two cases, the power that needs to be supplied to the plasma would be generated by an MHD generator downstream of the combustor, thus forming the 'reverse energy bypass' scheme. MHD power generation on board reentry vehicles is also discussed

  18. Full-scale impact test data for tornado-missile design of nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, A.E.; Sliter, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    It is standard practice to consider the effects of low-probability impacts of tornado-borne debris (''tornado missiles'' such as utility poles and steel pipes) in the structural design of nuclear power plants in the United States. To provide data that can be used directly in the design procedure, a series of full-scale tornado-missile impact tests was performed. This paper is a brief summary of the results and conclusions from these tests. The tests consisted of reinforced concrete panels impacted by poles, pipes, and rods propelled by a rocket sled. The panels were constructed to current minimum standards and had thicknesses typical of auxiliary buildings of nuclear power plants. A specific objective was the determination of the impact velocities below which the panels do not experience backface scabbing. Another objective was to assess the adequacy of (1) conventional design formulae for penetration and scabbing and (2) conventional design methods for overall structural response. Test missiles and velocities represented those in current design standards. Missiles included utility poles, steel pipes, and steel bars. It is important to interpret the data in this paper in recognition that the test conditions represent conservative assumptions regarding maximum wind speeds, injection of the missile into the wind stream, aerodynamic trajectory, and orientation of missile at impact. Even with the severe assumptions made, the full-scale tests described demonstrate the ability of prototypical nuclear plant walls and roofs to provide adequate protection against postulated tornado-missile impact

  19. Analysis of the development of missile-borne IR imaging detecting technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jinxiang; Wang, Feng

    2017-10-01

    Today's infrared imaging guiding missiles are facing many challenges. With the development of targets' stealth, new-style IR countermeasures and penetrating technologies as well as the complexity of the operational environments, infrared imaging guiding missiles must meet the higher requirements of efficient target detection, capability of anti-interference and anti-jamming and the operational adaptability in complex, dynamic operating environments. Missileborne infrared imaging detecting systems are constrained by practical considerations like cost, size, weight and power (SWaP), and lifecycle requirements. Future-generation infrared imaging guiding missiles need to be resilient to changing operating environments and capable of doing more with fewer resources. Advanced IR imaging detecting and information exploring technologies are the key technologies that affect the future direction of IR imaging guidance missiles. Infrared imaging detecting and information exploring technologies research will support the development of more robust and efficient missile-borne infrared imaging detecting systems. Novelty IR imaging technologies, such as Infrared adaptive spectral imaging, are the key to effectively detect, recognize and track target under the complicated operating and countermeasures environments. Innovative information exploring techniques for the information of target, background and countermeasures provided by the detection system is the base for missile to recognize target and counter interference, jamming and countermeasure. Modular hardware and software development is the enabler for implementing multi-purpose, multi-function solutions. Uncooled IRFPA detectors and High-operating temperature IRFPA detectors as well as commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) technology will support the implementing of low-cost infrared imaging guiding missiles. In this paper, the current status and features of missile-borne IR imaging detecting technologies are summarized. The key

  20. What to Do About That Pack of Wolves at the Door: A Binational Organization and Acquisitions Approach to Homeland Cruise Missile Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-04

    own cruise missile, the Tomahawk. Since then, the United States and Russia have cornered the market in cruise missile technology. For decades the...and low-visibility cruise missiles, and the ability to successfully neutralize large numbers of inbound cruise missiles. The USG also lacks the...well as High Altitude Sensors (HAS) to detect inbound missiles.42 In 2006, Naval Post Graduate students utilized game theory analysis to score all

  1. Numerical simulation of tornado-borne missile impact on reinforced concrete targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, D.K.; Larder, R.

    1979-02-01

    This study is a continuation of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) effort to evaluate the applicability of using the finite element procedure to numerically simulate the impact of tornado-borne missiles on reinforced concrete targets. The objective of this study is to assess the back-face scab threshold of a reinforced concrete target impacted by deformable and nondeformable missiles. Several simulations were run using slug and pipe-type impacting missiles. The numerical results were compared with full-scale experimental field tests

  2. Range Reference Atmosphere 0-70 Km Altitude. Kwajalein Missile Range, Kwajalein, Marshall Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    DOCUMENT 360-82 KWAJALEIN MISSILE RANGE KWAJALEIN, MARSHALL ISLANDS RANGE REFERENCE ATMOSPHERE 0-70 KM ALTITUDE, C00 L’’I METEOROLOGY GROUP .RANGE...34Reference Atmosphere (Part 1), Kwajale 4n Missile Range, Kwajalein, Marshall Islands ," ADA002664. * 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on revorsae d. If necoeewy...CLASSIFICATION OF TIlS PAGE (Whe~n Data EnterecD -v DOCUMENT 360-82 Vo- KWAJALEIN MISSILE RANGE KWAJALEIN, MARSHALL ISLANDS RANGE REFERENCE ATMOSPHERE 0-70 km

  3. Tornado missiles protections taken at the Ikata NPP of SEPCO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Kazutoyo; Takagi, Toshimitsu; Inoue, Haruhisa; Yoshida, Hisao; Moriuchi, Takehiro

    2014-01-01

    On July 8, 2013, the new regulatory requirements for commercial power reactors got in force. Based on a concept of 'Defense-in-depth', essential importance was placed on the third and fourth layers of defense and prevention of simultaneous loss of all safety functions due to common causes. In this regards, the previous assumptions on the impact of earthquakes, tsunamis and other external events such as volcanic eruptions, tornadoes and forest fires were re-evaluated, and countermeasures for nuclear safety against these external events were decided to be enhanced. For tornado, Nuclear Regulation Authority promulgated the 'Assessment Guide for Tornado Effect on Nuclear Power Plants' to evaluate the effect of tornadoes. This paper will introduce the outline of evaluation cases of tornado effect, and tornado missiles protections taken at the Ikata Unit 3 Nuclear Power Plant (for actual case studies). (author)

  4. Research on Multichannel Test Device of Missile Fuze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyong Zhen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the design of multichannel acquisition circuit based on FPGA which samples and records the Doppler signals, ignition signal and the working condition of fuze security enforcement agencies of missile fuze in real-time in the test of high speed dynamic intersection. Furthermore, for the problem of increasing number of sample channel which causes the complexity of the multiplexer control, a general programmable channel switching method is proposed based on FPGA. In the method, FPGA is the control core, and using the internal ROM resource effectively simplifies the complexity of channel switch in the multichannel acquisition system. This paper analyzes the acquisition system design, and describes the design of hardware circuit and analog switch address coding in detail. The test result shows that the acquisition circuit meets the design requirements with high sampling precision and application value.

  5. RS-485 Bus Design of a Missile Simulation Training System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Fang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In a missile simulation training system with one-master and multi-slaves distributed system structure, a universal controller is necessary due to the system composed with several controllers. In this research, the designed controllers communicate with each other and upper control computer through RS-485 field bus. RS-485 bus including interface circuits, transmission protocol, Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC method and upper control test software is designed and proposed. The universal controller adopting the designed RS-485 interface circuits is connected through twisted-pair and makes the simulation system, then the controller is tested in line. The results show that the RS-485 bus communicates effectively using the protocol and CRC method, data transmission rates reaches 115.2 kbps, and has a good stability.

  6. Microscopy analysis of soils at the Phoenix landing site, Mars : Classification of soil particles and description of their optical and magnetic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goetz, W.; Pike, W.T.; Hviid, S.F.; Madsen, M.B.; Morris, R.V.; Hecht, M.H.; Staufer, U.; Leer, K.; Sykulska, H.; Hemmig, E.; Marshall, J.; Morookian, J.M.; Parrat, D.; Vijendran, S.; Bos, B.J.; El Maarry, M.R.; Keller, H.U.; Kramm, R.; Markiewicz, W.J.; Drube, L.; Blaney, D.; Arvidson, R.E.; Bell, J.F.; Reynolds, R.; Smith, P.H.; Woida, P.; Woida, R.; Tanner, R.

    2010-01-01

    The optical microscope onboard the Phoenix spacecraft has returned color images (4 ?m pixel?1) of soils that were delivered to and held on various substrates. A preliminary taxonomy of Phoenix soil particles, based on color, size, and shape, identifies the following particle types [generic names in

  7. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) and Hot Structures for Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) and hot structures are required for a range of hypersonic vehicles ranging from ballistic reentry to hypersonic cruise vehicles, both within Earth's atmosphere and non-Earth atmospheres. The focus of this paper is on air breathing hypersonic vehicles in the Earth's atmosphere. This includes single-stage to orbit (SSTO), two-stage to orbit (TSTO) accelerators, access to space vehicles, and hypersonic cruise vehicles. This paper will start out with a brief discussion of aerodynamic heating and thermal management techniques to address the high heating, followed by an overview of TPS for rocket-launched and air-breathing vehicles. The argument is presented that as we move from rocket-based vehicles to air-breathing vehicles, we need to move away from the insulated airplane approach used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter to a wide range of TPS and hot structure approaches. The primary portion of the paper will discuss issues and design options for CMC TPS and hot structure components, including leading edges, acreage TPS, and control surfaces. The current state-of-the-art will be briefly discussed for some of the components. The two primary technical challenges impacting the use of CMC TPS and hot structures for hypersonic vehicles are environmental durability and fabrication, and will be discussed briefly.

  8. Detailed modeling of electron emission for transpiration cooling of hypersonic vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanquist, Kyle M.; Hara, Kentaro; Boyd, Iain D.

    2017-02-01

    Electron transpiration cooling (ETC) is a recently proposed approach to manage the high heating loads experienced at the sharp leading edges of hypersonic vehicles. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to investigate the feasibility of ETC in a hypersonic environment. A modeling approach is presented for ETC, which includes developing the boundary conditions for electron emission from the surface, accounting for the space-charge limit effects of the near-wall plasma sheath. The space-charge limit models are assessed using 1D direct-kinetic plasma sheath simulations, taking into account the thermionically emitted electrons from the surface. The simulations agree well with the space-charge limit theory proposed by Takamura et al. for emitted electrons with a finite temperature, especially at low values of wall bias, which validates the use of the theoretical model for the hypersonic CFD code. The CFD code with the analytical sheath models is then used for a test case typical of a leading edge radius in a hypersonic flight environment. The CFD results show that ETC can lower the surface temperature of sharp leading edges of hypersonic vehicles, especially at higher velocities, due to the increase in ionized species enabling higher electron heat extraction from the surface. The CFD results also show that space-charge limit effects can limit the ETC reduction of surface temperatures, in comparison to thermionic emission assuming no effects of the electric field within the sheath.

  9. Classifier utility modeling and analysis of hypersonic inlet start/unstart considering training data costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Juntao; Hu, Qinghua; Yu, Daren; Bao, Wen

    2011-11-01

    Start/unstart detection is one of the most important issues of hypersonic inlets and is also the foundation of protection control of scramjet. The inlet start/unstart detection can be attributed to a standard pattern classification problem, and the training sample costs have to be considered for the classifier modeling as the CFD numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiments of hypersonic inlets both cost time and money. To solve this problem, the CFD simulation of inlet is studied at first step, and the simulation results could provide the training data for pattern classification of hypersonic inlet start/unstart. Then the classifier modeling technology and maximum classifier utility theories are introduced to analyze the effect of training data cost on classifier utility. In conclusion, it is useful to introduce support vector machine algorithms to acquire the classifier model of hypersonic inlet start/unstart, and the minimum total cost of hypersonic inlet start/unstart classifier can be obtained by the maximum classifier utility theories.

  10. A weakly coupled semiconductor superlattice as a harmonic hypersonic-electrical transducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poyser, C L; Akimov, A V; Campion, R P; Kent, A J; Balanov, A G

    2015-01-01

    We study experimentally and theoretically the effects of high-frequency strain pulse trains on the charge transport in a weakly coupled semiconductor superlattice. In a frequency range of the order of 100 GHz such excitation may be considered as single harmonic hypersonic excitation. While travelling along the axis of the SL, the hypersonic acoustic wavepacket affects the electron tunnelling, and thus governs the electrical current through the device. We reveal how the change of current depends on the parameters of the hypersonic excitation and on the bias applied to the superlattice. We have found that the changes in the transport properties of the superlattices caused by the acoustic excitation can be largely explained using the current–voltage relation of the unperturbed system. Our experimental measurements show multiple peaks in the dependence of the transferred charge on the repetition rate of the strain pulses in the train. We demonstrate that these resonances can be understood in terms of the spectrum of the applied acoustic perturbation after taking into account the multiple reflections in the metal film serving as a generator of hypersonic excitation. Our findings suggest an application of the semiconductor superlattice as a hypersonic-electrical transducer, which can be used in various microwave devices. (paper)

  11. Dynamics Evolution Investigation of Mack Mode Instability in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer by Bicoherence Spectrum Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian; Jiang, Nan

    2012-07-01

    The instability of a hypersonic boundary layer on a cone is investigated by bicoherence spectrum analysis. The experiment is conducted at Mach number 6 in a hypersonic wind tunnel. The time series signals of instantaneous fluctuating surface-thermal-flux are measured by Pt-thin-film thermocouple temperature sensors mounted at 28 stations on the cone surface along streamwise direction to investigate the development of the unstable disturbances. The bicoherence spectrum analysis based on wavelet transform is employed to investigate the nonlinear interactions of the instability of Mack modes in hypersonic laminar boundary layer transition. The results show that wavelet bicoherence is a powerful tool in studying the unstable mode nonlinear interaction of hypersonic laminar-turbulent transition. The first mode instability gives rise to frequency shifts to higher unstable modes at the early stage of hypersonic laminar-turbulent transition. The modulations subsequently lead to the second mode instability occurrence. The second mode instability governs the last stage of instability and final breakdown to turbulence with multi-scale disturbances growth.

  12. Dynamics Evolution Investigation of Mack Mode Instability in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer by Bicoherence Spectrum Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jian; Jiang Nan

    2012-01-01

    The instability of a hypersonic boundary layer on a cone is investigated by bicoherence spectrum analysis. The experiment is conducted at Mach number 6 in a hypersonic wind tunnel. The time series signals of instantaneous fluctuating surface-thermal-flux are measured by Pt-thin-film thermocouple temperature sensors mounted at 28 stations on the cone surface along streamwise direction to investigate the development of the unstable disturbances. The bicoherence spectrum analysis based on wavelet transform is employed to investigate the nonlinear interactions of the instability of Mack modes in hypersonic laminar boundary layer transition. The results show that wavelet bicoherence is a powerful tool in studying the unstable mode nonlinear interaction of hypersonic laminar-turbulent transition. The first mode instability gives rise to frequency shifts to higher unstable modes at the early stage of hypersonic laminar-turbulent transition. The modulations subsequently lead to the second mode instability occurrence. The second mode instability governs the last stage of instability and final breakdown to turbulence with multi-scale disturbances growth. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  13. Survey of intestinal parasitism in dogs in the Phoenix metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Heather N; O'Neal, Peter R; Wong, Valerie M; Noah, Donald L

    2017-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of selected intestinal parasites in pet dogs and recently apprehended free-roaming (AFR) shelter dogs in the Phoenix metropolitan area and compare those prevalences between the 2 groups. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SAMPLE Convenience samples of fecal specimens from owned pet dogs from the Phoenix metropolitan area (n = 175) and free-roaming dogs apprehended and admitted to Maricopa County Animal Care and Control and Arizona Humane Society facilities from November 2014 through March 2015 (188). PROCEDURES Fresh fecal specimens were collected from all dogs; for AFR shelter dogs, specimens were collected within 72 hours after facility admission. Standard centrifugal flotation tests and an ELISA were performed to detect 5 common intestinal parasites (roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, Giardia spp, and Cystoisospora spp). Group comparisons were performed by means of the χ 2 test and Rogan-Gladen prevalence estimate. RESULTS At least 1 of the 5 evaluated parasites was detected in 85 (45.2%) fecal specimens from AFR shelter dogs and 24 (13.7%) specimens from owned pet dogs. This prevalence differed significantly between the groups. Notably, the prevalence of Giardia spp in AFR shelter dogs (n = 76 [40.4%]) was higher than previously reported in the United States. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The prevalence of the evaluated intestinal parasites, particularly of Giardia spp, in AFR shelter dogs was higher than expected. This information is important for veterinarians, animal shelter personnel, pet owners, human health-care providers, and public health officials to consider when devising effective interventions and risk communication efforts against potential zoonotic threats, particularly those relevant to the Phoenix metropolitan area.

  14. Analysis of Boundary Layer Meteorological Data Collected at the White Sands Missile Range

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Brien, Sean; Tofsted, David; Yarbrough, Jimmy; Elliott, D. S; Quintis, David

    2007-01-01

    ... Sands Missile Range (WSMR). Our primary motivation for collecting these measurements is to refine the accuracy of outer and inner scale effects models for optical, thermal, and absolute humidity turbulence for the desert boundary layer...

  15. A Simplified Procedure for Reliability Estimation of Underground Concrete Barriers against Normal Missile Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Siddiqui

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Underground concrete barriers are frequently used to protect strategic structures like Nuclear power plants (NPP, deep under the soil against any possible high velocity missile impact. For a given range and type of missile (or projectile it is of paramount importance to examine the reliability of underground concrete barriers under expected uncertainties involved in the missile, concrete, and soil parameters. In this paper, a simple procedure for the reliability assessment of underground concrete barriers against normal missile impact has been presented using the First Order Reliability Method (FORM. The presented procedure is illustrated by applying it to a concrete barrier that lies at a certain depth in the soil. Some parametric studies are also conducted to obtain the design values which make the barrier as reliable as desired.

  16. ARMS CONTROL: U.S. Efforts to Control the Transfer of Nuclear-Capable Missile Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Plunkett, R

    1990-01-01

    ...). Through the MTCR, the United States and seven of its allies are attempting to limit the availability of certain systems, equipment, and technologies necessary for developing nuclear-capable missiles...

  17. Local damage to reinforced concrete structures caused by impact of aircraft engine missiles. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, T.; Tsubota, H.; Kasai, Y.; Koshika, N.; Ohnuma, H.; Von Riesemann, W.A.; Bickel, D.C.; Parks, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    Structural damage induced by an aircraft crashing into a reinforced concrete structure includes local damage caused by the deformable engines, and global damage caused by the entire aircraft. Local damage to the target may consist of spalling of concrete from its front face together with missile penetration into it, scabbing of concrete from its rear face, and perforation of missile through it. Until now, local damage to concrete structures has been mainly evaluated by rigid missile impact tests. Past research work regarding local damage caused by impact of deformable missiles has been limited. This paper presents the results of a series of impact tests of small-, intermediate-, and full-scale engine models into reinforced concrete panels. The purpose of the tests was to determine the local damage to a reinforced concrete structure caused by the impact of a deformable aircraft engine. (orig.)

  18. Challenges in the Acceptance/Licensing of a Mobile Ballistic Missile Range Safety Technology (BMRST) System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bartone, Chris

    2001-01-01

    ...), Space Vehicle Directorate, Ballistic Missile Technology program. The BMRST Program is to develop and to demonstrate a "certifiable" mobile launch range tracking and control system based upon the Global Positioning System (GPS...

  19. Formal Specification and Run-time Monitoring Within the Ballistic Missile Defense Project

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caffall, Dale S; Cook, Thomas; Drusinsky, Doron; Michael, James B; Shing, Man-Tak; Sklavounos, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    .... Ballistic Missile Defense Advanced Battle Manager (ABM) project in an effort that is amongst the most comprehensive application of formal methods to a large-scale safety-critical software application ever reported...

  20. Report of the Defense Science Board/Defense Policy Board Task Force On Theater Missile Defense

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    ... also tackled the controversial subject of the ABM Treaty and its effect on theater missile defenses Subsequent to its interim report, which expressed strong concerns about the demarcation path the US...