WorldWideScience

Sample records for phase-noise impaired measurements

  1. Estimation of MIMO channel capacity from phase-noise impaired measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels; Yin, Xuefeng; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2008-01-01

    Due to the significantly reduced cost and effort for system calibration time-division multiplexing (TDM) is a commonly used technique to switch between the transmit and receive antennas in multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radio channel sounding. Nonetheless, Baum et al. [1], [2] have shown t...... matrix. It is shown by means of Monte Carlo simulations assuming a measurementbased phase noise model, that the MIMO channel capacity can be estimated accurately for signal to noise ratios up to about 35 dB......Due to the significantly reduced cost and effort for system calibration time-division multiplexing (TDM) is a commonly used technique to switch between the transmit and receive antennas in multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radio channel sounding. Nonetheless, Baum et al. [1], [2] have shown...... that phase noise of the transmitter and receiver local oscillators, when it is assumed to be a white Gaussian random process, can cause large errors of the estimated channel capacity of a low-rank MIMO channel when the standard channel matrix estimator is used. Experimental evidence shows that consecutive...

  2. Sound localization in noise in hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, C; Gatehouse, S; Lever, C

    1999-06-01

    The present study assesses the ability of four listeners with high-frequency, bilateral symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss to localize and detect a broadband click train in the frontal-horizontal plane, in quiet and in the presence of a white noise. The speaker array and stimuli are identical to those described by Lorenzi et al. (in press). The results show that: (1) localization performance is only slightly poorer in hearing-impaired listeners than in normal-hearing listeners when noise is at 0 deg azimuth, (2) localization performance begins to decrease at higher signal-to-noise ratios for hearing-impaired listeners than for normal-hearing listeners when noise is at +/- 90 deg azimuth, and (3) the performance of hearing-impaired listeners is less consistent when noise is at +/- 90 deg azimuth than at 0 deg azimuth. The effects of a high-frequency hearing loss were also studied by measuring the ability of normal-hearing listeners to localize the low-pass filtered version of the clicks. The data reproduce the effects of noise on three out of the four hearing-impaired listeners when noise is at 0 deg azimuth. They reproduce the effects of noise on only two out of the four hearing-impaired listeners when noise is at +/- 90 deg azimuth. The additional effects of a low-frequency hearing loss were investigated by attenuating the low-pass filtered clicks and the noise by 20 dB. The results show that attenuation does not strongly affect localization accuracy for normal-hearing listeners. Measurements of the clicks' detectability indicate that the hearing-impaired listeners who show the poorest localization accuracy also show the poorest ability to detect the clicks. The inaudibility of high frequencies, "distortions," and reduced detectability of the signal are assumed to have caused the poorer-than-normal localization accuracy for hearing-impaired listeners.

  3. Residual phase noise measurements of the input section in a receiver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavric, Uros; Chase, Brian; Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    If not designed properly, the input section of an analog down-converter can introduce phase noise that can prevail over other noise sources in the system. In the paper we present residual phase noise measurements of a simplified input section of a classical receiver that is composed of various commercially available mixers and driven by an LO amplifier

  4. Measurement of spectral phase noise in a cryogenically cooled Ti:Sa amplifier (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagymihaly, Roland S.; Jójárt, Péter; Börzsönyi, Ádám.; Osvay, Károly

    2017-05-01

    In most of cases the drift of the carrier envelope phase (CEP) of a chirped pulse amplifier (CPA) system is determined only [1], being the relevant parameter at laser-matter interactions. The need of coherent combination of multiple amplifier channels to further increase the peak power of pulses requires interferometric precision [2]. For this purpose, the stability of the group delay of the pulses may become equally important. Further development of amplifier systems requires the investigation of phase noise contributions of individual subsystems, like amplifier stages. Spectrally resolved interferometry (SRI), which is a completely linear optical method, makes the measurement of spectral phase noise possible of basically any part of a laser system [3]. By utilizing this method, the CEP stability of water-cooled Ti:Sa based amplifiers was investigated just recently, where the effects of seed and pump energy, repetition rate, and the cooling crystal mounts were thoroughly measured [4]. We present a systematic investigation on the noise of the spectral phase, including CEP, of laser pulses amplified in a cryogenically-cooled Ti:Sa amplifier of a CPA chain. The double-pass amplifier was built in the sample arm of a compact Michelson interferometer. The Ti:Sa crystal was cooled below 30 °K. The inherent phase noise was measured for different operation modes, as at various repetition rates, and pump depletion. Noise contributions of the vacuum pumps and the cryogenic refrigerator were found to be 43 and 47 mrad, respectively. We have also identified CEP noise having thermal as well as mechanical origin. Both showed a monotonically decreasing tendency towards higher repetition rates. We found that the widths of the noise distributions are getting broader towards lower repetition rates. Spectral phase noise with and without amplification was measured, and we found no significant difference in the phase noise distributions. The mechanical vibration was also measured in

  5. Phase Noise Compensation for OFDM Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshem, Amir; Yemini, Michal

    2017-11-01

    We describe a low complexity method for time domain compensation of phase noise in OFDM systems. We extend existing methods in several respects. First we suggest using the Karhunen-Lo\\'{e}ve representation of the phase noise process to estimate the phase noise. We then derive an improved datadirected choice of basis elements for LS phase noise estimation and present its total least square counterpart problem. The proposed method helps overcome one of the major weaknesses of OFDM systems. We also generalize the time domain phase noise compensation to the multiuser MIMO context. Finally we present simulation results using both simulated and measured phased noise. We quantify the tracking performance in the presence of residual carrier offset.

  6. Phase noise measurements with a cryogenic power-splitter to minimize the cross-spectral collapse effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hati, Archita; Nelson, Craig W.; Pappas, David P.; Howe, David A.

    2017-11-01

    The cross-spectrum noise measurement technique enables enhanced resolution of spectral measurements. However, it has disadvantages, namely, increased complexity, inability of making real-time measurements, and bias due to the "cross-spectral collapse" (CSC) effect. The CSC can occur when the spectral density of a random process under investigation approaches the thermal noise of the power splitter. This effect can severely bias results due to a differential measurement between the investigated noise and the anti-correlated (phase-inverted) noise of the power splitter. In this paper, we report an accurate measurement of the phase noise of a thermally limited electronic oscillator operating at room temperature (300 K) without significant CSC bias. We mitigated the problem by cooling the power splitter to liquid helium temperature (4 K). We quantify errors of greater than 1 dB that occur when the thermal noise of the oscillator at room temperature is measured with the power splitter at temperatures above 77 K.

  7. Phase Noise and Intensity Noise of the Pulse Train Generated from Mode-locked Lasers in the Demodulation Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Kan; Shum, Ping

    2010-01-01

    The phase noise and intensity noise of a pulse train are theoretically analyzed in the demodulation measurement. The effect of pulse asymmetry is discussed for the first time using Fourier series. Experimentally, photodetectors with different bandwidth and incident power levels are compared to achieve minimum pulse distortion.

  8. Measurement of two-phase flow variables in a BWR by analysis of in-core neutron detector noise signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stekelenburg, A.J.C.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the state of the art of the measurement of two-phase flow variables in a boiling water reactor (BWR) by analysis of in-core neutron detector noise signals is given. It is concluded that the neutronic processes involved in neutron noise are quite well understood, but that little is known about the density fluctuations in two-phase flow which are the main cause of the neutron noise. For this reason, the neutron noise measurements, like the well known two-detector velocity measurements, are still difficult to interpret. By analyzing neutron noise measurements in a natural circulation cooled BWR, it is illustrated that, once a theory on the density fluctuations is developed, two-phase flow can be monitored with a single in-core detector. (author). 70 refs, 4 figs

  9. Passive coherent discriminator using phase diversity for the simultaneous measurement of frequency noise and intensity noise of a continuous-wave laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud-Belleau, V.; Bergeron, H.; Light, P. S.; Hébert, N. B.; Deschênes, J. D.; Luiten, A. N.; Genest, J.

    2016-10-01

    The frequency noise and intensity noise of a laser set the performance limits in many modern photonics applications and, consequently, must often be characterized. As lasers continue to improve, the measurement of these noises however becomes increasingly challenging. Current approaches for the characterization of very high-performance lasers often call for a second laser with equal or higher performance to the one that is to be measured, an incoherent interferometer having an extremely long delay-arm, or an interferometer that relies on an active device. These instrumental features can be impractical or problematic under certain experimental conditions. As an alternative, this paper presents an entirely passive coherent interferometer that employs an optical 90° hybrid coupler to perform in-phase and quadrature detection. We demonstrate the technique by measuring the frequency noise power spectral density of a highly-stable 192 THz (1560 nm) fiber laser over five frequency decades. Simultaneously, we are able to measure its relative intensity noise power spectral density and characterize the correlation between its amplitude noise and phase noise. We correct some common misconceptions through a detailed theoretical analysis and demonstrate the necessity to account for normal imperfections of the optical 90° hybrid coupler. We finally conclude that this passive coherent discriminator is suitable for reliable and simple noise characterization of highly-stable lasers, with bandwidth and dynamic range benefits but susceptibility to additive noise contamination.

  10. Phase noise estimation and mitigation for DCT-based coherent optical OFDM systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuanchuan; Yang, Feng; Wang, Ziyu

    2009-09-14

    In this paper, as an attractive alternative to the conventional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM), discrete cosine transform (DCT) based OFDM which has certain advantages over its counterpart is studied for optical fiber communications. As is known, laser phase noise is a major impairment to the performance of coherent optical OFDM (CO-OFDM) systems. However, to our knowledge, detailed analysis of phase noise and the corresponding mitigation methods for DCT-based CO-OFDM systems have not been reported yet. To address these issues, we analyze the laser phase noise in the DCT-based CO-OFDM systems, and propose phase noise estimation and mitigation schemes. Numerical results show that the proposal is very effective in suppressing phase noise and could significantly improve the performance of DCT-based CO-OFDM systems.

  11. Phase noise effects in synchronized wireless networks for mimo-ofdm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyani, M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Channel impairments effects are evaluated by inclusion of phase noise in a synchronization error correction algorithm for MIMO (Multiple Input Multiple Output) OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) systems. The original synchronization error correction algorithm applicable to AWGN (Additive White Gaussian Noise) channel pertaining to SISO (Single Input Single Output) system is modified in the presence of SUI (Stanford University Interim) channel models and then applied to MIMO systems. Then the performance of this modified algorithm is verified through simulations under the effects of channel impairments. (author)

  12. A theoretical model for measuring mass flowrate and quality of two phase flow by the noise of throttling set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Yunxian; Wang Wenran

    1992-03-01

    The mass flowrate and steam quality measuring of two phase flowrate is an essential issue in the tests of loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The spatial stochastic distribution of phase concentration would cause a differential pressure noise when two phase flow is crossing a throttling set. Under the assumption of that the variance of disperse phase concentration is proportional to its mean phase concentration and by using the separated flow model of two phase flow, it has demonstrated that the variance of noise of differential pressure square root is approximately proportional to the flowrate of disperse phase. Thus, a theoretical model for measuring mass flowrate and quality of two phase flow by noise measurement is developed. It indicates that there is a possibility to measure two phase flowrate and steam quality by using the simple theoretical model and a single throttling set

  13. Laser phase and frequency noise measurement by Michelson interferometer composed of a 3 × 3 optical fiber coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dan; Yang, Fei; Chen, Dijun; Wei, Fang; Cai, Haiwen; Fang, Zujie; Qu, Ronghui

    2015-08-24

    A laser phase and frequency noise measurement method by an unbalanced Michelson interferometer composed of a 3 × 3 optical fiber coupler is proposed. The relations and differences of the power spectral density (PSD) of differential phase and frequency fluctuation, PSD of instantaneous phase and frequency fluctuation, phase noise and linewidth are derived strictly and discussed carefully. The method obtains the noise features of a narrow linewidth laser conveniently without any specific assumptions or noise models. The technique is also used to characterize the noise features of a narrow linewidth external-cavity semiconductor laser, which confirms the correction and robustness of the method.

  14. Squeezed noise in precision force measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocko, M.F.; Bordoni, F.; Fuligni, F.; Johnson, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    The effort to build gravitational radiation antennae with sensitivity sufficient to detect bursts of radiation from supernovae in the Virgo cluster of galaxies has caused a consideration of the fundamental limits for the detection of weak forces. The existing Weber bar detectors will be eventually limited, by the phase insensitive transducers now used, to noise temperatures no better than that of the first amplifier which follows the transducer. Even for a quantum limited amplifier this may not give the sensitivity required to definitively detect gravitational radiation. In a 'back action evasion' measurement a specific phase sensitive transducer would be used. It is believed that by the technique of measuring one of the two antenna phases it is possible to reach an effective noise temperature for the measured phase which is far below the amplifier noise temperature. This is at the expense of an infinite noise temperature in the unmeasured antenna phase and is thus described as squeezing the noise. The authors outline the theoretical model for the behavior of such systems and present data from several experiments which demonstrate the main features of a back action evasion measurement. (Auth.)

  15. Hearing Impairment Among Noise-Exposed Workers - United States, 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Elizabeth A; Bushnell, P Timothy; Themann, Christa L; Morata, Thais C

    2016-04-22

    Hearing loss is the third most common chronic physical condition in the United States, and is more prevalent than diabetes or cancer (1). Occupational hearing loss, primarily caused by high noise exposure, is the most common U.S. work-related illness (2). Approximately 22 million U.S. workers are exposed to hazardous occupational noise (3). CDC compared the prevalence of hearing impairment within nine U.S. industry sectors using 1,413,789 noise-exposed worker audiograms from CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Occupational Hearing Loss Surveillance Project (4). CDC estimated the prevalence at six hearing impairment levels, measured in the better ear, and the impact on quality of life expressed as annual disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), as defined by the 2013 Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study (5). The mining sector had the highest prevalence of workers with any hearing impairment, and with moderate or worse impairment, followed by the construction and manufacturing sectors. Hearing loss prevention, and early detection and intervention to avoid additional hearing loss, are critical to preserve worker quality of life.

  16. A Baseband Ultra-Low Noise SiGe:C BiCMOS 0.25 µm Amplifier And Its Application For An On-Chip Phase-Noise Measurement Circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Godet , Sylvain; Tournier , Éric; Llopis , Olivier; Cathelin , Andreia; Juyon , Julien

    2009-01-01

    4 pages; International audience; The design and realization of an ultra-low noise operational amplifier is presented. Its applications are integrated low-frequency noise measurements in electronic devices and on-chip phase-noise measurement circuit. This paper discusses the SiGe:C BiCMOS 0.25 µm design improvements used for low noise applications. The proposed three-stage operational amplifier uses parallel bipolar transistor connection as input differential pair for low noise behavior. This ...

  17. GSpecDisp: A matlab GUI package for phase-velocity dispersion measurements from ambient-noise correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghisorkhani, Hamzeh; Gudmundsson, Ólafur; Tryggvason, Ari

    2018-01-01

    We present a graphical user interface (GUI) package to facilitate phase-velocity dispersion measurements of surface waves in noise-correlation traces. The package, called GSpecDisp, provides an interactive environment for the measurements and presentation of the results. The selection of a dispersion curve can be done automatically or manually within the package. The data are time-domain cross-correlations in SAC format, but GSpecDisp measures phase velocity in the spectral domain. Two types of phase-velocity dispersion measurements can be carried out with GSpecDisp; (1) average velocity of a region, and (2) single-pair phase velocity. Both measurements are done by matching the real part of the cross-correlation spectrum with the appropriate Bessel function. Advantages of these two types of measurements are that no prior knowledge about surface-wave dispersion in the region is needed, and that phase velocity can be measured up to that period for which the inter-station distance corresponds to one wavelength. GSpecDisp can measure the phase velocity of Rayleigh and Love waves from all possible components of the noise correlation tensor. First, we briefly present the theory behind the methods that are used, and then describe different modules of the package. Finally, we validate the developed algorithms by applying them to synthetic and real data, and by comparison with other methods. The source code of GSpecDisp can be downloaded from: https://github.com/Hamzeh-Sadeghi/GSpecDisp

  18. Wide-band residual phase-noise measurements on 40-GHz monolithic mode-locked lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, David; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2005-01-01

    We have performed wide-band residual phase-noise measurements on semiconductor 40-GHz mode-locked lasers by employing electrical waveguide components for the radio-frequency circuit. The intrinsic timing jitters of lasers with one, two, and three quantum wells (QW) are compared and our design......-QW laser. There is good agreement between the measured results and existing theory....

  19. Low noise buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators for precise time and frequency measurement and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichinger, R. A.; Dachel, P.; Miller, W. H.; Ingold, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Extremely low noise, high performance, wideband buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators were developed. These buffer amplifiers are designed to distribute reference frequencies from 30 KHz to 45 MHz from a hydrogen maser without degrading the hydrogen maser's performance. The buffered phase comparators are designed to intercompare the phase of state of the art hydrogen masers without adding any significant measurement system noise. These devices have a 27 femtosecond phase stability floor and are stable to better than one picosecond for long periods of time. Their temperature coefficient is less than one picosecond per degree C, and they have shown virtually no voltage coefficients.

  20. Application of phased array technology for identification of low frequency noise sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugo E. Camargo; Patricio A. Ravetta; Ricardo A. Burdisso; Adam K. Smith [NIOSH (United States)

    2009-12-15

    A study conducted by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) revealed that 90% of coal miners have hearing impairment by age 50, compared to only 10% of those not exposed to occupational noise. According to the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), Continuous Mining Machine (CM) operators account for 30% of workers exposed to noise doses exceeding the Permissible Exposure Level (PEL). In this context, NIOSH is conducting research to identify and control dominant noise sources in CMs. Previous noise source identification was performed using a Bruel & Kjaer (B&K) 1.92-m diameter, 42-microphone phased array. These measurements revealed that the impacts from the conveyor chain onto the tail roller, and the impacts from the conveyor chain onto the upper deck are the dominant noise sources at the tail-section of the CM. The objectives of the work presented in this paper were: (1) To rank the noise radiated by the different sections of the conveyor, and (2) to determine the effect of a urethane-coated tail roller on the noise radiated by the tail-section. This test was conducted using an Acoustical and Vibrations Engineering Consultants (AVEC) 3.5-m diameter, 121-microphone phased array. The results from this new test show that a urethane-coated tail roller yields reductions in the tail-section of 2 to 8 dB in Sound Pressure Level in the frequency range of 1 kHz to 5 kHz. However, integration of the acoustic maps shows that the front-section and mid-section of the conveyor also contain dominant noise sources. Therefore, a urethane-coated tail roller in combination with a chain with urethane-coated flights that reduces the noise sources in the front and mid sections of the conveyor is required to yield a significant noise reduction on the CM operator's overall exposure. These results show the applicability of phased array technology for low frequency noise source identification.

  1. PHASE NOISE COMPARISON OF SHORT PULSE LASER SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukui Zhang; Stephen Benson; John Hansknecht; David Hardy; George Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-08-27

    This paper describes phase noise measurements of several different laser systems that have completely different gain media and configurations including a multi-kW free-electron laser. We will focus on state-of-the-art short pulse lasers, especially drive lasers for photocathode injectors. Phase noise comparison of the FEL drive laser, electron beam and FEL laser output also will be presented.

  2. A software to measure phase-velocity dispersion from ambient-noise correlations and its application to the SNSN data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghisorkhani, Hamzeh; Gudmundsson, Ólafur

    2017-04-01

    Graphical software for phase-velocity dispersion measurements of surface waves in noise-correlation traces, called GSpecDisp, is presented. It is an interactive environment for the measurements and presentation of the results. It measures phase-velocity dispersion curves in the frequency domain based on matching of the real part of the cross-correlation spectrum with the appropriate Bessel function. The inputs are time-domain cross-correlations in SAC format. It can measure two types of phase-velocity dispersion curves; 1- average phase-velocity of a region, and 2- single-pair phase velocity. The average phase-velocity dispersion curve of a region can be used as a reference curve to automatically select the dispersion curves from each single-pair cross-correlation in that region. It also allows the users to manually refine the selections. Therefore, no prior knowledge is needed for an unknown region. GSpecDisp can measure the phase velocity of Rayleigh and Love waves from all possible components of the noise correlation tensor, including diagonal and off-diagonal components of the tensor. First, we explain how GSpecDisp is applied to measure phase-velocity dispersion curves. Then, we demonstrate measurement results on synthetic and real data from the Swedish National Seismic Network (SNSN). We compare the results with two other methods of phase-velocity dispersion measurements. Finally, we compare phase-velocity dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves obtained from different components of the correlation tensor.

  3. Phased Array Noise Source Localization Measurements Made on a Williams International FJ44 Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podboy, Gary G.; Horvath, Csaba

    2010-01-01

    A 48-microphone planar phased array system was used to acquire noise source localization data on a full-scale Williams International FJ44 turbofan engine. Data were acquired with the array at three different locations relative to the engine, two on the side and one in front of the engine. At the two side locations the planar microphone array was parallel to the engine centerline; at the front location the array was perpendicular to the engine centerline. At each of the three locations, data were acquired at eleven different engine operating conditions ranging from engine idle to maximum (take off) speed. Data obtained with the array off to the side of the engine were spatially filtered to separate the inlet and nozzle noise. Tones occurring in the inlet and nozzle spectra were traced to the low and high speed spools within the engine. The phased array data indicate that the Inflow Control Device (ICD) used during this test was not acoustically transparent; instead, some of the noise emanating from the inlet reflected off of the inlet lip of the ICD. This reflection is a source of error for far field noise measurements made during the test. The data also indicate that a total temperature rake in the inlet of the engine is a source of fan noise.

  4. Binaural speech discrimination under noise in hearing-impaired listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K. V.; Rao, A. B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an assessment of speech discrimination by hearing-impaired listeners (sensori-neural, conductive, and mixed groups) under binaural free-field listening in the presence of background noise. Subjects with pure-tone thresholds greater than 20 dB in 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 kHz were presented with a version of the W-22 list of phonetically balanced words under three conditions: (1) 'quiet', with the chamber noise below 28 dB and speech at 60 dB; (2) at a constant S/N ratio of +10 dB, and with a background white noise at 70 dB; and (3) same as condition (2), but with the background noise at 80 dB. The mean speech discrimination scores decreased significantly with noise in all groups. However, the decrease in binaural speech discrimination scores with an increase in hearing impairment was less for material presented under the noise conditions than for the material presented in quiet.

  5. Phase noise measurements of the new master oscillator for TTF2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorbeer, B.

    2004-07-01

    The timing and RF-Field control systems in the Tesla Test Facility 2 and X-Ray FEL in the future require ultra low phase noise and timing jitter performance. The short term timing jitter should not exceed 100fs and the long term stability 1ps respectively. In order to meet these requirements a new master oscillator is under construction. The task of verifying its quality in terms of phase noise is approached in this thesis. The complexity of building an oscillator at such a high demand is focused on and its related problems are tried to be solved. (orig.)

  6. Locking the local oscillator phase to the atomic phase via weak measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiga, N; Takeuchi, M

    2012-01-01

    A new method is proposed to reduce the frequency noise of a local oscillator to the level of white phase noise by maintaining (not destroying by projective measurement) the coherence of the ensemble pseudo-spin of atoms over many measurement cycles. This method, which we call ‘atomic phase lock (APL)’, uses weak measurement to monitor the phase in the Ramsey method and repeat the cycle without initialization of the phase. APL will achieve white phase noise as long as the noise accumulated during dead time and the decoherence are smaller than the measurement noise. A numerical simulation confirmed that with APL, the Allan deviation is averaged down at a maximum rate that is proportional to the inverse of the total measurement time, τ -1 . In contrast, current atomic clocks that use projection measurement suppress the noise only to the white frequency noise level, in which case the Allan deviation scales as τ -1/2 . Faraday rotation is one way to achieve weak measurement for APL. The strength of Faraday rotation with 171 Yb + ions trapped in a linear rf-trap is evaluated, and the performance of APL is discussed. The main source of decoherence is a spontaneous emission, induced by the probe beam for Faraday rotation measurement. The Faraday rotation measurement can be repeated until the decoherence becomes comparable to the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurement. The number of cycles for a realistic experimental parameter is estimated to be ∼100. (paper)

  7. Phase Noise Comparision of Short Pulse Laser Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Zhang; S. V. Benson; J. Hansknecht; D. Hardy; G. Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the phase noise measurement on several different mode-locked laser systems that have completely different gain media and configurations including a multi-kW free-electron laser. We will focus on the state of the art short pulse lasers, especially the drive lasers for photocathode injectors. A comparison between the phase noise of the drive laser pulses, electron bunches and FEL pulses will also be presented.

  8. A LOW-PHASE NOISE FREQUENCY MULTIPLIER CHAIN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    operations which are influenced by the development of frequency syn ..... The phase noise of the Isolation amplifier is also measured by .... obtained from manual. T(sec). 100. 1000. 10 ... IEEE Transations on Instrumentation and. Measurement ...

  9. An Estimation of the Whole-of-Life Noise Exposure of Adolescent and Young Adult Australians with Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Lyndal; Black, Deborah; Bundy, Anita; Williams, Warwick

    2016-10-01

    Since amplified music gained widespread popularity, there has been community concern that leisure-noise exposure may cause hearing loss in adolescents and young adults who would otherwise be free from hearing impairment. Repeated exposure to personal stereo players and music events (e.g., nightclubbing, rock concerts, and music festivals) are of particular concern. The same attention has not been paid to leisure-noise exposure risks for young people with hearing impairment (either present from birth or acquired before adulthood). This article reports on the analysis of a subset of data (leisure participation measures) collected during a large, two-phase study of the hearing health, attitudes, and behaviors of 11- to 35-yr-old Australians conducted by the National Acoustic Laboratories (n = 1,667 hearing threshold level datasets analyzed). The overall aim of the two-phase study was to determine whether a relationship between leisure-noise exposure and hearing loss exists. In the current study, the leisure activity profiles and accumulated ("whole-of-life") noise exposures of young people with (1) hearing impairment and (2) with normal hearing were compared. Cross-sectional cohort study. Hearing impaired (HI) group, n = 125; normal (nonimpaired) hearing (NH) group, n = 296, analyzed in two age-based subsets: adolescents (13- to 17-yr-olds) and young adults (18- to 24-yr-olds). Participant survey. The χ² test was used to identify systematic differences between the leisure profiles and exposure estimates of the HI and NH groups. Whole-of-life noise exposure was estimated by adapting techniques described in ISO 1999. For adolescents, leisure profiles were similar for the two groups and few individuals exceeded the stated risk criterion. For young adults, participation was significantly lower for the HI group for 7 out of 18 leisure activities surveyed. Activity diversity and whole-of-life exposure were also significantly lower for the HI group young adults. A

  10. The effect of hearing aid noise reduction on listening effort in hearing-impaired adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Jamie L; Doherty, Karen A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a noise-reduction (NR) algorithm on the listening effort hearing-impaired participants expend on a speech in noise task. Twelve hearing-impaired listeners fitted with behind-the-ear hearing aids with a fast-acting modulation-based NR algorithm participated in this study. A dual-task paradigm was used to measure listening effort with and without the NR enabled in the hearing aid. The primary task was a sentence-in-noise task presented at fixed overall speech performance levels of 76% (moderate listening condition) and 50% (difficult listening condition) correct performance, and the secondary task was a visual-tracking test. Participants also completed measures of working memory (Reading Span test), and processing speed (Digit Symbol Substitution Test) ability. Participants' speech recognition in noise scores did not significantly change with the NR algorithm activated in the hearing aid in either listening condition. The NR algorithm significantly decreased listening effort, but only in the more difficult listening condition. Last, there was a tendency for participants with faster processing speeds to expend less listening effort with the NR algorithm when listening to speech in background noise in the difficult listening condition. The NR algorithm reduced the listening effort adults with hearing loss must expend to understand speech in noise.

  11. Noise-Induced Hearing Impairment As An Occupational Risk Factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Noise pollution in workplaces poses serious health risks including that of cardiovascular disturbances and impairment of hearing. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of occupational noise on hearing among selected industrial workers in Benin City, Nigeria. Male and female workers (n=150) in sawmills, ...

  12. Performance, fatigue and stress in open-plan offices: The effects of noise and restoration on hearing impaired and normal hearing individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Jahncke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing impaired and normal hearing individuals were compared in two within-participant office noise conditions (high noise: 60 L Aeq and low noise: 30 L Aeq . Performance, subjective fatigue, and physiological stress were tested during working on a simulated open-plan office. We also tested two between-participants restoration conditions following the work period with high noise (nature movie or continued office noise. Participants with a hearing impairment (N = 20 were matched with normal hearing participants (N = 18 and undertook one practice session and two counterbalanced experimental sessions. In each experimental session they worked for two hours with basic memory and attention tasks. We also measured physiological stress indicators (cortisol and catecholamines and self-reports of mood and fatigue. The hearing impaired participants were more affected by high noise than the normal hearing participants, as shown by impaired performance for tasks that involve recall of semantic information. The hearing impaired participants were also more fatigued by high noise exposure than participants with normal hearing, and they tended to have higher stress hormone levels during the high noise compared to the low noise condition. Restoration with a movie increased performance and motivation for the normal hearing participants, while rest with continued noise did not. For the hearing impaired participants, continued noise during rest increased motivation and performance, while the movie did not. In summary, the impact of noise and restorative conditions varied with the hearing characteristics of the participants. The small sample size does however encourage caution when interpreting the results.

  13. Noise in strong laser-atom interactions: Phase telegraph noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberly, J.H.; Wodkiewicz, K.; Shore, B.W.

    1984-01-01

    We discuss strong laser-atom interactions that are subjected to jump-type (random telegraph) random-phase noise. Physically, the jumps may arise from laser fluctuations, from collisions of various kinds, or from other external forces. Our discussion is carried out in two stages. First, direct and partially heuristic calculations determine the laser spectrum and also give a third-order differential equation for the average inversion of a two-level atom on resonance. At this stage a number of general features of the interaction are able to be studied easily. The optical analog of motional narrowing, for example, is clearly predicted. Second, we show that the theory of generalized Poisson processes allows laser-atom interactions in the presence of random telegraph noise of all kinds (not only phase noise) to be treated systematically, by means of a master equation first used in the context of quantum optics by Burshtein. We use the Burshtein equation to obtain an exact expression for the two-level atom's steady-state resonance fluorescence spectrum, when the exciting laser exhibits phase telegraph noise. Some comparisons are made with results obtained from other noise models. Detailed treatments of the effects ofmly jumps, or as a model of finite laser bandwidth effects, in which the laser frequency exhibits random jumps. We show that these two types of frequency noise can be distinguished in light-scattering spectra. We also discuss examples which demonstrate both temporal and spectral motional narrowing, nonexponential correlations, and non-Lorentzian spectra. Its exact solubility in finite terms makes the frequency-telegraph noise model an attractive alternative to the white-noise Ornstein-Uhlenbeck frequency noise model which has been previously applied to laser-atom interactions

  14. Difficulty understanding speech in noise by the hearing impaired: underlying causes and technological solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Eric W; Yoho, Sarah E

    2016-08-01

    A primary complaint of hearing-impaired individuals involves poor speech understanding when background noise is present. Hearing aids and cochlear implants often allow good speech understanding in quiet backgrounds. But hearing-impaired individuals are highly noise intolerant, and existing devices are not very effective at combating background noise. As a result, speech understanding in noise is often quite poor. In accord with the significance of the problem, considerable effort has been expended toward understanding and remedying this issue. Fortunately, our understanding of the underlying issues is reasonably good. In sharp contrast, effective solutions have remained elusive. One solution that seems promising involves a single-microphone machine-learning algorithm to extract speech from background noise. Data from our group indicate that the algorithm is capable of producing vast increases in speech understanding by hearing-impaired individuals. This paper will first provide an overview of the speech-in-noise problem and outline why hearing-impaired individuals are so noise intolerant. An overview of our approach to solving this problem will follow.

  15. Jet noise reduction via dispersed phase injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greska, Brent; Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu; Arakeri, Vijay

    2001-11-01

    A recently developed hot jet aeroacoustics facility at FMRL,FAMU-FSU College of Engineering has been used to study the far field noise characteristics of hot supersonic jets as influenced by the injection of a dispersed phase with low mass loading.The measured SPL from a fully expanded Mach 1.36 hot jet shows a peak value of about 139 dB at 40 deg from the jet axis.By injecting atomized water,the SPL are reduced in the angular region of about 30 deg to 50 deg with the maximum reduction being about 2 dB at 40 deg.However,with the use of non atomized aqueous polymer solution as a dispersed phase the noise levels are reduced over all angular positions by at least 1 dB with the maximum reduction being about 3 dB at 40 deg.The injection of a dispersed phase readily kills the screech; the initial results show promise and optimization studies are underway to find methods of further noise reduction.

  16. Psycho acoustical Measures in Individuals with Congenital Visual Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kaushlendra; Thomas, Teenu; Bhat, Jayashree S; Ranjan, Rajesh

    2017-12-01

    In congenital visual impaired individuals one modality is impaired (visual modality) this impairment is compensated by other sensory modalities. There is evidence that visual impaired performed better in different auditory task like localization, auditory memory, verbal memory, auditory attention, and other behavioural tasks when compare to normal sighted individuals. The current study was aimed to compare the temporal resolution, frequency resolution and speech perception in noise ability in individuals with congenital visual impaired and normal sighted. Temporal resolution, frequency resolution, and speech perception in noise were measured using MDT, GDT, DDT, SRDT, and SNR50 respectively. Twelve congenital visual impaired participants with age range of 18 to 40 years were taken and equal in number with normal sighted participants. All the participants had normal hearing sensitivity with normal middle ear functioning. Individual with visual impairment showed superior threshold in MDT, SRDT and SNR50 as compared to normal sighted individuals. This may be due to complexity of the tasks; MDT, SRDT and SNR50 are complex tasks than GDT and DDT. Visual impairment showed superior performance in auditory processing and speech perception with complex auditory perceptual tasks.

  17. Long-term exposure to noise impairs cortical sound processing and attention control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujala, Teija; Shtyrov, Yury; Winkler, Istvan; Saher, Marieke; Tervaniemi, Mari; Sallinen, Mikael; Teder-Sälejärvi, Wolfgang; Alho, Kimmo; Reinikainen, Kalevi; Näätänen, Risto

    2004-11-01

    Long-term exposure to noise impairs human health, causing pathological changes in the inner ear as well as other anatomical and physiological deficits. Numerous individuals are daily exposed to excessive noise. However, there is a lack of systematic research on the effects of noise on cortical function. Here we report data showing that long-term exposure to noise has a persistent effect on central auditory processing and leads to concurrent behavioral deficits. We found that speech-sound discrimination was impaired in noise-exposed individuals, as indicated by behavioral responses and the mismatch negativity brain response. Furthermore, irrelevant sounds increased the distractibility of the noise-exposed subjects, which was shown by increased interference in task performance and aberrant brain responses. These results demonstrate that long-term exposure to noise has long-lasting detrimental effects on central auditory processing and attention control.

  18. Removing Background Noise with Phased Array Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podboy, Gary; Stephens, David

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a test conducted to determine how well microphone phased array processing software could pull an acoustic signal out of background noise. The array consisted of 24 microphones in an aerodynamic fairing designed to be mounted in-flow. The processing was conducted using Functional Beam forming software developed by Optinav combined with cross spectral matrix subtraction. The test was conducted in the free-jet of the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig at NASA GRC. The background noise was produced by the interaction of the free-jet flow with the solid surfaces in the flow. The acoustic signals were produced by acoustic drivers. The results show that the phased array processing was able to pull the acoustic signal out of the background noise provided the signal was no more than 20 dB below the background noise level measured using a conventional single microphone equipped with an aerodynamic forebody.

  19. Phase noise in RF and microwave amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudot, Rodolphe; Rubiola, Enrico

    2012-12-01

    Understanding amplifier phase noise is a critical issue in many fields of engineering and physics, such as oscillators, frequency synthesis, telecommunication, radar, and spectroscopy; in the emerging domain of microwave photonics; and in exotic fields, such as radio astronomy, particle accelerators, etc. Focusing on the two main types of base noise in amplifiers, white and flicker, the power spectral density of the random phase φ(t) is Sφ(f) = b(0) + b(-1)/f. White phase noise results from adding white noise to the RF spectrum in the carrier region. For a given RF noise level, b(0) is proportional to the reciprocal of the carrier power P(0). By contrast, flicker results from a near-dc 1/f noise-present in all electronic devices-which modulates the carrier through some parametric effect in the semiconductor. Thus, b(-1) is a parameter of the amplifier, constant in a wide range of P(0). The consequences are the following: Connecting m equal amplifiers in parallel, b(-1) is 1/m times that of one device. Cascading m equal amplifiers, b(-1) is m times that of one amplifier. Recirculating the signal in an amplifier so that the gain increases by a power of m (a factor of m in decibels) as a result of positive feedback (regeneration), we find that b(-1) is m(2) times that of the amplifier alone. The feedforward amplifier exhibits extremely low b(-1) because the carrier is ideally nulled at the input of its internal error amplifier. Starting with an extensive review of the literature, this article introduces a system-oriented model which describes the phase flickering. Several amplifier architectures (cascaded, parallel, etc.) are analyzed systematically, deriving the phase noise from the general model. There follow numerous measurements of amplifiers using different technologies, including some old samples, and in a wide frequency range (HF to microwaves), which validate the theory. In turn, theory and results provide design guidelines and give suggestions for CAD and

  20. Coupling of relative intensity noise and pathlength noise to the length measurement in the optical metrology system of LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittchen, Andreas; the LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a technology demonstration mission for the space-based gravitational wave observatory, LISA. It demonstrated that the performance requirements for the interferometric measurement of two test masses in free fall can be met. An important part of the data analysis is to identify the limiting noise sources. [1] This measurement is performed with heterodyne interferometry. The performance of this optical metrology system (OMS) at high frequencies is limited by sensing noise. One such noise source is Relative Intensity Noise (RIN). RIN is a property of the laser, and the photodiode current generated by the interferometer signal contains frequency dependant RIN. From this electric signal the phasemeter calculates the phase change and laser power, and the coupling of RIN into the measurement signal depends on the noise frequency. RIN at DC, at the heterodyne frequency and at two times the heterodyne frequency couples into the phase. Another important noise at high frequencies is path length noise. To reduce the impact this noise is suppressed with a control loop. Path length noise not suppressed will couple directly into the length measurement. The subtraction techniques of both noise sources depend on the phase difference between the reference signal and the measurement signal, and thus on the test mass position. During normal operations we position the test mass at the interferometric zero, which is optimal for noise subtraction purposes. This paper will show results from an in-flight experiment where the test mass position was changed to make the position dependant noise visible.

  1. Joseph F. Keithley Award For Advances in Measurement Science Talk: Precision Noise Measurements at Microwave and Optical Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Eugene

    2010-03-01

    The quest to detect Gravitational Waves resulted in a number of important developments in the fields of oscillator frequency stabilization and precision noise measurements. This was due to the realization of similarities between the principles of high sensitivity measurements of weak mechanical forces and phase/amplitude fluctuations of microwave signals. In both cases interferometric carrier suppression and low-noise amplification of the residual noise sidebands were the main factors behind significant improvements in the resolution of spectral measurements. In particular, microwave frequency discriminators with almost thermal noise limited sensitivity were constructed leading to microwave oscillators with more than 25dB lower phase noise than the previous state-of-the-art. High power solid-state microwave amplifiers offered further opportunity of oscillator phase noise reduction due to the increased energy stored in the high-Q resonator of the frequency discriminator. High power microwave oscillators with the phase noise spectral density close to -160dBc/Hz at 1kHz Fourier frequency have been recently demonstrated. The principles of interferometric signal processing have been applied to the study of noise phenomena in microwave components which were considered to be ``noise free''. This resulted in the first experimental evidence of phase fluctuations in microwave circulators. More efficient use of signal power enabled construction of the ``power recycled'' interferometers with spectral resolution of -200dBc/Hz at 1kHz Fourier frequency. This has been lately superseded by an order of magnitude with a waveguide interferometer due to its higher power recycling factor. A number of opto-electronic measurement systems were developed to characterize the fidelity of frequency transfer from the optical to the microwave domain. This included a new type of a phase detector capable of measuring phase fluctuations of the weak microwave signals extracted from the demodulated

  2. Optimal Colored Noise for Estimating Phase Response Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinaga, Kazuhiko; Miyata, Ryota; Aonishi, Toru

    2015-09-01

    The phase response curve (PRC) is an important measure representing the interaction between oscillatory elements. To understand synchrony in biological systems, many research groups have sought to measure PRCs directly from biological cells including neurons. Ermentrout et al. and Ota et al. showed that PRCs can be identified through measurement of white-noise spike-triggered averages. The disadvantage of this method is that one has to collect more than ten-thousand spikes to ensure the accuracy of the estimate. In this paper, to achieve a more accurate estimation of PRCs with a limited sample size, we use colored noise, which has recently drawn attention because of its unique effect on dynamical systems. We numerically show that there is an optimal colored noise to estimate PRCs in the most rigorous fashion.

  3. Monte Carlo Solutions for Blind Phase Noise Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çırpan Hakan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the use of Monte Carlo sampling methods for phase noise estimation on additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN channels. The main contributions of the paper are (i the development of a Monte Carlo framework for phase noise estimation, with special attention to sequential importance sampling and Rao-Blackwellization, (ii the interpretation of existing Monte Carlo solutions within this generic framework, and (iii the derivation of a novel phase noise estimator. Contrary to the ad hoc phase noise estimators that have been proposed in the past, the estimators considered in this paper are derived from solid probabilistic and performance-determining arguments. Computer simulations demonstrate that, on one hand, the Monte Carlo phase noise estimators outperform the existing estimators and, on the other hand, our newly proposed solution exhibits a lower complexity than the existing Monte Carlo solutions.

  4. Phased Array Noise Source Localization Measurements of an F404 Nozzle Plume at Both Full and Model Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podboy, Gary G.; Bridges, James E.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2010-01-01

    A 48-microphone planar phased array system was used to acquire jet noise source localization data on both a full-scale F404-GE-F400 engine and on a 1/4th scale model of a F400 series nozzle. The full-scale engine test data show the location of the dominant noise sources in the jet plume as a function of frequency for the engine in both baseline (no chevron) and chevron configurations. Data are presented for the engine operating both with and without afterburners. Based on lessons learned during this test, a set of recommendations are provided regarding how the phased array measurement system could be modified in order to obtain more useful acoustic source localization data on high-performance military engines in the future. The data obtained on the 1/4th scale F400 series nozzle provide useful insights regarding the full-scale engine jet noise source mechanisms, and document some of the differences associated with testing at model-scale versus fullscale.

  5. Phase noise of dispersion-managed solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiller, Elaine T.; Biondini, Gino

    2009-01-01

    We quantify noise-induced phase deviations of dispersion-managed solitons (DMS) in optical fiber communications and femtosecond lasers. We first develop a perturbation theory for the dispersion-managed nonlinear Schroedinger equation (DMNLSE) in order to compute the noise-induced mean and variance of the soliton parameters. We then use the analytical results to guide importance-sampled Monte Carlo simulations of the noise-driven DMNLSE. Comparison of these results with those from the original unaveraged governing equations confirms the validity of the DMNLSE as a model for many dispersion-managed systems and quantify the increased robustness of DMS with respect to noise-induced phase jitter.

  6. Measurements and simulations analysing the noise behaviour of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, T., E-mail: thomas.weber@physik.uni-erlangen.de [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, ECAP - Erlangen Center for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Bartl, P.; Durst, J. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, ECAP - Erlangen Center for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Haas, W. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, ECAP - Erlangen Center for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Pattern Recognition Lab, Martensstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Michel, T.; Ritter, A.; Anton, G. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, ECAP - Erlangen Center for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-08-21

    In the last decades, phase-contrast imaging using a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer is possible even with a low-brilliance X-ray source. With the potential of increasing the soft-tissue contrast, this method is on its way into medical imaging. For this purpose, the knowledge of the underlying physics of this technique is necessary. With this paper, we would like to contribute to the understanding of grating-based phase-contrast imaging by presenting results on measurements and simulations regarding the noise behaviour of the differential phases. These measurements were done using a microfocus X-ray tube with a hybrid, photon-counting, semiconductor Medipix2 detector. The additional simulations were performed by our in-house developed phase-contrast simulation tool 'SPHINX', combining both wave and particle contributions of the simulated photons. The results obtained by both of these methods show the same behaviour. Increasing the number of photons leads to a linear decrease of the standard deviation of the phase. The number of used phase steps has no influence on the standard deviation, if the total number of photons is held constant. Furthermore, the probability density function (pdf) of the reconstructed differential phases was analysed. It turned out that the so-called von Mises distribution is the physically correct pdf, which was also confirmed by measurements. This information advances the understanding of grating-based phase-contrast imaging and can be used to improve image quality.

  7. Phase-dependent noise in Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Forrest; Peotta, Sebastiano; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2018-03-01

    In addition to the usual superconducting current, Josephson junctions (JJs) support a phase-dependent conductance related to the retardation effect of tunneling quasi-particles. This introduces a dissipative current with a memory-resistive (memristive) character that should also affect the current noise. By means of the microscopic theory of tunnel junctions we compute the complete current autocorrelation function of a Josephson tunnel junction and show that this memristive component gives rise to both a previously noted phase-dependent thermal noise, and an undescribed non-stationary, phase-dependent dynamic noise. As experiments are approaching ranges in which these effects may be observed, we examine the form and magnitude of these processes. Their phase dependence can be realized experimentally as a hysteresis effect and may be used to probe defects present in JJ based qubits and in other superconducting electronics applications.

  8. Chaos Noise on Phase of Van Der Pol Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian He Huang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Phase noise is the most important parameter in many oscillators. In this paper, based on nonlinear stochastic differential equation for phase noise analysis approach is proposed. And then discusses and compares the influence of two different sources of noise in the Van Der Pol oscillator adopted this method. One source of noise is a white noise process, which is a genuinely stochastic process; the other source of noise is actually a deterministic system, which exhibits chaotic behavior in some regions. The behavior of the oscillator under different conditions is investigated numerically. It is shown that the phase noise of the oscillator is affected more by noise arising from chaos than by noise arising from the genuine stochastic process at the same noise intensity.

  9. Phase noise and frequency stability in oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Rubiola, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Presenting a comprehensive account of oscillator phase noise and frequency stability, this practical text is both mathematically rigorous and accessible. An in-depth treatment of the noise mechanism is given, describing the oscillator as a physical system, and showing that simple general laws govern the stability of a large variety of oscillators differing in technology and frequency range. Inevitably, special attention is given to amplifiers, resonators, delay lines, feedback, and flicker (1/f) noise. The reverse engineering of oscillators based on phase-noise spectra is also covered, and end-of-chapter exercises are given. Uniquely, numerous practical examples are presented, including case studies taken from laboratory prototypes and commercial oscillators, which allow the oscillator internal design to be understood by analyzing its phase-noise spectrum. Based on tutorials given by the author at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, international IEEE meetings, and in industry, this is a useful reference for acade...

  10. Berry phase and shot noise for spin-polarized and entangled electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Pei; Tang Weihua; Lu Dinghui; Jiang Lixia; Zhao Xuean

    2007-01-01

    Shot noise for entangled and spin-polarized states in a four-probe geometric setup has been studied by adding two rotating magnetic fields in an incoming channel. Our results show that the noise power oscillates as the magnetic fields vary. The singlet, entangled triplet and polarized states can be distinguished by adjusting the magnetic fields. The Berry phase can be derived by measuring the shot noise power

  11. Development and Calibration of a Field-Deployable Microphone Phased Array for Propulsion and Airframe Noise Flyover Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Culliton, William G.; McSwain, Robert G.; Ravetta, Patricio A.; Johns, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    A new aeroacoustic measurement capability has been developed consisting of a large channelcount, field-deployable microphone phased array suitable for airframe noise flyover measurements for a range of aircraft types and scales. The array incorporates up to 185 hardened, weather-resistant sensors suitable for outdoor use. A custom 4-mA current loop receiver circuit with temperature compensation was developed to power the sensors over extended cable lengths with minimal degradation of the signal to noise ratio and frequency response. Extensive laboratory calibrations and environmental testing of the sensors were conducted to verify the design's performance specifications. A compact data system combining sensor power, signal conditioning, and digitization was assembled for use with the array. Complementing the data system is a robust analysis system capable of near real-time presentation of beamformed and deconvolved contour plots and integrated spectra obtained from array data acquired during flyover passes. Additional instrumentation systems needed to process the array data were also assembled. These include a commercial weather station and a video monitoring / recording system. A detailed mock-up of the instrumentation suite (phased array, weather station, and data processor) was performed in the NASA Langley Acoustic Development Laboratory to vet the system performance. The first deployment of the system occurred at Finnegan Airfield at Fort A.P. Hill where the array was utilized to measure the vehicle noise from a number of sUAS (small Unmanned Aerial System) aircraft. A unique in-situ calibration method for the array microphones using a hovering aerial sound source was attempted for the first time during the deployment.

  12. Hearing Impairment Caused by Occupational Noise | Mets | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occupational noise-induced hearing impairment is an insidiously developing injury which only becomes apparent when it affects the hearing of conversational speech. As no remedy is possible, prevention is the only answer. In view of the impending legislation in South Africa a review of the literature is presented. This is ...

  13. Current-phase relations and noise in rf biased SQUIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackel, L.D.; Clark, T.D.; Buhrman, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was made of the effect of the weak link current-phase relation on noise in rf biased SQUIDs. Non-sinusoidal current-phase relations were observed in various weak links, and these non-sinusoidal relations were correlated with significantly increased intrinsic noise in the SQUID ring. The current-phase relation was also found to affect the amplitude of the rf SQUID ring dissipation. The result of an rf SQUID system noise analysis shows that, due to increased intrinsic noise and reduced ring dissipation, the minimum attainable noise for a SQUID ring having a very non-sinusoidal current-phase relation is considerably greater than for a ring with a sinusoidal relation

  14. Hearing impairment among workers exposed to excessive levels of noise in ginning industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalesh J Dube

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotton ginning workers have a risk of hearing loss due to excessive noise levels at the workplace environment. In this study, estimates of typical sound levels prevailing at the workplace environment and its effects on hearing ability of the exposed workers were made among cotton ginning workers. Data on self-reported health status was collected by a questionnaire survey at 10 cotton ginning industries located at Jalgaon district of Maharashtra state, India. The cotton ginning workers were exposed to continuous noise levels between 89 and 106 dBA. The hearing ability of the subjects was accessed by pure tone audiometry. The results of audiometry show mild, moderate and moderately severe degree of hearing impairment among the cotton ginning workers. The data generated during the study show that hearing loss was significantly associated with period of exposure to the workplace noise (P <0.0001. The prevalence of audiometric hearing impairment defined as a threshold average greater than 25 dB hearing level was 96% for binaural low-frequency average, 97% for binaural mid frequency average and 94% for binaural high-frequency average in the cotton ginning workers. We recommend the compulsory use of personal protective equipment like ear plug by the cotton ginning workers at the workplace environment. A regular maintenance of ginning and pressing machineries will avoid the emission of excessive noise at the workplace environment of cotton gins. A regular periodic medical examination is necessary to measure the impact of workplace noise on the health of cotton ginning workers.

  15. Phase measurement of cognitive impairment specific to radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Carol L; Shera, David M; Lustig, Robert A; Phillips, Peter C

    2012-07-01

    Memory impairment is an early-delayed effect of radiotherapy (RT). The prospective longitudinal measurement of the cognitive phase effects from RT was conducted on treated and untreated brain tumor patients. The study design investigated semantic vs. perceptual and visual vs. verbal memory to determine the most disease-specific measure of RT-related changes and understanding of the neurotoxicity from RT to the brain. Tests of memory that had previously shown RT-related phasic changes were compared with experimental tests of memory to test hypotheses about cognition targeted to the neural toxicity of RT. The results from 41 irradiated and 29 nonirradiated patients with low-grade, supratentorial tumors were analyzed. The methods controlled for comorbid white matter risk, recurrence, interval after treatment, and age (18-69 years). The effects were examined before RT and at three points after RT to 1 year using a mixed effects model that included interval, group, surgical status, medication use, practice, and individual random effects. Four new tests of memory and other candidate cognitive tests were investigated, and a post hoc analysis of a comprehensive battery of tests was performed to identify the cognitive processes most specific to RT. The RT effects on memory were identified in the treated group only; among the new tests of memory and the complete neurocognitive battery, the RT effects were significant only for delayed recall (p measurement that is brief but specific to neural mechanisms is effective and feasible for studies of RT damage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Design and Characterization of a 5.2 GHz/2.4 GHz Fractional- Frequency Synthesizer for Low-Phase Noise Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Foster F

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a complete noise analysis of a -based fractional- phase-locked loop (PLL based frequency synthesizer. Rigorous analytical and empirical formulas have been given to model various phase noise sources and spurious components and to predict their impact on the overall synthesizer noise performance. These formulas have been applied to an integrated multiband WLAN frequency synthesizer RFIC to demonstrate noise minimization through judicious choice of loop parameters. Finally, predicted and measured phase jitter showed good agreement. For an LO frequency of 4.3 GHz, predicted and measured phase noise was rms and rms, respectively.

  17. Phase Noise Tolerant QPSK Receiver Using Phase Sensitive Wavelength Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Ros, Francesco; Xu, Jing; Lei, Lei

    2013-01-01

    A novel QPSK receiver based on a phase noise reduction pre-stage exploiting PSA in a HNLF and balanced detection is presented. Receiver sensitivity improvement over a conventional balanced receiver is demonstrated.......A novel QPSK receiver based on a phase noise reduction pre-stage exploiting PSA in a HNLF and balanced detection is presented. Receiver sensitivity improvement over a conventional balanced receiver is demonstrated....

  18. Real Time Phase Noise Meter Based on a Digital Signal Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angrisani, Leopoldo; D'Arco, Mauro; Greenhall, Charles A.; Schiano Lo Morille, Rosario

    2006-01-01

    A digital signal-processing meter for phase noise measurement on sinusoidal signals is dealt with. It enlists a special hardware architecture, made up of a core digital signal processor connected to a data acquisition board, and takes advantage of a quadrature demodulation-based measurement scheme, already proposed by the authors. Thanks to an efficient measurement process and an optimized implementation of its fundamental stages, the proposed meter succeeds in exploiting all hardware resources in such an effective way as to gain high performance and real-time operation. For input frequencies up to some hundreds of kilohertz, the meter is capable both of updating phase noise power spectrum while seamlessly capturing the analyzed signal into its memory, and granting as good frequency resolution as few units of hertz.

  19. Equalization Enhanced Phase Noise in Coherent Optical Systems with Digital Pre- and Post-Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Kakkar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present an extensive study of equalization enhanced phase noise (EEPN in coherent optical system for all practical electronic dispersion compensation configurations. It is shown that there are only eight practicable all-electronic impairment mitigation configurations. The non-linear and time variant analysis reveals that the existence and the cause of EEPN depend on the digital signal processing (DSP schemes. There are three schemes that in principle do not cause EEPN. Analysis further reveals the statistical equivalence of the remaining five system configurations resulting in EEPN. In three of them, EEPN is due to phase noise of the transmitting laser, while in the remaining two, EEPN is caused by the local oscillator. We provide a simple look-up table for the system designer to make an informative decision regarding practicable configuration choice and design.

  20. Linear phase formation by noise simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazi, G.; Por, G.

    1998-01-01

    A new simulation technique is introduced to study noise propagation in nuclear power plants. Noise processes are considered as time functions, and the dynamic behaviour of the reactor core is modelled by ordinary and partial differential equations. The equations are solved by numerical methods and the results (time series) are considered as virtual measurements. The auto power spectral density and the cross power spectral density of these time series are calculated by traditional techniques. The spectrum obtained is compared with the analytical solution to validate the new simulation approach. After validation, the simulator is expanded to investigate some physical phenomena which are unmanageable by analytical calculations. Propagating disturbances are studied, and the effect of non-flat flux shape on phase curves is demonstrated. Numerical problems also are briefly discussed. (author)

  1. Spectral Weighting Functions for Single-symbol Phase-noise Specifications in OFDM Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, F.W.; Schiphorst, Roelof; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2003-01-01

    For the specification of phase-noise requirements for the front-end of a HiperLAN/2 system we investigated available literature on the subject. Literature differed in several aspects. One aspect is in the type of phase-noise used (Wiener phase-noise or small-angle phase noise). A Wiener phase-noise

  2. Two-receiver measurements of phase velocity: cross-validation of ambient-noise and earthquake-based observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kästle, Emanuel D.; Soomro, Riaz; Weemstra, C.; Boschi, Lapo; Meier, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Phase velocities derived from ambient-noise cross-correlation are compared with phase velocities calculated from cross-correlations of waveform recordings of teleseismic earthquakes whose epicentres are approximately on the station–station great circle. The comparison is conducted both for Rayleigh

  3. Phase noise mitigation of QPSK signal utilizing phase-locked multiplexing of signal harmonics and amplitude saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajerin-Ariaei, Amirhossein; Ziyadi, Morteza; Chitgarha, Mohammad Reza; Almaiman, Ahmed; Cao, Yinwen; Shamee, Bishara; Yang, Jeng-Yuan; Akasaka, Youichi; Sekiya, Motoyoshi; Takasaka, Shigehiro; Sugizaki, Ryuichi; Touch, Joseph D; Tur, Moshe; Langrock, Carsten; Fejer, Martin M; Willner, Alan E

    2015-07-15

    We demonstrate an all-optical phase noise mitigation scheme based on the generation, delay, and coherent summation of higher order signal harmonics. The signal, its third-order harmonic, and their corresponding delayed variant conjugates create a staircase phase-transfer function that quantizes the phase of quadrature-phase-shift-keying (QPSK) signal to mitigate phase noise. The signal and the harmonics are automatically phase-locked multiplexed, avoiding the need for phase-based feedback loop and injection locking to maintain coherency. The residual phase noise converts to amplitude noise in the quantizer stage, which is suppressed by parametric amplification in the saturation regime. Phase noise reduction of ∼40% and OSNR-gain of ∼3  dB at BER 10(-3) are experimentally demonstrated for 20- and 30-Gbaud QPSK input signals.

  4. Speech intelligibility of normal listeners and persons with impaired hearing in traffic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniansson, G.; Peterson, Y.

    1983-10-01

    Speech intelligibility (PB words) in traffic-like noise was investigated in a laboratory situation simulating three common listening situations, indoors at 1 and 4 m and outdoors at 1 m. The maximum noise levels still permitting 75% intelligibility of PB words in these three listening situations were also defined. A total of 269 persons were examined. Forty-six had normal hearing, 90 a presbycusis-type hearing loss, 95 a noise-induced hearing loss and 38 a conductive hearing loss. In the indoor situation the majority of the groups with impaired hearing retained good speech intelligibility in 40 dB(A) masking noise. Lowering the noise level to less than 40 dB(A) resulted in a minor, usually insignificant, improvement in speech intelligibility. Listeners with normal hearing maintained good speech intelligibility in the outdoor listening situation at noise levels up to 60 dB(A), without lip-reading (i.e., using non-auditory information). For groups with impaired hearing due to age and/or noise, representing 8% of the population in Sweden, the noise level outdoors had to be lowered to less than 50 dB(A), in order to achieve good speech intelligibility at 1 m without lip-reading.

  5. The prediction of rotor rotational noise using measured fluctuating blade loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosier, R. N.; Pegg, R. J.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1974-01-01

    In tests conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center Helicopter Rotor Test Facility, simultaneous measurements of the high-frequency fluctuating aerodynamic blade loads and far-field radiated noise were made on a full-scale, nontranslating rotor system. After their characteristics were determined, the measured blade loads were used in an existing theory to predict the far-field rotational noise. A comparison of the calculated and measured rotational noise is presented with specific attention given to the effect of blade loading coefficients, chordwise loading distributions, blade loading phases, and observer azimuthal position on the predictions.

  6. Phase Measurement of Cognitive Impairment Specific to Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, Carol L.; Shera, David M.; Lustig, Robert A.; Phillips, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Memory impairment is an early-delayed effect of radiotherapy (RT). The prospective longitudinal measurement of the cognitive phase effects from RT was conducted on treated and untreated brain tumor patients. The study design investigated semantic vs. perceptual and visual vs. verbal memory to determine the most disease-specific measure of RT-related changes and understanding of the neurotoxicity from RT to the brain. Methods and Materials: Tests of memory that had previously shown RT-related phasic changes were compared with experimental tests of memory to test hypotheses about cognition targeted to the neural toxicity of RT. The results from 41 irradiated and 29 nonirradiated patients with low-grade, supratentorial tumors were analyzed. The methods controlled for comorbid white matter risk, recurrence, interval after treatment, and age (18–69 years). The effects were examined before RT and at three points after RT to 1 year using a mixed effects model that included interval, group, surgical status, medication use, practice, and individual random effects. Four new tests of memory and other candidate cognitive tests were investigated, and a post hoc analysis of a comprehensive battery of tests was performed to identify the cognitive processes most specific to RT. Results: The RT effects on memory were identified in the treated group only; among the new tests of memory and the complete neurocognitive battery, the RT effects were significant only for delayed recall (p < 0.009) and interval to recognize (p < 0.002). Tumor location was not related to the treatment effect. Memory decline was specific to retrieval of semantic memories; a double dissociation of semantic from perceptual visual memory was demonstrated in the RT group. Conclusions: These results implicate memory dependent on the semantic cortex and the hippocampal memory system. A cognitive measurement that is brief but specific to neural mechanisms is effective and feasible for studies of RT

  7. Phase Measurement of Cognitive Impairment Specific to Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Carol L., E-mail: armstrongc@email.chop.edu [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neuro-Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Shera, David M. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lustig, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Phillips, Peter C. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neurology and Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Memory impairment is an early-delayed effect of radiotherapy (RT). The prospective longitudinal measurement of the cognitive phase effects from RT was conducted on treated and untreated brain tumor patients. The study design investigated semantic vs. perceptual and visual vs. verbal memory to determine the most disease-specific measure of RT-related changes and understanding of the neurotoxicity from RT to the brain. Methods and Materials: Tests of memory that had previously shown RT-related phasic changes were compared with experimental tests of memory to test hypotheses about cognition targeted to the neural toxicity of RT. The results from 41 irradiated and 29 nonirradiated patients with low-grade, supratentorial tumors were analyzed. The methods controlled for comorbid white matter risk, recurrence, interval after treatment, and age (18-69 years). The effects were examined before RT and at three points after RT to 1 year using a mixed effects model that included interval, group, surgical status, medication use, practice, and individual random effects. Four new tests of memory and other candidate cognitive tests were investigated, and a post hoc analysis of a comprehensive battery of tests was performed to identify the cognitive processes most specific to RT. Results: The RT effects on memory were identified in the treated group only; among the new tests of memory and the complete neurocognitive battery, the RT effects were significant only for delayed recall (p < 0.009) and interval to recognize (p < 0.002). Tumor location was not related to the treatment effect. Memory decline was specific to retrieval of semantic memories; a double dissociation of semantic from perceptual visual memory was demonstrated in the RT group. Conclusions: These results implicate memory dependent on the semantic cortex and the hippocampal memory system. A cognitive measurement that is brief but specific to neural mechanisms is effective and feasible for studies of RT damage.

  8. Noise in NC-AFM measurements with significant tip–sample interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannis Lübbe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency shift noise in non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM imaging and spectroscopy consists of thermal noise and detection system noise with an additional contribution from amplitude noise if there are significant tip–sample interactions. The total noise power spectral density DΔf(fm is, however, not just the sum of these noise contributions. Instead its magnitude and spectral characteristics are determined by the strongly non-linear tip–sample interaction, by the coupling between the amplitude and tip–sample distance control loops of the NC-AFM system as well as by the characteristics of the phase locked loop (PLL detector used for frequency demodulation. Here, we measure DΔf(fm for various NC-AFM parameter settings representing realistic measurement conditions and compare experimental data to simulations based on a model of the NC-AFM system that includes the tip–sample interaction. The good agreement between predicted and measured noise spectra confirms that the model covers the relevant noise contributions and interactions. Results yield a general understanding of noise generation and propagation in the NC-AFM and provide a quantitative prediction of noise for given experimental parameters. We derive strategies for noise-optimised imaging and spectroscopy and outline a full optimisation procedure for the instrumentation and control loops.

  9. Noise Measurement and Frequency Analysis of Commercially Available Noisy Toys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Jalaie

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Noise measurement and frequency analysis of commercially available noisy toys were the main purposes of the study. Materials and Methods: 181 noisy toys commonly found in toy stores in different zones of Tehran were selected and categorized into 10 groups. Noise measurement were done at 2, 25, and 50 cm from toys in dBA. The noisiest toy of each group was frequency analyzed in octave bands. Results: The highest and the lowest intensity levels belonged to the gun (mean=112 dBA and range of 100-127 dBA and to the rattle-box (mean=84 dBA and range of 74-95 dBA, respectively. Noise intensity levels significantly decreased with increasing distance except for two toys. Noise frequency analysis indicated energy in effective hearing frequencies. Most of the toys energies were in the middle and high frequency region. Conclusion: As intensity level of the toys is considerable, mostly more than 90 dBA, and also their energy exist in the middle and high frequency region, toys should be considered as a cause of the hearing impairment.

  10. An excess noise measurement system for weak responsivity avalanche photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Dimler, Simon J.; Baharuddin, Aina N. A. P.; Green, James E.; David, John P. R.

    2018-06-01

    A system for measuring, with reduced photocurrent, the excess noise associated with the gain in avalanche photodiodes (APDs), using a transimpedance amplifier front-end and based on phase-sensitive detection is described. The system can reliably measure the excess noise power of devices, even when the un-multiplied photocurrent is low (~10 nA). This is more than one order of magnitude better than previously reported systems and represents a significantly better noise signal to noise ratio. This improvement in performance has been achieved by increasing the value of the feedback resistor and reducing the op-amp bandwidth. The ability to characterise APD performance with such low photocurrents enables the use of low power light sources such as light emitting diode rather than lasers to investigate the APD noise performance.

  11. A low-phase-noise wide-band CMOS quadrature VCO for multi-standard RF front-ends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fard, Ali; Andreani, Pietro

    2005-01-01

    structures. The QVCO is compared to a double cross-coupled LC-tank differential oscillator, both in theory and experiments, for evaluation of its phase noise, providing a good insight into its performance. The measured data displays up to 2 dBc/Hz lower phase noise in the 1/f2 region for the QVCO, when...

  12. Cognitive skills and the effect of noise on perceived effort in employees with aided hearing impairment and normal hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Hua

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the following study was to examine the relationship between working memory capacity (WMC, executive functions (EFs and perceived effort (PE after completing a work-related task in quiet and in noise in employees with aided hearing impairment (HI and normal hearing. The study sample consisted of 20 hearing-impaired and 20 normally hearing participants. Measures of hearing ability, WMC and EFs were tested prior to performing a work-related task in quiet and in simulated traffic noise. PE of the work-related task was also measured. Analysis of variance was used to analyze within- and between-group differences in cognitive skills, performance on the work-related task and PE. The presence of noise yielded a significantly higher PE for both groups. However, no significant group differences were observed in WMC, EFs, PE and performance in the work-related task. Interestingly, significant negative correlations were only found between PE in the noise condition and the ability to update information for both groups. In summary, noise generates a significantly higher PE and brings explicit processing capacity into play, irrespective of hearing. This suggest that increased PE involves other factors such as type of task that is to be performed, performance in the cognitive skill required solving the task at hand and whether noise is present. We therefore suggest that special consideration in hearing care should be made to the individual′s prerequisites on these factors in the labor market.

  13. Measurement of Noise in Supercapacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Szewczyk Arkadiusz

    2017-01-01

    A developed method and measurement setup for measurement of noise generated in a supercapacitor is presented. The requirements for noise data recording are considered and correlated with working modes of supercapacitors. An example of results of low-frequency noise measurements in commercially available supercapacitors are presented. The ability of flicker noise measurements suggests that they can be used to assess quality of tested supercapacitors.

  14. Measurement of Noise in Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szewczyk Arkadiusz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A developed method and measurement setup for measurement of noise generated in a supercapacitor is presented. The requirements for noise data recording are considered and correlated with working modes of supercapacitors. An example of results of low-frequency noise measurements in commercially available supercapacitors are presented. The ability of flicker noise measurements suggests that they can be used to assess quality of tested supercapacitors.

  15. Debuncher Momentum Cooling Systems Signal to Noise Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; /Fermilab

    2001-12-18

    The Debuncher Momentum cooling systems were carefully measured for signal to noise. It was observed that cooling performance was not optimum. Closer inspection shows that the installed front-end bandpass filters are wider than the pickup response. (The original filters were specified to be wider so that none of the available bandwidth would be clipped.) The end result is excess noise is amplified and passed onto the kickers unimpeded, hence, reducing the achievable system gain. From this data, new filters should be designed to improve performance. New system bandwidths are specified on the data figures. Also included are the transfer function measurements that clearly show adjacent band response. In band 4 upper, the adjacent lobes are strong and out of phase. This is also degrading the system performance. The correlation between spectrum analyzer signal to noise and network analyzer system transfer functions is very strong. The table below has a calculation of expected improvement of front noise reduction by means of building new front-end bandpass filters. The calculation is based on a flat input noise spectrum and is a linear estimation of improvement. The listed 3dB bandwidths of the original filters are from measured data. The expected bandwidth is taken from the linear spectrum analyzer plots and is closer to a 10 dB bandwidth making the percentage improvement conservative. The signal to noise measurements are taken with circulating pbars in the Debuncher. One cooling system was measured at a time with all others off. Beam currents are below ten microamperes.

  16. Debuncher Momentum Cooling Systems Signal to Noise Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.

    2001-01-01

    The Debuncher Momentum cooling systems were carefully measured for signal to noise. It was observed that cooling performance was not optimum. Closer inspection shows that the installed front-end bandpass filters are wider than the pickup response. (The original filters were specified to be wider so that none of the available bandwidth would be clipped.) The end result is excess noise is amplified and passed onto the kickers unimpeded, hence, reducing the achievable system gain. From this data, new filters should be designed to improve performance. New system bandwidths are specified on the data figures. Also included are the transfer function measurements that clearly show adjacent band response. In band 4 upper, the adjacent lobes are strong and out of phase. This is also degrading the system performance. The correlation between spectrum analyzer signal to noise and network analyzer system transfer functions is very strong. The table below has a calculation of expected improvement of front noise reduction by means of building new front-end bandpass filters. The calculation is based on a flat input noise spectrum and is a linear estimation of improvement. The listed 3dB bandwidths of the original filters are from measured data. The expected bandwidth is taken from the linear spectrum analyzer plots and is closer to a 10 dB bandwidth making the percentage improvement conservative. The signal to noise measurements are taken with circulating pbars in the Debuncher. One cooling system was measured at a time with all others off. Beam currents are below ten microamperes.

  17. Experimental Results on the Level Crossing Intervals of the Phase of Sine Wave Plus Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Neji; Munakata, Tsutomu; Mimaki, Tadashi

    1993-03-01

    Experimental study was made on the level crossing intervals of a phase process of a sine wave plus narrow-band Gaussian noise. Since successive level crossings of phase do not necessarily occur alternately in the upward and downward direction due to the phase jump beyond 2π, the usual definitions of the probability densities of the level crossing intervals for continuous random processes are not applicable in the case of the phase process. Therefore, the probability densities of level crossing intervals of phase process are newly defined. Measurements of these densities were performed for noise having lowpass spectra of Gaussian and 7th order Butterworth types. Results are given for various values of the signal-to-noise power ratio and of the crossing level, and compared with corresponding approximation developed under the assumption of quasi-independence. The validity of the assumption depends on the spectrum shape of the noise.

  18. Effect of simultaneous exposure to occupational noise and cigarette smoke on binaural hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Mohammadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has been postulated that cigarette smoking can aggravate noise-induced hearing loss. In this study, we aimed to assess the effect of concurrent exposure to cigarette smoke and occupational noise on binaural hearing impairment (BHI. In an analytic study on the workers of a large wagon manufacturing company in 2007, 622 male workers (252 smokers and 370 non-smokers, matched for other variables participated and their BHI was compared. BHI was significantly higher in smokers than in non-smokers (odds ratio= 5.6, P < 0.001, 95% CI =3.4-9.4. Logistic regression confirmed this significant difference as well, and showed a direct relationship between the amount of BHI and pack/years of smoking. Cigarette smoking accompanied by exposure to workplace noise may play a role in causing binaural hearing impairment, so giving up or decreasing the amount of smoking may prevent or at least delay binaural hearing impairment, and eventually reduce its compensation costs.

  19. High phase noise tolerant pilot-tone-aided DP-QPSK optical communication systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xu; Pang, Xiaodan; Deng, Lei

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we experimentally demonstrate a novel, high phase-noise tolerant, optical dual polarization (DP) quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) communication system based on pilot-tone-aided phase noise cancellation (PNC) algorithm. Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) with approx......In this paper we experimentally demonstrate a novel, high phase-noise tolerant, optical dual polarization (DP) quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) communication system based on pilot-tone-aided phase noise cancellation (PNC) algorithm. Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs...

  20. Design and Characterization of a 5.2 GHz/2.4 GHz ΣΔ Fractional- N Frequency Synthesizer for Low-Phase Noise Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a complete noise analysis of a ΣΔ -based fractional- N phase-locked loop (PLL based frequency synthesizer. Rigorous analytical and empirical formulas have been given to model various phase noise sources and spurious components and to predict their impact on the overall synthesizer noise performance. These formulas have been applied to an integrated multiband WLAN frequency synthesizer RFIC to demonstrate noise minimization through judicious choice of loop parameters. Finally, predicted and measured phase jitter showed good agreement. For an LO frequency of 4.3 GHz, predicted and measured phase noise was 0.50 ° rms and 0.535 ° rms, respectively.

  1. Multipurpose exciter with low phase noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, B.; Le, D.

    1989-01-01

    Results of an effort to develop a lower-cost exciter with high stability, low phase noise, and controllable phase and frequency for use in Deep Space Network and Goldstone Solar System Radar applications are discussed. Included is a discussion of the basic concept, test results, plans, and concerns.

  2. Detection threshold for sound distortion resulting from noise reduction in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brons, Inge; Dreschler, Wouter A; Houben, Rolph

    2014-09-01

    Hearing-aid noise reduction should reduce background noise, but not disturb the target speech. This objective is difficult because noise reduction suffers from a trade-off between the amount of noise removed and signal distortion. It is unknown if this important trade-off differs between normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners. This study separated the negative effect of noise reduction (distortion) from the positive effect (reduction of noise) to allow the measurement of the detection threshold for noise-reduction (NR) distortion. Twelve NH subjects and 12 subjects with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss participated in this study. The detection thresholds for distortion were determined using an adaptive procedure with a three-interval, two-alternative forced-choice paradigm. Different levels of distortion were obtained by changing the maximum amount of noise reduction. Participants were also asked to indicate their preferred NR strength. The detection threshold for overall distortion was higher for HI subjects than for NH subjects, suggesting that stronger noise reduction can be applied for HI listeners without affecting the perceived sound quality. However, the preferred NR strength of HI listeners was closer to their individual detection threshold for distortion than in NH listeners. This implies that HI listeners tolerate fewer audible distortions than NH listeners.

  3. Laser Frequency Noise in Coherent Optical Systems: Spectral Regimes and Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, Aditya; Rodrigo Navarro, Jaime; Schatz, Richard; Pang, Xiaodan; Ozolins, Oskars; Udalcovs, Aleksejs; Louchet, Hadrien; Popov, Sergei; Jacobsen, Gunnar

    2017-04-12

    Coherent communication networks are based on the ability to use multiple dimensions of the lightwave together with electrical domain compensation of transmission impairments. Electrical-domain dispersion compensation (EDC) provides many advantages such as network flexibility and enhanced fiber nonlinearity tolerance, but makes the system more susceptible to laser frequency noise (FN), e.g. to the local oscillator FN in systems with post-reception EDC. Although this problem has been extensively studied, statistically, for links assuming lasers with white-FN, many questions remain unanswered. Particularly, the influence of a realistic non-white FN-spectrum due to e.g., the presence of 1/f-flicker and carrier induced noise remains elusive and a statistical analysis becomes insufficient. Here we provide an experimentally validated theory for coherent optical links with lasers having general non-white FN-spectrum and EDC. The fundamental reason of the increased susceptibility is shown to be FN-induced symbol displacement that causes timing jitter and/or inter/intra symbol interference. We establish that different regimes of the laser FN-spectrum cause a different set of impairments. The influence of the impairments due to some regimes can be reduced by optimizing the corresponding mitigation algorithms, while other regimes cause irretrievable impairments. Theoretical boundaries of these regimes and corresponding criteria applicable to system/laser design are provided.

  4. Identification and Reduction of Turbomachinery Noise, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Communities near airports are often exposed to high noise levels due to low flying aircraft in the takeoff and landing phases of flight. Propulsion source noise is...

  5. A transimpedance amplifier for excess noise measurements of high junction capacitance avalanche photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, James E; David, John P R; Tozer, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a novel and versatile system for measuring excess noise and multiplication in avalanche photodiodes (APDs), using a bipolar junction transistor based transimpedance amplifier front-end and based on phase-sensitive detection, which permits accurate measurement in the presence of a high dark current. The system can reliably measure the excess noise factor of devices with capacitance up to 5 nF. This system has been used to measure thin, large area Si pin APDs and the resulting data are in good agreement with measurements of the same devices obtained from a different noise measurement system which will be reported separately. (paper)

  6. Experimental Investigations of Noise Control in Planetary Gear Set by Phasing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Gawande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Now a days reduction of gear noise and resulting vibrations has received much attention of the researchers. The internal excitation caused by the variation in tooth mesh stiffness is a key factor in causing vibration. Therefore to reduce gear noise and vibrations several techniques have been proposed in recent years. In this research the experimental work is carried out to study the effect of planet phasing on noise and subsequent resulting vibrations of Nylon-6 planetary gear drive. For this purpose experimental set-up was built and trials were conducted for two different arrangements (i.e., with phasing and without phasing and it is observed that the noise level and resulting vibrations were reduced by planet phasing arrangement. So from the experimental results it is observed that by applying the meshing phase difference one can reduce planetary gear set noise and vibrations.

  7. Noise measurements on proximity effect bridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, S.K.; Mercereau, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    Audio frequency noise density measurements were performed on weakly superconducting proximity effect bridges on using a cooled transformer and room temperature low noise preamplifier. The noise temperature of the measuring system is approximately 4 0 K for a 0.9 Ω resistor. Noise density was measured as a function of bias current and temperature for the bridges. Excess noise above that expected from Johnson noise for a resistor equal to the dynamic resistance of the bridges was observed in the region near the critical current of the device. At high currents compared to the critical current, the noise density closely approaches that given by Johnson noise

  8. Study on phase noise induced by 1/f noise of the modulator drive circuit in high-sensitivity fiber optic gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fei; Jin, Jing; Li, Yong; Zhang, Chunxi

    2018-05-01

    The contribution of modulator drive circuit noise as a 1/f noise source to the output noise of the high-sensitivity interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) was studied here. A noise model of closed-loop IFOG was built. By applying the simulated 1/f noise sequence into the model, a gyroscope output data series was acquired, and the corresponding power spectrum density (PSD) and the Allan variance curve were calculated to analyze the noise characteristic. The PSD curve was in the spectral shape of 1/f, which verifies that the modulator drive circuit induced a low frequency 1/f phase noise into the gyroscope. The random walk coefficient (RWC), a standard metric to characterize the noise performance of the IFOG, was calculated according to the Allan variance curve. Using an operational amplifier with an input 1/f noise of 520 nV/√Hz at 1 Hz, the RWC induced by this 1/f noise was 2 × 10-4°/√h, which accounts for 63% of the total RWC. To verify the correctness of the noise model we proposed, a high-sensitivity gyroscope prototype was built and tested. The simulated Allan variance curve gave a good rendition of the prototype actual measured curve. The error percentage between the simulated RWC and the measured value was less than 13%. According to the model, a noise reduction method is proposed and the effectiveness is verified by the experiment.

  9. JP-8 jet fuel can promote auditory impairment resulting from subsequent noise exposure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechter, Laurence D; Gearhart, Caroline; Fulton, Sherry; Campbell, Jerry; Fisher, Jeffrey; Na, Kwangsam; Cocker, David; Nelson-Miller, Alisa; Moon, Patrick; Pouyatos, Benoit

    2007-08-01

    We report on the transient and persistent effects of JP-8 jet fuel exposure on auditory function in rats. JP-8 has become the standard jet fuel utilized in the United States and North Atlantic Treaty Organization countries for military use and it is closely related to Jet A fuel, which is used in U.S. domestic aviation. Rats received JP-8 fuel (1000 mg/m(3)) by nose-only inhalation for 4 h and half of them were immediately subjected to an octave band of noise ranging between 97 and 105 dB in different experiments. The noise by itself produces a small, but permanent auditory impairment. The current permissible exposure level for JP-8 is 350 mg/m(3). Additionally, a positive control group received only noise exposure, and a fourth group consisted of untreated control subjects. Exposures occurred either on 1 day or repeatedly on 5 successive days. Impairments in auditory function were assessed using distortion product otoacoustic emissions and compound action potential testing. In other rats, tissues were harvested following JP-8 exposure for assessment of hydrocarbon levels or glutathione (GSH) levels. A single JP-8 exposure by itself at 1000 mg/m(3) did not disrupt auditory function. However, exposure to JP-8 and noise produced an additive disruption in outer hair cell function. Repeated 5-day JP-8 exposure at 1000 mg/m(3) for 4 h produced impairment of outer hair cell function that was most evident at the first postexposure assessment time. Partial though not complete recovery was observed over a 4-week postexposure period. The adverse effects of repeated JP-8 exposures on auditory function were inconsistent, but combined treatment with JP-8 + noise yielded greater impairment of auditory function, and hair cell loss than did noise by itself. Qualitative comparison of outer hair cell loss suggests an increase in outer hair cell death among rats treated with JP-8 + noise for 5 days as compared to noise alone. In most instances, hydrocarbon constituents of the fuel

  10. Phase noise reduction by self-phase locking in semiconductor lasers using phase conjugate feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lykke; Gliese, Ulrik Bo; Nielsen, Torben Nørskov

    1994-01-01

    noise takes a finite-low value corresponding to a state of first-order self-phase locking of the laser. As a result, the spectral shape of the laser signal does not remain Lorentzian but collapses around the carrier to a delta function with a close to carrier noise level of less than -137 d...

  11. Extra phase noise from thermal fluctuations in nonlinear optical crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    César, J. E. S.; Coelho, A.S.; Cassemiro, K.N.

    2009-01-01

    We show theoretically and experimentally that scattered light by thermal phonons inside a second-order nonlinear crystal is the source of additional phase noise observed in optical parametric oscillators. This additional phase noise reduces the quantum correlations and has hitherto hindered the d...

  12. Noise and Vibrations Measurements. External noise and vibrations measurements for offshore SODAR application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormel, F.T.; Eecen, P.J.; Herman, S.A.

    2003-10-01

    The partners in the WISE project investigate whether application of the SODAR (sonic detection and ranging) measurement technique in wind energy experimental work is feasible as a replacement for cup anemometers, wind direction sensors and tall meteorological masts. In Work Package 2 of the WISE project extensive controlled experiments with the SODAR are performed. For example SODAR measurements are compared with measurements from nearby masts and different brands of SODARs are compared. Part of the work package is the measurement of vibration and noise on an offshore SODAR system. The results of these measurements are presented in this report. ECN performed measurements at an offshore location to investigate the influence of noise and vibrations on the performance of a MiniSODAR measurement system. The aim of the measurements is to quantify the effect of these external noise and vibrations disturbances on the MiniSODAR's performance. Measurements on an identical SODAR system onshore are carried out to compare the disturbances of offshore and onshore external conditions. The effect of background noise on SODAR operation has clearly been established in literature. Therefore, measurements have been performed only to establish the absolute sound pressure levels. This is done at the Measuring Platform Noordwijk (MPN) located in the North Sea, nine kilometres out of the coast at Noordwijk, The Netherlands, and at two locations onshore. At the MPN-platform, the SODAR has been moved from the middle deck to the upper deck to diminish the influence of the diesel generator needed for the electric powering of the island. Although the absolute sound pressure level became higher at the new location, this level became lower at the most important frequencies inside the SODAR, due to the use of absorbing foam. With regards to the sound pressure level the move improved the situation. The sound pressure levels measured offshore were 6 to 15 dB higher than for the two locations

  13. Pavement noise measurements in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zofka, Ewa; Zofka, Adam; Mechowski, Tomasz

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of the On-Board Sound Intensity (OBSI) system to measure tire-pavement noise in Poland. In general, sources of noise emitted by the modern vehicles are the propulsion noise, aerodynamic resistance and noise generated at the tire-pavement interface. In order to capture tire-pavement noise, the OBSI system uses a noise intensity probe installed in the close proximity of that interface. In this study, OBSI measurements were performed at different types of pavement surfaces such as stone mastic asphalt (SMA), regular asphalt concrete (HMA) as well as Portland cement concrete (PCC). The influence of several necessary OBSI measurement conditions were recognized as: testing speed, air temperature, tire pressure and tire type. The results of this study demonstrate that the OBSI system is a viable and robust tool that can be used for the quality evaluation of newly built asphalt pavements in Poland. It can be also applied to generate reliable input parameters for the noise propagation models that are used to assess the environmental impact of new and existing highway corridors.

  14. Modeling of Thermal Phase Noise in a Solid Core Photonic Crystal Fiber-Optic Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningfang; Ma, Kun; Jin, Jing; Teng, Fei; Cai, Wei

    2017-10-26

    A theoretical model of the thermal phase noise in a square-wave modulated solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope has been established, and then verified by measurements. The results demonstrate a good agreement between theory and experiment. The contribution of the thermal phase noise to the random walk coefficient of the gyroscope is derived. A fiber coil with 2.8 km length is used in the experimental solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope, showing a random walk coefficient of 9.25 × 10 -5 deg/√h.

  15. Limitations of Phased Array Beamforming in Open Rotor Noise Source Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Csaba; Envia, Edmane; Podboy, Gary G.

    2013-01-01

    Phased array beamforming results of the F31/A31 historical baseline counter-rotating open rotor blade set were investigated for measurement data taken on the NASA Counter-Rotating Open Rotor Propulsion Rig in the 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel of NASA Glenn Research Center as well as data produced using the LINPROP open rotor tone noise code. The planar microphone array was positioned broadside and parallel to the axis of the open rotor, roughly 2.3 rotor diameters away. The results provide insight as to why the apparent noise sources of the blade passing frequency tones and interaction tones appear at their nominal Mach radii instead of at the actual noise sources, even if those locations are not on the blades. Contour maps corresponding to the sound fields produced by the radiating sound waves, taken from the simulations, are used to illustrate how the interaction patterns of circumferential spinning modes of rotating coherent noise sources interact with the phased array, often giving misleading results, as the apparent sources do not always show where the actual noise sources are located. This suggests that a more sophisticated source model would be required to accurately locate the sources of each tone. The results of this study also have implications with regard to the shielding of open rotor sources by airframe empennages.

  16. Measurement of tonal-noise characteristics and periodic flow structure around NACA0018 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, T.; Fujisawa, N. [Niigata University, Department Mechanical Engineering, Niigata (Japan); Lee, S. [Inha University, Department Mechanical Engineering, Incheon (Korea)

    2006-03-15

    The characteristics of tonal noise and the variations of flow structure around NACA0018 airfoil in a uniform flow are studied by means of simultaneous measurement of noise and velocity field by particle-image velocimetry to understand the generation mechanism of tonal noise. Measurements are made on the noise characteristics, the phase-averaged velocity field with respect to the noise signal, and the cross-correlation contour of velocity fluctuations and noise signal. These experimental results indicate that the tonal noise is generated from the periodic vortex structure on the pressure surface of the airfoil near the trailing edge of the airfoil. It is found that the vortex structure is highly correlated with the noise signal, which indicates the presence of noise-source distribution on the pressure surface. The vorticity distribution on the pressure surface breaks down near the trailing edge of the airfoil and forms a staggered vortex street in the wake of the airfoil. (orig.)

  17. Group-velocity dispersion effects on quantum noise of a fiber optical soliton in phase space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Heongkyu; Lee, Euncheol

    2010-01-01

    Group-velocity dispersion (GVD) effects on quantum noise of ultrashort pulsed light are theoretically investigated at the soliton energy level, using Gaussian-weighted pseudo-random distribution of phasors in phase space for the modeling of quantum noise properties including phase noise, photon number noise, and quantum noise shape in phase space. We present the effects of GVD that mixes the different spectral components in time, on the self-phase modulation(SPM)-induced quantum noise properties in phase space such as quadrature squeezing, photon-number noise, and tilting/distortion of quantum noise shape in phase space, for the soliton that propagates a distance of the nonlinear length η NL = 1/( γP 0 ) (P 0 is the pulse peak power and γ is the SPM parameter). The propagation dependence of phase space quantum noise properties for an optical soliton is also provided.

  18. Low noise constant current source for bias dependent noise measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talukdar, D.; Bose, Suvendu; Bardhan, K. K.; Chakraborty, R. K.

    2011-01-01

    A low noise constant current source used for measuring the 1/f noise in disordered systems in ohmic as well as nonohmic regime is described. The source can supply low noise constant current starting from as low as 1 μA to a few tens of milliampere with a high voltage compliance limit of around 20 V. The constant current source has several stages, which can work in a standalone manner or together to supply the desired value of load current. The noise contributed by the current source is very low in the entire current range. The fabrication of a low noise voltage preamplifier modified for bias dependent noise measurements and based on the existing design available in the MAT04 data sheet is also described.

  19. Phase noise characterization of a QD-based diode laser frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedala, Govind; Al-Qadi, Mustafa; O'Sullivan, Maurice; Cartledge, John; Hui, Rongqing

    2017-07-10

    We measure, simultaneously, the phases of a large set of comb lines from a passively mode locked, InAs/InP, quantum dot laser frequency comb (QDLFC) by comparing the lines to a stable comb reference using multi-heterodyne coherent detection. Simultaneity permits the separation of differential and common mode phase noise and a straightforward determination of the wavelength corresponding to the minimum width of the comb line. We find that the common mode and differential phases are uncorrelated, and measure for the first time for a QDLFC that the intrinsic differential-mode phase (IDMP) between adjacent subcarriers is substantially the same for all subcarrier pairs. The latter observation supports an interpretation of 4.4ps as the standard deviation of IDMP on a 200µs time interval for this laser.

  20. Binaural pitch perception in hearing-impaired listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Torsten; Santurette, Sébastien; Strelcyk, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    When two white noises differing only in phase in a particular frequency range are presented simultaneously each to one of our ears, a pitch sensation may be perceived inside the head. This phenomenon, called ’binaural pitch’ or ’dichotic pitch’, can be produced by frequency-dependent interaural...... phasedifference patterns. The evaluation of these interaural phase differences depends on the functionality of the binaural auditory system and the spectro-temporal information at its input. A melody recognition task was performed in the present study using pure-tone stimuli and six different types of noises...... that can generate a binaural pitch sensation. Normal-hearing listeners and hearing-impaired listeners with different kinds of hearing impairment participated in the experiment....

  1. Application of Machine Learning Techniques for Amplitude and Phase Noise Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Darko; de Carvalho, Luis Henrique Hecker; Piels, Molly

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, tools from machine learning community, such as Bayesian filtering and expectation maximization parameter estimation, are presented and employed for laser amplitude and phase noise characterization. We show that phase noise estimation based on Bayesian filtering outperforms...

  2. Noise properties of Hilbert transform evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavliček, Pavel; Svak, Vojtěch

    2015-01-01

    The Hilbert transform is a standard method for the calculation of the envelope and phase of a modulated signal in optical measurement methods. Usually, the intensity of light is converted into an electric signal at a detector. Therefore the actual spatially or temporally sampled signal is always affected by noise. Because the noise values of individual samples are independent, the noise can be considered as white. If the envelope and phase are calculated from the noised signal, they will also be affected by the noise. We calculate the variance and spectral density of both the envelope noise and the phase noise. We determine which parameters influence the variance and spectral density of both the envelope noise and the phase noise. Finally, we determine the influence of the noise on the measurement uncertainty in white-light interferometry and fringe-pattern analysis. (paper)

  3. Optimization of phase-variation measurements in low-coherence methods: implications for OCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Vladimir Y.; Matveyev, Alexandr L.; Matveev, Lev A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Sovetsky, Alexander A.; Vitkin, Alex

    2016-04-01

    Phase-resolved measurements found numerous applications in low-coherence methods, in particular in OCT-based compressional elastography, where phase-variation gradients are used for estimating strains produced by the OCT probe pressed onto the tissue. Conventionally, for the reference and deformed pixelated OCT scans, one performs comparison of phases taken from pixels with the same coordinates. This is reasonable in regions of sufficiently small sub-pixel displacements, for which the so-compared pixels contain the same scatterers. Furthermore, to avoid error-prone multiple phase unwrapping for reconstructing displacements, one have to ensure even smaller sub-wavelength displacements. This limits the allowable strains to less than ~10-4-10-3, although such weak phase gradients can be strongly corrupted by measurement noises. Here, we discuss how creation of an order of magnitude greater strains can be used for increasing the signal-to noise ratio in estimating phase gradients by obviating the phase-unwrapping procedures and reducing the influence of decorrelation noise for supra-pixel displacements. This optimized phase-variation measurement makes it possible to perform strain mapping in optical coherence elastography with exceptionally high tolerance to noises due to possibility of using significantly increased strains. We also discuss the effect of "frozen-phase zones" associated with displaced strong scatterers. This effect can result in appearance of artifacts in the form of false stiff inclusions in elastograms in the vicinity of bright scatterers in OCT scans. We present analytical arguments, numerical simulations and experimental examples illustrating the above-mentioned features of the "frozen-phase" effect and advantages of using the proposed optimized phase-variation measurement with pixel-scale displacement compensation in the compared OCT scans.

  4. Reduction of Musical Noise in Spectral Subtraction Method Using Subframe Phase Randomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok, J.W.; Bae, K.S. [Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea)

    1999-06-01

    The Subframe phase randomization method is applied to the spectral subtraction method to reduce the musical noise in nonvoicing region after speech enhancement. The musical noise in the spectral subtraction method is the result of the narrowband tonal components that appearing somewhat periodically in the spectrogram of unvoiced and silence regions. Thus each synthesis frame in nonvoicing region is divided into several subframes to broaden the narrowband spectrum, and then phases of silence and unvoiced regions are randomized to eliminate the tonal components in the spectrum while keeping the shape of the amplitude spectrum. Performance assessments based on visual inspection of spectrogram, objective measure, and informal subjective listening tests demonstrate the superiority of the proposed algorithm. (author). 7 refs., 5 figs.

  5. High temperature measurement by noise thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.C.

    1982-06-01

    Noise thermometry has received a lot of attention for measurements of temperatures in the high range around 1000-2000 deg. K. For these measurements, laboratory type experiments have been mostly performed. These have shown the interest of the technique when long term stability, high precision and insensibility to external conditions are concerned. This is particularly true for measurements in nuclear reactors where important drifts due to irradiation effects are experienced with other measurement techniques, as thermocouple for instance. Industrial noise thermometer experiments have not been performed extensively up to now. The subject of the present study is the development of a 1800 deg. K noise thermometer for nuclear applications. The measurement method is based on a generalized noise power approach. The rms noise voltage (Vsub(s)) and noise current (Isub(s)) are successively measured on the resistive sensor. The same quantities are also measured on a dummy short circuited probe (Vsub(d) and Isub(d)). The temperature is then deduced from these measured values by the following formula: cTsub(s) = (Vsub(s) 2 - Vsub(d) 2 )(Vsub(s)/Isub(s) - Vsub(d)/Isub(d)) - 1 , where c is a constant and Tsub(s) the absolute temperature of the sensor. This approach has the particular advantage of greatly reducing the sensibility to environmental perturbations on the leads and to the influence of amplifier noise sources. It also eliminates the necessity of resistance measurement and keeps the electronic circuits as simple as possible

  6. Flow measurements using noise signals of axially displaced thermocouples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozma, R.; Hoogenboom, J.E. (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands))

    1990-01-01

    Determination of the flow rate of the coolant in the cooling channels of nuclear reactors is an important aspect of core monitoring. It is usually impossible to measure the flow by flowmeters in the individual channels due to the lack of space and safety reasons. An alternative method is based on the analysis of noise signals of the available in-core detectors. In such a noise method, a transit time which characterises the propagation of thermohydraulic fluctuations (density or temperature fluctuations) in the coolant is determined from the correlation between the noise signals of axially displaced detectors. In this paper, the results of flow measurements using axially displaced thermocouples in the channel wall will be presented. The experiments have been performed in a simulated MRT-type fuel assembly located in the research reactor HOR of the Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft. It was found that the velocities obtained via temperature noise correlation methods are significantly larger than the area-averaged velocity in the single-phase coolant flow. Model calculations show that the observed phenomenon can be explained by effects due to the radial velocity distribution in the channel. (author).

  7. 14 CFR 36.801 - Noise measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Noise measurement. 36.801 Section 36.801 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION Helicopters § 36.801 Noise measurement. For primary, normal...

  8. Effect of dipole-quadrupole Robinson mode coupling upon the beam response to radio-frequency phase noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Bosch

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In an electron storage ring, coupling between dipole and quadrupole Robinson oscillations modifies the spectrum of longitudinal beam oscillations driven by radio-frequency (rf generator phase noise. In addition to the main peak at the resonant frequency of the coupled dipole Robinson mode, another peak occurs at the resonant frequency of the coupled quadrupole mode. To describe these peaks analytically for a quadratic synchrotron potential, we include the dipole and quadrupole modes when calculating the beam response to generator noise. We thereby obtain the transfer function from generator-noise phase modulation to beam phase modulation with and without phase feedback. For Robinson-stable bunches confined in a synchrotron potential with a single minimum, the calculated transfer function agrees with measurements at the Aladdin 800-MeV electron storage ring. The transfer function is useful in evaluating phase feedback that suppresses Robinson oscillations in order to obtain quiet operation of an infrared beam line.

  9. An enhanced close-in phase noise LC-VCO using parasitic V-NPN transistors in a CMOS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Peijun; Min Hao; Oh, N J

    2009-01-01

    A differential LC voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) employing parasitic vertical-NPN (V-NPN) transistors as a negative g m -cell is presented to improve the close-in phase noise. The V-NPN transistors have lower flicker noise compared to MOS transistors. DC and AC characteristics of the V-NPN transistors are measured to facilitate the VCO design. The proposed VCO is implemented in a 0.18 μm CMOS RF/mixed signal process, and the measurement results show the close-in phase noise is improved by 3.5-9.1 dB from 100 Hz to 10 kHz offset compared to that of a similar CMOS VCO. The proposed VCO consumes only 0.41 mA from a 1.5 V power supply. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  10. Feedback to Suppress Phase Noise at Aladdin

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch, Robert A; Kleman, Kevin J

    2005-01-01

    The performance of the Aladdin infrared beamline is adversely affected by a Robinson mode in which all bunches move in unison with a frequency of 3 kHz. To decrease these oscillations, feedback has been installed in the radiofrequency system to damp longitudinal motion of the bunch centroids. Simulations indicate that at frequencies around 3 kHz, the phase noise generated by Robinson modes may be reduced 20 dB by feedback with a damping time of 0.3 ms. This agrees with the measured performance of feedback circuitry. Since the feedback greatly improves operation of the infrared beamline, it is now incorporated into the standard operation of Aladdin.

  11. Evaluation of domain randomness in periodically poled lithium niobate by diffraction noise measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Prashant Povel; Choi, Hee Joo; Kim, Byoung Joo; Cha, Myoungsik

    2013-12-16

    Random duty-cycle errors (RDE) in ferroelectric quasi-phase-matching (QPM) devices not only affect the frequency conversion efficiency, but also generate non-phase-matched parasitic noise that can be detrimental to some applications. We demonstrate an accurate but simple method for measuring the RDE in periodically poled lithium niobate. Due to the equivalence between the undepleted harmonic generation spectrum and the diffraction pattern from the QPM grating, we employed linear diffraction measurement which is much simpler than tunable harmonic generation experiments [J. S. Pelc, et al., Opt. Lett.36, 864-866 (2011)]. As a result, we could relate the RDE for the QPM device to the relative noise intensity between the diffraction orders.

  12. Investigation on phase noise of the signal from a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinxia, Feng; Yuanji, Li; Kuanshou, Zhang

    2018-04-01

    The phase noise of the signal from a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO) is investigated theoretically and experimentally. An SRO based on periodically poled lithium niobate is built up that generates the signal with a maximum power of 5.2 W at 1.5 µm. The intensity noise of the signal reaches the shot noise level for frequencies above 5 MHz. The phase noise of the signal oscillates depending on the analysis frequency, and there are phase noise peaks above the shot noise level at the peak frequencies. To explain the phase noise feature of the signal, a semi-classical theoretical model of SROs including the guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering effect within the nonlinear crystal is developed. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  13. A novel crystal-analyzer phase retrieval algorithm and its noise property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Li, Panyun; Wu, Zhao; Shao, Qigang; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhili; Ju, Zaiqiang; Zhang, Kai; Yuan, Qingxi; Huang, Wanxia; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-05-01

    A description of the rocking curve in diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) is presented in terms of the angular signal response function and a simple multi-information retrieval algorithm based on the cosine function fitting. A comprehensive analysis of noise properties of DEI is also given considering the noise transfer characteristic of the X-ray source. The validation has been performed with synchrotron radiation experimental data and Monte Carlo simulations based on the Geant4 toolkit combined with the refractive process of X-rays, which show good agreement with each other. Moreover, results indicate that the signal-to-noise ratios of the refraction and scattering images are about one order of magnitude better than that of the absorption image at the edges of low-Z samples. The noise penalty is drastically reduced with the increasing photon flux and visibility. Finally, this work demonstrates that the analytical method can build an interesting connection between DEI and GDPCI (grating-based differential phase contrast imaging) and is widely suitable for a variety of measurement noise in the angular signal response imaging prototype. The analysis significantly contributes to the understanding of noise characteristics of DEI images and may allow improvements to the signal-to-noise ratio in biomedical and material science imaging.

  14. Measurements of liquid-phase turbulence in gas–liquid two-phase flows using particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xinquan; Doup, Benjamin; Sun, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Liquid-phase turbulence measurements were performed in an air–water two-phase flow loop with a circular test section of 50 mm inner diameter using a particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. An optical phase separation method-–planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique—which uses fluorescent particles and an optical filtration technique, was employed to separate the signals of the fluorescent seeding particles from those due to bubbles and other noises. An image pre-processing scheme was applied to the raw PIV images to remove the noise residuals that are not removed by the PLIF technique. In addition, four-sensor conductivity probes were adopted to measure the radial distribution of the void fraction. Two benchmark tests were performed: the first was a comparison of the PIV measurement results with those of similar flow conditions using thermal anemometry from previous studies; the second quantitatively compared the superficial liquid velocities calculated from the local liquid velocity and void fraction measurements with the global liquid flow rate measurements. The differences of the superficial liquid velocity obtained from the two measurements were bounded within ±7% for single-phase flows and two-phase bubbly flows with the area-average void fraction up to 18%. Furthermore, a preliminary uncertainty analysis was conducted to investigate the accuracy of the two-phase PIV measurements. The systematic uncertainties due to the circular pipe curvature effects, bubble surface reflection effects and other potential uncertainty sources of the PIV measurements were discussed. The purpose of this work is to facilitate the development of a measurement technique (PIV-PLIF) combined with image pre-processing for the liquid-phase turbulence in gas–liquid two-phase flows of relatively high void fractions. The high-resolution data set can be used to more thoroughly understand two-phase flow behavior, develop liquid-phase turbulence models, and assess high

  15. Bayesian Filtering for Phase Noise Characterization and Carrier Synchronization of up to 192 Gb/s PDM 64-QAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Darko; Carvalho, L.; Piels, Molly

    2014-01-01

    We show that phase noise estimation based on Bayesian filtering outperforms conventional time-domain approaches in the presence of moderate measurement noise. Additionally, carrier synchronization based on Bayesian filtering, in combination with expectation maximization, is demonstrated for the f...

  16. Noise-and delay-induced phase transitions of the dimer–monomer surface reaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Chunhua; Wang Hua

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We study the dimer–monomer surface reaction model. ► We show that noise induces first-order irreversible phase transition (IPT). ► Combination of noise and time-delayed feedback induce first- and second-order IPT. ► First- and second-order IPT is viewed as noise-and delay-induced phase transitions. - Abstract: The effects of noise and time-delayed feedback in the dimer–monomer (DM) surface reaction model are investigated. Applying small delay approximation, we construct a stochastic delayed differential equation and its Fokker–Planck equation to describe the state evolution of the DM reaction model. We show that the noise can only induce first-order irreversible phase transition (IPT) characteristic of the DM model, however the combination of the noise and time-delayed feedback can simultaneously induce first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model. Therefore, it is shown that the well-known first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model may be viewed as noise-and delay-induced phase transitions.

  17. Characterisation of ultrasonic structural noise in multiple scattering media using phased arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedetti, T; Dorval, V; Jenson, F; Derode, A

    2013-01-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of multiple scattering media gives rise to structural noise which makes it difficult to detect potential damage or crack inside the component. In order to predict the performances of ultrasonic inspection over such complex media, scattering models can be used. Such models rely on specific key parameters describing the multiple scattering process, which can be determined by specific measurements and post-processing techniques. Such experiments were carried out on stainless steel plates using linear phased-arrays. They consist in recording the response matrix constituted by impulse responses between all the elements of the array. By conducting post-processing on this matrix, we measure the elastic mean free path l e and the correlation distance d c of the recorded noise. Additionally, the dynamic behaviour of the coherent backscattering effect was studied in order to measure the diffusion constant D. Plane-wave beamforming has been applied to the response matrix to improve the angular resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio of the backscattered intensity. Details of postprocessing techniques will be shown

  18. Evaluation of noise pollution in urban traffic hubs—Noise maps and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler, Paulo Eduardo Kirrian; Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta

    2015-01-01

    A study was made of some of the main traffic hubs in a Latin American metropolis, in order to determine the presence or absence of noise by means of noise measurements and acoustic mapping. To characterize noise in the evaluated road stretches, 232 measurements were taken at different points. The Predictor software package was used for the noise mapping calculations. Noise sensitive areas, e.g., hospitals, were identified in the evaluated road stretches. Noise maps were calculated for two hospitals, showing the current levels of noise that reach their facades. Hypothetical scenarios were simulated by making changes in the composition of traffic and total number of vehicles, and an assessment was made of the potential influence of these modifications in reducing the noise levels reaching the facades of the buildings in question. The simulations indicated that a 50% reduction in total traffic flow, or a 50% reduction in heavy vehicle traffic flow, would reduce the noise levels by about 3 dB(A). - Highlights: • Evaluation of noise pollution in urban traffic hubs • Street systems • Environmental noise impacts • Noise mapping

  19. Evaluation of noise pollution in urban traffic hubs—Noise maps and measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Paulo Eduardo Kirrian; Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta, E-mail: paulo.zannin@pesquisador.cnpq.br

    2015-02-15

    A study was made of some of the main traffic hubs in a Latin American metropolis, in order to determine the presence or absence of noise by means of noise measurements and acoustic mapping. To characterize noise in the evaluated road stretches, 232 measurements were taken at different points. The Predictor software package was used for the noise mapping calculations. Noise sensitive areas, e.g., hospitals, were identified in the evaluated road stretches. Noise maps were calculated for two hospitals, showing the current levels of noise that reach their facades. Hypothetical scenarios were simulated by making changes in the composition of traffic and total number of vehicles, and an assessment was made of the potential influence of these modifications in reducing the noise levels reaching the facades of the buildings in question. The simulations indicated that a 50% reduction in total traffic flow, or a 50% reduction in heavy vehicle traffic flow, would reduce the noise levels by about 3 dB(A). - Highlights: • Evaluation of noise pollution in urban traffic hubs • Street systems • Environmental noise impacts • Noise mapping.

  20. Joint compensation scheme of polarization crosstalk, intersymbol interference, frequency offset, and phase noise based on cascaded Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun; Yang, Yanfu; Xiang, Qian; Zhou, Zhongqing; Yao, Yong

    2018-02-01

    A joint compensation scheme based on cascaded Kalman filter is proposed, which can implement polarization tracking, channel equalization, frequency offset, and phase noise compensation simultaneously. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can not only compensate multiple channel impairments simultaneously but also improve the polarization tracking capacity and accelerate the convergence speed. The scheme has up to eight times faster convergence speed compared with radius-directed equalizer (RDE) + Max-FFT (maximum fast Fourier transform) + BPS (blind phase search) and can track up polarization rotation 60 times and 15 times faster than that of RDE + Max-FFT + BPS and CMMA (cascaded multimodulus algorithm) + Max-FFT + BPS, respectively.

  1. Moderators of noise-induced cognitive change in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Bernice Al; Peters, Emmanuelle R; Ettinger, Ulrich; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Kumari, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Environmental noise causes cognitive impairment, particularly in executive function and episodic memory domains, in healthy populations. However, the possible moderating influences on this relationship are less clear. This study assessed 54 healthy participants (24 men) on a cognitive battery (measuring psychomotor speed, attention, executive function, working memory, and verbal learning and memory) under three (quiet, urban, and social) noise conditions. IQ, subjective noise sensitivity, sleep, personality, paranoia, depression, anxiety, stress, and schizotypy were assessed on a single occasion. We found significantly slower psychomotor speed (urban), reduced working memory and episodic memory (urban and social), and more cautious decision-making (executive function, urban) under noise conditions. There was no effect of sex. Variance in urban noise-induced changes in psychomotor speed, attention, Trail Making B-A (executive function), and immediate recall and social noise-induced changes in verbal fluency (executive function) and immediate recall were explained by a combination of baseline cognition and paranoia, noise sensitivity, sleep, or cognitive disorganization. Higher baseline cognition (but not IQ) predicted greater impairment under urban and social noise for most cognitive variables. Paranoia predicted psychomotor speed, attention, and executive function impairment. Subjective noise sensitivity predicted executive function and memory impairment. Poor sleep quality predicted less memory impairment. Finally, lower levels of cognitive disorganization predicted slower psychomotor speed and greater memory impairment. The identified moderators should be considered in studies aiming to reduce the detrimental effects of occupational and residential noise. These results highlight the importance of studying noise effects in clinical populations characterized by high levels of the paranoia, sleep disturbances, noise sensitivity, and cognitive disorganization.

  2. Deterministic phase measurements exhibiting super-sensitivity and super-resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfermeier, Clemens; Ježek, Miroslav; Madsen, Lars S.

    2018-01-01

    Phase super-sensitivity is obtained when the sensitivity in a phase measurement goes beyond the quantum shot noise limit, whereas super-resolution is obtained when the interference fringes in an interferometer are narrower than half the input wavelength. Here we show experimentally that these two...

  3. Using auditory-visual speech to probe the basis of noise-impaired consonant-vowel perception in dyslexia and auditory neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Joshua; Mann, Virginia

    2005-08-01

    Both dyslexics and auditory neuropathy (AN) subjects show inferior consonant-vowel (CV) perception in noise, relative to controls. To better understand these impairments, natural acoustic speech stimuli that were masked in speech-shaped noise at various intensities were presented to dyslexic, AN, and control subjects either in isolation or accompanied by visual articulatory cues. AN subjects were expected to benefit from the pairing of visual articulatory cues and auditory CV stimuli, provided that their speech perception impairment reflects a relatively peripheral auditory disorder. Assuming that dyslexia reflects a general impairment of speech processing rather than a disorder of audition, dyslexics were not expected to similarly benefit from an introduction of visual articulatory cues. The results revealed an increased effect of noise masking on the perception of isolated acoustic stimuli by both dyslexic and AN subjects. More importantly, dyslexics showed less effective use of visual articulatory cues in identifying masked speech stimuli and lower visual baseline performance relative to AN subjects and controls. Last, a significant positive correlation was found between reading ability and the ameliorating effect of visual articulatory cues on speech perception in noise. These results suggest that some reading impairments may stem from a central deficit of speech processing.

  4. Ocean Ambient Noise Measurement and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Carey, William M

    2011-01-01

    This book develops the theory of ocean ambient noise mechanisms and measurements, and also describes general noise characteristics and computational methods.  It concisely summarizes the vast ambient noise literature using theory combined with key representative results.  The air-sea boundary interaction zone is described in terms of non-dimensional variables requisite for future experiments.  Noise field coherency, rare directional measurements, and unique basin scale computations and methods are presented.  The use of satellite measurements in these basin scale models is demonstrated.  Finally, this book provides a series of appendices giving in-depth mathematical treatments.  With its complete and careful discussions of both theory and experimental results, this book will be of the greatest interest to graduate students and active researchers working in fields related to ambient noise in the ocean.

  5. Measurements techniques for transportation noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, G.

    2001-01-01

    The noise from transport systems (roads, railways and aircraft) are increasing more and more both in space and in time and, therefore, they are still the major factor responsible for environmental noise pollution. The population exposed to transport noise is also increasing, and the corresponding health effects on people (i.e. annoyance and sleep disturbance) become more severe. Due to this current situation international and national legislation has been issued and implemented to reduce the harmful effects of such noise. This paper describes the techniques prescribed by recent Italian legislation to measure road, railway and aircraft noise. (author)

  6. Noise propagation in x-ray phase-contrast imaging and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterets, Yakov I; Gureyev, Timur E

    2014-01-01

    Three phase-retrieval algorithms, based on the transport-of-intensity equation and on the contrast transfer function for propagation-based imaging, and on the linearized geometrical optics approximation for analyser-based imaging, are investigated. The algorithms are compared in terms of their effect on propagation of noise from projection images to the corresponding phase-retrieved images and further to the computed tomography (CT) images/slices of a monomorphous object reconstructed using filtered backprojection algorithm. The comparison is carried out in terms of an integral noise characteristic, the variance, as well as in terms of a simple figure-of-merit, i.e. signal-to-noise ratio per unit dose. A gain factor is introduced that quantitatively characterizes the effect of phase retrieval on the variance of noise in the reconstructed projection images and in the axial slices of the object. Simple analytical expressions are derived for the gain factor and the signal-to-noise ratio, which indicate that the application of phase-retrieval algorithms can increase these parameters by up to two orders of magnitude compared to raw projection images and conventional CT, thus allowing significant improvement in the image quality and/or reduction of the x-ray dose delivered to the patient. (paper)

  7. Self-Interference Cancellation Using Time-Domain Phase Noise Estimation in OFDM Full-Duplex Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Shehata, Heba; Khattab, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    In full-duplex systems, oscillator phase noise (PN) problem is considered the bottleneck challenge that may face the self-interference cancellation (SIC) stage especially when orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transmission scheme is deployed. Phase noise degrades the SIC performance significantly, if not mitigated before or during the SIC technique. The presence of the oscillator phase noise has different impacts on the transmitted data symbol like common phase error (CPE) and...

  8. Subassembly faults diagnostic of an LMFBR type reactor by the measurement of temperature noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokorev, B.V.; Palkin, I.I.; Turchin, N.M.; Pallagi, D.; Horanyi, S.

    1979-09-01

    The subassembly faults detection possibility by temperature noise analysis of an LMFBR is described. The paper contains the results of diagnostical examinations obtained on electrically heated NaK test rigs. On the basis of these results the measurement of temperature noise RMS value seems to be a practicable method to detect local blockages in an early phase. (author)

  9. External non-white noise and nonequilibrium phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sancho, J.M.; San Miguel, M.

    1980-01-01

    Langevin equations with external non-white noise are considered. A Fokker Planck equation valid in general in first order of the correlation time tau of the noise is derived. In some cases its validity can be extended to any value of tau. The effect of a finite tau in the nonequilibrium phase transitions induced by the noise is analyzed, by means of such Fokker Planck equation, in general, for the Verhulst equation under two different kind of fluctuations, and for a genetic model. It is shown that new transitions can appear and that the threshold value of the parameter can be changed. (orig.)

  10. Phase noise analysis of clock recovery based on an optoelectronic phase-locked loop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Darko; Mørk, Jesper; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2007-01-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis of a clock-recovery (CR) scheme based on an optoelectronic phase-locked loop is presented. The analysis emphasizes the phase noise performance, taking into account the noise of the input data signal, the local voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO), and the laser....... It is shown that a large loop length results in a higher timing jitter of the recovered clock signal. The impact of the loop length on the clock signal jitter can be reduced by using a low-noise VCO and a low loop filter bandwidth. Using the model, the timing jitter of the recovered optical and electrical...... clock signal can be evaluated. We numerically investigate the timing jitter requirements for combined electrical/optical local oscillators, in order for the recovered clock signal to have less jitter than that of the input signal. The timing jitter requirements for the free-running laser and the VCO...

  11. A low phase noise microwave frequency synthesis for a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    François, B.; Boudot, R. [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, 26 chemin de l' Epitaphe, 25030 Besançon (France); Calosso, C. E. [INRIM, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Danet, J. M. [LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS-UPMC, 61 avenue de l' Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France)

    2014-09-15

    We report the development, absolute phase noise, and residual phase noise characterization of a 9.192 GHz microwave frequency synthesis chain devoted to be used as a local oscillator in a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). It is based on frequency multiplication of an ultra-low phase noise 100 MHz oven-controlled quartz crystal oscillator using a nonlinear transmission line-based chain. Absolute phase noise performances of the 9.192 GHz output signal are measured to be −42, −100, −117 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz and −129 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 1 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. Compared to current results obtained in a state-of-the-art CPT-based frequency standard developed at LNE-SYRTE, this represents an improvement of 8 dB and 10 dB at f = 166 Hz and f = 10 kHz, respectively. With such performances, the expected Dick effect contribution to the atomic clock short term frequency stability is reported at a level of 6.2 × 10{sup −14} at 1 s integration time, that is a factor 3 higher than the atomic clock shot noise limit. Main limitations are pointed out.

  12. In Vitro Studies and Preliminary Mathematical Model for Jet Fuel and Noise Induced Auditory Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    of JP-8 and a Fischer- Tropsch synthetic jet fuel following subacute inhalation exposure in rats. Toxicol Sci 116(1): 239-248. Gallinat, J...AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2015-0084 IN VITRO STUDIES AND PRELIMINARY MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR JET FUEL AND NOISE INDUCED AUDITORY IMPAIRMENT...April 2014 – September 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE In Vitro Studies and Preliminary Mathematical Model for Jet Fuel and Noise Induced Auditory

  13. Spin noise measurement with diamagnetic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, M.; Ichihara, S.; Takano, T.; Kumakura, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2007-01-01

    We report the measurement of the atomic spin noise of the diamagnetic atom ytterbium (Yb). Yb has various merits for utilizing the quantum nature of the atomic spin ensemble compared with the paramagnetic atoms used in all previous experiments. From the magnitude of the noise level and dependence on the detuning, we concluded that we succeeded in the measurement of 171 Yb atomic spin noise in an atomic beam

  14. Measurements and analysis of neutron and gamma noise in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van; Kleiss, E.B.J.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron and gamma sensitive collectrons (self-powered detectors) have been designed for incore noise measurements in BWRs. A so-called twin-type has been developed for measurements of two-phase flow characteristics and detailed axial velocity distributions. Construction aspects of the twin detectors are discussed. An analysis is presented of the response of both detector types to incore parametric fluctuations. This analysis is based on detector response functions which provide an insight into the 'field of view' of the two types. The results are supported by experimental verifications; it is shown that incore gamma detectors provide useful additional information about two-phase flow in a BWR. (author)

  15. The effectiveness of environmental strategies on noise reduction in a pediatric intensive care unit: creation of single-patient bedrooms and reducing noise sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kol, Emine; Aydın, Perihan; Dursun, Oguz

    2015-07-01

    Noise is a substantial problem for both patients and healthcare workers in hospitals. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of environmental strategies (creating single-patient rooms and reducing noise sources) in noise reduction in a pediatric intensive care unit. Noise measurement in the unit was conducted in two phases. In the first phase, measurements aimed at determining the unit's present level of noise were performed over 4 weeks in December 2013. During the month following the first measurement phase, the intensive care unit (ICU) was moved to a new location and noise-reducing strategies were implemented. The second phase, in May 2014, measured noise levels in the newly constructed environment. The noise levels before and after environmental changes were statistically significant at 72.6 dB-A and 56 dB-A, respectively (p noise-reducing strategies can be effective in controlling environmental noise in the ICU. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Moderators of noise-induced cognitive change in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernice AL Wright

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental noise causes cognitive impairment, particularly in executive function and episodic memory domains, in healthy populations. However, the possible moderating influences on this relationship are less clear. This study assessed 54 healthy participants (24 men on a cognitive battery (measuring psychomotor speed, attention, executive function, working memory, and verbal learning and memory under three (quiet, urban, and social noise conditions. IQ, subjective noise sensitivity, sleep, personality, paranoia, depression, anxiety, stress, and schizotypy were assessed on a single occasion. We found significantly slower psychomotor speed (urban, reduced working memory and episodic memory (urban and social, and more cautious decision-making (executive function, urban under noise conditions. There was no effect of sex. Variance in urban noise-induced changes in psychomotor speed, attention, Trail Making B-A (executive function, and immediate recall and social noise-induced changes in verbal fluency (executive function and immediate recall were explained by a combination of baseline cognition and paranoia, noise sensitivity, sleep, or cognitive disorganization. Higher baseline cognition (but not IQ predicted greater impairment under urban and social noise for most cognitive variables. Paranoia predicted psychomotor speed, attention, and executive function impairment. Subjective noise sensitivity predicted executive function and memory impairment. Poor sleep quality predicted less memory impairment. Finally, lower levels of cognitive disorganization predicted slower psychomotor speed and greater memory impairment. The identified moderators should be considered in studies aiming to reduce the detrimental effects of occupational and residential noise. These results highlight the importance of studying noise effects in clinical populations characterized by high levels of the paranoia, sleep disturbances, noise sensitivity, and cognitive

  17. Experimental Evaluation of Impairments in Unrepeatered DP-16QAM Link with Distributed Raman Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodan Pang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The transmission impairments of a Raman amplified link using dual-polarization 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (DP-16QAM are experimentally characterized. The impact of amplitude and phase noise on the signal due to relative intensity noise (RIN transfer from the pump are compared for two pumping configurations: first-order backward pumping and bi-directional pumping. Experimental results indicate that with increased Raman backward pump power, though the optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR is increased, so is the pump-induced amplitude and phase noise. The transmission performance is firstly improved by the enhanced OSNR at a low pump power until an optimum point is reached, and then the impairments due to pump-induced noise start to dominate. However, the introduction of a low pump power in the forward direction can further improve the system’s performance.

  18. Comparison of Channel Estimation Protocols for Coherent AF Relaying Networks in the Presence of Additive Noise and LO Phase Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Berger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Channel estimation protocols for wireless two-hop networks with amplify-and-forward (AF relays are compared. We consider multiuser relaying networks, where the gain factors are chosen such that the signals from all relays add up coherently at the destinations. While the destinations require channel knowledge in order to decode, our focus lies on the channel estimates that are used to calculate the relay gains. Since knowledge of the compound two-hop channels is generally not sufficient to do this, the protocols considered here measure all single-hop coefficients in the network. We start from the observation that the direction in which the channels are measured determines (1 the number of channel uses required to estimate all coefficient and (2 the need for global carrier phase reference. Four protocols are identified that differ in the direction in which the first-hop and the second-hop channels are measured. We derive a sensible measure for the accuracy of the channel estimates in the presence of additive noise and phase noise and compare the protocols based on this measure. Finally, we provide a quantitative performance comparison for a simple single-user application example. It is important to note that the results can be used to compare the channel estimation protocols for any two-hop network configuration and gain allocation scheme.

  19. Noise-shaping all-digital phase-locked loops modeling, simulation, analysis and design

    CERN Document Server

    Brandonisio, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a novel approach to the analysis and design of all-digital phase-locked loops (ADPLLs), technology widely used in wireless communication devices. The authors provide an overview of ADPLL architectures, time-to-digital converters (TDCs) and noise shaping. Realistic examples illustrate how to analyze and simulate phase noise in the presence of sigma-delta modulation and time-to-digital conversion. Readers will gain a deep understanding of ADPLLs and the central role played by noise-shaping. A range of ADPLL and TDC architectures are presented in unified manner. Analytical and simulation tools are discussed in detail. Matlab code is included that can be reused to design, simulate and analyze the ADPLL architectures that are presented in the book.   • Discusses in detail a wide range of all-digital phase-locked loops architectures; • Presents a unified framework in which to model time-to-digital converters for ADPLLs; • Explains a procedure to predict and simulate phase noise in oscil...

  20. Theory and Measurement of Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Continuous-Wave Noise Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stec, Bronisław; Susek, Waldemar

    2018-05-06

    Determination of the signal power-to-noise power ratio on the input and output of reception systems is essential to the estimation of their quality and signal reception capability. This issue is especially important in the case when both signal and noise have the same characteristic as Gaussian white noise. This article considers the problem of how a signal-to-noise ratio is changed as a result of signal processing in the correlation receiver of a noise radar in order to determine the ability to detect weak features in the presence of strong clutter-type interference. These studies concern both theoretical analysis and practical measurements of a noise radar with a digital correlation receiver for 9.2 GHz bandwidth. Firstly, signals participating individually in the correlation process are defined and the terms signal and interference are ascribed to them. Further studies show that it is possible to distinguish a signal and a noise on the input and output of a correlation receiver, respectively, when all the considered noises are in the form of white noise. Considering the above, a measurement system is designed in which it is possible to represent the actual conditions of noise radar operation and power measurement of a useful noise signal and interference noise signals—in particular the power of an internal leakage signal between a transmitter and a receiver of the noise radar. The proposed measurement stands and the obtained results show that it is possible to optimize with the use of the equipment and not with the complex processing of a noise signal. The radar parameters depend on its prospective application, such as short- and medium-range radar, ground-penetrating radar, and through-the-wall detection radar.

  1. Noise thermometry - a new temperature measuring method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brixy, H.; Hecker, R.; Rittinghaus, K.F.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal Johnson-Niquist noise is the basis of noise thermometry. This temperature measuring method is, e.g., of interest insofar as the noise thermometer gives absolute values as a primary thermometer and is in principle extensively independent of environmental influences and material properties. The resistance values of the measuring probe are about 10 Ohm to a few kOhm. The demands of electronics are high, the self-noise of the measuring apparatus must be as small as possible; a comparative measuring method is advantageous. 1 to 2,500 K are given as a possible temperature range. An accuracy of 0.1% could be achieved in laboratory measurements. Temperature measurements to be used in operation in a few nuclear reactors are mentioned. (HP/LH) [de

  2. Does ambient noise or hypobaric atmosphere influence olfactory and gustatory function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahne, Torsten; Köppke, Robert; Nehring, Michael; Plontke, Stefan K; Fischer, Hans-Georg

    2018-01-01

    Multidimensional food perception is based mainly on gustatory and olfactory function. Recent research has demonstrated that hypobaric pressure impairs gustatory function and that background noise or distracting auditory stimulation impairs olfactory function. Using a hypobaric chamber, the odor identification, discrimination, and thresholds as well as taste identification and threshold scores were measured in 16 healthy male volunteers under normal and hypobaric (6380 ft) conditions using clinically validated tests. In both conditions, background noise was either canceled out or replaced by white noise presentation (70 dB sound pressure level). Olfactory sensitivity for n-butanol and gustatory sensitivity were impaired in a hypobaric atmosphere. White noise did not influence the odor test results. White noise stimulation impaired sensitivity for sour and sweet but not for bitter or salty tastants. We conclude that hypobaric or noisy environments could impair gustatory and olfactory sensitivity selectively for particular tastants and odorants.

  3. Measurement and control of occupational noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elammari, Muftah Faraj

    2007-01-01

    High level of environmental and occupational noise remain a problem all over the world. As problems and complaints increased dramatically by the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries focusing on the problem was intensified. In this thesis occupational noise levels at different places were measured and compared with the international permissible levels using the integrating sound level meter (Quest 2800). The calibration of the instrument was carried out before and after each measurement using the acoustic calibrator (Quest CA-12B calibrator). The method which was followed was measuring the sound pressure level of the different noise sources over a broad frequency band covering the audible frequency range using the (octave band filter, model OB-100), disregrading variation with time. Since the human ear is most sensitive in the 2-5 khz range of frequencies and least sensitive at extremely high and low frequencies the instrument was adjusted on the A weighting net work which varies with frequencies in a very similar way as that of the human ear. From the obtained results, some noise levels which were recorded were within the permissible levels i.e. below 90 dba and some noise levels were higher than the permissible limit as in janzour textile factory (95 dba), The welding workshop (120 dba), Benghazi Macaroni factory (100 dba), and near the air blowers at Zletin cement factory, Benghazi cement factory (97-10-dba) in these cases suggestions were made to minimize the problem. Concerning the noise control, four methods of noise control were tested, these methods were: reducing noise by sound absorbing material at Sirt local broadcasting radio, reducing noise by keeping a distance from the noise source, at the Boilers hall at REWDC, reducing noise by enclosures, at the compressors room at Zletin cement factory, and finally reducing noise by performing regular maintenance at Garabolli photo development centre. The percentage of noise reduction was 21%, 12

  4. Measurement time and statistics for a noise thermometer with a synthetic-noise reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D. R.; Benz, S. P.; Labenski, J. R.; Nam, S. W.; Qu, J. F.; Rogalla, H.; Tew, W. L.

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes methods for reducing the statistical uncertainty in measurements made by noise thermometers using digital cross-correlators and, in particular, for thermometers using pseudo-random noise for the reference signal. First, a discrete-frequency expression for the correlation bandwidth for conventional noise thermometers is derived. It is shown how an alternative frequency-domain computation can be used to eliminate the spectral response of the correlator and increase the correlation bandwidth. The corresponding expressions for the uncertainty in the measurement of pseudo-random noise in the presence of uncorrelated thermal noise are then derived. The measurement uncertainty in this case is less than that for true thermal-noise measurements. For pseudo-random sources generating a frequency comb, an additional small reduction in uncertainty is possible, but at the cost of increasing the thermometer's sensitivity to non-linearity errors. A procedure is described for allocating integration times to further reduce the total uncertainty in temperature measurements. Finally, an important systematic error arising from the calculation of ratios of statistical variables is described.

  5. Modeling Speech Intelligibility in Hearing Impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheidiger, Christoph; Jørgensen, Søren; Dau, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    speech, e.g. phase jitter or spectral subtraction. Recent studies predict SI for normal-hearing (NH) listeners based on a signal-to-noise ratio measure in the envelope domain (SNRenv), in the framework of the speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM, [20, 21]). These models have shown good...... agreement with measured data under a broad range of conditions, including stationary and modulated interferers, reverberation, and spectral subtraction. Despite the advances in modeling intelligibility in NH listeners, a broadly applicable model that can predict SI in hearing-impaired (HI) listeners...... is not yet available. As a firrst step towards such a model, this study investigates to what extent eects of hearing impairment on SI can be modeled in the sEPSM framework. Preliminary results show that, by only modeling the loss of audibility, the model cannot account for the higher speech reception...

  6. Analysis and evaluation of soundscapes in public parks through interviews and measurement of noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeremeta, Bani; Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the sound environment of public parks using a soundscape study model that analyzes not only noise but also all the types of sound of a given area, as well as other environmental factors. To this end, acoustic measurements were made in the parks under study and interviews were held with their frequent visitors. Noise measurements were conducted in 55 points, and a total of 335 people were interviewed in the 4 parks studied. The parks selected for this study are located in areas very close to streets with intense vehicle flow, raising the hypothesis that this proximity impairs the acoustic comfort of their visitors. The findings confirm the strong influence of traffic noise on the soundscapes of the parks. Noise measurements showed that in all parks, between 50 and 100% of the points evaluated displayed sound levels above 55dB(A), the level established by Curitiba's Municipal Law 10625 as the limit permitted for green areas during daytime. Other conditions in the parks' environments were also identified, which interfere jointly in the soundscape and in its perception, such as spatial factors of each park, the urban setting of its surroundings, and the sounds originating inside the parks.

  7. Phase shift errors in the theory and practice of surface intensity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgary, M. C.; Crocker, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    The surface acoustical intensity method (sometimes known as the microphone-accelerometer cross-spectral method) is a relatively new noise source/path identification tool. Several researchers have had difficulties implementing this method because of instrumentation phase mis-match. A simple technique for measuring and correcting instrumentation phase mis-match has been developed. This new technique has been tested recently on a noise source identification problem of practical interest. The results of the experiments indicate that the surface acoustic intensity method produces reliable data and can be applied to a variety of noise source/path problems.

  8. Understanding the amplitudes of noise correlation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    Cross correlation of ambient seismic noise is known to result in time series from which station-station travel-time measurements can be made. Part of the reason that these cross-correlation travel-time measurements are reliable is that there exists a theoretical framework that quantifies how these travel times depend on the features of the ambient noise. However, corresponding theoretical results do not currently exist to describe how the amplitudes of the cross correlation depend on such features. For example, currently it is not possible to take a given distribution of noise sources and calculate the cross correlation amplitudes one would expect from such a distribution. Here, we provide a ray-theoretical framework for calculating cross correlations. This framework differs from previous work in that it explicitly accounts for attenuation as well as the spatial distribution of sources and therefore can address the issue of quantifying amplitudes in noise correlation measurements. After introducing the general framework, we apply it to two specific problems. First, we show that we can quantify the amplitudes of coherency measurements, and find that the decay of coherency with station-station spacing depends crucially on the distribution of noise sources. We suggest that researchers interested in performing attenuation measurements from noise coherency should first determine how the dominant sources of noise are distributed. Second, we show that we can quantify the signal-to-noise ratio of noise correlations more precisely than previous work, and that these signal-to-noise ratios can be estimated for given situations prior to the deployment of seismometers. It is expected that there are applications of the theoretical framework beyond the two specific cases considered, but these applications await future work.

  9. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    François, B. [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, 26 chemin de l’Epitaphe, 25030 Besançon (France); INRIM, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Calosso, C. E.; Micalizio, S. [INRIM, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Abdel Hafiz, M.; Boudot, R. [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, 26 chemin de l’Epitaphe, 25030 Besançon (France)

    2015-09-15

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be −109 and −141 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is −105 and −138 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10{sup −14} for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10{sup −14} for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10{sup −15} level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  10. An investigation of time-frequency domain phase-weighted stacking and its application to phase-velocity extraction from ambient noise's empirical Green's functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoliang; Niu, Fenglin; Yang, Yingjie; Xie, Jun

    2018-02-01

    The time-frequency domain phase-weighted stacking (tf-PWS) technique based on the S transform has been employed in stacking empirical Green's functions (EGFs) derived from ambient noise data, mainly due to its superior power in enhancing weak signals. Questions such as the induced waveform distortion and the feasibility of phase-velocity extraction are yet to be thoroughly explored. In this study, we investigate these issues by conducting extensive numerical tests with both synthetic data and USArray transportable array (TA) ambient noise data. We find that the errors in the measured phase velocities associated with waveform distortion caused by the tf-PWS depend largely on the way of how the inverse S transform (IST) is implemented. If frequency IST is employed in tf-PWS, the corresponding errors are generally less than 0.1 per cent, sufficiently small that the measured phase velocities can be safely used in regular surface wave tomography. On the other hand, if a time IST is used in tf-PWS, then the extracted phase velocities are systematically larger than those measured from linearly stacked ones, and the discrepancy can reach as much as ˜0.4 per cent at some periods. Therefore, if tf-PWS is used in stacking EGFs, then frequency IST is preferred to transform the stacked S spectra back to the time domain for the stacked EGFs.

  11. Does the central limit theorem always apply to phase noise? Some implications for radar problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John E.; Addison, Stephen R.

    2017-05-01

    The phase noise problem or Rayleigh problem occurs in all aspects of radar. It is an effect that a radar engineer or physicist always has to take into account as part of a design or in attempt to characterize the physics of a problem such as reverberation. Normally, the mathematical difficulties of phase noise characterization are avoided by assuming the phase noise probability distribution function (PDF) is uniformly distributed, and the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) is invoked to argue that the superposition of relatively few random components obey the CLT and hence the superposition can be treated as a normal distribution. By formalizing the characterization of phase noise (see Gray and Alouani) for an individual random variable, the summation of identically distributed random variables is the product of multiple characteristic functions (CF). The product of the CFs for phase noise has a CF that can be analyzed to understand the limitations CLT when applied to phase noise. We mirror Kolmogorov's original proof as discussed in Papoulis to show the CLT can break down for receivers that gather limited amounts of data as well as the circumstances under which it can fail for certain phase noise distributions. We then discuss the consequences of this for matched filter design as well the implications for some physics problems.

  12. Noise and Vibration Monitoring for Premium Efficiency IE 3 Three-Phase Induction Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NISTOR, C. G.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the original SV-100 platform that enables low-cost and very high accuracy determinations of noise and vibration levels. The aim of the proposed platform is to achieve an effective integration of the two topics of this analysis: vibrations and noises. To the best of our knowledge, no low price, dedicated compact platform with embedded measuring instruments exists. For proving the practical utility of the proposed platform, two induction motors of 7.5 kW and 11 kW, respectively, in single-layer winding, at 1000 rpm, with IE3 premium efficiency were analyzed. This analysis is required because, according to IEC60034-30 standard, the IE3 efficiency standard has become mandatory for induction motors of rated power greater than 7.5 kW. Therefore, in order to improve the motor operating efficiency, the power losses caused by noises and vibrations have to be reduced. Several variants of supply were studied, i.e., by the three-phase 50 Hz network and by a three-phase inverter at 40, 50 and 60 Hz, respectively. The experimental determinations of noises are presented comparatively, by using a Bruel&Kjaer sonometer and by using the new platform SV-100. The results are compared with the IEC60034 standard.

  13. Using crosscorrelation to mitigate analog/RF impairments for integrated spectrum analyzers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Alink, M.S.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Kokkeler, Andre B.J.; Ru, Z.; Cheng, W.; Nauta, Bram

    2013-01-01

    An integrated spectrum analyzer is useful for built-in self-test purposes, software-defined radios, or dynamic spectrum access in cognitive radio. The analog/RF performance is impaired by a number of factors, including thermal noise, phase noise, and nonlinearity. In this paper, we present an

  14. Neural underpinnings of background acoustic noise in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinanaj, Indrit; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Rodriguez, Cristelle; Herrmann, François; Santini, Francesco; Haller, Sven; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon

    2015-12-03

    Previous contributions in younger cohorts have revealed that reallocation of cerebral resources, a crucial mechanism for working memory (WM), may be disrupted by parallel demands of background acoustic noise suppression. To date, no study has explored the impact of such disruption on brain activation in elderly individuals with or without subtle cognitive deficits. We performed a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study in 23 cases (mean age=75.7 y.o., 16 men) with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 16 elderly healthy controls (HC, mean age=70.1 y.o., three men) using a 2-back WM task, under two distinct MRI background acoustic noise conditions (louder vs. lower noise echo-planar imaging). General linear models were used to assess brain activation as a function of group and noise. In both groups, lower background noise is associated with increased activation of the working memory network (WMN). A decrease of the normally observed deactivation of the default mode network (DMN) is found under louder noise in both groups. Unlike HC, MCI cases also show decreased deactivation of the DMN under both louder and lower background noise. Under louder noise, this decrease is observed in anterior parts of the DMN in HC, and in the posterior cingulate cortex in MCI cases. Our results suggest that background acoustic noise has a differential impact on WMN activation in normal aging as a function of the cognitive status. Only louder noise has a disruptive effect on the usually observed DMN deactivation during WM task performance in HC. In contrast, MCI cases show altered DMN reactivity even in the presence of lower noise. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Shot-noise-limited monitoring and phase locking of the motion of a single trapped ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushev, P; Hétet, G; Slodička, L; Rotter, D; Wilson, M A; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Eschner, J; Blatt, R

    2013-03-29

    We perform a high-resolution real-time readout of the motion of a single trapped and laser-cooled Ba+ ion. By using an interferometric setup, we demonstrate a shot-noise-limited measurement of thermal oscillations with a resolution of 4 times the standard quantum limit. We apply the real-time monitoring for phase control of the ion motion through a feedback loop, suppressing the photon recoil-induced phase diffusion. Because of the spectral narrowing in the phase-locked mode, the coherent ion oscillation is measured with a resolution of about 0.3 times the standard quantum limit.

  16. Development and evaluation of the British English coordinate response measure speech-in-noise test as an occupational hearing assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, Hannah D; Rowan, Daniel; van Besouw, Rachel M; Allsopp, Adrian A

    2017-10-01

    The studies described in this article outline the design and development of a British English version of the coordinate response measure (CRM) speech-in-noise (SiN) test. Our interest in the CRM is as a SiN test with high face validity for occupational auditory fitness for duty (AFFD) assessment. Study 1 used the method of constant stimuli to measure and adjust the psychometric functions of each target word, producing a speech corpus with equal intelligibility. After ensuring all the target words had similar intelligibility, for Studies 2 and 3, the CRM was presented in an adaptive procedure in stationary speech-spectrum noise to measure speech reception thresholds and evaluate the test-retest reliability of the CRM SiN test. Studies 1 (n = 20) and 2 (n = 30) were completed by normal-hearing civilians. Study 3 (n = 22) was completed by hearing impaired military personnel. The results display good test-retest reliability (95% confidence interval (CI) hearing impairment. The British English CRM using stationary speech-spectrum noise is a "ready to use" SiN test, suitable for investigation as an AFFD assessment tool for military personnel.

  17. Interpretation of incore noise measurements in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van

    1982-01-01

    A survey is given of the main incentives for power reactor noise research and the differences and similarities of noise in power and zero power systems are touched on. The basic characteristics of the adjoint method in reactor noise theory are treated. The detector adjoint functions describe the transfer functions between spatially distributed noise sources and a (neutron or gamma) detector. In particular, the spatial dependence of these functions explains the 'local' and 'global' effects in BWR noise measurements. By including thermal hydraulic feedback effects in the adjoint analysis, it is shown that the common idea of a dominant global effect at low frequencies which should result in point kinetic behaviour, is erroneous. The same analysis provides a method for nonperturbing on-line measurement of the reactor transfer function, which is demonstrated by results from measurements on a BWR in the Netherlands. In the final part of the paper some ideas are given for further research in the field of BWR noise. (author)

  18. Final Report on DE-FG02-04ER46107: Glasses, Noise and Phase Transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Clare C. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2011-12-31

    We showed that noise has distinct signatures at phase transitions in spin systems. We also studied charge noise, critical current noise, and flux noise in superconducting qubits and Josephson junctions.

  19. Measuring of noise emitted by moving vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrúcaný Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to measure the intensity of the exterior noise of a vehicle in motion. It provides the results of the measurements of the external noise of selected vehicles in motion and the impact of selected factors on the sound level of driving. There are done two measurements in the paper. Results from the first one are comparing noise level of 9 passenger cars according to the Directive 71/157/EEC. The second one shows the road surface influence on the exterior noise of moving vehicle where the sound level was measured by a road whose surface was made of slightly degraded concrete, and at a different place of the same road, where the surface was renovated by applying asphalt mix onto it.

  20. Analysis of a Shock-Associated Noise Prediction Model Using Measured Jet Far-Field Noise Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Sharpe, Jacob A.

    2014-01-01

    A code for predicting supersonic jet broadband shock-associated noise was assessed using a database containing noise measurements of a jet issuing from a convergent nozzle. The jet was operated at 24 conditions covering six fully expanded Mach numbers with four total temperature ratios. To enable comparisons of the predicted shock-associated noise component spectra with data, the measured total jet noise spectra were separated into mixing noise and shock-associated noise component spectra. Comparisons between predicted and measured shock-associated noise component spectra were used to identify deficiencies in the prediction model. Proposed revisions to the model, based on a study of the overall sound pressure levels for the shock-associated noise component of the measured data, a sensitivity analysis of the model parameters with emphasis on the definition of the convection velocity parameter, and a least-squares fit of the predicted to the measured shock-associated noise component spectra, resulted in a new definition for the source strength spectrum in the model. An error analysis showed that the average error in the predicted spectra was reduced by as much as 3.5 dB for the revised model relative to the average error for the original model.

  1. Selective Inner Hair Cell Dysfunction in Chinchillas Impairs Hearing-in-Noise in the Absence of Outer Hair Cell Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobarinas, Edward; Salvi, Richard; Ding, Dalian

    2016-04-01

    Poorer hearing in the presence of background noise is a significant problem for the hearing impaired. Ototoxic drugs, ageing, and noise exposure can damage the sensory hair cells of the inner ear that are essential for normal hearing sensitivity. The relationship between outer hair cell (OHC) loss and progressively poorer hearing sensitivity in quiet or in competing background noise is supported by a number of human and animal studies. In contrast, the effect of moderate inner hair cell (IHC) loss or dysfunction shows almost no impact on behavioral measures of hearing sensitivity in quiet, when OHCs remain intact, but the relationship between selective IHC loss and hearing in noise remains relatively unknown. Here, a moderately high dose of carboplatin (75 mg/kg) that produced IHC loss in chinchillas ranging from 40 to 80 % had little effect on thresholds in quiet. However, when tested in the presence of competing broadband (BBN) or narrowband noise (NBN), thresholds increased significantly. IHC loss >60 % increased signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for tones (500-11,300 Hz) in competing BBN by 5-10 dB and broadened the masking function under NBN. These data suggest that IHC loss or dysfunction may play a significant role in listening in noise independent of OHC integrity and that these deficits may be present even when thresholds in quiet are within normal limits.

  2. The propagation of stochastic pixel noise into magnitude and phase values in the Fourier analysis of digital images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, J.E.; Halama, J.R.; Hasegawa, B.H.

    1986-01-01

    The use of Fourier analysis in nuclear medicine gated blood ventriculography provides a useful example of the application of Fourier methods to digital medical imaging. In particular, the nuclear medicine experience demonstrates that there is diagnostic significance not only in the pixel averages of temporal Fourier magnitude and phase computed in various image regions, but also in the distributions of the individual pixel values about those averages. However, a region containing pixels that are perfectly synchronous on average would still yield a finite distribution of calculated Fourier coefficients due to the propagation of stochastic pixel noise into the calculated values. The authors have studied this noise component of both the magnitude and phase distributions using phantom studies and computer simulation. In both approaches, several thousand one-pixel 'ventriculograms' were generated, all identical to each other except for stochastic noise. Fourier magnitudes and phases at several frequencies were calculated and histograms generated. A theoretical prediction of the distributions was developed and shown to fit the experimental results well. The authors' formalism can be used to estimate study count requirements or, for fixed study counts, to assess the stochastic noise contribution in the interpretation of measured phase and magnitude distributions. (author)

  3. Noise exposure and hearing impairment among Chinese restaurant workers and entertainment employees in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Xiang Qian; Yu, Ignatius Tak Sun; Au, Dennis Kin Kwok; Chiu, Yuk Lan; Wong, Claudie Chiu Yi; Wong, Tze Wai

    2013-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major concern in the non-manufacturing industries. This study aimed to investigate the occupational noise exposure and the NIHL among Chinese restaurant workers and entertainment employees working in the service industry in Hong Kong. This cross-sectional survey involved a total of 1,670 participants. Among them, 937 were randomly selected from the workers of Chinese restaurants and 733 were selected from workers in three entertainment sectors: radio and television stations; cultural performance halls or auditoria of the Leisure and Cultural Services Department (LCSD); and karaoke bars. Noise exposure levels were measured in the sampled restaurants and entertainment sectors. Each participant received an audiometric screening test. Those who were found to have abnormalities were required to take another diagnostic test in the health center. The "Klockhoff digit" method was used to classify NIHL in the present study. The main source of noise inside restaurants was the stoves. The mean hearing thresholds showed a typical dip at 3 to 6 KHz and a substantial proportion (23.7%) of the workers fulfilled the criteria for presumptive NIHL. For entertainment sectors, employees in radio and television stations generally had higher exposure levels than those in the halls or auditoria of the LCSD and karaoke bars. The mean hearing thresholds showed a typical dip at 6 KHz and a substantial proportion of the employees fulfilled the criteria for presumptive NIHL (38.6%, 95%CI: 35.1-42.1%). Being male, older, and having longer service and daily alcohol consumption were associated with noise-induced hearing impairment both in restaurant workers and entertainment employees. Excessive noise exposure is common in the Chinese restaurant and entertainment industries and a substantial proportion of restaurant workers and entertainment employees suffer from NIHL. Comprehensive hearing conservation programs should be introduced to the service industry

  4. Thermodynamics aspects of noise-induced phase synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Pedro D; Oliveira, Fernando A; Penna, André L A

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we present an approach for the thermodynamics of phase oscillators induced by an internal multiplicative noise. We analytically derive the free energy, entropy, internal energy, and specific heat. In this framework, the formulation of the first law of thermodynamics requires the definition of a synchronization field acting on the phase oscillators. By introducing the synchronization field, we have consistently obtained the susceptibility and analyzed its behavior. This allows us to characterize distinct phases in the system, which we have denoted as synchronized and parasynchronized phases, in analogy with magnetism. The system also shows a rich complex behavior, exhibiting ideal gas characteristics for low temperatures and susceptibility anomalies that are similar to those present in complex fluids such as water.

  5. Thermodynamics aspects of noise-induced phase synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Pedro D.; Oliveira, Fernando A.; Penna, André L. A.

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we present an approach for the thermodynamics of phase oscillators induced by an internal multiplicative noise. We analytically derive the free energy, entropy, internal energy, and specific heat. In this framework, the formulation of the first law of thermodynamics requires the definition of a synchronization field acting on the phase oscillators. By introducing the synchronization field, we have consistently obtained the susceptibility and analyzed its behavior. This allows us to characterize distinct phases in the system, which we have denoted as synchronized and parasynchronized phases, in analogy with magnetism. The system also shows a rich complex behavior, exhibiting ideal gas characteristics for low temperatures and susceptibility anomalies that are similar to those present in complex fluids such as water.

  6. Measuring Tyre Rolling Noise at the Contact Patch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, P.; Matuszkova, R.; Radimsky, M.; Kudrna, J.

    2017-06-01

    This paper deals with noise generated by road traffic. A focus is concentrated solely on one of its sources related to tyre/road interaction referred as rolling noise. The paper states brief overview of various approaches and methods used to measure this particular source of road traffic noise. On the basis of literature reviews, a unique device has been designed. Development of the measuring device and possibilities of its usage are described in detail in this paper. Obtained results of noise measurements can then be used to design measures that increase safety and a lead to better comfort on the road.

  7. Measurement of low-frequency noise in rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of low-frequency noise in rooms is problematic due to standing wave patterns. The spatial variation in the sound pressure level can typically be as much as 20-30 dB. For assessment of annoyance from low-frequency noise in dwellings, it is important to measure a level close...... rooms. The sound pressure level was measured 1) in three-dimensional corners and 2) according to current Swedish and Danish measurement methods. Furthermore, the entire sound pressure distributions were measured by scanning. The Swedish and Danish measurement methods include a corner measurement...... to the highest level present in a room, rather than a room average level. In order to ensure representative noise measurements, different positions were investigated based on theoretical considerations and observations from numerical room simulations. In addition measurements were performed in three different...

  8. Gamma model and its analysis for phase measuring profilometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Yongchang; Lau, Daniel L; Hao, Qi; Hassebrook, Laurence G

    2010-03-01

    Phase measuring profilometry is a method of structured light illumination whose three-dimensional reconstructions are susceptible to error from nonunitary gamma in the associated optical devices. While the effects of this distortion diminish with an increasing number of employed phase-shifted patterns, gamma distortion may be unavoidable in real-time systems where the number of projected patterns is limited by the presence of target motion. A mathematical model is developed for predicting the effects of nonunitary gamma on phase measuring profilometry, while also introducing an accurate gamma calibration method and two strategies for minimizing gamma's effect on phase determination. These phase correction strategies include phase corrections with and without gamma calibration. With the reduction in noise, for three-step phase measuring profilometry, analysis of the root mean squared error of the corrected phase will show a 60x reduction in phase error when the proposed gamma calibration is performed versus 33x reduction without calibration.

  9. Noise Exposure of Teachers in Nursery Schools-Evaluation of Measures for Noise Reduction When Dropping DUPLO Toy Bricks into Storage Cases by Sound Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Konstanze; Scharf, Thomas; Baumann, Uwe; Groneberg, David A; Bundschuh, Matthias

    2016-07-04

    Although noise is one of the leading work-related health risk factors for teachers, many nursery schools lack sufficient noise reduction measures. This intervention study evaluated the noise exposure of nursery school teachers when dropping DUPLO toy bricks into storage cases. Sound analyses of the impact included assessment of the maximum sound pressure level (LAFmax) as well as frequency analyses with 1/3 octave band filter. For the purpose of standardization, a customized gadget was developed. Recordings were performed in 11 cases of different materials and designs to assess the impact on sound level reduction. Thereby, the acoustic effects of three damping materials (foam rubber, carpet, and PU-foam) were investigated. The lowest LAFmax was measured in cases consisting of "metal grid" (90.71 dB) or of a woven willow "basket" (91.61 dB), whereas a case of "aluminium" (103.34 dB) generated the highest impact LAFmax. The frequency analyses determined especially low LAFmax in the frequency bands between 80 and 2500 Hz in cases designs "metal grid" and "basket". The insertion of PU-foam achieved the most significant attenuation of LAFmax (-13.88 dB) and, in the frequency analyses, the best sound damping. The dropping of DUPLO bricks in cases contributes to the high noise level in nursery schools, but measured LAFmax show no evidence for the danger of acute hearing loss. However, continuous exposure may lead to functional impairment of the hair cells and trigger stress reactions. We recommend noise reduction by utilizing cases of woven "basket" with an insert of PU-foam.

  10. Entanglement enhancement through multirail noise reduction for continuous-variable measurement-based quantum-information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yung-Chao; Wu, Shin-Tza

    2017-09-01

    We study theoretically the teleportation of a controlled-phase (cz) gate through measurement-based quantum-information processing for continuous-variable systems. We examine the degree of entanglement in the output modes of the teleported cz-gate for two classes of resource states: the canonical cluster states that are constructed via direct implementations of two-mode squeezing operations and the linear-optical version of cluster states which are built from linear-optical networks of beam splitters and phase shifters. In order to reduce the excess noise arising from finite-squeezed resource states, teleportation through resource states with different multirail designs will be considered and the enhancement of entanglement in the teleported cz gates will be analyzed. For multirail cluster with an arbitrary number of rails, we obtain analytical expressions for the entanglement in the output modes and analyze in detail the results for both classes of resource states. At the same time, we also show that for uniformly squeezed clusters the multirail noise reduction can be optimized when the excess noise is allocated uniformly to the rails. To facilitate the analysis, we develop a trick with manipulations of quadrature operators that can reveal rather efficiently the measurement sequence and corrective operations needed for the measurement-based gate teleportation, which will also be explained in detail.

  11. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Mark; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed

  12. Pump RIN-induced impairments in unrepeatered transmission systems using distributed Raman amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jingchi; Tang, Ming; Lau, Alan Pak Tao; Lu, Chao; Wang, Liang; Dong, Zhenhua; Bilal, Syed Muhammad; Fu, Songnian; Shum, Perry Ping; Liu, Deming

    2015-05-04

    High spectral efficiency modulation format based unrepeatered transmission systems using distributed Raman amplifier (DRA) have attracted much attention recently. To enhance the reach and optimize system performance, careful design of DRA is required based on the analysis of various types of impairments and their balance. In this paper, we study various pump RIN induced distortions on high spectral efficiency modulation formats. The vector theory of both 1st and higher-order stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) effect using Jones-matrix formalism is presented. The pump RIN will induce three types of distortion on high spectral efficiency signals: intensity noise stemming from SRS, phase noise stemming from cross phase modulation (XPM), and polarization crosstalk stemming from cross polarization modulation (XPolM). An analytical model for the statistical property of relative phase noise (RPN) in higher order DRA without dealing with complex vector theory is derived. The impact of pump RIN induced impairments are analyzed in polarization-multiplexed (PM)-QPSK and PM-16QAM-based unrepeatered systems simulations using 1st, 2nd and 3rd-order forward pumped Raman amplifier. It is shown that at realistic RIN levels, negligible impairments will be induced to PM-QPSK signals in 1st and 2nd order DRA, while non-negligible impairments will occur in 3rd order case. PM-16QAM signals suffer more penalties compared to PM-QPSK with the same on-off gain where both 2nd and 3rd order DRA will cause non-negligible performance degradations. We also investigate the performance of digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms to mitigate such impairments.

  13. Phase transitions in distributed control systems with multiplicative noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Nicolas; Bamieh, Bassam; Mitra, Partha; Sire, Clément

    2018-01-01

    Contemporary technological challenges often involve many degrees of freedom in a distributed or networked setting. Three aspects are notable: the variables are usually associated with the nodes of a graph with limited communication resources, hindering centralized control; the communication is subject to noise; and the number of variables can be very large. These three aspects make tools and techniques from statistical physics particularly suitable for the performance analysis of such networked systems in the limit of many variables (analogous to the thermodynamic limit in statistical physics). Perhaps not surprisingly, phase-transition like phenomena appear in these systems, where a sharp change in performance can be observed with a smooth parameter variation, with the change becoming discontinuous or singular in the limit of infinite system size. In this paper, we analyze the so called network consensus problem, prototypical of the above considerations, that has previously been analyzed mostly in the context of additive noise. We show that qualitatively new phase-transition like phenomena appear for this problem in the presence of multiplicative noise. Depending on dimensions, and on the presence or absence of a conservation law, the system performance shows a discontinuous change at a threshold value of the multiplicative noise strength. In the absence of the conservation law, and for graph spectral dimension less than two, the multiplicative noise threshold (the stability margin of the control problem) is zero. This is reminiscent of the absence of robust controllers for certain classes of centralized control problems. Although our study involves a ‘toy’ model, we believe that the qualitative features are generic, with implications for the robust stability of distributed control systems, as well as the effect of roundoff errors and communication noise on distributed algorithms.

  14. Maximizing noise energy for noise-masking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules Étienne, Cédric; Arleo, Angelo; Allard, Rémy

    2017-08-01

    Noise-masking experiments are widely used to investigate visual functions. To be useful, noise generally needs to be strong enough to noticeably impair performance, but under some conditions, noise does not impair performance even when its contrast approaches the maximal displayable limit of 100 %. To extend the usefulness of noise-masking paradigms over a wider range of conditions, the present study developed a noise with great masking strength. There are two typical ways of increasing masking strength without exceeding the limited contrast range: use binary noise instead of Gaussian noise or filter out frequencies that are not relevant to the task (i.e., which can be removed without affecting performance). The present study combined these two approaches to further increase masking strength. We show that binarizing the noise after the filtering process substantially increases the energy at frequencies within the pass-band of the filter given equated total contrast ranges. A validation experiment showed that similar performances were obtained using binarized-filtered noise and filtered noise (given equated noise energy at the frequencies within the pass-band) suggesting that the binarization operation, which substantially reduced the contrast range, had no significant impact on performance. We conclude that binarized-filtered noise (and more generally, truncated-filtered noise) can substantially increase the energy of the noise at frequencies within the pass-band. Thus, given a limited contrast range, binarized-filtered noise can display higher energy levels than Gaussian noise and thereby widen the range of conditions over which noise-masking paradigms can be useful.

  15. Interpretation of incore noise measurements in BWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van

    1983-01-01

    A survey is given of the main incentives for power reactor noise research, and the differences and similarities of noise in power and zero power systems are shown. After a short outline of historical developments the basic characteristics of the adjoint method in reactor noise theory are dealt with. The detector adjoint functions describe the transfer functions between spatially distributed noise sources and a (neutron or gamma) detector. In particular, the spatial dependence of these functions explains the 'local' and 'global' effects in BWR noise measurements. By including thermal hydraulic feedback effects in the adjoint analysis, it is shown that the common idea of a dominant global effect at low frequencies, which should result in point kinetic behaviour, is erroneous. The same analysis provides a method for nonperturbing on-line measurements on a BWR in The Netherlands. In the final part of the paper some ideas are given for further research in the field of BWR noise. (author)

  16. Imaging resolution signal-to-noise ratio in transverse phase amplification from classical information theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, Doug; Huang Zun; Pao, H.-Y.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2009-01-01

    A quantum phase amplifier operated in the spatial domain can improve the signal-to-noise ratio in imaging beyond the classical limit. The scaling of the signal-to-noise ratio with the gain of the quantum phase amplifier is derived from classical information theory

  17. The Effects of Audiovisual Stimulation on the Acceptance of Background Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plyler, Patrick N; Lang, Rowan; Monroe, Amy L; Gaudiano, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Previous examinations of noise acceptance have been conducted using an auditory stimulus only; however, the effect of visual speech supplementation of the auditory stimulus on acceptance of noise remains limited. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of audiovisual stimulation on the acceptance of noise in listeners with normal and impaired hearing. A repeated measures design was utilized. A total of 92 adult participants were recruited for this experiment. Of these participants, 54 were listeners with normal hearing and 38 were listeners with sensorineural hearing impairment. Most comfortable levels and acceptable noise levels (ANL) were obtained using auditory and auditory-visual stimulation modes for the unaided listening condition for each participant and for the aided listening condition for 35 of the participants with impaired hearing that owned hearing aids. Speech reading ability was assessed using the Utley test for each participant. The addition of visual input did not impact the most comfortable level values for listeners in either group; however, visual input improved unaided ANL values for listeners with normal hearing and aided ANL values in listeners with impaired hearing. ANL benefit received from visual speech input was related to the auditory ANL in listeners in each group; however, it was not related to speech reading ability for either listener group in any experimental condition. Visual speech input can significantly impact measures of noise acceptance. The current ANL measure may not accurately reflect acceptance of noise values when in more realistic environments, where the signal of interest is both audible and visible to the listener. American Academy of Audiology.

  18. When are we going to take noise seriously?; Arbeid og helse : Naar skal vi ta stoey paa alvor?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehlen, Ingrid Sivind

    2004-07-01

    Noise is often considered as a simple and OK issue in connection with working environments. It can be measured, and its harmful effect on the individual can be measured in hearing tests. In 2003, the Norwegian Labour Inspection was informed about 1921 cases of noise-impaired hearing. Noise is still common in today's working life. Impulsive noise from blows, shots, bangs etc. can cause immediate impaired hearing, but hearing losses can also be incurred by wear during many years of noise. Hearing-impaired people in noisy working conditions often also have diseases such as hypertension, cardiac infarction, blood clots, stomach ulcer, throat and vocal cord problems, muscle pain and sleeplessness. Noise may also cause problems of a more mental character, such as speech problems, stress, fatigue, reduced performance ability, reactivity and power of concentration (which may lead to accidents and fault rate). Few employers have the necessary equipment and skill to do noise measurements and hearing tests.

  19. Nonlinearity and Phase Noise Tolerant 75-110 GHz Signal over Fiber System Using Phase Modulation Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Lei; Pang, Xiaodan; Zhang, Xu

    2013-01-01

    We report on the transmission of 8 Gb/s 0 dB PAPR 16QAM-OFDM W-band (75-110 GHz) signals over 22.8km SMF without phase noise compensation by using a phase modulator in the optical heterodyne up-convertor....

  20. Investigation and measures to noise on spectroscopic measurement system in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaya, Susumu; Kubo, Hirotaka; Sugie, Tatsuo; Onizawa, Masami; Kawai, Isao; Nakata, Hisao.

    1997-11-01

    Breakdown of a negative-ion-based neutral beam injection (N-NBI) has caused noise trouble to several systems. The control circuit of a spectroscopic measurement system had not well worked because of the noise. The noise has been measured by an optical-fiber isolation system during operation of JT-60U. The amplitude and the frequency were 15-18 V and 15 MHz respectively. The transmission noise has been reduced by putting ferrite cores to all cables connecting with the control circuits. As a result, the trouble with the spectroscopic measurement system has completely been solved. Adding condensers and resistors to the circuit was not effective to reduce the noise. (author)

  1. Noise Exposure of Teachers in Nursery Schools—Evaluation of Measures for Noise Reduction When Dropping DUPLO Toy Bricks into Storage Cases by Sound Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstanze Gebauer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although noise is one of the leading work-related health risk factors for teachers, many nursery schools lack sufficient noise reduction measures. Methods: This intervention study evaluated the noise exposure of nursery school teachers when dropping DUPLO toy bricks into storage cases. Sound analyses of the impact included assessment of the maximum sound pressure level (LAFmax as well as frequency analyses with 1/3 octave band filter. For the purpose of standardization, a customized gadget was developed. Recordings were performed in 11 cases of different materials and designs to assess the impact on sound level reduction. Thereby, the acoustic effects of three damping materials (foam rubber, carpet, and PU-foam were investigated. Results: The lowest LAFmax was measured in cases consisting of “metal grid” (90.71 dB or of a woven willow “basket” (91.61 dB, whereas a case of “aluminium” (103.34 dB generated the highest impact LAFmax. The frequency analyses determined especially low LAFmax in the frequency bands between 80 and 2500 Hz in cases designs “metal grid” and “basket”. The insertion of PU-foam achieved the most significant attenuation of LAFmax (−13.88 dB and, in the frequency analyses, the best sound damping. Conclusion: The dropping of DUPLO bricks in cases contributes to the high noise level in nursery schools, but measured LAFmax show no evidence for the danger of acute hearing loss. However, continuous exposure may lead to functional impairment of the hair cells and trigger stress reactions. We recommend noise reduction by utilizing cases of woven “basket” with an insert of PU-foam.

  2. Noise exposure and hearing impairment among Chinese restaurant workers and entertainment employees in Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Qian Lao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is a major concern in the non-manufacturing industries. This study aimed to investigate the occupational noise exposure and the NIHL among Chinese restaurant workers and entertainment employees working in the service industry in Hong Kong. METHODS: This cross-sectional survey involved a total of 1,670 participants. Among them, 937 were randomly selected from the workers of Chinese restaurants and 733 were selected from workers in three entertainment sectors: radio and television stations; cultural performance halls or auditoria of the Leisure and Cultural Services Department (LCSD; and karaoke bars. Noise exposure levels were measured in the sampled restaurants and entertainment sectors. Each participant received an audiometric screening test. Those who were found to have abnormalities were required to take another diagnostic test in the health center. The "Klockhoff digit" method was used to classify NIHL in the present study. RESULTS: The main source of noise inside restaurants was the stoves. The mean hearing thresholds showed a typical dip at 3 to 6 KHz and a substantial proportion (23.7% of the workers fulfilled the criteria for presumptive NIHL. For entertainment sectors, employees in radio and television stations generally had higher exposure levels than those in the halls or auditoria of the LCSD and karaoke bars. The mean hearing thresholds showed a typical dip at 6 KHz and a substantial proportion of the employees fulfilled the criteria for presumptive NIHL (38.6%, 95%CI: 35.1-42.1%. Being male, older, and having longer service and daily alcohol consumption were associated with noise-induced hearing impairment both in restaurant workers and entertainment employees. CONCLUSION: Excessive noise exposure is common in the Chinese restaurant and entertainment industries and a substantial proportion of restaurant workers and entertainment employees suffer from NIHL. Comprehensive hearing

  3. Engineering the Flow of Liquid Two-Phase Systems by Passive Noise Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zeyi; Kong, Tiantian; Zhou, Chunmei; Wang, Liqiu

    2018-02-01

    We investigate a passive noise-control approach to engineering the two-phase flow in a microfluidic coflow system. The presence or absence of the jet breakup is studied for two immiscible oil phases, in a straight microchannel (referred to as the J device in the main text), an expansion microchannel (the W device) and a microchannel with the expansion-contraction geometry (the S device), respectively. We show that the jet breaks into droplets, in the jetting regime and the dripping regime (also referred to as the widening-jetting regime) for the straight channel and expansion channel, respectively, while a stable long jet does not break for the expansion-contraction geometry. As the inner phase passes the expansion-contraction functional unit, the random noise on the interface is significantly reduced and the hydrodynamic instability is suppressed, for a range of experimental parameters including flow rates, device geometry, liquid viscosity, and interfacial tension. We further present scale-up devices with multiple noise-control units and achieve decimeter-long yet stable jets. Our simple, effective, and robust noise-control approach can benefit microfluidic applications such as microfiber fabrication, interface chemical reaction, and on-chip distance transportation.

  4. Measurement noise of a point autofocus surface topography instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Xiaobing; Quagliotti, Danilo; Maculotti, Giacomo

    Optical instruments for areal topography measurement can be especially sensitive to noise when scanning is required. Such noise has different sources, including those internally generated and external sources from the environment.......Optical instruments for areal topography measurement can be especially sensitive to noise when scanning is required. Such noise has different sources, including those internally generated and external sources from the environment....

  5. Chronic exposure to low frequency noise at moderate levels causes impaired balance in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Tamura

    Full Text Available We are routinely exposed to low frequency noise (LFN; below 0.5 kHz at moderate levels of 60-70 dB sound pressure level (SPL generated from various sources in occupational and daily environments. LFN has been reported to affect balance in humans. However, there is limited information about the influence of chronic exposure to LFN at moderate levels for balance. In this study, we investigated whether chronic exposure to LFN at a moderate level of 70 dB SPL affects the vestibule, which is one of the organs responsible for balance in mice. Wild-type ICR mice were exposed for 1 month to LFN (0.1 kHz and high frequency noise (HFN; 16 kHz at 70 dB SPL at a distance of approximately 10-20 cm. Behavior analyses including rotarod, beam-crossing and footprint analyses showed impairments of balance in LFN-exposed mice but not in non-exposed mice or HFN-exposed mice. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a decreased number of vestibular hair cells and increased levels of oxidative stress in LFN-exposed mice compared to those in non-exposed mice. Our results suggest that chronic exposure to LFN at moderate levels causes impaired balance involving morphological impairments of the vestibule with enhanced levels of oxidative stress. Thus, the results of this study indicate the importance of considering the risk of chronic exposure to LFN at a moderate level for imbalance.

  6. RF Shot Noise Measurements in Au Atomic-scale Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruoyu

    Conduction electrons are responsible for many physical or chemical phenomena in condensed matter systems, and their behavior can be directly studied by electronic transport measurements. In conventional transport measurements, conductance or resistance is usually the focus. Such a measurement can be as simple as a quick two terminal DC check by a multi-meter, or a more sophisticated lock-in measurement of multiple higher harmonic signals synchronized to different frequencies. Conductance carries direct information about the quasi-particle density of states and the local electronic distributions, which are usually Fermi-Dirac distribution. Conductance is modified or dominated by scattering from defacts or interfaces, and could also reflect the spin-spin exchange interactions or inelastic couplings with phonons and photons. Naturally one can ask the question: is there anything else we can measure electronically, which carries extra information that a conductance measurement does not provide? One answer to this question is the electronic noise. While the conductance reflects the average charge conduction ability of a system, noise describes how the physical quantities fluctuate around their average values. Some of the fluctuations carry information about their physical origins. This thesis will focus on one particular type of the electronic noise shot noise, but other types of noise will also be introduced and discussed. We choose to measure the radio frequency component of shot noise, combining with a modulated lock-in detection technique, which provides a method to largely get rid of other unwanted low-frequency noise signals. Au atomic-scale junctions are the systems we studied here. Au is relatively well understood and will not generate too many complications, so it's ideal as the first platform for us to understand both shot noise itself and our RF technique. On the other hand, the atomic scale raises fundamental questions about electronic transport and local

  7. GMTI Direction of Arrival Measurements from Multiple Phase Centers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bickel, Douglas L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar attempts to detect and locate targets with unknown motion. Very slow-moving targets are difficult to locate in the presence of surrounding clutter. This necessitates multiple antenna phase centers (or equivalent) to offer independent Direction of Arrival (DOA) measurements. DOA accuracy and precision generally remains dependent on target Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Clutter-toNoise Ratio (CNR), scene topography, interfering signals, and a number of antenna parameters. This is true even for adaptive techniques like Space-Time-AdaptiveProcessing (STAP) algorithms.

  8. High-Tc Superconducting Bolometer Noise Measurement Using Low Noise Transformers - Theory and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Shahid; Jones, Hollis H.

    2011-01-01

    Care must always be taken when performing noise measurements on high-Tc superconducting materials to ensure that the results are not from the measurement system itself. One situation likely to occur is with low noise transformers. One of the least understood devices, it provides voltage gain for low impedance inputs (< 100 ), e.g., YBaCuO and GdBaCuO thin films, with comparatively lower noise levels than other devices for instance field effect and bipolar junction transistors. An essential point made in this paper is that because of the complex relationships between the transformer ports, input impedance variance alters the transformer s transfer function in particular, the low frequency cutoff shift. The transfer of external and intrinsic transformer noise to the output along with optimization and precautions are treated; all the while, we will cohesively connect the transfer function shift, the load impedance, and the actual noise at the transformer output.

  9. Improving the accuracy of smart devices to measure noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Benjamin; Kardous, Chucri; Neitzel, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Occupational noise exposure is one of the most frequent hazards present in the workplace; up to 22 million workers have potentially hazardous noise exposures in the U.S. As a result, noise-induced hearing loss is one of the most common occupational injuries in the U.S. Workers in manufacturing, construction, and the military are at the highest risk for hearing loss. Despite the large number of people exposed to high levels of noise at work, many occupations have not been adequately evaluated for noise exposure. The objective of this experiment was to investigate whether or not iOS smartphones and other smart devices (Apple iPhones and iPods) could be used as reliable instruments to measure noise exposures. For this experiment three different types of microphones were tested with a single model of iPod and three generations of iPhones: the internal microphones on the device, a low-end lapel microphone, and a high-end lapel microphone marketed as being compliant with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard for a Class 2-microphone. All possible combinations of microphones and noise measurement applications were tested in a controlled environment using several different levels of pink noise ranging from 60-100 dBA. Results were compared to simultaneous measurements made using a Type 1 sound level measurement system. Analysis of variance and Tukey's honest significant difference (HSD) test were used to determine if the results differed by microphone or noise measurement application. Levels measured with external microphones combined with certain noise measurement applications did not differ significantly from levels measured with the Type 1 sound measurement system. Results showed that it may be possible to use iOS smartphones and smart devices, with specific combinations of measurement applications and calibrated external microphones, to collect reliable, occupational noise exposure data under certain conditions and within the limitations of the

  10. Relations Between the Intelligibility of Speech in Noise and Psychophysical Measures of Hearing Measured in Four Languages Using the Auditory Profile Test Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. M. Van Esch

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the relations between the intelligibility of speech in noise and measures of auditory resolution, loudness recruitment, and cognitive function. The analyses were based on data published earlier as part of the presentation of the Auditory Profile, a test battery implemented in four languages. Tests of the intelligibility of speech, resolution, loudness recruitment, and lexical decision making were measured using headphones in five centers: in Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Correlations and stepwise linear regression models were calculated. In sum, 72 hearing-impaired listeners aged 22 to 91 years with a broad range of hearing losses were included in the study. Several significant correlations were found with the intelligibility of speech in noise. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that pure-tone average, age, spectral and temporal resolution, and loudness recruitment were significant predictors of the intelligibility of speech in fluctuating noise. Complex interrelationships between auditory factors and the intelligibility of speech in noise were revealed using the Auditory Profile data set in four languages. After taking into account the effects of pure-tone average and age, spectral and temporal resolution and loudness recruitment had an added value in the prediction of variation among listeners with respect to the intelligibility of speech in noise. The results of the lexical decision making test were not related to the intelligibility of speech in noise, in the population studied.

  11. Extended Kalman filtering for joint mitigation of phase and amplitude noise in coherent QAM systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakala, Lalitha; Schmauss, Bernhard

    2016-03-21

    We numerically investigate our proposed carrier phase and amplitude noise estimation (CPANE) algorithm using extend Kalman filter (EKF) for joint mitigation of linear and non-linear phase noise as well as amplitude noise on 4, 16 and 64 polarization multiplexed (PM) quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) 224 Gb/s systems. The results are compared to decision directed (DD) carrier phase estimation (CPE), DD phase locked loop (PLL) and universal CPE (U-CPE) algorithms. Besides eliminating the necessity of phase unwrapping function, EKF-CPANE shows improved performance for both back-to-back (BTB) and transmission scenarios compared to the aforementioned algorithms. We further propose a weighted innovation approach (WIA) of the EKF-CPANE which gives an improvement of 0.3 dB in the Q-factor, compared to the original algorithm.

  12. The minimization of ac phase noise in interferometric systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filinski, Ignacy; Gordon, R A

    1994-01-01

    bladder vibration isolators are used incorrectly and do not provide sufficient reduction in the contribution of floor vibrations to phase noise. Several simple trampoline-type air bladder vibration isolator systems are described which are comparable in performance to commercial systems. With the exception...

  13. Mobile Communication Devices, Ambient Noise, and Acoustic Voice Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryn, Youri; Ysenbaert, Femke; Zarowski, Andrzej; Vanspauwen, Robby

    2017-03-01

    The ability to move with mobile communication devices (MCDs; ie, smartphones and tablet computers) may induce differences in microphone-to-mouth positioning and use in noise-packed environments, and thus influence reliability of acoustic voice measurements. This study investigated differences in various acoustic voice measures between six recording equipments in backgrounds with low and increasing noise levels. One chain of continuous speech and sustained vowel from 50 subjects with voice disorders (all separated by silence intervals) was radiated and re-recorded in an anechoic chamber with five MCDs and one high-quality recording system. These recordings were acquired in one condition without ambient noise and in four conditions with increased ambient noise. A total of 10 acoustic voice markers were obtained in the program Praat. Differences between MCDs and noise condition were assessed with Friedman repeated-measures test and posthoc Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, both for related samples, after Bonferroni correction. (1) Except median fundamental frequency and seven nonsignificant differences, MCD samples have significantly higher acoustic markers than clinical reference samples in minimal environmental noise. (2) Except median fundamental frequency, jitter local, and jitter rap, all acoustic measures on samples recorded with the reference system experienced significant influence from room noise levels. Fundamental frequency is resistant to recording system, environmental noise, and their combination. All other measures, however, were impacted by both recording system and noise condition, and especially by their combination, often already in the reference/baseline condition without added ambient noise. Caution is therefore warranted regarding implementation of MCDs as clinical recording tools, particularly when applied for treatment outcomes assessments. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Neurally based measurement and evaluation of environmental noise

    CERN Document Server

    Soeta, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with methods of measurement and evaluation of environmental noise based on an auditory neural and brain-oriented model. The model consists of the autocorrelation function (ACF) and the interaural cross-correlation function (IACF) mechanisms for signals arriving at the two ear entrances. Even when the sound pressure level of a noise is only about 35 dBA, people may feel annoyed due to the aspects of sound quality. These aspects can be formulated by the factors extracted from the ACF and IACF. Several examples of measuring environmental noise—from outdoor noise such as that of aircraft, traffic, and trains, and indoor noise such as caused by floor impact, toilets, and air-conditioning—are demonstrated. According to the noise measurement and evaluation, applications for sound design are discussed. This book provides an excellent resource for students, researchers, and practitioners in a wide range of fields, such as the automotive, railway, and electronics industries, and soundscape, architec...

  15. Age, duration of work, noise and vibration in inducing hearing and balance impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Bashiruddin

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Noisy and vibrating bajaj, a public transportation in Jakarta, is a potential risk in inducing hearing and balance problems. Bajaj drivers in the Jakarta area were chosen by consecutive sampling and examined medically in the Neurotological Subdivision of the ENT Department of the Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta. Hearing and balance impairments were then diagnosed from audiometric and posturographic tests. The study was carried out from March 2000 until October 2001. A number of 350 bajaj drivers participated in this study. There were 97 subjects without hearing and balance impairments, and 96 subjects suffered from hearing and balance impairments. Compared to drivers aged less than 40 years, those aged 41 years or more had a four-fold increased risk of developing hearing and balance impairments [adjusted odds ratio (OR = 3.90; 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.67-9.01. Drivers working 9 hours or more a day had an increased risk 2.3 times of developing hearing and balance impairments compared those working less than 9 hours a day (adjusted OR = 2.32; 95% CI=I.22-4.41. Furthermore, when compared to those who had been working for 1-5 years, those who had been working for 5 years had an increased tendency of developing hearing and balance impairments. Those who had been working 21-30 years had a seven-fold increased risk of developing hearing and balance impairments (adjusted OR = 7.11; 95% CI = 1.88-26.92. To minimize hearing and balance impairments bajaj drivers are recommended to work less than 8 hours a day. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 101-6Keywords: noise, vibration, hearing, balance impairments, driver

  16. A Novel Phase-Locking-Free Phase Sensitive Amplifier based Regenerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Niels-Kristian; Røge, Kasper Meldgaard; Guan, Pengyu

    2016-01-01

    We propose a scheme for phase regeneration of optical binary phase-shift keying (BPSK) data signals based on phase sensitive amplification without active phase-locking. A delay interferometer (DI) is used to convert a BPSK signal impaired by noise to an amplitude modulated signal followed by cross......-locked pumps. As a result, active phase-stabilization is avoided. A proof-of-principle experiment is carried out with a dual-pump degenerate phase sensitive amplifier (PSA), demonstrating regeneration for a 10 Gb/s non-return-to-zero differential BPSK (NRZ-DPSK) data signal degraded by a sinusoidal phase...

  17. Noise measurements of highway pavements in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    This report presents the results of noise testing performed on Texas pavements between May of 2006 and the : summer of 2008. Two field test methodologies were used: roadside noise measurement with SPL meters and onvehicle : sound intensity measuremen...

  18. Moderators of noise-induced cognitive change in healthy adults

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Bernice AL; Peters, Emmanuelle R; Ettinger, Ulrich; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Kumari, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Environmental noise causes cognitive impairment, particularly in executive function and episodic memory domains, in healthy populations. However, the possible moderating influences on this relationship are less clear. This study assessed 54 healthy participants (24 men) on a cognitive battery (measuring psychomotor speed, attention, executive function, working memory, and verbal learning and memory) under three (quiet, urban, and social) noise conditions. IQ, subjective noise sensitivity, sle...

  19. Comparison of measured and predicted airfoil self-noise with application to wind turbine noise reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dassen, T.; Parchen, R.; Guidati, G.; Wagner, S.; Kang, S.; Khodak, A.E.

    1998-01-01

    In the ongoing JOULE-III project 'Development of Design Tools for Reduced Aerodynamic Noise Wind Turbines (DRAW)', prediction codes for inflow-turbulence (IT) noise and turbulent boundary layer trailing-edge (TE) noise, are developed and validated. It is shown that the differences in IT noise radiation between airfoils having a different shape, are correctly predicted. The first, preliminary comparison made between predicted and measured TE noise spectra yields satisfactory results. 17 refs

  20. Phase synchronization of neuronal noise in mouse hippocampal epileptiform dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletis, Demitre; Carlen, Peter L; Valiante, Taufik A; Bardakjian, Berj L

    2013-02-01

    Organized brain activity is the result of dynamical, segregated neuronal signals that may be used to investigate synchronization effects using sophisticated neuroengineering techniques. Phase synchrony analysis, in particular, has emerged as a promising methodology to study transient and frequency-specific coupling effects across multi-site signals. In this study, we investigated phase synchronization in intracellular recordings of interictal and ictal epileptiform events recorded from pairs of cells in the whole (intact) mouse hippocampus. In particular, we focused our analysis on the background noise-like activity (NLA), previously reported to exhibit complex neurodynamical properties. Our results show evidence for increased linear and nonlinear phase coupling in NLA across three frequency bands [theta (4-10 Hz), beta (12-30 Hz) and gamma (30-80 Hz)] in the ictal compared to interictal state dynamics. We also present qualitative and statistical evidence for increased phase synchronization in the theta, beta and gamma frequency bands from paired recordings of ictal NLA. Overall, our results validate the use of background NLA in the neurodynamical study of epileptiform transitions and suggest that what is considered "neuronal noise" is amenable to synchronization effects in the spatiotemporal domain.

  1. Noise measurements during high-frequency oscillatory and conventional mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berens, R J; Weigle, C G

    1995-10-01

    To evaluate the noise levels with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and conventional mechanical ventilation. An observational, prospective study. Pediatric intensive care unit. The caretakers and environment of the pediatric intensive care unit. High-frequency oscillatory and conventional mechanical ventilation. Caretakers evaluated noise using a visual analog scale. Noise was measured with a decibel meter and an octave band frequency filter. There was twice as much noise perceived by the caretakers and as measured on the decibel A scale. All measures showed significantly greater noise, especially at low frequencies, with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation exposes the patient to twice as much noise as does the use of conventional mechanical ventilation.

  2. Absence of phase-dependent noise in time-domain reflectivity studies of impulsively excited phonons

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, A.

    2010-06-17

    There have been several reports of phase-dependent noise in time-domain reflectivity studies of optical phonons excited by femtosecond laser pulses in semiconductors, semimetals, and superconductors. It was suggested that such behavior is associated with the creation of squeezed phonon states although there is no theoretical model that directly supports such a proposal. We have experimentally re-examined the studies of phonons in bismuth and gallium arsenide, and find no evidence of any phase-dependent noise signature associated with the phonons. We place an upper limit on any such noise at least 40–50 dB lower than previously reported.

  3. Absence of phase-dependent noise in time-domain reflectivity studies of impulsively excited phonons

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, A.; Andrews, S. R.

    2010-01-01

    There have been several reports of phase-dependent noise in time-domain reflectivity studies of optical phonons excited by femtosecond laser pulses in semiconductors, semimetals, and superconductors. It was suggested that such behavior is associated with the creation of squeezed phonon states although there is no theoretical model that directly supports such a proposal. We have experimentally re-examined the studies of phonons in bismuth and gallium arsenide, and find no evidence of any phase-dependent noise signature associated with the phonons. We place an upper limit on any such noise at least 40–50 dB lower than previously reported.

  4. Uncorrelated Noise in Turbulence Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Leif; Lenschow, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    of atmospheric variability. The authors assume that the measured signal is a representation of a variable that is continuous on the scale of interest in the atmosphere. Uncorrelated noise affects the autovariance function (or, equivalently, the structure function) only between zero and the first lag, while its...... effect is smeared across the entire power spectrum. For this reason, quantities such as variance dissipation may be more conveniently estimated from the structure function than from the spectrum. The modeling results are confirmed by artificially modifying a test time series with Poisson noise...

  5. Noise and analyzer-crystal angular position analysis for analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Keivan; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-04-01

    The analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging (ABI) method is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. Like many of the modern imaging techniques, ABI is a computed imaging method (meaning that images are calculated from raw data). ABI can simultaneously generate a number of planar parametric images containing information about absorption, refraction, and scattering properties of an object. These images are estimated from raw data acquired by measuring (sampling) the angular intensity profile of the x-ray beam passed through the object at different angular positions of the analyzer crystal. The noise in the estimated ABI parametric images depends upon imaging conditions like the source intensity (flux), measurements angular positions, object properties, and the estimation method. In this paper, we use the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRLB) to quantify the noise properties in parametric images and to investigate the effect of source intensity, different analyzer-crystal angular positions and object properties on this bound, assuming a fixed radiation dose delivered to an object. The CRLB is the minimum bound for the variance of an unbiased estimator and defines the best noise performance that one can obtain regardless of which estimation method is used to estimate ABI parametric images. The main result of this paper is that the variance (hence the noise) in parametric images is directly proportional to the source intensity and only a limited number of analyzer-crystal angular measurements (eleven for uniform and three for optimal non-uniform) are required to get the best parametric images. The following angular measurements only spread the total dose to the measurements without improving or worsening CRLB, but the added measurements may improve parametric images by reducing estimation bias. Next, using CRLB we evaluate the multiple-image radiography, diffraction enhanced imaging and scatter diffraction enhanced imaging estimation techniques

  6. Noise and analyzer-crystal angular position analysis for analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging (ABI) method is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. Like many of the modern imaging techniques, ABI is a computed imaging method (meaning that images are calculated from raw data). ABI can simultaneously generate a number of planar parametric images containing information about absorption, refraction, and scattering properties of an object. These images are estimated from raw data acquired by measuring (sampling) the angular intensity profile of the x-ray beam passed through the object at different angular positions of the analyzer crystal. The noise in the estimated ABI parametric images depends upon imaging conditions like the source intensity (flux), measurements angular positions, object properties, and the estimation method. In this paper, we use the Cramér–Rao lower bound (CRLB) to quantify the noise properties in parametric images and to investigate the effect of source intensity, different analyzer-crystal angular positions and object properties on this bound, assuming a fixed radiation dose delivered to an object. The CRLB is the minimum bound for the variance of an unbiased estimator and defines the best noise performance that one can obtain regardless of which estimation method is used to estimate ABI parametric images. The main result of this paper is that the variance (hence the noise) in parametric images is directly proportional to the source intensity and only a limited number of analyzer-crystal angular measurements (eleven for uniform and three for optimal non-uniform) are required to get the best parametric images. The following angular measurements only spread the total dose to the measurements without improving or worsening CRLB, but the added measurements may improve parametric images by reducing estimation bias. Next, using CRLB we evaluate the multiple-image radiography, diffraction enhanced imaging and scatter diffraction enhanced imaging estimation techniques

  7. Relations between perceptual measures of temporal processing, auditory-evoked brainstem responses and speech intelligibility in noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papakonstantinou, Alexandra; Strelcyk, Olaf; Dau, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates behavioural and objective measures of temporal auditory processing and their relation to the ability to understand speech in noise. The experiments were carried out on a homogeneous group of seven hearing-impaired listeners with normal sensitivity at low frequencies (up to 1...... kHz) and steeply sloping hearing losses above 1 kHz. For comparison, data were also collected for five normalhearing listeners. Temporal processing was addressed at low frequencies by means of psychoacoustical frequency discrimination, binaural masked detection and amplitude modulation (AM......) detection. In addition, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to clicks and broadband rising chirps were recorded. Furthermore, speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were determined for Danish sentences in speechshaped noise. The main findings were: (1) SRTs were neither correlated with hearing sensitivity...

  8. Performance analysis of an all-optical OFDM system in presence of non-linear phase noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmood, Jassim K; Harun, Sulaiman W; Emami, Siamak D; Khodaei, Amin; Noordin, Kamarul A; Ahmad, Harith; Shalaby, Hossam M H

    2015-02-23

    The potential for higher spectral efficiency has increased the interest in all-optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) systems. However, the sensitivity of all-optical OFDM to fiber non-linearity, which causes nonlinear phase noise, is still a major concern. In this paper, an analytical model for estimating the phase noise due to self-phase modulation (SPM), cross-phase modulation (XPM), and four-wave mixing (FWM) in an all-optical OFDM system is presented. The phase noise versus power, distance, and number of subcarriers is evaluated by implementing the mathematical model using Matlab. In order to verify the results, an all-optical OFDM system, that uses coupler-based inverse fast Fourier transform/fast Fourier transform without any nonlinear compensation, is demonstrated by numerical simulation. The system employs 29 subcarriers; each subcarrier is modulated by a 4-QAM or 16-QAM format with a symbol rate of 25 Gsymbol/s. The results indicate that the phase variance due to FWM is dominant over those induced by either SPM or XPM. It is also shown that the minimum phase noise occurs at -3 dBm and -1 dBm for 4-QAM and 16-QAM, respectively. Finally, the error vector magnitude (EVM) versus subcarrier power and symbol rate is quantified using both simulation and the analytical model. It turns out that both EVM results are in good agreement with each other.

  9. Effects of background noise on inter-trial phase coherence and auditory N1-P2 responses to speech stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, Tess K; Zhang, Yang

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of a speech-babble background noise on inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC, also referred to as phase locking value (PLV)) and auditory event-related responses (AERP) to speech sounds. Specifically, we analyzed EEG data from 11 normal hearing subjects to examine whether ITPC can predict noise-induced variations in the obligatory N1-P2 complex response. N1-P2 amplitude and latency data were obtained for the /bu/syllable in quiet and noise listening conditions. ITPC data in delta, theta, and alpha frequency bands were calculated for the N1-P2 responses in the two passive listening conditions. Consistent with previous studies, background noise produced significant amplitude reduction and latency increase in N1 and P2, which were accompanied by significant ITPC decreases in all the three frequency bands. Correlation analyses further revealed that variations in ITPC were able to predict the amplitude and latency variations in N1-P2. The results suggest that trial-by-trial analysis of cortical neural synchrony is a valuable tool in understanding the modulatory effects of background noise on AERP measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Data Quality Assurance for Supersonic Jet Noise Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford A.; Henderson, Brenda S.; Bridges, James E.

    2010-01-01

    The noise created by a supersonic aircraft is a primary concern in the design of future high-speed planes. The jet noise reduction technologies required on these aircraft will be developed using scale-models mounted to experimental jet rigs designed to simulate the exhaust gases from a full-scale jet engine. The jet noise data collected in these experiments must accurately predict the noise levels produced by the full-scale hardware in order to be a useful development tool. A methodology has been adopted at the NASA Glenn Research Center s Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory to insure the quality of the supersonic jet noise data acquired from the facility s High Flow Jet Exit Rig so that it can be used to develop future nozzle technologies that reduce supersonic jet noise. The methodology relies on mitigating extraneous noise sources, examining the impact of measurement location on the acoustic results, and investigating the facility independence of the measurements. The methodology is documented here as a basis for validating future improvements and its limitations are noted so that they do not affect the data analysis. Maintaining a high quality jet noise laboratory is an ongoing process. By carefully examining the data produced and continually following this methodology, data quality can be maintained and improved over time.

  11. Measuring low-frequency noise indoors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    that is exceeded in 10% of the volume of a room (L10) is proposed as a rational and objective target for a measurement method. In Sweden and Denmark rules exist for measuring low-frequency noise indoors. The performance of these procedures was investigated in three rooms. The results from the Swedish method were...

  12. Noise in the Measurement of Light with Photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robben, F

    1968-05-15

    In order to be able to compare measurements derived from the anode current of a photomultiplier with measurement derived from photoelectron pulse counting, a systematic investigation of the properties of some photomultiplier tubes has been made. This has led to a correlation of the properties of a photomultiplier based on the quantum efficiency {eta}, the gain G, a photoelectron loss factor S and an effective dark rate D. In terms of these quantities the signal to noise ratio of an experimental measurement can be calculated, given the light flux and measurement technique. The fluctuations in a photomultiplier output are divided into two parts; Poisson fluctuations, and those due to excess noise. It is experimentally shown, from measurements on a 931A photomultiplier, that the excess noise exceeds the Poisson fluctuations only at very low frequencies, or long DC measurement times (> 10 s), for both pulse counting and anode current measurements. The Poisson fluctuations are found to be approximately the same for both pulse counting and anode current measurements, at both high light levels where the dark current, or dark pulses, are negligible, as well as at low light levels where the dark current is dominant. The excess noise is found to be somewhat greater in the case of anode current measurements. Thus both pulse counting and anode current measurement techniques have nearly identical noise properties, as far as the photomultiplier is concerned, and selection of either experimental technique depends primarily on the properties of the electronic equipment. By use of a synchronous detection technique, the variance of the pulse count was measured experimentally to an accuracy of {+-} 4 %, and was shown to be in agreement with that predicted by Poisson statistics.

  13. Understanding noise stress-induced cognitive impairment in healthy adults and its implications for schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernice Wright

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise stress (NS is detrimental to many aspects of human health and behavior. Understanding the effect of noise stressors on human cognitive function is a growing area of research and is crucial to helping clinical populations, such as those with schizophrenia, which are particularly sensitive to stressors. A review of electronic databases for studies assessing the effect of acute NS on cognitive functions in healthy adults revealed 31 relevant studies. The review revealed (1 NS exerts a clear negative effect on attention, working memory and episodic recall, and (2 personality characteristics, in particular neuroticism, and sleep influence the impact of noise stressors on performance in interaction with task complexity. Previous findings of consistent impairment in NS-relevant cognitive domains, heightened sensitivity to stressors, elevated neuroticism and sleep disturbances in schizophrenia, taken together with the findings of this review, highlight the need for empirical studies to elucidate whether NS, a common aspect of urban environments, exacerbates cognitive deficits and other symptoms in schizophrenia and related clinical populations.

  14. Shot-noise-limited optical Faraday polarimetry with enhanced laser noise cancelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jiaming; Luo, Le; Carvell, Jeff; Cheng, Ruihua; Lai, Tianshu; Wang, Zixin

    2014-01-01

    We present a shot-noise-limited measurement of optical Faraday rotations with sub-ten-nanoradian angular sensitivity. This extremely high sensitivity is achieved by using electronic laser noise cancelling and phase sensitive detection. Specially, an electronic laser noise canceller with a common mode rejection ratio of over 100 dB was designed and built for enhanced laser noise cancelling. By measuring the Faraday rotation of ambient air, we demonstrate an angular sensitivity of up to 9.0×10 −9  rad/√(Hz), which is limited only by the shot-noise of the photocurrent of the detector. To date, this is the highest angular sensitivity ever reported for Faraday polarimeters in the absence of cavity enhancement. The measured Verdet constant of ambient air, 1.93(3)×10 −9 rad/(G cm) at 633 nm wavelength, agrees extremely well with the earlier experiments using high finesse optical cavities. Further, we demonstrate the applications of this sensitive technique in materials science by measuring the Faraday effect of an ultrathin iron film

  15. Power reactor noise measurements in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallagi, D.; Horanyi, S.; Hargitai, T.

    1975-01-01

    An outline is given of the history of reactor noise research in Hungary. A brief description is given of studies in the WWR-SM reactor, a modified version of the original WWR-S thermal reactor, for the detection of in-core simulated boiling by analysis of the noise of out-of-core ionization chambers. Coolant velocity measurements by transit time analysis of temperature fluctuations are described. (U.K.)

  16. Measurement of luminance noise and chromaticity noise of LCDs with a colorimeter and a color camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehrig, H.; Dallas, W. J.; Krupinski, E. A.; Redford, Gary R.

    2007-09-01

    This communication focuses on physical evaluation of image quality of displays for applications in medical imaging. In particular we were interested in luminance noise as well as chromaticity noise of LCDs. Luminance noise has been encountered in the study of monochrome LCDs for some time, but chromaticity noise is a new type of noise which has been encountered first when monochrome and color LCDs were compared in an ROC study. In this present study one color and one monochrome 3 M-pixel LCDs were studied. Both were DICOM calibrated with equal dynamic range. We used a Konica Minolta Chroma Meter CS-200 as well as a Foveon color camera to estimate luminance and chrominance variations of the displays. We also used a simulation experiment to estimate luminance noise. The measurements with the colorimeter were consistent. The measurements with the Foveon color camera were very preliminary as color cameras had never been used for image quality measurements. However they were extremely promising. The measurements with the colorimeter and the simulation results showed that the luminance and chromaticity noise of the color LCD were larger than that of the monochrome LCD. Under the condition that an adequate calibration method and image QA/QC program for color displays are available, we expect color LCDs may be ready for radiology in very near future.

  17. Noise-induced phase space transport in two-dimensional Hamiltonian systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelov, I V; Kandrup, H E

    1999-08-01

    First passage time experiments were used to explore the effects of low amplitude noise as a source of accelerated phase space diffusion in two-dimensional Hamiltonian systems, and these effects were then compared with the effects of periodic driving. The objective was to quantify and understand the manner in which "sticky" chaotic orbits that, in the absence of perturbations, are confined near regular islands for very long times, can become "unstuck" much more quickly when subjected to even very weak perturbations. For both noise and periodic driving, the typical escape time scales logarithmically with the amplitude of the perturbation. For white noise, the details seem unimportant: Additive and multiplicative noise typically have very similar effects, and the presence or absence of a friction related to the noise by a fluctuation-dissipation theorem is also largely irrelevant. Allowing for colored noise can significantly decrease the efficacy of the perturbation, but only when the autocorrelation time, which vanishes for white noise, becomes so large that there is little power at frequencies comparable to the natural frequencies of the unperturbed orbit. Similarly, periodic driving is relatively inefficient when the driving frequency is not comparable to these natural frequencies. This suggests that noise-induced extrinsic diffusion, like modulational diffusion associated with periodic driving, is a resonance phenomenon. The logarithmic dependence of the escape time on amplitude reflects the fact that the time required for perturbed and unperturbed orbits to diverge a given distance scales logarithmically in the amplitude of the perturbation.

  18. Processing of Binaural Pitch Stimuli in Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    Binaural pitch is a tonal sensation produced by introducing a frequency-dependent interaural phase shift in binaurally presented white noise. As no spectral cues are present in the physical stimulus, binaural pitch perception is assumed to rely on accurate temporal fine structure coding and intact...... binaural integration mechanisms. This study investigated to what extent basic auditory measures of binaural processing as well as cognitive abilities are correlated with the ability of hearing-impaired listeners to perceive binaural pitch. Subjects from three groups (1: normal-hearing; 2: cochlear...... hearingloss; 3: retro-cochlear impairment) were asked to identify the pitch contour of series of five notes of equal duration, ranging from 523 to 784 Hz, played either with Huggins’ binaural pitch stimuli (BP) or perceptually similar, but monaurally detectable, pitches (MP). All subjects from groups 1 and 2...

  19. Quantum Noise Reduction with Pulsed Light in Optical Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Keren

    Optical fibers offer considerable advantages over bulk nonlinear media for the generation of squeezed states. This thesis reports on experimental investigations of reducing quantum noise by means of squeezing in nonlinear fiber optic interferometers. Fibers have low insertion loss which allows for long interaction lengths. High field intensities are easily achieved in the small cores of single mode fibers. Additionally, the nonlinear process employed is self phase modulation or the Kerr effect, whose broad band nature requires no phase matching and can be exploited with ultra-short pulses of high peak intensity. All these advantageous features of fibers result in easily obtained large nonlinear phase shifts and subsequently large squeezing parameters. By the self phase modulation process a correlation is produced between the phase and amplitude fluctuations of the optical field. The attenuated or squeezed quadrature has a lower noise level than the initial level associated with the coherent state field before propagation. The resulting reduced quantum noise quadrature can be utilized to improve the sensitivity of a phase measuring instrument such as an interferometer. Because the Kerr nonlinearity is a degenerate self pumping process, the squeezed noise is at the same frequency as the pump field. Classical pump noise can therefore interfere with the desired measurement of the quantum noise reduction. The most severe noise process is the phase noise caused by thermally induced index modulation of the fiber. This noise termed Guided Acoustic Wave Brillouin Scattering, or GAWBS, by previous researchers is studied and analyzed. Experiments performed to overcome GAWBS successfully with several schemes are described. An experimental demonstration of an interferometric measurement with better sensitivity than the standard quantum limit is described. The results lead to new understandings into the limitations of quantum noise reduction that can be achieved in the

  20. Noise evaluation of a point autofocus surface topography measuring instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maculotti, Giacomo; Feng, Xiaobing; Galetto, Maurizio; Leach, Richard

    2018-06-01

    In this work, the measurement noise of a point autofocus surface topography measuring instrument is evaluated, as the first step towards establishing a route to traceability for this type of instrument. The evaluation is based on the determination of the metrological characteristics for noise as outlined in draft ISO specification standards by using a calibrated optical flat. The static noise and repeatability of the autofocus sensor are evaluated. The influence of environmental disturbances on the measured surface topography and the built-in software to compensate for such influences are also investigated. The instrument was found to have a measurement noise of approximately 2 nm or, when expressed with the measurement bandwidth, 0.4 nm for a single-point measurement.

  1. Decreased Hippocampal 5-HT and DA Levels Following Sub-Chronic Exposure to Noise Stress: Impairment in both Spatial and Recognition Memory in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Saida; Naqvi, Fizza; Batool, Zehra; Tabassum, Saiqa; Perveen, Tahira; Saleem, Sadia; Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2012-01-01

    Mankind is exposed to a number of stressors, and among them noise is one which can cause intense stress. High levels of background noise can severely impair one's ability to concentrate. The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of sub-chronic noise stress on cognitive behavior and hippocampal monoamine levels in male rats. The study was performed on 12 male Wistar rats, divided into two groups; the control and noise-exposed. The rats in the test group were subjected to noise stress, 4h daily for 15 days. Cognitive testing was performed by the Elevated Plus Maze test (EPM) and Novel Object Recognition test (NOR). HPLC-EC was used to determine hippocampal monoamine levels and their metabolites. The data obtained revealed a significant decrease in hippocampal serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and dopamine (DA) levels, whereas turnover ratios of 5-HT and DA were significantly increased compared to the controls. Rats exposed to noise exhibited a significant decrement in spatial memory. A significantly decreased recognition index of rats exposed to noise as compared to the control was also observed in the NOR test. Results of the present findings suggest the role of decreased hippocampal 5-HT and DA in the impairment of cognitive function following noise exposure.

  2. An Analysis of 1/f2 Phase Noise in Bipolar Colpitts Oscillators (With a Digression on Bipolar Differential-Pair LC Oscillators)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fard, A.; Andreani, Pietro

    2007-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of phase noise in the $1/f^{2}$ region displayed by both single-ended and differential bipolar Colpitts oscillators. Very accurate and rigorous symbolic phase noise expressions are derived, enabling a deeper insight into the major mechanisms of phase noise generatio......, and providing new tools for design optimization. Phase noise expressions for the cross-coupled differential-pair LC-tank oscillator are derived as well....

  3. Measured Noise from Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Randolph; McSwain, Robert; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Proposed uses of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), including home package delivery, have the potential to expose large portions of communities to a new noise source. This paper discusses results of flyover noise measurements of four small UAVs, including an internal combustion-powered model airplane and three battery-powered multicopters. Basic noise characteristics of these vehicles are discussed, including spectral properties and sound level metrics such as sound pressure level, effective perceived noise level, and sound exposure level. The size and aerodynamic characteristics of the multicopters in particular make their flight path susceptible to atmospheric disturbances such as wind gusts. These gusts, coupled with a flight control system that varies rotor speed to maintain vehicle stability, create an unsteady acoustic signature. The spectral variations resulting from this unsteadiness are explored, in both hover and flyover conditions for the multicopters. The time varying noise, which differs from the relatively steady noise generated by large transport aircraft, may complicate the prediction of human annoyance using conventional sound level metrics.

  4. Estimation of noise-free variance to measure heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilo Winkler

    Full Text Available Variance is a statistical parameter used to characterize heterogeneity or variability in data sets. However, measurements commonly include noise, as random errors superimposed to the actual value, which may substantially increase the variance compared to a noise-free data set. Our aim was to develop and validate a method to estimate noise-free spatial heterogeneity of pulmonary perfusion using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET scans. On theoretical grounds, we demonstrate a linear relationship between the total variance of a data set derived from averages of n multiple measurements, and the reciprocal of n. Using multiple measurements with varying n yields estimates of the linear relationship including the noise-free variance as the constant parameter. In PET images, n is proportional to the number of registered decay events, and the variance of the image is typically normalized by the square of its mean value yielding a coefficient of variation squared (CV(2. The method was evaluated with a Jaszczak phantom as reference spatial heterogeneity (CV(r(2 for comparison with our estimate of noise-free or 'true' heterogeneity (CV(t(2. We found that CV(t(2 was only 5.4% higher than CV(r2. Additional evaluations were conducted on 38 PET scans of pulmonary perfusion using (13NN-saline injection. The mean CV(t(2 was 0.10 (range: 0.03-0.30, while the mean CV(2 including noise was 0.24 (range: 0.10-0.59. CV(t(2 was in average 41.5% of the CV(2 measured including noise (range: 17.8-71.2%. The reproducibility of CV(t(2 was evaluated using three repeated PET scans from five subjects. Individual CV(t(2 were within 16% of each subject's mean and paired t-tests revealed no difference among the results from the three consecutive PET scans. In conclusion, our method provides reliable noise-free estimates of CV(t(2 in PET scans, and may be useful for similar statistical problems in experimental data.

  5. Accuracy improvement in measurement of arterial wall elasticity by applying pulse inversion to phased-tracking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyachi, Yukiya; Arakawa, Mototaka; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2018-07-01

    In our studies on ultrasonic elasticity assessment, minute change in the thickness of the arterial wall was measured by the phased-tracking method. However, most images in carotid artery examinations contain multiple-reflection noise, making it difficult to evaluate arterial wall elasticity precisely. In the present study, a modified phased-tracking method using the pulse inversion method was examined to reduce the influence of the multiple-reflection noise. Moreover, aliasing in the harmonic components was corrected by the fundamental components. The conventional and proposed methods were applied to a pulsated tube phantom mimicking the arterial wall. For the conventional method, the elasticity was 298 kPa without multiple-reflection noise and 353 kPa with multiple-reflection noise on the posterior wall. That of the proposed method was 302 kPa without multiple-reflection noise and 297 kPa with multiple-reflection noise on the posterior wall. Therefore, the proposed method was very robust against multiple-reflection noise.

  6. Measuring high-frequency responses of an electro-optic phase modulator based on dispersion induced phase modulation to intensity modulation conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shangjian; Wang, Heng; Wang, Yani; Zou, Xinhai; Zhang, Yali; Liu, Shuang; Liu, Yong

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the phase modulation to intensity modulation conversion in dispersive fibers for measuring frequency responses of electro-optic phase modulators, and demonstrate two typical measurements with cascade path and fold-back path. The measured results achieve an uncertainty of less than 2.8% within 20 GHz. Our measurements show stable and repeatable results because the optical carrier and its phase-modulated sidebands are affected by the same fiber impairments. The proposed method requires only dispersive fibers and works without any small-signal assumption, which is applicable for swept frequency measurement at different driving levels and operating wavelengths.

  7. Noise texture and signal detectability in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality for reconstructing estimates of an object's three-dimensional x-ray refractive index distribution. Unlike conventional x-ray computed tomography methods, the statistical properties of the reconstructed images in PCT remain unexplored. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively investigate noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. Methods: The authors derived explicit expressions for the autocovariance of the reconstructed absorption and refractive index images to characterize noise texture and understand how the noise properties are influenced by the imaging geometry. Concepts from statistical detection theory were employed to understand how the imaging geometry-dependent statistical properties affect the signal detection performance in a signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly task. Results: The analytical formulas for the phase and absorption autocovariance functions were implemented numerically and compared to the corresponding empirical values, and excellent agreement was found. They observed that the reconstructed refractive images are highly spatially correlated, while the absorption images are not. The numerical results confirm that the strength of the covariance is scaled by the detector spacing. Signal detection studies were conducted, employing a numerical observer. The detection performance was found to monotonically increase as the detector-plane spacing was increased. Conclusions: The authors have conducted the first quantitative investigation of noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. The reconstructed refractive images were found to be highly spatially correlated, while absorption images were not. This is due to the presence of a Fourier space singularity in the reconstruction formula for the refraction images. The statistical analysis may facilitate the use of task-based image quality measures to further develop and optimize this emerging

  8. Noise texture and signal detectability in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A. [Department of Bio-Industrial Mechatronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, Taiwan 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Imaging Research Center, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3440 S. Dearborn Street, E1-116, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality for reconstructing estimates of an object's three-dimensional x-ray refractive index distribution. Unlike conventional x-ray computed tomography methods, the statistical properties of the reconstructed images in PCT remain unexplored. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively investigate noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. Methods: The authors derived explicit expressions for the autocovariance of the reconstructed absorption and refractive index images to characterize noise texture and understand how the noise properties are influenced by the imaging geometry. Concepts from statistical detection theory were employed to understand how the imaging geometry-dependent statistical properties affect the signal detection performance in a signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly task. Results: The analytical formulas for the phase and absorption autocovariance functions were implemented numerically and compared to the corresponding empirical values, and excellent agreement was found. They observed that the reconstructed refractive images are highly spatially correlated, while the absorption images are not. The numerical results confirm that the strength of the covariance is scaled by the detector spacing. Signal detection studies were conducted, employing a numerical observer. The detection performance was found to monotonically increase as the detector-plane spacing was increased. Conclusions: The authors have conducted the first quantitative investigation of noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. The reconstructed refractive images were found to be highly spatially correlated, while absorption images were not. This is due to the presence of a Fourier space singularity in the reconstruction formula for the refraction images. The statistical analysis may facilitate the use of task-based image quality measures to further develop and optimize this emerging

  9. Low-complexity Joint Sub-carrier Phase Noise Compensation for Digital Multi-carrier Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yankov, Metodi Plamenov; Barletta, Luca; Zibar, Darko

    2017-01-01

    Joint sub-carrier phase noise processing is proposed which recovers the SNR penalty related to decreased sub-carrier baudrate w.r.t. single carrier systems. The method enables digital sub-banding to be safely employed for nonlinear mitigation for modulation formats of up to 256-QAM.......Joint sub-carrier phase noise processing is proposed which recovers the SNR penalty related to decreased sub-carrier baudrate w.r.t. single carrier systems. The method enables digital sub-banding to be safely employed for nonlinear mitigation for modulation formats of up to 256-QAM....

  10. Noise-induced phase space transport in two-dimensional Hamiltonian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorelov, I.V.; Kandrup, H.E.

    1999-01-01

    First passage time experiments were used to explore the effects of low amplitude noise as a source of accelerated phase space diffusion in two-dimensional Hamiltonian systems, and these effects were then compared with the effects of periodic driving. The objective was to quantify and understand the manner in which open-quotes stickyclose quotes chaotic orbits that, in the absence of perturbations, are confined near regular islands for very long times, can become open-quotes unstuckclose quotes much more quickly when subjected to even very weak perturbations. For both noise and periodic driving, the typical escape time scales logarithmically with the amplitude of the perturbation. For white noise, the details seem unimportant: Additive and multiplicative noise typically have very similar effects, and the presence or absence of a friction related to the noise by a fluctuation-dissipation theorem is also largely irrelevant. Allowing for colored noise can significantly decrease the efficacy of the perturbation, but only when the autocorrelation time, which vanishes for white noise, becomes so large that there is little power at frequencies comparable to the natural frequencies of the unperturbed orbit. Similarly, periodic driving is relatively inefficient when the driving frequency is not comparable to these natural frequencies. This suggests that noise-induced extrinsic diffusion, like modulational diffusion associated with periodic driving, is a resonance phenomenon. The logarithmic dependence of the escape time on amplitude reflects the fact that the time required for perturbed and unperturbed orbits to diverge a given distance scales logarithmically in the amplitude of the perturbation. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  11. An examination of the parametric properties of four noise sensitivity measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kamp, Irene; Ellermeier, Wolfgang; Lopez-Barrio, Isabel

    2006-01-01

    Noise sensitivity (NS) is a personality trait with a strong influence on reactions to noise. Studies of reaction should include a standard measure of NS that is founded on a theoretically justified definition of NS, and examination of existing NS measures' parametric properties (internal consiste......, demographics and lifestyle). A standard NS measure should demonstrate high reliability, and should predict responses to noise. Discussion is welcomed and will focus on validation strategies and optimizing the study design.......Noise sensitivity (NS) is a personality trait with a strong influence on reactions to noise. Studies of reaction should include a standard measure of NS that is founded on a theoretically justified definition of NS, and examination of existing NS measures' parametric properties (internal...... consistency; stability; convergent and predictive validity). At each of 6 laboratory centres (Aalborg; London; Sydney; Dortmund; Madrid, Amsterdam), participants will complete four NS measures on each of two occasions. In one occasion, participants will complete a task while exposed to recorded aircraft noise...

  12. Comparison of single distance phase retrieval algorithms by considering different object composition and the effect of statistical and structural noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R C; Rigon, L; Longo, R

    2013-03-25

    Phase retrieval is a technique for extracting quantitative phase information from X-ray propagation-based phase-contrast tomography (PPCT). In this paper, the performance of different single distance phase retrieval algorithms will be investigated. The algorithms are herein called phase-attenuation duality Born Algorithm (PAD-BA), phase-attenuation duality Rytov Algorithm (PAD-RA), phase-attenuation duality Modified Bronnikov Algorithm (PAD-MBA), phase-attenuation duality Paganin algorithm (PAD-PA) and phase-attenuation duality Wu Algorithm (PAD-WA), respectively. They are all based on phase-attenuation duality property and on weak absorption of the sample and they employ only a single distance PPCT data. In this paper, they are investigated via simulated noise-free PPCT data considering the fulfillment of PAD property and weakly absorbing conditions, and with experimental PPCT data of a mixture sample containing absorbing and weakly absorbing materials, and of a polymer sample considering different degrees of statistical and structural noise. The simulation shows all algorithms can quantitatively reconstruct the 3D refractive index of a quasi-homogeneous weakly absorbing object from noise-free PPCT data. When the weakly absorbing condition is violated, the PAD-RA and PAD-PA/WA obtain better result than PAD-BA and PAD-MBA that are shown in both simulation and mixture sample results. When considering the statistical noise, the contrast-to-noise ratio values decreases as the photon number is reduced. The structural noise study shows that the result is progressively corrupted by ring-like artifacts with the increase of structural noise (i.e. phantom thickness). The PAD-RA and PAD-PA/WA gain better density resolution than the PAD-BA and PAD-MBA in both statistical and structural noise study.

  13. Sound quality measures for speech in noise through a commercial hearing aid implementing digital noise reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Todd A; Hornsby, Benjamin W Y

    2005-05-01

    This brief report discusses the affect of digital noise reduction (DNR) processing on aided speech recognition and sound quality measures in 14 adults fitted with a commercial hearing aid. Measures of speech recognition and sound quality were obtained in two different speech-in-noise conditions (71 dBA speech, +6 dB SNR and 75 dBA speech, +1 dB SNR). The results revealed that the presence or absence of DNR processing did not impact speech recognition in noise (either positively or negatively). Paired comparisons of sound quality for the same speech in noise signals, however, revealed a strong preference for DNR processing. These data suggest that at least one implementation of DNR processing is capable of providing improved sound quality, for speech in noise, in the absence of improved speech recognition.

  14. A digital, constant-frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop instrument for real-time, absolute ultrasonic phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldren, H. A.; Perey, D. F.; Yost, W. T.; Cramer, K. E.; Gupta, M. C.

    2018-05-01

    A digitally controlled instrument for conducting single-frequency and swept-frequency ultrasonic phase measurements has been developed based on a constant-frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop (CFPPLL) design. This instrument uses a pair of direct digital synthesizers to generate an ultrasonically transceived tone-burst and an internal reference wave for phase comparison. Real-time, constant-frequency phase tracking in an interrogated specimen is possible with a resolution of 0.000 38 rad (0.022°), and swept-frequency phase measurements can be obtained. Using phase measurements, an absolute thickness in borosilicate glass is presented to show the instrument's efficacy, and these results are compared to conventional ultrasonic pulse-echo time-of-flight (ToF) measurements. The newly developed instrument predicted the thickness with a mean error of -0.04 μm and a standard deviation of error of 1.35 μm. Additionally, the CFPPLL instrument shows a lower measured phase error in the absence of changing temperature and couplant thickness than high-resolution cross-correlation ToF measurements at a similar signal-to-noise ratio. By showing higher accuracy and precision than conventional pulse-echo ToF measurements and lower phase errors than cross-correlation ToF measurements, the new digitally controlled CFPPLL instrument provides high-resolution absolute ultrasonic velocity or path-length measurements in solids or liquids, as well as tracking of material property changes with high sensitivity. The ability to obtain absolute phase measurements allows for many new applications than possible with previous ultrasonic pulsed phase-locked loop instruments. In addition to improved resolution, swept-frequency phase measurements add useful capability in measuring properties of layered structures, such as bonded joints, or materials which exhibit non-linear frequency-dependent behavior, such as dispersive media.

  15. Noise measurement on Preshower Si sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Evangelou, Ioannis; Barney, David; Bloch, Philippe; Elsha, Vladimir; Go, Apollo; Kloukinas, Kostas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Peisert, Anna; Prouskas, C; Reynaud, Serge; Triantis, Frixos A; Tzoulis, Nikolaos; Zub, E

    2002-01-01

    Throughout the past couple of years when we were designing the Preshower silicon sensors we have noticed that some of them have strips with a noise higher than the average and not correlated to the leakage current. In order to investigate this effect we have developed a set-up for noise measurement on wafers and diced sensors that does not require bonding. The set-up is based on the DeltaStream chip coupled to a probe card with 32 pins at a pitch of 1.9 mm. All the digital electronics, including the analogue-to-digital converter and a microprocessor, is placed on a motherboard which communicates with a PC via an RS232 line. We have tested 45 sensors and found that some strips which have an above average noise, also have a higher relative current increase as a function of voltage, deltaI/(I deltaV), even though their leakage current is below 50 nA. We also observed that on these strips th e breakdown occurs within about 60 V from the onset of the noise. The source of this noise is not yet clear and the investi...

  16. An injection-locked OEO based frequency doubler independent of electrical doubler phase noise deteriorating rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhengyang; Zheng, Xiaoping; Li, Shangyuan; Yan, Haozhe; Xiao, Xuedi; Xue, Xiaoxiao

    2018-06-01

    We propose an injection-locked optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) based wide-band frequency doubler, which is free from phase noise deterioration in electrical doubler, by using a dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator (DPMZM). Through adjusting the optical phase shifts in different arms of the DPMZM, the doubling signal oscillates in the OEO loop while the fundamental signal takes on phase modulation over the light and vanishes at photo-detector (PD) output. By controlling power of fundamental signal the restriction of phase-noise deterioration rule in electrical doubler is totally canceled. Experimental results show that the doubler output has a better phase noise value of, for example, -117 dBc/Hz @ 10 kHz at 6 GHz with an improvement more than 17 dB and 23 dB compared with that of fundamental input and electrical doubler, respectively. Besides, the stability of this doubler output can reach to 1 . 5 × 10-14 at 1000 s averaging time. The frequency range of doubling signal is limited by the bandwidth of electrical amplifier in OEO loop.

  17. Liquid-phase exfoliated graphene self-assembled films: Low-frequency noise and thermal-electric characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubon Usca, G.; Hernandez-Ambato, J.; Pace, C.; Caputi, L.S.; Tavolaro, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphene was exfoliated in liquid phase also in the presence of zeolite 4A. • Films were obtained by drop-casting. • SEM, Raman, low-frequency noise and thermal electric measurements show that the presence of zeolite improves the quality of the FLG films. - Abstract: In few years, graphene has become a revolutionary material, leading not only to applications in various fields such as electronics, medicine and environment, but also to the production of new types of 2D materials. In this work, Liquid Phase Exfoliation (LPE) was applied to natural graphite by brief sonication or mixer treatment in suitable solvents, in order to produce Few Layers Graphene (FLG) suspensions. Additionally, zeolite 4A (Z4A) was added during the production of FLG flakes-based inks, with the aim of aiding the exfoliation process. Conductive films were obtained by drop casting three types of suspensions over Al 2 O 3 substrates with interdigitated electrodes, with total channel surface of 1.39 mm 2 . The morphology characterization resulted in the verification of the presence of thin self-assembled flakes. Raman studies gave evidence of 4 to 10 layers graphene flakes. Electrical measurements were performed to state the Low-Frequency Noise and Thermal-Electric characteristics of the samples. We observe interesting relations between sample preparation procedures and electrical properties.

  18. Noise Reduction of Measurement Data using Linear Digital Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitzmann B.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper Butterworth, Chebyshev (Type I and II and Elliptic digital filters are designed for signal noise reduction. On-line data measurements of substrate concentration from E. coli fed-batch cultivation process are used. Application of the designed filters leads to a successful noise reduction of on-line glucose measurements. The digital filters presented here are simple, easy to implement and effective - the used filters allow for a smart compromise between signal information and noise corruption.

  19. Digital coherent superposition of optical OFDM subcarrier pairs with Hermitian symmetry for phase noise mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xingwen; Chen, Xuemei; Sharma, Dinesh; Li, Chao; Luo, Ming; Yang, Qi; Li, Zhaohui; Qiu, Kun

    2014-06-02

    Digital coherent superposition (DCS) provides an approach to combat fiber nonlinearities by trading off the spectrum efficiency. In analogy, we extend the concept of DCS to the optical OFDM subcarrier pairs with Hermitian symmetry to combat the linear and nonlinear phase noise. At the transmitter, we simply use a real-valued OFDM signal to drive a Mach-Zehnder (MZ) intensity modulator biased at the null point and the so-generated OFDM signal is Hermitian in the frequency domain. At receiver, after the conventional OFDM signal processing, we conduct DCS of the optical OFDM subcarrier pairs, which requires only conjugation and summation. We show that the inter-carrier-interference (ICI) due to phase noise can be reduced because of the Hermitain symmetry. In a simulation, this method improves the tolerance to the laser phase noise. In a nonlinear WDM transmission experiment, this method also achieves better performance under the influence of cross phase modulation (XPM).

  20. Measurement of the environmental noise at the Torseroed wind turbine site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fegeant, Olivier

    2000-12-01

    Further to complaints about the noise generated by a Micon 600 kW wind turbine, measurements of both noise immission and noise emission were performed at the Torseroed site. The measurements and analysis presented in this report were carried out by following the recommendations of the IEA documents for noise emission and immission measurements. It was found that the immission level, i.e. the wind turbine sound, at one of the nearest dwelling, namely Solglaentan, is 39 dB(A) for a wind speed of 8 m/s at hub height. Measurements carried out close to the turbine show that the sound power level of the turbine is 4.3 dB higher than the A-weighted level given by the supplier. Furthermore, the noise level increases more rapidly as a function of the wind speed than what is expected from the values furnished by the manufacturer. The measurements results also show that the background noise level is unusually low at Solglaentan

  1. Noise characterization of oil and gas operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Cameron; Autenrieth, Daniel A; Lipsey, Tiffany; Brazile, William J

    2017-08-01

    In cooperation with The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, researchers at Colorado State University performed area noise monitoring at 23 oil and gas sites throughout Northern Colorado. The goals of this study were to: (1) measure and compare the noise levels for the different phases of oil and gas development sites; (2) evaluate the effectiveness of noise barriers; and (3) determine if noise levels exceeded the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission noise limits. The four phases of oil and gas development include drilling, hydraulic fracturing, completion and production. Noise measurements were collected using the A- and C-weighted sound scales. Octave band analysis was also performed to characterize the frequency spectra of the noise measurements.  Noise measurements were collected using noise dosimeters and a hand-held sound-level meter at specified distances from the development sites in each cardinal direction. At 350 ft (107 m), drilling, hydraulic fracturing, and completion sites without noise barriers exceeded the maximum permissible noise levels for residential and commercial zones (55 dBA and 60 dBA, respectively). In addition, drilling and hydraulic fracturing sites with noise barriers exceeded the maximum permissible noise level for residential zones (55 dBA). However, during drilling, hydraulic fracturing, and completion operations, oil producers are allowed an exception to the noise permissible limits in that they only must comply with the industrial noise limit (80 dBA). It is stated in Rule 604.c.(2)A. that: "Operations involving pipeline or gas facility installation or maintenance, the use of a drilling rig, completion rig, workover rig, or stimulation is subject to the maximum permissible noise levels for industrial zones (80dBA)." [8] Production sites were within the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission permissible noise level criteria for all zones. At 350 ft (107 m) from the noise source, all drilling

  2. Reduction of environmental MHz noise for SQUID application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araya, T. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)]. E-mail: araya@sup.ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kitamura, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Kamishiro, M. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Sakuta, K. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Itozaki, H. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)]. E-mail: itozaki@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-10-01

    It is important to remove large environmental noise in measurement using SQUIDs without magnetic shielding. Active noise control (ANC) is an effective method to remove the environmental noise. The environmental noise has been reduced by the ANC system in the radio frequency region around MHz. The anti-phase waves of the environmental noise should be generated by this system. The ANC system including the phase and amplitude control circuit was developed to make the anti-phase waves in the MHz region. In this paper, sinusoidal waves with a MHz frequency were used as the environmental noise. When a coil antenna was used for a receiver antenna, this ANC system suppressed these sinusoidal waves to the white noise level about 40 dB. When we used a SQUID as a receiver antenna, we also cancelled sinusoidal waves to the white noise level by this system. This shows that the ANC system is useful to reduce an environmental noise when this ANC system is developed to cancel multi-frequency noise.

  3. Reduction of environmental MHz noise for SQUID application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, T.; Kitamura, Y.; Kamishiro, M.; Sakuta, K.; Itozaki, H.

    2006-01-01

    It is important to remove large environmental noise in measurement using SQUIDs without magnetic shielding. Active noise control (ANC) is an effective method to remove the environmental noise. The environmental noise has been reduced by the ANC system in the radio frequency region around MHz. The anti-phase waves of the environmental noise should be generated by this system. The ANC system including the phase and amplitude control circuit was developed to make the anti-phase waves in the MHz region. In this paper, sinusoidal waves with a MHz frequency were used as the environmental noise. When a coil antenna was used for a receiver antenna, this ANC system suppressed these sinusoidal waves to the white noise level about 40 dB. When we used a SQUID as a receiver antenna, we also cancelled sinusoidal waves to the white noise level by this system. This shows that the ANC system is useful to reduce an environmental noise when this ANC system is developed to cancel multi-frequency noise

  4. Cross-correlation measurement of quantum shot noise using homemade transimpedance amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashisaka, Masayuki; Ota, Tomoaki; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Fujisawa, Toshimasa; Muraki, Koji

    2014-01-01

    We report a cross-correlation measurement system, based on a new approach, which can be used to measure shot noise in a mesoscopic conductor at milliKelvin temperatures. In contrast to other measurement systems in which high-speed low-noise voltage amplifiers are commonly used, our system employs homemade transimpedance amplifiers (TAs). The low input impedance of the TAs significantly reduces the crosstalk caused by unavoidable parasitic capacitance between wires. The TAs are designed to have a flat gain over a frequency band from 2 kHz to 1 MHz. Low-noise performance is attained by installing the TAs at a 4 K stage of a dilution refrigerator. Our system thus fulfills the technical requirements for cross-correlation measurements: low noise floor, high frequency band, and negligible crosstalk between two signal lines. Using our system, shot noise generated at a quantum point contact embedded in a quantum Hall system is measured. The good agreement between the obtained shot-noise data and theoretical predictions demonstrates the accuracy of the measurements

  5. Long-Term Impairment of Sound Processing in the Auditory Midbrain by Daily Short-Term Exposure to Moderate Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Most citizen people are exposed daily to environmental noise at moderate levels with a short duration. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of daily short-term exposure to moderate noise on sound level processing in the auditory midbrain. Sound processing properties of auditory midbrain neurons were recorded in anesthetized mice exposed to moderate noise (80 dB SPL, 2 h/d for 6 weeks and were compared with those from age-matched controls. Neurons in exposed mice had a higher minimum threshold and maximum response intensity, a longer first spike latency, and a higher slope and narrower dynamic range for rate level function. However, these observed changes were greater in neurons with the best frequency within the noise exposure frequency range compared with those outside the frequency range. These sound processing properties also remained abnormal after a 12-week period of recovery in a quiet laboratory environment after completion of noise exposure. In conclusion, even daily short-term exposure to moderate noise can cause long-term impairment of sound level processing in a frequency-specific manner in auditory midbrain neurons.

  6. Advanced Receiver Design for Mitigating Multiple RF Impairments in OFDM Systems: Algorithms and RF Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Kiayani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct-conversion architecture-based orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM systems are troubled by impairments such as in-phase and quadrature-phase (I/Q imbalance and carrier frequency offset (CFO. These impairments are unavoidable in any practical implementation and severely degrade the obtainable link performance. In this contribution, we study the joint impact of frequency-selective I/Q imbalance at both transmitter and receiver together with channel distortions and CFO error. Two estimation and compensation structures based on different pilot patterns are proposed for coping with such impairments. The first structure is based on preamble pilot pattern while the second one assumes a sparse pilot pattern. The proposed estimation/compensation structures are able to separate the individual impairments, which are then compensated in the reverse order of their appearance at the receiver. We present time-domain estimation and compensation algorithms for receiver I/Q imbalance and CFO and propose low-complexity algorithms for the compensation of channel distortions and transmitter IQ imbalance. The performance of the compensation algorithms is investigated with computer simulations as well as with practical radio frequency (RF measurements. The performance results indicate that the proposed techniques provide close to the ideal performance both in simulations and measurements.

  7. Effects of measurement noise on modal parameter identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorvash, S; Pakzad, S N

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, much research has been conducted on data-driven structural health monitoring (SHM) algorithms with use of sensor measurements. A fundamental step in this SHM application is to identify the dynamic characteristics of structures. Despite the significant efforts devoted to development and enhancement of the modal parameter identification algorithms, there are still substantial uncertainties in the results obtained in real-life deployments. One of the sources of uncertainties in the results is the existence of noise in the measurement data. Depending on the subsequent application of the system identification, the level of uncertainty in the results and, consequently, the level of noise contamination can be very important. As an effort towards understanding the effect of measurement noise on the modal identification, this paper presents parameters that quantify the effects of measurement noise on the modal identification process and determine their influence on the accuracy of results. The performance of these parameters is validated by a numerically simulated example. They are then used to investigate the accuracy of identified modal properties of the Golden Gate Bridge using ambient data collected by wireless sensors. The vibration monitoring tests of the Golden Gate Bridge provided two synchronized data sets collected by two different sensor types. The influence of the sensor noise level on the accuracy of results is investigated throughout this work and it is shown that high quality sensors provide more accurate results as the physical contribution of response in their measured data is significantly higher. Additionally, higher purity and consistency of modal parameters, identified by higher quality sensors, is observed in the results. (paper)

  8. Fine-structure processing, frequency selectivity and speech perception in hearing-impaired listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strelcyk, Olaf; Dau, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    Hearing-impaired people often experience great difficulty with speech communication when background noise is present, even if reduced audibility has been compensated for. Other impairment factors must be involved. In order to minimize confounding effects, the subjects participating in this study...... consisted of groups with homogeneous, symmetric audiograms. The perceptual listening experiments assessed the intelligibility of full-spectrum as well as low-pass filtered speech in the presence of stationary and fluctuating interferers, the individual's frequency selectivity and the integrity of temporal...... modulation were obtained. In addition, these binaural and monaural thresholds were measured in a stationary background noise in order to assess the persistence of the fine-structure processing to interfering noise. Apart from elevated speech reception thresholds, the hearing impaired listeners showed poorer...

  9. Uncertainty In Measuring Noise Parameters Of a Communication Receiver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korcz, Karol; Palczynska, Beata; Spiralski, Ludwik

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the method of assessing uncertainty in measuring the usable sensitivity Es of communication receiver. The influence of partial uncertainties of measuring the noise factor F and the energy pass band of the receiver Δf on the combined standard uncertainty level is analyzed. The method to assess the uncertainty in measuring the noise factor on the basis of the systematic component of uncertainty, assuming that the main source of measurement uncertainty is the hardware of the measuring system, is proposed. The assessment of uncertainty in measuring the pass band of the receiver is determined with the assumption that input quantities of the measurement equation are not correlated. They are successive, discrete values of the spectral power density of the noise on the output of receiver. The results of the analyses of particular uncertainties components of measuring the sensitivity, which were carried out for a typical communication receiver, are presented

  10. Novel BCH Code Design for Mitigation of Phase Noise Induced Cycle Slips in DQPSK Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leong, M. Y.; Larsen, Knud J.; Jacobsen, G.

    2014-01-01

    We show that by proper code design, phase noise induced cycle slips causing an error floor can be mitigated for 28 Gbau d DQPSK systems. Performance of BCH codes are investigated in terms of required overhead......We show that by proper code design, phase noise induced cycle slips causing an error floor can be mitigated for 28 Gbau d DQPSK systems. Performance of BCH codes are investigated in terms of required overhead...

  11. Measurement of MOSFET LF Noise Under Large Signal RF Excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, A.P.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    A new measurement technique is presented that allows measurement of MOSFET LF noise under large signal RF excitation. Measurements indicate that MOSFETS exhibit a reduction in LF noise when they are cycled from inversion to accummulation and that this reduction does not depend on the frequency of

  12. Dimensioning BCH codes for coherent DQPSK systems with laser phase noise and cycle slips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leong, Miu Yoong; Larsen, Knud J.; Jacobsen, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Forward error correction (FEC) plays a vital role in coherent optical systems employing multi-level modulation. However, much of coding theory assumes that additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) is dominant, whereas coherent optical systems have significant phase noise (PN) in addition to AWGN...... approach for a target post-FEC BER of 10-5. Codes dimensioned with our bivariate binomial model meet the target within 0.2-dB signal-to-noise ratio....

  13. On the use of mobile phones and wearable microphones for noise exposure measurements: Calibration and measurement accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Romain

    Despite the fact that noise-induced hearing loss remains the number one occupational disease in developed countries, individual noise exposure levels are still rarely known and infrequently tracked. Indeed, efforts to standardize noise exposure levels present disadvantages such as costly instrumentation and difficulties associated with on site implementation. Given their advanced technical capabilities and widespread daily usage, mobile phones could be used to measure noise levels and make noise monitoring more accessible. However, the use of mobile phones for measuring noise exposure is currently limited due to the lack of formal procedures for their calibration and challenges regarding the measurement procedure. Our research investigated the calibration of mobile phone-based solutions for measuring noise exposure using a mobile phone's built-in microphones and wearable external microphones. The proposed calibration approach integrated corrections that took into account microphone placement error. The corrections were of two types: frequency-dependent, using a digital filter and noise level-dependent, based on the difference between the C-weighted noise level minus A-weighted noise level of the noise measured by the phone. The electro-acoustical limitations and measurement calibration procedure of the mobile phone were investigated. The study also sought to quantify the effect of noise exposure characteristics on the accuracy of calibrated mobile phone measurements. Measurements were carried out in reverberant and semi-anechoic chambers with several mobiles phone units of the same model, two types of external devices (an earpiece and a headset with an in-line microphone) and an acoustical test fixture (ATF). The proposed calibration approach significantly improved the accuracy of the noise level measurements in diffuse and free fields, with better results in the diffuse field and with ATF positions causing little or no acoustic shadowing. Several sources of errors

  14. Sentence Recognition Prediction for Hearing-impaired Listeners in Stationary and Fluctuation Noise With FADE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädler, Marc René; Warzybok, Anna; Meyer, Bernd T.; Brand, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the individual patient’s hearing impairment as obtained with the matrix sentence recognition test, a simulation Framework for Auditory Discrimination Experiments (FADE) is extended here using the Attenuation and Distortion (A+D) approach by Plomp as a blueprint for setting the individual processing parameters. FADE has been shown to predict the outcome of both speech recognition tests and psychoacoustic experiments based on simulations using an automatic speech recognition system requiring only few assumptions. It builds on the closed-set matrix sentence recognition test which is advantageous for testing individual speech recognition in a way comparable across languages. Individual predictions of speech recognition thresholds in stationary and in fluctuating noise were derived using the audiogram and an estimate of the internal level uncertainty for modeling the individual Plomp curves fitted to the data with the Attenuation (A-) and Distortion (D-) parameters of the Plomp approach. The “typical” audiogram shapes from Bisgaard et al with or without a “typical” level uncertainty and the individual data were used for individual predictions. As a result, the individualization of the level uncertainty was found to be more important than the exact shape of the individual audiogram to accurately model the outcome of the German Matrix test in stationary or fluctuating noise for listeners with hearing impairment. The prediction accuracy of the individualized approach also outperforms the (modified) Speech Intelligibility Index approach which is based on the individual threshold data only. PMID:27604782

  15. Sentence Recognition Prediction for Hearing-impaired Listeners in Stationary and Fluctuation Noise With FADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birger Kollmeier

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To characterize the individual patient’s hearing impairment as obtained with the matrix sentence recognition test, a simulation Framework for Auditory Discrimination Experiments (FADE is extended here using the Attenuation and Distortion (A+D approach by Plomp as a blueprint for setting the individual processing parameters. FADE has been shown to predict the outcome of both speech recognition tests and psychoacoustic experiments based on simulations using an automatic speech recognition system requiring only few assumptions. It builds on the closed-set matrix sentence recognition test which is advantageous for testing individual speech recognition in a way comparable across languages. Individual predictions of speech recognition thresholds in stationary and in fluctuating noise were derived using the audiogram and an estimate of the internal level uncertainty for modeling the individual Plomp curves fitted to the data with the Attenuation (A- and Distortion (D- parameters of the Plomp approach. The “typical” audiogram shapes from Bisgaard et al with or without a “typical” level uncertainty and the individual data were used for individual predictions. As a result, the individualization of the level uncertainty was found to be more important than the exact shape of the individual audiogram to accurately model the outcome of the German Matrix test in stationary or fluctuating noise for listeners with hearing impairment. The prediction accuracy of the individualized approach also outperforms the (modified Speech Intelligibility Index approach which is based on the individual threshold data only.

  16. Use of a Microphone Phased Array to Determine Noise Sources in a Rocket Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, J.; Mosher, R.

    2010-01-01

    A 70-element microphone phased array was used to identify noise sources in the plume of a solid rocket motor. An environment chamber was built and other precautions were taken to protect the sensitive condenser microphones from rain, thunderstorms and other environmental elements during prolonged stay in the outdoor test stand. A camera mounted at the center of the array was used to photograph the plume. In the first phase of the study the array was placed in an anechoic chamber for calibration, and validation of the indigenous Matlab(R) based beamform software. It was found that the "advanced" beamform methods, such as CLEAN-SC was partially successful in identifying speaker sources placed closer than the Rayleigh criteria. To participate in the field test all equipments were shipped to NASA Marshal Space Flight Center, where the elements of the array hardware were rebuilt around the test stand. The sensitive amplifiers and the data acquisition hardware were placed in a safe basement, and 100m long cables were used to connect the microphones, Kulites and the camera. The array chamber and the microphones were found to withstand the environmental elements as well as the shaking from the rocket plume generated noise. The beamform map was superimposed on a photo of the rocket plume to readily identify the source distribution. It was found that the plume made an exceptionally long, >30 diameter, noise source over a large frequency range. The shock pattern created spatial modulation of the noise source. Interestingly, the concrete pad of the horizontal test stand was found to be a good acoustic reflector: the beamform map showed two distinct source distributions- the plume and its reflection on the pad. The array was found to be most effective in the frequency range of 2kHz to 10kHz. As expected, the classical beamform method excessively smeared the noise sources at lower frequencies and produced excessive side-lobes at higher frequencies. The "advanced" beamform

  17. Evaluating noise abatement measures using strategic noise maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, H.C.; Miedema, H.M.E.; Laan, W.P.N. van der; Lohman, W.J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Noise annoyance due to transportation is widespread in industrialized countries and in urban areas in the developing countries. The European Noise Directive (END) requires an assessment of the noise situation as well as the formulation of action plans for the reduction of the number of people

  18. Evaluation of a Cubature Kalman Filtering-Based Phase Unwrapping Method for Differential Interferograms with High Noise in Coal Mining Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanli Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar has been shown to be effective for monitoring subsidence in coal mining areas. Phase unwrapping can have a dramatic influence on the monitoring result. In this paper, a filtering-based phase unwrapping algorithm in combination with path-following is introduced to unwrap differential interferograms with high noise in mining areas. It can perform simultaneous noise filtering and phase unwrapping so that the pre-filtering steps can be omitted, thus usually retaining more details and improving the detectable deformation. For the method, the nonlinear measurement model of phase unwrapping is processed using a simplified Cubature Kalman filtering, which is an effective and efficient tool used in many nonlinear fields. Three case studies are designed to evaluate the performance of the method. In Case 1, two tests are designed to evaluate the performance of the method under different factors including the number of multi-looks and path-guiding indexes. The result demonstrates that the unwrapped results are sensitive to the number of multi-looks and that the Fisher Distance is the most suitable path-guiding index for our study. Two case studies are then designed to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed phase unwrapping method based on Cubature Kalman filtering. The results indicate that, compared with the popular Minimum Cost Flow method, the Cubature Kalman filtering-based phase unwrapping can achieve promising results without pre-filtering and is an appropriate method for coal mining areas with high noise.

  19. LTP interferometer-noise sources and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, David; Killow, Christian; Ward, Harry; Hough, Jim; Heinzel, Gerhard; Garcia, Antonio; Wand, Vinzenz; Johann, Ulrich; Braxmaier, Claus

    2005-01-01

    The LISA Technology Package (LTP) uses laser interferometry to measure the changes in relative displacement between two inertial test masses. The goals of the mission require a displacement measuring precision of 10 pm Hz -1/2 at frequencies in the 3-30 mHz band. We report on progress with a prototype LTP interferometer optical bench in which fused silica mirrors and beamsplitters are fixed to a ZERODUR (registered) substrate using hydroxide catalysis bonding to form a rigid interferometer. The couplings to displacement noise of this interferometer of two expected noise sources-laser frequency noise and ambient temperature fluctuations-have been investigated, and an additional, unexpected, noise source has been identified. The additional noise is due to small amounts of signal at the heterodyne frequency arriving at the photodiode preamplifiers with a phase that quasistatically changes with respect to the optical signal. The phase shift is caused by differential changes in the external optical paths the beams travel before they reach the rigid interferometer. Two different external path length stabilization systems have been demonstrated and these allowed the performance of the overall system to meet the LTP displacement noise requirement

  20. Prediction of Landing Gear Noise Reduction and Comparison to Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Leonard V.

    2010-01-01

    Noise continues to be an ongoing problem for existing aircraft in flight and is projected to be a concern for next generation designs. During landing, when the engines are operating at reduced power, the noise from the airframe, of which landing gear noise is an important part, is equal to the engine noise. There are several methods of predicting landing gear noise, but none have been applied to predict the change in noise due to a change in landing gear design. The current effort uses the Landing Gear Model and Acoustic Prediction (LGMAP) code, developed at The Pennsylvania State University to predict the noise from landing gear. These predictions include the influence of noise reduction concepts on the landing gear noise. LGMAP is compared to wind tunnel experiments of a 6.3%-scale Boeing 777 main gear performed in the Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) at NASA Langley. The geometries tested in the QFF include the landing gear with and without a toboggan fairing and the door. It is shown that LGMAP is able to predict the noise directives and spectra from the model-scale test for the baseline configuration as accurately as current gear prediction methods. However, LGMAP is also able to predict the difference in noise caused by the toboggan fairing and by removing the landing gear door. LGMAP is also compared to far-field ground-based flush-mounted microphone measurements from the 2005 Quiet Technology Demonstrator 2 (QTD 2) flight test. These comparisons include a Boeing 777-300ER with and without a toboggan fairing that demonstrate that LGMAP can be applied to full-scale flyover measurements. LGMAP predictions of the noise generated by the nose gear on the main gear measurements are also shown.

  1. The influence of underwater turbulence on optical phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Brandon; Davis, Allen; Kirkendall, Clay; Dandridge, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    Emerging underwater optical imaging and sensing applications rely on phase-sensitive detection to provide added functionality and improved sensitivity. However, underwater turbulence introduces spatio-temporal variations in the refractive index of water which can degrade the performance of these systems. Although the influence of turbulence on traditional, non-interferometric imaging has been investigated, its influence on the optical phase remains poorly understood. Nonetheless, a thorough understanding of the spatio-temporal dynamics of the optical phase of light passing through underwater turbulence are crucial to the design of phase-sensitive imaging and sensing systems. To address this concern, we combined underwater imaging with high speed holography to provide a calibrated characterization of the effects of turbulence on the optical phase. By measuring the modulation transfer function of an underwater imaging system, we were able to calibrate varying levels of optical turbulence intensity using the Simple Underwater Imaging Model (SUIM). We then used high speed holography to measure the temporal dynamics of the optical phase of light passing through varying levels of turbulence. Using this method, we measured the variance in the amplitude and phase of the beam, the temporal correlation of the optical phase, and recorded the turbulence induced phase noise as a function of frequency. By bench marking the effects of varying levels of turbulence on the optical phase, this work provides a basis to evaluate the real-world potential of emerging underwater interferometric sensing modalities.

  2. Transient threshold shift after gunshot noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedi, B; Ghasemi, M; Motiee, M; Mojtahed, M; Safavi, A

    2013-01-01

    Many people, such as soldiers, are routinely exposed to gunshot noise during target practice. It is suspected that this high-intensity noise may affect audition through repeated Transient Threshold Shifts (TTS); it can also mechanically alter auditory components such as waves. This study investigates the scope of gunshot noise from the AK-47 rifle (Kalashnikov) and the impact on the shooters' audition. Forty soldiers (80 ears) were recruited in this study. They were all young and being exposed to gunshot noise for the first time. Gunshot characteristics were measured before exposure. The soldiers underwent auditory evaluation with Pure Tone Audiometry (PTA) and Oto-Acoustic Emission (OAE) once before exposure and immediately (less than one hour) after exposure. The AK-47 gunshot noise pressure level varied between L(AIm) = 73.7 dBA to L(AIm) = 111.4 dBA. Fourteen participants had subclinical hearing impairment in their pre-exposure evaluation; this number increased to 16 after the exposure. Six months post-exposure and later, the number of cases with impairment had fallen to eight (improvement in 50%). Both pre- and post-exposure OAE results were within normal values, while PTA results indicated a significant threshold alteration only at 6 kHz. The results of this study confirm that exposure to gunshot noise with no ear protection can represent a significant hazard for auditory function, especially at higher frequencies.

  3. Vibration measurement with nonlinear converter in the presence of noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozuras, Almantas

    2017-10-01

    Conventional vibration measurement methods use the linear properties of physical converters. These methods are strongly influenced by nonlinear distortions, because ideal linear converters are not available. Practically, any converter can be considered as a linear one, when an output signal is very small. However, the influence of noise increases significantly and signal-to-noise ratio decreases at lower signals. When the output signal is increasing, the nonlinear distortions are also augmenting. If the wide spectrum vibration is measured, conventional methods face a harmonic distortion as well as intermodulation effects. Purpose of this research is to develop a measurement method of wide spectrum vibration by using a converter described by a nonlinear function of type f(x), where x =x(t) denotes the dependence of coordinate x on time t due to the vibration. Parameter x(t) describing the vibration is expressed as Fourier series. The spectral components of the converter output f(x(t)) are determined by using Fourier transform. The obtained system of nonlinear equations is solved using the least squares technique that permits to find x(t) in the presence of noise. This method allows one to carry out the absolute or relative vibration measurements. High resistance to noise is typical for the absolute vibration measurement, but it is necessary to know the Taylor expansion coefficients of the function f(x). If the Taylor expansion is not known, the relative measurement of vibration parameters is also possible, but with lower resistance to noise. This method allows one to eliminate the influence of nonlinear distortions to the measurement results, and consequently to eliminate harmonic distortion and intermodulation effects. The use of nonlinear properties of the converter for measurement gives some advantages related to an increased frequency range of the output signal (consequently increasing the number of equations) that allows one to decrease the noise influence on

  4. Propagation based phase retrieval of simulated intensity measurements using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Z. D. C.

    2018-04-01

    Determining the phase of a wave from intensity measurements has many applications in fields such as electron microscopy, visible light optics, and medical imaging. Propagation based phase retrieval, where the phase is obtained from defocused images, has shown significant promise. There are, however, limitations in the accuracy of the retrieved phase arising from such methods. Sources of error include shot noise, image misalignment, and diffraction artifacts. We explore the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to improve the accuracy of propagation based phase retrieval algorithms applied to simulated intensity measurements. We employ a phase retrieval algorithm based on the transport-of-intensity equation to obtain the phase from simulated micrographs of procedurally generated specimens. We then train an ANN with pairs of retrieved and exact phases, and use the trained ANN to process a test set of retrieved phase maps. The total error in the phase is significantly reduced using this method. We also discuss a variety of potential extensions to this work.

  5. Measurements of noise from rotary coal unloading operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, T.S.; Bilello, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    In the licensing effort for a coal-fired power plant in the northeast United States, noise related to delivery and unloading of coal by train was identified as a significant concern to the nearby community. Specific issues included locomotive noise, the banging noises caused by railcar couplings during the start and stop cycles of the unloading operation, wheel squeal in the curves of the rail loop, and rotary coal unloader noises. This paper reports that a literature review provided adequate information on idling locomotive noise but very little on the other noise sources. Coupling impact noise was well documented for railcars actually being coupled at various speeds but not for coupled trains during start and stop operations. Wheel squeal was well documented by subway trains travelling at normal speeds, but nothing could be found for wheel squeal during very slow train movement as occurs during unloading. Similarly, adequate information was available for unenclosed rotary unloaders but not for enclosed unloaders. Consequently, actual noise measurements of a similar enclosed facility, and the associated train movements, were undertaken to obtain data more directly applicable to the planned facility

  6. Results and interpretation of noise measurements using in-core self powered neutron detector strings at Unit 2 of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloeckler, O.; Por, G.; Valko, J.

    1986-11-01

    In-core neutron noise and fuel assembly outlet temperature noise measurements were performed at Unit 2 of Paks Nuclear Power Plant. Characteristics of the reactor and the noise measuring equipment are briefly described. The in-core Rhodium emitter selfpowered neutron detector strings positioned axially above the other show high coherence and linear phase at low frequencies indicating a marked transport effect, not regularly measured in PWRs. The coherence between horizontally placed neutron detectors is small and the phase is zero. A transport effect of different nature is obtained between neutron detectors (in-core and ex-core) and fuel assembly outlet thermocouples. The observed characteristics depend on reactor and fuel assembly power in a way supporting interpretation in terms of coolant density and void content changes and power feedback effects. During routine analysis vibration of 1.1 Hz appeared as a strong peak in the power spectra. The control assembly that was responsible for the observed behaviour could be localized with high certainty. (author)

  7. Analytical evaluation of the signal and noise propagation in x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raupach, Rainer; Flohr, Thomas G

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the signal and noise propagation of differential phase-contrast computed tomography (PCT) compared with conventional attenuation-based computed tomography (CT) from a theoretical point of view. This work focuses on grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging. A mathematical framework is derived that is able to analytically predict the relative performance of both imaging techniques in the sense of the relative contrast-to-noise ratio for the contrast of any two materials. Two fundamentally different properties of PCT compared with CT are identified. First, the noise power spectra show qualitatively different characteristics implying a resolution-dependent performance ratio. The break-even point is derived analytically as a function of system parameters such as geometry and visibility. A superior performance of PCT compared with CT can only be achieved at a sufficiently high spatial resolution. Second, due to periodicity of phase information which is non-ambiguous only in a bounded interval statistical phase wrapping can occur. This effect causes a collapse of information propagation for low signals which limits the applicability of phase-contrast imaging at low dose.

  8. Quantification of signal detection performance degradation induced by phase-retrieval in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    In propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast (PB XPC) imaging, the measured image contains a mixture of absorption- and phase-contrast. To obtain separate images of the projected absorption and phase (i.e., refractive) properties of a sample, phase retrieval methods can be employed. It has been suggested that phase-retrieval can always improve image quality in PB XPC imaging. However, when objective (task-based) measures of image quality are employed, this is not necessarily true and phase retrieval can be detrimental. In this work, signal detection theory is utilized to quantify the performance of a Hotelling observer (HO) for detecting a known signal in a known background. Two cases are considered. In the first case, the HO acts directly on the measured intensity data. In the second case, the HO acts on either the retrieved phase or absorption image. We demonstrate that the performance of the HO is superior when acting on the measured intensity data. The loss of task-specific information induced by phase-retrieval is quantified by computing the efficiency of the HO as the ratio of the test statistic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the two cases. The effect of the system geometry on this efficiency is systematically investigated. Our findings confirm that phase-retrieval can impair signal detection performance in XPC imaging.

  9. A time-variant analysis of the 1/f^(2) phase noise in CMOS parallel LC-Tank quadrature oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreani, Pietro

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a study of 1/f2 phase noise in quadrature oscillators built by connecting two differential LC-tank oscillators in a parallel fashion. The analysis clearly demonstrates the necessity of adopting a time-variant theory of phase noise, where a more simplistic, time...

  10. Liquid-phase turbulence measurements in air-water two-phase flows over a wide range of void fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xinquan [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, 201 W. 19th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Sun, Xiaodong, E-mail: sun.200@osu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, 201 W. 19th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Liu, Yang [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, 635 Prices Fork Road, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    This paper focuses on liquid-phase turbulence measurements in air-water two-phase flows over a wide range of void fractions and flow regimes, spanning from bubbly, cap-bubbly, slug, to churn-turbulent flows. The measurements have been conducted in two test facilities, the first one with a circular test section and the second one with a rectangular test section. A particle image velocimetry-planar laser-induced fluorescence (PIV-PLIF) system was used to acquire local liquid-phase turbulence information, including the time-averaged velocity and velocity fluctuations in the streamwise and spanwise directions, and Reynolds stress. An optical phase separation method using fluorescent particles and optical filtration technique was adopted to extract the liquid-phase velocity information. An image pre-processing scheme was imposed on the raw PIV images acquired to remove noise due to the presence of bubble residuals and optically distorted particles in the raw PIV images. Four-sensor conductivity probes and high-speed images were also used to acquire the gas-phase information, which was aimed to understand the flow interfacial structure. The highest area-averaged void fraction covered in the measurements for the circular and rectangular test sections was about 40%.

  11. Liquid-phase turbulence measurements in air-water two-phase flows over a wide range of void fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xinquan; Sun, Xiaodong; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on liquid-phase turbulence measurements in air-water two-phase flows over a wide range of void fractions and flow regimes, spanning from bubbly, cap-bubbly, slug, to churn-turbulent flows. The measurements have been conducted in two test facilities, the first one with a circular test section and the second one with a rectangular test section. A particle image velocimetry-planar laser-induced fluorescence (PIV-PLIF) system was used to acquire local liquid-phase turbulence information, including the time-averaged velocity and velocity fluctuations in the streamwise and spanwise directions, and Reynolds stress. An optical phase separation method using fluorescent particles and optical filtration technique was adopted to extract the liquid-phase velocity information. An image pre-processing scheme was imposed on the raw PIV images acquired to remove noise due to the presence of bubble residuals and optically distorted particles in the raw PIV images. Four-sensor conductivity probes and high-speed images were also used to acquire the gas-phase information, which was aimed to understand the flow interfacial structure. The highest area-averaged void fraction covered in the measurements for the circular and rectangular test sections was about 40%.

  12. Sub-shot-noise phase sensitivity with a Bose-Einstein condensate Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezze, L.; Smerzi, A.; Collins, L.A.; Berman, G.P.; Bishop, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC), with their coherence properties, have attracted wide interest for their possible application to ultraprecise interferometry and ultraweak force sensors. Since condensates, unlike photons, are interacting, they may permit the realization of specific quantum states needed as input of an interferometer to approach the Heisenberg limit, the supposed lower bound to precision phase measurements. To this end, we study the sensitivity to external weak perturbations of a representative matter-wave Mach-Zehnder interferometer whose input are two Bose-Einstein condensates created by splitting a single condensate in two parts. The interferometric phase sensitivity depends on the specific quantum state created with the two condensates, and, therefore, on the time scale of the splitting process. We identify three different regimes, characterized by a phase sensitivity Δθ scaling with the total number of condensate particles N as (i) the standard quantum limit Δθ∼1/N 1/2 (ii) the sub shot-noise Δθ∼1/N 3/4 , and the (iii) the Heisenberg limit Δθ∼1/N. However, in a realistic dynamical BEC splitting, the 1/N limit requires a long adiabaticity time scale, which is hardly reachable experimentally. On the other hand, the sub-shot-noise sensitivity Δθ∼1/N 3/4 can be reached in a realistic experimental setting. We also show that the 1/N 3/4 scaling is a rigorous upper bound in the limit N→∞, while keeping constant all different parameters of the bosonic Mach-Zehnder interferometer

  13. Low-complexity BCH codes with optimized interleavers for DQPSK systems with laser phase noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leong, Miu Yoong; Larsen, Knud J.; Jacobsen, Gunnar

    2017-01-01

    The presence of high phase noise in addition to additive white Gaussian noise in coherent optical systems affects the performance of forward error correction (FEC) schemes. In this paper, we propose a simple scheme for such systems, using block interleavers and binary Bose...... simulations. For a target post-FEC BER of 10−6, codes selected using our method result in BERs around 3× target and achieve the target with around 0.2 dB extra signal-to-noise ratio....

  14. Measuring the Noise Caused by Tehran Metro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Abbas Pour

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common and important sources of noise in the residential environments are vehicles such as airplanes and subways. Trafficking of vehicles in streets and highways, psychologically, have damaging impacts on people living close to such areas. The development and expansion of the trading and industrial units is another factor that causes more and more exposure to noise.We have aimed at measuring the noises caused by vibration of subways of the Line of Karaj-Tehran-Mehrshahr and its effect on its surrounding area.To study this effect we designed a mathematical model and put the information of this subway line in the mentioned model. Then we analyzed the findings.This model demonstrated that we can control the harsh noise of the subway by reducing the speed of the train to 60Km/h in some points and increase in other parts to 130Km/h.

  15. Noise in position measurement by centroid calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, P.

    1996-01-01

    The position of a particle trajectory in a gaseous (or semiconductor) detector can be measured by calculating the centroid of the induced charge on the cathode plane. The charge amplifiers attached to each cathode strip introduce noise which is added to the signal. This noise broadens the position resolution line. Our article gives an analytical tool to estimate the resolution broadening due to the noise per strip and the number of strips involved in the centroid calculation. It is shown that the position resolution increases faster than the square root of the number of strips involved. We also consider the consequence of added interstrip capacitors, intended to diminish the differential nonlinearity. It is shown that the position error increases slower than linearly with the interstrip capacities, due to the cancellation of correlated noise. The estimation we give, can be applied to calculations of position broadening other than the centroid finding. (orig.)

  16. Compressed Sensing with Linear Correlation Between Signal and Measurement Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arildsen, Thomas; Larsen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    reconstruction algorithms, but is not known in existing literature. The proposed technique reduces reconstruction error considerably in the case of linearly correlated measurements and noise. Numerical experiments confirm the efficacy of the technique. The technique is demonstrated with application to low......Existing convex relaxation-based approaches to reconstruction in compressed sensing assume that noise in the measurements is independent of the signal of interest. We consider the case of noise being linearly correlated with the signal and introduce a simple technique for improving compressed...... sensing reconstruction from such measurements. The technique is based on a linear model of the correlation of additive noise with the signal. The modification of the reconstruction algorithm based on this model is very simple and has negligible additional computational cost compared to standard...

  17. Cross correlation measurement of low frequency conductivity noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aditya Kumar; Nigudkar, Himanshu; Chakraborti, Himadri; Udupa, Aditi; Gupta, Kantimay Das

    2018-04-01

    In order to study the low frequency noise(1/f noise)an experimental technique based on cross correlation of two channels is presented. In this method the device under test (DUT)is connected to the two independently powered preamplifiers in parallel. The amplified signals from the two preamplifiers are fed to two channels of a digitizer. Subsequent data processing largelyeliminates the uncorrelated noise of the two channels. This method is tested for various commercial carbon/metal film resistors by measuring equilibrium thermal noise (4kBTR). The method is then modified to study the non-equilibrium low frequency noise of heterostructure samples using fiveprobe configuration. Five contact probes allow two parts of the sample to become two arms of a balanced bridge. This configuration helps in suppressing the effect of power supply fluctuations, bath temperature fluctuations and contact resistances.

  18. Failing to get the gist of what's being said: background noise impairs higher-order cognitive processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, John E; Ljung, Robert; Nöstl, Anatole; Threadgold, Emma; Campbell, Tom A

    2015-01-01

    A dynamic interplay is known to exist between auditory processing and human cognition. For example, prior investigations of speech-in-noise have revealed there is more to learning than just listening: Even if all words within a spoken list are correctly heard in noise, later memory for those words is typically impoverished. These investigations supported a view that there is a "gap" between the intelligibility of speech and memory for that speech. Here, the notion was that this gap between speech intelligibility and memorability is a function of the extent to which the spoken message seizes limited immediate memory resources (e.g., Kjellberg et al., 2008). Accordingly, the more difficult the processing of the spoken message, the less resources are available for elaboration, storage, and recall of that spoken material. However, it was not previously known how increasing that difficulty affected the memory processing of semantically rich spoken material. This investigation showed that noise impairs higher levels of cognitive analysis. A variant of the Deese-Roediger-McDermott procedure that encourages semantic elaborative processes was deployed. On each trial, participants listened to a 36-item list comprising 12 words blocked by each of 3 different themes. Each of those 12 words (e.g., bed, tired, snore…) was associated with a "critical" lure theme word that was not presented (e.g., sleep). Word lists were either presented without noise or at a signal-to-noise ratio of 5 decibels upon an A-weighting. Noise reduced false recall of the critical words, and decreased the semantic clustering of recall. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  19. Measurements of effective noise temperature in fused silica fiber violin modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilenko, I.A.; Lourie, S.L

    2002-11-25

    The results of measurements of the effective noise temperature in fused silica fiber violin modes are presented. In these measurements the fibers were stressed and value of the effective noise temperature was obtained by direct observation of oscillations in the fundamental violin modes of several samples. Measured values indicate that effective noise temperature does not exceed the room temperature significantly. This result is important for the design of the advanced gravitational wave antennae.

  20. Noise Measurements of the VAIIPR Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Jeff; Weir, Don

    2012-01-01

    This final report has been prepared by Honeywell Aerospace, Phoenix, Arizona, a unit of Honeywell International, Inc., documenting work performed during the period September 2004 through November 2005 for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, under the Revolutionary Aero-Space Engine Research (RASER) Program, Contract No. NAS3- 01136, Task Order 6, Noise Measurements of the VAIIPR Fan. The NASA Task Manager was Dr. Joe Grady, NASA Glenn Research Center, Mail Code 60-6, Cleveland, Ohio 44135. The NASA Contract Officer was Mr. Albert Spence, NASA Glenn Research Center, Mail Code 60-6, Cleveland, Ohio 44135. This report focuses on the evaluation of internal fan noise as generated from various inflow disturbances based on measurements made from a circumferential array of sensors located near the fan and sensors upstream of a serpentine inlet.

  1. Extracting Earth's Elastic Wave Response from Noise Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, Roel; Larose, Eric

    2013-05-01

    Recent research has shown that noise can be turned from a nuisance into a useful seismic source. In seismology and other fields in science and engineering, the estimation of the system response from noise measurements has proven to be a powerful technique. To convey the essence of the method, we first treat the simplest case of a homogeneous medium to show how noise measurements can be used to estimate waves that propagate between sensors. We provide an overview of physics research—dating back more than 100 years—showing that random field fluctuations contain information about the system response. This principle has found extensive use in surface-wave seismology but can also be applied to the estimation of body waves. Because noise provides continuous illumination of the subsurface, the extracted response is ideally suited for time-lapse monitoring. We present examples of time-lapse monitoring as applied to the softening of soil after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, the detection of a precursor to a landslide, and temporal changes in the lunar soil.

  2. Noise Parameters of CW Radar Sensors Used in Active Defense Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Jenik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Active defense represents an innovative way of protecting military vehicles. It is based on the employment of a set of radar sensors which detect an approaching threat missile and activate a suitable counter-measure. Since the radar sensors are supposed to detect flying missiles very fast and, at the same time, distinguish them from stationary or slow-moving objects, CW Doppler radar sensors can be employed with a benefit. The submitted article deals with a complex noise analysis of this type of sensors. The analysis considers the noise of linear and quasi-linear RF components, phase-noise of the local oscillator as well as the noise of low-frequency circuits. Since the incidence of the phase-noise depends strongly upon the time delay between the reference and the cross-talked signals, a new method of measuring noise parameters utilizing a reflecting wall has been developed and verified. The achieved results confirm potentially high influence of the phase-noise on the noise parameters of the mentioned type of radar sensors. Obtained results can be used for the analysis of noise parameters of the similar but even more complex sensors.

  3. Relationship of core exit-temperature noise to thermal-hydraulic conditions in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    Core exit thermocouple temperature noise and neutron detector noise measurements were performed at the Loss of Fluid Test Facility (LOFT) reactor and a Westinghouse, 1148 MW(e) PWR to relate temperature noise to core thermal-hydraulic conditions. The noise analysis results show that the RMS of the temperature noise increases linearly with increasing core δT at LOFT and the commercial PWR. Out-of-core test loop temperature noise has shown similar behavior. The phase angle between core exit temperature noise and in-core or ex-core neutron noise is directly related to the core coolant flow velocity. However, if the thermocouple response time is slow, compared to the coolant transit time between the sensors, velocities inferred from the phase angle are lower than measured coolant flow velocities

  4. Hearing Impairment CausedbyOccupational Noise*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-08-28

    Aug 28, 1971 ... over-all noise level, (b) exposure duration in a working day, and (c) exposure .... The highest tone on a piano is about 4 000 Hz. This is the frequency for which ..... hours per week and serves as the decisive criterion for hearing ...

  5. Design and analysis of an energy-efficient O-QPSK coherent IR-UWB transceiver with a 0.52° RMS phase-noise fractional synthesizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yutong; Lin, Fujiang; Bai, Xuefei

    2018-03-01

    This paper explores an energy-efficient pulsed ultra-wideband (UWB) radio-frequency (RF) front-end chip fabricated in 0.18-μm CMOS technology, including a transmitter, receiver, and fractional synthesizer. The transmitter adopts a digital offset quadrature phase-shift keying (O-QPSK) modulator and passive direct-phase multiplexing technology, which are energy- and hardware-efficient, to enhance the data rate for a given spectrum. A passive mixer and a capacitor cross-coupled (CCC) source-follower driving amplifier (DA) are also designed for the transmitter to further reduce the low power consumption. For the receiver, a power-aware low-noise amplifier (LNA) and a quadrature mixer are applied. The LNA adopts a CCC boost common-gate amplifier as the input stage, and its current is reused for the second stage to save power. The mixer uses a shared amplification stage for the following passive IQ mixer. Phase noise suppression of the phase-locked loop (PLL) is achieved by utilizing an even-harmonics-nulled series-coupled quadrature oscillator (QVCO) and an in-band noise-aware charge pump (CP) design. The transceiver achieves a measured data rate of 0.8 Gbps with power consumption of 16 mW and 31.5 mW for the transmitter and the receiver, respectively. The optimized integrated phase noise of the PLL is 0.52° at 4.025 GHz. Project supported by the National Science and Technology Major Project of China (No. 2011ZX03004-002-01).

  6. Detection of stably bright squeezed light with the quantum noise reduction of 12.6  dB by mutually compensating the phase fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenhai; Shi, Shaoping; Wang, Yajun; Ma, Weiguang; Zheng, Yaohui; Peng, Kunchi

    2017-11-01

    We present a mutual compensation scheme of three phase fluctuations, originating from the residual amplitude modulation (RAM) in the phase modulation process, in the bright squeezed light generation system. The influence of the RAM on each locking loop is harmonized by using one electro-optic modulator (EOM), and the direction of the phase fluctuation is manipulated by positioning the photodetector (PD) that extracts the error signal before or after the optical parametric amplifier (OPA). Therefore a bright squeezed light with non-classical noise reduction of π is obtained. By fitting the squeezing and antisqueezing measurement results, we confirm that the total phase fluctuation of the system is around 3.1 mrad. The fluctuation of the noise suppression is 0.2 dB for 3 h.

  7. Kalman filtering techniques for reducing variance of digital speckle displacement measurement noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donghui Li; Li Guo

    2006-01-01

    @@ Target dynamics are assumed to be known in measuring digital speckle displacement. Use is made of a simple measurement equation, where measurement noise represents the effect of disturbances introduced in measurement process. From these assumptions, Kalman filter can be designed to reduce variance of measurement noise. An optical and analysis system was set up, by which object motion with constant displacement and constant velocity is experimented with to verify validity of Kalman filtering techniques for reduction of measurement noise variance.

  8. Effects of environmental noise on cognitive (dys)functions in schizophrenia: A pilot within-subjects experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Bernice; Peters, Emmanuelle; Ettinger, Ulrich; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Kumari, Veena

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive impairment, particularly in attention, memory and executive function domains, is commonly present and associated with poor functional outcomes in schizophrenia. In healthy adults, environmental noise adversely affects many cognitive domains, including those known to be compromised in schizophrenia. This pilot study examined whether environmental noise causes further cognitive deterioration in a small sample of people with schizophrenia. Eighteen outpatients with schizophrenia on stable doses of antipsychotics and 18 age and sex-matched healthy participants were assessed on a comprehensive cognitive battery including measures of psychomotor speed, attention, executive functioning, working memory, and verbal learning and memory under three different conditions [quiet: ~30dB(A); urban noise: building site noise, 68-78dB(A); and social noise: background babble and footsteps from a crowded hall without any discernible words, 68-78dB(A)], 7-14days apart, with counter-balanced presentation of noise conditions across participants of both groups. The results showed widespread cognitive impairment in patients under all conditions, and noise-induced impairments of equal magnitude on specific cognitive functions in both groups. Both patient and healthy participant groups showed significant disruption of delayed verbal recall and recognition by urban and social noise, and of working memory by social noise, relative to the quiet condition. Performance under urban and social noise did not differ significantly from each other for any cognitive measure in either group. We conclude that noise has adverse effects on the verbal and working memory domains in schizophrenia patients and healthy participants. This may be particularly problematic for patients as it worsens their pre-existing cognitive deficits. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Corrosion detection of carbon steel in water/oil two phases environment by electrochemical noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusmano, G.; Montesperelli, G.; De Grandis, A.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the electrochemical noise analysis to detect the onset of corrosion phenomena in a very high resistivity medium. Tests were carried out on carbon steel electrodes immersed in a water/mineral oil two phases environment with high concentration of CO 2 , different aqueous/organic phase ratio, sulphide content between 0 and 0.5 g/l and pH between 1 and 5. The evolution of corrosion phenomena were followed by collecting current and potential noise between three nominally identical electrodes. The noise data were analysed in the time and in the frequency domain. In spite of a great loss of sensitivity of the method with respect to tests performed in aqueous solution, the data indicate a good agreement between the standard deviations and the power level of power spectra density (PSD) of current and potential noise signals and corrosion rates by means of weight loss. The values of the PSD slope, indicate the form of corrosion. The effect of water/oil ratio, sulphide concentration and pH on the corrosion rate was determined. Finally two methods to increase the sensitivity of the electrochemical noise are proposed. (orig.)

  10. Frequency-dependent effects of background noise on subcortical response timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, A; Parbery-Clark, A; Skoe, E; Kraus, N

    2011-12-01

    The addition of background noise to an auditory signal delays brainstem response timing. This effect has been extensively documented using manual peak selection. Peak picking, however, is impractical for large-scale studies of spectrotemporally complex stimuli, and leaves open the question of whether noise-induced delays are frequency-dependent or occur across the frequency spectrum. Here we use an automated, objective method to examine phase shifts between auditory brainstem responses to a speech sound (/da/) presented with and without background noise. We predicted that shifts in neural response timing would also be reflected in frequency-specific phase shifts. Our results indicate that the addition of background noise causes phase shifts across the subcortical response spectrum (70-1000 Hz). However, this noise-induced delay is not uniform such that some frequency bands show greater shifts than others: low-frequency phase shifts (300-500 Hz) are largest during the response to the consonant-vowel formant transition (/d/), while high-frequency shifts (720-1000 Hz) predominate during the response to the steady-state vowel (/a/). Most importantly, phase shifts occurring in specific frequency bands correlate strongly with shifts in the latencies of the predominant peaks in the auditory brainstem response, while phase shifts in other frequency bands do not. This finding confirms the validity of phase shift detection as an objective measure of timing differences and reveals that this method detects noise-induced shifts in timing that may not be captured by traditional peak latency measurements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Filterless low-phase-noise frequency-quadrupled microwave generation based on a multimode optoelectronic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yichao; Zhang, Pin; Zhang, Baofu; Chen, Yiwang

    2018-02-01

    A scheme to realize low-phase-noise frequency-quadrupled microwave generation without any filter is demonstrated. In this scheme, a multimode optoelectronic oscillator is mainly contributed by dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulators, fiber, photodetector, and microwave amplifier. The local source signal is modulated by a child MZM (MZMa), which is worked at maximum transmission point. Through properly adjusting the bias voltages of the other child MZM (MZMb) and the parent MZM (MZMc), optical carrier is effectively suppressed and second sidebands are retained, then the survived optical signal is fed back to the photodetector and MZMb to form an optoelectronic hybrid resonator and realize frequency-quadrupled signal generation. Due to the high Q-factor and mode selection effect of the optoelectronic hybrid resonator, compared with the source signal, the generated frequency-quadrupled signal has a lower phase noise. The approach has verified by experiments, and 18, 22, and 26 GHz frequency-quadrupled signal are generated by 4.5, 5.5, and 6.5 GHz local source signals. Compared with 4.5 GHz source signal, the phase noise of generated 18 GHz signal at 10 kHz frequency offset has 26.5 dB reduction.

  12. Impact of Noise and Noise Reduction on Processing Effort: A Pupillometry Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Dorothea; Hietkamp, Renskje K; Lunner, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    of noise (intelligibility level) and different NR schemes on effort were evaluated by measuring the pupil dilation of listeners. In 2 different experiments, performance accuracy and peak pupil dilation (PPD) were measured in 24 listeners with hearing impairment while they performed a speech recognition...... task. The listeners were tested at 2 different signal to noise ratios corresponding to either the individual 50% correct (L50) or the 95% correct (L95) performance level in a 4-talker babble condition with and without the use of a NR scheme. In experiment 1, the PPD differed in response to both changes...... in the speech intelligibility level (L50 versus L95) and NR scheme. The PPD increased with decreasing intelligibility, indicating higher processing effort under the L50 condition compared with the L95 condition. Moreover, the PPD decreased when the NR scheme was applied, suggesting that the processing effort...

  13. A low-power and low-phase-noise LC digitally controlled oscillator featuring a novel capacitor bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Huanhuan; Li Zhiqiang; Chen Pufeng; Wu Rufei; Zhang Haiying, E-mail: thuan8@126.com [Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2010-12-15

    A monolithic low-power and low-phase-noise digitally controlled oscillator (DCO) based on a symmetric spiral inductor with center-tap and novel capacitor bank was implemented in a 0.18 {mu}m CMOS process with six metal layers. A third new way to change capacitance is proposed and implemented in this work. Results show that the phase noise at 1 MHz offset frequency is below -122.5 dBc/Hz while drawing a current of only 4.8 mA from a 1.8 V supply. Also, the DCO can work at low supply voltage conditions with a 1.6 V power supply and 4.1 mA supply current for the DCO's core circuit, achieving a phase-noise of -21.5 dBc/Hz at offset of 1 MHz. It demonstrates that the supply pushing of DCO is less than 10 MHz/V. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  14. Objective measures of listening effort: effects of background noise and noise reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarampalis, Anastasios; Kalluri, Sridhar; Edwards, Brent; Hafter, Ervin

    2009-10-01

    This work is aimed at addressing a seeming contradiction related to the use of noise-reduction (NR) algorithms in hearing aids. The problem is that although some listeners claim a subjective improvement from NR, it has not been shown to improve speech intelligibility, often even making it worse. To address this, the hypothesis tested here is that the positive effects of NR might be to reduce cognitive effort directed toward speech reception, making it available for other tasks. Normal-hearing individuals participated in 2 dual-task experiments, in which 1 task was to report sentences or words in noise set to various signal-to-noise ratios. Secondary tasks involved either holding words in short-term memory or responding in a complex visual reaction-time task. At low values of signal-to-noise ratio, although NR had no positive effect on speech reception thresholds, it led to better performance on the word-memory task and quicker responses in visual reaction times. Results from both dual tasks support the hypothesis that NR reduces listening effort and frees up cognitive resources for other tasks. Future hearing aid research should incorporate objective measurements of cognitive benefits.

  15. Noise reduction methods for nucleic acid and macromolecule sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Balatsky, Alexander

    2018-05-08

    Methods, systems, and devices are disclosed for processing macromolecule sequencing data with substantial noise reduction. In one aspect, a method for reducing noise in a sequential measurement of a macromolecule comprising serial subunits includes cross-correlating multiple measured signals of a physical property of subunits of interest of the macromolecule, the multiple measured signals including the time data associated with the measurement of the signal, to remove or at least reduce signal noise that is not in the same frequency and in phase with the systematic signal contribution of the measured signals.

  16. Pilot study of methods and equipment for in-home noise level measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitzel, Richard L; Heikkinen, Maire S A; Williams, Christopher C; Viet, Susan Marie; Dellarco, Michael

    2015-01-15

    Knowledge of the auditory and non-auditory effects of noise has increased dramatically over the past decade, but indoor noise exposure measurement methods have not advanced appreciably, despite the introduction of applicable new technologies. This study evaluated various conventional and smart devices for exposure assessment in the National Children's Study. Three devices were tested: a sound level meter (SLM), a dosimeter, and a smart device with a noise measurement application installed. Instrument performance was evaluated in a series of semi-controlled tests in office environments over 96-hour periods, followed by measurements made continuously in two rooms (a child's bedroom and a most used room) in nine participating homes over a 7-day period with subsequent computation of a range of noise metrics. The SLMs and dosimeters yielded similar A-weighted average noise levels. Levels measured by the smart devices often differed substantially (showing both positive and negative bias, depending on the metric) from those measured via SLM and dosimeter, and demonstrated attenuation in some frequency bands in spectral analysis compared to SLM results. Virtually all measurements exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency's 45 dBA day-night limit for indoor residential exposures. The measurement protocol developed here can be employed in homes, demonstrates the possibility of measuring long-term noise exposures in homes with technologies beyond traditional SLMs, and highlights potential pitfalls associated with measurements made by smart devices.

  17. Modulator noise suppression in the LISA time-delay interferometric combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinto, Massimo; Armstrong, J W; Estabrook, Frank B

    2008-01-01

    Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a mission to detect and study low-frequency cosmic gravitational radiation through its influence on the phases of six modulated laser beams exchanged between three remote spacecraft. We previously showed how the measurements of some 18 time series of relative frequency or phase shifts could be combined (1) to cancel the phase noise of the lasers, (2) to cancel the Doppler fluctuations due to non-inertial motions of the six optical benches and (3) to remove the phase noise of the onboard reference oscillators required to track the photodetector fringes, all the while preserving signals from passing gravitational waves. Here we analyze the effect of the additional noise due to the optical modulators used for removing the phase fluctuations of the onboard reference oscillators. We use the recently measured noise spectrum of an individual modulator (Klipstein et al 2006 Proc. 6th Int. LISA Symp. (Greenbelt, MA) (AIP Conf. Proc. vol 873) ed S M Merkowitz and J C Livas pp 19-23) to quantify the contribution of modulator noise to the first and second-generation time-delay interferometric (TDI) combinations as a function of the modulation frequency. We show that modulator noise can be made smaller than the expected proof-mass acceleration and optical-path noises if the modulation frequencies are larger than ∼682 MHz in the case of the unequal-arm Michelson TDI combination X 1 , ∼ 1.08 GHz for the Sagnac TDI combination α 1 , and ∼706 MHz for the symmetrical Sagnac TDI combination ζ 1 . These modulation frequencies are substantially smaller than previously estimated and may lead to less stringent requirements on the LISA's oscillator noise calibration subsystem. The measurements in Klipstein et al were performed in a laboratory experiment for a range of modulation frequencies, but we emphasize that, for the reference oscillator noise calibration algorithm to work, the modulation frequencies must be equal to the

  18. Local gas- and liquid-phase measurements for air-water two-phase flows in a rectangular channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, X.; Sun, X.; Williams, M.; Fu, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Local gas- and liquid-phase measurements of various gas-liquid two-phase flows, including bubbly, cap-bubbly, slug, and churn-turbulent flows, were performed in an acrylic vertical channel with a rectangular cross section of 30 mm x 10 mm and height of 3.0 m. All the measurements were carried out at three measurement elevations along the flow channel, with z/D h = 9, 72, and 136, respectively, to study the flow development. The gas-phase velocity, void fraction, and bubble number frequency were measured using a double-sensor conductivity probe. A high-speed imaging system was utilized to perform the flow regime visualization and to provide additional quantitative information of the two-phase flow structure. An image processing scheme was developed to obtain the gas-phase velocity, void fraction, Sauter mean diameter, bubble number density, and interfacial area concentration. The liquid-phase velocity and turbulence measurements were conducted using a particle image velocimetry-planar laser-induced fluorescence (PIV-PLIF) system, which enables whole-field and high-resolution data acquisition. An optical phase separation method, which uses fluorescent particles and optical filtration technique, is adopted to extract the velocity information of the liquid phase. An image pre-processing scheme is imposed on the raw PIV images acquired to remove noises due to the presence of bubble residuals and optically distorted particles in the images captured by the PIV-PLIF system. Due to the better light access and less bubble distortion in the narrow rectangular channel, the PIV-PLIF system were able to perform reasonably well in flows of even higher void fractions as compared to the situations with circular pipe test sections. The flow conditions being studied covered various flow regime transitions, void fractions, and liquid-phase flow Reynolds numbers. The obtained experimental data can also be used to validate two-phase CFD results. (author)

  19. Noise measurements in 4 wind turbine farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zuylen, E.J.; Koerts, M.

    1993-02-01

    The title wind turbine arrays are situated in Herbayum (Newinco 23PI250), Callantsoog (Bouma 160/20), Noordoostpolder (Windmaster WM300), and Ulketocht (Newinco 500 kW). Measurements were carried out by means of the so-called Ecofys Correlating Noise Meter to determine the source level of the wind turbines. The resulting source level as a function of the wind speed is interpolated to a source level for a wind speed of 8 m/s at 10 m height, on the basis of which the noise contours can be calculated. The noise contours are determined to analyze the noise load for people living in the neighbourhood of the wind parks. The source levels are compared with values as indicated in certificates, which are granted on the basis of a so-called Restricted Quality Certificate (BKC, abbreviated in Dutch) or the new standard NNI 6096/2 for the above-mentioned wind turbines. In general the results of this study agree quite well with the certified values. 12 figs., 7 tabs., 6 refs

  20. Effect of uncompensated SPN detector cables on neutron noise signals measured in VVER-440 reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiss, S. E-mail: kisss@sunserv.kfki.hu; Lipcsei, S. E-mail: lipcsei@sunserv.kfki.hu; Hazi, G. E-mail: gah@sunserv.kfki.hu

    2003-03-01

    The Self Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) noise measurements of an operating VVER-440 nuclear reactor are described and characterised. Signal characteristics may be radically influenced by the geometrical properties of the detector and the cable, and by the measuring arrangement. Simulator is used as a means of studying the structure of those phase spectra that show propagating perturbations measured on uncompensated SPN detectors. The paper presents measurements with detectors of very different sizes (i.e. 20 cm length SPNDs and the 200 cm length compensation cables), where the ratios of the global and local component differ significantly for the different detector sizes. This phenomenon is used up for signal compensation.

  1. An image-processing method to detect sub-optical features based on understanding noise in intensity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Tripta

    2018-02-01

    Accurate quantitative analysis of image data requires that we distinguish between fluorescence intensity (true signal) and the noise inherent to its measurements to the extent possible. We image multilamellar membrane tubes and beads that grow from defects in the fluid lamellar phase of the lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine dissolved in water and water-glycerol mixtures by using fluorescence confocal polarizing microscope. We quantify image noise and determine the noise statistics. Understanding the nature of image noise also helps in optimizing image processing to detect sub-optical features, which would otherwise remain hidden. We use an image-processing technique "optimum smoothening" to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of features of interest without smearing their structural details. A high SNR renders desired positional accuracy with which it is possible to resolve features of interest with width below optical resolution. Using optimum smoothening, the smallest and the largest core diameter detected is of width [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] nm, respectively, discussed in this paper. The image-processing and analysis techniques and the noise modeling discussed in this paper can be used for detailed morphological analysis of features down to sub-optical length scales that are obtained by any kind of fluorescence intensity imaging in the raster mode.

  2. Evaluation of stress-induced martensite phase in ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Fe-30.2at%Pd by non-destructive Barkhausen noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Yasubumi; Okazaki, Teiko; Ueno, Takasi; Spearing, Mark; Wutting, Manfred

    2005-05-01

    Barkhausen noise (BHN) method seems a useful tecnique to non-destructive evaluation of martensite phase transformation of ferromagnetic shape memory alloy, which is used as the filler of our proposing "Smart Composite Board". The concept of design for "Smart Composite Board" which can combine the non-destructive magnetic inspection and shape recovery function in the material itself was formerly proposed. In the present study, we survey the possibility of Barkhausen noise (BHN) method to detect the transformation of microscopic martensite phase caused by stress-loading in Fe-30.2at%Pd thin foil, which has a stable austenite phase (fcc structure) at room temperature. The BHN voltage was measured at loading stress up to 100 MPa in temperature range of 300K to 373K. Stress-induced martensite twin was observed by laser microscope above loading stress of 25 MPa. A phase transformation caused by loading stress were analyzed also by X-ray diffraction. The signals of BHN are analyzed by the time of magnetization and the noise frequency. BHN caused by grain boundaries appears in the lower frequency range (1kHz-3kHz) and BHN by martensite twin in the higher frequency range (8kHz-10kHz). The envelope of the BHN voltage as a function of time of magnetization shows a peak due to austenite phase at weak magnetic field. The BHN envelope due to martensite twins creates additional two peaks at intermediate magnetic field. BHN method turns out to be a powerful technique for non-destructive evaluation of the phase transformation of ferromagnetic shape memory alloy.

  3. Airframe Noise from a Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Spalt, Taylor B.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Plassman, Gerald E.

    2016-01-01

    A high fidelity aeroacoustic test was conducted in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel to establish a detailed database of component noise for a 5.8% scale HWB aircraft configuration. The model has a modular design, which includes a drooped and a stowed wing leading edge, deflectable elevons, twin verticals, and a landing gear system with geometrically scaled wheel-wells. The model is mounted inverted in the test section and noise measurements are acquired at different streamwise stations from an overhead microphone phased array and from overhead and sideline microphones. Noise source distribution maps and component noise spectra are presented for airframe configurations representing two different approach flight conditions. Array measurements performed along the aircraft flyover line show the main landing gear to be the dominant contributor to the total airframe noise, followed by the nose gear, the inboard side-edges of the LE droop, the wing tip/LE droop outboard side-edges, and the side-edges of deployed elevons. Velocity dependence and flyover directivity are presented for the main noise components. Decorrelation effects from turbulence scattering on spectral levels measured with the microphone phased array are discussed. Finally, noise directivity maps obtained from the overhead and sideline microphone measurements for the landing gear system are provided for a broad range of observer locations.

  4. Inter-Individual Differences in Neurobehavioural Impairment following Sleep Restriction Are Associated with Circadian Rhythm Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sletten, Tracey L.; Segal, Ahuva Y.; Flynn-Evans, Erin E.; Lockley, Steven W.; Rajaratnam, Shantha M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Although sleep restriction is associated with decrements in daytime alertness and neurobehavioural performance, there are considerable inter-individual differences in the degree of impairment. This study examined the effects of short-term sleep restriction on neurobehavioural performance and sleepiness, and the associations between individual differences in impairments and circadian rhythm phase. Healthy adults (n = 43; 22 M) aged 22.5 ± 3.1 (mean ± SD) years maintained a regular 8:16 h sleep:wake routine for at least three weeks prior to laboratory admission. Sleep opportunity was restricted to 5 hours time-in-bed at home the night before admission and 3 hours time-in-bed in the laboratory, aligned by wake time. Hourly saliva samples were collected from 5.5 h before until 5 h after the pre-laboratory scheduled bedtime to assess dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) as a marker of circadian phase. Participants completed a 10-min auditory Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) and had slow eye movements (SEM) measured by electrooculography two hours after waking. We observed substantial inter-individual variability in neurobehavioural performance, particularly in the number of PVT lapses. Increased PVT lapses (r = -0.468, p circadian phase. When the difference between DLMO and sleep onset was less than 2 hours, individuals were significantly more likely to have at least three attentional lapses the following morning. This study demonstrates that the phase of an individual’s circadian system is an important variable in predicting the degree of neurobehavioural performance impairment in the hours after waking following sleep restriction, and confirms that other factors influencing performance decrements require further investigation. PMID:26043207

  5. Effects of slow- and fast-acting compression on hearing impaired listeners’ consonant-vowel identification in interrupted noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalewski, Borys; Zaar, Johannes; Fereczkowski, Michal

    2017-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence about the relative benefit of slow- and fast- acting compression for speech intelligibility. It has been hypothesized tha tfast-acting compression improves audibility at low signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) but may distort the speech envelope at higher SNRs. The present...... intelligibility benefit of fast-acting compression was found in both the quiet and the noisy conditions for the lower speech levels. No negative effects of fast-acting compression were observed when the speech level exceeded the level of the noise. These findings suggest that fast-acting compression provides...... study investigated the effects of compression with nearly instantaneous attack time but either fast (10 ms) or slow (500 ms) release times on consonant identification in hearing-impaired listeners. Consonant-vowel speech tokens were presented at several presentation levels in two conditions...

  6. A model for measurement of noise in CCD digital-video cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, K; Woodhead, I M; McKinnon, A E; Unsworth, K

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a comprehensive measurement of CCD digital-video camera noise. Knowledge of noise detail within images or video streams allows for the development of more sophisticated algorithms for separating true image content from the noise generated in an image sensor. The robustness and performance of an image-processing algorithm is fundamentally limited by sensor noise. The individual noise sources present in CCD sensors are well understood, but there has been little literature on the development of a complete noise model for CCD digital-video cameras, incorporating the effects of quantization and demosaicing

  7. Phase noise cancellation in polarisation-maintaining fibre links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, B.; Vélez López, M. C.; Thoumany, P.; Pizzocaro, M.; Calonico, D.

    2018-03-01

    The distribution of ultra-narrow linewidth laser radiation is an integral part of many challenging metrological applications. Changes in the optical pathlength induced by environmental disturbances compromise the stability and accuracy of optical fibre networks distributing the laser light and call for active phase noise cancellation. Here we present a laboratory scale optical (at 578 nm) fibre network featuring all polarisation maintaining fibres in a setup with low optical powers available and tracking voltage-controlled oscillators implemented. The stability and accuracy of this system reach performance levels below 1 × 10-19 after 10 000 s of averaging.

  8. Relating the absence of binaural pitch percept to retro-cochlear impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    Binaural pitch stimuli, created by introducing an interaural phase difference over a narrow band of otherwise diotic white noise, produce an immediate tonal sensation with a pitch close to the centre of the phase-shifted band. In Santurette and Dau [Hear. Res. 223(1-2):29-47, 2007], it was shown...... that the salience of binaural pitch was affected by hearing impairment. Specifically, for subjects with a sensorineural impairment, binaural pitch perception was weaker than the normal-hearing average but the pitch sensation was immediately present. In contrast, no binaural pitch sensation at all was found...... for the (only) two subjects with damage at central stages. The aim of the present study is to clarify whether such a sharp distinction between levels of impairment can be made using binaural pitch stimuli. A pitch detection test was performed by three groups of subjects with: 1) normal hearing; 2) a cochlear...

  9. Coherence and phase synchrony analyses of EEG signals in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): A study of functional brain connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handayani, Nita; Haryanto, Freddy; Khotimah, Siti Nurul; Arif, Idam; Taruno, Warsito Purwo

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents an EEG study for coherence and phase synchrony in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects. MCI is characterized by cognitive decline, which is an early stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is a neurodegenerative disorder with symptoms such as memory loss and cognitive impairment. EEG coherence is a statistical measure of correlation between signals from electrodes spatially separated on the scalp. The magnitude of phase synchrony is expressed in the phase locking value (PLV), a statistical measure of neuronal connectivity in the human brain. Brain signals were recorded using an Emotiv Epoc 14-channel wireless EEG at a sampling frequency of 128 Hz. In this study, we used 22 elderly subjects consisted of 10 MCI subjects and 12 healthy subjects as control group. The coherence between each electrode pair was measured for all frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha and beta). In the MCI subjects, the value of coherence and phase synchrony was generally lower than in the healthy subjects especially in the beta frequency. A decline of intrahemisphere coherence in the MCI subjects occurred in the left temporo-parietal-occipital region. The pattern of decline in MCI coherence is associated with decreased cholinergic connectivity along the path that connects the temporal, occipital, and parietal areas of the brain to the frontal area of the brain. EEG coherence and phase synchrony are able to distinguish persons who suffer AD in the early stages from healthy elderly subjects.

  10. The Influence of Optical Filtering on the Noise Performance of Microwave Photonic Phase Shifters Based on SOAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lloret, Juan; Ramos, Francisco; Xue, Weiqi

    2011-01-01

    Different optical filtering scenarios involving microwave photonic phase shifters based on semiconductor optical amplifiers are investigated numerically as well as experimentally with respect to noise performance. Investigations on the role of the modulation depth and number of elements in cascad...... shifting stages are also carried out. Suppression of the noise level by more than 5 dB has been achieved in schemes based on band-pass optical filtering when three phase shifting stages are cascaded....

  11. Structureborne noise measurements on a small twin-engine aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J. E., III; Martini, K. F.

    1988-01-01

    Structureborne noise measurements performed on a twin-engine aircraft (Beechcraft Baron) are reported. There are two overall objectives of the test program. The first is to obtain data to support the development of analytical models of the wing and fuselage, while the second is to evaluate effects of structural parameters on cabin noise. Measurements performed include structural and acoustic responses to impact excitation, structural and acoustic loss factors, and modal parameters of the wing. Path alterations include added mass to simulate fuel, variations in torque of bolts joining wing and fuselage, and increased acoustic absorption. Conclusions drawn regarding these measurements are presented.

  12. Measuring Variability in the Presence of Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, W. F.

    Quantitative measurements of a variable signal in the presence of noise requires very careful attention to subtle affects which can easily bias the measurements. This is not limited to the low-count rate regime, nor is the bias error necessarily small. In this talk I will mention some of the dangers in applying standard techniques which are appropriate for high signal to noise data but fail in the cases where the S/N is low. I will discuss methods for correcting the bias in the these cases, both for periodic and non-periodic variability, and will introduce the concept of the ``filtered de-biased RMS''. I will also illustrate some common abuses of power spectrum interpretation. All of these points will be illustrated with examples from recent work on CV and AGN variability.

  13. Simpplified extended Kalman filter phase noise estimation for CO-OFDM transmissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tu T; Le, Son T; Wuilpart, Marc; Yakusheva, Tatiana; Mégret, Patrice

    2017-10-30

    We propose a flexible simplified extended Kalman filter (S-EKF) scheme that can be applied in both pilot-aided and blind modes for phase noise compensation in 16-QAM CO-OFDM transmission systems employing a small-to-moderate number of subcarriers. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated and compared with conventional pilot-aided (PA) and blind phase search (BPS) methods via extensive an Monte Carlo simulation in a back-to-back configuration and with a dual polarization fiber transmission. For 64 subcarrier 32 Gbaud 16-QAM CO-OFDM systems with 200 kHz combined laser linewidths, an optical signal-to-noise ratio penalty as low as 1 dB can be achieved with the proposed S-EKF scheme using only 2 pilots in the pilot-aided mode and just 4 inputs in the blind mode, resulting in a spectrally efficient enhancement by a factor of 3 and a computational effort reduction by a factor of more than 50 in comparison with the conventional PA and the BPS methods, respectively.

  14. Validation of an Aero-Acoustic Wind Turbine Noise Model Using Advanced Noise Source Measurements of a 500kW Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    rotor noise model is presented. It includes the main sources of aeroacoustic noise from wind turbines: turbulent inflow, trailing edge and stall noise. The noise measured by one microphone located directly downstream of the wind turbine is compared to the model predictions at the microphone location....... A good qualitative agreement is found. When wind speed increases, the rotor noise model shows that at high frequencies the stall noise becomes dominant. It also shows that turbulent inflow noise is dominant at low frequencies for all wind speeds and that trailing edge noise is dominant at low wind speeds...

  15. Algorithmic-Reducibility = Renormalization-Group Fixed-Points; ``Noise''-Induced Phase-Transitions (NITs) to Accelerate Algorithmics (``NIT-Picking'') Replacing CRUTCHES!!!: Gauss Modular/Clock-Arithmetic Congruences = Signal X Noise PRODUCTS..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, J.; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    Cook-Levin computational-"complexity"(C-C) algorithmic-equivalence reduction-theorem reducibility equivalence to renormalization-(semi)-group phase-transitions critical-phenomena statistical-physics universality-classes fixed-points, is exploited with Gauss modular/clock-arithmetic/model congruences = signal X noise PRODUCT reinterpretation. Siegel-Baez FUZZYICS=CATEGORYICS(SON of ``TRIZ''): Category-Semantics(C-S) tabular list-format truth-table matrix analytics predicts and implements "noise"-induced phase-transitions (NITs) to accelerate versus to decelerate Harel [Algorithmics(1987)]-Sipser[Intro. Theory Computation(1997) algorithmic C-C: "NIT-picking" to optimize optimization-problems optimally(OOPO). Versus iso-"noise" power-spectrum quantitative-only amplitude/magnitude-only variation stochastic-resonance, this "NIT-picking" is "noise" power-spectrum QUALitative-type variation via quantitative critical-exponents variation. Computer-"science" algorithmic C-C models: Turing-machine, finite-state-models/automata, are identified as early-days once-workable but NOW ONLY LIMITING CRUTCHES IMPEDING latter-days new-insights!!!

  16. Robust shot-noise measurement for continuous-variable quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz-Jacques, Sébastien; Jouguet, Paul

    2015-02-01

    We study a practical method to measure the shot noise in real time in continuous-variable quantum key distribution systems. The amount of secret key that can be extracted from the raw statistics depends strongly on this quantity since it affects in particular the computation of the excess noise (i.e., noise in excess of the shot noise) added by an eavesdropper on the quantum channel. Some powerful quantum hacking attacks relying on faking the estimated value of the shot noise to hide an intercept and resend strategy were proposed. Here, we provide experimental evidence that our method can defeat the saturation attack and the wavelength attack.

  17. Mechanical modulation method for ultrasensitive phase measurements in photonics biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patskovsky, S; Maisonneuve, M; Meunier, M; Kabashin, A V

    2008-12-22

    A novel polarimetry methodology for phase-sensitive measurements in single reflection geometry is proposed for applications in optical transduction-based biological sensing. The methodology uses altering step-like chopper-based mechanical phase modulation for orthogonal s- and p- polarizations of light reflected from the sensing interface and the extraction of phase information at different harmonics of the modulation. We show that even under a relatively simple experimental arrangement, the methodology provides the resolution of phase measurements as low as 0.007 deg. We also examine the proposed approach using Total Internal Reflection (TIR) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) geometries. For TIR geometry, the response appears to be strongly dependent on the prism material with the best values for high refractive index Si. The detection limit for Si-based TIR is estimated as 10(-5) in terms Refractive Index Units (RIU) change. SPR geometry offers much stronger phase response due to a much sharper phase characteristics. With the detection limit of 3.2*10(-7) RIU, the proposed methodology provides one of best sensitivities for phase-sensitive SPR devices. Advantages of the proposed method include high sensitivity, simplicity of experimental setup and noise immunity as a result of a high stability modulation.

  18. Unconditional violation of the shot-noise limit in photonic quantum metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slussarenko, Sergei; Weston, Morgan M.; Chrzanowski, Helen M.; Shalm, Lynden K.; Verma, Varun B.; Nam, Sae Woo; Pryde, Geoff J.

    2017-11-01

    Interferometric phase measurement is widely used to precisely determine quantities such as length, speed and material properties1-3. Without quantum correlations, the best phase sensitivity Δ ϕ achievable using n photons is the shot-noise limit, Δ ϕ =1 /√{n }. Quantum-enhanced metrology promises better sensitivity, but, despite theoretical proposals stretching back decades3,4, no measurement using photonic (that is, definite photon number) quantum states has truly surpassed the shot-noise limit. Instead, all such demonstrations, by discounting photon loss, detector inefficiency or other imperfections, have considered only a subset of the photons used. Here, we use an ultrahigh-efficiency photon source and detectors to perform unconditional entanglement-enhanced photonic interferometry. Sampling a birefringent phase shift, we demonstrate precision beyond the shot-noise limit without artificially correcting our results for loss and imperfections. Our results enable quantum-enhanced phase measurements at low photon flux and open the door to the next generation of optical quantum metrology advances.

  19. Elimination of white Gaussian noise in arterial phase CT images to bring adrenal tumours into the forefront.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, Hasan; Ceylan, Rahime

    2018-04-01

    Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography (DCE-CT) is applied to observe adrenal tumours in detail by utilising from the contrast matter, which generally brings the tumour into the forefront. However, DCE-CT images are generally influenced by noises that occur as the result of the trade-off between radiation doses vs. noise. Herein, this situation constitutes a challenge in the achievement of accurate tumour segmentation. In CT images, most of the noises are similar to Gaussian Noise. In this study, arterial phase CT images containing adrenal tumours are utilised, and elimination of Gaussian Noise is realised by fourteen different techniques reported in literature for the achievement of the best denoising process. In this study, the Block Matching and 3D Filtering (BM3D) algorithm typically achieve reliable Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratios (PSNR) and resolves challenges of similar techniques when addressing different levels of noise. Furthermore, BM3D obtains the best mean PSNR values among the first five techniques. BM3D outperforms to other techniques by obtaining better Total Statistical Success (TSS), CPU time and computation cost. Consequently, it prepares clearer arterial phase CT images for the next step (segmentation of adrenal tumours). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Using Smart Devices to Measure Intermittent Noise in the Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Roberts

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the accuracy of smart devices (iPods to measure intermittent noise and integrate a noise dose in the workplace. Materials and Methods: In experiment 1, four iPods were each paired with a Larson Davis Spark dosimeter and exposed to randomly fluctuating pink noise in a reverberant sound chamber. Descriptive statistics and the mean difference between the iPod and its paired dosimeter were calculated for the 1-s data logged measurements. The calculated time weighted average (TWA was also compared between the devices. In experiment 2, 15 maintenance workers and 14 office workers wore an iPod and dosimeter during their work-shift for a maximum of five workdays. A mixed effects linear regression model was used to control for repeated measures and to determine the effect of the device type on the projected 8-h TWA. Results: In experiment 1, a total of 315,306 1-s data logged measurements were made. The interquartile range of the mean difference fell within ±2.0 A-weighted decibels (dBA, which is the standard used by the American National Standards Institute to classify a type 2 sound level meter. The mean difference of the calculated TWA was within ±0.5 dBA except for one outlier. In experiment 2, the results of the mixed effects model found that, on average, iPods measured an 8-h TWA 1.7 dBA higher than their paired dosimeters. Conclusion: This study shows that iPods have the ability to make reasonably accurate noise measurements in the workplace, but they are not as accurate as traditional noise dosimeters.

  1. Failing to Get the Gist of What’s Being Said: Background Noise Impairs Higher Order Cognitive Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Everett Marsh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic interplay is known to exist between auditory processing and human cognition. For example, prior investigations of speech-in-noise have revealed there is more to learning than just listening: Even if all words within a spoken list correctly heard in noise, later memory for those words is typically impoverished. At such low signal-to-noise ratios when listeners could identify words, those participants could not necessarily remember those words. These investigations supported a view that there is a gap between the intelligibility of speech and memory for that speech. Here, the notion was that this gap between speech intelligibility and memorability is a function of the extent to which the spoken message seizes limited immediate memory resources (e.g., Kjellberg, Ljung, & Hallman, 2008. Accordingly, the more difficult the processing of the spoken message, the less resources are available for elaboration, storage, and recall of that spoken material. However, it was not previously known how increasing that difficulty affected the memory processing of semantically rich spoken material. This investigation showed that noise impairs higher levels of cognitive analysis. A variant of the Deese-Roediger-McDermott procedure that encourages semantic elaborative processes was deployed. On each trial, participants listened to a 36-item list comprising 12 words blocked by each of 3 different themes. Each of those 12 words (e.g., bed, tired, snore… was associated with a critical lure theme word that was not presented (e.g., sleep. Word lists were either presented without noise or at a signal-to-noise ratio of 5 decibels upon an A-weighting. Noise reduced false recall of the critical words, and decreased the semantic clustering of recall. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  2. On measuring surface wave phase velocity from station–station cross-correlation of ambient signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boschi, Lapo; Weemstra, Cornelis; Verbeke, Julie

    2012-01-01

    We apply two different algorithms to measure surface wave phase velocity, as a function of frequency, from seismic ambient noise recorded at pairs of stations from a large European network. The two methods are based on consistent theoretical formulations, but differ in the implementation: one met...

  3. Assessment of noise in the airplane cabin environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevitas, Christopher D; Spengler, John D; Jones, Byron; McNeely, Eileen; Coull, Brent; Cao, Xiaodong; Loo, Sin Ming; Hard, Anna-Kate; Allen, Joseph G

    2018-03-15

    To measure sound levels in the aircraft cabin during different phases of flight. Sound level was measured on 200 flights, representing six aircraft groups using continuous monitors. A linear mixed-effects model with random intercept was used to test for significant differences in mean sound level by aircraft model and across each flight phase as well as by flight phase, airplane type, measurement location and proximity to engine noise. Mean sound levels across all flight phases and aircraft groups ranged from 37.6 to >110 dB(A) with a median of 83.5 dB(A). Significant differences in noise levels were also observed based on proximity to the engines and between aircraft with fuselage- and wing mounted engines. Nine flights (4.5%) exceeded the recommended 8-h TWA exposure limit of 85 dB(A) by the NIOSH and ACGIH approach, three flights (1.5%) exceeded the 8-h TWA action level of 85 dB(A) by the OSHA approach, and none of the flights exceeded the 8-h TWA action level of 90 dB(A) by the OSHA PEL approach. Additional characterization studies, including personal noise dosimetry, are necessary to document accurate occupational exposures in the aircraft cabin environment and identify appropriate response actions. FAA should consider applying the more health-protective NIOSH/ACGIH occupational noise recommendations to the aircraft cabin environment.

  4. Phase Noise Effect on MIMO-OFDM Systems with Common and Independent Oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Wang, Hua; Fan, Wei

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of oscillator phase noises (PNs) on multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) systems are studied. It is shown that PNs of common oscillators at the transmitter and at the receiver have the same influence on the performance ...

  5. Environmental Noise Annoyance and Mental Health in Adults: Findings from the Cross-Sectional German Health Update (GEDA Study 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Hammersen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The health implications of environmental noise, especially cardiovascular effects, have been studied intensively. Research on associations between noise and mental health, however, has shown contradictory results. The present study examined associations between individual levels of noise annoyance due to noise from various sources in the living environment and mental health of adults in Germany. It evaluated whether these associations persisted after adjusting for potential covariates. Data were obtained from the cross-sectional “German Health Update” study 2012 (GEDA 2012, a national health interview survey among adults in Germany conducted by the Robert Koch Institute (n = 19,294. Noise annoyance questions referred to overall noise and that from road traffic, neighbours, and air traffic. Mental health was measured with the five-item Mental Health Inventory. Bivariate analysis showed associations between high levels of noise annoyance and impaired mental health for all noise sources except air traffic. After adjusting for covariates (sociodemographic factors, chronic disease, and social support, both men and women who reported high overall noise annoyance showed more than doubled odds of impaired mental health compared to those who were not annoyed. The odds of impaired mental health in the highest noise annoyance category from road traffic and neighbours were also significantly increased. These findings indicate that high noise annoyance is associated with impaired mental health and that this association can vary with the source of environmental noise. Further research on covariates of this association is necessary. Particularly, longitudinal data are required to establish the direction of associations and to address questions of causality.

  6. Suppression of laser phase noise in direct-detection optical OFDM transmission using phase-conjugated pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Ming, Yi; Li, Jin

    2017-11-01

    Due to the unique phase noise (PN) characteristics in direct-detection optical OFDM (DDO-OFDM) systems, the design of PN compensator is considered as a difficult task. In this paper, a laser PN suppression scheme with low complexity for DDO-OFDM based on coherent superposition of data carrying subcarriers and their phase conjugates is proposed. Through theoretical derivation, the obvious PN suppression is observed. The effectiveness of this technique is demonstrated by simulation of a 4-QAM DDO-OFDM system over 1000 km transmission length at different laser line-width and subcarrier frequency spacing. The results show that the proposed scheme can significantly suppress both varied phase rotation term (PTR) and inter-carrier interference (ICI), and the laser line-width can be relaxed with up to 9 dB OSNR saving or even breakthrough of performance floor.

  7. Speech perception at positive signal-to-noise ratios using adaptive adjustment of time compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlueter, Anne; Brand, Thomas; Lemke, Ulrike; Nitzschner, Stefan; Kollmeier, Birger; Holube, Inga

    2015-11-01

    Positive signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) characterize listening situations most relevant for hearing-impaired listeners in daily life and should therefore be considered when evaluating hearing aid algorithms. For this, a speech-in-noise test was developed and evaluated, in which the background noise is presented at fixed positive SNRs and the speech rate (i.e., the time compression of the speech material) is adaptively adjusted. In total, 29 younger and 12 older normal-hearing, as well as 24 older hearing-impaired listeners took part in repeated measurements. Younger normal-hearing and older hearing-impaired listeners conducted one of two adaptive methods which differed in adaptive procedure and step size. Analysis of the measurements with regard to list length and estimation strategy for thresholds resulted in a practical method measuring the time compression for 50% recognition. This method uses time-compression adjustment and step sizes according to Versfeld and Dreschler [(2002). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 401-408], with sentence scoring, lists of 30 sentences, and a maximum likelihood method for threshold estimation. Evaluation of the procedure showed that older participants obtained higher test-retest reliability compared to younger participants. Depending on the group of listeners, one or two lists are required for training prior to data collection.

  8. Does Anthropogenic Noise in National Parks Impair Memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfield, Jacob A.; Bell, Paul A.; Troup, Lucy J.; Soderstrom, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Research on noise shows that a variety of effects including stress, annoyance, and performance decrements exist for certain types of sounds. Noise interferes with cognitive ability by overloading the attentional system or simply distracting from efficient encoding or rehearsal, but very little research has extended those findings to recreation or…

  9. What Do Contrast Threshold Equivalent Noise Studies Actually Measure? Noise vs. Nonlinearity in Different Masking Paradigms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex S Baldwin

    Full Text Available The internal noise present in a linear system can be quantified by the equivalent noise method. By measuring the effect that applying external noise to the system's input has on its output one can estimate the variance of this internal noise. By applying this simple "linear amplifier" model to the human visual system, one can entirely explain an observer's detection performance by a combination of the internal noise variance and their efficiency relative to an ideal observer. Studies using this method rely on two crucial factors: firstly that the external noise in their stimuli behaves like the visual system's internal noise in the dimension of interest, and secondly that the assumptions underlying their model are correct (e.g. linearity. Here we explore the effects of these two factors while applying the equivalent noise method to investigate the contrast sensitivity function (CSF. We compare the results at 0.5 and 6 c/deg from the equivalent noise method against those we would expect based on pedestal masking data collected from the same observers. We find that the loss of sensitivity with increasing spatial frequency results from changes in the saturation constant of the gain control nonlinearity, and that this only masquerades as a change in internal noise under the equivalent noise method. Part of the effect we find can be attributed to the optical transfer function of the eye. The remainder can be explained by either changes in effective input gain, divisive suppression, or a combination of the two. Given these effects the efficiency of our observers approaches the ideal level. We show the importance of considering these factors in equivalent noise studies.

  10. Testing Time and Frequency Fiber-Optic Link Transfer by Hardware Emulation of Acoustic-Band Optical Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipiński Marcin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The low-frequency optical-signal phase noise induced by mechanical vibration of the base occurs in field-deployed fibers. Typical telecommunication data transfer is insensitive to this type of noise but the phenomenon may influence links dedicated to precise Time and Frequency (T&F fiber-optic transfer that exploit the idea of stabilization of phase or propagation delay of the link. To measure effectiveness of suppression of acoustic noise in such a link, a dedicated measurement setup is necessary. The setup should enable to introduce a low-frequency phase corruption to the optical signal in a controllable way. In the paper, a concept of a setup in which the mechanically induced acoustic-band optical signal phase corruption is described and its own features and measured parameters are presented. Next, the experimental measurement results of the T&F transfer TFTS-2 system’s immunity as a function of the fibre-optic length vs. the acoustic-band noise are presented. Then, the dependency of the system immunity on the location of a noise source along the link is also pointed out.

  11. Electrochemical noise measurements under pressurized water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Nieuwenhove, R.

    2000-01-01

    Electrochemical potential noise measurements on sensitized stainless steel pressure tubes under pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions were performed for the first time. Very short potential spikes, believed to be associated to crack initiation events, were detected when stressing the sample above the yield strength and increased in magnitude until the sample broke. Sudden increases of plastic deformation, as induced by an increased tube pressure, resulted in slower, high-amplitude potential transients, often accompanied by a reduction in noise level

  12. Measurement of Acceptable Noise Level with Background Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyun-Jung; Bahng, Junghwa; Lee, Jae Hee

    2015-09-01

    Acceptable noise level (ANL) is a measure of the maximum background noise level (BNL) that a person is willing to tolerate while following a target story. Although researchers have used various sources of target sound in ANL measures, a limited type of background noise has been used. Extending the previous study of Gordon-Hickey & Moore (2007), the current study determined the effect of music genre and tempo on ANLs as possible factors affecting ANLs. We also investigated the relationships between individual ANLs and the familiarity of music samples and between music ANLs and subjective preference. Forty-one participants were seperated into two groups according to their ANLs, 29 low-ANL listeners and 12 high-ANL listeners. Using Korean ANL material, the individual ANLs were measured based on the listeners' most comfortable listening level and BNL. The ANLs were measured in six conditions, with different music tempo (fast, slow) and genre (K-pop, pop, classical) in a counterbalanced order. Overall, ANLs did not differ by the tempo of background music, but music genre significantly affected individual ANLs. We observed relatively higher ANLs with K-pop music and relatively lower ANLs with classical music. This tendency was similar in both low-ANL and high-ANL groups. However, the subjective ratings of music familiarity and preference affected ANLs differently for low-ANL and high-ANL groups. In contrast to the low-ANL listeners, the ANLs of the high-ANL listeners were significantly affected by music familiarity and preference. The genre of background music affected ANLs obtained using background music. The degree of music familiarity and preference appears to be associated with individual susceptibility to background music only for listeners who are greatly annoyed by background noise (high-ANL listeners).

  13. Inter-Individual Differences in Neurobehavioural Impairment following Sleep Restriction Are Associated with Circadian Rhythm Phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey L Sletten

    Full Text Available Although sleep restriction is associated with decrements in daytime alertness and neurobehavioural performance, there are considerable inter-individual differences in the degree of impairment. This study examined the effects of short-term sleep restriction on neurobehavioural performance and sleepiness, and the associations between individual differences in impairments and circadian rhythm phase. Healthy adults (n = 43; 22 M aged 22.5 ± 3.1 (mean ± SD years maintained a regular 8:16 h sleep:wake routine for at least three weeks prior to laboratory admission. Sleep opportunity was restricted to 5 hours time-in-bed at home the night before admission and 3 hours time-in-bed in the laboratory, aligned by wake time. Hourly saliva samples were collected from 5.5 h before until 5 h after the pre-laboratory scheduled bedtime to assess dim light melatonin onset (DLMO as a marker of circadian phase. Participants completed a 10-min auditory Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT, the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS and had slow eye movements (SEM measured by electrooculography two hours after waking. We observed substantial inter-individual variability in neurobehavioural performance, particularly in the number of PVT lapses. Increased PVT lapses (r = -0.468, p < 0.01, greater sleepiness (r = 0.510, p < 0.0001, and more slow eye movements (r = 0.375, p = 0.022 were significantly associated with later DLMO, consistent with participants waking at an earlier circadian phase. When the difference between DLMO and sleep onset was less than 2 hours, individuals were significantly more likely to have at least three attentional lapses the following morning. This study demonstrates that the phase of an individual's circadian system is an important variable in predicting the degree of neurobehavioural performance impairment in the hours after waking following sleep restriction, and confirms that other factors influencing performance decrements require further

  14. Scaling law for noise variance and spatial resolution in differential phase contrast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guanghong; Zambelli, Joseph; Li Ke; Bevins, Nicholas; Qi Zhihua

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The noise variance versus spatial resolution relationship in differential phase contrast (DPC) projection imaging and computed tomography (CT) are derived and compared to conventional absorption-based x-ray projection imaging and CT. Methods: The scaling law for DPC-CT is theoretically derived and subsequently validated with phantom results from an experimental Talbot-Lau interferometer system. Results: For the DPC imaging method, the noise variance in the differential projection images follows the same inverse-square law with spatial resolution as in conventional absorption-based x-ray imaging projections. However, both in theory and experimental results, in DPC-CT the noise variance scales with spatial resolution following an inverse linear relationship with fixed slice thickness. Conclusions: The scaling law in DPC-CT implies a lesser noise, and therefore dose, penalty for moving to higher spatial resolutions when compared to conventional absorption-based CT in order to maintain the same contrast-to-noise ratio.

  15. Measuring the background acoustic noise in the BN-600 steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yugaj, V.S.; Zhukovets, V.N.; Ivannikov, V.I.; Vylomov, V.V.; Ryabinin, F.; Chernykh, P.G.; Flejsher, Yu.V.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic noises in the lower chambers of evaporation and intermediate overheating moduli of the BN-600 reactor steam generator are measured. Bachground noises are registered in the whole range of frequencies studied, from 0.63 to 160 kHz. The comparison of noise spectra in evaporator and overheater has revealed a certain difference. However the general tendency is the reduction of the noise level at high frequencies > 8 kHz. The increase of the noise level at low steam content is observed only in a narrow of frequency range of 3-6 kHz

  16. Automated measurement of CT noise in patient images with a novel structure coherence feature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Minsoo; Kim, Jong Hyo; Choi, Young Hun

    2015-01-01

    While the assessment of CT noise constitutes an important task for the optimization of scan protocols in clinical routine, the majority of noise measurements in practice still rely on manual operation, hence limiting their efficiency and reliability. This study presents an algorithm for the automated measurement of CT noise in patient images with a novel structure coherence feature. The proposed algorithm consists of a four-step procedure including subcutaneous fat tissue selection, the calculation of structure coherence feature, the determination of homogeneous ROIs, and the estimation of the average noise level. In an evaluation with 94 CT scans (16 517 images) of pediatric and adult patients along with the participation of two radiologists, ROIs were placed on a homogeneous fat region at 99.46% accuracy, and the agreement of the automated noise measurements with the radiologists’ reference noise measurements (PCC  =  0.86) was substantially higher than the within and between-rater agreements of noise measurements (PCC within   =  0.75, PCC between   =  0.70). In addition, the absolute noise level measurements matched closely the theoretical noise levels generated by a reduced-dose simulation technique. Our proposed algorithm has the potential to be used for examining the appropriateness of radiation dose and the image quality of CT protocols for research purposes as well as clinical routine. (paper)

  17. Error Probability Analysis of Hardware Impaired Systems with Asymmetric Transmission

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Sidrah; Amin, Osama; Ikki, Salama S.; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2018-01-01

    Error probability study of the hardware impaired (HWI) systems highly depends on the adopted model. Recent models have proved that the aggregate noise is equivalent to improper Gaussian signals. Therefore, considering the distinct noise nature and self-interfering (SI) signals, an optimal maximum likelihood (ML) receiver is derived. This renders the conventional minimum Euclidean distance (MED) receiver as a sub-optimal receiver because it is based on the assumptions of ideal hardware transceivers and proper Gaussian noise in communication systems. Next, the average error probability performance of the proposed optimal ML receiver is analyzed and tight bounds and approximations are derived for various adopted systems including transmitter and receiver I/Q imbalanced systems with or without transmitter distortions as well as transmitter or receiver only impaired systems. Motivated by recent studies that shed the light on the benefit of improper Gaussian signaling in mitigating the HWIs, asymmetric quadrature amplitude modulation or phase shift keying is optimized and adapted for transmission. Finally, different numerical and simulation results are presented to support the superiority of the proposed ML receiver over MED receiver, the tightness of the derived bounds and effectiveness of asymmetric transmission in dampening HWIs and improving overall system performance

  18. Error Probability Analysis of Hardware Impaired Systems with Asymmetric Transmission

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Sidrah

    2018-04-26

    Error probability study of the hardware impaired (HWI) systems highly depends on the adopted model. Recent models have proved that the aggregate noise is equivalent to improper Gaussian signals. Therefore, considering the distinct noise nature and self-interfering (SI) signals, an optimal maximum likelihood (ML) receiver is derived. This renders the conventional minimum Euclidean distance (MED) receiver as a sub-optimal receiver because it is based on the assumptions of ideal hardware transceivers and proper Gaussian noise in communication systems. Next, the average error probability performance of the proposed optimal ML receiver is analyzed and tight bounds and approximations are derived for various adopted systems including transmitter and receiver I/Q imbalanced systems with or without transmitter distortions as well as transmitter or receiver only impaired systems. Motivated by recent studies that shed the light on the benefit of improper Gaussian signaling in mitigating the HWIs, asymmetric quadrature amplitude modulation or phase shift keying is optimized and adapted for transmission. Finally, different numerical and simulation results are presented to support the superiority of the proposed ML receiver over MED receiver, the tightness of the derived bounds and effectiveness of asymmetric transmission in dampening HWIs and improving overall system performance

  19. A novel transmitter IQ imbalance and phase noise suppression method utilizing pilots in PDM CO-OFDM system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoyuan; Ma, Xiurong; Li, Pengru

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we develop a novel pilot structure to suppress transmitter in-phase and quadrature (Tx IQ) imbalance, phase noise and channel distortion for polarization division multiplexed (PDM) coherent optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CO-OFDM) systems. Compared with the conventional approach, our method not only significantly improves the system tolerance of IQ imbalance as well as phase noise, but also provides higher transmission speed. Numerical simulations of PDM CO-OFDM system is used to validate the theoretical analysis under the simulation conditions: the amplitude mismatch 3 dB, the phase mismatch 15°, the transmission bit rate 100 Gb/s and 560 km standard signal-mode fiber transmission. Moreover, the proposed method is 63% less complex than the compared method.

  20. Noise exposure and public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier-Vermeer, W.; Passchier, W.F.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure to noise constitutes a health risk. There is sufficient scientific evidence that noise exposure can induce hearing impairment, hypertension and ischemic heart disease, annoyance, sleep disturbance, and decreased school performance. For other effects such as changes in the immune system and

  1. The systematic error of temperature noise correlation measurement method and self-calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Hong; Tong Yunxian

    1993-04-01

    The turbulent transport behavior of fluid noise and the nature of noise affect on the velocity measurement system have been studied. The systematic error of velocity measurement system is analyzed. A theoretical calibration method is proposed, which makes the velocity measurement of time-correlation as an absolute measurement method. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experiments

  2. An all digital phase locked loop for synchronization of a sinusoidal signal embedded in white Gaussian noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, C. P.; Gupta, S. C.

    1973-01-01

    An all digital phase locked loop which tracks the phase of the incoming sinusoidal signal once per carrier cycle is proposed. The different elements and their functions and the phase lock operation are explained in detail. The nonlinear difference equations which govern the operation of the digital loop when the incoming signal is embedded in white Gaussian noise are derived, and a suitable model is specified. The performance of the digital loop is considered for the synchronization of a sinusoidal signal. For this, the noise term is suitably modelled which allows specification of the output probabilities for the two level quantizer in the loop at any given phase error. The loop filter considered increases the probability of proper phase correction. The phase error states in modulo two-pi forms a finite state Markov chain which enables the calculation of steady state probabilities, RMS phase error, transient response and mean time for cycle skipping.

  3. Effects of noise in excitable systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, B.; Garcia-Ojalvo, J.; Neiman, A.; Schimansky-Geier, L.

    2004-01-01

    We review the behavior of theoretical models of excitable systems driven by Gaussian white noise. We focus mainly on those general properties of such systems that are due to noise, and present several applications of our findings in biophysics and lasers. As prototypes of excitable stochastic dynamics we consider the FitzHugh-Nagumo and the leaky integrate-and-fire model, as well as cellular automata and phase models. In these systems, taken as individual units or as networks of globally or locally coupled elements, we study various phenomena due to noise, such as noise-induced oscillations, stochastic resonance, stochastic synchronization, noise-induced phase transitions and noise-induced pulse and spiral dynamics. Our approach is based on stochastic differential equations and their corresponding Fokker-Planck equations, treated by both analytical calculations and/or numerical simulations. We calculate and/or measure the rate and diffusion coefficient of the excitation process, as well as spectral quantities like power spectra and degree of coherence. Combined with a multiparametric bifurcation analysis of the corresponding cumulant equations, these approaches provide a comprehensive picture of the multifaceted dynamical behaviour of noisy excitable systems

  4. Low phase noise microwave extraction from femtosecond laser by frequency conversion pair and IF-domain processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yitang; Cen, Qizhuang; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Yue; Yin, Feifei; Dai, Jian; Li, Jianqiang; Xu, Kun

    2015-12-14

    Extraction of a microwave component from a low-time-jitter femtosecond pulse train has been attractive for current generation of spectrally pure microwave. In order to avoid the transfer from the optical amplitude noise to microwave phase noise (AM-PM), we propose to down-convert the target component to intermediate frequency (IF) before the opto-electronic conversion. Due to the much lower carrier frequency, the AM-PM is greatly suppressed. The target is then recovered by up-conversion with the same microwave local oscillation (LO). As long as the time delay of the second LO matches that of the IF carrier, the phase noise of the LO shows no impact on the extraction process. The residual noise of the proposed extraction is analyzed in theory, which is also experimentally demonstrated as averagely around -155 dBc/Hz under offset frequency larger than 1 kHz when 10-GHz tone is extracted from a home-made femtosecond fiber laser. Large tunable extraction from 1 GHz to 10 GHz is also reported.

  5. Vibration Noise Modeling for Measurement While Drilling System Based on FOGs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxi Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to improve survey accuracy of Measurement While Drilling (MWD based on Fiber Optic Gyroscopes (FOGs in the long period, the external aiding sources are fused into the inertial navigation by the Kalman filter (KF method. The KF method needs to model the inertial sensors’ noise as the system noise model. The system noise is modeled as white Gaussian noise conventionally. However, because of the vibration while drilling, the noise in gyros isn’t white Gaussian noise any more. Moreover, an incorrect noise model will degrade the accuracy of KF. This paper developed a new approach for noise modeling on the basis of dynamic Allan variance (DAVAR. In contrast to conventional white noise models, the new noise model contains both the white noise and the color noise. With this new noise model, the KF for the MWD was designed. Finally, two vibration experiments have been performed. Experimental results showed that the proposed vibration noise modeling approach significantly improved the estimated accuracies of the inertial sensor drifts. Compared the navigation results based on different noise model, with the DAVAR noise model, the position error and the toolface angle error are reduced more than 90%. The velocity error is reduced more than 65%. The azimuth error is reduced more than 50%.

  6. Vibration Noise Modeling for Measurement While Drilling System Based on FOGs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunxi; Wang, Lu; Gao, Shuang; Lin, Tie; Li, Xianmu

    2017-10-17

    Aiming to improve survey accuracy of Measurement While Drilling (MWD) based on Fiber Optic Gyroscopes (FOGs) in the long period, the external aiding sources are fused into the inertial navigation by the Kalman filter (KF) method. The KF method needs to model the inertial sensors' noise as the system noise model. The system noise is modeled as white Gaussian noise conventionally. However, because of the vibration while drilling, the noise in gyros isn't white Gaussian noise any more. Moreover, an incorrect noise model will degrade the accuracy of KF. This paper developed a new approach for noise modeling on the basis of dynamic Allan variance (DAVAR). In contrast to conventional white noise models, the new noise model contains both the white noise and the color noise. With this new noise model, the KF for the MWD was designed. Finally, two vibration experiments have been performed. Experimental results showed that the proposed vibration noise modeling approach significantly improved the estimated accuracies of the inertial sensor drifts. Compared the navigation results based on different noise model, with the DAVAR noise model, the position error and the toolface angle error are reduced more than 90%. The velocity error is reduced more than 65%. The azimuth error is reduced more than 50%.

  7. Controlled longitudinal emittance blow-up using band-limited phase noise in CERN PSB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartullo, D.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Timko, H.

    2017-07-01

    Controlled longitudinal emittance blow-up (from 1 eVs to 1.4 eVs) for LHC beams in the CERN PS Booster is currently achievied using sinusoidal phase modulation of a dedicated high-harmonic RF system. In 2021, after the LHC injectors upgrade, 3 eVs should be extracted to the PS. Even if the current method may satisfy the new requirements, it relies on low-power level RF improvements. In this paper another method of blow-up was considered, that is the injection of band-limited phase noise in the main RF system (h=1), never tried in PSB but already used in CERN SPS and LHC, under different conditions (longer cycles). This technique, which lowers the peak line density and therefore the impact of intensity effects in the PSB and the PS, can also be complementary to the present method. The longitudinal space charge, dominant in the PSB, causes significant synchrotron frequency shifts with intensity, and its effect should be taken into account. Another complication arises from the interaction of the phase loop with the injected noise, since both act on the RF phase. All these elements were studied in simulations of the PSB cycle with the BLonD code, and the required blow-up was achieved.

  8. Measurement of quantum noise in a single-electron transistor near the quantum limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, W. W.; Ji, Z.; Pan, Feng; Stettenheim, Joel; Blencowe, M. P.; Rimberg, A. J.

    2009-09-01

    Quantum measurement has challenged physicists for almost a century. Classically, there is no lower bound on the noise a measurement may add. Quantum mechanically, however, measuring a system necessarily perturbs it. When applied to electrical amplifiers, this means that improved sensitivity requires increased backaction that itself contributes noise. The result is a strict quantum limit on added amplifier noise. To approach this limit, a quantum-limited amplifier must possess an ideal balance between sensitivity and backaction; furthermore, its noise must dominate that of subsequent classical amplifiers. Here, we report the first complete and quantitative measurement of the quantum noise of a superconducting single-electron transistor (S-SET) near a double Cooper-pair resonance predicted to have the right combination of sensitivity and backaction. A simultaneous measurement of our S-SET's charge sensitivity indicates that it operates within a factor of 3.6 of the quantum limit, a fourfold improvement over the nearest comparable results.

  9. ARMA modelling of neutron stochastic processes with large measurement noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavaljevski, N.; Kostic, Lj.; Pesic, M.

    1994-01-01

    An autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of the neutron fluctuations with large measurement noise is derived from langevin stochastic equations and validated using time series data obtained during prompt neutron decay constant measurements at the zero power reactor RB in Vinca. Model parameters are estimated using the maximum likelihood (ML) off-line algorithm and an adaptive pole estimation algorithm based on the recursive prediction error method (RPE). The results show that subcriticality can be determined from real data with high measurement noise using much shorter statistical sample than in standard methods. (author)

  10. Using phase information to enhance speckle noise reduction in the ultrasonic NDE of coarse grain materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lardner, Timothy; Gachagan, Anthony [Centre for Ultrasonic Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom); Li, Minghui [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18

    Materials with a coarse grain structure are becoming increasingly prevalent in industry due to their resilience to stress and corrosion. These materials are difficult to inspect with ultrasound because reflections from the grains lead to high noise levels which hinder the echoes of interest. Spatially Averaged Sub-Aperture Correlation Imaging (SASACI) is an advanced array beamforming technique that uses the cross-correlation between images from array sub-apertures to generate an image weighting matrix, in order to reduce noise levels. This paper presents a method inspired by SASACI to further improve imaging using phase information to refine focusing and reduce noise. A-scans from adjacent array elements are cross-correlated using both signal amplitude and phase to refine delay laws and minimize phase aberration. The phase-based and amplitude-based corrected images are used as inputs to a two-dimensional cross-correlation algorithm that will output a weighting matrix that can be applied to any conventional image. This approach was validated experimentally using a 5MHz array a coarse grained Inconel 625 step wedge, and compared to the Total Focusing Method (TFM). Initial results have seen SNR improvements of over 20dB compared to TFM, and a resolution that is much higher.

  11. Using phase information to enhance speckle noise reduction in the ultrasonic NDE of coarse grain materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardner, Timothy; Li, Minghui; Gachagan, Anthony

    2014-02-01

    Materials with a coarse grain structure are becoming increasingly prevalent in industry due to their resilience to stress and corrosion. These materials are difficult to inspect with ultrasound because reflections from the grains lead to high noise levels which hinder the echoes of interest. Spatially Averaged Sub-Aperture Correlation Imaging (SASACI) is an advanced array beamforming technique that uses the cross-correlation between images from array sub-apertures to generate an image weighting matrix, in order to reduce noise levels. This paper presents a method inspired by SASACI to further improve imaging using phase information to refine focusing and reduce noise. A-scans from adjacent array elements are cross-correlated using both signal amplitude and phase to refine delay laws and minimize phase aberration. The phase-based and amplitude-based corrected images are used as inputs to a two-dimensional cross-correlation algorithm that will output a weighting matrix that can be applied to any conventional image. This approach was validated experimentally using a 5MHz array a coarse grained Inconel 625 step wedge, and compared to the Total Focusing Method (TFM). Initial results have seen SNR improvements of over 20dB compared to TFM, and a resolution that is much higher.

  12. Low-complexity linewidth-tolerant time domain sub-symbol optical phase noise suppression in CO-OFDM systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xuezhi; Hong, Xiaojian; Zhang, Junwei; He, Sailing

    2016-03-07

    Two linewidth-tolerant optical phase noise suppression algorithms, non-decision aided sub-symbol optical phase noise suppression (NDA-SPS) and partial-decision aided sub-symbol optical phase noise suppression (PDA-SPS), based on low-complexity time domain sub-symbol processing are proposed for coherent optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CO-OFDM) systems. High accuracy carrier phase estimation is achieved in the NDA-SPS algorithm without decision error propagation. Compared with NDA-SPS, partial-decision aided estimation is introduced in PDA-SPS to reduce the pilot-overhead by half, yet only a small performance degradation is induced. The principles and computational complexities of the proposed algorithms are theoretically analyzed. By adopting specially designed comb-type pilot subcarriers, multiplier-free observation-based matrix generation is realized in the proposed algorithms. Computationally intensive discrete Fourier transform (DFT) or inverse DFT (IDFT) operations, which are usually carried out in other high-performance inter-carrier-interference (ICI) mitigation algorithms multiple times, are completely avoided. Compared with several other sub-symbol algorithms, the proposed algorithms with lower complexities offer considerably larger laser linewidth tolerances as demonstrated by Monte-Carlo simulations. Numerical analysis verifies that the optimal performance of PDA-SPS can be achieved with moderate numbers of sub-symbols.

  13. Phase unwrapping algorithm using polynomial phase approximation and linear Kalman filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh; Rastogi, Pramod

    2018-02-01

    A noise-robust phase unwrapping algorithm is proposed based on state space analysis and polynomial phase approximation using wrapped phase measurement. The true phase is approximated as a two-dimensional first order polynomial function within a small sized window around each pixel. The estimates of polynomial coefficients provide the measurement of phase and local fringe frequencies. A state space representation of spatial phase evolution and the wrapped phase measurement is considered with the state vector consisting of polynomial coefficients as its elements. Instead of using the traditional nonlinear Kalman filter for the purpose of state estimation, we propose to use the linear Kalman filter operating directly with the wrapped phase measurement. The adaptive window width is selected at each pixel based on the local fringe density to strike a balance between the computation time and the noise robustness. In order to retrieve the unwrapped phase, either a line-scanning approach or a quality guided strategy of pixel selection is used depending on the underlying continuous or discontinuous phase distribution, respectively. Simulation and experimental results are provided to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method.

  14. Phase slip and telegraph noise in δ-MoN nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buh, Jože, E-mail: joze.buh@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department of Complex Matter, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mrzel, Aleš; Kovič, Andrej; Kabanov, Viktor [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department of Complex Matter, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jagličić, Zvonko [Institute of Mathematics, Physics and Mechanics, Jadranska 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, Jamova 2, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vrtnik, Stanislav; Koželj, Primož [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jozef Stefan Institute, Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Jozef Stefan Institute, University of Ljubljana, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mihailović, Dragan [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department of Complex Matter, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Jozef Stefan Institute, University of Ljubljana, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozef Stefan International Postgraduate School, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Normal to SC transition width is strongly dependent on the diameter of the wire. • Telegraph noise frequency can be controlled by bias current. • Bias current is controlling the stability of different resistive states. • Magnetic field blurs of transitions between resistive superconducting states. - Abstract: We have investigated the effect of the nanowire thickness on the superconducting resistive phase transition R(T) in δ-MoN nanowires. We have characterized the width of the transition in terms of thermally-activated phase-slip theory. A large increase in the width of the transition was found with the decrease of the nanowire thickness. Discrete phase-slip fluctuations also lead to the appearance of meta-stable resistive superconducting states in current-bearing superconducting wires, with spontaneous switching between them. We have investigated the effect of the bias current on the switching rate and the stability of different resistive states.

  15. Distributions of Conductance and Shot Noise and Associated Phase Transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivo, Pierpaolo; Majumdar, Satya N.; Bohigas, Oriol

    2008-01-01

    For a chaotic cavity with two identical leads each supporting N channels, we compute analytically, for large N, the full distribution of the conductance and the shot noise power and show that in both cases there is a central Gaussian region flanked on both sides by non-Gaussian tails. The distribution is weakly singular at the junction of Gaussian and non-Gaussian regimes, a direct consequence of two phase transitions in an associated Coulomb gas problem

  16. Noise analysis of grating-based x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging with angular signal radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faiz, Wali; Gao Kun; Wu Zhao; Wei Chen-Xi; Zan Gui-Bin; Tian Yang-Chao; Bao Yuan; Zhu Pei-Ping

    2017-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is one of the novel techniques, and has potential to enhance image quality and provide the details of inner structures nondestructively. In this work, we investigate quantitatively signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging (GBPCI) system by employing angular signal radiography (ASR). Moreover, photon statistics and mechanical error that is a major source of noise are investigated in detail. Results show the dependence of SNR on the system parameters and the effects on the extracted absorption, refraction and scattering images. Our conclusions can be used to optimize the system design for upcoming practical applications in the areas such as material science and biomedical imaging. (paper)

  17. Ambient Noise Tomography at Regional and Local Scales in Southern California using Rayleigh Wave Phase Dispersion and Ellipticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, E.; Lin, F. C.; Qiu, H.; Wang, Y.; Allam, A. A.; Clayton, R. W.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Rayleigh waves extracted from cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise have proven useful in imaging the shallow subsurface velocity structure. In contrast to phase velocities, which are sensitive to slightly deeper structure, Rayleigh wave ellipticity (H/V ratios) constrains the uppermost crust. We conduct Rayleigh wave ellipticity and phase dispersion measurements in Southern California between 6 and 18 second periods, computed from multi-component ambient noise cross-correlations using 315 stations across the region in 2015. Because of the complimentary sensitivity of phase velocity and H/V, this method enables simple and accurate resolution of near-surface geological features from the surface to 20km depth. We compare the observed H/V ratios and phase velocities to predictions generated from the current regional models (SCEC UCVM), finding strong correspondence where the near-surface structure is well-resolved by the models. This includes high H/V ratios in the LA Basin, Santa Barbara Basin and Salton Trough; and low ratios in the San Gabriel, San Jacinto and southern Sierra Nevada mountains. Disagreements in regions such as the Western Transverse Ranges, Salton Trough, San Jacinto and Elsinore fault zones motivate further work to improve the community models. A new updated 3D isotropic model of the area is derived via a joint inversion of Rayleigh phase dispersions and H/V ratios. Additionally, we examine azimuthal dependence of the H/V ratio to ascertain anisotropy patterns for each station. Clear 180º periodicity is observed for many stations suggesting strong shallow anisotropy across the region including up to 20% along the San Andreas fault, 15% along the San Jacinto Fault and 25% in the LA Basin. To better resolve basin structures, we apply similar techniques to three dense linear geophone arrays in the San Gabriel and San Bernardino basins. The three arrays are composed by 50-125 three-component 5Hz geophones deployed for one month each with 15-25km

  18. Measuring proton beam thermal noises on the NAP-M storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dement'ev, E.N.; Dikanskij, N.S.; Medvedko, A.S.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Pestrikov, D.V.

    1980-01-01

    The data on experimental investigation of thermal noises of an asimuthally homogeneous proton beam on the NAP-M storage ring are given. The noise spectra are measured at the 5th and 8th harmonics of the ciculation frequency using pick-up electrodes. The dependencies of the noise power on the proton current for noncooled and cooled beams are presented. It is shown that as a result of electron cooling the noise power decreases by two orders and in the 0.5-10 μA current range the noise power of the cooled beam does not depend on the proton current. The noise power of the noncooled beam linearly increases with the proton current. It is also shown that with the modulation growth the noise power increases. The conclusions are made that while analyzing noises of the continuous beam in the storage ring the changes of the noise spectra due to particle interaction in the beam should be taken into account

  19. Characterization and reduction of noise in Mo/Au transition edge sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindeman, Mark A.; Bandler, Simon; Brekosky, Regis P.; Chervenak, James A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Saab, Tarek; Stahle, Caroline K.

    2004-01-01

    We measured noise in a variety of Mo/Au transition-edge sensor (TES) X-ray calorimeters. We investigated the relationship between the noise, bias, and the superconducting phase transition in the TESs. Our square TES calorimeters have achieved very good energy resolutions (2.4 eV at 1.5 keV) but their resolutions have been limited by broadband white excess noise generated by the TES when it is biased in the phase transition. We have recently fabricated Mo/Cu TESs with interdigitated normal metal bars deposited on top of the bilayer. The new TES calorimeters have demonstrated little or no excess noise in the phase transition. These results point the way to development of TES calorimeters with higher energy resolution

  20. Expert group study on recommended practices for wind turbine testing and evaluation. 10. Measurement of noise immission from wind turbines at noise receptor locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljunggren, S.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide a set of techniques and methods for the measurement and description of wind turbine noise immission, that is, wind turbine noise at receptor locations. These techniques and methods have been prepared so that they can be used by: manufacturers; developers; operators; planning authorities; research and development engineers, for the purpose of verification of compliance with noise immission limits and of noise propagation models. The measurement of noise immission from wind turbines is a complex acoustic task. This guideline cannot cover all possible problems that may be encountered on, for instance: determination of wind speed; measurements in cases of low signal-to-noise ratio; allowance for reflections from buildings. Thus, it is strongly recommended that the measurements described in this guide are always carried out by experienced acousticians. (au)

  1. Boundary layer measurements of the NACA0015 and implications for noise modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, F.

    2011-01-15

    A NACA0015 airfoil section instrumented with an array of high frequency microphones flush-mounted beneath its surface was measured in the wind tunnel at LM Wind Power in Lunderskov. Various inflow speeds and angles of attack were investigated. In addition, a hot-wire device system was used to measure the velocity profiles and turbulence characteristics in the boundary layer near the trailing edge of the airfoil. The measured boundary layer data are presented in this report and compared with CFD results. A relative good agreement is observed, though a few discrepancies also appear. Comparisons of surface pressure fluctuations spectra are used to analyze and improve trailing edge noise modeling by the so-called TNO model. Finally, a pair of hot-wires were placed on each side of the trailing edge in order to measure the radiated trailing edge noise. However, there is no strong evidence that such noise could be measured in the higher frequency range. Nevertheless, low-frequency noise could be measured and related to the presence of the airfoil but its origin is unclear. (Author)

  2. Noise emissions of cooling towers; Geraeuschemissionen von Kuehltuermen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinkelmann, Dirk [Mueller-BBM GmbH, Gelsenkirchen (Germany)

    2013-09-01

    Cooling towers are often large structures with high sound emission. The impact of water drops on the water surface in the collecting basin leads to the generation of middle- and high-frequency noise that is emitted via the air intake opening and the outlet. In forced-draft cooling towers, additional noise is generated by drives and fans. The sound emissions can be predicted by means of empirical calculation models. In this way, noise control measures can be taken into account already at an early phase of planning. Different, proven measures for reduction of sound emissions are taken depending on cooling tower design. Regulations on noise acceptance testing for cooling towers are given in various standards. (orig.)

  3. Noise Measurements of High Aspect Ratio Distributed Exhaust Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers far-field acoustic measurements of a family of rectangular nozzles with aspect ratio 8, in the high subsonic flow regime. Several variations of nozzle geometry, commonly found in embedded exhaust systems, are explored, including bevels, slants, single broad chevrons and notches, and internal septae. Far-field acoustic results, presented previously for the simple rectangular nozzle, showed that increasing aspect ratio increases the high frequency noise, especially directed in the plane containing the minor axis of the nozzle. Detailed changes to the nozzle geometry generally made little difference in the noise, and the differences were greatest at low speed. Having an extended lip on one broad side (bevel) did produce up to 3 decibels more noise in all directions, while extending the lip on the narrow side (slant) produced up to 2 decibels more noise, primarily on the side with the extension. Adding a single, non-intrusive chevron, made no significant change to the noise, while inverting the chevron (notch) produced up to 2decibels increase in the noise. Having internal walls (septae) within the nozzle, such as would be required for structural support or when multiple fan ducts are aggregated, reduced the noise of the rectangular jet, but could produce a highly directional shedding tone from the septae trailing edges. Finally, a nozzle with both septae and a beveled nozzle, representative of the exhaust system envisioned for a distributed electric propulsion aircraft with a common rectangular duct, produced almost as much noise as the beveled nozzle, with the septae not contributing much reduction in noise.

  4. Application of a Beamforming Technique to the Measurement of Airfoil Leading Edge Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Geyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes the use of microphone array technology and beamforming algorithms for the measurement and analysis of noise generated by the interaction of a turbulent flow with the leading edge of an airfoil. Experiments were performed using a setup in an aeroacoustic wind tunnel, where the turbulent inflow is provided by different grids. In order to exactly localize the aeroacoustic noise sources and, moreover, to separate airfoil leading edge noise from grid-generated noise, the selected deconvolution beamforming algorithm is extended to be used on a fully three-dimensional source region. The result of this extended beamforming are three-dimensional mappings of noise source locations. Besides acoustic measurements, the investigation of airfoil leading edge noise requires the measurement of parameters describing the incident turbulence, such as the intensity and a characteristic length scale or time scale. The method used for the determination of these parameters in the present study is explained in detail. To demonstrate the applicability of the extended beamforming algorithm and the experimental setup as a whole, the noise generated at the leading edge of airfoils made of porous materials was measured and compared to that generated at the leading edge of a common nonporous airfoil.

  5. Effects of noise and working memory capacity on memory processing of speech for hearing-aid users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Elaine Hoi Ning; Rudner, Mary; Lunner, Thomas; Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2013-07-01

    It has been shown that noise reduction algorithms can reduce the negative effects of noise on memory processing in persons with normal hearing. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether a similar effect can be obtained for persons with hearing impairment and whether such an effect is dependent on individual differences in working memory capacity. A sentence-final word identification and recall (SWIR) test was conducted in two noise backgrounds with and without noise reduction as well as in quiet. Working memory capacity was measured using a reading span (RS) test. Twenty-six experienced hearing-aid users with moderate to moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss. Noise impaired recall performance. Competing speech disrupted memory performance more than speech-shaped noise. For late list items the disruptive effect of the competing speech background was virtually cancelled out by noise reduction for persons with high working memory capacity. Noise reduction can reduce the adverse effect of noise on memory for speech for persons with good working memory capacity. We argue that the mechanism behind this is faster word identification that enhances encoding into working memory.

  6. Preliminary investigation of the categorization of gaps and overlaps in turn-taking interactions: Effects of noise and hearing loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anna Josefine; Weisser, Adam; MacDonald, Ewen

    2017-01-01

    Normal conversation requires interlocutors to monitor the ongoing acoustic signal to judge when it is appropriate to start talking. Categorical thresholds for gaps and overlaps in turn-taking interactions were measured for normalhearing and hearing-impaired listeners in both quiet and multitalker...... babble (+6 dB SNR). The slope of the categorization functions were significantly shallower for hearing impaired listeners and in the presence of background noise. Moreover, the categorization threshold for overlaps increased in background noise....

  7. Automated system for noise-measurements on low-ohmic samples and magnetic sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, R.J.W.; Briaire, J.; Vandamme, L.K.J.

    1999-01-01

    An automated system for electronic noise measurements on metal films is presented. This new system, controlled by a personal computer which utilizes National Instruments' LabVIEW software, is designed to measure low frequency noise as a function of an externally imposed magnetic field and as a

  8. Measurement of the Low Frequency Noise of MOSFETs under Large Signal RF Excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, A.P.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2002-01-01

    A measurement technique [1] is presented that allows measurement of MOSFET low frequency (LF) noise under large signal RF (Radio Frequency) excitation. Measurements indicate that MOSFETS exhibit a reduction in LF noise when they are cycled from inversion to accummulation and that this reduction does

  9. Correlation techniques for the improvement of signal-to-noise ratio in measurements with stochastic processes

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, V R; Reddy, T G; Reddy, P Y; Reddy, K R

    2003-01-01

    An AC modulation technique is described to convert stochastic signal variations into an amplitude variation and its retrieval through Fourier analysis. It is shown that this AC detection of signals of stochastic processes when processed through auto- and cross-correlation techniques improve the signal-to-noise ratio; the correlation techniques serve a similar purpose of frequency and phase filtering as that of phase-sensitive detection. A few model calculations applied to nuclear spectroscopy measurements such as Angular Correlations, Mossbauer spectroscopy and Pulse Height Analysis reveal considerable improvement in the sensitivity of signal detection. Experimental implementation of the technique is presented in terms of amplitude variations of harmonics representing the derivatives of normal spectra. Improved detection sensitivity to spectral variations is shown to be significant. These correlation techniques are general and can be made applicable to all the fields of particle counting where measurements ar...

  10. Theoretical calculation on ICI reduction using digital coherent superposition of optical OFDM subcarrier pairs in the presence of laser phase noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xingwen; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Jing; Lin, Yun; Qiu, Kun

    2014-12-15

    Digital coherent superposition (DCS) of optical OFDM subcarrier pairs with Hermitian symmetry can reduce the inter-carrier-interference (ICI) noise resulted from phase noise. In this paper, we show two different implementations of DCS-OFDM that have the same performance in the presence of laser phase noise. We complete the theoretical calculation on ICI reduction by using the model of pure Wiener phase noise. By Taylor expansion of the ICI, we show that the ICI power is cancelled to the second order by DCS. The fourth order term is further derived out and only decided by the ratio of laser linewidth to OFDM subcarrier symbol rate, which can greatly simplify the system design. Finally, we verify our theoretical calculations in simulations and use the analytical results to predict the system performance. DCS-OFDM is expected to be beneficial to certain optical fiber transmissions.

  11. Nuisance levels of noise effects radiologists' performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, Mark F.; Coffey, Amina; Ryan, John; O'Beirne, Aaron; Toomey, Rachel; Evanoff, Micheal; Manning, David; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2010-02-01

    This study aimed to measure the sound levels in Irish x-ray departments. The study then established whether these levels of noise have an impact on radiologists performance Noise levels were recorded 10 times within each of 14 environments in 4 hospitals, 11 of which were locations where radiologic images are judged. Thirty chest images were then presented to 26 senior radiologists, who were asked to detect up to three nodular lesions within 30 posteroanterior chest x-ray images in the absence and presence of noise at amplitude demonstrated in the clinical environment. The results demonstrated that noise amplitudes rarely exceeded that encountered with normal conversation with the maximum mean value for an image-viewing environment being 56.1 dB. This level of noise had no impact on the ability of radiologists to identify chest lesions with figure of merits of 0.68, 0.69, and 0.68 with noise and 0.65, 0.68, and 0.67 without noise for chest radiologists, non-chest radiologists, and all radiologists, respectively. the difference in their performance using the DBM MRMC method was significantly better with noise than in the absence of noise at the 90% confidence interval (p=0.077). Further studies are required to establish whether other aspects of diagnosis are impaired such as recall and attention and the effects of more unexpected noise on performance.

  12. Experimental Test of Entropic Noise-Disturbance Uncertainty Relations for Spin-1/2 Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulyok, Georg; Sponar, Stephan; Demirel, Bülent; Buscemi, Francesco; Hall, Michael J W; Ozawa, Masanao; Hasegawa, Yuji

    2015-07-17

    Information-theoretic definitions for noise and disturbance in quantum measurements were given in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 050401 (2014)] and a state-independent noise-disturbance uncertainty relation was obtained. Here, we derive a tight noise-disturbance uncertainty relation for complementary qubit observables and carry out an experimental test. Successive projective measurements on the neutron's spin-1/2 system, together with a correction procedure which reduces the disturbance, are performed. Our experimental results saturate the tight noise-disturbance uncertainty relation for qubits when an optimal correction procedure is applied.

  13. Noise study in condensed matter physics-Towards extension to surrounding fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Atsutaka

    2006-01-01

    I briefly review noise studies in condensed matter physics, such as the shot noise measurement in metals, the dynamic-coherent-volume investigation in charge-density waves, the macroscopic quantum tunneling in superconductors, and the experimental investigation of dynamic phase diagram of driven vortices in high-T c superconductors. With these examples, one finds that the noise studies have played many crucial roles in condensed matter physics. I also discuss a recent theoretical suggestion that noise measurements in Josephson junction may clarify the origin of the dark energy in the universe

  14. 3D geometric phase analysis and its application in 3D microscopic morphology measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ronghua; Shi, Wenxiong; Cao, Quankun; Liu, Zhanwei; Guo, Baoqiao; Xie, Huimin

    2018-04-01

    Although three-dimensional (3D) morphology measurement has been widely applied on the macro-scale, there is still a lack of 3D measurement technology on the microscopic scale. In this paper, a microscopic 3D measurement technique based on the 3D-geometric phase analysis (GPA) method is proposed. In this method, with machine vision and phase matching, the traditional GPA method is extended to three dimensions. Using this method, 3D deformation measurement on the micro-scale can be realized using a light microscope. Simulation experiments were conducted in this study, and the results demonstrate that the proposed method has a good anti-noise ability. In addition, the 3D morphology of the necking zone in a tensile specimen was measured, and the results demonstrate that this method is feasible.

  15. Low-Complexity Tracking of Laser and Nonlinear Phase Noise in WDM Optical Fiber Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yankov, Metodi Plamenov; Fehenberger, Tobias; Barletta, Luca

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) fiber optic channel is considered. It is shown that for ideal distributed Raman amplification (IDRA), the Wiener process model is suitable for the non-linear phase noise due to cross phase modulation from neighboring channels. Based......, at the moderate received SNR region. The performance in these cases is close to the information rate achieved by the above mentioned trellis processing....

  16. Noise in the operating room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasfeldt-Hansen, Dorthe; Lærkner, Eva Ann; Birkelund, Regner

    2010-01-01

    Because noise is a general stressor, noise in the OR should be avoided whenever possible. This article presents the results of a review of the research literature on the topic of noise in the OR. A systematic literature search was conducted. Eighteen relevant articles were identified...... and categorized as follows: noise levels, noise sources, staff performances, and patient’s perception of noise. Each study was assessed according to the strength of the evidence and the quality of the study. Noise levels in the OR in general exceed recommended levels, and the noise sources are related...... to equipment and staff behavior. The main effect of noise on staff performances is related to impaired communication, resulting in a negative effect on patient safety. The literature on patients’ perception of noise is both limited and inconsistent, and more research on this topic is needed....

  17. Noise measurement at wind power plants; Geraeuschmessung an Windenergieanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoene, Ralph [Cirrus Research plc, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Wind energy is a supporting pillar of the energy transition. For further expansion, it is important to reduce prejudices, for example by measurements as precise as possible and assessments of the often unobjectively discussed noise emissions. These measurements are based on instruments which can analyze and measure low-frequency sound.

  18. Neutron noise measurements at the Delphi subcritical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szieberth, M.; Klujber, G.; Kloosterman, J. L.; De Haas, D.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results and evaluations of a comprehensive set of neutron noise measurements on the Delphi subcritical assembly of the Delft Univ. of Technology. The measurements investigated the effect of different source distributions (inherent spontaneous fission and 252 Cf) and the position of the detectors applied (both radially and vertically). The evaluation of the measured data has been performed by the variance-to-mean ratio (VTMR, Feynman-α), the autocorrelation (ACF, Rossi-α) and the cross-correlation (CCF) methods. The values obtained for the prompt decay constant show a strong bias, which depends both on the detector position and on the source distribution. This is due to the presence of higher modes in the system. It has been observed that the α value fitted is higher when the detector is close to the boundary of the core or to the 252 Cf point-source. The higher alpha-modes have also been observed by fitting functions describing two alpha-modes. The successful set of measurement also provides a good basis for further theoretical investigations including the Monte Carlo simulation of the noise measurements and the calculation of the alpha-modes in the Delphi subcritical assembly. (authors)

  19. Optimal Linear Filters for Pulse Height Measurements in the Presence of Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygaard, K.

    1966-07-01

    For measurements of nuclear pulse height spectra a linear filter is used between the pulse amplifier and the pulse height recorder so as to improve the signal/noise ratio. The problem of finding the optimal filter is investigated with emphasis on technical realizability. The maximum available signal/noise ratio is theoretically calculated on the basis of all the information which can be found in the output of the pulse amplifier, and on an assumed a priori knowledge of the pulse time of arrival. It is then shown that the maximum available signal/noise ratio can be obtained with practical measurements without any a priori knowledge of pulse time of arrival, and a general description of the optimal linear filter is given. The solution is unique, technically realizable, and based solely on data (noise power spectrum and pulse shape) which can be measured at the output terminals of the pulse amplifier used

  20. Optimal Linear Filters for Pulse Height Measurements in the Presence of Noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nygaard, K

    1966-07-15

    For measurements of nuclear pulse height spectra a linear filter is used between the pulse amplifier and the pulse height recorder so as to improve the signal/noise ratio. The problem of finding the optimal filter is investigated with emphasis on technical realizability. The maximum available signal/noise ratio is theoretically calculated on the basis of all the information which can be found in the output of the pulse amplifier, and on an assumed a priori knowledge of the pulse time of arrival. It is then shown that the maximum available signal/noise ratio can be obtained with practical measurements without any a priori knowledge of pulse time of arrival, and a general description of the optimal linear filter is given. The solution is unique, technically realizable, and based solely on data (noise power spectrum and pulse shape) which can be measured at the output terminals of the pulse amplifier used.

  1. Active3 noise reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzfuss, J.

    1996-01-01

    Noise reduction is a problem being encountered in a variety of applications, such as environmental noise cancellation, signal recovery and separation. Passive noise reduction is done with the help of absorbers. Active noise reduction includes the transmission of phase inverted signals for the cancellation. This paper is about a threefold active approach to noise reduction. It includes the separation of a combined source, which consists of both a noise and a signal part. With the help of interaction with the source by scanning it and recording its response, modeling as a nonlinear dynamical system is achieved. The analysis includes phase space analysis and global radial basis functions as tools for the prediction used in a subsequent cancellation procedure. Examples are given which include noise reduction of speech. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  2. Measurements of 1/f noise in A-Si:H pin diodes and thin-film-transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Gyuseong; Drewery, J.S.; Fujieda, I.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Qureshi, S.; Wildermuth, D.; Street, R.A.

    1990-05-01

    We measured the equivalent noise charge of a-Si:H pin diodes (5 ∼ 45μm i-layer) with a pulse shaping time of 2.5 μsec under reverse biases up to 30 V/μm and analyzed it as a four component noise source. The frequency spectra of 1/f noise on the soft-breakdown region and of the Nyquist noise from contact resistance of diodes were measured. Using the conversion equations for a CR-RC shaper, we identified the contact resistance noise and the 1/f noise as the main noise sources in the low bias and high bias regions respectively. The 1/f noise of a-Si:H TFTs with channel length of 15 μm was measured to be the dominant component up to ∼100kHz for both saturation and linear regions. 15 refs., 7 figs

  3. Behavioral measures of cochlear compression and temporal resolution as predictors of speech masking release in hearing-impaired listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregan, Melanie J.; Nelson, Peggy B.; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Hearing-impaired (HI) listeners often show less masking release (MR) than normal-hearing listeners when temporal fluctuations are imposed on a steady-state masker, even when accounting for overall audibility differences. This difference may be related to a loss of cochlear compression in HI listeners. Behavioral estimates of compression, using temporal masking curves (TMCs), were compared with MR for band-limited (500–4000 Hz) speech and pure tones in HI listeners and age-matched, noise-masked normal-hearing (NMNH) listeners. Compression and pure-tone MR estimates were made at 500, 1500, and 4000 Hz. The amount of MR was defined as the difference in performance between steady-state and 10-Hz square-wave-gated speech-shaped noise. In addition, temporal resolution was estimated from the slope of the off-frequency TMC. No significant relationship was found between estimated cochlear compression and MR for either speech or pure tones. NMNH listeners had significantly steeper off-frequency temporal masking recovery slopes than did HI listeners, and a small but significant correlation was observed between poorer temporal resolution and reduced MR for speech. The results suggest either that the effects of hearing impairment on MR are not determined primarily by changes in peripheral compression, or that the TMC does not provide a sufficiently reliable measure of cochlear compression. PMID:24116426

  4. Phased Acoustic Array Measurements of a 5.75 Percent Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, Nathan J.; Horne, William C.; Elmer, Kevin R.; Cheng, Rui; Brusniak, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Detailed acoustic measurements of the noise from the leading-edge Krueger flap of a 5.75 percent Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft model were recently acquired with a traversing phased microphone array in the AEDC NFAC (Arnold Engineering Development Complex, National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The spatial resolution of the array was sufficient to distinguish between individual support brackets over the full-scale frequency range of 100 to 2875 Hertz. For conditions representative of landing and take-off configuration, the noise from the brackets dominated other sources near the leading edge. Inclusion of flight-like brackets for select conditions highlights the importance of including the correct number of leading-edge high-lift device brackets with sufficient scale and fidelity. These measurements will support the development of new predictive models.

  5. Noise Spectroscopy in Strongly Correlated Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaqqa, Ali M.

    Strongly correlated materials are an interesting class of materials, thanks to the novel electronic and magnetic phenomena they exhibit as a result of the interplay of various degrees of freedom. This gives rise to an array of potential applications, from Mott-FET to magnetic storage. Many experimental probes have been used to study phase transitions in strongly correlated oxides. Among these, resistance noise spectroscopy, together with conventional transport measurements, provides a unique viewpoint to understand the microscopic dynamics near the phase transitions in these oxides. In this thesis, utilizing noise spectroscopy and transport measurements, four different strongly correlated materials were studied: (1) neodymium nickel oxide (NdNiO 3) ultrathin films, (2) vanadium dioxide (VO2) microribbons, (3) copper vanadium bronze (CuxV2O 5) microribbons and (4) niobium triselenide (NbSe3) microribbons. Ultra thin films of rare-earth nickelates exhibit several temperature-driven phase transitions. In this thesis, we studied the metal-insulator and Neel transitions in a series of NdNiO3 films with different lattice mismatches. Upon colling down, the metal-insulator phase transition is accompanied by a structural (orthorohombic to monoclinic) and magnetic (paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic) transitions as well, making the problem more interesting and complex at the same time. The noise is of the 1/f type and is Gaussian in the high temperature phase, however deviations are seen in the low temperature phases. Below the metal-insulator transition, noise magnitude increases by orders of magnitude: a sign of inhomogeneous electrical conduction as result of phase separation. This is further assured by the non-Gaussian noise signature. At very low temperatures (T switches between Gaussian and non-Gaussian over several hours, possibly arising from dynamically competing ground states. VO2 is one of the most widely studied strongly correlated oxides and is important from the

  6. Influence of background noise on the performance in the odor sensitivity task: effects of noise type and extraversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Han-Seok; Hähner, Antje; Gudziol, Volker; Scheibe, Mandy; Hummel, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Recent research demonstrated that background noise relative to silence impaired subjects' performance in a cognitively driven odor discrimination test. The current study aimed to investigate whether the background noise can also modulate performance in an odor sensitivity task that is less cognitively loaded. Previous studies have shown that the effect of background noise on task performance can be different in relation to degree of extraversion and/or type of noise. Accordingly, we wanted to examine whether the influence of background noise on the odor sensitivity task can be altered as a function of the type of background noise (i.e., nonverbal vs. verbal noise) and the degree of extraversion (i.e., introvert vs. extrovert group). Subjects were asked to conduct an odor sensitivity task in the presence of either nonverbal noise (e.g., party sound) or verbal noise (e.g., audio book), or silence. Overall, the subjects' mean performance in the odor sensitivity task was not significantly different across three auditory conditions. However, with regard to the odor sensitivity task, a significant interaction emerged between the type of background noise and the degree of extraversion. Specifically, verbal noise relative to silence significantly impaired or improved the performance of the odor sensitivity task in the introvert or extrovert group, respectively; the differential effect of introversion/extraversion was not observed in the nonverbal noise-induced task performance. In conclusion, our findings provide new empirical evidence that type of background noise and degree of extraversion play an important role in modulating the effect of background noise on subjects' performance in an odor sensitivity task.

  7. [De-noising and measurement of pulse wave velocity of the wavelet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baohua; Zhu, Honglian; Ren, Xiaohua

    2011-02-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a vital index of the cardiovascular pathology, so that the accurate measurement of PWV can be of benefit for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The noise in the measure system of pulse wave signal, rounding error and selection of the recording site all cause errors in the measure result. In this paper, with wavelet transformation to eliminate the noise and to raise the precision, and with the choice of the point whose slope was maximum as the recording site of the reconstructing pulse wave, the measuring system accuracy was improved.

  8. Dyslexic adults can learn from repeated stimulus presentation but have difficulties in excluding external noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L Beattie

    Full Text Available We examined whether the characteristic impairments of dyslexia are due to a deficit in excluding external noise or a deficit in taking advantage of repeated stimulus presentation. We compared non-impaired adults and adults with poor reading performance on a visual letter detection task that varied two aspects: the presence or absence of background visual noise, and a small or large stimulus set. There was no interaction between group and stimulus set size, indicating that the poor readers took advantage of repeated stimulus presentation as well as the non-impaired readers. The poor readers had higher thresholds than non-impaired readers in the presence of high external noise, but not in the absence of external noise. The results support the hypothesis that an external noise exclusion deficit, not a perceptual anchoring deficit, impairs reading for adults.

  9. Channel Equalization and Phase Estimation for Reduced-Guard-Interval CO-OFDM Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Qunbi

    Reduced-guard-interval (RGI) coherent optical (CO) orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) is a potential candidate for next generation 100G beyond optical transports, attributed to its advantages such as high spectral efficiency and high tolerance to optical channel impairments. First of all, we review the coherent optical systems with an emphasis on CO-OFDM systems as well as the optical channel impairments and the general digital signal processing techniques to combat them. This work focuses on the channel equalization and phase estimation of RGI CO-OFDM systems. We first propose a novel equalization scheme based on the equalization structure of RGI CO-OFDM to reduce the cyclic prefix overhead to zero. Then we show that intra-channel nonlinearities should be considered when designing the training symbols for channel estimation. Afterwards, we propose and analyze the phenomenon of dispersion-enhanced phase noise (DEPN) caused by the interaction between the laser phase noise and the chromatic dispersion in RGI CO-OFDM transmissions. DEPN induces a non-negligible performance degradation and limits the tolerant laser linewidth. However, it can be compensated by the grouped maximum-likelihood phase estimation proposed in this work.

  10. Measuring hope among families impacted by cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsaker, Amanda E; Terhorst, Lauren; Gentry, Amanda; Lingler, Jennifer H

    2016-07-01

    The current exploratory investigation aims to establish the reliability and validity of a hope measure, the Herth Hope Index, among families impacted by early cognitive impairment (N = 96). Exploratory factor analysis was used to examine the dimensionality of the measure. Bivariate analyses were used to examine construct validity. The sample had moderately high hope scores. A two-factor structure emerged from the factor analysis, explaining 51.44% of the variance. Both factors exhibited strong internal consistency (Cronbach's alphas ranged from .83 to .86). Satisfaction with social support was positively associated with hope, supporting convergent validity. Neurocognitive status, illness insight, and depression were not associated with hope, indicating discriminant validity. Families impacted by cognitive impairment may maintain hope in the face of a potentially progressive illness, regardless of cognitive status. The Herth Hope Index can be utilized as a reliable and valid measure of hope by practitioners providing support to families impacted by cognitive impairment. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. MICROWAVE NOISE MEASUREMENT OF ELECTRON TEMPERATURES IN AFTERGLOW PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiby, Jr., C. C.; McBee, W. D.

    1963-10-15

    Transient electron temperatures in afterglow plasmas were determined for He (5 and 10 torr), Ne, and Ne plus or minus 5% Ar (2.4 and 24 torr) by combining measurements of plasma microwave noise power, and plasma reflectivity and absorptivity. Use of a low-noise parametric preamplifier permitted continuous detection during the afterglow of noise power at 5.5 Bc in a 1 Mc bandwidth. Electron temperature decays were a function of pressure and gas but were slower than predicted by electron energy loss mechanisms. The addition of argon altered the electron density decay in the neon afterglow but the electron temperature decay was not appreciably changed. Resonances in detected noise power vs time in the afterglow were observed for two of the three plasma waveguide geometries studied. These resonances correlate with observed resonances in absorptivity and occur over the same range of electron densities for a given geometry independent of gas type and pressure. (auth)

  12. Assessing the effects of noise abatement measures on health risks: A case study in Istanbul

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ongel, Aybike; Sezgin, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, noise pollution caused by industrialization and increased motorization has become a major concern around the world because of its adverse effects on human well-being. Therefore, transportation agencies have been implementing noise abatement measures in order to reduce road traffic noise. However, limited attention is given to noise in environmental assessment of road transportation systems. This paper presents a framework for a health impact assessment model for road transportation noise emissions. The model allows noise impacts to be addressed with the health effects of air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions from road transportation. The health damages assessed in the model include annoyance, sleep disturbance, and cardiovascular disease in terms of acute myocardial infarction. The model was applied in a case study in Istanbul in order to evaluate the change in health risks from the implementation of noise abatement strategies. The noise abatement strategies evaluated include altering pavement surfaces in order to absorb noise and introducing speed limits. It was shown that significant improvements in health risks can be achieved using open graded pavement surfaces and introducing speed limits on highways. - Highlights: • Transportation noise has a significant effect on health. • Noise should be included in the environmental assessment of transportation systems. • Traffic noise abatement measures include noise reducing pavements and speed limits. • Noise abatement measures help reduce the health risks of transportation noise. • Speed limit reduction on uncongested roads is an effective way to reduce health risks.

  13. Assessing the effects of noise abatement measures on health risks: A case study in Istanbul

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ongel, Aybike, E-mail: aybike.ongel@eng.bahcesehir.edu.tr [Bahcesehir University, Department of Civil Engineering, Istanbul 34353 (Turkey); Sezgin, Fatih, E-mail: fatih.sezgin@ibb.gov.tr [Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality, Environmental Protection Agency, Istanbul 34169 (Turkey)

    2016-01-15

    In recent decades, noise pollution caused by industrialization and increased motorization has become a major concern around the world because of its adverse effects on human well-being. Therefore, transportation agencies have been implementing noise abatement measures in order to reduce road traffic noise. However, limited attention is given to noise in environmental assessment of road transportation systems. This paper presents a framework for a health impact assessment model for road transportation noise emissions. The model allows noise impacts to be addressed with the health effects of air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions from road transportation. The health damages assessed in the model include annoyance, sleep disturbance, and cardiovascular disease in terms of acute myocardial infarction. The model was applied in a case study in Istanbul in order to evaluate the change in health risks from the implementation of noise abatement strategies. The noise abatement strategies evaluated include altering pavement surfaces in order to absorb noise and introducing speed limits. It was shown that significant improvements in health risks can be achieved using open graded pavement surfaces and introducing speed limits on highways. - Highlights: • Transportation noise has a significant effect on health. • Noise should be included in the environmental assessment of transportation systems. • Traffic noise abatement measures include noise reducing pavements and speed limits. • Noise abatement measures help reduce the health risks of transportation noise. • Speed limit reduction on uncongested roads is an effective way to reduce health risks.

  14. Towards a practical Johnson noise thermometer for long-term measurements in harsh environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenen, Adam; Pearce, Jonathan; Cruickshank, David; Bramley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The impact of mechanical and chemical changes in conventional sensors such as thermocouples and resistance thermometers can be avoided by instead using temperature sensors based on fundamental thermometry. A prime example of this is Johnson noise thermometry, which is based on measurement of the fluctuations in the voltage of a resistor arising from thermal motion of charge carriers - i.e. the 'Johnson noise'. A Johnson noise thermometer never needs calibration and is insensitive to the condition of the sensor material. It is therefore ideally suited to long-term temperature measurements in harsh environments, such as nuclear reactor coolant circuits, in-pile measurements, nuclear waste management and storage, and severe accident monitoring. There have been a number of previous attempts to develop a Johnson noise thermometer for the nuclear industry, but none have reached commercial exploitation because of technical problems in practical implementation. The main challenge is to extract the tiny Johnson noise signal from ambient electrical noise influences, both from the internal amplification electronics, and from external electrical noise sources. Recent advances in electronics technology and digital signal processing techniques have opened up new possibilities for developing a viable, practical Johnson noise thermometer. We describe a project funded by the UK Technology Strategy Board (now Innovate UK) 'Developing the nuclear supply chain' call, currently underway, to develop a practical Johnson noise thermometer that makes use of innovative electronics for ultralow noise amplification and signal processing. The new electronics technology has the potential to help overcome the problems encountered with previous attempts at constructing a practical Johnson noise thermometer. An outline of the new developments is presented, together with an overview of the current status of the project. (authors)

  15. Towards a practical Johnson noise thermometer for long-term measurements in harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenen, Adam; Pearce, Jonathan [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, TW11 0LW, (United Kingdom); Cruickshank, David; Bramley, Paul [Metrosol Limited, Plum Park Estate, Watling Street, Paulerspury, Northamptonshire, NN12 6LQ, (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The impact of mechanical and chemical changes in conventional sensors such as thermocouples and resistance thermometers can be avoided by instead using temperature sensors based on fundamental thermometry. A prime example of this is Johnson noise thermometry, which is based on measurement of the fluctuations in the voltage of a resistor arising from thermal motion of charge carriers - i.e. the 'Johnson noise'. A Johnson noise thermometer never needs calibration and is insensitive to the condition of the sensor material. It is therefore ideally suited to long-term temperature measurements in harsh environments, such as nuclear reactor coolant circuits, in-pile measurements, nuclear waste management and storage, and severe accident monitoring. There have been a number of previous attempts to develop a Johnson noise thermometer for the nuclear industry, but none have reached commercial exploitation because of technical problems in practical implementation. The main challenge is to extract the tiny Johnson noise signal from ambient electrical noise influences, both from the internal amplification electronics, and from external electrical noise sources. Recent advances in electronics technology and digital signal processing techniques have opened up new possibilities for developing a viable, practical Johnson noise thermometer. We describe a project funded by the UK Technology Strategy Board (now Innovate UK) 'Developing the nuclear supply chain' call, currently underway, to develop a practical Johnson noise thermometer that makes use of innovative electronics for ultralow noise amplification and signal processing. The new electronics technology has the potential to help overcome the problems encountered with previous attempts at constructing a practical Johnson noise thermometer. An outline of the new developments is presented, together with an overview of the current status of the project. (authors)

  16. CT urography in the urinary bladder: To compare excretory phase images using a low noise index and a high noise index with adaptive noise reduction filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeyama, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Takaki; Ohgiya, Yoshimitsu

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although CT urography (CTU) is widely used for the evaluation of the entire urinary tract, the most important drawback is the radiation exposure. Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a noise reduction filter (NRF) using a phantom and to quantitatively and qualitatively compare excretory phase (EP) images using a low noise index (NI) with those using a high NI and postprocessing NRF (pNRF). Material and Methods: Each NI value was defined for a slice thickness of 5 mm, and reconstructed images with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm were assessed. Sixty patients who were at high risk of developing bladder tumors (BT) were divided into two groups according to whether their EP images were obtained using an NI of 9.88 (29 patients; group A) or an NI of 20 and pNRF (31 patients; group B). The CT dose index volume (CTDI vol ) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the bladder with respect to the anterior pelvic fat were compared in both groups. Qualitative assessment of the urinary bladder for image noise, sharpness, streak artifacts, homogeneity, and the conspicuity of polypoid or sessile-shaped BTs with a short-axis diameter greater than 10 mm was performed using a 3-point scale. Results: The phantom study showed noise reduction of approximately 40% and 76% dose reduction between group A and group B. CTDI vol demonstrated a 73% reduction in group B (4.6 ± 1.1 mGy) compared with group A (16.9 ± 3.4 mGy). The CNR value was not significantly different (P = 0.60) between group A (16.1 ± 5.1) and group B (16.6 ± 7.6). Although group A was superior (P < 0.01) to group B with regard to image noise, other qualitative analyses did not show significant differences. Conclusion: EP images using a high NI and pNRF were quantitatively and qualitatively comparable to those using a low NI, except with regard to image noise

  17. Green noise wall construction and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    This report details the research performed under Phase I of a research study titled Green Noise Wall Construction and Evaluation that looks into the feasibility of using green noise barriers as a noise mitigation option in Ohio. This phase incl...

  18. Speech-in-Noise Tests and Supra-threshold Auditory Evoked Potentials as Metrics for Noise Damage and Clinical Trial Outcome Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Prell, Colleen G; Brungart, Douglas S

    2016-09-01

    In humans, the accepted clinical standards for detecting hearing loss are the behavioral audiogram, based on the absolute detection threshold of pure-tones, and the threshold auditory brainstem response (ABR). The audiogram and the threshold ABR are reliable and sensitive measures of hearing thresholds in human listeners. However, recent results from noise-exposed animals demonstrate that noise exposure can cause substantial neurodegeneration in the peripheral auditory system without degrading pure-tone audiometric thresholds. It has been suggested that clinical measures of auditory performance conducted with stimuli presented above the detection threshold may be more sensitive than the behavioral audiogram in detecting early-stage noise-induced hearing loss in listeners with audiometric thresholds within normal limits. Supra-threshold speech-in-noise testing and supra-threshold ABR responses are reviewed here, given that they may be useful supplements to the behavioral audiogram for assessment of possible neurodegeneration in noise-exposed listeners. Supra-threshold tests may be useful for assessing the effects of noise on the human inner ear, and the effectiveness of interventions designed to prevent noise trauma. The current state of the science does not necessarily allow us to define a single set of best practice protocols. Nonetheless, we encourage investigators to incorporate these metrics into test batteries when feasible, with an effort to standardize procedures to the greatest extent possible as new reports emerge.

  19. Note: A temperature-stable low-noise transimpedance amplifier for microcurrent measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kai; Shi, Xueyou; Zhao, Kai; Guo, Lixin; Zhang, Hanlu

    2017-02-01

    Temperature stability and noise characteristics often run contradictory in microcurrent (e.g., pA-scale) measurement instruments because low-noise performance requires high-value resistors with relatively poor temperature coefficients. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier with high-temperature stability, which involves an active compensation mechanism to overcome the temperature drift mainly caused by high-value resistors, is presented. The implementation uses a specially designed R-2R compensating network to provide programmable current gain with extra-fine trimming resolution. The temperature drifts of all components (e.g., feedback resistors, operational amplifiers, and the R-2R network itself) are compensated simultaneously. Therefore, both low-temperature drift and ultra-low-noise performance can be achieved. With a current gain of 1011 V/A, the internal current noise density was about 0.4 fA/√Hz, and the average temperature coefficient was 4.3 ppm/K at 0-50 °C. The amplifier module maintains accuracy across a wide temperature range without additional thermal stabilization, and its compact size makes it especially suitable for high-precision, low-current measurement in outdoor environments for applications such as electrochemical emission supervision, air pollution particles analysis, radiation monitoring, and bioelectricity.

  20. Magnified Neural Envelope Coding Predicts Deficits in Speech Perception in Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millman, Rebecca E; Mattys, Sven L; Gouws, André D; Prendergast, Garreth

    2017-08-09

    Verbal communication in noisy backgrounds is challenging. Understanding speech in background noise that fluctuates in intensity over time is particularly difficult for hearing-impaired listeners with a sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). The reduction in fast-acting cochlear compression associated with SNHL exaggerates the perceived fluctuations in intensity in amplitude-modulated sounds. SNHL-induced changes in the coding of amplitude-modulated sounds may have a detrimental effect on the ability of SNHL listeners to understand speech in the presence of modulated background noise. To date, direct evidence for a link between magnified envelope coding and deficits in speech identification in modulated noise has been absent. Here, magnetoencephalography was used to quantify the effects of SNHL on phase locking to the temporal envelope of modulated noise (envelope coding) in human auditory cortex. Our results show that SNHL enhances the amplitude of envelope coding in posteromedial auditory cortex, whereas it enhances the fidelity of envelope coding in posteromedial and posterolateral auditory cortex. This dissociation was more evident in the right hemisphere, demonstrating functional lateralization in enhanced envelope coding in SNHL listeners. However, enhanced envelope coding was not perceptually beneficial. Our results also show that both hearing thresholds and, to a lesser extent, magnified cortical envelope coding in left posteromedial auditory cortex predict speech identification in modulated background noise. We propose a framework in which magnified envelope coding in posteromedial auditory cortex disrupts the segregation of speech from background noise, leading to deficits in speech perception in modulated background noise. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT People with hearing loss struggle to follow conversations in noisy environments. Background noise that fluctuates in intensity over time poses a particular challenge. Using magnetoencephalography, we demonstrate

  1. A new technique for noise reduction at coronary CT angiography with multi-phase data-averaging and non-rigid image registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsugami, Fuminari; Higaki, Toru; Nakamura, Yuko; Yamagami, Takuji; Date, Shuji; Awai, Kazuo [Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Minami-ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Fujioka, Chikako; Kiguchi, Masao [Hiroshima University, Department of Radiology, Minami-ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Kihara, Yasuki [Hiroshima University, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Minami-ku, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    To investigate the feasibility of a newly developed noise reduction technique at coronary CT angiography (CTA) that uses multi-phase data-averaging and non-rigid image registration. Sixty-five patients underwent coronary CTA with prospective ECG-triggering. The range of the phase window was set at 70-80 % of the R-R interval. First, three sets of consecutive volume data at 70 %, 75 % and 80 % of the R-R interval were prepared. Second, we applied non-rigid registration to align the 70 % and 80 % images to the 75 % image. Finally, we performed weighted averaging of the three images and generated a de-noised image. The image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the proximal coronary arteries between the conventional 75 % and the de-noised images were compared. Two radiologists evaluated the image quality using a 5-point scale (1, poor; 5, excellent). On de-noised images, mean image noise was significantly lower than on conventional 75 % images (18.3 HU ± 2.6 vs. 23.0 HU ± 3.3, P < 0.01) and the CNR was significantly higher (P < 0.01). The mean image quality score for conventional 75 % and de-noised images was 3.9 and 4.4, respectively (P < 0.01). Our method reduces image noise and improves image quality at coronary CTA. (orig.)

  2. Measurement, characterization, and modeling of noise in staring infrared focal plane arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scribner, D.A.; Kruer, M.R.; Gridley, C.J.; Sarkady, K.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of selected methods for the measurement and characterization of spatial and temporal noise in staring focal plane arrays (FPAs), in order to demonstrate how these results can be used in simulations and analytic models to predict the performance of selected staring sensors. Attention is given to MIR FPAs applicable to the detection and tracking of point sources, and to the ways in which these spatial and temporal noise measurements can be incorporated into simulations and sensors having staring FPAs. Methods for predicting the performance of selected staring sensor systems are derivable from spatial and temporal noise values. 13 references

  3. A PWM strategy for acoustic noise reduction for grid-connected single-phase inverters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, R.; Guo, Z.; Chang, L. [New Brunswick Univ., Fredericton, NB (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    2006-07-01

    This paper presented a newly proposed and improved pulse width modulation (PWM) strategy for grid-connected single-phase inverters. Small distributed generators using energy from renewable resources such as PV and wind systems typically use grid-connected single-phase inverters as voltage source inverters for good acoustic performance. PWM is generally applied in these inverters in order to achieve good waveforms of output current as required by interconnection standards. In routine simultaneous switching PWM methods, the current ripples through the inverter output filter inductor are at the carrier switching frequency, which is one of the major causes for inverter acoustic noise. The new PWM strategy effectively alleviates acoustic noise and improves output power quality. It is based on the principle of evenly splitting the switching of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBT) in each switching cycle among all IGBTs of the full bridge, thereby using a non-simultaneous mode of PWM which doubles the output current ripple frequency. This increases the inductor current ripple frequency to twice the carrier frequency. It is therefore possible to increase the current ripple frequency, or noise frequency into the range of ultrasonic which is inaudible to the human ear, without increasing the inverter's switching frequency to which the inverter's switching loss is proportional. In addition, this new PWM scheme can reduce the output current harmonics distortion and dc link current ripples. As such, lower capacitance in dc link capacitors and lower inductance of output inductor are needed. The improved PWM scheme was verified in a 3 kW grid-connected single-phase inverter. It was shown that the PWM strategy can be readily implemented with a digital signal processing microcontroller. 8 refs., 11 figs.

  4. Source modelling of train noise - Literature review and some initial measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xuetao; Jonasson, Hans; Holmberg, Kjell

    2000-07-01

    A literature review of source modelling of railway noise is reported. Measurements on a special test rig at Surahammar and on the new railway line between Arlanda and Stockholm City are reported and analyzed. In the analysis the train is modelled as a number of point sources with or without directivity and each source is combined with analytical sound propagation theory to predict the sound propagation pattern best fitting the measured data. Wheel/rail rolling noise is considered to be the most important noise source. The rolling noise can be modelled as an array of moving point sources, which have a dipole-like horizontal directivity and some kind of vertical directivity. In general it is necessary to distribute the point sources on several heights. Based on our model analysis the source heights for the rolling noise should be below the wheel axles and the most important height is about a quarter of wheel diameter above the railheads. When train speeds are greater than 250 km/h aerodynamic noise will become important and even dominant. It may be important for low frequency components only if the train speed is less than 220 km/h. Little data are available for these cases. It is believed that aerodynamic noise has dipole-like directivity. Its spectrum depends on many factors: speed, railway system, type of train, bogies, wheels, pantograph, presence of barriers and even weather conditions. Other sources such as fans, engine, transmission and carriage bodies are at most second order noise sources, but for trains with a diesel locomotive engine the engine noise will be dominant if train speeds are less than about 100 km/h. The Nord 2000 comprehensive model for sound propagation outdoors, together with the source model that is based on the understandings above, can suitably handle the problems of railway noise propagation in one-third octave bands although there are still problems left to be solved.

  5. 1/f neural noise and electrophysiological indices of contextual prediction in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, S; Brothers, T A; Swaab, T Y

    2018-07-15

    Prediction of upcoming words during reading has been suggested to enhance the efficiency of discourse processing. Emerging models have postulated that predictive mechanisms require synchronous firing of neural networks, but to date, this relationship has been investigated primarily through oscillatory activity in narrow frequency bands. A recently-developed measure proposed to reflect broadband neural activity - and thereby synchronous neuronal firing - is 1/f neural noise extracted from EEG spectral power. Previous research has indicated that this measure of 1/f neural noise changes across the lifespan, and these neural changes predict age-related behavioral impairments in visual working memory. Using a cross-sectional sample of young and older adults, we examined age-related changes in 1/f neural noise and whether this measure predicted ERP correlates of successful lexical prediction during discourse comprehension. 1/f neural noise across two different language tasks revealed high within-subject correlations, indicating that this measure can provide a reliable index of individualized patterns of neural activation. In addition to age, 1/f noise was a significant predictor of N400 effects of successful lexical prediction; however, noise did not mediate age-related declines in other ERP effects. We discuss broader implications of these findings for theories of predictive processing, as well as potential applications of 1/f noise across research populations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. NACA0015 measurements in LM wind tunnel and turbulence generated noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    2008-11-15

    A NACA0015 airfoil section was instrumented with an array of highfrequency microphones mounted on its surface and measured in the wind tunnel at LM Glasfiber at various inflow speeds, angles of attack, and with different turbulent inflow conditions. The aim of this work is to analyze these measurement data, including the turbulent inflow characteristics. The airfoil surface pressure data are considered in the perspective of turbulent inflow noise in order to identify the potential for using these data to validate and possibly improve associated noise models from the literature. In addition, these data are further analyzed in the context of trailing edge noise modeling which is directly related to the surface pressure fluctuations in the vicinity of the trailing edge. (au)

  7. On Low-Pass Phase Noise Mitigation in OFDM System for mmWave Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Fan, Wei; Zhang, Anxue

    2017-01-01

    A phase noise (PN) mitigation scheme was proposed for orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) in a previous work. The proposed scheme does not require detailed knowledge of PN statistics and can eectively compensate the PN with sucient number of unknowns. In this paper, we analyze....... It is also shown that the PN spectral shape of the phase-lockedloop (PLL) based oscillator also aects the PN mitigation and that a larger PN may not necessarily degrade the performance of the OFDM system with PN mitigation. Simulations with realistic millimeter-wave (mmWave) PN and channel models...

  8. Active control of the noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez V, Luis Alfonso; Lopez Q, Jose German

    2001-01-01

    The problems of acoustic noise are more and more preponderant in the measure in that the amount of equipment and industrial machinery is increased such as fans, transformers, compressors etc. the use of devices passive mechanics for the reduction of the noise is effective and very appreciated because its effects embrace a wide range of acoustic frequency. However, to low frequencies, such devices become too big and expensive besides that present a tendency to do not effective. The control of active noise, CAN, using the electronic generation anti-noise, constitutes an interesting solution to the problem because their operation principle allows achieving an appreciable reduction of the noise by means of the use of compact devices. The traditional techniques for the control of acoustic noise like barriers and silenced to attenuate it, are classified as passive and their works has been accepted as norm as for the treatment of problems of noise it refers. Such techniques are considered in general very effective in the attenuation of noise of wide band. However, for low frequency, the required passive structures are too big and expensive; also, their effectiveness diminishes flagrantly, that which makes them impractical in many applications. The active suppression is profiled like a practical alternative for the reduction of acoustic noise. The idea in the active treatment of the noise it contemplates the use of a device electro-acoustic, like a speaker for example that it cancels to the noise by the generation of sounds of Same width and of contrary phase (anti-noise). The cancellation phenomenon is carried out when the ant-noise combines acoustically with the noise, what is in the cancellation of both sounds. The effectiveness of the cancellation of the primary source of noise depends on the precision with which the width and the phase of the generated ant-noise are controlled. The active control of noise, ANC (activates noise control), it is being investigated for

  9. Linearly interpolated sub-symbol optical phase noise suppression in CO-OFDM system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xuezhi; Hong, Xiaojian; He, Sailing

    2015-02-23

    An optical phase noise suppression algorithm, LI-SCPEC, based on phase linear interpolation and sub-symbol processing is proposed for CO-OFDM system. By increasing the temporal resolution of carrier phase tracking through dividing one symbol into several sub-blocks, i.e., sub-symbols, inter-carrier-interference (ICI) mitigation is achieved in the proposed algorithm. Linear interpolation is employed to obtain a reliable temporal reference for sub-symbol phase estimation. The new algorithm, with only a few number of sub-symbols (N(B) = 4), can provide a considerably larger laser linewidth tolerance than several other ICI mitigation algorithms as demonstrated by Monte-Carlo simulations. Numerical analysis verifies that the best performance is achieved with an optimal and moderate number of sub-symbols. Complexity analysis shows that the required number of complex-valued multiplications is independent of the number of sub-symbols used in the proposed algorithm.

  10. Auxiliary functions of the LISA laser link: ranging, clock noise transfer and data communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzel, Gerhard; Esteban, Juan Jose; Barke, Simon; Otto, Markus; Wang Yan; Garcia, Antonio F; Danzmann, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is required to reduce two important noise sources by post-processing on the ground using time-delay interferometry (TDI): phase noise of the on-board reference clocks and laser frequency noise. To achieve the desired suppression, the TDI algorithm needs measurements of the differential clock noise between any two spacecraft and inter-spacecraft ranging measurements with at least 1 m accuracy, which is beyond the precision of ground-based measurements for deep space missions. Therefore, we need on-board measurements by transmitting clock noise and ranging information between the spacecraft as auxiliary functions of the laser link. This paper reports our current experimental results in clock noise transfer and ranging for noise subtraction via post-processing as well as additional data transfer.

  11. Evaluation of phase transformation in ferromagnetic shape memory Fe-Pd alloy by magnetic Barkhausen noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Yasubumi; Tamoto, Shizuka; Kubota, Takeshi; Okazaki, Teiko; Hagood, Nesbitt W.; Spearing, S. Mark

    2002-07-01

    The possibility to detect the phase transformation with martensites by heating or cooling as well as stress-loading in ferromagnetic shape memory Fe-30at percent Pd alloy thin foil by using magnetic Markhausen noise sensor was studied. MBHN is caused by the irregular interactions between magnetic domain and thermally activated martensite twins during magnetization. In general, the envelope of the MBHN voltage versus time signals in Fe-29at percent Pd ribbon showed two peaks during magnetization, where secondary peak at intermediate state of magnetization process decreased with increasing temperature, while the MBHN envelopes in pure iron did not change with increasing temperature. The variety of MBHN due to the phase transformation was apt to arise at higher frequency part of spectrum during intermediate state of magnetization process and it decreased with disappearance of martensite twins. Besides, MBHN increased monotonically with increasing loading stress and then, it decreased with unloading, however MBHN showed large hysteresis between loading and unloading passes. Based on the experimental results from MBHN measurements for both thermoelastic and stress-induced martensite phase transformations in Fe-30at percent Pd ribbon samples, MBHN method seems a useful technique to non-destructive evaluation of martensite phase transformation of ferromagnetic shape memory alloy.

  12. Luminance noise as a novel approach for measuring contrast sensitivity within the magnocellular and parvocellular pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Cierra M; McAnany, J Jason

    2017-07-01

    This study evaluated the extent to which different types of luminance noise can be used to target selectively the inferred magnocellular (MC) and parvocellular (PC) visual pathways. Letter contrast sensitivity (CS) was measured for three visually normal subjects for letters of different size (0.8°-5.3°) under established paradigms intended to target the MC pathway (steady-pedestal paradigm) and PC pathway (pulsed-pedestal paradigm). Results obtained under these paradigms were compared to those obtained in asynchronous static noise (a field of unchanging luminance noise) and asynchronous dynamic noise (a field of randomly changing luminance noise). CS was measured for letters that were high- and low-pass filtered using a range of filter cutoffs to quantify the object frequency information (cycles per letter) mediating letter identification, which was used as an index of the pathway mediating CS. A follow-up experiment was performed to determine the range of letter duration over which MC and PC pathway CS can be targeted. Analysis of variance indicated that the object frequencies measured under the static noise and steady-pedestal paradigms did not differ significantly (p ≥ 0.065), but differed considerably from those measured under the dynamic noise (both p noise, and in dynamic noise. These data suggest that the spatiotemporal characteristics of noise can be manipulated to target the inferred MC (static noise) and PC (dynamic noise) pathways. The results also suggest that CS within these pathways can be measured at long stimulus durations, which has potential importance in the design of future clinical CS tests.

  13. Auditory and Non-Auditory Contributions for Unaided Speech Recognition in Noise as a Function of Hearing Aid Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieseler, Anja; Tahden, Maike A S; Thiel, Christiane M; Wagener, Kirsten C; Meis, Markus; Colonius, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Differences in understanding speech in noise among hearing-impaired individuals cannot be explained entirely by hearing thresholds alone, suggesting the contribution of other factors beyond standard auditory ones as derived from the audiogram. This paper reports two analyses addressing individual differences in the explanation of unaided speech-in-noise performance among n = 438 elderly hearing-impaired listeners ( mean = 71.1 ± 5.8 years). The main analysis was designed to identify clinically relevant auditory and non-auditory measures for speech-in-noise prediction using auditory (audiogram, categorical loudness scaling) and cognitive tests (verbal-intelligence test, screening test of dementia), as well as questionnaires assessing various self-reported measures (health status, socio-economic status, and subjective hearing problems). Using stepwise linear regression analysis, 62% of the variance in unaided speech-in-noise performance was explained, with measures Pure-tone average (PTA), Age , and Verbal intelligence emerging as the three most important predictors. In the complementary analysis, those individuals with the same hearing loss profile were separated into hearing aid users (HAU) and non-users (NU), and were then compared regarding potential differences in the test measures and in explaining unaided speech-in-noise recognition. The groupwise comparisons revealed significant differences in auditory measures and self-reported subjective hearing problems, while no differences in the cognitive domain were found. Furthermore, groupwise regression analyses revealed that Verbal intelligence had a predictive value in both groups, whereas Age and PTA only emerged significant in the group of hearing aid NU.

  14. Radio-frequency shot-noise measurement in a magnetic tunnel junction with a MgO barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, Mushtaq; Park, Junghwan; Song, Woon; Chong, Yonuk; Lee, Yeonsub; Min, Byoungchul; Shin, Kyungho; Ryu, Sangwan; Khim, Zheong

    2010-01-01

    We measured the noise power of a magnetic tunnel junction in the frequency range of 710 ∼ 1200 MHz. A low-noise cryogenic HEMT amplifier was used to measure the small noise signal at a high frequency with wide bandwidth. The MgO-barrier tunnel junction showed large tunnel magnetoresistance ratio of 215% at low temperature, which indicates electronic transport through the tunnel barrier without any significant spin-flip scattering. In the bias-dependent noise measurement, however, the zero-bias shot noise was enhanced compared to the value expected from a perfect tunnel barrier or the value observed from a good Al-AlO x -Al tunnel junction. We assume that this enhanced noise comes from inelastic tunneling processes through the barrier, which may be related to the observed zero-bias anomaly in the differential resistance of the tunnel junctions. We present a simple phenomenological model for how the inelastic scattering process can enhance the zero-bias noise in a tunnel junction.

  15. Air flow measurement techniques applied to noise reduction of a centrifugal blower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laage, John W.; Armstrong, Ashli J.; Eilers, Daniel J.; Olsen, Michael G.; Mann, J. Adin

    2005-09-01

    The air flow in a centrifugal blower was studied using a variety of flow and sound measurement techniques. The flow measurement techniques employed included Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), pitot tubes, and a five hole spherical probe. PIV was used to measure instantaneous and ensemble-averaged velocity fields over large area of the outlet duct as a function of fan position, allowing for the visualization of the flow as it leave the fan blades and progressed downstream. The results from the flow measurements were reviewed along side the results of the sound measurements with the goal of identifying sources of noise and inefficiencies in flow performance. The radiated sound power was divided into broadband and tone noise and measures of the flow. The changes in the tone and broadband sound were compared to changes in flow quantities such as the turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds stress. Results for each method will be presented to demonstrate the strengths of each flow measurement technique as well as their limitations. Finally, the role that each played in identifying noise sources is described.

  16. Noise estimation for remote sensing image data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qian

    2004-01-01

    Noise estimation does not receive much attention in remote sensing society. It may be because normally noise is not large enough to impair image analysis result. Noise estimation is also very challenging due to the randomness nature of the noise (for random noise) and the difficulty of separating the noise component from the signal in each specific location. We review and propose seven different types of methods to estimate noise variance and noise covariance matrix in a remotely sensed image. In the experiment, it is demonstrated that a good noise estimate can improve the performance of an algorithm via noise whitening if this algorithm assumes white noise.

  17. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Wright, Kenneth D.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Smith, Charlie D.

    2000-01-01

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) has for years been a leader in field acoustic array measurement technique. Two field-deployable digital measurement systems have been developed to support acoustic research programs at LaRC. For several years, LaRC has used the Digital Acoustic Measurement System (DAMS) for measuring the acoustic noise levels from rotorcraft and tiltrotor aircraft. Recently, a second system called Remote Acquisition and Storage System (RASS) was developed and deployed for the first time in the field along with DAMS system for the Community Noise Flight Test using the NASA LaRC-757 aircraft during April, 2000. The test was performed at Airborne Airport in Wilmington, OH to validate predicted noise reduction benefits from alternative operational procedures. The test matrix was composed of various combinations of altitude, cutback power, and aircraft weight. The DAMS digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone site and can be located up to 2000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 10 microphones is recorded on a Jaz disk and is analyzed post-test by microcomputer system. The RASS digitizes and stores acoustic inputs at the microphone site that can be located up to three miles from the base station and can compose a 3 mile by 3 mile array of microphones. 16-bit digitized data from the microphones is stored on removable Jaz disk and is transferred through a high speed array to a very large high speed permanent storage device. Up to 30 microphones can be utilized in the array. System control and monitoring is accomplished via Radio Frequency (RF) link. This paper will present a detailed description of both systems, along with acoustic data analysis from both systems.

  18. New phase method of measuring particle size with laser Doppler radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemlianskii, Vladimir M.

    1996-06-01

    A vast field of non-contact metrology, vibrometry, dynamics and microdynamics problems solved on the basis of laser Doppler method resulted in the development of great variety of laser Doppler radar (LDR). In coherent LDR few beams with various polarization are generally adopted, that are directed at the zone of measurement, through which the probing air stream moves. Studies of various coherent LDR demonstrated that polarization-phase effects of scattering can in some cases considerably effect on the signal-to-noise ratio of the Doppler signal. On the other side using phase effects can simultaneous measurement of size and velocity of spherical particles. New possibilities for improving the accuracy of measuring spherical particles' sizes come to light when application is made in coherent LDR of two waves- probing and one out of the types of symmetrical reception of scattered radiation, during which phase-conjugate signals are formed. The theoretical analysis on the basis of the scattering theory showed, that in symmetrical reception of scattered radiation with respect to the planes OXZ and OYZ output signal of the photoreceiver contains two high- frequency signal components, which in relation to parameters of the probing and size, can either be in phase or antiphase. Results of numerical modeling are presented: amplitude of high frequency signal, coefficient of phase and polarization matching of mixed waves, the depths of photocurrent modulation and also signal's phase in relation to the angle between the probing beams. Phase method of determining particle's sizes based on the use of two wavelengths probing and symmetrical reception of scattered radiation in which conditions for the formation of phase conjugated high-frequency signals are satisfied is presented.

  19. Aging and Temporal Influences on Speech Perception in Reverberation and Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, Karen S.

    The present study examined the interactions of age, temporal resolution, hearing loss, and consonant perception under realistic listening conditions. Four subject groups were employed, with N = 8 per group: young adults with normal hearing or sloping sensorineural hearing loss; and elderly individuals with minimal peripheral hearing loss or presbycusis. Copies of the CUNY Nonsense Syllable Test (NST) were re-recorded under four levels of reverberation in quiet and in +10 signal-to-noise ratio of cafeteria noise. The test stimuli were presented binaurally to the subjects via TDH-49 headphones. In addition, a diotic wideband gap detection task, using a 72 dBSPL presentation level, was used as a measure of temporal resolution. Results of the present investigation demonstrated that all other subject groups performed significantly poorer than the young, normal hearing adults. Scores decreased as the amount of distortion increased, although there was very little difference between performance in the two highest reverberation conditions. For reverberation alone, the young, hearing-impaired listeners obtained the lowest scores; for reverberation + noise, the older, hearing-impaired subjects performed poorest. Large within-group variability was noted in the size of the gap thresholds, and only the two groups of young subjects differed significantly on this task of temporal resolution. Correlation analyses demonstrated a strong inverse relation between age and performance in reverberation + noise, even when degree of hearing loss was partialed out. Pure -tone average, as well as NST scores in quiet and in noise alone were related strongly to performance in reverberation. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated that nonsense syllable perception in reverberation could be predicted from a combination of age, pure-tone thresholds, scores in quiet and noise, and gap threshold. Gap threshold was the strongest predictor variable for reverberation alone, while the NST score

  20. Comparative study of eddy current and Barkhausen noise nondestructive testing methods in microstructural examination of ferrite-martensite dual-phase steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanei, S.; Kashefi, M.; Mazinani, M.

    2014-04-01

    The magnetic properties of ferrite-martensite dual-phase steels were evaluated using eddy current and Barkhausen noise nondestructive testing methods and correlated with their microstructural changes. Several routes were used to produce different microstructures of dual-phase steels. The first route was different heat treatments in γ region to vary the ferrite grain size (from 9.47 to 11.12 in ASTM number), and the second one was variation in intercritical annealing temperatures (from 750 to 890 °C) in order to produce different percentages of martensite in dual-phase microstructure. The results concerning magnetic Barkhausen noise are discussed in terms of height, position and shape of Barkhausen noise profiles, taking into account two main aspects: ferrite grain size, and different percentages of martensite. Then, eddy current testing was used to study the mentioned microstructural changes by detection of impedance variations. The obtained results show that microstructural changes have a noticeable effect on the magnetic properties of dual-phase steels. The results reveal that both magnetic methods have a high potential to be used as a reliable nondestructive tool to detect and monitor microstructural changes occurring during manufacturing of dual-phase steels.

  1. An Analysis of FM Jamming and Noise Quality Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    equipment setup is shown in figure 6. For reasons of practicality and manageability , all equipment was chosen to be commercially available and of a fairly...bins based on the size of the parameter F. It computes a smoothed "Turner Noise Qaulity " similar to the noise quality measure employed by Daly in his...recý.orate for :nf-,aton Doe,A-,ým5 1o- A c-t•s. )2 15 efferso Oarts H,9gPay, Srte 1204. ArtOngton, VA 222024302 and to the Of"ce of Management and aucige

  2. Development of equally intelligible Telugu sentence-lists to test speech recognition in noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanniru, Kishore; Narne, Vijaya Kumar; Jain, Chandni; Konadath, Sreeraj; Singh, Niraj Kumar; Sreenivas, K J Ramadevi; K, Anusha

    2017-09-01

    To develop sentence lists in the Telugu language for the assessment of speech recognition threshold (SRT) in the presence of background noise through identification of the mean signal-to-noise ratio required to attain a 50% sentence recognition score (SRTn). This study was conducted in three phases. The first phase involved the selection and recording of Telugu sentences. In the second phase, 20 lists, each consisting of 10 sentences with equal intelligibility, were formulated using a numerical optimisation procedure. In the third phase, the SRTn of the developed lists was estimated using adaptive procedures on individuals with normal hearing. A total of 68 native Telugu speakers with normal hearing participated in the study. Of these, 18 (including the speakers) performed on various subjective measures in first phase, 20 performed on sentence/word recognition in noise for second phase and 30 participated in the list equivalency procedures in third phase. In all, 15 lists of comparable difficulty were formulated as test material. The mean SRTn across these lists corresponded to -2.74 (SD = 0.21). The developed sentence lists provided a valid and reliable tool to measure SRTn in Telugu native speakers.

  3. First evaluation of low frequency noise measurements of in core detector signals in the measuring assembly Rheinsberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collatz, S.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor noise spectra of in core neutron detectors are measured in the low frequency range (0.03 Hz to 1 Hz) and evaluated. The increase of the effective noise signal value is due to pressure oscillations or oscillations of special steam volume portions. Thus boiling monitoring of reactor cores in PWR type reactors may be possible, if the low frequency noise of the whole set of in core detectors is taken into account

  4. Inference from the futures: ranking the noise cancelling accuracy of realized measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirone, Giorgio

    We consider the log-linear relationship between futures contracts and their underlying assets and show that in the classical Brownian semi-martingale (BSM) framework the two series must, by no-arbitrage, have the same integrated variance. We then introduce the concept of noise cancelling...... measures in the presence of noise. Moreover, a thorough simulation analysis is employed to evaluate the estimators' sensitivity to different price and noise processes, and sampling frequencies....

  5. Noise effects on reproduction— animal experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takigawa, H.; Sakamoto, H.; Murata, M.; Matsumura, Y.

    1988-12-01

    Noise effects on fetal development were observed in animals. While the copulatory function was not affected, birth rate decreased when the animals were exposed to noise. An increased number of stunted fetuses was observed when the animals were intermittently exposed. However, malformations in the fetuses increased with exposure to both intermittent and continuous noise. Two phases of hormonal change were observed in connection with noise exposure. One is the initial response phase, characterized by the increment of 11-OHCS in the adrenal gland. The other is the end phenomena phase, characterized by a disorder in central control. It is discussed that the disturbance of fetal development by exposure to noise is related to these changes in the hormonal condition.

  6. Combatting nonlinear phase noise in coherent optical systems with an optimized decision processor based on machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Danshi; Zhang, Min; Cai, Zhongle; Cui, Yue; Li, Ze; Han, Huanhuan; Fu, Meixia; Luo, Bin

    2016-06-01

    An effective machine learning algorithm, the support vector machine (SVM), is presented in the context of a coherent optical transmission system. As a classifier, the SVM can create nonlinear decision boundaries to mitigate the distortions caused by nonlinear phase noise (NLPN). Without any prior information or heuristic assumptions, the SVM can learn and capture the link properties from only a few training data. Compared with the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) algorithm, a lower bit-error rate (BER) is achieved by the SVM for a given launch power; moreover, the launch power dynamic range (LPDR) is increased by 3.3 dBm for 8 phase-shift keying (8 PSK), 1.2 dBm for QPSK, and 0.3 dBm for BPSK. The maximum transmission distance corresponding to a BER of 1 ×10-3 is increased by 480 km for the case of 8 PSK. The larger launch power range and longer transmission distance improve the tolerance to amplitude and phase noise, which demonstrates the feasibility of the SVM in digital signal processing for M-PSK formats. Meanwhile, in order to apply the SVM method to 16 quadratic amplitude modulation (16 QAM) detection, we propose a parameter optimization scheme. By utilizing a cross-validation and grid-search techniques, the optimal parameters of SVM can be selected, thus leading to the LPDR improvement by 2.8 dBm. Additionally, we demonstrate that the SVM is also effective in combating the laser phase noise combined with the inphase and quadrature (I/Q) modulator imperfections, but the improvement is insignificant for the linear noise and separate I/Q imbalance. The computational complexity of SVM is also discussed. The relatively low complexity makes it possible for SVM to implement the real-time processing.

  7. Towards measuring the off-resonant thermal noise of a pendulum mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Leonhardt, V; Kloevekorn, P; Willke, B; Lück, H B; Danzmann, K

    2002-01-01

    Thermal noise is one of the dominant noise sources in interferometric length measurements and can limit the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors. Our goal is to analyse the off-resonant thermal noise of a high Q pendulum. Therefore we interferometrically detect the length changes of a 2.3 cm long optical resonator, which for good seismic isolation consists of two multiple stage pendulums. We are able to lock the length of this optical resonator to a frequency-stabilized laser beam and as a result get the spectral density of the differential mirror movement.

  8. Optimal signal constellation design for ultra-high-speed optical transport in the presence of nonlinear phase noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2014-12-29

    In this paper, we first describe an optimal signal constellation design algorithm suitable for the coherent optical channels dominated by the linear phase noise. Then, we modify this algorithm to be suitable for the nonlinear phase noise dominated channels. In optimization procedure, the proposed algorithm uses the cumulative log-likelihood function instead of the Euclidian distance. Further, an LDPC coded modulation scheme is proposed to be used in combination with signal constellations obtained by proposed algorithm. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the LDPC-coded modulation schemes employing the new constellation sets, obtained by our new signal constellation design algorithm, outperform corresponding QAM constellations significantly in terms of transmission distance and have better nonlinearity tolerance.

  9. A combined aeroelastic-aeroacoustic model for wind turbine noise: Verification and analysis of field measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Fischer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, semi-empirical engineering models for the three main wind turbine aerodynamic noise sources, namely, turbulent inflow, trailing edge and stall noise, are introduced. They are implemented into the in-house aeroelastic code HAWC2 commonly used for wind turbine load calculations...... and design. The results of the combined aeroelastic and aeroacoustic model are compared with field noise measurements of a 500kW wind turbine. Model and experimental data are in fairly good agreement in terms of noise levels and directivity. The combined model allows separating the various noise sources...... and highlights a number of mechanisms that are difficult to differentiate when only the overall noise from a wind turbine is measured....

  10. A novel approach to reduce environmental noise in microgravity measurements using a Scintrex CG5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddice, Daniel; Atkins, Phillip; Rodgers, Anthony; Metje, Nicole; Goncharenko, Yuriy; Chapman, David

    2018-05-01

    The accuracy and repeatability of microgravity measurements for surveying purposes are affected by two main sources of noise; instrument noise from the sensor and electronics, and environmental sources of noise from anthropogenic activity, wind, microseismic activity and other sources of vibrational noise. There is little information in the literature on the quantitative values of these different noise sources and their significance for microgravity measurements. Experiments were conducted to quantify these sources of noise with multiple instruments, and to develop methodologies to reduce these unwanted signals thereby improving the accuracy or speed of microgravity measurements. External environmental sources of noise were found to be concentrated at higher frequencies (> 0.1 Hz), well within the instrument's bandwidth. In contrast, the internal instrumental noise was dominant at frequencies much lower than the reciprocal of the maximum integration time, and was identified as the limiting factor for current instruments. The optimum time for integration was found to be between 120 and 150 s for the instruments tested. In order to reduce the effects of external environmental noise on microgravity measurements, a filtering and despiking technique was created using data from noisy environments next to a main road and outside on a windy day. The technique showed a significant improvement in the repeatability of measurements, with between 40% and 50% lower standard deviations being obtained over numerous different data sets. The filtering technique was then tested in field conditions by using an anomaly of known size, and a comparison made between different filtering methods. Results showed improvements with the proposed method performing better than a conventional, or boxcar, averaging process. The proposed despiking process was generally found to be ineffective, with greater gains obtained when complete measurement records were discarded. Field survey results were

  11. Measurement of the betatron phase advance and betatron amplitude ratio at the SPP-barS collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, R.; Scandale, W.

    1987-01-01

    A technique for the precise measurement of lattice functions in a hadron collider has been developed. The betatron functions on either side of the two low beta insertions of the SPS collider have been determined from the measured amplitude and phase of horizontal beam oscillations with a peak amplitude of 40 μm. Four directional couplers and four synchronous receivers working at 200 MHz monitor the betatron oscillations of the beam excited by the fast deflectors of the damper. A fast Fourier transform of the signals provides the phase and amplitude ratio of the beam oscillations between any pair of monitors. The relative amplitude and phase of the beam oscillations can be measured with an accuracy of 0 in phase. For achieving such an accuracy a special calibration method has been implemented to determine the propagation times and amplification factors of the measuring equipment, using the intensity signals of the beam itself. The same equipment can be used also for measuring the beam transfer function by injecting white noise into the beam deflectors

  12. Measurements of noise immission from wind turbines at receptor locations: Use of a vertical microphone board to improve the signal-to-noise ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fegeant, Olivier

    1999-01-01

    The growing interest in wind energy has increased the need of accuracy in wind turbine noise immission measurements and thus, the need of new measurement techniques. This paper shows that mounting the microphone on a vertical board improves the signal-to-noise ratio over the whole frequency range compared to the free microphone technique. Indeed, the wind turbine is perceived two times noisier by the microphone due to the signal reflection by the board while, in addition, the wind noise is reduced. Furthermore, the board shielding effect allows the measurements to be carried out in the presence of reflecting surfaces such as building facades

  13. The application of cost-effective lasers in coherent UDWDM-OFDM-PON aided by effective phase noise suppression methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue; Yang, Chuanchuan; Yang, Feng; Li, Hongbin

    2014-03-24

    Digital coherent passive optical network (PON), especially the coherent orthogonal frequency division multiplexing PON (OFDM-PON), is a strong candidate for the 2nd-stage-next-generation PON (NG-PON2). As is known, OFDM is very sensitive to the laser phase noise which severely limits the application of the cost-effective distributed feedback (DFB) lasers and more energy-efficient vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL) in the coherent OFDM-PON. The current long-reach coherent OFDM-PON experiments always choose the expensive external cavity laser (ECL) as the optical source for its narrow linewidth (usuallyOFDM-PON and study the possibility of the application of the DFB lasers and VCSEL in coherent OFDM-PON. A typical long-reach coherent ultra dense wavelength division multiplexing (UDWDM) OFDM-PON has been set up. The numerical results prove that the OBE method can stand severe phase noise of the lasers in this architecture and the DFB lasers as well as VCSEL can be used in coherent OFDM-PON. In this paper, we have also analyzed the performance of the RF-pilot-aided (RFP) phase noise suppression method in coherent OFDM-PON.

  14. Adaptive iterated function systems filter for images highly corrupted with fixed - Value impulse noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugavadivu, P.; Eliahim Jeevaraj, P. S.

    2014-06-01

    The Adaptive Iterated Functions Systems (AIFS) Filter presented in this paper has an outstanding potential to attenuate the fixed-value impulse noise in images. This filter has two distinct phases namely noise detection and noise correction which uses Measure of Statistics and Iterated Function Systems (IFS) respectively. The performance of AIFS filter is assessed by three metrics namely, Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR), Mean Structural Similarity Index Matrix (MSSIM) and Human Visual Perception (HVP). The quantitative measures PSNR and MSSIM endorse the merit of this filter in terms of degree of noise suppression and details/edge preservation respectively, in comparison with the high performing filters reported in the recent literature. The qualitative measure HVP confirms the noise suppression ability of the devised filter. This computationally simple noise filter broadly finds application wherein the images are highly degraded by fixed-value impulse noise.

  15. Analog phase lock between two lasers at LISA power levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diekmann, Christian; Steier, Frank; Sheard, Benjamin; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the implementation of an analog optical phase-locked-loop with an offset frequency of about 20MHz between two lasers, where the detected light powers were of the order of 31 pW and 200 μW. The goal of this setup was the design and characterization of a photodiode transimpedance amplifier for application in LISA. By application of a transimpedance amplifier designed to have low noise and low power consumption, the phase noise between the two lasers was a factor of two above the shot noise limit down to 60mHz. The achievable phase sensitivity depends ultimately on the available power of the highly attenuated master laser and on the input current noise of the transimpedance amplifier of the photodetector. The limiting noise source below 60mHz was the analog phase measurement system that was used in this experiment. A digital phase measurement system that is currently under development at the AEI will be used in the near future. Its application should improve the sensitivity.

  16. Analog phase lock between two lasers at LISA power levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekmann, Christian; Steier, Frank; Sheard, Benjamin; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten, E-mail: Christian.Diekmann@aei.mpg.d [Max-Planck-Institute for Gravitational Physics, Callinstr. 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents the implementation of an analog optical phase-locked-loop with an offset frequency of about 20MHz between two lasers, where the detected light powers were of the order of 31 pW and 200 muW. The goal of this setup was the design and characterization of a photodiode transimpedance amplifier for application in LISA. By application of a transimpedance amplifier designed to have low noise and low power consumption, the phase noise between the two lasers was a factor of two above the shot noise limit down to 60mHz. The achievable phase sensitivity depends ultimately on the available power of the highly attenuated master laser and on the input current noise of the transimpedance amplifier of the photodetector. The limiting noise source below 60mHz was the analog phase measurement system that was used in this experiment. A digital phase measurement system that is currently under development at the AEI will be used in the near future. Its application should improve the sensitivity.

  17. An instantaneous spatiotemporal model to predict a bicyclist's Black Carbon exposure based on mobile noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoninck, Luc; Botteldooren, Dick; Int Panis, Luc

    2013-11-01

    Several studies have shown that a significant amount of daily air pollution exposure, in particular Black Carbon (BC), is inhaled during trips. Assessing this contribution to exposure remains difficult because on the one hand local air pollution maps lack spatio-temporal resolution, at the other hand direct measurement of particulate matter concentration remains expensive. This paper proposes to use in-traffic noise measurements in combination with geographical and meteorological information for predicting BC exposure during commuting trips. Mobile noise measurements are cheaper and easier to perform than mobile air pollution measurements and can easily be used in participatory sensing campaigns. The uniqueness of the proposed model lies in the choice of noise indicators that goes beyond the traditional overall A-weighted noise level used in previous work. Noise and BC exposures are both related to the traffic intensity but also to traffic speed and traffic dynamics. Inspired by theoretical knowledge on the emission of noise and BC, the low frequency engine related noise and the difference between high frequency and low frequency noise that indicates the traffic speed, are introduced in the model. In addition, it is shown that splitting BC in a local and a background component significantly improves the model. The coefficients of the proposed model are extracted from 200 commuter bicycle trips. The predicted average exposure over a single trip correlates with measurements with a Pearson coefficient of 0.78 using only four parameters: the low frequency noise level, wind speed, the difference between high and low frequency noise and a street canyon index expressing local air pollution dispersion properties.

  18. The effect of noise in a performance measure on work motivation: A real effort laboratory experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloof, R.; van Praag, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an individual real effort laboratory experiment where subjects are paid for measured performance. Measured performance equals actual performance plus noise. We compare a stable environment where the noise is small with a volatile environment where the noise is

  19. The effect of noise in a performance measure on work motivation: A real effort laboratory experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloof, R.; van Praag, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an individual real effort laboratory experiment where subjects are paid for measured performance. Measured performance equals actual performance plus noise. We compare a stable environment where the noise is small with a volatile environment where the noise is

  20. Noise analysis of the measurement of group delay in Fourier white-light interferometric cross correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laude, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    The problem of noise analysis in measuring the group delay introduced by a dispersive optical element by use of white-light interferometric cross correlation is investigated. Two noise types, detection noise and position noise, are specifically analyzed. Detection noise is shown to be highly sensitive to the spectral content of the white-light source at the frequency considered and to the temporal acquisition window. Position noise, which arises from the finite accuracy of the measurement of the scanning mirror's position, can severely damage the estimation of the group delay. Such is shown to be the case for fast Fourier transform-based estimation algorithms. A new algorithm that is insensitive to scanning delay errors is proposed, and subfemtosecond accuracy is obtained without any postprocessing

  1. Practical ranges of loudness levels of various types of environmental noise, including traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.; Janssen, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a

  2. Measurement of signal-to-noise ratio performance of TV fluoroscopy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geluk, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    A method has been developed for direct measurement of Signal-to-Noise ratio performance on X-ray TV systems. To this end the TV signal resulting from a calibrated test object, is compared with the noise level in the image. The method is objective and produces instantaneous readout, which makes it very suitable for system evaluation under dynamic conditions. (author)

  3. Optimal configuration of partial Mueller matrix polarimeter for measuring the ellipsometric parameters in the presence of Poisson shot noise and Gaussian noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Naicheng; Zhang, Chunmin; Mu, Tingkui

    2018-05-01

    We address the optimal configuration of a partial Mueller matrix polarimeter used to determine the ellipsometric parameters in the presence of additive Gaussian noise and signal-dependent shot noise. The numerical results show that, for the PSG/PSA consisting of a variable retarder and a fixed polarizer, the detection process immune to these two types of noise can be optimally composed by 121.2° retardation with a pair of azimuths ±71.34° and a 144.48° retardation with a pair of azimuths ±31.56° for four Mueller matrix elements measurement. Compared with the existing configurations, the configuration presented in this paper can effectively decrease the measurement variance and thus statistically improve the measurement precision of the ellipsometric parameters.

  4. Pulsating aurora and cosmic noise absorption associated with growth-phase arcs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. McKay

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial stage of a magnetospheric substorm is the growth phase, which typically lasts 1–2 h. During the growth phase, an equatorward moving, east–west extended, optical auroral arc is observed. This is called a growth-phase arc. This work aims to characterize the optical emission and riometer absorption signatures associated with growth-phase arcs of isolated substorms. This is done using simultaneous all-sky camera and imaging riometer observations. The optical and riometric observations allow determination of the location of the precipitation within growth-phase arcs of low- (< 10  keV and high- (>  10 keV energy electrons, respectively. The observations indicate that growth-phase arcs have the following characteristics: 1. The peak of the cosmic noise absorption (CNA arc is equatorward of the optical emission arc. This CNA is contained within the region of diffuse aurora on the equatorward side.2. Optical pulsating aurora are seen in the border region between the diffuse emission region on the equatorward side and the bright growth-phase arc on the poleward side. CNA is detected in the same region. 3. There is no evidence of pulsations in the CNA. 4. Once the equatorward drift starts, it proceeds at constant speed, with uniform separation between the growth-phase arc and CNA of 40 ± 10 km. Optical pulsating aurora are known to be prominent in the post-onset phase of a substorm. The fact that pulsations are also seen in a fairly localized region during the growth phase shows that the substorm expansion-phase dynamics are not required to closely precede the pulsating aurora.

  5. Detecting the presence of a magnetic field under Gaussian and non-Gaussian noise by adaptive measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuan-Mei; Li, Jun-Gang, E-mail: jungl@bit.edu.cn; Zou, Jian

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Adaptive measurement strategy is used to detect the presence of a magnetic field. • Gaussian Ornstein–Uhlenbeck noise and non-Gaussian noise have been considered. • Weaker magnetic fields may be more easily detected than some stronger ones. - Abstract: By using the adaptive measurement method we study how to detect whether a weak magnetic field is actually present or not under Gaussian noise and non-Gaussian noise. We find that the adaptive measurement method can effectively improve the detection accuracy. For the case of Gaussian noise, we find the stronger the magnetic field strength, the easier for us to detect the magnetic field. Counterintuitively, for non-Gaussian noise, some weaker magnetic fields are more likely to be detected rather than some stronger ones. Finally, we give a reasonable physical interpretation.

  6. Effect of Wind Farm Noise on Local Residents' Decision to Adopt Mitigation Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Anabela; Arezes, Pedro; Bernardo, Carlos; Dias, Hernâni; Pinto, Lígia M Costa

    2017-07-11

    Wind turbines' noise is frequently pointed out as the reason for local communities' objection to the installation of wind farms. The literature suggests that local residents feel annoyed by such noise and that, in many instances, this is significant enough to make them adopt noise-abatement interventions on their homes. Aiming at characterizing the relationship between wind turbine noise, annoyance, and mitigating actions, we propose a novel conceptual framework. The proposed framework posits that actual sound pressure levels of wind turbines determine individual homes' noise-abatement decisions; in addition, the framework analyzes the role that self-reported annoyance, and perception of noise levels, plays on the relationship between actual noise pressure levels and those decisions. The application of this framework to a particular case study shows that noise perception and annoyance constitutes a link between the two. Importantly, however, noise also directly affects people's decision to adopt mitigating measures, independently of the reported annoyance.

  7. Effect of Wind Farm Noise on Local Residents’ Decision to Adopt Mitigation Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Anabela; Bernardo, Carlos; Dias, Hernâni; Pinto, Lígia M. Costa

    2017-01-01

    Wind turbines’ noise is frequently pointed out as the reason for local communities’ objection to the installation of wind farms. The literature suggests that local residents feel annoyed by such noise and that, in many instances, this is significant enough to make them adopt noise-abatement interventions on their homes. Aiming at characterizing the relationship between wind turbine noise, annoyance, and mitigating actions, we propose a novel conceptual framework. The proposed framework posits that actual sound pressure levels of wind turbines determine individual homes’ noise-abatement decisions; in addition, the framework analyzes the role that self-reported annoyance, and perception of noise levels, plays on the relationship between actual noise pressure levels and those decisions. The application of this framework to a particular case study shows that noise perception and annoyance constitutes a link between the two. Importantly, however, noise also directly affects people’s decision to adopt mitigating measures, independently of the reported annoyance. PMID:28696404

  8. Electrostatic noise measurement with a pair of spherical probes near interplanetary shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, J.; Touzin, F.

    1991-01-01

    In order to obtain accurate measurements of electrostatic noise spectra on board the ISEE 1 satellite, near interplanetary shock waves, the authors perform a detailed theoretical and numerical study of an antenna consisting of a pair of spherical probes. They compute the quasi-thermal electrostatic noise observed theoretically on the antenna by assuming that the solar wind plasma can be properly represented by the sum of two Maxwellian distributions (core and halo). They study the dependence of the electrostatic spectra on the antenna length and on the different plasma parameters, particularly on the density and temperature ratio of the core and of the halo. They show that by also taking into account the instrumental noise and the shot noise on the antenna, a calibration factor can be precisely determined for the antenna that they consider. They display some results obtained from measurements of electrostatic noise spectra behind interplanetary shock waves. Finally, they discuss the real meaning of a specific halo temperature, and they show that, in a first approximation, the theoretical results are only slightly modified when they consider types of distributions other than Maxwellians

  9. Subchronic JP-8 jet fuel exposure enhances vulnerability to noise-induced hearing loss in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechter, L D; Fisher, J W; Chapman, G D; Mokashi, V P; Ortiz, P A; Reboulet, J E; Stubbs, J E; Lear, A M; McInturf, S M; Prues, S L; Gearhart, C A; Fulton, S; Mattie, D R

    2012-01-01

    Both laboratory and epidemiological studies published over the past two decades have identified the risk of excess hearing loss when specific chemical contaminants are present along with noise. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potency of JP-8 jet fuel to enhance noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) using inhalation exposure to fuel and simultaneous exposure to either continuous or intermittent noise exposure over a 4-wk exposure period using both male and female Fischer 344 rats. In the initial study, male (n = 5) and female (n = 5) rats received inhalation exposure to JP-8 fuel for 6 h/d, 5 d/wk for 4 wk at concentrations of 200, 750, or 1500 mg/m³. Parallel groups of rats also received nondamaging noise (constant octave band noise at 85 dB(lin)) in combination with the fuel, noise alone (75, 85, or 95 dB), or no exposure to fuel or noise. Significant concentration-related impairment of auditory function measured by distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) and compound action potential (CAP) threshold was seen in rats exposed to combined JP-8 plus noise exposure when JP-8 levels of 1500 mg/m³ were presented with trends toward impairment seen with 750 mg/m³ JP-8 + noise. JP-8 alone exerted no significant effect on auditory function. In addition, noise was able to disrupt the DPOAE and increase auditory thresholds only when noise exposure was at 95 dB. In a subsequent study, male (n = 5 per group) and female (n = 5 per group) rats received 1000 mg/m³ JP-8 for 6 h/d, 5 d/wk for 4 wk with and without exposure to 102 dB octave band noise that was present for 15 min out of each hour (total noise duration 90 min). Comparisons were made to rats receiving only noise, and thosereceiving no experimental treatment. Significant impairment of auditory thresholds especially for high-frequency tones was identified in the male rats receiving combined treatment. This study provides a basis for estimating excessive hearing loss under

  10. On-line velocity measurements using phase probes at the SuperHILAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, B.; Meaney, D.; Thatcher, R.; Timossi, C.

    1987-12-01

    Phase probes have been placed in several external beam lines at the LBL heavy ion linear accelerator (SuperHILAC) to provide non- destructive velocity measurements independent of the ion being accelerated. The system uses three probes in each line to obtain accurate velocity measurements at all beam energies. Automatic gain control and signal analysis are performed so that the energy/nucleon along with up to three probe signals are displayed on a vector graphics display with a refresh rate better than twice per second. The system uses a sensitive pseudo-correlation technique to pick out the signal from the noise, features simultaneous measurements of up to four ion velocities when more than one beam is being accelerated, and is controlled by a touch-screen operator interface. It is accurate to within /+-/0.25% and has provisions for on-line calibration tests. The phase probes thus provide a velocity measurement independent of the mass defect associated with the use of crystal detectors, which can become significant for heavy elements. They are now used as a routine tuning aid to ensure proper bunch structure, and as a beam velocity monitor. 3 refs., 5 figs

  11. Influence of lasers with non-white frequency noise on the design of coherent optical links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kakkar, Aditya; Navarro, Jaime Rodrigo; Schatz, Richard

    2017-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate for a 28 Gbaud 64-QAM metro link that the LO frequency noise causes timing impairment. Results show the existence of LO frequency noise spectrum regimes where different design criteria apply.......We experimentally demonstrate for a 28 Gbaud 64-QAM metro link that the LO frequency noise causes timing impairment. Results show the existence of LO frequency noise spectrum regimes where different design criteria apply....

  12. Vertical blind phase search for low-complexity carrier phase recovery of offset-QAM Nyquist WDM transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianing; Fu, Songnian; Tang, Haoyuan; Xiang, Meng; Tang, Ming; Liu, Deming

    2017-01-01

    Low complexity carrier phase recovery (CPR) scheme based on vertical blind phase search (V-BPS) for M-ary offset quadrature amplitude modulation (OQAM) is proposed and numerically verified. After investigating the constellations of both even and odd samples with respect to the phase noise, we identify that the CPR can be realized by measuring the verticality of constellation with respect to different test phase angles. Then measurement without multiplication in the complex plane is found with low complexity. Furthermore, a two-stage configuration is put forward to further reduce the computational complexity (CC). Compared with our recently proposed modified blind phase search (M-BPS) algorithm, the proposed algorithm shows comparable tolerance of phase noise, but reduces the CC by a factor of 3.81 (or 3.05) in the form of multipliers (or adders), taking the CPR of 16-OQAM into account.

  13. Instrumentation for Gate Current Noise Measurements on sub-100 nm MOS Transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Gaioni, L; Ratti, L; Re, V; Speziali, V; Traversi, G

    2008-01-01

    This work describes a measuring system that was developed to characterize the gate current noise performances of CMOS devices with minimum feature size in the 100 nm span. These devices play an essential role in the design of present daymixedsignal integrated circuits, because of the advantages associated with the scaling process. The reduction in the gate oxide thickness brought about by CMOS technology downscaling leads to a non-negligible gate current due to direct tunneling phenomena; this current represents a noise source which requires an accurate characterization for optimum analog design. In this paper, two instruments able to perform measurements in two different ranges of gate current values will be discussed. Some of the results of gate current noise characterization will also be presented.

  14. When noise is beneficial for sensory encoding: Noise adaptation can improve face processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Claudia; Hayn-Leichsenring, Gregor U; Redies, Christoph; Németh, Kornél; Kovács, Gyula

    2017-10-01

    The presence of noise usually impairs the processing of a stimulus. Here, we studied the effects of noise on face processing and show, for the first time, that adaptation to noise patterns has beneficial effects on face perception. We used noiseless faces that were either surrounded by random noise or presented on a uniform background as stimuli. In addition, the faces were either preceded by noise adaptors or not. Moreover, we varied the statistics of the noise so that its spectral slope either matched that of the faces or it was steeper or shallower. Results of parallel ERP recordings showed that the background noise reduces the amplitude of the face-evoked N170, indicating less intensive face processing. Adaptation to a noise pattern, however, led to reduced P1 and enhanced N170 amplitudes as well as to a better behavioral performance in two of the three noise conditions. This effect was also augmented by the presence of background noise around the target stimuli. Additionally, the spectral slope of the noise pattern affected the size of the P1, N170 and P2 amplitudes. We reason that the observed effects are due to the selective adaptation of noise-sensitive neurons present in the face-processing cortical areas, which may enhance the signal-to-noise-ratio. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A generalized formulation for noise-based seismic velocity change measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-García, C.; Brenguier, F.; Boué, P.; Shapiro, N.; Droznin, D.; Droznina, S.; Senyukov, S.; Gordeev, E.

    2017-12-01

    The observation of continuous seismic velocity changes is a powerful tool for detecting seasonal variations in crustal structure, volcanic unrest, co- and post-seismic evolution of stress in fault areas or the effects of fluid injection. The standard approach for measuring such velocity changes relies on comparison of travel times in the coda of a set of seismic signals, usually noise-based cross-correlations retrieved at different dates, and a reference trace, usually a averaged function over dates. A good stability in both space and time of the noise sources is then the main assumption for reliable measurements. Unfortunately, these conditions are often not fulfilled, as it happens when ambient-noise sources are non-stationary, such as the emissions of low-frequency volcanic tremors.We propose a generalized formulation for retrieving continuous time series of noise-based seismic velocity changes without any arbitrary reference cross-correlation function. We set up a general framework for future applications of this technique performing synthetic tests. In particular, we study the reliability of the retrieved velocity changes in case of seasonal-type trends, transient effects (similar to those produced as a result of an earthquake or a volcanic eruption) and sudden velocity drops and recoveries as the effects of transient local source emissions. Finally, we apply this approach to a real dataset of noise cross-correlations. We choose the Klyuchevskoy volcanic group (Kamchatka) as a case study where the recorded wavefield is hampered by loss of data and dominated by strongly localized volcanic tremor sources. Despite the mentioned wavefield contaminations, we retrieve clear seismic velocity drops associated with the eruptions of the Klyuchevskoy an the Tolbachik volcanoes in 2010 and 2012, respectively.

  16. Residual stress measurements with barkhausen noise in power plant creep failure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karvonen, I. [CoMoTest Oy, Maentsaelae (Finland)] Suominen, L. [Stresstech Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    Continuously developing power and process industry needs predictive maintenance inspection methods in order to prevent failures with correctly timed and properly specified measures. Materials` monitoring has traditionally been non-destructive inspection to detect growing cracks or other deficiencies. Recently, after the development of portable stress measurement systems, some advances has been reached. Based on stress anomalies due to creep, fatigue or corrosion, new applications have been found in the use of Barkhausen noise inspection. When the Barkhausen noise findings have been simultaneously confirmed with other stress measuring methods, a wider acceptance of the application of the method can be proposed. (orig.) 7 refs.

  17. Residual stress measurements with barkhausen noise in power plant creep failure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karvonen, I. [CoMoTest Oy, Maentsaelae (Finland)] Suominen, L. [Stresstech Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Continuously developing power and process industry needs predictive maintenance inspection methods in order to prevent failures with correctly timed and properly specified measures. Materials` monitoring has traditionally been non-destructive inspection to detect growing cracks or other deficiencies. Recently, after the development of portable stress measurement systems, some advances has been reached. Based on stress anomalies due to creep, fatigue or corrosion, new applications have been found in the use of Barkhausen noise inspection. When the Barkhausen noise findings have been simultaneously confirmed with other stress measuring methods, a wider acceptance of the application of the method can be proposed. (orig.) 7 refs.

  18. Aerodynamic Measurements of a Gulfstream Aircraft Model With and Without Noise Reduction Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; Hannon, Judith A.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2014-01-01

    Steady and unsteady aerodynamic measurements of a high-fidelity, semi-span 18% scale Gulfstream aircraft model are presented. The aerodynamic data were collected concurrently with acoustic measurements as part of a larger aeroacoustic study targeting airframe noise associated with main landing gear/flap components, gear-flap interaction noise, and the viability of related noise mitigation technologies. The aeroacoustic tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel with the facility in the acoustically treated open-wall (jet) mode. Most of the measurements were obtained with the model in landing configuration with the flap deflected at 39º and the main landing gear on and off. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0.16, 0.20, and 0.24. Global forces (lift and drag) and extensive steady and unsteady surface pressure measurements were obtained. Comparison of the present results with those acquired during a previous test shows a significant reduction in the lift experienced by the model. The underlying cause was traced to the likely presence of a much thicker boundary layer on the tunnel floor, which was acoustically treated for the present test. The steady and unsteady pressure fields on the flap, particularly in the regions of predominant noise sources such as the inboard and outboard tips, remained unaffected. It is shown that the changes in lift and drag coefficients for model configurations fitted with gear/flap noise abatement technologies fall within the repeatability of the baseline configuration. Therefore, the noise abatement technologies evaluated in this experiment have no detrimental impact on the aerodynamic performance of the aircraft model.

  19. Phase Sensitive Amplification using Parametric Processes in Optical Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Ning

    . Further, phase sensitive parametric processes in a nano-engineered silicon waveguide have been measured experimentally for the first time. Numerical optimizations show that with reduced waveguide propagation loss and reduced carrier life time, larger signal phase sensitive extinction ratio is achievable......Phase sensitive amplification using the parametric processes in fiber has the potential of delivering high gain and broadband operation with ultralow noise. It is able to regenerate both amplitude and phase modulated signals, simultaneously, with the appropriate design. This thesis concerns...... types. The regeneration capability of PSAs on phase encoded signal in an optical link has been optimized. Flat-top phase sensitive profile has been synthesized. It is able to provide simultaneous amplitude and phase noise squeezing, with enhanced phase noise margin compared to conventional designs...

  20. Experimental Study of Nonlinear Phase Noise and its Impact on WDM Systems with DP-256QAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yankov, Metodi Plamenov; Da Ros, Francesco; Porto da Silva, Edson

    2016-01-01

    A probabilistic method for mitigating the phase noise component of the non-linear interference in WDM systems with Raman amplification is experimentally demonstrated. The achieved gains increase with distance and are comparable to the gains of single-channel digital back-propagation....

  1. Experimental Study of Wake / Flap Interaction Noise and the Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.; Plassman, Gerald E.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the interaction of a wake with a half-span flap on radiated noise are examined. The incident wake is generated by bars of various widths and lengths or by a simplified landing gear model. Single microphone and phased array measurements are used to isolate the effects of the wake interaction on the noise radiating from the flap side edge and flap cove regions. The effects on noise of the wake generator's geometry and relative placement with respect to the flap are assessed. Placement of the wake generators upstream of the flap side edge is shown to lead to the reduction of flap side edge noise by introducing a velocity deficit and likely altering the instabilities in the flap side edge vortex system. Significant reduction in flap side edge noise is achieved with a bar positioned directly upstream of the flap side edge. The noise reduction benefit is seen to improve with increased bar width, length and proximity to the flap edge. Positioning of the landing gear model upstream of the flap side edge also leads to decreased flap side edge noise. In addition, flap cove noise levels are significantly lower than when the landing gear is positioned upstream of the flap mid-span. The impact of the local flow velocity on the noise radiating directly from the landing gear is discussed. The effects of the landing gear side-braces on flap side edge, flap cove and landing gear noise are shown.

  2. Microphone Handling Noise: Measurements of Perceptual Threshold and Effects on Audio Quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Kendrick

    Full Text Available A psychoacoustic experiment was carried out to test the effects of microphone handling noise on perceived audio quality. Handling noise is a problem affecting both amateurs using their smartphones and cameras, as well as professionals using separate microphones and digital recorders. The noises used for the tests were measured from a variety of devices, including smartphones, laptops and handheld microphones. The signal features that characterise these noises are analysed and presented. The sounds include various types of transient, impact noises created by tapping or knocking devices, as well as more sustained sounds caused by rubbing. During the perceptual tests, listeners auditioned speech podcasts and were asked to rate the degradation of any unwanted sounds they heard. A representative design test methodology was developed that tried to encourage everyday rather than analytical listening. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the handling noise events was shown to be the best predictor of quality degradation. Other factors such as noise type or background noise in the listening environment did not significantly affect quality ratings. Podcast, microphone type and reproduction equipment were found to be significant but only to a small extent. A model allowing the prediction of degradation from the SNR is presented. The SNR threshold at which 50% of subjects noticed handling noise was found to be 4.2 ± 0.6 dBA. The results from this work are important for the understanding of our perception of impact sound and resonant noises in recordings, and will inform the future development of an automated predictor of quality for handling noise.

  3. Comparison of direct measurement methods for headset noise exposure in the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora G Nassrallah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of noise exposure from communication headsets poses a methodological challenge. Although several standards describe methods for general noise measurements in occupational settings, these are not directly applicable to noise assessments under communication headsets. For measurements under occluded ears, specialized methods have been specified by the International Standards Organization (ISO 11904 such as the microphone in a real ear and manikin techniques. Simpler methods have also been proposed in some national standards such as the use of general purpose artificial ears and simulators in conjunction with single number corrections to convert measurements to the equivalent diffuse field. However, little is known about the measurement agreement between these various methods and the acoustic manikin technique. Twelve experts positioned circum-aural, supra-aural and insert communication headsets on four different measurement setups (Type 1, Type 2, Type 3.3 artificial ears, and acoustic manikin. Fit-refit measurements of four audio communication signals were taken under quiet laboratory conditions. Data were transformed into equivalent diffuse-field sound levels using third-octave procedures. Results indicate that the Type 1 artificial ear is not suited for the measurement of sound exposure under communication headsets, while Type 2 and Type 3.3 artificial ears are in good agreement with the acoustic manikin technique. Single number corrections were found to introduce a large measurement uncertainty, making the use of the third-octave transformation preferable.

  4. Increasing the darkfield contrast-to-noise ratio using a deconvolution-based information retrieval algorithm in X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Thomas; Pelzer, Georg; Bayer, Florian; Horn, Florian; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Zang, Andrea; Durst, Jürgen; Anton, Gisela; Michel, Thilo

    2013-07-29

    A novel information retrieval algorithm for X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging based on the deconvolution of the object and the reference phase stepping curve (PSC) as proposed by Modregger et al. was investigated in this paper. We applied the method for the first time on data obtained with a polychromatic spectrum and compared the results to those, received by applying the commonly used method, based on a Fourier analysis. We confirmed the expectation, that both methods deliver the same results for the absorption and the differential phase image. For the darkfield image, a mean contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) increase by a factor of 1.17 using the new method was found. Furthermore, the dose saving potential was estimated for the deconvolution method experimentally. It is found, that for the conventional method a dose which is higher by a factor of 1.66 is needed to obtain a similar CNR value compared to the novel method. A further analysis of the data revealed, that the improvement in CNR and dose efficiency is due to the superior background noise properties of the deconvolution method, but at the cost of comparability between measurements at different applied dose values, as the mean value becomes dependent on the photon statistics used.

  5. An adaptive filtering method based on EMD for X-ray pulsar navigation with uncertain measurement noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Affected by the unstable pulse radiation and the pulsar directional errors, the statistical characteristics of the pulsar measurement noise may vary with time slowly and cannot be accurately determined, which cause the filtering accuracy of the extended Kalman filter(EKF in pulsar navigation positioning system decline sharply or even diverge. To solve this problem, an adaptive extended Kalman filtering algorithm based on the empirical mode decomposition(EMD is proposed. In this method, the high frequency noise is separated from measurement information of pulsar by the method of EMD, and the noise variance can be estimated to update the parameters of EKF. The simulation results demonstrate that compared with conventional EKF, the proposed method can adaptively track the change of the measurement noise, and still keeps high estimation accuracy with unknown measurement noise, the positioning accuracy of the pulsar navigation is improved simultaneously.

  6. High-Fidelity Simulation of Turbofan Noise, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Broadband fan noise -- closely tied to turbulent flow on and around the fan blades -- represents a key challenge to the noise reduction community due to the...

  7. Investigations of SPND noise signals in VVER-440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, S.; Lipcsei, S.; Hazi, G.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes and characterises SPND noise measurements of an operating VVER-440 nuclear reactor. Characteristics of the signal can be radically influenced by the geometrical properties of the detector and the cable and by the measuring arrangement. Structure of phase spectra showing propagating perturbations measured on uncompensated SPN detectors is studied through models.(author)

  8. Balanced detection for self-mixing interferometry to improve signal-to-noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Changming; Norgia, Michele; Li, Kun

    2018-01-01

    We apply balanced detection to self-mixing interferometry for displacement and vibration measurement, using two photodiodes for implementing a differential acquisition. The method is based on the phase opposition of the self-mixing signal measured between the two laser diode facet outputs. The balanced signal obtained by enlarging the self-mixing signal, also by canceling of the common-due noises mainly due to disturbances on laser supply and transimpedance amplifier. Experimental results demonstrate the signal-to-noise ratio significantly improves, with almost twice signals enhancement and more than half noise decreasing. This method allows for more robust, longer-distance measurement systems, especially using fringe-counting.

  9. Noise measurements of YBa2Cu3O7 thin film high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of thin-film YBa2Cu3O7 superconductors were studied from the superconducting region through the transition region and into the normal region. The properties studied included the resistance-temperature, current-voltage, and electrical noise with concentration of measurements in the transition region. The resistance vs. temperature measurements show a zero resistance followed by a small rise in magnitude at the onset of resistance followed by a sharp increase until the resistance tapers off in the fully normal region. The a-axis films had a larger normal resistivity, a lower critical temperature, and a broader transition than the similar c-axis films. The current(I) - voltage(V) measurements were concentrated in the transition region. A power relation between I and V was found to be V varies as I a(T) where a(T) is temperature dependent starting high the onset of vortex formation, approaches 3 at the vortex unbinding temperature, and goes to 1 when fully normal. This behavior was predicted by the Kosterlitz-Thouless theory and was found experimentally in all four films measured. The current-induced electrical noise characteristics were measured for four samples varying in thickness and axis orientation. Each film exhibited a widely varying magnitude of the noise voltage spectral density (S V ) in the transition region with a leveling off when fully normal. The normalized noise (S V /V squared) showed a sharp decrease in magnitude from the onset of measurable noise continually decreasing until flattening out when fully normal. The a-axis films exhibited S V /V squared over 3 order of magnitude larger than the c-axis films in the transition and normal regions. The normalized temperature coefficient of resistance (beta) was plotted against S V /V squared on a log-log scale to see if the noise generated was due to temperature fluctuations (slope = 2)

  10. Low-noise sub-harmonic injection locked multiloop ring oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilin, Xu; Di, Wu; Xueming, Wei; Baolin, Wei; Jihai, Duan; Fadi, Gui

    2016-09-01

    A three-stage differential voltage-controlled ring oscillator is presented for wide-tuning and low-phase noise requirement of clock and data recovery circuit in ultra wideband (UWB) wireless body area network. To improve the performance of phase noise of delay cell with coarse and fine frequency tuning, injection locked technology together with pseudo differential architecture are adopted. In addition, a multiloop is employed for frequency boosting. Two RVCOs, the standard RVCO without the IL block and the proposed IL RVCO, were fabricated in SMIC 0.18 μm 1P6M Salicide CMOS process. The proposed IL RVCO exhibits a measured phase noise of -112.37 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset from the center frequency of 1 GHz, while dissipating a current of 8 mA excluding the buffer from a 1.8-V supply voltage. It shows a 16.07 dB phase noise improvement at 1 MHz offset compared to the standard topology. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61264001), the Guangxi Natural Science Foundation (Nos. 2013GXNSFAA019333, 2015GXNSFAA139301, 2014GXNSFAA118386), the Graduate Education Innovation Program of GUET (No. GDYCSZ201457), the Project of Guangxi Education Department (No. LD14066B) and the High-Level-Innovation Team and Outstanding Scholar Project of Guangxi Higher Education Institutes.

  11. DALY-Based Health Risk Assessment of Construction Noise in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jun; Li, Xiaodong; Zhang, Zhihui

    2016-01-01

    Noise produced by construction activities has become the second most serious acoustic polluting element in China. To provide industry practitioners with a better understanding of the health risks of construction noise and to aid in creating environmentally friendly construction plans during early construction stages, we developed a quantitative model to assess the health impairment risks (HIA) associated with construction noise for individuals living adjacent to construction sites. This model classifies noise-induced health impairments into four categories: cardiovascular disease, cognitive impairment, sleep disturbance, and annoyance, and uses disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) as an indicator of damage. Furthermore, the value of a statistical life (VSL) is used to transform DALYs into a monetary value based on the affected demographic characteristics, thereby offering policy makers a reliable theoretical foundation for establishing reasonable standards to compensate residents suffering from construction noise. A practical earthwork project in Beijing is used as a case study to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model. The results indicate that construction noise could bring significant health risks to the neighboring resident community, with an estimated 34.51 DALYs of health damage and 20.47 million yuan in social costs. In particular, people aged 45–54 are most vulnerable to construction noise, with the greatest health risks being caused by sleep disturbance. PMID:27792207

  12. Experimental Demonstration of Nonlinearity and Phase Noise Tolerant 16-QAM OFDM W-Band (75–110 GHz) Signal Over Fiber System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Lei; Pang, Xiaodan; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2014-01-01

    We propose a nonlinearity and phase noise tolerant orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) W-band signal over fiber system based on phase modulation and photonic heterodyne up-conversion techniques. By heterodyne mixing the phase-modulated optical OFDM signal with a free-running laser i...

  13. Circuit Models and Experimental Noise Measurements of Micropipette Amplifiers for Extracellular Neural Recordings from Live Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hao Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass micropipettes are widely used to record neural activity from single neurons or clusters of neurons extracellularly in live animals. However, to date, there has been no comprehensive study of noise in extracellular recordings with glass micropipettes. The purpose of this work was to assess various noise sources that affect extracellular recordings and to create model systems in which novel micropipette neural amplifier designs can be tested. An equivalent circuit of the glass micropipette and the noise model of this circuit, which accurately describe the various noise sources involved in extracellular recordings, have been developed. Measurement schemes using dead brain tissue as well as extracellular recordings from neurons in the inferior colliculus, an auditory brain nucleus of an anesthetized gerbil, were used to characterize noise performance and amplification efficacy of the proposed micropipette neural amplifier. According to our model, the major noise sources which influence the signal to noise ratio are the intrinsic noise of the neural amplifier and the thermal noise from distributed pipette resistance. These two types of noise were calculated and measured and were shown to be the dominating sources of background noise for in vivo experiments.

  14. Electrochemical corrosion potential and noise measurement in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, Clinton; Chen, Yaw-Ming; Chu, Fang; Huang, Chia-Shen

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) is one of the most important methods in boiling water reactor(BWR) system to mitigate and prevent stress corrosion cracking (SCC) problems of stainless steel components. Currently, the effectiveness of HWC in each BWR is mainly evaluated by the measurement of electrochemical corrosion potentials (ECP) and on-line monitoring of SCC behaviors of stainless steels. The objective of this work was to evaluate the characteristics and performance of commercially available high temperature reference electrodes. In addition, SCC monitoring technique based on electrochemical noise analysis (ECN) was also tested to examine its crack detection capability. The experimental work on electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) measurements reveals that high temperature external Ag/AgCl reference electrode of highly dilute KCl electrolyte can adequately function in both NWC and HWC environments. The high dilution external Ag/AgCl electrode can work in conjunction with internal Ag/AgCl reference electrode, and Pt electrode to ensure the ECP measurement reliability. In simulated BWR environment, the electrochemical noise tests of SCC were carried out with both actively and passively loaded specimens of type 304 stainless steel with various electrode arrangements. From the coupling current and corrosion potential behaviors of the passive loading tests during immersion test, it is difficult to interpret the general state of stress corrosion cracking based on the analytical results of overall current and potential variations, local pulse patterns, statistical characteristics, or power spectral density of electrochemical noise signals. However, more positive SCC indication was observed in the power spectral density analysis. For aqueous environments of high solution impedance, successful application of electrochemical noise technique for SCC monitoring may require further improvement in specimen designs and analytical methods to enhance detection sensitivity

  15. On-line adaptive line frequency noise cancellation from a nuclear power measuring channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qadir Javed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available On-line software for adaptively canceling 50 Hz line frequency noise has been designed and tested at Pakistan Research Reactor 1. Line frequency noise causes much problem in weak signals acquisition. Sometimes this noise is so dominant that original signal is totally corrupted. Although notch filter can be used for eliminating this noise, but if signal of interest is in close vicinity of 50 Hz, then original signal is also attenuated and hence overall performance is degraded. Adaptive noise removal is a technique which could be employed for removing line frequency without degrading the desired signal. In this paper line frequency noise has been eliminated on-line from a nuclear power measuring channel. The adaptive LMS algorithm has been used to cancel 50 Hz noise. The algorithm has been implemented in labVIEW with NI 6024 data acquisition card. The quality of the acquired signal has been improved much as can be seen in experimental results.

  16. Barkhausen noise measurements give direct observation of magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy in ferromagnetic polycrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espina-Hernández, J H; Pérez-Benítez, J A; Caleyo, F; Hallen, J M; Baudin, T; Helbert, A L

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental evidence of the capability of Barkhausen noise measurements to estimate the angular dependence of the average magnetocrystalline energy in soft magnetic polycrystalline materials. Three different API 5L steel samples, all obtained from out-of-service pipelines, were investigated using crystallographic texture and Barkhausen noise measurements. The angular dependence of the rms voltage of the Barkhausen signal was determined in each sample for the time band corresponding to the saturation-to-remanence part of the hysteresis loop where irreversible domain rotation occurs. For each angular position, the rms voltage of the Barkhausen noise signal in this time band was interpreted as a direct measure of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy of the polycrystal in the corresponding direction. A strong correlation between the angular dependence of both the rms voltage of the Barkhausen signal in the time band of interest and the average magnetocrystalline energy obtained from crystallographic texture measurements was found experimentally. (fast track communication)

  17. Noise Budget and Interstellar Medium Mitigation Advances in the NANOGrav Pulsar Timing Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolch, T.; NANOGrav Collaboration; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Demorest, P. B.; Ellis, J. A.; Jones, M. L.; Lam, M. T.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Levin, L.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Palliyaguru, N. T.; Stinebring, D. R.

    2018-02-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) detection with pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) requires accurate noise characterization. The noise of our Galactic-scale GW detector has been systematically evaluated by the Noise Budget and Interstellar Medium Mitigation working groups within the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) collaboration. Intrinsically, individual radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) used by NANOGrav can have some degree of achromatic red spin noise, as well as white noise due to pulse phase jitter. Along any given line-of-sight, the ionized interstellar medium contributes chromatic noise through dispersion measure (DM) variations, interstellar scintillation, and scattering. These effects contain both red and white components. In the future, with wideband receivers, the effects of frequency-dependent DM will become important. Having anticipated and measured these diverse sources of detector noise, the NANOGrav PTA remains well-poised to detect low-frequency GWs.

  18. A particle velocity sensor to measure the sound from a structure in the presence of background noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bree, H.E.; Druyvesteyn, W.F.

    2005-01-01

    The performance (or quality) of a product is often checked by measuring the radiated sound (noise) from the vibrating structure. Often this test has to be done in an environment with background noise, which makes the measurement difficult. When using a (pressure) microphone the background noise can

  19. High frequency measurements of shot noise suppression in atomic-scale metal contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Patrick J.; Evans, Kenneth; Russom, Jeffrey; King, Nicholas; Natelson, Douglas

    2009-03-01

    Shot noise provides a means of assessing the number and transmission coefficients of transmitting channels in atomic- and molecular-scale junctions. Previous experiments at low temperatures in metal and semiconductor point contacts have demonstrated the expected suppression of shot noise when junction conductance is near an integer multiple of the conductance quantum, G0≡2e^2/h. Using high frequency techniques, we demonstrate the high speed acquisition of such data at room temperature in mechanical break junctions. In clean Au contacts conductance histograms with clear peaks at G0, 2G0, and 3G0 are acquired within hours, and histograms of simultaneous measurements of the shot noise show clear suppression at those conductance values. We describe the dependence of the noise on bias voltage and analyze the noise vs. conductance histograms in terms of a model that averages over transmission coefficients.

  20. Processing Mechanisms in Hearing-Impaired Listeners: Evidence from Reaction Times and Sentence Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Rebecca; Uslar, Verena; Brand, Thomas; Ruigendijk, Esther

    The authors aimed to determine whether hearing impairment affects sentence comprehension beyond phoneme or word recognition (i.e., on the sentence level), and to distinguish grammatically induced processing difficulties in structurally complex sentences from perceptual difficulties associated with listening to degraded speech. Effects of hearing impairment or speech in noise were expected to reflect hearer-specific speech recognition difficulties. Any additional processing time caused by the sustained perceptual challenges across the sentence may either be independent of or interact with top-down processing mechanisms associated with grammatical sentence structure. Forty-nine participants listened to canonical subject-initial or noncanonical object-initial sentences that were presented either in quiet or in noise. Twenty-four participants had mild-to-moderate hearing impairment and received hearing-loss-specific amplification. Twenty-five participants were age-matched peers with normal hearing status. Reaction times were measured on-line at syntactically critical processing points as well as two control points to capture differences in processing mechanisms. An off-line comprehension task served as an additional indicator of sentence (mis)interpretation, and enforced syntactic processing. The authors found general effects of hearing impairment and speech in noise that negatively affected perceptual processing, and an effect of word order, where complex grammar locally caused processing difficulties for the noncanonical sentence structure. Listeners with hearing impairment were hardly affected by noise at the beginning of the sentence, but were affected markedly toward the end of the sentence, indicating a sustained perceptual effect of speech recognition. Comprehension of sentences with noncanonical word order was negatively affected by degraded signals even after sentence presentation. Hearing impairment adds perceptual processing load during sentence processing

  1. Effects of noise and reverberation on speech perception and listening comprehension of children and adults in a classroom-like setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatte, Maria; Lachmann, Thomas; Meis, Markus

    2010-01-01

    The effects of classroom noise and background speech on speech perception, measured by word-to-picture matching, and listening comprehension, measured by execution of oral instructions, were assessed in first- and third-grade children and adults in a classroom-like setting. For speech perception, in addition to noise, reverberation time (RT) was varied by conducting the experiment in two virtual classrooms with mean RT = 0.47 versus RT = 1.1 s. Children were more impaired than adults by background sounds in both speech perception and listening comprehension. Classroom noise evoked a reliable disruption in children's speech perception even under conditions of short reverberation. RT had no effect on speech perception in silence, but evoked a severe increase in the impairments due to background sounds in all age groups. For listening comprehension, impairments due to background sounds were found in the children, stronger for first- than for third-graders, whereas adults were unaffected. Compared to classroom noise, background speech had a smaller effect on speech perception, but a stronger effect on listening comprehension, remaining significant when speech perception was controlled. This indicates that background speech affects higher-order cognitive processes involved in children's comprehension. Children's ratings of the sound-induced disturbance were low overall and uncorrelated to the actual disruption, indicating that the children did not consciously realize the detrimental effects. The present results confirm earlier findings on the substantial impact of noise and reverberation on children's speech perception, and extend these to classroom-like environmental settings and listening demands closely resembling those faced by children at school.

  2. Practical Ranges of Loudness Levels of Various Types of Environmental Noise, Including Traffic Noise, Aircraft Noise, and Industrial Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine A. Janssen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a noise signal varies considerably with the shape of the frequency spectrum of the noise signal. In particular the bandwidth of the spectrum has a large effect on the loudness level, due to the effect of critical bands in the human hearing system. The low-frequency content of the spectrum also has an effect on the loudness level. In this note the relation between loudness level and A-weighted sound level is analyzed for various environmental noise spectra, including spectra of traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise. From loudness levels calculated for these environmental noise spectra, diagrams are constructed that show the relation between loudness level, A‑weighted sound level, and shape of the spectrum. The diagrams show that the upper limits of the loudness level for broadband environmental noise spectra are about 20 to 40 phon higher than the lower limits for narrowband spectra, which correspond to the loudness levels of pure tones. The diagrams are useful for assessing limitations and potential improvements of environmental noise control methods and policy based on A-weighted sound levels.

  3. Semi-automated identification of artefact and noise signals in MEG sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettich, E.

    2006-09-01

    Magnetic encephalography (MEG) is a noninvasive method of measuring cerebral activity. It is based on the registration of magnetic fields that are induced by synaptic ion currents as the brain processes information. These magnetic fields are of a very small magnitude, ranging from a few femto Tesla (1 fT = 10 15 T) to several thousand fT (1 pT). This is equivalent to a ten thousandth to a billionth of the Earth's magnetic field. When applied with a time resolution in the range of milliseconds this technique permits research on time-critical neurophysiological processes. A meaningful analysis of MEG data presupposes that signals have been measured at low noise levels. This in turn requires magnetic shielding, normally in the form of a shielded cabin, and low-noise detectors. Data input from high-noise channels impairs the result of the measurement, possibly rendering it useless. To prevent this it is necessary to identify high-noise channels and remove them from the measurement data. At Juelich Research Center, like at most MEG laboratories, this is done by visual inspection. However, being dependent on the individual observer, this method does not yield objective results. Furthermore, visual inspection presupposes a high degree of experience and is time-consuming. This situation could be significantly improved by automated identification of high-noise channels. The purpose of the present study was to develop an algorithm that analyses measurement signals in a given time and frequency interval on the basis of statistical traits. Using a suitably designed user interface this permits searching MEG data for high-noise channel data below or above statistical threshold values on the basis of predetermined decision criteria. The identified high-noise channels are then output in a selection list, and the measurement data and results of the statistical analysis are displayed. This information enables the user to make changes and decide which high-noise channels to extract

  4. Measuring impairment when diagnosing adolescent ADHD: Differentiating problems due to ADHD versus other sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Alejandro L; H Sibley, Margaret; Campez, Mileini

    2018-04-13

    The DSM-5 requires clinicians to link ADHD symptoms to clinically meaningful impairments in daily life functioning. Measuring impairment during ADHD assessments may be particularly challenging in adolescence, when ADHD is often not the sole source of a youth's difficulties. Existing impairment rating scales are criticized for not specifying ADHD as the source of impairment in their instructions, leading to potential problems with rating scale specificity. The current study utilized a within subjects design (N = 107) to compare parent report of impairment on two versions of a global impairment measure: one that specified ADHD as the source of impairment (Impairment Rating Scale-ADHD) and a standard version that did not (Impairment Rating Scale). On the standard family impairment item, parents endorsed greater impairment as compared to the IRS-ADHD. This finding was particularly pronounced when parents reported high levels of parenting stress. More severe ADHD symptoms were associated with greater concordance between the two versions. Findings indicate that adolescent family related impairments reported during ADHD assessments may be due to sources other than ADHD symptoms, such as developmental maladjustment. To prevent false positive diagnoses, symptom-specific wording may optimize impairment measures when assessing family functioning in diagnostic assessments for adolescents with ADHD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Audible Noise Measurement and Analysis of the Main Power Apparatus in UHV GIS Substations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Nian Guang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of audible noise characteristics of the main power apparatus in UHV GIS substations provides essential statistics for the noise prediction and control. Noise pressure level, spectrum and attenuation characteristics of the main transformers and high voltage (HV reactors are measured and analyzed in this paper. The result shows that the main transformer and HV reactor have identical A-weighted equivalent sound pressure level. The medium- and low-frequency noises are the primary components in the spectral. More attention should be paid to the low-frequency bands in the noise control process. The noise of cooling fan has a large influence on that of the main transformer. Without the consideration of corona noise, the average A-weighted sound pressure level shows an overall decreasing trend with the increase of the propagation distance. Obvious interference phenomenon of the noises at 100 and 200Hz exists in the noise propagation process.

  6. Magnetic and spontaneous Barkhausen noise techniques used in investigation of a martensitic transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capò Sànchez, J.; Huallpa, E.; Farina, P.; Padovese, L. R.; Goldenstein, H.

    2011-10-01

    Magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) was used to characterize the progress of austenite to martensite phase transformation while cooling steel specimens, using a conventional Barkhausen noise emission setup stimulated by an alternating magnetic field. The phase transformation was also followed by electrical resistivity measurements and by optical and scanning electron microscopy. MBN measurements on a AISI D2 tool steel austenitized at 1473 K and cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature presented a clear change near 225 K during cooling, corresponding to the MS (martensite start) temperature, as confirmed by resistivity measurements. Analysis of the resulting signals suggested a novel experimental technique that measures spontaneous magnetic emission during transformation, in the absence of any external field. Spontaneous magnetic noise emission measurements were registered in situ while cooling an initially austenitic sample in liquid nitrogen, showing that local microstructural changes, corresponding to an avalanche or "burst" phenomena, could be detected. This spontaneous magnetic emission (SME) can thus be considered a new experimental tool for the study of martensite transformations in ferrous alloys, at the same level as acoustic emission.

  7. Involuntary and Persistent Environmental Noise Influences Health and Hearing in Beirut, Lebanon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fooladi, M.M.; Fooladi, M.M.; Fooladi, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This study was conducted to assess the effects of involuntary and persistent noise exposure on health and hearing among Lebanese adults in Beirut, Lebanon, where people are exposed to noise from construction sites, power generators, honking cars, and motorcycles. Methods. Using a descriptive and exploratory design with mixed methods, participants were surveyed, interviewed, and tested for hearing while street noise levels were measured near their residents and work places. Results. Self-reports of 83 Lebanese adult, who lived and worked in Beirut, helped identify common patterns in experiences such as irritability, anger, headaches, and sleep disturbances due to noise annoyance. Of those tested, 30% suffered from high-frequency hearing impairment. Our results showed that environmental sound dB had increased by 12% and sound intensity by 400% above the maximum standard level when compared to the WHO report of 1999. Conclusion. Environmental noise contributes to premature hearing loss and potentiate systemic diseases among Lebanese

  8. Davis Canyon noise analysis: Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    A study was performed as part of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program to quantify the level and effect of noise from the various major phases of development of the proposed potentially acceptable nuclear waste repository site at Davis Canyon, Utah. This report contains the results of a predictive noise level study for the site characterization, repository construction, and repository operational phases. Included herein are graphic representations of energy averaged sound levels, and of audibility levels representing impact zones expected during each phase. Sound levels from onsite and offsite activity including traffic on highways and railroad routes are presented in isopleth maps. A description of the Environmental Noise Prediction Model used for the study, the study basis and methodologies, and actual modeling data are provided. Noise and vibration levels from blasting are also predicted and evaluated. Protective noise criteria containing a margin of safety are used in relation to residences, schools, churches, noise-sensitive recreation areas, and noise-sensitive biological resources. Protective ground motion criteria for ruins and delicate rock formation in Canyonlands National Park and for human annoyance are used in the evaluation of blasting. The evaluations provide the basis for assessing the noise impacts from the related activities at the proposed repository. 45 refs., 21 figs., 15 tabs

  9. Knowledge on the Effects and Perceived Health Problems of Noise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a growing concern on the increase of noise induced hearing impairment in developing nations. Academic settings have been reported to be plagued by noise levels that affect cognitive activities. However, there is paucity of information on the level of knowledge on the effects of noise and the reported health ...

  10. Effects of noise and parameter deviations in a bichromatic Raman white light cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Qingqing; Zubairy, M. Suhail; Shahriar, M. Selim

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the effects of noise and parameter deviations in a bichromatic Raman type white light cavity, with potential applications in precision measurements. The results show that the dispersion variation induced by parameter deviation can be controlled with an accuracy of 10 -4 . The laser phase noise decreases the dispersion magnitude while the amplitude noise increases it. Although we can always adjust the parameters to satisfy the white light condition, both types of noise make the cavity transmission curve uneven.

  11. Development of electronic system for reactivity measurement and reactor noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohl, Claude Emile; Soares, Adalberto Jose

    1996-01-01

    In nuclear power reactors, the neutron detector signal is dependent of the number of fissions and the reactor power level. The detector signal can be divided into two components; a DC component, proportional to the average value and an AC component, which is the fluctuating part superimposed to the DC component. The analysis of the fluctuating part of the signal is called noise analysis and allow us to investigate phenomena occurring within the reactor vessel, such as vibration of fuels elements and coolant density, temperature, pressure and flow changes. On the other hand, the measure of the static DC part allow us to measure the local power density. This paper describes the development of a personal computer based signal conditioning card that, together with a personal computer commercial data acquisition card, can be used for noise analysis measurements and reactivity measurements of signals coming from ionization chambers or SPD's. (author)

  12. The Effect of Noise on Relationships Between Speech Intelligibility and Self-Reported Communication Measures in Tracheoesophageal Speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadie, Tanya L; Otero, Devon Sawin; Bolt, Susan; Kapsner-Smith, Mara; Sullivan, Jessica R

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how sentence intelligibility relates to self-reported communication in tracheoesophageal speakers when speech intelligibility is measured in quiet and noise. Twenty-four tracheoesophageal speakers who were at least 1 year postlaryngectomy provided audio recordings of 5 sentences from the Sentence Intelligibility Test. Speakers also completed self-reported measures of communication-the Voice Handicap Index-10 and the Communicative Participation Item Bank short form. Speech recordings were presented to 2 groups of inexperienced listeners who heard sentences in quiet or