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Sample records for phase precession network

  1. Toroidal Precession as a Geometric Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.W. Burby and H. Qin

    2012-09-26

    Toroidal precession is commonly understood as the orbit-averaged toroidal drift of guiding centers in axisymmetric and quasisymmetric configurations. We give a new, more natural description of precession as a geometric phase effect. In particular, we show that the precession angle arises as the holonomy of a guiding center's poloidal trajectory relative to a principal connection. The fact that this description is physically appropriate is borne out with new, manifestly coordinate-independent expressions for the precession angle that apply to all types of orbits in tokamaks and quasisymmetric stellarators alike. We then describe how these expressions may be fruitfully employed in numerical calculations of precession.

  2. Theta phase precession and phase selectivity: a cognitive device description of neural coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalay, Osbert C.; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2009-06-01

    Information in neural systems is carried by way of phase and rate codes. Neuronal signals are processed through transformative biophysical mechanisms at the cellular and network levels. Neural coding transformations can be represented mathematically in a device called the cognitive rhythm generator (CRG). Incoming signals to the CRG are parsed through a bank of neuronal modes that orchestrate proportional, integrative and derivative transformations associated with neural coding. Mode outputs are then mixed through static nonlinearities to encode (spatio) temporal phase relationships. The static nonlinear outputs feed and modulate a ring device (limit cycle) encoding output dynamics. Small coupled CRG networks were created to investigate coding functionality associated with neuronal phase preference and theta precession in the hippocampus. Phase selectivity was found to be dependent on mode shape and polarity, while phase precession was a product of modal mixing (i.e. changes in the relative contribution or amplitude of mode outputs resulted in shifting phase preference). Nonlinear system identification was implemented to help validate the model and explain response characteristics associated with modal mixing; in particular, principal dynamic modes experimentally derived from a hippocampal neuron were inserted into a CRG and the neuron's dynamic response was successfully cloned. From our results, small CRG networks possessing disynaptic feedforward inhibition in combination with feedforward excitation exhibited frequency-dependent inhibitory-to-excitatory and excitatory-to-inhibitory transitions that were similar to transitions seen in a single CRG with quadratic modal mixing. This suggests nonlinear modal mixing to be a coding manifestation of the effect of network connectivity in shaping system dynamic behavior. We hypothesize that circuits containing disynaptic feedforward inhibition in the nervous system may be candidates for interpreting upstream rate codes to

  3. Neutron spin quantum precession using multilayer spin splitters and a phase-spin echo interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisawa, Toru; Tasaki, Seiji; Kawai, Takeshi; Hino, Masahiro; Akiyoshi, Tsunekazu; Achiwa, Norio; Otake, Yoshie; Funahashi, Haruhiko.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron spin quantum precession by multilayer spin splitter has been demonstrated using a new spin interferometer. The multilayer spin splitter consists of a magnetic multilayer mirror on top, followed by a gap layer and a non magnetic multilayer mirror which are evaporated on a silicon substrate. Using the multilayer spin splitter, a polarized neutron wave in a magnetic field perpendicular to the polarization is split into two spin eigenstates with a phase shift in the direction of the magnetic field. The spin quantum precession is equal to the phase shift, which depends on the effective thickness of the gap layer. The demonstration experiments verify the multilayer spin splitter as a neutron spin precession device as well as the coherent superposition principle of the two spin eigenstates. We have developed a new phase-spin echo interferometer using the multilayer spin splitters. We present successful performance tests of the multilayer spin splitter and the phase-spin echo interferometer. (author)

  4. Phase precession through acceleration of local theta rhythm: a biophysical model for the interaction between place cells and local inhibitory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Luísa; Aguiar, Paulo

    2012-08-01

    Phase precession is one of the most well known examples within the temporal coding hypothesis. Here we present a biophysical spiking model for phase precession in hippocampal CA1 which focuses on the interaction between place cells and local inhibitory interneurons. The model's functional block is composed of a place cell (PC) connected with a local inhibitory cell (IC) which is modulated by the population theta rhythm. Both cells receive excitatory inputs from the entorhinal cortex (EC). These inputs are both theta modulated and space modulated. The dynamics of the two neuron types are described by integrate-and-fire models with conductance synapses, and the EC inputs are described using non-homogeneous Poisson processes. Phase precession in our model is caused by increased drive to specific PC/IC pairs when the animal is in their place field. The excitation increases the IC's firing rate, and this modulates the PC's firing rate such that both cells precess relative to theta. Our model implies that phase coding in place cells may not be independent from rate coding. The absence of restrictive connectivity constraints in this model predicts the generation of phase precession in any network with similar architecture and subject to a clocking rhythm, independently of the involvement in spatial tasks.

  5. Scanning Precession Electron Diffraction Study of 2xxx Series Aluminium Alloys Exhibiting Several Coexisting Strengthening Phases

    OpenAIRE

    Sunde, Jonas Kristoffer

    2016-01-01

    Throughout this thesis, scanning precession electron diffraction is applied to heat-treated Al-Cu-Li and Al-Mg-Cu-Ag alloys, shedding light on the distribution of phases present and the complex interplay between these microstructural features. The employed technique yielded high quality data sets, which through subsequent data processing enabled a detailed phase mapping of these multi-component Al alloys. Among the main results presented, are virtual dark field images highlighting all separat...

  6. Artificial neural network for suppression of banding artifacts in balanced steady-state free precession MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Park, Sung-Hong

    2017-04-01

    The balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) MR sequence is frequently used in clinics, but is sensitive to off-resonance effects, which can cause banding artifacts. Often multiple bSSFP datasets are acquired at different phase cycling (PC) angles and then combined in a special way for banding artifact suppression. Many strategies of combining the datasets have been suggested for banding artifact suppression, but there are still limitations in their performance, especially when the number of phase-cycled bSSFP datasets is small. The purpose of this study is to develop a learning-based model to combine the multiple phase-cycled bSSFP datasets for better banding artifact suppression. Multilayer perceptron (MLP) is a feedforward artificial neural network consisting of three layers of input, hidden, and output layers. MLP models were trained by input bSSFP datasets acquired from human brain and knee at 3T, which were separately performed for two and four PC angles. Banding-free bSSFP images were generated by maximum-intensity projection (MIP) of 8 or 12 phase-cycled datasets and were used as targets for training the output layer. The trained MLP models were applied to another brain and knee datasets acquired with different scan parameters and also to multiple phase-cycled bSSFP functional MRI datasets acquired on rat brain at 9.4T, in comparison with the conventional MIP method. Simulations were also performed to validate the MLP approach. Both the simulations and human experiments demonstrated that MLP suppressed banding artifacts significantly, superior to MIP in both banding artifact suppression and SNR efficiency. MLP demonstrated superior performance over MIP for the 9.4T fMRI data as well, which was not used for training the models, while visually preserving the fMRI maps very well. Artificial neural network is a promising technique for combining multiple phase-cycled bSSFP datasets for banding artifact suppression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All

  7. Three-Dimensional Precession Feature Extraction of Ballistic Targets Based on Narrowband Radar Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Shuang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Micro-motion is a crucial feature used in ballistic target recognition. To address the problem that single-view observations cannot extract true micro-motion parameters, we propose a novel algorithm based on the narrowband radar network to extract three-dimensional precession features. First, we construct a precession model of the cone-shaped target, and as a precondition, we consider the invisible problem of scattering centers. We then analyze in detail the micro-Doppler modulation trait caused by the precession. Then, we match each scattering center in different perspectives based on the ratio of the top scattering center’s micro-Doppler frequency modulation coefficient and extract the 3D coning vector of the target by establishing associated multi-aspect equation systems. In addition, we estimate feature parameters by utilizing the correlation of the micro-Doppler frequency modulation coefficient of the three scattering centers combined with the frequency compensation method. We then calculate the coordinates of the conical point in each moment and reconstruct the 3D spatial portion. Finally, we provide simulation results to validate the proposed algorithm.

  8. Phase mapping of iron-based rapidly quenched alloys using precession electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svec, P.; Janotova, I.; Hosko, J.; Matko, I.; Janickovic, D.; Svec, P. Sr.; Kepaptsoglou, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    The present contribution is focused on application of PED and phase/orientation mapping of nanocrystals of bcc-Fe formed during the first crystallization stage of amorphous Fe-Co-Si-B ribbon. Using precession electron diffraction and phase/orientation mapping the formation of primary crystalline phase, bcc-Fe, from amorphous Fe-Co-Si-B has been analyzed. Important information about mutual orientation of the phase in individual submicron grains as well as against the sample surface has been obtained. This information contributes to the understanding of micromechanisms controlling crystallization from amorphous rapidly quenched structure and of the structure of the original amorphous state. The presented technique due to its high spatial resolution, speed and information content provided complements well classical techniques, especially in nanocrystalline materials. (authors)

  9. GABAergic contributions to gating, timing, and phase precession of hippocampal neuronal activity during theta oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutsuridis, Vassilis; Hasselmo, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Successful spatial exploration requires gating, storage, and retrieval of spatial memories in the correct order. The hippocampus is known to play an important role in the temporal organization of spatial information. Temporally ordered spatial memories are encoded and retrieved by the firing rate and phase of hippocampal pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons with respect to ongoing network theta oscillations paced by intra- and extrahippocampal areas. Much is known about the anatomical, physiological, and molecular characteristics as well as the connectivity and synaptic properties of various cell types in the hippocampal microcircuits, but how these detailed properties of individual neurons give rise to temporal organization of spatial memories remains unclear. We present a model of the hippocampal CA1 microcircuit based on observed biophysical properties of pyramidal cells and six types of inhibitory interneurons: axo-axonic, basket, bistratistified, neurogliaform, ivy, and oriens lacunosum-moleculare cells. The model simulates a virtual rat running on a linear track. Excitatory transient inputs come from the entorhinal cortex (EC) and the CA3 Schaffer collaterals and impinge on both the pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons, whereas inhibitory inputs from the medial septum impinge only on the inhibitory interneurons. Dopamine operates as a gate-keeper modulating the spatial memory flow to the PC distal dendrites in a frequency-dependent manner. A mechanism for spike-timing-dependent plasticity in distal and proximal PC dendrites consisting of three calcium detectors, which responds to the instantaneous calcium level and its time course in the dendrite, is used to model the plasticity effects. The model simulates the timing of firing of different hippocampal cell types relative to theta oscillations, and proposes functional roles for the different classes of the hippocampal and septal inhibitory interneurons in the correct ordering of spatial memories

  10. High-K precession modes: Axially symmetric limit of wobbling motion in the cranked random-phase approximation description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.; Matsuzaki, Masayuki; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi

    2005-01-01

    The rotational band built on the high-K multi-quasiparticle state can be interpreted as a multi-phonon band of the precession mode, which represents the precessional rotation about the axis perpendicular to the direction of the intrinsic angular momentum. By using the axially symmetric limit of the random-phase approximation (RPA) formalism developed for the nuclear wobbling motion, we study the properties of the precession modes in 178 W: the excitation energies, B(E2) and B(M1) values. We show that the excitations of such a specific type of rotation can be well described by the RPA formalism, which gives new insight into the wobbling motion in the triaxial superdeformed nuclei from a microscopic viewpoint

  11. Non magnetic neutron spin quantum precession using multilayer spin splitter and a phase-spin echo interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebisawa, T.; Tasaki, S.; Kawai, T.; Akiyoshi, T. [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Achiwa, N.; Hino, M.; Otake, Y.; Funahashi, H.

    1996-08-01

    The authors have developed cold neutron optics and interferometry using multilayer mirrors. The advantages of the multilayer mirrors are their applicability to long wavelength neutrons and a great variety of the mirror performance. The idea of the present spin interferometry is based on nonmagnetic neutron spin quantum precession using multilayer spin splitters. The equation for polarized neutrons means that the polarized neutrons are equivalent to the coherent superposition of two parallel spin eigenstates. The structure and principle of a multilayer spin splitter are explained, and the nonmagnetic gap layer of the multilayer spin splitter gives rise to neutron spin quantum precession. The performance test of the multilayer spin splitter were made with a new spin interferometer, which is analogous optically to a spin echo system with vertical precession field. The spin interferometers were installed at Kyoto University research reactor and the JRR-3. The testing method and the results are reported. The performance tests on a new phase-spin echo interferometer are described, and its applications to the development of a high resolution spin echo system and a Jamin type cold neutron interferometer are proposed. (K.I.)

  12. Neutron spin precession in samples of polarised nuclei and neutron spin phase imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piegsa, Florian Michael

    2009-01-01

    The doublet neutron-deuteron (nd) scattering length b 2,d , which is at present only known with an accuracy of 5%, is particularly well suited to fix three-body forces in novel effective field theories at low energies. The understanding of such few-nucleon systems is essential, e.g. for predictions of element abundances in the big-bang and stellar fusion. b 2,d can be obtained via a linear combination of the spin-independent nd scattering length b c,d and the spin-dependent one, b i,d . The aim of this thesis was to perform a high-accuracy measurement of the latter to improve the relative accuracy of b 2,d below 1%. The experiment was performed at the fundamental neutron physics beam line FUNSPIN at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. It utilises the effect that the spin of a neutron passing through a target with polarised nuclei performs a pseudomagnetic precession proportional to the spin-dependent scattering length of the nuclei. An ideal method to measure this precession angle very accurately is Ramsey's atomic beam technique, adapted to neutrons. The most crucial part of the experimental setup is the so-called frozen spin target, which consists of a specially designed dilution refrigerator and contains a sample with dynamically polarised nuclear spins. The polarisation of the sample is determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. It turned out that the relaxation of the nuclear spins during the necessary ''cross-calibration'' of the two employed NMR systems is ultimately limiting the achievable accuracy of b i,d . During the extensive use of the Ramsey resonance method in the neutron-deuteron experiment, an idea emerged that the applied technique could be exploited in a completely different context, namely polarised neutron radiography. Hence, the second part of the thesis covers the development of a novel neutron radiography technique, based on the spin-dependent interaction of the neutron with ferromagnetic samples and magnetic fields

  13. Neutron spin precession in samples of polarised nuclei and neutron spin phase imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piegsa, Florian Michael

    2009-07-09

    The doublet neutron-deuteron (nd) scattering length b{sub 2,d}, which is at present only known with an accuracy of 5%, is particularly well suited to fix three-body forces in novel effective field theories at low energies. The understanding of such few-nucleon systems is essential, e.g. for predictions of element abundances in the big-bang and stellar fusion. b{sub 2,d} can be obtained via a linear combination of the spin-independent nd scattering length b{sub c,d} and the spin-dependent one, b{sub i,d}. The aim of this thesis was to perform a high-accuracy measurement of the latter to improve the relative accuracy of b{sub 2,d} below 1%. The experiment was performed at the fundamental neutron physics beam line FUNSPIN at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. It utilises the effect that the spin of a neutron passing through a target with polarised nuclei performs a pseudomagnetic precession proportional to the spin-dependent scattering length of the nuclei. An ideal method to measure this precession angle very accurately is Ramsey's atomic beam technique, adapted to neutrons. The most crucial part of the experimental setup is the so-called frozen spin target, which consists of a specially designed dilution refrigerator and contains a sample with dynamically polarised nuclear spins. The polarisation of the sample is determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. It turned out that the relaxation of the nuclear spins during the necessary ''cross-calibration'' of the two employed NMR systems is ultimately limiting the achievable accuracy of b{sub i,d}. During the extensive use of the Ramsey resonance method in the neutron-deuteron experiment, an idea emerged that the applied technique could be exploited in a completely different context, namely polarised neutron radiography. Hence, the second part of the thesis covers the development of a novel neutron radiography technique, based on the spin-dependent interaction of the

  14. Orientation and phase mapping in the transmission electron microscope using precession-assisted diffraction spot recognition: state-of-the-art results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viladot, D; Véron, M; Gemmi, M; Peiró, F; Portillo, J; Estradé, S; Mendoza, J; Llorca-Isern, N; Nicolopoulos, S

    2013-10-01

    A recently developed technique based on the transmission electron microscope, which makes use of electron beam precession together with spot diffraction pattern recognition now offers the possibility to acquire reliable orientation/phase maps with a spatial resolution down to 2 nm on a field emission gun transmission electron microscope. The technique may be described as precession-assisted crystal orientation mapping in the transmission electron microscope, precession-assisted crystal orientation mapping technique-transmission electron microscope, also known by its product name, ASTAR, and consists in scanning the precessed electron beam in nanoprobe mode over the specimen area, thus producing a collection of precession electron diffraction spot patterns, to be thereafter indexed automatically through template matching. We present a review on several application examples relative to the characterization of microstructure/microtexture of nanocrystalline metals, ceramics, nanoparticles, minerals and organics. The strengths and limitations of the technique are also discussed using several application examples. ©2013 The Authors. Journal of Microscopy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Microscopical Society.

  15. Larmor precession reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauter, H.J.; Toperverg, B.P.; Lauter-Pasyuk, V.; Petrenko, A.; Aksenov, V.

    2004-01-01

    Larmor precession phase encoding is applied to modulate TOF reflection spectra measured from a polymer multilayer and from an Fe/Cr multilayer. It is proposed that decoding of the spectra can be used to extract the small-angle scattering signal from the polymer film-embedded nanoparticles. The second example is directed to demonstrate one of the plausible realizations of the vector polarization analysis in reflectometry of magnetic systems. This would allow to unambiguously reconstruct the transverse and lateral distribution of the magnetization vectors throughout the multilayered superlattices

  16. Thomas precession for dressed particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblak, Blagoje

    2018-03-01

    We consider a particle dressed with boundary gravitons in three-dimensional Minkowski space. The existence of BMS transformations implies that the particle’s wavefunction picks up a Berry phase when subjected to changes of reference frames that trace a closed path in the asymptotic symmetry group. We evaluate this phase and show that, for BMS superrotations, it provides a gravitational generalization of Thomas precession. In principle, such phases are observable signatures of asymptotic symmetries.

  17. The theta/gamma discrete phase code occuring during the hippocampal phase precession may be a more general brain coding scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisman, John

    2005-01-01

    In the hippocampus, oscillations in the theta and gamma frequency range occur together and interact in several ways, indicating that they are part of a common functional system. It is argued that these oscillations form a coding scheme that is used in the hippocampus to organize the readout from long-term memory of the discrete sequence of upcoming places, as cued by current position. This readout of place cells has been analyzed in several ways. First, plots of the theta phase of spikes vs. position on a track show a systematic progression of phase as rats run through a place field. This is termed the phase precession. Second, two cells with nearby place fields have a systematic difference in phase, as indicated by a cross-correlation having a peak with a temporal offset that is a significant fraction of a theta cycle. Third, several different decoding algorithms demonstrate the information content of theta phase in predicting the animal's position. It appears that small phase differences corresponding to jitter within a gamma cycle do not carry information. This evidence, together with the finding that principle cells fire preferentially at a given gamma phase, supports the concept of theta/gamma coding: a given place is encoded by the spatial pattern of neurons that fire in a given gamma cycle (the exact timing within a gamma cycle being unimportant); sequential places are encoded in sequential gamma subcycles of the theta cycle (i.e., with different discrete theta phase). It appears that this general form of coding is not restricted to readout of information from long-term memory in the hippocampus because similar patterns of theta/gamma oscillations have been observed in multiple brain regions, including regions involved in working memory and sensory integration. It is suggested that dual oscillations serve a general function: the encoding of multiple units of information (items) in a way that preserves their serial order. The relationship of such coding to

  18. Ultrahigh-resolution imaging of the human brain with phase-cycled balanced steady-state free precession at 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeineh, Michael M; Parekh, Mansi B; Zaharchuk, Greg; Su, Jason H; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Fischbein, Nancy J; Rutt, Brian K

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to acquire ultra-high resolution images of the brain using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) at 7 T and to identify the potential utility of this sequence. Eight volunteers participated in this study after providing informed consent. Each volunteer was scanned with 8 phase cycles of bSSFP at 0.4-mm isotropic resolution using 0.5 number of excitations and 2-dimensional parallel acceleration of 1.75 × 1.75. Each phase cycle required 5 minutes of scanning, with pauses between the phase cycles allowing short periods of rest. The individual phase cycles were aligned and then averaged. The same volunteers underwent scanning using 3-dimensional (3D) multiecho gradient recalled echo at 0.8-mm isotropic resolution, 3D Cube T2 at 0.7-mm isotropic resolution, and thin-section coronal oblique T2-weighted fast spin echo at 0.22 × 0.22 × 2.0-mm resolution for comparison. Two neuroradiologists assessed image quality and potential research and clinical utility. The volunteers generally tolerated the scan sessions well, and composite high-resolution bSSFP images were produced for each volunteer. Rater analysis demonstrated that bSSFP had a superior 3D visualization of the microarchitecture of the hippocampus, very good contrast to delineate the borders of the subthalamic nucleus, and relatively good B1 homogeneity throughout. In addition to an excellent visualization of the cerebellum, subtle details of the brain and skull base anatomy were also easier to identify on the bSSFP images, including the line of Gennari, membrane of Liliequist, and cranial nerves. Balanced steady-state free precession had a strong iron contrast similar to or better than the comparison sequences. However, cortical gray-white contrast was significantly better with Cube T2 and T2-weighted fast spin echo. Balanced steady-state free precession can facilitate ultrahigh-resolution imaging of the brain. Although total imaging times are long, the individually short

  19. Impeller in Precessing Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Yoshida

    2001-01-01

    destabilizing in the region of negative precessing speed ratio (-0.3<Ω/ω<0, at the design flow rate; (2 At reduced flow rate, the destabilizing fluid force moments occurred at small positive precessing speed ratio (0.2<Ω/ω<0.4; (3 From the comparison of direct measured fluid force moments with those estimated from the unsteady pressure measured on the front and back casing walls, it was found that the destabilizing moments in the backward precession are mainly caused by the fluid forces on the front surface of the present impeller, where there is large clearance between the back shroud and casing.

  20. Supressão das anomalias de fase e batimentos laterais em espectros de RMN 13c obtidos com a sequência de precessão livre no estado estacionário Suppression of phase anomalies and sidebands on 13c NMR spectra obtained with the steady-state free precession sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana Macedo dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Steady-State Free Precession (SSFP sequence has been widely used in low-field and low-resolution imaging NMR experiments to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (s/n of the signals. Here, we analyzed the Scrambled Steady State - SSS and Unscrambled Steady State - USS sequences to suppress phase anomalies and sidebands of the 13C NMR spectrum acquired in the SSFP regime. The results showed that the application of the USS sequence allowed a uniform distribution of the time interval between pulses (Tp, in the established time range, allowing a greater suppression of phase anomalies and sidebands, when compared with the SSS sequence.

  1. Thomas precession in time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strnad, J.

    1983-01-01

    A Thomas precession mechanism is described which would become effective in a symmetric six-dimensional space-time if the time vector of a particle would rotate uniformly. For the effect a discrepancy of the decay time of particles in flight, proportional to their kinetic energy would be characteristic

  2. Gyro precession and Mach's principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eby, P.

    1979-01-01

    The precession of a gyroscope is calculated in a nonrelativistic theory due to Barbour which satisfies Mach's principle. It is shown that the theory predicts both the geodetic and motional precession of general relativity to within factors of order 1. The significance of the gyro experiment is discussed from the point of view of metric theories of gravity and this is contrasted with its significance from the point of view of Mach's principle. (author)

  3. Analyzing phase diagrams and phase transitions in networked competing populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Y.-C.; Yin, H. P.; Xu, C.; Hui, P. M.

    2011-03-01

    Phase diagrams exhibiting the extent of cooperation in an evolutionary snowdrift game implemented in different networks are studied in detail. We invoke two independent payoff parameters, unlike a single payoff often used in most previous works that restricts the two payoffs to vary in a correlated way. In addition to the phase transition points when a single payoff parameter is used, phase boundaries separating homogeneous phases consisting of agents using the same strategy and a mixed phase consisting of agents using different strategies are found. Analytic expressions of the phase boundaries are obtained by invoking the ideas of the last surviving patterns and the relative alignments of the spectra of payoff values to agents using different strategies. In a Watts-Strogatz regular network, there exists a re-entrant phenomenon in which the system goes from a homogeneous phase into a mixed phase and re-enters the homogeneous phase as one of the two payoff parameters is varied. The non-trivial phase diagram accompanying this re-entrant phenomenon is quantitatively analyzed. The effects of noise and cooperation in randomly rewired Watts-Strogatz networks are also studied. The transition between a mixed phase and a homogeneous phase is identify to belong to the directed percolation universality class. The methods used in the present work are applicable to a wide range of problems in competing populations of networked agents.

  4. Associative memory in phasing neuron networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, Niketh S [ORNL; Bochove, Erik J. [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base; Braiman, Yehuda [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    We studied pattern formation in a network of coupled Hindmarsh-Rose model neurons and introduced a new model for associative memory retrieval using networks of Kuramoto oscillators. Hindmarsh-Rose Neural Networks can exhibit a rich set of collective dynamics that can be controlled by their connectivity. Specifically, we showed an instance of Hebb's rule where spiking was correlated with network topology. Based on this, we presented a simple model of associative memory in coupled phase oscillators.

  5. Improved Models for Precession and Nutation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mathews, P. M

    2000-01-01

    .... Such a fit is provided by the MHB2000 nutation series (Mathews et al., 2000) based on geophysical theory with a few basic Earth parameters estimated by a fit to nutation-precession data, and its accompanying precession rate...

  6. Routing strategies in traffic network and phase transition in network ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Department of Electronic Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong ... Routing strategy; network traffic flow; hysteretic loop; phase transition from ... ered from two aspects: modifying the underlying network structure or developing ... capacity corresponds to α = −1 in the case of identical nodes' delivering ability.

  7. Quantitative phase microscopy using deep neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Sinha, Ayan; Lee, Justin; Barbastathis, George

    2018-02-01

    Deep learning has been proven to achieve ground-breaking accuracy in various tasks. In this paper, we implemented a deep neural network (DNN) to achieve phase retrieval in a wide-field microscope. Our DNN utilized the residual neural network (ResNet) architecture and was trained using the data generated by a phase SLM. The results showed that our DNN was able to reconstruct the profile of the phase target qualitatively. In the meantime, large error still existed, which indicated that our approach still need to be improved.

  8. Competing dynamic phases of active polymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Simon; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R.

    Recent experiments on in-vitro reconstituted assemblies of F-actin, myosin-II motors, and cross-linking proteins show that tuning local network properties can changes the fundamental biomechanical behavior of the system. For example, by varying cross-linker density and actin bundle rigidity, one can switch between contractile networks useful for reshaping cells, polarity sorted networks ideal for directed molecular transport, and frustrated networks with robust structural properties. To efficiently investigate the dynamic phases of actomyosin networks, we developed a coarse grained non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of model semiflexible filaments, molecular motors, and cross-linkers with phenomenologically defined interactions. The simulation's accuracy was verified by benchmarking the mechanical properties of its individual components and collective behavior against experimental results at the molecular and network scales. By adjusting the model's parameters, we can reproduce the qualitative phases observed in experiment and predict the protein characteristics where phase crossovers could occur in collective network dynamics. Our model provides a framework for understanding cells' multiple uses of actomyosin networks and their applicability in materials research. Supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  9. Symmetric Topological Phases and Tensor Network States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shenghan

    Classification and simulation of quantum phases are one of main themes in condensed matter physics. Quantum phases can be distinguished by their symmetrical and topological properties. The interplay between symmetry and topology in condensed matter physics often leads to exotic quantum phases and rich phase diagrams. Famous examples include quantum Hall phases, spin liquids and topological insulators. In this thesis, I present our works toward a more systematically understanding of symmetric topological quantum phases in bosonic systems. In the absence of global symmetries, gapped quantum phases are characterized by topological orders. Topological orders in 2+1D are well studied, while a systematically understanding of topological orders in 3+1D is still lacking. By studying a family of exact solvable models, we find at least some topological orders in 3+1D can be distinguished by braiding phases of loop excitations. In the presence of both global symmetries and topological orders, the interplay between them leads to new phases termed as symmetry enriched topological (SET) phases. We develop a framework to classify a large class of SET phases using tensor networks. For each tensor class, we can write down generic variational wavefunctions. We apply our method to study gapped spin liquids on the kagome lattice, which can be viewed as SET phases of on-site symmetries as well as lattice symmetries. In the absence of topological order, symmetry could protect different topological phases, which are often referred to as symmetry protected topological (SPT) phases. We present systematic constructions of tensor network wavefunctions for bosonic symmetry protected topological (SPT) phases respecting both onsite and spatial symmetries.

  10. Phase separation in living micellar networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristobal, G.; Rouch, J.; Curély, J.; Panizza, P.

    We present a lattice model based on two n→0 spin vectors, capable of treating the thermodynamics of living networks in micellar solutions at any surfactant concentration. We establish an isomorphism between the coupling constants in the two spin vector Hamiltonian and the surfactant energies involved in the micellar situation. Solving this Hamiltonian in the mean-field approximation allows one to calculate osmotic pressure, aggregation number, free end and cross-link densities at any surfactant concentration. We derive a phase diagram, including changes in topology such as the transition between spheres and rods and between saturated and unsaturated networks. A phase separation can be found between a saturated network and a dilute solution composed of long flexible micelles or a saturated network and a solution of spherical micelles.

  11. Tensor Network Wavefunctions for Topological Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Brayden Alexander

    The combination of quantum effects and interactions in quantum many-body systems can result in exotic phases with fundamentally entangled ground state wavefunctions--topological phases. Topological phases come in two types, both of which will be studied in this thesis. In topologically ordered phases, the pattern of entanglement in the ground state wavefunction encodes the statistics of exotic emergent excitations, a universal indicator of a phase that is robust to all types of perturbations. In symmetry protected topological phases, the entanglement instead encodes a universal response of the system to symmetry defects, an indicator that is robust only to perturbations respecting the protecting symmetry. Finding and creating these phases in physical systems is a motivating challenge that tests all aspects--analytical, numerical, and experimental--of our understanding of the quantum many-body problem. Nearly three decades ago, the creation of simple ansatz wavefunctions--such as the Laughlin fractional quantum hall state, the AKLT state, and the resonating valence bond state--spurred analytical understanding of both the role of entanglement in topological physics and physical mechanisms by which it can arise. However, quantitative understanding of the relevant phase diagrams is still challenging. For this purpose, tensor networks provide a toolbox for systematically improving wavefunction ansatz while still capturing the relevant entanglement properties. In this thesis, we use the tools of entanglement and tensor networks to analyze ansatz states for several proposed new phases. In the first part, we study a featureless phase of bosons on the honeycomb lattice and argue that this phase can be topologically protected under any one of several distinct subsets of the crystalline lattice symmetries. We discuss methods of detecting such phases with entanglement and without. In the second part, we consider the problem of constructing fixed-point wavefunctions for

  12. Phase diagram of spiking neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed-Allaei, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    In computer simulations of spiking neural networks, often it is assumed that every two neurons of the network are connected by a probability of 2%, 20% of neurons are inhibitory and 80% are excitatory. These common values are based on experiments, observations, and trials and errors, but here, I take a different perspective, inspired by evolution, I systematically simulate many networks, each with a different set of parameters, and then I try to figure out what makes the common values desirable. I stimulate networks with pulses and then measure their: dynamic range, dominant frequency of population activities, total duration of activities, maximum rate of population and the occurrence time of maximum rate. The results are organized in phase diagram. This phase diagram gives an insight into the space of parameters - excitatory to inhibitory ratio, sparseness of connections and synaptic weights. This phase diagram can be used to decide the parameters of a model. The phase diagrams show that networks which are configured according to the common values, have a good dynamic range in response to an impulse and their dynamic range is robust in respect to synaptic weights, and for some synaptic weights they oscillates in α or β frequencies, independent of external stimuli.

  13. Phase Diagram of Spiking Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed eSeyed-Allaei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In computer simulations of spiking neural networks, often it is assumed that every two neurons of the network are connected by a probablilty of 2%, 20% of neurons are inhibitory and 80% are excitatory. These common values are based on experiments, observations. but here, I take a different perspective, inspired by evolution. I simulate many networks, each with a different set of parameters, and then I try to figure out what makes the common values desirable by nature. Networks which are configured according to the common values, have the best dynamic range in response to an impulse and their dynamic range is more robust in respect to synaptic weights. In fact, evolution has favored networks of best dynamic range. I present a phase diagram that shows the dynamic ranges of different networks of different parameteres. This phase diagram gives an insight into the space of parameters -- excitatory to inhibitory ratio, sparseness of connections and synaptic weights. It may serve as a guideline to decide about the values of parameters in a simulation of spiking neural network.

  14. Sparse representations of gravitational waves from precessing compact binaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Jonathan; Szilagyi, Bela; Galley, Chad R; Tiglio, Manuel

    2014-07-11

    Many relevant applications in gravitational wave physics share a significant common problem: the seven-dimensional parameter space of gravitational waveforms from precessing compact binary inspirals and coalescences is large enough to prohibit covering the space of waveforms with sufficient density. We find that by using the reduced basis method together with a parametrization of waveforms based on their phase and precession, we can construct ultracompact yet high-accuracy representations of this large space. As a demonstration, we show that less than 100 judiciously chosen precessing inspiral waveforms are needed for 200 cycles, mass ratios from 1 to 10, and spin magnitudes ≤0.9. In fact, using only the first 10 reduced basis waveforms yields a maximum mismatch of 0.016 over the whole range of considered parameters. We test whether the parameters selected from the inspiral regime result in an accurate reduced basis when including merger and ringdown; we find that this is indeed the case in the context of a nonprecessing effective-one-body model. This evidence suggests that as few as ∼100 numerical simulations of binary black hole coalescences may accurately represent the seven-dimensional parameter space of precession waveforms for the considered ranges.

  15. Comparing Post-Newtonian and Numerical-Relativity Precession Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidder, Lawrence; Ossokine, Sergei; Boyle, Michael; Pfeiffer, Harald; Scheel, Mark; Szilagyi, Bela

    2015-04-01

    Binary black-hole systems are expected to be important sources of gravitational waves for upcoming gravitational-wave detectors. If the spins are not colinear with each other or with the orbital angular momentum, these systems exhibit complicated precession dynamics that are imprinted on the gravitational waveform. We develop a new procedure to match the precession dynamics computed by post-Newtonian (PN) theory to those of numerical binary black-hole simulations in full general relativity. For numerical relativity (NR) simulations lasting approximately two precession cycles, we find that the PN and NR predictions for the directions of the orbital angular momentum and the spins agree to better than ~1° with NR during the inspiral, increasing to 5° near merger. Nutation of the orbital plane on the orbital time-scale agrees well between NR and PN, whereas nutation of the spin direction shows qualitatively different behavior in PN and NR. We also examine how the PN equations for precession and orbital-phase evolution converge with PN order, and we quantify the impact of various choices for handling partially known PN terms.

  16. Inspiral waveforms for spinning compact binaries in a new precessing convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Anuradha; Gopakumar, Achamveedu

    2016-01-01

    It is customary to use a precessing convention, based on Newtonian orbital angular momentum L N , to model inspiral gravitational waves from generic spinning compact binaries. A key feature of such a precessing convention is its ability to remove all spin precession induced modulations from the orbital phase evolution. However, this convention usually employs a postNewtonian (PN) accurate precessional equation, appropriate for the PN accurate orbital angular momentum L , to evolve the L N -based precessing source frame. This motivated us to develop inspiral waveforms for spinning compact binaries in a precessing convention that explicitly use L to describe the binary orbits. Our approach introduces certain additional 3PN order terms in the orbital phase and frequency evolution equations with respect to the usual L N -based implementation of the precessing convention. The implications of these additional terms are explored by computing the match between inspiral waveforms that employ L and L N -based precessing conventions. We found that the match estimates are smaller than the optimal value, namely 0.97, for a non-negligible fraction of unequal mass spinning compact binaries. (paper)

  17. Phase transitions in Pareto optimal complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Luís F; Solé, Ricard

    2015-09-01

    The organization of interactions in complex systems can be described by networks connecting different units. These graphs are useful representations of the local and global complexity of the underlying systems. The origin of their topological structure can be diverse, resulting from different mechanisms including multiplicative processes and optimization. In spatial networks or in graphs where cost constraints are at work, as it occurs in a plethora of situations from power grids to the wiring of neurons in the brain, optimization plays an important part in shaping their organization. In this paper we study network designs resulting from a Pareto optimization process, where different simultaneous constraints are the targets of selection. We analyze three variations on a problem, finding phase transitions of different kinds. Distinct phases are associated with different arrangements of the connections, but the need of drastic topological changes does not determine the presence or the nature of the phase transitions encountered. Instead, the functions under optimization do play a determinant role. This reinforces the view that phase transitions do not arise from intrinsic properties of a system alone, but from the interplay of that system with its external constraints.

  18. Bistable flows in precessing spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cébron, D, E-mail: david.cebron@ujf-grenoble.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, ISTerre, Grenoble (France)

    2015-04-15

    Precession driven flows are found in any rotating container filled with liquid, when the rotation axis itself rotates about a secondary axis that is fixed in an inertial frame of reference. Because of its relevance for planetary fluid layers, many works consider spheroidal containers, where the uniform vorticity component of the bulk flow is reliably given by the well-known equations obtained by Busse (1968 J. Fluid Mech. 33 739–51). So far however, no analytical result for the solutions is available. Moreover, the cases where multiple flows can coexist have not been investigated in detail since their discovery by Noir et al (2003 Geophys. J. Int. 154 407–16). In this work we aim at deriving analytical results for the solutions, aiming in particular at first estimating the ranges of parameters where multiple solutions exist, and second studying quantitatively their stability. Using the models recently proposed by Noir and Cébron (2013 J. Fluid Mech. 737 412–39), which are more generic in the inviscid limit than the equations of Busse, we analytically describe these solutions, their conditions of existence, and their stability in a systematic manner. We then successfully compare these analytical results with the theory of Busse (1968). Dynamical model equations are finally proposed to investigate the stability of the solutions, which describe the bifurcation of the unstable flow solution. We also report for the first time the possibility that time-dependent multiple flows can coexist in precessing triaxial ellipsoids. Numerical integrations of the algebraic and differential equations have been efficiently performed with the dedicated script FLIPPER (supplementary material). (paper)

  19. Deep Neural Network Detects Quantum Phase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Shunta; Ohzeki, Masayuki; Tanaka, Kazuyuki

    2018-03-01

    We detect the quantum phase transition of a quantum many-body system by mapping the observed results of the quantum state onto a neural network. In the present study, we utilized the simplest case of a quantum many-body system, namely a one-dimensional chain of Ising spins with the transverse Ising model. We prepared several spin configurations, which were obtained using repeated observations of the model for a particular strength of the transverse field, as input data for the neural network. Although the proposed method can be employed using experimental observations of quantum many-body systems, we tested our technique with spin configurations generated by a quantum Monte Carlo simulation without initial relaxation. The neural network successfully identified the strength of transverse field only from the spin configurations, leading to consistent estimations of the critical point of our model Γc = J.

  20. Phase-space networks of geometrically frustrated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yilong

    2009-11-01

    We illustrate a network approach to the phase-space study by using two geometrical frustration models: antiferromagnet on triangular lattice and square ice. Their highly degenerated ground states are mapped as discrete networks such that the quantitative network analysis can be applied to phase-space studies. The resulting phase spaces share some comon features and establish a class of complex networks with unique Gaussian spectral densities. Although phase-space networks are heterogeneously connected, the systems are still ergodic due to the random Poisson processes. This network approach can be generalized to phase spaces of some other complex systems.

  1. Chiral topological phases from artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaubruegger, Raphael; Pastori, Lorenzo; Budich, Jan Carl

    2018-05-01

    Motivated by recent progress in applying techniques from the field of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to quantum many-body physics, we investigate to what extent the flexibility of ANNs can be used to efficiently study systems that host chiral topological phases such as fractional quantum Hall (FQH) phases. With benchmark examples, we demonstrate that training ANNs of restricted Boltzmann machine type in the framework of variational Monte Carlo can numerically solve FQH problems to good approximation. Furthermore, we show by explicit construction how n -body correlations can be kept at an exact level with ANN wave functions exhibiting polynomial scaling with power n in system size. Using this construction, we analytically represent the paradigmatic Laughlin wave function as an ANN state.

  2. Accuracy of right and left ventricular functional assessment by short-axis vs axial cine steady-state free-precession magnetic resonance imaging: intrapatient correlation with main pulmonary artery and ascending aorta phase-contrast flow measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Susan H; Wald, Rachel; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Jimenez-Juan, Laura; Deva, Djeven; Crean, Andrew M; Nguyen, Elsie; Paul, Narinder S; Ley, Sebastian

    2013-08-01

    The left ventricle (LV) is routinely assessed with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by using short-axis orientation; it remains unclear whether the right ventricle (RV) can also be adequately assessed in this orientation or whether dedicated axial orientation is required. We used phase-contrast (PC) flow measurements in the main pulmonary artery (MPA) and the ascending aorta (Aorta) as nonvolumetric standard of reference and compared RV and LV volumes in short-axis and axial orientations. A retrospective analysis identified 30 patients with cardiac MRI data sets. Patients underwent MRI (1.5 T or 3 T), with retrospectively gated cine steady-state free-precession in axial and short-axis orientations. PC flow analyses of MPA and Aorta were used as the reference measure of RV and LV output. There was a high linear correlation between MPA-PC flow and RV-stroke volume (SV) short axis (r = 0.9) and RV-SV axial (r = 0.9). Bland-Altman analysis revealed a mean offset of 1.4 mL for RV axial and -2.3 mL for RV-short-axis vs MPA-PC flow. There was a high linear correlation between Aorta-PC flow and LV-SV short-axis (r = 0.9) and LV-SV axial (r = 0.9). Bland-Altman analysis revealed a mean offset of 4.8 m for LV short axis and 7.0 mL for LV axial vs Aorta-PC flow. There was no significant difference (P = .6) between short-axis-LV SV and short-axis-RV SV. No significant impact of the slice acquisition orientation for determination of RV and LV stroke volumes was found. Therefore, cardiac magnetic resonance workflow does not need to be extended by an axial data set for patients without complex cardiac disease for assessment of biventricular function and volumes. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Network periodic solutions: patterns of phase-shift synchrony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubitsky, Martin; Wang, Yunjiao; Romano, David

    2012-01-01

    We prove the rigid phase conjecture of Stewart and Parker. It then follows from previous results (of Stewart and Parker and our own) that rigid phase-shifts in periodic solutions on a transitive network are produced by a cyclic symmetry on a quotient network. More precisely, let X(t) = (x 1 (t), ..., x n (t)) be a hyperbolic T-periodic solution of an admissible system on an n-node network. Two nodes c and d are phase-related if there exists a phase-shift θ cd in [0, 1) such that x d (t) = x c (t + θ cd T). The conjecture states that if phase relations persist under all small admissible perturbations (that is, the phase relations are rigid), then for each pair of phase-related cells, their input signals are also phase-related to the same phase-shift. For a transitive network, rigid phase relations can also be described abstractly as a Z m permutation symmetry of a quotient network. We discuss how patterns of phase-shift synchrony lead to rigid synchrony, rigid phase synchrony, and rigid multirhythms, and we show that for each phase pattern there exists an admissible system with a periodic solution with that phase pattern. Finally, we generalize the results to nontransitive networks where we show that the symmetry that generates rigid phase-shifts occurs on an extension of a quotient network

  4. Simulation of stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency in Heusler-based spin torque oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Houbing; Zhao, Congpeng; Ma, Xingqiao

    2017-01-01

    We investigated stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency in Heusler-based spin transfer torque oscillator by combining micromagnetic simulations with phase field microelasticity theory, by encapsulating the magnetic tunnel junction into multilayers structures. We proposed a novel method of using an external stress to control the magnetization precession in spin torque oscillator instead of an external magnetic field. The stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency can be linearly modulated by externally applied uniaxial in-plane stress, with a tunable range 4.4–7.0 GHz under the stress of 10 MPa. By comparison, the out-of-plane stress imposes negligible influence on the precession frequency due to the large out-of-plane demagnetization field. The results offer new inspiration to the design of spin torque oscillator devices that simultaneously process high frequency, narrow output band, and tunable over a wide range of frequencies via external stress. - Highlights: • We proposed stress-modulated magnetization precession in spin torque oscillator. • The magnetization precession frequency can be linearly modulated by in-plane stress. • The stress also can widen the magnetization frequency range 4.4–7.0 GHz. • The stress-modulated oscillation frequency can simplify STO devices.

  5. Simulation of stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency in Heusler-based spin torque oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Houbing, E-mail: hbhuang@ustb.edu.cn; Zhao, Congpeng; Ma, Xingqiao, E-mail: xqma@sas.ustb.edu.cn

    2017-03-15

    We investigated stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency in Heusler-based spin transfer torque oscillator by combining micromagnetic simulations with phase field microelasticity theory, by encapsulating the magnetic tunnel junction into multilayers structures. We proposed a novel method of using an external stress to control the magnetization precession in spin torque oscillator instead of an external magnetic field. The stress-modulated magnetization precession frequency can be linearly modulated by externally applied uniaxial in-plane stress, with a tunable range 4.4–7.0 GHz under the stress of 10 MPa. By comparison, the out-of-plane stress imposes negligible influence on the precession frequency due to the large out-of-plane demagnetization field. The results offer new inspiration to the design of spin torque oscillator devices that simultaneously process high frequency, narrow output band, and tunable over a wide range of frequencies via external stress. - Highlights: • We proposed stress-modulated magnetization precession in spin torque oscillator. • The magnetization precession frequency can be linearly modulated by in-plane stress. • The stress also can widen the magnetization frequency range 4.4–7.0 GHz. • The stress-modulated oscillation frequency can simplify STO devices.

  6. Precession effects on a liquid planetary core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Li, Li-Gang

    2018-02-01

    Motivated by the desire to understand the rich dynamics of precessionally driven flow in a liquid planetary core, we investigate, through numerical simulations, the precessing fluid motion in a rotating cylindrical annulus, which simultaneously possesses slow precession. The same problemhas been studied extensively in cylinders, where the precessing flow is characterized by three key parameters: the Ekman number E, the Poincaré number Po and the radius-height aspect ratio Γ. While in an annulus, there is another parameter, the inner-radius-height aspect ratio ϒ, which also plays an important role in controlling the structure and evolution of the flow. By decomposing the nonlinear solution into a set of inertial modes, we demonstrate the properties of both weakly and moderately precessing flows. It is found that, when the precessional force is weak, the flow is stable with a constant amplitude of kinetic energy. As the precessional force increases, our simulation suggests that the nonlinear interaction between the boundary effects and the inertial modes can trigger more turbulence, introducing a transitional regime of rich dynamics to disordered flow. The inertial mode u 111, followed by u 113 or u 112, always dominates the precessing flow when 0.001 ≤ Po ≤ 0.05, ranging from weak to moderate precession. Moreover, the precessing flow in an annulus shows more stability than in a cylinder which is likely to be caused by the effect of the inner boundary that restricts the growth of resonant and non-resonant inertial modes. Furthermore, the mechanism of triadic resonance is not found in the transitional regime from a laminar to disordered flow.

  7. SELENE - Self-Forming Extensible Lunar EVA Network, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of this research effort (Phase I and Phase II) by Scientific Systems Company, Inc. and BBN Technologies is to develop the SELENE network --...

  8. What forces act in relativistic gyroscope precession?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semerák, Oldrich

    1996-11-01

    The translation of the relativistic motion into the language of forces, proposed by the author (1995, Nuovo Cimento B 110 973), is employed to interpret the gyroscope precession in general relativity. The precession is referred to the comoving Frenet triad built up along the projection of the gyroscope's trajectory onto the 3-space of the local hypersurface-orthogonal observer. The contributions of the centrifugal, the gravitational and the dragging + Coriolis forces are identified respectively with the Thomas, the geodetic, and the gravitomagnetic components of precession. Explicit expressions are given for several simple types of motion in the Kerr (or simpler) field in order to show that the general formulae obtained are not only very simple, but also yield clear results in accord with intuition in concrete situations.

  9. Brown dwarfs in retrogradely precessing cataclysmic variables?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin E.L.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We compare Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic simulations of retrogradely precessing accretion disks that have a white dwarf primary and a main sequence secondary with observational data and with theory on retrograde precession via tidal torques like those by the Moon and the Sun on the Earth [1, 2]. Assuming the primary does not accrete much of the mass lost from the secondary, we identify the theoretical low mass star/brown dwarf boundary. We find no observational candidates in our study that could qualify as brown dwarfs.

  10. Complex quantum network geometries: Evolution and phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph; Wu, Zhihao

    2015-08-01

    Networks are topological and geometric structures used to describe systems as different as the Internet, the brain, or the quantum structure of space-time. Here we define complex quantum network geometries, describing the underlying structure of growing simplicial 2-complexes, i.e., simplicial complexes formed by triangles. These networks are geometric networks with energies of the links that grow according to a nonequilibrium dynamics. The evolution in time of the geometric networks is a classical evolution describing a given path of a path integral defining the evolution of quantum network states. The quantum network states are characterized by quantum occupation numbers that can be mapped, respectively, to the nodes, links, and triangles incident to each link of the network. We call the geometric networks describing the evolution of quantum network states the quantum geometric networks. The quantum geometric networks have many properties common to complex networks, including small-world property, high clustering coefficient, high modularity, and scale-free degree distribution. Moreover, they can be distinguished between the Fermi-Dirac network and the Bose-Einstein network obeying, respectively, the Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. We show that these networks can undergo structural phase transitions where the geometrical properties of the networks change drastically. Finally, we comment on the relation between quantum complex network geometries, spin networks, and triangulations.

  11. Phase multistability in a dynamical small world network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabunin, A. V., E-mail: shabuninav@info.sgu.ru [Radiophysics and Nonlinear Dynamics Department, Saratov State University, Saratov (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-15

    The effect of phase multistability is explored in a small world network of periodic oscillators with diffusive couplings. The structure of the network represents a ring with additional non-local links, which spontaneously arise and vanish between arbitrary nodes. The dynamics of random couplings is modeled by “birth” and “death” stochastic processes by means of the cellular automate approach. The evolution of the network under gradual increasing of the number of random couplings goes through stages of phases fluctuations and spatial cluster formation. Finally, in the presence of non-local couplings the phase multistability “dies” and only the in-phase regime survives.

  12. Spinor approach to gravitational motion and precession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hestenes, D.

    1986-01-01

    The translational and rotational equations of motion for a small rigid body in a gravitational field are combined in a single spinor equation. Besides its computational advantages, this unifies the description of gravitational interaction in classical and quantum theory. Explicit expressions for gravitational precession rates are derived. (author)

  13. Solutions to the relativistic precession model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingram, A.; Motta, S.

    2014-01-01

    The relativistic precession model (RPM) can be used to obtain a precise measurement of the mass and spin of a black hole when the appropriate set of quasi-periodic oscillations is detected in the power-density spectrum of an accreting black hole. However, in previous studies, the solution of the RPM

  14. Precession of the Earth-Moon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2009-01-01

    The precession rate of the Earth-Moon system by the gravitational influence of the Sun is derived. Attention is focussed on a physically transparent but complete presentation accessible to first- or second-year physics students. Both a shortcut and a full analysis are given, which allows the inclusion of this material as an example of the physics…

  15. On the precession of the optical star in the Cyg X-1 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopylov, I.M.; Sokolov, V.V.

    1984-01-01

    Some results are analysed of previoUs spectroscopic investigation of the supergiant HDE 226868 (based on six-year observations at the 6-m telescope) with the puspose of searching for possible variations in the spectrum connected with the precession of the rotation axis of the star upper layers. It is noted that spectral type and HeI lambda 4471 line halfwidth show a coordinated behaviour with the phase of the 39-day period in the frame of the precession hypothesis. Nonuniform distribution of CNO anomalies over the star latitude seems to be possible

  16. Perturbation analysis of complete synchronization in networks of phase oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tönjes, Ralf; Blasius, Bernd

    2009-08-01

    The behavior of weakly coupled self-sustained oscillators can often be well described by phase equations. Here we use the paradigm of Kuramoto phase oscillators which are coupled in a network to calculate first- and second-order corrections to the frequency of the fully synchronized state for nonidentical oscillators. The topology of the underlying coupling network is reflected in the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the network Laplacian which influence the synchronization frequency in a particular way. They characterize the importance of nodes in a network and the relations between them. Expected values for the synchronization frequency are obtained for oscillators with quenched random frequencies on a class of scale-free random networks and for a Erdös-Rényi random network. We briefly discuss an application of the perturbation theory in the second order to network structural analysis.

  17. Detecting phase synchronization by localized maps: Application to neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, T.; Baptista, M. S.; Kurths, J.

    2007-01-01

    We present an approach which enables to state about the existence of phase synchronization in coupled chaotic oscillators without having to measure the phase. This is done by observing the oscillators at special times, and analyzing whether this set of points is localized. In particular, we show that this approach is fruitful to analyze the onset of phase synchronization in chaotic attractors whose phases are not well defined, as well as, in networks of non-identical spiking/bursting neurons ...

  18. Gravitational waves from freely precessing neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.I.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the likely detectability of gravitational waves from freely precessing neutron stars. We begin by presenting a neutron star model of sufficient complexity to take into account both the elasticity and fluidity of a realistic neutron star. We then examine the effect of internal dissipation (i.e. heat generation within the star) and gravitational radiation reaction on the wobble. This is followed by an examination of various astrophysical scenarios where some mechanism might pump the precessional motion. We estimate the gravitational wave amplitude in these situations. Finally, we conclude that gravitational radiation from freely precessing neutron stars is almost certainly limited to a level undetectable by a LIGO II detector by internal dissipation. (author)

  19. Relativistic spin precession in the double pulsar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Rene P; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kramer, Michael; McLaughlin, Maura A; Lyutikov, Maxim; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; Ferdman, Robert D; Camilo, Fernando; Possenti, Andrea

    2008-07-04

    The double pulsar PSR J0737-3039A/B consists of two neutron stars in a highly relativistic orbit that displays a roughly 30-second eclipse when pulsar A passes behind pulsar B. Describing this eclipse of pulsar A as due to absorption occurring in the magnetosphere of pulsar B, we successfully used a simple geometric model to characterize the observed changing eclipse morphology and to measure the relativistic precession of pulsar B's spin axis around the total orbital angular momentum. This provides a test of general relativity and alternative theories of gravity in the strong-field regime. Our measured relativistic spin precession rate of 4.77 degrees (-0 degrees .65)(+0 degrees .66) per year (68% confidence level) is consistent with that predicted by general relativity within an uncertainty of 13%.

  20. Evidence for free precession in a pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stairs; Lyne; Shemar

    2000-08-03

    Pulsars are rotating neutron stars that produce lighthouse-like beams of radio emission from their magnetic poles. The observed pulse of emission enables their rotation rates to be measured with great precision. For some young pulsars, this provides a means of studying the interior structure of neutron stars. Most pulsars have stable pulse shapes, and slow down steadily (for example, see ref. 20). Here we report the discovery of long-term, highly periodic and correlated variations in both the pulse shape and the rate of slow-down of the pulsar PSR B1828-11. The variations are best described as harmonically related sinusoids, with periods of approximately 1,000, 500 and 250 days, probably resulting from precession of the spin axis caused by an asymmetry in the shape of the pulsar. This is difficult to understand theoretically, because torque-free precession of a solitary pulsar should be damped out by the vortices in its superfluid interior.

  1. Geodetic precession or dragging of inertial frames?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, N.; Shahid-Saless, B.

    1990-01-01

    In metric theories of gravity the principle of general covariance allows one to describe phenomena by means of any convenient choice of coordinate system. In this paper it is shown that in an appropriately chosen coordinate system, geodetic precession of a gyroscope orbiting a spherically symmetric, spinning mass can be recast as a Lense-Thirring frame-dragging effect without invoking spatial curvature. The origin of this reference frame moves around the source but the frame axes point in fixed directions. The drag can be interpreted to arise from the orbital angular momentum of the source around the origin of the reference frame. In this reference frame the effects of geodetic precession and Lense-Thirring drag due to intrinsic angular momentum of the source have the same origin, namely, gravitomagnetism

  2. Concise CIO based precession-nutation formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitaine, N.; Wallace, P. T.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The IAU 2000/2006 precession-nutation models have precision goals measured in microarcseconds. To reach this level of performance has required series containing terms at over 1300 frequencies and involving several thousand amplitude coefficients. There are many astronomical applications for which such precision is not required and the associated heavy computations are wasteful. This justifies developing smaller models that achieve adequate precision with greatly reduced computing costs. Aims: We discuss strategies for developing simplified IAU 2000/2006 precession-nutation procedures that offer a range of compromises between accuracy and computing costs. Methods: The chain of transformations linking celestial and terrestrial coordinates comprises frame bias, precession-nutation, Earth rotation and polar motion. We address the bias and precession-nutation (NPB) portion of the chain, linking the Geocentric Celestial Reference System (GCRS) with the Celestial Intermediate Reference System (CIRS), the latter based on the Celestial Intermediate Pole (CIP) and Celestial Intermediate Origin (CIO). Starting from direct series that deliver the CIP coordinates X,Y and (via the quantity s + XY/2) the CIO locator s, we look at the opportunities for simplification. Results: The biggest reductions come from truncating the series, but some additional gains can be made in the areas of the matrix formulation, the expressions for the nutation arguments and by subsuming long period effects into the bias quantities. Three example models are demonstrated that approximate the IAU 2000/2006 CIP to accuracies of 1 mas, 16 mas and 0.4 arcsec throughout 1995-2050 but with computation costs reduced by 1, 2 and 3 orders of magnitude compared with the full model. Appendices A to G are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. A network of networks model to study phase synchronization using structural connection matrix of human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, F. A. S.; Viana, R. L.; Reis, A. S.; Iarosz, K. C.; Caldas, I. L.; Batista, A. M.

    2018-04-01

    The cerebral cortex plays a key role in complex cortical functions. It can be divided into areas according to their function (motor, sensory and association areas). In this paper, the cerebral cortex is described as a network of networks (cortex network), we consider that each cortical area is composed of a network with small-world property (cortical network). The neurons are assumed to have bursting properties with the dynamics described by the Rulkov model. We study the phase synchronization of the cortex network and the cortical networks. In our simulations, we verify that synchronization in cortex network is not homogeneous. Besides, we focus on the suppression of neural phase synchronization. Synchronization can be related to undesired and pathological abnormal rhythms in the brain. For this reason, we consider the delayed feedback control to suppress the synchronization. We show that delayed feedback control is efficient to suppress synchronous behavior in our network model when an appropriate signal intensity and time delay are defined.

  4. Phase synchronization on small-world networks with community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Hua, Wang; Li-Cheng, Jiao; Jian-She, Wu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a simple model that can generate small-world network with community structure. The network is introduced as a tunable community organization with parameter r, which is directly measured by the ratio of inter- to intra-community connectivity, and a smaller r corresponds to a stronger community structure. The structure properties, including the degree distribution, clustering, the communication efficiency and modularity are also analysed for the network. In addition, by using the Kuramoto model, we investigated the phase synchronization on this network, and found that increasing the fuzziness of community structure will markedly enhance the network synchronizability; however, in an abnormal region (r ≤ 0.001), the network has even worse synchronizability than the case of isolated communities (r = 0). Furthermore, this network exhibits a remarkable synchronization behaviour in topological scales: the oscillators of high densely interconnected communities synchronize more easily, and more rapidly than the whole network. (general)

  5. Uganda Health Information Network (UHIN) - Phase IV | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... reports on drug supplies and use, and continuing education materials. This phase aims to fully integrate the Network into the Ministry of Health district and national ... IWRA/IDRC webinar on climate change and adaptive water management.

  6. Networked ATM for Efficient Routing, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We developed a EFB Data Communication Network (EDCN) concept that offers a more capable air-ground communications architecture. The solution takes full advantage of...

  7. Synchronization of Phase Oscillators in Networks with Certain Frequency Sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yuan-Yuan; Wu Liang; Zhu Shi-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Synchronization of Kuramoto phase oscillators arranged in real complex neural networks is investigated. It is shown that the synchronization greatly depends on the sets of natural frequencies of the involved oscillators. The influence of network connectivity heterogeneity on synchronization depends particularly on the correlation between natural frequencies and node degrees. This finding implies a potential application that inhibiting the effects caused by the changes of network structure can be balanced out nicely by choosing the correlation parameter appropriately. (general)

  8. Nonlinear threshold Boolean automata networks and phase transitions

    OpenAIRE

    Demongeot, Jacques; Sené, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    In this report, we present a formal approach that addresses the problem of emergence of phase transitions in stochastic and attractive nonlinear threshold Boolean automata networks. Nonlinear networks considered are informally defined on the basis of classical stochastic threshold Boolean automata networks in which specific interaction potentials of neighbourhood coalition are taken into account. More precisely, specific nonlinear terms compose local transition functions that define locally t...

  9. Perfect synchronization in networks of phase-frustrated oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Prosenjit; Hens, Chittaranjan; Barzel, Baruch; Pal, Pinaki

    2017-11-01

    Synchronizing phase-frustrated Kuramoto oscillators, a challenge that has found applications from neuronal networks to the power grid, is an eluding problem, as even small phase lags cause the oscillators to avoid synchronization. Here we show, constructively, how to strategically select the optimal frequency set, capturing the natural frequencies of all oscillators, for a given network and phase lags, that will ensure perfect synchronization. We find that high levels of synchronization are sustained in the vicinity of the optimal set, allowing for some level of deviation in the frequencies without significant degradation of synchronization. Demonstrating our results on first- and second-order phase-frustrated Kuramoto dynamics, we implement them on both model and real power grid networks, showing how to achieve synchronization in a phase-frustrated environment.

  10. Routing strategies in traffic network and phase transition in network ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The dynamics of information traffic over scale-free networks has been investigated systematically. A series of routing strategies of data packets have been proposed, including the local routing strategy, the next-nearest-neighbour routing strategy, and the mixed routing strategy based on local static and dynamic information.

  11. Extracting the orbital axis from gravitational waves of precessing binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Kyohei; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Masaru

    2018-01-01

    We present a new method for extracting the instantaneous orbital axis only from gravitational wave strains of precessing binary systems observed from a particular observer direction. This method enables us to reconstruct the coprecessing frame waveforms only from observed strains for the ideal case with the high signal-to-noise ratio. Specifically, we do not presuppose any theoretical model of the precession dynamics and coprecessing waveforms in our method. We test and measure the accuracy of our method using the numerical relativity simulation data of precessing binary black holes taken from the SXS Catalog. We show that the direction of the orbital axis is extracted within ≈0.07 rad error from gravitational waves emitted during the inspiral phase. The coprecessing waveforms are also reconstructed with high accuracy; the mismatch (assuming white noise) between them and the original coprecessing waveforms is typically a few times 10-3 including the merger-ringdown phase, and can be improved by an order of magnitude focusing only on the inspiral waveform. In this method, the coprecessing frame waveforms are not only the purely technical tools for understanding the complex nature of precessing waveforms but also direct observables.

  12. Phase-synchronisation in continuous flow models of production networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz-Reiter, Bernd; Tervo, Jan Topi; Freitag, Michael

    2006-04-01

    To improve their position at the market, many companies concentrate on their core competences and hence cooperate with suppliers and distributors. Thus, between many independent companies strong linkages develop and production and logistics networks emerge. These networks are characterised by permanently increasing complexity, and are nowadays forced to adapt to dynamically changing markets. This factor complicates an enterprise-spreading production planning and control enormously. Therefore, a continuous flow model for production networks will be derived regarding these special logistic problems. Furthermore, phase-synchronisation effects will be presented and their dependencies to the set of network parameters will be investigated.

  13. Precession feature extraction of ballistic missile warhead with high velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huixia

    2018-04-01

    This paper establishes the precession model of ballistic missile warhead, and derives the formulas of micro-Doppler frequency induced by the target with precession. In order to obtain micro-Doppler feature of ballistic missile warhead with precession, micro-Doppler bandwidth estimation algorithm, which avoids velocity compensation, is presented based on high-resolution time-frequency transform. The results of computer simulations confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method even with low signal-to-noise ratio.

  14. Design of multi-phase dynamic chemical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chenrui; Tan, Junjun; Hsieh, Ming-Chien; Pan, Ting; Goodwin, Jay T.; Mehta, Anil K.; Grover, Martha A.; Lynn, David G.

    2017-08-01

    Template-directed polymerization reactions enable the accurate storage and processing of nature's biopolymer information. This mutualistic relationship of nucleic acids and proteins, a network known as life's central dogma, is now marvellously complex, and the progressive steps necessary for creating the initial sequence and chain-length-specific polymer templates are lost to time. Here we design and construct dynamic polymerization networks that exploit metastable prion cross-β phases. Mixed-phase environments have been used for constructing synthetic polymers, but these dynamic phases emerge naturally from the growing peptide oligomers and create environments suitable both to nucleate assembly and select for ordered templates. The resulting templates direct the amplification of a phase containing only chain-length-specific peptide-like oligomers. Such multi-phase biopolymer dynamics reveal pathways for the emergence, self-selection and amplification of chain-length- and possibly sequence-specific biopolymers.

  15. LORETA EEG phase reset of the default mode network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Robert W; North, Duane M; Biver, Carl J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore phase reset of 3-dimensional current sources in Brodmann areas located in the human default mode network (DMN) using Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) of the human electroencephalogram (EEG). The EEG was recorded from 19 scalp locations from 70 healthy normal subjects ranging in age from 13 to 20 years. A time point by time point computation of LORETA current sources were computed for 14 Brodmann areas comprising the DMN in the delta frequency band. The Hilbert transform of the LORETA time series was used to compute the instantaneous phase differences between all pairs of Brodmann areas. Phase shift and lock durations were calculated based on the 1st and 2nd derivatives of the time series of phase differences. Phase shift duration exhibited three discrete modes at approximately: (1) 25 ms, (2) 50 ms, and (3) 65 ms. Phase lock duration present primarily at: (1) 300-350 ms and (2) 350-450 ms. Phase shift and lock durations were inversely related and exhibited an exponential change with distance between Brodmann areas. The results are explained by local neural packing density of network hubs and an exponential decrease in connections with distance from a hub. The results are consistent with a discrete temporal model of brain function where anatomical hubs behave like a "shutter" that opens and closes at specific durations as nodes of a network giving rise to temporarily phase locked clusters of neurons for specific durations.

  16. Numerical simulation for gas-liquid two-phase flow in pipe networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoyan; Kuang Bo; Zhou Guoliang; Xu Jijun

    1998-01-01

    The complex pipe network characters can not directly presented in single phase flow, gas-liquid two phase flow pressure drop and void rate change model. Apply fluid network theory and computer numerical simulation technology to phase flow pipe networks carried out simulate and compute. Simulate result shows that flow resistance distribution is non-linear in two phase pipe network

  17. Chaos in generically coupled phase oscillator networks with nonpairwise interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Christian; Ashwin, Peter; Rodrigues, Ana

    2016-09-01

    The Kuramoto-Sakaguchi system of coupled phase oscillators, where interaction between oscillators is determined by a single harmonic of phase differences of pairs of oscillators, has very simple emergent dynamics in the case of identical oscillators that are globally coupled: there is a variational structure that means the only attractors are full synchrony (in-phase) or splay phase (rotating wave/full asynchrony) oscillations and the bifurcation between these states is highly degenerate. Here we show that nonpairwise coupling-including three and four-way interactions of the oscillator phases-that appears generically at the next order in normal-form based calculations can give rise to complex emergent dynamics in symmetric phase oscillator networks. In particular, we show that chaos can appear in the smallest possible dimension of four coupled phase oscillators for a range of parameter values.

  18. Explosive transitions to synchronization in networks of phase oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, I; Navas, A; Sendiña-Nadal, I; Almendral, J A; Buldú, J M; Zanin, M; Papo, D; Boccaletti, S

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of dynamical abrupt transitions in the macroscopic state of a system is currently a subject of the utmost interest. The occurrence of a first-order phase transition to synchronization of an ensemble of networked phase oscillators was reported, so far, for very particular network architectures. Here, we show how a sharp, discontinuous transition can occur, instead, as a generic feature of networks of phase oscillators. Precisely, we set conditions for the transition from unsynchronized to synchronized states to be first-order, and demonstrate how these conditions can be attained in a very wide spectrum of situations. We then show how the occurrence of such transitions is always accompanied by the spontaneous setting of frequency-degree correlation features. Third, we show that the conditions for abrupt transitions can be even softened in several cases. Finally, we discuss, as a possible application, the use of this phenomenon to express magnetic-like states of synchronization.

  19. Research on three-phase unbalanced distribution network reconfiguration strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuang; Li, Ke-Jun; Xu, Yanshun; Liu, Zhijie; Guo, Jing; Wang, Zhuodi

    2017-01-01

    With the development of social economy, the loads installed in the distribution network become more and more complex which may cause the three-phase unbalance problems. This paper proposes an optimal reconfiguration approach based on mixed integer quadric programming (MIQP) method to address the three-phase unbalance problem. It aims to minimize the total network losses of the system. By using several square constraints to substitute the circular constraint, the original optimization problem is linearized and converted into a mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) model. Then this MILP problem is solved in general algebraic model system (GAMS) software using CPLEX solver. The additional losses caused by three-phase unbalanced are also considered. An IEEE 34 nodes test system is used to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. The results show that the losses and the voltage violation mitigation in the network can be reduced significantly.

  20. Parameter diagnostics of phases and phase transition learning by neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchsland, Philippe; Wessel, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    We present an analysis of neural network-based machine learning schemes for phases and phase transitions in theoretical condensed matter research, focusing on neural networks with a single hidden layer. Such shallow neural networks were previously found to be efficient in classifying phases and locating phase transitions of various basic model systems. In order to rationalize the emergence of the classification process and for identifying any underlying physical quantities, it is feasible to examine the weight matrices and the convolutional filter kernels that result from the learning process of such shallow networks. Furthermore, we demonstrate how the learning-by-confusing scheme can be used, in combination with a simple threshold-value classification method, to diagnose the learning parameters of neural networks. In particular, we study the classification process of both fully-connected and convolutional neural networks for the two-dimensional Ising model with extended domain wall configurations included in the low-temperature regime. Moreover, we consider the two-dimensional XY model and contrast the performance of the learning-by-confusing scheme and convolutional neural networks trained on bare spin configurations to the case of preprocessed samples with respect to vortex configurations. We discuss these findings in relation to similar recent investigations and possible further applications.

  1. Chaos in generically coupled phase oscillator networks with nonpairwise interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bick, Christian; Ashwin, Peter; Rodrigues, Ana [Centre for Systems, Dynamics and Control and Department of Mathematics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QF (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    The Kuramoto–Sakaguchi system of coupled phase oscillators, where interaction between oscillators is determined by a single harmonic of phase differences of pairs of oscillators, has very simple emergent dynamics in the case of identical oscillators that are globally coupled: there is a variational structure that means the only attractors are full synchrony (in-phase) or splay phase (rotating wave/full asynchrony) oscillations and the bifurcation between these states is highly degenerate. Here we show that nonpairwise coupling—including three and four-way interactions of the oscillator phases—that appears generically at the next order in normal-form based calculations can give rise to complex emergent dynamics in symmetric phase oscillator networks. In particular, we show that chaos can appear in the smallest possible dimension of four coupled phase oscillators for a range of parameter values.

  2. Phased Array Radar Network Experiment for Severe Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushio, T.; Kikuchi, H.; Mega, T.; Yoshikawa, E.; Mizutani, F.; Takahashi, N.

    2017-12-01

    Phased Array Weather Radar (PAWR) was firstly developed in 2012 by Osaka University and Toshiba under a grant of NICT using the Digital Beamforming Technique, and showed a impressive thunderstorm behavior with 30 second resolution. After that development, second PAWR was installed in Kobe city about 60 km away from the first PAWR site, and Tokyo Metropolitan University, Osaka Univeristy, Toshiba and the Osaka Local Government started a new project to develop the Osaka Urban Demonstration Network. The main sensor of the Osaka Network is a 2-node Phased Array Radar Network and lightning location system. Data products that are created both in local high performance computer and Toshiba Computer Cloud, include single and multi-radar data, vector wind, quantitative precipitation estimation, VIL, nowcasting, lightning location and analysis. Each radar node is calibarated by the baloon measurement and through the comparison with the GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement)/ DPR (Dual Frequency Space borne Radar) within 1 dB. The attenuated radar reflectivities obtained by the Phased Array Radar Network at X band are corrected based on the bayesian scheme proposed in Shimamura et al. [2016]. The obtained high resolution (every 30 seconds/ 100 elevation angles) 3D reflectivity and rain rate fields are used to nowcast the surface rain rate up to 30 minutes ahead. These new products are transferred to Osaka Local Government in operational mode and evaluated by several section in Osaka Prefecture. Furthermore, a new Phased Array Radar with polarimetric function has been developed in 2017, and will be operated in the fiscal year of 2017. In this presentation, Phased Array Radar, network architecuture, processing algorithm, evalution of the social experiment and first Multi-Prameter Phased Array Radar experiment are presented.

  3. African Transitional Justice Research Network - Phase II | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The African Transitional Justice Research Network (ATJRN) aims to strengthen the capacity of African researchers and civil society institutions to conduct effective human rights advocacy through the production of high-quality, locally based and targeted empirical research. Phase I of the project (102862) focused on creating ...

  4. African Transitional Justice Research Network - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The African Transitional Justice Research Network (ATJRN) aims to strengthen the capacity of African researchers and civil society institutions to conduct effective human rights advocacy through the production of high-quality, locally based and targeted empirical research. Phase I of the project (102862) focused on creating ...

  5. Precession electron diffraction – a topical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Midgley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 20 years since precession electron diffraction (PED was introduced, it has grown from a little-known niche technique to one that is seen as a cornerstone of electron crystallography. It is now used primarily in two ways. The first is to determine crystal structures, to identify lattice parameters and symmetry, and ultimately to solve the atomic structure ab initio. The second is, through connection with the microscope scanning system, to map the local orientation of the specimen to investigate crystal texture, rotation and strain at the nanometre scale. This topical review brings the reader up to date, highlighting recent successes using PED and providing some pointers to the future in terms of method development and how the technique can meet some of the needs of the X-ray crystallography community. Complementary electron techniques are also discussed, together with how a synergy of methods may provide the best approach to electron-based structure analysis.

  6. Development of a nuclear precession magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgens Alves, J.G. das.

    1983-12-01

    The objective of this thesis was to develop a proton precession magnetometer for geophysical prospecting and base stations. The proton procession magnetometer measures the total magnetic fields intensity. It operates on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance by determining the processing frequency of protons of a non viscous liquid in the terrestrial magnetic fields. The instrument was tested in field to evaluate signal/noise ratio, supportable gradient and battery consumption. Application test was carried out to take diurnal variation data and, reconnaissance and detail surveys data on an archaeological site in the Marajo Island-Pa. The test results were confronted with two commercial magnetometers-GP-70, McPhar e G-816, Geometric - and, with data from Observatorio Magnetico Ilha de Tatuoca as well. For all cases, the data comparison showed a good performance of the magnetometer tested. (author)

  7. A QSO with precessing jets: 2300 - 189

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunstead, R.W.; Murdoch, H.S.; Phillips, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    The QSO 2300-189 (z = 0.1287) is found to have a faint companion galaxy at the same redshift. The separation is 6.8 arcsec on the sky. A spectrum of the fuzz around the QSO shows absorption features typical of late-type stars, which argues for its occurence in a normal disc or E galaxy. Radio maps obtained with the VLA at 1465 MHz and 4885 MHz show inversion (or S-shaped) symmetry, which is explained as due to the ejection of jets along an axis which is precessing, probably due to the tidal influence of the nearby galaxy. Several kinematic parameters are deduced including an upper limit for the jet velocity. Further support for tidal interaction comes from the detection of extensive region of low-brightness optical emission in the vicinity of the QSO. (author)

  8. Thomas precession: correct and incorrect solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malykin, Grigorii B

    2006-01-01

    A wealth of different expressions for the frequency of the Thomas precession (TP) can be found in the literature, with the consequence that this issue has been discussed over a long period of time. It is shown that the correct result was obtained in the works of several authors, which were published more than forty years ago but remained unnoticed against the background of numerous erroneous works. Several TP-related physical paradoxes formulated primarily to disprove the special relativity theory are shown to be fallacious. Different techniques for deriving the correct expression are considered and the reasons for the emergence of the main incorrect expressions for the TP frequency are analyzed. (from the history of physics)

  9. A PULSED, PRECESSING JET IN CEPHEUS A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, Nathaniel J.; Moeckel, Nickolas; Bally, John

    2009-01-01

    We present near-infrared H 2 , radio CO, and thermal infrared observations of the nearby massive star-forming region Cepheus A (Cep A). From H 2 bow shocks arranged along four distinct jet axes, we infer that the massive protostellar source HW2 drives a pulsed, precessing jet that has changed its orientation by about 45 deg. in roughly 10 4 years. The current HW2 radio jet represents the most recent event in this time series of eruptions. This scenario is consistent with the recent discovery of a disk around HW2, perpendicular to the current jet orientation, and with the presence of companions at projected distances comparable to the disk radius. We propose that the Cep A system formed by the disk-assisted capture of a sibling star by HW2. We present a numerical model of a 15 M sun star with a circumstellar disk, orbited by a companion in an inclined, eccentric orbit. Close passages of the companion through or near the disk result in periods of enhanced accretion and mass loss, as well as forced precession of the disk and associated orientation changes in the jet. The observations reveal a second powerful outflow that emerges from radio source HW3c or HW3d. This flow is associated with blueshifted CO emission and a faint H 2 bow shock to the east, and with HH 168 to the west. A collision between the flows from HW2 and HW3c/d may be responsible for X-ray and radio continuum emission in Cep A West.

  10. EEG PHASE RESET OF THE DEFAULT MODE NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Thatcher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore phase reset of 3-dimensional current sources located in Brodmann areas located in the human default mode network (DMN using Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA of the human electroencephalogram (EEG. Methods: The EEG was recorded from 19 scalp locations from 70 healthy normal subjects ranging in age from 13 to 20 years. A time point by time point computation of LORETA current sources were computed for 14 Brodman areas comprising the DMN in the delta frequency band. The Hilbert transform of the LORETA time series was used to compute the instantaneous phase differences between all pairs of Brodmann areas. Phase shift and lock durations were calculated based on the 1st & 2nd derivatives of the time series of phase differences. Results: Phase shift duration exhibited three discrete modes at approximately: 1- 30 msec,, 2- 55 msec and, 3- 65 msec. Phase lock duration present primarily at: 1- 300 to 350 msec and, 2- 350 msec to 450 msec. Phase shift and lock durations were inversely related and exhibited an exponential change with distance between Brodmann areas. Conclusions: The results are explained by local neural packing density of network hubs and an exponential decrease in connections with distance from a hub. The results are consistent with a discrete temporal model of brain function where anatomical hubs behave like a ‘shutter’ that opens and closes at specific durations as nodes of a network giving rise to temporarily phase locked clusters of neurons for specific durations.

  11. Gyroscope precession in special and general relativity from basic principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Rickard M.

    2007-05-01

    In special relativity a gyroscope that is suspended in a torque-free manner will precess as it is moved along a curved path relative to an inertial frame S. We explain this effect, which is known as Thomas precession, by considering a real grid that moves along with the gyroscope, and that by definition is not rotating as observed from its own momentary inertial rest frame. From the basic properties of the Lorentz transformation we deduce how the form and rotation of the grid (and hence the gyroscope) will evolve relative to S. As an intermediate step we consider how the grid would appear if it were not length contracted along the direction of motion. We show that the uncontracted grid obeys a simple law of rotation. This law simplifies the analysis of spin precession compared to more traditional approaches based on Fermi transport. We also consider gyroscope precession relative to an accelerated reference frame and show that there are extra precession effects that can be explained in a way analogous to the Thomas precession. Although fully relativistically correct, the entire analysis is carried out using three-vectors. By using the equivalence principle the formalism can also be applied to static spacetimes in general relativity. As an example, we calculate the precession of a gyroscope orbiting a static black hole.

  12. Numerical relativity simulations of precessing binary neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Tim; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Brügmann, Bernd; Ujevic, Maximiliano; Tichy, Wolfgang

    2018-03-01

    We present the first set of numerical relativity simulations of binary neutron mergers that include spin precession effects and are evolved with multiple resolutions. Our simulations employ consistent initial data in general relativity with different spin configurations and dimensionless spin magnitudes ˜0.1 . They start at a gravitational-wave frequency of ˜392 Hz and cover more than 1 precession period and about 15 orbits up to merger. We discuss the spin precession dynamics by analyzing coordinate trajectories, quasilocal spin measurements, and energetics, by comparing spin aligned, antialigned, and irrotational configurations. Gravitational waveforms from different spin configuration are compared by calculating the mismatch between pairs of waveforms in the late inspiral. We find that precession effects are not distinguishable from nonprecessing configurations with aligned spins for approximately face-on binaries, while the latter are distinguishable from nonspinning configurations. Spin precession effects are instead clearly visible for approximately edge-on binaries. For the parameters considered here, precession does not significantly affect the characteristic postmerger gravitational-wave frequencies nor the mass ejection. Our results pave the way for the modeling of spin precession effects in the gravitational waveform from binary neutron star events.

  13. Change in General Relativistic precession rates due to Lidov-Kozai oscillations in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Aswin; Asher, David J.; Werner, Stephanie C.; Vaubaillon, Jeremie; Li, Gongjie

    2017-04-01

    Introduction: Two well known phenomena associated with low perihelion distance bodies in orbital dynamics are general relativistic (GR) precession and Lidov-Kozai (LK) oscillations. The accurate prediction of the perihelion shift of Mercury in accord with real observations is one of the significant triumphs of the general theory of relativity developed by Einstein. The Lidov-Kozai mechanism was first proposed and derived by Kozai and independently by Lidov explaining the periodic exchange between eccentricities e and inclinations i thereby increasing or decreasing the perihelion distance q secularly in the orbiting body. Co-existence of GR Precession and LK Oscillations: In this work, we were interested to identify bodies evolving in the near future (i.e. thousands of years in this case) into rapid sungrazing and sun colliding phases and undergoing inclination flips, due to LK oscillations and being GR active at the same time. Of all the bodies we checked from the IAU-Minor Planet Center, and Marsden plus Kracht families from the comet catalogue, 96P/Machholz 1 stands out because it shows all these trends in the near future. LK leads to secular lowering of q which in turn leads to a huge increase in GR precession of argument of pericentre. This in turn gives feedback to the LK mechanism as the e,i and argument of pericentre in Kozai cycles are closely correlated. In this work, we find real examples of solar system bodies which show the continuum nature between GR precession domi-nant and LK mechanism dominant regimes. Results and Discussion: We have shown that there are bodies in the solar system in which both GR precession and LK mechanism can co-exist at the same time and for which these effects can be measured and identified using analytical and numerical techniques. Thus there is a continuum of bodies encompassing, firstly GR precession dominant, secondly GR precession plus LK mechanism co-existing and finally LK mechanism dominant states which are all

  14. Precession mode on high-K configurations: non-collective axially-symmetric limit of wobbling motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yoshifumi R; Matsuzaki, Masayuki; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    The precession mode, the rotational excitation built on the high-K isomeric state, in comparison with the recently identified wobbling mode has been studied. The random-phase-approximation (RPA) formalism, which has been developed for the nuclear wobbling motion, is invoked and the precession phonon is obtained by the non-collective axially symmetric limit of the formalism. The excitation energies and the electromagnetic properties of the precession bands in 178 W are calculated, and it is found that the results of RPA calculations well correspond to those of the rotor model; the correspondence can be understood by an adiabatic approximation to the RPA phonon. As a by-product, it is also found that the problem of too small out-of-band B(E2) in our previous RPA wobbling calculations can be solved by a suitable choice of the triaxial deformation which corresponds to the one used in the rotor model

  15. Phase transitions in glassy systems via convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chao

    Machine learning is a powerful approach commonplace in industry to tackle large data sets. Most recently, it has found its way into condensed matter physics, allowing for the first time the study of, e.g., topological phase transitions and strongly-correlated electron systems. The study of spin glasses is plagued by finite-size effects due to the long thermalization times needed. Here we use convolutional neural networks in an attempt to detect a phase transition in three-dimensional Ising spin glasses. Our results are compared to traditional approaches.

  16. Three-Phase Unbalanced Load Flow Tool for Distribution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirok, Erhan; Kjær, Søren Bækhøj; Sera, Dezso

    2012-01-01

    This work develops a three-phase unbalanced load flow tool tailored for radial distribution networks based on Matlab®. The tool can be used to assess steady-state voltage variations, thermal limits of grid components and power losses in radial MV-LV networks with photovoltaic (PV) generators where...... most of the systems are single phase. New ancillary service such as static reactive power support by PV inverters can be also merged together with the load flow solution tool and thus, the impact of the various reactive power control strategies on the steady-state grid operation can be simply...... investigated. Performance of the load flow solution tool in the sense of resulting bus voltage magnitudes is compared and validated with IEEE 13-bus test feeder....

  17. Equatorial Precession Drove Mid-Latitude Changes in ENSO-Scale Variation in the Earliest Miocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, B.; D'Andrea, W. J.; Lee, D. E.; Wilson, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Foulden Maar is an annually laminated lacustrine diatomite deposit from the South Island of New Zealand. The deposit was laid down over ~100 kyr of the latest Oligocene and earliest Miocene, during the peak and deglaciation phase of the Mi-1 Antarctic glaciation event. At this time, New Zealand was located at approximately the same latitude as today (~45°S). Evidence from organic geochemical proxies (δD, δ13C) and physical properties (density, colour) indicates the presence of an 11-kyr cycle at the site. Although it is known that 11-kyr insolation (half-precession) cycles occur between the Tropics, this cycle is rarely seen in sedimentary archives deposited outside the immediate vicinity of the Equator. Records from Foulden Maar correlate well with the amplitude and phase of the modelled equatorial half-precession cycle for the earliest Miocene. High-resolution (50 µm) colour intensity measurements and lamina thickness measurements both indicate the presence of significant ENSO-like (2-8 year) variation in the Foulden Maar sediments. Early results from targeted lamina thickness measurements suggest that ENSO-band variation is modulated by the 11-kyr cycle, with power in the ENSO band increasing during periods of increased insolation at the Equator. This implies that equatorial half-precession had a significant effect on ENSO-like variation in the early Miocene, and that this effect was felt as far afield as the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere.

  18. Suppression of phase synchronisation in network based on cat's brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameu, Ewandson L; Borges, Fernando S; Borges, Rafael R; Iarosz, Kelly C; Caldas, Iberê L; Batista, Antonio M; Viana, Ricardo L; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the effects of perturbations on the cat's cerebral cortex. According to the literature, this cortex structure can be described by a clustered network. This way, we construct a clustered network with the same number of areas as in the cat matrix, where each area is described as a sub-network with a small-world property. We focus on the suppression of neuronal phase synchronisation considering different kinds of perturbations. Among the various controlling interventions, we choose three methods: delayed feedback control, external time-periodic driving, and activation of selected neurons. We simulate these interventions to provide a procedure to suppress undesired and pathological abnormal rhythms that can be associated with many forms of synchronisation. In our simulations, we have verified that the efficiency of synchronisation suppression by delayed feedback control is higher than external time-periodic driving and activation of selected neurons of the cat's cerebral cortex with the same coupling strengths.

  19. Graph and Network for Model Elicitation (GNOME Phase 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    GRAPH AND NETWORK FOR MODEL ELICITATION (GNOME PHASE II) CUBRC FEBRUARY 2013 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR...NUMBER 00 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 01 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) CUBRC 4455 Genesee St. Buffalo, NY 14225 8. PERFORMING...Explorer Since the previous version of GNOME was developed as an Eclipse RCP plug-in, it allowed CUBRC to develop the Model Explorer separately without

  20. Conducting polymer networks synthesized by photopolymerization-induced phase separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Yuki; Komori, Kana; Murata, Tasuku; Nakanishi, Hideyuki; Norisuye, Tomohisa; Yamao, Takeshi; Tran-Cong-Miyata, Qui

    2018-03-01

    Polymer mixtures composed of double networks of a polystyrene derivative (PSAF) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were alternatively synthesized by using ultraviolet (UV) and visible (Vis) light. The PSAF networks were generated by UV irradiation to photodimerize the anthracene (A) moieties labeled on the PSAF chains, whereas PMMA networks were produced by photopolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomer and the cross-link reaction using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) under Vis light irradiation. It was found that phase separation process of these networks can be independently induced and promptly controlled by using UV and Vis light. The characteristic length scale distribution of the resulting co-continuous morphology can be well regulated by the UV and Vis light intensity. In order to confirm and utilize the connectivity of the bicontinuous morphology observed by confocal microscopy, a very small amount, 0.1 wt%, of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was introduced into the mixture and the current-voltage (I-V) relationship was subsequently examined. Preliminary data show that MWCNTs are preferentially dispersed in the PSAF-rich continuous domains and the whole mixture became electrically conducting, confirming the connectivity of the observed bi-continuous morphology. The experimental data obtained in this study reveal a promising method to design various scaffolds for conducting soft matter taking advantages of photopolymerization-induced phase separation.

  1. Larmor-precession based neutron scattering instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioffe, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The Larmor precession of the neutron spin in a magnetic field allows the attachment of a Larmor clock to every neutron. Such Larmor labelling opens the possibility for the development of unusual neutron scattering techniques, where the energy (momentum) resolution does not require the initial and final states to be well selected. This principally allows for achievement of very high energy (momentum) resolution that is not feasible at all with conventional neutron scattering techniques, because the required neutron beam monochromatization (collimation) will result in intolerable intensity losses. Such decoupling of resolution and collimation allows, for example, for a significant increase in the luminosity of small-angle scattering or high-resolution diffractometers; the fact that opens new perspectives for their implementation at middle flux neutron sources. Different kinds of Larmor clock-based instrumentation, particularly two alternative NSE techniques using rotating and time-gradient magnetic field arrangements, which can be considered as inexpensive and affordable alternatives to present day NSE techniques, will be discussed and results of simulations and first experiments will be presented. (author)

  2. Vortex precession in thin elliptical ferromagnetic nanodisks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaspel, C.E., E-mail: craig.zaspel@umwestern.edu

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • A general form for the magnetostatic energy is calculated for the vortex state in a ferromagnetic ellipse. • The ellipse magnetostatic energy is minimized by conformal mapping the circular disk onto the ellipse. • The gyrotropic precession frequency is obtained in general for a range of ellipticities. - Abstract: The magnetostatic energy is calculated for a magnetic vortex in a noncircular elliptical nanodisk. It is well-known that the energy of a vortex in the circular disk is minimized though an ansatz that eliminates the magnetostatic charge at the disk edge. Beginning with this ansatz for the circular disk, a conformal mapping of a circle interior onto the interior of an ellipse results in the magnetization of the elliptical disk. This magnetization in the interior of an ellipse also has no magnetostatic charge at the disk edge also minimizing the magnetostatic energy. As expected the energy has a quadratic dependence on the displacement of the vortex core from the ellipse center, but reflecting the lower symmetry of the ellipse. Through numerical integration of the magnetostatic integral a general expression for the energy is obtained for ellipticity values from 1.0 to about 0.3. Finally a general expression for the gyrotropic frequency as described by the Thiele equation is obtained.

  3. Numerical simulation of a precessing vortex breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochmann, P.; Sinigersky, A.; Hehle, M.; Schaefer, O.; Koch, R.; Bauer, H.-J.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this work is to present the results of time-dependent numerical predictions of a turbulent symmetry breaking vortex breakdown in a realistic gas turbine combustor. The unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations are solved by using the k-ε two-equation model as well as by a full second-order closure using the Reynolds stress model of Speziale, Sarkar and Gatski (SSG). The results for a Reynolds number of 5.2 x 10 4 , a swirl number of 0.52 and an expansion ratio of 5 show that the flow is emerging from the swirler as a spiral gyrating around a zone of strong recirculation which is also asymmetric and precessing. These flow structures which are typical for the spiral type (S-type) vortex breakdown have been confirmed by PIV and local LDA measurements in a corresponding experimental setup. Provided that high resolution meshes are employed the calculations with both turbulence models are capable to reproduce the spatial and temporal dynamics of the flow

  4. Complex network analysis of phase dynamics underlying oil-water two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Cai, Qing; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the complicated flow behaviors arising from high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows is an important problem of significant challenge. We design a high-speed cycle motivation conductance sensor and carry out experiments for measuring the local flow information from different oil-in-water flow patterns. We first use multivariate time-frequency analysis to probe the typical features of three flow patterns from the perspective of energy and frequency. Then we infer complex networks from multi-channel measurements in terms of phase lag index, aiming to uncovering the phase dynamics governing the transition and evolution of different oil-in-water flow patterns. In particular, we employ spectral radius and weighted clustering coefficient entropy to characterize the derived unweighted and weighted networks and the results indicate that our approach yields quantitative insights into the phase dynamics underlying the high water cut and low velocity oil-water flows. PMID:27306101

  5. Macroscopic phase-resetting curves for spiking neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Grégory; Ermentrout, G. Bard; Gutkin, Boris

    2017-10-01

    The study of brain rhythms is an open-ended, and challenging, subject of interest in neuroscience. One of the best tools for the understanding of oscillations at the single neuron level is the phase-resetting curve (PRC). Synchronization in networks of neurons, effects of noise on the rhythms, effects of transient stimuli on the ongoing rhythmic activity, and many other features can be understood by the PRC. However, most macroscopic brain rhythms are generated by large populations of neurons, and so far it has been unclear how the PRC formulation can be extended to these more common rhythms. In this paper, we describe a framework to determine a macroscopic PRC (mPRC) for a network of spiking excitatory and inhibitory neurons that generate a macroscopic rhythm. We take advantage of a thermodynamic approach combined with a reduction method to simplify the network description to a small number of ordinary differential equations. From this simplified but exact reduction, we can compute the mPRC via the standard adjoint method. Our theoretical findings are illustrated with and supported by numerical simulations of the full spiking network. Notably our mPRC framework allows us to predict the difference between effects of transient inputs to the excitatory versus the inhibitory neurons in the network.

  6. Macroscopic phase-resetting curves for spiking neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Grégory; Ermentrout, G Bard; Gutkin, Boris

    2017-10-01

    The study of brain rhythms is an open-ended, and challenging, subject of interest in neuroscience. One of the best tools for the understanding of oscillations at the single neuron level is the phase-resetting curve (PRC). Synchronization in networks of neurons, effects of noise on the rhythms, effects of transient stimuli on the ongoing rhythmic activity, and many other features can be understood by the PRC. However, most macroscopic brain rhythms are generated by large populations of neurons, and so far it has been unclear how the PRC formulation can be extended to these more common rhythms. In this paper, we describe a framework to determine a macroscopic PRC (mPRC) for a network of spiking excitatory and inhibitory neurons that generate a macroscopic rhythm. We take advantage of a thermodynamic approach combined with a reduction method to simplify the network description to a small number of ordinary differential equations. From this simplified but exact reduction, we can compute the mPRC via the standard adjoint method. Our theoretical findings are illustrated with and supported by numerical simulations of the full spiking network. Notably our mPRC framework allows us to predict the difference between effects of transient inputs to the excitatory versus the inhibitory neurons in the network.

  7. CONEDEP: COnvolutional Neural network based Earthquake DEtection and Phase Picking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Huang, Y.; Yue, H.; Zhou, S.; An, S.; Yun, N.

    2017-12-01

    We developed an automatic local earthquake detection and phase picking algorithm based on Fully Convolutional Neural network (FCN). The FCN algorithm detects and segments certain features (phases) in 3 component seismograms to realize efficient picking. We use STA/LTA algorithm and template matching algorithm to construct the training set from seismograms recorded 1 month before and after the Wenchuan earthquake. Precise P and S phases are identified and labeled to construct the training set. Noise data are produced by combining back-ground noise and artificial synthetic noise to form the equivalent scale of noise set as the signal set. Training is performed on GPUs to achieve efficient convergence. Our algorithm has significantly improved performance in terms of the detection rate and precision in comparison with STA/LTA and template matching algorithms.

  8. Single-spin precessing gravitational waveform in closed form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Andrew; O'Shaughnessy, R.

    2014-02-01

    In coming years, gravitational-wave detectors should find black hole-neutron star (BH-NS) binaries, potentially coincident with astronomical phenomena like short gamma ray bursts. These binaries are expected to precess. Gravitational-wave science requires a tractable model for precessing binaries, to disentangle precession physics from other phenomena like modified strong field gravity, tidal deformability, or Hubble flow; and to measure compact object masses, spins, and alignments. Moreover, current searches for gravitational waves from compact binaries use templates where the binary does not precess and are ill-suited for detection of generic precessing sources. In this paper we provide a closed-form representation of the single-spin precessing waveform in the frequency domain by reorganizing the signal as a sum over harmonics, each of which resembles a nonprecessing waveform. This form enables simple analytic calculations of the Fisher matrix for use in template bank generation and coincidence metrics, and jump proposals to improve the efficiency of Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. We have verified that for generic BH-NS binaries, our model agrees with the time-domain waveform to 2%. Straightforward extensions of the derivations outlined here (and provided in full online) allow higher accuracy and error estimates.

  9. Local Magnetic Fields in Ferromagnetics Studied by Positive Muon Precession

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Positive muons are used to study local magnetic fields in different materials. A polarized muon beam is employed with energies of 30-50 MeV, and the muons are stopped in the target being studied. During its lifetime the muon will precess in the magnetic fields present, and after the decay of the muon the emitted positron is detected in plastic scintillators. The time and angle of the detected positron is used to calculate the magnetic field at the position of the muon in the sample. \\\\ \\\\ The detector system consists of plastic scintillators. Most of the measurements are made in an applied magnetic field. A dilution cryostat is used to produce temperatures down to well below $ 1 ^0 $ K. \\\\ \\\\ The present line of experiments concern mainly: \\item a)~~~~Local magnetism in the paramagnetic state of the Lave's phase type REAl$_{2} $ and RENi$_{2} $ systems ~~~where RE is a rare-earth ion. \\item b)~~~~Local magnetic fields and critical behaviour of the magnetism in Gd metal. \\item c)~~~~Investigation of flux exclu...

  10. Identifying quantum phase transitions with adversarial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huembeli, Patrick; Dauphin, Alexandre; Wittek, Peter

    2018-04-01

    The identification of phases of matter is a challenging task, especially in quantum mechanics, where the complexity of the ground state appears to grow exponentially with the size of the system. Traditionally, physicists have to identify the relevant order parameters for the classification of the different phases. We here follow a radically different approach: we address this problem with a state-of-the-art deep learning technique, adversarial domain adaptation. We derive the phase diagram of the whole parameter space starting from a fixed and known subspace using unsupervised learning. This method has the advantage that the input of the algorithm can be directly the ground state without any ad hoc feature engineering. Furthermore, the dimension of the parameter space is unrestricted. More specifically, the input data set contains both labeled and unlabeled data instances. The first kind is a system that admits an accurate analytical or numerical solution, and one can recover its phase diagram. The second type is the physical system with an unknown phase diagram. Adversarial domain adaptation uses both types of data to create invariant feature extracting layers in a deep learning architecture. Once these layers are trained, we can attach an unsupervised learner to the network to find phase transitions. We show the success of this technique by applying it on several paradigmatic models: the Ising model with different temperatures, the Bose-Hubbard model, and the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model with disorder. The method finds unknown transitions successfully and predicts transition points in close agreement with standard methods. This study opens the door to the classification of physical systems where the phase boundaries are complex such as the many-body localization problem or the Bose glass phase.

  11. AN APPARENT PRECESSING HELICAL OUTFLOW FROM A MASSIVE EVOLVED STAR: EVIDENCE FOR BINARY INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, R. M.; Hankins, M. J.; Herter, T. L. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Morris, M. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Mills, E. A. C. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O 1009, Lopezville Drive, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Ressler, M. E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    Massive, evolved stars play a crucial role in the metal enrichment, dust budget, and energetics of the interstellar medium; however, the details of their evolution are uncertain because of their rarity and short lifetimes before exploding as supernovae. Discrepancies between theoretical predictions from single-star evolutionary models and observations of massive stars have evoked a shifting paradigm that implicates the importance of binary interaction. We present mid- to far-infrared observations from the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy of a conical “helix” of warm dust (∼180 K) that appears to extend from the Wolf–Rayet star WR102c. Our interpretation of the helix is a precessing, collimated outflow that emerged from WR102c during a previous evolutionary phase as a rapidly rotating luminous blue variable. We attribute the precession of WR102c to gravitational interactions with an unseen compact binary companion whose orbital period can be constrained to 800 days < P < 1400 days from the inferred precession period, τ{sub p} ∼ 1.4 × 10{sup 4} yr, and limits imposed on the stellar and orbital parameters of the system. Our results concur with the range of orbital periods (P ≲ 1500 days) where spin-up via mass exchange is expected to occur for massive binary systems.

  12. New precession expressions, valid for long time intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondrák, J.; Capitaine, N.; Wallace, P.

    2011-10-01

    Context. The present IAU model of precession, like its predecessors, is given as a set of polynomial approximations of various precession parameters intended for high-accuracy applications over a limited time span. Earlier comparisons with numerical integrations have shown that this model is valid only for a few centuries around the basic epoch, J2000.0, while for more distant epochs it rapidly diverges from the numerical solution. In our preceding studies we also obtained preliminary developments for the precessional contribution to the motion of the equator: coordinates X,Y of the precessing pole and precession parameters ψA,ωA, suitable for use over long time intervals. Aims: The goal of the present paper is to obtain upgraded developments for various sets of precession angles that would fit modern observations near J2000.0 and at the same time fit numerical integration of the motions of solar system bodies on scales of several thousand centuries. Methods: We used the IAU 2006 solutions to represent the precession of the ecliptic and of the equator close to J2000.0 and, for more distant epochs, a numerical integration using the Mercury 6 package and solutions by Laskar et al. (1993, A&A, 270, 522) with upgraded initial conditions and constants to represent the ecliptic, and general precession and obliquity, respectively. From them, different precession parameters were calculated in the interval ± 200 millennia from J2000.0, and analytical expressions are found that provide a good fit for the whole interval. Results: Series for the various precessional parameters, comprising a cubic polynomial plus from 8 to 14 periodic terms, are derived that allow precession to be computed with an accuracy comparable to IAU 2006 around the central epoch J2000.0, a few arcseconds throughout the historical period, and a few tenths of a degree at the ends of the ± 200 millennia time span. Computer algorithms are provided that compute the ecliptic and mean equator poles and the

  13. Determining Cloud Thermodynamic Phase from Micropulse Lidar Network Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jasper R.; Campbell, James; Lolli, Simone; Tan, Ivy; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2017-01-01

    Determining cloud thermodynamic phase is a critical factor in studies of Earth's radiation budget. Here we use observations from the NASA Micro Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) and thermodynamic profiles from the Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5) to distinguish liquid water, mixed-phase, and ice water clouds. The MPLNET provides sparse global, autonomous, and continuous measurements of clouds and aerosols which have been used in a number of scientific investigations to date. The use of a standardized instrument and a common suite of data processing algorithms with thorough uncertainty characterization allows for straightforward comparisons between sites. Lidars with polarization capabilities have recently been incorporated into the MPLNET project which allows, for the first time, the ability to infer a cloud thermodynamic phase. This presentation will look specifically at the occurrence of ice and mixed phase clouds in the temperature region of -10 C to -40 C for different climatological regions and seasons. We compare MPLNET occurrences of mixed-phase clouds to an historical climatology based on observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument aboard the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) spacecraft.

  14. Unstable dynamics, nonequilibrium phases, and criticality in networked excitable media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franciscis, S. de; Torres, J. J.; Marro, J.

    2010-01-01

    Excitable systems are of great theoretical and practical interest in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. Here, we numerically study models of excitable media, namely, networks whose nodes may occasionally be dormant and the connection weights are allowed to vary with the system activity on a short-time scale, which is a convenient and realistic representation. The resulting global activity is quite sensitive to stimuli and eventually becomes unstable also in the absence of any stimuli. Outstanding consequences of such unstable dynamics are the spontaneous occurrence of various nonequilibrium phases--including associative-memory phases and one in which the global activity wanders irregularly, e.g., chaotically among all or part of the dynamic attractors--and 1/f noise as the system is driven into the phase region corresponding to the most irregular behavior. A net result is resilience which results in an efficient search in the model attractor space that can explain the origin of some observed behavior in neural, genetic, and ill-condensed matter systems. By extensive computer simulation we also address a previously conjectured relation between observed power-law distributions and the possible occurrence of a ''critical state'' during functionality of, e.g., cortical networks, and describe the precise nature of such criticality in the model which may serve to guide future experiments.

  15. Phase-response curves and synchronized neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeal, Roy M; Ermentrout, G Bard; White, John A

    2010-08-12

    We review the principal assumptions underlying the application of phase-response curves (PRCs) to synchronization in neuronal networks. The PRC measures how much a given synaptic input perturbs spike timing in a neural oscillator. Among other applications, PRCs make explicit predictions about whether a given network of interconnected neurons will synchronize, as is often observed in cortical structures. Regarding the assumptions of the PRC theory, we conclude: (i) The assumption of noise-tolerant cellular oscillations at or near the network frequency holds in some but not all cases. (ii) Reduced models for PRC-based analysis can be formally related to more realistic models. (iii) Spike-rate adaptation limits PRC-based analysis but does not invalidate it. (iv) The dependence of PRCs on synaptic location emphasizes the importance of improving methods of synaptic stimulation. (v) New methods can distinguish between oscillations that derive from mutual connections and those arising from common drive. (vi) It is helpful to assume linear summation of effects of synaptic inputs; experiments with trains of inputs call this assumption into question. (vii) Relatively subtle changes in network structure can invalidate PRC-based predictions. (viii) Heterogeneity in the preferred frequencies of component neurons does not invalidate PRC analysis, but can annihilate synchronous activity.

  16. Rounding of abrupt phase transitions in brain networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín, Paula Villa; Moretti, Paolo; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    The observation of critical-like behavior in cortical networks represents a major step forward in elucidating how the brain manages information. Understanding the origin and functionality of critical-like dynamics, as well as its robustness, is a major challenge in contemporary neuroscience. Here, we present an extensive numerical study of a family of simple dynamical models, which describe activity propagation in brain networks through the integration of different neighboring spiking potentials, mimicking basic neural interactions. The requirement of signal integration may lead to discontinuous phase transitions in networks that are well described by the mean-field approximation, thus preventing the emergence of critical points in such systems. Brain networks, however, are finite dimensional and exhibit a heterogeneous hierarchical structure that cannot be encoded in mean-field models. Here we propose that, as a consequence of the presence of such a heterogeneous substrate with its concomitant structural disorder, critical-like features may emerge even in the presence of integration. These conclusions may prove significant in explaining the observation of traits of critical behavior in large-scale measurements of brain activity. (paper)

  17. Phase resetting reveals network dynamics underlying a bacterial cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yihan; Li, Ying; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R; Scherer, Norbert F

    2012-01-01

    Genomic and proteomic methods yield networks of biological regulatory interactions but do not provide direct insight into how those interactions are organized into functional modules, or how information flows from one module to another. In this work we introduce an approach that provides this complementary information and apply it to the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, a paradigm for cell-cycle control. Operationally, we use an inducible promoter to express the essential transcriptional regulatory gene ctrA in a periodic, pulsed fashion. This chemical perturbation causes the population of cells to divide synchronously, and we use the resulting advance or delay of the division times of single cells to construct a phase resetting curve. We find that delay is strongly favored over advance. This finding is surprising since it does not follow from the temporal expression profile of CtrA and, in turn, simulations of existing network models. We propose a phenomenological model that suggests that the cell-cycle network comprises two distinct functional modules that oscillate autonomously and couple in a highly asymmetric fashion. These features collectively provide a new mechanism for tight temporal control of the cell cycle in C. crescentus. We discuss how the procedure can serve as the basis for a general approach for probing network dynamics, which we term chemical perturbation spectroscopy (CPS).

  18. Searching for gravitational waves from the inspiral of precessing binary systems: New hierarchical scheme using 'spiky' templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandclement, Philippe; Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2003-01-01

    In a recent investigation of the effects of precession on the anticipated detection of gravitational-wave inspiral signals from compact object binaries with moderate total masses · , we found that (i) if precession is ignored, the inspiral detection rate can decrease by almost a factor of 10, and (ii) previously proposed 'mimic' templates cannot improve the detection rate significantly (by more than a factor of 2). In this paper we propose a new family of templates that can improve the detection rate by a factor of 5 or 6 in cases where precession is most important. Our proposed method for these new 'mimic' templates involves a hierarchical scheme of efficient, two-parameter template searches that can account for a sequence of spikes that appear in the residual inspiral phase, after one corrects for any oscillatory modification in the phase. We present our results for two cases of compact object masses (10 and 1.4 M · and 7 and 3 M · ) as a function of spin properties. Although further work is needed to fully assess the computational efficiency of this newly proposed template family, we conclude that these 'spiky templates' are good candidates for a family of precession templates used in realistic searches that can improve detection rates of inspiral events

  19. Transmission Network Expansion Planning Considering Phase-Shifter Transformers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso T. Miasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel mathematical model for the transmission network expansion planning problem. Main idea is to consider phase-shifter (PS transformers as a new element of the transmission system expansion together with other traditional components such as transmission lines and conventional transformers. In this way, PS are added in order to redistribute active power flows in the system and, consequently, to diminish the total investment costs due to new transmission lines. Proposed mathematical model presents the structure of a mixed-integer nonlinear programming (MINLP problem and is based on the standard DC model. In this paper, there is also applied a specialized genetic algorithm aimed at optimizing the allocation of candidate components in the network. Results obtained from computational simulations carried out with IEEE-24 bus system show an outstanding performance of the proposed methodology and model, indicating the technical viability of using these nonconventional devices during the planning process.

  20. Remoting alternatives for a multiple phased-array antenna network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zan; Foshee, James J.

    2001-10-01

    Significant improvements in technology have made phased array antennas an attractive alternative to the traditional dish antenna for use on wide body airplanes. These improvements have resulted in reduced size, reduced cost, reduced losses in the transmit and receive channels (simplifying the design), a significant extension in the bandwidth capability, and an increase in the functional capability. Flush mounting (thus reduced drag) and rapid beam switching are among the evolving desirable features of phased array antennas. Beam scanning of phased array antennas is limited to +/-45 degrees at best and therefore multiple phased array antennas would need to be used to insure instantaneous communications with any ground station (stations located at different geographical locations on the ground) and with other airborne stations. The exact number of phased array antennas and the specific installation location of each antenna on the wide body airplane would need to be determined by the specific communication requirements, but it is conceivable as many as five phased array antennas may need to be used to provide the required coverage. Control and switching of these antennas would need to be accomplished at a centralized location on the airplane and since these antennas would be at different locations on the airplane an efficient scheme of remoting would need to be used. To save in cost and keep the phased array antennas as small as possible the design of the phased array antennas would need to be kept simple. A dish antenna and a blade antenna (small size) could also be used to augment the system. Generating the RF signals at the central location and then using RF cables or waveguide to get the signal to any given antenna could result in significant RF losses. This paper will evaluate a number of remoting alternatives to keep the system design simple, reduce system cost, and utilize the functional capability of networking multiple phased array antennas on a wide body

  1. Scalable Lunar Surface Networks and Adaptive Orbit Access, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovative network architecture, protocols, and algorithms are proposed for both lunar surface networks and orbit access networks. Firstly, an overlaying...

  2. 3D quantitative phase imaging of neural networks using WDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taewoo; Liu, S. C.; Iyer, Raj; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    White-light diffraction tomography (WDT) is a recently developed 3D imaging technique based on a quantitative phase imaging system called spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM). The technique has achieved a sub-micron resolution in all three directions with high sensitivity granted by the low-coherence of a white-light source. Demonstrations of the technique on single cell imaging have been presented previously; however, imaging on any larger sample, including a cluster of cells, has not been demonstrated using the technique. Neurons in an animal body form a highly complex and spatially organized 3D structure, which can be characterized by neuronal networks or circuits. Currently, the most common method of studying the 3D structure of neuron networks is by using a confocal fluorescence microscope, which requires fluorescence tagging with either transient membrane dyes or after fixation of the cells. Therefore, studies on neurons are often limited to samples that are chemically treated and/or dead. WDT presents a solution for imaging live neuron networks with a high spatial and temporal resolution, because it is a 3D imaging method that is label-free and non-invasive. Using this method, a mouse or rat hippocampal neuron culture and a mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron culture have been imaged in order to see the extension of processes between the cells in 3D. Furthermore, the tomogram is compared with a confocal fluorescence image in order to investigate the 3D structure at synapses.

  3. Phase reduction and synchronization of a network of coupled dynamical elements exhibiting collective oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Hiroya; Yasui, Sho; Ota, Masashi; Arai, Kensuke; Kawamura, Yoji

    2018-04-01

    A general phase reduction method for a network of coupled dynamical elements exhibiting collective oscillations, which is applicable to arbitrary networks of heterogeneous dynamical elements, is developed. A set of coupled adjoint equations for phase sensitivity functions, which characterize the phase response of the collective oscillation to small perturbations applied to individual elements, is derived. Using the phase sensitivity functions, collective oscillation of the network under weak perturbation can be described approximately by a one-dimensional phase equation. As an example, mutual synchronization between a pair of collectively oscillating networks of excitable and oscillatory FitzHugh-Nagumo elements with random coupling is studied.

  4. Numerical simulations of bistable flows in precessing spheroidal shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vormann, J.; Hansen, U.

    2018-05-01

    Precession of the rotation axis is an often neglected mechanical driving mechanism for flows in planetary interiors, through viscous coupling at the boundaries and topographic forcing in non-spherical geometries. We investigate precession-driven flows in spheroidal shells over a wide range of parameters and test the results against theoretical predictions. For Ekman numbers down to 8.0 × 10-7, we see a good accordance with the work of Busse, who assumed the precession-driven flow to be dominated by a rigid rotation component that is tilted to the main rotation axis. The velocity fields show localized small-scale structures for lower Ekman numbers and clear signals of inertial waves for some parameters. For the case of moderate viscosity and strong deformation, we report the realization of multiple solutions at the same parameter combination, depending on the initial condition.

  5. Rotation Detection Using the Precession of Molecular Electric Dipole Moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yi; Deng, Xiao-Bing; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2017-11-01

    We present a method to detect the rotation by using the precession of molecular electric dipole moment in a static electric field. The molecular electric dipole moments are polarized under the static electric field and a nonzero electric polarization vector emerges in the molecular gas. A resonant radio-frequency pulse electric field is applied to realize a 90° flip of the electric polarization vector of a particular rotational state. After the pulse electric field, the electric polarization vector precesses under the static electric field. The rotation induces a shift in the precession frequency which is measured to deduce the angular velocity of the rotation. The fundamental sensitivity limit of this method is estimated. This work is only a proposal and does not involve experimental results.

  6. Bounce Precession Fishbones in the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eric Fredrickson; Liu Chen; Roscoe White Eric Fredrickson; Liu Chen; Roscoe White

    2003-01-01

    Bursting modes are observed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557], which are identified as bounce-precession-frequency fishbone modes. They are predicted to be important in high-current, low-shear discharges with a significant population of trapped particles with a large mean-bounce angle, such as produced by near-tangential beam injection into a large aspect-ratio device. Such a distribution is often stable to the usual precession-resonance fishbone mode. These modes could be important in ignited plasmas, driven by the trapped-alpha-particle population

  7. Non-resonant precession of the neutron magnetic moment in antiferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoblin, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the magnetic moment of a neutron moving in an antiferromagnet with a spiral-order magnetic field slowly precesses. Precession pitch strongly depends on the value and direction of the neutron velocity. 4 refs

  8. The precession of mercury's perihelion via perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosales, M.H.; Castro-Quilantan, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Perturbation theory is used to solve the problem of the precession of Mercury's perihelion, this phenomenon being a relativistic effect. The expansion parameter appears naturally when the orbit equation is written in an appropriate form and it completely justifies the use of the first order approximation. (author)

  9. Pseudo Steady-State Free Precession for MR-Fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assländer, Jakob; Glaser, Steffen J; Hennig, Jürgen

    2017-03-01

    This article discusses the signal behavior in the case the flip angle in steady-state free precession sequences is continuously varied as suggested for MR-fingerprinting sequences. Flip angle variations prevent the establishment of a steady state and introduce instabilities regarding to magnetic field inhomogeneities and intravoxel dephasing. We show how a pseudo steady state can be achieved, which restores the spin echo nature of steady-state free precession. Based on geometrical considerations, relationships between the flip angle, repetition and echo time are derived that suffice to the establishment of a pseudo steady state. The theory is tested with Bloch simulations as well as phantom and in vivo experiments. A typical steady-state free precession passband can be restored with the proposed conditions. The stability of the pseudo steady state is demonstrated by comparing the evolution of the signal of a single isochromat to one resulting from a spin ensemble. As confirmed by experiments, magnetization in a pseudo steady state can be described with fewer degrees of freedom compared to the original fingerprinting and the pseudo steady state results in more reliable parameter maps. The proposed conditions restore the spin-echo-like signal behavior typical for steady-state free precession in fingerprinting sequences, making this approach more robust to B 0 variations. Magn Reson Med 77:1151-1161, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Relativistic shifts of bound negative-muon precession frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, J.H.; Froese, A. M.; Fryer, B.A.; Ghandi, K.

    2005-01-01

    High-field negative-muon spin precession experiments have been performed using a backward-muon beam with substantial transverse spin polarization, facilitating high-precision measurements of the magnetogyric ratio of negative muons bound to nuclei in the ground states of muonic atoms. These results may provide a testing ground for quantum electrodynamics in very strong electromagnetic fields

  11. Satellite Orbital Precessions Caused by the Octupolar Mass Moment ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. I consider a satellite moving around a non-spherical body of mass M and equatorial radius R, and calculate its orbital precessions caused by the body's octupolar mass moment J4. I consider only the effects averaged over one orbital period T of the satellite. I give exact for- mulas, not restricted to any special values ...

  12. Resonant spin-flavor precession constraints on the neutrino ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 61; Issue 1. Resonant spin-flavor precession constraints on the neutrino parameters and the twisting structure of the solar magnetic fields from the solar neutrino data. S Dev Jyoti Dhar Sharma U C Pandey S P Sud B C Chauhan. Research Articles Volume 61 Issue 1 ...

  13. Predicting Mercury's precession using simple relativistic Newtonian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Y.; Steiner, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new simple relativistic model for planetary motion describing accurately the anomalous precession of the perihelion of Mercury and its origin. The model is based on transforming Newton's classical equation for planetary motion from absolute to real spacetime influenced by the gravitational potential and introducing the concept of influenced direction.

  14. Precessing rotating flows with additional shear: stability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhi, A; Cambon, C

    2009-03-01

    We consider unbounded precessing rotating flows in which vertical or horizontal shear is induced by the interaction between the solid-body rotation (with angular velocity Omega(0)) and the additional "precessing" Coriolis force (with angular velocity -epsilonOmega(0)), normal to it. A "weak" shear flow, with rate 2epsilon of the same order of the Poincaré "small" ratio epsilon , is needed for balancing the gyroscopic torque, so that the whole flow satisfies Euler's equations in the precessing frame (the so-called admissibility conditions). The base flow case with vertical shear (its cross-gradient direction is aligned with the main angular velocity) corresponds to Mahalov's [Phys. Fluids A 5, 891 (1993)] precessing infinite cylinder base flow (ignoring boundary conditions), while the base flow case with horizontal shear (its cross-gradient direction is normal to both main and precessing angular velocities) corresponds to the unbounded precessing rotating shear flow considered by Kerswell [Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn. 72, 107 (1993)]. We show that both these base flows satisfy the admissibility conditions and can support disturbances in terms of advected Fourier modes. Because the admissibility conditions cannot select one case with respect to the other, a more physical derivation is sought: Both flows are deduced from Poincaré's [Bull. Astron. 27, 321 (1910)] basic state of a precessing spheroidal container, in the limit of small epsilon . A Rapid distortion theory (RDT) type of stability analysis is then performed for the previously mentioned disturbances, for both base flows. The stability analysis of the Kerswell base flow, using Floquet's theory, is recovered, and its counterpart for the Mahalov base flow is presented. Typical growth rates are found to be the same for both flows at very small epsilon , but significant differences are obtained regarding growth rates and widths of instability bands, if larger epsilon values, up to 0.2, are considered. Finally

  15. NETWORK-CENTRIC TECHNOLOGIES FOR CONTROL OF THREE-PHASE NETWORK OPERATION MODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. I. Sokol

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The development of the control system for three-phase network is based on intelligent technologies of network-centric control of heterogeneous objects. The introduction of unmanned aerial vehicles for monitoring of three-phase network increases the efficiency of management. Methodology. The case of decomposition of the instantaneous capacities of the fixed and variable components for 3-wire system. The features of power balance for the different modes of its functioning. It should be noted that symmetric sinusoidal mode is balanced and good, but really unbalanced, if the standard reactive power is not zero. To solve the problem of compensation is sufficient knowledge of the total value of the inactive components of full power (value of the inactive power without detail. The creation of a methodology of measurement and assessment will require knowledge of the magnitudes of each inactive component separately, which leads to the development of a unified approach to the measurement and compensation of inactive components of full power and the development of a generalized theory of power. Results. Procedure for the compensation of the current of zero sequence excludes from circuit the source, as the active component of instantaneous power of zero sequence, and a vector due to a current of zero sequence. This procedure is performed without time delay as it does not require integration. Only a 3–wire system with symmetrical voltage eliminates pulsations and symmetrization of the equivalent conductances of the phases of the task. Under asymmetric voltage, the power is different, its analysis requires the creation of a vector mathematical model of the energy processes of asymmetrical modes of 3–phase systems. Originality. The proposed method extends the basis of the vector method for any zero sequence voltages and shows that the various theories of instantaneous power three wired scheme due to the choice of a basis in a two

  16. ESTABLISHED MODES AND STATIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THREE-PHASE ASYNCHRONOUS MOTOR POWERED WITH SINGLE PHASE NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Malyar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model is developed to study the operation of three-phase asynchronous motor with squirrel-cage rotor when the stator winding is powered from a single phase network. To create a rotating magnetic field one of the phases is fed through the capacitor. Due to the asymmetry of power feed not only transients, but the steady-state regimes are dynamic, so they are described by differential equations in any coordinate system. Their study cannot be carried out with sufficient adequacy on the basis of known equivalent circuits and require the use of dynamic parameters. In the mathematical model the state equations of the circuits of the stator and rotor are composed in the stationary three phase coordinate system. Calculation of the established mode is performed by solving the boundary problem that makes it possible to obtain the coordinate dependences over the period, without calculation of the transient process. In order to perform it, the original nonlinear differential equations are algebraized by approximating the variables with the use of cubic splines. The resulting nonlinear system of algebraic equations is a discrete analogue of the initial system of differential equations. It is solved by parameter continuation method. To calculate the static characteristics as a function of a certain variable, the system is analytically differentiated, and then numerically integrated over this variable. In the process of integration, Newton's refinement is performed at each step or at every few steps, making it possible to implement the integration in just a few steps using Euler's method. Jacobi matrices in both cases are the same. To account for the current displacement in the rods of the squirrel-cage rotor, each of them, along with the squirrel-cage rings, is divided in height into several elements. This results in several squirrel-cage rotor windings which are represented by three-phase windings with magnetic coupling between them.

  17. Flexible Tube-Based Network Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Innovation Laboratory, Inc. builds a control system which controls the topology of an air traffic flow network and the network flow properties which enables Air...

  18. Time concurrency/phase-time synchronization in digital communications networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Masami; Imaoka, Atsushi

    1990-01-01

    Digital communications networks have the intrinsic capability of time synchronization which makes it possible for networks to supply time signals to some applications and services. A practical estimation method for the time concurrency on terrestrial networks is presented. By using this method, time concurrency capability of the Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) digital communications network is estimated to be better than 300 ns rms at an advanced level, and 20 ns rms at final level.

  19. MODELING OF SYMMETRIC THREE-PHASE ASYNCHRONOUS ELECTRIC MOTOR IN ASYMMETRIC CONNECTION TO NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Lukovnikov

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows how to solve the problem concerning reveal of changes in mathematical models and electric parameters of symmetric three-phase short-circuited asynchronous electric motors in case of their connection to single- or two-phase network in comparison with their connection to three-phase network. The uniform methodological approach permitting to generalize the known data and receive new results is offered in the paper.

  20. LDV survey of cavitation and resonance effect on the precessing vortex rope dynamics in the draft tube of Francis turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favrel, A.; Müller, A.; Landry, C.; Yamamoto, K.; Avellan, F.

    2016-11-01

    The large-scale penetration of the electrical grid by intermittent renewable energy sources requires a continuous operating range extension of hydropower plants. This causes the formation of unfavourable flow patterns in the draft tube of turbines and pump-turbines. At partial load operation, a precessing cavitation vortex rope is formed at the Francis turbine runner outlet, acting as an excitation source for the hydraulic system. In case of resonance, the resulting high-amplitude pressure pulsations can put at risk the stability of the machine and of the electrical grid to which it is connected. It is therefore crucial to understand and accurately simulate the underlying physical mechanisms in such conditions. However, the exact impact of cavitation and hydro-acoustic resonance on the flow velocity fluctuations in the draft tube remains to be established. The flow discharge pulsations expected to occur in the draft tube in resonance conditions have for instance never been verified experimentally. In this study, two-component Laser Doppler Velocimetry is used to investigate the axial and tangential velocity fluctuations at the runner outlet of a reduced scale physical model of a Francis turbine. The investigation is performed for a discharge equal to 64 % of the nominal value and three different pressure levels in the draft tube, including resonance and cavitation-free conditions. Based on the convective pressure fluctuations induced by the vortex precession, the periodical velocity fluctuations over one typical precession period are recovered by phase averaging. The impact of cavitation and hydro-acoustic resonance on both axial and tangential velocity fluctuations in terms of amplitude and phase shift is highlighted for the first time. It is shown that the occurrence of resonance does not have significant effects on the draft tube velocity fields, suggesting that the synchronous axial velocity fluctuations are surprisingly negligible compared to the velocity

  1. Steady flow in a rotating sphere with strong precession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Shigeo

    2018-04-01

    The steady flow in a rotating sphere is investigated by asymptotic analysis in the limit of strong precession. The whole spherical body is divided into three regions in terms of the flow characteristics: the critical band, which is the close vicinity surrounding the great circle perpendicular to the precession axis, the boundary layer, which is attached to the whole sphere surface and the inviscid region that occupies the majority of the sphere. The analytic expressions, in the leading order of the asymptotic expansion, of the velocity field are obtained in the former two, whereas partial differential equations for the velocity field are derived in the latter, which are solved numerically. This steady flow structure is confirmed by the corresponding direct numerical simulation.

  2. From the Kinematics of Precession Motion to Generalized Rabi Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danail S. Brezov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We use both vector-parameter and quaternion techniques to provide a thorough description of several classes of rotations, starting with coaxial angular velocity Ω of varying magnitude. Then, we fix the magnitude and let Ω precess at constant rate about the z-axis, which yields a particular solution to the free Euler dynamical equations in the case of axially symmetric inertial ellipsoid. The latter appears also in the description of spin precessions in NMR and quantum computing. As we show below, this problem has analytic solutions for a much larger class of motions determined by a simple condition relating the polar angle and z-projection of Ω (expressed in cylindrical coordinates, which are both time-dependent in the generic case. Relevant physical examples are also provided.

  3. Precessing vortex core in a swirling wake with heat release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunova, A.; Klimov, A.; Molevich, N.; Moralev, I.; Porfiriev, D.; Sugak, S.; Zavershinskii, I.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Precessing vortex core is left-handed co-rotated bending single-vortex structure. • The precession frequency grows with the heat-source power. • Growth of the heat-source power decreases vortex core oscillations. • The left-handed bending mode is the most unstable mode in the low-density wake. - Abstract: Numerical simulation of the non-stationary three-dimensional swirling flow is presented for an open tube with a paraxial heat source. In the considered type of swirling flows, it is shown that a precessing vortex core (PVC) appears. The obtained PVC is a left-handed co-rotated bending single-vortex structure. The influence of the heat release enhancement on parameters of PVC is investigated. Using various turbulence models (the Spalart–Allmaras, k–ω and SST models), it is shown that an increase in the heat-source power leads to an increase in the PVC frequency and to a decrease in the amplitude of PVC oscillations. Moreover, we conduct the linear stability analysis of the simplified flow model with paraxial heating (the Rankine vortex with the piecewise axial flow and density) and demonstrate that its results correspond to the results of numerical simulations rather well. In particular, we prove that the left-handed bending mode (m = +1) is the most unstable one in the low-density wake and its frequency increases with a decrease of density ratio that is similar to the behavior of precession frequency with an increase of heat-source power.

  4. Reorientation precession measurements of quadrupole moments in 103Rh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelberg, A.; Herskind, B.; Kalish, R.; Neiman, M.

    1976-01-01

    The quadrupole moments of the 3/2 - and 5/2 - states in 103 Rh have been determined by measuring the precession of the gamma-ray angular distribution following Coulomb excitation; 16 O and 32 S beams have been used. The structure of the negative-parity states in 103 Rh is found to be in agreement with the model of Arima and Iachello. (orig.) [de

  5. MR fingerprinting using fast imaging with steady state precession (FISP) with spiral readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yun; Ma, Dan; Seiberlich, Nicole; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    This study explores the possibility of using gradient echo-based sequences other than balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) in the magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF) framework to quantify the relaxation parameters . An MRF method based on a fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) sequence structure is presented. A dictionary containing possible signal evolutions with physiological range of T1 and T2 was created using the extended phase graph formalism according to the acquisition parameters. The proposed method was evaluated in a phantom and a human brain. T1 , T2 , and proton density were quantified directly from the undersampled data by the pattern recognition algorithm. T1 and T2 values from the phantom demonstrate that the results of MRF FISP are in good agreement with the traditional gold-standard methods. T1 and T2 values in brain are within the range of previously reported values. MRF-FISP enables a fast and accurate quantification of the relaxation parameters. It is immune to the banding artifact of bSSFP due to B0 inhomogeneities, which could improve the ability to use MRF for applications beyond brain imaging. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Effect of precession on the mixing of a jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobes, D.S. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Nathan, G.J. [Adelaide Univ., Adelaide (Australia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    The mixing of fuel and oxidant are fundamentally linked to the performance characteristics of a diffusion flame, including radiant emissions, flame stability, pollutant emissions and overall dimensions such as flame length and width. Modification of these characteristics through the mixing field can be achieved by appropriate nozzle design. One method is to precess the nozzle fluid which can be gained by fluidic or mechanical means. This paper described the effect of precession on the mixing field from a mechanical nozzle using a two-dimensional imaging technique based on Mie scattering. The paper discussed the experimental technique as well as the results and discussion. The effect of precessing the jet was to create a large scale helix in the near field that contained two counter-rotating vortices within it. This flow supplied high concentration fluid to a region above the nozzle exit that had low momentum and low shear. The resulting flow field had scale mixing larger than the local length scales of the flow in a region close to the nozzle exit. It was found that the flow field beyond this region had low rate of mixing similar to the far field of a jet. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Multivariate recurrence network analysis for characterizing horizontal oil-water two-phase flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Zhang, Xin-Wang; Jin, Ning-De; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2013-09-01

    Characterizing complex patterns arising from horizontal oil-water two-phase flows is a contemporary and challenging problem of paramount importance. We design a new multisector conductance sensor and systematically carry out horizontal oil-water two-phase flow experiments for measuring multivariate signals of different flow patterns. We then infer multivariate recurrence networks from these experimental data and investigate local cross-network properties for each constructed network. Our results demonstrate that a cross-clustering coefficient from a multivariate recurrence network is very sensitive to transitions among different flow patterns and recovers quantitative insights into the flow behavior underlying horizontal oil-water flows. These properties render multivariate recurrence networks particularly powerful for investigating a horizontal oil-water two-phase flow system and its complex interacting components from a network perspective.

  8. Complex network analysis in inclined oil–water two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong-Ke, Gao; Ning-De, Jin

    2009-01-01

    Complex networks have established themselves in recent years as being particularly suitable and flexible for representing and modelling many complex natural and artificial systems. Oil–water two-phase flow is one of the most complex systems. In this paper, we use complex networks to study the inclined oil–water two-phase flow. Two different complex network construction methods are proposed to build two types of networks, i.e. the flow pattern complex network (FPCN) and fluid dynamic complex network (FDCN). Through detecting the community structure of FPCN by the community-detection algorithm based on K-means clustering, useful and interesting results are found which can be used for identifying three inclined oil–water flow patterns. To investigate the dynamic characteristics of the inclined oil–water two-phase flow, we construct 48 FDCNs under different flow conditions, and find that the power-law exponent and the network information entropy, which are sensitive to the flow pattern transition, can both characterize the nonlinear dynamics of the inclined oil–water two-phase flow. In this paper, from a new perspective, we not only introduce a complex network theory into the study of the oil–water two-phase flow but also indicate that the complex network may be a powerful tool for exploring nonlinear time series in practice. (general)

  9. Markov transition probability-based network from time series for characterizing experimental two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Zhong-Ke; Hu Li-Dan; Jin Ning-De

    2013-01-01

    We generate a directed weighted complex network by a method based on Markov transition probability to represent an experimental two-phase flow. We first systematically carry out gas—liquid two-phase flow experiments for measuring the time series of flow signals. Then we construct directed weighted complex networks from various time series in terms of a network generation method based on Markov transition probability. We find that the generated network inherits the main features of the time series in the network structure. In particular, the networks from time series with different dynamics exhibit distinct topological properties. Finally, we construct two-phase flow directed weighted networks from experimental signals and associate the dynamic behavior of gas-liquid two-phase flow with the topological statistics of the generated networks. The results suggest that the topological statistics of two-phase flow networks allow quantitative characterization of the dynamic flow behavior in the transitions among different gas—liquid flow patterns. (general)

  10. Security-Enhanced Autonomous Network Management for Space Networking, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) program is integrating its three current agency networks: Space Network (SN), Deep Space Network (DSN), and Near...

  11. Regional Educational Laboratory Electronic Network Phase 2 System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cradler, John

    1995-01-01

    The Far West Laboratory in collaboration with the other regional educational laboratories is establishing a regionally coordinated telecommunication network to electronically interconnect each of the ten regional laboratories with educators and education stakeholders from the school to the state level. For the national distributed information database, each lab is working with mid-level networks to establish a common interface for networking throughout the country and include topics of importance to education reform as assessment and technology planning.

  12. Miniature Network Data Acquisition System for Airborne Sensors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Over-the-horizon communications and information networks are beginning to produce sustainable capabilities for Earth science operations using advanced unpiloted...

  13. Viet Nam Economic Research Network (VERN) - Phase II | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    VERN I (101273) constituted the first network for young economic researchers in Viet Nam, where previously there had been no modality for cooperation or peer review. Guided by the philosophy of "understanding and managing globalization" that underpinned the earlier project, VERN II proposes to expand the network, ...

  14. Core Support to Global Development Network (GND) - Phase II ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Global Development Network (GDN) was launched by the World Bank in 1999 on the premise that good policy research, properly applied, can accelerate development and improve people's lives. Working mainly through regional networks, GDN supports economic and, increasingly, social science research in and on ...

  15. Application of neural networks to prediction of phase transport characteristics in high-pressure two-phase turbulent bubbly flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, A.-S.; Kuo, T.-C.; Ling, P.-H.

    2003-01-01

    The phase transport phenomenon of the high-pressure two-phase turbulent bubbly flow involves complicated interfacial interactions of the mass, momentum, and energy transfer processes between phases, revealing that an enormous effort is required in characterizing the liquid-gas flow behavior. Nonetheless, the instantaneous information of bubbly flow properties is often desired for many industrial applications. This investigation aims to demonstrate the successful use of neural networks in the real-time determination of two-phase flow properties at elevated pressures. Three back-propagation neural networks, trained with the simulation results of a comprehensive theoretical model, are established to predict the transport characteristics (specifically the distributions of void-fraction and axial liquid-gas velocities) of upward turbulent bubbly pipe flows at pressures covering 3.5-7.0 MPa. Comparisons of the predictions with the test target vectors indicate that the averaged root-mean-squared (RMS) error for each one of three back-propagation neural networks is within 4.59%. In addition, this study appraises the effects of different network parameters, including the number of hidden nodes, the type of transfer function, the number of training pairs, the learning rate-increasing ratio, the learning rate-decreasing ratio, and the momentum value, on the training quality of neural networks.

  16. Phase dynamics of complex-valued neural networks and its application to traffic signal control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Ikuko; Iritani, Takeshi; Sakakibara, Kazutoshi; Kuroe, Yasuaki

    2005-01-01

    Complex-valued Hopfield networks which possess the energy function are analyzed. The dynamics of the network with certain forms of an activation function is de-composable into the dynamics of the amplitude and phase of each neuron. Then the phase dynamics is described as a coupled system of phase oscillators with a pair-wise sinusoidal interaction. Therefore its phase synchronization mechanism is useful for the area-wide offset control of the traffic signals. The computer simulations show the effectiveness under the various traffic conditions.

  17. Improving the phase stability of the SLAC rf driveline network for SLC operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, J.N.; Hogg, H.A.

    1983-01-01

    Successful operation of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) will require greater phase stability from the two-mile long rf drive network than previous linac operation did. This paper discusses four proposed modifications of the present system that should help achieve the general objective to reduce all long term temperature and atmospheric pressure induced phase variations to less than 20 0 at 2856 MHz, so that the phase/amplitude detector subsystems, which will control the network output phases relative to a beam reference, will operate within their most accurate ranges

  18. Wireless Networked Sensors for Remote Monitoring in Propulsion Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Phase I SBIR program would fabricate wireless networked nanomembrane (NM) based surface pressure sensors for remote monitoring in propulsion systems, using...

  19. Multi-Cluster Network on a Chip Reconfigurable Radiation Hardened Radio, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase-I research is to architect, model and simulate a multi-cluster Network on a Chip (NoC) reconfigurable Radio in SystemC RTL, with...

  20. The phases of large networks with edge and triangle constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Richard; Radin, Charles; Ren, Kui; Sadun, Lorenzo

    2017-10-01

    Based on numerical simulation and local stability analysis we describe the structure of the phase space of the edge/triangle model of random graphs. We support simulation evidence with mathematical proof of continuity and discontinuity for many of the phase transitions. All but one of the many phase transitions in this model break some form of symmetry, and we use this model to explore how changes in symmetry are related to discontinuities at these transitions.

  1. Maxwell rigidity and topological constraints in amorphous phase-change networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micoulaut, M.; Otjacques, C.; Raty, J.-Y.; Bichara, C.

    2011-01-01

    By analyzing first-principles molecular-dynamics simulations of different telluride amorphous networks, we develop a method for the enumeration of radial and angular topological constraints, and show that the phase diagram of the most popular system Ge-Sb-Te can be split into two compositional elastic phases: a tellurium rich flexible phase and a stressed rigid phase that contains most of the materials used in phase-change applications. This sound atomic scale insight should open new avenues for the understanding of phase-change materials and other complex amorphous materials from the viewpoint of rigidity.

  2. SELENE - Self-Forming Extensible Lunar EVA Network, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar EVA network will exhibit a wide range of connectivity levels due to the challenging communications environment and mission dynamics. Disruption-Tolerant...

  3. Knowledge in Access in Rural Interconnected Areas Network Phase ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Researchers will explore network management issues by -examining KariaNet's ... Institution Country. Lebanon. Institution Website. http://www.aub.edu.lb ... IDRC “unpacks women's empowerment” at McGill University Conference. Findings ...

  4. V-Band Wireless Surface Networks, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA GLENN RESEARCH CENTER in Topic O1.10 has identified the need to provide surface communications networks for human and robotic missions to explore the Moon and...

  5. Wideband Autonomous Cognitive Radios for Networked Satellites Communications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Wideband Autonomous Cognitive Radios (WACRs) are advanced radios that have the ability to sense state of the RF spectrum and the network and self-optimize its...

  6. Wideband autonomous cognitive radios for networked satellites communications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is growing recognition that success in a variety of space mission types can be greatly enhanced by making current communication transceivers and networks...

  7. Complete and phase synchronization in a heterogeneous small-world neuronal network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Han; Qi-Shao, Lu; Quan-Bao, Ji; Marian, Wiercigroch

    2009-01-01

    Synchronous firing of neurons is thought to be important for information communication in neuronal networks. This paper investigates the complete and phase synchronization in a heterogeneous small-world chaotic Hindmarsh–Rose neuronal network. The effects of various network parameters on synchronization behaviour are discussed with some biological explanations. Complete synchronization of small-world neuronal networks is studied theoretically by the master stability function method. It is shown that the coupling strength necessary for complete or phase synchronization decreases with the neuron number, the node degree and the connection density are increased. The effect of heterogeneity of neuronal networks is also considered and it is found that the network heterogeneity has an adverse effect on synchrony. (general)

  8. Precipitate statistics in an Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy from scanning precession electron diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunde, J. K.; Paulsen, Ø.; Wenner, S.; Holmestad, R.

    2017-09-01

    The key microstructural feature providing strength to age-hardenable Al alloys is nanoscale precipitates. Alloy development requires a reliable statistical assessment of these precipitates, in order to link the microstructure with material properties. Here, it is demonstrated that scanning precession electron diffraction combined with computational analysis enable the semi-automated extraction of precipitate statistics in an Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy. Among the main findings is the precipitate number density, which agrees well with a conventional method based on manual counting and measurements. By virtue of its data analysis objectivity, our methodology is therefore seen as an advantageous alternative to existing routines, offering reproducibility and efficiency in alloy statistics. Additional results include improved qualitative information on phase distributions. The developed procedure is generic and applicable to any material containing nanoscale precipitates.

  9. Current distribution in LV networks during 1-phase MV short-circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waes, van J.B.M.; Provoost, F.; Merwe, van der J.; Cobben, J.F.G.; Deursen, van A.P.J.; van Riet, M.J.M.; Laan, van der P.C.T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the consequences of a fault in a medium voltage network on the grounding systems at the LV-side. To study the current distribution and to verify the models, we deliberately introduced one phase to ground faults in the 10 kV floating MV network. The selected site was the end of a

  10. Voltage Management in Unbalanced Low Voltage Networks Using a Decoupled Phase-Tap-Changer Transformer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coppo, Massimiliano; Turri, Roberto; Marinelli, Mattia

    2014-01-01

    The paper studies a medium voltage-low voltage transformer with a decoupled on load tap changer capability on each phase. The overall objective is the evaluation of the potential benefits on a low voltage network of such possibility. A realistic Danish low voltage network is used for the analysis...

  11. Motif distributions in phase-space networks for characterizing experimental two-phase flow patterns with chaotic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Jin, Ning-De; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2010-07-01

    The dynamics of two-phase flows have been a challenging problem in nonlinear dynamics and fluid mechanics. We propose a method to characterize and distinguish patterns from inclined water-oil flow experiments based on the concept of network motifs that have found great usage in network science and systems biology. In particular, we construct from measured time series phase-space complex networks and then calculate the distribution of a set of distinct network motifs. To gain insight, we first test the approach using time series from classical chaotic systems and find a universal feature: motif distributions from different chaotic systems are generally highly heterogeneous. Our main finding is that the distributions from experimental two-phase flows tend to be heterogeneous as well, suggesting the underlying chaotic nature of the flow patterns. Calculation of the maximal Lyapunov exponent provides further support for this. Motif distributions can thus be a feasible tool to understand the dynamics of realistic two-phase flow patterns.

  12. Type-I superconductivity and neutron star precession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedrakian, Armen

    2005-01-01

    Type-I proton superconducting cores of neutron stars break up in a magnetic field into alternating domains of superconducting and normal fluids. We examine two channels of superfluid-normal fluid friction where (i) rotational vortices are decoupled from the nonsuperconducting domains and the interaction is due to the strong force between protons and neutrons; (ii) the nonsuperconducting domains are dynamically coupled to the vortices and the vortex motion generates transverse electric fields within them, causing electronic current flow and Ohmic dissipation. The obtained dissipation coefficients are consistent with the Eulerian precession of neutron stars

  13. Resonant spin-flavor precession of neutrino and the solar neutrino problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmedov, E.Kh.; Bychuk, O.V.; AN SSSR, Moscow

    1989-01-01

    Resonant amplification of spin-flavor precession of neutrinos in solar matter is considered. Some possible consequences of the process are discussed. It is shown that resonant spin-flavor neutrino precession may account for the deficit of solar neutrinos in Davis' experiment and the anticorrelation between the rate of neutrino counting and solar activity. Experiments are considered which should make it possible to distinguish between spin-flavor neutrino precession and the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effect. A new restriction on the usual spin precession of solar neutrinos is derived

  14. An Application of Social Network Analysis on Military Strategy, System Networks and the Phases of War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    power grid network also used by Watts and Strogatz [53]. A summary of all exemplar networks is located in Table 9 below: Table 9: Full Exemplar...53] D. J. Watts and S. H. Strogatz , “Collective Dynamics of “Small World” networks,” Nature, no. 393, pp. 440-442, 1998. [54] M. E. Porter

  15. Oscillator Neural Network Retrieving Sparsely Coded Phase Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Toshio; Nomura, Masaki

    1999-08-01

    Little is known theoretically about the associative memory capabilities of neural networks in which information is encoded not only in the mean firing rate but also in the timing of firings. Particularly, in the case of sparsely coded patterns, it is biologically important to consider the timings of firings and to study how such consideration influences storage capacities and quality of recalled patterns. For this purpose, we propose a simple extended model of oscillator neural networks to allow for expression of a nonfiring state. Analyzing both equilibrium states and dynamical properties in recalling processes, we find that the system possesses good associative memory.

  16. Scalable Lunar Surface Networks and Adaptive Orbit Access, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Based on our proposed innovations and accomplished work in Phase I, we will focus on developing the new MAC protocol and hybrid routing protocol for lunar surface...

  17. A Two-Phase Coverage-Enhancing Algorithm for Hybrid Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingguo Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Providing field coverage is a key task in many sensor network applications. In certain scenarios, the sensor field may have coverage holes due to random initial deployment of sensors; thus, the desired level of coverage cannot be achieved. A hybrid wireless sensor network is a cost-effective solution to this problem, which is achieved by repositioning a portion of the mobile sensors in the network to meet the network coverage requirement. This paper investigates how to redeploy mobile sensor nodes to improve network coverage in hybrid wireless sensor networks. We propose a two-phase coverage-enhancing algorithm for hybrid wireless sensor networks. In phase one, we use a differential evolution algorithm to compute the candidate’s target positions in the mobile sensor nodes that could potentially improve coverage. In the second phase, we use an optimization scheme on the candidate’s target positions calculated from phase one to reduce the accumulated potential moving distance of mobile sensors, such that the exact mobile sensor nodes that need to be moved as well as their final target positions can be determined. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm provided significant improvement in terms of area coverage rate, average moving distance, area coverage–distance rate and the number of moved mobile sensors, when compare with other approaches.

  18. Equatorial insolation: from precession harmonics to eccentricity frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Berger

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the paper by Hays et al. (1976, spectral analyses of climate proxy records provide substantial evidence that a fraction of the climatic variance is driven by insolation changes in the frequency ranges of obliquity and precession variations. However, it is the variance components centered near 100 kyr which dominate most Upper Pleistocene climatic records, although the amount of insolation perturbation at the eccentricity driven periods close to 100-kyr (mainly the 95 kyr- and 123 kyr-periods is much too small to cause directly a climate change of ice-age amplitude. Many attempts to find an explanation to this 100-kyr cycle in climatic records have been made over the last decades. Here we show that the double maximum which characterizes the daily irradiation received in tropical latitudes over the course of the year is at the origin in equatorial insolation of not only strong 95 kyr and 123 kyr periods related to eccentricity, but also of a 11-kyr and a 5.5-kyr periods related to precession.

  19. Organization of Anti-Phase Synchronization Pattern in Neural Networks: What are the Key Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Zhou, Changsong

    2011-01-01

    Anti-phase oscillation has been widely observed in cortical neural network. Elucidating the mechanism underlying the organization of anti-phase pattern is of significance for better understanding more complicated pattern formations in brain networks. In dynamical systems theory, the organization of anti-phase oscillation pattern has usually been considered to relate to time delay in coupling. This is consistent to conduction delays in real neural networks in the brain due to finite propagation velocity of action potentials. However, other structural factors in cortical neural network, such as modular organization (connection density) and the coupling types (excitatory or inhibitory), could also play an important role. In this work, we investigate the anti-phase oscillation pattern organized on a two-module network of either neuronal cell model or neural mass model, and analyze the impact of the conduction delay times, the connection densities, and coupling types. Our results show that delay times and coupling types can play key roles in this organization. The connection densities may have an influence on the stability if an anti-phase pattern exists due to the other factors. Furthermore, we show that anti-phase synchronization of slow oscillations can be achieved with small delay times if there is interaction between slow and fast oscillations. These results are significant for further understanding more realistic spatiotemporal dynamics of cortico-cortical communications. PMID:22232576

  20. Social climber attachment in forming networks produces a phase transition in a measure of connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Dane; Larremore, Daniel B.

    2012-09-01

    The formation and fragmentation of networks are typically studied using percolation theory, but most previous research has been restricted to studying a phase transition in cluster size, examining the emergence of a giant component. This approach does not study the effects of evolving network structure on dynamics that occur at the nodes, such as the synchronization of oscillators and the spread of information, epidemics, and neuronal excitations. We introduce and analyze an alternative link-formation rule, called social climber (SC) attachment, that may be combined with arbitrary percolation models to produce a phase transition using the largest eigenvalue of the network adjacency matrix as the order parameter. This eigenvalue is significant in the analyses of many network-coupled dynamical systems in which it measures the quality of global coupling and is hence a natural measure of connectivity. We highlight the important self-organized properties of SC attachment and discuss implications for controlling dynamics on networks.

  1. Phase-locking and bistability in neuronal networks with synaptic depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcay, Zeynep; Huang, Xinxian; Nadim, Farzan; Bose, Amitabha

    2018-02-01

    We consider a recurrent network of two oscillatory neurons that are coupled with inhibitory synapses. We use the phase response curves of the neurons and the properties of short-term synaptic depression to define Poincaré maps for the activity of the network. The fixed points of these maps correspond to phase-locked modes of the network. Using these maps, we analyze the conditions that allow short-term synaptic depression to lead to the existence of bistable phase-locked, periodic solutions. We show that bistability arises when either the phase response curve of the neuron or the short-term depression profile changes steeply enough. The results apply to any Type I oscillator and we illustrate our findings using the Quadratic Integrate-and-Fire and Morris-Lecar neuron models.

  2. A multi-scale network method for two-phase flow in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khayrat, Karim, E-mail: khayratk@ifd.mavt.ethz.ch; Jenny, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Pore-network models of porous media are useful in the study of pore-scale flow in porous media. In order to extract macroscopic properties from flow simulations in pore-networks, it is crucial the networks are large enough to be considered representative elementary volumes. However, existing two-phase network flow solvers are limited to relatively small domains. For this purpose, a multi-scale pore-network (MSPN) method, which takes into account flow-rate effects and can simulate larger domains compared to existing methods, was developed. In our solution algorithm, a large pore network is partitioned into several smaller sub-networks. The algorithm to advance the fluid interfaces within each subnetwork consists of three steps. First, a global pressure problem on the network is solved approximately using the multiscale finite volume (MSFV) method. Next, the fluxes across the subnetworks are computed. Lastly, using fluxes as boundary conditions, a dynamic two-phase flow solver is used to advance the solution in time. Simulation results of drainage scenarios at different capillary numbers and unfavourable viscosity ratios are presented and used to validate the MSPN method against solutions obtained by an existing dynamic network flow solver.

  3. A multi-scale network method for two-phase flow in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayrat, Karim; Jenny, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Pore-network models of porous media are useful in the study of pore-scale flow in porous media. In order to extract macroscopic properties from flow simulations in pore-networks, it is crucial the networks are large enough to be considered representative elementary volumes. However, existing two-phase network flow solvers are limited to relatively small domains. For this purpose, a multi-scale pore-network (MSPN) method, which takes into account flow-rate effects and can simulate larger domains compared to existing methods, was developed. In our solution algorithm, a large pore network is partitioned into several smaller sub-networks. The algorithm to advance the fluid interfaces within each subnetwork consists of three steps. First, a global pressure problem on the network is solved approximately using the multiscale finite volume (MSFV) method. Next, the fluxes across the subnetworks are computed. Lastly, using fluxes as boundary conditions, a dynamic two-phase flow solver is used to advance the solution in time. Simulation results of drainage scenarios at different capillary numbers and unfavourable viscosity ratios are presented and used to validate the MSPN method against solutions obtained by an existing dynamic network flow solver.

  4. Coherent chirped pulse laser network with Mickelson phase conjugator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okulov, A Yu

    2014-04-10

    The mechanisms of nonlinear phase-locking of a large fiber amplifier array are analyzed. The preference is given to the most suitable configuration for a coherent coupling of thousands of fundamental spatial mode fiber beams into a single smooth beam ready for chirped pulse compression. It is shown that a Michelson phase-conjugating configuration with double passage through an array of fiber amplifiers has the definite advantage compared to a one-way fiber array coupled in a Mach-Zehnder configuration. Regardless of the amount of synchronized fiber amplifiers, the Michelson phase-conjugating interferometer is expected to do a perfect compensation of the phase-piston errors and collimation of backwardly amplified fiber beams on an entrance/output beam splitter. In both configurations, the nonlinear transformation of the stretched pulse envelope, due to gain saturation, is capable of randomizing the position of chirp inside an envelope; thus it may reduce the visibility of the interference pattern at an output beam splitter. Certain advantages are inherent to the sech-form temporal envelope because of the exponential precursor and self-similar propagation in gain medium. The Gaussian envelope is significantly compressed in a deep gain saturation regime, and the frequency chirp position inside pulse envelope is more deformed.

  5. Geometrical characterization of interconnected phase networks in three dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Hansen, Karin Vels; Larsen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    In electrochemical devices such as fuel cells or batteries the microstructure is a determining factor for the performance of the device. To be able to optimize the microstructure it is important to be able to quantitatively measure key structural parameters, such that systematic studies can be made...... to the analysis of each of the three phases in a solid oxide fuel cell sample....

  6. Animal Telemetry Network Data Assembly Center: Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    marine animal tags (Archival, Satellite and Acoustic) and from several marine animals (Fish, Sharks, Marine Mammals , Turtles and Seabirds); • Deploy...Restoration 3 Program (DARRPA) phase of the U.S. Government’s response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico . The U.S. IOOS

  7. Nonlinear analysis of gas-water/oil-water two-phase flow in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of multi-phase flows has been a challenge in the fields of nonlinear dynamics and fluid mechanics. This chapter reviews our work on two-phase flow dynamics in combination with complex network theory. We systematically carried out gas-water/oil-water two-phase flow experiments for measuring the time series of flow signals which is studied in terms of the mapping from time series to complex networks. Three network mapping methods were proposed for the analysis and identification of flow patterns, i.e. Flow Pattern Complex Network (FPCN), Fluid Dynamic Complex Network (FDCN) and Fluid Structure Complex Network (FSCN). Through detecting the community structure of FPCN based on K-means clustering, distinct flow patterns can be successfully distinguished and identified. A number of FDCN’s under different flow conditions were constructed in order to reveal the dynamical characteristics of two-phase flows. The FDCNs exhibit universal power-law degree distributions. The power-law exponent ...

  8. The Pole Orientation, Pole Precession, and Moment of Inertia Factor of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, R. A.; French, R. G.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M.; Colwell, J. E.; Marouf, E.; Rappaport, N.; McGhee, C.; Sepersky, T.; Lonergan, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses our determination of the Saturn's pole orientation and precession using a combination of Earthbased and spacecraft based observational data. From our model of the polar motion and the observed precession rate we obtain a value for Saturn's polar moment of inertia

  9. Nano-phase separation and structural ordering in silica-rich mixed network former glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Youngman, Randall E; Kapoor, Saurabh; Jensen, Lars R; Smedskjaer, Morten M; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2018-06-13

    We investigate the structure, phase separation, glass transition, and crystallization in a mixed network former glass series, i.e., B2O3-Al2O3-SiO2-P2O5 glasses with varying SiO2/B2O3 molar ratio. All the studied glasses exhibit two separate glassy phases: droplet phase (G1) with the size of 50-100 nm and matrix phase (G2), corresponding to a lower calorimetric glass transition temperature (Tg1) and a higher one (Tg2), respectively. Both Tg values decrease linearly with the substitution of B2O3 for SiO2, but the magnitude of the decrease is larger for Tg1. Based on nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy results, we infer that the G1 phase is rich in boroxol rings, while the G2 phase mainly involves the B-O-Si network. Both phases contain BPO4- and AlPO4-like units. Ordered domains occur in G2 upon isothermal and dynamic heating, driven by the structural heterogeneity in the as-prepared glasses. The structural ordering lowers the activation energy of crystal growth, thus promoting partial crystallization of G2. These findings are useful for understanding glass formation and phase separation in mixed network former oxide systems, and for tailoring their properties.

  10. Detecting phase transitions in a neural network and its application to classification of syndromes in traditional Chinese medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J; Xi, G [Key Laboratory of Complex Systems and Intelligence Science, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100080, Beijing (China); Wang, W [Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, 100029, Beijing (China)], E-mail: guangcheng.xi@ia.ac.cn

    2008-02-15

    Detecting phase transitions in neural networks (determined or random) presents a challenging subject for phase transitions play a key role in human brain activity. In this paper, we detect numerically phase transitions in two types of random neural network(RNN) under proper parameters.

  11. The gravitational wave spectrum of non-axisymmetric, freely precessing neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broeck, Chris van den

    2005-01-01

    Evidence for free precession has been observed in the radio signature of several pulsars. Freely precessing pulsars radiate gravitationally at frequencies near the rotation rate and twice the rotation rate, which for rotation frequencies greater than ∼10 Hz is in the LIGO band. In older work, the gravitational wave spectrum of a precessing neutron star has been evaluated to first order in a small precession angle. Here, we calculate the contributions to second order in the wobble angle, and we find that a new spectral line emerges. We show that for reasonable wobble angles, the second-order line may well be observable with the proposed advanced LIGO detectors for precessing neutron stars as far away as the galactic centre. Observation of the full second-order spectrum permits a direct measurement of the star's wobble angle, oblateness and deviation from axisymmetry, with the potential to significantly increase our understanding of neutron star structure

  12. Organization of anti-phase synchronization pattern in neural networks: what are the key factors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong eLi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anti-phase oscillation has been widely observed in cortical neuralnetwork. Elucidating the mechanism underlying the organization ofanti-phase pattern is of significance for better understanding morecomplicated pattern formations in brain networks. In dynamicalsystems theory, the organization of anti-phase oscillation patternhas usually been considered to relate to time-delay in coupling.This is consistent to conduction delays in real neural networks inthe brain due to finite propagation velocity of action potentials.However, other structural factors in cortical neural network, suchas modular organization (connection density and the coupling types(excitatory or inhibitory, could also play an important role. Inthis work, we investigate the anti-phase oscillation patternorganized on a two-module network of either neuronal cell model orneural mass model, and analyze the impact of the conduction delaytimes, the connection densities, and coupling types. Our resultsshow that delay times and coupling types can play key roles in thisorganization. The connection densities may have an influence on thestability if an anti-phase pattern exists due to the other factors.Furthermore, we show that anti-phase synchronization of slowoscillations can be achieved with small delay times if there isinteraction between slow and fast oscillations. These results aresignificant for further understanding more realistic spatiotemporaldynamics of cortico-cortical communications.

  13. Horizontal two phase flow pattern identification by neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crivelaro, Kelen Cristina Oliveira; Seleghim Junior, Paulo; Hervieu, Eric

    1999-01-01

    A multiphase fluid can flow according to several flow regimes. The problem associated with multiphase systems are basically related to the behavior of macroscopic parameters, such as pressure drop, thermal exchanges and so on, and their strong correlation to the flow regime. From the industrial applications point of view, the safety and longevity of equipment and systems can only be assured when they work according to the flow regimes for which they were designed to. This implies in the need to diagnose flow regimes in real time. The automatic diagnosis of flow regimes represents an objective of extreme importance, mainly for applications on nuclear and petrochemical industries. In this work, a neural network is used in association to a probe of direct visualization for the identification of a gas-liquid flow horizontal regimes, developed in an experimental circuit. More specifically, the signals produced by the probe are used to compose a qualitative image of the flow, which is promptly sent to the network for the recognition of the regimes. Results are presented for different transitions among the flow regimes, which demonstrate the extremely satisfactory performance of the diagnosis system. (author)

  14. The default mode network and the working memory network are not anti-correlated during all phases of a working memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Tommaso; Valente, Giancarlo; Linden, David E J; Re, Marta; Esposito, Fabrizio; Sack, Alexander T; Di Salle, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The default mode network and the working memory network are known to be anti-correlated during sustained cognitive processing, in a load-dependent manner. We hypothesized that functional connectivity among nodes of the two networks could be dynamically modulated by task phases across time. To address the dynamic links between default mode network and the working memory network, we used a delayed visuo-spatial working memory paradigm, which allowed us to separate three different phases of working memory (encoding, maintenance, and retrieval), and analyzed the functional connectivity during each phase within and between the default mode network and the working memory network networks. We found that the two networks are anti-correlated only during the maintenance phase of working memory, i.e. when attention is focused on a memorized stimulus in the absence of external input. Conversely, during the encoding and retrieval phases, when the external stimulation is present, the default mode network is positively coupled with the working memory network, suggesting the existence of a dynamically switching of functional connectivity between "task-positive" and "task-negative" brain networks. Our results demonstrate that the well-established dichotomy of the human brain (anti-correlated networks during rest and balanced activation-deactivation during cognition) has a more nuanced organization than previously thought and engages in different patterns of correlation and anti-correlation during specific sub-phases of a cognitive task. This nuanced organization reinforces the hypothesis of a direct involvement of the default mode network in cognitive functions, as represented by a dynamic rather than static interaction with specific task-positive networks, such as the working memory network.

  15. Spin precession in inversion-asymmetric two-dimensional systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, M.-H.; Chang, C.-R.

    2006-01-01

    We present a theoretical method to calculate the expectation value of spin in an inversion-asymmetric two-dimensional (2D) system with respect to an arbitrarily spin-polarized electron state, injected via an ideal point contact. The 2D system is confined in a [0 0 1]-grown quantum well, where both the Rashba and the Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings are taken into account. The obtained analytical results allow more concrete description of the spatial behaviors of the spin precession caused individually by the Rashba and the Dresselhaus terms. Applying the calculation on the Datta-Das spin-FET, whose original design considers only the Rashba effect inside the channel, we investigate the possible influence due to the Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling. Concluded solution is the choice of ±[1±10], in particular [1 1 0], as the channel direction

  16. Resonant spin-flavour precession of neutrinos and pulsar velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmedov, E.Kh.; Lanza, A.; Sciama, D.W.

    1997-02-01

    Young pulsars are known to exhibit large space velocities, up to 10 3 km/s. We propose a new mechanism for the generation of these large velocities based on an asymmetric emission of neutrinos during the supernova explosion. The mechanism involves the resonant spin-flavour precession of neutrinos with a transition magnetic moment in the magnetic field of the supernova. The asymmetric emission of neutrinos is due the distortion of the resonance surface by matter polarization effects in the supernova magnetic field. The requisite values of the field strengths and neutrino parameters are estimated for various neutrino conversions caused by their Dirac or Majorana-type transition magnetic moments. (author). 30 refs, 1 tab

  17. The equations of motion of a secularly precessing elliptical orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casotto, S.; Bardella, M.

    2013-01-01

    The equations of motion of a secularly precessing ellipse are developed using time as the independent variable. The equations are useful when integrating numerically the perturbations about a reference trajectory which is subject to secular perturbations in the node, the argument of pericentre and the mean motion. Usually this is done in connection with Encke's method to ensure minimal rectification frequency. Similar equations are already available in the literature, but they are either given based on the true anomaly as the independent variable or in mixed mode with respect to time through the use of a supporting equation to track the anomaly. The equations developed here form a complete and independent set of six equations in time. Reformulations both of Escobal's and Kyner and Bennett's equations are also provided which lead to a more concise form.

  18. A Precessing Jet in the CH Cyg Symbiotic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karovska, Margarita; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Carilli, Christopher L.; Hack, Warren; Raymond, John C.; Lee, Nicholas P.

    2010-02-01

    Jets have been detected in only a few symbiotic binaries to date, and CH Cyg is one of them. In 2001, a non-relativistic jet was detected in CH Cyg for the first time in X-rays. We carried out coordinated Chandra, Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and VLA observations in 2008 to study the propagation of this jet and its interaction with the circumbinary medium. We detected the jet with Chandra and HST and determined that the apex has expanded to the south from ~300 AU to ~1400 AU, with the shock front propagating with velocity <100 km s-1. The shock front has significantly slowed down since 2001. Unexpectedly, we also discovered a powerful jet in the NE-SW direction, in the X-ray, optical and radio. This jet has a multi-component structure, including an inner jet and a counterjet at ~170 AU, and a SW component ending in several clumps extending out to ~750 AU. The structure of the jet and the curvature of the outer portion of the SW jet suggest an episodically powered precessing jet or a continuous precessing jet with occasional mass ejections or pulses. We carried out detailed spatial mapping of the X-ray emission and correlation with the optical and radio emission. X-ray spectra were extracted from the central source, inner NE counterjet, and the brightest clump at a distance of ~500 AU from the central source. We discuss the initial results of our analyses, including the multi-component spectral fitting of the jet components and of the central source.

  19. A PRECESSING JET IN THE CH Cyg SYMBIOTIC SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karovska, Margarita; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Raymond, John C.; Lee, Nicholas P.; Carilli, Christopher L.; Hack, Warren

    2010-01-01

    Jets have been detected in only a few symbiotic binaries to date, and CH Cyg is one of them. In 2001, a non-relativistic jet was detected in CH Cyg for the first time in X-rays. We carried out coordinated Chandra, Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and VLA observations in 2008 to study the propagation of this jet and its interaction with the circumbinary medium. We detected the jet with Chandra and HST and determined that the apex has expanded to the south from ∼300 AU to ∼1400 AU, with the shock front propagating with velocity -1 . The shock front has significantly slowed down since 2001. Unexpectedly, we also discovered a powerful jet in the NE-SW direction, in the X-ray, optical and radio. This jet has a multi-component structure, including an inner jet and a counterjet at ∼170 AU, and a SW component ending in several clumps extending out to ∼750 AU. The structure of the jet and the curvature of the outer portion of the SW jet suggest an episodically powered precessing jet or a continuous precessing jet with occasional mass ejections or pulses. We carried out detailed spatial mapping of the X-ray emission and correlation with the optical and radio emission. X-ray spectra were extracted from the central source, inner NE counterjet, and the brightest clump at a distance of ∼500 AU from the central source. We discuss the initial results of our analyses, including the multi-component spectral fitting of the jet components and of the central source.

  20. Two-phase hybrid cryptography algorithm for wireless sensor networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawya Rizk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available For achieving security in wireless sensor networks (WSNs, cryptography plays an important role. In this paper, a new security algorithm using combination of both symmetric and asymmetric cryptographic techniques is proposed to provide high security with minimized key maintenance. It guarantees three cryptographic primitives, integrity, confidentiality and authentication. Elliptical Curve Cryptography (ECC and Advanced Encryption Standard (AES are combined to provide encryption. XOR-DUAL RSA algorithm is considered for authentication and Message Digest-5 (MD5 for integrity. The results show that the proposed hybrid algorithm gives better performance in terms of computation time, the size of cipher text, and the energy consumption in WSN. It is also robust against different types of attacks in the case of image encryption.

  1. A Unified Network Security Architecture for Large, Distributed Networks, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In typical, multi-organizational networking environments, it is difficult to define and maintain a uniform authentication scheme that provides users with easy access...

  2. Evaluation of partnership working in cities in phase IV of the WHO Healthy Cities Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, Alistair; Winters, Tim; de Leeuw, Evelyne

    2013-10-01

    An intersectoral partnership for health improvement is a requirement of the WHO European Healthy Cities Network of municipalities. A review was undertaken in 59 cities based on responses to a structured questionnaire covering phase IV of the network (2003-2008). Cities usually combined formal and informal working partnerships in a pattern seen in previous phases. However, these encompassed more sectors than previously and achieved greater degrees of collaborative planning and implementation. Additional WHO technical support and networking in phase IV significantly enhanced collaboration with the urban planning sector. Critical success factors were high-level political commitment and a well-organized Healthy City office. Partnerships remain a successful component of Healthy City working. The core principles, purpose and intellectual rationale for intersectoral partnerships remain valid and fit for purpose. This applied to long-established phase III cities as well as newcomers to phase IV. The network, and in particular the WHO brand, is well regarded and encourages political and organizational engagement and is a source of support and technical expertise. A key challenge is to apply a more rigorous analytical framework and theory-informed approach to reviewing partnership and collaboration parameters.

  3. Algorithm for detection of the broken phase conductor in the radial networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojić Mladen M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an algorithm for a directional relay to be used for a detection of the broken phase conductor in the radial networks. The algorithm would use synchronized voltages, measured at the beginning and at the end of the line, as input signals. During the process, the measured voltages would be phase-compared. On the basis of the normalized energy, the direction of the phase conductor, with a broken point, would be detected. Software tool Matlab/Simulink package has developed a radial network model which simulates the broken phase conductor. The simulations generated required input signals by which the algorithm was tested. Development of the algorithm along with the formation of the simulation model and the test results of the proposed algorithm are presented in this paper.

  4. Comparison of phase boundaries between kagomé and honeycomb superconducting wire networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yi; Huse, David A.; Chaikin, Paul M.; Higgins, Mark J.; Bhattacharya, Shobo; Spencer, David

    2002-06-01

    We measure resistively the mean-field superconducting-normal phase boundaries of both kagomé and honeycomb wire networks immersed in a transverse magnetic field. In addition to their agreement with theory about the overall shapes of phase diagrams, they show striking one-to-one correspondence between the cusps in the honeycomb phase boundary and those in the kagomé curve. This correspondence is due to their geometric arrangements and agrees with Lin and Nori's recent calculation. We also find that for the frustrated honeycomb network at f=1/2, the current patterns in the superconducting phase differ between the low-temperature London regime and the higher-temperature Ginzburg-Landau regime near Tc.

  5. Models for Master-Slave Clock Distribution Networks with Third-Order Phase-Locked Loops

    OpenAIRE

    Piqueira, José Roberto Castilho; de Carvalho Freschi, Marcela

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the processing and transmission of clock signals in networks of geographically distributed nodes, in order to derive conditions for frequency and phase synchronization between the nodes. The focus is on the master-slave architecture, which presents a priority scheme of clock distribution. One-way master-slave (OWMS ) and two-way master-slave (TWMS) chains are studied, considering that the slave nodes are third-order phase-locked loops...

  6. Voltage unbalance mitigation in LV networks using three-phase PV systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia Bajo, Cristina; Hashemi Toghroljerdi, Seyedmostafa; Bækhøj Kjær, Søren

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new method is proposed to mitigate voltage unbalance caused by single-phase solar inverters in low voltage (LV) networks. The method is based on uneven reactive power absorption and injection by three-phase solar inverters. Independent control of each phase is performed to achieve...... this uneven injection. The average values of phase voltages at the connection points of the photovoltaic (PV) inverters are used as the references for the balancing algorithm. Voltage unbalance mitigation is achieved by use of this method in different scenarios with variable three-phase and single......-phase inverters penetration in a realistic LV grid. In addition, the overvoltage is reduced by using this method....

  7. Space and time reconstruction of the precessing vortex core in Francis turbine draft tube by 2D-PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favrel, A.; Müller, A.; Landry, C.; Yamamoto, K.; Avellan, F.

    2016-11-01

    Francis turbines operating at part load conditions experience the development of a high swirling flow at the runner outlet, giving rise to the development of a cavitation precessing vortex rope in the draft tube. The latter acts as an excitation source for the hydro-mechanical system and may jeopardize the system stability if resonance conditions are met. Although many aspects of the part load issue have been widely studied in the past, the accurate stability analysis of hydro-power plants remains challenging. A better understanding of the vortex rope dynamics in a wide range of operating conditions is an important step towards the prediction and the transposition of the pressure fluctuations from reduced to prototype scale. For this purpose, an investigation of the flow velocity fields at the outlet of a Francis turbine reduced scale physical model operating at part load conditions is performed by means of 2D-PIV in three different horizontal cross-sections of the draft tube cone. The measurements are performed in cavitation-free conditions for three values of discharge factor, comprised between 60% and 81% of the value at the Best Efficiency Point. The present article describes a detailed methodology to properly recover the evolution of the velocity fields during one precession cycle by means of phase averaging. The vortex circulation is computed and the vortex trajectory over one typical precession period is finally recovered for each operating point. It is notably shown that below a given value of the discharge factor, the vortex dynamics abruptly change and loose its periodicity and coherence.

  8. Artificial neural networks using complex numbers and phase encoded weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Howard E; Awwal, Abdul Ahad S

    2010-04-01

    The model of a simple perceptron using phase-encoded inputs and complex-valued weights is proposed. The aggregation function, activation function, and learning rule for the proposed neuron are derived and applied to Boolean logic functions and simple computer vision tasks. The complex-valued neuron (CVN) is shown to be superior to traditional perceptrons. An improvement of 135% over the theoretical maximum of 104 linearly separable problems (of three variables) solvable by conventional perceptrons is achieved without additional logic, neuron stages, or higher order terms such as those required in polynomial logic gates. The application of CVN in distortion invariant character recognition and image segmentation is demonstrated. Implementation details are discussed, and the CVN is shown to be very attractive for optical implementation since optical computations are naturally complex. The cost of the CVN is less in all cases than the traditional neuron when implemented optically. Therefore, all the benefits of the CVN can be obtained without additional cost. However, on those implementations dependent on standard serial computers, CVN will be more cost effective only in those applications where its increased power can offset the requirement for additional neurons.

  9. Generalized network modeling of capillary-dominated two-phase flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeini, Ali Q; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J

    2018-02-01

    We present a generalized network model for simulating capillary-dominated two-phase flow through porous media at the pore scale. Three-dimensional images of the pore space are discretized using a generalized network-described in a companion paper [A. Q. Raeini, B. Bijeljic, and M. J. Blunt, Phys. Rev. E 96, 013312 (2017)2470-004510.1103/PhysRevE.96.013312]-which comprises pores that are divided into smaller elements called half-throats and subsequently into corners. Half-throats define the connectivity of the network at the coarsest level, connecting each pore to half-throats of its neighboring pores from their narrower ends, while corners define the connectivity of pore crevices. The corners are discretized at different levels for accurate calculation of entry pressures, fluid volumes, and flow conductivities that are obtained using direct simulation of flow on the underlying image. This paper discusses the two-phase flow model that is used to compute the averaged flow properties of the generalized network, including relative permeability and capillary pressure. We validate the model using direct finite-volume two-phase flow simulations on synthetic geometries, and then present a comparison of the model predictions with a conventional pore-network model and experimental measurements of relative permeability in the literature.

  10. Chemical and phase structure of poly cyanurate-polyurethane grafted semi interpenetrating polymer networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainleib, A.M.; Gomza, Yu.P.; Privalko, V.P.; Bershtein, V.A.; Carini, G.

    2001-01-01

    In this research the phase morphology and properties of dicyanate ester of bisphenol A (DCEBA) based poly cyanurate network (PCN) modified with linear polyurethane (LPU) were successfully studied by the combination of infra-red spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA), differential scanning calorimetry and laser-interferometric creep rate spectroscopy

  11. New all-passive 4x4 planar optical phase diversity network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soldano, L.B.; Smit, M.K.; Vreede, De A.H.; Uffelen, van J.W.M.; Verbeek, B.H.; Bennekom, van P.K.; Krom, de W.H.C.; Etten, van W.C.

    1991-01-01

    The realisation and performance of an all-passive silicon-based 4*4 planar optical hybrid receiver for operation at 1.55- mu m wavelength is reported here for the first time. Measurements show 5 degrees /12 degrees /12 degrees /9 degrees output phase deviations, without tuning or trimming. Network

  12. Design of a ring resonator-based optical beam forming network for phased array receive antennas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Klooster, J.W.J.R.; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.; Meijerink, Arjan; Zhuang, L.; Marpaung, D.A.I.; van Etten, Wim; Heideman, Rene; Leinse, Arne; Schippers, H.; Verpoorte, J.; Wintels, M.

    2008-01-01

    A novel squint-free ring resonator-based optical beam forming network (OBFN) for phased array antennas (PAA) is proposed. It is intended to provide broadband connectivity to airborne platforms via geostationary satellites. In this paper, we present the design of the OBFN and its control system. Our

  13. An Electromagnet for Precession of the Polarization of Fast-Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspesund, O.; Bjorkman, J.; Trumpy, G.

    1965-05-01

    The advantages of using a transverse magnetic field for precessing the polarization of fast-neutrons are discussed. Design details of a powerful electromagnet supplying a transverse field of approximately 20 kGauss are given. Precession characteristics for polarized fast neutrons obtained at 50 deg (lab. syst.) from the Li 7 (p, n) Be 7 reaction are reported, using elastic scattering at 42 deg (lab. syst.) off natural carbon as an analyser. Correlation of the precession data with theoretical predictions presented elsewhere is made, and good agreement is found

  14. An Electromagnet for Precession of the Polarization of Fast-Neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspesund, O; Bjorkman, J; Trumpy, G

    1965-05-15

    The advantages of using a transverse magnetic field for precessing the polarization of fast-neutrons are discussed. Design details of a powerful electromagnet supplying a transverse field of approximately 20 kGauss are given. Precession characteristics for polarized fast neutrons obtained at 50 deg (lab. syst.) from the Li{sup 7} (p, n) Be{sup 7} reaction are reported, using elastic scattering at 42 deg (lab. syst.) off natural carbon as an analyser. Correlation of the precession data with theoretical predictions presented elsewhere is made, and good agreement is found.

  15. Precessed electron beam electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Beyond channelling effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yedra, Ll.; Estradé, S., E-mail: sestrade@ub.edu [LENS, MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); TEM-MAT, CCiT, Universitat de Barcelona, Solé i Sabarís 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Torruella, P.; Eljarrat, A.; Peiró, F. [LENS, MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Darbal, A. D. [AppFive LLC, 1095 W Rio Salado Pkway, Suite 110, Tempe, Arizona 85281 (United States); Weiss, J. K. [AppFive LLC, 1095 W Rio Salado Pkway, Suite 110, Tempe, Arizona 85281 (United States); NanoMEGAS SPRL, Blvd. Edmond Machtens 79, B-1080 Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-08-04

    The effects of beam precession on the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) signal of the carbon K edge in a 2 monolayer graphene sheet are studied. In a previous work, we demonstrated the use of precession to compensate for the channeling-induced reduction of EELS signal when in zone axis. In the case of graphene, no enhancement of EELS signal is found in the usual experimental conditions, as graphene is not thick enough to present channeling effects. Interestingly, though it is found that precession makes it possible to increase the collection angle, and, thus, the overall signal, without a loss of signal-to-background ratio.

  16. Larmor precession and dwell time of a relativistic particle scattered by a rectangular quantum well

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Z J; Liang, J J; Liang, J Q

    2003-01-01

    The Larmor precession of a relativistic neutral spin particle in a uniform constant magnetic field confined to the region of a one-dimensional rectangular potential well is investigated. The spin precession serves as a clock to measure the time spent by a quantum particle dwelling at a potential well. With the help of a general spin coherent state it is explicitly shown that the spin precession time is equal to the dwell time in the first-order approximation of the infinitesimal field limit. The comparison of the time in a potential well with that in free space shows apparent superluminality.

  17. Potential pitfalls of single phasing operation in a three phase distribution network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanan, V S

    1986-07-01

    Finding it difficult to cope with the increased demand for electric power, some electricity boards have resorted to single phasing techniques in distribution system. This practice is harmful to the equipment in the power system. Some of the potential dangers associated with this undesirable practice are briefly discussed.

  18. Analysis of a phase synchronized functional network based on the rhythm of brain activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ling; Jin Zhen-Lan; Li Bin

    2011-01-01

    Rhythm of brain activities represents oscillations of postsynaptic potentials in neocortex, therefore it can serve as an indicator of the brain activity state. In order to check the connectivity of brain rhythm, this paper develops a new method of constructing functional network based on phase synchronization. Electroencephalogram (EEG) data were collected while subjects looking at a green cross in two states, performing an attention task and relaxing with eyes-open. The EEG from these two states was filtered by three band-pass filters to obtain signals of theta (4–7 Hz), alpha (8–13 Hz) and beta (14–30 Hz) bands. Mean resultant length was used to estimate strength of phase synchronization in three bands to construct networks of both states, and mean degree K and cluster coefficient C of networks were calculated as a function of threshold. The result shows higher cluster coefficient in the attention state than in the eyes-open state in all three bands, suggesting that cluster coefficient reflects brain state. In addition, an obvious fronto-parietal network is found in the attention state, which is a well-known attention network. These results indicate that attention modulates the fronto-parietal connectivity in different modes as compared with the eyes-open state. Taken together this method is an objective and important tool to study the properties of neural networks of brain rhythm. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  19. Propagation based phase retrieval of simulated intensity measurements using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Z. D. C.

    2018-04-01

    Determining the phase of a wave from intensity measurements has many applications in fields such as electron microscopy, visible light optics, and medical imaging. Propagation based phase retrieval, where the phase is obtained from defocused images, has shown significant promise. There are, however, limitations in the accuracy of the retrieved phase arising from such methods. Sources of error include shot noise, image misalignment, and diffraction artifacts. We explore the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to improve the accuracy of propagation based phase retrieval algorithms applied to simulated intensity measurements. We employ a phase retrieval algorithm based on the transport-of-intensity equation to obtain the phase from simulated micrographs of procedurally generated specimens. We then train an ANN with pairs of retrieved and exact phases, and use the trained ANN to process a test set of retrieved phase maps. The total error in the phase is significantly reduced using this method. We also discuss a variety of potential extensions to this work.

  20. Coordinated single-phase control scheme for voltage unbalance reduction in low voltage network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullaguram, Deepak; Mishra, Sukumar; Senroy, Nilanjan

    2017-08-13

    Low voltage (LV) distribution systems are typically unbalanced in nature due to unbalanced loading and unsymmetrical line configuration. This situation is further aggravated by single-phase power injections. A coordinated control scheme is proposed for single-phase sources, to reduce voltage unbalance. A consensus-based coordination is achieved using a multi-agent system, where each agent estimates the averaged global voltage and current magnitudes of individual phases in the LV network. These estimated values are used to modify the reference power of individual single-phase sources, to ensure system-wide balanced voltages and proper power sharing among sources connected to the same phase. Further, the high X / R ratio of the filter, used in the inverter of the single-phase source, enables control of reactive power, to minimize voltage unbalance locally. The proposed scheme is validated by simulating a LV distribution network with multiple single-phase sources subjected to various perturbations.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy management: flexibility, risk and optimization'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. The Precession Index and a Nonlinear Energy Balance Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubincam, David

    2004-01-01

    A simple nonlinear energy balance climate model yields a precession index-like term in the temperature. Despite its importance in the geologic record, the precession index e sin (Omega)S, where e is the Earth's orbital eccentricity and (Omega)S is the Sun's perigee in the geocentric frame, is not present in the insolation at the top of the atmosphere. Hence there is no one-for-one mapping of 23,000 and 19,000 year periodicities from the insolation to the paleoclimate record; a nonlinear climate model is needed to produce these long periods. A nonlinear energy balance climate model with radiative terms of form T n, where T is surface temperature and n less than 1, does produce e sin (omega)S terms in temperature; the e sin (omega)S terms are called Seversmith psychroterms. Without feedback mechanisms, the model achieves extreme values of 0.64 K at the maximum orbital eccentricity of 0.06, cooling one hemisphere while simultaneously warming the other; the hemisphere over which perihelion occurs is the cooler. In other words, the nonlinear energy balance model produces long-term cooling in the northern hemisphere when the Sun's perihelion is near northern summer solstice and long-term warming in the northern hemisphere when the aphelion is near northern summer solstice. (This behavior is similar to the inertialess gray body which radiates like T 4, but the amplitude is much lower for the energy balance model because of its thermal inertia.) This seemingly paradoxical behavior works against the standard Milankovitch model, which requires cool northern summers (Sun far from Earth in northern summer) to build up northern ice sheets, so that if the standard model is correct it must be more efficient than previously thought. Alternatively, the new mechanism could possibly be dominant and indicate southern hemisphere control of the northern ice sheets, wherein the southern oceans undergo a long-term cooling when the Sun is far from the Earth during northern summer. The cold

  2. Periodic Forcing of Inhibition-Stabilized Networks: Nonlinear Resonances and Phase-Amplitude Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltz, Romain; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition-stabilized networks (ISNs) are neural architectures with strong positive feedback among pyramidal neurons balanced by strong negative feedback from inhibitory interneurons, a circuit element found in the hippocampus and the primary visual cortex. In their working regime, ISNs produce damped oscillations in the γ-range in response to inputs to the inhibitory population. In order to understand the properties of interconnected ISNs, we investigated periodic forcing of ISNs. We show that ISNs can be excited over a range of frequencies and derive properties of the resonance peaks. In particular, we studied the phase-locked solutions, the torus solutions, and the resonance peaks. Periodically forced ISNs respond with (possibly multistable) phase-locked activity, whereas networks with sustained intrinsic oscillations respond more dynamically to periodic inputs with tori. Hence, the dynamics are surprisingly rich, and phase effects alone do not adequately describe the network response. This strengthens the importance of phaseamplitude coupling as opposed to phase-phase coupling in providing multiple frequencies for multiplexing and routing information. PMID:26496044

  3. Gait Phases Recognition from Accelerations and Ground Reaction Forces: Application of Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rafajlović

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to test the applicability of accelerometer as the sensor for assessment of the walking. We present here the comparison of gait phases detected from the data recorded by force sensing resistors mounted in the shoe insoles, non-processed acceleration and processed acceleration perpendicular to the direction of the foot. The gait phases in all three cases were detected by means of a neural network. The output from the neural network was the gait phase, while the inputs were data from the sensors. The results show that the errors were in the ranges: 30 ms (2.7% – force sensors; 150 ms (13.6% – nonprocessed acceleration, and 120 ms (11% – processed acceleration data. This result suggests that it is possible to use the accelerometer as the gait phase detector, however, with the knowledge that the gait phases are time shifted for about 100 ms with respect the neural network predicted times.

  4. Prediction of two-phase mixture density using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, C.; Mazzola, A.

    1997-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, the density of boiling mixtures has a significant relevance due to its influence on the neutronic balance, the power distribution and the reactor dynamics. Since the determination of the two-phase mixture density on a purely analytical basis is in fact impractical in many situations of interest, heuristic relationships have been developed based on the parameters describing the two-phase system. However, the best or even a good structure for the correlation cannot be determined in advance, also considering that it is usually desired to represent the experimental data with the most compact equation. A possible alternative to empirical correlations is the use of artificial neural networks, which allow one to model complex systems without requiring the explicit formulation of the relationships existing among the variables. In this work, the neural network methodology was applied to predict the density data of two-phase mixtures up-flowing in adiabatic channels under different experimental conditions. The trained network predicts the density data with a root-mean-square error of 5.33%, being ∼ 93% of the data points predicted within 10%. When compared with those of two conventional well-proven correlations, i.e. the Zuber-Findlay and the CISE correlations, the neural network performances are significantly better. In spite of the good accuracy of the neural network predictions, the 'black-box' characteristic of the neural model does not allow an easy physical interpretation of the knowledge integrated in the network weights. Therefore, the neural network methodology has the advantage of not requiring a formal correlation structure and of giving very accurate results, but at the expense of a loss of model transparency. (author)

  5. Entraining the topology and the dynamics of a network of phase oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendiña-Nadal, I.; Leyva, I.; Buldú, J. M.; Almendral, J. A.; Boccaletti, S.

    2009-04-01

    We show that the topology and dynamics of a network of unsynchronized Kuramoto oscillators can be simultaneously controlled by means of a forcing mechanism which yields a phase locking of the oscillators to that of an external pacemaker in connection with the reshaping of the network’s degree distribution. The entrainment mechanism is based on the addition, at regular time intervals, of unidirectional links from oscillators that follow the dynamics of a pacemaker to oscillators in the pristine graph whose phases hold a prescribed phase relationship. Such a dynamically based rule in the attachment process leads to the emergence of a power-law shape in the final degree distribution of the graph whenever the network is entrained to the dynamics of the pacemaker. We show that the arousal of a scale-free distribution in connection with the success of the entrainment process is a robust feature, characterizing different networks’ initial configurations and parameters.

  6. Phase models and clustering in networks of oscillators with delayed coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sue Ann; Wang, Zhen

    2018-01-01

    We consider a general model for a network of oscillators with time delayed coupling where the coupling matrix is circulant. We use the theory of weakly coupled oscillators to reduce the system of delay differential equations to a phase model where the time delay enters as a phase shift. We use the phase model to determine model independent existence and stability results for symmetric cluster solutions. Our results extend previous work to systems with time delay and a more general coupling matrix. We show that the presence of the time delay can lead to the coexistence of multiple stable clustering solutions. We apply our analytical results to a network of Morris Lecar neurons and compare these results with numerical continuation and simulation studies.

  7. Spin precession experiments for light axionic dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter W.; Kaplan, David E.; Mardon, Jeremy; Rajendran, Surjeet; Terrano, William A.; Trahms, Lutz; Wilkason, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Axionlike particles are promising candidates to make up the dark matter of the Universe, but it is challenging to design experiments that can detect them over their entire allowed mass range. Dark matter in general, and, in particular, axionlike particles and hidden photons, can be as light as roughly 10-22 eV (˜10-8 Hz ), with astrophysical anomalies providing motivation for the lightest masses ("fuzzy dark matter"). We propose experimental techniques for direct detection of axionlike dark matter in the mass range from roughly 10-13 eV (˜102 Hz ) down to the lowest possible masses. In this range, these axionlike particles act as a time-oscillating magnetic field coupling only to spin, inducing effects such as a time-oscillating torque and periodic variations in the spin-precession frequency with the frequency and direction of these effects set by the axion field. We describe how these signals can be measured using existing experimental technology, including torsion pendulums, atomic magnetometers, and atom interferometry. These experiments demonstrate a strong discovery capability, with future iterations of these experiments capable of pushing several orders of magnitude past current astrophysical bounds.

  8. Spinning gas clouds with precession: a new formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffet, B

    2010-01-01

    We consider Dyson's model (Dyson F J 1968 J. Math. Mech. 18 91) of an ellipsoidally stratified ideal gas cloud expanding adiabatically into a vacuum, in the Liouville integrable case where the gas is monatomic (γ = 5/3) and there is no vorticity (Gaffet B 2001a J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 34 2097; Paper I). In the cases of rotation about a fixed axis the separation of variables can be achieved, and the separable variables are linearly related to a set of three variables denoted by ρ, R, W (Gaffet B 2001b J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 34 9195; Paper II). We show in the present work that these variables admit a natural generalization to cases of rotation about a movable axis (precessing motion). The present study is restricted to the consideration of the so-called degenerate cases (see Gaffet B 2006 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 99; Paper III), but we hope to generalize our results in the future to the non-degenerate ones as well. We also present a new, compact and generally valid formulation of one of the integrals of motion, of the sixth degree in the momenta, denoted by I 6 .

  9. Continuous Faraday measurement of spin precession without light shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasperse, M.; Kewming, M. Â. J.; Fischer, S. Â. N.; Pakkiam, P.; Anderson, R. Â. P.; Turner, L. Â. D.

    2017-12-01

    We describe a dispersive Faraday optical probe of atomic spin which performs a weak measurement of spin projection of a quantum gas continuously for more than one second. To date, focusing bright far-off-resonance probes onto quantum gases has proved invasive due to strong scalar and vector light shifts exerting dipole and Stern-Gerlach forces. We show that tuning the probe near the magic-zero wavelength at 790 nm between the fine-structure doublet of 87Rb cancels the scalar light shift, and careful control of polarization eliminates the vector light shift. Faraday rotations due to each fine-structure line reinforce at this wavelength, enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio for a fixed rate of probe-induced decoherence. Using this minimally invasive spin probe, we perform microscale atomic magnetometry at high temporal resolution. Spectrogram analysis of the Larmor precession signal of a single spinor Bose-Einstein condensate measures a time-varying magnetic field strength with 1 μ G accuracy every 5 ms; or, equivalently, makes more than 200 successive measurements each at 10 pT /√{Hz } sensitivity.

  10. Precession and recession of the rock'n'roller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, Peter; Bustamante, Miguel D

    2009-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a spherical rigid body that rocks and rolls on a plane under the effect of gravity. The distribution of mass is non-uniform and the centre of mass does not coincide with the geometric centre. The symmetric case, with moments of inertia I 1 = I 2 3 , is integrable and the motion is completely regular. Three known conservation laws are the total energy E, Jellett's quantity Q J and Routh's quantity Q R . When the inertial symmetry I 1 = I 2 is broken, even slightly, the character of the solutions is profoundly changed and new types of motion become possible. We derive the equations governing the general motion and present analytical and numerical evidence of the recession, or reversal of precession, that has been observed in physical experiments. We present an analysis of recession in terms of critical lines dividing the (Q R , Q J ) plane into four dynamically disjoint zones. We prove that recession implies the lack of conservation of Jellett's and Routh's quantities, by identifying individual reversals as crossings of the orbit (Q R (t), Q J (t)) through the critical lines. Consequently, a method is found to produce a large number of initial conditions so that the system will exhibit recession.

  11. Zero-field precession and hysteretic threshold currents in a spin torque nano device with tilted polarizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Yan; Bonetti, S; Zha, C L; Akerman, Johan [Department of Microelectronics and Applied Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden)], E-mail: zhouyan@kth.se

    2009-10-15

    Using nonlinear system theory and numerical simulations, we map out the static and dynamic phase diagrams in the zero applied field of a spin torque nano device with a tilted polarizer (TP). We find that for sufficiently large currents, even very small tilt angles ({beta}>1 deg.) will lead to steady free layer precession in zero field. Within a rather large range of tilt angles, 1 deg. <{beta}<19 deg., we find coexisting static states and hysteretic switching between these using only current. In a more narrow window (1 deg. <{beta}<5 deg.) one of the static states turns into a limit cycle (precession). The coexistence of current-driven static and dynamic states in the zero magnetic field is unique to the TP device and leads to large hysteresis in the upper and lower threshold currents for its operation. The nano device with TP can facilitate the generation of large amplitude mode of spin torque signals without the need for cumbersome magnetic field sources and thus should be very important for future telecommunication applications based on spin transfer torque effects.

  12. The Weyl non-Abelian gauge field and the Thomas precession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbashov, B.M.; Pestov, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    The connection between the Fermi-Walker transport and the Weyl non-Abelian gauge field is established. A theoretical possibility of detecting the Weyl gauge field caused by the Thomas precession of a gyroscope is discussed

  13. Transport Through a Precessing Spin Coupled to Noncollinearly Polarized Ferromagnetic Leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xianchao; Xin Zihua; Feng Liya

    2010-01-01

    The quantum electronic transport through a precessing magnetic spin coupled to noncollinearly polarized ferromagnetic leads (F-MS-F) has been studied in this paper. The nonequilibrium Green function approach is used to calculate local density of states (LDOS) and current in the presence of external bias. The characters of LDOS and the electronic current are obtained. The tunneling current is investigated for different precessing angle and different configurations of the magnetization of the leads. The investigation reveals that when the precessing angle takes θ < π/2 and negative bias is applied, the resonant tunneling current appears, otherwise, it appears when positive bias is applied. When the leads are totally polarized and the precessing angel takes 0, the tunneling current changes with the configuration of two leads; and it becomes zero when the two leads are antiparallel. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  14. Implications of the Occurrence of Glitches in Pulsar Free Precession Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D I; Ashton, G; Prix, R

    2017-06-30

    The timing properties of radio pulsars provide a unique probe of neutron star interiors. Recent observations have uncovered quasiperiodicities in the timing and pulse properties of some pulsars, a phenomenon that has often been attributed to free precession of the neutron star, with profound implications for the distribution of superfluidity and superconductivity in the star. We advance this program by developing consistency relations between free precession and pulsars glitches, and we show that there are difficulties in reconciling the two phenomena in some precession candidates. This indicates that the precession model used here needs to be modified or some other phenomenon is at work in producing the quasiperiodicities, or even that there is something missing in terms of our understanding of glitches.

  15. Phase transitions in pancreatic islet cellular networks and implications for type-1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamper, I. J.; Jackson, Elais; Wang, Xujing

    2014-01-01

    In many aspects the onset of a chronic disease resembles a phase transition in a complex dynamic system: Quantitative changes accumulate largely unnoticed until a critical threshold is reached, which causes abrupt qualitative changes of the system. In this study we examine a special case, the onset of type-1 diabetes (T1D), a disease that results from loss of the insulin-producing pancreatic islet β cells. Within each islet, the β cells are electrically coupled to each other via gap-junctional channels. This intercellular coupling enables the β cells to synchronize their insulin release, thereby generating the multiscale temporal rhythms in blood insulin that are critical to maintaining blood glucose homeostasis. Using percolation theory we show how normal islet function is intrinsically linked to network connectivity. In particular, the critical amount of β-cell death at which the islet cellular network loses site percolation is consistent with laboratory and clinical observations of the threshold loss of β cells that causes islet functional failure. In addition, numerical simulations confirm that the islet cellular network needs to be percolated for β cells to synchronize. Furthermore, the interplay between site percolation and bond strength predicts the existence of a transient phase of islet functional recovery after onset of T1D and introduction of treatment, potentially explaining the honeymoon phenomenon. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the onset of T1D may be the result of a phase transition of the islet β-cell network.

  16. Generalized network modeling of capillary-dominated two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeini, Ali Q.; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J.

    2018-02-01

    We present a generalized network model for simulating capillary-dominated two-phase flow through porous media at the pore scale. Three-dimensional images of the pore space are discretized using a generalized network—described in a companion paper [A. Q. Raeini, B. Bijeljic, and M. J. Blunt, Phys. Rev. E 96, 013312 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevE.96.013312]—which comprises pores that are divided into smaller elements called half-throats and subsequently into corners. Half-throats define the connectivity of the network at the coarsest level, connecting each pore to half-throats of its neighboring pores from their narrower ends, while corners define the connectivity of pore crevices. The corners are discretized at different levels for accurate calculation of entry pressures, fluid volumes, and flow conductivities that are obtained using direct simulation of flow on the underlying image. This paper discusses the two-phase flow model that is used to compute the averaged flow properties of the generalized network, including relative permeability and capillary pressure. We validate the model using direct finite-volume two-phase flow simulations on synthetic geometries, and then present a comparison of the model predictions with a conventional pore-network model and experimental measurements of relative permeability in the literature.

  17. Improved analysis of GW150914 using a fully spin-precessing waveform model

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barish, B. C.; Berger, B. K.; Billingsley, G.; Blackburn, J. K.; Bork, R.; Brooks, A. F.; Brunett, S.; Cahillane, C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents updated estimates of source parameters for GW150914, a binary black-hole coalescence event detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) in 2015 [Abbott et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102 (2016).]. Abbott et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016).] presented parameter estimation of the source using a 13-dimensional, phenomenological precessing-spin model (precessing IMRPhenom) and an 11-dimensional nonprecessing effective-one-body (EOB) mode...

  18. A two-phase copula entropy-based multiobjective optimization approach to hydrometeorological gauge network design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pengcheng; Wang, Dong; Singh, Vijay P.; Wang, Yuankun; Wu, Jichun; Wang, Lachun; Zou, Xinqing; Chen, Yuanfang; Chen, Xi; Liu, Jiufu; Zou, Ying; He, Ruimin

    2017-12-01

    Hydrometeorological data are needed for obtaining point and areal mean, quantifying the spatial variability of hydrometeorological variables, and calibration and verification of hydrometeorological models. Hydrometeorological networks are utilized to collect such data. Since data collection is expensive, it is essential to design an optimal network based on the minimal number of hydrometeorological stations in order to reduce costs. This study proposes a two-phase copula entropy- based multiobjective optimization approach that includes: (1) copula entropy-based directional information transfer (CDIT) for clustering the potential hydrometeorological gauges into several groups, and (2) multiobjective method for selecting the optimal combination of gauges for regionalized groups. Although entropy theory has been employed for network design before, the joint histogram method used for mutual information estimation has several limitations. The copula entropy-based mutual information (MI) estimation method is shown to be more effective for quantifying the uncertainty of redundant information than the joint histogram (JH) method. The effectiveness of this approach is verified by applying to one type of hydrometeorological gauge network, with the use of three model evaluation measures, including Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficient (NSC), arithmetic mean of the negative copula entropy (MNCE), and MNCE/NSC. Results indicate that the two-phase copula entropy-based multiobjective technique is capable of evaluating the performance of regional hydrometeorological networks and can enable decision makers to develop strategies for water resources management.

  19. Simulation of two-phase flow in horizontal fracture networks with numerical manifold method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, G. W.; Wang, H. D.; Fan, L. F.; Wang, B.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents simulation of two-phase flow in discrete fracture networks with numerical manifold method (NMM). Each phase of fluids is considered to be confined within the assumed discrete interfaces in the present method. The homogeneous model is modified to approach the mixed fluids. A new mathematical cover formation for fracture intersection is proposed to satisfy the mass conservation. NMM simulations of two-phase flow in a single fracture, intersection, and fracture network are illustrated graphically and validated by the analytical method or the finite element method. Results show that the motion status of discrete interface significantly depends on the ratio of mobility of two fluids rather than the value of the mobility. The variation of fluid velocity in each fracture segment and the driven fluid content are also influenced by the ratio of mobility. The advantages of NMM in the simulation of two-phase flow in a fracture network are demonstrated in the present study, which can be further developed for practical engineering applications.

  20. Phase transitions and self-organized criticality in networks of stochastic spiking neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochini, Ludmila; de Andrade Costa, Ariadne; Abadi, Miguel; Roque, Antônio C; Stolfi, Jorge; Kinouchi, Osame

    2016-11-07

    Phase transitions and critical behavior are crucial issues both in theoretical and experimental neuroscience. We report analytic and computational results about phase transitions and self-organized criticality (SOC) in networks with general stochastic neurons. The stochastic neuron has a firing probability given by a smooth monotonic function Φ(V) of the membrane potential V, rather than a sharp firing threshold. We find that such networks can operate in several dynamic regimes (phases) depending on the average synaptic weight and the shape of the firing function Φ. In particular, we encounter both continuous and discontinuous phase transitions to absorbing states. At the continuous transition critical boundary, neuronal avalanches occur whose distributions of size and duration are given by power laws, as observed in biological neural networks. We also propose and test a new mechanism to produce SOC: the use of dynamic neuronal gains - a form of short-term plasticity probably located at the axon initial segment (AIS) - instead of depressing synapses at the dendrites (as previously studied in the literature). The new self-organization mechanism produces a slightly supercritical state, that we called SOSC, in accord to some intuitions of Alan Turing.

  1. Are we close to putting the anomalous perihelion precessions from Verlinde's emergent gravity to the test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2017-03-01

    In the framework of the emergent gravity scenario by Verlinde, it was recently observed by Liu and Prokopec that, among other things, an anomalous pericenter precession would affect the orbital motion of a test particle orbiting an isolated central body. Here, it is shown that, if it were real, its expected magnitude for the inner planets of the Solar System would be at the same level of the present-day accuracy in constraining any possible deviations from their standard perihelion precessions as inferred from long data records spanning about the last century. The most favorable situation for testing the Verlinde-type precession seems to occur for Mars. Indeed, according to recent versions of the EPM and INPOP planetary ephemerides, non-standard perihelion precessions, of whatsoever physical origin, which are larger than some ≈ 0.02-0.11 milliarcseconds per century are not admissible, while the putative precession predicted by Liu and Prokopec amounts to 0.09 milliarcseconds per century. Other potentially interesting astronomical and astrophysical scenarios like, e.g., the Earth's LAGEOS II artificial satellite, the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B and the S-stars orbiting the Supermassive Black Hole in Sgr A^* are, instead, not viable because of the excessive smallness of the predicted precessions for them.

  2. Improved Analysis of GW150914 Using a Fully Spin-Precessing Waveform Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, C.; Casentini, J.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gaebel, S.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Johnson-McDaniel, N. K.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J. V.; Vano-Vinuales, A.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Boyle, M.; Brügmann, B.; Campanelli, M.; Chu, T.; Clark, M.; Haas, R.; Hemberger, D.; Hinder, I.; Kidder, L. E.; Kinsey, M.; Laguna, P.; Ossokine, S.; Pan, Y.; Röver, C.; Scheel, M.; Szilagyi, B.; Teukolsky, S.; Zlochower, Y.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents updated estimates of source parameters for GW150914, a binary black-hole coalescence event detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) in 2015 [Abbott et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102 (2016).]. Abbott et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016).] presented parameter estimation of the source using a 13-dimensional, phenomenological precessing-spin model (precessing IMRPhenom) and an 11-dimensional nonprecessing effective-one-body (EOB) model calibrated to numerical-relativity simulations, which forces spin alignment (nonprecessing EOBNR). Here, we present new results that include a 15-dimensional precessing-spin waveform model (precessing EOBNR) developed within the EOB formalism. We find good agreement with the parameters estimated previously [Abbott et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016).], and we quote updated component masses of 35-3+5 M⊙ and 3 0-4+3 M⊙ (where errors correspond to 90% symmetric credible intervals). We also present slightly tighter constraints on the dimensionless spin magnitudes of the two black holes, with a primary spin estimate <0.65 and a secondary spin estimate <0.75 at 90% probability. Abbott et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016).] estimated the systematic parameter-extraction errors due to waveform-model uncertainty by combining the posterior probability densities of precessing IMRPhenom and nonprecessing EOBNR. Here, we find that the two precessing-spin models are in closer agreement, suggesting that these systematic errors are smaller than previously quoted.

  3. Quantifying Complexity in Quantum Phase Transitions via Mutual Information Complex Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Marc Andrew; Jaschke, Daniel; Vargas, David L; Carr, Lincoln D

    2017-12-01

    We quantify the emergent complexity of quantum states near quantum critical points on regular 1D lattices, via complex network measures based on quantum mutual information as the adjacency matrix, in direct analogy to quantifying the complexity of electroencephalogram or functional magnetic resonance imaging measurements of the brain. Using matrix product state methods, we show that network density, clustering, disparity, and Pearson's correlation obtain the critical point for both quantum Ising and Bose-Hubbard models to a high degree of accuracy in finite-size scaling for three classes of quantum phase transitions, Z_{2}, mean field superfluid to Mott insulator, and a Berzinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless crossover.

  4. Quantifying Complexity in Quantum Phase Transitions via Mutual Information Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Marc Andrew; Jaschke, Daniel; Vargas, David L.; Carr, Lincoln D.

    2017-12-01

    We quantify the emergent complexity of quantum states near quantum critical points on regular 1D lattices, via complex network measures based on quantum mutual information as the adjacency matrix, in direct analogy to quantifying the complexity of electroencephalogram or functional magnetic resonance imaging measurements of the brain. Using matrix product state methods, we show that network density, clustering, disparity, and Pearson's correlation obtain the critical point for both quantum Ising and Bose-Hubbard models to a high degree of accuracy in finite-size scaling for three classes of quantum phase transitions, Z2, mean field superfluid to Mott insulator, and a Berzinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless crossover.

  5. Three-phase Power Flow Calculation of Low Voltage Distribution Network Considering Characteristics of Residents Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaping; Lin, Shunjiang; Yang, Zhibin

    2017-05-01

    In the traditional three-phase power flow calculation of the low voltage distribution network, the load model is described as constant power. Since this model cannot reflect the characteristics of actual loads, the result of the traditional calculation is always different from the actual situation. In this paper, the load model in which dynamic load represented by air conditioners parallel with static load represented by lighting loads is used to describe characteristics of residents load, and the three-phase power flow calculation model is proposed. The power flow calculation model includes the power balance equations of three-phase (A,B,C), the current balance equations of phase 0, and the torque balancing equations of induction motors in air conditioners. And then an alternating iterative algorithm of induction motor torque balance equations with each node balance equations is proposed to solve the three-phase power flow model. This method is applied to an actual low voltage distribution network of residents load, and by the calculation of three different operating states of air conditioners, the result demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed model and the algorithm.

  6. Structural integration and performance of inter-sectoral public health-related policy networks: An analysis across policy phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, D T J M; Raab, J; Grêaux, K M; Stronks, K; Harting, J

    2017-12-01

    Inter-sectoral policy networks may be effective in addressing environmental determinants of health with interventions. However, contradictory results are reported on relations between structural network characteristics (i.e., composition and integration) and network performance, such as addressing environmental determinants of health. This study examines these relations in different phases of the policy process. A multiple-case study was performed on four public health-related policy networks. Using a snowball method among network actors, overall and sub-networks per policy phase were identified and the policy sector of each actor was assigned. To operationalise the outcome variable, interventions were classified by the proportion of environmental determinants they addressed. In the overall networks, no relation was found between structural network characteristics and network performance. In most effective cases, the policy development sub-networks were characterised by integration with less interrelations between actors (low cohesion), more equally distributed distances between the actors (low closeness centralisation), and horizontal integration in inter-sectoral cliques. The most effective case had non-public health central actors with less connections in all sub-networks. The results suggest that, to address environmental determinants of health, sub-networks should be inter-sectorally composed in the policy development rather than in the intervention development and implementation phases, and that policy development actors should have the opportunity to connect with other actors, without strong direction from a central actor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Book Review: Precession, Nutation, and Wobble of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, Christiaan; Dehant, V.; Mathews, P. M.

    2016-10-01

    This great book describes and explains observational and computational aspects of three apparently tiny changes in the Earth's motion and orientation, viz., precession, nutation, and wobble. The three introductory chapters of this book present fundamental definitions, elementary geodetic theory, and celestial/terrestrial reference systems - including transformations between reference frames. The next chapter on observational techniques describes the principle of accurate measurements of the orientation of the Earth's axis, as obtained from measurements of extra-galactic radio sources using Very Long Baseline Interferometry and GPS observations. Chapter 5 handles precession and nutation of the rigid Earth (i.e., a celestial body that cannot, by definition, deform) and the subsequent chapter takes deformation into consideration, viz., the effect of a centrifugal force caused by a constant-rate rotation that causes the Earth's shape and structure to become ellipsoidal. Deformations caused by external solar-system bodies are discussed in terms of deformability parameters. The next three chapters handle additional complex deviations: non-rigid Earth and more general Earth models, anelastic Earth parameters, and the effects of the fluid layers (i.e., ocean and atmosphere) on Earth rotation. Chapter 10 complements Chapter 7 with refinements that take into account diverse small effects such as the effect of a thermal conductive layer at the top of the core, Core Mantle and Inner Boundary coupling effects on nutation, electromagnetic coupling, and so-called topographic coupling. Chapter 11 covers comparison of observation and theory, and tells us that the present-date precision of the nutation theory is at the level of milliarcseconds in the time domain, and of a tenth of a microsecond in the frequency domain (with some exceptions). This chapter is followed by a 25-page chapter of definitions of equator, equinox, celestial intermediate pole and origin, stellar angle

  8. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE THEORY OF INSTANTANEOUS POWER OF THREE-PHASE NETWORK IN TERMS OF NETWORK CENTRISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. I. Sokol

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Information technologies allow multidimensional analysis of information about the state of the power system in a single information space in terms of providing network-centric approach to control and use of unmanned aerial vehicles as tools for condition monitoring of three-phase network. Methodology. The idea of energy processes in three independent (rather than four dependent curves vector-functions with values in the arithmetic three-dimensional space adequately for both 4-wire and 3–wire circuits. The presence of zero sequence current structural (and mathematically features a 4-wire scheme of energy from a 3-wire circuit. The zero sequence voltage caused by the displacement of the zero voltage phases. Offset zero in the calculations can be taken into account by appropriate selection of the reference voltages. Both of these energetic phenomena with common methodical positions are described in the framework of the general mathematical model, in which a significant role is played by the ort zero sequence. Results. Vector approach with a unified voice allows us to obtain and analyze new energy characteristics for 4–wire and 3–wire circuits in sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal mode, both in temporal and frequency domain. Originality. Symmetric sinusoidal mode is balanced, even with non-zero reactive power. The converse is not true. The mode can be balanced and unbalanced load. The mode can be balanced and unbalanced voltage. Practical value. Assessing balance in network mode and the impact of instantaneous power on the magnitude of the losses, will allow to avoid the appearance of zero sequence and, thus, to improve the quality of electricity.

  9. NCC simulation model. Phase 2: Simulating the operations of the Network Control Center and NCC message manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Norman M.; Gill, Tepper; Charles, Mary

    1994-01-01

    The network control center (NCC) provides scheduling, monitoring, and control of services to the NASA space network. The space network provides tracking and data acquisition services to many low-earth orbiting spacecraft. This report describes the second phase in the development of simulation models for the FCC. Phase one concentrated on the computer systems and interconnecting network.Phase two focuses on the implementation of the network message dialogs and the resources controlled by the NCC. Performance measures were developed along with selected indicators of the NCC's operational effectiveness.The NCC performance indicators were defined in terms of the following: (1) transfer rate, (2) network delay, (3) channel establishment time, (4) line turn around time, (5) availability, (6) reliability, (7) accuracy, (8) maintainability, and (9) security. An NCC internal and external message manual is appended to this report.

  10. Measurement of void fraction distribution in two-phase flow by impedance CT with neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hideaki; Sumida, Isao; Sakai, Sinji; Wakai, Kazunori

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for measurement of void distribution using impedance CT with a hierarchical neural network. The present method consists of four processes. First, output electric currents are calculated by simulation of various distributions of void fraction. The relationship between distribution of void fraction and electric current is called 'teaching data'. Second, the neural network learns the teaching data by the back propagation method. Third, output electric currents are measured about actual two-phase flow. Finally, distribution of void fraction is calculated by the taught neural network using the measured electric currents. In this paper, measurement and learning parameters are adjusted, experimental results obtained using the impedance CT method are compared with data obtained by the impedance probe method. The results show that our method is effective for measurement of void fraction distribution. (author)

  11. Spatial-area selective retrieval of multiple object-place associations in a hierarchical cognitive map formed by theta phase coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Naoyuki; Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2009-06-01

    The human cognitive map is known to be hierarchically organized consisting of a set of perceptually clustered landmarks. Patient studies have demonstrated that these cognitive maps are maintained by the hippocampus, while the neural dynamics are still poorly understood. The authors have shown that the neural dynamic "theta phase precession" observed in the rodent hippocampus may be capable of forming hierarchical cognitive maps in humans. In the model, a visual input sequence consisting of object and scene features in the central and peripheral visual fields, respectively, results in the formation of a hierarchical cognitive map for object-place associations. Surprisingly, it is possible for such a complex memory structure to be formed in a few seconds. In this paper, we evaluate the memory retrieval of object-place associations in the hierarchical network formed by theta phase precession. The results show that multiple object-place associations can be retrieved with the initial cue of a scene input. Importantly, according to the wide-to-narrow unidirectional connections among scene units, the spatial area for object-place retrieval can be controlled by the spatial area of the initial cue input. These results indicate that the hierarchical cognitive maps have computational advantages on a spatial-area selective retrieval of multiple object-place associations. Theta phase precession dynamics is suggested as a fundamental neural mechanism of the human cognitive map.

  12. Phase synchronization of non-Abelian oscillators on small-world networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Zhi-Ming [College of Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Zhao, Ming [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zhou, Tao [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)]. E-mail: zhutou@ustc.edu; Zhu, Chen-Ping [College of Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Bing-Hong [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2007-02-26

    In this Letter, by extending the concept of Kuramoto oscillator to the left-invariant flow on general Lie group, we investigate the generalized phase synchronization on networks. The analyses and simulations of some typical dynamical systems on Watts-Strogatz networks are given, including the n-dimensional torus, the identity component of 3-dimensional general linear group, the special unitary group, and the special orthogonal group. In all cases, the greater disorder of networks will predict better synchronizability, and the small-world effect ensures the global synchronization for sufficiently large coupling strength. The collective synchronized behaviors of many dynamical systems, such as the integrable systems, the two-state quantum systems and the top systems, can be described by the present phase synchronization frame. In addition, it is intuitive that the low-dimensional systems are more easily to synchronize, however, to our surprise, we found that the high-dimensional systems display obviously synchronized behaviors in regular networks, while these phenomena cannot be observed in low-dimensional systems.

  13. Phase synchronization of non-Abelian oscillators on small-world networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Zhi-Ming; Zhao, Ming; Zhou, Tao; Zhu, Chen-Ping; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2007-01-01

    In this Letter, by extending the concept of Kuramoto oscillator to the left-invariant flow on general Lie group, we investigate the generalized phase synchronization on networks. The analyses and simulations of some typical dynamical systems on Watts-Strogatz networks are given, including the n-dimensional torus, the identity component of 3-dimensional general linear group, the special unitary group, and the special orthogonal group. In all cases, the greater disorder of networks will predict better synchronizability, and the small-world effect ensures the global synchronization for sufficiently large coupling strength. The collective synchronized behaviors of many dynamical systems, such as the integrable systems, the two-state quantum systems and the top systems, can be described by the present phase synchronization frame. In addition, it is intuitive that the low-dimensional systems are more easily to synchronize, however, to our surprise, we found that the high-dimensional systems display obviously synchronized behaviors in regular networks, while these phenomena cannot be observed in low-dimensional systems

  14. Flow-pattern identification and nonlinear dynamics of gas-liquid two-phase flow in complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhongke; Jin, Ningde

    2009-06-01

    The identification of flow pattern is a basic and important issue in multiphase systems. Because of the complexity of phase interaction in gas-liquid two-phase flow, it is difficult to discern its flow pattern objectively. In this paper, we make a systematic study on the vertical upward gas-liquid two-phase flow using complex network. Three unique network construction methods are proposed to build three types of networks, i.e., flow pattern complex network (FPCN), fluid dynamic complex network (FDCN), and fluid structure complex network (FSCN). Through detecting the community structure of FPCN by the community-detection algorithm based on K -mean clustering, useful and interesting results are found which can be used for identifying five vertical upward gas-liquid two-phase flow patterns. To investigate the dynamic characteristics of gas-liquid two-phase flow, we construct 50 FDCNs under different flow conditions, and find that the power-law exponent and the network information entropy, which are sensitive to the flow pattern transition, can both characterize the nonlinear dynamics of gas-liquid two-phase flow. Furthermore, we construct FSCN and demonstrate how network statistic can be used to reveal the fluid structure of gas-liquid two-phase flow. In this paper, from a different perspective, we not only introduce complex network theory to the study of gas-liquid two-phase flow but also indicate that complex network may be a powerful tool for exploring nonlinear time series in practice.

  15. Laws of motion and precession for black holes and other bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorne, K.S.; Hartle, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    Laws of motion and precession are derived for a Kerr black hole or any other body which is far from all other sources of gravity (''isolated body'') and has multipole moments that change slowly with time. Previous work by D'Eath and others has shown that to high accuracy the body moves along a geodesic of the surrounding spacetime geometry, and Fermi-Walker transports its angular-momentum vector. This paper derives the largest corrections to the geodesic law of motion and Fermi-Walker law of transport. These corrections are due to coupling of the body's angular momentum and quadrupole moment to the Riemann curvature of the surrounding spacetime. The resulting laws of motion and precession are identical to those that have been derived previously, by many researchers, for test bodies with negligible self-gravity. However, the derivation given here is valid for any isolated body, regardless of the strength of its self-gravity. These laws of motion and precession can be converted into equations of motion and precession by combining them with an approximate solution to the Einstein field equations for the surrounding spacetime. As an example, the conversion is carried out for two gravitationally bound systems of bodies with sizes much less than their separations. The resulting equations of motion and precession are derived accurately through post/sup 1.5/-Newtonian order. For the special case of two Kerr black holes orbiting each other, these equations of motion and precession (which include couplings of the holes' spins and quadrupole moments to spacetime curvature) reduce to equations previously derived by D'Eath. The precession due to coupling of a black hole's quadrupole moment to surrounding curvature may be large enough, if the hole lives at the center of a very dense star cluster, for observational detection by its effects on extragalactic radio jets

  16. Flow Regime Identification of Co-Current Downward Two-Phase Flow With Neural Network Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroshi Goda; Seungjin Kim; Ye Mi; Finch, Joshua P.; Mamoru Ishii; Jennifer Uhle

    2002-01-01

    Flow regime identification for an adiabatic vertical co-current downward air-water two-phase flow in the 25.4 mm ID and the 50.8 mm ID round tubes was performed by employing an impedance void meter coupled with the neural network classification approach. This approach minimizes the subjective judgment in determining the flow regimes. The signals obtained by an impedance void meter were applied to train the self-organizing neural network to categorize these impedance signals into a certain number of groups. The characteristic parameters set into the neural network classification included the mean, standard deviation and skewness of impedance signals in the present experiment. The classification categories adopted in the present investigation were four widely accepted flow regimes, viz. bubbly, slug, churn-turbulent, and annular flows. These four flow regimes were recognized based upon the conventional flow visualization approach by a high-speed motion analyzer. The resulting flow regime maps classified by the neural network were compared with the results obtained through the flow visualization method, and consequently the efficiency of the neural network classification for flow regime identification was demonstrated. (authors)

  17. Youth's social network structures and peer influences: study protocol MyMovez project - Phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevelander, Kirsten E; Smit, Crystal R; van Woudenberg, Thabo J; Buijs, Laura; Burk, William J; Buijzen, Moniek

    2018-04-16

    Youth are an important target group for social network interventions, because they are particularly susceptible to the adaptation of healthy and unhealthy habits and behaviors of others. They are surrounded by 'social influence agents' (i.e., role models such as family, friends and peers) that co-determine their dietary intake and physical activity. However, there is a lack of systematic and comprehensive research on the implementation of a social network approach in health campaigns. The MyMovez research project aims to fill this gap by developing a method for effective social network campaign implementation. This protocol paper describes the design and methods of Phase I of the MyMovez project, aiming to unravel youth's social network structures in combination with individual, psychosocial, and environmental factors related to energy intake and expenditure. In addition, the Wearable Lab is developed to enable an attractive and state-of-the-art way of collecting data and online campaign implementation via social networks. Phase I of the MyMovez project consists of a large-scale cross-sequential cohort study (N = 953; 8-12 and 12-15 y/o). In five waves during a 3-year period (2016-2018), data are collected about youth's social network exposure, media consumption, socialization experiences, psychological determinants of behavior, physical environment, dietary intake (snacking and drinking behavior) and physical activity using the Wearable Lab. The Wearable Lab exists of a smartphone-based research application (app) connected to an activity tracking bracelet, that is developed throughout the duration of the project. It generates peer- and self-reported (e.g., sociometric data and surveys) and experience sampling data, social network beacon data, real-time physical activity data (i.e., steps and cycling), location information, photos and chat conversation data from the app's social media platform Social Buzz. The MyMovez project - Phase I is an innovative cross

  18. Co-ordinated experimental research into PV power interaction with the supply network - Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, R.; Thornycroft, J.; Knight, J.

    2000-07-01

    This report describes the development of a procedure for type testing photovoltaic inverters that are suitable for connecting to the UK public distribution system based on experimental research and consultation within the industry. Phase 1 of the project investigated the performance of the inverters and the cumulative effect of multiple installation on a section of distributed network, and Phase 2 concentrated on the requirements for PV inverters that would allow them to be connected to the grid without further investigation and to develop a type test procedure. The production of the 'UK Technical Guidelines for Inverter Connected Single Phase Photovoltaic (PV) Generators up to 5kVA' based on the project results and its adoption by the Electricity Association as draft Engineering Recommendations G77 are reported.

  19. Frequency transfer via a two-way optical phase comparison on a multiplexed fiber network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calosso, C E; Bertacco, E; Calonico, D; Clivati, C; Costanzo, G A; Frittelli, M; Levi, F; Mura, A; Godone, A

    2014-03-01

    We performed a two-way remote optical phase comparison on optical fiber. Two optical frequency signals were launched in opposite directions in an optical fiber and their phases were simultaneously measured at the other end. In this technique, the fiber noise is passively canceled, and we compared two optical frequencies at the ultimate 10(-21) stability level. The experiment was performed on a 47 km fiber that is part of the metropolitan network for Internet traffic. The technique relies on the synchronous measurement of the optical phases at the two ends of the link, which is here performed by digital electronics. This scheme offers some advantages with respect to active noise cancellation schemes, as the light travels only once in the fiber.

  20. One Core Phase Shifting Transformer for Control of the Power Flow Distribution in Electric Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golub I.V.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the variant of phase shifting transformer that is made, unlike from traditional technology, on the basis of only one magnetic core. The paper describes the methodology related to the analysis of operation modes of device and its components. Additionally it presents a mathematical model of device with determines the relationship between input and output electric quantities as well as own longitudinal and transverse parameters of an equivalent circuit of phase shifting transformer (PST. Proposed configuration of PST is interesting from an economic and operational consideration; enable continuous control of power flow distribution in electric networks as a result of regulation a phase shift angle between input and output voltages of device.

  1. The pairwise phase consistency in cortical network and its relationship with neuronal activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Daming

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-band neuronal oscillation and synchronization with the range of 30-90 Hz are ubiquitous phenomenon across numerous brain areas and various species, and correlated with plenty of cognitive functions. The phase of the oscillation, as one aspect of CTC (Communication through Coherence hypothesis, underlies various functions for feature coding, memory processing and behaviour performing. The PPC (Pairwise Phase Consistency, an improved coherence measure, statistically quantifies the strength of phase synchronization. In order to evaluate the PPC and its relationships with input stimulus, neuronal activation and firing rate, a simplified spiking neuronal network is constructed to simulate orientation columns in primary visual cortex. If the input orientation stimulus is preferred for a certain orientation column, neurons within this corresponding column will obtain higher firing rate and stronger neuronal activation, which consequently engender higher PPC values, with higher PPC corresponding to higher firing rate. In addition, we investigate the PPC in time resolved analysis with a sliding window.

  2. Applications of neural networks to the studies of phase transitions of two-dimensional Potts models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.-D.; Tan, D.-R.; Jiang, F.-J.

    2018-04-01

    We study the phase transitions of two-dimensional (2D) Q-states Potts models on the square lattice, using the first principles Monte Carlo (MC) simulations as well as the techniques of neural networks (NN). We demonstrate that the ideas from NN can be adopted to study these considered phase transitions efficiently. In particular, even with a simple NN constructed in this investigation, we are able to obtain the relevant information of the nature of these phase transitions, namely whether they are first order or second order. Our results strengthen the potential applicability of machine learning in studying various states of matters. Subtlety of applying NN techniques to investigate many-body systems is briefly discussed as well.

  3. Plasticity-induced characteristic changes of pattern dynamics and the related phase transitions in small-world neuronal networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xu-Hui; Hu Gang

    2014-01-01

    Phase transitions widely exist in nature and occur when some control parameters are changed. In neural systems, their macroscopic states are represented by the activity states of neuron populations, and phase transitions between different activity states are closely related to corresponding functions in the brain. In particular, phase transitions to some rhythmic synchronous firing states play significant roles on diverse brain functions and disfunctions, such as encoding rhythmical external stimuli, epileptic seizure, etc. However, in previous studies, phase transitions in neuronal networks are almost driven by network parameters (e.g., external stimuli), and there has been no investigation about the transitions between typical activity states of neuronal networks in a self-organized way by applying plastic connection weights. In this paper, we discuss phase transitions in electrically coupled and lattice-based small-world neuronal networks (LBSW networks) under spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). By applying STDP on all electrical synapses, various known and novel phase transitions could emerge in LBSW networks, particularly, the phenomenon of self-organized phase transitions (SOPTs): repeated transitions between synchronous and asynchronous firing states. We further explore the mechanics generating SOPTs on the basis of synaptic weight dynamics. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  4. A new approach for 3D reconstruction from bright field TEM imaging: Beam precession assisted electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebled, J.M.; Yedra, Ll.; Estrade, S.; Portillo, J.; Peiro, F.

    2011-01-01

    The successful combination of electron beam precession and bright field electron tomography for 3D reconstruction is reported. Beam precession is demonstrated to be a powerful technique to reduce the contrast artifacts due to diffraction and curvature in thin foils. Taking advantage of these benefits, Precession assisted electron tomography has been applied to reconstruct the morphology of Sn precipitates embedded in an Al matrix, from a tilt series acquired in a range from +49 o to -61 o at intervals of 2 o and with a precession angle of 0.6 o in bright field mode. The combination of electron tomography and beam precession in conventional TEM mode is proposed as an alternative procedure to obtain 3D reconstructions of nano-objects without a scanning system or a high angle annular dark field detector. -- Highlights: → Electron beam precession reduces spurious diffraction contrast in bright field mode. → Bend contour related contrast depends on precession angle. → Electron beam precession is combined with bright field electron tomography. → Precession assisted BF tomography allowed 3D reconstruction of a Sn precipitate.

  5. A new approach for 3D reconstruction from bright field TEM imaging: Beam precession assisted electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebled, J.M. [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona-CSIC, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Yedra, Ll. [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Estrade, S.; Portillo, J. [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); TEM-MAT, CCiT-UB, Sole i Sabaris 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Peiro, F., E-mail: francesca.peiro@ub.edu [LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    The successful combination of electron beam precession and bright field electron tomography for 3D reconstruction is reported. Beam precession is demonstrated to be a powerful technique to reduce the contrast artifacts due to diffraction and curvature in thin foils. Taking advantage of these benefits, Precession assisted electron tomography has been applied to reconstruct the morphology of Sn precipitates embedded in an Al matrix, from a tilt series acquired in a range from +49{sup o} to -61{sup o} at intervals of 2{sup o} and with a precession angle of 0.6{sup o} in bright field mode. The combination of electron tomography and beam precession in conventional TEM mode is proposed as an alternative procedure to obtain 3D reconstructions of nano-objects without a scanning system or a high angle annular dark field detector. -- Highlights: {yields} Electron beam precession reduces spurious diffraction contrast in bright field mode. {yields} Bend contour related contrast depends on precession angle. {yields} Electron beam precession is combined with bright field electron tomography. {yields} Precession assisted BF tomography allowed 3D reconstruction of a Sn precipitate.

  6. Stochastic Template Bank for Gravitational Wave Searches for Precessing Neutron Star-Black Hole Coalescence Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indik, Nathaniel; Haris, K.; Dal Canton, Tito; Fehrmann, Henning; Krishnan, Badri; Lundgren, Andrew; Nielsen, Alex B.; Pai, Archana

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational wave searches to date have largely focused on non-precessing systems. Including precession effects greatly increases the number of templates to be searched over. This leads to a corresponding increase in the computational cost and can increase the false alarm rate of a realistic search. On the other hand, there might be astrophysical systems that are entirely missed by non-precessing searches. In this paper we consider the problem of constructing a template bank using stochastic methods for neutron star-black hole binaries allowing for precession, but with the restrictions that the total angular momentum of the binary is pointing toward the detector and that the neutron star spin is negligible relative to that of the black hole. We quantify the number of templates required for the search, and we explicitly construct the template bank. We show that despite the large number of templates, stochastic methods can be adapted to solve the problem. We quantify the parameter space region over which the non-precessing search might miss signals.

  7. Impact of a small ellipticity on the sustainability condition of developed turbulence in a precessing spheroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horimoto, Yasufumi; Simonet-Davin, Gabriel; Katayama, Atsushi; Goto, Susumu

    2018-04-01

    We experimentally investigate the flow transition to developed turbulence in a precessing spheroid with a small ellipticity. Fully developed turbulence appears through a subcritical transition when we fix the Reynolds number (the spin rate) and gradually increase the Poincaré number (the precession rate). In the transitional range of the Poincaré number, two qualitatively different turbulent states (i.e., fully developed turbulence and quiescent turbulence with a spin-driven global circulation) are stable and they are connected by a hysteresis loop. This discontinuous transition is in contrast to the continuous transition in a precessing sphere, for which neither bistable turbulent states nor hysteresis loops are observed. The small ellipticity of the container makes the global circulation of the confined fluid more stable, and it requires much stronger precession of the spheroid, than a sphere, for fully developed turbulence to be sustained. Nevertheless, once fully developed turbulence is sustained, its flow structures are almost identical in the spheroid and sphere. The argument [Lorenzani and Tilgner, J. Fluid Mech. 492, 363 (2003), 10.1017/S002211200300572X; Noir et al., Geophys. J. Int. 154, 407 (2003), 10.1046/j.1365-246X.2003.01934.x] on the basis of the analytical solution [Busse, J. Fluid Mech. 33, 739 (1968), 10.1017/S0022112068001655] of the steady global circulation in a weak precession range well describes the onset of the fully developed turbulence in the spheroid.

  8. Performance analysis of wavelength/spatial coding system with fixed in-phase code matrices in OCDMA network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Mu; Liang, Tsair-Chun

    2011-12-01

    This paper proposes a wavelength/spatial (W/S) coding system with fixed in-phase code (FIPC) matrix in the optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) network. A scheme is presented to form the FIPC matrix which is applied to construct the W/S OCDMA network. The encoder/decoder in the W/S OCDMA network is fully able to eliminate the multiple-access-interference (MAI) at the balanced photo-detectors (PD), according to fixed in-phase cross correlation. The phase-induced intensity noise (PIIN) related to the power square is markedly suppressed in the receiver by spreading the received power into each PD while the net signal power is kept the same. Simulation results show that the W/S OCDMA network based on the FIPC matrices cannot only completely remove the MAI but effectively suppress the PIIN to upgrade the network performance.

  9. Phase transitions in scale-free neural networks: Departure from the standard mean-field universality class

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldana, Maximino; Larralde, Hernan

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the nature of the phase transition from an ordered to a disordered state that occurs in a family of neural network models with noise. These models are closely related to the majority voter model, where a ferromagneticlike interaction between the elements prevails. Each member of the family is distinguished by the network topology, which is determined by the probability distribution of the number of incoming links. We show that for homogeneous random topologies, the phase transition belongs to the standard mean-field universality class, characterized by the order parameter exponent β=1/2. However, for scale-free networks we obtain phase transition exponents ranging from 1/2 to infinity. Furthermore, we show the existence of a phase transition even for values of the scale-free exponent in the interval (1.5,2], where the average network connectivity diverges

  10. Storage of phase-coded patterns via STDP in fully-connected and sparse network: a study of the network capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Scarpetta

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We study the storage and retrieval of phase-coded patterns as stable dynamical attractors in recurrent neural networks, for both an analog and a integrate-and-fire spiking model. The synaptic strength is determined by a learning rule based on spike-time-dependent plasticity, with an asymmetric time window depending on the relative timing between pre- and post-synaptic activity. We store multiple patterns and study the network capacity. For the analog model, we find that the network capacity scales linearly with the network size, and that both capacity and the oscillation frequency of the retrieval state depend on the asymmetry of the learning time window. In addition to fully-connected networks, we study sparse networks, where each neuron is connected only to a small number $zll N$ of other neurons. Connections can be short range, between neighboring neurons placed on a regular lattice, or long range, between randomly chosen pairs of neurons. We find that a small fraction of long range connections is able to amplify the capacity of the network. This imply that a small-world-network topology is optimal, as a compromise between the cost of long range connections and the capacity increase. Also in the spiking integrate and fire model the crucial result of storing and retrieval of multiple phase-coded patterns is observed. The capacity of the fully-connected spiking network is investigated, together with the relation between oscillation frequency of retrieval state and window asymmetry.

  11. Synergistic interactions promote behavior spreading and alter phase transitions on multiplex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quan-Hui; Wang, Wei; Cai, Shi-Min; Tang, Ming; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2018-02-01

    Synergistic interactions are ubiquitous in the real world. Recent studies have revealed that, for a single-layer network, synergy can enhance spreading and even induce an explosive contagion. There is at the present a growing interest in behavior spreading dynamics on multiplex networks. What is the role of synergistic interactions in behavior spreading in such networked systems? To address this question, we articulate a synergistic behavior spreading model on a double layer network, where the key manifestation of the synergistic interactions is that the adoption of one behavior by a node in one layer enhances its probability of adopting the behavior in the other layer. A general result is that synergistic interactions can greatly enhance the spreading of the behaviors in both layers. A remarkable phenomenon is that the interactions can alter the nature of the phase transition associated with behavior adoption or spreading dynamics. In particular, depending on the transmission rate of one behavior in a network layer, synergistic interactions can lead to a discontinuous (first-order) or a continuous (second-order) transition in the adoption scope of the other behavior with respect to its transmission rate. A surprising two-stage spreading process can arise: due to synergy, nodes having adopted one behavior in one layer adopt the other behavior in the other layer and then prompt the remaining nodes in this layer to quickly adopt the behavior. Analytically, we develop an edge-based compartmental theory and perform a bifurcation analysis to fully understand, in the weak synergistic interaction regime where the dynamical correlation between the network layers is negligible, the role of the interactions in promoting the social behavioral spreading dynamics in the whole system.

  12. Interictal to Ictal Phase Transition in a Small-World Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemzer, Louis; Cravens, Gary; Worth, Robert

    Real-time detection and prediction of seizures in patients with epilepsy is essential for rapid intervention. Here, we perform a full Hodgkin-Huxley calculation using n 50 in silico neurons configured in a small-world network topology to generate simulated EEG signals. The connectivity matrix, constructed using a Watts-Strogatz algorithm, admits randomized or deterministic entries. We find that situations corresponding to interictal (non-seizure) and ictal (seizure) states are separated by a phase transition that can be influenced by congenital channelopathies, anticonvulsant drugs, and connectome plasticity. The interictal phase exhibits scale-free phenomena, as characterized by a power law form of the spectral power density, while the ictal state suffers from pathological synchronization. We compare the results with intracranial EEG data and show how these findings may be used to detect or even predict seizure onset. Along with the balance of excitatory and inhibitory factors, the network topology plays a large role in determining the overall characteristics of brain activity. We have developed a new platform for testing the conditions that contribute to the phase transition between non-seizure and seizure states.

  13. An amplified coarse wavelength division multiplexing self-referencing sensor network based on phase-shifted FBGs in transmissive configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elosua, C; Perez-Herrera, R A; Lopez-Amo, M; Bariain, C; Garcia-Olcina, R; Sales, S; Capmany, J

    2009-01-01

    A new amplified CWDM (coarse wavelength division multiplexing) self-referencing sensor network using phase-shifted fibre Bragg gratings (PS-FBGs) is experimentally demonstrated in this work. The network uses the PS-FBGs to address intensity sensors in a transmissive configuration, obtaining simultaneously in reflection a wavelength encoded reference signal. In order to enable the remote operation of the sensors, we have introduced optical amplification at the interrogation header of the network, using highly doped erbium fibre

  14. Spin-dynamics simulations of vortex precession in 2-D magnetic dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depondt, Ph.; Levy, J.-C.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Vortex precession was simulated in two-dimensional magnetic dots of finite size. → A simple qualitative explanation of the observed behaviors is proposed, including seemingly erratic ones. → Pinning of the vortex motion, unconnected with defects, is also observed and an explanation thereof provided. -- Abstract: Vortex precession was simulated in two-dimensional magnetic dots. The Landau-Lifshitz equation with exchange and dipolar interactions was integrated at a low temperature with initial conditions consisting in a single vortex situated aside from the central position. This vortex precesses around the center of the sample and either can be expelled or converges towards the center. These relaxation processes are systematically studied. A simple qualitative explanation of the observed behaviors is proposed, including seemingly somewhat erratic ones. Intrinsic pinning of the vortex motion, unconnected with defects, is also observed and an explanation thereof provided.

  15. EELS signal enhancement by means of beam precession in the TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estradé, Sonia; Portillo, Joaquim; Yedra, Lluís; Rebled, José Manuel; Peiró, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    EELS is nowadays a most relevant characterization tool as it provides chemical and electronic information with an extraordinary spatial resolution. When a crystal is viewed in zone axis in the TEM, there is channelling of the electrons along the atom columns, which strongly reduce the EELS signal, so that it is generally advised to work slightly off the zone axis to collect EELS data, which may not always be possible or advantageous. In the present work, we demonstrate the use of precession to compensate for the reduction of EELS signal when in the zone axis. -- Highlights: ► Channelling compromises EELS signal in zone axis. ► Precession can be used to get rid of channelling effects. ► Use of precession to enhance EELS signal in the zone axis is demonstrated.

  16. On network coding and modulation mapping for three-phase bidirectional relaying

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Ronald Y.; Lin, Sian Jheng; Chung, Wei-Ho

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 IEEE. In this paper, we consider the network coding (NC) enabled three-phase protocol for information exchange between two users in a wireless two-way (bidirectional) relay network. Modulo-based (nonbinary) and XOR-based (binary) NC schemes are considered as information mixture schemes at the relay while all transmissions adopt pulse amplitude modulation (PAM). We first obtain the optimal constellation mapping at the relay that maximizes the decoding performance at the users for each NC scheme. Then, we compare the two NC schemes, each in conjunction with the optimal constellation mapping at the relay, in different conditions. Our results demonstrate that, in the low SNR regime, binary NC outperforms nonbinary NC with 4-PAM, while they have mixed performance with 8-PAM. This observation applies to quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) composed of two parallel PAMs.

  17. Phase Transitions of an Epidemic Spreading Model in Small-World Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Da-Yin; Gao, Ke

    2011-06-01

    We propose a modified susceptible-infected-refractory-susceptible (SIRS) model to investigate the global oscillations of the epidemic spreading in Watts—Strogatz (WS) small-world networks. It is found that when an individual immunity does not change or decays slowly in an immune period, the system can exhibit complex transition from an infecting stationary state to a large amplitude sustained oscillation or an absorbing state with no infection. When the immunity decays rapidly in the immune period, the transition to the global oscillation disappears and there is no oscillation. Furthermore, based on the spatio-temporal evolution patterns and the phase diagram, it is disclosed that a long immunity period takes an important role in the emergence of the global oscillation in small-world networks.

  18. On network coding and modulation mapping for three-phase bidirectional relaying

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Ronald Y.

    2015-12-03

    © 2015 IEEE. In this paper, we consider the network coding (NC) enabled three-phase protocol for information exchange between two users in a wireless two-way (bidirectional) relay network. Modulo-based (nonbinary) and XOR-based (binary) NC schemes are considered as information mixture schemes at the relay while all transmissions adopt pulse amplitude modulation (PAM). We first obtain the optimal constellation mapping at the relay that maximizes the decoding performance at the users for each NC scheme. Then, we compare the two NC schemes, each in conjunction with the optimal constellation mapping at the relay, in different conditions. Our results demonstrate that, in the low SNR regime, binary NC outperforms nonbinary NC with 4-PAM, while they have mixed performance with 8-PAM. This observation applies to quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) composed of two parallel PAMs.

  19. Predicting Precession Rates from Secular Dynamics for Extra-solar Multi-planet Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Laerhoven, Christa

    2015-12-01

    Considering the secular dynamics of multi-planet systems provides substantial insight into the interactions between planets in those systems. Secular interactions are those that don't involve knowing where a planet is along its orbit, and they dominate when planets are not involved in mean motion resonances. These interactions exchange angular momentum among the planets, evolving their eccentricities and inclinations. To second order in the planets' eccentricities and inclinations, the eccentricity and inclination perturbations are decoupled. Given the right variable choice, the relevant differential equations are linear and thus the eccentricity and inclination behaviors can be described as a sum of eigenmodes. Since the underlying structure of the secular eigenmodes can be calculated using only the planets' masses and semi-major axes, one can elucidate the eccentricity and inclination behavior of planets in exoplanet systems even without knowing the planets' current eccentricities and inclinations. I have calculated both the eccentricity and inclination secular eigenmodes for the population of known multi-planet systems whose planets have well determined masses and periods and have used this to predict what range of pericenter precession (and nodal regression) rates the planets may have. One might have assumed that in any given system the planets with shorter periods would have faster precession rates, but I show that this is not necessarily the case. Planets that are 'loners' have narrow ranges of possible precession rates, while planets that are 'groupies' can have a wider range of possible precession rates. Several planets are expected to undergo significant precession on few-year timescales and many planets (though not the majority of planets) will undergo significant precession on decade timescales.

  20. Improved Analysis of GW150914 Using a Fully Spin-Precessing Waveform Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents updated estimates of source parameters for GW150914, a binary black-hole coalescence event detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO in 2015 [Abbott et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102 (2016.]. Abbott et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016.] presented parameter estimation of the source using a 13-dimensional, phenomenological precessing-spin model (precessing IMRPhenom and an 11-dimensional nonprecessing effective-one-body (EOB model calibrated to numerical-relativity simulations, which forces spin alignment (nonprecessing EOBNR. Here, we present new results that include a 15-dimensional precessing-spin waveform model (precessing EOBNR developed within the EOB formalism. We find good agreement with the parameters estimated previously [Abbott et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016.], and we quote updated component masses of 35_{-3}^{+5} M_{⊙} and 30_{-4}^{+3} M_{⊙} (where errors correspond to 90% symmetric credible intervals. We also present slightly tighter constraints on the dimensionless spin magnitudes of the two black holes, with a primary spin estimate <0.65 and a secondary spin estimate <0.75 at 90% probability. Abbott et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 241102 (2016.] estimated the systematic parameter-extraction errors due to waveform-model uncertainty by combining the posterior probability densities of precessing IMRPhenom and nonprecessing EOBNR. Here, we find that the two precessing-spin models are in closer agreement, suggesting that these systematic errors are smaller than previously quoted.

  1. Impedance void-meter and neural networks for vertical two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mi, Y.; Li, M.; Xiao, Z.; Tsoukalas, L.H.; Ishii, M.

    1998-01-01

    Most two-phase flow measurements, including void fraction measurements, depend on correct flow regime identification. There are two steps towards successful identification of flow regimes: one is to develop a non-intrusive instrument to demonstrate area-averaged void fluctuations, the other to develop a non-linear mapping approach to perform objective identification of flow regimes. A non-intrusive impedance void-meter provides input signals to a neural mapping approach used to identify flow regimes. After training, both supervised and self-organizing neural network learning paradigms performed flow regime identification successfully. The methodology presented holds considerable promise for multiphase flow diagnostic and measurement applications. (author)

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of disordered materials from network glasses to phase-change memory alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Massobrio, Carlo; Bernasconi, Marco; Salmon, Philip S

    2015-01-01

    This book is a unique reference work in the area of atomic-scale simulation of glasses. For the first time, a highly selected panel of about 20 researchers provides, in a single book, their views, methodologies and applications on the use of molecular dynamics as a tool to describe glassy materials. The book covers a wide range of systems covering ""traditional"" network glasses, such as chalcogenides and oxides, as well as glasses for applications in the area of phase change materials. The novelty of this work is the interplay between molecular dynamics methods (both at the classical and firs

  3. The PAGES 2k Network, Phase 3: Themes and Call for Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gunten, L.; Mcgregor, H. V.; Martrat, B.; St George, S.; Neukom, R.; Bothe, O.; Linderholm, H. W.; Phipps, S. J.; Abram, N.

    2017-12-01

    The past 2000 years (the "2k" interval) provides critical context for understanding recent anthropogenic forcing of the climate and provides baseline information about the characteristics of natural climate variability. It also presents opportunities to improve the interpretation of proxy observations and to evaluate the climate models used to make future projections. Phases 1 and 2 of the PAGES 2k Network focussed on building regional and global surface temperature reconstructions for terrestrial regions and the oceans, and comparing these with model simulations to identify mechanisms of climate variation on interannual to bicentennial time scales. Phase 3 was launched in May 2017 and aims to address major questions around past hydroclimate, climate processes and proxy uncertainties. Its scientific themes are: Theme 1: "Climate Variability, Modes and Mechanisms"Further understand the mechanisms driving regional climate variability and change on interannual to centennial time scales; Theme 2: "Methods and Uncertainties"Reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of observations imprinted in paleoclimatic archives by environmental sensors; Theme 3: "Proxy and Model Understanding"Identify and analyse the extent of agreement between reconstructions and climate model simulations. Research is organized as a linked network of well-defined projects, identified and led by 2k community members. The 2k projects focus on specific scientific questions aligned with Phase 3 themes, rather than being defined along regional boundaries. New 2k projects can be proposed at any time at http://www.pastglobalchanges.org/ini/wg/2k-network/projects An enduring element of PAGES 2k is a culture of collegiality, transparency, and reciprocity. Phase 3 seeks to stimulate community based projects and facilitate collaboration between researchers from different regions and career stages, drawing on the breadth and depth of the global PAGES 2k community. All PAGES 2k projects also promote best

  4. Control Method of Single-phase Inverter Based Grounding System in Distribution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wen; Yan, L.; Zeng, X.

    2016-01-01

    of neutral-to-ground voltage is critical for the safety of distribution networks. An active grounding system based on single-phase inverter is proposed to achieve this objective. Relationship between output current of the system and neutral-to-ground voltage is derived to explain the principle of neutral......The asymmetry of the inherent distributed capacitances causes the rise of neutral-to-ground voltage in ungrounded system or high resistance grounded system. Overvoltage may occur in resonant grounded system if Petersen coil is resonant with the distributed capacitances. Thus, the restraint...

  5. Generating macroscopic chaos in a network of globally coupled phase oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Paul; Barreto, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    We consider an infinite network of globally coupled phase oscillators in which the natural frequencies of the oscillators are drawn from a symmetric bimodal distribution. We demonstrate that macroscopic chaos can occur in this system when the coupling strength varies periodically in time. We identify period-doubling cascades to chaos, attractor crises, and horseshoe dynamics for the macroscopic mean field. Based on recent work that clarified the bifurcation structure of the static bimodal Kuramoto system, we qualitatively describe the mechanism for the generation of such complicated behavior in the time varying case. PMID:21974662

  6. First observation of magnetic moment precession of channeled particles in bent crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.; Albuquerque, I.F.; Baublis, V.V.; Bondar, N.F.; Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Cooper, P.S.; Lisheng, D.; Denisov, A.S.; Dobrovolsky, A.V.; Dubbs, T.; Endler, A.M.F.; Escobar, C.O.; Foucher, M.; Golovtsov, V.L.; Goritchev, P.A.; Gottschalk, H.; Gouffon, P.; Grachev, V.T.; Khanzadeev, A.V.; Kubantsev, M.A.; Kuropatkin, N.P.; Lach, J.; Lang Pengfei; Lebedenko, V.N.; Li Chengze; Li Yunshan; Mahon, J.R.P.; McCliment, E.; Morelos, A.; Newsom, C.; Pommot Maia, M.C.; Samsonov, V.M.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Shi Huanzhang; Smith, V.J.; Sun, C.R.; Tang Fukun; Terentyev, N.K.; Timm, S.; Tkatch, I.I.; Uvarov, L.N.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Yan Jie; Zhao Wenheng; Zheng Shuchen; Zhong Yuanyuan

    1992-01-01

    Spin precession of channeled particles in bent crystals has been observed for the first time. Polarized Σ + were channeled using bent Si crystals. These crystals provided an effective magnetic field of 45 T which resulted in a measured spin precession of 60±17 degree. This agrees with the prediction of 62±2 degree using the world average of Σ + magnetic moment measurements. This new technique gives a Σ + magnetic moment of (2.40±0.46±0.40)μ N , where the quoted uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. We see no evidence of depolarization in the channeling process

  7. Studies on the phase diagram of boron employing a neural network potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morawietz, Tobias; Behler, Joerg [Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Parrinello, Michele [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    The crystalline phases of elemental boron have a structural complexity unique in the periodic table. The complex connection pattern of the icosahedral building blocks forms a formidable challenge for the construction of accurate but efficient potentials. We present a high-dimensional neural network potential for boron, which is based on first-principles calculations and can be systematically improved. The potential is several orders of magnitude faster to evaluate than the underlying density-functional theory calculations and allows to perform long molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations of large system. By a stepwise refinement of the potential and an application of the potential in metadynamics simulations we show that starting from random atomic positions the structure of {alpha}-boron is predicted in agreement with experiment. Further, pressure-induced phase transitions of {alpha}-boron are discussed.

  8. The design and construction of a nuclear free-precession magnetometer; Etude et realisation d'un magnetometre a precession libre nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baconnier, Y [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-10-15

    After presenting the advantages of nuclear magnetic resonance with respect to electromagnetic processes, as far as the measurement of the earths' magnetic field is concerned, we deal with the macroscopic theory for the Bloch model and analyse Packard and Varions' experiment. The development of a particular absolute free-precession magnetometer is studied, and the conditions are determined for obtaining a maximum amplitude signal as a function of the geometrical form of the detector coil, of the method of cut-off, and of the coupling between various parts of the system. After having described in detail the technology of amplifiers, we consider the problem of the measurement of the frequency of precession for which an original solution, of analogy form, is proposed and discussed. Complete plans of the equipment are given in an appendix. (author) [French] Apres avoir presente les avantages de la resonance magnetique nucleaire relativement aux procedes electromagnetiques, en ce qui concerne la mesure du champ magnetique terrestre, on traite de la theorie macroscopique dans le modele de Bloch et analyse l'experience de Packard et Varian. On etudie une realisation particuliere d'un magnetometre absolu a precession libre et determine les conditions d'obtention d'un signal d'amplitude maximale en fonction de la forme geometrique du bobinage detecteur, de la methode de coupure, et du couplage entre les differents elements du montage. Apres avoir decrit en detail la technologie des amplificateurs, on aborde le probleme de la mesure de la frequence de precession, pour laquelle une solution originale, sous forme analogique, est proposee et discutee. En annexe est joint un dossier complet des plans de la realisation. (auteur)

  9. Vertical propagation of waves in the solar atmosphere. II. Phase delays in the quiet chromosphere and cell-network distinctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lites, B.W.; Chipman, E.G.; White, O.R.

    1982-01-01

    The differences in the phase of the velocity oscillations between a pair of chromospheric Ca II lines was measured using the Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Sacramento Peak Observatory. The observed phase differences indicate that the acoustic modes are trapped or envanescent, rather than propagating in the chromosphere. We find systematic distinctions in the phase delays between quiet network and cell interior regions for both intensity and velocity oscillations in photospheric and chromospheric lines. The theory of linear perturbations in a isothermal atmosphere is invoked to interpret these differences. From this analysis we find that one or more of the following explanations is possible. (1) the radiative damping is more effective in the network than in the cell interior; (2) the network features exclude oscillations of large horizontal wavenumber; or (3) the scale height of the chromosphere is larger in the network than in the cell interior

  10. Precise measurement of magnetic field gradients from free spin precession signals of He-3 and Xe-129 magnetometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allmendinger, Fabian; Blümler, Peter; Doll, Michael; Grasdijk, Oliver; Heil, Werner; Jungmann, Klaus; Karpuk, Sergej; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Offenhäuser, Andreas; Repetto, Maricel; Schmidt, Ulrich; Sobolev, Yuri; Tullney, Kathlyne; Willmann, Lorenz; Zimmer, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We report on precise measurements of magnetic field gradients extracted from transverse relaxation rates of precessing spin samples. The experimental approach is based on the free precession of gaseous, nuclear spin polarized He-3 and (12)9Xe atoms in a spherical cell inside a magnetic guiding field

  11. A complete solution for GP-B's gyroscopic precession by retarded gravitational theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Keyun

    Mainstream physicists generally believe that Mercury’s Perihelion precession and GP-B’ gyroscopic precession are two of the strongest evidences supporting Einstein’ curved spacetime and general relativity. However, most classical literatures and textbooks (e.g. Ohanain: Gravitation and Spacetime) paint an incorrect picture of Mercury’s orbit anomaly, namely Mercury’s perihelion precessed 43 arc-seconds per century; a correct picture should be that Mercury rotated 43 arc-seconds per century more than along Newtonian theoretical orbit. The essence of Le Verrier’s and Newcomb’s observation and analysis is that the angular speed of Mercury is slightly faster than the Newtonian theoretical value. The complete explanation to Mercury’s orbit anomaly should include two factors, perihelion precession is one of two factors, in addition, the change of orbital radius will also cause a change of angular speed, which is another component of Mercury's orbital anomaly. If Schwarzschild metric is correct, then the solution of the Schwarzschild orbit equation must contain three non-ignorable items. The first corresponds to Newtonian ellipse; the second is a nonlinear perturbation with increasing amplitude, which causes the precession of orbit perihelion; this is just one part of the angular speed anomaly of Mercury; the third part is a linear perturbation, corresponding to a similar figure of the Newton's ellipse, but with a minimal radius; this makes no contribution to the perihelion precession of the Schwarzschild orbit, but makes the Schwarzschild orbital radius slightly smaller, leading to a slight increase in Mercury’s angular speed. All classical literatures of general relativity ignored this last factor, which is a gross oversight. If you correctly take all three factors into consideration, the final result is that the difference between the angles rotated along Schwarzschild’s orbit and the angle rotated along Newton’s orbit for one hundred years should

  12. Increasing sync rate of pulse-coupled oscillators via phase response function design: theory and application to wireless networks

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yongqiang; Nunez, Felipe; Doyle III, Francis J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the synchronization rate of weakly connected pulse-coupled oscillators (PCOs). We prove that besides coupling strength, the phase response function is also a determinant of synchronization rate. Inspired by the result, we propose to increase the synchronization rate of PCOs by designing the phase response function. This has important significance in PCO-based clock synchronization of wireless networks. By designing the phase response function, synchronization rate is incr...

  13. A quantum logic network for implementing optimal symmetric universal and phase-covariant telecloning of a bipartite entangled state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Fanyu; Zhu Aidong

    2008-01-01

    A quantum logic network to implement quantum telecloning is presented in this paper. The network includes two parts: the first part is used to create the telecloning channel and the second part to teleport the state. It can be used not only to implement universal telecloning for a bipartite entangled state which is completely unknown, but also to implement the phase-covariant telecloning for one that is partially known. Furthermore, the network can also be used to construct a tele-triplicator. It can easily be implemented in experiment because only single- and two-qubit operations are used in the network.

  14. Effects of partial time delays on phase synchronization in Watts-Strogatz small-world neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaojuan; Perc, Matjaž; Kurths, Jürgen

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we study effects of partial time delays on phase synchronization in Watts-Strogatz small-world neuronal networks. Our focus is on the impact of two parameters, namely the time delay τ and the probability of partial time delay pdelay, whereby the latter determines the probability with which a connection between two neurons is delayed. Our research reveals that partial time delays significantly affect phase synchronization in this system. In particular, partial time delays can either enhance or decrease phase synchronization and induce synchronization transitions with changes in the mean firing rate of neurons, as well as induce switching between synchronized neurons with period-1 firing to synchronized neurons with period-2 firing. Moreover, in comparison to a neuronal network where all connections are delayed, we show that small partial time delay probabilities have especially different influences on phase synchronization of neuronal networks.

  15. Phase transition of the susceptible-infected-susceptible dynamics on time-varying configuration model networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Guillaume; Young, Jean-Gabriel; Laurence, Edward; Murphy, Charles; Dubé, Louis J.

    2018-02-01

    We present a degree-based theoretical framework to study the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) dynamics on time-varying (rewired) configuration model networks. Using this framework on a given degree distribution, we provide a detailed analysis of the stationary state using the rewiring rate to explore the whole range of the time variation of the structure relative to that of the SIS process. This analysis is suitable for the characterization of the phase transition and leads to three main contributions: (1) We obtain a self-consistent expression for the absorbing-state threshold, able to capture both collective and hub activation. (2) We recover the predictions of a number of existing approaches as limiting cases of our analysis, providing thereby a unifying point of view for the SIS dynamics on random networks. (3) We obtain bounds for the critical exponents of a number of quantities in the stationary state. This allows us to reinterpret the concept of hub-dominated phase transition. Within our framework, it appears as a heterogeneous critical phenomenon: observables for different degree classes have a different scaling with the infection rate. This phenomenon is followed by the successive activation of the degree classes beyond the epidemic threshold.

  16. Report of the International Astronomical Union Division I working group on precession and the ecliptic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hilton, J. L.; Capitaine, N.; Chapront, J.; Ferrandiz, J.M.; Fienga, A.; Fukushima, T.; Getino, J.; Mathews, P. M.; Simon, J.-C.; Soffel, M.; Vondrák, Jan; Wallace, P.; Williams, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 3 (2006), s. 351-367 ISSN 0923-2958 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : precession and the ecliptic * reference systems Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.175, year: 2006

  17. A neutron spin echo spectrometer with two optimal field shape coils for neutron spin precession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, T.; Ebisawa, T.; Tasaki, S.; Ito, Y.; Takahashi, S.; Yoshizawa, H.

    1995-01-01

    We have designed and have been constructing at the C 2-2 cold neutron guide port of JRR-3M, JAERI, a neutron spin echo spectrometer (NSE) which is equipped with two optimal field shape (OFS) coils for neutron spin precession with the maximum field integral of 0.22 T m, an assembly of position sensitive detectors (PSD), a converging polarizer and a wide area analyzer. The dynamic range of scattering vector Q covers from 0.005 A -1 to 0.2 A -1 and that of energy hω from 10 neV to 30 μeV. Performance tests of the OFS coils show that the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field integral in the OFS coils with the spiral coils is so small that the NSE signal amplitude decreases little even for the neutron cross section of 30 mm diameter as the Fourier time t increases up to 25 ns, though the precession coils are close to iron covers of the neighboring neutron guide. This verifies that the OFS precession coils are appropriate for this NSE spectrometer. Another test experiment shows that the homogeneity condition of the precession magnet is loosened by use of PSD. (orig.)

  18. Classical relativistic spinning particle with anomalous magnetic moment: The precession of spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barut, A.O.; Cruz, M.G.

    1993-05-01

    The theory of classical relativistic spinning particles with c-number internal spinor variables, modelling accurately the Dirac electron, is generalized to particles with anomalous magnetic moments. The equations of motion are derived and the problem of spin precession is discussed and compared with other theories of spin. (author). 32 refs

  19. Free precession of neutron stars: some plain truths, cautionary remarks, and assorted speculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pines, D.; Shaham, J.

    1974-01-01

    A brief summary is presented of present understanding of free precession in neutron stars. Attention is called to some truths concerning such wobble motion and then one describes some current efforts to devise mechanisms for exciting neutron star wobble with particular attention to the Crab and Vela pulsars and to Her X-1. (U.S.)

  20. Light variations of a spherical star with two hot precessing spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyurkchieva, D.P.; Shkodrov, V.G.

    1984-01-01

    In one of the models of SS443, suggested by Lipunov and Shakura (1982), the second component of the double stellar system is considered a star with two hot spots on the surface. Since the gas jets forming the spots are precessing, the hot spots on the visible disk will do likewise. In this paper, the light variations of a spherical star with two precessing hot spots are analyzed under the following restrictive conditions: (I) the inclination of the precession axis toward the line of sight is i=π/2; (II) the visible disk of the spherical star is considered uniformly illuminated, i.e. the effect of the variation in intensity from the disk center to the limb is neglected. The time variations in the projection area of the precessing spots on the visible stellar disk are investigated. In the studies to follow, the same effect will be analyzed assuming: (1) inot=π/2; (2) the variation in intensity is estimated from center to the stellar boundary; (3) a case of ellipsoidal stars; (4) this effect added to the effect of darkening due to orbital movement in a double stellar system

  1. A Neural Network-Based Gait Phase Classification Method Using Sensors Equipped on Lower Limb Exoskeleton Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jun-Young; Heo, Wonho; Yang, Hyundae; Park, Hyunsub

    2015-10-30

    An exact classification of different gait phases is essential to enable the control of exoskeleton robots and detect the intentions of users. We propose a gait phase classification method based on neural networks using sensor signals from lower limb exoskeleton robots. In such robots, foot sensors with force sensing registers are commonly used to classify gait phases. We describe classifiers that use the orientation of each lower limb segment and the angular velocities of the joints to output the current gait phase. Experiments to obtain the input signals and desired outputs for the learning and validation process are conducted, and two neural network methods (a multilayer perceptron and nonlinear autoregressive with external inputs (NARX)) are used to develop an optimal classifier. Offline and online evaluations using four criteria are used to compare the performance of the classifiers. The proposed NARX-based method exhibits sufficiently good performance to replace foot sensors as a means of classifying gait phases.

  2. Pressure-induced phase transitions in silicon studied by neural network-based metadynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behler, Joerg [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, USI-Campus, Lugano (Switzerland); Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Martonak, Roman [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, USI-Campus, Lugano (Switzerland); Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynska dolina F2, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Donadio, Davide [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, USI-Campus, Lugano (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry, UC Davis, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Parrinello, Michele [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, USI-Campus, Lugano (Switzerland)

    2008-12-15

    We present a combination of the metadynamics method for the investigation of pressure-induced phase transitions in solids with a neural network representation of high-dimensional density-functional theory (DFT) potential-energy surfaces. In a recent illustration of the method for the complex high-pressure phase diagram of silicon[Behler et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 185501 (2008)] we have shown that the full sequence of phases can be reconstructed by a series of subsequent simulations. In the present paper we give a detailed account of the underlying methodology and discuss the scope and limitations of the approach, which promises to be a valuable tool for the investigation of a variety of inorganic materials. The method is several orders of magnitude faster than a direct coupling of metadynamics with electronic structure calculations, while the accuracy is essentially maintained, thus providing access to extended simulations of large systems. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Spontaneous default mode network phase-locking moderates performance perceptions under stereotype threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Chad E; Leitner, Jordan B; Duran-Jordan, Kelly; Magerman, Adam B; Schmader, Toni; Allen, John J B

    2015-07-01

    This study assessed whether individual differences in self-oriented neural processing were associated with performance perceptions of minority students under stereotype threat. Resting electroencephalographic activity recorded in white and minority participants was used to predict later estimates of task errors and self-doubt on a presumed measure of intelligence. We assessed spontaneous phase-locking between dipole sources in left lateral parietal cortex (LPC), precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex (P/PCC), and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC); three regions of the default mode network (DMN) that are integral for self-oriented processing. Results revealed that minorities with greater LPC-P/PCC phase-locking in the theta band reported more accurate error estimations. All individuals experienced less self-doubt to the extent they exhibited greater LPC-MPFC phase-locking in the alpha band but this effect was driven by minorities. Minorities also reported more self-doubt to the extent they overestimated errors. Findings reveal novel neural moderators of stereotype threat effects on subjective experience. Spontaneous synchronization between DMN regions may play a role in anticipatory coping mechanisms that buffer individuals from stereotype threat. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Charge as the Stereographic Projection of Geometric Precession on Pseudospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Binder, B

    2002-01-01

    In this paper geometric phases (Berry and Aharonov-Bohm) are generalized to nonlinear topological phase fields on pseudospheres, where the coordinate vector field is parallel transported along the signal/soliton vector field with Levi--Civita connection. Projective $PSL(2,{\\Bbb R})$ symmetry describes the relativistic self-interacting bosonic sine-Gordon field. A Coulomb potential can be induced as the stereographic projection of a harmonic oscillator potential mapping angles or phases to distances and vice versa resulting in mutual coupling with a generalized coupling constant given by a nonlinear iteration. With single-valuedness requirement in 137-gonal symmetry it fits within a few ppb uncertainty to the Sommerfeld fine structure constant.

  5. Methodologies for assessing the use-phase power consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of telecommunications network services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chien A; Gygax, André F; Wong, Elaine; Leckie, Christopher A; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Kilper, Daniel C

    2013-01-02

    Internet traffic has grown rapidly in recent years and is expected to continue to expand significantly over the next decade. Consequently, the resulting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of telecommunications service-supporting infrastructures have become an important issue. In this study, we develop a set of models for assessing the use-phase power consumption and carbon dioxide emissions of telecom network services to help telecom providers gain a better understanding of the GHG emissions associated with the energy required for their networks and services. Due to the fact that measuring the power consumption and traffic in a telecom network is a challenging task, these models utilize different granularities of available network information. As the granularity of the network measurement information decreases, the corresponding models have the potential to produce larger estimation errors. Therefore, we examine the accuracy of these models under various network scenarios using two approaches: (i) a sensitivity analysis through simulations and (ii) a case study of a deployed network. Both approaches show that the accuracy of the models depends on the network size, the total amount of network service traffic (i.e., for the service under assessment), and the number of network nodes used to process the service.

  6. Multivariate multiscale complex network analysis of vertical upward oil-water two-phase flow in a small diameter pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Zhai, Lu-Sheng; Dang, Wei-Dong; Yu, Jia-Liang; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-02-02

    High water cut and low velocity vertical upward oil-water two-phase flow is a typical complex system with the features of multiscale, unstable and non-homogenous. We first measure local flow information by using distributed conductance sensor and then develop a multivariate multiscale complex network (MMCN) to reveal the dispersed oil-in-water local flow behavior. Specifically, we infer complex networks at different scales from multi-channel measurements for three typical vertical oil-in-water flow patterns. Then we characterize the generated multiscale complex networks in terms of network clustering measure. The results suggest that the clustering coefficient entropy from the MMCN not only allows indicating the oil-in-water flow pattern transition but also enables to probe the dynamical flow behavior governing the transitions of vertical oil-water two-phase flow.

  7. Identification of lines of electric lines of three-phase distribution networks in the composition of ASMAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omorov Turatbek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of protection of a three-phase four-wire distribution network (DEN with a voltage of 0.4 kV from the interruption of electric power lines is considered. On the basis of the analysis of the values of complex resistances of interpersonal sections of the main line of the network, criteria are proposed that allow detecting critical situations associated with discontinuities in power transmission lines. Using these criteria makes it possible to localize the places of breaks of phase and neutral wires. Mathematical models and methods that are used to evaluate the complex resistances of interpersonal sections of a three-phase network are briefly considered. The obtained results are oriented for use in the automated system of electricity control and accounting (ASMAE.

  8. Phase equilibrium of binary system carbon dioxide - methanol at high pressure using artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasri, F.; Hatami, T.

    2012-01-01

    Interest in supercritical fluids extraction (SFE ) is increasing throughout many scientific and industrial fields. The common solvent for use in SFE is carbon dioxide. However, pure carbon dioxide frequently fails to efficiently extract the essential oil from a sample matrix, and modifier fluids such as methanol should be used to enhance extraction yield. A more efficient use of SFE requires quantitative prediction of phase equilibrium of this binary system, carbon dioxide - methanol. The purpose of the current research is modeling carbon dioxide - methanol system using artificial neural network (ANN). Results of ANN modeling has been compared with experimental data as well as thermodynamic equations of state. The comparison shows that the ANN modeling has a higher accuracy than thermodynamic models. (author)

  9. Quantum phase transition of the transverse-field quantum Ising model on scale-free networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hangmo

    2015-01-01

    I investigate the quantum phase transition of the transverse-field quantum Ising model in which nearest neighbors are defined according to the connectivity of scale-free networks. Using a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo simulation method and the finite-size scaling analysis, I identify the quantum critical point and study its scaling characteristics. For the degree exponent λ=6, I obtain results that are consistent with the mean-field theory. For λ=4.5 and 4, however, the results suggest that the quantum critical point belongs to a non-mean-field universality class. Further simulations indicate that the quantum critical point remains mean-field-like if λ>5, but it continuously deviates from the mean-field theory as λ becomes smaller.

  10. Modelling the continuous cooling transformation diagram of engineering steels using neural networks. Part I. Phase regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolk, P.J. van der; Wang, J. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Sietsma, J.; Zwaag, S. van der [Delft Univ. of Technology, Lab. for Materials Science (Netherlands)

    2002-12-01

    A neural network model for the calculation of the phase regions of the continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram of engineering steels has been developed. The model is based on experimental CCT diagrams of 459 low-alloy steels, and calculates the CCT diagram as a function of composition and austenitisation temperature. In considering the composition, 9 alloying elements are taken into account. The model reproduces the original diagrams rather accurately, with deviations that are not larger than the average experimental inaccuracy of the experimental diagrams. Therefore, it can be considered an adequate alternative to the experimental determination of the CCT diagram of a certain steel within the composition range used. The effects of alloying elements can be quantified, either individually or in combination, with the model. Nonlinear composition dependencies are observed. (orig.)

  11. The association between reconstructed phase space and Artificial Neural Networks for vectorcardiographic recognition of myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cecília M; Silva, Ittalo S; de Sousa, Rafael D; Hortegal, Renato A; Regis, Carlos Danilo M

    Myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. As it is life threatening, it requires an immediate and precise treatment. Due to this, a growing number of research and innovations in the field of biomedical signal processing is in high demand. This paper proposes the association of Reconstructed Phase Space and Artificial Neural Networks for Vectorcardiography Myocardial Infarction Recognition. The algorithm promotes better results for the box size 10 × 10 and the combination of four parameters: box counting (Vx), box counting (Vz), self-similarity method (Vx) and self-similarity method (Vy) with sensitivity = 92%, specificity = 96% and accuracy = 94%. The topographic diagnosis presented different performances for different types of infarctions with better results for anterior wall infarctions and less accurate results for inferior infarctions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Interacting opinion and disease dynamics in multiplex networks: Discontinuous phase transition and nonmonotonic consensus times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez-Rojas, Fátima; Vazquez, Federico

    2017-05-01

    Opinion formation and disease spreading are among the most studied dynamical processes on complex networks. In real societies, it is expected that these two processes depend on and affect each other. However, little is known about the effects of opinion dynamics over disease dynamics and vice versa, since most studies treat them separately. In this work we study the dynamics of the voter model for opinion formation intertwined with that of the contact process for disease spreading, in a population of agents that interact via two types of connections, social and contact. These two interacting dynamics take place on two layers of networks, coupled through a fraction q of links present in both networks. The probability that an agent updates its state depends on both the opinion and disease states of the interacting partner. We find that the opinion dynamics has striking consequences on the statistical properties of disease spreading. The most important is that the smooth (continuous) transition from a healthy to an endemic phase observed in the contact process, as the infection probability increases beyond a threshold, becomes abrupt (discontinuous) in the two-layer system. Therefore, disregarding the effects of social dynamics on epidemics propagation may lead to a misestimation of the real magnitude of the spreading. Also, an endemic-healthy discontinuous transition is found when the coupling q overcomes a threshold value. Furthermore, we show that the disease dynamics delays the opinion consensus, leading to a consensus time that varies nonmonotonically with q in a large range of the model's parameters. A mean-field approach reveals that the coupled dynamics of opinions and disease can be approximately described by the dynamics of the voter model decoupled from that of the contact process, with effective probabilities of opinion and disease transmission.

  13. Hypoxia induces a phase transition within a kinase signaling network in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Shi, Qihui; Remacle, Francoise; Qin, Lidong; Shackelford, David B; Shin, Young Shik; Mischel, Paul S; Levine, R D; Heath, James R

    2013-04-09

    Hypoxia is a near-universal feature of cancer, promoting glycolysis, cellular proliferation, and angiogenesis. The molecular mechanisms of hypoxic signaling have been intensively studied, but the impact of changes in oxygen partial pressure (pO2) on the state of signaling networks is less clear. In a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cancer cell model, we examined the response of signaling networks to targeted pathway inhibition between 21% and 1% pO2. We used a microchip technology that facilitates quantification of a panel of functional proteins from statistical numbers of single cells. We find that near 1.5% pO2, the signaling network associated with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1)--a critical component of hypoxic signaling and a compelling cancer drug target--is deregulated in a manner such that it will be unresponsive to mTOR kinase inhibitors near 1.5% pO2, but will respond at higher or lower pO2 values. These predictions were validated through experiments on bulk GBM cell line cultures and on neurosphere cultures of a human-origin GBM xenograft tumor. We attempt to understand this behavior through the use of a quantitative version of Le Chatelier's principle, as well as through a steady-state kinetic model of protein interactions, both of which indicate that hypoxia can influence mTORC1 signaling as a switch. The Le Chatelier approach also indicates that this switch may be thought of as a type of phase transition. Our analysis indicates that certain biologically complex cell behaviors may be understood using fundamental, thermodynamics-motivated principles.

  14. Hypoxia induces a phase transition within a kinase signaling network in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Shi, Qihui; Remacle, Francoise; Qin, Lidong; Shackelford, David B.; Shin, Young Shik; Mischel, Paul S.; Levine, R. D.; Heath, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia is a near-universal feature of cancer, promoting glycolysis, cellular proliferation, and angiogenesis. The molecular mechanisms of hypoxic signaling have been intensively studied, but the impact of changes in oxygen partial pressure (pO2) on the state of signaling networks is less clear. In a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cancer cell model, we examined the response of signaling networks to targeted pathway inhibition between 21% and 1% pO2. We used a microchip technology that facilitates quantification of a panel of functional proteins from statistical numbers of single cells. We find that near 1.5% pO2, the signaling network associated with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1)—a critical component of hypoxic signaling and a compelling cancer drug target—is deregulated in a manner such that it will be unresponsive to mTOR kinase inhibitors near 1.5% pO2, but will respond at higher or lower pO2 values. These predictions were validated through experiments on bulk GBM cell line cultures and on neurosphere cultures of a human-origin GBM xenograft tumor. We attempt to understand this behavior through the use of a quantitative version of Le Chatelier’s principle, as well as through a steady-state kinetic model of protein interactions, both of which indicate that hypoxia can influence mTORC1 signaling as a switch. The Le Chatelier approach also indicates that this switch may be thought of as a type of phase transition. Our analysis indicates that certain biologically complex cell behaviors may be understood using fundamental, thermodynamics-motivated principles. PMID:23530221

  15. Duality in Phase Space and Complex Dynamics of an Integrated Pest Management Network Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Baoyin; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    Fragmented habitat patches between which plants and animals can disperse can be modeled as networks with varying degrees of connectivity. A predator-prey model with network structures is proposed for integrated pest management (IPM) with impulsive control actions. The model was analyzed using numerical methods to investigate how factors such as the impulsive period, the releasing constant of natural enemies and the mode of connections between the patches affect pest outbreak patterns and the success or failure of pest control. The concept of the cluster as defined by Holland and Hastings is used to describe variations in results ranging from global synchrony when all patches have identical fluctuations to n-cluster solutions with all patches having different dynamics. Heterogeneity in the initial densities of either pest or natural enemy generally resulted in a variety of cluster oscillations. Surprisingly, if n > 1, the clusters fall into two groups one with low amplitude fluctuations and the other with high amplitude fluctuations (i.e. duality in phase space), implying that control actions radically alter the system's characteristics by inducing duality and more complex dynamics. When the impulsive period is small enough, i.e. the control strategy is undertaken frequently, the pest can be eradicated. As the period increases, the pest's dynamics shift from a steady state to become chaotic with periodic windows and more multicluster oscillations arise for heterogenous initial density distributions. Period-doubling bifurcation and periodic halving cascades occur as the releasing constant of the natural enemy increases. For the same ecological system with five differently connected networks, as the randomness of the connectedness increases, the transient duration becomes smaller and the probability of multicluster oscillations appearing becomes higher.

  16. Embedded Electro-Optic Sensor Network for the On-Site Calibration and Real-Time Performance Monitoring of Large-Scale Phased Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Kyoung

    2005-01-01

    This final report summarizes the progress during the Phase I SBIR project entitled "Embedded Electro-Optic Sensor Network for the On-Site Calibration and Real-Time Performance Monitoring of Large-Scale Phased Arrays...

  17. Adaptive autonomous Communications Routing Optimizer for Network Efficiency Management, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Maximizing network efficiency for NASA's Space Networking resources is a large, complex, distributed problem, requiring substantial collaboration. We propose the...

  18. Methods for the determination of lunisolar precession from observations of extragalactic radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsmore, B.

    1976-01-01

    Although it is not practicable at present to determine the position or motion of the equinox using radio techniques, lunisolar precession may be determined from measurements at two epochs of differences of (i) Right Ascension -RA, and (ii) Declinations - Dec., of extragalactic radio sources. The determinations are largely free from systematic errors, and the magnitudes of random errors, arising principally from tropospheric irregularities, are given for observations with the Cambridge 5-km telescope. Some first epoch measure-ments have been made with this instrument and it is estimated that by carrying out second epoch measurements after an interval of 5 yr, the centennial value of lunisolar precession will be determined with a standard error of +- 0''.25. (author)

  19. FERMILAB: Tevatron upgrade; Magnetic precession in bent crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1993-01-15

    The Fermilab accelerator complex is in the middle of a major upgrade to increase the luminosity beyond the original design goal. During Phase I of this upgrade, there have been major modifications to the Tevatron. These modifications were commissioned at the start of the latest collider run and include the installation of electrostatic separators to separate the orbits of the stored beams and new low beta insertions to squeeze the colliding proton and antiproton beams at both experiment interaction regions. These modifications have already enabled the Tevatron to achieve a record peak luminosity of 6.93 x 10{sup 30} per sq cm per s and a record weekly integrated luminosity of 10{sup 60} inverse nanobarns. The peak goal for the present run of 5.0 x 10{sup 30} has already been exceeded.

  20. FERMILAB: Tevatron upgrade; Magnetic precession in bent crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The Fermilab accelerator complex is in the middle of a major upgrade to increase the luminosity beyond the original design goal. During Phase I of this upgrade, there have been major modifications to the Tevatron. These modifications were commissioned at the start of the latest collider run and include the installation of electrostatic separators to separate the orbits of the stored beams and new low beta insertions to squeeze the colliding proton and antiproton beams at both experiment interaction regions. These modifications have already enabled the Tevatron to achieve a record peak luminosity of 6.93 x 10 30 per sq cm per s and a record weekly integrated luminosity of 10 60 inverse nanobarns. The peak goal for the present run of 5.0 x 10 30 has already been exceeded

  1. Temperature-induced phase transition in hydrogels of interpenetrating networks poly(N-isopropylmethacrylamide)/poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šťastná, J.; Hanyková, L.; Sedláková, Zdeňka; Valentová, H.; Spěváček, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 291, č. 10 (2013), s. 2409-2417 ISSN 0303-402X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1281 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : temperature-induced volume phase transition * poly (N-isopropylmethacrylamide) poly (Nisopropylacrylamide) interpenetrating network * 1H NMR spectroscopy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.410, year: 2013

  2. A Novel Neural Network Vector Control for Single-Phase Grid-Connected Converters with L, LC and LCL Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingang Fu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a novel recurrent neural network (NN-based vector control approach for single-phase grid-connected converters (GCCs with L (inductor, LC (inductor-capacitor and LCL (inductor-capacitor-inductor filters and provides their comparison study with the conventional standard vector control method. A single neural network controller replaces two current-loop PI controllers, and the NN training approximates the optimal control for the single-phase GCC system. The Levenberg–Marquardt (LM algorithm was used to train the NN controller based on the complete system equations without any decoupling policies. The proposed NN approach can solve the decoupling problem associated with the conventional vector control methods for L, LC and LCL-filter-based single-phase GCCs. Both simulation study and hardware experiments demonstrate that the neural network vector controller shows much more improved performance than that of conventional vector controllers, including faster response speed and lower overshoot. Especially, NN vector control could achieve very good performance using low switch frequency. More importantly, the neural network vector controller is a damping free controller, which is generally required by a conventional vector controller for an LCL-filter-based single-phase grid-connected converter and, therefore, can overcome the inefficiency problem caused by damping policies.

  3. Nonorthogonal multiple access and carrierless amplitude phase modulation for flexible multiuser provisioning in 5G mobile networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altabas, J.A.; Rommel, S.; Puerta, R.; Izquierdo, D.; Ignacio Garces, J.; Antonio Lazaro, J.; Vegas Olmos, J.J.; Tafur Monroy, I.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a combined nonorthogonal multiple access (NOMA) and multiband carrierless amplitude phase modulation (multiCAP) scheme is proposed for capacity enhancement of and flexible resource provisioning in 5G mobile networks. The proposed scheme is experimentally evaluated over a W-band

  4. Increasing sync rate of pulse-coupled oscillators via phase response function design: theory and application to wireless networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongqiang; Núñez, Felipe; Doyle, Francis J

    2012-07-25

    This paper addresses the synchronization rate of weakly connected pulse-coupled oscillators (PCOs). We prove that besides coupling strength, the phase response function is also a determinant of synchronization rate. Inspired by the result, we propose to increase the synchronization rate of PCOs by designing the phase response function. This has important significance in PCO-based clock synchronization of wireless networks. By designing the phase response function, synchronization rate is increased even under a fixed transmission power. Given that energy consumption in synchronization is determined by the product of synchronization time and transformation power, the new strategy reduces energy consumption in clock synchronization. QualNet experiments confirm the theoretical results.

  5. Fast and Slow Precession of Gaseous Debris Disks around Planet-accreting White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Ryan; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2018-04-01

    Spectroscopic observations of some metal-rich white dwarfs (WDs), believed to be polluted by planetary material, reveal the presence of compact gaseous metallic disks orbiting them. The observed variability of asymmetric, double-peaked emission-line profiles in about half of such systems could be interpreted as the signature of precession of an eccentric gaseous debris disk. The variability timescales—from decades down to 1.4 year (recently inferred for the debris disk around HE 1349–2305)—are in rough agreement with the rate of general relativistic (GR) precession in the test-particle limit. However, it has not been demonstrated that this mechanism can drive such a fast, coherent precession of a radially extended (out to 1 {R}ȯ ) gaseous disk mediated by internal stresses (pressure). Here, we use the linear theory of eccentricity evolution in hydrodynamic disks to determine several key properties of eccentric modes in gaseous debris disks around WDs. We find a critical dependence of both the precession period and radial eccentricity distribution of the modes on the inner disk radius, r in. For small inner radii, {r}in}≲ (0.2{--}0.4) {R}ȯ , the modes are GR-driven, with periods of ≈1–10 year. For {r}in}≳ (0.2{--}0.4) {R}ȯ , the modes are pressure dominated, with periods of ≈3–20 year. Correspondence between the variability periods and inferred inner radii of the observed disks is in general agreement with this trend. In particular, the short period of HE 1349–2305 is consistent with its small r in. Circum-WD debris disks may thus serve as natural laboratories for studying the evolution of eccentric gaseous disks.

  6. Mitigation of near-band balanced steady-state free precession through-plane flow artifacts using partial dephasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Anjali; Cheng, Joseph Y; Hargreaves, Brian A; Baron, Corey A; Nishimura, Dwight G

    2018-06-01

    To mitigate artifacts from through-plane flow at the locations of steady-state stopbands in balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) using partial dephasing. A 60° range in the phase accrual during a TR was created over the voxel by slightly unbalancing the slice-select dephaser. The spectral profiles of SSFP with partial dephasing for various constant flow rates and during pulsatile flow were simulated to determine if partial dephasing decreases through-plane flow artifacts originating near SSFP dark bands while maintaining on-resonant signal. Simulations were then validated in a flow phantom. Lastly, phase-cycled SSFP cardiac cine images were acquired with and without partial dephasing in six subjects. Partial dephasing decreased the strength and non-linearity of the dependence of the signal at the stopbands on the through-plane flow rate. It thus mitigated hyper-enhancement from out-of-slice signal contributions and transient-related artifacts caused by variable flow both in the phantom and in vivo. In six volunteers, partial dephasing noticeably decreased artifacts in all of the phase-cycled cardiac cine datasets. Partial dephasing can mitigate the flow artifacts seen at the stopbands in balanced SSFP while maintaining the sequence's desired signal. By mitigating hyper-enhancement and transient-related artifacts originating from the stopbands, partial dephasing facilitates robust multiple-acquisition phase-cycled SSFP in the heart. Magn Reson Med 79:2944-2953, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF NATURALLY TILTED, RETROGRADELY PRECESSING, NODAL SUPERHUMPING ACCRETION DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Accretion disks around black hole, neutron star, and white dwarf systems are thought to sometimes tilt, retrogradely precess, and produce hump-shaped modulations in light curves that have a period shorter than the orbital period. Although artificially rotating numerically simulated accretion disks out of the orbital plane and around the line of nodes generate these short-period superhumps and retrograde precession of the disk, no numerical code to date has been shown to produce a disk tilt naturally. In this work, we report the first naturally tilted disk in non-magnetic cataclysmic variables using three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics. Our simulations show that after many hundreds of orbital periods, the disk has tilted on its own and this disk tilt is without the aid of radiation sources or magnetic fields. As the system orbits, the accretion stream strikes the bright spot (which is on the rim of the tilted disk) and flows over and under the disk on different flow paths. These different flow paths suggest the lift force as a source to disk tilt. Our results confirm the disk shape, disk structure, and negative superhump period and support the source to disk tilt, source to retrograde precession, and location associated with X-ray and He II emission from the disk as suggested in previous works. Our results identify the fundamental negative superhump frequency as the indicator of disk tilt around the line of nodes.

  8. A covariant formalism of spin precession with respect to a reference congruence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Rickard

    2006-01-01

    We derive an effectively three-dimensional relativistic spin precession formalism. The formalism is applicable to any spacetime where an arbitrary timelike reference congruence of worldlines is specified. We employ what we call a stopped spin vector which is the spin vector that we would get if we momentarily make a pure boost of the spin vector to stop it relative to the congruence. Starting from the Fermi transport equation for the standard spin vector we derive a corresponding transport equation for the stopped spin vector. Employing a spacetime transport equation for a vector along a worldline, corresponding to spatial parallel transport with respect to the congruence, we can write down a precession formula for a gyroscope relative to the local spatial geometry defined by the congruence. This general approach has already been pursued by Jantzen et al (see e.g. Jantzen R T, Carini P and Bini D 1992 Ann. Phys. 215 1-50), but the algebraic form of our respective expressions differs. We are also applying the formalism to a novel type of spatial parallel transport introduced in Jonsson (2006 Class. Quantum Grav. 23 1), as well as verifying the validity of the intuitive approach of a forthcoming paper (Jonsson 2006 forthcoming) where gyroscope precession is explained entirely as a double Thomas type of effect. We also present the resulting formalism in explicit three-dimensional form (using the boldface vector notation), and give examples of applications

  9. Microcomputer-based instrument for the detection and analysis of precession motion in a gas centrifuge machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulus, S.S.

    1986-03-01

    The Centrifuge Precession Analyzer (CPA) is a microcomputer-based instrument which detects precession motion in a gas centrifuge machine and calculates the amplitude and frequency of precession. The CPA consists of a printed circuit board which contains signal-conditioning circuitry and a 24-bit counter and an INTEL iSBC 80-/24 single-board computer. Precession motion is detected by monitoring a signal generated by a variable reluctance pick-up coil in the top of the centrifuge machine. This signal is called a Fidler signal. The initial Fidler signal triggers a counter which is clocked by a high-precision, 20.000000-MHz, temperature-controlled, crystal oscillator. The contents of the counter are read by the computer, and the counter reset after every ten Fidler signals. The speed of the centrifuge machine and the amplitude and frequency of precession are calculated, and the results are displayed on a liquid crystal display on the front panel of the CPA. The thesis contains results from data generated by a Fidler signal simulator and data taken when the centrifuge was operated under three test conditions: (1) nitrogen gas during drive-up, steady state, and drive-down, (2) xenon gas during slip test, steady state, and the addition of gas, and (3) no gas during steady state. The qualitative results were consistent with experience with centrifuge machines UF 6 in that the amplitude of precession increased and the frequency of precession decreased during drive-up, drive-down and the slip check. The magnitude of the amplitude and frequency of precession were proportional to the molecular weight of the gases in steady state

  10. Precessing Black Hole Binaries and Their Gravitational Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    László Á. Gergely

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The first and second observational runs of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO have marked the first direct detections of gravitational waves, either from black hole binaries or, in one case, from coalescing neutron stars. These observations opened up the era of gravitational wave astronomy, but also of gravitational wave cosmology, in the form of an independent derivation of the Hubble constant. They were equally important to prove false a plethora of modified gravity theories predicting gravitational wave propagation speed different from that of light. For a continued and improved testing of general relativity, the precise description of compact binary dynamics, not only in the final coalescence phase but also earlier, when precessional effects dominate, are required. We report on the derivation of the full secular dynamics for compact binaries, valid over the precessional time-scale, in the form of an autonomous closed system of differential equations for the set of spin angles and periastron. The system can be applied for mapping the parameter space for the occurrence of the spin flip-flop effect and for more accurately analyzing the spin-flip effect, which could explain the formation of X-shaped radio galaxies.

  11. Power factor improvement in three-phase networks with unbalanced inductive loads using the Roederstein ESTAmat RPR power factor controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniş, C. M.; Cunţan, C. D.; Rob, R. O. S.; Popa, G. N.

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents the analysis of a power factor with capacitors banks, without series coils, used for improving power factor for a three-phase and single-phase inductive loads. In the experimental measurements, to improve the power factor, the Roederstein ESTAmat RPR power factor controller can command up to twelve capacitors banks, while experimenting using only six capacitors banks. Six delta capacitors banks with approximately equal reactive powers were used for experimentation. The experimental measurements were carried out with a three-phase power quality analyser which worked in three cases: a case without a controller with all capacitors banks permanently parallel connected with network, and two other cases with power factor controller (one with setting power factor at 0.92 and the other one at 1). When performing experiments with the power factor controller, a current transformer was used to measure the current on one phase (at a more charged or less loaded phase).

  12. Phase Diagrams of Three-Dimensional Anderson and Quantum Percolation Models Using Deep Three-Dimensional Convolutional Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Tomohiro; Ohtsuki, Tomi

    2017-11-01

    The three-dimensional Anderson model is a well-studied model of disordered electron systems that shows the delocalization-localization transition. As in our previous papers on two- and three-dimensional (2D, 3D) quantum phase transitions [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 85, 123706 (2016), 86, 044708 (2017)], we used an image recognition algorithm based on a multilayered convolutional neural network. However, in contrast to previous papers in which 2D image recognition was used, we applied 3D image recognition to analyze entire 3D wave functions. We show that a full phase diagram of the disorder-energy plane is obtained once the 3D convolutional neural network has been trained at the band center. We further demonstrate that the full phase diagram for 3D quantum bond and site percolations can be drawn by training the 3D Anderson model at the band center.

  13. GPS receiver phase biases estimable in PPP-RTK networks: dynamic characterization and impact analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baocheng; Liu, Teng; Yuan, Yunbin

    2018-06-01

    The integer ambiguity resolution enabled precise point positioning (PPP-RTK) has been proven advantageous in a wide range of applications. The realization of PPP-RTK concerns the isolation of satellite phase biases (SPBs) and other corrections from a network of Global Positioning System (GPS) reference receivers. This is generally based on Kalman filter in order to achieve real-time capability, in which proper modeling of the dynamics of various types of unknowns remains crucial. This paper seeks to gain insight into how to reasonably deal with the dynamic behavior of the estimable receiver phase biases (RPBs). Using dual-frequency GPS data collected at six colocated receivers over days 50-120 of 2015, we analyze the 30-s epoch-by-epoch estimates of L1 and wide-lane (WL) RPBs for each receiver pair. The dynamics observed in these estimates are a combined effect of three factors, namely the random measurement noise, the multipath and the ambient temperature. The first factor can be overcome by turning to a real-time filter and the second by considering the use of a sidereal filtering. The third factor has an effect only on the WL, and this effect appears to be linear. After accounting for these three factors, the low-pass-filtered, sidereal-filtered, epoch-by-epoch estimates of L1 RPBs follow a random walk process, whereas those of WL RPBs are constant over time. Properly modeling the dynamics of RPBs is vital, as it ensures the best convergence of the Kalman-filtered, between-satellite single-differenced SPB estimates to their correct values and, in turn, shortens the time-to-first-fix at user side.

  14. GPS receiver phase biases estimable in PPP-RTK networks: dynamic characterization and impact analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baocheng; Liu, Teng; Yuan, Yunbin

    2017-11-01

    The integer ambiguity resolution enabled precise point positioning (PPP-RTK) has been proven advantageous in a wide range of applications. The realization of PPP-RTK concerns the isolation of satellite phase biases (SPBs) and other corrections from a network of Global Positioning System (GPS) reference receivers. This is generally based on Kalman filter in order to achieve real-time capability, in which proper modeling of the dynamics of various types of unknowns remains crucial. This paper seeks to gain insight into how to reasonably deal with the dynamic behavior of the estimable receiver phase biases (RPBs). Using dual-frequency GPS data collected at six colocated receivers over days 50-120 of 2015, we analyze the 30-s epoch-by-epoch estimates of L1 and wide-lane (WL) RPBs for each receiver pair. The dynamics observed in these estimates are a combined effect of three factors, namely the random measurement noise, the multipath and the ambient temperature. The first factor can be overcome by turning to a real-time filter and the second by considering the use of a sidereal filtering. The third factor has an effect only on the WL, and this effect appears to be linear. After accounting for these three factors, the low-pass-filtered, sidereal-filtered, epoch-by-epoch estimates of L1 RPBs follow a random walk process, whereas those of WL RPBs are constant over time. Properly modeling the dynamics of RPBs is vital, as it ensures the best convergence of the Kalman-filtered, between-satellite single-differenced SPB estimates to their correct values and, in turn, shortens the time-to-first-fix at user side.

  15. Are we close to putting the anomalous perihelion precessions from Verlinde's emergent gravity to the test?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iorio, Lorenzo [Ministero dell' Istruzione, Universita e della Ricerca (M.I.U.R.)-Istruzione, Bari, BA (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    In the framework of the emergent gravity scenario by Verlinde, it was recently observed by Liu and Prokopec that, among other things, an anomalous pericenter precession would affect the orbital motion of a test particle orbiting an isolated central body. Here, it is shown that, if it were real, its expected magnitude for the inner planets of the Solar System would be at the same level of the present-day accuracy in constraining any possible deviations from their standard perihelion precessions as inferred from long data records spanning about the last century. The most favorable situation for testing the Verlinde-type precession seems to occur for Mars. Indeed, according to recent versions of the EPM and INPOP planetary ephemerides, non-standard perihelion precessions, of whatsoever physical origin, which are larger than some ∼ 0.02-0.11 milliarcseconds per century are not admissible, while the putative precession predicted by Liu and Prokopec amounts to 0.09 milliarcseconds per century. Other potentially interesting astronomical and astrophysical scenarios like, e.g., the Earth's LAGEOS II artificial satellite, the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B and the S-stars orbiting the Supermassive Black Hole in Sgr A* are, instead, not viable because of the excessive smallness of the predicted precessions for them. (orig.)

  16. Using Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) modelling for Rapid Source Term Prediction. RASTEP Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knochenhauer, M.; Swaling, V.H.; Alfheim, P.

    2012-09-01

    The project is connected to the development of RASTEP, a computerized source term prediction tool aimed at providing a basis for improving off-site emergency management. RASTEP uses Bayesian belief networks (BBN) to model severe accident progression in a nuclear power plant in combination with pre-calculated source terms (i.e., amount, timing, and pathway of released radio-nuclides). The output is a set of possible source terms with associated probabilities. In the NKS project, a number of complex issues associated with the integration of probabilistic and deterministic analyses are addressed. This includes issues related to the method for estimating source terms, signal validation, and sensitivity analysis. One major task within Phase 1 of the project addressed the problem of how to make the source term module flexible enough to give reliable and valid output throughout the accident scenario. Of the alternatives evaluated, it is recommended that RASTEP is connected to a fast running source term prediction code, e.g., MARS, with a possibility of updating source terms based on real-time observations. (Author)

  17. Using Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) modelling for Rapid Source Term Prediction. RASTEP Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knochenhauer, M.; Swaling, V.H.; Alfheim, P. [Scandpower AB, Sundbyberg (Sweden)

    2012-09-15

    The project is connected to the development of RASTEP, a computerized source term prediction tool aimed at providing a basis for improving off-site emergency management. RASTEP uses Bayesian belief networks (BBN) to model severe accident progression in a nuclear power plant in combination with pre-calculated source terms (i.e., amount, timing, and pathway of released radio-nuclides). The output is a set of possible source terms with associated probabilities. In the NKS project, a number of complex issues associated with the integration of probabilistic and deterministic analyses are addressed. This includes issues related to the method for estimating source terms, signal validation, and sensitivity analysis. One major task within Phase 1 of the project addressed the problem of how to make the source term module flexible enough to give reliable and valid output throughout the accident scenario. Of the alternatives evaluated, it is recommended that RASTEP is connected to a fast running source term prediction code, e.g., MARS, with a possibility of updating source terms based on real-time observations. (Author)

  18. Forced phase-locked states and information retrieval in a two-layer network of oscillatory neurons with directional connectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazantsev, Victor; Pimashkin, Alexey

    2007-01-01

    We propose two-layer architecture of associative memory oscillatory network with directional interlayer connectivity. The network is capable to store information in the form of phase-locked (in-phase and antiphase) oscillatory patterns. The first (input) layer takes an input pattern to be recognized and their units are unidirectionally connected with all units of the second (control) layer. The connection strengths are weighted using the Hebbian rule. The output (retrieved) patterns appear as forced-phase locked states of the control layer. The conditions are found and analytically expressed for pattern retrieval in response on incoming stimulus. It is shown that the system is capable to recover patterns with a certain level of distortions or noises in their profiles. The architecture is implemented with the Kuramoto phase model and using synaptically coupled neural oscillators with spikes. It is found that the spiking model is capable to retrieve patterns using the spiking phase that translates memorized patterns into the spiking phase shifts at different time scales

  19. Working memory activation of neural networks in the elderly as a function of information processing phase and task complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charroud, Céline; Steffener, Jason; Le Bars, Emmanuelle; Deverdun, Jérémy; Bonafe, Alain; Abdennour, Meriem; Portet, Florence; Molino, François; Stern, Yaakov; Ritchie, Karen; Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas; Akbaraly, Tasnime N

    2015-11-01

    Changes in working memory are sensitive indicators of both normal and pathological brain aging and associated disability. The present study aims to further understanding of working memory in normal aging using a large cohort of healthy elderly in order to examine three separate phases of information processing in relation to changes in task load activation. Using covariance analysis, increasing and decreasing neural activation was observed on fMRI in response to a delayed item recognition task in 337 cognitively healthy elderly persons as part of the CRESCENDO (Cognitive REServe and Clinical ENDOphenotypes) study. During three phases of the task (stimulation, retention, probe), increased activation was observed with increasing task load in bilateral regions of the prefrontal cortex, parietal lobule, cingulate gyrus, insula and in deep gray matter nuclei, suggesting an involvement of central executive and salience networks. Decreased activation associated with increasing task load was observed during the stimulation phase, in bilateral temporal cortex, parietal lobule, cingulate gyrus and prefrontal cortex. This spatial distribution of decreased activation is suggestive of the default mode network. These findings support the hypothesis of an increased activation in salience and central executive networks and a decreased activation in default mode network concomitant to increasing task load. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Study of pattern formation in multilayer adaptive network of phase oscillators in application to brain dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsanov, Daniil V.; Nedaivozov, Vladimir O.; Makarov, Vladimir V.; Goremyko, Mikhail V.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2017-04-01

    In the report we study the mechanisms of phase synchronization in the model of adaptive network of Kuramoto phase oscillators and discuss the possibility of the further application of the obtained results for the analysis of the neural network of brain. In our theoretical study the model network represents itself as the multilayer structure, in which the links between the elements belonging to the different layers are arranged according to the competitive rule. In order to analyze the dynamical states of the multilayer network we calculate and compare the values of local and global order parameter, which describe the degree of coherence between the neighboring nodes and the elements over whole network, respectively. We find that the global synchronous dynamics takes place for the large values of the coupling strength and are characterized by the identical topology of the interacting layers and a homogeneous distribution of the link strength within each layer. We also show that the partial (or cluster) synchronization, occurs for the small values of the coupling strength, lead to the emergence of the scale-free topology, within the layers.

  1. Methods for discriminating gas-liquid two phase flow patterns based on gray neural networks and SVM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jingjing; Zhou Tao; Duan Jun; Zhang Lei

    2013-01-01

    Background: The flow patterns of two phase flow will directly influence the heat transfer and mass transfer of the flow. Purpose: By wavelet analysis of the pressure drop experimental data, the wavelet coefficients of different frequency can be obtained. Methods: Get the wavelet energy and then train them in the model of BP neural network to distinguish the flow patterns. Introduced the implant gray neural networks model and use it for the two phase flow for the first time. At the same time, set up the method of training the pressure data and wavelet energy data in the support vector machine. Results: Through treatment of the gray layer, the result of the neural network is more accuracy. It can obviously reduce the effect of data marginalization. The accuracy of the pressure drop Lib-SVM method is 95.2%. Conclusions: The results show that these three methods can make a distinction among the different flow patterns and the Lib-SVM method gets the best result, then the gray neural networks, and at last the BP neural networks. (authors)

  2. A system model for assessing vehicle use-phase water consumption in urban mobility networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, Jeff; Bras, Bert

    2012-01-01

    Water consumption is emerging as an important issue potentially influencing the composition of future urban transportation networks, especially as projected urban populations are expected to outpace water availability and as alternative fuels and vehicles are being implemented in such regions. National and State policies aimed at reducing dependence on imported fuels and energy can increase local production of fuels and energy, impacting demand on local water resources. This article details the development of a model-based assessment on water consumption and withdrawal pertaining to the use-phase of conventional and alternative transportation modes based on regional energy and fuel production. An extensive literature review details water consumption from fuel extraction, processing, and distribution as well as power plant operations. Using Model-Based Systems Engineering principles and the Systems Modeling Language, a multi-level, multi-modal framework was developed and applied to the Metro Atlanta transportation system consisting of conventional and alternative vehicles across varying conditions. According to the analysis, vehicles powered by locally produced biofuels and electricity (assuming average local grid mix for charging) consume more water than locally refined gasoline and CNG-powered vehicles. Improvements in power plant technologies, electricity generation (e.g., use of solar and wind versus hydro power) and vehicle efficiencies can reduce such water consumption significantly. Total water withdrawal for each vehicle and fuel is significantly greater than water consumption. - Highlights: ► A model was made to assess the local water consumption due to conventional and alternatively powered vehicles in a city. ► Water consumed in the local and external production of various fuels was reviewed and included. ► Basic battery electric and biofuel powered vehicles consume on average more water than conventional gasoline and Compressed Natural Gas (CNG

  3. Neural network-based voltage regulator for an isolated asynchronous generator supplying three-phase four-wire loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Bhim; Kasal, Gaurav Kumar [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, Hauz-Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2008-06-15

    This paper deals with a neural network-based solid state voltage controller for an isolated asynchronous generator (IAG) driven by constant speed prime mover like diesel engine, bio-gas or gasoline engine and supplying three-phase four-wire loads. The proposed control scheme uses an indirect current control and a fast adaptive linear element (adaline) based neural network reference current extractor, which extracts the real positive sequence current component without any phase shift. The neutral current of the source is also compensated by using three single-phase bridge configuration of IGBT (insulated gate bipolar junction transistor) based voltage source converter (VSC) along-with single-phase transformer having self-supported dc bus. The proposed controller provides the functions as a voltage regulator, a harmonic eliminator, a neutral current compensator, and a load balancer. The proposed isolated electrical system with its controller is modeled and simulated in MATLAB along with Simulink and PSB (Power System Block set) toolboxes. The simulated results are presented to demonstrate the capability of an isolated asynchronous generating system driven by a constant speed prime mover for feeding three-phase four-wire loads. (author)

  4. Application of Detailed Phase Comparison Protection Models for the Analysis of its Operation in Networks with Facts Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruban Nikolay Yu.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of relay protection misoperations in networks with FACTS devices is considered in the paper. It is offered a solution to this problem for a phase comparison protection of transmission power line through the use of its detailed model for the analysis of the functioning for a case of various normal, emergency and post-emergency modes of electric power systems. The research results of this approach are given in the paper.

  5. Self-force correction to geodetic spin precession in Kerr spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcay, Sarp

    2017-08-01

    We present an expression for the gravitational self-force correction to the geodetic spin precession of a spinning compact object with small, but non-negligible mass in a bound, equatorial orbit around a Kerr black hole. We consider only conservative backreaction effects due to the mass of the compact object (m1), thus neglecting the effects of its spin s1 on its motion; i.e., we impose s1≪G m12/c and m1≪m2, where m2 is the mass parameter of the background Kerr spacetime. We encapsulate the correction to the spin precession in ψ , the ratio of the accumulated spin-precession angle to the total azimuthal angle over one radial orbit in the equatorial plane. Our formulation considers the gauge-invariant O (m1) part of the correction to ψ , denoted by Δ ψ , and is a generalization of the results of Akcay et al. [Classical Quantum Gravity 34, 084001 (2017), 10.1088/1361-6382/aa61d6] to Kerr spacetime. Additionally, we compute the zero-eccentricity limit of Δ ψ and show that this quantity differs from the circular orbit Δ ψcirc by a gauge-invariant quantity containing the gravitational self-force correction to general relativistic periapsis advance in Kerr spacetime. Our result for Δ ψ is expressed in a manner that readily accommodates numerical/analytical self-force computations, e.g., in the radiation gauge, and paves the way for the computation of a new eccentric-orbit Kerr gauge invariant beyond the generalized redshift.

  6. Comparison of Channel Estimation Protocols for Coherent AF Relaying Networks in the Presence of Additive Noise and LO Phase Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Berger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Channel estimation protocols for wireless two-hop networks with amplify-and-forward (AF relays are compared. We consider multiuser relaying networks, where the gain factors are chosen such that the signals from all relays add up coherently at the destinations. While the destinations require channel knowledge in order to decode, our focus lies on the channel estimates that are used to calculate the relay gains. Since knowledge of the compound two-hop channels is generally not sufficient to do this, the protocols considered here measure all single-hop coefficients in the network. We start from the observation that the direction in which the channels are measured determines (1 the number of channel uses required to estimate all coefficient and (2 the need for global carrier phase reference. Four protocols are identified that differ in the direction in which the first-hop and the second-hop channels are measured. We derive a sensible measure for the accuracy of the channel estimates in the presence of additive noise and phase noise and compare the protocols based on this measure. Finally, we provide a quantitative performance comparison for a simple single-user application example. It is important to note that the results can be used to compare the channel estimation protocols for any two-hop network configuration and gain allocation scheme.

  7. Electron-Spin Precession in Dependence of the Orientation of the External Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, M Idrish

    2009-03-13

    Electron-spin dynamics in semiconductor-based heterostructures has been investigated in oblique magnetic fields. Spins are generated optically by a circularly polarized light, and the dynamics of spins in dependence of the orientation (theta) of the magnetic field are studied. The electron-spin precession frequency, polarization amplitude, and decay rate as a function of theta are obtained and the reasons for their dependences are discussed. From the measured data, the values of the longitudinal and transverse components of the electron g-factor are estimated and are found to be in good agreement with those obtained in earlier investigations. The possible mechanisms responsible for the observed effects are also discussed.

  8. Negative muon spin precession measurement of the hyperfine states of muonic sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, J.H.; Ghandi, K.; Froese, A.M.; Fryer, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    Both hyperfine states of muonic 23 Na and the rate R of conversion between them have been observed directly in a high field negative muon spin precession experiment using a backward muon beam with transverse spin polarization. The result in metallic sodium, R=13.7±2.2 μs -1 , is consistent with Winston's prediction in 1963 based on Auger emission of core electrons, and with the measurements of Gorringe et al. in Na metal, but not with their smaller result in NaF. In NaOH we find R=23.5±8 μs -1 , leaving medium-dependent effects ambiguous

  9. Structure refinement using precession electron diffraction tomography and dynamical diffraction: tests on experimental data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Correa, Cinthia Antunes; Steciuk, G.; Jacob, D.; Roussel, P.; Boullay, P.; Klementová, Mariana; Gemmi, M.; Kopeček, Jaromír; Domeneghetti, C.; Cámara, F.; Petříček, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 6 (2015), 740-751 ISSN 2052-5206 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR GA13-25747S; GA MŠk LO1409 Grant - others:SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132; FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568 Keywords : XRD * structure refinement * precession electron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.892, year: 2015

  10. When effective theories predict: the inevitability of Mercury's anomalous perihelion precession

    CERN Document Server

    Wells, James D

    2012-01-01

    If the concepts underlying Effective Theory were appreciated from the earliest days of Newtonian gravity, Le Verrier's announcement in 1845 of the anomalous perihelion precession of Mercury would have been no surprise. Furthermore, the size of the effect could have been anticipated through "naturalness" arguments well before the definitive computation in General Relativity. Thus, we have an illustration of how Effective Theory concepts can guide us in extending our knowledge to "new physics", and not just in how to reduce larger theories to restricted (e.g., lower energy) domains.

  11. Flight Testing of Wireless Networking for Nanosat Launch Vehicles, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation proposed here addresses the testing and evaluation of wireless networking technologies for small launch vehicles by leveraging existing nanosat launch...

  12. Branch current state estimation of three phase distribution networks suitable for paralellization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauwbroek, N.; Nguyen, H.P.; Gibescu, M.; Slootweg, J.G.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of distribution networks from passive to active distribution systems puts new requirements on the monitoring and control capabilities of these systems. The development of state estimation algorithms to gain insight in the actual system state of a distribution network has resulted in a

  13. Precession technique and electron diffractometry as new tools for crystal structure analysis and chemical bonding determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avilov, A.; Kuligin, K.; Nicolopoulos, S.; Nickolskiy, M.; Boulahya, K.; Portillo, J.; Lepeshov, G.; Sobolev, B.; Collette, J.P.; Martin, N.; Robins, A.C.; Fischione, P.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a new fast electron diffractometer working with high dynamic range and linearity for crystal structure determinations. Electron diffraction (ED) patterns can be scanned serially in front of a Faraday cage detector; the total measurement time for several hundred ED reflections can be tens of seconds having high statistical accuracy for all measured intensities (1-2%). This new tool can be installed to any type of TEM without any column modification and is linked to a specially developed electron beam precession 'Spinning Star' system. Precession of the electron beam (Vincent-Midgley technique) reduces dynamical effects allowing also use of accurate intensities for crystal structure analysis. We describe the technical characteristics of this new tool together with the first experimental results. Accurate measurement of electron diffraction intensities by electron diffractometer opens new possibilities not only for revealing unknown structures, but also for electrostatic potential determination and chemical bonding investigation. As an example, we present detailed atomic bonding information of CaF 2 as revealed for the first time by precise electron diffractometry

  14. Exploring the use of numerical relativity waveforms in burst analysis of precessing black hole mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischetti, Sebastian; Cadonati, Laura; Mohapatra, Satyanarayan R. P.; Healy, James; London, Lionel; Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in numerical relativity and an ever improving performance of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors. In preparation for the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO) and a new era in gravitational wave astronomy, the numerical relativity and gravitational wave data analysis communities are collaborating to ascertain the most useful role for numerical relativity waveforms in the detection and characterization of binary black hole coalescences. In this paper, we explore the detectability of equal mass, merging black hole binaries with precessing spins and total mass M T (set-membership sign)[80,350]M · , using numerical relativity waveforms and templateless search algorithms designed for gravitational wave bursts. In particular, we present a systematic study using waveforms produced by the MayaKranc code that are added to colored, Gaussian noise and analyzed with the Omega burst search algorithm. Detection efficiency is weighed against the orientation of one of the black-hole's spin axes. We find a strong correlation between the detection efficiency and the radiated energy and angular momentum, and that the inclusion of the l=2, m=±1, 0 modes, at a minimum, is necessary to account for the full dynamics of precessing systems.

  15. A model for precessing helical vortex in the turbine discharge cone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuibin, P A; University Politehnica Timişoara, Bv. Mihai Viteazu 1, RO-300222, Timişoara (Romania))" data-affiliation=" (Department of Hydraulic Machinery, University Politehnica Timişoara, Bv. Mihai Viteazu 1, RO-300222, Timişoara (Romania))" >Susan-Resiga, R F; Muntean, S

    2014-01-01

    The decelerated swirling flow in the discharge cone of hydraulic turbine develops various self-induced instabilities and associated low frequency phenomena when the turbine is operated far from the best efficiency regime. In particular, the precessing helical vortex ( v ortex rope ) developed at part-load regimes is notoriously difficult and expensive to be computed using full three-dimensional turbulent unsteady flow models. On the other hand, modern design and optimization techniques require robust, tractable and accurate a-priori assessment of the turbine flow unsteadiness level within a wide operating range before actually knowing the runner geometry details. This paper presents the development and validation of a quasi-analytical model of the vortex rope in the discharge cone. The first stage is the computing of the axisymmetrical swirling flow at runner outlet with input information related only to the operating point and to the blade outlet angle. Then, the swirling flow profile further downstream is computed in successive cross-sections through the discharge cone. The second stage is the reconstruction of the precessing vortex core parameters in successive cross-sections of the discharge cone. The final stage lies in assembling 3D unsteady flow field in the discharge cone. The end result is validated against both experimental and numerical data

  16. Hofstadter's Butterfly and Phase Transition of Checkerboard Superconducting Network in a Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Jingmin; Tian, Li-Jim

    2010-01-01

    We study the magnetic effect of the checkerboard superconducting wire network. Based on the de Gennes-Alexader theory, we obtain difference equations for superconducting order parameter in the wire network. Through solving these difference equations, we obtain the eigenvalues, linked to the coherence length, as a function of magnetic field. The diagram of eigenvalues shows a fractal structure, being so-called Hofstadter's butterfly. We also calculate and discuss the dependence of the transition temperature of the checkerboard superconducting wire network on the applied magnetic field, which is related to up-edge of the Hofstadter's butterfly spectrum. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  17. Microcomputer-based instrument for the detection and analysis of precession motion in a gas centrifuge machine. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulus, S.S.

    1986-03-01

    The Centrifuge Procession Analyzer (CPA) is a microcomputer-based instrument which detects precession motion in a gas centrifuge machine and calculates the amplitude and frequency of precession. The CPA consists of a printed circuit board which contains signal-conditioning circuitry and a 24-bit counter and an INTEL iSBC 80/24 single/board computer. Pression motion is detected by monitoring a signal generated by a variable reluctance pick-up coil in the top of the centrifuge machine. This signal is called a Fidler signal. The initial Fidler signal triggers a counter which is clocked by a high-precision, 20.000000-MHz, temperature-controlled, crystal oscillator. The contents of the counter are read by the computer and the counter reset after every ten Fidler signals. The speed of the centrifuge machine and the amplitude and frequency of precession are calculated and the results are displayed on a liquid crystal display on the front panel of the CPA. The report contains results from data generated by a Fidler signal simulator and data taken when the centrifuge was operated under three test conditions: (1) nitrogen gas during drive-up, steady state, and drive-down; (2) xenon gas during slip test, steady state, and the addition of gas; and (3) no gas during steady state. The qualitative results were consistent with experience with centrifuge machines using UF 6 in that the amplitude of precession increased and the frequency of precession decreased during drive-up, drive-down and the slip check. The magnitude of the amplitude and frequency of precession were proportional to the molecular weight of the gases in steady state

  18. Real-Time Identification of Smoldering and Flaming Combustion Phases in Forest Using a Wireless Sensor Network-Based Multi-Sensor System and Artificial Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaofei; Cheng, Hong; Zhao, Yandong; Yu, Wenhua; Huang, Huan; Zheng, Xiaoliang

    2016-08-04

    Diverse sensing techniques have been developed and combined with machine learning method for forest fire detection, but none of them referred to identifying smoldering and flaming combustion phases. This study attempts to real-time identify different combustion phases using a developed wireless sensor network (WSN)-based multi-sensor system and artificial neural network (ANN). Sensors (CO, CO₂, smoke, air temperature and relative humidity) were integrated into one node of WSN. An experiment was conducted using burning materials from residual of forest to test responses of each node under no, smoldering-dominated and flaming-dominated combustion conditions. The results showed that the five sensors have reasonable responses to artificial forest fire. To reduce cost of the nodes, smoke, CO₂ and temperature sensors were chiefly selected through correlation analysis. For achieving higher identification rate, an ANN model was built and trained with inputs of four sensor groups: smoke; smoke and CO₂; smoke and temperature; smoke, CO₂ and temperature. The model test results showed that multi-sensor input yielded higher predicting accuracy (≥82.5%) than single-sensor input (50.9%-92.5%). Based on these, it is possible to reduce the cost with a relatively high fire identification rate and potential application of the system can be tested in future under real forest condition.

  19. TOPLAR: Time of Flight with Larmor Precessions - or - How to extend the dynamic range of NSE spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Well, A.A.; Bleuel, M.; Pappas, C.

    2011-01-01

    Neutron Spin Echo (NSE) spectrometers typically cover a dynamic range of three orders of magnitude at a given wavelength. At long Fourier times the limits are given by the homogeneity of precession fields. At short Fourier times, the quasi-elastic approximation and the NSE formalism mark a methodological limit. We propose to overcome this limitation and by combining Time Of Flight with Larmor precession to extend the capabilities of Neutron Spin Echo spectrometers towards short Fourier times. TOFLAR should be easily implemented on NSE spectrometers equipped with a chopper system such as IN15 or the planned WASP. (authors)

  20. SCONES: Secure Content-Oriented Networking for Exploring Space, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We envision a secure content-oriented internetwork as a natural generalization of the cache-and-forward architecture inherent in delay-tolerant networks. Using our...

  1. ANSIBLE: A Network of Social Interactions for Bilateral Life Enhancement, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ANSIBLE (A Network of Social Interactions for Bilateral Life Enhancement) can be used pre, during, and post flight to connect the flight crew with their family,...

  2. A Formal Method for Verification and Validation of Neural Network High Assurance Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our proposed innovation is to develop neural network (NN) rule extraction technology to a level where it can be incorporated into a software tool, we are calling...

  3. Smart Multifunction Antenna for Lunar/Planetary Surface Network, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is planning a series of human and robotic missions to explore the Moon and later Mars. According to NASA SBIR topic O1.10, surface networks are needed for these...

  4. Sci-Share: Social Networking Adapted for Distributed Scientific Collaboration, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our goal is to develop a social networking site with novel, specially designed feature sets to enable simultaneous remote collaboration and sharing of large data...

  5. RFID-Enabled Navigation and Communication Networks for Long-Duration Space Missions, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Virtual EM Inc. proposes a system that employs semi-passive RFID sensors with carbon nanotube inkjet-printed antenna and solar powered mesh-networked beacons. The...

  6. Youth's social network structures and peer influences: study protocol MyMovez project – Phase I

    OpenAIRE

    Bevelander, Kirsten E.; Smit, Crystal R.; van Woudenberg, Thabo J.; Buijs, Laura; Burk, William J.; Buijzen, Moniek

    2018-01-01

    Background: Youth are an important target group for social network interventions, because they are particularly susceptible to the adaptation of healthy and unhealthy habits and behaviors of others. They are surrounded by 'social influence agents' (i.e., role models such as family, friends and peers) that co-determine their dietary intake and physical activity. However, there is a lack of systematic and comprehensive research on the implementation of a social network approach in health campai...

  7. Youth's social network structures and peer influences: Study protocol MyMovez project - Phase I

    OpenAIRE

    Bevelander, K.E.; Smit, C.R.; Woudenberg, T.J. van; Buijs, L.B.; Burk, W.J.; Buijzen, M.A.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Youth are an important target group for social network interventions, because they are particularly susceptible to the adaptation of healthy and unhealthy habits and behaviors of others. They are surrounded by 'social influence agents' (i.e., role models such as family, friends and peers) that co-determine their dietary intake and physical activity. However, there is a lack of systematic and comprehensive research on the implementation of a social network approach in health campai...

  8. Co-ordinated experimental research into PV power interaction with the supply network - Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, R.; Thornycroft, J.; Munro, D.; Rudkin, E.

    1999-07-01

    This report summarises the findings of a study examining the integration of photovoltaic systems into the UK electricity supply network. Details of research and development in the UK, and the participants in the research project are given. Information on photovoltaics as embedded generators, power conditioner design and performance, and the effects of photovoltaics on the network are outlined, and AC modules, standards, testing and approval schemes are considered. (UK)

  9. Continuous-variable Measurement-device-independent Quantum Relay Network with Phase-sensitive Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Zhao, Wei; Guo, Ying

    2018-01-01

    Continuous-variable (CV) measurement-device-independent (MDI) quantum cryptography is now heading towards solving the practical problem of implementing scalable quantum networks. In this paper, we show that a solution can come from deploying an optical amplifier in the CV-MDI system, aiming to establish a high-rate quantum network. We suggest an improved CV-MDI protocol using the EPR states coupled with optical amplifiers. It can implement a practical quantum network scheme, where the legal participants create the secret correlations by using EPR states connecting to an untrusted relay via insecure links and applying the multi-entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state analysis at relay station. Despite the possibility that the relay could be completely tampered with and imperfect links are subject to the powerful attacks, the legal participants are still able to extract a secret key from network communication. The numerical simulation indicates that the quantum network communication can be achieved in an asymmetric scenario, fulfilling the demands of a practical quantum network. Furthermore, we show that the use of optical amplifiers can compensate the inherent imperfections and improve the secret key rate of the CV-MDI system.

  10. Second Language Word Learning through Repetition and Imitation: Functional Networks as a Function of Learning Phase and Language Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazi-Saidi, Ladan; Ansaldo, Ana Ines

    2017-01-01

    Introduction and Aim : Repetition and imitation are among the oldest second language (L2) teaching approaches and are frequently used in the context of L2 learning and language therapy, despite some heavy criticism. Current neuroimaging techniques allow the neural mechanisms underlying repetition and imitation to be examined. This fMRI study examines the influence of verbal repetition and imitation on network configuration. Integration changes within and between the cognitive control and language networks were studied, in a pair of linguistically close languages (Spanish and French), and compared to our previous work on a distant language pair (Ghazi-Saidi et al., 2013). Methods : Twelve healthy native Spanish-speaking (L1) adults, and 12 healthy native Persian-speaking adults learned 130 new French (L2) words, through a computerized audiovisual repetition and imitation program. The program presented colored photos of objects. Participants were instructed to look at each photo and pronounce its name as closely as possible to the native template (imitate). Repetition was encouraged as many times as necessary to learn the object's name; phonological cues were provided if necessary. Participants practiced for 15 min, over 30 days, and were tested while naming the same items during fMRI scanning, at week 1 (shallow learning phase) and week 4 (consolidation phase) of training. To compare this set of data with our previous work on Persian speakers, a similar data analysis plan including accuracy rates (AR), response times (RT), and functional integration values for the language and cognitive control network at each measure point was included, with further L1-L2 direct comparisons across the two populations. Results and Discussion : The evidence shows that learning L2 words through repetition induces neuroplasticity at the network level. Specifically, L2 word learners showed increased network integration after 3 weeks of training, with both close and distant language

  11. Rapid 3D in vivo 1H human lung respiratory imaging at 1.5 T using ultra-fast balanced steady-state free precession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusterla, Orso; Bauman, Grzegorz; Wielpütz, Mark O; Nyilas, Sylvia; Latzin, Philipp; Heussel, Claus P; Bieri, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    To introduce a reproducible, nonenhanced 1H MRI method for rapid in vivo functional assessment of the whole lung at 1.5 Tesla (T). At different respiratory volumes, the pulmonary signal of ultra-fast steady-state free precession (ufSSFP) follows an adapted sponge model, characterized by a respiratory index α. From the model, α reflects local ventilation-related information, is virtually independent from the lung density and thus from the inspiratory phase and breathing amplitude. Respiratory α-mapping is evaluated for healthy volunteers and patients with obstructive lung disease from a set of five consecutive 3D ultra-fast steady-state free precession (ufSSFP) scans performed in breath-hold and at different inspiratory volumes. For the patients, α-maps were compared with CT, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), and Fourier decomposition (FD). In healthy volunteers, respiratory α-maps showed good reproducibility and were homogeneous on iso-gravitational planes, but showed a gravity-dependent respiratory gradient. In patients with obstructive pulmonary disease, the functional impairment observed in respiratory α-maps was associated with emphysematous regions present on CT images, perfusion defects observable on DCE-MRI, and impairments visualized on FD ventilation and perfusion maps. Respiratory α-mapping derived from multivolumetric ufSSFP provides insights into functional lung impairment and may serve as a reproducible and normative measure for clinical studies. Magn Reson Med 78:1059-1069, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Characterisation of UV-cured acrylate networks by means of hydrolysis followed by aqueous size-exclusion combined with reversed-phase chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R.; Litvinov, V. M.; Steeman, P.; Dias, A. A.; Mengerink, Y.; van Benthem, R.; de Koster, C. G.; van der Wal, S. J.; Schoenmakers, P.

    2007-01-01

    UV-cured networks prepared from mixtures of di-functional (polyethylene-glycol di-acrylate) and mono-functional (2-ethylhexyl acrylate) acrylates were analysed after hydrolysis, by aqueous size-exclusion chromatography coupled to on-line reversed-phase liquid-chromatography. The mean network density

  13. Systematic Design of the Lead-Lag Network Method for Active Damping in LCL-Filter Based Three Phase Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alzola, Rafael Pena; Liserre, Marco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    ) nor its rationale has been explained. Thus, in this paper a straightforward procedure is developed to tune the lead-lag network with the help of software tools. The rationale of this procedure, based on the capacitor current feedback, is elucidated. Stability is studied by means of the root locus......Three-phase active rectifiers guarantee sinusoidal input currents and unity power factor at the price of a high switching frequency ripple. To adopt an LCL-filter, instead of an L-filter, allows using reduced values for the inductances and so preserving dynamics. However, stability problems can...... without using dissipative elements but, sometimes, needing additional sensors. This solution has been addressed in many publications. The lead-lag network method is one of the first reported procedures and continues being in use. However, neither there is a direct tuning procedure (without trial and error...

  14. Decomposing neural synchrony: toward an explanation for near-zero phase-lag in cortical oscillatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasimhan Rajagovindan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Synchronized oscillation in cortical networks has been suggested as a mechanism for diverse functions ranging from perceptual binding to memory formation to sensorimotor integration. Concomitant with synchronization is the occurrence of near-zero phase-lag often observed between network components. Recent theories have considered the importance of this phenomenon in establishing an effective communication framework among neuronal ensembles. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two factors, among possibly others, can be hypothesized to contribute to the near-zero phase-lag relationship: (1 positively correlated common input with no significant relative time delay and (2 bidirectional interaction. Thus far, no empirical test of these hypotheses has been possible for lack of means to tease apart the specific causes underlying the observed synchrony. In this work simulation examples were first used to illustrate the ideas. A quantitative method that decomposes the statistical interdependence between two cortical areas into a feed-forward, a feed-back and a common-input component was then introduced and applied to test the hypotheses on multichannel local field potential recordings from two behaving monkeys. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The near-zero phase-lag phenomenon is important in the study of large-scale oscillatory networks. A rigorous mathematical theorem is used for the first time to empirically examine the factors that contribute to this phenomenon. Given the critical role that oscillatory activity is likely to play in the regulation of biological processes at all levels, the significance of the proposed method may extend beyond systems neuroscience, the level at which the present analysis is conceived and performed.

  15. Investigation of phase-wise voltage regulator control logics for compensating voltage deviations in an experimental low voltage network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Junjie; Zecchino, Antonio; Marinelli, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the control logics of an on-load tap-changer (OLTC) transformer by means of an experimental system validation. The experimental low-voltage unbalanced system consists of a decoupled single-phase OLTC transformer, a 75-metre 16 mm2 cable, a controllable single-phase resistive...... load and an electric vehicle, which has the vehicle-to-grid function. Three control logics of the OLTC transformer are described in the study. The three control logics are classified based on their control objectives and control inputs, which include network currents and voltages, and can be measured...... either locally or remotely. To evaluate and compare the control performances of the three control logics, all the tests use the same loading profiles. The experimental results indicate that the modified line compensation control can regulate voltage in a safe band in the case of various load...

  16. A Re-entrant Phase Transition in the Survival of Secondary Infections on Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sam; Mörters, Peter; Rogers, Tim

    2018-06-01

    We study the dynamics of secondary infections on networks, in which only the individuals currently carrying a certain primary infection are susceptible to the secondary infection. In the limit of large sparse networks, the model is mapped to a branching process spreading in a random time-sensitive environment, determined by the dynamics of the underlying primary infection. When both epidemics follow the Susceptible-Infective-Recovered model, we show that in order to survive, it is necessary for the secondary infection to evolve on a timescale that is closely matched to that of the primary infection on which it depends.

  17. Network analysis of the transcriptional pattern of young and old cells of Escherichia coli during lag phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinton Jay CD

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aging process of bacteria in stationary phase is halted if cells are subcultured and enter lag phase and it is then followed by cellular division. Network science has been applied to analyse the transcriptional response, during lag phase, of bacterial cells starved previously in stationary phase for 1 day (young cells and 16 days (old cells. Results A genome scale network was constructed for E. coli K-12 by connecting genes with operons, transcription and sigma factors, metabolic pathways and cell functional categories. Most of the transcriptional changes were detected immediately upon entering lag phase and were maintained throughout this period. The lag period was longer for older cells and the analysis of the transcriptome revealed different intracellular activity in young and old cells. The number of genes differentially expressed was smaller in old cells (186 than in young cells (467. Relatively, few genes (62 were up- or down-regulated in both cultures. Transcription of genes related to osmotolerance, acid resistance, oxidative stress and adaptation to other stresses was down-regulated in both young and old cells. Regarding carbohydrate metabolism, genes related to the citrate cycle were up-regulated in young cells while old cells up-regulated the Entner Doudoroff and gluconate pathways and down-regulated the pentose phosphate pathway. In both old and young cells, anaerobic respiration and fermentation pathways were down-regulated, but only young cells up-regulated aerobic respiration while there was no evidence of aerobic respiration in old cells. Numerous genes related to DNA maintenance and replication, translation, ribosomal biosynthesis and RNA processing as well as biosynthesis of the cell envelope and flagellum and several components of the chemotaxis signal transduction complex were up-regulated only in young cells. The genes for several transport proteins for iron compounds were up-regulated in both young

  18. Network analysis of the transcriptional pattern of young and old cells of Escherichia coli during lag phase

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pin, Carmen

    2009-11-16

    Abstract Background The aging process of bacteria in stationary phase is halted if cells are subcultured and enter lag phase and it is then followed by cellular division. Network science has been applied to analyse the transcriptional response, during lag phase, of bacterial cells starved previously in stationary phase for 1 day (young cells) and 16 days (old cells). Results A genome scale network was constructed for E. coli K-12 by connecting genes with operons, transcription and sigma factors, metabolic pathways and cell functional categories. Most of the transcriptional changes were detected immediately upon entering lag phase and were maintained throughout this period. The lag period was longer for older cells and the analysis of the transcriptome revealed different intracellular activity in young and old cells. The number of genes differentially expressed was smaller in old cells (186) than in young cells (467). Relatively, few genes (62) were up- or down-regulated in both cultures. Transcription of genes related to osmotolerance, acid resistance, oxidative stress and adaptation to other stresses was down-regulated in both young and old cells. Regarding carbohydrate metabolism, genes related to the citrate cycle were up-regulated in young cells while old cells up-regulated the Entner Doudoroff and gluconate pathways and down-regulated the pentose phosphate pathway. In both old and young cells, anaerobic respiration and fermentation pathways were down-regulated, but only young cells up-regulated aerobic respiration while there was no evidence of aerobic respiration in old cells. Numerous genes related to DNA maintenance and replication, translation, ribosomal biosynthesis and RNA processing as well as biosynthesis of the cell envelope and flagellum and several components of the chemotaxis signal transduction complex were up-regulated only in young cells. The genes for several transport proteins for iron compounds were up-regulated in both young and old cells

  19. Location capability of a sparse regional network (RSTN) using a multi-phase earthquake location algorithm (REGLOC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchings, L.

    1994-01-01

    The Regional Seismic Test Network (RSTN) was deployed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to determine whether data recorded by a regional network could be used to detect and accurately locate seismic events that might be clandestine nuclear tests. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the location capability of the RSTN. A major part of this project was the development of the location algorithm REGLOC and application of Basian a prior statistics for determining the accuracy of the location estimates. REGLOC utilizes all identifiable phases, including backazimuth, in the location. Ninty-four events, distributed throughout the network area, detected by both the RSTN and located by local networks were used in the study. The location capability of the RSTN was evaluated by estimating the location accuracy, error ellipse accuracy, and the percentage of events that could be located, as a function of magnitude. The location accuracy was verified by comparing the RSTN results for the 94 events with published locations based on data from the local networks. The error ellipse accuracy was evaluated by determining whether the error ellipse includes the actual location. The percentage of events located was assessed by combining detection capability with location capability to determine the percentage of events that could be located within the study area. Events were located with both an average crustal model for the entire region, and with regional velocity models along with station corrections obtained from master events. Most events with a magnitude <3.0 can only be located with arrivals from one station. Their average location errors are 453 and 414 km for the average- and regional-velocity model locations, respectively. Single station locations are very unreliable because they depend on accurate backazimuth estimates, and backazimuth proved to be a very unreliable computation.

  20. Conductance dips and spin precession in a nonuniform waveguide with spin–orbit coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyshev, A. I., E-mail: malyshev@phys.unn.ru; Kozulin, A. S. [Lobachevsky Nizhny Novgorod State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    An infinite waveguide with a nonuniformity, a segment of finite length with spin–orbit coupling, is considered in the case when the Rashba and Dresselhaus parameters are identical. Analytical expressions have been derived in the single-mode approximation for the conductance of the system for an arbitrary initial spin state. Based on numerical calculations with several size quantization modes, we have detected and described the conductance dips arising when the waves are localized in the nonuniformity due to the formation of an effective potential well in it. We show that allowance for the evanescent modes under carrier spin precession in an effective magnetic field does not lead to a change in the direction of the average spin vector at the output of the system.

  1. Electron-Spin Precession in Dependence of the Orientation of the External Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miah M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Electron-spin dynamics in semiconductor-based heterostructures has been investigated in oblique magnetic fields. Spins are generated optically by a circularly polarized light, and the dynamics of spins in dependence of the orientation (θ of the magnetic field are studied. The electron-spin precession frequency, polarization amplitude, and decay rate as a function ofθare obtained and the reasons for their dependences are discussed. From the measured data, the values of the longitudinal and transverse components of the electrong-factor are estimated and are found to be in good agreement with those obtained in earlier investigations. The possible mechanisms responsible for the observed effects are also discussed.

  2. SPIN-PRECESSION: BREAKING THE BLACK HOLE-NEUTRON STAR DEGENERACY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatziioannou, Katerina; Cornish, Neil; Klein, Antoine; Yunes, Nicolás [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Mergers of compact stellar remnants are prime targets for the LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave detectors. The gravitational wave signals from these merger events can be used to study the mass and spin distribution of stellar remnants, and provide information about black hole horizons and the material properties of neutron stars. However, it has been suggested that degeneracies in the way that the star's mass and spin are imprinted in the waveforms may make it impossible to distinguish between black holes and neutron stars. Here we show that the precession of the orbital plane due to spin-orbit coupling breaks the mass-spin degeneracy, and allows us to distinguish between standard neutron stars and alternative possibilities, such as black holes or exotic neutron stars with large masses and spins.

  3. In-situ Indentation and Correlated Precession Electron Diffraction Analysis of a Polycrystalline Cu Thin Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qianying; Thompson, Gregory B.

    2018-04-01

    In-situ TEM nanoindentation of a polycrystalline Cu film was cross-correlated with precession electron diffraction (PED) to quantify the microstructural evolution. The use of PED is shown to clearly reveal features, such as grain size, that are easily masked by diffraction contrast created by the deformation. Using PED, the accompanying grain refinement and change in texture as well as the preservation of specific grain boundary structures, including a ∑3 boundary, under the indent impression were quantified. The nucleation of dislocations, evident in low-angle grain boundary formations, was also observed under the indent. PED quantification of texture gradients created by the indentation process linked well to bend contours observed in the bright-field images. Finally, PED enabled generating a local orientation spread map that gave an approximate estimation of the spatial distribution of strain created by the indentation impression.

  4. Translation compensation and micro-Doppler extraction for precession ballistic targets with a wideband terahertz radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; Deng, Bin; Wang, Hongqiang; Zhang, Ye; Qin, Yuliang

    2018-01-01

    Imaging, classification, and recognition techniques of ballistic targets in midcourse have always been the focus of research in the radar field for military applications. However, the high velocity translation of ballistic targets will subject range profile and Doppler to translation, slope, and fold, which are especially severe in the terahertz region. Therefore, a two-step translation compensation method based on envelope alignment is presented. The rough compensation is based on the traditional envelope alignment algorithm in inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging, and the fine compensation is supported by distance fitting. Then, a wideband imaging radar system with a carrier frequency of 0.32 THz is introduced, and an experiment on a precession missile model is carried out. After translation compensation with the method proposed in this paper, the range profile and the micro-Doppler distributions unaffected by translation are obtained, providing an important foundation for the high-resolution imaging and micro-Doppler extraction of the terahertz radar.

  5. Topological currents in neutron stars: kicks, precession, toroidal fields, and magnetic helicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbonneau, James; Zhitnitsky, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    The effects of anomalies in high density QCD are striking. We consider a direct application of one of these effects, namely topological currents, on the physics of neutron stars. All the elements required for topological currents are present in neutron stars: degenerate matter, large magnetic fields, and parity violating processes. These conditions lead to the creation of vector currents capable of carrying momentum and inducing magnetic fields. We estimate the size of these currents for many representative states of dense matter in the neutron star and argue that they could be responsible for the large proper motion of neutron stars (kicks), the toroidal magnetic field and finite magnetic helicity needed for stability of the poloidal field, and the resolution of the conflict between type-II superconductivity and precession. Though these observational effects appear unrelated, they likely originate from the same physics — they are all P-odd phenomena that stem from a topological current generated by parity violation

  6. Rotation of the swing plane of Foucault's pendulum and Thomas spin precession: two sides of one coin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivoruchenko, Mikhail I [Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Russian Federation State Scientific Center, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-08-31

    Using elementary geometric tools, we apply essentially the same methods to derive expressions for the rotation angle of the swing plane of Foucault's pendulum and the rotation angle of the spin of a relativistic particle moving in a circular orbit (the Thomas precession effect). (methodological notes)

  7. Rotation of the swing plane of Foucault's pendulum and Thomas spin precession: two sides of one coin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivoruchenko, Mikhail I

    2009-01-01

    Using elementary geometric tools, we apply essentially the same methods to derive expressions for the rotation angle of the swing plane of Foucault's pendulum and the rotation angle of the spin of a relativistic particle moving in a circular orbit (the Thomas precession effect). (methodological notes)

  8. METHODOLOGICAL NOTES: Rotation of the swing plane of Foucault's pendulum and Thomas spin precession: two sides of one coin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoruchenko, Mikhail I.

    2009-08-01

    Using elementary geometric tools, we apply essentially the same methods to derive expressions for the rotation angle of the swing plane of Foucault's pendulum and the rotation angle of the spin of a relativistic particle moving in a circular orbit (the Thomas precession effect).

  9. Myocardial tagging with steady state free precession techniques and semi-automatic postprocessing--impact on diagnostic value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Thorsten R C; Bayrhof, Nicole; Huber, Armin

    2007-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the diagnostic value of myocardial tagging sequences with regard to the evaluable share of the cardiac cycle. Thirty-three patients were examined at 1.5 T using tagging sequences with gradient-echo (GRE) readout, 18 patients at 1.5 T with steady-state free precession (SSF...

  10. Two-phase deep convolutional neural network for reducing class skewness in histopathological images based breast cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Noorul; Khan, Asifullah; Lee, Yeon Soo

    2017-06-01

    Different types of breast cancer are affecting lives of women across the world. Common types include Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), Tubular carcinoma, Medullary carcinoma, and Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). While detecting cancer, one important factor is mitotic count - showing how rapidly the cells are dividing. But the class imbalance problem, due to the small number of mitotic nuclei in comparison to the overwhelming number of non-mitotic nuclei, affects the performance of classification models. This work presents a two-phase model to mitigate the class biasness issue while classifying mitotic and non-mitotic nuclei in breast cancer histopathology images through a deep convolutional neural network (CNN). First, nuclei are segmented out using blue ratio and global binary thresholding. In Phase-1 a CNN is then trained on the segmented out 80×80 pixel patches based on a standard dataset. Hard non-mitotic examples are identified and augmented; mitotic examples are oversampled by rotation and flipping; whereas non-mitotic examples are undersampled by blue ratio histogram based k-means clustering. Based on this information from Phase-1, the dataset is modified for Phase-2 in order to reduce the effects of class imbalance. The proposed CNN architecture and data balancing technique yielded an F-measure of 0.79, and outperformed all the methods relying on specific handcrafted features, as well as those using a combination of handcrafted and CNN-generated features. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Youth's social network structures and peer influences: Study protocol MyMovez project - Phase I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevelander, K.E.; Smit, C.R.; Woudenberg, T.J. van; Buijs, L.B.; Burk, W.J.; Buijzen, M.A.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Youth are an important target group for social network interventions, because they are particularly susceptible to the adaptation of healthy and unhealthy habits and behaviors of others. They are surrounded by 'social influence agents' (i.e., role models such as family, friends and

  12. Phase-dependent effects of stimuli locked to oscillatory activity in cultured cortical networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegenga, J.; le Feber, Jakob; Marani, Enrico; Rutten, Wim

    The archetypal activity pattern in cultures of dissociated neurons is spontaneous network-wide bursting. Bursts may interfere with controlled activation of synaptic plasticity, but can be suppressed by the application of stimuli at a sufficient rate. We sinusoidally modulated (4 Hz) the pulse rate

  13. Harmonic Emissions of Three-Phase Diode Rectifiers in Distribution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zare, Firuz; Soltani, Hamid; Kumar, Dinesh

    2017-01-01

    Harmonic emissions have been changed in distribution networks, with respect to frequency range and magnitude, due to the penetration of modern power electronics systems. Two new frequency ranges: 2–9 kHz and 9–150 kHz have been identified as new disturbing frequency ranges affecting distribution ...

  14. Precession of a two-layer Earth: contributions of the core and elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baenas, Tomás; Ferrándiz, José M.; Escapa, Alberto; Getino, Juan; Navarro, Juan F.

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's internal structure contributes to the precession rate in a small but non-negligible amount, given the current accuracy goals demanded by IAG/GGOS to the reference frames, namely 30 μas and 3 μas/yr. These contributions come from a variety of sources. One of those not yet accounted for in current IAU models is associated to the crossed effects of certain nutation-rising terms of a two-layer Earth model; intuitively, it gathers an 'indirect' effect of the core via the NDFW, or FCN, resonance as well as a 'direct' effect arising from terms that account for energy variations depending on the elasticity of the core. Similar order of magnitude reaches the direct effect of the departure of the Earth's rheology from linear elasticity. To compute those effects we work out the problem in a unified way within the Hamiltonian framework developed by Getino and Ferrándiz (2001). It allows a consistent treatment of the problem since all the perturbations are derived from the same tide generating expansion and the crossing effects are rigorously obtained through Hori's canonical perturbation method. The problem admits an asymptotic analytical solution. The Hamiltonian is constructed by considering a two-layer Earth model made up of an anelastic mantle and a fluid core, perturbed by the gravitational action of the Moon and the Sun. The former effects reach some tens of μas/yr in the longitude rate, hence above the target accuracy level. We outline their influence in the estimation of the Earth's dynamical ellipticity, a main parameter factorizing both precession and nutation.

  15. Phase transitions in cooperative coinfections: Simulation results for networks and lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassberger, Peter; Chen, Li; Ghanbarnejad, Fakhteh; Cai, Weiran

    2016-04-01

    We study the spreading of two mutually cooperative diseases on different network topologies, and with two microscopic realizations, both of which are stochastic versions of a susceptible-infected-removed type model studied by us recently in mean field approximation. There it had been found that cooperativity can lead to first order transitions from spreading to extinction. However, due to the rapid mixing implied by the mean field assumption, first order transitions required nonzero initial densities of sick individuals. For the stochastic model studied here the results depend strongly on the underlying network. First order transitions are found when there are few short but many long loops: (i) No first order transitions exist on trees and on 2-d lattices with local contacts. (ii) They do exist on Erdős-Rényi (ER) networks, on d -dimensional lattices with d ≥4 , and on 2-d lattices with sufficiently long-ranged contacts. (iii) On 3-d lattices with local contacts the results depend on the microscopic details of the implementation. (iv) While single infected seeds can always lead to infinite epidemics on regular lattices, on ER networks one sometimes needs finite initial densities of infected nodes. (v) In all cases the first order transitions are actually "hybrid"; i.e., they display also power law scaling usually associated with second order transitions. On regular lattices, our model can also be interpreted as the growth of an interface due to cooperative attachment of two species of particles. Critically pinned interfaces in this model seem to be in different universality classes than standard critically pinned interfaces in models with forbidden overhangs. Finally, the detailed results mentioned above hold only when both diseases propagate along the same network of links. If they use different links, results can be rather different in detail, but are similar overall.

  16. Artificial neural network modelling of retention of pesticides in various octadecylsiloxane-bonded reversed-phase columns and water-acetonitrile mobile phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Archivio, Angelo Antonio; Maggi, Maria Anna; Mazzeo, Pietro; Ruggieri, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    Previously, retention of 26 pesticides in the reversed-phase column Gemini (Phenomenex) and water-acetonitrile mobile phase was modelled using a feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN) learned by error back-propagation, accounting for both the effect of solute structure and mobile phase composition. To this end, log K ow of solutes and four quantum chemical molecular descriptors (the dipole moment, the mean polarizability, the anisotropy of the polarizability and an hydrogen-bonding descriptor based on the atomic charges located on the acid and basic functional groups) and acetonitrile % (v/v) in the eluent (%ACN) were used as ANN inputs. The above ANN-based approach is here tested on further five similar octadecylsiloxane-bonded columns in water-acetonitrile mobile phase within the %ACN range 30-70%. A quite good predictive performance evaluated on three external solutes in the whole %ACN range is observed, prediction errors being lower than ±0.1 log k units or slightly higher although still within ±0.15 log k units. On the other hand, multilinear regression used in place of ANN provides a more diffuse and non-uniform residual distribution for all the investigated columns. ANN multiple-column retention prediction is attempted by adding to the above variables a column descriptor defined as the average retention of calibration solutes extrapolated to 100% water. This more general model is built using 16 solutes and five 5-μm columns in calibration, while its predictive performance is tested on the remaining 10 compounds. Under these conditions, prediction errors are generally within ±0.2 log k units regardless of the kind of column. The possibility of cross-column prediction is evaluated by column leave-one-out cross-validation within the five 5-μm stationary phases and on a 4-μm external column. This analysis reveals that accuracy of retention prediction for unknown solutes in unknown columns is acceptable provided that the external column is not very

  17. Artificial neural network modelling of retention of pesticides in various octadecylsiloxane-bonded reversed-phase columns and water-acetonitrile mobile phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Archivio, Angelo Antonio, E-mail: angeloantonio.darchivio@univaq.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Ingegneria Chimica e Materiali, Universita degli Studi di L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, 67010 Coppito, L' Aquila (Italy); Maggi, Maria Anna; Mazzeo, Pietro; Ruggieri, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Chimica, Ingegneria Chimica e Materiali, Universita degli Studi di L' Aquila, Via Vetoio, 67010 Coppito, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2009-07-30

    Previously, retention of 26 pesticides in the reversed-phase column Gemini (Phenomenex) and water-acetonitrile mobile phase was modelled using a feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN) learned by error back-propagation, accounting for both the effect of solute structure and mobile phase composition. To this end, log K{sub ow} of solutes and four quantum chemical molecular descriptors (the dipole moment, the mean polarizability, the anisotropy of the polarizability and an hydrogen-bonding descriptor based on the atomic charges located on the acid and basic functional groups) and acetonitrile % (v/v) in the eluent (%ACN) were used as ANN inputs. The above ANN-based approach is here tested on further five similar octadecylsiloxane-bonded columns in water-acetonitrile mobile phase within the %ACN range 30-70%. A quite good predictive performance evaluated on three external solutes in the whole %ACN range is observed, prediction errors being lower than {+-}0.1 log k units or slightly higher although still within {+-}0.15 log k units. On the other hand, multilinear regression used in place of ANN provides a more diffuse and non-uniform residual distribution for all the investigated columns. ANN multiple-column retention prediction is attempted by adding to the above variables a column descriptor defined as the average retention of calibration solutes extrapolated to 100% water. This more general model is built using 16 solutes and five 5-{mu}m columns in calibration, while its predictive performance is tested on the remaining 10 compounds. Under these conditions, prediction errors are generally within {+-}0.2 log k units regardless of the kind of column. The possibility of cross-column prediction is evaluated by column leave-one-out cross-validation within the five 5-{mu}m stationary phases and on a 4-{mu}m external column. This analysis reveals that accuracy of retention prediction for unknown solutes in unknown columns is acceptable provided that the external

  18. The impact of intermediate wet states on two-phase flow in porous media, studied by network modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeiland, Linda Kaada

    2006-04-15

    Reservoir wettability is a measure of a rocks preference for the oil and/or the brine phase. Wettability has a dominant impact on fluid movements in porous media, hence oil displacement in reservoir rocks. Understanding the local wettability and the effect of wettability on the fluid movements are therefore of interest in relation to oil recovery processes. Contrary to the earlier believed homogenous wetted cases where the porous media was strongly oil-wet for carbonate reservoirs or strongly water-wet for clastic reservoirs, it is now believed that most reservoir rocks experience some kind of intermediate wet state. Since wettability affects oil recovery, different classes of intermediate wettability are expected to have different impacts on the fluid flow processes. The major subject treated in this thesis is how different intermediate wet states affect fluid flow parameters which are important for the oil recovery. This is done by use of a capillary dominated network model of two-phase flow, where the network is based on a model of reconstructed sandstone. The existence of different intermediate wet classes is argued in Paper I, while Paper II, III and IV analyse the effect different intermediate wet classes have on wettability indices, residual oil saturation, capillary pressure and relative permeability (author)

  19. Response of the Asian summer monsoons to idealized precession and obliquity forcing in a set of GCMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, J. H. C.; Erb, M. P.; Dolan, A. M.; Drijfhout, S. S.; Tuenter, E.; Hilgen, F. J.; Edge, D.; Pope, J. O.; Lourens, L. J.

    2018-05-01

    We examine the response of the Indian and East Asian summer monsoons to separate precession and obliquity forcing, using a set of fully coupled high-resolution models for the first time: EC-Earth, GFDL CM2.1, CESM and HadCM3. We focus on the effect of insolation changes on monsoon precipitation and underlying circulation changes, and find strong model agreement despite a range of model physics, parameterization, and resolution. Our results show increased summer monsoon precipitation at times of increased summer insolation, i.e. minimum precession and maximum obliquity, accompanied by a redistribution of precipitation and convection from ocean to land. Southerly monsoon winds over East Asia are strengthened as a consequence of an intensified land-sea pressure gradient. The response of the Indian summer monsoon is less straightforward. Over south-east Asia low surface pressure is less pronounced and winds over the northern Indian Ocean are directed more westward. An Indian Ocean Dipole pattern emerges, with increased precipitation and convection over the western Indian Ocean. Increased temperatures occur during minimum precession over the Indian Ocean, but not during maximum obliquity when insolation is reduced over the tropics and southern hemisphere during northern hemisphere summer. Evaporation is reduced over the northern Indian Ocean, which together with increased precipitation over the western Indian Ocean dampens the increase of monsoonal precipitation over the continent. The southern tropical Indian Ocean as well as the western tropical Pacific (for precession) act as a moisture source for enhanced monsoonal precipitation. The models are in closest agreement for precession-induced changes, with more model spread for obliquity-induced changes, possibly related to a smaller insolation forcing. Our results indicate that a direct response of the Indian and East Asian summer monsoons to insolation forcing is possible, in line with speleothem records but in

  20. A Predictive Coexpression Network Identifies Novel Genes Controlling the Seed-to-Seedling Phase Transition in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anderson Tadeu; Ribone, Pamela A; Chan, Raquel L; Ligterink, Wilco; Hilhorst, Henk W M

    2016-04-01

    The transition from a quiescent dry seed to an actively growing photoautotrophic seedling is a complex and crucial trait for plant propagation. This study provides a detailed description of global gene expression in seven successive developmental stages of seedling establishment in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using the transcriptome signature from these developmental stages, we obtained a coexpression gene network that highlights interactions between known regulators of the seed-to-seedling transition and predicts the functions of uncharacterized genes in seedling establishment. The coexpressed gene data sets together with the transcriptional module indicate biological functions related to seedling establishment. Characterization of the homeodomain leucine zipper I transcription factor AtHB13, which is expressed during the seed-to-seedling transition, demonstrated that this gene regulates some of the network nodes and affects late seedling establishment. Knockout mutants for athb13 showed increased primary root length as compared with wild-type (Columbia-0) seedlings, suggesting that this transcription factor is a negative regulator of early root growth, possibly repressing cell division and/or cell elongation or the length of time that cells elongate. The signal transduction pathways present during the early phases of the seed-to-seedling transition anticipate the control of important events for a vigorous seedling, such as root growth. This study demonstrates that a gene coexpression network together with transcriptional modules can provide insights that are not derived from comparative transcript profiling alone. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Networking

    OpenAIRE

    Rauno Lindholm, Daniel; Boisen Devantier, Lykke; Nyborg, Karoline Lykke; Høgsbro, Andreas; Fries, de; Skovlund, Louise

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine what influencing factor that has had an impact on the presumed increasement of the use of networking among academics on the labour market and how it is expressed. On the basis of the influence from globalization on the labour market it can be concluded that the globalization has transformed the labour market into a market based on the organization of networks. In this new organization there is a greater emphasis on employees having social qualificati...

  2. Emergence of a multilayer structure in adaptive networks of phase oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, V.V.; Koronovskii, A.A.; Maksimenko, V.A.; Hramov, A.E.; Moskalenko, O.I.; Buldú, J.M.; Boccaletti, S.

    2016-01-01

    We report on self-organization of adaptive networks, where topology and dynamics evolve in accordance to a competition between homophilic and homeostatic mechanisms, and where links are associated to a vector of weights. Under an appropriate balance between the intra- and inter- layer coupling strengths, we show that a multilayer structure emerges due to the adaptive evolution, resulting in different link weights at each layer, i.e. different components of the weights’ vector. In parallel, synchronized clusters at each layer are formed, which may overlap or not, depending on the values of the coupling strengths. Only when intra- and inter- layer coupling strengths are high enough, all layers reach identical final topologies, collapsing the system into, in fact, a monolayer network. The relationships between such steady state topologies and a set of dynamical network’s properties are discussed.

  3. Structural phase transition in a growing network model with tunable member intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kibum; Jo, Woo Seong; Kim, Beom Jun

    2017-05-01

    Users of online communities become more intimate in time by writing posts and exchanging comments to each other. Although a certain level of intimacy among a group of members can be beneficial for the activity of the whole community, too strong intimacy among existing members can make newcomers feel alienated, driving them to leave the community. In this letter, we introduce a growing network model in which we systematically study the effect of member intimacy on the formation of connected component of the network. We introduce a parameter called clinginess and control how the member intimacy affects the communication activity. We observe that cumulative number of users who leave the community exhibits a transition-like behavior, similarly to the discontinuous transition in statistical mechanics models. Implication of our result in constructing a sustainable online community is also discussed.

  4. Phasing in wind-power in Norway: Network congestion and crowding-out of hydropower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsund, Finn R.; Singh, Balbir; Jensen, Trond; Larsen, Cato

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the effects on utilisation of existing hydropower in a region of investing in significant wind-power in the region within the present network. Policy simulations are conducted using a dynamic system-wide model that is calibrated to reflect the structure of the Nordic power market. This model is the one used by the Norwegian electricity regulator and large hydropower companies in Norway for scheduling of hydro and market analyses. Simulations are carried out for different inflow situations based on past observations going back 60 years. Introduction of wind-power leads to significant increase in network congestion in the region, lower hydropower production, higher level of storage, increased spillage of water, and considerably lower price level in the local region in question

  5. The Impact of a Power Electronics Converter in Phase Failure Work on the Power System Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Zieliński

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the impact of phase failure work on power converters. The study includes a three-level NPC inverter (Neutral Point Clamped, controlled by Voltage Oriented Control (VOC. The NPC converter integrates renewable energy sources with the power grid. The article includes a discussion about the causes of phase failure work and an analysis of the converter’s failure and its impact on the power grid. The simulations were performed in MATLAB/Simulink. The study also includes the concept of an integrated protection for IGBTs, controlled by the DSP microprocessor system.

  6. Control of Three-Phase Grid-Connected Microgrids Using Artificial Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Shuhui, L.; Fu, X.; Jaithwa, I.; Alonso, E.; Fairbank, M.; Wunsch, D. C.

    2015-01-01

    A microgrid consists of a variety of inverter-interfaced distributed energy resources (DERs). A key issue is how to control DERs within the microgrid and how to connect them to or disconnect them from the microgrid quickly. This paper presents a strategy for controlling inverter-interfaced DERs within a microgrid using an artificial neural network, which implements a dynamic programming algorithm and is trained with a new Levenberg-Marquardt backpropagation algorithm. Compared to conventional...

  7. Periodic Forcing of Inhibition-Stabilized Networks: Nonlinear Resonances and Phase-Amplitude Coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Veltz, Romain; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Inhibition stabilized networks (ISNs) are neural architectures with strong positive feedback among pyramidal neurons balanced by strong negative feedback from in-hibitory interneurons, a circuit element found in the hippocampus and the primary vi-sual cortex. In their working regime, ISNs produce damped oscillations in the γ-range in response to inputs to the inhibitory population. In order to understand the proper-ties of interconnected ISNs, we investigated periodic ...

  8. Dentate gyrus network dysfunctions precede the symptomatic phase in a genetic mouse model of seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana eToader

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal circuit disturbances that lead to hyperexcitability in the cortico-hippocampal network are one of the landmarks of temporal lobe epilepsy. The dentate gyrus (DG network plays an important role in regulating the excitability of the entire hippocampus by filtering and integrating information received via the perforant path. Here, we investigated possible epileptogenic abnormalities in the function of the DG neuronal network in the Synapsin II (Syn II knockout mouse (Syn II-/-, a genetic mouse model of epilepsy. Syn II is a presynaptic protein whose deletion in mice reproducibly leads to generalized seizures starting at the age of two months. We made use of a high-resolution microelectrode array (4096 electrodes and patch-clamp recordings, and found that in acute hippocampal slices of young pre-symptomatic (3-6 weeks-old Syn II-/- mice excitatory synaptic output of the mossy fibers is reduced. Moreover, we showed that the main excitatory neurons present in the polymorphic layer of the DG, hilar mossy cells, display a reduced excitability. We also provide evidence of a predominantly inhibitory regulatory output from mossy cells to granule cells, through feed-forward inhibition, and show that the excitatory-inhibitory ratio is increased in both pre-symptomatic and symptomatic Syn II-/- mice. These results support the key role of the hilar mossy neurons in maintaining the normal excitability of the hippocampal network and show that the late epileptic phenotype of the Syn II-/- mice is preceded by neuronal circuitry dysfunctions. Our data provide new insights into the mechanisms of epileptogenesis in the Syn II-/- mice and open the possibility for early diagnosis and therapeutic interventions.

  9. An Intelligent QoS Identification for Untrustworthy Web Services Via Two-phase Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Weidong; Wang, Liqiang; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    QoS identification for untrustworthy Web services is critical in QoS management in the service computing since the performance of untrustworthy Web services may result in QoS downgrade. The key issue is to intelligently learn the characteristics of trustworthy Web services from different QoS levels, then to identify the untrustworthy ones according to the characteristics of QoS metrics. As one of the intelligent identification approaches, deep neural network has emerged as a powerful techniqu...

  10. Newton Power Flow Methods for Unbalanced Three-Phase Distribution Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sereeter, B.; Vuik, C.; Witteveen, C.

    2017-01-01

    Two mismatch functions (power or current) and three coordinates (polar, Cartesian andcomplex form) result in six versions of the Newton–Raphson method for the solution of powerflow problems. In this paper, five new versions of the Newton power flow method developed forsingle-phase problems in our

  11. Thematic Network on The role of Monitoring in a Phased Approach to Disposal - EUR 21025, 2004. Conclusions of the EC Thematic Network on The role of Monitoring in a Phased Approach to Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    The EC thematic network on the role of monitoring in a phased approach to the geological disposal of radioactive waste brought together expertise from twelve organisations from ten countries. It was started in 2001 following on from an earlier EC study of retrievability and reversibility (EUR 19145 EN), and completed in 2004 with publication of the final report (EUR 21025 EN). The project mainly aimed to: - Understand the approaches to monitoring in each national programme and their dependency on concepts and approaches. - Distil consensus views and recognise alternative approaches to monitoring. - Share technical knowledge and experience. - Communicate views and experiences. Participants from the projects looked at various definitions of monitoring in relation to a phased approach to disposal, and achieved a consensus on the following: 'Continuous or periodic observations and measurements of engineering, environmental, radiological or other parameters and indicators/characteristics, to help evaluate the behaviour of components of the repository system, or the impacts of the repository and its operation on the environment, and to help in making decisions on the implementation of successive phases of the disposal concept'. That definition is mainly based on an IAEA definition with a few modifications and, in particular, by adding the fact that monitoring has a role in making decisions. Various alternative approaches to make decisions and achieve goals were analysed and the need was stressed for a flexible schedule with a degree of concept flexibility. The project achieved a consensus on the following principles: (i) monitoring has a role in underpinning and verification of operational safety (compliance monitoring); (ii) long-term (post-closure) safety must be assured by design - it cannot rely on monitoring, although monitoring may be implemented for other reasons - monitoring must not be detrimental to long-term (post-closure) safety (iii) monitoring

  12. COHERENT NETWORK ANALYSIS FOR CONTINUOUS GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNALS IN A PULSAR TIMING ARRAY: PULSAR PHASES AS EXTRINSIC PARAMETERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurements, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430074 (China); Mohanty, Soumya D.; Jenet, Fredrick A., E-mail: ywang12@hust.edu.cn [Department of Physics, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, 1 West University Boulevard, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States)

    2015-12-20

    Supermassive black hole binaries are one of the primary targets of gravitational wave (GW) searches using pulsar timing arrays (PTAs). GW signals from such systems are well represented by parameterized models, allowing the standard Generalized Likelihood Ratio Test (GLRT) to be used for their detection and estimation. However, there is a dichotomy in how the GLRT can be implemented for PTAs: there are two possible ways in which one can split the set of signal parameters for semi-analytical and numerical extremization. The straightforward extension of the method used for continuous signals in ground-based GW searches, where the so-called pulsar phase parameters are maximized numerically, was addressed in an earlier paper. In this paper, we report the first study of the performance of the second approach where the pulsar phases are maximized semi-analytically. This approach is scalable since the number of parameters left over for numerical optimization does not depend on the size of the PTA. Our results show that for the same array size (9 pulsars), the new method performs somewhat worse in parameter estimation, but not in detection, than the previous method where the pulsar phases were maximized numerically. The origin of the performance discrepancy is likely to be in the ill-posedness that is intrinsic to any network analysis method. However, the scalability of the new method allows the ill-posedness to be mitigated by simply adding more pulsars to the array. This is shown explicitly by taking a larger array of pulsars.

  13. Neural network prediction of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit during the storm recovery phase: effects of recurring substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fukata

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available During the recovery phase of geomagnetic storms, the flux of relativistic (>2 MeV electrons at geosynchronous orbits is enhanced. This enhancement reaches a level that can cause devastating damage to instruments on satellites. To predict these temporal variations, we have developed neural network models that predict the flux for the period 1–12 h ahead. The electron-flux data obtained during storms, from the Space Environment Monitor on board a Geostationary Meteorological Satellite, were used to construct the model. Various combinations of the input parameters AL, SAL, Dst and SDst were tested (where S denotes the summation from the time of the minimum Dst. It was found that the model, including SAL as one of the input parameters, can provide some measure of relativistic electron-flux prediction at geosynchronous orbit during the recovery phase. We suggest from this result that the relativistic electron-flux enhancement during the recovery phase is associated with recurring substorms after Dst minimum and their accumulation effect.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, trapped; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; storms and substorms

  14. Using data- and network science to reveal iterations and phase-transitions in the design process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piccolo, Sebastiano; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann; Maier, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the role of iterations is a prevalent topic in both design research and design practice. Furthermore, the increasing amount of data produced and stored by companies leaves traces and enables the application of data science to learn from past design processes. In this article, we...... analyse a documentlog to show the temporal evolution of a real design process of a power plant by using exploratory data analysis and network analysis. We show how the iterative nature of the design process is reflected in archival data and how one might re-construct the design process, involving...

  15. On the application of neural networks to the classification of phase modulated waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchenroth, Anthony; Yim, Joong Gon; Nowak, Michael; Chakravarthy, Vasu

    2017-04-01

    Accurate classification of phase modulated radar waveforms is a well-known problem in spectrum sensing. Identification of such waveforms aids situational awareness enabling radar and communications spectrum sharing. While various feature extraction and engineering approaches have sought to address this problem, the use of a machine learning algorithm that best utilizes these features is becomes foremost. In this effort, a comparison of a standard shallow and a deep learning approach are explored. Experiments provide insights into classifier architecture, training procedure, and performance.

  16. MOONLIGHT: A NEW LUNAR LASER RANGING RETROREFLECTOR AND THE LUNAR GEODETIC PRECESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Martini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970s Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR to the Apollo Cube Corner Retroreflector (CCR arrays (developed by the University of Maryland, UMD supplied almost all significant tests of General Relativity (Alley et al., 1970; Chang et al., 1971; Bender et al.,1973: possible changes in the gravitational constant, gravitational self-energy, weak equivalence principle, geodetic precession, inverse-square force-law. The LNF group, in fact, has just completed a new measurement of the lunar geodetic precession with Apollo array, with accuracy of 9 × 10−3, comparable to the best measurement to date. LLR has also provided significant information on the composition and origin of the moon. This is the only Apollo experiment still in operation. In the 1970s Apollo LLR arrays contributed a negligible fraction of the ranging error budget. Since the ranging capabilities of ground stations improved by more than two orders of magnitude, now, because of the lunar librations, Apollo CCR arrays dominate the error budget. With the project MoonLIGHT (Moon Laser Instrumentation for General relativity High-accuracy Tests, in 2006 INFN-LNF joined UMD in the development and test of a new-generation LLR payload made by a single, large CCR (100mm diameter unaffected by the effect of librations. With MoonLIGHT CCRs the accuracy of the measurement of the lunar geodetic precession can be improved up to a factor 100 compared to Apollo arrays. From a technological point of view, INFN-LNF built and is operating a new experimental apparatus (Satellite/lunar laser ranging Characterization Facility, SCF and created a new industry-standard test procedure (SCF-Test to characterize and model the detailed thermal behavior and the optical performance of CCRs in accurately laboratory-simulated space conditions, for industrial and scientific applications. Our key experimental innovation is the concurrent measurement and modeling of the optical Far Field Diffraction Pattern (FFDP and the

  17. Precession electron diffraction for SiC grain boundary characterization in unirradiated TRISO fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillo, T.M.; Rooyen, I.J. van; Wu, Y.Q.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • SiC grain orientation determined by TEM-based precession electron diffraction. • Orientation data improved with increasing TEM sample thickness. • Fraction of low angle grain boundaries lower from PED data than EBSD data. • Fractions of high angle and CSL-related boundaries similar to EBSD data. - Abstract: Precession electron diffraction (PED), a transmission electron microscopy-based technique, has been evaluated for the suitability for evaluating grain boundary character in the SiC layer of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. This work reports the effect of transmission electron microscope (TEM) lamella thickness on the quality of data and establishes a baseline comparison to SiC grain boundary characteristics, in an unirradiated TRISO particle, determined previously using a conventional electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) scanning electron microscope (SEM)-based technique. In general, it was determined that the lamella thickness produced using the standard focused ion beam (FIB) fabrication process (∼80 nm), is sufficient to provide reliable PED measurements, although thicker lamellae (∼120 nm) were found to produce higher quality orientation data. Also, analysis of SiC grain boundary character from the TEM-based PED data showed a much lower fraction of low-angle grain boundaries compared to SEM-based EBSD data from the SiC layer of a TRISO-coated particle made using the same fabrication parameters and a SiC layer deposited at a slightly lower temperature from a surrogate TRISO particle. However, the fractions of high-angle and coincident site lattice (CSL)-related grain boundaries determined by PED are similar to those found using SEM-based EBSD. Since the grain size of the SiC layer of TRSIO fuel can be as small as 250 nm (Kirchhofer et al., 2013), depending on the fabrication parameters, and since grain boundary fission product precipitates in irradiated TRISO fuel can be nano-sized, the TEM-based PED orientation data

  18. Decoupling control of a five-phase fault-tolerant permanent magnet motor by radial basis function neural network inverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Liu, Guohai; Xu, Dezhi; Xu, Liang; Xu, Gaohong; Aamir, Nazir

    2018-05-01

    This paper proposes a new decoupled control for a five-phase in-wheel fault-tolerant permanent magnet (IW-FTPM) motor drive, in which radial basis function neural network inverse (RBF-NNI) and internal model control (IMC) are combined. The RBF-NNI system is introduced into original system to construct a pseudo-linear system, and IMC is used as a robust controller. Hence, the newly proposed control system incorporates the merits of the IMC and RBF-NNI methods. In order to verify the proposed strategy, an IW-FTPM motor drive is designed based on dSPACE real-time control platform. Then, the experimental results are offered to verify that the d-axis current and the rotor speed are successfully decoupled. Besides, the proposed motor drive exhibits strong robustness even under load torque disturbance.

  19. LCL filter design for three-phase two-level power factor correction using line impedance stabilization network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouchaki, Alireza; Nymand, Morten

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents LCL filter design method for three-phase two-level power factor correction (PFC) using line impedance stabilization network (LISN). A straightforward LCL filter design along with variation in grid impedance is not simply achievable and inevitably lead to an iterative solution...... for filter. By introducing of fast power switches for PFC applications such as silicon-carbide, major current harmonics around the switching frequency drops in the region that LISN can actively provide well-defined impedance for measuring the harmonics (i.e. 9 kHz- 30MHz). Therefore, LISN can be replaced...... is derived using the current ripple behavior of converter-side inductor. The grid-side inductor is achieved as a function of LISN impedance to fulfill the grid regulation. To verify the analyses, an LCL filter is designed for a 5 kW SiC-based PFC. The simulation and experimental results support the validity...

  20. NMDA-dependent phase synchronization between septal and temporal CA3 hippocampal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ning; Jackson, Jesse; Goutagny, Romain; Lowe, Germaine; Manseau, Frédéric; Williams, Sylvain

    2013-05-08

    Increasing evidence suggests that synchronization between brain regions is essential for information exchange and memory processes. However, it remains incompletely known which synaptic mechanisms contribute to the process of synchronization. Here, we investigated whether NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic plasticity was an important player in synchronization between septal and temporal CA3 areas of the rat hippocampus. We found that both the septal and temporal CA3 regions intrinsically generate weakly synchronized δ frequency oscillations in the complete hippocampus in vitro. Septal and temporal oscillators differed in frequency, power, and rhythmicity, but both required GABAA and AMPA receptors. NMDA receptor activation, and most particularly the NR2B subunit, contributed considerably more to rhythm generation at the temporal than the septal region. Brief activation of NMDA receptors by application of extracellular calcium dramatically potentiated the septal-temporal coherence for long durations (>40 min), an effect blocked by the NMDA antagonist AP-5. This long-lasting NMDA-receptor-dependent increase in coherence was also associated with an elevated phase locking of spikes locally and across regions. Changes in coherence between oscillators were associated with increases in phase locking between oscillators independent of oscillator amplitude. Finally, although the septal CA3 rhythm preceded the oscillations in temporal regions in control conditions, this was reversed during the NMDA-dependent enhancement in coherence, suggesting that NMDA receptor activation can change the direction of information flow along the septotemporal CA3 axis. These data demonstrate that plastic changes in communication between septal and temporal hippocampal regions can arise from the NMDA-dependent phase locking of neural oscillators.

  1. Phase noise effects in synchronized wireless networks for mimo-ofdm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyani, M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Channel impairments effects are evaluated by inclusion of phase noise in a synchronization error correction algorithm for MIMO (Multiple Input Multiple Output) OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) systems. The original synchronization error correction algorithm applicable to AWGN (Additive White Gaussian Noise) channel pertaining to SISO (Single Input Single Output) system is modified in the presence of SUI (Stanford University Interim) channel models and then applied to MIMO systems. Then the performance of this modified algorithm is verified through simulations under the effects of channel impairments. (author)

  2. Determination of size distribution of bubbles in a bubbly column two phase flows by ultrasound and neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baroni, Douglas B.; Lamy, Carlos A.; Bittencourt, Marcelo S.Q.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Cunha Filho, Jurandyr S.; Motta, Mauricio S.

    2011-01-01

    The development of advanced nuclear reactor conceptions depends largely on the amount of available data to the designer. Non invasive ultrasonic techniques can contribute to the evaluation of gas-liquid two-phase regimes in the nuclear thermo-hydraulic circuits. A key-point for success of those techniques is the interpretation of the ultrasonic signal. In this work, a methodology based in artificial neural networks (ANN) is proposed to predict size distribution of bubbles in a bubbly flow. To accomplish that, an air feed system control was used to obtain specific bubbly flows in an experimental system utilizing a Plexiglas vertical bubbly column. Four different size distribution of bubbles were generated. The bubbles were photographed and measured. To evaluate the different size distribution of bubbles it was used the ultrasonic reflected echo on the opposite wall of the column. Then, an ANN has been developed for predicting size distribution of bubbles by using the frequency spectra of the ultrasonic signal as input. A trained artificial neural network using ultrasonic signal in the frequency domain can evaluate with a good precision the size distribution of bubbles generated in this system. (author)

  3. Determination of size distribution of bubbles in a bubbly column two phase flows by ultrasound and neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroni, Douglas B.; Lamy, Carlos A.; Bittencourt, Marcelo S.Q.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A., E-mail: douglasbaroni@ien.gov.b, E-mail: lamy@ien.gov.b, E-mail: bittenc@ien.gov.b, E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cunha Filho, Jurandyr S. [Escola Tecnica Estadual Visconde de Maua (ETEVM/RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Motta, Mauricio S., E-mail: mmotta@cefet-rj.b [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica Celso Suckow da Fonseca (CEFET/RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The development of advanced nuclear reactor conceptions depends largely on the amount of available data to the designer. Non invasive ultrasonic techniques can contribute to the evaluation of gas-liquid two-phase regimes in the nuclear thermo-hydraulic circuits. A key-point for success of those techniques is the interpretation of the ultrasonic signal. In this work, a methodology based in artificial neural networks (ANN) is proposed to predict size distribution of bubbles in a bubbly flow. To accomplish that, an air feed system control was used to obtain specific bubbly flows in an experimental system utilizing a Plexiglas vertical bubbly column. Four different size distribution of bubbles were generated. The bubbles were photographed and measured. To evaluate the different size distribution of bubbles it was used the ultrasonic reflected echo on the opposite wall of the column. Then, an ANN has been developed for predicting size distribution of bubbles by using the frequency spectra of the ultrasonic signal as input. A trained artificial neural network using ultrasonic signal in the frequency domain can evaluate with a good precision the size distribution of bubbles generated in this system. (author)

  4. Breadth-First Search-Based Single-Phase Algorithms for Bridge Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Vahid Khalilpour; Dagdeviren, Orhan

    2013-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are promising technologies for exploring harsh environments, such as oceans, wild forests, volcanic regions and outer space. Since sensor nodes may have limited transmission range, application packets may be transmitted by multi-hop communication. Thus, connectivity is a very important issue. A bridge is a critical edge whose removal breaks the connectivity of the network. Hence, it is crucial to detect bridges and take preventions. Since sensor nodes are battery-powered, services running on nodes should consume low energy. In this paper, we propose energy-efficient and distributed bridge detection algorithms for WSNs. Our algorithms run single phase and they are integrated with the Breadth-First Search (BFS) algorithm, which is a popular routing algorithm. Our first algorithm is an extended version of Milic's algorithm, which is designed to reduce the message length. Our second algorithm is novel and uses ancestral knowledge to detect bridges. We explain the operation of the algorithms, analyze their proof of correctness, message, time, space and computational complexities. To evaluate practical importance, we provide testbed experiments and extensive simulations. We show that our proposed algorithms provide less resource consumption, and the energy savings of our algorithms are up by 5.5-times. PMID:23845930

  5. THE FRAME NETWORK OF INTERDISCIPLINARY STAKEHOLDER COMPOSITIONS IN THE EARLY PHASES OF NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Alexander Kjær; Nafei, Nadiim Mohamed Adel Abd El Fatta; Larsen, Michael Planck

    2017-01-01

    New Product Development (NPD) projects have continually become more complex over the years and now involve a diverse range of stakeholders, who have different disciplinary backgrounds, values, objectives, and experience. This makes them create different ‘frames’, which may represent conflicting p...... also identifies core activities and events of the framing process and propose a model describing an iterative cycle of six phases that stakeholders in New Product Development go through, which we in this article call ‘The Interdisciplinary Framing Loop’.......New Product Development (NPD) projects have continually become more complex over the years and now involve a diverse range of stakeholders, who have different disciplinary backgrounds, values, objectives, and experience. This makes them create different ‘frames’, which may represent conflicting...... in the early phases of NPD projects involving interdisciplinary stakeholders in organisational settings. The study indicates that stakeholders create isolated aspired values and working principles and from these form a ‘network’ of ‘partial frames’ before connecting them into ‘fully defined frames’. The study...

  6. Detecting gravitational waves from precessing binaries of spinning compact objects: Adiabatic limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonanno, Alessandra; Chen Yanbei; Vallisneri, Michele

    2003-01-01

    Black-hole (BH) binaries with single-BH masses m=(5-20)M · , moving on quasicircular orbits, are among the most promising sources for first-generation ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Until now, the development of data-analysis techniques to detect GWs from these sources has been focused mostly on nonspinning BHs. The data-analysis problem for the spinning case is complicated by the necessity to model the precession-induced modulations of the GW signal, and by the large number of parameters needed to characterize the system, including the initial directions of the spins, and the position and orientation of the binary with respect to the GW detector. In this paper we consider binaries of maximally spinning BHs, and we work in the adiabatic-inspiral regime to build families of modulated detection templates that (i) are functions of very few physical and phenomenological parameters, (ii) model remarkably well the dynamical and precessional effects on the GW signal, with fitting factors on average > or approx. 0.97, (iii) but, however, might require increasing the detection thresholds, offsetting at least partially the gains in the fitting factors. Our detection-template families are quite promising also for the case of neutron-star-black-hole binaries, with fitting factors on average ≅0.93. For these binaries we also suggest (but do not test) a further template family, which would produce essentially exact waveforms written directly in terms of the physical spin parameters

  7. Spin precession and spin Hall effect in monolayer graphene/Pt nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savero Torres, W.; Sierra, J. F.; Benítez, L. A.; Bonell, F.; Costache, M. V.; Valenzuela, S. O.

    2017-12-01

    Spin Hall effects have surged as promising phenomena for spin logics operations without ferromagnets. However, the magnitude of the detected electric signals at room temperature in metallic systems has been so far underwhelming. Here, we demonstrate a two-order of magnitude enhancement of the signal in monolayer graphene/Pt devices when compared to their fully metallic counterparts. The enhancement stems in part from efficient spin injection and the large spin resistance of graphene but we also observe 100% spin absorption in Pt and find an unusually large effective spin Hall angle of up to 0.15. The large spin-to-charge conversion allows us to characterise spin precession in graphene under the presence of a magnetic field. Furthermore, by developing an analytical model based on the 1D diffusive spin-transport, we demonstrate that the effective spin-relaxation time in graphene can be accurately determined using the (inverse) spin Hall effect as a means of detection. This is a necessary step to gather full understanding of the consequences of spin absorption in spin Hall devices, which is known to suppress effective spin lifetimes in both metallic and graphene systems.

  8. Assessing the Detectability of Gravitational Waves from Coalescing Binary Black Holes with Precessing Spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Sara; Privitera, Stephen; Weinstein, Alan J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors will come online within the year and are expected to outperform the strain sensitivity of initial LIGO/Virgo detectors by an order of magnitude and operate with greater bandwidth, possibly to frequencies as low as 10 Hz. Coalescing binary black holes (BBH) are anticipated to be among the most likely sources of gravitational radiation observable by the detectors. Searches for such systems benefit greatly from the use of accurate predictions for the gravitational wave signal to filter the data. The component black holes of these systems are predicted to have substantial spin, which greatly influences the gravitational waveforms from these sources; however, recent LIGO/Virgo searches have made use of banks of waveform models which neglect the effects of the component spins. The inclusion of spinning components is relatively simplified when the spins are taken to be aligned with the orbital angular momentum, though the difficult task of including precession (allowing for mis-aligned component spins) remains a goal of this work. We aim to assess the ability of the GSTLAL gravitational wave search pipeline using IMR aligned-spin template waveforms to recover signals from generically spinning black hole binaries injected into simulated Advanced LIGO and Virgo detector noise. If black holes are highly spinning as predicted, use of aligned-spin template banks in upcoming searches could increase the detection rate of these systems in Advanced LIGO and Virgo data, providing the opportunity for a deeper understanding of the sources.

  9. Modulation of ice ages via precession and dust-albedo feedbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Ellis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present here a simple and novel proposal for the modulation and rhythm of ice-ages and interglacials during the late Pleistocene. While the standard Milankovitch-precession theory fails to explain the long intervals between interglacials, these can be accounted for by a novel forcing and feedback system involving CO2, dust and albedo. During the glacial period, the high albedo of the northern ice sheets drives down global temperatures and CO2 concentrations, despite subsequent precessional forcing maxima. Over the following millennia more CO2 is sequestered in the oceans and atmospheric concentrations eventually reach a critical minima of about 200 ppm, which combined with arid conditions, causes a die-back of temperate and boreal forests and grasslands, especially at high altitude. The ensuing soil erosion generates dust storms, resulting in increased dust deposition and lower albedo on the northern ice sheets. As northern hemisphere insolation increases during the next Milankovitch cycle, the dust-laden ice-sheets absorb considerably more insolation and undergo rapid melting, which forces the climate into an interglacial period. The proposed mechanism is simple, robust, and comprehensive in its scope, and its key elements are well supported by empirical evidence.

  10. Using ERP Systems to Transform Business Processes: A Case Study at a Precession Engineering Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.K.M.Lee

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Enterprises nowadays strive to keep transforming their business processes in accordance with the fastchanging customer demands so as to survive the intense global competition. In an attempt to provide practitioners with an insight into ERP implementation and the resulting business performances, this paper investigate how a successful ERP implementation can help transform enterprises processes. Case based research which is based on an in-depth observation under managerial and practitioner situation. A case study at a precession engineering company is conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed strategic enterprise information model. This paper focuses on the implementation of Sales & Marketing and Warehouse modules of an ERP system. The key performance indicators are used to evaluate how the ERP implementation can improve the business processes. It is found that ERP helps to improve data visibility and improve on-time delivery but less effective on improving employee productivity. This research proposes an enterprise information model to exploit what strategy should be formulate and how ERP tactic can be implemented in company to enhance enterprise competitive advantages. The strategic enterprise information model is formulated based on our in-depth case study and ERP consultant's experience.

  11. In vivo determination of hepatic stiffness using steady-state free precession magnetic resonance elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Dieter; Asbach, Patrick; Rump, Jens; Papazoglou, Sebastian; Somasundaram, Rajan; Modrow, Jens; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce an magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) protocol based on fractional motion encoding and planar wave acquisition for rapid measurements of in vivo human liver stiffness. Vibrations of a remote actuator membrane were fed by a rigid rod to the patient's surface beneath the right costal arch resulting in axial shear deflections of the liver. Data acquisition was performed using a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence incorporating oscillating gradients for motion sensitization. Tissue vibrations of frequency fv = 51 Hz were tuned by twice the sequence repetition time (1/fv = 2TR). Twenty axial images acquired by time-resolved through-plane wave encoding were used for planar elasticity reconstruction. The MRE data acquisition was achieved within 4 breathholds of 17 seconds each. The method was applied to 12 healthy volunteers and 2 patients with diffuse liver disease (fibrosis grade 3). MRE data acquisition was successful in all volunteers and patients. The elastic moduli were measured with values between 1.99 +/- 0.16 and 5.77 +/- 0.88 kPa. Follow-up studies demonstrated the reproducibility of the method and revealed a difference of 0.74 +/- 0.47 kPa (P analysis of the strain wave field captured by axial wave images. The measured data indicate individual variations of hepatic stiffness in healthy volunteers.

  12. Deformation-Induced Precession of a Robot Moving on Curved Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengkai; Aydin, Yasemin; Lofaro, Olivia; Rieser, Jennifer; Goldman, Daniel

    Previous studies have demonstrated that passive particles rolling on a deformed surface can mimic aspects of general relativity [Ford et al, AJP, 2015]. However, these systems are dissipative. To explore steady-state dynamics, we study the movement of a self-propelled robot car on a large deformable elastic membrane: a spandex sheet stretched over a metal frame with a diameter of 2.5 m. Two wheels in the rear of the car are differentially-driven by a DC motor, and a caster in the front helps maintain directional stability; in the absence of curvature the car drives straight. A linear actuator attached below the membrane allows for controlled deformation at the center of the membrane. We find that closed elliptic orbits occur when the membrane is highly depressed ( 10 cm). However, when the center is only slightly indented, the elliptical orbits precess at a rate depending on the orbit shape and the depression. Remarkably, this dynamic is well described by the Schwarzschild metric solution, typically used to describe the effects of gravity on bodies orbiting a massive object. Experiments with multiple cars reveal complex interactions that are mediated through car-induced deformations of the membrane.

  13. The low cost Proton Precession Magnetometer developed at the Indian Institute of Geomagnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahavarkar, P.; Singh, S.; Labde, S.; Dongre, V.; Patil, A.

    2017-01-01

    Proton magnetometers are the oldest scalar magnetometers. The first commercial units were produced in early 1960s as portable instruments. In continuation airborne instruments appeared with optimized speed of readings and sensitivity, large sensors etc. Later development of Overhauser and optically pumped magnetometers has eliminated Proton magnetometers from airborne surveys. However they remain very popular in various ground surveys and observatories. With this primary purpose of generating the ground based magnetic data, the Indian Institute of Geomagnetism (IIG) for the last 3 decades have been developing low cost Proton Precession Magnetometers (PPM). Beginning with the 1 nT PPM which has undergone several changes in design, the successor PM7 the advanced version has been successfully developed by the institute and is installed at various observatories of the institute. PM7 records the total field 'F' with accuracy of 0.1 nT and a sampling rate of 10 seconds/sample. This article briefly discusses the design and development of this IIG make PM7 and compares the data recorded by this instrument with one of the commercially available Overhauser magnetometer in the world market. The quality of data recorded by PM7 is in excellent agreement with the Overhauser. With the available quality of data generated by this instrument, PM7 is an affordable PPM for scientific institutions, schools and colleges intending to carry out geomagnetic studies. The commercial cost of PM7 is ≈ 20% of the cost of Overhauser available in market.

  14. The low cost Proton Precession Magnetometer developed at the Indian Institute of Geomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahavarkar, P.; Singh, S.; Labde, S.; Dongre, V.; Patil, A.

    2017-05-01

    Proton magnetometers are the oldest scalar magnetometers. The first commercial units were produced in early 1960s as portable instruments. In continuation airborne instruments appeared with optimized speed of readings and sensitivity, large sensors etc. Later development of Overhauser and optically pumped magnetometers has eliminated Proton magnetometers from airborne surveys. However they remain very popular in various ground surveys and observatories. With this primary purpose of generating the ground based magnetic data, the Indian Institute of Geomagnetism (IIG) for the last 3 decades have been developing low cost Proton Precession Magnetometers (PPM). Beginning with the 1 nT PPM which has undergone several changes in design, the successor PM7 the advanced version has been successfully developed by the institute and is installed at various observatories of the institute. PM7 records the total field `F' with accuracy of 0.1 nT and a sampling rate of 10 seconds/sample. This article briefly discusses the design and development of this IIG make PM7 and compares the data recorded by this instrument with one of the commercially available Overhauser magnetometer in the world market. The quality of data recorded by PM7 is in excellent agreement with the Overhauser. With the available quality of data generated by this instrument, PM7 is an affordable PPM for scientific institutions, schools and colleges intending to carry out geomagnetic studies. The commercial cost of PM7 is ≈ 20% of the cost of Overhauser available in market.

  15. The BANANA Project. V. Misaligned and Precessing Stellar Rotation Axes in CV Velorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Simon; Winn, Joshua N.; Torres, Guillermo; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Setiawan, Johny; Gillon, Michaël; Jehin, Emmanuel; Triaud, Amaury; Queloz, Didier; Snellen, Ignas; Eggleton, Peter

    2014-04-01

    As part of the Binaries Are Not Always Neatly Aligned project (BANANA), we have found that the eclipsing binary CV Velorum has misaligned rotation axes. Based on our analysis of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, we find sky-projected spin-orbit angles of βp = -52° ± 6° and βs = 3° ± 7° for the primary and secondary stars (B2.5V + B2.5V, P = 6.9 days). We combine this information with several measurements of changing projected stellar rotation speeds (vsin i sstarf) over the last 30 yr, leading to a model in which the primary star's obliquity is ≈65°, and its spin axis precesses around the total angular momentum vector with a period of about 140 yr. The geometry of the secondary star is less clear, although a significant obliquity is also implicated by the observed time variations in the vsin i sstarf. By integrating the secular tidal evolution equations backward in time, we find that the system could have evolved from a state of even stronger misalignment similar to DI Herculis, a younger but otherwise comparable binary. Based on observations made with ESOs 2.2 m Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID 084.C-1008 and under MPIA guaranteed time.

  16. Factors influencing fast low angle positive contrast steady-state free precession (FLAPS) magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmakumar, Rohan; Koktzoglou, Ioannis; Li Debiao

    2007-01-01

    The presence of susceptibility-shifting media can lead to signal voids in magnetic resonance images. While signal voids have been traditionally used to detect such magnetic perturbers, selective magnetic resonance imaging of off-resonant spins surrounding susceptibility-shifted media allows for them to be visualized as hyper-intense (positive contrast) regions. These positive contrast methods can potentially improve the detection conspicuity of magnetic perturbers against regions that appear dark due to the absence of protons, such as air. Recently, a fast low angle positive contrast steady-state free precession (FLAPS) technique has been proposed as a positive contrast imaging method. This work systematically evaluates the contrast characteristics and acquisition strategies of FLAPS-based imaging from the standpoint of imaging parameters and physical properties of the magnetic perturbers. Results show that scan parameters (T R , flip angle, B 0 ), physical properties of the perturber (size and concentration of shift reagent) and the ratio of the relaxation constants (T 1 /T 2 ) of the medium are significant factors influencing the FLAPS-based positive contrast

  17. Universal crystal cooling device for precession cameras, rotation cameras and diffractometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajdu, J.; McLaughlin, P.J.; Helliwell, J.R.; Sheldon, J.; Thompson, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    A versatile crystal cooling device is described for macromolecular crystallographic applications in the 290 to 80 K temperature range. It utilizes a fluctuation-free cold-nitrogen-gas supply, an insulated Mylar crystal cooling chamber and a universal ball joint, which connects the cooling chamber to the goniometer head and the crystal. The ball joint is a novel feature over all previous designs. As a result, the device can be used on various rotation cameras, precession cameras and diffractometers. The lubrication of the interconnecting parts with graphite allows the cooling chamber to remain stationary while the crystal and goniometer rotate. The construction allows for 360 0 rotation of the crystal around the goniometer axis and permits any settings on the arcs and slides of the goniometer head (even if working at 80 K). There are no blind regions associated with the frame holding the chamber. Alternatively, the interconnecting ball joint can be tightened and fixed. This results in a set up similar to the construction described by Bartunik and Schubert where the cooling chamber rotates with the crystal. The flexibility of the systems allows for the use of the device on most cameras or diffractometers. THis device has been installed at the protein crystallographic stations of the Synchrotron Radiation Source at Daresbury Laboratory and in the Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Oxford. Several data sets have been collected with processing statistics typical of data collected without a cooling chamber. Tests using the full white beam of the synchrotron also look promising. (orig./BHO)

  18. Steady-state free precession with myocardial tagging: CSPAMM in a single breathhold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Kuijer, Joost P A; Marcus, J Tim; Heethaar, Robert M

    2003-04-01

    A method is presented that combines steady-state free precession (SSFP) cine imaging with myocardial tagging. Before the tagging preparation at each ECG-R wave, the steady-state magnetization is stored as longitudinal magnetization by an alpha/2 flip-back pulse. Imaging is continued immediately after tagging preparation, using linearly increasing startup angles (LISA) with a rampup over 10 pulses. Interleaved segmented k-space ordering is used to prevent artifacts from the increasing signal during the LISA rampup. First, this LISA-SSFP method was evaluated regarding ghost artifacts from the steady-state interruption by comparing LISA with an alpha/2 startup method. Next, LISA-SSFP was compared with spoiled gradient echo (SGRE) imaging, regarding tag contrast-to-noise ratio and tag persistence. The measurements were performed in phantoms and in six subjects applying breathhold cine imaging with tagging (temporal resolution 51 ms). The results show that ghost artifacts are negligible for the LISA method. Compared to the SGRE reference, LISA-SSFP was two times faster, with a slightly better tag contrast-to-noise. Additionally, the tags persisted 126 ms longer with LISA-SSFP than with SGRE imaging. The high efficiency of LISA-SSFP enables the acquisition of complementary tagged (CSPAMM) images in a single breathhold. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Recognition and detection of seismic phases by artificial neural network detector; Jinko neural network ni yoru jishinha no ninshiki to kenshutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, K; Wang, W [Tokyo Gakugei University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    Initial parts of P-waves, medium or high in intensity, are detected using an artificial neural network (ANN). The ANN is the generic name given to information processing systems of the non-Neumann type configured to human brain in point of information processing function, and is packaged into computers in the form of software capable of parallel processing, self-organizing, learning, etc. In this paper, a hierarchical ANN-assisted seismic motion recognition system is constructed on the basis of an error reverse propagation algorithm. It is reported here, with a remark that this study wants much more data from tests for the evaluation of the quality of the recognition, that P-wave recognition has been achieved. When this technique is applied to the S-wave, much more real-time information will become available. For the improvement of the system, a number of problems have to be solved, including the establishment of automatic refurbishment through adaptation-and-learning and configuration that incorporates frequency-related matters. It is found that this system is effective in seismic wave phase recognition but that it is not suitable for precision measurement. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Structural integration and performance of inter-sectoral public health-related policy networks: An analysis across policy phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, D. T. J. M.; Raab, J.; Grêaux, K. M.; Stronks, K.; Harting, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Inter-sectoral policy networks may be effective in addressing environmental determinants of health with interventions. However, contradictory results are reported on relations between structural network characteristics (i.e., composition and integration) and network performance, such as

  1. Structural integration and performance of inter-sectoral public health-related policy networks : An analysis across policy phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Dorothee; Raab, J.; Grêaux, Kimberley M.; Stronks, Karien; Harting, Janneke

    2017-01-01

    Background: Inter-sectoral policy networks may be effective in addressing environmental determinants of health with interventions. However, contradictory results are reported on relations between structure and network characteristics (i.e., composition and integration) and network performance, such

  2. Automatic neuron segmentation and neural network analysis method for phase contrast microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jincheng; Özkucur, Nurdan; Ren, Michael; Kaplan, David L; Levin, Michael; Miller, Eric L

    2015-11-01

    Phase Contrast Microscopy (PCM) is an important tool for the long term study of living cells. Unlike fluorescence methods which suffer from photobleaching of fluorophore or dye molecules, PCM image contrast is generated by the natural variations in optical index of refraction. Unfortunately, the same physical principles which allow for these studies give rise to complex artifacts in the raw PCM imagery. Of particular interest in this paper are neuron images where these image imperfections manifest in very different ways for the two structures of specific interest: cell bodies (somas) and dendrites. To address these challenges, we introduce a novel parametric image model using the level set framework and an associated variational approach which simultaneously restores and segments this class of images. Using this technique as the basis for an automated image analysis pipeline, results for both the synthetic and real images validate and demonstrate the advantages of our approach.

  3. In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrato, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    located at the Florida International University Applied Research Center, Miami, FL (FIU-ARC). A follow-on fluid injection test was developed to detect fluid and ion migration in a cementitious material/grouted test cube using a limited number of existing embedded sensor systems. This In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report summarizes the test implementation, acquired and processed data, and results from the activated embedded sensor systems used during the fluid injection test. The ISDSN-MSTB Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test was conducted from August 27 through September 6, 2013 at the FIU-ARC ISDSN-MSTB test cube. The fluid injection test activated a portion of the existing embedded sensor systems in the ISDSN-MSTB test cube: Electrical Resistivity Tomography-Thermocouple Sensor Arrays, Advance Tensiometer Sensors, and Fiber Loop Ringdown Optical Sensors. These embedded sensor systems were activated 15 months after initial placement. All sensor systems were remotely operated and data acquisition was completed through the established Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) hosted on the DOE D&D Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D DKM-IT) server. The ISDN Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test successfully demonstrated the feasibility of embedding sensor systems to assess moisture-fluid flow and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility through a cementitious material/grout monolith. The ISDSN embedded sensor systems activated for the fluid injection test highlighted the robustness of the sensor systems and the importance of configuring systems in-depth (i.e., complementary sensors and measurements) to alleviate data acquisition gaps

  4. In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrato, M. G.

    2013-09-27

    located at the Florida International University Applied Research Center, Miami, FL (FIU-ARC). A follow-on fluid injection test was developed to detect fluid and ion migration in a cementitious material/grouted test cube using a limited number of existing embedded sensor systems. This In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report summarizes the test implementation, acquired and processed data, and results from the activated embedded sensor systems used during the fluid injection test. The ISDSN-MSTB Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test was conducted from August 27 through September 6, 2013 at the FIU-ARC ISDSN-MSTB test cube. The fluid injection test activated a portion of the existing embedded sensor systems in the ISDSN-MSTB test cube: Electrical Resistivity Tomography-Thermocouple Sensor Arrays, Advance Tensiometer Sensors, and Fiber Loop Ringdown Optical Sensors. These embedded sensor systems were activated 15 months after initial placement. All sensor systems were remotely operated and data acquisition was completed through the established Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) hosted on the DOE D&D Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D DKM-IT) server. The ISDN Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test successfully demonstrated the feasibility of embedding sensor systems to assess moisture-fluid flow and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility through a cementitious material/grout monolith. The ISDSN embedded sensor systems activated for the fluid injection test highlighted the robustness of the sensor systems and the importance of configuring systems in-depth (i.e., complementary sensors and measurements) to alleviate data acquisition gaps.

  5. Radar cross section of dipole phased arrays with parallel feed network

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Hema; Jha, Rakesh Mohan

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the detailed analytical formulation for the RCS of parallel-fed linear dipole array in the presence of mutual coupling. The radar cross section (RCS) of an object represents its electromagnetic (EM) scattering properties for a given incident wave. The analysis of scattered field is critical in military and defence arenas, especially while designing low-observable platforms. It is well-known that the presence of an antenna/array on the target influences its echo area significantly. The primary cause for such scattering of the incident signals is reflection that occurs within the antenna aperture and its feed network. In this book, the RCS estimation is done based on the signal path within the antenna system. The scattered field is expressed in terms of array design parameters including the reflection and transmission coefficients. The computed results show the variation in the RCS pattern with and without mutual coupling. The effect of finite dipole-length, inter-element spacing, scan angle,...

  6. Power adaptive multi-filter carrierless amplitude and phase access scheme for visible light communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Huang, Zhitong; Li, Haoyue; Ji, Yuefeng

    2018-04-01

    Visible light communication (VLC) is a promising candidate for short-range broadband access due to its integration of advantages for both optical communication and wireless communication, whereas multi-user access is a key problem because of the intra-cell and inter-cell interferences. In addition, the non-flat channel effect results in higher losses for users in high frequency bands, which leads to unfair qualities. To solve those issues, we propose a power adaptive multi-filter carrierless amplitude and phase access (PA-MF-CAPA) scheme, and in the first step of this scheme, the MF-CAPA scheme utilizing multiple filters as different CAP dimensions is used to realize multi-user access. The character of orthogonality among the filters in different dimensions can mitigate the effect of intra-cell and inter-cell interferences. Moreover, the MF-CAPA scheme provides different channels modulated on the same frequency bands, which further increases the transmission rate. Then, the power adaptive procedure based on MF-CAPA scheme is presented to realize quality fairness. As demonstrated in our experiments, the MF-CAPA scheme yields an improved throughput compared with multi-band CAP access scheme, and the PA-MF-CAPA scheme enhances the quality fairness and further improves the throughput compared with the MF-CAPA scheme.

  7. Balanced steady state free precession for arterial spin labeling MRI: Initial experience for blood flow mapping in human brain, retina, and kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Hong; Wang, Danny J J; Duong, Timothy Q

    2013-09-01

    We implemented pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) with 2D and 3D balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) readout for mapping blood flow in the human brain, retina, and kidney, free of distortion and signal dropout, which are typically observed in the most commonly used echo-planar imaging acquisition. High resolution functional brain imaging in the human visual cortex was feasible with 3D bSSFP pCASL. Blood flow of the human retina could be imaged with pCASL and bSSFP in conjunction with a phase cycling approach to suppress the banding artifacts associated with bSSFP. Furthermore, bSSFP based pCASL enabled us to map renal blood flow within a single breath hold. Control and test-retest experiments suggested that the measured blood flow values in retina and kidney were reliable. Because there is no specific imaging tool for mapping human retina blood flow and the standard contrast agent technique for mapping renal blood flow can cause problems for patients with kidney dysfunction, bSSFP based pCASL may provide a useful tool for the diagnosis of retinal and renal diseases and can complement existing imaging techniques. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Unraveling bacterial networks and their antimicrobial susceptibility on silicon microarchitectures using intrinsic phase-shift spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Heidi; Holtzman, Liran; Haimov, Yuri; Weizman, Daniel; Kashi, Yechezkel; Nativ, Ofer; Halachmi, Sarel; Segal, Ester

    2018-02-01

    We have developed a rapid phenotypic antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) in which photonic 2D silicon microarrays are employed as both the optical transducer element and as a preferable solid-liquid interface for bacterial colonization. We harness the intrinsic ability of the micro-architectures to relay optical phase-shift reflectometric interference spectroscopic measurements (termed PRISM) and incorporate it into a platform for culture-free, label-free tracking of bacterial accumulation, proliferation, and death. This assay employs microfluidic channels interfaced with PRISM chips and is carried out in a two-stage process, namely bacteria seeding and antibiotic incubation. Bacteria proliferation within the microtopologies results in an increase in refractive index of the medium, yielding an increase in optical path difference, while cell death or bacteriostatic activity results in decreasing or unchanged values. The optical responses of bacteria to various concentrations of relevant antibiotics have been tracked in real time, allowing for accurate determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values within 2-3 hours. We further extended this work to analyze antibiotic susceptibilities of clinical isolates and direct urine samples derived from patients at neighboring hospitals in newly designed, disposable microfluidic devices. This has opened the door to the observation of unique bacterial behaviors, as we can evaluate bacterial adhesion, growth, and antibiotic resistance on different microarchitectures, different surface chemistries, and even different strains. Motility, charge, and biofilm abilities have been explored for their effect of bacterial adhesion to the microstructures as we further develop our method of rapid, label-free AST for full clinical application.

  9. Non-invasive classification of gas–liquid two-phase horizontal flow regimes using an ultrasonic Doppler sensor and a neural network

    OpenAIRE

    Abbagoni, Baba Musa; Yeung, Hoi

    2016-01-01

    The identification of flow pattern is a key issue in multiphase flow which is encountered in the petrochemical industry. It is difficult to identify the gas–liquid flow regimes objectively with the gas–liquid two-phase flow. This paper presents the feasibility of a clamp-on instrument for an objective flow regime classification of two-phase flow using an ultrasonic Doppler sensor and an artificial neural network, which records and processes the ultrasonic signals reflected from the two-phase ...

  10. Multi-port network and 3D finite-element models for accurate transformer calculations: Single-phase load-loss test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escarela-Perez, R. [Departamento de Energia, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Av. San Pablo 180, Col. Reynosa, C.P. 02200, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Kulkarni, S.V. [Electrical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (India); Melgoza, E. [Instituto Tecnologico de Morelia, Av. Tecnologico 1500, Morelia, Mich., C.P. 58120 (Mexico)

    2008-11-15

    A six-port impedance network for a three-phase transformer is obtained from a 3D time-harmonic finite-element (FE) model. The network model properly captures the eddy current effects of the transformer tank and frame. All theorems and tools of passive linear networks can be used with the multi-port model to simulate several important operating conditions without resorting anymore to computationally expensive 3D FE simulations. The results of the network model are of the same quality as those produced by the FE program. Although the passive network may seem limited by the assumption of linearity, many important transformer operating conditions imply unsaturated states. Single-phase load-loss measurements are employed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the network model and to understand phenomena that could not be explained with conventional equivalent circuits. In addition, formal deduction of novel closed-form formulae is presented for the calculation of the leakage impedance measured at the high and low voltage sides of the transformer. (author)

  11. Free-breathing steady-state free precession cine cardiac magnetic resonance with respiratory navigator gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghari, Mehdi H; Komarlu, Rukmini; Annese, David; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    To develop and validate a respiratory motion compensation method for free-breathing cardiac cine imaging. A free-breathing navigator-gated cine steady-state free precession acquisition (Cine-Nav) was developed which preserves the equilibrium state of the net magnetization vector, maintains the high spatial and temporal resolutions of standard breath-hold (BH) acquisition, and images entire cardiac cycle. Cine image data is accepted only from cardiac cycles occurring entirely during end-expiration. Prospective validation was performed in 10 patients by obtaining in each three complete ventricular image stacks with different respiratory motion compensation approaches: (1) BH, (2) free-breathing with 3 signal averages (3AVG), and (3) free-breathing with Cine-Nav. The subjective image quality score (1 = worst, 4 = best) for Cine-Nav (3.8 ± 0.4) was significantly better than for 3AVG (2.2 ± 0.5, P = 0.002), and similar to BH (4.0 ± 0.0, P = 0.13). The blood-to-myocardium contrast ratio for Cine-Nav (6.3 ± 1.5) was similar to BH (5.9 ± 1.6, P = 0.52) and to 3AVG (5.6 ± 2.5, P = 0.43). There were no significant differences between Cine-Nav and BH for the ventricular volumes and mass. In contrast, there were significant differences between 3AVG and BH in all of these measurements but right ventricular mass. Free-breathing cine imaging with Cine-Nav yielded comparable image quality and ventricular measurements to BH, and was superior to 3AVG. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF A DISK SUBJECTED TO LENSE-THIRRING PRECESSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorathia, Kareem A.; Krolik, Julian H.; Hawley, John F.

    2013-01-01

    When matter orbits around a central mass obliquely with respect to the mass's spin axis, the Lense-Thirring effect causes it to precess at a rate declining sharply with radius. Ever since the work of Bardeen and Petterson, it has been expected that when a fluid fills an orbiting disk, the orbital angular momentum at small radii should then align with the mass's spin. Nearly all previous work has studied this alignment under the assumption that a phenomenological 'viscosity' isotropically degrades fluid shears in accretion disks, even though it is now understood that internal stress in flat disks is due to anisotropic MHD turbulence. In this paper we report a pair of matched simulations, one in MHD and one in pure (non-viscous) HD in order to clarify the specific mechanisms of alignment. As in the previous work, we find that disk warps induce radial flows that mix angular momentum of different orientation; however, we also show that the speeds of these flows are generically transonic and are only very weakly influenced by internal stresses other than pressure. In particular, MHD turbulence does not act in a manner consistent with an isotropic viscosity. When MHD effects are present, the disk aligns, first at small radii and then at large; alignment is only partial in the HD case. We identify the specific angular momentum transport mechanisms causing alignment and show how MHD effects permit them to operate more efficiently. Last, we relate the speed at which an alignment front propagates outward (in the MHD case) to the rate at which Lense-Thirring torques deliver angular momentum at smaller radii

  13. Non-invasive classification of gas–liquid two-phase horizontal flow regimes using an ultrasonic Doppler sensor and a neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbagoni, Baba Musa; Yeung, Hoi

    2016-01-01

    The identification of flow pattern is a key issue in multiphase flow which is encountered in the petrochemical industry. It is difficult to identify the gas–liquid flow regimes objectively with the gas–liquid two-phase flow. This paper presents the feasibility of a clamp-on instrument for an objective flow regime classification of two-phase flow using an ultrasonic Doppler sensor and an artificial neural network, which records and processes the ultrasonic signals reflected from the two-phase flow. Experimental data is obtained on a horizontal test rig with a total pipe length of 21 m and 5.08 cm internal diameter carrying air-water two-phase flow under slug, elongated bubble, stratified-wavy and, stratified flow regimes. Multilayer perceptron neural networks (MLPNNs) are used to develop the classification model. The classifier requires features as an input which is representative of the signals. Ultrasound signal features are extracted by applying both power spectral density (PSD) and discrete wavelet transform (DWT) methods to the flow signals. A classification scheme of ‘1-of-C coding method for classification’ was adopted to classify features extracted into one of four flow regime categories. To improve the performance of the flow regime classifier network, a second level neural network was incorporated by using the output of a first level networks feature as an input feature. The addition of the two network models provided a combined neural network model which has achieved a higher accuracy than single neural network models. Classification accuracies are evaluated in the form of both the PSD and DWT features. The success rates of the two models are: (1) using PSD features, the classifier missed 3 datasets out of 24 test datasets of the classification and scored 87.5% accuracy; (2) with the DWT features, the network misclassified only one data point and it was able to classify the flow patterns up to 95.8% accuracy. This approach has demonstrated the

  14. Non-invasive classification of gas-liquid two-phase horizontal flow regimes using an ultrasonic Doppler sensor and a neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa Abbagoni, Baba; Yeung, Hoi

    2016-08-01

    The identification of flow pattern is a key issue in multiphase flow which is encountered in the petrochemical industry. It is difficult to identify the gas-liquid flow regimes objectively with the gas-liquid two-phase flow. This paper presents the feasibility of a clamp-on instrument for an objective flow regime classification of two-phase flow using an ultrasonic Doppler sensor and an artificial neural network, which records and processes the ultrasonic signals reflected from the two-phase flow. Experimental data is obtained on a horizontal test rig with a total pipe length of 21 m and 5.08 cm internal diameter carrying air-water two-phase flow under slug, elongated bubble, stratified-wavy and, stratified flow regimes. Multilayer perceptron neural networks (MLPNNs) are used to develop the classification model. The classifier requires features as an input which is representative of the signals. Ultrasound signal features are extracted by applying both power spectral density (PSD) and discrete wavelet transform (DWT) methods to the flow signals. A classification scheme of ‘1-of-C coding method for classification’ was adopted to classify features extracted into one of four flow regime categories. To improve the performance of the flow regime classifier network, a second level neural network was incorporated by using the output of a first level networks feature as an input feature. The addition of the two network models provided a combined neural network model which has achieved a higher accuracy than single neural network models. Classification accuracies are evaluated in the form of both the PSD and DWT features. The success rates of the two models are: (1) using PSD features, the classifier missed 3 datasets out of 24 test datasets of the classification and scored 87.5% accuracy; (2) with the DWT features, the network misclassified only one data point and it was able to classify the flow patterns up to 95.8% accuracy. This approach has demonstrated the

  15. Classification of C2C12 cells at differentiation by convolutional neural network of deep learning using phase contrast images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niioka, Hirohiko; Asatani, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Aina; Ohigashi, Hironori; Tagawa, Seiichi; Miyake, Jun

    2018-01-01

    In the field of regenerative medicine, tremendous numbers of cells are necessary for tissue/organ regeneration. Today automatic cell-culturing system has been developed. The next step is constructing a non-invasive method to monitor the conditions of cells automatically. As an image analysis method, convolutional neural network (CNN), one of the deep learning method, is approaching human recognition level. We constructed and applied the CNN algorithm for automatic cellular differentiation recognition of myogenic C2C12 cell line. Phase-contrast images of cultured C2C12 are prepared as input dataset. In differentiation process from myoblasts to myotubes, cellular morphology changes from round shape to elongated tubular shape due to fusion of the cells. CNN abstract the features of the shape of the cells and classify the cells depending on the culturing days from when differentiation is induced. Changes in cellular shape depending on the number of days of culture (Day 0, Day 3, Day 6) are classified with 91.3% accuracy. Image analysis with CNN has a potential to realize regenerative medicine industry.

  16. Swing Phase Control of Semi-Active Prosthetic Knee Using Neural Network Predictive Control With Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekkachai, Kittipong; Nilkhamhang, Itthisek

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, intelligent prosthetic knees have been developed that enable amputees to walk as normally as possible when compared to healthy subjects. Although semi-active prosthetic knees utilizing magnetorheological (MR) dampers offer several advantages, they lack the ability to generate active force that is required during some states of a normal gait cycle. This prevents semi-active knees from achieving the same level of performance as active devices. In this work, a new control algorithm for a semi-active prosthetic knee during the swing phase is proposed to reduce this gap. The controller uses neural network predictive control and particle swarm optimization to calculate suitable command signals. Simulation results using a double pendulum model show that the generated knee trajectory of the proposed controller is more similar to the normal gait than previous open-loop controllers at various ambulation speeds. Moreover, the investigation shows that the algorithm can be calculated in real time by an embedded system, allowing for easy implementation on real prosthetic knees.

  17. International network non-energy use and CO2 emissions (NEU-CO2). An activity within the European Commission's ENRICH programme, DG RTD, 'Environment and Climate'. Final report of the first phase of the network (January 1999 - June 2000)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, M.; Gielen, D.; Kilde, N.; Simmons, T.

    2000-07-01

    This report concludes the first phase of the NEU-CO 2 network, covering the period from January 1999 to June 2000. Within this period, two workshops were held, one in Paris in September 1999 and the other in Brussels in April 2000. The results of these workshops represent the basis of this report. The workshop papers have also been compiled in workshop proceedings which are publicly available. Due to the success of the NEU-CO 2 network, the partners decided to apply for the continuation of this activity which was recently accepted by the European Commission. The second phase of the of the NEU-CO 2 network will start in Fall 2000 and will continue for 18 months. This will allow the NEU-CO 2 network to improve the methods applied, to close data gaps, to check the preliminary conclusions given in this report and to provide consolidated results and recommendations by mid 2002. The ultimate goal of the NEU-CO 2 network is to contribute to an improvement of the IPCC guidelines in the area of non-energy use and to provide inventorists with tools and methods to estimate more accurately non-energy CO 2 emissions. (orig.)

  18. A NEW NETWORK FOR HIGHER-TEMPERATURE GAS-PHASE CHEMISTRY. I. A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF ACCRETION DISKS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Nanase; Herbst, Eric; Wakelam, Valentine

    2010-01-01

    We present a new interstellar chemical gas-phase reaction network for time-dependent kinetics that can be used for modeling high-temperature sources up to ∼800 K. This network contains an extended set of reactions based on the Ohio State University (OSU) gas-phase chemical network. The additional reactions include processes with significant activation energies, reverse reactions, proton exchange reactions, charge exchange reactions, and collisional dissociation. Rate coefficients already in the OSU network are modified for H 2 formation on grains, ion-neutral dipole reactions, and some radiative association reactions. The abundance of H 2 O is enhanced at high temperature by hydrogenation of atomic O. Much of the elemental oxygen is in the form of water at T ≥ 300 K, leading to effective carbon-rich conditions, which can efficiently produce carbon-chain species such as C 2 H 2 . At higher temperatures, HCN and NH 3 are also produced much more efficiently. We have applied the extended network to a simplified model of the accretion disk of an active galactic nucleus.

  19. Jet Precession Driven by a Supermassive Black Hole Binary System in the BL Lac Object PG 1553+113

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caproni, Anderson; Abraham, Zulema; Motter, Juliana Cristina; Monteiro, Hektor

    2017-12-01

    The recent discovery of a roughly simultaneous periodic variability in the light curves of the BL Lac object PG 1553+113 at several electromagnetic bands represents the first case of such odd behavior reported in the literature. Motivated by this, we analyzed 15 GHz interferometric maps of the parsec-scale radio jet of PG 1553+113 to verify the presence of a possible counterpart of this periodic variability. We used the Cross-entropy statistical technique to obtain the structural parameters of the Gaussian components present in the radio maps of this source. We kinematically identified seven jet components formed coincidentally with flare-like features seen in the γ-ray light curve. From the derived jet component positions in the sky plane and their kinematics (ejection epochs, proper motions, and sky position angles), we modeled their temporal changes in terms of a relativistic jet that is steadily precessing in time. Our results indicate a precession period in the observer’s reference frame of 2.24 ± 0.03 years, compatible with the periodicity detected in the light curves of PG 1553+113. However, the maxima of the jet Doppler boosting factor are systematically delayed relative to the peaks of the main γ-ray flares. We propose two scenarios that could explain this delay, both based on the existence of a supermassive black hole binary system in PG 1553+113. We estimated the characteristics of this putative binary system that also would be responsible for driving the inferred jet precession.

  20. X-Ray Quasi-periodic Oscillations in the Lense–Thirring Precession Model. I. Variability of Relativistic Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Bei; Bursa, Michal; Życki, Piotr T.

    2018-05-01

    We develop a Monte Carlo code to compute the Compton-scattered X-ray flux arising from a hot inner flow that undergoes Lense–Thirring precession. The hot flow intercepts seed photons from an outer truncated thin disk. A fraction of the Comptonized photons will illuminate the disk, and the reflected/reprocessed photons will contribute to the observed spectrum. The total spectrum, including disk thermal emission, hot flow Comptonization, and disk reflection, is modeled within the framework of general relativity, taking light bending and gravitational redshift into account. The simulations are performed in the context of the Lense–Thirring precession model for the low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations, so the inner flow is assumed to precess, leading to periodic modulation of the emitted radiation. In this work, we concentrate on the energy-dependent X-ray variability of the model and, in particular, on the evolution of the variability during the spectral transition from hard to soft state, which is implemented by the decrease of the truncation radius of the outer disk toward the innermost stable circular orbit. In the hard state, where the Comptonizing flow is geometrically thick, the Comptonization is weakly variable with a fractional variability amplitude of ≤10% in the soft state, where the Comptonizing flow is cooled down and thus becomes geometrically thin, the fractional variability of the Comptonization is highly variable, increasing with photon energy. The fractional variability of the reflection increases with energy, and the reflection emission for low spin is counterintuitively more variable than the one for high spin.

  1. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Wu, Ming-Long; Chuang, Tzu-Chao; Shih, Yi-Yu; Huang, Teng-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm 3 achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm 3 voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm 3 to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm 3 has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain

  2. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ping-Huei [Imaging Research Center, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan and Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Long, E-mail: minglong.wu@csie.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Medical Informatics, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan and Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Tzu-Chao [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Shih, Yi-Yu [Siemens Limited Healthcare Sector, Taipei 11503, Taiwan (China); Huang, Teng-Yi [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  3. The g-factor of the first excited 4+ state in 20Ne from transient field precession measurement in gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, P.N.; Speidel, K.H.; Mertens, V.; Trolenberg, W.; Kumbartzki, G.S.; Ayres de Campos, N.; Goldberg, M.B.; Gerber, J.; Toulemonde, M.

    1981-01-01

    The g-factor of the 4 + state in 20 Ne at 4.25 MeV has been obtained to be g = +0.08(20) from transient field precession measurements in Gd in agreement with the present authors' earlier reported value of g =- 0.10(19) (1980). The significant reduction in the value of the g- factor, g = -0.01(14), relative to that of the 2 + state (g = + 0.54(4))(1975) is in complete disagreement with theory. In addition the life time of the 4 + state has been measured to be tau = 95(13) fs. (author)

  4. DCE: A Distributed Energy-Efficient Clustering Protocol for Wireless Sensor Network Based on Double-Phase Cluster-Head Election.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ruisong; Yang, Wei; Wang, Yipeng; You, Kaiming

    2017-05-01

    Clustering is an effective technique used to reduce energy consumption and extend the lifetime of wireless sensor network (WSN). The characteristic of energy heterogeneity of WSNs should be considered when designing clustering protocols. We propose and evaluate a novel distributed energy-efficient clustering protocol called DCE for heterogeneous wireless sensor networks, based on a Double-phase Cluster-head Election scheme. In DCE, the procedure of cluster head election is divided into two phases. In the first phase, tentative cluster heads are elected with the probabilities which are decided by the relative levels of initial and residual energy. Then, in the second phase, the tentative cluster heads are replaced by their cluster members to form the final set of cluster heads if any member in their cluster has more residual energy. Employing two phases for cluster-head election ensures that the nodes with more energy have a higher chance to be cluster heads. Energy consumption is well-distributed in the proposed protocol, and the simulation results show that DCE achieves longer stability periods than other typical clustering protocols in heterogeneous scenarios.

  5. An improved fault detection classification and location scheme based on wavelet transform and artificial neural network for six phase transmission line using single end data only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koley, Ebha; Verma, Khushaboo; Ghosh, Subhojit

    2015-01-01

    Restrictions on right of way and increasing power demand has boosted development of six phase transmission. It offers a viable alternative for transmitting more power, without major modification in existing structure of three phase double circuit transmission system. Inspite of the advantages, low acceptance of six phase system is attributed to the unavailability of a proper protection scheme. The complexity arising from large number of possible faults in six phase lines makes the protection quite challenging. The proposed work presents a hybrid wavelet transform and modular artificial neural network based fault detector, classifier and locator for six phase lines using single end data only. The standard deviation of the approximate coefficients of voltage and current signals obtained using discrete wavelet transform are applied as input to the modular artificial neural network for fault classification and location. The proposed scheme has been tested for all 120 types of shunt faults with variation in location, fault resistance, fault inception angles. The variation in power system parameters viz. short circuit capacity of the source and its X/R ratio, voltage, frequency and CT saturation has also been investigated. The result confirms the effectiveness and reliability of the proposed protection scheme which makes it ideal for real time implementation.

  6. 3D network single-phase Ni0.9Zn0.1O as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Guoyong; Guo, Xueyi; Cao, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    A novel 3D network single-phase Ni0.9Zn0.1O has been designed and synthesized by calcining a special metal-organic precursor (MOP) (MeO2C3H6, Me=Ni and Zn, the molar ratio of Ni: Zn=9:1) as the self-sacrificing template for the first time. Comparing with NiO or the mixture of NiO and ZnO, the new...

  7. Dynamical ejecta from precessing neutron star-black hole mergers with a hot, nuclear-theory based equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucart, F; Kasen, D; Desai, D; Brege, W; Duez, M D; Hemberger, D A; Scheel, M A; Kidder, L E; Pfeiffer, H P

    2017-01-01

    Neutron star-black hole binaries are among the strongest sources of gravitational waves detectable by current observatories. They can also power bright electromagnetic signals (gamma-ray bursts, kilonovae), and may be a significant source of production of r-process nuclei. A misalignment of the black hole spin with respect to the orbital angular momentum leads to precession of that spin and of the orbital plane, and has a significant effect on the properties of the post-merger remnant and of the material ejected by the merger. We present a first set of simulations of precessing neutron star-black hole mergers using a hot, composition dependent, nuclear-theory based equation of state (DD2). We show that the mass of the remnant and of the dynamical ejecta are broadly consistent with the result of simulations using simpler equations of state, while differences arise when considering the dynamics of the merger and the velocity of the ejecta. We show that the latter can easily be understood from assumptions about the composition of low-density, cold material in the different equations of state, and propose an updated estimate for the ejecta velocity which takes those effects into account. We also present an updated mesh-refinement algorithm which allows us to improve the numerical resolution used to evolve neutron star-black hole mergers. (paper)

  8. Optimization of Network Topology in Computer-Aided Detection Schemes Using Phased Searching with NEAT in a Time-Scaled Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Maxine; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin

    2014-01-01

    In the field of computer-aided mammographic mass detection, many different features and classifiers have been tested. Frequently, the relevant features and optimal topology for the artificial neural network (ANN)-based approaches at the classification stage are unknown, and thus determined by trial-and-error experiments. In this study, we analyzed a classifier that evolves ANNs using genetic algorithms (GAs), which combines feature selection with the learning task. The classifier named "Phased Searching with NEAT in a Time-Scaled Framework" was analyzed using a dataset with 800 malignant and 800 normal tissue regions in a 10-fold cross-validation framework. The classification performance measured by the area under a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.856 ± 0.029. The result was also compared with four other well-established classifiers that include fixed-topology ANNs, support vector machines (SVMs), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and bagged decision trees. The results show that Phased Searching outperformed the LDA and bagged decision tree classifiers, and was only significantly outperformed by SVM. Furthermore, the Phased Searching method required fewer features and discarded superfluous structure or topology, thus incurring a lower feature computational and training and validation time requirement. Analyses performed on the network complexities evolved by Phased Searching indicate that it can evolve optimal network topologies based on its complexification and simplification parameter selection process. From the results, the study also concluded that the three classifiers - SVM, fixed-topology ANN, and Phased Searching with NeuroEvolution of Augmenting Topologies (NEAT) in a Time-Scaled Framework - are performing comparably well in our mammographic mass detection scheme.

  9. Single- and two-phase flow simulation based on equivalent pore network extracted from micro-CT images of sandstone core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rui; Liu, Jianjun; Cui, Mengmeng

    2016-01-01

    Due to the intricate structure of porous rocks, relationships between porosity or saturation and petrophysical transport properties classically used for reservoir evaluation and recovery strategies are either very complex or nonexistent. Thus, the pore network model extracted from the natural porous media is emphasized as a breakthrough to predict the fluid transport properties in the complex micro pore structure. This paper presents a modified method of extracting the equivalent pore network model from the three-dimensional micro computed tomography images based on the maximum ball algorithm. The partition of pore and throat are improved to avoid tremendous memory usage when extracting the equivalent pore network model. The porosity calculated by the extracted pore network model agrees well with the original sandstone sample. Instead of the Poiseuille's law used in the original work, the Lattice-Boltzmann method is employed to simulate the single- and two- phase flow in the extracted pore network. Good agreements are acquired on relative permeability saturation curves of the simulation against the experiment results.

  10. EFFECTS OF STEEL PLANTS WITH THREE-PHASE INDUCTION FURNACES ON POWER DISTRIBUTION QUALITY OF THE EXISTING 33 kV NETWORK IN NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saheed Lekan Gbadamosi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating and analyzing the voltage and current distortions on the introduction of a steel production plant in a typical 33 kV distribution system in Nigeria, with a view to assisting decisions made in the present system operation and planning effective service delivery in terms of quality. A three phase induction furnace was developed using MatLab Simulink software and the effects of steel plant loads on the quality of electric power system supply to electricity users on the same distribution network was analyzed in terms of total harmonic distortions of voltage and current. In order to evaluate voltage magnitude profile on the network, load flow computation and analyses were carried out on the 33 kV distribution network before and after the introduction of steel plant loads, using Successive Approximation Method. The results showed critical voltage magnitude profile below -5% of nominal voltage at the receiving end nodes. With the aid of the Matlab Simulink model, inadmissible voltage and current distortions of 15.47% and 10.35% were measured. Passive filter was proposed, designed and simulated, in order to mitigate these distortions caused by the steel production plant loads. By simulation, the installation of the designed passive filter gave a reduction of the distortions to permissible values. Further, for every 1 MW load increment when the steel plant is connected, network losses increased by 94%; however, for every of Mvar of filter capacity, loss reduction in the network is 5.1 MW.

  11. Berry's Phase and Fine Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Binder, B

    2002-01-01

    Irrational numbers can be assigned to physical entities based on iterative processes of geometric objects. It is likely that iterative round trips of vector signals include a geometric phase component. If so, this component will couple back to the round trip frequency or path length generating an non-linear feedback loop (i.e. induced by precession). In this paper such a quantum feedback mechanism is defined including generalized fine structure constants in accordance with the fundamental gravitomagnetic relation of spin-orbit coupling. Supported by measurements, the general relativistic and topological background allows to propose, that the deviation of the fine structure constant from 1/137 could be assigned to Berry's phase. The interpretation is straightforward: spacetime curvature effects can be greatly amplified by non-linear phase-locked feedback-loops adjusted to single-valued phase relationships in the quantum regime.

  12. Review of quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: promising novel imaging technique to resolve neuronal network activity and identify cellular biomarkers of psychiatric disorders

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, Pierre

    2014-09-22

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) has recently emerged as a new powerful quantitative imaging technique well suited to noninvasively explore a transparent specimen with a nanometric axial sensitivity. In this review, we expose the recent developments of quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM). Quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM) represents an important and efficient quantitative phase method to explore cell structure and dynamics. In a second part, the most relevant QPM applications in the field of cell biology are summarized. A particular emphasis is placed on the original biological information, which can be derived from the quantitative phase signal. In a third part, recent applications obtained, with QP-DHM in the field of cellular neuroscience, namely the possibility to optically resolve neuronal network activity and spine dynamics, are presented. Furthermore, potential applications of QPM related to psychiatry through the identification of new and original cell biomarkers that, when combined with a range of other biomarkers, could significantly contribute to the determination of high risk developmental trajectories for psychiatric disorders, are discussed.

  13. Application of artificial neural networks for the prediction of volume fraction using spectra of gamma rays backscattered by three-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipour Peyvandi, R.; Islami Rad, S. Z.

    2017-12-01

    The determination of the volume fraction percentage of the different phases flowing in vessels using transmission gamma rays is a conventional method in petroleum and oil industries. In some cases, with access only to the one side of the vessels, attention was drawn toward backscattered gamma rays as a desirable choice. In this research, the volume fraction percentage was measured precisely in water-gasoil-air three-phase flows by using the backscatter gamma ray technique andthe multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network. The volume fraction determination in three-phase flows requires two gamma radioactive sources or a dual-energy source (with different energies) while in this study, we used just a 137Cs source (with the single energy) and a NaI detector to analyze backscattered gamma rays. The experimental set-up provides the required data for training and testing the network. Using the presented method, the volume fraction was predicted with a mean relative error percentage less than 6.47%. Also, the root mean square error was calculated as 1.60. The presented set-up is applicable in some industries with limited access. Also, using this technique, the cost, radiation safety and shielding requirements are minimized toward the other proposed methods.

  14. 'Ab initio' structure solution from electron diffraction data obtained by a combination of automated diffraction tomography and precession technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mugnaioli, E.; Gorelik, T.; Kolb, U.

    2009-01-01

    Using a combination of our recently developed automated diffraction tomography (ADT) module with precession electron technique (PED), quasi-kinematical 3D diffraction data sets of an inorganic salt (BaSO 4 ) were collected. The lattice cell parameters and their orientation within the data sets were found automatically. The extracted intensities were used for 'ab initio' structure analysis by direct methods. The data set covered almost the complete set of possible symmetrically equivalent reflections for an orthorhombic structure. The structure solution in one step delivered all heavy (Ba, S) as well as light atoms (O). Results of the structure solution using direct methods, charge flipping and maximum entropy algorithms as well as structure refinement for three different 3D electron diffraction data sets were presented.

  15. The reorientation precession technique, REPREC, and the quadrupole moments of /sup 108/ /sup 110/Pd. [Sum rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselgren, L; Fahlander, C; Edvardson, L O; Thun, J E; Falk, F; Ghumman, B S

    1975-04-01

    The orientation precession technique, REPREC, for measurements of quadrupole moments is described. The application of REPREC to the measurement of the static electric quadrupole moments of the first excited 2/sup +/-states in /sup 108/ /sup 110/Pd is presented. The possibility to measure the matrix product P/sub 4/ = M/sub 02/M/sub 22/,M/sub 02/M/sub 22/ is also discussed. Such measurements are presented for /sup 108/ /sup 110/Pd. The results of these measurements are P/sub 4/O for both /sup 108/Pd and /sup 110/Pd. For /sup 108/Pd the quadrupole moment of the first excited 2/sup +/-state was found to be -.66 +- .18 eb and for /sup 110/Pd -.72 +- .14 eb. Intrinsic nuclear properties for /sup 106 -110/Pd are derived using the sum rules suggested by Kumar.

  16. Reorientation precession measurements on /sup 108/ /sup 110/Pd and the quadrupole moments of their first 2/sup +/ states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselgren, L; Fahlander, C; Falk, F; Edvardson, L O; Thun, J E; Ghuman, B S [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Fysiska Institutionen; Skaali, B [Oslo Univ. (Norway). Fysisk Institutt

    1976-06-28

    The reorientation precession technique, REPREC, for measurements of quadrupole moments is described. The application of REPREC to the measurement of the static electric quadrupole moments of the first excited 2/sup +/ states in /sup 108/ /sup 110/Pd is presented. The possibility to measure the sign of the matrix product P/sub 4/ = M/sub 02/Msub(22')Msub(02')M/sub 22/ is also discussed. Such measurements are presented for /sup 108/ /sup 110/Pd. The results of these measurements are P/sub 4/ < 0 for both /sup 108/Pd and /sup 110/Pd. For /sup 108/Pd the quadrupole moment of the first excited 2/sup +/ state was found to be -0.66+-0.18e.b and for /sup 110/Pd, -0.72+-0.14e.b. Intrinsic nuclear properties for /sup 106 -110/Pd are derived using the sum rules suggested by Kumar.

  17. Spin precession of a particle with an electric dipole moment: contributions from classical electrodynamics and from the Thomas effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silenko, Alexander J

    2015-01-01

    The new derivation of the equation of the spin precession is given for a particle possessing electric and magnetic dipole moments. Contributions from classical electrodynamics and from the Thomas effect are explicitly separated. A fully covariant approach is used. The final equation is expressed in a very simple form in terms of the fields in the instantaneously accompanying frame. The Lorentz transformations of the electric and magnetic dipole moments and of the spin are derived from basic equations of classical electrodynamics. For this purpose, the Maxwell equations in matter are used and the result is confirmed by other methods. An antisymmetric four-tensor is correctly constructed from the electric and magnetic dipole moments. (article)

  18. INFLUENCE OF THE HIGHER ORDER DERIVATIVES ON THE PLANET PERIHELION PRECESSION IN THE EINSTEIN FIELD EQUATIONS FOR VACUUM CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teguh Budi Prayitno

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the effect of higher order derivative tensor in the Einstein field equations for vacuum condition on the planet perihelion precession. This tensor was initially proposed as the space-time curvature tensor by Deser and Tekin on discussions about the energy effects caused by this tensor. However, they include this tensor to Einstein field equations as a new model in general relativity theory. This is very interesting since there are some questions in cosmology and astrophysics that have no answers. Thus, they hoped this model could solve those problems by finding analytical or perturbative solution and interpreting it. In this case, the perturbative solution was used to find the Schwarzschild solution and it was also applied to consider the planetary motion in the solar gravitational field. Furthermore, it was proven that the tensor is divergence-free in order to keep the Einstein field equations remain valid.

  19. Identification method of gas-liquid two-phase flow regime based on image wavelet packet information entropy and genetic neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yunlong; Chen Fei; Sun Bin

    2008-01-01

    Based on the characteristic that wavelet packet transform image can be decomposed by different scales, a flow regime identification method based on image wavelet packet information entropy feature and genetic neural network was proposed. Gas-liquid two-phase flow images were captured by digital high speed video systems in horizontal pipe. The information entropy feature from transformation coefficients were extracted using image processing techniques and multi-resolution analysis. The genetic neural network was trained using those eigenvectors, which was reduced by the principal component analysis, as flow regime samples, and the flow regime intelligent identification was realized. The test result showed that image wavelet packet information entropy feature could excellently reflect the difference between seven typical flow regimes, and the genetic neural network with genetic algorithm and BP algorithm merits were with the characteristics of fast convergence for simulation and avoidance of local minimum. The recognition possibility of the network could reach up to about 100%, and a new and effective method was presented for on-line flow regime. (authors)

  20. An estimation of Envisat's rotational state accounting for the precession of its rotational axis caused by gravity-gradient torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hou-Yuan; Zhao, Chang-Yin

    2018-01-01

    The rotational state of Envisat is re-estimated using the specular glint times in optical observation data obtained from 2013 to 2015. The model is simplified to a uniaxial symmetric model with the first order variation of its angular momentum subject to a gravity-gradient torque causing precession around the normal of the orbital plane. The sense of Envisat's rotation can be derived from observational data, and is found to be opposite to the sense of its orbital motion. The rotational period is estimated to be (120.674 ± 0.068) · exp((4.5095 ± 0.0096) ×10-4 · t) s , where t is measured in days from the beginning of 2013. The standard deviation is 0.760 s, making this the best fit obtained for Envisat in the literature to date. The results demonstrate that the angle between the angular momentum vector and the negative normal of the orbital plane librates around a mean value of 8.53 ° ± 0.42 ° with an amplitude from about 0.7 ° (in 2013) to 0.5 ° (in 2015), with the libration period equal to the precession period of the angular momentum, from about 4.8 days (in 2013) to 3.4 days (in 2015). The ratio of the minimum to maximum principal moments of inertia is estimated to be 0.0818 ± 0.0011 , and the initial longitude of the angular momentum in the orbital coordinate system is 40.5 ° ± 9.3 ° . The direction of the rotation axis derived from our results at September 23, 2013, UTC 20:57 is similar to the results obtained from satellite laser ranging data but about 20 ° closer to the negative normal of the orbital plane.

  1. Capacitance estimation algorithm based on DC-link voltage harmonics using artificial neural network in three-phase motor drive systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Hammam Abdelaal Hammam; Davari, Pooya; Wang, Huai

    2017-01-01

    to industry. In this digest, a condition monitoring methodology that estimates the capacitance value of the dc-link capacitor in a three phase Front-End diode bridge motor drive is proposed. The proposed software methodology is based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithm. The harmonics of the dc......-link voltage are used as training data to the Artificial Neural Network. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of the dc-link voltage is analysed in order to study the impact of capacitance variation on the harmonics order. Laboratory experiments are conducted to validate the proposed methodology and the error analysis......In modern design of power electronic converters, reliability of dc-link capacitors is one of the critical considered aspects. The industrial field have been attracted to the monitoring of their health condition and the estimation of their ageing process status. However, the existing condition...

  2. An in-building network based on community access television integration with quadrature phase-shift keying orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chia-Yi; Lin, Ying-Pyng; Lu, Hai-Han; Wu, Po-Yi; Lin, Huang-Chang; Wu, Hsiao-Wen

    2012-01-01

    An in-building network based on cable television (CATV) integration with quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) transport over a combination of single-mode fibers (SMF) and perfluorinated graded-index plastic optical fibers (GI-POF) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In this system, a 1558.5 nm optical signal is directly transmitted along two fiber spans (20 km SMF + 25 m GI-POF). An optimum guard band is carefully established to ensure that no very substantial signal interference is induced between the CATV and QPSK OFDM bands. Error free transmission with sufficiently low bit error rate values was achieved for 1.25 Gbps/771.5 MHz QPSK OFDM signals; also, acceptable carrier-to-noise ratio, composite second-order, and composite triple-beat performances were obtained for CATV signals. This proposed network is significant because it is economical and convenient to install. (paper)

  3. Hydro-acoustic resonance behavior in presence of a precessing vortex rope: observation of a lock-in phenomenon at part load Francis turbine operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favrel, A; Landry, C; Müller, A; Yamamoto, K; Avellan, F

    2014-01-01

    Francis turbines operating at part load condition experience the development of a cavitating helical vortex rope in the draft tube cone at the runner outlet. The precession movement of this vortex rope induces local convective pressure fluctuations and a synchronous pressure pulsation acting as a forced excitation for the hydraulic system, propagating in the entire system. In the draft tube, synchronous pressure fluctuations with a frequency different to the precession frequency may also be observed in presence of cavitation. In the case of a matching between the precession frequency and the synchronous surge frequency, hydro-acoustic resonance occurs in the draft tube inducing high pressure fluctuations throughout the entire hydraulic system, causing torque and power pulsations. The risk of such resonances limits the possible extension of the Francis turbine operating range. A more precise knowledge of the phenomenon occurring at such resonance conditions and prediction capabilities of the induced pressure pulsations needs therefore to be developed. This paper proposes a detailed study of the occurrence of hydro-acoustic resonance for one particular part load operating point featuring a well-developed precessing vortex rope and corresponding to 64% of the BEP. It focuses particularly on the evolution of the local interaction between the pressure fluctuations at the precession frequency and the synchronous surge mode passing through the resonance condition. For this purpose, an experimental investigation is performed on a reduced scale model of a Francis turbine, including pressure fluctuation measurements in the draft tube and in the upstream piping system. Changing the pressure level in the draft tube, resonance occurrences are highlighted for different Froude numbers. The evolution of the hydro-acoustic response of the system suggests that a lock-in effect between the excitation frequency and the natural frequency may occur at low Froude number, inducing a hydro

  4. Principle and Design of a Single-phase Inverter-Based Grounding System for Neutral-to-ground Voltage Compensation in Distribution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wen; Yan, Lingjie; Zeng, Xiangjun

    2017-01-01

    Neutral-to-ground overvoltage may occur in non-effectively grounded power systems because of the distributed parameters asymmetry and resonance between Petersen coil and distributed capacitances. Thus, the constraint of neutral-to-ground voltage is critical for the safety of distribution networks....... In this paper, an active grounding system based on single-phase inverter and its control parameter design method is proposed to achieve this objective. Relationship between its output current and neutral-to-ground voltage is derived to explain the principle of neutral-to-ground voltage compensation. Then...

  5. Modeling of Multi Phase Flow in Porous Media: Operator Splitting, Front Tracking, Interfacial Area and Network Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordhaug, Hans Fredrik

    2001-07-01

    In reservoir problems we consider some or all of the following phases: Oil, gas, water and solid. The solid phase is normally assumed to be immobile and non-deforming, but in general this does not need to be the case. By multi phase flow we will mean the flow of oil, gas and water. The phases are categorized according to their different physical quantities. A hydrocarbon phase, may consist of different hydrocarbon components, e.g., the oil phase can contain several oil and gas types. In this work the components are neglected and only the phases are considered. A porous medium is any solid phase, e.g. sand stone, that is permeable. The flow in a porous medium takes place through connected pores in the rock. Regions on a larger scale that contain oil or gas are called reservoirs. The typical size of a reservoir is kilometers in each direction while the pore scale size is millimeters or less. Solving the Navier-Stokes equation at the pore scale to obtain the transport on a larger scale is not numerically feasible because of the huge difference in scales. Therefore, some averaging is necessary to go from the pore scale (micro scale) to the reservoir scale (macro scale). In this process the Navier-Stokes equations are replaced by macro scale equations that are solved for macro scale variables. The papers presented herein cover several topics in multi phase flow in porous media, and they address some central problems both on the micro scale as well as on the macro scale. In addition, operator splitting techniques have been developed for convection dominated non-linear transport equations.

  6. Experimental Testing and Model Validation of a Decoupled-Phase On-Load Tap Changer Transformer in an Active Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zecchino, Antonio; Hu, Junjie; Coppo, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing penetration of single-phase small generation units and electric vehicles connected to distribution grids, system operators are facing challenges related to local unbalanced voltage rise or drop issues, which may lead to a violation of the allowed voltage band. To address...... this problem, distribution transformers with on-load tapping capability are under development. This paper presents model and experimental validation of a 35 kVA three-phase power distribution transformer with independent on-load tap changer control capability on each phase. With the purpose of investigating...... to reproduce the main feature of an unbalanced grid. The experimental activities are recreated in by carrying out dynamics simulation studies, aiming at validating the implemented models of both the transformer as well as the other grid components. Phase-neutral voltages’ deviations are limited, proving...

  7. c-T phase diagram and Landau free energies of (AgAu)55 nanoalloy via neural-network molecular dynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiriki, Siva; Jindal, Shweta; Bulusu, Satya S

    2017-10-21

    For understanding the structure, dynamics, and thermal stability of (AgAu) 55 nanoalloys, knowledge of the composition-temperature (c-T) phase diagram is essential due to the explicit dependence of properties on composition and temperature. Experimentally, generating the phase diagrams is very challenging, and therefore theoretical insight is necessary. We use an artificial neural network potential for (AgAu) 55 nanoalloys. Predicted global minimum structures for pure gold and gold rich compositions are lower in energy compared to previous reports by density functional theory. The present work based on c-T phase diagram, surface area, surface charge, probability of isomers, and Landau free energies supports the enhancement of catalytic property of Ag-Au nanoalloys by incorporation of Ag up to 24% by composition in Au nanoparticles as found experimentally. The phase diagram shows that there is a coexistence temperature range of 70 K for Ag 28 Au 27 compared to all other compositions. We propose the power spectrum coefficients derived from spherical harmonics as an order parameter to calculate Landau free energies.

  8. Simulation Network for Test and Evaluation of Defense Systems. Phase I. Survey of DoD Testbed Requirements,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-15

    Interconnection (ISO 051) is the model used as a guide for this introduction to network protocols [30] T. Utsumi, " GLOSAS Project (GLObal Systems...Analysis and Simulation)," Proceedings of the 1980 Winter Simulation * Conference, Orlando, Fl., December, 1980, pp. 165-217. GLOSAS Project proposes the

  9. Development of the self-learning machine for creating models of microprocessor of single-phase earth fault protection devices in networks with isolated neutral voltage above 1000 V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utegulov, B. B.; Utegulov, A. B.; Meiramova, S.

    2018-02-01

    The paper proposes the development of a self-learning machine for creating models of microprocessor-based single-phase ground fault protection devices in networks with an isolated neutral voltage higher than 1000 V. Development of a self-learning machine for creating models of microprocessor-based single-phase earth fault protection devices in networks with an isolated neutral voltage higher than 1000 V. allows to effectively implement mathematical models of automatic change of protection settings. Single-phase earth fault protection devices.

  10. Reactive Power Control of Single-Stage Three-Phase Photovoltaic System during Grid Faults Using Recurrent Fuzzy Cerebellar Model Articulation Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faa-Jeng Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new active and reactive power control scheme for a single-stage three-phase grid-connected photovoltaic (PV system during grid faults. The presented PV system utilizes a single-stage three-phase current-controlled voltage-source inverter to achieve the maximum power point tracking (MPPT control of the PV panel with the function of low voltage ride through (LVRT. Moreover, a formula based on positive sequence voltage for evaluating the percentage of voltage sag is derived to determine the ratio of the injected reactive current to satisfy the LVRT regulations. To reduce the risk of overcurrent during LVRT operation, a current limit is predefined for the injection of reactive current. Furthermore, the control of active and reactive power is designed using a two-dimensional recurrent fuzzy cerebellar model articulation neural network (2D-RFCMANN. In addition, the online learning laws of 2D-RFCMANN are derived according to gradient descent method with varied learning-rate coefficients for network parameters to assure the convergence of the tracking error. Finally, some experimental tests are realized to validate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  11. Reliable prediction of heat transfer coefficient in three-phase bubble column reactor via adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system and regularization network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmroodi Asil, A.; Nakhaei Pour, A.; Mirzaei, Sh.

    2018-04-01

    In the present article, generalization performances of regularization network (RN) and optimize adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) are compared with a conventional software for prediction of heat transfer coefficient (HTC) as a function of superficial gas velocity (5-25 cm/s) and solid fraction (0-40 wt%) at different axial and radial locations. The networks were trained by resorting several sets of experimental data collected from a specific system of air/hydrocarbon liquid phase/silica particle in a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR). A special convection HTC measurement probe was manufactured and positioned in an axial distance of 40 and 130 cm above the sparger at center and near the wall of SBCR. The simulation results show that both in-house RN and optimized ANFIS due to powerful noise filtering capabilities provide superior performances compared to the conventional software of MATLAB ANFIS and ANN toolbox. For the case of 40 and 130 cm axial distance from center of sparger, at constant superficial gas velocity of 25 cm/s, adding 40 wt% silica particles to liquid phase leads to about 66% and 69% increasing in HTC respectively. The HTC in the column center for all the cases studied are about 9-14% larger than those near the wall region.

  12. A new approach of chaos and complex network method to study fluctuation and phase transition in nuclear collision at high energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaduri, Susmita; Bhaduri, Anirban; Ghosh, Dipak [Deepa Ghosh Research Foundation, Kolkata (India)

    2017-06-15

    In the endeavour to study fluctuation and a signature of phase transition in ultrarelativistic nuclear collision during the process of particle production, an approach based on chaos and complex network is proposed. In this work we have attempted an exhaustive study of pion fluctuation in η space, φ space, their cross-correlation and finally two-dimensional fluctuation in terms of scaling of void probability distribution. The analysis is done on the η values and their corresponding φ values extracted from the {sup 32}S-Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 200 GeV per nucleon. The methods used are Multifractal Detrended Cross-Correlation Analysis (MF-DXA) and a chaos-based rigorous complex network method -Visibility Graph. The analysis reveals that the highest degree of cross-correlation between pseudorapidity and azimuthal angles exists in the most central region of the interaction. The analysis further shows that two-dimensional void distribution corresponding to the η-φ space reveals a strong scaling behaviour. Both cross-correlation coefficients of MF-DXA and PSVG (Power of the Scale-freeness in Visibility Graph, which is implicitly connected with the Hurst exponent) can be effectively used for the quantitative assessment of pion fluctuation in a very precise manner and have the capability to assess the tendency of approaching criticality for phase transitions. (orig.)

  13. Fabrication of PVDF-based blend membrane with a thin hydrophilic deposition layer and a network structure supporting layer via the thermally induced phase separation followed by non-solvent induced phase separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiguo; Cui, Zhenyu; Li, Tianyu; Qin, Shuhao; He, Benqiao; Han, Na; Li, Jianxin

    2017-10-01

    A simple strategy of thermally induced phase separation followed by non-solvent induced phase separation (TIPS-NIPS) is reported to fabricate poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)-based blend membrane. The dissolved poly (styrene-co-maleic anhydride) (SMA) in diluent prevents the crystallization of PVDF during the cooling process and deposites on the established PVDF matrix in the later extraction. Compared with traditional coating technique, this one-step TIPS-NIPS method can not only fabricate a supporting layer with an interconnected network structure even via solid-liquid phase separation of TIPS, but also form a uniform SMA skin layer approximately as thin as 200 nm via surface deposition of NIPS. Besides the better hydrophilicity, what's interesting is that the BSA rejection ratio increases from 48% to 94% with the increase of SMA, which indicates that the separation performance has improved. This strategy can be conveniently extended to the creation of firmly thin layer, surface functionalization and structure controllability of the membrane.

  14. Practice and Learning: Spatiotemporal Differences in Thalamo-Cortical-Cerebellar Networks Engagement across Learning Phases in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korostil, Michele; Remington, Gary; McIntosh, Anthony Randal

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how practice mediates the transition of brain-behavior networks between early and later stages of learning is constrained by the common approach to analysis of fMRI data. Prior imaging studies have mostly relied on a single scan, and parametric, task-related analyses. Our experiment incorporates a multisession fMRI lexicon-learning experiment with multivariate, whole-brain analysis to further knowledge of the distributed networks supporting practice-related learning in schizophrenia (SZ). Participants with SZ were compared with healthy control (HC) participants as they learned a novel lexicon during two fMRI scans over a several day period. All participants were trained to equal task proficiency prior to scanning. Behavioral-Partial Least Squares, a multivariate analytic approach, was used to analyze the imaging data. Permutation testing was used to determine statistical significance and bootstrap resampling to determine the reliability of the findings. With practice, HC participants transitioned to a brain-accuracy network incorporating dorsostriatal regions in late-learning stages. The SZ participants did not transition to this pattern despite comparable behavioral results. Instead, successful learners with SZ were differentiated primarily on the basis of greater engagement of perceptual and perceptual-integration brain regions. There is a different spatiotemporal unfolding of brain-learning relationships in SZ. In SZ, given the same amount of practice, the movement from networks suggestive of effortful learning toward subcortically driven procedural one differs from HC participants. Learning performance in SZ is driven by varying levels of engagement in perceptual regions, which suggests perception itself is impaired and may impact downstream, "higher level" cognition.

  15. Multislice imaging of integrated circuits by precession X-ray ptychography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Kei; Hirose, Makoto; Takahashi, Yukio

    2018-01-01

    A method for nondestructively visualizing multisection nanostructures of integrated circuits by X-ray ptychography with a multislice approach is proposed. In this study, tilt-series ptychographic diffraction data sets of a two-layered circuit with a ∼1.4 µm gap at nine incident angles are collected in a wide Q range and then artifact-reduced phase images of each layer are successfully reconstructed at ∼10 nm resolution. The present method has great potential for the three-dimensional observation of flat specimens with thickness on the order of 100 µm, such as three-dimensional stacked integrated circuits based on through-silicon vias, without laborious sample preparation.

  16. Effective equations for the precession dynamics of electron spins and electron–impurity correlations in diluted magnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygorek, M; Axt, V M

    2015-01-01

    Starting from a quantum kinetic theory for the spin dynamics in diluted magnetic semiconductors, we derive simplified equations that effectively describe the spin transfer between carriers and magnetic impurities for an arbitrary initial impurity magnetization. Taking the Markov limit of these effective equations, we obtain good quantitative agreement with the full quantum kinetic theory for the spin dynamics in bulk systems at high magnetic doping. In contrast, the standard rate description where the carrier–dopant interaction is treated according to Fermi’s golden rule, which involves the assumption of a short memory as well as a perturbative argument, has been shown previously to fail if the impurity magnetization is non-zero. The Markov limit of the effective equations is derived, assuming only a short memory, while higher order terms are still accounted for. These higher order terms represent the precession of the carrier–dopant correlations in the effective magnetic field due to the impurity spins. Numerical calculations show that the Markov limit of our effective equations reproduces the results of the full quantum kinetic theory very well. Furthermore, this limit allows for analytical solutions and for a physically transparent interpretation. (paper)

  17. Differentiation of benign osteoporotic and neoplastic vertebral compression fractures with a diffusion-weighted, steady-state free precession sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, A.; Huber, A.; Nikolaou, K.; Staebler, A.; Reiser, M.; Duerr, H.R.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnosic accuracy of a diffusion-weigthed, steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequence for the differentiation of acute benign osteoporotic and neoplastic vertebral compression fractures. Methods: 85 patients with 102 vertebral compression fractures were examined with MR imaging using a spine array surface coil (Siemens, Vision, 1.5 Tesla). The following sequences were performed in sagittal orientation: T 1 -weighted spin echo (SE), short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) and a diffusion-weighted SSFP sequence (TR=25 msec, diffusion pulse length δ=3 msec). The SSFP images were evaluated qualitatively on a 5-grade scale from strongly hypointense to strongly hyperintense. Quantitative analysis was performed with region of interest measurements (ROI) and calculation of a bone marrow ratio. Results: 60 fractures were due to osteoporosis and 42 fractures were caused by malignancy. 'Hyperintensity' in a vertebral fracture on a SSFP sequence provided a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 93%. The positive predictive value was 91%, the negative predictive value was 100%. Quantitative analysis of the bone marrow ratio showed a statistically significant difference between the osteoporosis and the tumor group (p [de

  18. In vivo MRI discrimination between live and lysed iron-labelled cells using balanced steady state free precession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribot, E.J.; Foster, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the ability of balanced steady state free precession (b-SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging sequence to distinguish between live and lysed iron-labelled cells. Human breast cancer cells were labelled with iron oxide nanoparticles. Cells were lysed using sonication. Imaging was performed at 3 T. The timing parameters for b-SSFP and the number of iron-labelled cells in samples were varied to optimise the b-SSFP signal difference between live and lysed iron-labelled cell samples. For in vivo experiments, cells were mixed with Matrigel and implanted into nude mice. Three mice implanted with live labelled cancer cells were irradiated to validate this method. Lysed iron-labelled cells have a significantly higher signal compared with live, intact iron-labelled cells in bSSFP images. The contrast between live and dead cells can be maximised by careful optimisation of timing parameters. A change in the b-SSFP signal was measured 6 days after irradiation, reflecting cell death in vivo. Histology confirmed the presence of dead cells in the implant. Our results show that the b-SSFP sequence can be optimised to allow for the discrimination of live iron-labelled cells and lysed iron-labelled cells in vitro and in vivo. (orig.)

  19. In vivo MRI discrimination between live and lysed iron-labelled cells using balanced steady state free precession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribot, E.J. [University of Western Ontario, Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, ON (Canada); Foster, P.J. [University of Western Ontario, Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, ON (Canada); University of Western Ontario, Department of Medical Biophysics, London, ON (Canada)

    2012-09-15

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the ability of balanced steady state free precession (b-SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging sequence to distinguish between live and lysed iron-labelled cells. Human breast cancer cells were labelled with iron oxide nanoparticles. Cells were lysed using sonication. Imaging was performed at 3 T. The timing parameters for b-SSFP and the number of iron-labelled cells in samples were varied to optimise the b-SSFP signal difference between live and lysed iron-labelled cell samples. For in vivo experiments, cells were mixed with Matrigel and implanted into nude mice. Three mice implanted with live labelled cancer cells were irradiated to validate this method. Lysed iron-labelled cells have a significantly higher signal compared with live, intact iron-labelled cells in bSSFP images. The contrast between live and dead cells can be maximised by careful optimisation of timing parameters. A change in the b-SSFP signal was measured 6 days after irradiation, reflecting cell death in vivo. Histology confirmed the presence of dead cells in the implant. Our results show that the b-SSFP sequence can be optimised to allow for the discrimination of live iron-labelled cells and lysed iron-labelled cells in vitro and in vivo. (orig.)

  20. Extended RF shimming: Sequence-level parallel transmission optimization applied to steady-state free precession MRI of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beqiri, Arian; Price, Anthony N; Padormo, Francesco; Hajnal, Joseph V; Malik, Shaihan J

    2017-06-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at high field presents challenges because of the high specific absorption rate and significant transmit field (B 1 + ) inhomogeneities. Parallel transmission MRI offers the ability to correct for both issues at the level of individual radiofrequency (RF) pulses, but must operate within strict hardware and safety constraints. The constraints are themselves affected by sequence parameters, such as the RF pulse duration and TR, meaning that an overall optimal operating point exists for a given sequence. This work seeks to obtain optimal performance by performing a 'sequence-level' optimization in which pulse sequence parameters are included as part of an RF shimming calculation. The method is applied to balanced steady-state free precession cardiac MRI with the objective of minimizing TR, hence reducing the imaging duration. Results are demonstrated using an eight-channel parallel transmit system operating at 3 T, with an in vivo study carried out on seven male subjects of varying body mass index (BMI). Compared with single-channel operation, a mean-squared-error shimming approach leads to reduced imaging durations of 32 ± 3% with simultaneous improvement in flip angle homogeneity of 32 ± 8% within the myocardium. © 2017 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.