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Sample records for phase encode mri

  1. GPU accelerated iterative SENSE reconstruction of radial phase encoded whole-heart MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Prieto, Claudia; Atkinson, David

    2010-01-01

    Isotropic whole-heart imaging has become an important protocol in simplifying cardiac MRI. The acquisition time can however be a prohibiting factor. To reduce acquisition times a 3D scheme combining Cartesian sampling in the readout direction with radial sampling in the phase encoding plane was r...... time can be brought to a clinically acceptable level using commodity graphics hardware (GPUs)....

  2. TU-AB-BRA-09: A Novel Method of Generating Ultrafast Volumetric Cine MRI (VC-MRI) Using Prior 4D-MRI and On-Board Phase-Skipped Encoding Acquisition for Radiotherapy Target Localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C; Yin, F; Harris, W; Cai, J; Chang, Z; Ren, L [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a technique generating ultrafast on-board VC-MRI using prior 4D-MRI and on-board phase-skipped encoding k-space acquisition for real-time 3D target tracking of liver and lung radiotherapy. Methods: The end-of-expiration (EOE) volume in 4D-MRI acquired during the simulation was selected as the prior volume. 3 major respiratory deformation patterns were extracted through the principal component analysis of the deformation field maps (DFMs) generated between EOE and all other phases. The on-board VC-MRI at each instant was considered as a deformation of the prior volume, and the deformation was modeled as a linear combination of the extracted 3 major deformation patterns. To solve the weighting coefficients of the 3 major patterns, a 2D slice was extracted from VC-MRI volume to match with the 2D on-board sampling data, which was generated by 8-fold phase skipped-encoding k-space acquisition (i.e., sample 1 phase-encoding line out of every 8 lines) to achieve an ultrafast 16–24 volumes/s frame rate. The method was evaluated using XCAT digital phantom to simulate lung cancer patients. The 3D volume of end-ofinhalation (EOI) phase at the treatment day was used as ground-truth onboard VC-MRI with simulated changes in 1) breathing amplitude and 2) breathing amplitude/phase change from the simulation day. A liver cancer patient case was evaluated for in-vivo feasibility demonstration. Results: The comparison between ground truth and estimated on-board VC-MRI shows good agreements. In XCAT study with changed breathing amplitude, the volume-percent-difference(VPD) between ground-truth and estimated tumor volumes at EOI was 6.28% and the Center-of-Mass-Shift(COMS) was 0.82mm; with changed breathing amplitude and phase, the VPD was 8.50% and the COMS was 0.54mm. The study of liver patient case also demonstrated a promising in vivo feasibility of the proposed method Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest the feasibility to estimate ultrafast VC-MRI for on

  3. TU-AB-BRA-09: A Novel Method of Generating Ultrafast Volumetric Cine MRI (VC-MRI) Using Prior 4D-MRI and On-Board Phase-Skipped Encoding Acquisition for Radiotherapy Target Localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C; Yin, F; Harris, W; Cai, J; Chang, Z; Ren, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a technique generating ultrafast on-board VC-MRI using prior 4D-MRI and on-board phase-skipped encoding k-space acquisition for real-time 3D target tracking of liver and lung radiotherapy. Methods: The end-of-expiration (EOE) volume in 4D-MRI acquired during the simulation was selected as the prior volume. 3 major respiratory deformation patterns were extracted through the principal component analysis of the deformation field maps (DFMs) generated between EOE and all other phases. The on-board VC-MRI at each instant was considered as a deformation of the prior volume, and the deformation was modeled as a linear combination of the extracted 3 major deformation patterns. To solve the weighting coefficients of the 3 major patterns, a 2D slice was extracted from VC-MRI volume to match with the 2D on-board sampling data, which was generated by 8-fold phase skipped-encoding k-space acquisition (i.e., sample 1 phase-encoding line out of every 8 lines) to achieve an ultrafast 16–24 volumes/s frame rate. The method was evaluated using XCAT digital phantom to simulate lung cancer patients. The 3D volume of end-ofinhalation (EOI) phase at the treatment day was used as ground-truth onboard VC-MRI with simulated changes in 1) breathing amplitude and 2) breathing amplitude/phase change from the simulation day. A liver cancer patient case was evaluated for in-vivo feasibility demonstration. Results: The comparison between ground truth and estimated on-board VC-MRI shows good agreements. In XCAT study with changed breathing amplitude, the volume-percent-difference(VPD) between ground-truth and estimated tumor volumes at EOI was 6.28% and the Center-of-Mass-Shift(COMS) was 0.82mm; with changed breathing amplitude and phase, the VPD was 8.50% and the COMS was 0.54mm. The study of liver patient case also demonstrated a promising in vivo feasibility of the proposed method Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest the feasibility to estimate ultrafast VC-MRI for on

  4. Fully phase-encoded MRI near metallic implants using ultrashort echo times and broadband excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Curtis N; Artz, Nathan S; Jang, Hyungseok; McMillan, Alan B; Koch, Kevin M; Reeder, Scott B

    2018-04-01

    To develop a fully phase-encoded MRI method for distortion-free imaging near metallic implants, in clinically feasible acquisition times. An accelerated 3D fully phase-encoded acquisition with broadband excitation and ultrashort echo times is presented, which uses a broadband radiofrequency pulse to excite the entire off-resonance induced by the metallic implant. Furthermore, fully phase-encoded imaging is used to prevent distortions caused by frequency encoding, and to obtain ultrashort echo times for rapidly decaying signal. Phantom and in vivo acquisitions were used to describe the relationship among excitation bandwidth, signal loss near metallic implants, and T 1 weighting. Shorter radiofrequency pulses captured signal closer to the implant by improving spectral coverage and allowing shorter echo times, whereas longer pulses improved T 1 weighting through larger maximum attainable flip angles. Comparisons of fully phase-encoded acquisition with broadband excitation and ultrashort echo times to T 1 -weighted multi-acquisition with variable resonance image combination selective were performed in phantoms and subjects with metallic knee and hip prostheses. These acquisitions had similar contrast and acquisition efficiency. Accelerated fully phase-encoded acquisitions with ultrashort echo times and broadband excitation can generate distortion free images near metallic implants in clinically feasible acquisition times. Magn Reson Med 79:2156-2163, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Effect of Phase-Encoding Reduction on Geometric Distortion and BOLD Signal Changes in fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golestan karami

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Echo-planar imaging (EPI is a group of fast data acquisition methods commonly used in fMRI studies. It acquires multiple image lines in k-space after a single excitation, which leads to a very short scan time. A well-known problem with EPI is that it is more sensitive to distortions due to the used encoding scheme. Source of distortion is inhomogeneity in the static B0 field that causes more geometric distortion in phase encoding direction. This inhomogeneity is induced mainly by the magnetic susceptibility differences between various structures within the object placed inside the scanner, often at air-tissue or bone-tissue interfaces. Methods of reducing EPI distortion are mainly based on decreasing steps of the phase encoding. Reducing steps of phase encoding can be applied by reducing field of view, slice thickness, and/or the use of parallel acquisition technique. Materials and Methods We obtained three data acquisitions with different FOVs including: conventional low resolution, conventional high resolution, and zoomed high resolution EPIs. Moreover we used SENSE technique for phase encoding reduction. All experiments were carried out on three Tesla scanners (Siemens, TIM, and Germany equipped with 12 channel head coil. Ten subjects participated in the experiments. Results The data were processed by FSL software and were evaluated by ANOVA. Distortion was assessed by obtaining low displacement voxels map, and calculated from a field map image. Conclusion We showed that image distortion can be reduced by decreasing slice thickness and phase encoding steps. Distortion reduction in zoomed technique resulted the lowest level, but at the cost of signal-to-noise loss. Moreover, the SENSE technique was shown to decrease the amount of image distortion, efficiently.

  6. Encoding and immediate retrieval tasks in patients with epilepsy: A functional MRI study of verbal and visual memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddiki, Najat; Hennion, Sophie; Viard, Romain; Ramdane, Nassima; Lopes, Renaud; Baroncini, Marc; Szurhaj, William; Reyns, Nicolas; Pruvo, Jean Pierre; Delmaire, Christine

    2018-05-01

    Medial lobe temporal structures and more specifically the hippocampus play a decisive role in episodic memory. Most of the memory functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies evaluate the encoding phase; the retrieval phase being performed outside the MRI. We aimed to determine the ability to reveal greater hippocampal fMRI activations during retrieval phase. Thirty-five epileptic patients underwent a two-step memory fMRI. During encoding phase, subjects were requested to identify the feminine or masculine gender of faces and words presented, in order to encourage stimulus encoding. One hour after, during retrieval phase, subjects had to recognize the word and face. We used an event-related design to identify hippocampal activations. There was no significant difference between patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy, patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy and patients with extratemporal lobe epilepsy on verbal and visual learning task. For words, patients demonstrated significantly more bilateral hippocampal activation for retrieval task than encoding task and when the tasks were associated than during encoding alone. Significant difference was seen between face-encoding alone and face retrieval alone. This study demonstrates the essential contribution of the retrieval task during a fMRI memory task but the number of patients with hippocampal activations was greater when the two tasks were taken into account. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. WE-DE-206-03: MRI Image Formation - Slice Selection, Phase Encoding, Frequency Encoding, K-Space, SNR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential part of clinical imaging due to its ability to render high soft tissue contrast. Instead of ionizing radiation, MRI use strong magnetic field, radio frequency waves and field gradients to create diagnostic useful images. It can be used to image the anatomy and also functional and physiological activities within the human body. Knowledge of the basic physical principles underlying MRI acquisition is vitally important to successful image production and proper image interpretation. This lecture will give an overview of the spin physics, imaging principle of MRI, the hardware of the MRI scanner, and various pulse sequences and their applications. It aims to provide a conceptual foundation to understand the image formation process of a clinical MRI scanner. Learning Objectives: Understand the origin of the MR signal and contrast from the spin physics level. Understand the main hardware components of a MRI scanner and their purposes Understand steps for MR image formation including spatial encoding and image reconstruction Understand the main kinds of MR pulse sequences and their characteristics.

  8. WE-DE-206-03: MRI Image Formation - Slice Selection, Phase Encoding, Frequency Encoding, K-Space, SNR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C. [Indiana University School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential part of clinical imaging due to its ability to render high soft tissue contrast. Instead of ionizing radiation, MRI use strong magnetic field, radio frequency waves and field gradients to create diagnostic useful images. It can be used to image the anatomy and also functional and physiological activities within the human body. Knowledge of the basic physical principles underlying MRI acquisition is vitally important to successful image production and proper image interpretation. This lecture will give an overview of the spin physics, imaging principle of MRI, the hardware of the MRI scanner, and various pulse sequences and their applications. It aims to provide a conceptual foundation to understand the image formation process of a clinical MRI scanner. Learning Objectives: Understand the origin of the MR signal and contrast from the spin physics level. Understand the main hardware components of a MRI scanner and their purposes Understand steps for MR image formation including spatial encoding and image reconstruction Understand the main kinds of MR pulse sequences and their characteristics.

  9. Multichannel compressive sensing MRI using noiselet encoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Pawar

    Full Text Available The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS. In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding.

  10. Effect of phase-encoding direction on group analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yasuo; Miyata, Jun; Isobe, Masanori; Son, Shuraku; Yoshihara, Yujiro; Aso, Toshihiko; Kouchiyama, Takanori; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2018-05-17

    Echo-planar imaging is a common technique used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), however it suffers from image distortion and signal loss because of large susceptibility effects that are related to the phase-encoding direction of the scan. Despite this relationship, the majority of neuroimaging studies have not considered the influence of phase-encoding direction. Here, we aimed to clarify how phase-encoding direction can affect the outcome of an fMRI connectivity study of schizophrenia. Resting-state fMRI using anterior to posterior (A-P) and posterior to anterior (P-A) directions was used to examine 25 patients with schizophrenia (SC) and 37 matched healthy controls (HC). We conducted a functional connectivity analysis using independent component analysis and performed three group comparisons: A-P vs. P-A (all participants), SC vs. HC for the A-P and P-A datasets, and the interaction between phase-encoding direction and participant group. The estimated functional connectivity differed between the two phase-encoding directions in areas that were more extensive than those where signal loss has been reported. Although functional connectivity in the SC group was lower than that in the HC group for both directions, the A-P and P-A conditions did not exhibit the same specific pattern of differences. Further, we observed an interaction between participant group and the phase-encoding direction in the left temporo-parietal junction and left fusiform gyrus. Phase-encoding direction can influence the results of functional connectivity studies. Thus, appropriate selection and documentation of phase-encoding direction will be important in future resting-state fMRI studies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Choosing the polarity of the phase-encoding direction in diffusion MRI: Does it matter for group analysis?

    OpenAIRE

    Kennis, M.; van Rooij, S.J.H.; Kahn, R.S.; Geuze, E.; Leemans, A.

    2016-01-01

    Notorious for degrading diffusion MRI data quality are so-called susceptibility-induced off-resonance fields, which cause non-linear geometric image deformations. While acquiring additional data to correct for these distortions alleviates the adverse effects of this artifact drastically – e.g., by reversing the polarity of the phase-encoding (PE) direction – this strategy is often not an option due to scan time constraints. Especially in a clinical context, where patient comfort and safety ar...

  12. Reference-free unwarping of single-shot spatiotemporally encoded MRI using asymmetric self-refocused echoes acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Chen, Song; Zhong, Jianhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a phase evolution rewinding algorithm for correcting the geometric and intensity distortions in single-shot spatiotemporally encoded (SPEN) MRI with acquisition of asymmetric self-refocused echo trains. Using the field map calculated from the phase distribution of the source image, the off-resonance induced phase errors are successfully rewound through deconvolution. The alias-free partial Fourier transform reconstruction helps improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the field maps and the output images. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm was validated through 7 T MRI experiments on a lemon, a water phantom, and in vivo rat head. SPEN imaging was evaluated using rapid acquisition by sequential excitation and refocusing (RASER) which produces uniform T2 weighting. The results indicate that the new technique can more robustly deal with the cases in which the images obtained with conventional single-shot spin-echo EPI are difficult to be restored due to serious field variations.

  13. Parametric fMRI analysis of visual encoding in the human medial temporal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombouts, S A; Scheltens, P; Machielson, W C; Barkhof, F; Hoogenraad, F G; Veltman, D J; Valk, J; Witter, M P

    1999-01-01

    A number of functional brain imaging studies indicate that the medial temporal lobe system is crucially involved in encoding new information into memory. However, most studies were based on differences in brain activity between encoding of familiar vs. novel stimuli. To further study the underlying cognitive processes, we applied a parametric design of encoding. Seven healthy subjects were instructed to encode complex color pictures into memory. Stimuli were presented in a parametric fashion at different rates, thus representing different loads of encoding. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to assess changes in brain activation. To determine the number of pictures successfully stored into memory, recognition scores were determined afterwards. During encoding, brain activation occurred in the medial temporal lobe, comparable to the results obtained by others. Increasing the encoding load resulted in an increase in the number of successfully stored items. This was reflected in a significant increase in brain activation in the left lingual gyrus, in the left and right parahippocampal gyrus, and in the right inferior frontal gyrus. This study shows that fMRI can detect changes in brain activation during variation of one aspect of higher cognitive tasks. Further, it strongly supports the notion that the human medial temporal lobe is involved in encoding novel visual information into memory.

  14. Phase-encoded MRI for geometrically undistorted imaging and signal characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gorp, JS

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a versatile diagnostic modality that has earned its place in clinical practice all over the world. MRI delivers excellent soft-tissue contrast that can be utilized to detect disease and measure physiological properties in a non-invasive manner. As long as the main

  15. Geometrically undistorted MRI in the presence of field inhomogeneities using compressed sensing accelerated broadband 3D phase encoded turbo spin-echo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Gorp, Jetse S; Bakker, Chris J G; Bouwman, Job G; Zijlstra, Frank; Seevinck, Peter R; Smink, Jouke

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore the potential of compressed sensing (CS) accelerated broadband 3D phase-encoded turbo spin-echo (3D-PE-TSE) for the purpose of geometrically undistorted imaging in the presence of field inhomogeneities. To achieve this goal 3D-PE-SE and 3D-PE-TSE sequences with broadband rf pulses and dedicated undersampling patterns were implemented on a clinical scanner. Additionally, a 3D multi-spectral spin-echo (ms3D-SE) sequence was implemented for reference purposes. First, we demonstrated the influence of susceptibility induced off-resonance effects on the spatial encoding of broadband 3D-SE, ms3D-SE, 3D-PE-SE and 3D-PE-TSE using a grid phantom containing a titanium implant (Δχ = 182 ppm) with x-ray CT as a gold standard. These experiments showed that the spatial encoding of 3D-PE-(T)SE was unaffected by susceptibility induced off-resonance effects, which caused geometrical distortions and/or signal hyper-intensities in broadband 3D-SE and, to a lesser extent, in ms3D-SE frequency encoded methods. Additionally, an SNR analysis was performed and the temporally resolved signal of 3D-PE-(T)SE sequences was exploited to retrospectively decrease the acquisition bandwidth and obtain field offset maps. The feasibility of CS acceleration was studied retrospectively and prospectively for the 3D-PE-SE sequence using an existing CS algorithm adapted for the reconstruction of 3D data with undersampling in all three phase encoded dimensions. CS was combined with turbo-acceleration by variable density undersampling and spherical stepwise T 2 weighting by randomly sorting consecutive echoes in predefined spherical k-space layers. The CS-TSE combination resulted in an overall acceleration factor of 60, decreasing the original 3D-PE-SE scan time from 7 h to 7 min. Finally, CS accelerated 3D-PE-TSE in vivo images of a titanium screw were obtained within 10 min using a micro-coil demonstrating the feasibility of geometrically undistorted MRI near severe

  16. Phase reconstruction from velocity-encoded MRI measurements – A survey of sparsity-promoting variational approaches

    KAUST Repository

    Benning, Martin; Gladden, Lynn; Holland, Daniel; Schö nlieb, Carola-Bibiane; Valkonen, Tuomo

    2014-01-01

    for the reconstruction of phase-encoded magnetic resonance velocity images from sub-sampled k-space data. We are particularly interested in regularisers that correctly treat both smooth and geometric features of the image. These features are common to velocity imaging

  17. Conventions and nomenclature for double diffusion encoding NMR and MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shemesh, Noam; Jespersen, Sune N; Alexander, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    , such as double diffusion encoding (DDE) NMR and MRI, may provide novel quantifiable metrics that are less easily inferred from conventional diffusion acquisitions. Despite the growing interest on the topic, the terminology for the pulse sequences, their parameters, and the metrics that can be derived from them...

  18. Radial k-t SPIRiT: autocalibrated parallel imaging for generalized phase-contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelli, Claudio; Schaeffter, Tobias; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2014-11-01

    To extend SPIRiT to additionally exploit temporal correlations for highly accelerated generalized phase-contrast MRI and to compare the performance of the proposed radial k-t SPIRiT method relative to frame-by-frame SPIRiT and radial k-t GRAPPA reconstruction for velocity and turbulence mapping in the aortic arch. Free-breathing navigator-gated two-dimensional radial cine imaging with three-directional multi-point velocity encoding was implemented and fully sampled data were obtained in the aortic arch of healthy volunteers. Velocities were encoded with three different first gradient moments per axis to permit quantification of mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy. Velocity and turbulent kinetic energy maps from up to 14-fold undersampled data were compared for k-t SPIRiT, frame-by-frame SPIRiT, and k-t GRAPPA relative to the fully sampled reference. Using k-t SPIRiT, improvements in magnitude and velocity reconstruction accuracy were found. Temporally resolved magnitude profiles revealed a reduction in spatial blurring with k-t SPIRiT compared with frame-by-frame SPIRiT and k-t GRAPPA for all velocity encodings, leading to improved estimates of turbulent kinetic energy. k-t SPIRiT offers improved reconstruction accuracy at high radial undersampling factors and hence facilitates the use of generalized phase-contrast MRI for routine use. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Quantitative chemical shift-encoded MRI is an accurate method to quantify hepatic steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Jens-Peter; Hernando, Diego; Mensel, Birger; Krüger, Paul C; Ittermann, Till; Mayerle, Julia; Hosten, Norbert; Reeder, Scott B

    2014-06-01

    To compare the accuracy of liver fat quantification using a three-echo chemical shift-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique without and with correction for confounders with spectroscopy (MRS) as the reference standard. Fifty patients (23 women, mean age 56.6 ± 13.2 years) with fatty liver disease were enrolled. Patients underwent T2-corrected single-voxel MRS and a three-echo chemical shift-encoded gradient echo (GRE) sequence at 3.0T. MRI fat fraction (FF) was calculated without and with T2* and T1 correction and multispectral modeling of fat and compared with MRS-FF using linear regression. The spectroscopic range of liver fat was 0.11%-38.7%. Excellent correlation between MRS-FF and MRI-FF was observed when using T2* correction (R(2)  = 0.96). With use of T2* correction alone, the slope was significantly different from 1 (1.16 ± 0.03, P fat were addressed, the results showed equivalence between fat quantification using MRI and MRS (slope: 1.02 ± 0.03, P = 0.528; intercept: 0.26% ± 0.46%, P = 0.572). Complex three-echo chemical shift-encoded MRI is equivalent to MRS for quantifying liver fat, but only with correction for T2* decay and T1 recovery and use of spectral modeling of fat. This is necessary because T2* decay, T1 recovery, and multispectral complexity of fat are processes which may otherwise bias the measurements. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Review of Random Phase Encoding in Volume Holographic Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chia Su

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Random phase encoding is a unique technique for volume hologram which can be applied to various applications such as holographic multiplexing storage, image encryption, and optical sensing. In this review article, we first review and discuss diffraction selectivity of random phase encoding in volume holograms, which is the most important parameter related to multiplexing capacity of volume holographic storage. We then review an image encryption system based on random phase encoding. The alignment of phase key for decryption of the encoded image stored in holographic memory is analyzed and discussed. In the latter part of the review, an all-optical sensing system implemented by random phase encoding and holographic interconnection is presented.

  1. Multiple-stage pure phase encoding with biometric information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, many optical systems have been developed for securing information, and optical encryption/encoding has attracted more and more attention due to the marked advantages, such as parallel processing and multiple-dimensional characteristics. In this paper, an optical security method is presented based on pure phase encoding with biometric information. Biometric information (such as fingerprint) is employed as security keys rather than plaintext used in conventional optical security systems, and multiple-stage phase-encoding-based optical systems are designed for generating several phase-only masks with biometric information. Subsequently, the extracted phase-only masks are further used in an optical setup for encoding an input image (i.e., plaintext). Numerical simulations are conducted to illustrate the validity, and the results demonstrate that high flexibility and high security can be achieved.

  2. Sensitivity and specificity considerations for fMRI encoding, decoding, and mapping of auditory cortex at ultra-high field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerel, Michelle; De Martino, Federico; Kemper, Valentin G; Schmitter, Sebastian; Vu, An T; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Formisano, Elia; Yacoub, Essa

    2018-01-01

    Following rapid technological advances, ultra-high field functional MRI (fMRI) enables exploring correlates of neuronal population activity at an increasing spatial resolution. However, as the fMRI blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast is a vascular signal, the spatial specificity of fMRI data is ultimately determined by the characteristics of the underlying vasculature. At 7T, fMRI measurement parameters determine the relative contribution of the macro- and microvasculature to the acquired signal. Here we investigate how these parameters affect relevant high-end fMRI analyses such as encoding, decoding, and submillimeter mapping of voxel preferences in the human auditory cortex. Specifically, we compare a T 2 * weighted fMRI dataset, obtained with 2D gradient echo (GE) EPI, to a predominantly T 2 weighted dataset obtained with 3D GRASE. We first investigated the decoding accuracy based on two encoding models that represented different hypotheses about auditory cortical processing. This encoding/decoding analysis profited from the large spatial coverage and sensitivity of the T 2 * weighted acquisitions, as evidenced by a significantly higher prediction accuracy in the GE-EPI dataset compared to the 3D GRASE dataset for both encoding models. The main disadvantage of the T 2 * weighted GE-EPI dataset for encoding/decoding analyses was that the prediction accuracy exhibited cortical depth dependent vascular biases. However, we propose that the comparison of prediction accuracy across the different encoding models may be used as a post processing technique to salvage the spatial interpretability of the GE-EPI cortical depth-dependent prediction accuracy. Second, we explored the mapping of voxel preferences. Large-scale maps of frequency preference (i.e., tonotopy) were similar across datasets, yet the GE-EPI dataset was preferable due to its larger spatial coverage and sensitivity. However, submillimeter tonotopy maps revealed biases in assigned frequency

  3. Accelerated radial Fourier-velocity encoding using compressed sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Han, Dietbert [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Radiology; Wech, Tobias; Koestler, Herbert [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Radiology; Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Comprehensive Heart Failure Center (CHFC)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose:Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a tool for non-invasive determination of flow velocities inside blood vessels. Because Phase Contrast MRI only measures a single mean velocity per voxel, it is only applicable to vessels significantly larger than the voxel size. In contrast, Fourier Velocity Encoding measures the entire velocity distribution inside a voxel, but requires a much longer acquisition time. For accurate diagnosis of stenosis in vessels on the scale of spatial resolution, it is important to know the velocity distribution of a voxel. Our aim was to determine velocity distributions with accelerated Fourier Velocity Encoding in an acquisition time required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Materials and Methods:We imaged the femoral artery of healthy volunteers with ECG - triggered, radial CINE acquisition. Data acquisition was accelerated by undersampling, while missing data were reconstructed by Compressed Sensing. Velocity spectra of the vessel were evaluated by high resolution Phase Contrast images and compared to spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoding. By means of undersampling, it was possible to reduce the scan time for Fourier Velocity Encoding to the duration required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Results:Acquisition time for a fully sampled data set with 12 different Velocity Encodings was 40 min. By applying a 12.6 - fold retrospective undersampling, a data set was generated equal to 3:10 min acquisition time, which is similar to a conventional Phase Contrast measurement. Velocity spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoded images are in good agreement and show the same maximum velocities as compared to velocity maps from Phase Contrast measurements. Conclusion: Compressed Sensing proved to reliably reconstruct Fourier Velocity Encoded data. Our results indicate that Fourier Velocity Encoding allows an accurate determination of the velocity

  4. Accelerated radial Fourier-velocity encoding using compressed sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Han, Dietbert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a tool for non-invasive determination of flow velocities inside blood vessels. Because Phase Contrast MRI only measures a single mean velocity per voxel, it is only applicable to vessels significantly larger than the voxel size. In contrast, Fourier Velocity Encoding measures the entire velocity distribution inside a voxel, but requires a much longer acquisition time. For accurate diagnosis of stenosis in vessels on the scale of spatial resolution, it is important to know the velocity distribution of a voxel. Our aim was to determine velocity distributions with accelerated Fourier Velocity Encoding in an acquisition time required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Materials and Methods:We imaged the femoral artery of healthy volunteers with ECG - triggered, radial CINE acquisition. Data acquisition was accelerated by undersampling, while missing data were reconstructed by Compressed Sensing. Velocity spectra of the vessel were evaluated by high resolution Phase Contrast images and compared to spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoding. By means of undersampling, it was possible to reduce the scan time for Fourier Velocity Encoding to the duration required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Results:Acquisition time for a fully sampled data set with 12 different Velocity Encodings was 40 min. By applying a 12.6 - fold retrospective undersampling, a data set was generated equal to 3:10 min acquisition time, which is similar to a conventional Phase Contrast measurement. Velocity spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoded images are in good agreement and show the same maximum velocities as compared to velocity maps from Phase Contrast measurements. Conclusion: Compressed Sensing proved to reliably reconstruct Fourier Velocity Encoded data. Our results indicate that Fourier Velocity Encoding allows an accurate determination of the velocity

  5. Accelerated radial Fourier-velocity encoding using compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Wech, Tobias; Hahn, Dietbert; Köstler, Herbert

    2014-09-01

    Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a tool for non-invasive determination of flow velocities inside blood vessels. Because Phase Contrast MRI only measures a single mean velocity per voxel, it is only applicable to vessels significantly larger than the voxel size. In contrast, Fourier Velocity Encoding measures the entire velocity distribution inside a voxel, but requires a much longer acquisition time. For accurate diagnosis of stenosis in vessels on the scale of spatial resolution, it is important to know the velocity distribution of a voxel. Our aim was to determine velocity distributions with accelerated Fourier Velocity Encoding in an acquisition time required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. We imaged the femoral artery of healthy volunteers with ECG-triggered, radial CINE acquisition. Data acquisition was accelerated by undersampling, while missing data were reconstructed by Compressed Sensing. Velocity spectra of the vessel were evaluated by high resolution Phase Contrast images and compared to spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoding. By means of undersampling, it was possible to reduce the scan time for Fourier Velocity Encoding to the duration required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Acquisition time for a fully sampled data set with 12 different Velocity Encodings was 40 min. By applying a 12.6-fold retrospective undersampling, a data set was generated equal to 3:10 min acquisition time, which is similar to a conventional Phase Contrast measurement. Velocity spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoded images are in good agreement and show the same maximum velocities as compared to velocity maps from Phase Contrast measurements. Compressed Sensing proved to reliably reconstruct Fourier Velocity Encoded data. Our results indicate that Fourier Velocity Encoding allows an accurate determination of the velocity distribution in vessels in the order of the voxel size. Thus

  6. Efficacy of double arterial phase dynamic magnetic resonance imaging with the sensitivity encoding technique versus dynamic multidetector-row helical computed tomography for detecting hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumano, Seishi; Okada, Masahiro; Murakami, Takamichi; Uemura, Masahiko; Haraikawa, Toyoaki; Hirata, Masaaki; Kikuchi, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Kim, Tonsok

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of double arterial phase dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the sensitivity encoding technique (SENSE dynamic MRI) for detection of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in comparison with double arterial phase dynamic multidetector-row helical computed tomography (dynamic MDCT). A total of 28 patients with 66 hypervascular HCCs underwent both double arterial SENSE dynamic MRI and dynamic MDCT. The diagnosis of HCC was based on surgical resection (n=7), biopsy (n=10), or a combination of CT during arterial portography (CTAP), CT during hepatic arteriography (CTA), and/or the 6-month follow-up CT (n=49). Based on alternative-free response receiving operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the diagnostic performance for detecting HCC was compared between double arterial phase SENSE dynamic MRI and double arterial phase dynamic MDCT. The mean sensitivity, positive predictive value, and mean A Z values for hypervascular HCCs were 72%, 80%, and 0.79, respectively, for SENSE dynamic MRI and 66%, 92%, and 0.78, respectively, for dynamic MDCT. The mean sensitivity for double arterial phase SENSE dynamic MRI was higher than that for double arterial phase dynamic MDCT, but the difference was not statistically significant. Double arterial phase SENSE dynamic MRI is as valuable as double arterial phase dynamic MDCT for detecting hypervascular HCCs. (author)

  7. Effect of Unpleasant Loud Noise on Hippocampal Activities during Picture Encoding: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Fujita, Masafumi; Watanabe, Kazuko; Niwa, Masami; Takahashi, Toru; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Ido, Yasushi; Tomida, Mihoko; Onozuka, Minoru

    2006-01-01

    The functional link between the amygdala and hippocampus in humans has not been well documented. We examined the effect of unpleasant loud noise on hippocampal and amygdaloid activities during picture encoding by means of fMRI, and on the correct response in humans. The noise reduced activity in the hippocampus during picture encoding, decreased…

  8. Quantification of liver fat with respiratory-gated quantitative chemical shift encoded MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motosugi, Utaroh; Hernando, Diego; Bannas, Peter; Holmes, James H; Wang, Kang; Shimakawa, Ann; Iwadate, Yuji; Taviani, Valentina; Rehm, Jennifer L; Reeder, Scott B

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate free-breathing chemical shift-encoded (CSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantification of hepatic proton density fat-fraction (PDFF). A secondary purpose was to evaluate hepatic R2* values measured using free-breathing quantitative CSE-MRI. Fifty patients (mean age, 56 years) were prospectively recruited and underwent the following four acquisitions to measure PDFF and R2*; 1) conventional breath-hold CSE-MRI (BH-CSE); 2) respiratory-gated CSE-MRI using respiratory bellows (BL-CSE); 3) respiratory-gated CSE-MRI using navigator echoes (NV-CSE); and 4) single voxel MR spectroscopy (MRS) as the reference standard for PDFF. Image quality was evaluated by two radiologists. MRI-PDFF measured from the three CSE-MRI methods were compared with MRS-PDFF using linear regression. The PDFF and R2* values were compared using two one-sided t-test to evaluate statistical equivalence. There was no significant difference in the image quality scores among the three CSE-MRI methods for either PDFF (P = 1.000) or R2* maps (P = 0.359-1.000). Correlation coefficients (95% confidence interval [CI]) for the PDFF comparisons were 0.98 (0.96-0.99) for BH-, 0.99 (0.97-0.99) for BL-, and 0.99 (0.98-0.99) for NV-CSE. The statistical equivalence test revealed that the mean difference in PDFF and R2* between any two of the three CSE-MRI methods was less than ±1 percentage point (pp) and ±5 s(-1) , respectively (P liver PDFF and R2* and are as valid as the standard breath-hold technique. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cardiac magnetic resonance: is phonocardiogram gating reliable in velocity-encoded phase contrast imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassenstein, Kai; Schlosser, Thomas; Orzada, Stephan; Ladd, Mark E.; Maderwald, Stefan; Haering, Lars; Czylwik, Andreas; Jensen, Christoph; Bruder, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of phonocardiogram (PCG) gated velocity-encoded phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Flow quantification above the aortic valve was performed in 68 patients by acquiring a retrospectively PCG- and a retrospectively ECG-gated velocity-encoded GE-sequence at 1.5 T. Peak velocity (PV), average velocity (AV), forward volume (FV), reverse volume (RV), net forward volume (NFV), as well as the regurgitant fraction (RF) were assessed for both datasets, as well as for the PCG-gated datasets after compensation for the PCG trigger delay. PCG-gated image acquisition was feasible in 64 patients, ECG-gated in all patients. PCG-gated flow quantification overestimated PV (Δ 3.8 ± 14.1 cm/s; P = 0.037) and underestimated FV (Δ -4.9 ± 15.7 ml; P = 0.015) and NFV (Δ -4.5 ± 16.5 ml; P = 0.033) compared with ECG-gated imaging. After compensation for the PCG trigger delay, differences were only observed for PV (Δ 3.8 ± 14.1 cm/s; P = 0.037). Wide limits of agreement between PCG- and ECG-gated flow quantification were observed for all variables (PV: -23.9 to 31.4 cm/s; AV: -4.5 to 3.9 cm/s; FV: -35.6 to 25.9 ml; RV: -8.0 to 7.2 ml; NFV: -36.8 to 27.8 ml; RF: -10.4 to 10.2 %). The present study demonstrates that PCG gating in its current form is not reliable enough for flow quantification based on velocity-encoded phase contrast gradient echo (GE) sequences. (orig.)

  10. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Glucose Administration Enhances fMRI Brain Activation and Connectivity Related to Episodic Memory Encoding for Neutral and Emotional Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Marise B.; Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Ryan, John P.; Wilson, Jennifer S.; Harenski, Carla; Hamann, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Glucose enhances memory in a variety of species. In humans, glucose administration enhances episodic memory encoding, although little is known regarding the neural mechanisms underlying these effects. Here we examined whether elevating blood glucose would enhance functional MRI (fMRI) activation and connectivity in brain regions associated with…

  12. Cortical processing of pitch: Model-based encoding and decoding of auditory fMRI responses to real-life sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Vittoria; De Martino, Federico; Moerel, Michelle; Santoro, Roberta; Hausfeld, Lars; Formisano, Elia

    2017-11-13

    Pitch is a perceptual attribute related to the fundamental frequency (or periodicity) of a sound. So far, the cortical processing of pitch has been investigated mostly using synthetic sounds. However, the complex harmonic structure of natural sounds may require different mechanisms for the extraction and analysis of pitch. This study investigated the neural representation of pitch in human auditory cortex using model-based encoding and decoding analyses of high field (7 T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data collected while participants listened to a wide range of real-life sounds. Specifically, we modeled the fMRI responses as a function of the sounds' perceived pitch height and salience (related to the fundamental frequency and the harmonic structure respectively), which we estimated with a computational algorithm of pitch extraction (de Cheveigné and Kawahara, 2002). First, using single-voxel fMRI encoding, we identified a pitch-coding region in the antero-lateral Heschl's gyrus (HG) and adjacent superior temporal gyrus (STG). In these regions, the pitch representation model combining height and salience predicted the fMRI responses comparatively better than other models of acoustic processing and, in the right hemisphere, better than pitch representations based on height/salience alone. Second, we assessed with model-based decoding that multi-voxel response patterns of the identified regions are more informative of perceived pitch than the remainder of the auditory cortex. Further multivariate analyses showed that complementing a multi-resolution spectro-temporal sound representation with pitch produces a small but significant improvement to the decoding of complex sounds from fMRI response patterns. In sum, this work extends model-based fMRI encoding and decoding methods - previously employed to examine the representation and processing of acoustic sound features in the human auditory system - to the representation and processing of a relevant

  13. Distributed-phase OCDMA encoder-decoders based on fiber Bragg gratings

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhaowei; Tian, C.; Petropoulos, P.; Richardson, D.J.; Ibsen, M.

    2007-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate new optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) encoder-decoders having a continuous phase-distribution. With the same spatial refractive index distribution as the reconfigurable optical phase encoder-decoders, they are inherently suitable for the application in reconfigurable OCDMA systems. Furthermore, compared with conventional discrete-phase devices, they also have additional advantages of being more tolerant to input pulse width and, therefore, have the poten...

  14. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty MRI: impact of slice-encoding for metal artefact correction MRI on image quality, findings and therapy decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agten, Christoph A.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Sutter, Reto; Grande, Filippo del; Fucentese, Sandro F.; Blatter, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of slice-encoding for metal artefact correction (SEMAC) on image quality, findings, and therapy decision in patients with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Forty-five painful UKAs were examined at 1.5T-MRI (STIR, proton-density(PD)-weighted sequence, each with SEMAC and high-bandwidth). Artefact size, image quality, anatomic depiction, and clinically relevant findings were compared between SEMAC and high-bandwidth (2 readers). In 30 patients, therapy decision was retrospectively assessed by two orthopaedic surgeons without MRI, with high-bandwidth-MRI, and with SEMAC-MRI. SEMAC reduced mean artefact size for STIR (11.8 cm 2 vs. 37.7 cm 2 ) and PD (16.8 cm 2 vs. 18.9 cm 2 ), p < 0.0005 for both comparisons. SEMAC showed more blurring than high-bandwidth, p < 0.0005. STIR-SEMAC revealed more bone marrow oedema (29 vs. 18 patients, p = 0.001, 30 vs. 13 patients, p < 0.0005, for reader 1 and 2 respectively). PD-SEMAC was worse in detecting meniscal lesions (6 missed, p = 0.031, 9 missed, p = 0.004, by reader 1 and 2 respectively) than PD-high-bandwidth. Revision-surgery was chosen in 12 and 11 patients without MRI (surgeon 1 and 2), with high-bandwidth-MRI in 15 and 14 patients, and with SEMAC-MRI in 19 and 14 patients. STIR-SEMAC was useful in detecting bone marrow oedema and influenced the orthopaedic surgeons' decisions towards surgery, while PD-SEMAC showed no clinical benefit. (orig.)

  15. A 4-channel 3 Tesla phased array receive coil for awake rhesus monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachaturian, Mark Haig

    2010-01-01

    Awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI combined with conventional neuroscience techniques has the potential to study the structural and functional neural network. The majority of monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments are performed with single coils which suffer from severe EPI distortions which limit resolution. By constructing phased array coils for monkey MRI studies, gains in SNR and anatomical accuracy (i.e., reduction of EPI distortions) can be achieved using parallel imaging. The major challenges associated with constructing phased array coils for monkeys are the variation in head size and space constraints. Here, we apply phased array technology to a 4-channel phased array coil capable of improving the resolution and image quality of full brain awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments. The phased array coil is that can adapt to different rhesus monkey head sizes (ages 4-8) and fits in the limited space provided by monkey stereotactic equipment and provides SNR gains in primary visual cortex and anatomical accuracy in conjunction with parallel imaging and improves resolution in fMRI experiments by a factor of 2 (1.25 mm to 1.0 mm isotropic) and diffusion MRI experiments by a factor of 4 (1.5 mm to 0.9 mm isotropic).

  16. Theory of multisource crosstalk reduction by phase-encoded statics

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2011-03-01

    Formulas are derived that relate the strength of the crosstalk noise in supergather migration images to the variance of time, amplitude and polarity shifts in encoding functions. A supergather migration image is computed by migrating an encoded supergather, where the supergather is formed by stacking a large number of encoded shot gathers. Analysis reveals that for temporal source static shifts in each shot gather, the crosstalk noise is exponentially reduced with increasing variance of the static shift and the square of source frequency. This is not too surprising because larger time shifts lead to less correlation between traces in different shot gathers, and so should tend to reduce the crosstalk noise. Analysis also reveals that combining both polarity and time statics is a superior encoding strategy compared to using either polarity statics or time statics alone. Signal-to-noise (SNR) estimates show that for a standard migration image and for an image computed by migrating a phase-encoded supergather; here, G is the number of traces in a shot gather, I is the number of stacking iterations in the supergather and S is the number of encoded/blended shot gathers that comprise the supergather. If the supergather can be uniformly divided up into Q unique sub-supergathers, then the resulting SNR of the final image is, which means that we can enhance image quality but at the expense of Q times more cost. The importance of these formulas is that they provide a precise understanding between different phase encoding strategies and image quality. Finally, we show that iterative migration of phase-encoded supergathers is a special case of passive seismic interferometry. We suggest that the crosstalk noise formulas can be helpful in designing optimal strategies for passive seismic interferometry and efficient extraction of Green\\'s functions from simulated supergathers. © 2011 The Authors Geophysical Journal International © 2011 RAS.

  17. Fully refocused multi-shot spatiotemporally encoded MRI: robust imaging in the presence of metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Eliezer, Noam; Solomon, Eddy; Harel, Elad; Nevo, Nava; Frydman, Lucio

    2012-12-01

    An approach has been recently introduced for acquiring arbitrary 2D NMR spectra or images in a single scan, based on the use of frequency-swept RF pulses for the sequential excitation and acquisition of the spins response. This spatiotemporal-encoding (SPEN) approach enables a unique, voxel-by-voxel refocusing of all frequency shifts in the sample, for all instants throughout the data acquisition. The present study investigates the use of this full-refocusing aspect of SPEN-based imaging in the multi-shot MRI of objects, subject to sizable field inhomogeneities that complicate conventional imaging approaches. 2D MRI experiments were performed at 7 T on phantoms and on mice in vivo, focusing on imaging in proximity to metallic objects. Fully refocused SPEN-based spin echo imaging sequences were implemented, using both Cartesian and back-projection trajectories, and compared with k-space encoded spin echo imaging schemes collected on identical samples under equal bandwidths and acquisition timing conditions. In all cases assayed, the fully refocused spatiotemporally encoded experiments evidenced a ca. 50 % reduction in signal dephasing in the proximity of the metal, as compared to analogous results stemming from the k-space encoded spin echo counterparts. The results in this study suggest that SPEN-based acquisition schemes carry the potential to overcome strong field inhomogeneities, of the kind that currently preclude high-field, high-resolution tissue characterizations in the neighborhood of metallic implants.

  18. Prefrontal-hippocampal-fusiform activity during encoding predicts intraindividual differences in free recall ability: an event-related functional-anatomic MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, B C; Miller, S L; Greve, D N; Dale, A M; Albert, M S; Schacter, D L; Sperling, R A

    2007-01-01

    The ability to spontaneously recall recently learned information is a fundamental mnemonic activity of daily life, but has received little study using functional neuroimaging. We developed a functional MRI (fMRI) paradigm to study regional brain activity during encoding that predicts free recall. In this event-related fMRI study, ten lists of fourteen pictures of common objects were shown to healthy young individuals and regional brain activity during encoding was analyzed based on subsequent free recall performance. Free recall of items was predicted by activity during encoding in hippocampal, fusiform, and inferior prefrontal cortical regions. Within-subject variance in free recall performance for the ten lists was predicted by a linear combination of condition-specific inferior prefrontal, hippocampal, and fusiform activity. Recall performance was better for lists in which prefrontal activity was greater for all items of the list and hippocampal and fusiform activity were greater specifically for items that were recalled from the list. Thus, the activity of medial temporal, fusiform, and prefrontal brain regions during the learning of new information is important for the subsequent free recall of this information. These fronto-temporal brain regions act together as a large-scale memory-related network, the components of which make distinct yet interacting contributions during encoding that predict subsequent successful free recall performance.

  19. Regularly incremented phase encoding - MR fingerprinting (RIPE-MRF) for enhanced motion artifact suppression in preclinical cartesian MR fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christian E; Wang, Charlie Y; Gu, Yuning; Darrah, Rebecca; Griswold, Mark A; Yu, Xin; Flask, Chris A

    2018-04-01

    The regularly incremented phase encoding-magnetic resonance fingerprinting (RIPE-MRF) method is introduced to limit the sensitivity of preclinical MRF assessments to pulsatile and respiratory motion artifacts. As compared to previously reported standard Cartesian-MRF methods (SC-MRF), the proposed RIPE-MRF method uses a modified Cartesian trajectory that varies the acquired phase-encoding line within each dynamic MRF dataset. Phantoms and mice were scanned without gating or triggering on a 7T preclinical MRI scanner using the RIPE-MRF and SC-MRF methods. In vitro phantom longitudinal relaxation time (T 1 ) and transverse relaxation time (T 2 ) measurements, as well as in vivo liver assessments of artifact-to-noise ratio (ANR) and MRF-based T 1 and T 2 mean and standard deviation, were compared between the two methods (n = 5). RIPE-MRF showed significant ANR reductions in regions of pulsatility (P Reson Med 79:2176-2182, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty MRI: impact of slice-encoding for metal artefact correction MRI on image quality, findings and therapy decision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agten, Christoph A.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Sutter, Reto [Balgrist University Hospital, Radiology Department, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Grande, Filippo del [Regional Hospital, Radiology, Lugano (Switzerland); Fucentese, Sandro F.; Blatter, Samuel [University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Balgrist University Hospital, Orthopedics, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate the impact of slice-encoding for metal artefact correction (SEMAC) on image quality, findings, and therapy decision in patients with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Forty-five painful UKAs were examined at 1.5T-MRI (STIR, proton-density(PD)-weighted sequence, each with SEMAC and high-bandwidth). Artefact size, image quality, anatomic depiction, and clinically relevant findings were compared between SEMAC and high-bandwidth (2 readers). In 30 patients, therapy decision was retrospectively assessed by two orthopaedic surgeons without MRI, with high-bandwidth-MRI, and with SEMAC-MRI. SEMAC reduced mean artefact size for STIR (11.8 cm{sup 2} vs. 37.7 cm{sup 2}) and PD (16.8 cm{sup 2} vs. 18.9 cm{sup 2}), p < 0.0005 for both comparisons. SEMAC showed more blurring than high-bandwidth, p < 0.0005. STIR-SEMAC revealed more bone marrow oedema (29 vs. 18 patients, p = 0.001, 30 vs. 13 patients, p < 0.0005, for reader 1 and 2 respectively). PD-SEMAC was worse in detecting meniscal lesions (6 missed, p = 0.031, 9 missed, p = 0.004, by reader 1 and 2 respectively) than PD-high-bandwidth. Revision-surgery was chosen in 12 and 11 patients without MRI (surgeon 1 and 2), with high-bandwidth-MRI in 15 and 14 patients, and with SEMAC-MRI in 19 and 14 patients. STIR-SEMAC was useful in detecting bone marrow oedema and influenced the orthopaedic surgeons' decisions towards surgery, while PD-SEMAC showed no clinical benefit. (orig.)

  1. Neurite density imaging versus imaging of microscopic anisotropy in diffusion MRI: A model comparison using spherical tensor encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampinen, Björn; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; Mårtensson, Johan; van Westen, Danielle; Sundgren, Pia C; Nilsson, Markus

    2017-02-15

    In diffusion MRI (dMRI), microscopic diffusion anisotropy can be obscured by orientation dispersion. Separation of these properties is of high importance, since it could allow dMRI to non-invasively probe elongated structures such as neurites (axons and dendrites). However, conventional dMRI, based on single diffusion encoding (SDE), entangles microscopic anisotropy and orientation dispersion with intra-voxel variance in isotropic diffusivity. SDE-based methods for estimating microscopic anisotropy, such as the neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) method, must thus rely on model assumptions to disentangle these features. An alternative approach is to directly quantify microscopic anisotropy by the use of variable shape of the b-tensor. Along those lines, we here present the 'constrained diffusional variance decomposition' (CODIVIDE) method, which jointly analyzes data acquired with diffusion encoding applied in a single direction at a time (linear tensor encoding, LTE) and in all directions (spherical tensor encoding, STE). We then contrast the two approaches by comparing neurite density estimated using NODDI with microscopic anisotropy estimated using CODIVIDE. Data were acquired in healthy volunteers and in glioma patients. NODDI and CODIVIDE differed the most in gray matter and in gliomas, where NODDI detected a neurite fraction higher than expected from the level of microscopic diffusion anisotropy found with CODIVIDE. The discrepancies could be explained by the NODDI tortuosity assumption, which enforces a connection between the neurite density and the mean diffusivity of tissue. Our results suggest that this assumption is invalid, which leads to a NODDI neurite density that is inconsistent between LTE and STE data. Using simulations, we demonstrate that the NODDI assumptions result in parameter bias that precludes the use of NODDI to map neurite density. With CODIVIDE, we found high levels of microscopic anisotropy in white matter

  2. Comparison of phase-constrained parallel MRI approaches: Analogies and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaimer, Martin; Heim, Marius; Neumann, Daniel; Jakob, Peter M; Kannengiesser, Stephan; Breuer, Felix A

    2016-03-01

    Phase-constrained parallel MRI approaches have the potential for significantly improving the image quality of accelerated MRI scans. The purpose of this study was to investigate the properties of two different phase-constrained parallel MRI formulations, namely the standard phase-constrained approach and the virtual conjugate coil (VCC) concept utilizing conjugate k-space symmetry. Both formulations were combined with image-domain algorithms (SENSE) and a mathematical analysis was performed. Furthermore, the VCC concept was combined with k-space algorithms (GRAPPA and ESPIRiT) for image reconstruction. In vivo experiments were conducted to illustrate analogies and differences between the individual methods. Furthermore, a simple method of improving the signal-to-noise ratio by modifying the sampling scheme was implemented. For SENSE, the VCC concept was mathematically equivalent to the standard phase-constrained formulation and therefore yielded identical results. In conjunction with k-space algorithms, the VCC concept provided more robust results when only a limited amount of calibration data were available. Additionally, VCC-GRAPPA reconstructed images provided spatial phase information with full resolution. Although both phase-constrained parallel MRI formulations are very similar conceptually, there exist important differences between image-domain and k-space domain reconstructions regarding the calibration robustness and the availability of high-resolution phase information. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. MR imaging of ore for heap bioleaching studies using pure phase encode acquisition methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Marijke A.; Sederman, Andrew J.; Johns, Michael L.

    2012-03-01

    Various MRI techniques were considered with respect to imaging of aqueous flow fields in low grade copper ore. Spin echo frequency encoded techniques were shown to produce unacceptable image distortions which led to pure phase encoded techniques being considered. Single point imaging multiple point acquisition (SPI-MPA) and spin echo single point imaging (SESPI) techniques were applied. By direct comparison with X-ray tomographic images, both techniques were found to be able to produce distortion-free images of the ore packings at 2 T. The signal to noise ratios (SNRs) of the SESPI images were found to be superior to SPI-MPA for equal total acquisition times; this was explained based on NMR relaxation measurements. SESPI was also found to produce suitable images for a range of particles sizes, whereas SPI-MPA SNR deteriorated markedly as particles size was reduced. Comparisons on a 4.7 T magnet showed significant signal loss from the SPI-MPA images, the effect of which was accentuated in the case of unsaturated flowing systems. Hence it was concluded that SESPI was the most robust imaging method for the study of copper ore heap leaching hydrology.

  4. Event-Related fMRI Studies of Episodic Encoding and Retrieval: Meta-Analyses Using Activation Likelihood Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniol, Julia; Davidson, Patrick S. R.; Kim, Alice S. N.; Han, Hua; Moscovitch, Morris; Grady, Cheryl L.

    2009-01-01

    The recent surge in event-related fMRI studies of episodic memory has generated a wealth of information about the neural correlates of encoding and retrieval processes. However, interpretation of individual studies is hampered by methodological differences, and by the fact that sample sizes are typically small. We submitted results from studies of…

  5. Glucose administration enhances fMRI brain activation and connectivity related to episodic memory encoding for neutral and emotional stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Marise B; Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L; Ryan, John P; Wilson, Jennifer S; Harenski, Carla; Hamann, Stephan

    2011-04-01

    Glucose enhances memory in a variety of species. In humans, glucose administration enhances episodic memory encoding, although little is known regarding the neural mechanisms underlying these effects. Here we examined whether elevating blood glucose would enhance functional MRI (fMRI) activation and connectivity in brain regions associated with episodic memory encoding and whether these effects would differ depending on the emotional valence of the material. We used a double-blind, within-participants, crossover design in which either glucose (50g) or a saccharin placebo were administered before scanning, on days approximately 1 week apart. We scanned healthy young male participants with fMRI as they viewed emotionally arousing negative pictures and emotionally neutral pictures, intermixed with baseline fixation. Free recall was tested at 5 min after scanning and again after 1 day. Glucose administration increased activation in brain regions associated with successful episodic memory encoding. Glucose also enhanced activation in regions whose activity was correlated with subsequent successful recall, including the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, and other regions, and these effects differed for negative vs. neutral stimuli. Finally, glucose substantially increased functional connectivity between the hippocampus and amygdala and a network of regions previously implicated in successful episodic memory encoding. These findings fit with evidence from nonhuman animals indicating glucose modulates memory by selectively enhancing neural activity in brain regions engaged during memory tasks. Our results highlight the modulatory effects of glucose and the importance of examining both regional changes in activity and functional connectivity to fully characterize the effects of glucose on brain function and memory. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Phase modulated high density collinear holographic data storage system with phase-retrieval reference beam locking and orthogonal reference encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinpeng; Horimai, Hideyoshi; Lin, Xiao; Huang, Yong; Tan, Xiaodi

    2018-02-19

    A novel phase modulation method for holographic data storage with phase-retrieval reference beam locking is proposed and incorporated into an amplitude-encoding collinear holographic storage system. Unlike the conventional phase retrieval method, the proposed method locks the data page and the corresponding phase-retrieval interference beam together at the same location with a sequential recording process, which eliminates piezoelectric elements, phase shift arrays and extra interference beams, making the system more compact and phase retrieval easier. To evaluate our proposed phase modulation method, we recorded and then recovered data pages with multilevel phase modulation using two spatial light modulators experimentally. For 4-level, 8-level, and 16-level phase modulation, we achieved the bit error rate (BER) of 0.3%, 1.5% and 6.6% respectively. To further improve data storage density, an orthogonal reference encoding multiplexing method at the same position of medium is also proposed and validated experimentally. We increased the code rate of pure 3/16 amplitude encoding method from 0.5 up to 1.0 and 1.5 using 4-level and 8-level phase modulation respectively.

  7. Key management of the double random-phase-encoding method using public-key encryption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Nirmala; Sinha, Aloka

    2010-03-01

    Public-key encryption has been used to encode the key of the encryption process. In the proposed technique, an input image has been encrypted by using the double random-phase-encoding method using extended fractional Fourier transform. The key of the encryption process have been encoded by using the Rivest-Shamir-Adelman (RSA) public-key encryption algorithm. The encoded key has then been transmitted to the receiver side along with the encrypted image. In the decryption process, first the encoded key has been decrypted using the secret key and then the encrypted image has been decrypted by using the retrieved key parameters. The proposed technique has advantage over double random-phase-encoding method because the problem associated with the transmission of the key has been eliminated by using public-key encryption. Computer simulation has been carried out to validate the proposed technique.

  8. Single-shot spiral imaging enabled by an expanded encoding model: Demonstration in diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilm, Bertram J; Barmet, Christoph; Gross, Simon; Kasper, Lars; Vannesjo, S Johanna; Haeberlin, Max; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Brunner, David O; Schmid, Thomas; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve the quality of single-shot spiral MRI and demonstrate its application for diffusion-weighted imaging. Image formation is based on an expanded encoding model that accounts for dynamic magnetic fields up to third order in space, nonuniform static B 0 , and coil sensitivity encoding. The encoding model is determined by B 0 mapping, sensitivity mapping, and concurrent field monitoring. Reconstruction is performed by iterative inversion of the expanded signal equations. Diffusion-tensor imaging with single-shot spiral readouts is performed in a phantom and in vivo, using a clinical 3T instrument. Image quality is assessed in terms of artefact levels, image congruence, and the influence of the different encoding factors. Using the full encoding model, diffusion-weighted single-shot spiral imaging of high quality is accomplished both in vitro and in vivo. Accounting for actual field dynamics, including higher orders, is found to be critical to suppress blurring, aliasing, and distortion. Enhanced image congruence permitted data fusion and diffusion tensor analysis without coregistration. Use of an expanded signal model largely overcomes the traditional vulnerability of spiral imaging with long readouts. It renders single-shot spirals competitive with echo-planar readouts and thus deploys shorter echo times and superior readout efficiency for diffusion imaging and further prospective applications. Magn Reson Med 77:83-91, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Measurement of pulsatile motion with millisecond resolution by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souchon, Rémi; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Salomir, Rares; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    We investigated a technique based on phase-contrast cine MRI combined with deconvolution of the phase shift waveforms to measure rapidly varying pulsatile motion waveforms. The technique does not require steady-state displacement during motion encoding. Simulations and experiments were performed in porcine liver samples in view of a specific application, namely the observation of transient displacements induced by acoustic radiation force. Simulations illustrate the advantages and shortcomings of the methods. For experimental validation, the waveforms were acquired with an ultrafast ultrasound scanner (Supersonic Imagine Aixplorer), and the rates of decay of the waveforms (relaxation time) were compared. With bipolar motion-encoding gradient of 8.4 ms, the method was able to measure displacement waveforms with a temporal resolution of 1 ms over a time course of 40 ms. Reasonable agreement was found between the rate of decay of the waveforms measured in ultrasound (2.8 ms) and in MRI (2.7-3.3 ms). Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Posterior parietal cortex and episodic encoding: insights from fMRI subsequent memory effects and dual-attention theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncapher, Melina R; Wagner, Anthony D

    2009-02-01

    The formation of episodic memories--memories for life events--is affected by attention during event processing. A leading neurobiological model of attention posits two separate yet interacting systems that depend on distinct regions in lateral posterior parietal cortex (PPC). From this dual-attention perspective, dorsal PPC is thought to support the goal-directed allocation of attention, whereas ventral PPC is thought to support reflexive orienting to information that automatically captures attention. To advance understanding of how parietal mechanisms may impact event encoding, we review functional MRI studies that document the relationship between lateral PPC activation during encoding and subsequent memory performance (e.g., later remembering or forgetting). This review reveals that (a) encoding-related activity is frequently observed in human lateral PPC, (b) increased activation in dorsal PPC is associated with later memory success, and (c) increased activation in ventral PPC predominantly correlates with later memory failure. From a dual-attention perspective, these findings suggest that allocating goal-directed attention during event processing increases the probability that the event will be remembered later, whereas the capture of reflexive attention during event processing may have negative consequences for event encoding. The prevalence of encoding-related activation in parietal cortex suggests that neurobiological models of episodic memory should consider how parietal-mediated attentional mechanisms regulate encoding.

  11. Security enhancement of double random phase encoding using rear-mounted phase masking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junxin; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jinchang; Zhang, Li-bo

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a security enhancement for double random phase encoding (DRPE) by introducing a rear-mounted phase masking procedure is presented. Based on exhaustively studying the cryptanalysis achievements of DRPE and its variants, invalidation of the second lens, which plays a critical role in cryptanalyzing processes, is concluded. The improved system can exploit the security potential of the second lens and consequently strengthen the security of DRPE. Experimental results and security analyses are presented in detail to demonstrate the security potential of the proposed cryptosystem.

  12. Efficient Text Encryption and Hiding with Double-Random Phase-Encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad S. Alam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a double-random phase-encoding technique-based text encryption and hiding method is proposed. First, the secret text is transformed into a 2-dimensional array and the higher bits of the elements in the transformed array are used to store the bit stream of the secret text, while the lower bits are filled with specific values. Then, the transformed array is encoded with double-random phase-encoding technique. Finally, the encoded array is superimposed on an expanded host image to obtain the image embedded with hidden data. The performance of the proposed technique, including the hiding capacity, the recovery accuracy of the secret text, and the quality of the image embedded with hidden data, is tested via analytical modeling and test data stream. Experimental results show that the secret text can be recovered either accurately or almost accurately, while maintaining the quality of the host image embedded with hidden data by properly selecting the method of transforming the secret text into an array and the superimposition coefficient. By using optical information processing techniques, the proposed method has been found to significantly improve the security of text information transmission, while ensuring hiding capacity at a prescribed level.

  13. Semantic encoding and retrieval in the left inferior prefrontal cortex: a functional MRI study of task difficulty and process specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demb, J B; Desmond, J E; Wagner, A D; Vaidya, C J; Glover, G H; Gabrieli, J D

    1995-09-01

    Prefrontal cortical function was examined during semantic encoding and repetition priming using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a noninvasive technique for localizing regional changes in blood oxygenation, a correlate of neural activity. Words studied in a semantic (deep) encoding condition were better remembered than words studied in both easier and more difficult nonsemantic (shallow) encoding conditions, with difficulty indexed by response time. The left inferior prefrontal cortex (LIPC) (Brodmann's areas 45, 46, 47) showed increased activation during semantic encoding relative to nonsemantic encoding regardless of the relative difficulty of the nonsemantic encoding task. Therefore, LIPC activation appears to be related to semantic encoding and not task difficulty. Semantic encoding decisions are performed faster the second time words are presented. This represents semantic repetition priming, a facilitation in semantic processing for previously encoded words that is not dependent on intentional recollection. The same LIPC area activated during semantic encoding showed decreased activation during repeated semantic encoding relative to initial semantic encoding of the same words. This decrease in activation during repeated encoding was process specific; it occurred when words were semantically reprocessed but not when words were nonsemantically reprocessed. The results were apparent in both individual and averaged functional maps. These findings suggest that the LIPC is part of a semantic executive system that contributes to the on-line retrieval of semantic information.

  14. Posterior Parietal Cortex and Episodic Encoding: Insights from fMRI Subsequent Memory Effects and Dual Attention Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncapher, Melina; Wagner, Anthony D.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of episodic memories –– memories for life events –– is affected by attention during event processing. A leading neurobiological model of attention posits two separate yet interacting systems that depend on distinct regions in lateral posterior parietal cortex (PPC). From this dual-attention perspective, dorsal PPC is thought to support the goal-directed allocation of attention, whereas ventral PPC is thought to support reflexive orienting to information that automatically captures attention. To advance understanding of how parietal mechanisms may impact event encoding, we review functional MRI studies that document the relationship between lateral PPC activation during encoding and subsequent memory performance (e.g., later remembering or forgetting). This review reveals that (a) encoding-related activity is frequently observed in human lateral PPC, (b) increased activation in dorsal PPC is associated with later memory success, and (c) increased activation in ventral PPC predominantly correlates with later memory failure. From a dual-attention perspective, these findings suggest that allocating goal-directed attention during event processing increases the probability that the event will be remembered later, whereas the capture of reflexive attention during event processing may have negative consequences for event encoding. The prevalence of encoding-related activation in parietal cortex suggests that neurobiological models of episodic memory should consider how parietal-mediated attentional mechanisms regulate encoding. PMID:19028591

  15. Changes in the modulation of brain activity during context encoding vs. context retrieval across the adult lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankudowich, E; Pasvanis, S; Rajah, M N

    2016-10-01

    Age-related deficits in context memory may arise from neural changes underlying both encoding and retrieval of context information. Although age-related functional changes in the brain regions supporting context memory begin at midlife, little is known about the functional changes with age that support context memory encoding and retrieval across the adult lifespan. We investigated how age-related functional changes support context memory across the adult lifespan by assessing linear changes with age during successful context encoding and retrieval. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we compared young, middle-aged and older adults during both encoding and retrieval of spatial and temporal details of faces. Multivariate behavioral partial least squares (B-PLS) analysis of fMRI data identified a pattern of whole-brain activity that correlated with a linear age term and a pattern of whole-brain activity that was associated with an age-by-memory phase (encoding vs. retrieval) interaction. Further investigation of this latter effect identified three main findings: 1) reduced phase-related modulation in bilateral fusiform gyrus, left superior/anterior frontal gyrus and right inferior frontal gyrus that started at midlife and continued to older age, 2) reduced phase-related modulation in bilateral inferior parietal lobule that occurred only in older age, and 3) changes in phase-related modulation in older but not younger adults in left middle frontal gyrus and bilateral parahippocampal gyrus that was indicative of age-related over-recruitment. We conclude that age-related reductions in context memory arise in midlife and are related to changes in perceptual recollection and changes in fronto-parietal retrieval monitoring. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Diffusion weighted MRI by spatiotemporal encoding: Analytical description and in vivo validations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Eddy; Shemesh, Noam; Frydman, Lucio

    2013-07-01

    Diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI is a powerful modality for studying microstructure in normal and pathological tissues. The accuracy derived from DW MRI depends on the acquisition of quality images, and on a precise assessment of the b-values involved. Conventional DW MRI tends to be of limited use in regions suffering from large magnetic field or chemical shift heterogeneities, which severely distort the MR images. In this study we propose novel sequences based on SPatio-temporal ENcoding (SPEN), which overcome such shortcomings owing to SPEN's inherent robustness to offsets. SPEN, however, relies on the simultaneous application of gradients and radiofrequency-swept pulses, which may impart different diffusion weightings along the spatial axes. These will be further complicated in DW measurements by the diffusion-sensitizing gradients, and will in general lead to complex, spatially-dependent b-values. This study presents a formalism for analyzing these diffusion-weighted SPEN (dSPEN) data, which takes into account the concomitant effects of adiabatic pulses, of the imaging as well as diffusion gradients, and of the cross-terms between them. These analytical b-values derivations are subject to experimental validations in phantom systems and ex vivo spinal cords. Excellent agreement is found between the theoretical predictions and these dSPEN experiments. The ensuing methodology is then demonstrated by in vivo mapping of diffusion in human breast - organs where conventional k-space DW acquisition methods are challenged by both field and chemical shift heterogeneities. These studies demonstrate the increased robustness of dSPEN vis-à-vis comparable DW echo planar imaging, and demonstrate the value of this new methodology for medium- or high-field diffusion measurements in heterogeneous systems.

  17. Encoding plaintext by Fourier transform hologram in double random phase encoding using fingerprint keys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Masafumi; Nakano, Kazuya; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2012-09-01

    It has been shown that biometric information can be used as a cipher key for binary data encryption by applying double random phase encoding. In such methods, binary data are encoded in a bit pattern image, and the decrypted image becomes a plain image when the key is genuine; otherwise, decrypted images become random images. In some cases, images decrypted by imposters may not be fully random, such that the blurred bit pattern can be partially observed. In this paper, we propose a novel bit coding method based on a Fourier transform hologram, which makes images decrypted by imposters more random. Computer experiments confirm that the method increases the randomness of images decrypted by imposters while keeping the false rejection rate as low as in the conventional method.

  18. Encoding plaintext by Fourier transform hologram in double random phase encoding using fingerprint keys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Masafumi; Nakano, Kazuya; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that biometric information can be used as a cipher key for binary data encryption by applying double random phase encoding. In such methods, binary data are encoded in a bit pattern image, and the decrypted image becomes a plain image when the key is genuine; otherwise, decrypted images become random images. In some cases, images decrypted by imposters may not be fully random, such that the blurred bit pattern can be partially observed. In this paper, we propose a novel bit coding method based on a Fourier transform hologram, which makes images decrypted by imposters more random. Computer experiments confirm that the method increases the randomness of images decrypted by imposters while keeping the false rejection rate as low as in the conventional method. (paper)

  19. Estimating Accurate Target Coordinates with Magnetic Resonance Images by Using Multiple Phase-Encoding Directions during Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minsoo; Jung, Na Young; Park, Chang Kyu; Chang, Won Seok; Jung, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jin Woo

    2018-06-01

    Stereotactic procedures are image guided, often using magnetic resonance (MR) images limited by image distortion, which may influence targets for stereotactic procedures. The aim of this work was to assess methods of identifying target coordinates for stereotactic procedures with MR in multiple phase-encoding directions. In 30 patients undergoing deep brain stimulation, we acquired 5 image sets: stereotactic brain computed tomography (CT), T2-weighted images (T2WI), and T1WI in both right-to-left (RL) and anterior-to-posterior (AP) phase-encoding directions. Using CT coordinates as a reference, we analyzed anterior commissure and posterior commissure coordinates to identify any distortion relating to phase-encoding direction. Compared with CT coordinates, RL-directed images had more positive x-axis values (0.51 mm in T1WI, 0.58 mm in T2WI). AP-directed images had more negative y-axis values (0.44 mm in T1WI, 0.59 mm in T2WI). We adopted 2 methods to predict CT coordinates with MR image sets: parallel translation and selective choice of axes according to phase-encoding direction. Both were equally effective at predicting CT coordinates using only MR; however, the latter may be easier to use in clinical settings. Acquiring MR in multiple phase-encoding directions and selecting axes according to the phase-encoding direction allows identification of more accurate coordinates for stereotactic procedures. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. 3D Multisource Full‐Waveform Inversion using Dynamic Random Phase Encoding

    KAUST Repository

    Boonyasiriwat, Chaiwoot

    2010-10-17

    We have developed a multisource full‐waveform inversion algorithm using a dynamic phase encoding strategy with dual‐randomization—both the position and polarity of simultaneous sources are randomized and changed every iteration. The dynamic dual‐randomization is used to promote the destructive interference of crosstalk noise resulting from blending a large number of common shot gathers into a supergather. We compare our multisource algorithm with various algorithms in a numerical experiment using the 3D SEG/EAGE overthrust model and show that our algorithm provides a higher‐quality velocity tomogram than the other methods that use only monorandomization. This suggests that increasing the degree of randomness in phase encoding should improve the quality of the inversion result.

  1. Advanced flow MRI: emerging techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markl, M.; Schnell, S.; Wu, C.; Bollache, E.; Jarvis, K.; Barker, A.J.; Robinson, J.D.; Rigsby, C.K.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide non-invasive and non-ionising methods for the highly accurate anatomical depiction of the heart and vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. In addition, the intrinsic sensitivity of MRI to motion offers the unique ability to acquire spatially registered blood flow simultaneously with the morphological data, within a single measurement. In clinical routine, flow MRI is typically accomplished using methods that resolve two spatial dimensions in individual planes and encode the time-resolved velocity in one principal direction, typically oriented perpendicular to the two-dimensional (2D) section. This review describes recently developed advanced MRI flow techniques, which allow for more comprehensive evaluation of blood flow characteristics, such as real-time flow imaging, 2D multiple-venc phase contrast MRI, four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, quantification of complex haemodynamic properties, and highly accelerated flow imaging. Emerging techniques and novel applications are explored. In addition, applications of these new techniques for the improved evaluation of cardiovascular (aorta, pulmonary arteries, congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation, coronary arteries) as well as cerebrovascular disease (intra-cranial arteries and veins) are presented.

  2. Optical image transformation and encryption by phase-retrieval-based double random-phase encoding and compressive ghost imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sheng; Yang, Yangrui; Liu, Xuemei; Zhou, Xin; Wei, Zhenzhuo

    2018-01-01

    An optical image transformation and encryption scheme is proposed based on double random-phase encoding (DRPE) and compressive ghost imaging (CGI) techniques. In this scheme, a secret image is first transformed into a binary image with the phase-retrieval-based DRPE technique, and then encoded by a series of random amplitude patterns according to the ghost imaging (GI) principle. Compressive sensing, corrosion and expansion operations are implemented to retrieve the secret image in the decryption process. This encryption scheme takes the advantage of complementary capabilities offered by the phase-retrieval-based DRPE and GI-based encryption techniques. That is the phase-retrieval-based DRPE is used to overcome the blurring defect of the decrypted image in the GI-based encryption, and the CGI not only reduces the data amount of the ciphertext, but also enhances the security of DRPE. Computer simulation results are presented to verify the performance of the proposed encryption scheme.

  3. A novel attack method about double-random-phase-encoding-based image hiding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hongsheng; Xiao, Zhijun; Zhu, Xianchen

    2018-03-01

    By using optical image processing techniques, a novel text encryption and hiding method applied by double-random phase-encoding technique is proposed in the paper. The first step is that the secret message is transformed into a 2-dimension array. The higher bits of the elements in the array are used to fill with the bit stream of the secret text, while the lower bits are stored specific values. Then, the transformed array is encoded by double random phase encoding technique. Last, the encoded array is embedded on a public host image to obtain the image embedded with hidden text. The performance of the proposed technique is tested via analytical modeling and test data stream. Experimental results show that the secret text can be recovered either accurately or almost accurately, while maintaining the quality of the host image embedded with hidden data by properly selecting the method of transforming the secret text into an array and the superimposition coefficient.

  4. Stable and efficient retrospective 4D-MRI using non-uniformly distributed quasi-random numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Kathrin; Meyer, Cord B.; Breuer, Felix A.; Richter, Anne; Exner, Florian; Weng, Andreas M.; Ströhle, Serge; Polat, Bülent; Jakob, Peter M.; Sauer, Otto A.; Flentje, Michael; Weick, Stefan

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this work is the development of a robust and reliable three-dimensional (3D) Cartesian imaging technique for fast and flexible retrospective 4D abdominal MRI during free breathing. To this end, a non-uniform quasi random (NU-QR) reordering of the phase encoding (k y –k z ) lines was incorporated into 3D Cartesian acquisition. The proposed sampling scheme allocates more phase encoding points near the k-space origin while reducing the sampling density in the outer part of the k-space. Respiratory self-gating in combination with SPIRiT-reconstruction is used for the reconstruction of abdominal data sets in different respiratory phases (4D-MRI). Six volunteers and three patients were examined at 1.5 T during free breathing. Additionally, data sets with conventional two-dimensional (2D) linear and 2D quasi random phase encoding order were acquired for the volunteers for comparison. A quantitative evaluation of image quality versus scan times (from 70 s to 626 s) for the given sampling schemes was obtained by calculating the normalized mutual information (NMI) for all volunteers. Motion estimation was accomplished by calculating the maximum derivative of a signal intensity profile of a transition (e.g. tumor or diaphragm). The 2D non-uniform quasi-random distribution of phase encoding lines in Cartesian 3D MRI yields more efficient undersampling patterns for parallel imaging compared to conventional uniform quasi-random and linear sampling. Median NMI values of NU-QR sampling are the highest for all scan times. Therefore, within the same scan time 4D imaging could be performed with improved image quality. The proposed method allows for the reconstruction of motion artifact reduced 4D data sets with isotropic spatial resolution of 2.1  ×  2.1  ×  2.1 mm3 in a short scan time, e.g. 10 respiratory phases in only 3 min. Cranio-caudal tumor displacements between 23 and 46 mm could be observed. NU-QR sampling enables for stable 4D-MRI

  5. Alpha desynchronization and fronto­parietal connectivity during spatial working memory encoding deficits in ADHD: A simultaneous EEG­fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agatha Lenartowicz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The underlying mechanisms of alpha band (8–12 Hz neural oscillations are of importance to the functioning of attention control systems as well as to neuropsychiatric conditions that are characterized by deficits of that system, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. The objectives of the present study were to test if visual encoding-related alpha event-related desynchronization (ERD correlates with fronto-parieto-occipital connectivity, and whether this is disrupted in ADHD during spatial working memory (SWM performance. We acquired EEG concurrently with fMRI in thirty boys (12–16 yrs. old, 15 with ADHD, during SWM encoding. Psychophysiological connectivity analyses indicated that alpha ERD during SWM encoding was associated with both occipital activation and fronto-parieto-occipital functional connectivity, a finding that expands on prior associations between alpha ERD and occipital activation. This finding provides novel support for the interpretation of alpha ERD (and the associated changes in occipital activation as a phenomenon that involves, and perhaps arises as a result of, top-down network interactions. Alpha ERD was associated less strongly with occipital activity, but associated more strongly with fronto-parieto-occipital connectivity in ADHD, consistent with a compensatory attentional response. Additionally, we illustrate that degradation of EEG data quality by MRI-amplified motion artifacts is robust to existing cleaning algorithms and is significantly correlated with hyperactivity symptoms and the ADHD Combined Type diagnosis. We conclude that persistent motion-related MR artifacts in EEG data can increase variance and introduce bias in interpretation of group differences in populations characterized by hypermobility — a clear limitation of current-state EEG-fMRI methodology.

  6. Strain-encoded cardiac MRI as an adjunct for dobutamine stress testing: incremental value to conventional wall motion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosoglou, Grigorios; Lossnitzer, Dirk; Schellberg, Dieter; Lewien, Antje; Wochele, Angela; Schaeufele, Tim; Neizel, Mirja; Steen, Henning; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Katus, Hugo A; Osman, Nael F

    2009-03-01

    High-dose dobutamine stress MRI is safe and feasible for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) in humans. However, the assessment of cine scans relies on the visual interpretation of regional wall motion, which is subjective. Recently, strain-encoded MRI (SENC) has been proposed for the direct color-coded visualization of myocardial strain. The purpose of our study was to compare the diagnostic value of SENC with that provided by conventional wall motion analysis for the detection of inducible ischemia during dobutamine stress MRI. Stress-induced ischemia was assessed by wall motion analysis and by SENC in 101 patients with suspected or known CAD and in 17 healthy volunteers who underwent dobutamine stress MRI in a clinical 1.5-T scanner. Quantitative coronary angiography deemed as the standard reference for the presence or absence of significant CAD (> or =50% diameter stenosis). On a coronary vessel level, SENC detected inducible ischemia in 86 of 101 versus 71 of 101 diseased coronary vessels (P or =50% stenosis (area under the curve, 0.96; SE, 0.01; 95% CI, 0.94 to 0.98; P<0.001). The direct color-coded visualization of strain on MR images is a useful adjunct for dobutamine stress MRI, which provides incremental value for the detection of CAD compared with conventional wall motion readings on cine images.

  7. Screening for skeletal metastases of the spine and pelvis: gradient echo opposed-phase MRI compared with bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, K.; Hosten, N.; Venz, S.

    1995-01-01

    Opposed-phase gradient echo (GRE) MRI at 0.5 T was compared with T1-weighted GRE MRI and bone scintigraphy regarding the detection of malignant bone marrow infiltrates of the spine and pelvis. Seventeen control patients and 41 patients with suspected skeletal metastases were studied with plain and gadolinium-enhanced MRI. In the control group only a vertebral haemangioma showed contrast enhancement, while all metastases (confirmed histologically or by follow-up) were enhancing. Opposed-phase surface coil MRI showed a significantly higher contrast-to-noise ratio of 56 metastases than T1-weighted images. In 28 patients body coil opposed-phase MRI detected more metastatic foci of the spine and pelvis than did bone scintigraphy (84 vs 56). No scintigraphically visualised lesion was missed by MRI. In conclusion, body coil gadolinium-enhanced opposed-phase GRE MRI may be applied as a screening method for skeletal metastases of the spine and pelvis at intermediate field strengths. (orig.)

  8. Screening for skeletal metastases of the spine and pelvis: gradient echo opposed-phase MRI compared with bone scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, K. [Zentralinstitut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Gesamthochschule Essen (Germany); Hosten, N. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany); Venz, S. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    1995-11-01

    Opposed-phase gradient echo (GRE) MRI at 0.5 T was compared with T1-weighted GRE MRI and bone scintigraphy regarding the detection of malignant bone marrow infiltrates of the spine and pelvis. Seventeen control patients and 41 patients with suspected skeletal metastases were studied with plain and gadolinium-enhanced MRI. In the control group only a vertebral haemangioma showed contrast enhancement, while all metastases (confirmed histologically or by follow-up) were enhancing. Opposed-phase surface coil MRI showed a significantly higher contrast-to-noise ratio of 56 metastases than T1-weighted images. In 28 patients body coil opposed-phase MRI detected more metastatic foci of the spine and pelvis than did bone scintigraphy (84 vs 56). No scintigraphically visualised lesion was missed by MRI. In conclusion, body coil gadolinium-enhanced opposed-phase GRE MRI may be applied as a screening method for skeletal metastases of the spine and pelvis at intermediate field strengths. (orig.)

  9. 3D Multisource Full‐Waveform Inversion using Dynamic Random Phase Encoding

    KAUST Repository

    Boonyasiriwat, Chaiwoot; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a multisource full‐waveform inversion algorithm using a dynamic phase encoding strategy with dual‐randomization—both the position and polarity of simultaneous sources are randomized and changed every iteration. The dynamic dual

  10. Synthesis and nanoscale thermal encoding of phase-change nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xuhui; Yu Bin; Meyyappan, M.

    2007-01-01

    Low-dimensional phase-change nanostructures provide a valuable research platform for understanding the phase-transition behavior and thermal properties at nanoscale and their potential in achieving superdense data storage. Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 nanowires have been grown using a vapor-liquid-solid technique and shown to exhibit distinctive properties that may overcome the present data storage scaling barrier. Local heating of an individual nanowire with a focused electron beam was used to shape a nano-bar-code on a Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 nanowire. The data encoding on Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 nanowire may promote novel device concepts to implement ultrahigh density, low energy, high speed data storage using phase-change nanomaterials with diverse thermal-programing strategies

  11. Spectral phase encoding of ultra-short optical pulse in time domain for OCDMA application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Wada, Naoya

    2007-06-11

    We propose a novel reconfigurable time domain spectral phase encoding (SPE) scheme for coherent optical code-division-multiple-access application. In the proposed scheme, the ultra-short optical pulse is stretched by dispersive device and the SPE is done in time domain using high speed phase modulator. The time domain SPE scheme is robust to wavelength drift of the light source and is very flexible and compatible with the fiber optical system. Proof-of-principle experiments of encoding with 16-chip, 20 GHz/chip binary-phase-shift-keying codes and 1.25 Gbps data transmission have been successfully demonstrated together with an arrayed-wave-guide decoder.

  12. Encoding and retrieval of landmark-related spatial cues during navigation: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegman, Joost; Tyborowska, Anna; Janzen, Gabriele

    2014-07-01

    To successfully navigate, humans can use different cues from their surroundings. Learning locations in an environment can be supported by parallel subsystems in the hippocampus and the striatum. We used fMRI to look at differences in the use of object-related spatial cues while 47 participants actively navigated in an open-field virtual environment. In each trial, participants navigated toward a target object. During encoding, three positional cues (columns) with directional cues (shadows) were available. During retrieval, the removed target had to be replaced while either two objects without shadows (objects trial) or one object with a shadow (shadow trial) were available. Participants were informed in blocks about which type of retrieval trial was most likely to occur, thereby modulating expectations of having to rely on a single landmark or on a configuration of landmarks. How the spatial learning systems in the hippocampus and caudate nucleus were involved in these landmark-based encoding and retrieval processes were investigated. Landmark configurations can create a geometry similar to boundaries in an environment. It was found that the hippocampus was involved in encoding when relying on configurations of landmarks, whereas the caudate nucleus was involved in encoding when relying on single landmarks. This might suggest that the observed hippocampal activation for configurations of objects is linked to a spatial representation observed with environmental boundaries. Retrieval based on configurations of landmarks activated regions associated with the spatial updation of object locations for reorientation. When only a single landmark was available during retrieval, regions associated with updating the location of oneself were activated. There was also evidence that good between-participant performance was predicted by right hippocampal activation. This study therefore sheds light on how the brain deals with changing demands on spatial processing related purely

  13. Fiber Bragg grating for spectral phase optical code-division multiple-access encoding and decoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaohui; Wang, Dong-Ning; Li, Shichen

    2003-08-01

    A new method for realizing spectral phase optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) coding based on step chirped fiber Bragg gratings (SCFBGs) is proposed and the corresponding encoder/decoder is presented. With this method, a mapping code is introduced for the m-sequence address code and the phase shift can be inserted into the subgratings of the SCFBG according to the mapping code. The transfer matrix method together with Fourier transform is used to investigate the characteristics of the encoder/decoder. The factors that influence the correlation property of the encoder/decoder, including index modulation and bandwidth of the subgrating, are identified. The system structure is simple and good correlation output can be obtained. The performance of the OCDMA system based on SCFBGs has been analyzed.

  14. Phase reconstruction from velocity-encoded MRI measurements – A survey of sparsity-promoting variational approaches

    KAUST Repository

    Benning, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been significant developments in the reconstruction of magnetic resonance velocity images from sub-sampled k-space data. While showing a strong improvement in reconstruction quality compared to classical approaches, the vast number of different methods, and the challenges in setting them up, often leaves the user with the difficult task of choosing the correct approach, or more importantly, not selecting a poor approach. In this paper, we survey variational approaches for the reconstruction of phase-encoded magnetic resonance velocity images from sub-sampled k-space data. We are particularly interested in regularisers that correctly treat both smooth and geometric features of the image. These features are common to velocity imaging, where the flow field will be smooth but interfaces between the fluid and surrounding material will be sharp, but are challenging to represent sparsely. As an example we demonstrate the variational approaches on velocity imaging of water flowing through a packed bed of solid particles. We evaluate Wavelet regularisation against Total Variation and the relatively recent second order Total Generalised Variation regularisation. We combine these regularisation schemes with a contrast enhancement approach called Bregman iteration. We verify for a variety of sampling patterns that Morozov\\'s discrepancy principle provides a good criterion for stopping the iterations. Therefore, given only the noise level, we present a robust guideline for setting up a variational reconstruction scheme for MR velocity imaging. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Identifying musical pieces from fMRI data using encoding and decoding models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefle, Sebastian; Engel, Annerose; Basilio, Rodrigo; Alluri, Vinoo; Toiviainen, Petri; Cagy, Maurício; Moll, Jorge

    2018-02-02

    Encoding models can reveal and decode neural representations in the visual and semantic domains. However, a thorough understanding of how distributed information in auditory cortices and temporal evolution of music contribute to model performance is still lacking in the musical domain. We measured fMRI responses during naturalistic music listening and constructed a two-stage approach that first mapped musical features in auditory cortices and then decoded novel musical pieces. We then probed the influence of stimuli duration (number of time points) and spatial extent (number of voxels) on decoding accuracy. Our approach revealed a linear increase in accuracy with duration and a point of optimal model performance for the spatial extent. We further showed that Shannon entropy is a driving factor, boosting accuracy up to 95% for music with highest information content. These findings provide key insights for future decoding and reconstruction algorithms and open new venues for possible clinical applications.

  16. Inter-subject phase synchronization for exploratory analysis of task-fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Taylor; Nomi, Jason S; Vij, Shruti G; Chang, Catie; Uddin, Lucina Q

    2018-08-01

    Analysis of task-based fMRI data is conventionally carried out using a hypothesis-driven approach, where blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) time courses are correlated with a hypothesized temporal structure. In some experimental designs, this temporal structure can be difficult to define. In other cases, experimenters may wish to take a more exploratory, data-driven approach to detecting task-driven BOLD activity. In this study, we demonstrate the efficiency and power of an inter-subject synchronization approach for exploratory analysis of task-based fMRI data. Combining the tools of instantaneous phase synchronization and independent component analysis, we characterize whole-brain task-driven responses in terms of group-wise similarity in temporal signal dynamics of brain networks. We applied this framework to fMRI data collected during performance of a simple motor task and a social cognitive task. Analyses using an inter-subject phase synchronization approach revealed a large number of brain networks that dynamically synchronized to various features of the task, often not predicted by the hypothesized temporal structure of the task. We suggest that this methodological framework, along with readily available tools in the fMRI community, provides a powerful exploratory, data-driven approach for analysis of task-driven BOLD activity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Phase-encoded measurement device independent quantum key distribution without a shared reference frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo-Dan, Zhu; Shang-Hong, Zhao; Chen, Dong; Ying, Sun

    2018-07-01

    In this paper, a phase-encoded measurement device independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol without a shared reference frame is presented, which can generate secure keys between two parties while the quantum channel or interferometer introduces an unknown and slowly time-varying phase. The corresponding secret key rate and single photons bit error rate is analysed, respectively, with single photons source (SPS) and weak coherent source (WCS), taking finite-key analysis into account. The numerical simulations show that the modified phase-encoded MDI-QKD protocol has apparent superiority both in maximal secure transmission distance and key generation rate while possessing the improved robustness and practical security in the high-speed case. Moreover, the rejection of the frame-calibrating part will intrinsically reduce the consumption of resources as well as the potential security flaws of practical MDI-QKD systems.

  18. Combining Fourier phase encoding and broadband inversion toward J-edited spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yulan; Guan, Quanshuai; Su, Jianwei; Chen, Zhong

    2018-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are often utilized for gathering accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. In this study, we develop a homonuclear encoding approach based on imparting a discrete phase modulation of the targeted cross peaks, and combine it with a pure shift experiments (PSYCHE) based J-modulated scheme, providing simple 2D J-edited spectra for accurate measurement of scalar coupling networks. Chemical shifts and J coupling constants of protons coupled to the specific protons are demonstrated along the F2 and F1 dimensions, respectively. Polychromatic pulses by Fourier phase encoding were performed to simultaneously detect several coupling networks. Proton-proton scalar couplings are chosen by a polychromatic pulse and a PSYCHE element. Axis peaks and unwanted couplings are complete eradicated by incorporating a selective COSY block as a preparation period. The theoretical principles and the signal processing procedure are laid out, and experimental observations are rationalized on the basis of theoretical analyses.

  19. Diffusion-weighted MRI of the prostate at 3.0 T: comparison of endorectal coil (ERC) MRI and phased-array coil (PAC) MRI-The impact of SNR on ADC measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Yousef; Vargas, H Alberto; Nyman, Gregory; Shukla-Dave, Amita; Akin, Oguz; Hricak, Hedvig

    2013-10-01

    To compare ADC values measured from diffusion-weighted MR (DW-MR) images of the prostate obtained with both endorectal and phased-array coils (ERC+PAC) to those from DW-MRI images obtained with an eight-channel torso phased-array coil (PAC) at 3.0 T. The institutional review board issued a waiver of informed consent for this HIPAA-compliant study. Twenty-five patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer underwent standard 3-T MRI using 2 different coil arrangements (ERC+PAC and PAC only) in the same session. DW-MRI at five b-values (0, 600, 1000, 1200, and 1500 s/mm(2)) were acquired using both coil arrangements. On b=0 images, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were measured as the ratio of the mean signal from PZ and TZ ROIs to the standard deviation from the mean signal in an artifact-free ROI in the rectum. Matching regions-of-interest (ROIs) were identified in the peripheral zone and transition zone on ERC-MRI and PAC-MRI. For each ROI, mean ADC values for all zero and non-zero b-value combinations were computed. Mean SNR with ERC-MRI at PZ (66.33 ± 27.07) and TZ (32.69 ± 12.52) was 9.27 and 5.52 times higher than with PAC-MRI ((7.32 ± 2.30) and (6.13 ± 1.56), respectively) (PERC-MRI (PERC. To address these requirements, clinical MR systems should have image processing capabilities which incorporate the noise distribution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Polarization states encoded by phase modulation for high bit rate quantum key distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaobao; Tang Zhilie; Liao Changjun; Lu Yiqun; Zhao Feng; Liu Songhao

    2006-01-01

    We present implementation of quantum cryptography with polarization code by wave-guide type phase modulator. At four different low input voltages of the phase modulator, coder encodes pulses into four different polarization states, 45 o , 135 o linearly polarized or right, left circle polarized, while the decoder serves as the complementary polarizers

  1. Assessment of left ventricular hemodynamics by Gd-DTPA enhanced high speed cine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Kentaro; Nakase, Emiko; Kawai, Ichiro

    1992-01-01

    To assess the validity of Gd-DTPA enhanced high speed cine MRI in left ventricular (LV) volumes and ejection fraction (EF), high speed cine MRI was compared with intra-venous digital subtraction left ventriculography (IV-DSA) in 14 patients. All patients underwent conventional cine MRI and Gd-DTPA enhanced high speed MRI, simultaneously. The pulse sequences of high speed MRI were TR 8 ms (TR 6 ms plus rewind pulse 2 ms), TE 3.2 ms, matrix 128, phase encode 8 or 6 and NEX 1. Comparison with LV-volume showed a high correlation (y = 0.854x + 1,699, r = 0.985) between high speed cine MRI and VI-DSA. To make left ventricular volume curve by area-length method in cine MRI, manual tracing of LV-cavity was more difficult in conventional cine MRI-method than enhanced high speed cine MRI-method. In conclusion, first pass-Gd-DTPA enhanced high speed cine MRI, using the horizontal long axis approach and the multiphase study, is a highly, accurate reproducible method of evaluating LV-volumetry. (author)

  2. Cortical phase changes in Alzheimer's disease at 7T MRI: a novel imaging marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooden, Sanneke; Versluis, Maarten J; Liem, Michael K; Milles, Julien; Maier, Andrea B; Oleksik, Ania M; Webb, Andrew G; van Buchem, Mark A; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Postmortem studies have indicated the potential of high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize amyloid depositions in the cerebral cortex. The aim of this study is to test this hypothesis in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). T2*-weighted MRI was performed in 16 AD patients and 15 control subjects. All magnetic resonance images were scored qualitatively by visual assessment, and quantitatively by measuring phase shifts in the cortical gray matter and hippocampus. Statistical analysis was performed to assess differences between groups. Patients with AD demonstrated an increased phase shift in the cortex in the temporoparietal, frontal, and parietal regions (P < .005), and this was associated with individual Mini-Mental State Examination scores (r = -0.54, P < .05). Increased cortical phase shift in AD patients demonstrated on 7-tesla T2*-weighted MRI is a potential new biomarker for AD, which may reflect amyloid pathology in the early stages. Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. High-definition, single-scan 2D MRI in inhomogeneous fields using spatial encoding methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Eliezer, Noam; Shrot, Yoav; Frydman, Lucio

    2010-01-01

    An approach has been recently introduced for acquiring two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance images in a single scan, based on the spatial encoding of the spin interactions. This article explores the potential of integrating this spatial encoding together with conventional temporal encoding principles, to produce 2D single-shot images with moderate field of views. The resulting "hybrid" imaging scheme is shown to be superior to traditional schemes in non-homogeneous magnetic field environments. An enhancement of previously discussed pulse sequences is also proposed, whereby distortions affecting the image along the spatially encoded axis are eliminated. This new variant is also characterized by a refocusing of T(2)(*) effects, leading to a restoration of high-definition images for regions which would otherwise be highly dephased and thus not visible. These single-scan 2D images are characterized by improved signal-to-noise ratios and a genuine T(2) contrast, albeit not free from inhomogeneity distortions. Simple postprocessing algorithms relying on inhomogeneity phase maps of the imaged object can successfully remove most of these residual distortions. Initial results suggest that this acquisition scheme has the potential to overcome strong field inhomogeneities acting over extended acquisition durations, exceeding 100 ms for a single-shot image.

  4. A model for visual memory encoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe Nenert

    Full Text Available Memory encoding engages multiple concurrent and sequential processes. While the individual processes involved in successful encoding have been examined in many studies, a sequence of events and the importance of modules associated with memory encoding has not been established. For this reason, we sought to perform a comprehensive examination of the network for memory encoding using data driven methods and to determine the directionality of the information flow in order to build a viable model of visual memory encoding. Forty healthy controls ages 19-59 performed a visual scene encoding task. FMRI data were preprocessed using SPM8 and then processed using independent component analysis (ICA with the reliability of the identified components confirmed using ICASSO as implemented in GIFT. The directionality of the information flow was examined using Granger causality analyses (GCA. All participants performed the fMRI task well above the chance level (>90% correct on both active and control conditions and the post-fMRI testing recall revealed correct memory encoding at 86.33 ± 5.83%. ICA identified involvement of components of five different networks in the process of memory encoding, and the GCA allowed for the directionality of the information flow to be assessed, from visual cortex via ventral stream to the attention network and then to the default mode network (DMN. Two additional networks involved in this process were the cerebellar and the auditory-insular network. This study provides evidence that successful visual memory encoding is dependent on multiple modules that are part of other networks that are only indirectly related to the main process. This model may help to identify the node(s of the network that are affected by a specific disease processes and explain the presence of memory encoding difficulties in patients in whom focal or global network dysfunction exists.

  5. A model for visual memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenert, Rodolphe; Allendorfer, Jane B; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2014-01-01

    Memory encoding engages multiple concurrent and sequential processes. While the individual processes involved in successful encoding have been examined in many studies, a sequence of events and the importance of modules associated with memory encoding has not been established. For this reason, we sought to perform a comprehensive examination of the network for memory encoding using data driven methods and to determine the directionality of the information flow in order to build a viable model of visual memory encoding. Forty healthy controls ages 19-59 performed a visual scene encoding task. FMRI data were preprocessed using SPM8 and then processed using independent component analysis (ICA) with the reliability of the identified components confirmed using ICASSO as implemented in GIFT. The directionality of the information flow was examined using Granger causality analyses (GCA). All participants performed the fMRI task well above the chance level (>90% correct on both active and control conditions) and the post-fMRI testing recall revealed correct memory encoding at 86.33 ± 5.83%. ICA identified involvement of components of five different networks in the process of memory encoding, and the GCA allowed for the directionality of the information flow to be assessed, from visual cortex via ventral stream to the attention network and then to the default mode network (DMN). Two additional networks involved in this process were the cerebellar and the auditory-insular network. This study provides evidence that successful visual memory encoding is dependent on multiple modules that are part of other networks that are only indirectly related to the main process. This model may help to identify the node(s) of the network that are affected by a specific disease processes and explain the presence of memory encoding difficulties in patients in whom focal or global network dysfunction exists.

  6. Holding Biological Motion in Working Memory: An fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiqian eLu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Holding biological motion (BM, the movements of animate entities, in working memory (WM is important to our daily life activities. However, the neural substrates underlying the WM processing of BM remain largely unknown. Employing the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI technique, the current study directly investigated this issue. We used point-light BM animations as the tested stimuli, and explored the neural substrates involved in encoding and retaining BM information in WM. Participants were required to remember two or four BM stimuli in a change-detection task. We first defined a set of potential brain regions devoted to the BM processing in WM in one experiment. We then conducted the second fMRI experiment, and performed time-course analysis over the pre-defined regions, which allowed us to differentiate the encoding and maintenance phases of WM. The results showed that a set of brain regions were involved in encoding BM into WM, including the middle frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, superior parietal lobule, inferior parietal lobule, superior temporal sulcus, fusiform gyrus, and middle occipital gyrus. However, only the middle frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, superior parietal lobule, and inferior parietal lobule were involved in retaining BM into WM. These results suggest that an overlapped network exists between the WM encoding and maintenance for BM; however, retaining BM in WM predominately relies on the mirror neuron system.

  7. Use of (N-1)-D expansions for N-D phase unwrapping in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bones, Philip J.; King, Laura J.; Millane, Rick P.

    2017-09-01

    In MRI the presence of metal implants causes severe artifacts in images and interferes with the usual techniques used to separate fat signals from other tissues. In the Dixon method, three images are acquired at different echo times to enable the variation in the magnetic field to be estimated. However, the estimate is represented as the phase of a complex quantity and therefore suffers from wrapping. High field gradients near the metal mean that the phase estimate is undersampled and therefore challenging to unwrap. We have developed POP, phase estimation by onion peeling, an algorithm which unwraps the phase along 1-D paths for a 2-D image obtained with the Dixon method. The unwrapping is initially performed along a closed path enclosing the implant and well separated from it. The recovered phase is expanded using a smooth periodic basis along the path. Then, path-by-path, the estimate is applied to the next path and then the expansion coefficients are estimated to best fit the wrapped measurements. We have successfully tested POP on MRI images of specially constructed phantoms and on a group of patients with hip implants. In principle, POP can be extended to 3-D imaging. In that case, POP would entail representing phase with a suitably smooth basis over a series of surfaces enclosing the implant (the "onion skins"), again beginning the phase estimation well away from the implant. An approach for this is proposed. Results are presented for fat and water separation for 2-D images of phantoms and actual patients. The practicality of the method and its employment in clinical MRI are discussed.

  8. Differing Time of Onset of Concurrent TMS-fMRI during Associative Memory Encoding: A Measure of Dynamic Connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Hawco

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available There has been a distinct shift in neuroimaging from localization of function into a more network based approach focused on connectivity. While fMRI has proven very fruitful for this, the hemodynamic signal is inherently slow which limits the temporal resolution of fMRI-only connectivity measures. The brain, however, works on a time scale of milliseconds. This study utilized concurrent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS-fMRI in a novel way to obtain measures of dynamic connectivity by measuring changes in fMRI signal amplitude in regions distal to the site of stimulation following differing TMS onset times. Seventeen healthy subjects completed an associative memory encoding task known to involve the DLPFC, viewing pairs of objects which could be semantically related or unrelated. Three pulses of 10 Hz repetitive TMS were applied over the left DLPFC starting either at 200, 600, or 1000 ms after stimulus onset. Associations for related pairs were better remembered than unrelated pairs in a post-scan cued recall test. Differences in neural activity were assessed across different TMS onsets, separately for related and unrelated pairs. Time specific TMS effects were observed in several regions, including those associated with higher-level processing (lateral frontal, anterior cingulate, visual areas (occipital, and regions involved in semantic processing (e.g., left mid-temporal and medial frontal. Activity in the frontal cortex was decreased at 200 ms post-stimulus for unrelated pairs, and 1000 ms post-stimulus for related pairs. This suggests differences in the timing across conditions in which the DLFPC interacts with other PFC regions, consistent with the notion that the DLPFC is facilitating extended semantic processing for related items. This study demonstrates that time-varying TMS onset inside the MRI can be used to reliably measure fast dynamic connectivity with a temporal resolution in the hundreds of milliseconds.

  9. Hemodynamic measurement using four-dimensional phase-contrast MRI: Quantification of hemodynamic parameters and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Ho Jin; Lee, Sang Joon [POSTECH Biotech Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Ji Hoon; Kim, Young Hak; Lee, Deok Hee; Yang, Dong Hyun; KIm, Nam Kug [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions.

  10. Hemodynamic Measurement Using Four-Dimensional Phase-Contrast MRI: Quantification of Hemodynamic Parameters and Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Hojin [POSTECH Biotech Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guk Bae [Asan Institute of Life Science, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Kweon, Jihoon [Department of Cardiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Joon [POSTECH Biotech Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Hak [Department of Cardiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Deok Hee; Yang, Dong Hyun [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Namkug [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Convergence Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions.

  11. An fMRI investigation of cognitive stages in reasoning by analogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Daniel C; McClelland, M Michelle; Donovan, Colin M; Tillman, Gail D; Maguire, Mandy J

    2010-06-25

    We compared reasoning about four-term analogy problems in the format (A:B::C: D) to semantic and perceptual control conditions that required matching without analogical mapping. We investigated distinct phases of the problem solving process divided into encoding, mapping/inference, and response. Using fMRI, we assessed the brain activation relevant to each of these phases with an emphasis on achieving a better understanding of analogical reasoning relative to these other matching conditions. We predicted that the analogical condition would involve the most cognitive effort in the encoding and mapping/inference phases, while the control conditions were expected to engage greater prefrontal cortex (PFC) activation at the response period. Results showed greater activation for the analogical condition relative to the control conditions at the encoding phase in several predominantly left lateralized and medial areas of the PFC. Similar results were observed for the mapping/inference phase, though this difference was limited to the left PFC and rostral PFC. The response phase resulted in the fastest and most accurate responses in the analogy condition relative to the control conditions. This was accompanied by greater processing within the left lateral and the medial PFC for the control conditions relative to the analogy condition, consistent with most of the cognitive processing of the analogy condition having occurred in the prior task phases. Overall we demonstrate that the left ventral and dorsal lateral, medial, and rostral PFC are important in both the encoding of relational information, mapping and inference processes, and verification of semantic and perceptual responses in four term analogical reasoning. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Decoding the encoding of functional brain networks: An fMRI classification comparison of non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), independent component analysis (ICA), and sparse coding algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jianwen; Douglas, Pamela K; Wu, Ying Nian; Brody, Arthur L; Anderson, Ariana E

    2017-04-15

    Brain networks in fMRI are typically identified using spatial independent component analysis (ICA), yet other mathematical constraints provide alternate biologically-plausible frameworks for generating brain networks. Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) would suppress negative BOLD signal by enforcing positivity. Spatial sparse coding algorithms (L1 Regularized Learning and K-SVD) would impose local specialization and a discouragement of multitasking, where the total observed activity in a single voxel originates from a restricted number of possible brain networks. The assumptions of independence, positivity, and sparsity to encode task-related brain networks are compared; the resulting brain networks within scan for different constraints are used as basis functions to encode observed functional activity. These encodings are then decoded using machine learning, by using the time series weights to predict within scan whether a subject is viewing a video, listening to an audio cue, or at rest, in 304 fMRI scans from 51 subjects. The sparse coding algorithm of L1 Regularized Learning outperformed 4 variations of ICA (pcoding algorithms. Holding constant the effect of the extraction algorithm, encodings using sparser spatial networks (containing more zero-valued voxels) had higher classification accuracy (pcoding algorithms suggests that algorithms which enforce sparsity, discourage multitasking, and promote local specialization may capture better the underlying source processes than those which allow inexhaustible local processes such as ICA. Negative BOLD signal may capture task-related activations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Should breast MRI be performed with adjustment for the phase in patients’ menstrual cycle? Correlation between mammographic density, age, and background enhancement on breast MRI without adjusting for the phase in patients’ menstrual cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Takayoshi; Kasami, Masako; Watanabe, Junichiro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation between mammographic density, age, and background enhancement on breast MRI without adjusting for the phase in patients’ menstrual cycle. Material and methods: The background enhancement of bilateral breast MRI and the breast density of mammography in 146 consecutive women without adjusting for the phase in patients’ menstrual cycle were reviewed. The breast density was classified into four categories according to the American College of Radiology the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon. The background enhancement was classified into four categories: minimal, mild, moderate, and marked. The correlations of mammographic breast density as well as age with background enhancement on breast MRI were examined. Results: There was a significant correlation between mammographic breast density and background enhancement (p = 0.011). All nine cases with almost completely fat mammographic breast density showed minimal (78%) or mild (12%) background enhancement on breast MRI. There was a significant inverse correlation between age and background enhancement (p < 0.0001). Younger patients with dense breasts were more likely to demonstrate moderate/marked background enhancement. Conclusion: When no adjusting for the phase in patients’ menstrual cycle, a significant correlation was observed between background enhancement and mammographic density. A significant inverse correlation was also observed between age and background enhancement.

  14. Fractional Fourier domain optical image hiding using phase retrieval algorithm based on iterative nonlinear double random phase encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaogang; Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2014-09-22

    We present a novel image hiding method based on phase retrieval algorithm under the framework of nonlinear double random phase encoding in fractional Fourier domain. Two phase-only masks (POMs) are efficiently determined by using the phase retrieval algorithm, in which two cascaded phase-truncated fractional Fourier transforms (FrFTs) are involved. No undesired information disclosure, post-processing of the POMs or digital inverse computation appears in our proposed method. In order to achieve the reduction in key transmission, a modified image hiding method based on the modified phase retrieval algorithm and logistic map is further proposed in this paper, in which the fractional orders and the parameters with respect to the logistic map are regarded as encryption keys. Numerical results have demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed algorithms.

  15. Time domain spectral phase encoding/DPSK data modulation using single phase modulator for OCDMA application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Gao, Zhensen; Kataoka, Nobuyuki; Wada, Naoya

    2010-05-10

    A novel scheme using single phase modulator for simultaneous time domain spectral phase encoding (SPE) signal generation and DPSK data modulation is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Array- Waveguide-Grating and Variable-Bandwidth-Spectrum-Shaper based devices can be used for decoding the signal directly in spectral domain. The effects of fiber dispersion, light pulse width and timing error on the coding performance have been investigated by simulation and verified in experiment. In the experiment, SPE signal with 8-chip, 20GHz/chip optical code patterns has been generated and modulated with 2.5 Gbps DPSK data using single modulator. Transmission of the 2.5 Gbps data over 34km fiber with BEROCDMA) and secure optical communication applications. (c) 2010 Optical Society of America.

  16. Phase-contrast MR angiography of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellerini, M.; Mascalchi, M.; Mangiafico, S.; Ferrito, G.P.; Scardigli, V.; Pellicano, G.; Quilici, N.

    1999-01-01

    MRI and phase-contrast MR angiography (PC MRA) were obtained in 13 patients with angiographically confirmed intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVF). Three- and two-dimensional PC MRA was obtained with low (6-20 cm/s) and high (>40 cm/s) velocity encoding along the three main body axes. MRI showed focal or diffuse signal abnormalities in the brain parenchyma in six patients, dilated cortical veins in seven, venous pouches in four with type IV DAVF and enlargement of the superior ophthalmic vein in three patients with DAVF of the cavernous sinus. However, it showed none of the fistula sites and did not allow reliable identification of feeding arteries. 3D PC MRA enabled identification of the fistula and enlarged feeding arteries in six cases each. Stenosis or occlusion of the dural sinuses was detected in six of eight cases on 3D PC MRA with low velocity encoding. In six patients with type II DAVF phase reconstruction of 2D PC MRA demonstrated flow reversal in the dural sinuses or superior ophthalmic vein. (orig.)

  17. Phase-based vascular input function: Improved quantitative DCE-MRI of atherosclerotic plaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoof, R. H. M.; Hermeling, E.; Truijman, M. T. B.; van Oostenbrugge, R. J.; Daemen, J. W. H.; van der Geest, R. J.; van Orshoven, N. P.; Schreuder, A. H.; Backes, W. H.; Daemen, M. J. A. P.; Wildberger, J. E.; Kooi, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quantitative pharmacokinetic modeling of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI can be used to assess atherosclerotic plaque microvasculature, which is an important marker of plaque vulnerability. Purpose of the present study was (1) to compare magnitude-versus phase-based vascular input

  18. Encoding model of temporal processing in human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigliani, Anthony; Jeska, Brianna; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2017-12-19

    How is temporal information processed in human visual cortex? Visual input is relayed to V1 through segregated transient and sustained channels in the retina and lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). However, there is intense debate as to how sustained and transient temporal channels contribute to visual processing beyond V1. The prevailing view associates transient processing predominately with motion-sensitive regions and sustained processing with ventral stream regions, while the opposing view suggests that both temporal channels contribute to neural processing beyond V1. Using fMRI, we measured cortical responses to time-varying stimuli and then implemented a two temporal channel-encoding model to evaluate the contributions of each channel. Different from the general linear model of fMRI that predicts responses directly from the stimulus, the encoding approach first models neural responses to the stimulus from which fMRI responses are derived. This encoding approach not only predicts cortical responses to time-varying stimuli from milliseconds to seconds but also, reveals differential contributions of temporal channels across visual cortex. Consistent with the prevailing view, motion-sensitive regions and adjacent lateral occipitotemporal regions are dominated by transient responses. However, ventral occipitotemporal regions are driven by both sustained and transient channels, with transient responses exceeding the sustained. These findings propose a rethinking of temporal processing in the ventral stream and suggest that transient processing may contribute to rapid extraction of the content of the visual input. Importantly, our encoding approach has vast implications, because it can be applied with fMRI to decipher neural computations in millisecond resolution in any part of the brain. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  19. Volumetric Arterial Wall Shear Stress Calculation Based on Cine Phase Contrast MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potters, Wouter V.; van Ooij, Pim; Marquering, Henk; VanBavel, Ed; Nederveen, Aart J.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo assess the accuracy and precision of a volumetric wall shear stress (WSS) calculation method applied to cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) data. Materials and MethodsVolumetric WSS vectors were calculated in software phantoms. WSS algorithm parameters were optimized

  20. Evidence for anomalous network connectivity during working memory encoding in schizophrenia: an ICA based analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashwath A Meda

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerous neuroimaging studies report abnormal regional brain activity during working memory performance in schizophrenia, but few have examined brain network integration as determined by "functional connectivity" analyses.We used independent component analysis (ICA to identify and characterize dysfunctional spatiotemporal networks in schizophrenia engaged during the different stages (encoding and recognition of a Sternberg working memory fMRI paradigm. 37 chronic schizophrenia and 54 healthy age/gender-matched participants performed a modified Sternberg Item Recognition fMRI task. Time series images preprocessed with SPM2 were analyzed using ICA. Schizophrenia patients showed relatively less engagement of several distinct "normal" encoding-related working memory networks compared to controls. These encoding networks comprised 1 left posterior parietal-left dorsal/ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, cingulate, basal ganglia, 2 right posterior parietal, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and 3 default mode network. In addition, the left fronto-parietal network demonstrated a load-dependent functional response during encoding. Network engagement that differed between groups during recognition comprised the posterior cingulate, cuneus and hippocampus/parahippocampus. As expected, working memory task accuracy differed between groups (p<0.0001 and was associated with degree of network engagement. Functional connectivity within all three encoding-associated functional networks correlated significantly with task accuracy, which further underscores the relevance of abnormal network integration to well-described schizophrenia working memory impairment. No network was significantly associated with task accuracy during the recognition phase.This study extends the results of numerous previous schizophrenia studies that identified isolated dysfunctional brain regions by providing evidence of disrupted schizophrenia functional connectivity using ICA within

  1. Sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Wald, Lawrence L; Belliveau, John W; Posse, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) provides spatially resolved metabolite information that is invaluable for both neuroscience studies and clinical applications. However, lengthy data acquisition times, which are a result of time-consuming phase encoding, represent a major challenge for MRSI. Fast MRSI pulse sequences that use echo-planar readout gradients, such as proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI), are capable of fast spectral-spatial encoding and thus enable acceleration of image acquisition times. Combining PEPSI with recent advances in parallel MRI utilizing RF coil arrays can further accelerate MRSI data acquisition. Here we investigate the feasibility of ultrafast spectroscopic imaging at high field (3T and 4T) by combining PEPSI with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) MRI using eight-channel head coil arrays. We show that the acquisition of single-average SENSE-PEPSI data at a short TE (15 ms) can be accelerated to 32 s or less, depending on the field strength, to obtain metabolic images of choline (Cho), creatine (Cre), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), and J-coupled metabolites (e.g., glutamate (Glu) and inositol (Ino)) with acceptable spectral quality and localization. The experimentally measured reductions in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) of metabolite resonances were well explained by both the g-factor and reduced measurement times. Thus, this technology is a promising means of reducing the scan times of 3D acquisitions and time-resolved 2D measurements. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Phase recovering algorithms for extended objects encoded in digitally recorded holograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Z.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents algorithms to recover the optical phase of digitally encoded holograms. Algorithms are based on the use of a numerical spherical reconstructing wave. Proof of the validity of the concept is performed through an experimental off axis digital holographic set-up. Two-color digital holographic reconstruction is also investigated. Application of the color set-up and algorithms concerns the simultaneous two-dimensional deformation measurement of an object submitted to a mechanical loading.

  3. Temporal lobe cortical electrical stimulation during the encoding and retrieval phase reduces false memories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo S Boggio

    Full Text Available A recent study found that false memories were reduced by 36% when low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS was applied to the left anterior temporal lobe after the encoding (study phase. Here we were interested in the consequences on a false memory task of brain stimulation throughout the encoding and retrieval task phases. We used transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS because it has been shown to be a useful tool to enhance cognition. Specifically, we examined whether tDCS can induce changes in a task assessing false memories. Based on our preliminary results, three conditions of stimulation were chosen: anodal left/cathodal right anterior temporal lobe (ATL stimulation ("bilateral stimulation"; anodal left ATL stimulation (with a large contralateral cathodal electrode--referred as "unilateral stimulation" and sham stimulation. Our results showed that false memories were reduced significantly after the two active conditions (unilateral and bilateral stimulation as compared with sham stimulation. There were no significant changes in veridical memories. Our findings show that false memories are reduced by 73% when anodal tDCS is applied to the anterior temporal lobes throughout the encoding and retrieval stages, suggesting a possible strategy for improving certain aspects of learning.

  4. Detection of hepatocellular carcinoma by Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI: Comparison with triple phase 64 detector row helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akai, Hiroyuki; Kiryu, Shigeru; Matsuda, Izuru; Satou, Jirou; Takao, Hidemasa; Tajima, Taku; Watanabe, Yasushi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Akahane, Masaaki; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic performance of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI with that of triple phase 64-MDCT in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients and methods: Thirty-four patients with 52 surgically proven lesions underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and triple phase 64-MDCT. Two observers independently evaluated MR and CT imaging on a lesion-by-lesion basis. Sensitivity, positive and negative predictive values and reproducibility were evaluated. The diagnostic accuracy of each modality was assessed with alternative-free response receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: Both observers showed higher sensitivity in detecting lesions with MRI compared to CT, however, only the difference between the two imaging techniques for observer 2 was significant (P = 0.034). For lesions 1 cm or smaller, MRI and CT showed equal sensitivity (both 62.5%) with one observer, and MRI proved superior to CT with the other observer (MRI 75% vs. CT 56.3%), but the latter difference was not significant (P = 0.083). The difference in positive and negative predictive value between the two imaging techniques for each observer was not significant (P > 0.05). The areas under the ROC curve for each observer were 0.843 and 0.861 for MRI vs. 0.800 and 0.833 for CT and the differences were not significant. Reproducibility was higher using MRI for both observers, but the result was not significant (MRI 32/33 vs. CT 29/33, P = 0.083). Conclusion: Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI tended to show higher diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and reproducibility compared to triple phase 64-MDCT in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma, however statistical significance was not achieved.

  5. Directional patterns of cross frequency phase and amplitude coupling within the resting state mimic patterns of fMRI functional connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kurt E.; Wander, Jeremiah D.; Ko, Andrew L.; Casimo, Kaitlyn; Grabowski, Thomas J.; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Darvas, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Functional imaging investigations into the brain's resting state interactions have yielded a wealth of insight into the intrinsic and dynamic neural architecture supporting cognition and behavior. Electrophysiological studies however have highlighted the fact that synchrony across large-scale cortical systems is composed of spontaneous interactions occurring at timescales beyond the traditional resolution of fMRI, a feature that limits the capacity of fMRI to draw inference on the true directional relationship between network nodes. To approach the question of directionality in resting state signals, we recorded resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) and electrocorticography (ECoG) from four human subjects undergoing invasive epilepsy monitoring. Using a seed-point based approach, we employed phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) and biPhase Locking Values (bPLV), two measures of cross-frequency coupling (CFC) to explore both outgoing and incoming connections between the seed and all non-seed, site electrodes. We observed robust PAC between a wide range of low-frequency phase and high frequency amplitude estimates. However, significant bPLV, a CFC measure of phase-phase synchrony, was only observed at specific narrow low and high frequency bandwidths. Furthermore, the spatial patterns of outgoing PAC connectivity were most closely associated with the rsfMRI connectivity maps. Our results support the hypothesis that PAC is relatively ubiquitous phenomenon serving as a mechanism for coordinating high-frequency amplitudes across distant neuronal assemblies even in absence of overt task structure. Additionally, we demonstrate that the spatial distribution of a seed-point rsfMRI sensorimotor network is strikingly similar to specific patterns of directional PAC. Specifically, the high frequency activities of distal patches of cortex owning membership in a rsfMRI sensorimotor network were most likely to be entrained to the phase of a low frequency rhythm engendered from the

  6. Information hiding based on double random-phase encoding and public-key cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yuan; Xin, Zhou; Alam, Mohammed S; Xi, Lu; Xiao-Feng, Li

    2009-03-02

    A novel information hiding method based on double random-phase encoding (DRPE) and Rivest-Shamir-Adleman (RSA) public-key cryptosystem is proposed. In the proposed technique, the inherent diffusion property of DRPE is cleverly utilized to make up the diffusion insufficiency of RSA public-key cryptography, while the RSA cryptosystem is utilized for simultaneous transmission of the cipher text and the two phase-masks, which is not possible under the DRPE technique. This technique combines the complementary advantages of the DPRE and RSA encryption techniques and brings security and convenience for efficient information transmission. Extensive numerical simulation results are presented to verify the performance of the proposed technique.

  7. Accelerated three-dimensional cine phase contrast imaging using randomly undersampled echo planar imaging with compressed sensing reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Nezafat, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to implement and evaluate an accelerated three-dimensional (3D) cine phase contrast MRI sequence by combining a randomly sampled 3D k-space acquisition sequence with an echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. An accelerated 3D cine phase contrast MRI sequence was implemented by combining EPI readout with randomly undersampled 3D k-space data suitable for compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction. The undersampled data were then reconstructed using low-dimensional structural self-learning and thresholding (LOST). 3D phase contrast MRI was acquired in 11 healthy adults using an overall acceleration of 7 (EPI factor of 3 and CS rate of 3). For comparison, a single two-dimensional (2D) cine phase contrast scan was also performed with sensitivity encoding (SENSE) rate 2 and approximately at the level of the pulmonary artery bifurcation. The stroke volume and mean velocity in both the ascending and descending aorta were measured and compared between two sequences using Bland-Altman plots. An average scan time of 3 min and 30 s, corresponding to an acceleration rate of 7, was achieved for 3D cine phase contrast scan with one direction flow encoding, voxel size of 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) , foot-head coverage of 6 cm and temporal resolution of 30 ms. The mean velocity and stroke volume in both the ascending and descending aorta were statistically equivalent between the proposed 3D sequence and the standard 2D cine phase contrast sequence. The combination of EPI with a randomly undersampled 3D k-space sampling sequence using LOST reconstruction allows a seven-fold reduction in scan time of 3D cine phase contrast MRI without compromising blood flow quantification. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Divided attention can enhance early-phase memory encoding: the attentional boost effect and study trial duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W; Spataro, Pietro

    2015-07-01

    Divided attention during encoding typically produces marked reductions in later memory. The attentional boost effect (ABE) is a surprising variation on this phenomenon. In this paradigm, each study stimulus (e.g., a word) is presented along with a target or a distractor (e.g., different colored circles) in a detection task. Later memory is better for stimuli co-occurring with targets. The present experiments indicate that the ABE arises during an early phase of memory encoding that involves initial stimulus perception and comprehension rather than at a later phase entailing controlled, elaborative rehearsal. Experiment 1 demonstrated that the ABE was robust at a short study duration (700 ms) and did not increase with increasing study trial durations (1,500 ms and 4,000 ms). Furthermore, the target condition is boosted to the level of memory performance in a full-attention condition for the short duration but not the long duration. Both results followed from the early-phase account. This account also predicts that for very short study times (limiting the influence of late-phase controlled encoding and thus minimizing the usual negative effect of divided attention), the target condition will produce better memory than will the full-attention condition. Experiment 2 used a study time of 400 ms and found that words presented with targets lead to greater recognition accuracy than do either words presented with distractors or words in the full-attention condition. Consistent with the early-phase account, a divided attention condition actually produced superior memory than did the full-attention condition, a very unusual but theoretically predicted result. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Heterodyne detection using spectral line pairing for spectral phase encoding optical code division multiple access and dynamic dispersion compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Foster, Mark; Khurgin, Jacob B; Cooper, A Brinton

    2012-07-30

    A novel coherent optical code-division multiple access (OCDMA) scheme is proposed that uses spectral line pairing to generate signals suitable for heterodyne decoding. Both signal and local reference are transmitted via a single optical fiber and a simple balanced receiver performs sourceless heterodyne detection, canceling speckle noise and multiple-access interference (MAI). To validate the idea, a 16 user fully loaded phase encoded system is simulated. Effects of fiber dispersion on system performance are studied as well. Both second and third order dispersion management is achieved by using a spectral phase encoder to adjust phase shifts of spectral components at the optical network unit (ONU).

  10. MRI in acute phase of whiplash injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagerlund, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Bjoernebrink, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Pettersson, K. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Hildingsson, C. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden)

    1995-11-01

    A prospective MRI study of 39 whiplash patients was performed and the results were compared with the clinical findings within 15 days after trauma. The MRI parameters included disc bulging either with impingement on the anterior epidural space or with medullary compression, foraminal stenosis, dorsal ligament thickening, osteophyte extension and intramedullary or paravertebral soft tissue injury. All changes were graded visually on a four-point scale (no, some, moderate or extensive changes). After the MRI evaluation was made the clinical findings were analysed by two orthopaedic surgeons using a specially designed protocol. With MRI 29 patients (74 %) showed no or only slight changes, and were thus regarded as normal variations. Of these, 10 of 29 patients (34 %) had as the only symptom pain in the head or in the neck, 19 of 29 patients (66 %) showed neurological changes, either paresthesias, sensory deficits or weakness of upper extremities. In 10 (26 %) patients with moderate or extensive MRI changes, 3 of 10 (33 %) had only head or neck pain, or both, and 7 of 10 (66 %) had neurological changes. Use of MRI in whiplash injury is helpful, but it is not the first-choice radiological examination method. Despite neurological changes, the frequency of true traumatic lesions is low. There is no clear correlation between the patients` subjective symptoms or clinical signs and the findings with MRI. However, MRI can be used to find patients with disk herniation that can be treated surgically. (orig.)

  11. MRI in acute phase of whiplash injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagerlund, M.; Bjoernebrink, J.; Pettersson, K.; Hildingsson, C.

    1995-01-01

    A prospective MRI study of 39 whiplash patients was performed and the results were compared with the clinical findings within 15 days after trauma. The MRI parameters included disc bulging either with impingement on the anterior epidural space or with medullary compression, foraminal stenosis, dorsal ligament thickening, osteophyte extension and intramedullary or paravertebral soft tissue injury. All changes were graded visually on a four-point scale (no, some, moderate or extensive changes). After the MRI evaluation was made the clinical findings were analysed by two orthopaedic surgeons using a specially designed protocol. With MRI 29 patients (74 %) showed no or only slight changes, and were thus regarded as normal variations. Of these, 10 of 29 patients (34 %) had as the only symptom pain in the head or in the neck, 19 of 29 patients (66 %) showed neurological changes, either paresthesias, sensory deficits or weakness of upper extremities. In 10 (26 %) patients with moderate or extensive MRI changes, 3 of 10 (33 %) had only head or neck pain, or both, and 7 of 10 (66 %) had neurological changes. Use of MRI in whiplash injury is helpful, but it is not the first-choice radiological examination method. Despite neurological changes, the frequency of true traumatic lesions is low. There is no clear correlation between the patients' subjective symptoms or clinical signs and the findings with MRI. However, MRI can be used to find patients with disk herniation that can be treated surgically. (orig.)

  12. Signal to noise comparison of metabolic imaging methods on a clinical 3T MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, C. A.; Hansen, Rie Beck; Skinner, J. G.

    MRI with hyperpolarized tracers has enabled new diagnostic applications, e.g. metabolic imaging in cancer research. However, the acquisition of the transient, hyperpolarized signal with spatial and frequency resolution requires dedicated imaging methods. Here, we compare three promising candidate...... for 2D MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI): (i) multi-echo balanced steady-state free precession (me-bSSFP), 1,2 (ii) echo planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) sequence and (iii) phase-encoded, pulseacquisition chemical-shift imaging (CSI)...

  13. Lateral and medial prefrontal contributions to emotion generation by semantic elaboration during episodic encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Takumi; Shigemune, Yayoi; Tsukiura, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    Memories for emotion-laden stimuli are remembered more accurately than those for neutral stimuli. Although this enhancement reflects stimulus-driven modulation of memory by emotions, functional neuroimaging evidence of the interacting mechanisms between emotions generated by intentional processes, such as semantic elaboration, and memory is scarce. The present fMRI study investigated how encoding-related activation is modulated by emotions generated during the process of semantic elaboration. During encoding with fMRI, healthy young adults viewed neutral (target) pictures either passively or with semantic elaboration. In semantic elaboration, participants imagined background stories related to the pictures. Encoding trials with semantic elaboration were subdivided into conditions in which participants imagined negative, positive, or neutral stories. One week later, memories for target pictures were tested. In behavioral results, memories for target pictures were significantly enhanced by semantic elaboration, compared to passive viewing, and the memory enhancement was more remarkable when negative or positive stories were imagined. fMRI results demonstrated that activations in the left inferior frontal gyrus and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) were greater during the encoding of target pictures with semantic elaboration than those with passive viewing, and that these activations further increased during encoding with semantic elaboration of emotional stories than of neutral stories. Functional connectivity between the left inferior frontal gyrus and dmPFC/hippocampus during encoding significantly predicted retrieval accuracies of memories encoded with self-generated emotional stories. These findings suggest that networks including the left inferior frontal region, dmPFC, and hippocampus could contribute to the modulation of memories encoded with the emotion generation.

  14. SU-F-J-158: Respiratory Motion Resolved, Self-Gated 4D-MRI Using Rotating Cartesian K-Space Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, F; Zhou, Z; Yang, Y; Sheng, K; Hu, P [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Dynamic MRI has been used to quantify respiratory motion of abdominal organs in radiation treatment planning. Many existing 4D-MRI methods based on 2D acquisitions suffer from limited slice resolution and additional stitching artifacts when evaluated in 3D{sup 1}. To address these issues, we developed a 4D-MRI (3D dynamic) technique with true 3D k-space encoding and respiratory motion self-gating. Methods: The 3D k-space was acquired using a Rotating Cartesian K-space (ROCK) pattern, where the Cartesian grid was reordered in a quasi-spiral fashion with each spiral arm rotated using golden angle{sup 2}. Each quasi-spiral arm started with the k-space center-line, which were used as self-gating{sup 3} signal for respiratory motion estimation. The acquired k-space data was then binned into 8 respiratory phases and the golden angle ensures a near-uniform k-space sampling in each phase. Finally, dynamic 3D images were reconstructed using the ESPIRiT technique{sup 4}. 4D-MRI was performed on 6 healthy volunteers, using the following parameters (bSSFP, Fat-Sat, TE/TR=2ms/4ms, matrix size=500×350×120, resolution=1×1×1.2mm, TA=5min, 8 respiratory phases). Supplemental 2D real-time images were acquired in 9 different planes. Dynamic locations of the diaphragm dome and left kidney were measured from both 4D and 2D images. The same protocol was also performed on a MRI-compatible motion phantom where the motion was programmed with different amplitude (10–30mm) and frequency (3–10/min). Results: High resolution 4D-MRI were obtained successfully in 5 minutes. Quantitative motion measurements from 4D-MRI agree with the ones from 2D CINE (<5% error). The 4D images are free of the stitching artifacts and their near-isotropic resolution facilitates 3D visualization and segmentation of abdominal organs such as the liver, kidney and pancreas. Conclusion: Our preliminary studies demonstrated a novel ROCK 4D-MRI technique with true 3D k-space encoding and respiratory

  15. Biometrics based key management of double random phase encoding scheme using error control codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Nirmala; Sinha, Aloka

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, an optical security system has been proposed in which key of the double random phase encoding technique is linked to the biometrics of the user to make it user specific. The error in recognition due to the biometric variation is corrected by encoding the key using the BCH code. A user specific shuffling key is used to increase the separation between genuine and impostor Hamming distance distribution. This shuffling key is then further secured using the RSA public key encryption to enhance the security of the system. XOR operation is performed between the encoded key and the feature vector obtained from the biometrics. The RSA encoded shuffling key and the data obtained from the XOR operation are stored into a token. The main advantage of the present technique is that the key retrieval is possible only in the simultaneous presence of the token and the biometrics of the user which not only authenticates the presence of the original input but also secures the key of the system. Computational experiments showed the effectiveness of the proposed technique for key retrieval in the decryption process by using the live biometrics of the user.

  16. Lower Parietal Encoding Activation Is Associated with Sharper Information and Better Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hongmi; Chun, Marvin M; Kuhl, Brice A

    2017-04-01

    Mean fMRI activation in ventral posterior parietal cortex (vPPC) during memory encoding often negatively predicts successful remembering. A popular interpretation of this phenomenon is that vPPC reflects "off-task" processing. However, recent fMRI studies considering distributed patterns of activity suggest that vPPC actively represents encoded material. Here, we assessed the relationships between pattern-based content representations in vPPC, mean activation in vPPC, and subsequent remembering. We analyzed data from two fMRI experiments where subjects studied then recalled word-face or word-scene associations. For each encoding trial, we measured 1) mean univariate activation within vPPC and 2) the strength of face/scene information as indexed by pattern analysis. Mean activation in vPPC negatively predicted subsequent remembering, but the strength of pattern-based information in the same vPPC voxels positively predicted later memory. Indeed, univariate amplitude averaged across vPPC voxels negatively correlated with pattern-based information strength. This dissociation reflected a tendency for univariate reductions to maximally occur in voxels that were not strongly tuned for the category of encoded stimuli. These results indicate that vPPC activity patterns reflect the content and quality of memory encoding and constitute a striking example of lower univariate activity corresponding to stronger pattern-based information. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Accelerated 4D phase contrast MRI in skeletal muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoli, Valentina; Gottwald, Lukas M; Peper, Eva S; Froeling, Martijn; Coolen, Bram F; Verdonschot, Nico; Sprengers, Andre M; van Ooij, Pim; Strijkers, Gustav J; Nederveen, Aart J

    2018-03-05

    3D time-resolved (4D) phase contrast MRI can be used to study muscle contraction. However, 3D coverage with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution can only be achieved by interleaved acquisitions during many repetitions of the motion task, resulting in long scan times. The aim of this study was to develop a compressed sensing accelerated 4D phase contrast MRI technique for quantification of velocities and strain rate of the muscles in the lower leg during active plantarflexion/dorsiflexion. Nine healthy volunteers were scanned during active dorsiflexion/plantarflexion task. For each volunteer, we acquired a reference scan, as well as 4 different accelerated scans (k-space undersampling factors: 3.14X, 4.09X, 4.89X, and 6.41X) obtained using Cartesian Poisson disk undersampling schemes. The data was reconstructed using a compressed sensing pipeline. For each scan, velocity and strain rate values were quantified in the gastrocnemius lateralis, gastrocnemius medialis, tibialis anterior, and soleus. No significant differences in velocity values were observed as a function acceleration factor in the investigated muscles. The strain rate calculation resulted in one positive (s + ) and one negative (s - ) eigenvalue, whereas the third eigenvalue (s 3 ) was consistently 0 for all the acquisitions. No significant differences were observed for the strain rate eigenvalues as a function of acceleration factor. Data undersampling combined with compressed sensing reconstruction allowed obtainment of time-resolved phase contrast acquisitions with 3D coverage and quantitative information comparable to the reference scan. The 3D sensitivity of the method can help in understanding the connection between muscle architecture and muscle function in future studies. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of blood flow regularized by 3D phase contrast MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rispoli, Vinicius C; Nielsen, Jon; Nayak, Krishna S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is used clinically for quantitative assessment of cardiovascular flow and function, as it is capable of providing directly-measured 3D velocity maps. Alternatively, vascular flow can be estimated from model-based computation fluid dyn...

  19. Functional MRI study of diencephalic amnesia in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulo, M; Van Hecke, J; Toma, L; Ferretti, A; Tartaro, A; Colosimo, C; Romani, G L; Uncini, A

    2005-07-01

    Anterograde amnesia in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is associated with diencephalic lesions, mainly in the anterior thalamic nuclei. Whether diencephalic and temporal lobe amnesias are distinct entities is still not clear. We investigated episodic memory for faces using functional MRI (fMRI) in eight controls and in a 34-year-old man with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and diencephalic lesions but without medial temporal lobe (MTL) involvement at MRI. fMRI was performed with a 1.5 tesla unit. Three dual-choice tasks were employed: (i) face encoding (18 faces were randomly presented three times and subjects were asked to memorize the faces); (ii) face perception (subjects indicated which of two faces matched a third face); and (iii) face recognition (subjects indicated which of two faces belonged to the group they had been asked to memorize during encoding). All activation was greater in the right hemisphere. In controls both the encoding and recognition tasks activated two hippocampal regions (anterior and posterior). The anterior hippocampal region was more activated during recognition. Activation in the prefrontal cortex was greater during recognition. In the subject with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, fMRI did not show hippocampal activation during either encoding or recognition. During recognition, although behavioural data showed defective retrieval, the prefrontal regions were activated as in controls, except for the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. fMRI activation of the visual cortices and the behavioural score on the perception task indicated that the subject with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome perceived the faces, paid attention to the task and demonstrated accurate judgement. In the subject with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, although the anatomical damage does not involve the MTL, the hippocampal memory encoding has been lost, possibly as a consequence of the hippocampal-anterior thalamic axis involvement. Anterograde amnesia could therefore be the expression of

  20. Ready...go: Amplitude of the FMRI signal encodes expectation of cue arrival time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Cui

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available What happens when the brain awaits a signal of uncertain arrival time, as when a sprinter waits for the starting pistol? And what happens just after the starting pistol fires? Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we have discovered a novel correlate of temporal expectations in several brain regions, most prominently in the supplementary motor area (SMA. Contrary to expectations, we found little fMRI activity during the waiting period; however, a large signal appears after the "go" signal, the amplitude of which reflects learned expectations about the distribution of possible waiting times. Specifically, the amplitude of the fMRI signal appears to encode a cumulative conditional probability, also known as the cumulative hazard function. The fMRI signal loses its dependence on waiting time in a "countdown" condition in which the arrival time of the go cue is known in advance, suggesting that the signal encodes temporal probabilities rather than simply elapsed time. The dependence of the signal on temporal expectation is present in "no-go" conditions, demonstrating that the effect is not a consequence of motor output. Finally, the encoding is not dependent on modality, operating in the same manner with auditory or visual signals. This finding extends our understanding of the relationship between temporal expectancy and measurable neural signals.

  1. Functional analysis of third ventriculostomy patency with phase-contrast MRI velocity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lev, S.; Bhadelia, R.A.; Estin, D.; Heilman, C.B.; Wolpert, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose was to explore the utility of cine phase-contrast MRI velocity measurements in determining the functional status of third ventriculostomies, and to correlate the quantitative velocity data with clinical follow-up. We examined six patients with third ventriculostomies and 12 normal subjects by phase-contrast MRI. The maximum craniocaudal to maximum caudocranial velocity range was measured at regions of interest near the third ventricular floor, and in cerebrospinal fluid anterior to the upper pons and spinal cord on midline sagittal images. Ratios of the velocities of both the third ventricle and prepontine space to the space anterior to the spinal cord were obtained. The velocities near the third ventricular floor and in the pontine cistern were significantly higher in patients than in normal subjects, but the velocity anterior to the spinal cord was similar between the groups. The velocity ratios, used to normalize individual differences, were also higher in patients than in controls. Two patients had lower velocity ratios than their fellows at the third ventricular floor and in the pontine cistern; one required a shunt 11 months later, while in the other, who had a third ventricular/thalamic tumor, the lower values probably reflect distortion of the third ventricular floor. We conclude that phase-contrast MR velocity measurements, specifically the velocity ratio between the high pontine cistern and the space anterior to the spinal cord, can help determine the functional status of third ventriculostomies. (orig.)

  2. Anticipatory alpha phase influences visual working memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanto, Theodore P; Chadick, James Z; Gazzaley, Adam

    2014-01-15

    Alpha band (8-12 Hz) phase dynamics in the visual cortex are thought to reflect fluctuations in cortical excitability that influences perceptual processing. As such, visual stimuli are better detected when their onset is concurrent with specific phases of the alpha cycle. However, it is unclear whether alpha phase differentially influences cognitive performance at specific times relative to stimulus onset (i.e., is the influence of phase maximal before, at, or after stimulus onset?). To address this, participants performed a delayed-recognition, working memory (WM) task for visual motion direction during two separate visits. The first visit utilized functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) imaging to identify neural regions associated with task performance. Replicating previous studies, fMRI data showed engagement of visual cortical area V5, as well as a prefrontal cortical region, the inferior frontal junction (IFJ). During the second visit, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied separately to both the right IFJ and right V5 (with the vertex as a control region) while electroencephalography (EEG) was simultaneously recorded. During each trial, a single pulse of TMS (spTMS) was applied at one of six time points (-200, -100, -50, 0, 80, 160 ms) relative to the encoded stimulus onset. Results demonstrated a relationship between the phase of the posterior alpha signal prior to stimulus encoding and subsequent response times to the memory probe two seconds later. Specifically, spTMS to V5, and not the IFJ or vertex, yielded faster response times, indicating improved WM performance, when delivered during the peak, compared to the trough, of the alpha cycle, but only when spTMS was applied 100 ms prior to stimulus onset. These faster responses to the probe correlated with decreased early event related potential (ERP) amplitudes (i.e., P1) to the probe stimuli. Moreover, participants that were least affected by spTMS exhibited greater functional connectivity

  3. Automated segmentation of blood-flow regions in large thoracic arteries using 3D-cine PC-MRI measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pelt, Roy; Nguyen, Huy; ter Haar Romeny, Bart; Vilanova, Anna

    2012-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of vascular blood flow, acquired by phase-contrast MRI, requires accurate segmentation of the vessel lumen. In clinical practice, 2D-cine velocity-encoded slices are inspected, and the lumen is segmented manually. However, segmentation of time-resolved volumetric blood-flow measurements is a tedious and time-consuming task requiring automation. Automated segmentation of large thoracic arteries, based solely on the 3D-cine phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) blood-flow data, was done. An active surface model, which is fast and topologically stable, was used. The active surface model requires an initial surface, approximating the desired segmentation. A method to generate this surface was developed based on a voxel-wise temporal maximum of blood-flow velocities. The active surface model balances forces, based on the surface structure and image features derived from the blood-flow data. The segmentation results were validated using volunteer studies, including time-resolved 3D and 2D blood-flow data. The segmented surface was intersected with a velocity-encoded PC-MRI slice, resulting in a cross-sectional contour of the lumen. These cross-sections were compared to reference contours that were manually delineated on high-resolution 2D-cine slices. The automated approach closely approximates the manual blood-flow segmentations, with error distances on the order of the voxel size. The initial surface provides a close approximation of the desired luminal geometry. This improves the convergence time of the active surface and facilitates parametrization. An active surface approach for vessel lumen segmentation was developed, suitable for quantitative analysis of 3D-cine PC-MRI blood-flow data. As opposed to prior thresholding and level-set approaches, the active surface model is topologically stable. A method to generate an initial approximate surface was developed, and various features that influence the segmentation model were evaluated. The active surface

  4. Diffusion-weighted MRI of the prostate at 3.0 T: Comparison of endorectal coil (ERC) MRI and phased-array coil (PAC) MRI—The impact of SNR on ADC measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazaheri, Yousef; Vargas, H. Alberto; Nyman, Gregory; Shukla-Dave, Amita; Akin, Oguz; Hricak, Hedvig

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare ADC values measured from diffusion-weighted MR (DW-MR) images of the prostate obtained with both endorectal and phased-array coils (ERC + PAC) to those from DW-MRI images obtained with an eight-channel torso phased-array coil (PAC) at 3.0 T. Methods: The institutional review board issued a waiver of informed consent for this HIPAA-compliant study. Twenty-five patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer underwent standard 3-T MRI using 2 different coil arrangements (ERC + PAC and PAC only) in the same session. DW-MRI at five b-values (0, 600, 1000, 1200, and 1500 s/mm 2 ) were acquired using both coil arrangements. On b = 0 images, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were measured as the ratio of the mean signal from PZ and TZ ROIs to the standard deviation from the mean signal in an artifact-free ROI in the rectum. Matching regions-of-interest (ROIs) were identified in the peripheral zone and transition zone on ERC-MRI and PAC-MRI. For each ROI, mean ADC values for all zero and non-zero b-value combinations were computed. Results: Mean SNR with ERC-MRI at PZ (66.33 ± 27.07) and TZ (32.69 ± 12.52) was 9.27 and 5.52 times higher than with PAC-MRI ((7.32 ± 2.30) and (6.13 ± 1.56), respectively) (P < 0.0001 for both). ADCs from DW-MR images obtained with all b-values in the PZ and TZ were significantly lower with PAC-MRI than with ERC-MRI (P < 0.001 for all). Conclusion: Lower SNR of DW-MR images of the prostate obtained with a PAC can significantly decrease ADC values at higher b-values compared to similar measurements obtained using the ERC. To address these requirements, clinical MR systems should have image processing capabilities which incorporate the noise distribution

  5. A technique to reduce motion artifact for externally triggered cine-MRI(EC-MRI) based on detecting the onset of the articulated word with spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yasuhiro; Nishimoto, Hironori; Kochiyama, Takanori; Fujimoto, Ichiro; Mano, Hiroaki; Masaki, Shinobu; Murase, Kenya

    2012-01-01

    One issue in externally triggered cine-magnetic resonance imaging (EC-MRI) for the dynamic observation of speech organs is motion artifact in the phase-encoding direction caused by unstable repetitions of speech during data acquisition. We propose a technique to reduce such artifact by rearranging the k-space data used to reconstruct MR images based on the analysis of recorded speech sounds. We recorded the subject's speech sounds during EC-MRI and used post hoc acoustical processing to reduce scanning noise and detect the onset of each utterance based on analysis of the recorded sounds. We selected each line of k-space from several data acquisition sessions and rearranged them to reconstruct a new series of dynamic MR images according to the analyzed time of utterance onset. Comparative evaluation showed significant reduction in motion artifact signal in the dynamic MR images reconstructed by the proposed method. The quality of the reconstructed images was sufficient to observe the dynamic aspects of speech production mechanisms. (author)

  6. Cumulant expansions for measuring water exchange using diffusion MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Lipeng; Nilsson, Markus; Lasič, Samo; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Rathi, Yogesh

    2018-02-01

    The rate of water exchange across cell membranes is a parameter of biological interest and can be measured by diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI). In this work, we investigate a stochastic model for the diffusion-and-exchange of water molecules. This model provides a general solution for the temporal evolution of dMRI signal using any type of gradient waveform, thereby generalizing the signal expressions for the Kärger model. Moreover, we also derive a general nth order cumulant expansion of the dMRI signal accounting for water exchange, which has not been explored in earlier studies. Based on this analytical expression, we compute the cumulant expansion for dMRI signals for the special case of single diffusion encoding (SDE) and double diffusion encoding (DDE) sequences. Our results provide a theoretical guideline on optimizing experimental parameters for SDE and DDE sequences, respectively. Moreover, we show that DDE signals are more sensitive to water exchange at short-time scale but provide less attenuation at long-time scale than SDE signals. Our theoretical analysis is also validated using Monte Carlo simulations on synthetic structures.

  7. Magnetic resonance visualization of conductive structures by sequence-triggered direct currents and spin-echo phase imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eibofner, Frank; Wojtczyk, Hanne; Graf, Hansjörg, E-mail: hansjoerg.graf@med.uni-tuebingen.de, E-mail: drGraf@t-online.de [Section on Experimental Radiology, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen D-72076 (Germany); Clasen, Stephan [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen D-72076 (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Instrument visualization in interventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is commonly performed via susceptibility artifacts. Unfortunately, this approach suffers from limited conspicuity in inhomogeneous tissue and disturbed spatial encoding. Also, susceptibility artifacts are controllable only by sequence parameters. This work presents the basics of a new visualization method overcoming such problems by applying sequence-triggered direct current (DC) pulses in spin-echo (SE) imaging. SE phase images allow for background free current path localization. Methods: Application of a sequence-triggered DC pulse in SE imaging, e.g., during a time period between radiofrequency excitation and refocusing, results in transient field inhomogeneities. Dependent on the additional z-magnetic field from the DC, a phase offset results despite the refocusing pulse. False spatial encoding is avoided by DC application during periods when read-out or slice-encoding gradients are inactive. A water phantom containing a brass conductor (water equivalent susceptibility) and a titanium needle (serving as susceptibility source) was used to demonstrate the feasibility. Artifact dependence on current strength and orientation was examined. Results: Without DC, the brass conductor was only visible due to its water displacement. The titanium needle showed typical susceptibility artifacts. Applying triggered DC pulses, the phase offset of spins near the conductor appeared. Because SE phase images are homogenous also in regions of persistent field inhomogeneities, the position of the conductor could be determined with high reliability. Artifact characteristic could be easily controlled by amperage leaving sequence parameters unchanged. For an angle of 30° between current and static field visualization was still possible. Conclusions: SE phase images display the position of a conductor carrying pulsed DC free from artifacts caused by persistent field inhomogeneities. Magnitude and phase

  8. Comparison of PET and fMRI activation patterns during declarative memory processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottaghy, F.M.; Krause, B.J.; Schmidt, D.; Hautzel, H.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.-W.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N.J.; Halsband, U.

    2000-01-01

    Aim: In this study neuronal correlates of encoding and retrieval in paired association learning were compared using two different neuroimaging methods: Positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Methods: 6 right-handed normal male volunteers took part in the study. Each subject underwent six 0-15-butanol PET scans and an fMRI study comprising four single epochs on a different day. The subjects had to learn and retrieve 12 word pairs which were visually presented (highly imaginable words, not semantically related). Results: Mean recall accuracy was 93% in the PET as well as in the fMRI experiment. During encoding and retrieval we found anterior cingulate cortex activation, and bilateral prefrontal cortex activation in both imaging modalities. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of the precuneus in episodic memory. With PET the results demonstrate frontopolar activations whereas fMRI fails to show activations in this area probably due to susceptibility artifacts. In fMRI we found additionally parahippocampal activation and due to the whole-brain coverage cerebellar activation during encoding. The distance between the center-of-mass activations in both modalities was 7.2±6.5 mm. Conclusion: There is a preponderance of commonalities in the activation patterns yielded with fMRI and PET. However, there are also important differences. The decision to choose one or the other neuroimaging modality should among other aspects depend on the study design (single subject vs. group study) and the task of interest. (orig.) [de

  9. FMRI activity during associative encoding is correlated with cardiorespiratory fitness and source memory performance in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Scott M.; Hayes, Jasmeet P.; Williams, Victoria J.; Liu, Huiting; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2017-01-01

    Older adults (OA), relative to young adults (YA), exhibit age-related alterations in functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) activity during associative encoding, which contributes to deficits in source memory. Yet, there are remarkable individual differences in brain health and memory performance among OA. Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is one individual difference factor that may attenuate brain aging, and thereby contribute to enhanced source memory in OA. To examine this possibility, 26 OA and 31 YA completed a treadmill-based exercise test to evaluate CRF (peak VO2) and fMRI to examine brain activation during a face-name associative encoding task. Our results indicated that in OA, peak VO2 was positively associated with fMRI activity during associative encoding in multiple regions including bilateral prefrontal cortex, medial frontal cortex, bilateral thalamus and left hippocampus. Next, a conjunction analysis was conducted to assess whether CRF influenced age-related differences in fMRI activation. We classified OA as high or low CRF and compared their activation to YA. High fit OA (HFOA) showed fMRI activation more similar to YA than low fit OA (LFOA) (i.e., reduced age-related differences) in multiple regions including thalamus, posterior and prefrontal cortex. Conversely, in other regions, primarily in prefrontal cortex, HFOA, but not LFOA, demonstrated greater activation than YA (i.e., increased age-related differences). Further, fMRI activity in these brain regions was positively associated with source memory among OA, with a mediation model demonstrating that associative encoding activation in medial frontal cortex indirectly influenced the relationship between peak VO2 and subsequent source memory performance. These results indicate that CRF may contribute to neuroplasticity among OA, reducing age-related differences in some brain regions, consistent with the brain maintenance hypothesis, but accentuating age-differences in other regions

  10. On the relationship between instantaneous phase synchrony and correlation-based sliding windows for time-resolved fMRI connectivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mangor; Omidvarnia, Amir; Zalesky, Andrew; Jackson, Graeme D

    2018-06-08

    Correlation-based sliding window analysis (CSWA) is the most commonly used method to estimate time-resolved functional MRI (fMRI) connectivity. However, instantaneous phase synchrony analysis (IPSA) is gaining popularity mainly because it offers single time-point resolution of time-resolved fMRI connectivity. We aim to provide a systematic comparison between these two approaches, on both temporal and topological levels. For this purpose, we used resting-state fMRI data from two separate cohorts with different temporal resolutions (45 healthy subjects from Human Connectome Project fMRI data with repetition time of 0.72 s and 25 healthy subjects from a separate validation fMRI dataset with a repetition time of 3 s). For time-resolved functional connectivity analysis, we calculated tapered CSWA over a wide range of different window lengths that were temporally and topologically compared to IPSA. We found a strong association in connectivity dynamics between IPSA and CSWA when considering the absolute values of CSWA. The association between CSWA and IPSA was stronger for a window length of ∼20 s (shorter than filtered fMRI wavelength) than ∼100 s (longer than filtered fMRI wavelength), irrespective of the sampling rate of the underlying fMRI data. Narrow-band filtering of fMRI data (0.03-0.07 Hz) yielded a stronger relationship between IPSA and CSWA than wider-band (0.01-0.1 Hz). On a topological level, time-averaged IPSA and CSWA nodes were non-linearly correlated for both short (∼20 s) and long (∼100 s) windows, mainly because nodes with strong negative correlations (CSWA) displayed high phase synchrony (IPSA). IPSA and CSWA were anatomically similar in the default mode network, sensory cortex, insula and cerebellum. Our results suggest that IPSA and CSWA provide comparable characterizations of time-resolved fMRI connectivity for appropriately chosen window lengths. Although IPSA requires narrow-band fMRI filtering, we recommend the use of

  11. Determining the Neural Substrate for Encoding a Memory of Human Pain and the Influence of Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Kong, Yazhuo; Eippert, Falk; Tracey, Irene

    2017-12-06

    To convert a painful stimulus into a briefly maintainable construct when the painful stimulus is no longer accessible is essential to guide human behavior and avoid dangerous situations. Because of the aversive nature of pain, this encoding process might be influenced by emotional aspects and could thus vary across individuals, but we have yet to understand both the basic underlying neural mechanisms as well as potential interindividual differences. Using fMRI in combination with a delayed-discrimination task in healthy volunteers of both sexes, we discovered that brain regions involved in this working memory encoding process were dissociable according to whether the to-be-remembered stimulus was painful or not, with the medial thalamus and the rostral anterior cingulate cortex encoding painful and the primary somatosensory cortex encoding nonpainful stimuli. Encoding of painful stimuli furthermore significantly enhanced functional connectivity between the thalamus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). With regards to emotional aspects influencing encoding processes, we observed that more anxious participants showed significant performance advantages when encoding painful stimuli. Importantly, only during the encoding of pain, the interindividual differences in anxiety were associated with the strength of coupling between medial thalamus and mPFC, which was furthermore related to activity in the amygdala. These results indicate not only that there is a distinct signature for the encoding of a painful experience in humans, but also that this encoding process involves a strong affective component. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT To convert the sensation of pain into a briefly maintainable construct is essential to guide human behavior and avoid dangerous situations. Although this working memory encoding process is implicitly contained in the majority of studies, the underlying neural mechanisms remain unclear. Using fMRI in a delayed-discrimination task, we found that the

  12. WE-G-BRD-06: Volumetric Cine MRI (VC-MRI) Estimated Based On Prior Knowledge for On-Board Target Localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, W; Yin, F; Cai, J; Zhang, Y; Ren, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a technique to generate on-board VC-MRI using patient prior 4D-MRI, motion modeling and on-board 2D-cine MRI for real-time 3D target verification of liver and lung radiotherapy. Methods: The end-expiration phase images of a 4D-MRI acquired during patient simulation are used as patient prior images. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used to extract 3 major respiratory deformation patterns from the Deformation Field Maps (DFMs) generated between end-expiration phase and all other phases. On-board 2D-cine MRI images are acquired in the axial view. The on-board VC-MRI at any instant is considered as a deformation of the prior MRI at the end-expiration phase. The DFM is represented as a linear combination of the 3 major deformation patterns. The coefficients of the deformation patterns are solved by matching the corresponding 2D slice of the estimated VC-MRI with the acquired single 2D-cine MRI. The method was evaluated using both XCAT (a computerized patient model) simulation of lung cancer patients and MRI data from a real liver cancer patient. The 3D-MRI at every phase except end-expiration phase was used to simulate the ground-truth on-board VC-MRI at different instances, and the center-tumor slice was selected to simulate the on-board 2D-cine images. Results: Image subtraction of ground truth with estimated on-board VC-MRI shows fewer differences than image subtraction of ground truth with prior image. Excellent agreement between profiles was achieved. The normalized cross correlation coefficients between the estimated and ground-truth in the axial, coronal and sagittal views for each time step were >= 0.982, 0.905, 0.961 for XCAT data and >= 0.998, 0.911, 0.9541 for patient data. For XCAT data, the maximum-Volume-Percent-Difference between ground-truth and estimated tumor volumes was 1.6% and the maximum-Center-of-Mass-Shift was 0.9 mm. Conclusion: Preliminary studies demonstrated the feasibility to estimate real-time VC-MRI for on

  13. WE-G-BRD-06: Volumetric Cine MRI (VC-MRI) Estimated Based On Prior Knowledge for On-Board Target Localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, W; Yin, F; Cai, J; Zhang, Y; Ren, L [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a technique to generate on-board VC-MRI using patient prior 4D-MRI, motion modeling and on-board 2D-cine MRI for real-time 3D target verification of liver and lung radiotherapy. Methods: The end-expiration phase images of a 4D-MRI acquired during patient simulation are used as patient prior images. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used to extract 3 major respiratory deformation patterns from the Deformation Field Maps (DFMs) generated between end-expiration phase and all other phases. On-board 2D-cine MRI images are acquired in the axial view. The on-board VC-MRI at any instant is considered as a deformation of the prior MRI at the end-expiration phase. The DFM is represented as a linear combination of the 3 major deformation patterns. The coefficients of the deformation patterns are solved by matching the corresponding 2D slice of the estimated VC-MRI with the acquired single 2D-cine MRI. The method was evaluated using both XCAT (a computerized patient model) simulation of lung cancer patients and MRI data from a real liver cancer patient. The 3D-MRI at every phase except end-expiration phase was used to simulate the ground-truth on-board VC-MRI at different instances, and the center-tumor slice was selected to simulate the on-board 2D-cine images. Results: Image subtraction of ground truth with estimated on-board VC-MRI shows fewer differences than image subtraction of ground truth with prior image. Excellent agreement between profiles was achieved. The normalized cross correlation coefficients between the estimated and ground-truth in the axial, coronal and sagittal views for each time step were >= 0.982, 0.905, 0.961 for XCAT data and >= 0.998, 0.911, 0.9541 for patient data. For XCAT data, the maximum-Volume-Percent-Difference between ground-truth and estimated tumor volumes was 1.6% and the maximum-Center-of-Mass-Shift was 0.9 mm. Conclusion: Preliminary studies demonstrated the feasibility to estimate real-time VC-MRI for on

  14. WE-DE-206-00: MRI Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential part of clinical imaging due to its ability to render high soft tissue contrast. Instead of ionizing radiation, MRI use strong magnetic field, radio frequency waves and field gradients to create diagnostic useful images. It can be used to image the anatomy and also functional and physiological activities within the human body. Knowledge of the basic physical principles underlying MRI acquisition is vitally important to successful image production and proper image interpretation. This lecture will give an overview of the spin physics, imaging principle of MRI, the hardware of the MRI scanner, and various pulse sequences and their applications. It aims to provide a conceptual foundation to understand the image formation process of a clinical MRI scanner. Learning Objectives: Understand the origin of the MR signal and contrast from the spin physics level. Understand the main hardware components of a MRI scanner and their purposes Understand steps for MR image formation including spatial encoding and image reconstruction Understand the main kinds of MR pulse sequences and their characteristics.

  15. Distinct neural correlates of associative working memory and long-term memory encoding in the medial temporal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Heiko C; Rijpkema, Mark; Fernández, Guillén; Kessels, Roy P C

    2012-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests a role for the hippocampus not only in long-term memory (LTM) but also in relational working memory (WM) processes, challenging the view of the hippocampus as being solely involved in episodic LTM. However, hippocampal involvement reported in some neuroimaging studies using "classical" WM tasks may at least partly reflect incidental LTM encoding. To disentangle WM processing and LTM formation we administered a delayed-match-to-sample associative WM task in an event-related fMRI study design. Each trial of the WM task consisted of four pairs of faces and houses, which had to be maintained during a delay of 10 s. This was followed by a probe phase consisting of three consecutively presented pairs; for each pair participants were to indicate whether it matched one of the pairs of the encoding phase. After scanning, an unexpected recognition-memory (LTM) task was administered. Brain activity during encoding was analyzed based on WM and LTM performance. Hence, encoding-related activity predicting WM success in the absence of successful LTM formation could be isolated. Furthermore, regions critical for successful LTM formation for pairs previously correctly processed in WM were analyzed. Results showed that the left parahippocampal gyrus including the fusiform gyrus predicted subsequent accuracy on WM decisions. The right anterior hippocampus and left inferior frontal gyrus, in contrast, predicted successful LTM for pairs that were previously correctly classified in the WM task. Our results suggest that brain regions associated with higher-level visuo-perceptual processing are involved in successful associative WM encoding, whereas the anterior hippocampus and left inferior frontal gyrus are involved in successful LTM formation during incidental encoding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Feasibility of semiautomated MR volumetry using gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI at hepatobiliary phase for living liver donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongjin; Kim, Kyoung Won; Kim, So Yeon; Kim, Bohyoung; Lee, So Jung; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Moon Gyu; Song, Gi-Won; Hwang, Shin; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2014-09-01

    To assess the feasibility of semiautomated MR volumetry using gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI at the hepatobiliary phase compared with manual CT volumetry. Forty potential live liver donor candidates who underwent MR and CT on the same day, were included in our study. Semiautomated MR volumetry was performed using gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI at the hepatobiliary phase. We performed the quadratic MR image division for correction of the bias field inhomogeneity. With manual CT volumetry as the reference standard, we calculated the average volume measurement error of the semiautomated MR volumetry. We also calculated the mean of the number and time of the manual editing, edited volume, and total processing time. The average volume measurement errors of the semiautomated MR volumetry were 2.35% ± 1.22%. The average values of the numbers of editing, operation times of manual editing, edited volumes, and total processing time for the semiautomated MR volumetry were 1.9 ± 0.6, 8.1 ± 2.7 s, 12.4 ± 8.8 mL, and 11.7 ± 2.9 s, respectively. Semiautomated liver MR volumetry using hepatobiliary phase gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI with the quadratic MR image division is a reliable, easy, and fast tool to measure liver volume in potential living liver donors. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Comparison of brown and white adipose tissues in infants and children with chemical-shift-encoded water-fat MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Houchun H; Yin, Larry; Aggabao, Patricia C; Perkins, Thomas G; Chia, Jonathan M; Gilsanz, Vicente

    2013-10-01

    To compare fat-signal fractions (FFs) and T2* values between brown (BAT) and white (WAT) adipose tissue located within the supraclavicular fossa and subcutaneous depots, respectively. Twelve infants and 39 children were studied. Children were divided into lean and overweight/obese subgroups. Chemical-shift-encoded water-fat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify FFs and T2* metrics in the supraclavicular and adjacent subcutaneous adipose tissue depots. Linear regression and t-tests were performed. Infants had lower supraclavicular FFs than children (P children exhibited lower supraclavicular FFs and T2* values than overweight children (P children, but not in infants. FFs in both depots were positively correlated with age and weight in infants (P children, they were correlated with weight and body mass index (BMI) (P children (P children, which are potentially indicative of physiological differences in adipose tissue fat content, amount, and metabolic activity. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. MRI Reporter Genes for Noninvasive Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is one of the most important imaging technologies used in clinical diagnosis. Reporter genes for MRI can be applied to accurately track the delivery of cell in cell therapy, evaluate the therapy effect of gene delivery, and monitor tissue/cell-specific microenvironments. Commonly used reporter genes for MRI usually include genes encoding the enzyme (e.g., tyrosinase and β-galactosidase, the receptor on the cells (e.g., transferrin receptor, and endogenous reporter genes (e.g., ferritin reporter gene. However, low sensitivity limits the application of MRI and reporter gene-based multimodal imaging strategies are common including optical imaging and radionuclide imaging. These can significantly improve diagnostic efficiency and accelerate the development of new therapies.

  19. A Multispectral Photon-Counting Double Random Phase Encoding Scheme for Image Authentication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faliu Yi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new method for color image-based authentication that combines multispectral photon-counting imaging (MPCI and double random phase encoding (DRPE schemes. The sparsely distributed information from MPCI and the stationary white noise signal from DRPE make intruder attacks difficult. In this authentication method, the original multispectral RGB color image is down-sampled into a Bayer image. The three types of color samples (red, green and blue color in the Bayer image are encrypted with DRPE and the amplitude part of the resulting image is photon counted. The corresponding phase information that has nonzero amplitude after photon counting is then kept for decryption. Experimental results show that the retrieved images from the proposed method do not visually resemble their original counterparts. Nevertheless, the original color image can be efficiently verified with statistical nonlinear correlations. Our experimental results also show that different interpolation algorithms applied to Bayer images result in different verification effects for multispectral RGB color images.

  20. A multispectral photon-counting double random phase encoding scheme for image authentication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Faliu; Moon, Inkyu; Lee, Yeon H

    2014-05-20

    In this paper, we propose a new method for color image-based authentication that combines multispectral photon-counting imaging (MPCI) and double random phase encoding (DRPE) schemes. The sparsely distributed information from MPCI and the stationary white noise signal from DRPE make intruder attacks difficult. In this authentication method, the original multispectral RGB color image is down-sampled into a Bayer image. The three types of color samples (red, green and blue color) in the Bayer image are encrypted with DRPE and the amplitude part of the resulting image is photon counted. The corresponding phase information that has nonzero amplitude after photon counting is then kept for decryption. Experimental results show that the retrieved images from the proposed method do not visually resemble their original counterparts. Nevertheless, the original color image can be efficiently verified with statistical nonlinear correlations. Our experimental results also show that different interpolation algorithms applied to Bayer images result in different verification effects for multispectral RGB color images.

  1. Accuracy of 3 Tesla pelvic phased-array multiparametric MRI in diagnosing prostate cancer at repeat biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Pepe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Multiparametric pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI accuracy in prostate cancer (PCa diagnosis was evaluated. Materials and Methods. From June 2011 to December 2013, 168 patients (median 65 years with negative digital rectal examination underwent repeat transperineal saturation biopsy (SPBx; median 28 cores for persistently high or increasing PSA values, PSA >10 ng/ml or PSA values between 4.1-10 o r 2.6-4 ng/ml with free/total PSA < 25% and < 20%, respectively. All patients underwent mpMRI using a 3.0 Tesla scanner equipped with surface 16 channels phased-array coil and lesions suspicious for PCa were submitted to additional targeted biopsies. Results. A T1c PCa was found in 66 (39% cases; SPBx and mpMRI-suspicious targeted biopsy diagnosed 60 (91% and 52 (78.8% cancers missing 6 (all of the anterior zone and 14 cancers (12 and 2 of the lateral margins and anterior zone, respectively; in detail, mpMRI missed 12 (18.1% PCa charaterized by microfocal (1 positive core with greatest percentage of cancer and Gleason score equal to 5% and 6, respectively disease at risk for insignificant cancer. The diameter of the suspicious mpMRI lesion was directly correlated to the diagnosis of PCa with poor Gleason score (p < 0.05; detection rate of cancer for each suspicious mpMRI core was 35.3%. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of mpMRI in diagnosing PCa was 75.7%, 82.5%, 71.8%, 78.9%, 87.9%, respectively. Conclusion. Multiparametric pMRI improved SPBx accuracy in diagnosing significant anterior PCa; the diameter of mpMRI suspicious lesion resulted significantly predictive of aggressive cancers.

  2. Fast entrainment of human electroencephalogram to a theta-band photic flicker during successful memory encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki eSato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Theta band power (4-8Hz in the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG is thought to be stronger during memory encoding for subsequently remembered items than for forgotten items. According to simultaneous EEG-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI measurements, the memory-dependent EEG theta is associated with multiple regions of the brain. This suggests that the multiple regions cooperate with EEG theta synchronization during successful memory encoding. However, a question still remains: What kind of neural dynamic organizes such a memory-dependent global network? In this study, the modulation of the EEG theta entrainment property during successful encoding was hypothesized to lead to EEG theta synchronization among a distributed network. Then, a transient response of EEG theta to a theta-band photic flicker with a short duration was evaluated during memory encoding. In the results, flicker-induced EEG power increased and decreased with a time constant of several hundred milliseconds following the onset and the offset of the flicker, respectively. Importantly, the offset response of EEG power was found to be significantly decreased during successful encoding. Moreover, the offset response of the phase locking index was also found to associate with memory performance. According to computational simulations, the results are interpreted as a smaller time constant (i.e., faster response of a driven harmonic oscillator rather than a change in the spontaneous oscillatory input. This suggests that the fast response of EEG theta forms a global EEG theta network among memory-related regions during successful encoding, and it contributes to a flexible formation of the network along the time course.

  3. Fast entrainment of human electroencephalogram to a theta-band photic flicker during successful memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Naoyuki

    2013-01-01

    Theta band power (4-8 Hz) in the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) is thought to be stronger during memory encoding for subsequently remembered items than for forgotten items. According to simultaneous EEG-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements, the memory-dependent EEG theta is associated with multiple regions of the brain. This suggests that the multiple regions cooperate with EEG theta synchronization during successful memory encoding. However, a question still remains: What kind of neural dynamic organizes such a memory-dependent global network? In this study, the modulation of the EEG theta entrainment property during successful encoding was hypothesized to lead to EEG theta synchronization among a distributed network. Then, a transient response of EEG theta to a theta-band photic flicker with a short duration was evaluated during memory encoding. In the results, flicker-induced EEG power increased and decreased with a time constant of several hundred milliseconds following the onset and the offset of the flicker, respectively. Importantly, the offset response of EEG power was found to be significantly decreased during successful encoding. Moreover, the offset response of the phase locking index was also found to associate with memory performance. According to computational simulations, the results are interpreted as a smaller time constant (i.e., faster response) of a driven harmonic oscillator rather than a change in the spontaneous oscillatory input. This suggests that the fast response of EEG theta forms a global EEG theta network among memory-related regions during successful encoding, and it contributes to a flexible formation of the network along the time course.

  4. Influences of prolonged apnea and oxygen inhalation on pulmonary hemodynamics during breath holding: Quantitative assessment by velocity-encoded MR imaging with SENSE technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogami, Munenobu; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Higashino, Takanori; Takenaka, Daisuke; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Koyama, Hisanobu; Kawamitsu, Hideaki; Fujii, Masahiko; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to assess the influence of prolonged apnea and administration of oxygen on pulmonary hemodynamics during breath holding (BH) by using velocity-encoded MR imaging combined with the SENSE technique (velocity MRI). Materials and methods: Ten healthy male volunteers underwent velocity MRI during BH with and without O 2 inhalation. All velocity MRI data sets were obtained continuously with the 2D cine phase-contrast method during a single BH period. The data were then divided into three BH time phases as follows: first, second and third. To evaluate the influence of prolonged apnea on hemodynamics, stroke volume (SV) and maximal change in flow rate during ejection (MCFR) of second and third phases were statistically compared with those of first phase by using the ANOVA followed by Turkey's HSD multiple comparison test. To assess the influence of O 2 on hemodynamics, SV and MCFR with or without O 2 were compared by the paired t-test. To assess the measuring agreement of hemodynamic indices during prolonged breath holding, Bland-Altman's analysis was performed. Results: Prolonged apnea had no significant influence on SV and MCFR regardless of administration of O 2 (p > 0.05). Mean MCFR for all phases was significantly lower with administration of O 2 than without (p 2 were smaller than without. Conclusion: O 2 inhalation modulated maximal change in flow rate during ejection, and did not influence stroke volume during breath holding. Influence of O 2 inhalation should be considered for MR measurements of pulmonary hemodynamics during breath holding

  5. Phase-contrast MRI and CFD modeling of apparent 3He gas flow in rat pulmonary airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minard, Kevin R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kabilan, Senthil; Jacob, Richard E.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.; Corley, Richard A.

    2012-08-01

    Phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized 3He is potentially useful for developing and testing patient-specific models of pulmonary airflow. One challenge, however, is that PC-MRI provides apparent values of local 3He velocity that not only depend on actual airflow but also on gas diffusion. This not only blurs laminar flow patterns in narrow airways but also introduces anomalous airflow structure that reflects gas-wall interactions. Here, both effects are predicted in a live rat using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and for the first time, simulated patterns of apparent 3He gas velocity are compared with in vivo PC-MRI. Results show (1) that correlations (R2) between measured and simulated airflow patterns increase from 0.23 to 0.79 simply by accounting for apparent 3He transport, and (2) that remaining differences are mainly due to uncertain airway segmentation and partial volume effects stemming from relatively coarse MRI resolution. Higher-fidelity testing of pulmonary airflow predictions should therefore be possible with future imaging improvements.

  6. An Information Theoretic Characterisation of Auditory Encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overath, Tobias; Cusack, Rhodri; Kumar, Sukhbinder; von Kriegstein, Katharina; Warren, Jason D; Grube, Manon; Carlyon, Robert P; Griffiths, Timothy D

    2007-01-01

    The entropy metric derived from information theory provides a means to quantify the amount of information transmitted in acoustic streams like speech or music. By systematically varying the entropy of pitch sequences, we sought brain areas where neural activity and energetic demands increase as a function of entropy. Such a relationship is predicted to occur in an efficient encoding mechanism that uses less computational resource when less information is present in the signal: we specifically tested the hypothesis that such a relationship is present in the planum temporale (PT). In two convergent functional MRI studies, we demonstrated this relationship in PT for encoding, while furthermore showing that a distributed fronto-parietal network for retrieval of acoustic information is independent of entropy. The results establish PT as an efficient neural engine that demands less computational resource to encode redundant signals than those with high information content. PMID:17958472

  7. The role of the thalamic nuclei in recognition memory accompanied by recall during encoding and retrieval: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergola, Giulio; Ranft, Alexander; Mathias, Klaus; Suchan, Boris

    2013-07-01

    The present functional imaging study aimed at investigating the contribution of the mediodorsal nucleus and the anterior nuclei of the thalamus with their related cortical networks to recognition memory and recall. Eighteen subjects performed associative picture encoding followed by a single item recognition test during the functional magnetic resonance imaging session. After scanning, subjects performed a cued recall test using the formerly recognized pictures as cues. This post-scanning test served to classify recognition trials according to subsequent recall performance. In general, single item recognition accompanied by successful recall of the associations elicited stronger activation in the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus and in the prefrontal cortices both during encoding and retrieval compared to recognition without recall. In contrast, the anterior nuclei of the thalamus were selectively active during the retrieval phase of recognition followed by recall. A correlational analysis showed that activation of the anterior thalamus during retrieval as assessed by measuring the percent signal changes predicted lower rates of recognition without recall. These findings show that the thalamus is critical for recognition accompanied by recall, and provide the first evidence of a functional segregation of the thalamic nuclei with respect to the memory retrieval phase. In particular, the mediodorsal thalamic-prefrontal cortical network is activated during successful encoding and retrieval of associations, which suggests a role of this system in recall and recollection. The activity of the anterior thalamic-temporal network selectively during retrieval predicts better memory performances across subjects and this confirms the paramount role of this network in recall and recollection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. FMRI activity during associative encoding is correlated with cardiorespiratory fitness and source memory performance in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Scott M; Hayes, Jasmeet P; Williams, Victoria J; Liu, Huiting; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2017-06-01

    Older adults (OA), relative to young adults (YA), exhibit age-related alterations in functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) activity during associative encoding, which contributes to deficits in source memory. Yet, there are remarkable individual differences in brain health and memory performance among OA. Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is one individual difference factor that may attenuate brain aging, and thereby contribute to enhanced source memory in OA. To examine this possibility, 26 OA and 31 YA completed a treadmill-based exercise test to evaluate CRF (peak VO 2 ) and fMRI to examine brain activation during a face-name associative encoding task. Our results indicated that in OA, peak VO 2 was positively associated with fMRI activity during associative encoding in multiple regions including bilateral prefrontal cortex, medial frontal cortex, bilateral thalamus and left hippocampus. Next, a conjunction analysis was conducted to assess whether CRF influenced age-related differences in fMRI activation. We classified OA as high or low CRF and compared their activation to YA. High fit OA (HFOA) showed fMRI activation more similar to YA than low fit OA (LFOA) (i.e., reduced age-related differences) in multiple regions including thalamus, posterior and prefrontal cortex. Conversely, in other regions, primarily in prefrontal cortex, HFOA, but not LFOA, demonstrated greater activation than YA (i.e., increased age-related differences). Further, fMRI activity in these brain regions was positively associated with source memory among OA, with a mediation model demonstrating that associative encoding activation in medial frontal cortex indirectly influenced the relationship between peak VO 2 and subsequent source memory performance. These results indicate that CRF may contribute to neuroplasticity among OA, reducing age-related differences in some brain regions, consistent with the brain maintenance hypothesis, but accentuating age-differences in other regions

  9. Comparison of particle image velocimetry and phase contrast MRI in a patient-specific extracardiac total cavopulmonary connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Hiroumi D; Sundareswaran, Kartik S; Teisseyre, Thomas Z; Astary, Garrett W; Parks, W James; Skrinjar, Oskar; Oshinski, John N; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2008-08-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) have not been compared in complex biofluid environments. Such analysis is particularly useful to investigate flow structures in the correction of single ventricle congenital heart defects, where fluid dynamic efficiency is essential. A stereolithographic replica of an extracardiac total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) is studied using PIV and PC-MRI in a steady flow loop. Volumetric two-component PIV is compared to volumetric three-component PC-MRI at various flow conditions. Similar flow structures are observed in both PIV and PC-MRI, where smooth flow dominates the extracardiac TCPC, and superior vena cava flow is preferential to the right pulmonary artery, while inferior vena cava flow is preferential to the left pulmonary artery. Where three-component velocity is available in PC-MRI studies, some helical flow in the extracardiac TCPC is observed. Vessel cross sections provide an effective means of validation for both experiments, and velocity magnitudes are of the same order. The results highlight similarities to validate flow in a complex patient-specific extracardiac TCPC. Additional information obtained by velocity in three components further describes the complexity of the flow in anatomic structures.

  10. MRI angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncelet, B.; Baleriiaux, D.; struyven, J.; Segebarth, C.

    1989-01-01

    In MRI angiography two basis images are measured which only differ by the signal intensity of the flowing blood in the vessels. Subtraction of these two images produces a high contrast-to-noise representation of the vessels. Contrast between stationary tissues and flowing blood is changed, for one image compared to the second one, using a selective modification of the phase of the signal from the flowing blood, and/or using a selective modification of its longitudinal magnetization: The macroscopic spin motions along the selection and the measurement gradient directions affect the phase of the nuclear signal; assuming constant velocity, the phase is proportional to the velocity and to the first moment of the gradient waveforms applied. This work concentrates on the generarion of MRI angiograms, following a phase-based approach, of the carotid bifurcation and of different intracranical regions including the carotid syphon and the circle of Willis. (author). 21 refs.; 3 figs

  11. An eigenvalue approach for the automatic scaling of unknowns in model-based reconstructions: Application to real-time phase-contrast flow MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhengguo; Hohage, Thorsten; Kalentev, Oleksandr; Joseph, Arun A; Wang, Xiaoqing; Voit, Dirk; Merboldt, K Dietmar; Frahm, Jens

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automatic method for the scaling of unknowns in model-based nonlinear inverse reconstructions and to evaluate its application to real-time phase-contrast (RT-PC) flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Model-based MRI reconstructions of parametric maps which describe a physical or physiological function require the solution of a nonlinear inverse problem, because the list of unknowns in the extended MRI signal equation comprises multiple functional parameters and all coil sensitivity profiles. Iterative solutions therefore rely on an appropriate scaling of unknowns to numerically balance partial derivatives and regularization terms. The scaling of unknowns emerges as a self-adjoint and positive-definite matrix which is expressible by its maximal eigenvalue and solved by power iterations. The proposed method is applied to RT-PC flow MRI based on highly undersampled acquisitions. Experimental validations include numerical phantoms providing ground truth and a wide range of human studies in the ascending aorta, carotid arteries, deep veins during muscular exercise and cerebrospinal fluid during deep respiration. For RT-PC flow MRI, model-based reconstructions with automatic scaling not only offer velocity maps with high spatiotemporal acuity and much reduced phase noise, but also ensure fast convergence as well as accurate and precise velocities for all conditions tested, i.e. for different velocity ranges, vessel sizes and the simultaneous presence of signals with velocity aliasing. In summary, the proposed automatic scaling of unknowns in model-based MRI reconstructions yields quantitatively reliable velocities for RT-PC flow MRI in various experimental scenarios. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Brain activity and functional coupling changes associated with self-reference effect during both encoding and retrieval.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastassja Morel

    Full Text Available Information that is processed with reference to oneself, i.e. Self-Referential Processing (SRP, is generally associated with better remembering compared to information processed in a condition not related to oneself. This positive effect of the self on subsequent memory performance is called as Self-Reference Effect (SRE. The neural basis of SRE is still poorly understood. The main goal of the present work was thus to highlight brain changes associated with SRE in terms of activity and functional coupling and during both encoding and retrieval so as to assess the relative contribution of both processes to SRE. For this purpose, we used an fMRI event-related self-referential paradigm in 30 healthy young subjects and measured brain activity during both encoding and retrieval of self-relevant information compared to a semantic control condition. We found that SRE was associated with brain changes during the encoding phase only, including both greater activity in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and greater functional coupling between these brain regions and the posterior cingulate cortex. These findings highlight the contribution of brain regions involved in both SRP and episodic memory and the relevance of the communication between these regions during the encoding process as the neural substrates of SRE. This is consistent with the idea that SRE reflects a positive effect of the reactivation of self-related memories on the encoding of new information in episodic memory.

  13. An MR/MRI compatible core holder with the RF probe immersed in the confining fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerian, M.; Balcom, B. J.

    2018-01-01

    An open frame RF probe for high pressure and high temperature MR/MRI measurements was designed, fabricated, and tested. The open frame RF probe was installed inside an MR/MRI compatible metallic core holder, withstanding a maximum pressure and temperature of 5000 psi and 80 °C. The open frame RF probe was tunable for both 1H and 19F resonance frequencies with a 0.2 T static magnetic field. The open frame structure was based on simple pillars of PEEK polymer upon which the RF probe was wound. The RF probe was immersed in the high pressure confining fluid during operation. The open frame structure simplified fabrication of the RF probe and significantly reduced the amount of polymeric materials in the core holder. This minimized the MR background signal detected. Phase encoding MRI methods were employed to map the spin density of a sulfur hexafluoride gas saturating a Berea core plug in the core holder. The SF6 was imaged as a high pressure gas and as a supercritical fluid.

  14. SU-F-R-32: Evaluation of MRI Acquisition Parameter Variations On Texture Feature Extraction Using ACR Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Y; Wang, J; Wang, C; Chang, Z

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the sensitivity of classic texture features to variations of MRI acquisition parameters. Methods: This study was performed on American College of Radiology (ACR) MRI Accreditation Program Phantom. MR imaging was acquired on a GE 750 3T scanner with XRM explain gradient, employing a T1-weighted images (TR/TE=500/20ms) with the following parameters as the reference standard: number of signal average (NEX) = 1, matrix size = 256×256, flip angle = 90°, slice thickness = 5mm. The effect of the acquisition parameters on texture features with and without non-uniformity correction were investigated respectively, while all the other parameters were kept as reference standard. Protocol parameters were set as follows: (a). NEX = 0.5, 2 and 4; (b).Phase encoding steps = 128, 160 and 192; (c). Matrix size = 128×128, 192×192 and 512×512. 32 classic texture features were generated using the classic gray level run length matrix (GLRLM) and gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCOM) from each image data set. Normalized range ((maximum-minimum)/mean) was calculated to determine variation among the scans with different protocol parameters. Results: For different NEX, 31 out of 32 texture features’ range are within 10%. For different phase encoding steps, 31 out of 32 texture features’ range are within 10%. For different acquisition matrix size without non-uniformity correction, 14 out of 32 texture features’ range are within 10%; for different acquisition matrix size with non-uniformity correction, 16 out of 32 texture features’ range are within 10%. Conclusion: Initial results indicated that those texture features that range within 10% are less sensitive to variations in T1-weighted MRI acquisition parameters. This might suggest that certain texture features might be more reliable to be used as potential biomarkers in MR quantitative image analysis.

  15. Saccades phase-locked to alpha oscillations in the occipital and medial temporal lobe enhance memory encoding

    OpenAIRE

    Noachtar, Soheyl; Doeller, Christian; Jensen, Ole; Hartl, Elisabeth; Staudigl, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Efficient sampling of visual information requires a coordination of eye movements and ongoing brain oscillations. Using intracranial and MEG recordings, we show that saccades are locked to the phase of visual alpha oscillations, and that this coordination supports mnemonic encoding of visual scenes. Furthermore, parahippocampal and retrosplenial cortex involvement in this coordination reflects effective vision-to-memory mapping, highlighting the importance of neural oscillations for the inter...

  16. Aerobic Exercise During Encoding Impairs Hippocampus-Dependent Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Keishi; Kamijo, Keita; Masaki, Hiroaki

    2017-08-01

    We investigated how aerobic exercise during encoding affects hippocampus-dependent memory through a source memory task that assessed hippocampus-independent familiarity and hippocampus-dependent recollection processes. Using a within-participants design, young adult participants performed a memory-encoding task while performing a cycling exercise or being seated. The subsequent retrieval phase was conducted while sitting on a chair. We assessed behavioral and event-related brain potential measures of familiarity and recollection processes during the retrieval phase. Results indicated that source accuracy was lower for encoding with exercise than for encoding in the resting condition. Event-related brain potential measures indicated that the parietal old/new effect, which has been linked to recollection processing, was observed in the exercise condition, whereas it was absent in the rest condition, which is indicative of exercise-induced hippocampal activation. These findings suggest that aerobic exercise during encoding impairs hippocampus-dependent memory, which may be attributed to inefficient source encoding during aerobic exercise.

  17. Correcting for respiratory motion in liver PET/MRI: preliminary evaluation of the utility of bellows and navigated hepatobiliary phase imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hope, Thomas A.; Verdin, Emily F.; Bergsland, Emily K.; Ohliger, Michael A.; Corvera, Carlos University; Nakakura, Eric K.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of bellows-based respiratory compensation and navigated hepatobiliary phase imaging to correct for respiratory motion in the setting of dedicated liver PET/MRI. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Six patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumor were imaged using Ga-68 DOTA-TOC PET/MRI. Whole body imaging and a dedicated 15-min liver PET acquisition was performed, in addition to navigated and breath-held hepatobiliary phase (HBP) MRI. Liver PET data was reconstructed three ways: the entire data set (liver PET), gated using respiratory bellows (RC-liver PET), and a non-gated data set reconstructed using the same amount of data used in the RC-liver PET (shortened liver PET). Liver lesions were evaluated using SUV max , SUV peak , SUV mean , and Vol isocontour . Additionally, the displacement of each lesion between the RC-liver PET images and the navigated and breath-held HBP images was calculated. Respiratory compensation resulted in a 43 % increase in SUVs compared to ungated data (liver vs RC-liver PET SUV max 26.0 vs 37.3, p < 0.001) and a 25 % increase compared to a non-gated reconstruction using the same amount of data (RC-liver vs shortened liver PET SUV max 26.0 vs 32.6, p < 0.001). Lesion displacement was minimized using navigated HBP MRI (1.3 ± 1.0 mm) compared to breath-held HBP MRI (23.3 ± 1.0 mm). Respiratory bellows can provide accurate respiratory compensation when imaging liver lesions using PET/MRI, and results in increased SUVs due to a combination of increased image noise and reduced respiratory blurring. Additionally, navigated HBP MRI accurately aligns with respiratory compensated PET data.

  18. Correcting for respiratory motion in liver PET/MRI: preliminary evaluation of the utility of bellows and navigated hepatobiliary phase imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hope, Thomas A. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Radiology, San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Verdin, Emily F. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Bergsland, Emily K. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ohliger, Michael A. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Radiology, San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, CA (United States); Corvera, Carlos University; Nakakura, Eric K. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-09-18

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of bellows-based respiratory compensation and navigated hepatobiliary phase imaging to correct for respiratory motion in the setting of dedicated liver PET/MRI. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Six patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumor were imaged using Ga-68 DOTA-TOC PET/MRI. Whole body imaging and a dedicated 15-min liver PET acquisition was performed, in addition to navigated and breath-held hepatobiliary phase (HBP) MRI. Liver PET data was reconstructed three ways: the entire data set (liver PET), gated using respiratory bellows (RC-liver PET), and a non-gated data set reconstructed using the same amount of data used in the RC-liver PET (shortened liver PET). Liver lesions were evaluated using SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub peak}, SUV{sub mean}, and Vol{sub isocontour}. Additionally, the displacement of each lesion between the RC-liver PET images and the navigated and breath-held HBP images was calculated. Respiratory compensation resulted in a 43 % increase in SUVs compared to ungated data (liver vs RC-liver PET SUV{sub max} 26.0 vs 37.3, p < 0.001) and a 25 % increase compared to a non-gated reconstruction using the same amount of data (RC-liver vs shortened liver PET SUV{sub max} 26.0 vs 32.6, p < 0.001). Lesion displacement was minimized using navigated HBP MRI (1.3 ± 1.0 mm) compared to breath-held HBP MRI (23.3 ± 1.0 mm). Respiratory bellows can provide accurate respiratory compensation when imaging liver lesions using PET/MRI, and results in increased SUVs due to a combination of increased image noise and reduced respiratory blurring. Additionally, navigated HBP MRI accurately aligns with respiratory compensated PET data.

  19. Measurement of coronary flow response to cold pressor stress in asymptomatic women with cardiovascular risk factors using spiral velocity-encoded cine MRI at 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroules, Christopher D.; Peshock, Ronald M.; Chang, Alice Y.; Kontak, Andrew; Dimitrov, Ivan; Kotys, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Background: Coronary sinus (CS) flow in response to a provocative stress has been used as a surrogate measure of coronary flow reserve, and velocity-encoded cine (VEC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established technique for measuring CS flow. In this study, the cold pressor test (CPT) was used to measure CS flow response because it elicits an endothelium-dependent coronary vasodilation that may afford greater sensitivity for detecting early changes in coronary endothelial function. Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and reproducibility of CS flow reactivity (CSFR) to CPT using spiral VEC MRI at 3 Tesla in a sample of asymptomatic women with cardiovascular risk factors. Material and Methods: Fourteen asymptomatic women (age 38 years ± 10) with cardiovascular risk factors were studied using 3D spiral VEC MRI of the CS at 3 T. The CPT was utilized as a provocative stress to measure changes in CS flow. CSFR to CPT was calculated from the ratio of CS flow during peak stress to baseline CS flow. Results: CPT induced a significant hemodynamic response as measured by a 45% increase in rate-pressure product (P<0.01). A significant increase in CS volume flow was also observed (baseline, 116 ± 26 ml/min; peak stress, 152 ± 34 ml/min, P=0.01). CSFR to CPT was 1.31 ± 0.20. Test-retest variability of CS volume flow was 5% at baseline and 6% during peak stress. Conclusion: Spiral CS VEC MRI at 3 T is a feasible and reproducible technique for measuring CS flow in asymptomatic women at risk for cardiovascular disease. Significant changes in CSFR to CPT are detectable, without demanding pharmacologic stress

  20. MRI for characterization of primary tumors in the non-cirrhotic liver: Added value of Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced hepatospecific phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donati, Olivio F.; Hunziker, Roger; Fischer, Michael A. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Raptis, Dimitri A.; Breitenstein, Stefan [Department of Visceral and Transplant Surgery, Swiss Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary (HPB) Center, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Patak, Michael A., E-mail: Michael.Patak@hirslanden.ch [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Clinic Hirslanden, Hirslanden Hospital Group, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the added value of hepatospecific phase in Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with primary tumors in non-cirrhotic liver. Methods: Twenty-nine patients (median, 39 years; range, 18–81 years; 11 male) underwent preoperative Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRI including hepatospecific phase after 10 and 20 min of contrast injection at four institutions in Europe, North America and New Zealand. Images were evaluated by three different readers (R1–R3) who characterized liver tumors with and without consultation of the hepatospecific phase images. Confidence in diagnosis was scored on a visual analog scale from 1 to 10. Histopathology (adenoma, n = 5; focal nodular hyperplasia, n = 11 and hepatocellular carcinoma, n = 13) in all patients served as the standard of reference. Differences were evaluated using the McNemar and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: Without hepatospecific phase images available, 22 (76%), 19 (66%) and 19 (66%) of 29 tumors were characterized correctly by the three readers respectively. Mean confidence in diagnosis was 6.1, 5.7 and 5.8. With the hepatospecific phase included, characterization of liver tumors did not change significantly with 21 (72%), 23 (79%) and 19 (66%) of 29 tumors diagnosed correctly (p > 0.05). According confidence ratings increased to 6.3, 6.5 and 7.7, respectively. Increase in diagnostic confidence was significant for R2 and R3 (p < 0.05) and independent of reader's experience. Conclusion: The additional hepatospecific phase in Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRI did not significantly increase diagnostic accuracy in characterization of primary tumors in the non-cirrhotic liver. However, 2/3 readers showed a significant increase in diagnostic confidence after consultation of the hepatospecific phase.

  1. Modulating the Focus of Attention for Spoken Words at Encoding Affects Frontoparietal Activation for Incidental Verbal Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Thomas A.; Almryde, Kyle R.; Fidler, Lesley J.; Lockwood, Julie L.; Antonucci, Sharon M.; Plante, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Attention is crucial for encoding information into memory, and current dual-process models seek to explain the roles of attention in both recollection memory and incidental-perceptual memory processes. The present study combined an incidental memory paradigm with event-related functional MRI to examine the effect of attention at encoding on the subsequent neural activation associated with unintended perceptual memory for spoken words. At encoding, we systematically varied attention levels as ...

  2. Ultrasonic backscatter imaging by shear-wave-induced echo phase encoding of target locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAleavey, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel method for ultrasound backscatter image formation wherein lateral resolution of the target is obtained by using traveling shear waves to encode the lateral position of targets in the phase of the received echo. We demonstrate that the phase modulation as a function of shear wavenumber can be expressed in terms of a Fourier transform of the lateral component of the target echogenicity. The inverse transform, obtained by measurements of the phase modulation over a range of shear wave spatial frequencies, yields the lateral scatterer distribution. Range data are recovered from time of flight as in conventional ultrasound, yielding a B-mode-like image. In contrast to conventional ultrasound imaging, where mechanical or electronic focusing is used and lateral resolution is determined by aperture size and wavelength, we demonstrate that lateral resolution using the proposed method is independent of the properties of the aperture. Lateral resolution of the target is achieved using a stationary, unfocused, single-element transducer. We present simulated images of targets of uniform and non-uniform shear modulus. Compounding for speckle reduction is demonstrated. Finally, we demonstrate image formation with an unfocused transducer in gelatin phantoms of uniform shear modulus.

  3. Turbulent stress measurements with phase-contrast magnetic resonance through tilted slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKenzie, Jordan; Soederberg, Daniel; Lundell, Fredrik [Linne FLOW Centre, KTH Mechanics, Stockholm (Sweden); Swerin, Agne [SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden-Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces, Stockholm (Sweden); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Surface and Corrosion Science, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-05-15

    Aiming at turbulent measurements in opaque suspensions, a simplistic methodology for measuring the turbulent stresses with phase-contrast magnetic resonance velocimetry is described. The method relies on flow-compensated and flow-encoding protocols with the flow encoding gradient normal to the slice. The experimental data is compared with direct numerical simulations (DNS), both directly but also, more importantly, after spatial averaging of the DNS data that resembles the measurement and data treatment of the experimental data. The results show that the most important MRI data (streamwise velocity, streamwise variance and Reynolds shear stress) is reliable up to at least anti r = 0.75 without any correction, paving the way for dearly needed turbulence and stress measurements in opaque suspensions. (orig.)

  4. The Implications of Encoder/Modulator/ Phased Array Designs for Future Broadband LEO Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderaar, Mark; Jensen, Chris A.; Terry, John D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the effects of modulation and channel coding on the design of wide angle scan, broadband, phased army antennas. In the paper we perform several trade studies. First, we investigate the amplifier back-off requirement as a function of variability of modulation envelope. Specifically, we contrast constant and non-constant envelope modulations, as well as single and multiple carrier schemes. Additionally, we address the issues an(f concerns of using pulse shaping filters with the above modulation types. Second, we quantify the effects of beam steering on the quality of data, recovery using selected modulation techniques. In particular, we show that the frequency response of the array introduces intersymbol interference for broadband signals and that the mode of operation for the beam steering controller may introduce additional burst or random errors. Finally, we show that the encoder/modulator design must be performed in conjunction with the phased array antenna design.

  5. Neural Activity during Encoding Predicts False Memories Created by Misinformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okado, Yoko; Stark, Craig E. L.

    2005-01-01

    False memories are often demonstrated using the misinformation paradigm, in which a person's recollection of a witnessed event is altered after exposure to misinformation about the event. The neural basis of this phenomenon, however, remains unknown. The authors used fMRI to investigate encoding processes during the viewing of an event and…

  6. Modulating the Focus of Attention for Spoken Words at Encoding Affects Frontoparietal Activation for Incidental Verbal Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A. Christensen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Attention is crucial for encoding information into memory, and current dual-process models seek to explain the roles of attention in both recollection memory and incidental-perceptual memory processes. The present study combined an incidental memory paradigm with event-related functional MRI to examine the effect of attention at encoding on the subsequent neural activation associated with unintended perceptual memory for spoken words. At encoding, we systematically varied attention levels as listeners heard a list of single English nouns. We then presented these words again in the context of a recognition task and assessed the effect of modulating attention at encoding on the BOLD responses to words that were either attended strongly, weakly, or not heard previously. MRI revealed activity in right-lateralized inferior parietal and prefrontal regions, and positive BOLD signals varied with the relative level of attention present at encoding. Temporal analysis of hemodynamic responses further showed that the time course of BOLD activity was modulated differentially by unintentionally encoded words compared to novel items. Our findings largely support current models of memory consolidation and retrieval, but they also provide fresh evidence for hemispheric differences and functional subdivisions in right frontoparietal attention networks that help shape auditory episodic recall.

  7. Modulating the focus of attention for spoken words at encoding affects frontoparietal activation for incidental verbal memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Thomas A; Almryde, Kyle R; Fidler, Lesley J; Lockwood, Julie L; Antonucci, Sharon M; Plante, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Attention is crucial for encoding information into memory, and current dual-process models seek to explain the roles of attention in both recollection memory and incidental-perceptual memory processes. The present study combined an incidental memory paradigm with event-related functional MRI to examine the effect of attention at encoding on the subsequent neural activation associated with unintended perceptual memory for spoken words. At encoding, we systematically varied attention levels as listeners heard a list of single English nouns. We then presented these words again in the context of a recognition task and assessed the effect of modulating attention at encoding on the BOLD responses to words that were either attended strongly, weakly, or not heard previously. MRI revealed activity in right-lateralized inferior parietal and prefrontal regions, and positive BOLD signals varied with the relative level of attention present at encoding. Temporal analysis of hemodynamic responses further showed that the time course of BOLD activity was modulated differentially by unintentionally encoded words compared to novel items. Our findings largely support current models of memory consolidation and retrieval, but they also provide fresh evidence for hemispheric differences and functional subdivisions in right frontoparietal attention networks that help shape auditory episodic recall.

  8. Intrusive Memories of Distressing Information: An fMRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Battaglini

    Full Text Available Although intrusive memories are characteristic of many psychological disorders, the neurobiological underpinning of these involuntary recollections are largely unknown. In this study we used functional magentic resonance imaging (fMRI to identify the neural networks associated with encoding of negative stimuli that are subsequently experienced as intrusive memories. Healthy partipants (N = 42 viewed negative and neutral images during a visual/verbal processing task in an fMRI context. Two days later they were assessed on the Impact of Event Scale for occurrence of intrusive memories of the encoded images. A sub-group of participants who reported significant intrusions (n = 13 demonstrated stronger activation in the amygdala, bilateral ACC and parahippocampal gyrus during verbal encoding relative to a group who reported no intrusions (n = 13. Within-group analyses also revealed that the high intrusion group showed greater activity in the dorsomedial (dmPFC and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC, inferior frontal gyrus and occipital regions during negative verbal processing compared to neutral verbal processing. These results do not accord with models of intrusions that emphasise visual processing of information at encoding but are consistent with models that highlight the role of inhibitory and suppression processes in the formation of subsequent intrusive memories.

  9. 4-D flow magnetic resonance imaging: blood flow quantification compared to 2-D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and Doppler echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabbour, Maya [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Schnell, Susanne [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Jarvis, Kelly [Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States); Robinson, Joshua D. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Doppler echocardiography (echo) is the reference standard for blood flow velocity analysis, and two-dimensional (2-D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the reference standard for quantitative blood flow assessment. However, both clinical standard-of-care techniques are limited by 2-D acquisitions and single-direction velocity encoding and may make them inadequate to assess the complex three-dimensional hemodynamics seen in congenital heart disease. Four-dimensional flow MRI (4-D flow) enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of complex blood flow in the heart and great arteries. The objectives of this study are to compare 4-D flow with 2-D phase-contrast MRI for quantification of aortic and pulmonary flow and to evaluate the advantage of 4-D flow-based volumetric flow analysis compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo for peak velocity assessment in children and young adults. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI of the aortic root, main pulmonary artery (MPA), and right and left pulmonary arteries (RPA, LPA) and 4-D flow with volumetric coverage of the aorta and pulmonary arteries were performed in 50 patients (mean age: 13.1 ± 6.4 years). Four-dimensional flow analyses included calculation of net flow and regurgitant fraction with 4-D flow analysis planes similarly positioned to 2-D planes. In addition, 4-D flow volumetric assessment of aortic root/ascending aorta and MPA peak velocities was performed and compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo. Excellent correlation and agreement were found between 2-D phase-contrast MRI and 4-D flow for net flow (r = 0.97, P < 0.001) and excellent correlation with good agreement was found for regurgitant fraction (r = 0.88, P < 0.001) in all vessels. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI significantly underestimated aortic (P = 0.032) and MPA (P < 0.001) peak velocities compared to echo, while volumetric 4-D flow analysis resulted in higher (aortic: P = 0.001) or similar (MPA: P = 0.98) peak

  10. A brain stress test: Cerebral perfusion during memory encoding in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Long; Dolui, Sudipto; Das, Sandhitsu R; Stockbower, Grace E; Daffner, Molly; Rao, Hengyi; Yushkevich, Paul A; Detre, John A; Wolk, David A

    2016-01-01

    Arterial spin labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (ASL MRI) provides non-invasive quantification of cerebral blood flow, which can be used as a biomarker of brain function due to the tight coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain metabolism. A growing body of literature suggests that regional CBF is altered in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we examined ASL MRI CBF in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 65) and cognitively normal healthy controls (n = 62), both at rest and during performance of a memory-encoding task. As compared to rest, task-enhanced ASL MRI improved group discrimination, which supports the notion that physiologic measures during a cognitive challenge, or "stress test", may increase the ability to detect subtle functional changes in early disease stages. Further, logistic regression analysis demonstrated that ASL MRI and concomitantly acquired structural MRI provide complementary information of disease status. The current findings support the potential utility of task-enhanced ASL MRI as a biomarker in early Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Functional-anatomic study of episodic retrieval using fMRI. I. Retrieval effort versus retrieval success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, R L; Koutstaal, W; Schacter, D L; Wagner, A D; Rosen, B R

    1998-04-01

    A number of recent functional imaging studies have identified brain areas activated during tasks involving episodic memory retrieval. The identification of such areas provides a foundation for targeted hypotheses regarding the more specific contributions that these areas make to episodic retrieval. As a beginning effort toward such an endeavor, whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine 14 subjects during episodic word recognition in a block-designed fMRI experiment. Study conditions were manipulated by presenting either shallow or deep encoding tasks. This manipulation yielded two recognition conditions that differed with regard to retrieval effort and retrieval success: shallow encoding yielded low levels of recognition success with high levels of retrieval effort, and deep encoding yielded high levels of recognition success with low levels of effort. Many brain areas were activated in common by these two recognition conditions compared to a low-level fixation condition, including left and right prefrontal regions often detected during PET episodic retrieval paradigms (e.g., R. L. Buckner et al., 1996, J. Neurosci. 16, 6219-6235) thereby generalizing these findings to fMRI. Characterization of the activated regions in relation to the separate recognition conditions showed (1) bilateral anterior insular regions and a left dorsal prefrontal region were more active after shallow encoding, when retrieval demanded greatest effort, and (2) right anterior prefrontal cortex, which has been implicated in episodic retrieval, was most active during successful retrieval after deep encoding. We discuss these findings in relation to component processes involved in episodic retrieval and in the context of a companion study using event-related fMRI.

  12. Health-economic evaluation of three imaging strategies in patients with suspected colorectal liver metastases: Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI vs. extracellular contrast media-enhanced MRI and 3-phase MDCT in Germany, Italy and Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zech, C.J.; Grazioli, L.; Jonas, E.; Ekman, M.; Joensson, L.; Niebecker, R.; Kienbaum, S.; Gschwend, S.; Breuer, J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform an economic evaluation of hepatocyte-specific Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRI (PV-MRI) compared to extracellular contrast-media-enhanced MRI (ECCM-MRI) and three-phase-MDCT as initial modalities in the work-up of patients with metachronous colorectal liver metastases. The economic evaluation was performed with a decision-tree model designed to estimate all aggregated costs depending on the initial investigation. Probabilities on the need for further imaging to come to a treatment decision were collected through interviews with 13 pairs of each a radiologist and a liver surgeon in Germany, Italy and Sweden. The rate of further imaging needed was 8.6% after initial PV-MRI, 18.5% after ECCM-MRI and 23.5% after MDCT. Considering the cost of all diagnostic work-up, intra-operative treatment changes and unnecessary surgery, a strategy starting with PV-MRI with 959 EUR was cost-saving compared to ECCM-MRI (1,123 EUR) and MDCT (1,044 EUR) in Sweden. In Italy and Germany, PV-MRI was cost-saving compared to ECCM-MRI and had total costs similar to MDCT. In conclusion, our results indicate that PV-MRI can lead to cost savings by improving pre-operative planning and decreasing intra-operative changes. The higher cost of imaging with PV-MRI is offset in such a scenario by lower costs for additional imaging and less intra-operative changes. (orig.)

  13. Male carriers of the FMR1 premutation show altered hippocampal-prefrontal function during memory encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous functional MRI (fMRI studies have shown that fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1 premutation allele carriers (FXPCs exhibit decreased hippocampal activation during a recall task and lower inferior frontal activation during a working memory task compared to matched controls. The molecular characteristics of FXPCs includes 55 to 200 CGG trinucleoutide expansions, increased FMR1 mRNA levels, and decreased FMRP levels especially at higher repeat sizes. In the current study, we utilized MRI to examine differences in hippocampal volume and function during an encoding task in young male FXPCs. While no decreases in either hippocampal volume or hippocampal activity were observed during the encoding task in FXPCs, FMRP level (measured in blood correlated with decreases in parahippocampal activation. In addition, activity in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during correctly encoded trials correlated negatively with mRNA levels. These results, as well as the established biological effects associated with elevated mRNA levels and decreased FMRP levels on dendritic maturation and axonal growth, prompted us to explore functional connectivity between the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus using a psychophysiological interaction analysis. In FXPCs, the right hippocampus evinced significantly lower connectivity with right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC and right parahippocampal gyrus. Furthermore, the weaker connectivity between the right hippocampus and VLPFC was associated with reduced FMRP in the FXPC group. These results suggest that while FXPCs show relatively typical brain response during encoding, faulty connectivity between frontal and hippocampal regions may have subsequent effects on recall and working memory.

  14. Re-engaging with the past: recapitulation of encoding operations during retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa eMorcom

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Recollection of events is accompanied by selective reactivation of cortical regions which responded to specific sensory and cognitive dimensions of the original events. This reactivation is thought to reflect the reinstatement of stored memory representations and therefore to reflect memory content, but it may also reveal processes which support both encoding and retrieval. The present study used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate whether regions selectively engaged in encoding face and scene context with studied words are also re-engaged when the context is later retrieved. As predicted, encoding face and scene context with visually presented words elicited activity in distinct, context-selective regions. Retrieval of face and scene context also re-engaged some of the regions which had shown successful encoding effects. However, this recapitulation of encoding activity did not show the same context selectivity observed at encoding. Successful retrieval of both face and scene context re-engaged regions which had been associated with encoding of the other type of context, as well as those associated with encoding the same type of context. This recapitulation may reflect retrieval attempts which are not context-selective, but use shared retrieval cues to re-engage encoding operations in service of recollection.

  15. Value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI in the acute phase of transient global amnesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Förster

    Full Text Available Transient global amnesia (TGA is a transitory, short-lasting neurological disorder characterized by a sudden onset of antero- and retrograde amnesia. Perfusion abnormalities in TGA have been evaluated mainly by use of positron emission tomography (PET or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. In the present study we explore the value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI in TGA in the acute phase.From a MRI report database we identified TGA patients who underwent MRI including PWI in the acute phase and compared these to control subjects. Quantitative perfusion maps (cerebral blood flow (CBF and volume (CBV were generated and analyzed by use of Signal Processing In NMR-Software (SPIN. CBF and CBV values in subcortical brain regions were assessed by use of VOI created in FIRST, a model-based segmentation tool in the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB Software Library (FSL.Five TGA patients were included (2 men, 3 women. On PWI, no relevant perfusion alterations were found by visual inspection in TGA patients. Group comparisons for possible differences between TGA patients and control subjects showed significant lower rCBF values bilaterally in the hippocampus, in the left thalamus and globus pallidus as well as bilaterally in the putamen and the left caudate nucleus. Correspondingly, significant lower rCBV values were observed bilaterally in the hippocampus and the putamen as well as in the left caudate nucleus. Group comparisons for possible side differences in rCBF and rCBV values in TGA patients revealed a significant lower rCBV value in the left caudate nucleus.Mere visual inspection of PWI is not sufficient for the assessment of perfusion changes in TGA in the acute phase. Group comparisons with healthy control subjects might be useful to detect subtle perfusion changes on PWI in TGA patients. However, this should be confirmed in larger data sets and serial PWI

  16. Exosomes released in vitro from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells contain EBV-encoded latent phase mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Andrea; Venturi, Giulietta; Borghi, Martina; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Fais, Stefano

    2013-09-01

    EBV is a human herpesvirus associated with a number of malignancies. Both lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), and EBV-infected nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells have been demonstrated to release exosomes containing the EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), and mature micro-RNAs (EBV-miRNAs). Here we analyze the EBV protein and nucleic acid content of exosomes from different EBV-infected cells (LCL, 721 and Daudi) and we show for the first time that exosomes released from LCLs and 721 also contain EBV-encoded latent phase mRNAs. This confirms and strengthens exosomes pathogenetic potential, and might provide insights for development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Attention promotes episodic encoding by stabilizing hippocampal representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Mariam; Turk-Browne, Nicholas B.

    2016-01-01

    Attention influences what is later remembered, but little is known about how this occurs in the brain. We hypothesized that behavioral goals modulate the attentional state of the hippocampus to prioritize goal-relevant aspects of experience for encoding. Participants viewed rooms with paintings, attending to room layouts or painting styles on different trials during high-resolution functional MRI. We identified template activity patterns in each hippocampal subfield that corresponded to the attentional state induced by each task. Participants then incidentally encoded new rooms with art while attending to the layout or painting style, and memory was subsequently tested. We found that when task-relevant information was better remembered, the hippocampus was more likely to have been in the correct attentional state during encoding. This effect was specific to the hippocampus, and not found in medial temporal lobe cortex, category-selective areas of the visual system, or elsewhere in the brain. These findings provide mechanistic insight into how attention transforms percepts into memories. PMID:26755611

  18. Encoding methods for B1+ mapping in parallel transmit systems at ultra high field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Desmond H. Y.; Poole, Michael S.; Magill, Arthur W.; Felder, Jörg; Brenner, Daniel; Jon Shah, N.

    2014-08-01

    Parallel radiofrequency (RF) transmission, either in the form of RF shimming or pulse design, has been proposed as a solution to the B1+ inhomogeneity problem in ultra high field magnetic resonance imaging. As a prerequisite, accurate B1+ maps from each of the available transmit channels are required. In this work, four different encoding methods for B1+ mapping, namely 1-channel-on, all-channels-on-except-1, all-channels-on-1-inverted and Fourier phase encoding, were evaluated using dual refocusing acquisition mode (DREAM) at 9.4 T. Fourier phase encoding was demonstrated in both phantom and in vivo to be the least susceptible to artefacts caused by destructive RF interference at 9.4 T. Unlike the other two interferometric encoding schemes, Fourier phase encoding showed negligible dependency on the initial RF phase setting and therefore no prior B1+ knowledge is required. Fourier phase encoding also provides a flexible way to increase the number of measurements to increase SNR, and to allow further reduction of artefacts by weighted decoding. These advantages of Fourier phase encoding suggest that it is a good choice for B1+ mapping in parallel transmit systems at ultra high field.

  19. A novel anisotropic fast marching method and its application to blood flow computation in phase-contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenke, M; Hennemuth, A; Fischer, B; Friman, O

    2012-01-01

    Phase-contrast MRI (PC MRI) can be used to assess blood flow dynamics noninvasively inside the human body. The acquired images can be reconstructed into flow vector fields. Traditionally, streamlines can be computed based on the vector fields to visualize flow patterns and particle trajectories. The traditional methods may give a false impression of precision, as they do not consider the measurement uncertainty in the PC MRI images. In our prior work, we incorporated the uncertainty of the measurement into the computation of particle trajectories. As a major part of the contribution, a novel numerical scheme for solving the anisotropic Fast Marching problem is presented. A computing time comparison to state-of-the-art methods is conducted on artificial tensor fields. A visual comparison of healthy to pathological blood flow patterns is given. The comparison shows that the novel anisotropic Fast Marching solver outperforms previous schemes in terms of computing time. The visual comparison of flow patterns directly visualizes large deviations of pathological flow from healthy flow. The novel anisotropic Fast Marching solver efficiently resolves even strongly anisotropic path costs. The visualization method enables the user to assess the uncertainty of particle trajectories derived from PC MRI images.

  20. Diagnosis of renal cell cancer by dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togami, Izumi; Kitagawa, Takahiro; Katoh, Katsuya

    1992-01-01

    Dynamic MRI was performed in 15 cases (16 lesions) of renal cell cancer. The enhanced pattern of the tumor was mainly evaluated and findings were compared with these of dynamic CT and renal angiography. Enhanced patterns on dynamic MRI and dynamic CT were similar, but each phase on dynamic MRI tended to be prolonged compared with dynamic CT. Many hypervascular tumors on renal angiography had prominent enhancement in an early phase on dynamic MRI, but there was no prominent enhancement in cases with tumor thrombi in the renal vein or IVC. All hypovascular tumors were enhanced to some degree without exception on dynamic MRI. Dynamic MRI is considered to be useful for the evaluation of the characterization, especially vascularity, of renal cell cancer, but we should pay attention to the differential diagnosis from other tumor in atypical cases because its enhanced patterns are various on dynamic MRI. (author)

  1. Increased phase synchronization during continuous face integration measured simultaneously with EEG and fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottlow, Mara; Jann, Kay; Dierks, Thomas; Koenig, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Gamma zero-lag phase synchronization has been measured in the animal brain during visual binding. Human scalp EEG studies used a phase locking factor (trial-to-trial phase-shift consistency) or gamma amplitude to measure binding but did not analyze common-phase signals so far. This study introduces a method to identify networks oscillating with near zero-lag phase synchronization in human subjects. We presented unpredictably moving face parts (NOFACE) which - during some periods - produced a complete schematic face (FACE). The amount of zero-lag phase synchronization was measured using global field synchronization (GFS). GFS provides global information on the amount of instantaneous coincidences in specific frequencies throughout the brain. Gamma GFS was increased during the FACE condition. To localize the underlying areas, we correlated gamma GFS with simultaneously recorded BOLD responses. Positive correlates comprised the bilateral middle fusiform gyrus and the left precuneus. These areas may form a network of areas transiently synchronized during face integration, including face-specific as well as binding-specific regions and regions for visual processing in general. Thus, the amount of zero-lag phase synchronization between remote regions of the human visual system can be measured with simultaneously acquired EEG/fMRI. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical and MRI evaluation of tuberculous meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Chunjing; Shu Jiner; Chen Jian; Sheng Sanlan; Lu Jinhua; Cai Xiaoxiao; Li Huimin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship of clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM), and to improve the understanding of TBM. Methods: The clinical and MRI findings in 42 patients with confirmed TBM were analyzed retrospectively. MRI examination was performed using a 1 Tesla system, including SE T 1 WI and T 2 WI. Intravenous contrast was injected in 29 patients, and follow-up scans were performed on 17 patients. Results: Of 24 patients with early TBM, MRI was abnormal in 5(21%) with slight Tl-hypointense meningeal (4) or ependymal thickening (1). MRI on 33/35 (94%) patients with late stage TBM was abnormal with T 1 hypointensity and T 2 hyperintensity including meningeal thickening (19), mild surrounding brain edema (10), nodules (11), tuberculoma (5) and abscess (2). There was significant plaque-like, nodular or rim enhancement with surrounding brain edema. Conclusion: Tuberculous meningitis has minimal clinical and MRI findings in the early phase and significant clinical and MRI findings in the late phase. The enhanced scan may help to detect the abnormality. (authors)

  3. Dissociation of the Neural Correlates of Visual and Auditory Contextual Encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Lauren J.; Uncapher, Melina R.; Rugg, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    The present study contrasted the neural correlates of encoding item-context associations according to whether the contextual information was visual or auditory. Subjects (N = 20) underwent fMRI scanning while studying a series of visually presented pictures, each of which co-occurred with either a visually or an auditorily presented name. The task…

  4. Hormone effects on fMRI and cognitive measures of encoding: importance of hormone preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, C E; Schmitz, T W; Hess, T; Koscik, R L; Trivedi, M A; Ries, M L; Carlsson, C M; Sager, M A; Asthana, S; Johnson, S C

    2006-12-12

    We compared fMRI and cognitive data from nine hormone therapy (HT)-naive women with data from women exposed to either opposed conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) (n = 10) or opposed estradiol (n = 4). Exposure to either form of HT was associated with healthier fMRI response; however, CEE-exposed women exhibited poorer memory performance than either HT-naive or estradiol-exposed subjects. These preliminary findings emphasize the need to characterize differential neural effects of various HTs.

  5. Design of sparse Halbach magnet arrays for portable MRI using a genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Clarissa Zimmerman; Haskell, Melissa W; Cauley, Stephen F; Sappo, Charlotte; Lapierre, Cristen D; Ha, Christopher G; Stockmann, Jason P; Wald, Lawrence L

    2018-01-01

    Permanent magnet arrays offer several attributes attractive for the development of a low-cost portable MRI scanner for brain imaging. They offer the potential for a relatively lightweight, low to mid-field system with no cryogenics, a small fringe field, and no electrical power requirements or heat dissipation needs. The cylindrical Halbach array, however, requires external shimming or mechanical adjustments to produce B 0 fields with standard MRI homogeneity levels (e.g., 0.1 ppm over FOV), particularly when constrained or truncated geometries are needed, such as a head-only magnet where the magnet length is constrained by the shoulders. For portable scanners using rotation of the magnet for spatial encoding with generalized projections, the spatial pattern of the field is important since it acts as the encoding field. In either a static or rotating magnet, it will be important to be able to optimize the field pattern of cylindrical Halbach arrays in a way that retains construction simplicity. To achieve this, we present a method for designing an optimized cylindrical Halbach magnet using the genetic algorithm to achieve either homogeneity (for standard MRI applications) or a favorable spatial encoding field pattern (for rotational spatial encoding applications). We compare the chosen designs against a standard, fully populated sparse Halbach design, and evaluate optimized spatial encoding fields using point-spread-function and image simulations. We validate the calculations by comparing to the measured field of a constructed magnet. The experimentally implemented design produced fields in good agreement with the predicted fields, and the genetic algorithm was successful in improving the chosen metrics. For the uniform target field, an order of magnitude homogeneity improvement was achieved compared to the un-optimized, fully populated design. For the rotational encoding design the resolution uniformity is improved by 95% compared to a uniformly populated design.

  6. Quantification of intravoxel velocity standard deviation and turbulence intensity by generalizing phase-contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyverfeldt, Petter; Sigfridsson, Andreas; Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Ebbers, Tino

    2006-10-01

    Turbulent flow, characterized by velocity fluctuations, is a contributing factor to the pathogenesis of several cardiovascular diseases. A clinical noninvasive tool for assessing turbulence is lacking, however. It is well known that the occurrence of multiple spin velocities within a voxel during the influence of a magnetic gradient moment causes signal loss in phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI). In this paper a mathematical derivation of an expression for computing the standard deviation (SD) of the blood flow velocity distribution within a voxel is presented. The SD is obtained from the magnitude of PC-MRI signals acquired with different first gradient moments. By exploiting the relation between the SD and turbulence intensity (TI), this method allows for quantitative studies of turbulence. For validation, the TI in an in vitro flow phantom was quantified, and the results compared favorably with previously published laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) results. This method has the potential to become an important tool for the noninvasive assessment of turbulence in the arterial tree.

  7. Depth of processing effects on neural correlates of memory encoding: relationship between findings from across- and within-task comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, L J; Henson, R N; Rugg, M D

    2001-02-01

    Neuroimaging studies have implicated the prefrontal cortex and medial temporal areas in the successful encoding of verbal material into episodic memory. The present study used event-related functional MRI to investigate whether the brain areas associated with successful episodic encoding of words in a semantic study task are a subset of those demonstrating depth of processing effects. In addition, we tested whether the brain areas associated with successful episodic encoding differ depending on the nature of the study task. At study, 15 volunteers were cued to make either animacy or alphabetical decisions about words. A recognition memory test including confidence judgements followed after a delay of 15 min. Prefrontal and medial temporal regions showed greater functional MRI activations for semantically encoded words relative to alphabetically encoded words. Two of these regions (left anterior hippocampus and left ventral inferior frontal gyrus) showed greater activation for semantically encoded words that were subsequently recognized confidently. However, other regions (left posterior hippocampus and right inferior frontal cortex) demonstrated subsequent memory effects, but not effects of depth of processing. Successful memory for alphabetically encoded words was also associated with greater activation in the left anterior hippocampus and left ventral inferior frontal gyrus. The findings suggest that episodic encoding for words in a semantic study task involves a subset of the regions activated by deep relative to shallow processing. The data provide little evidence that successful episodic encoding during a shallow study task depends upon regions different from those that support the encoding of deeply studied words. Instead, the findings suggest that successful episodic encoding during a shallow study task relies on a subset of the regions engaged during successful encoding in a deep task.

  8. WE-DE-206-02: MRI Hardware - Magnet, Gradient, RF Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocharian, A. [Methodist Hospital (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential part of clinical imaging due to its ability to render high soft tissue contrast. Instead of ionizing radiation, MRI use strong magnetic field, radio frequency waves and field gradients to create diagnostic useful images. It can be used to image the anatomy and also functional and physiological activities within the human body. Knowledge of the basic physical principles underlying MRI acquisition is vitally important to successful image production and proper image interpretation. This lecture will give an overview of the spin physics, imaging principle of MRI, the hardware of the MRI scanner, and various pulse sequences and their applications. It aims to provide a conceptual foundation to understand the image formation process of a clinical MRI scanner. Learning Objectives: Understand the origin of the MR signal and contrast from the spin physics level. Understand the main hardware components of a MRI scanner and their purposes Understand steps for MR image formation including spatial encoding and image reconstruction Understand the main kinds of MR pulse sequences and their characteristics.

  9. Remembering with gains and losses: effects of monetary reward and punishment on successful encoding activation of source memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemune, Yayoi; Tsukiura, Takashi; Kambara, Toshimune; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-05-01

    The motivation of getting rewards or avoiding punishments reinforces learning behaviors. Although the neural mechanisms underlying the effect of rewards on episodic memory have been demonstrated, there is little evidence of the effect of punishments on this memory. Our functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated the effects of monetary rewards and punishments on activation during the encoding of source memories. During encoding, participants memorized words (item) and locations of presented words (source) under 3 conditions (Reward, Punishment, and Control). During retrieval, participants retrieved item and source memories of the words and were rewarded or penalized according to their performance. Source memories encoded with rewards or punishments were remembered better than those without such encoding. fMRI data demonstrated that the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra and nucleus accumbens activations reflected both the processes of reward and punishment, whereas insular activation increased as a linear function of punishment. Activation in the hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex predicted subsequent retrieval success of source memories. Additionally, correlations between these reward/punishment-related regions and the hippocampus were significant. The successful encoding of source memories could be enhanced by punishments and rewards, and interactions between reward/punishment-related regions and memory-related regions could contribute to memory enhancement by reward and/or punishment.

  10. Remembering with Gains and Losses: Effects of Monetary Reward and Punishment on Successful Encoding Activation of Source Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemune, Yayoi; Tsukiura, Takashi; Kambara, Toshimune; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-01-01

    The motivation of getting rewards or avoiding punishments reinforces learning behaviors. Although the neural mechanisms underlying the effect of rewards on episodic memory have been demonstrated, there is little evidence of the effect of punishments on this memory. Our functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated the effects of monetary rewards and punishments on activation during the encoding of source memories. During encoding, participants memorized words (item) and locations of presented words (source) under 3 conditions (Reward, Punishment, and Control). During retrieval, participants retrieved item and source memories of the words and were rewarded or penalized according to their performance. Source memories encoded with rewards or punishments were remembered better than those without such encoding. fMRI data demonstrated that the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra and nucleus accumbens activations reflected both the processes of reward and punishment, whereas insular activation increased as a linear function of punishment. Activation in the hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex predicted subsequent retrieval success of source memories. Additionally, correlations between these reward/punishment-related regions and the hippocampus were significant. The successful encoding of source memories could be enhanced by punishments and rewards, and interactions between reward/punishment-related regions and memory-related regions could contribute to memory enhancement by reward and/or punishment. PMID:23314939

  11. Artificial neural networks using complex numbers and phase encoded weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Howard E; Awwal, Abdul Ahad S

    2010-04-01

    The model of a simple perceptron using phase-encoded inputs and complex-valued weights is proposed. The aggregation function, activation function, and learning rule for the proposed neuron are derived and applied to Boolean logic functions and simple computer vision tasks. The complex-valued neuron (CVN) is shown to be superior to traditional perceptrons. An improvement of 135% over the theoretical maximum of 104 linearly separable problems (of three variables) solvable by conventional perceptrons is achieved without additional logic, neuron stages, or higher order terms such as those required in polynomial logic gates. The application of CVN in distortion invariant character recognition and image segmentation is demonstrated. Implementation details are discussed, and the CVN is shown to be very attractive for optical implementation since optical computations are naturally complex. The cost of the CVN is less in all cases than the traditional neuron when implemented optically. Therefore, all the benefits of the CVN can be obtained without additional cost. However, on those implementations dependent on standard serial computers, CVN will be more cost effective only in those applications where its increased power can offset the requirement for additional neurons.

  12. Sensitivity encoded silicon photomultiplier—a new sensor for high-resolution PET-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Volkmar; Berker, Yannick; Berneking, Arne; Omidvari, Negar; Kiessling, Fabian; Gola, Alberto; Piemonte, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Detectors for simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in particular with sub-mm spatial resolution are commonly composed of scintillator crystal arrays, readout via arrays of solid state sensors, such as avalanche photo diodes (APDs) or silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Usually a light guide between the crystals and the sensor is used to enable the identification of crystals which are smaller than the sensor elements. However, this complicates crystal identification at the gaps and edges of the sensor arrays. A solution is to use as many sensors as crystals with a direct coupling, which unfortunately increases the complexity and power consumption of the readout electronics. Since 1997, position-sensitive APDs have been successfully used to identify sub-mm crystals. Unfortunately, these devices show a limitation in their time resolution and a degradation of spatial resolution when placed in higher magnetic fields. To overcome these limitations, this paper presents a new sensor concept that extends conventional SiPMs by adding position information via the spatial encoding of the channel sensitivity. The concept allows a direct coupling of high-resolution crystal arrays to the sensor with a reduced amount of readout channels. The theory of sensitivity encoding is detailed and linked to compressed sensing to compute unique sparse solutions. Two devices have been designed using one- and two-dimensional linear sensitivity encoding with eight and four readout channels, respectively. Flood histograms of both devices show the capability to precisely identify all 4 × 4 LYSO crystals with dimensions of 0.93 × 0.93 × 10 mm 3 . For these crystals, the energy and time resolution (MV ± SD) of the devices with one (two)-dimensional encoding have been measured to be 12.3 · (1 ± 0.047)% (13.7 · (1 ± 0.047)%) around 511 keV with a paired coincidence time resolution (full width at half maximum) of 462 · (1 ± 0.054) ps (452 · (1 ± 0

  13. Sensitivity encoded silicon photomultiplier—a new sensor for high-resolution PET-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Volkmar; Berker, Yannick; Berneking, Arne; Omidvari, Negar; Kiessling, Fabian; Gola, Alberto; Piemonte, Claudio

    2013-07-01

    Detectors for simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in particular with sub-mm spatial resolution are commonly composed of scintillator crystal arrays, readout via arrays of solid state sensors, such as avalanche photo diodes (APDs) or silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Usually a light guide between the crystals and the sensor is used to enable the identification of crystals which are smaller than the sensor elements. However, this complicates crystal identification at the gaps and edges of the sensor arrays. A solution is to use as many sensors as crystals with a direct coupling, which unfortunately increases the complexity and power consumption of the readout electronics. Since 1997, position-sensitive APDs have been successfully used to identify sub-mm crystals. Unfortunately, these devices show a limitation in their time resolution and a degradation of spatial resolution when placed in higher magnetic fields. To overcome these limitations, this paper presents a new sensor concept that extends conventional SiPMs by adding position information via the spatial encoding of the channel sensitivity. The concept allows a direct coupling of high-resolution crystal arrays to the sensor with a reduced amount of readout channels. The theory of sensitivity encoding is detailed and linked to compressed sensing to compute unique sparse solutions. Two devices have been designed using one- and two-dimensional linear sensitivity encoding with eight and four readout channels, respectively. Flood histograms of both devices show the capability to precisely identify all 4 × 4 LYSO crystals with dimensions of 0.93 × 0.93 × 10 mm3. For these crystals, the energy and time resolution (MV ± SD) of the devices with one (two)-dimensional encoding have been measured to be 12.3 · (1 ± 0.047)% (13.7 · (1 ± 0.047)%) around 511 keV with a paired coincidence time resolution (full width at half maximum) of 462 · (1 ± 0.054) ps (452 · (1 ± 0

  14. Sensitivity encoded silicon photomultiplier--a new sensor for high-resolution PET-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Volkmar; Berker, Yannick; Berneking, Arne; Omidvari, Negar; Kiessling, Fabian; Gola, Alberto; Piemonte, Claudio

    2013-07-21

    Detectors for simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in particular with sub-mm spatial resolution are commonly composed of scintillator crystal arrays, readout via arrays of solid state sensors, such as avalanche photo diodes (APDs) or silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Usually a light guide between the crystals and the sensor is used to enable the identification of crystals which are smaller than the sensor elements. However, this complicates crystal identification at the gaps and edges of the sensor arrays. A solution is to use as many sensors as crystals with a direct coupling, which unfortunately increases the complexity and power consumption of the readout electronics. Since 1997, position-sensitive APDs have been successfully used to identify sub-mm crystals. Unfortunately, these devices show a limitation in their time resolution and a degradation of spatial resolution when placed in higher magnetic fields. To overcome these limitations, this paper presents a new sensor concept that extends conventional SiPMs by adding position information via the spatial encoding of the channel sensitivity. The concept allows a direct coupling of high-resolution crystal arrays to the sensor with a reduced amount of readout channels. The theory of sensitivity encoding is detailed and linked to compressed sensing to compute unique sparse solutions. Two devices have been designed using one- and two-dimensional linear sensitivity encoding with eight and four readout channels, respectively. Flood histograms of both devices show the capability to precisely identify all 4 × 4 LYSO crystals with dimensions of 0.93 × 0.93 × 10 mm(3). For these crystals, the energy and time resolution (MV ± SD) of the devices with one (two)-dimensional encoding have been measured to be 12.3 · (1 ± 0.047)% (13.7 · (1 ± 0.047)%) around 511 keV with a paired coincidence time resolution (full width at half maximum) of 462 · (1 ± 0.054) ps (452 · (1 ± 0

  15. An fMRI study of semantic processing in men with schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicki, M.; McCarley, R.W.; Nestor, P.G.; Huh, T.; Kikinis, R.; Shenton, M.E.; Wible, C.G.

    2009-01-01

    As a means toward understanding the neural bases of schizophrenic thought disturbance, we examined brain activation patterns in response to semantically and superficially encoded words in patients with schizophrenia. Nine male schizophrenic and 9 male control subjects were tested in a visual levels of processing (LOP) task first outside the magnet and then during the fMRI scanning procedures (using a different set of words). During the experiments visual words were presented under two conditions. Under the deep, semantic encoding condition, subjects made semantic judgments as to whether the words were abstract or concrete. Under the shallow, nonsemantic encoding condition, subjects made perceptual judgments of the font size (uppercase/lowercase) of the presented words. After performance of the behavioral task, a recognition test was used to assess the depth of processing effect, defined as better performance for semantically encoded words than for perceptually encoded words. For the scanned version only, the words for both conditions were repeated in order to assess repetition-priming effects. Reaction times were assessed in both testing scenarios. Both groups showed the expected depth of processing effect for recognition, and control subjects showed the expected increased activation of the left inferior prefrontal cortex (LIPC) under semantic encoding relative to perceptual encoding conditions as well as repetition priming for semantic conditions only. In contrast, schizophrenics showed similar patterns of fMRI activation regardless of condition. Most striking in relation to controls, patients showed decreased LIFC activation concurrent with increased left superior temporal gyrus activation for semantic encoding versus shallow encoding. Furthermore, schizophrenia subjects did not show the repetition priming effect, either behaviorally or as a decrease in LIPC activity. In patients with schizophrenia, LIFC underactivation and left superior temporal gyrus

  16. An fMRI study of semantic processing in men with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicki, M; McCarley, R W; Nestor, P G; Huh, T; Kikinis, R; Shenton, M E; Wible, C G

    2003-12-01

    As a means toward understanding the neural bases of schizophrenic thought disturbance, we examined brain activation patterns in response to semantically and superficially encoded words in patients with schizophrenia. Nine male schizophrenic and 9 male control subjects were tested in a visual levels of processing (LOP) task first outside the magnet and then during the fMRI scanning procedures (using a different set of words). During the experiments visual words were presented under two conditions. Under the deep, semantic encoding condition, subjects made semantic judgments as to whether the words were abstract or concrete. Under the shallow, nonsemantic encoding condition, subjects made perceptual judgments of the font size (uppercase/lowercase) of the presented words. After performance of the behavioral task, a recognition test was used to assess the depth of processing effect, defined as better performance for semantically encoded words than for perceptually encoded words. For the scanned version only, the words for both conditions were repeated in order to assess repetition-priming effects. Reaction times were assessed in both testing scenarios. Both groups showed the expected depth of processing effect for recognition, and control subjects showed the expected increased activation of the left inferior prefrontal cortex (LIPC) under semantic encoding relative to perceptual encoding conditions as well as repetition priming for semantic conditions only. In contrast, schizophrenics showed similar patterns of fMRI activation regardless of condition. Most striking in relation to controls, patients showed decreased LIFC activation concurrent with increased left superior temporal gyrus activation for semantic encoding versus shallow encoding. Furthermore, schizophrenia subjects did not show the repetition priming effect, either behaviorally or as a decrease in LIPC activity. In patients with schizophrenia, LIFC underactivation and left superior temporal gyrus

  17. MRI evaluation and treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Ken; Otani, Koji

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between Gd-DTPA enhanced MRI findings and the prognosis of the fractured vertebral body in the patients with fresh osteoporotic compression vertebral fractures. Subjects were 8 cases, 11 vertebrae. All of the cases were treated with no bed rest and no corset. MRI and radiographs were taken within 1 week after injury. MRI signal intensity of the fractured vertebral body altered low on T1WI at acute phase. When the fractured vertebrae were enhanced at whole area with Gd-DTPA at acute phase, the vertebrae showed no progression of wedge deformity by follow up radiographs. On the other hand, when the fractured vertebrae were not enhanced at whole area, the vertebrae showed progression of wedge deformity. These findings suggests that vertebral fractures in osteoporosis should be taken MRI including GD-DTPA in acute phase after injury. When the fractured vertebrae are enhanced with Gd-DTPA in whole body at acute phase, the fracture may need no special treatment. In conclusion, Gd-DTPA enhanced MRI may be useful to determine the prognosis of the osteoporotic compression fracture. (author)

  18. Known-plaintext attack on the double phase encoding and its implementation with parallel hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hengzheng; Peng, Xiang; Liu, Haitao; Feng, Songlin; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2008-03-01

    A known-plaintext attack on the double phase encryption scheme implemented with parallel hardware is presented. The double random phase encoding (DRPE) is one of the most representative optical cryptosystems developed in mid of 90's and derives quite a few variants since then. Although the DRPE encryption system has a strong power resisting to a brute-force attack, the inherent architecture of DRPE leaves a hidden trouble due to its linearity nature. Recently the real security strength of this opto-cryptosystem has been doubted and analyzed from the cryptanalysis point of view. In this presentation, we demonstrate that the optical cryptosystems based on DRPE architecture are vulnerable to known-plain text attack. With this attack the two encryption keys in the DRPE can be accessed with the help of the phase retrieval technique. In our approach, we adopt hybrid input-output algorithm (HIO) to recover the random phase key in the object domain and then infer the key in frequency domain. Only a plaintext-ciphertext pair is sufficient to create vulnerability. Moreover this attack does not need to select particular plaintext. The phase retrieval technique based on HIO is an iterative process performing Fourier transforms, so it fits very much into the hardware implementation of the digital signal processor (DSP). We make use of the high performance DSP to accomplish the known-plaintext attack. Compared with the software implementation, the speed of the hardware implementation is much fast. The performance of this DSP-based cryptanalysis system is also evaluated.

  19. Modular verification of chemical reaction network encodings via serializability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Matthew R.; Stefanovic, Darko; Phillips, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Chemical reaction networks are a powerful means of specifying the intended behaviour of synthetic biochemical systems. A high-level formal specification, expressed as a chemical reaction network, may be compiled into a lower-level encoding, which can be directly implemented in wet chemistry and may itself be expressed as a chemical reaction network. Here we present conditions under which a lower-level encoding correctly emulates the sequential dynamics of a high-level chemical reaction network. We require that encodings are transactional, such that their execution is divided by a “commit reaction” that irreversibly separates the reactant-consuming phase of the encoding from the product-generating phase. We also impose restrictions on the sharing of species between reaction encodings, based on a notion of “extra tolerance”, which defines species that may be shared between encodings without enabling unwanted reactions. Our notion of correctness is serializability of interleaved reaction encodings, and if all reaction encodings satisfy our correctness properties then we can infer that the global dynamics of the system are correct. This allows us to infer correctness of any system constructed using verified encodings. As an example, we show how this approach may be used to verify two- and four-domain DNA strand displacement encodings of chemical reaction networks, and we generalize our result to the limit where the populations of helper species are unlimited. PMID:27325906

  20. MRI of the coronary arteries: flip angle train optimization for 3D sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hietschold, V.; Kittner, T.; Abolmaali, N.

    2002-01-01

    Application of contrast agents in MRI of coronary arteries improves contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), but widens the range of T 1 relaxation times of the tissues to be imaged. The flip angle train, generated for the measurement of all phase-encoding steps in the 3 rd spatial dimension of the navigator echo FLASH sequence used, is optimal only for one T 1 . Computer simulations show that it is not advisable to optimize the sequence on the basis of an extremely short T 1 relaxation time (such as in the case of contrast-enhanced vessels) because the imaging of the surrounding tissue would be negatively influenced. A sequence optimization to a T1 of approximately 200 ms seems to allow a CNR improvement of ≥ 50%. (orig.)

  1. A Technique for Generating Volumetric Cine MRI (VC-MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Wendy; Ren, Lei; Cai, Jing; Zhang, You; Chang, Zheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a technique to generate on-board volumetric-cine MRI (VC-MRI) using patient prior images, motion modeling and on-board 2D-cine MRI. Methods One phase of a 4D-MRI acquired during patient simulation is used as patient prior images. 3 major respiratory deformation patterns of the patient are extracted from 4D-MRI based on principal-component-analysis. The on-board VC-MRI at any instant is considered as a deformation of the prior MRI. The deformation field is represented as a linear combination of the 3 major deformation patterns. The coefficients of the deformation patterns are solved by the data fidelity constraint using the acquired on-board single 2D-cine MRI. The method was evaluated using both XCAT simulation of lung cancer patients and MRI data from four real liver cancer patients. The accuracy of the estimated VC-MRI was quantitatively evaluated using Volume-Percent-Difference(VPD), Center-of-Mass-Shift(COMS), and target tracking errors. Effects of acquisition orientation, region-of-interest(ROI) selection, patient breathing pattern change and noise on the estimation accuracy were also evaluated. Results Image subtraction of ground-truth with estimated on-board VC-MRI shows fewer differences than image subtraction of ground-truth with prior image. Agreement between profiles in the estimated and ground-truth VC-MRI was achieved with less than 6% error for both XCAT and patient data. Among all XCAT scenarios, the VPD between ground-truth and estimated lesion volumes was on average 8.43±1.52% and the COMS was on average 0.93±0.58mm across all time-steps for estimation based on the ROI region in the sagittal cine images. Matching to ROI in the sagittal view achieved better accuracy when there was substantial breathing pattern change. The technique was robust against noise levels up to SNR=20. For patient data, average tracking errors were less than 2 mm in all directions for all patients. Conclusions Preliminary studies demonstrated the

  2. Intracavitary ultrasound phased arrays for prostate thermal therapies: MRI compatibility and in vivo testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, E B; Hynynen, K

    1998-12-01

    A 62 element MRI-compatible linear phased array was designed and constructed to investigate the feasibility of using transrectal ultrasound for the thermal therapeutic treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. An aperiodic design technique developed in a previous study was used in the design of this array, which resulted in reduced grating lobe levels by using an optimized random distribution of unequally sized elements. The element sizes used in this array were selected to be favorable for both grating lobe levels as determined by array aperiodicity and array efficiency as determined by width to thickness ratios. The heating capabilities and MRI compatibility of the array were tested with in vivo rabbit thigh muscle heating experiments using MRI temperature monitoring. The array produced therapeutic temperature elevations in vivo at depths of 3-6 cm and axial locations up to 3 cm off the central axis and increased the size of the heated volume with electronic scanning of a single focus. The ability of this array to be used for ultrasound surgery was demonstrated by creating necrosed tissue lesions in vivo using short high-power sonications. The ability of the array to be used for hyperthermia was demonstrated by inducing therapeutic temperature elevations for longer exposures. Based on the acoustic and heating performance of this array, it has the potential to be clinically useful for delivering thermal therapies to the prostate and other target volumes close to body cavities.

  3. Phase-contrast MRI versus numerical simulation to quantify hemodynamical changes in cerebral aneurysms after flow diverter treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Sergey; Prothmann, Sascha; Liepsch, Dieter; Balasso, Andrea; Berg, Philipp; Kaczmarz, Stephan; Kirschke, Jan Stefan

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysms are a major risk factor for intracranial bleeding with devastating consequences for the patient. One recently established treatment is the implantation of flow-diverters (FD). Methods to predict their treatment success before or directly after implantation are not well investigated yet. The aim of this work was to quantitatively study hemodynamic parameters in patient-specific models of treated cerebral aneurysms and its correlation with the clinical outcome. Hemodynamics were evaluated using both computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and phase contrast (PC) MRI. CFD simulations and in vitro MRI measurements were done under similar flow conditions and results of both methods were comparatively analyzed. For preoperative and postoperative distribution of hemodynamic parameters, CFD simulations and PC-MRI velocity measurements showed similar results. In both cases where no occlusion of the aneurysm was observed after six months, a flow reduction of about 30-50% was found, while in the clinically successful case with complete occlusion of the aneurysm after 6 months, the flow reduction was about 80%. No vortex was observed in any of the three models after treatment. The results are in agreement with recent studies suggesting that CFD simulations can predict post-treatment aneurysm flow alteration already before implantation of a FD and PC-MRI could validate the predicted hemodynamic changes right after implantation of a FD. PMID:29304062

  4. Comparison of Global Cerebral Blood Flow Measured by Phase-Contrast Mapping MRI with O-15-H2O Positron Emission Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mark Bitsch; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare mean global cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured by phase-contrast mapping magnetic resonance imaging (PCM MRI) and by 15O-H2O positron emission tomography (PET) in healthy subjects. PCM MRI is increasingly being used to measure mean global CBF, but has not been validated in vivo...... against an accepted reference technique. Materials and Methods Same-day measurements of CBF by 15O-H2O PET and subsequently by PCM MRI were performed on 22 healthy young male volunteers. Global CBF by PET was determined by applying a one-tissue compartment model with measurement of the arterial input...... function. Flow was measured in the internal carotid and vertebral arteries by a noncardiac triggered PCM MRI sequence at 3T. The measured flow was normalized to total brain weight determined from a volume-segmented 3D T1-weighted anatomical MR-scan. Results Mean CBF was 34.9 ± 3.4 mL/100 g/min measured...

  5. Least-squares reverse time migration of marine data with frequency-selection encoding

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei; Huang, Yunsong; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2013-01-01

    The phase-encoding technique can sometimes increase the efficiency of the least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) by more than one order of magnitude. However, traditional random encoding functions require all the encoded shots to share

  6. Relationship between pineal cyst size and aqueductal CSF flow measured by phase contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezuidenhout, Abraham F; Kasper, Ekkehard M; Baledent, Olivier; Rojas, Rafael; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A

    2018-02-23

    Most patients with pineal cysts referred for neurosurgical consultation have no specific symptoms or objective findings except for pineal cyst size to help in management decisions. Our purpose was to assess the relationship between pineal cyst size and aqueductal CSF flow using PC-MRI. Eleven adult patients with pineal cysts (> 1-cm in size) referred for neurosurgical consultations were included. Cyst volume was calculated using 3D T1 images. PC-MRI in axial plane with velocity encoding of 5 cm/sec was used to quantitatively assess CSF flow through the cerebral aqueduct to determine the aqueductal stroke volume, which was then correlated to cyst size using Pearson's correlation. Pineal cysts were grouped by size into small (6/11) and large (5/11) using the median value to compare aqueductal stroke volume using Mann-Whitney test. Patients were 39 ± 13 years (mean ± SD) of age, and 10/11 (91%) were female. There was significant negative correlation between cyst volume and aqueductal stroke volume (r=0.74; p=0.009). Volume of small cysts (4954±2157 mm3) was significantly different compared to large cysts (13752±3738 mm3; p= 0.008). The aqueductal stroke volume of patients harboring large cysts 33±8 μL/cardiac cycle was significantly lower than that of patients with small cysts 96±29 μL/cardiac cycle (p=0.008). Aqueductal CSF flow appears to decrease with increasing pineal cyst size. Our preliminary results provide first evidence that even in the absence of objective neurological findings or hydrocephalus; larger pineal cysts already display decreased CSF flow through the cerebral aqueduct.

  7. Ultrasound of the coracoclavicular ligaments in the acute phase of an acromioclavicular disjunction: Comparison of radiographic, ultrasound and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faruch Bilfeld, Marie; Lapegue, Franck; Chiavassa Gandois, Helene; Bayol, Marie Aurelie; Sans, Nicolas [CHU Toulouse-Purpan, Service de Radiologie, Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Bonnevialle, Nicolas [CHU Toulouse-Purpan, Service d' Orthopedie, Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)

    2017-02-15

    Acromioclavicular joint injuries are typically diagnosed by clinical and radiographic assessment with the Rockwood classification, which is crucial for treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to describe how the ultrasound findings of acromioclavicular joint injury compare with radiography and MRI findings. Forty-seven patients with suspected unilateral acromioclavicular joint injury after acute trauma were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent digital radiography, ultrasound and 3T MRI. A modified Rockwood classification was used to evaluate the coracoclavicular ligaments. The classifications of acromioclavicular joint injuries diagnosed with radiography, ultrasound and MRI were compared. MRI was used as the gold standard. The agreement between the ultrasound and MRI findings was very good, with a correlation coefficient of 0.83 (95 % CI: 0.72-0.90; p < 0.0001). Ultrasound detected coracoclavicular ligament injuries with a sensitivity of 88.9 %, specificity of 90.0 %, positive predictive value of 92.3 % and negative predictive value of 85.7 %. The agreement between the ultrasound and radiography findings was poor, with a correlation coefficient of 0.69 (95 % CI: 0.51-0.82; p < 0.0001). Ultrasound is an effective examination for the diagnostic work-up of lesions of the coracoclavicular ligaments in the acute phase of an acromioclavicular injury. (orig.)

  8. Ultrasound of the coracoclavicular ligaments in the acute phase of an acromioclavicular disjunction: Comparison of radiographic, ultrasound and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faruch Bilfeld, Marie; Lapegue, Franck; Chiavassa Gandois, Helene; Bayol, Marie Aurelie; Sans, Nicolas; Bonnevialle, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Acromioclavicular joint injuries are typically diagnosed by clinical and radiographic assessment with the Rockwood classification, which is crucial for treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to describe how the ultrasound findings of acromioclavicular joint injury compare with radiography and MRI findings. Forty-seven patients with suspected unilateral acromioclavicular joint injury after acute trauma were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent digital radiography, ultrasound and 3T MRI. A modified Rockwood classification was used to evaluate the coracoclavicular ligaments. The classifications of acromioclavicular joint injuries diagnosed with radiography, ultrasound and MRI were compared. MRI was used as the gold standard. The agreement between the ultrasound and MRI findings was very good, with a correlation coefficient of 0.83 (95 % CI: 0.72-0.90; p < 0.0001). Ultrasound detected coracoclavicular ligament injuries with a sensitivity of 88.9 %, specificity of 90.0 %, positive predictive value of 92.3 % and negative predictive value of 85.7 %. The agreement between the ultrasound and radiography findings was poor, with a correlation coefficient of 0.69 (95 % CI: 0.51-0.82; p < 0.0001). Ultrasound is an effective examination for the diagnostic work-up of lesions of the coracoclavicular ligaments in the acute phase of an acromioclavicular injury. (orig.)

  9. Multi-flux-transformer MRI detection with an atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savukov, Igor; Karaulanov, Todor

    2014-12-01

    Recently, anatomical ultra-low field (ULF) MRI has been demonstrated with an atomic magnetometer (AM). A flux-transformer (FT) has been used for decoupling MRI fields and gradients to avoid their negative effects on AM performance. The field of view (FOV) was limited because of the need to compromise between the size of the FT input coil and MRI sensitivity per voxel. Multi-channel acquisition is a well-known solution to increase FOV without significantly reducing sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate twofold FOV increase with the use of three FT input coils. We also show that it is possible to use a single atomic magnetometer and single acquisition channel to acquire three independent MRI signals by applying a frequency-encoding gradient along the direction of the detection array span. The approach can be generalized to more channels and can be critical for imaging applications of non-cryogenic ULF MRI where FOV needs to be large, including head, hand, spine, and whole-body imaging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhancing Security of Double Random Phase Encoding Based on Random S-Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girija, R.; Singh, Hukum

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel asymmetric cryptosystem for double random phase encoding (DRPE) using random S-Box. While utilising S-Box separately is not reliable and DRPE does not support non-linearity, so, our system unites the effectiveness of S-Box with an asymmetric system of DRPE (through Fourier transform). The uniqueness of proposed cryptosystem lies on employing high sensitivity dynamic S-Box for our DRPE system. The randomness and scalability achieved due to applied technique is an additional feature of the proposed solution. The firmness of random S-Box is investigated in terms of performance parameters such as non-linearity, strict avalanche criterion, bit independence criterion, linear and differential approximation probabilities etc. S-Boxes convey nonlinearity to cryptosystems which is a significant parameter and very essential for DRPE. The strength of proposed cryptosystem has been analysed using various parameters such as MSE, PSNR, correlation coefficient analysis, noise analysis, SVD analysis, etc. Experimental results are conferred in detail to exhibit proposed cryptosystem is highly secure.

  11. Working memory contributes to the encoding of object location associations: Support for a 3-part model of object location memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, M Meredith; Garcia, Sarah; Hampstead, Benjamin M

    2016-09-15

    A recent model by Postma and colleagues posits that the encoding of object location associations (OLAs) requires the coordination of several cognitive processes mediated by ventral (object perception) and dorsal (spatial perception) visual pathways as well as the hippocampus (feature binding) [1]. Within this model, frontoparietal network recruitment is believed to contribute to both the spatial processing and working memory task demands. The current study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test each step of this model in 15 participants who encoded OLAs and performed standard n-back tasks. As expected, object processing resulted in activation of the ventral visual stream. Object in location processing resulted in activation of both the ventral and dorsal visual streams as well as a lateral frontoparietal network. This condition was also the only one to result in medial temporal lobe activation, supporting its role in associative learning. A conjunction analysis revealed areas of shared activation between the working memory and object in location phase within the lateral frontoparietal network, anterior insula, and basal ganglia; consistent with prior working memory literature. Overall, findings support Postma and colleague's model and provide clear evidence for the role of working memory during OLA encoding. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Cholinergic Enhancement of Brain Activation in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI during Episodic Memory Encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon L Risacher

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the physiological impact of treatment with donepezil (Aricept on neural circuitry supporting episodic memory encoding in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI using functional MRI (fMRI. Methods: 18 patients with MCI and 20 age-matched healthy controls (HC were scanned twice while performing an event-related verbal episodic encoding task. MCI participants were scanned before treatment and after approximately 3 months on donepezil; HC were untreated but rescanned at the same interval. Voxel-level analyses assessed treatment effects in activation profile relative to retest changes in non-treated HC. Changes in task-related connectivity in medial temporal circuitry were also evaluated, as were associations between brain activation pattern, task-related functional connectivity, task performance, and clinical measures of cognition.Results: At baseline, the MCI group showed reduced activation during encoding relative to HC in the right medial temporal lobe (MTL; hippocampal/parahippocampal and additional regions, as well as attenuated task-related deactivation, relative to rest, in a medial parietal lobe cluster. After treatment, the MCI group showed normalized MTL activation and improved parietal deactivation. These changes were associated with cognitive performance. After treatment, the MCI group also demonstrated increased task-related functional connectivity from the right MTL cluster seed region to a network of other sites including the basal nucleus/caudate and bilateral frontal lobes. Increased functional connectivity was associated with improved task performance.Conclusions: Pharmacologic enhancement of cholinergic function in amnestic MCI is associated with changes in brain activation pattern and functional connectivity during episodic memory processing which are in turn related to increased cognitive performance. fMRI is a promising biomarker for assessing treatment related changes in brain function.

  13. Phase correction for three-dimensional (3D) diffusion-weighted interleaved EPI using 3D multiplexed sensitivity encoding and reconstruction (3D-MUSER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Hui, Edward S; Chiu, Pui-Wai; Liu, Xiaoxi; Chen, Nan-Kuei

    2018-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) multiplexed sensitivity encoding and reconstruction (3D-MUSER) algorithm is proposed to reduce aliasing artifacts and signal corruption caused by inter-shot 3D phase variations in 3D diffusion-weighted echo planar imaging (DW-EPI). 3D-MUSER extends the original framework of multiplexed sensitivity encoding (MUSE) to a hybrid k-space-based reconstruction, thereby enabling the correction of inter-shot 3D phase variations. A 3D single-shot EPI navigator echo was used to measure inter-shot 3D phase variations. The performance of 3D-MUSER was evaluated by analyses of point-spread function (PSF), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and artifact levels. The efficacy of phase correction using 3D-MUSER for different slab thicknesses and b-values were investigated. Simulations showed that 3D-MUSER could eliminate artifacts because of through-slab phase variation and reduce noise amplification because of SENSE reconstruction. All aliasing artifacts and signal corruption in 3D interleaved DW-EPI acquired with different slab thicknesses and b-values were reduced by our new algorithm. A near-whole brain single-slab 3D DTI with 1.3-mm isotropic voxel acquired at 1.5T was successfully demonstrated. 3D phase correction for 3D interleaved DW-EPI data is made possible by 3D-MUSER, thereby improving feasible slab thickness and maximum feasible b-value. Magn Reson Med 79:2702-2712, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. Profilometry of discontinuous solids by means of co-phased demodulation of projected fringes with RGB encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, J. M.; Servin, M.; Garnica, G.

    2015-05-01

    Here we describe a 2-projectors and 1-camera setup for profilometry of discontinuous solids by means of co-phased demodulation of projected fringes and red, green, and blue (RGB) multichannel operation. The dual projection configuration for this profilometer is proposed to solve efficiently specular regions and self-occluding shadows due to discontinuities, which are the main drawbacks for a 1-projector 1-camera configuration. This is because the regions where shadows and specular reflections are generated, and the fringe contrast drops to zero, are in general different for each projection direction; thus, the resulting fringe patterns will have complementary phase information. Multichannel RGB operation allows us to work simultaneously with both projectors and to record independently the complementary fringe patterns phase-modulated by the 3D profile of the object under study. In other words, color encoding/decoding reduces the acquisition time respect to one-at-a-time grayscale operation and, in principle, enables the study of dynamic phenomena. The co-phased demodulation method implemented in this work benefits from the complex (analytic) nature of the output signals estimated with most phase demodulation methods (such as the Fourier method, and temporal phaseshifting algorithms). This allowed us to straightforwardly generate a single phase-map well-defined for the entire area of interest. Finally we assessed our proposed profilometry setup by measuring a fractured spherical cap made of (uncoated) expanded polystyrene. The results were satisfactory but in the authors' opinion this must be considered a preliminary report.

  15. Water and fat separation in real-time MRI of joint movement with phase-sensitive bSSFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoli, Valentina; Nederveen, Aart J; Oudeman, Jos; Sprengers, Andre; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J; Verdonschot, Nico

    2017-07-01

    To introduce a method for obtaining fat-suppressed images in real-time MRI of moving joints at 3 Tesla (T) using a bSSFP sequence with phase detection to enhance visualization of soft tissue structures during motion. The wrist and knee of nine volunteers were imaged with a real-time bSSFP sequence while performing dynamic tasks. For appropriate choice of sequence timing parameters, water and fat pixels showed an out-of-phase behavior, which was exploited to reconstruct water and fat images. Additionally, a 2-point Dixon sequence was used for dynamic imaging of the joints, and resulting water and fat images were compared with our proposed method. The joints could be visualized with good water-fat separation and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), while maintaining a relatively high temporal resolution (5 fps in knee imaging and 10 fps in wrist imaging). The proposed method produced images of moving joints with higher SNR and higher image quality when compared with the Dixon method. Water-fat separation is feasible in real-time MRI of moving knee and wrist at 3 T. PS-bSSFP offers movies with higher SNR and higher diagnostic quality when compared with Dixon scans. Magn Reson Med 78:58-68, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. Item Memory, Context Memory and the Hippocampus: fMRI Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugg, Michael D.; Vilberg, Kaia L.; Mattson, Julia T.; Yu, Sarah S.; Johnson, Jeffrey D.; Suzuki, Maki

    2012-01-01

    Dual-process models of recognition memory distinguish between the retrieval of qualitative information about a prior event (recollection), and judgments of prior occurrence based on an acontextual sense of familiarity. fMRI studies investigating the neural correlates of memory encoding and retrieval conducted within the dual-process framework have…

  17. Effect of pulse sequence parameter selection on signal strength in positive-contrast MRI markers for MRI-based prostate postimplant assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Tze Yee [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas at Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 6767 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J., E-mail: rkudchad@mdanderson.org; Wang, Jihong; Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Stafford, R. Jason [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); MacLellan, Christopher [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas at Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 6767 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Rao, Arvind [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: For postimplant dosimetric assessment, computed tomography (CT) is commonly used to identify prostate brachytherapy seeds, at the expense of accurate anatomical contouring. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is superior to CT for anatomical delineation, but identification of the negative-contrast seeds is challenging. Positive-contrast MRI markers were proposed to replace spacers to assist seed localization on MRI images. Visualization of these markers under varying scan parameters was investigated. Methods: To simulate a clinical scenario, a prostate phantom was implanted with 66 markers and 86 seeds, and imaged on a 3.0T MRI scanner using a 3D fast radiofrequency-spoiled gradient recalled echo acquisition with various combinations of scan parameters. Scan parameters, including flip angle, number of excitations, bandwidth, field-of-view, slice thickness, and encoding steps were systematically varied to study their effects on signal, noise, scan time, image resolution, and artifacts. Results: The effects of pulse sequence parameter selection on the marker signal strength and image noise were characterized. The authors also examined the tradeoff between signal-to-noise ratio, scan time, and image artifacts, such as the wraparound artifact, susceptibility artifact, chemical shift artifact, and partial volume averaging artifact. Given reasonable scan time and managable artifacts, the authors recommended scan parameter combinations that can provide robust visualization of the MRI markers. Conclusions: The recommended MRI pulse sequence protocol allows for consistent visualization of the markers to assist seed localization, potentially enabling MRI-only prostate postimplant dosimetry.

  18. Flip angle modulations in late phase Gd-EOB-DTPA MRI improve the identification of the biliary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelter, Lars, E-mail: lars.stelter@charite.de [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Grieser, Christian, E-mail: christian.grieser@charite.de [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Fernandes, Carmen Maria Perez, E-mail: carmen.perez-fernandez@charite.de [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Rothe, Jan Holger, E-mail: jan-holger.rothe@charite.de [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Streitparth, Florian, E-mail: florian.streitparth@charite.de [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Seehofer, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.seehofer@charite.de [Klinik fuer Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: To assess the improvement of bile duct visualization in Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MR-cholangiography (EOB-MRC) by using an increased flip angle. Methods: 35 patients underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRI of the liver including T2-weighted MRCP and hepatobiliary phase EOB-MRC using a flip angle of 10 Degree-Sign (FA10) and of 35 Degree-Sign (FA35), respectively. Images were evaluated regarding the delineation of biliary ducts, the order of branching and anatomic visualization of the biliary tree. ROI analysis was performed to estimate the signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios. Results: Applying the FA35 resulted in a significantly better SNR and CNR as compared to FA10. The overall image quality was rated as good for both, FA10 and FA35. The overall rating for regional delineation of the biliary system was rated significantly better for FA35 than for FA10 (p = 0.02). Classification of bile duct anatomy variations, however, was equivalent in both techniques. Conclusions: Increasing the flip angle of a T1-weighted 3D-sequence from 10 Degree-Sign to 35 Degree-Sign during the hepatobiliary phase of Gd-EOB enhanced MRI visually and quantitatively improved the visualization of the biliary ducts.

  19. Brain systems underlying attentional control and emotional distraction during working memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei, Maryam; Peira, Nathalie; Persson, Jonas

    2014-02-15

    Goal-directed behavior requires that cognitive operations can be protected from emotional distraction induced by task-irrelevant emotional stimuli. The brain processes involved in attending to relevant information while filtering out irrelevant information are still largely unknown. To investigate the neural and behavioral underpinnings of attending to task-relevant emotional stimuli while ignoring irrelevant stimuli, we used fMRI to assess brain responses during attentional instructed encoding within an emotional working memory (WM) paradigm. We showed that instructed attention to emotion during WM encoding resulted in enhanced performance, by means of increased memory performance and reduced reaction time, compared to passive viewing. A similar performance benefit was also demonstrated for recognition memory performance, although for positive pictures only. Functional MRI data revealed a network of regions involved in directed attention to emotional information for both positive and negative pictures that included medial and lateral prefrontal cortices, fusiform gyrus, insula, the parahippocampal gyrus, and the amygdala. Moreover, we demonstrate that regions in the striatum, and regions associated with the default-mode network were differentially activated for emotional distraction compared to neutral distraction. Activation in a sub-set of these regions was related to individual differences in WM and recognition memory performance, thus likely contributing to performing the task at an optimal level. The present results provide initial insights into the behavioral and neural consequences of instructed attention and emotional distraction during WM encoding. © 2013.

  20. Value-based modulation of memory encoding involves strategic engagement of fronto-temporal semantic processing regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael S; Rissman, Jesse; Suthana, Nanthia A; Castel, Alan D; Knowlton, Barbara J

    2014-06-01

    A number of prior fMRI studies have focused on the ways in which the midbrain dopaminergic reward system coactivates with hippocampus to potentiate memory for valuable items. However, another means by which people could selectively remember more valuable to-be-remembered items is to be selective in their use of effective but effortful encoding strategies. To broadly examine the neural mechanisms of value on subsequent memory, we used fMRI to assess how differences in brain activity at encoding as a function of value relate to subsequent free recall for words. Each word was preceded by an arbitrarily assigned point value, and participants went through multiple study-test cycles with feedback on their point total at the end of each list, allowing for sculpting of cognitive strategies. We examined the correlation between value-related modulation of brain activity and participants' selectivity index, which measures how close participants were to their optimal point total, given the number of items recalled. Greater selectivity scores were associated with greater differences in the activation of semantic processing regions, including left inferior frontal gyrus and left posterior lateral temporal cortex, during the encoding of high-value words relative to low-value words. Although we also observed value-related modulation within midbrain and ventral striatal reward regions, our fronto-temporal findings suggest that strategic engagement of deep semantic processing may be an important mechanism for selectively encoding valuable items.

  1. Value-based modulation of memory encoding involves strategic engagement of fronto-temporal semantic processing regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael S.; Rissman, Jesse; Suthana, Nanthia A.; Castel, Alan D.; Knowlton, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    A number of prior fMRI studies have focused on the ways in which the midbrain dopaminergic reward system co-activates with hippocampus to potentiate memory for valuable items. However, another means by which people could selectively remember more valuable to-be-remembered items is to be selective in their use of effective but effortful encoding strategies. To broadly examine the neural mechanisms of value on subsequent memory, we used fMRI to examine how differences in brain activity at encoding as a function of value relate to subsequent free recall for words. Each word was preceded by an arbitrarily assigned point value, and participants went through multiple study-test cycles with feedback on their point total at the end of each list, allowing for sculpting of cognitive strategies. We examined the correlation between value-related modulation of brain activity and participants’ selectivity index, a measure of how close participants were to their optimal point total given the number of items recalled. Greater selectivity scores were associated with greater differences in activation of semantic processing regions, including left inferior frontal gyrus and left posterior lateral temporal cortex, during encoding of high-value words relative to low-value words. Although we also observed value-related modulation within midbrain and ventral striatal reward regions, our fronto-temporal findings suggest that strategic engagement of deep semantic processing may be an important mechanism for selectively encoding valuable items. PMID:24683066

  2. Brain functional BOLD perturbation modelling for forward fMRI and inverse mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jennifer; Calhoun, Vince

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To computationally separate dynamic brain functional BOLD responses from static background in a brain functional activity for forward fMRI signal analysis and inverse mapping. Methods A brain functional activity is represented in terms of magnetic source by a perturbation model: χ = χ0 +δχ, with δχ for BOLD magnetic perturbations and χ0 for background. A brain fMRI experiment produces a timeseries of complex-valued images (T2* images), whereby we extract the BOLD phase signals (denoted by δP) by a complex division. By solving an inverse problem, we reconstruct the BOLD δχ dataset from the δP dataset, and the brain χ distribution from a (unwrapped) T2* phase image. Given a 4D dataset of task BOLD fMRI, we implement brain functional mapping by temporal correlation analysis. Results Through a high-field (7T) and high-resolution (0.5mm in plane) task fMRI experiment, we demonstrated in detail the BOLD perturbation model for fMRI phase signal separation (P + δP) and reconstructing intrinsic brain magnetic source (χ and δχ). We also provided to a low-field (3T) and low-resolution (2mm) task fMRI experiment in support of single-subject fMRI study. Our experiments show that the δχ-depicted functional map reveals bidirectional BOLD χ perturbations during the task performance. Conclusions The BOLD perturbation model allows us to separate fMRI phase signal (by complex division) and to perform inverse mapping for pure BOLD δχ reconstruction for intrinsic functional χ mapping. The full brain χ reconstruction (from unwrapped fMRI phase) provides a new brain tissue image that allows to scrutinize the brain tissue idiosyncrasy for the pure BOLD δχ response through an automatic function/structure co-localization. PMID:29351339

  3. Brain functional BOLD perturbation modelling for forward fMRI and inverse mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Robinson, Jennifer; Calhoun, Vince

    2018-01-01

    To computationally separate dynamic brain functional BOLD responses from static background in a brain functional activity for forward fMRI signal analysis and inverse mapping. A brain functional activity is represented in terms of magnetic source by a perturbation model: χ = χ0 +δχ, with δχ for BOLD magnetic perturbations and χ0 for background. A brain fMRI experiment produces a timeseries of complex-valued images (T2* images), whereby we extract the BOLD phase signals (denoted by δP) by a complex division. By solving an inverse problem, we reconstruct the BOLD δχ dataset from the δP dataset, and the brain χ distribution from a (unwrapped) T2* phase image. Given a 4D dataset of task BOLD fMRI, we implement brain functional mapping by temporal correlation analysis. Through a high-field (7T) and high-resolution (0.5mm in plane) task fMRI experiment, we demonstrated in detail the BOLD perturbation model for fMRI phase signal separation (P + δP) and reconstructing intrinsic brain magnetic source (χ and δχ). We also provided to a low-field (3T) and low-resolution (2mm) task fMRI experiment in support of single-subject fMRI study. Our experiments show that the δχ-depicted functional map reveals bidirectional BOLD χ perturbations during the task performance. The BOLD perturbation model allows us to separate fMRI phase signal (by complex division) and to perform inverse mapping for pure BOLD δχ reconstruction for intrinsic functional χ mapping. The full brain χ reconstruction (from unwrapped fMRI phase) provides a new brain tissue image that allows to scrutinize the brain tissue idiosyncrasy for the pure BOLD δχ response through an automatic function/structure co-localization.

  4. Persistent schema-dependent hippocampal-neocortical connectivity during memory encoding and postencoding rest in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kesteren, Marlieke T R; Fernández, Guillén; Norris, David G; Hermans, Erno J

    2010-04-20

    The hippocampus is thought to promote gradual incorporation of novel information into long-term memory by binding, reactivating, and strengthening distributed cortical-cortical connections. Recent studies implicate a key role in this process for hippocampally driven crosstalk with the (ventro)medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), which is proposed to become a central node in such representational networks over time. The existence of a relevant prior associative network, or schema, may moreover facilitate this process. Thus, hippocampal-vmPFC crosstalk may support integration of new memories, particularly in the absence of a relevant prior schema. To address this issue, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and prior schema manipulation to track hippocampal-vmPFC connectivity during encoding and postencoding rest. We manipulated prior schema knowledge by exposing 30 participants to the first part of a movie that was temporally scrambled for 15 participants. The next day, participants underwent fMRI while encoding the movie's final 15 min in original order and, subsequently, while resting. Schema knowledge and item recognition performance show that prior schema was successfully and selectively manipulated. Intersubject synchronization (ISS) and interregional partial correlation analyses furthermore show that stronger prior schema was associated with more vmPFC ISS and less hippocampal-vmPFC interregional connectivity during encoding. Notably, this connectivity pattern persisted during postencoding rest. These findings suggest that additional crosstalk between hippocampus and vmPFC is required to compensate for difficulty integrating novel information during encoding and provide tentative support for the notion that functionally relevant hippocampal-neocortical crosstalk persists during off-line periods after learning.

  5. The list-composition effect in memory for emotional and neutral pictures: Differential contribution of ventral and dorsal attention networks to successful encoding

    OpenAIRE

    Barnacle, Gemma; Montaldi, Daniela; Talmi, Deborah; Sommer, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The Emotional enhancement of memory (EEM) is observed in immediate free-recall memory tests when emotional and neutral stimuli are encoded and tested together (“mixed lists”), but surprisingly, not when they are encoded and tested separately (“pure lists”). Here our aim was to investigate whether the effect of list-composition (mixed versus pure lists) on the EEM is due to differential allocation of attention. We scanned participants with fMRI during encoding of semantically-related emotional...

  6. A slice of π: An exploratory neuroimaging study of digit encoding and retrieval in a superior memorist

    OpenAIRE

    Raz, Amir; Packard, Mark G.; Alexander, Gerianne M.; Buhle, Jason T.; Zhu, Hongtu; Yu, Shan; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2009-01-01

    Subject PI demonstrated superior memory using a variant of a Method of Loci (MOL) technique to recite the first digits of the mathematical constant π to more than 216 decimal places. We report preliminary behavioral, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and brain volumetric data from PI. fMRI data collected while PI recited the first 540 digits of π (i.e., during retrieval) revealed increased activity in medial frontal gyrus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Encoding of a novel str...

  7. Differences in prefrontal cortex activation and deactivation during strategic episodic verbal memory encoding in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Bisol Balardin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined differences in fMRI activation and deactivation patterns during episodic verbal memory encoding between individuals with MCI (n=18 and healthy controls (n=17. Participants were scanned in two different sessions during the application of self-initiated or directed instructions to apply semantic strategies at encoding of word lists. MCI participants showed reduced free recall scores when using self-initiated encoding strategies that were increased to baseline controls’ level after directed instructions were provided. During directed strategic encoding, greater recruitment of frontoparietal regions was observed in both MCI and control groups; group differences between sessions were observed in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the right superior frontal gyrus. This study provides evidence suggesting that differences of activity in these regions may be related to encoding deficits in MCI, possibly mediating executive functions during task performance.

  8. Sub-Millimeter T2 Weighted fMRI at 7 T: Comparison of 3D-GRASE and 2D SE-EPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin G. Kemper

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI allows studying human brain function non-invasively up to the spatial resolution of cortical columns and layers. Most fMRI acquisitions rely on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD contrast employing T2* weighted 2D multi-slice echo-planar imaging (EPI. At ultra-high magnetic field (i.e. 7 T and above, it has been shown experimentally and by simulation, that T2 weighted acquisitions yield a signal that is spatially more specific to the site of neuronal activity at the cost of functional sensitivity. This study compared two T2 weighted imaging sequences, inner-volume 3D Gradient-and-Spin-Echo (3D-GRASE and 2D Spin-Echo EPI (SE-EPI, with evaluation of their imaging point-spread function, functional specificity, and functional sensitivity at sub-millimeter resolution. Simulations and measurements of the imaging point-spread function revealed that the strongest anisotropic blurring in 3D-GRASE (along the second phase-encoding direction was about 60 % higher than the strongest anisotropic blurring in 2D SE-EPI (along the phase-encoding direction In a visual paradigm, the BOLD sensitivity of 3D-GRASE was found to be superior due to its higher temporal signal-to-noise ratio. High resolution cortical depth profiles suggested that the contrast mechanisms are similar between the two sequences, however, 2D SE-EPI had a higher surface bias owing to the higher T2* contribution of the longer in-plane EPI echo-train for full field of view compared to the reduced field of view of zoomed 3D-GRASE.

  9. Comparing different stimulus configurations for population receptive field mapping in human fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan eAlvarez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Population receptive field (pRF mapping is a widely used approach to measuring aggregate human visual receptive field properties by recording non-invasive signals using functional MRI. Despite growing interest, no study to date has systematically investigated the effects of different stimulus configurations on pRF estimates from human visual cortex. Here we compared the effects of three different stimulus configurations on a model-based approach to pRF estimation: size-invariant bars and eccentricity-scaled bars defined in Cartesian coordinates and traveling along the cardinal axes, and a novel simultaneous ‘wedge and ring’ stimulus defined in polar coordinates, systematically covering polar and eccentricity axes. We found that the presence or absence of eccentricity scaling had a significant effect on goodness of fit and pRF size estimates. Further, variability in pRF size estimates was directly influenced by stimulus configuration, particularly for higher visual areas including V5/MT+. Finally, we compared eccentricity estimation between phase-encoded and model-based pRF approaches. We observed a tendency for more peripheral eccentricity estimates using phase-encoded methods, independent of stimulus size. We conclude that both eccentricity scaling and polar rather than Cartesian stimulus configuration are important considerations for optimal experimental design in pRF mapping. While all stimulus configurations produce adequate estimates, simultaneous wedge and ring stimulation produced higher fit reliability, with a significant advantage in reduced acquisition time.

  10. Comparison of neural activity that leads to true memories, false memories, and forgetting: An fMRI study of the misinformation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baym, Carol L; Gonsalves, Brian D

    2010-09-01

    False memories can occur when people are exposed to misinformation about a past event. Of interest here are the neural mechanisms of this type of memory failure. In the present study, participants viewed photographic vignettes of common activities during an original event phase (OEP), while we monitored their brain activity using fMRI. Later, in a misinformation phase, participants viewed sentences describing the studied photographs, some of which contained information conflicting with that depicted in the photographs. One day later, participants returned for a surprise item memory recognition test for the content of the photographs. Results showed reliable creation of false memories, in that participants reported information that had been presented in the verbal misinformation but not in the photographs. Several regions were more active during the OEP for later accurate memory than for forgetting, but they were also more active for later false memories, indicating that false memories in this paradigm are not simply caused by failure to encode the original event. There was greater activation in the ventral visual stream for subsequent true memories than for subsequent false memories, however, suggesting that differences in encoding may contribute to later susceptibility to misinformation.

  11. Energy efficiency and pulmonary artery flow after balloon pulmonary angioplasty for inoperable, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: Analysis by phase-contrast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Michinobu, E-mail: nagao.michinobu@twmu.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging & Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Yamasaki, Yuzo [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Abe, Kohtaro; Hosokawa, Kazuya [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kawanami, Satoshi [Department of Molecular Imaging & Diagnosis, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kamitani, Takeshi; Yamanouchi, Torahiko [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yabuuchi, Hidetake [Department of Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Fukushima, Kenji [Department of Diagnostic Imaging & Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to propose a new quantitative method for pulmonary artery (PA) flow energetics using phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI), and to investigate how balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA) impacts energetics in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). Materials and methods: PC-MRI at 3-Teslar and with a flow sensitive gradient echo was used to examine energetics prior to and following BPA for 24 CTEPH patients. Stroke volume (m; ml) and mean velocity (V; mm/s) for the main pulmonary artery (PA), right PA, and left PA were calculated from a time-flow curve derived from PC-MRI. Based on the Bernoulli principle, PA energy was identified as 1/2 mV{sup 2} (μj/kg), and energy loss was defined as the following equation “energy loss = main PA energy − (rt. PA energy + lt. PA energy)”. Results: Right PA energy was significantly greater post-BPA than pre-BPA (61 ± 55 vs. 32 ± 40 μj/kg). There was no difference in main PA and left PA energies. Energy loss was significantly decreased post-BPA (18 ± 97 μj/kg) than pre-BPA (79 ± 125 μj/kg). An optimal cutoff of left PA energy of 45 μj/kg pre-BPA can be used to predict patients with mPAP ≥ 30 mmHg after BPA, with an area under the curve of 0.91, 78% sensitivity, and 92% specificity. Conclusion: Analysis of PA energetics using phase-contrast MRI demonstrates that BPA improves energy loss in CTEPH. In addition, BPA responses can be predicted by PA energy status pre-treatment.

  12. Dissociable effects of top-down and bottom-up attention during episodic encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncapher, Melina R.; Hutchinson, J. Benjamin; Wagner, Anthony D.

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that the formation of memories for life’s experiences—episodic memory—is influenced by how we attend to those experiences, yet the neural mechanisms by which attention shapes episodic encoding are still unclear. We investigated how top-down and bottom-up attention contribute to memory encoding of visual objects in humans by manipulating both types of attention during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of episodic memory formation. We show that dorsal parietal cortex—specifically, intraparietal sulcus (IPS)—was engaged during top-down attention and was also recruited during the successful formation of episodic memories. By contrast, bottom-up attention engaged ventral parietal cortex—specifically, temporoparietal junction (TPJ)—and was also more active during encoding failure. Functional connectivity analyses revealed further dissociations in how top-down and bottom-up attention influenced encoding: while both IPS and TPJ influenced activity in perceptual cortices thought to represent the information being encoded (fusiform/lateral occipital cortex), they each exerted opposite effects on memory encoding. Specifically, during a preparatory period preceding stimulus presentation, a stronger drive from IPS was associated with a higher likelihood that the subsequently attended stimulus would be encoded. By contrast, during stimulus processing, stronger connectivity with TPJ was associated with a lower likelihood the stimulus would be successfully encoded. These findings suggest that during encoding of visual objects into episodic memory, top-down and bottom-up attention can have opposite influences on perceptual areas that subserve visual object representation, suggesting that one manner in which attention modulates memory is by altering the perceptual processing of to-be-encoded stimuli. PMID:21880922

  13. Prefrontal activity and impaired memory encoding strategies in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimond, Synthia; Hawco, Colin; Lepage, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Schizophrenia patients have significant memory difficulties that have far-reaching implications in their daily life. These impairments are partly attributed to an inability to self-initiate effective memory encoding strategies, but its core neurobiological correlates remain unknown. The current study addresses this critical gap in our knowledge of episodic memory impairments in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia patients (n = 35) and healthy controls (n = 23) underwent a Semantic Encoding Memory Task (SEMT) during an fMRI scan. Brain activity was examined for conditions where participants were a) prompted to use semantic encoding strategies, or b) not prompted but required to self-initiate such strategies. When prompted to use semantic encoding strategies, schizophrenia patients exhibited similar recognition performance and brain activity as healthy controls. However, when required to self-initiate these strategies, patients had significant reduced recognition performance and brain activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, as well as in the left temporal gyrus, left superior parietal lobule, and cerebellum. When patients were divided based on performance on the SEMT, the subgroup with more severe deficits in self-initiation also showed greater reduction in left dorsolateral prefrontal activity. These results suggest that impaired self-initiation of elaborative encoding strategies is a driving feature of memory deficits in schizophrenia. We also identified the neural correlates of impaired self-initiation of semantic encoding strategies, in which a failure to activate the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex plays a key role. These findings provide important new targets in the development of novel treatments aiming to improve memory and ultimately patients' outcome. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Wavelength-encoded OCDMA system using opto-VLSI processors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljada, Muhsen; Alameh, Kamal

    2007-07-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a 2.5 Gbits/sper user wavelength-encoded optical code-division multiple-access encoder-decoder structure based on opto-VLSI processing. Each encoder and decoder is constructed using a single 1D opto-very-large-scale-integrated (VLSI) processor in conjunction with a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) array of different Bragg wavelengths. The FBG array spectrally and temporally slices the broadband input pulse into several components and the opto-VLSI processor generates codewords using digital phase holograms. System performance is measured in terms of the autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions as well as the eye diagram.

  15. Wavelength-encoded OCDMA system using opto-VLSI processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljada, Muhsen; Alameh, Kamal

    2007-07-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a 2.5 Gbits/sper user wavelength-encoded optical code-division multiple-access encoder-decoder structure based on opto-VLSI processing. Each encoder and decoder is constructed using a single 1D opto-very-large-scale-integrated (VLSI) processor in conjunction with a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) array of different Bragg wavelengths. The FBG array spectrally and temporally slices the broadband input pulse into several components and the opto-VLSI processor generates codewords using digital phase holograms. System performance is measured in terms of the autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions as well as the eye diagram.

  16. Sequential changes on [sup 23]Na MRI after cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, T. (Cerebrovascular Div., Dept. of Medicine, National Cardiovascular Center, Osaka (Japan)); Naritomi, H. (Cerebrovascular Div., Dept. of Medicine, National Cardiovascular Center, Osaka (Japan)); Sawada, T. (Cerebrovascular Div., Dept. of Medicine, National Cardiovascular Center, Osaka (Japan))

    1993-01-01

    [sup 23]Na MRI changes from the acute to chronic phase were investigated in seven patients with cerebral infarcts. They showed no signal increase during the first 13 h after the stroke and revealed a definite signal increase thereafter. This reached a maximum 45-82 h after stroke and became sightly less marked in the subacute and chronic phases, probably as a result of disappearance of cerebral oedema. In the early acute phase of stroke, [sup 23]Na MRI appears to fail to demonstrate Na[sup +] increases in the ischaemic area, due presumably to the invisibility on MRI of intracellular [sup 23]Na in the intact brain. The increase more than 13 h after stroke, during which ischaemic cells are likely to die, is presumably because of increased visibility of intracellular [sup 23]Na in the dead cells. [sup 23]Na MRI is apparently insensitive to early ischaemic changes, but may be useful for assessing the cell viability in the ischaemic brain. (orig.)

  17. Designing a compact MRI motion phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmiedel Max

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Even today, dealing with motion artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a challenging task. Image corruption due to spontaneous body motion complicates diagnosis. In this work, an MRI phantom for rigid motion is presented. It is used to generate motion-corrupted data, which can serve for evaluation of blind motion compensation algorithms. In contrast to commercially available MRI motion phantoms, the presented setup works on small animal MRI systems. Furthermore, retrospective gating is performed on the data, which can be used as a reference for novel motion compensation approaches. The motion of the signal source can be reconstructed using motor trigger signals and be utilized as the ground truth for motion estimation. The proposed setup results in motion corrected images. Moreover, the importance of preprocessing the MRI raw data, e.g. phase-drift correction, is demonstrated. The gained knowledge can be used to design an MRI phantom for elastic motion.

  18. Performance Analysis of Spectral-Phase-Encoded Optical CDMA System Using Two-Photon-Absorption Receiver Structure for Asynchronous and Slot-Level Synchronous Transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Kambiz; Salehi, Jawad A.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the performance of a nonlinear two-photon-absorption (TPA) receiver and compare its performance with that of a single-photon-absorption (SPA) receiver in the context of spectral-phase-encoded optical code-division multiple access (CDMA) technique. The performances for the above systems are evaluated for two different transmission scenarios, namely, asynchronous and slot-level synchronous transmitters. Performance evaluation includes different sources of degradation such as multiple-access interference, noise due to optical amplification, shot noise, and thermal noise. In obtaining the performance, the mean and variance of the received signal in each of the above techniques are derived, and bit error rate is obtained using Gaussian approximation. In general, it is shown that TPA receivers are superior in performance with respect to SPA receivers when the receiver employs a much slower photodetector in comparison with the laser's transmitted pulse duration. This, indeed, is the reason behind the choice of nonlinear receivers, such as TPA, in most spectral-phase-encoded optical CDMA systems.

  19. In vivo single-shot (13)C spectroscopic imaging of hyperpolarized metabolites by spatiotemporal encoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Rita; Laustsen, Christoffer; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    are necessary. Several approaches have been customized for hyperpolarized (13)C MRI, including CSI with a center-out k-space encoding, EPSI, and spectrally selective pulses in combination with spiral EPI acquisitions. Recent studies have described the potential of single-shot alternatives based...... temporal) data sets were obtained at 7T from a murine lymphoma tumor model....

  20. Parietal cortex integrates contextual and saliency signals during the encoding of natural scenes in working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Valerio; Di Francesco, Simona Arianna; Mastroberardino, Serena; Macaluso, Emiliano

    2015-12-01

    The Brief presentation of a complex scene entails that only a few objects can be selected, processed indepth, and stored in memory. Both low-level sensory salience and high-level context-related factors (e.g., the conceptual match/mismatch between objects and scene context) contribute to this selection process, but how the interplay between these factors affects memory encoding is largely unexplored. Here, during fMRI we presented participants with pictures of everyday scenes. After a short retention interval, participants judged the position of a target object extracted from the initial scene. The target object could be either congruent or incongruent with the context of the scene, and could be located in a region of the image with maximal or minimal salience. Behaviourally, we found a reduced impact of saliency on visuospatial working memory performance when the target was out-of-context. Encoding-related fMRI results showed that context-congruent targets activated dorsoparietal regions, while context-incongruent targets de-activated the ventroparietal cortex. Saliency modulated activity both in dorsal and ventral regions, with larger context-related effects for salient targets. These findings demonstrate the joint contribution of knowledge-based and saliency-driven attention for memory encoding, highlighting a dissociation between dorsal and ventral parietal regions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Parenchymal neurocysticercosis: follow-up and staging by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumas, J.L.; Visy, J.M.; Belin, C.; Gaston, A.; Goldlust, D.; Dumas, M.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the evolution of parenchymal cerebral cysticerci on MRI, to assess signs of early cyst degeneration. We studied 15 lesions in four treated and one untreated patient. MRI was performed before therapy and repeated in the 1st month after each course of anticysticercus drugs, every 4 months during the 1st year and then annually; the follow-up period was 8-48 months. Lesions were classified according to changes in four features: cyst content and capsule signal, gadolinium enhancement and oedema signal. We were able to recognise each of the pathological phases; five MRI stages were identified. Stage 1 showed oedema and/or nodular gadolinium enhancement in the tissue invasion phase; stage 2 was cerebrospinal fluid-like signal within a cyst in the vesicular phase; stage 3 showed a thick capsule with an impure liquid content signal and surrounding oedema, in the cystic phase; stage 4 showed the disappearance of the cyst fluid content signal in the degenerative phase; stage 5 showed a calcified lesion in the residual phase. Stage 1 lesions disappeared after therapy; the other progressed from one stage to another. Stage 4 indicated the end of viability of the parasite and determined the point after which treatment was useless. On T2-weighted images changes in the cyst content differed according to the history of the lesion; nodular low intensity followed the natural degeneration of the parasite and a mixed fluid signal with punctate low signal seemed to represent the specific result of therapy. MRI staging can help in the evaluation of indications for treatment and facilitate clinical therapeutic trials. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  2. Parenchymal neurocysticercosis: follow-up and staging by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, J.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France)]|[Inst. of Tropical Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Limoges (France); Visy, J.M. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Belin, C. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France); Gaston, A. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Henri-Mondor, Creteil (France); Goldlust, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France); Dumas, M. [Inst. of Tropical Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Limoges (France)

    1997-01-01

    We describe the evolution of parenchymal cerebral cysticerci on MRI, to assess signs of early cyst degeneration. We studied 15 lesions in four treated and one untreated patient. MRI was performed before therapy and repeated in the 1st month after each course of anticysticercus drugs, every 4 months during the 1st year and then annually; the follow-up period was 8-48 months. Lesions were classified according to changes in four features: cyst content and capsule signal, gadolinium enhancement and oedema signal. We were able to recognise each of the pathological phases; five MRI stages were identified. Stage 1 showed oedema and/or nodular gadolinium enhancement in the tissue invasion phase; stage 2 was cerebrospinal fluid-like signal within a cyst in the vesicular phase; stage 3 showed a thick capsule with an impure liquid content signal and surrounding oedema, in the cystic phase; stage 4 showed the disappearance of the cyst fluid content signal in the degenerative phase; stage 5 showed a calcified lesion in the residual phase. Stage 1 lesions disappeared after therapy; the other progressed from one stage to another. Stage 4 indicated the end of viability of the parasite and determined the point after which treatment was useless. On T2-weighted images changes in the cyst content differed according to the history of the lesion; nodular low intensity followed the natural degeneration of the parasite and a mixed fluid signal with punctate low signal seemed to represent the specific result of therapy. MRI staging can help in the evaluation of indications for treatment and facilitate clinical therapeutic trials. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Pupil size reflects successful encoding and recall of memory in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucewicz, Michal T; Dolezal, Jaromir; Kremen, Vaclav; Berry, Brent M; Miller, Laura R; Magee, Abigail L; Fabian, Vratislav; Worrell, Gregory A

    2018-03-21

    Pupil responses are known to indicate brain processes involved in perception, attention and decision-making. They can provide an accessible biomarker of human memory performance and cognitive states in general. Here we investigated changes in the pupil size during encoding and recall of word lists. Consistent patterns in the pupil response were found across and within distinct phases of the free recall task. The pupil was most constricted in the initial fixation phase and was gradually more dilated through the subsequent encoding, distractor and recall phases of the task, as the word items were maintained in memory. Within the final recall phase, retrieving memory for individual words was associated with pupil dilation in absence of visual stimulation. Words that were successfully recalled showed significant differences in pupil response during their encoding compared to those that were forgotten - the pupil was more constricted before and more dilated after the onset of word presentation. Our results suggest pupil size as a potential biomarker for probing and modulation of memory processing.

  4. Partial Fourier techniques in single-shot cross-term spatiotemporal encoded MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Frydman, Lucio

    2018-03-01

    Cross-term spatiotemporal encoding (xSPEN) is a single-shot approach with exceptional immunity to field heterogeneities, the images of which faithfully deliver 2D spatial distributions without requiring a priori information or using postacquisition corrections. xSPEN, however, suffers from signal-to-noise ratio penalties due to its non-Fourier nature and due to diffusion losses-especially when seeking high resolution. This study explores partial Fourier transform approaches that, acting along either the readout or the spatiotemporally encoded dimensions, reduce these penalties. xSPEN uses an orthogonal (e.g., z) gradient to read, in direct space, the low-bandwidth (e.g., y) dimension. This substantially changes the nature of partial Fourier acquisitions vis-à-vis conventional imaging counterparts. A suitable theoretical analysis is derived to implement these procedures, along either the spatiotemporally or readout axes. Partial Fourier single-shot xSPEN images were recorded on preclinical and human scanners. Owing to their reduction in the experiments' acquisition times, this approach provided substantial sensitivity gains vis-à-vis previous implementations for a given targeted in-plane resolution. The physical origins of these gains are explained. Partial Fourier approaches, particularly when implemented along the low-bandwidth spatiotemporal dimension, provide several-fold sensitivity advantages at minimal costs to the execution and processing of the single-shot experiments. Magn Reson Med 79:1506-1514, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Contrast enhanced liver MRI in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis: inverse appearance of focal confluent fibrosis on delayed phase MR images with hepatocyte specific versus extracellular gadolinium based contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husarik, Daniela B; Gupta, Rajan T; Ringe, Kristina I; Boll, Daniel T; Merkle, Elmar M

    2011-12-01

    To assess the enhancement pattern of focal confluent fibrosis (FCF) on contrast-enhanced hepatic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using hepatocyte-specific (Gd-EOB-DTPA) and extracellular (ECA) gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). After institutional review board approval, 10 patients with PSC (6 male, 4 female; 33-61 years) with 13 FCF were included in this retrospective study. All patients had a Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI exam, and a comparison ECA-enhanced MRI. On each T1-weighted dynamic dataset, the signal intensity (SI) of FCF and the surrounding liver as well as the paraspinal muscle (M) were measured. In the Gd-EOB-DTPA group, hepatocyte phase images were also included. SI FCF/SI M, SI liver/SI M, and [(SI liver - SI FCF)/SI liver] were compared between the different contrast agents for each dynamic phase using the paired Student's t-test. There was no significant difference in SI FCF/SI M in all imaging phases. SI liver/SI M was significantly higher for the Gd-EOB-DTPA group in the delayed phase (P DTPA group, mean [(SI liver - SI FCF)/SI liver] were as follows (values for ECA group in parentheses): unenhanced phase: 0.26 (0.26); arterial phase: 0.01 (-0.31); portal venous phase (PVP): -0.05 (-0.26); delayed phase (DP): 0.14 (-0.54); and hepatocyte phase: 0.26. Differences were significant for the DP (P DTPA-enhanced images. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Phase contrast MRI assessment of pedal blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debatin, J.F.; Dalman, R.; Herfkens, R.J.; Harris, E.J.; Pelc, N.J.

    1995-01-01

    This study attempts to evaluate the reliability of cine phase contrast (PC) flow measurements in the assessment of normal pedal blood flow and quantitation of revascularisation-induced flow changes in patients with end-stage peripheral vascular occlusive disease (PVOD). Oblique axial cine-PC acquisitions were obtained on a 1.5 T MRI system at the level of the talotibial joints in 8 normal subjects on four separate occasions. Subsequently 8 patients with end-stage PVOD were examined before and after surgical revascularisation (bilateral, n = 2; unilateral, n = 6). Measured flow in the trifurcation vessels was highly variable among normal subjects. Total pedal flow ranged from 32 to 183 ml/min (mean 91 ml/min) and was significantly different between the subjects evaluated (P < 0.0001). Measurements in the same subject over time were considerably less variable (P < 0.005). Normal arterial flow patterns were consistently triphasic; those in patients with PVOD were either mono- or biphasic. Pedal flow measured by cine-PC in patients was reduced compared with normal subjects (mean 38.3 ml/min). Flow was slower in symptomatic limbs (26.7 ml/min) compared with asymptomatic ones (48.9 ml/min). Flow increases in revascularised limbs (mean 315%) were significantly different from those observed in non-affected limbs (P < 0.005). The ability to quantitate pedal blood flow and subsequent revascularisation-induced flow increases appears promising for the identification of optimal treatment options and monitoring of treatment results. (orig.)

  7. Non-invasive pulmonary blood flow analysis and blood pressure mapping derived from 4D flow MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delles, Michael; Rengier, Fabian; Azad, Yoo-Jin; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Ley, Sebastian; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2015-03-01

    In diagnostics and therapy control of cardiovascular diseases, detailed knowledge about the patient-specific behavior of blood flow and pressure can be essential. The only method capable of measuring complete time-resolved three-dimensional vector fields of the blood flow velocities is velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), often denoted as 4D flow MRI. Furthermore, relative pressure maps can be computed from this data source, as presented by different groups in recent years. Hence, analysis of blood flow and pressure using 4D flow MRI can be a valuable technique in management of cardiovascular diseases. In order to perform these tasks, all necessary steps in the corresponding process chain can be carried out in our in-house developed software framework MEDIFRAME. In this article, we apply MEDIFRAME for a study of hemodynamics in the pulmonary arteries of five healthy volunteers. The study included measuring vector fields of blood flow velocities by phase-contrast MRI and subsequently computing relative blood pressure maps. We visualized blood flow by streamline depictions and computed characteristic values for the left and the right pulmonary artery (LPA and RPA). In all volunteers, we observed a lower amount of blood flow in the LPA compared to the RPA. Furthermore, we visualized blood pressure maps using volume rendering and generated graphs of pressure differences between the LPA, the RPA and the main pulmonary artery. In most volunteers, blood pressure was increased near to the bifurcation and in the proximal LPA, leading to higher average pressure values in the LPA compared to the RPA.

  8. An encoding device and a method of encoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to an encoding device, such as an optical position encoder, for encoding input from an object, and a method for encoding input from an object, for determining a position of an object that interferes with light of the device. The encoding device comprises a light source...... in the area in the space and may interfere with the light, which interference may be encoded into a position or activation....

  9. WE-DE-206-04: MRI Pulse Sequences - Spin Echo, Gradient Echo, EPI, Non-Cartesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pooley, R. [Mayo Clinic (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential part of clinical imaging due to its ability to render high soft tissue contrast. Instead of ionizing radiation, MRI use strong magnetic field, radio frequency waves and field gradients to create diagnostic useful images. It can be used to image the anatomy and also functional and physiological activities within the human body. Knowledge of the basic physical principles underlying MRI acquisition is vitally important to successful image production and proper image interpretation. This lecture will give an overview of the spin physics, imaging principle of MRI, the hardware of the MRI scanner, and various pulse sequences and their applications. It aims to provide a conceptual foundation to understand the image formation process of a clinical MRI scanner. Learning Objectives: Understand the origin of the MR signal and contrast from the spin physics level. Understand the main hardware components of a MRI scanner and their purposes Understand steps for MR image formation including spatial encoding and image reconstruction Understand the main kinds of MR pulse sequences and their characteristics.

  10. Encoding and retrieval of landmark-related spatial cues during navigation: An fMRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegman, J.B.T.; Tyborowska, A.B.; Janzen, G.

    2014-01-01

    To successfully navigate, humans can use different cues from their surroundings. Learning locations in an environment can be supported by parallel subsystems in the hippocampus and the striatum. We used fMRI to look at differences in the use of object-related spatial cues while 47 participants

  11. Parallel imaging with phase scrambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Maxim; Schultz, Gerrit; Hennig, Juergen; Gruetter, Rolf; Gallichan, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Most existing methods for accelerated parallel imaging in MRI require additional data, which are used to derive information about the sensitivity profile of each radiofrequency (RF) channel. In this work, a method is presented to avoid the acquisition of separate coil calibration data for accelerated Cartesian trajectories. Quadratic phase is imparted to the image to spread the signals in k-space (aka phase scrambling). By rewriting the Fourier transform as a convolution operation, a window can be introduced to the convolved chirp function, allowing a low-resolution image to be reconstructed from phase-scrambled data without prominent aliasing. This image (for each RF channel) can be used to derive coil sensitivities to drive existing parallel imaging techniques. As a proof of concept, the quadratic phase was applied by introducing an offset to the x(2) - y(2) shim and the data were reconstructed using adapted versions of the image space-based sensitivity encoding and GeneRalized Autocalibrating Partially Parallel Acquisitions algorithms. The method is demonstrated in a phantom (1 × 2, 1 × 3, and 2 × 2 acceleration) and in vivo (2 × 2 acceleration) using a 3D gradient echo acquisition. Phase scrambling can be used to perform parallel imaging acceleration without acquisition of separate coil calibration data, demonstrated here for a 3D-Cartesian trajectory. Further research is required to prove the applicability to other 2D and 3D sampling schemes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Neural activation patterns of successful episodic encoding: Reorganization during childhood, maintenance in old age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Lee Shing

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The two-component framework of episodic memory (EM development posits that the contributions of medial temporal lobe (MTL and prefrontal cortex (PFC to successful encoding differ across the lifespan. To test the framework’s hypotheses, we compared subsequent memory effects (SME of 10–12 year-old children, younger adults, and older adults using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Memory was probed by cued recall, and SME were defined as regional activation differences during encoding between subsequently correctly recalled versus omitted items. In MTL areas, children’s SME did not differ in magnitude from those of younger and older adults. In contrast, children’s SME in PFC were weaker than the corresponding SME in younger and older adults, in line with the hypothesis that PFC contributes less to successful encoding in childhood. Differences in SME between younger and older adults were negligible. The present results suggest that, among individuals with high memory functioning, the neural circuitry contributing to successful episodic encoding is reorganized from middle childhood to adulthood. Successful episodic encoding in later adulthood, however, is characterized by the ability to maintain the activation patterns that emerged in young adulthood.

  13. Aging affects the interaction between attentional control and source memory: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulas, Michael R; Duarte, Audrey

    2014-12-01

    Age-related source memory impairments may be due, at least in part, to deficits in executive processes mediated by the PFC at both study and test. Behavioral work suggests that providing environmental support at encoding, such as directing attention toward item-source associations, may improve source memory and reduce age-related deficits in the recruitment of these executive processes. The present fMRI study investigated the effects of directed attention and aging on source memory encoding and retrieval. At study, participants were shown pictures of objects. They were either asked to attend to the objects and their color (source) or to their size. At test, participants determined if objects were seen before, and if so, whether they were the same color as previously. Behavioral results showed that direction of attention improved source memory for both groups; however, age-related deficits persisted. fMRI results revealed that, across groups, direction of attention facilitated medial temporal lobe-mediated contextual binding processes during study and attenuated right PFC postretrieval monitoring effects at test. However, persistent age-related source memory deficits may be related to increased recruitment of medial anterior PFC during encoding, indicative of self-referential processing, as well as underrecruitment of lateral anterior PFC-mediated relational processes. Taken together, this study suggests that, even when supported, older adults may fail to selectively encode goal-relevant contextual details supporting source memory performance.

  14. Evaluation of COPD's diaphragm motion extracted from 4D-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swastika, Windra; Masuda, Yoshitada; Kawata, Naoko; Matsumoto, Koji; Suzuki, Toshio; Iesato, Ken; Tada, Yuji; Sugiura, Toshihiko; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Ohnishi, Takashi; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a method called intersection profile method to construct a 4D-MRI (3D+time) from time-series of 2D-MRI. The basic idea is to find the best matching of the intersection profile from the time series of 2D-MRI in sagittal plane (navigator slice) and time series of 2D-MRI in coronal plane (data slice). In this study, we use 4D-MRI to semiautomatically extract the right diaphragm motion of 16 subjects (8 healthy subjects and 8 COPD patients). The diaphragm motion is then evaluated quantitatively by calculating the displacement of each subjects and normalized it. We also generate phase-length map to view and locate paradoxical motion of the COPD patients. The quantitative results of the normalized displacement shows that COPD patients tend to have smaller displacement compared to healthy subjects. The average normalized displacement of total 8 COPD patients is 9.4mm and the average of normalized displacement of 8 healthy volunteers is 15.3mm. The generated phase-length maps show that not all of the COPD patients have paradoxical motion, however if it has paradoxical motion, the phase-length map is able to locate where does it occur.

  15. Visual short-term memory: activity supporting encoding and maintenance in retinotopic visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneve, Markus H; Alnæs, Dag; Endestad, Tor; Greenlee, Mark W; Magnussen, Svein

    2012-10-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated that retinotopic cortex maintains information about visual stimuli during retention intervals. However, the process by which transient stimulus-evoked sensory responses are transformed into enduring memory representations is unknown. Here, using fMRI and short-term visual memory tasks optimized for univariate and multivariate analysis approaches, we report differential involvement of human retinotopic areas during memory encoding of the low-level visual feature orientation. All visual areas show weaker responses when memory encoding processes are interrupted, possibly due to effects in orientation-sensitive primary visual cortex (V1) propagating across extrastriate areas. Furthermore, intermediate areas in both dorsal (V3a/b) and ventral (LO1/2) streams are significantly more active during memory encoding compared with non-memory (active and passive) processing of the same stimulus material. These effects in intermediate visual cortex are also observed during memory encoding of a different stimulus feature (spatial frequency), suggesting that these areas are involved in encoding processes on a higher level of representation. Using pattern-classification techniques to probe the representational content in visual cortex during delay periods, we further demonstrate that simply initiating memory encoding is not sufficient to produce long-lasting memory traces. Rather, active maintenance appears to underlie the observed memory-specific patterns of information in retinotopic cortex. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. TH-A-BRF-11: Image Intensity Non-Uniformities Between MRI Simulation and Diagnostic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulson, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: MRI simulation for MRI-based radiotherapy demands that patients be setup in treatment position, which frequently involves use of alternative radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations to accommodate immobilized patients. However, alternative RF coil geometries may exacerbate image intensity non-uniformities (IINU) beyond those observed in diagnostic MRI, which may challenge image segmentation and registration accuracy as well as confound studies assessing radiotherapy response when MR simulation images are used as baselines for evaluation. The goal of this work was to determine whether differences in IINU exist between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Methods: ACR-MRI phantom images were acquired at 3T using a spin-echo sequence (TE/TR:20/500ms, rBW:62.5kHz, TH/skip:5/5mm). MR simulation images were obtained by wrapping two flexible phased-array RF coils around the phantom. Diagnostic MR images were obtained by placing the phantom into a commercial phased-array head coil. Pre-scan normalization was enabled in both cases. Images were transferred offline and corrected for IINU using the MNI N3 algorithm. Coefficients of variation (CV=σ/μ) were calculated for each slice. Wilcoxon matched-pairs and Mann-Whitney tests compared CV values between original and N3 images and between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Results: Significant differences in CV were detected between original and N3 images in both MRI simulation and diagnostic MRI groups (p=0.010, p=0.010). In addition, significant differences in CV were detected between original MR simulation and original and N3 diagnostic MR images (p=0.0256, p=0.0016). However, no significant differences in CV were detected between N3 MR simulation images and original or N3 diagnostic MR images, demonstrating the importance of correcting MR simulation images beyond pre-scan normalization prior to use in radiotherapy. Conclusions: Alternative RF coil configurations used in MRI simulation can Result in

  17. Episodic retrieval involves early and sustained effects of reactivating information from encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey D; Price, Mason H; Leiker, Emily K

    2015-02-01

    Several fMRI studies have shown a correspondence between the brain regions activated during encoding and retrieval, consistent with the view that memory retrieval involves hippocampally-mediated reinstatement of cortical activity. With the limited temporal resolution of fMRI, the precise timing of such reactivation is unclear, calling into question the functional significance of these effects. Whereas reactivation influencing retrieval should emerge with neural correlates of retrieval success, that signifying post-retrieval monitoring would trail retrieval. The present study employed EEG to provide a temporal landmark of retrieval success from which we could investigate the sub-trial time course of reactivation. Pattern-classification analyses revealed that early-onsetting reactivation differentiated the outcome of recognition-memory judgments and was associated with individual differences in behavioral accuracy, while reactivation was also evident in a sustained form later in the trial. The EEG findings suggest that, whereas prior fMRI findings could be interpreted as reflecting the contribution of reinstatement to retrieval success, they could also indicate the maintenance of episodic information in service of post-retrieval evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of Reynolds stress components and turbulent pressure loss using 4D flow MRI with extended motion encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsson, Henrik; Kefayati, Sarah; Ahn, Sinyeob; Dyverfeldt, Petter; Lantz, Jonas; Karlsson, Matts; Laub, Gerhard; Ebbers, Tino; Saloner, David

    2018-04-01

    To measure the Reynolds stress tensor using 4D flow MRI, and to evaluate its contribution to computed pressure maps. A method to assess both velocity and Reynolds stress using 4D flow MRI is presented and evaluated. The Reynolds stress is compared by cross-sectional integrals of the Reynolds stress invariants. Pressure maps are computed using the pressure Poisson equation-both including and neglecting the Reynolds stress. Good agreement is seen for Reynolds stress between computational fluid dynamics, simulated MRI, and MRI experiment. The Reynolds stress can significantly influence the computed pressure loss for simulated (eg, -0.52% vs -15.34% error; P Reynolds stress (P Reynolds stress tensor. The additional information provided by this method improves the assessment of pressure gradients across a stenosis in the presence of turbulence. Unlike conventional methods, which are only valid if the flow is laminar, the proposed method is valid for both laminar and disturbed flow, a common presentation in diseased vessels. Magn Reson Med 79:1962-1971, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Temperature mapping using proton phase shift on a 0.3 T permanent magnet open MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komura, Kazumi; Takahashi, Tetsuhiko; Dohi, Michiko; Harada, Junta

    2000-01-01

    Temperature mapping using proton phase shift (PPS) was evaluated for ex vivo objects. The evaluation was done on a 0.3 T permanent magnet open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine, like those widely used for clinical diagnosis. Temperature maps were acquired using a gradient echo sequence (TR/TE =80/30 ms, flip angle =60 degrees, field of view =200 x 200 mm, slice thickness =8 mm, matrix size =128 x 128, data acquisition number =1, and imaging time =10.2 s). Specific first order data correction was performed to eliminate calculated temperature fluctuation due to magnetic field instability. A ham, 10 cm in diameter, was heated with a Nd: YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm. The laser fiber was inserted into the ham to a depth of 3 cm. The laser power was 5, 8, or 10 W. Magnetic resonance images were taken continually during and after irradiation. Temperature maps were taken every 15 s. The maps taken during laser ablation showed color changes for the heated areas. Temperatures measured by the MRI and thermocouple had a linear relationship of r 2 =0.80. The inter-image standard deviation of the temperature maps of a non-heated object was 2.07 degrees for a 4.68 x 4.68 x 8 mm volume. This value is negligible for a monitored laser heating process since temperature rise is typically larger than 30 degrees. These results show that temperature mapping based on PPS is feasible for a 0.3 T permanent magnet open MRI system. (author)

  20. Application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging in endoscopic aqueductoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Zheng, Jiaping; Xiao, Qing; Liu, Yunsheng

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endoscopic aqueductoplasty (EA) for patients with obstructive hydrocephalus. The clinical diagnosis of hydrocephalus caused by aqueduct obstruction in 23 patients was confirmed by phase-contrast cine MRI examination. The patients were treated with EA and MRI was repeated during the follow-up. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow velocity in the aqueduct was measured to determine whether the aqueduct was obstructed. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations indicated that there was no CSF flow in the aqueduct for all patients prior to surgery. Aqueductoplasty was successfully performed in all patients. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations performed a week after surgery demonstrated an average CSF flow velocity of 4.74±1.77 cm/sec. During the follow-up, intracranial hypertension recurred in two patients in whom CSF flow was not observed in the aqueduct by the phase-contrast cine MRI scan. Aqueduct re-occlusion was revealed by an endoscopic exploration. By measuring the CSF flow velocity, phase-contrast cine MRI accurately identifies aqueduct obstruction. Cine MRI is a nontraumatic, simple and reliable method for determining whether the aqueduct is successfully opened following aqueductoplasty.

  1. Extramedullary paraspinal hematopoiesis in thalassemia: CT and MRI evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsitouridis, J.; Stamos, S.; Hassapopoulou, E.; Tsitouridis, K.; Nikolopoulos, P.

    1999-01-01

    We present a comparative CT and MRI study of the paraspinal extramedullary hematopoiesis in 32 thalassemic patients. The patients were classified into four groups according to the MRI and CT imaging findings. Active recent extramedullary paraspinal hematopoietic masses show soft tissue behavior in both CT and MRI. Older inactive masses reveal iron deposition or fatty replacement. Combined imaging findings of paraspinal extramedullary hematopoiesis revealed the phase of its evolution and the correct diagnosis

  2. Extramedullary paraspinal hematopoiesis in thalassemia: CT and MRI evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsitouridis, J.; Stamos, S.; Hassapopoulou, E.; Tsitouridis, K.; Nikolopoulos, P

    1999-04-01

    We present a comparative CT and MRI study of the paraspinal extramedullary hematopoiesis in 32 thalassemic patients. The patients were classified into four groups according to the MRI and CT imaging findings. Active recent extramedullary paraspinal hematopoietic masses show soft tissue behavior in both CT and MRI. Older inactive masses reveal iron deposition or fatty replacement. Combined imaging findings of paraspinal extramedullary hematopoiesis revealed the phase of its evolution and the correct diagnosis.

  3. Age dependence of spleen- and muscle-corrected hepatic signal enhancement on hepatobiliary phase gadoxetate MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matoori, Simon [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Hirslanden Clinic St. Anna, Clinical Research Group, Lucerne (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Hirslanden Clinic St. Anna, Clinical Research Group, Lucerne (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zurich (Switzerland); Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Breitenstein, Stefan [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Surgery, Clinic for Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, Winterthur (Switzerland); Doert, Aleksis [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Pozdniakova, Viktoria [Stavanger University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stavanger (Norway); Koh, Dow-Mu [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Radiology, Surrey, England (United Kingdom); Gutzeit, Andreas [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Hirslanden Clinic St. Anna, Clinical Research Group, Lucerne (Switzerland); Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland)

    2016-06-15

    To identify correlations of signal enhancements (SE) and SE normalized to reference tissues of the spleen, kidney, liver, musculus erector spinae (MES) and ductus hepatocholedochus (DHC) on hepatobiliary phase gadoxetate-enhanced MRI with patient age in non-cirrhotic patients. A heterogeneous cohort of 131 patients with different clinical backgrounds underwent a standardized 3.0-T gadoxetate-enhanced liver MRI between November 2008 and June 2013. After exclusion of cirrhotic patients, a cohort of 75 patients with no diagnosed diffuse liver disease was selected. The ratio of signal intensity 20 min post- to pre-contrast administration (SE) in the spleen, kidney, liver, MES and DHC, and the SE of the kidney, liver and DHC normalized to the reference tissues spleen or MES were compared to patient age. Patient age was inversely correlated with the liver SE normalized to the spleen and MES SE (both p < 0.001) and proportionally with the SE of the spleen (p = 0.043), the MES (p = 0.030) and the kidney (p = 0.022). No significant correlations were observed for the DHC (p = 0.347) and liver SE (p = 0.606). The age dependence of hepatic SE normalized to the enhancement in the spleen and MES calls for a cautious interpretation of these quantification methods. (orig.)

  4. Age dependence of spleen- and muscle-corrected hepatic signal enhancement on hepatobiliary phase gadoxetate MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matoori, Simon; Froehlich, Johannes M.; Breitenstein, Stefan; Doert, Aleksis; Pozdniakova, Viktoria; Koh, Dow-Mu; Gutzeit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    To identify correlations of signal enhancements (SE) and SE normalized to reference tissues of the spleen, kidney, liver, musculus erector spinae (MES) and ductus hepatocholedochus (DHC) on hepatobiliary phase gadoxetate-enhanced MRI with patient age in non-cirrhotic patients. A heterogeneous cohort of 131 patients with different clinical backgrounds underwent a standardized 3.0-T gadoxetate-enhanced liver MRI between November 2008 and June 2013. After exclusion of cirrhotic patients, a cohort of 75 patients with no diagnosed diffuse liver disease was selected. The ratio of signal intensity 20 min post- to pre-contrast administration (SE) in the spleen, kidney, liver, MES and DHC, and the SE of the kidney, liver and DHC normalized to the reference tissues spleen or MES were compared to patient age. Patient age was inversely correlated with the liver SE normalized to the spleen and MES SE (both p < 0.001) and proportionally with the SE of the spleen (p = 0.043), the MES (p = 0.030) and the kidney (p = 0.022). No significant correlations were observed for the DHC (p = 0.347) and liver SE (p = 0.606). The age dependence of hepatic SE normalized to the enhancement in the spleen and MES calls for a cautious interpretation of these quantification methods. (orig.)

  5. PET/MRI assessment of the infarcted mouse heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buonincontri, Guido, E-mail: gb396@cam.ac.uk [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Methner, Carmen; Krieg, Thomas [Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hawkes, Robert C.; Adrian Carpenter, T. [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Sawiak, Stephen J., E-mail: sjs80@cam.ac.uk [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-11

    Heart failure originating from myocardial infarction (MI) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Mouse models of ischaemia and reperfusion injury (I/R) are used to study the effects of novel treatment strategies targeting MI, however staging disease and treatment efficacy is a challenge. Damage and recovery can be assessed on the cellular, tissue or whole-organ scale but these are rarely measured in concert. Here, for the first time, we present data showing measures of injury in infarcted mice using complementary techniques for multi-modal characterisation of the heart. We use in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess heart function with cine-MRI, hindered perfusion with late gadolinium enhancement imaging and muscular function with displacement encoded with stimulated echoes (DENSE) MRI. These measures are followed by positron emission tomography (PET) with 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose to assess cellular metabolism. We demonstrate a protocol combining each of these measures for the same animal in the same imaging session and compare how the different markers can be used to quantify cardiac recovery on different scales following injury.

  6. PET/MRI assessment of the infarcted mouse heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonincontri, Guido; Methner, Carmen; Krieg, Thomas; Hawkes, Robert C.; Adrian Carpenter, T.; Sawiak, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure originating from myocardial infarction (MI) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Mouse models of ischaemia and reperfusion injury (I/R) are used to study the effects of novel treatment strategies targeting MI, however staging disease and treatment efficacy is a challenge. Damage and recovery can be assessed on the cellular, tissue or whole-organ scale but these are rarely measured in concert. Here, for the first time, we present data showing measures of injury in infarcted mice using complementary techniques for multi-modal characterisation of the heart. We use in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess heart function with cine-MRI, hindered perfusion with late gadolinium enhancement imaging and muscular function with displacement encoded with stimulated echoes (DENSE) MRI. These measures are followed by positron emission tomography (PET) with 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose to assess cellular metabolism. We demonstrate a protocol combining each of these measures for the same animal in the same imaging session and compare how the different markers can be used to quantify cardiac recovery on different scales following injury

  7. View-Angle Tilting and Slice-Encoding Metal Artifact Correction for Artifact Reduction in MRI: Experimental Sequence Optimization for Orthopaedic Tumor Endoprostheses and Clinical Application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia M Jungmann

    Full Text Available MRI plays a major role in follow-up of patients with malignant bone tumors. However, after limb salvage surgery, orthopaedic tumor endoprostheses might cause significant metal-induced susceptibility artifacts.To evaluate the benefit of view-angle tilting (VAT and slice-encoding metal artifact correction (SEMAC for MRI of large-sized orthopaedic tumor endoprostheses in an experimental model and to demonstrate clinical benefits for assessment of periprosthetic soft tissue abnormalities.In an experimental setting, tumor endoprostheses (n=4 were scanned at 1.5T with three versions of optimized high-bandwidth turbo-spin-echo pulse sequences: (i standard, (ii VAT and (iii combined VAT and SEMAC (VAT&SEMAC. Pulse sequences included coronal short-tau-inversion-recovery (STIR, coronal T1-weighted (w, transverse T1-w and T2-w TSE sequences. For clinical evaluation, VAT&SEMAC was compared to conventional metal artifact-reducing MR sequences (conventional MR in n=25 patients with metal implants and clinical suspicion of tumor recurrence or infection. Diameters of artifacts were measured quantitatively. Qualitative parameters were assessed on a five-point scale (1=best, 5=worst: "image distortion", "artificial signal changes at the edges" and "diagnostic confidence". Imaging findings were correlated with pathology. T-tests and Wilcoxon-signed rank tests were used for statistical analyses.The true size of the prostheses was overestimated on MRI (P<0.05. A significant reduction of artifacts was achieved by VAT (P<0.001 and VAT&SEMAC (P=0.003 compared to the standard group. Quantitative scores improved in the VAT and VAT&SEMAC group (P<0.05. On clinical MR images, artifact diameters were significantly reduced in the VAT&SEMAC-group as compared with the conventional-group (P<0.001. Distortion and artificial signal changes were reduced and diagnostic confidence improved (P<0.05. In two cases, tumor-recurrence, in ten cases infection and in thirteen cases other

  8. Quantitative measurement of cerebral oxygen extraction fraction using MRI in patients with MELAS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the cerebral OEF at different phases of stroke-like episodes in patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS by using MRI. METHODS: We recruited 32 patients with MELAS confirmed by gene analysis. Conventional MRI scanning, as well as functional MRI including arterial spin labeling and oxygen extraction fraction imaging, was undertaken to obtain the pathological and metabolic information of the brains at different stages of stroke-like episodes in patients. A total of 16 MRI examinations at the acute and subacute phase and 19 examinations at the interictal phase were performed. In addition, 24 healthy volunteers were recruited for control subjects. Six regions of interest were placed in the anterior, middle, and posterior parts of the bilateral hemispheres to measure the OEF of the brain or the lesions. RESULTS: OEF was reduced significantly in brains of patients at both the acute and subacute phase (0.266 ± 0.026 and at the interictal phase (0.295 ± 0.009, compared with normal controls (0.316 ± 0.025. In the brains at the acute and subacute phase of the episode, 13 ROIs were prescribed on the stroke-like lesions, which showed decreased OEF compared with the contralateral spared brain regions. Increased blood flow was revealed in the stroke-like lesions at the acute and subacute phase, which was confined to the lesions. CONCLUSION: MRI can quantitatively show changes in OEF at different phases of stroke-like episodes. The utilization of oxygen in the brain seems to be reduced more severely after the onset of episodes in MELAS, especially for those brain tissues involved in the episodes.

  9. Contributions of Feature Binding During Encoding and Functional Connectivity of the Medial Temporal Lobe Structures to Episodic Memory Deficits Across the Prodromal and First-Episode Phases of Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haut, Kristen M; van Erp, Theo G M; Knowlton, Barbara; Bearden, Carrie E; Subotnik, Kenneth; Ventura, Joseph; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Cannon, Tyrone D

    2015-03-01

    Patients with and at risk for psychosis may have difficulty using associative strategies to facilitate episodic memory encoding and recall. In parallel studies, patients with first-episode schizophrenia ( n = 27) and high psychosis risk ( n = 28) compared with control participants ( n = 22 and n = 20, respectively) underwent functional MRI during a remember-know memory task. Psychophysiological interaction analyses, using medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures as regions of interest, were conducted to measure functional connectivity patterns supporting successful episodic memory. During encoding, patients with first-episode schizophrenia demonstrated reduced functional coupling between MTL regions and regions involved in stimulus representations, stimulus selection, and cognitive control. Relative to control participants and patients with high psychosis risk who did not convert to psychosis, patients with high psychosis risk who later converted to psychosis also demonstrated reduced connectivity between MTL regions and auditory-verbal and visual-association regions. These results suggest that episodic memory deficits in schizophrenia are related to inefficient recruitment of cortical connections involved in associative memory formation; such deficits precede the onset of psychosis among those individuals at high clinical risk.

  10. Neural correlates of incidental memory in mild cognitive impairment: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandzia, Jennifer L; McAndrews, Mary Pat; Grady, Cheryl L; Graham, Simon J; Black, Sandra E

    2009-05-01

    Behaviour and fMRI brain activation patterns were compared during encoding and recognition tasks in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n=14) and normal controls (NC) (n=14). Deep (natural vs. man-made) and shallow (color vs. black and white) decisions were made at encoding and pictures from each condition were presented for yes/no recognition 20 min later. MCI showed less inferior frontal activation during deep (left only) and superficial encoding (bilaterally) and in both medial temporal lobes (MTL). When performance was equivalent (recognition of words encoded superficially), MTL activation was similar for the two groups, but during recognition testing of deeply encoded items NC showed more activation in both prefrontal and left MTL region. In a region of interest analysis, the extent of activation during deep encoding in the parahippocampi bilaterally and in left hippocampus correlated with subsequent recognition accuracy for those items in controls but not in MCI, which may reflect the heterogeneity of activation responses in conjunction with different degrees of pathology burden and progression status in the MCI group.

  11. Concurrent tACS-fMRI Reveals Causal Influence of Power Synchronized Neural Activity on Resting State fMRI Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bächinger, Marc; Zerbi, Valerio; Moisa, Marius; Polania, Rafael; Liu, Quanying; Mantini, Dante; Ruff, Christian; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2017-05-03

    Resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) is commonly used to study the brain's intrinsic neural coupling, which reveals specific spatiotemporal patterns in the form of resting state networks (RSNs). It has been hypothesized that slow rs-fMRI oscillations (5 Hz); however, causal evidence for this relationship is currently lacking. Here we measured rs-fMRI in humans while applying transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) to entrain brain rhythms in left and right sensorimotor cortices. The two driving tACS signals were tailored to the individual's α rhythm (8-12 Hz) and fluctuated in amplitude according to a 1 Hz power envelope. We entrained the left versus right hemisphere in accordance to two different coupling modes where either α oscillations were synchronized between hemispheres (phase-synchronized tACS) or the slower oscillating power envelopes (power-synchronized tACS). Power-synchronized tACS significantly increased rs-fMRI connectivity within the stimulated RSN compared with phase-synchronized or no tACS. This effect outlasted the stimulation period and tended to be more effective in individuals who exhibited a naturally weak interhemispheric coupling. Using this novel approach, our data provide causal evidence that synchronized power fluctuations contribute to the formation of fMRI-based RSNs. Moreover, our findings demonstrate that the brain's intrinsic coupling at rest can be selectively modulated by choosing appropriate tACS signals, which could lead to new interventions for patients with altered rs-fMRI connectivity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) has become an important tool to estimate brain connectivity. However, relatively little is known about how slow hemodynamic oscillations measured with fMRI relate to electrophysiological processes. It was suggested that slowly fluctuating power envelopes of electrophysiological signals synchronize across brain areas and that the topography of this activity is spatially correlated to

  12. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, C. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Brossmann, J. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Melchert, U.H. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Schroeder, C. [Radiologische Abt., Universitaets-Kinderklinik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Boer, R. de [Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Spielmann, R.P. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Heller, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  13. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhle, C.; Brossmann, J.; Melchert, U.H.; Schroeder, C.; Boer, R. de; Spielmann, R.P.; Heller, M.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  14. Value of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI in diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN Yu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the value of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Methods A total of 40 patients with liver cirrhosis or suspected HCC who visited General Hospital of Shenyang Military Area Command from October 2016 to April 2017 were enrolled, and the data on three dynamic phases of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI (arterial phase, portal venous phase, and delayed phase, hepatobiliary phase (delayed for 20 minutes, and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI (b=50,400, and 1000 s/mm2 were collected. Two radiologists made a diagnosis and gave diagnostic confidence scores based on the presence or absence of hepatobiliary phase images. Postoperative pathology or clinical diagnosis was used as the criteria for assessing the diagnostic accuracy of HCC. The t-test was used for comparison of continuous data, and the chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data. Results A total of 42 HCC lesions and 37 cirrhotic nodules were detected. There were significant differences between HCC lesions and cirrhotic nodules in signal intensity on hepatobiliary phase and DWI (χ2=64.503 and 67.855, both P<0.001,as well as the apparent diffusion coefficient when the b-values of DWI were 400 s/mm2 and 1000 s/mm2 (t=62.75 and 75.36, both P<0.001. There was a significant difference in diagnostic confidence score given by the radiologists between the images of three dynamic phases of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and those of four dynamic phases (including hepatobiliary phase (3.260±0.521 vs 4.620±0.661, t=10.67, P<0.001. With postoperative pathology and clinical diagnosis as criteria, the images of three dynamic phases of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI had a significantly higher diagnostic accuracy for HCC than those of four dynamic phases (including hepatobiliary phase [76.19% (32/42 vs 95.24% (40/42, χ2=6.222, P=0.013]. Conclusion Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI may improve diagnostic accuracy and confidence for HCC and has

  15. Age Differences in Self-Referencing: Evidence for Common and Distinct Encoding Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutchess, Angela H.; Sokal, Rebecca; Coleman, Jennifer A.; Gotthilf, Gina; Grewal, Lauren; Rosa, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Although engagement of medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) underlies self-referencing of information for younger and older adults, the region has not consistently been implicated across age groups for the encoding of self-referenced information. We sought to determine whether making judgments about others as well as the self influenced findings in the previous study. During an fMRI session, younger and older adults encoded adjectives using only a self-reference task. For items later remembered compared to those later forgotten, both age groups robustly recruited medial prefrontal cortex, indicating common neural regions support encoding across younger and older adults when participants make only self-reference judgments. Focal age differences emerged in regions related to emotional processing and cognitive control, though these differences are more limited than in tasks in which judgments also are made about others. We conclude that making judgments about another person differently affects the ways that younger and older adults make judgments about the self, with results of a follow-up behavioral study supporting this interpretation. PMID:25223905

  16. Quantification of mechanical ventricular dyssynchrony. Direct comparison of velocity-encoded and cine magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muellerleile, K.; Baholli, L.; Groth, M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The preoperative assessment of mechanical dyssynchrony can help to improve patient selection in candidates for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The present study compared the performance of velocity-encoded (VENC) MRI to cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantifying mechanical ventricular dyssynchrony. Materials and Methods: VENC-MRI and cine-MRI were performed in 20 patients with heart failure NYHA class III and reduced ejection fraction (median: 24 %, interquartile range: 18 - 28 %) before CRT device implantation. The interventricular mechanical delay (IVMD) was assessed by VENC-MRI as the temporal difference between the onset of aortic and pulmonary flow. Intraventricular dyssynchrony was quantified by cine-MRI, using the standard deviation of time to maximal wall thickening in sixteen left ventricular segments (SDt-16). The response to CRT was assessed in a six-month follow-up. Results: 14 patients (70 %) clinically responded to CRT. A similar accuracy was found to predict the response to CRT by measurements of the IVMD and SDt-16 (75 vs. 70 %; p = ns). The time needed for data analysis was significantly shorter for the IVMD at 1.69 min (interquartile range: 1.66 - 1.88 min) compared to 9.63 min (interquartile range: 8.92 - 11.63 min) for the SDt-16 (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Measurements of the IVMD by VENC-MRI and the SDt-16 by cine-MRI provide a similar accuracy to identify clinical responders to CRT. However, data analysis of the IVMD is significantly less time-consuming compared to data analysis of the SDt-16. (orig.)

  17. Real-time phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of haemodynamics: from phantom to patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traber, Julius; Wurche, Lennart; Dieringer, Matthias A.; Utz, Wolfgang; Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian von; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette [Max-Delbrueck-Centrum and Charite -Medical University Berlin and HELIOS Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Department of Cardiology and Nephrology, Working Group on Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Greiser, Andreas [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany); Jin, Ning [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Assessment of haemodynamics is crucial in many cardiac diseases. Phase contrast MRI (PC-MRI) can accurately access it. Arrhythmia is a major limitation in conventional segmented PC-MRI (SEG). A real-time PC-MRI sequence (RT) could overcome this. We validated RT by comparing to SEG. A prototype RT using shared velocity encoding was tested against SEG at 1.5 T in a flow phantom and consecutively included patients with (n = 55) or without (n = 59) aortic valve disease. In patients with atrial fibrillation (Afib, n = 15), only RT was applied. Phantom: PC images were acquired in front of and behind an interchangeable aortic-stenosis-like inlay. Mean velocity and flow were quantified. Patients: PC images were acquired in the ascending aorta, pulmonary trunk and superior caval vein. Peak velocity, stroke volume and regurgitant fraction were quantified. Phantom: Mean velocities (11 ± 1 to 207 ± 10 cm/s) and flow correlated closely between SEG and RT (r ≥ 0.99, ICC ≥ 0.98, p < 0.0005). Patients without AVD or with aortic regurgitation: Concordance of SEG and RT was excellent regarding peak velocities, stroke volumes (r ≥ 0.91, ICC ≥ 0.94, p < 0.0005) and regurgitant fractions (r = 0.95, ICC = 0.95, p < 0.0005). RT was feasible in all patients with Afib. The real-time sequence is accurate compared to conventional segmented PC-MRI. Its applicability in Afib was shown. Real-time PC-MRI might become a valuable tool in arrhythmia. (orig.)

  18. Memory retrieval of smoking-related images induce greater insula activation as revealed by an fMRI-based delayed matching to sample task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Amy C; Ross, Robert S; Farmer, Stacey; Frederick, Blaise B; Nickerson, Lisa D; Lukas, Scott E; Stern, Chantal E

    2015-03-01

    Nicotine dependence is a chronic and difficult to treat disorder. While environmental stimuli associated with smoking precipitate craving and relapse, it is unknown whether smoking cues are cognitively processed differently than neutral stimuli. To evaluate working memory differences between smoking-related and neutral stimuli, we conducted a delay-match-to-sample (DMS) task concurrently with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in nicotine-dependent participants. The DMS task evaluates brain activation during the encoding, maintenance and retrieval phases of working memory. Smoking images induced significantly more subjective craving, and greater midline cortical activation during encoding in comparison to neutral stimuli that were similar in content yet lacked a smoking component. The insula, which is involved in maintaining nicotine dependence, was active during the successful retrieval of previously viewed smoking versus neutral images. In contrast, neutral images required more prefrontal cortex-mediated active maintenance during the maintenance period. These findings indicate that distinct brain regions are involved in the different phases of working memory for smoking-related versus neutral images. Importantly, the results implicate the insula in the retrieval of smoking-related stimuli, which is relevant given the insula's emerging role in addiction. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  19. Processing Depth and Episodic Retrieval: an fMRI study

    OpenAIRE

    Beratis, Ion

    2010-01-01

    Background. According to the reinstatement theory that stems from the transfer appropriate processing (TAP) and the encoding specificity principles, episodic retrieval involves reactivation of processes and, therefore, of brain regions that were active during encoding. Hence, if two encoding conditions engage different cognitive operations, qualitative differences are expected also to be present at the retrieval phase. Functional neuroimaging applications have detected qualitative differences...

  20. MRI-Based Nonrigid Motion Correction in Simultaneous PET/MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Se Young; Reese, Timothy G.; Ouyang, Jinsong; Guerin, Bastien; Catana, Ciprian; Zhu, Xuping; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion is the most serious limitation to whole-body PET, resulting in spatial resolution close to 1 cm. Furthermore, motion-induced inconsistencies in the attenuation measurements often lead to significant artifacts in the reconstructed images. Gating can remove motion artifacts at the cost of increased noise. This paper presents an approach to respiratory motion correction using simultaneous PET/MRI to demonstrate initial results in phantoms, rabbits, and nonhuman primates and discusses the prospects for clinical application. Methods Studies with a deformable phantom, a free-breathing primate, and rabbits implanted with radioactive beads were performed with simultaneous PET/MRI. Motion fields were estimated from concurrently acquired tagged MR images using 2 B-spline nonrigid image registration methods and incorporated into a PET list-mode ordered-subsets expectation maximization algorithm. Using the measured motion fields to transform both the emission data and the attenuation data, we could use all the coincidence data to reconstruct any phase of the respiratory cycle. We compared the resulting SNR and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) detection signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the motion-corrected reconstruction with the results obtained from standard gating and uncorrected studies. Results Motion correction virtually eliminated motion blur without reducing SNR, yielding images with SNR comparable to those obtained by gating with 5–8 times longer acquisitions in all studies. The CHO study in dynamic phantoms demonstrated a significant improvement (166%–276%) in lesion detection SNR with MRI-based motion correction as compared with gating (P < 0.001). This improvement was 43%–92% for large motion compared with lesion detection without motion correction (P < 0.001). CHO SNR in the rabbit studies confirmed these results. Conclusion Tagged MRI motion correction in simultaneous PET/MRI significantly improves lesion detection

  1. Encoding of Touch Intensity But Not Pleasantness in Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubacher, Claire M.; Olausson, Håkan; Wang, Binquan; Spagnolo, Primavera A.; Bushnell, M. Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Growing interest in affective touch has delineated a neural network that bypasses primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Several recent studies, however, have cast doubt on the segregation of touch discrimination and affect, suggesting that S1 also encodes affective qualities. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to examine the role of S1 in processing touch intensity and pleasantness. Twenty-six healthy human adults rated brushing on the hand during fMRI. Intensity ratings significantly predicted activation in S1, whereas pleasantness ratings predicted activation only in the anterior cingulate cortex. Nineteen subjects also received inhibitory rTMS over right hemisphere S1 and the vertex (control). After S1 rTMS, but not after vertex rTMS, sensory discrimination was reduced and subjects with reduced sensory discrimination rated touch as more intense. In contrast, rTMS did not alter ratings of touch pleasantness. Our findings support divergent neural processing of touch intensity and pleasantness, with affective touch encoded outside of S1. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Growing interest in affective touch has identified a neural network that bypasses primary somatosensory cortex (S1). Several recent studies, however, cast doubt on the separation of touch discrimination and affect. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to demonstrate the representation of touch discrimination and intensity in S1, but the representation of pleasantness in the anterior cingulate cortex, not S1. Our findings support divergent neural processing of touch intensity and pleasantness, with affective touch encoded outside of S1. Our study contributes to growing delineation of the affective touch system, a crucial step in understanding its dysregulation in numerous clinical conditions such as autism, eating disorders, depression, and chronic pain. PMID:27225773

  2. Comparison of transient severe motion in gadoxetate disodium and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI. Effect of modified breath-holding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ji Soo; Choi, Eun Jung; Park, Eun Hae; Lee, Ju-Hyung

    2018-01-01

    To compare the occurrence of transient severe motion (TSM) between gadoxetate disodium- and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI and between gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI scans obtained with and without the application of a modified breath-holding technique. We reviewed 80 patients who underwent two magnetic resonance examinations (gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI) with the application of a modified breath-holding technique (dual group). This group was compared with 100 patients who underwent gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI without the application of the modified breath-holding technique (single group). Patient risk factors and motion scores (1 [none] to 5 [non-diagnostic]) for each dynamic-phase imaging were analysed. In the dual group, mean motion scores did not differ significantly between gadoxetate disodium- and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI (p=0.096-0.807) in any phase. However, in all phases except the late dynamic phase, mean motion scores of the dual group were significantly lower than those in the single group. TSM incidence did not differ significantly between gadoxetate disodium- and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI in the dual group (3.8% vs. 1.3%, p=0.620). With proper application of the modified breath-holding technique, TSM occurrence with gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI was comparable to that associated with gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of transient severe motion in gadoxetate disodium and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI. Effect of modified breath-holding method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ji Soo; Choi, Eun Jung; Park, Eun Hae [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju-Hyung [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Department of Preventive Medicine, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-03-15

    To compare the occurrence of transient severe motion (TSM) between gadoxetate disodium- and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI and between gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI scans obtained with and without the application of a modified breath-holding technique. We reviewed 80 patients who underwent two magnetic resonance examinations (gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI) with the application of a modified breath-holding technique (dual group). This group was compared with 100 patients who underwent gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI without the application of the modified breath-holding technique (single group). Patient risk factors and motion scores (1 [none] to 5 [non-diagnostic]) for each dynamic-phase imaging were analysed. In the dual group, mean motion scores did not differ significantly between gadoxetate disodium- and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI (p=0.096-0.807) in any phase. However, in all phases except the late dynamic phase, mean motion scores of the dual group were significantly lower than those in the single group. TSM incidence did not differ significantly between gadoxetate disodium- and gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI in the dual group (3.8% vs. 1.3%, p=0.620). With proper application of the modified breath-holding technique, TSM occurrence with gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI was comparable to that associated with gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI. (orig.)

  4. Bayesian Inference for Functional Dynamics Exploring in fMRI Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to review state-of-the-art Bayesian-inference-based methods applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data. Particularly, we focus on one specific long-standing challenge in the computational modeling of fMRI datasets: how to effectively explore typical functional interactions from fMRI time series and the corresponding boundaries of temporal segments. Bayesian inference is a method of statistical inference which has been shown to be a powerful tool to encode dependence relationships among the variables with uncertainty. Here we provide an introduction to a group of Bayesian-inference-based methods for fMRI data analysis, which were designed to detect magnitude or functional connectivity change points and to infer their functional interaction patterns based on corresponding temporal boundaries. We also provide a comparison of three popular Bayesian models, that is, Bayesian Magnitude Change Point Model (BMCPM, Bayesian Connectivity Change Point Model (BCCPM, and Dynamic Bayesian Variable Partition Model (DBVPM, and give a summary of their applications. We envision that more delicate Bayesian inference models will be emerging and play increasingly important roles in modeling brain functions in the years to come.

  5. There are differences in cerebral activation between females in distinct menstrual phases during viewing of erotic stimuli: A fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizewski, Elke R; Krause, Eva; Karama, Sherif; Baars, Anneke; Senf, Wolfgang; Forsting, Michael

    2006-09-01

    There is evidence that men experience more sexual arousal than women but also that women in mid-luteal phase experience more sexual arousal than women outside this phase. Recently, a few functional brain imaging studies have tackled the issue of gender differences as pertaining to reactions to erotica. The question of whether or not gender differences in reactions to erotica are maintained with women in different phases has not yet been answered from a functional brain imaging perspective. In order to examine this issue, functional MRI was performed in 22 male and 22 female volunteers. Subjects viewed erotic film excerpts alternating with emotionally neutral excerpts in a standard block-design paradigm. Arousal to erotic stimuli was evaluated using standard rating scales after scanning. Two-sample t-test with uncorrected P erotic stimuli and with corrected P erotic stimuli. Furthermore, gender differences with women in mid-luteal phases are similar to those in females outside the mid-luteal phase.

  6. MRI of chemical reactions and processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Melanie M

    2017-08-01

    As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can spatially resolve a wealth of molecular information available from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), it is able to non-invasively visualise the composition, properties and reactions of a broad range of spatially-heterogeneous molecular systems. Hence, MRI is increasingly finding applications in the study of chemical reactions and processes in a diverse range of environments and technologies. This article will explain the basic principles of MRI and how it can be used to visualise chemical composition and molecular properties, providing an overview of the variety of information available. Examples are drawn from the disciplines of chemistry, chemical engineering, environmental science, physics, electrochemistry and materials science. The review introduces a range of techniques used to produce image contrast, along with the chemical and molecular insight accessible through them. Methods for mapping the distribution of chemical species, using chemical shift imaging or spatially-resolved spectroscopy, are reviewed, as well as methods for visualising physical state, temperature, current density, flow velocities and molecular diffusion. Strategies for imaging materials with low signal intensity, such as those containing gases or low sensitivity nuclei, using compressed sensing, para-hydrogen or polarisation transfer, are discussed. Systems are presented which encapsulate the diversity of chemical and physical parameters observable by MRI, including one- and two-phase flow in porous media, chemical pattern formation, phase transformations and hydrodynamic (fingering) instabilities. Lastly, the emerging area of electrochemical MRI is discussed, with studies presented on the visualisation of electrochemical deposition and dissolution processes during corrosion and the operation of batteries, supercapacitors and fuel cells. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Least-square NUFFT methods applied to 2-D and 3-D radially encoded MR image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiayu; Liu, Yanhui; Gewalt, Sally L; Cofer, Gary; Johnson, G Allan; Liu, Qing Huo

    2009-04-01

    Radially encoded MRI has gained increasing attention due to its motion insensitivity and reduced artifacts. However, because its samples are collected nonuniformly in the k-space, multidimensional (especially 3-D) radially sampled MRI image reconstruction is challenging. The objective of this paper is to develop a reconstruction technique in high dimensions with on-the-fly kernel calculation. It implements general multidimensional nonuniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) algorithms and incorporates them into a k-space image reconstruction framework. The method is then applied to reconstruct from the radially encoded k-space data, although the method is applicable to any non-Cartesian patterns. Performance comparisons are made against the conventional Kaiser-Bessel (KB) gridding method for 2-D and 3-D radially encoded computer-simulated phantoms and physically scanned phantoms. The results show that the NUFFT reconstruction method has better accuracy-efficiency tradeoff than the KB gridding method when the kernel weights are calculated on the fly. It is found that for a particular conventional kernel function, using its corresponding deapodization function as a scaling factor in the NUFFT framework has the potential to improve accuracy. In particular, when a cosine scaling factor is used, the NUFFT method is faster than KB gridding method since a closed-form solution is available and is less computationally expensive than the KB kernel (KB griding requires computation of Bessel functions). The NUFFT method has been successfully applied to 2-D and 3-D in vivo studies on small animals.

  8. MRI and contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging for evaluation of focal irreversible electroporation treatment: results from a phase I-II study in patients undergoing IRE followed by radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, Willemien van den; Bruin, D.M. de; Randen, A. van; Engelbrecht, M.R.W.; Postema, A.W.; Muller, B.G.; Zondervan, P.J.; Laguna Pes, M.P.; Reijke, T.M. de; Rosette, J.J.M.C.H. de la; Varkarakis, I.M.; Skolarikos, A.; Savci-Heijink, C.D.; Jurhill, R.R.; Wijkstra, H.

    2016-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an ablative therapy with a low side-effect profile in prostate cancer. The objective was: 1) To compare the volumetric IRE ablation zone on grey-scale transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) with histopathology findings; 2) To determine a reliable imaging modality to visualize the IRE ablation effects accurately. A prospective phase I-II study was performed in 16 patients scheduled for radical prostatectomy (RP). IRE of the prostate was performed 4 weeks before RP. Prior to, and 4 weeks after the IRE treatment, imaging was performed by TRUS, CEUS, and mpMRI. 3D-analysis of the ablation volumes on imaging and on H and E-stained whole-mount sections was performed. The volumes were compared and the correlation was calculated. Evaluation of the imaging demonstrated that with T2-weighted MRI, dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI, and CEUS, effects of IRE are visible. T2MRI and CEUS closely match the volumes on histopathology (Pearson correlation r = 0.88 resp. 0.80). However, IRE is not visible with TRUS. mpMRI and CEUS are appropriate for assessing IRE effects and are the most feasible imaging modalities to visualize IRE ablation zone. The imaging is concordant with results of histopathological examination. (orig.)

  9. WE-DE-206-01: MRI Signal in Biological Tissues - Proton, Spin, T1, T2, T2*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorny, K. [Mayo Clinic (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential part of clinical imaging due to its ability to render high soft tissue contrast. Instead of ionizing radiation, MRI use strong magnetic field, radio frequency waves and field gradients to create diagnostic useful images. It can be used to image the anatomy and also functional and physiological activities within the human body. Knowledge of the basic physical principles underlying MRI acquisition is vitally important to successful image production and proper image interpretation. This lecture will give an overview of the spin physics, imaging principle of MRI, the hardware of the MRI scanner, and various pulse sequences and their applications. It aims to provide a conceptual foundation to understand the image formation process of a clinical MRI scanner. Learning Objectives: Understand the origin of the MR signal and contrast from the spin physics level. Understand the main hardware components of a MRI scanner and their purposes Understand steps for MR image formation including spatial encoding and image reconstruction Understand the main kinds of MR pulse sequences and their characteristics.

  10. Neural correlates of relational memory: successful encoding and retrieval of semantic and perceptual associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prince, S.E.; Daselaar, S.M.; Cabeza, R.

    2005-01-01

    Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, we identified brain regions involved in successful relational memory (RM) during encoding and retrieval for semantic and perceptual associations or in general, independent of phase and content. Participants were scanned while encoding and

  11. Complex Wavelet transform for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junor, P.; Janney, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: There is a perpetual compromise encountered in magnetic resonance (MRl) image reconstruction, between the traditional elements of image quality (noise, spatial resolution and contrast). Additional factors exacerbating this trade-off include various artifacts, computational (and hence time-dependent) overhead, and financial expense. This paper outlines a new approach to the problem of minimizing MRI image acquisition and reconstruction time without compromising resolution and noise reduction. The standard approaches for reconstructing magnetic resonance (MRI) images from raw data (which rely on relatively conventional signal processing) have matured but there are a number of challenges which limit their use. A major one is the 'intrinsic' signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed image that depends on the strength of the main field. A typical clinical MRI almost invariably uses a super-cooled magnet in order to achieve a high field strength. The ongoing running cost of these super-cooled magnets prompts consideration of alternative magnet systems for use in MRIs for developing countries and in some remote regional installations. The decrease in image quality from using lower field strength magnets can be addressed by improvements in signal processing strategies. Conversely, improved signal processing will obviously benefit the current conventional field strength MRI machines. Moreover, the 'waiting time' experienced in many MR sequences (due to the relaxation time delays) can be exploited by more rigorous processing of the MR signals. Acquisition often needs to be repeated so that coherent averaging may partially redress the shortfall in SNR, at the expense of further delay. Wavelet transforms have been used in MRI as an alternative for encoding and denoising for over a decade. These have not supplanted the traditional Fourier transform methods that have long been the mainstay of MRI reconstruction, but have some inflexibility. The dual

  12. Mixed model phase evolution for correction of magnetic field inhomogeneity effects in 3D quantitative gradient echo-based MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fatnassi, Chemseddine; Boucenna, Rachid; Zaidi, Habib

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: In 3D gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), strong field gradients B0macro are visually observed at air/tissue interfaces. At low spatial resolution in particular, the respective field gradients lead to an apparent increase in intravoxel dephasing, and subsequently, to signal...... loss or inaccurate R2* estimates. If the strong field gradients are measured, their influence can be removed by postprocessing. METHODS: Conventional corrections usually assume a linear phase evolution with time. For high macroscopic gradient inhomogeneities near the edge of the brain...

  13. Role of MRI in paediatric neurooncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Padma

    2008-01-01

    The investigation of children with suspected brain tumours has undergone major advances over the last few decades. MRI has become the primary imaging modality in the initial diagnosis and in follow up of established tumours. Some of the newer techniques are still in the evolutionary phase and not yet routinely used in all centres around the world. However, with the advent of the high field strength magnets and more sophisticated MRI techniques such as MR spectroscopy and MR perfusion, the potential for more rapid and accurate diagnosis is expanding

  14. Three-dimensional trace measurements for fast-moving objects using binary-encoded fringe projection techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei-Hung; Kuo, Cho-Yo; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2014-08-20

    A fringe projection technique to trace the shape of a fast-moving object is proposed. A binary-encoded fringe pattern is illuminated by a strobe lamp and then projected onto the moving object at a sequence of time. Phases of the projected fringes obtained from the sequent measurements are extracted by the Fourier transform method. Unwrapping is then performed with reference to the binary-encoded fringe pattern. Even though the inspected object is colorful, fringe orders can be identified. A stream of profiles is therefore retrieved from the sequent unwrapped phases. This makes it possible to analyze physical properties of the dynamic objects. Advantages of the binary-encoded fringe pattern for phase unwrapping also include (1) reliable performance for colorful objects, spatially isolated objects, and surfaces with large depth discontinuities; (2) unwrapped errors only confined in a local area; and (3) low computation cost.

  15. Evaluation of liver hemodynamics using SPIO-enhanced dynamic MRI. Comparison between cirrhotic liver and normal liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Hisato; Furuta, Akihiro; Nunoura, T.; Takahashi, Takahiro; Ogasawara, Nobuhiko; Akuta, Keizo

    2006-01-01

    SPIO, ferucarbotran (Resovist), which enables rapid bolus injection is well suited for the evaluation of liver hemodynamics. Our study aimed to assess the difference of hemodynamics associated with progression of chronic liver disease using SPIO-enhanced dynamic MRI. Ten patients with normal liver function, 10 patients with chronic hepatitis, and 16 patients with liver cirrhosis were examined. The MR perfusion studies were performed by 1.5T MR system with a single-shot GRE-EPI with spectral presaturation inversion recovery (SPIR) and sensitivity encoding (SENSE) technique. After the bolus injection of SPIO (0.016 ml/kg) followed by a 20 ml saline flush, 30 sequential dynamic echo planar images were obtained under the condition of 30 seconds breath hold. From the ROI set in the right lobe of the liver, time-to-signal intensity curves (TICs) were obtained. TICs were converted to time-to-R2 * curves, and the slope at hepatic arterial phase (Sa) and at portal predominant phase (Sp) were calculated by the linear regression. Sp/Sa (portal/arterial ratio) of each group was analyzed statistically. (unpaired T-test) In comparing Sp/Sa of each group, there was a significant difference between normal liver and advanced liver cirrhosis. The decrease of Sp/Sa was seen in severe cirrhosis, but this change was unclear in chronic hepatitis and mild cirrhosis. In extremely severe cirrhosis, there was a bizarre phenomenon that Sp became minus number. In conclusion, SPIO-enhanced dynamic MRI was useful to assess the difference of liver hemodynamics associated with progression of chronic liver disease. (author)

  16. Background parenchymal enhancement in preoperative breast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohara, Satoko; Ishigaki, Satoko; Satake, Hiroko; Kawamura, Akiko; Kawai, Hisashi; Kikumori, Toyone; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to assess the influence of background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) on surgical planning performed using preoperative MRI for breast cancer evaluation. Between January 2009 and December 2010, 91 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients (mean age, 55.5 years; range, 30-88 years) who underwent preoperative bilateral breast MRI followed by planned breast conservation therapy were retrospectively enrolled. MRI was performed to assess the tumor extent in addition to mammography and breast ultrasonography. BPE in the contralateral normal breast MRI at the early dynamic phase was visually classified as follows: minimal (n=49), mild (n=27), moderate (n=7), and marked (n=8). The correlations between the BPE grade and age, menopausal status, index tumor size, changes in surgical management based on MRI results, positive predictive value (PPV) of MRI, and surgical margins were assessed. Patients in the strong BPE groups were significantly younger (p=0.002) and generally premenopausal (p<0.001). Surgical treatment was not changed in 67 cases (73.6%), while extended excision and mastectomy were performed in 12 cases (13.2%), each based on additional lesions on MRI. Six of 79 (7.6%) patients who underwent breast conservation therapy had tumor-positive resection margins. In cases where surgical management was changed, the PPV for MRI-detected foci was high in the minimal (91.7%) and mild groups (66.7%), and 0% in the moderate and marked groups (p=0.002). Strong BPE causes false-positive MRI findings and may lead to overly extensive surgery, whereas MRI may be beneficial in select patients with weak BPE.

  17. Chediak-Higashi syndrome: brain MRI and MR spectroscopy manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lolli, Valentina; Soto Ares, Gustavo; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre; Abou Chahla, Wadih; Jissendi-Tchofo, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome is a rare inherited metabolic disorder characterized by partial oculocutaneous albinism, immunodeficiency, and neurological dysfunction. We present the brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) findings obtained during the accelerated phase of the disorder in an 8-year-old. The brain MRI manifestations at recurrences 15 months and 24 months later are reported as well. (orig.)

  18. Chediak-Higashi syndrome: brain MRI and MR spectroscopy manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lolli, Valentina; Soto Ares, Gustavo; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre [Roger Salengro Hospital, CHRU, Neuroradiology Department, Lille (France); Abou Chahla, Wadih [Jeanne de Flandre Hospital, Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Department, Lille (France); Jissendi-Tchofo, Patrice [University Hospital Saint-Pierre, Radiology Department - Pediatric Neuroradiology Section, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-08-15

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome is a rare inherited metabolic disorder characterized by partial oculocutaneous albinism, immunodeficiency, and neurological dysfunction. We present the brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) findings obtained during the accelerated phase of the disorder in an 8-year-old. The brain MRI manifestations at recurrences 15 months and 24 months later are reported as well. (orig.)

  19. Non-deterministic quantum CNOT gate with double encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueddana, Amor; Attia, Moez; Chatta, Rihab

    2013-09-01

    We define an Asymmetric Partially Polarizing Beam Splitter (APPBS) to be a linear optical component having different reflectivity (transmittance) coefficients, on the upper and the lower arms, for horizontally and vertically Polarized incident photons. Our CNOT model is composed by two APPBSs, one Half Wave Plate (HWP), two Polarizing Beam Splitters (PBSs), a Beam Splitter (BS) and a -phase rotator for specific wavelength. Control qubit operates with dual rail encoding while target qubit is based on polarization encoding. To perform CNOT operation in 4/27 of the cases, input and target incoming photons are injected with different wavelengths.

  20. Age-related influences of prior sleep on brain activation during verbal encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle B Jonelis

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Disrupted sleep is more common in older adults (OA than younger adults (YA, often co-morbid with other conditions. How these sleep disturbances affect cognitive performance is an area of active study. We examined whether brain activation during verbal encoding correlates with sleep quantity and quality the night before testing in a group of healthy OA and YA. Twenty-seven OA (ages 59-82 and twenty-seven YA (ages 19-36 underwent one night of standard polysomnography. Twelve hours post-awakening, subjects performed a verbal encoding task while undergoing functional MRI. Analyses examined the group (OA vs. YA by prior sleep quantity (Total Sleep Time (TST or quality (Sleep Efficiency (SE interaction on cerebral activation, controlling for performance. Longer TST promoted higher levels of activation in the bilateral anterior parahippocampi in OA and lower activation levels in the left anterior parahippocampus in YA. Greater SE promoted higher activation levels in the left posterior parahippocampus and right inferior frontal gyrus in YA, but not in OA. The roles of these brain regions in verbal encoding suggest, in OA, longer sleep duration may facilitate functional compensation during cognitive challenges. By contrast, in YA, shorter sleep duration may necessitate functional compensation to maintain cognitive performance, similar to what is seen following acute sleep deprivation. Additionally, in YA, better sleep quality may improve semantic retrieval processes, thereby aiding encoding.

  1. Aliasless fresnel transform image reconstruction in phase scrambling fourier transform technique by data interpolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yoshifumi; Liu, Na; Ito, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    The signal in the Fresnel transform technique corresponds to a blurred one of the spin density image. Because the amplitudes of adjacent sampled signals have a high interrelation, the signal amplitude at a point between sampled points can be estimated with a high degree of accuracy even if the sampling is so coarse as to generate aliasing in the reconstructed images. In this report, we describe a new aliasless image reconstruction technique in the phase scrambling Fourier transform (PSFT) imaging technique in which the PSFT signals are converted to Fresnel transform signals by multiplying them by a quadratic phase term and are then interpolated using polynomial expressions to generate fully encoded signals. Numerical simulation using MR images showed that almost completely aliasless images are reconstructed by this technique. Experiments using ultra-low-field PSFT MRI were conducted, and aliasless images were reconstructed from coarsely sampled PSFT signals. (author)

  2. Reversible MRI abnormalities in an unusual paediatric presentation of Wernicke's encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparacia, G.; Banco, A.; Lagalla, R.

    1999-01-01

    Background. We report an unusual paediatric presentation of acute Wernicke's encephalopathy in a 12-year-old boy affected by chronic gastrointestinal disease. MRI demonstrated, in addition to the typical diencephalic and mesencephalic signal abnormalities on T2-weighted images, enhancement of the mammillary bodies and the floor of the hypothalamus. Materials and methods. Following parenteral administration of thiamine for 4 days, the patient recovered from his neurological deficits and on follow-up enhanced MRI 1 month later, no signal abnormalities were found nor was there diencephalic or mesencephalic atrophy, as is usual in the chronic phase of the disease. Results. MRI provides crucial information in the diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy, either in the acute or chronic phases of the disease. Conclusion. Our report provides an additional clue for recognition of the acute phase of the disease; enhancement of the floor of the hypothalamus has not previously been described despite its recorded involvement at autopsy. (orig.)

  3. SnoVault and encodeD: A novel object-based storage system and applications to ENCODE metadata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C Hitz

    Full Text Available The Encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE project is an ongoing collaborative effort to create a comprehensive catalog of functional elements initiated shortly after the completion of the Human Genome Project. The current database exceeds 6500 experiments across more than 450 cell lines and tissues using a wide array of experimental techniques to study the chromatin structure, regulatory and transcriptional landscape of the H. sapiens and M. musculus genomes. All ENCODE experimental data, metadata, and associated computational analyses are submitted to the ENCODE Data Coordination Center (DCC for validation, tracking, storage, unified processing, and distribution to community resources and the scientific community. As the volume of data increases, the identification and organization of experimental details becomes increasingly intricate and demands careful curation. The ENCODE DCC has created a general purpose software system, known as SnoVault, that supports metadata and file submission, a database used for metadata storage, web pages for displaying the metadata and a robust API for querying the metadata. The software is fully open-source, code and installation instructions can be found at: http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/snovault/ (for the generic database and http://github.com/ENCODE-DCC/encoded/ to store genomic data in the manner of ENCODE. The core database engine, SnoVault (which is completely independent of ENCODE, genomic data, or bioinformatic data has been released as a separate Python package.

  4. Cryptographic analysis on the key space of optical phase encryption algorithm based on the design of discrete random phase mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chao; Shen, Xueju; Li, Zengyan

    2013-07-01

    The key space of phase encryption algorithm using discrete random phase mask is investigated by numerical simulation in this paper. Random phase mask with finite and discrete phase levels is considered as the core component in most practical optical encryption architectures. The key space analysis is based on the design criteria of discrete random phase mask. The role of random amplitude mask and random phase mask in optical encryption system is identified from the perspective of confusion and diffusion. The properties of discrete random phase mask in a practical double random phase encoding scheme working in both amplitude encoding (AE) and phase encoding (PE) modes are comparably analyzed. The key space of random phase encryption algorithm is evaluated considering both the encryption quality and the brute-force attack resistibility. A method for enlarging the key space of phase encryption algorithm is also proposed to enhance the security of optical phase encryption techniques.

  5. Comprehensive MRI simulation methodology using a dedicated MRI scanner in radiation oncology for external beam radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulson, Eric S.; Erickson, Beth; Schultz, Chris; Allen Li, X.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, and more clinics are integrating MRI into their radiation therapy workflows. However, radiation therapy presents a new set of challenges and places additional constraints on MRI compared to diagnostic radiology that, if not properly addressed, can undermine the advantages MRI offers for radiation treatment planning (RTP). The authors introduce here strategies to manage several challenges of using MRI for virtual simulation in external beam RTP. Methods: A total of 810 clinical MRI simulation exams were performed using a dedicated MRI scanner for external beam RTP of brain, breast, cervix, head and neck, liver, pancreas, prostate, and sarcoma cancers. Patients were imaged in treatment position using MRI-optimal immobilization devices. Radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations and scan protocols were optimized based on RTP constraints. Off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity-induced geometric distortions were minimized or corrected prior to using images for RTP. A multidisciplinary MRI simulation guide, along with window width and level presets, was created to standardize use of MR images during RTP. A quality assurance program was implemented to maintain accuracy and repeatability of MRI simulation exams. Results: The combination of a large bore scanner, high field strength, and circumferentially wrapped, flexible phased array RF receive coils permitted acquisition of thin slice images with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image intensity uniformity, while simultaneously accommodating patient setup and immobilization devices. Postprocessing corrections and alternative acquisition methods were required to reduce or correct off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity induced geometric distortions. Conclusions: The methodology described herein contains practical strategies the authors have implemented through lessons learned performing clinical MRI simulation exams. In

  6. Comprehensive MRI simulation methodology using a dedicated MRI scanner in radiation oncology for external beam radiation treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulson, Eric S., E-mail: epaulson@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 and Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States); Erickson, Beth; Schultz, Chris; Allen Li, X. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, and more clinics are integrating MRI into their radiation therapy workflows. However, radiation therapy presents a new set of challenges and places additional constraints on MRI compared to diagnostic radiology that, if not properly addressed, can undermine the advantages MRI offers for radiation treatment planning (RTP). The authors introduce here strategies to manage several challenges of using MRI for virtual simulation in external beam RTP. Methods: A total of 810 clinical MRI simulation exams were performed using a dedicated MRI scanner for external beam RTP of brain, breast, cervix, head and neck, liver, pancreas, prostate, and sarcoma cancers. Patients were imaged in treatment position using MRI-optimal immobilization devices. Radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations and scan protocols were optimized based on RTP constraints. Off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity-induced geometric distortions were minimized or corrected prior to using images for RTP. A multidisciplinary MRI simulation guide, along with window width and level presets, was created to standardize use of MR images during RTP. A quality assurance program was implemented to maintain accuracy and repeatability of MRI simulation exams. Results: The combination of a large bore scanner, high field strength, and circumferentially wrapped, flexible phased array RF receive coils permitted acquisition of thin slice images with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image intensity uniformity, while simultaneously accommodating patient setup and immobilization devices. Postprocessing corrections and alternative acquisition methods were required to reduce or correct off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity induced geometric distortions. Conclusions: The methodology described herein contains practical strategies the authors have implemented through lessons learned performing clinical MRI simulation exams. In

  7. Transferring and generalizing deep-learning-based neural encoding models across subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Haiguang; Shi, Junxing; Chen, Wei; Liu, Zhongming

    2018-08-01

    Recent studies have shown the value of using deep learning models for mapping and characterizing how the brain represents and organizes information for natural vision. However, modeling the relationship between deep learning models and the brain (or encoding models), requires measuring cortical responses to large and diverse sets of natural visual stimuli from single subjects. This requirement limits prior studies to few subjects, making it difficult to generalize findings across subjects or for a population. In this study, we developed new methods to transfer and generalize encoding models across subjects. To train encoding models specific to a target subject, the models trained for other subjects were used as the prior models and were refined efficiently using Bayesian inference with a limited amount of data from the target subject. To train encoding models for a population, the models were progressively trained and updated with incremental data from different subjects. For the proof of principle, we applied these methods to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from three subjects watching tens of hours of naturalistic videos, while a deep residual neural network driven by image recognition was used to model visual cortical processing. Results demonstrate that the methods developed herein provide an efficient and effective strategy to establish both subject-specific and population-wide predictive models of cortical representations of high-dimensional and hierarchical visual features. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Alpha Oscillations during Incidental Encoding Predict Subsequent Memory for New "Foil" Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsang, David A; Gruber, Matthias; Bergström, Zara M; Ranganath, Charan; Simons, Jon S

    2018-05-01

    People can employ adaptive strategies to increase the likelihood that previously encoded information will be successfully retrieved. One such strategy is to constrain retrieval toward relevant information by reimplementing the neurocognitive processes that were engaged during encoding. Using EEG, we examined the temporal dynamics with which constraining retrieval toward semantic versus nonsemantic information affects the processing of new "foil" information encountered during a memory test. Time-frequency analysis of EEG data acquired during an initial study phase revealed that semantic compared with nonsemantic processing was associated with alpha decreases in a left frontal electrode cluster from around 600 msec after stimulus onset. Successful encoding of semantic versus nonsemantic foils during a subsequent memory test was related to decreases in alpha oscillatory activity in the same left frontal electrode cluster, which emerged relatively late in the trial at around 1000-1600 msec after stimulus onset. Across participants, left frontal alpha power elicited by semantic processing during the study phase correlated significantly with left frontal alpha power associated with semantic foil encoding during the memory test. Furthermore, larger left frontal alpha power decreases elicited by semantic foil encoding during the memory test predicted better subsequent semantic foil recognition in an additional surprise foil memory test, although this effect did not reach significance. These findings indicate that constraining retrieval toward semantic information involves reimplementing semantic encoding operations that are mediated by alpha oscillations and that such reimplementation occurs at a late stage of memory retrieval, perhaps reflecting additional monitoring processes.

  9. Integrated microchip incorporating atomic magnetometer and microfluidic channel for NMR and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Micah P [Oakland, CA; Savukov, Igor M [Los Alamos, NM; Budker, Dmitry [El Cerrito, CA; Shah, Vishal K [Plainsboro, NJ; Knappe, Svenja [Boulder, CO; Kitching, John [Boulder, CO; Michalak, David J [Berkeley, CA; Xu, Shoujun [Houston, TX; Pines, Alexander [Berkeley, CA

    2011-08-09

    An integral microfluidic device includes an alkali vapor cell and microfluidic channel, which can be used to detect magnetism for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Small magnetic fields in the vicinity of the vapor cell can be measured by optically polarizing and probing the spin precession in the small magnetic field. This can then be used to detect the magnetic field of in encoded analyte in the adjacent microfluidic channel. The magnetism in the microfluidic channel can be modulated by applying an appropriate series of radio or audio frequency pulses upstream from the microfluidic chip (the remote detection modality) to yield a sensitive means of detecting NMR and MRI.

  10. The usefulness of high-resolution three-dimensional dynamic MR imaging with sensitivity encoding for evaluating extrahepatic bile duct cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Kon; Ko, Seog Wan [Chonbuk National University Hospital and Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-15

    We assessed the usefulness of high-resolution 3D dynamic MR imaging with sensitivity encoding (mSENSE) for evaluating bile duct cancer. Twenty-three patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer underwent multiphasic 3D GRE MRI, including two delayed phases without and with mSENSE. The first delayed phases were obtained with volumetric interpolated breath-hold imaging (VIBE) and then the higher in-place resolution images (320 X 168) were obtained using mSENSE. The two delayed phase images were compared quantitatively by measuring the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of liver and tumor, the liver-visceral fat contrast and the tumor-visceral fat contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR); the two delayed phase images were compared qualitatively by evaluating the sharpness of the hepatic vessels and bile duct, the artifacts and the conspicuity of bile duct cancer. The quantitative results with mSENSE image were significantly better than those with conventional VIBE. Though the clarity of the intrahepatic vessels and the intrahepatic bile duct, and the artifacts did not differ significantly between the two images ( {rho} > 0.05), the clarity of the extrahepatic vessels, the extrahepatic bile duct and the bile duct cancer were better on the mSENSE image than on the VIBE ( {rho} < 0.05). The higher in-plane resolution 3D GRE image obtained with mSENSE was of a better image quality than the conventional VIBE images. This technique shows promise for use as a comprehensive exam for assessing bile duct cancer.

  11. The usefulness of high-resolution three-dimensional dynamic MR imaging with sensitivity encoding for evaluating extrahepatic bile duct cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Kon; Ko, Seog Wan

    2006-01-01

    We assessed the usefulness of high-resolution 3D dynamic MR imaging with sensitivity encoding (mSENSE) for evaluating bile duct cancer. Twenty-three patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer underwent multiphasic 3D GRE MRI, including two delayed phases without and with mSENSE. The first delayed phases were obtained with volumetric interpolated breath-hold imaging (VIBE) and then the higher in-place resolution images (320 X 168) were obtained using mSENSE. The two delayed phase images were compared quantitatively by measuring the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of liver and tumor, the liver-visceral fat contrast and the tumor-visceral fat contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR); the two delayed phase images were compared qualitatively by evaluating the sharpness of the hepatic vessels and bile duct, the artifacts and the conspicuity of bile duct cancer. The quantitative results with mSENSE image were significantly better than those with conventional VIBE. Though the clarity of the intrahepatic vessels and the intrahepatic bile duct, and the artifacts did not differ significantly between the two images ( ρ > 0.05), the clarity of the extrahepatic vessels, the extrahepatic bile duct and the bile duct cancer were better on the mSENSE image than on the VIBE ( ρ < 0.05). The higher in-plane resolution 3D GRE image obtained with mSENSE was of a better image quality than the conventional VIBE images. This technique shows promise for use as a comprehensive exam for assessing bile duct cancer

  12. Scan-rescan reproducibility of segmental aortic wall shear stress as assessed by phase-specific segmentation with 4D flow MRI in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Palen, Roel L F; Roest, Arno A W; van den Boogaard, Pieter J; de Roos, Albert; Blom, Nico A; Westenberg, Jos J M

    2018-05-26

    The aim was to investigate scan-rescan reproducibility and observer variability of segmental aortic 3D systolic wall shear stress (WSS) by phase-specific segmentation with 4D flow MRI in healthy volunteers. Ten healthy volunteers (age 26.5 ± 2.6 years) underwent aortic 4D flow MRI twice. Maximum 3D systolic WSS (WSSmax) and mean 3D systolic WSS (WSSmean) for five thoracic aortic segments over five systolic cardiac phases by phase-specific segmentations were calculated. Scan-rescan analysis and observer reproducibility analysis were performed. Scan-rescan data showed overall good reproducibility for WSSmean (coefficient of variation, COV 10-15%) with moderate-to-strong intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC 0.63-0.89). The variability in WSSmax was high (COV 16-31%) with moderate-to-good ICC (0.55-0.79) for different aortic segments. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility was good-to-excellent for regional aortic WSSmax (ICC ≥ 0.78; COV ≤ 17%) and strong-to-excellent for WSSmean (ICC ≥ 0.86; COV ≤ 11%). In general, ascending aortic segments showed more WSSmax/WSSmean variability compared to aortic arch or descending aortic segments for scan-rescan, intraobserver and interobserver comparison. Scan-rescan reproducibility was good for WSSmean and moderate for WSSmax for all thoracic aortic segments over multiple systolic phases in healthy volunteers. Intra/interobserver reproducibility for segmental WSS assessment was good-to-excellent. Variability of WSSmax is higher and should be taken into account in case of individual follow-up or in comparative rest-stress studies to avoid misinterpretation.

  13. The new INRIM rotating encoder angle comparator (REAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisani, Marco; Astrua, Milena

    2017-01-01

    A novel angle comparator has been built and tested at INRIM. The device is based on a double air bearing structure embedding a continuously rotating encoder, which is read by two heads: one fixed to the base of the comparator and a second fixed to the upper moving part of the comparator. The phase measurement between the two heads’ signals is proportional to the relative angle suspended between them (and, therefore, the angle between the base and the upper, movable part of the comparator). The advantage of this solution is to reduce the encoder graduation errors and to cancel the cyclic errors due to the interpolation of the encoder lines. By using only two pairs of reading heads, we have achieved an intrinsic accuracy of  ±0.04″ (rectangular distribution) that can be reduced through self-calibration. The residual cyclic errors have shown to be less than 0.01″ peak-to-peak. The random fluctuations are less than 0.01″ rms on a 100 s time interval. A further advantage of the rotating encoder is the intrinsic knowledge of the absolute position without the need of a zeroing procedure. Construction details of the rotating encoder angle comparator (REAC), characterization tests, and examples of practical use are given. (paper)

  14. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6: MRI of three Japanese patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, J.I.; Tokumoto, H.; Yukitake, M.; Matsui, M.; Kuroda, Y.; Matsuyama, Z.; Kawakami, H.; Nakamura, S.

    1998-01-01

    We describe the MRI findings in three Japanese patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) in which a polymorphic CAG repeat was identified in the gene encoding the α 1A voltage-dependent P/Q-type Ca 2+ channel subunit (CACNL1A4). All showed slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia and mild pyramidal signs. Neuroradiologically, they had moderate cerebellar atrophy, most prominently in the superior vermis, whereas the brain stem appeared to be spared. No abnormal signal intensity was identified. (orig.)

  15. MRI-Guided Intervention for Breast Lesions Using the Freehand Technique in a 3.0-T Closed-Bore MRI Scanner: Feasibility and Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hye Young [Department of Radiology, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju 660-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mijung; Yun, Bo La [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Yeon [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Sook [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    To report the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided intervention for diagnosing suspicious breast lesions detectable by MRI only, using the freehand technique with a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI scanner. Five women with 5 consecutive MRI-only breast lesions underwent MRI-guided intervention: 3 underwent MRI-guided needle localization and 2, MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy. The interventions were performed in a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI system using a dedicated phased-array breast coil with the patients in the prone position; the freehand technique was used. Technical success and histopathologic outcome were analyzed. MRI showed that four lesions were masses (mean size, 11.5 mm; range, 7-18 mm); and 1, a nonmass-like enhancement (maximum diameter, 21 mm). The locations of the lesions with respect to the breast with index cancer were as follows: different quadrant, same breast - 3 cases; same quadrant, same breast - 1 case; and contralateral breast - 1 case. Histopathologic evaluation of the lesions treated with needle localization disclosed perilobular hemangioma, fibrocystic change, and fibroadenomatous change. The lesions treated with vacuum-assisted biopsy demonstrated a radial scar and atypical apocrine hyperplasia. Follow-up MRI after 2-7 months (mean, 4.6 months) confirmed complete lesion removal in all cases. MRI-guided intervention for breast lesions using the freehand technique with a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI scanner is feasible and accurate for diagnosing MRI-only lesions.

  16. MRI-Guided Intervention for Breast Lesions Using the Freehand Technique in a 3.0-T Closed-Bore MRI Scanner: Feasibility and Initial Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mijung; Yun, Bo La; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung; Park, So Yeon; Moon, Woo Kyung; Ko, Eun Sook

    2013-01-01

    To report the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided intervention for diagnosing suspicious breast lesions detectable by MRI only, using the freehand technique with a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI scanner. Five women with 5 consecutive MRI-only breast lesions underwent MRI-guided intervention: 3 underwent MRI-guided needle localization and 2, MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy. The interventions were performed in a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI system using a dedicated phased-array breast coil with the patients in the prone position; the freehand technique was used. Technical success and histopathologic outcome were analyzed. MRI showed that four lesions were masses (mean size, 11.5 mm; range, 7-18 mm); and 1, a nonmass-like enhancement (maximum diameter, 21 mm). The locations of the lesions with respect to the breast with index cancer were as follows: different quadrant, same breast - 3 cases; same quadrant, same breast - 1 case; and contralateral breast - 1 case. Histopathologic evaluation of the lesions treated with needle localization disclosed perilobular hemangioma, fibrocystic change, and fibroadenomatous change. The lesions treated with vacuum-assisted biopsy demonstrated a radial scar and atypical apocrine hyperplasia. Follow-up MRI after 2-7 months (mean, 4.6 months) confirmed complete lesion removal in all cases. MRI-guided intervention for breast lesions using the freehand technique with a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI scanner is feasible and accurate for diagnosing MRI-only lesions

  17. Cine phase-contrast MRI measurement of CSF flow in the cervical spine: a pilot study in patients with spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahdar, MJ; Shakeri, M.; McDowell, E.; Wells, J.; Vitaz, T.; Harkema, S.; Amini, A.

    2011-03-01

    MRI velocimetry (also known as phase-contrast MRI) is a powerful tool for quantification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in various regions of the brain and craniospinal junction and has been accepted as a diagnostic tool to assist with the diagnosis of certain conditions such as hydrocephalus and chiari malformations. Cerebrospinal fluid is continually produced in the ventricles of the brain, flows through the ventricular system and then out and around the brain and spinal cord and is reabsorbed over the convexity of the brain. Any disease process which either impedes the normal pattern of flow or restricts the area where flow occurs can change the pattern of these waveforms with the direction and velocity of flow being determined by the pressure transmitted from the pulsation of the heart and circulation of blood within the central nervous system. Therefore, we hypothesized that phase-contrast MRI could eventually be used as a diagnostic aid in determining the degree of spinal cord compression following injury to the cervical or thoracic spine. In this study, we examined CSF flow in 3 normal subjects and 2 subjects with non-acute injuries in the cervical spine using Cine phasecontrast MRI. CSF flow analysis was performed using an in-house developed software. The flow waveform was calculated in both normal subjects (n=3) as well as subjects with spinal cord injury in the cervical spine (n=2). The bulk flow at C2 was measured to be 0.30 +/- 0.05 cc, at 5 cm distal to C2, it was 0.19+/- 0.07 cc, and at 10 cm distal to C2, it was 0.17+/- 0.05 cc. These results were in good agreement with previously published results. In patients with spinal cord injury, at the site of injury in the cervical spine, bulk flow was found to be 0.08 +/- 0.12 cc, at 5 cm proximal to the site of injury it was found to be 0.18 +/- 0.07 cc, and at 5 cm distal to the site of injury, it was found to be 0.12 +/- 0.01 cc.

  18. From reference to sense: how the brain encodes meaning for speaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eMenenti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In speaking, semantic encoding is the conversion of a nonverbal mental representation (the reference into a semantic structure suitable for expression (the sense. In this fMRI study on sentence production we investigate how the speaking brain accomplishes this transition from nonverbal to verbal representations. In an overt picture description task, we manipulated repetition of sense (the semantic structure of the sentence and reference (the described situation separately. By investigating brain areas showing response adaptation to repetition of each of these sentence properties, we disentangle the neuronal infrastructure for these two components of semantic encoding. We also performed a control experiment with the same stimuli and design but without any linguistic task to identify areas involved in perception of the stimuli per se. The bilateral inferior parietal lobes were selectively sensitive to repetition of reference, while left inferior frontal gyrus showed selective suppression to repetition of sense. Strikingly, a widespread network of areas associated with language processing (left middle frontal gyrus, bilateral superior parietal lobes and bilateral posterior temporal gyri all showed repetition suppression to both sense and reference processing. These areas are probably involved in mapping reference onto sense, the crucial step in semantic encoding. These results enable us to track the transition from nonverbal to verbal representations in our brains.

  19. Control study of MRI and histopathology in early atherosclerotic plaque of rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Qiong; Xia Liming; Wang Chengyuan; Hu Junwu; Feng Dingyi; Zou Mingli

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the diagnostic value of MRI in the early atherosclerosis. Materials and Methods: Atherosclerosis was induced in 20 New Zealand White male rabbits with high cholesterol diet. Rabbits underwent serial MRI at 9 and 18 weeks after high cholesterol diet. Axial T 1 and fat-suppressed PDWI spin echo images of the abdominal aorta were obtained above and below the right renal arteries. The signal intensity and morphologic features of plaque in the various phases after high cholesterol diet in MRI were analyzed and compared with those of histopathology. Results: Plaque could be observed in all animals on MRI at 9 weeks after high cholesterol diet, and mild enhancement of the plaque could be noted on enhanced imaging. Imaging effect was the best at T 1 sequence. Plaque size increased gradually at 18 weeks. Plaque and vessel wall were all enrichment. In histopathology, foam cells, collagen and matrix fiber component can be seen in the various phases. Conclusion: The conventional MRI technique can be used to assess the formation and development of the early atherosclerosis dynamically and histologically. (authors)

  20. Merits of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of myositis ossificans circumscripta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchardy, L.; Garcia, J.

    1994-01-01

    A retrospective study of 5 cases, 4 of myositis ossificans circumscripta (MOC) and 1 of non-ossificans myositis, is presented. The clinical presentation was a painful soft-tissues swelling, and the final diagnosis was established by biopsy in 3 cases and clinical evolution in 2 cases. Different types of imaging techniques were performed: 4 MRI, 2 arteriographies, 3 Tc 99m scintigraphies, 3 US, 3 CT and plain film radiographs for all patients. MOC is a benign process (as opposed to myositis ossificans progressiva, which is an hereditary pathology with a fatal prognosis) with 3 phases of evolution: an acute or pseudo-inflammatory phase, a sub-acute or pseudo-tumoral phase and a chronic phase with a spontaneous healing. The radiologic diagnostic findings are dependent of the phase of the disease. The calcifications are seen earlier with scintigraphy than plain films, with US being less helpful. A heterogenous mass and calcifications are seen with CT. MRI allows the characterization of oedema during the acute phase and sometimes can exclude a malignant process. MRI is the best method for an early diagnosis, the differential diagnosis and to follow the evolution. (authors). 26 refs., 8 figs

  1. Cortical phase changes in Alzheimer's disease at 7T MRI: a novel imaging marker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooden, S.; Versluis, M.J.; Liem, M.K.; Milles, J.; Maier, A.B.; Oleksik, A.M.; Webb, A.G.; van Buchem, M.A.; van der Grond, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Postmortem studies have indicated the potential of high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize amyloid depositions in the cerebral cortex. The aim of this study is to test this hypothesis in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: T2*-weighted MRI was performed in

  2. Evidence for Policy Making: Clinical Appropriateness Study of Lumbar Spine MRI Prescriptions Using RAND Appropriateness Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Yousefi Manesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MRI is a new and expensive diagnostic technology, which has been used increasingly all over the world. Low back pain is a worldwide prevalent disorder and MRI technique is one of the several ways to diagnose it. This paper aims to identify the appropriateness of lumbar spine MRI prescriptions in Shiraz teaching hospitals using standardized RAND Appropriateness Method (RAM criteria. Methods This study consisted of two phases. The first phase involved a qualitative enquiry and the second phase had a quantitative cross-sectional nature. In the first phase RAM was used for developing lumbar spine MRI indications and scenarios. In the second phase, the finalized scenarios were compared with the history and physical examination of 300 patients with low back pain. The rate of appropriateness of lumbar spine MRI prescription was then calculated. Results Of 300 cases of lumbar spine MRI prescriptions, approximately 167 (56% were considered inappropriate, 72 (24% were uncertain, and 61 (20% were deemed to be appropriate. The economic burden of inappropriate prescriptions was calculated at 88,009,000 Rials. In addition, the types of expertise and physical examination were considered as related factors to appropriateness of prescriptions. Conclusion In conclusion, a large proportion of lumbar spine MRI prescriptions, which result in financial burden on the insurance companies and the patients alike is unnecessary. This study suggests that policy makers consider this evidence while decision-making. Our findings highlight the imperative role of Health Technology Assessment (HTA and Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs. As a result, developing local clinical guidelines may create the commitment needed in physicians in prescribing appropriate prescriptions within the health sector. The study further recommends that appropriate scenarios should be considered as a criterion for payment and reimbursement.

  3. ERPs and oscillations during encoding predict retrieval of digit memory in superior mnemonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yafeng; Li, Xianchun; Chen, Xi; Ku, Yixuan; Dong, Yujie; Dou, Zheng; He, Lin; Hu, Yi; Li, Weidong; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies have consistently demonstrated that superior mnemonists (SMs) outperform normal individuals in domain-specific memory tasks. However, the neural correlates of memory-related processes remain unclear. In the current EEG study, SMs and control participants performed a digit memory task during which their brain activity was recorded. Chinese SMs used a digit-image mnemonic for encoding digits, in which they associated 2-digit groups with images immediately after the presentation of each even-position digit in sequences. Behaviorally, SMs' memory of digit sequences was better than the controls'. During encoding in the study phase, SMs showed an increased right central P2 (150-250ms post onset) and a larger right posterior high-alpha (10-14Hz, 500-1720ms) oscillation on digits at even-positions compared with digits at odd-positions. Both P2 and high-alpha oscillations in the study phase co-varied with performance in the recall phase, but only in SMs, indicating that neural dynamics during encoding could predict successful retrieval of digit memory in SMs. Our findings suggest that representation of a digit sequence in SMs using mnemonics may recruit both the early-stage attention allocation process and the sustained information preservation process. This study provides evidence for the role of dynamic and efficient neural encoding processes in mnemonists. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Contribution of stress and sex hormones to memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Christian J

    2017-08-01

    Distinct stages of the menstrual cycle and the intake of oral contraceptives (OC) affect sex hormone levels, stress responses, and memory processes critically involved in the pathogenesis of mental disorders. To characterize the interaction of sex and stress hormones on memory encoding, 30 men, 30 women in the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (FO), 30 women in the luteal phase (LU), and 30 OC women were exposed to either a stress (socially evaluated cold-pressor test) or a control condition prior to memory encoding and immediate recall of neutral, positive, and negative words. On the next day, delayed free and cued recall was tested. Sex hormone levels verified distinct estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone levels between groups. Stress increased blood pressure, cortisol concentrations, and ratings of stress appraisal in all four groups as well as cued recall performance of negative words in men. Stress exposure in OC women led to a blunted cortisol response and rather enhanced cued recall of neutral words. Thus, pre-encoding stress facilitated emotional cued recall performance in men only, but not women with different sex hormone statuses pointing to the pivotal role of circulating sex hormones in modulation of learning and memory processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Information verification cryptosystem using one-time keys based on double random phase encoding and public-key cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tieyu; Ran, Qiwen; Yuan, Lin; Chi, Yingying; Ma, Jing

    2016-08-01

    A novel image encryption system based on double random phase encoding (DRPE) and RSA public-key algorithm is proposed. The main characteristic of the system is that each encryption process produces a new decryption key (even for the same plaintext), thus the encryption system conforms to the feature of the one-time pad (OTP) cryptography. The other characteristic of the system is the use of fingerprint key. Only with the rightful authorization will the true decryption be obtained, otherwise the decryption will result in noisy images. So the proposed system can be used to determine whether the ciphertext is falsified by attackers. In addition, the system conforms to the basic agreement of asymmetric cryptosystem (ACS) due to the combination with the RSA public-key algorithm. The simulation results show that the encryption scheme has high robustness against the existing attacks.

  6. Fractionation of the component processes underlying successful episodic encoding: a combined fMRI and divided-attention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncapher, Melina R; Rugg, Michael D

    2008-02-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that attentional resources are necessary for the encoding of episodic memories, but the nature of the relationship between attention and neural correlates of encoding is unclear. Here we address this question using functional magnetic resonance imaging and a divided-attention paradigm in which competition for different types of attentional resources was manipulated. Fifteen volunteers were scanned while making animacy judgments to visually presented words and concurrently performing one of three tasks on auditorily presented words: male/female voice discrimination (control task), 1-back voice comparison (1-back task), or indoor/outdoor judgment (semantic task). The 1-back and semantic tasks were designed to compete for task-generic and task-specific attentional resources, respectively. Using the "remember/know" procedure, memory for the study words was assessed after 15 min. In the control condition, subsequent memory effects associated with later recollection were identified in the left dorsal inferior frontal gyrus and in the left hippocampus. These effects were differentially attenuated in the two more difficult divided-attention conditions. The effects of divided attention seem, therefore, to reflect impairments due to limitations at both task-generic and task-specific levels. Additionally, each of the two more difficult divided-attention conditions was associated with subsequent memory effects in regions distinct from those showing effects in the control condition. These findings suggest the engagement of alternative encoding processes to those engaged in the control task. The overall pattern of findings suggests that divided attention can impact later memory in different ways, and accordingly, that different attentional resources, including task-generic and task-specific resources, make distinct contributions to successful episodic encoding.

  7. An fMRI study of semantic processing in men with schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Kubicki, M.; McCarley, R.W.; Nestor, P.G.; Huh, T.; Kikinis, R.; Shenton, M.E.; Wible, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    As a means toward understanding the neural bases of schizophrenic thought disturbance, we examined brain activation patterns in response to semantically and superficially encoded words in patients with schizophrenia. Nine male schizophrenic and 9 male control subjects were tested in a visual levels of processing (LOP) task first outside the magnet and then during the fMRI scanning procedures (using a different set of words). During the experiments visual words were presented under two conditi...

  8. Comparison of neurite density measured by MRI and histology after TBI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyang Wang

    Full Text Available Functional recovery after brain injury in animals is improved by marrow stromal cells (MSC which stimulate neurite reorganization. However, MRI measurement of neurite density changes after injury has not been performed. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of MRI measurement of neurite density in an animal model of traumatic brain injury (TBI with and without MSC treatment.Fifteen male Wistar rats, were treated with saline (n = 6 or MSCs (n = 9 and were sacrificed at 6 weeks after controlled cortical impact (CCI. Healthy non-CCI rats (n = 5, were also employed. Ex-vivo MRI scans were performed two days after the rats were sacrificed. Multiple-shell hybrid diffusion imaging encoding scheme and spherical harmonic expansion of a two-compartment water diffusion displacement model were used to extract neurite related parameters. Bielshowski and Luxol Fast blue was used for staining axons and myelin, respectively. Modified Morris water maze and neurological severity score (mNSS test were performed for functional evaluation. The treatment effects, the correlations between neurite densities measured by MRI and histology, and the correlations between MRI and functional variables were calculated by repeated measures analysis of variance, the regression correlation analysis tests, and spearman correlation coefficients.Neurite densities exhibited a significant correlation (R(2>0.80, p<1E-20 between MRI and immuno-histochemistry measurements with 95% lower bound of the intra-correlation coefficient (ICC as 0.86. The conventional fractional anisotropy (FA correlated moderately with histological neurite density (R(2 = 0.59, P<1E-5 with 95% lower bound of ICC as 0.76. MRI data revealed increased neurite reorganization with MSC treatment compared with saline treatment, confirmed by histological data from the same animals. mNSS were significantly correlated with MRI neurite density in the hippocampus region.The present studies

  9. Automated selection of brain regions for real-time fMRI brain-computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lührs, Michael; Sorger, Bettina; Goebel, Rainer; Esposito, Fabrizio

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) implemented with real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) use fMRI time-courses from predefined regions of interest (ROIs). To reach best performances, localizer experiments and on-site expert supervision are required for ROI definition. To automate this step, we developed two unsupervised computational techniques based on the general linear model (GLM) and independent component analysis (ICA) of rt-fMRI data, and compared their performances on a communication BCI. Approach. 3 T fMRI data of six volunteers were re-analyzed in simulated real-time. During a localizer run, participants performed three mental tasks following visual cues. During two communication runs, a letter-spelling display guided the subjects to freely encode letters by performing one of the mental tasks with a specific timing. GLM- and ICA-based procedures were used to decode each letter, respectively using compact ROIs and whole-brain distributed spatio-temporal patterns of fMRI activity, automatically defined from subject-specific or group-level maps. Main results. Letter-decoding performances were comparable to supervised methods. In combination with a similarity-based criterion, GLM- and ICA-based approaches successfully decoded more than 80% (average) of the letters. Subject-specific maps yielded optimal performances. Significance. Automated solutions for ROI selection may help accelerating the translation of rt-fMRI BCIs from research to clinical applications.

  10. Asymmetric synthesis using chiral-encoded metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yutthalekha, Thittaya; Wattanakit, Chularat; Lapeyre, Veronique; Nokbin, Somkiat; Warakulwit, Chompunuch; Limtrakul, Jumras; Kuhn, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of chiral compounds is of crucial importance in many areas of society and science, including medicine, biology, chemistry, biotechnology and agriculture. Thus, there is a fundamental interest in developing new approaches for the selective production of enantiomers. Here we report the use of mesoporous metal structures with encoded geometric chiral information for inducing asymmetry in the electrochemical synthesis of mandelic acid as a model molecule. The chiral-encoded mesoporous metal, obtained by the electrochemical reduction of platinum salts in the presence of a liquid crystal phase and the chiral template molecule, perfectly retains the chiral information after removal of the template. Starting from a prochiral compound we demonstrate enantiomeric excess of the (R)-enantiomer when using (R)-imprinted electrodes and vice versa for the (S)-imprinted ones. Moreover, changing the amount of chiral cavities in the material allows tuning the enantioselectivity.

  11. Simultaneous tumor and surrogate motion tracking with dynamic MRI for radiation therapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seyoun; Farah, Rana; Shea, Steven M.; Tryggestad, Erik; Hales, Russell; Lee, Junghoon

    2018-01-01

    Respiration-induced tumor motion is a major obstacle for achieving high-precision radiotherapy of cancers in the thoracic and abdominal regions. Surrogate-based estimation and tracking methods are commonly used in radiotherapy, but with limited understanding of quantified correlation to tumor motion. In this study, we propose a method to simultaneously track the lung tumor and external surrogates to evaluate their spatial correlation in a quantitative way using dynamic MRI, which allows real-time acquisition without ionizing radiation exposure. To capture the lung and whole tumor, four MRI-compatible fiducials are placed on the patient’s chest and upper abdomen. Two different types of acquisitions are performed in the sagittal orientation including multi-slice 2D cine MRIs to reconstruct 4D-MRI and two-slice 2D cine MRIs to simultaneously track the tumor and fiducials. A phase-binned 4D-MRI is first reconstructed from multi-slice MR images using body area as a respiratory surrogate and groupwise registration. The 4D-MRI provides 3D template volumes for different breathing phases. 3D tumor position is calculated by 3D-2D template matching in which 3D tumor templates in the 4D-MRI reconstruction and the 2D cine MRIs from the two-slice tracking dataset are registered. 3D trajectories of the external surrogates are derived via matching a 3D geometrical model of the fiducials to their segmentations on the 2D cine MRIs. We tested our method on ten lung cancer patients. Using a correlation analysis, the 3D tumor trajectory demonstrates a noticeable phase mismatch and significant cycle-to-cycle motion variation, while the external surrogate was not sensitive enough to capture such variations. Additionally, there was significant phase mismatch between surrogate signals obtained from the fiducials at different locations.

  12. Motivated encoding selectively promotes memory for future inconsequential semantically-related events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzún, Javiera P; Packard, Pau A; de Diego-Balaguer, Ruth; Fuentemilla, Lluis

    2016-09-01

    Neurobiological models of long-term memory explain how memory for inconsequential events fades, unless these happen before or after other relevant (i.e., rewarding or aversive) or novel events. Recently, it has been shown in humans that retrospective and prospective memories are selectively enhanced if semantically related events are paired with aversive stimuli. However, it remains unclear whether motivating stimuli, as opposed to aversive, have the same effect in humans. Here, participants performed a three phase incidental encoding task where one semantic category was rewarded during the second phase. A memory test 24h after, but not immediately after encoding, revealed that memory for inconsequential items was selectively enhanced only if items from the same category had been previously, but not subsequently, paired with rewards. This result suggests that prospective memory enhancement of reward-related information requires, like previously reported for aversive memories, of a period of memory consolidation. The current findings provide the first empirical evidence in humans that the effects of motivated encoding are selectively and prospectively prolonged over time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Note: An absolute X-Y-Θ position sensor using a two-dimensional phase-encoded binary scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Ahn; Kim, Jae Wan; Kang, Chu-Shik; Jin, Jonghan

    2018-04-01

    This Note presents a new absolute X-Y-Θ position sensor for measuring planar motion of a precision multi-axis stage system. By analyzing the rotated image of a two-dimensional phase-encoded binary scale (2D), the absolute 2D position values at two separated points were obtained and the absolute X-Y-Θ position could be calculated combining these values. The sensor head was constructed using a board-level camera, a light-emitting diode light source, an imaging lens, and a cube beam-splitter. To obtain the uniform intensity profiles from the vignette scale image, we selected the averaging directions deliberately, and higher resolution in the angle measurement could be achieved by increasing the allowable offset size. The performance of a prototype sensor was evaluated in respect of resolution, nonlinearity, and repeatability. The sensor could resolve 25 nm linear and 0.001° angular displacements clearly, and the standard deviations were less than 18 nm when 2D grid positions were measured repeatedly.

  14. Design of 10Gbps optical encoder/decoder structure for FE-OCDMA system using SOA and opto-VLSI processors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljada, Muhsen; Hwang, Seow; Alameh, Kamal

    2008-01-21

    In this paper we propose and experimentally demonstrate a reconfigurable 10Gbps frequency-encoded (1D) encoder/decoder structure for optical code division multiple access (OCDMA). The encoder is constructed using a single semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and 1D reflective Opto-VLSI processor. The SOA generates broadband amplified spontaneous emission that is dynamically sliced using digital phase holograms loaded onto the Opto-VLSI processor to generate 1D codewords. The selected wavelengths are injected back into the same SOA for amplifications. The decoder is constructed using single Opto-VLSI processor only. The encoded signal can successfully be retrieved at the decoder side only when the digital phase holograms of the encoder and the decoder are matched. The system performance is measured in terms of the auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions as well as the eye diagram.

  15. Led into temptation? Rewarding brand logos bias the neural encoding of incidental economic decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawski, Carsten; Harris, Philip G; Bode, Stefan; Domínguez D, Juan F; Egan, Gary F

    2012-01-01

    Human decision-making is driven by subjective values assigned to alternative choice options. These valuations are based on reward cues. It is unknown, however, whether complex reward cues, such as brand logos, may bias the neural encoding of subjective value in unrelated decisions. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we subliminally presented brand logos preceding intertemporal choices. We demonstrated that priming biased participants' preferences towards more immediate rewards in the subsequent temporal discounting task. This was associated with modulations of the neural encoding of subjective values of choice options in a network of brain regions, including but not restricted to medial prefrontal cortex. Our findings demonstrate the general susceptibility of the human decision making system to apparently incidental contextual information. We conclude that the brain incorporates seemingly unrelated value information that modifies decision making outside the decision-maker's awareness.

  16. Short-term effects of a standardized glucose load on region-specific aortic pulse wave velocity assessed by MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, J.T.; Tjeerdema, N.; Hensen, L.C.; Lamb, H.J.; Romijn, J.A.; Smit, J.W.; Westenberg, J.J.; Roos, A. de

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the short-term effects of a standardized oral glucose load on regional aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) using two-directional in-plane velocity encoded MRI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A randomized, controlled intervention was performed in 16 male subjects (mean +/- standard deviation:

  17. 4D ultrasound and 3D MRI registration of beating heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlambang, N.; Matsumiya, K.; Masamune, K.; Dohi, T.; Liao, H.; Tsukihara, H.; Takamoto, S.

    2007-01-01

    To realize intra-cardiac surgery without cardio-pulmonary bypass, a medical imaging technique with both high image quality and data acquisition rate that is fast enough to follow heart beat movements is required. In this research, we proposed a method that utilized the image quality of MRI and the speed of ultrasound. We developed a 4D image reconstruction method using image registration of 3D MRI and 4D ultrasound images. The registration method consists of rigid registration between 3D MRI and 3D ultrasound with the same heart beat phase, and non-rigid registration between 3D ultrasound images from different heart beat phases. Non-rigid registration was performed with B-spline based registration using variable spring model. In phantom experiment using balloon phantom, registration accuracy was less than 2 mm for total heart volume variation range of 10%. We applied our registration method on 3D MRI and 4D ultrasound images of a volunteer's beating heart data and confirmed through visual observation that heart beat pattern was well reproduced. (orig.)

  18. Cingulo-opercular activity affects incidental memory encoding for speech in noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaden, Kenneth I; Teubner-Rhodes, Susan; Ahlstrom, Jayne B; Dubno, Judy R; Eckert, Mark A

    2017-08-15

    Correctly understood speech in difficult listening conditions is often difficult to remember. A long-standing hypothesis for this observation is that the engagement of cognitive resources to aid speech understanding can limit resources available for memory encoding. This hypothesis is consistent with evidence that speech presented in difficult conditions typically elicits greater activity throughout cingulo-opercular regions of frontal cortex that are proposed to optimize task performance through adaptive control of behavior and tonic attention. However, successful memory encoding of items for delayed recognition memory tasks is consistently associated with increased cingulo-opercular activity when perceptual difficulty is minimized. The current study used a delayed recognition memory task to test competing predictions that memory encoding for words is enhanced or limited by the engagement of cingulo-opercular activity during challenging listening conditions. An fMRI experiment was conducted with twenty healthy adult participants who performed a word identification in noise task that was immediately followed by a delayed recognition memory task. Consistent with previous findings, word identification trials in the poorer signal-to-noise ratio condition were associated with increased cingulo-opercular activity and poorer recognition memory scores on average. However, cingulo-opercular activity decreased for correctly identified words in noise that were not recognized in the delayed memory test. These results suggest that memory encoding in difficult listening conditions is poorer when elevated cingulo-opercular activity is not sustained. Although increased attention to speech when presented in difficult conditions may detract from more active forms of memory maintenance (e.g., sub-vocal rehearsal), we conclude that task performance monitoring and/or elevated tonic attention supports incidental memory encoding in challenging listening conditions. Copyright © 2017

  19. Variation in supratentorial cerebrospinal fluid production rate in one day. Measurement by nontriggered phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroto; Tanaka, Hisashi; Fujita, Norihiko; Murase, Kenya; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2011-01-01

    Measuring the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production rate is important for understanding the physiology related to normal conditions and neurological disorders. Triggered phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to measure CSF production rate, but the use of nontriggered phase-contrast MRI has not been reported. The purposes of this study were to assess the feasibility of using nontriggered phase-contrast MRI to measure CSF flow and to determine whether CSF production exhibits circadian rhythm. The feasibility of phase-contrast MRI was assessed with a phantom simulated human cerebral aqueduct. CSF flow through the cerebral aqueduct was measured with nontriggered phase-contrast MRI four times during 1 day in 10 normal volunteers. In the phantom study, linear regression analysis gave the following measured values (ml/h): 0.80 x (value of steady flow)-10.0 for triggered phase-contrast MRI and 1.27 x (value of steady flow)-12.2 for nontriggered phase-contrast MRI. One-factor analysis of variance showed no significant effect of the time of the measurements (P=0.47). The supratentorial CSF production rate was 510±549 ml/day (mean ± SD). Nontriggered phase-contrast MRI provided good estimates of the flow rate in the phantom study. We observed no circadian rhythm in CSF production. (author)

  20. Bone scintigraphy compared to MRI and ultrasound in the early diagnosis of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandrock, D.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory arthritis is recognized specifically by bone erosions, caused by characteristic pannus tissue. In the finger joints dynamic low-Tesla MRI is nearly double but not completely sensitive in the detection of erosions than conventional radiography, sonography takes an intermediate position. Less specific signs of synovitis and tenosynovitis are shown with high sensitivity by both 3(2)-phase bone scintigraphy and ultrasound, MRI is less sensitive in this respect. However, standard situation of inflammation in bone scintigraphy - positive finding in early as well as late phase - is of surprisingly low sensitivity, any singular finding in the early or late phase has to be regarded as positive. Specificity of these singular findings is nevertheless sufficiently high, acute inflammatory joint changes and even erosions are also seen with MRI in obviously healthy persons. Only 2-phase bone scintigraphy is easily able to present a simultaneous survey of all joints of the body. For this reason 2-phase bone scintigraphy is most suitable for exclusion but also for primary diagnosis of disease, specification must be done afterwards by other imaging modalities or by laboratory findings. (orig.)

  1. Hippocampal-medial prefrontal circuit supports memory updating during learning and post-encoding rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Margaret L.; Preston, Alison R.

    2015-01-01

    Learning occurs in the context of existing memories. Encountering new information that relates to prior knowledge may trigger integration, whereby established memories are updated to incorporate new content. Here, we provide a critical test of recent theories suggesting hippocampal (HPC) and medial prefrontal (MPFC) involvement in integration, both during and immediately following encoding. Human participants with established memories for a set of initial (AB) associations underwent fMRI scanning during passive rest and encoding of new related (BC) and unrelated (XY) pairs. We show that HPC-MPFC functional coupling during learning was more predictive of trial-by-trial memory for associations related to prior knowledge relative to unrelated associations. Moreover, the degree to which HPC-MPFC functional coupling was enhanced following overlapping encoding was related to memory integration behavior across participants. We observed a dissociation between anterior and posterior MPFC, with integration signatures during post-encoding rest specifically in the posterior subregion. These results highlight the persistence of integration signatures into post-encoding periods, indicating continued processing of interrelated memories during rest. We also interrogated the coherence of white matter tracts to assess the hypothesis that integration behavior would be related to the integrity of the underlying anatomical pathways. Consistent with our predictions, more coherent HPC-MPFC white matter structure was associated with better performance across participants. This HPC-MPFC circuit also interacted with content-sensitive visual cortex during learning and rest, consistent with reinstatement of prior knowledge to enable updating. These results show that the HPC-MPFC circuit supports on- and offline integration of new content into memory. PMID:26608407

  2. Can a single-shot black-blood T2-weighted spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with sensitivity encoding replace the respiratory-triggered turbo spin-echo sequence for the liver? An optimization and feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shahid M; De Becker, Jan; Hop, Wim C J; Dwarkasing, Soendersing; Wielopolski, Piotr A

    2005-03-01

    To optimize and assess the feasibility of a single-shot black-blood T2-weighted spin-echo echo-planar imaging (SSBB-EPI) sequence for MRI of the liver using sensitivity encoding (SENSE), and compare the results with those obtained with a T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence. Six volunteers and 16 patients were scanned at 1.5T (Philips Intera). In the volunteer study, we optimized the SSBB-EPI sequence by interactively changing the parameters (i.e., the resolution, echo time (TE), diffusion weighting with low b-values, and polarity of the phase-encoding gradient) with regard to distortion, suppression of the blood signal, and sensitivity to motion. The influence of each change was assessed. The optimized SSBB-EPI sequence was applied in patients (N = 16). A number of items, including the overall image quality (on a scale of 1-5), were used for graded evaluation. In addition, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the liver was calculated. Statistical analysis was carried out with the use of Wilcoxon's signed rank test for comparison of the SSBB-EPI and TSE sequences, with P = 0.05 considered the limit for significance. The SSBB-EPI sequence was improved by the following steps: 1) less frequency points than phase-encoding steps, 2) a b-factor of 20, and 3) a reversed polarity of the phase-encoding gradient. In patients, the mean overall image quality score for the optimized SSBB-EPI (3.5 (range: 1-4)) and TSE (3.6 (range: 3-4)), and the SNR of the liver on SSBB-EPI (mean +/- SD = 7.6 +/- 4.0) and TSE (8.9 +/- 4.6) were not significantly different (P > .05). Optimized SSBB-EPI with SENSE proved to be feasible in patients, and the overall image quality and SNR of the liver were comparable to those achieved with the standard respiratory-triggered T2-weighted TSE sequence. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Distinctiveness and encoding effects in online sentence comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip eHofmeister

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In explicit memory recall and recognition tasks, elaboration and contextual isolation both facilitate memory performance. Here, we investigate these effects in the context of sentence processing: targets for retrieval during online sentence processing of English object relative clause constructions differ in the amount of elaboration associated with the target noun phrase, or the homogeneity of superficial features (text color. Experiment 1 shows that greater elaboration for targets during the encoding phase reduces reading times at retrieval sites, but elaboration of non-targets has considerably weaker effects. Experiment 2 illustrates that processing isolated superficial features of target noun phrases --- here, a green word in a sentence with words colored white --- does not lead to enhanced memory performance, despite triggering longer encoding times. These results are interpreted in the light of the memory models of Nairne 1990, 2001, 2006, which state that encoding remnants contribute to the set of retrieval cues that provide the basis for similarity-based interference effects.

  4. Trends in magnetic resonance imaging. Technical trends in MRI, noise reduction and fast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    At MRI examination, patients suffer the machine noise and long tight lying as well as an oppressive feeling. This paper describes the technological efforts against the former two. The noise is generated from the force (thumb-ward) to vibrate the magnetic field gradient coil according to the left-hand rule. Authors have developed a MRI machine (Pianissimo) where the coil is placed in vacuum and its actual noise level is found reduced from 105 - 112 to 84 dB(A) at 1.5T. Fast imaging to shorten the imaging time is attained by combination of parallel imaging where MR signals are into multiple high frequency receiver coils, and the usual pulse sequence imaging, which results in the increased encoding in a given time. Together with these, MR angiography and diffusion weighted imaging of abdomen for cancer examination are becoming popular as an additional MRI diagnosis, also acceptable to patients. Future progress of MRI machines conceivably accompanies the unavoidable noise increase and possibly significant magnetic effects on human body, and efforts for their reduction will be continued at patients' viewpoint. (T.I.)

  5. Differential roles for medial prefrontal and medial temporal cortices in schema-dependent encoding: From congruent to incongruent

    OpenAIRE

    Kesteren, M.T.R. van; Beul, S.F.; Takashima, A.; Henson, R.N.; Ruiter, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Information that is congruent with prior knowledge is generally remembered better than incongruent information. This effect of congruency on memory has been attributed to a facilitatory influence of activated schemas on memory encoding and consolidation processes, and hypothesised to reflect a shift between processing in medial temporal lobes (MTL) towards processing in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). To investigate this shift, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare ...

  6. MRI in local staging of rectal cancer: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapan, Ümit; Özbayrak, Mustafa; Tatlı, Servet

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative imaging for staging of rectal cancer has become an important aspect of current approach to rectal cancer management, because it helps to select suitable patients for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and determine the appropriate surgical technique. Imaging modalities such as endoscopic ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play an important role in assessing the depth of tumor penetration, lymph node involvement, mesorectal fascia and anal sphincter invasion, and presence of distant metastatic diseases. Currently, there is no consensus on a preferred imaging technique for preoperative staging of rectal cancer. However, high-resolution phased-array MRI is recommended as a standard imaging modality for preoperative local staging of rectal cancer, with excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability, and absence of ionizing radiation. This review will mainly focus on the role of MRI in preoperative local staging of rectal cancer and discuss recent advancements in MRI technique such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. PMID:25010367

  7. Pre-clinical testing of a phased array ultrasound system for MRI-guided noninvasive surgery of the brain--a primate study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynynen, Kullervo; McDannold, Nathan; Clement, Greg; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Zadicario, Eyal; Killiany, Ron; Moore, Tara; Rosen, Douglas

    2006-08-01

    MRI-guided and monitored focused ultrasound thermal surgery of brain through intact skull was tested in three rhesus monkeys. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of skull heating in an animal model with a head shape similar to that of a human. The ultrasound beam was generated by a 512 channel phased array system (Exablate 3000, InSightec, Haifa, Israel) that was integrated within a 1.5-T MR-scanner. The skin was pre-cooled by degassed temperature controlled water circulating between the array surface and the skin. Skull surface temperature was measured with invasive thermocouple probes. The results showed that by applying surface cooling the skin and skull surface can be protected, and that the brain surface temperature becomes the limiting factor. The MRI thermometry was shown to be useful in detecting the tissue temperature distribution next to the bone, and it should be used to monitor the brain surface temperature. The acoustic intensity values during the 20 s sonications were adequate for thermal ablation in the human brain provided that surface cooling is used.

  8. MRI findings of multiple focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xin; Yu Qingtai; Jing Yu; Wang Haiyi; Pan Jingjing; Duan Weidong; Wang Dianjun; Ye Huiyi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic value of MRI on multiple focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) of the liver. Methods: MR images of 9 cases with pathological-confirmed multiple FNH were retrospectively analyzed. MRI features of the lesions were correlated with pathological findings. Results: Multiple FNH was considered in all these 9 cases. Among them, the primary diagnosis was FNH in 5, hepatic adenoma in 3 and fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma in 1 case. A total of 31 lesions were detected in the 9 cases. On T 2 WI, 19 lesions presented slightly high-signal intensity, and the other 12 presented iso-signal intensity. On T 1 WI, 12 lesions presented slightly low-signal intensity, 7 presented iso-signal intensity, and the other 12 presented high-signal intensity. On opposed-phase, the signal intensity of 1 lesion dropped unevenly. After bolus injection of contrast agent Gd-DTPA, in hepatic arterial phase 18 lesions showed mild to marked heterogeneous enhancement, 11 showed marked homogeneous enhancement, 1 showed moderate ring-like enhancement, and the last one did not have obvious enhancement. In portal venous and delayed phase, all the lesions turned to iso- or slightly high-signal intensity gradually. Sixteen of 31 lesions presented central scar, which demonstrated mild star-like enhancement in delayed phase. Conclusion: Multiple FNH presented certain MRI features, which contributed to the preoperative diagnosis. (authors)

  9. MRI for therapy planning in patients with atrial septum defects; MRT zur Therapieplanung bei Patienten mit Vorhofseptumdefekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, A.; Rummeny, E. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Prompona, M.; Reiser, M.; Theisen, D. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Kozlik-Feldmann, R. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Kinderkardiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Muehling, O. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Medizinische Klinik I, Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the value of a combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol including steady-state free precession (SSFP) imaging, phase-contrast measurements and contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) for presurgical or preinterventional diagnostic imaging in patients with suspected atrial septum defects. Out of 65 MRI studies of patients with suspected atrial septum defects, 56 patients were included in the study. The atrial septum defects were identified on cine images. Velocity encoded flow measurements were used to determine shunt volumes, which were compared with invasive oxymetry in 24 patients. Contrast-enhanced MRI was used to assess the thoracic vessels in order to detect vascular anomalies. The findings were compared with the intraoperative results. A total of 24 patients with high shunt volumes were treated either surgically (16 patients) or interventionally (8 patients) and 32 patients with low shunt volumes did not require surgical or interventional treatment. The vascular anomaly, which in all cases was anomalous pulmonary venous return, was confirmed by the intraoperative findings. The type and location of atrial septal defects which required treatment, were confirmed intraoperatively or during the intervention. The results of shunt quantification by MRI showed a good correlation with the results of invasive oximetry (r=0.91, p <0.0001). A combined MRI protocol including cine SSFP images, velocity-encoded flow measurements and CE-MRA is an accurate method for preoperative and preinterventional evaluation of atrial septum defects. (orig.) [German] Ziel war es, die Wertigkeit eines kombinierten MRT-Protokolls aus Funktionsuntersuchung, Flussmessung und MR-Angiographie zur praeoperativen oder -interventionellen Abklaerung bei Patienten mit Vorhofseptumdefekt zu evaluieren. Ingesamt wurden 56 Patienten mit Vorhofseptumdefekt aus einem Kollektiv von 65 Patienten mit Verdacht auf Vorhofseptumdefekt, die im MRT untersucht

  10. Facilitation of memory encoding in primate hippocampus by a neuroprosthesis that promotes task-specific neural firing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Robert E.; Song, Dong; Opris, Ioan; Santos, Lucas M.; Shin, Dae C.; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.; Berger, Theodore W.; Deadwyler, Sam A.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Memory accuracy is a major problem in human disease and is the primary factor that defines Alzheimer’s, ageing and dementia resulting from impaired hippocampal function in the medial temporal lobe. Development of a hippocampal memory neuroprosthesis that facilitates normal memory encoding in nonhuman primates (NHPs) could provide the basis for improving memory in human disease states. Approach. NHPs trained to perform a short-term delayed match-to-sample (DMS) memory task were examined with multi-neuron recordings from synaptically connected hippocampal cell fields, CA1 and CA3. Recordings were analyzed utilizing a previously developed nonlinear multi-input multi-output (MIMO) neuroprosthetic model, capable of extracting CA3-to-CA1 spatiotemporal firing patterns during DMS performance. Main results. The MIMO model verified that specific CA3-to-CA1 firing patterns were critical for the successful encoding of sample phase information on more difficult DMS trials. This was validated by the delivery of successful MIMO-derived encoding patterns via electrical stimulation to the same CA1 recording locations during the sample phase which facilitated task performance in the subsequent, delayed match phase, on difficult trials that required more precise encoding of sample information. Significance. These findings provide the first successful application of a neuroprosthesis designed to enhance and/or repair memory encoding in primate brain.

  11. Phase-contrast cerebrospinal fluid flow magnetic resonance imaging in qualitative evaluation of patency of CSF flow pathways prior to infusion of chemotherapeutic and other agents into the fourth ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajan P; Sitton, Clark W; Ketonen, Leena M; Hou, Ping; Johnson, Jason M; Romo, Seferino; Fletcher, Stephen; Shah, Manish N; Kerr, Marcia; Zaky, Wafik; Rytting, Michael E; Khatua, Soumen; Sandberg, David I

    2018-03-01

    Nuclear medicine studies have previously been utilized to assess for blockage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow prior to intraventricular chemotherapy infusions. To assess CSF flow without nuclear medicine studies, we obtained cine phase-contrast MRI sequences that assess CSF flow from the fourth ventricle down to the sacrum. In three clinical trials, 18 patients with recurrent malignant posterior fossa tumors underwent implantation of a ventricular access device (VAD) into the fourth ventricle, either with or without simultaneous tumor resection. Prior to infusing therapeutic agents into the VAD, cine MRI phase-contrast CSF flow sequences of the brain and total spine were performed. Velocity encoding (VENC) of 5 and 10 cm/s was used to confirm CSF flow from the fourth ventricular outlets to the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine. Qualitative CSF flow was characterized by neuroradiologists as present or absent. All 18 patients demonstrated CSF flow from the outlets of the fourth ventricle down to the sacrum with no evidence of obstruction. One of these patients, after disease progression, subsequently showed obstruction of CSF flow. No patient required a nuclear medicine study to assess CSF flow prior to initiation of infusions. Fourteen patients have received infusions to date, and none has had neurological toxicity. CSF flow including the fourth ventricle and the total spine can be assessed noninvasively with phase-contrast MRI sequences. Advantages over nuclear medicine studies include avoiding both an invasive procedure and radiation exposure.

  12. Cerebral hemodynamic changes measured by gradient-echo or spin-echo bolus tracking and its correlation to changes in ICA blood flow measured by phase-mapping MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marstrand, J.R.; Rostrup, Egill; Garde, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) induced by Acetazolamide (ACZ) were measured using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) with both spin echo (SE) EPI and gradient echo (GE) EPI, and related to changes in internal carotid artery (ICA) flow measured by phase-mapping. Also examined...... increase in CBF and CBV in response to ACZ, while SE-EPI measured a significant increase in CBV and MTT. CBV and MTT change measured by SE-EPI was sensitive to previous bolus injections. There was a significant linear relation between change in CBF measured by GE-EPI and change in ICA flow. In conclusion......, GE-EPI under the present condition was superior to SE-EPI in monitoring cerebral vascular changes...

  13. Least-squares reverse time migration of marine data with frequency-selection encoding

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2013-08-20

    The phase-encoding technique can sometimes increase the efficiency of the least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) by more than one order of magnitude. However, traditional random encoding functions require all the encoded shots to share the same receiver locations, thus limiting the usage to seismic surveys with a fixed spread geometry. We implement a frequency-selection encoding strategy that accommodates data with a marine streamer geometry. The encoding functions are delta functions in the frequency domain, so that all the en- coded shots have unique non-overlapping frequency content, and the receivers can distinguish the wavefield from each shot with a unique frequency band. Since the encoding functions are orthogonal to each other, there will be no crosstalk between different shots during modeling and migration. With the frequency-selection encoding method, the computational efficiency of LSRTM is increased so that its cost is compara- ble to conventional RTM for both the Marmousi2 model and a marine data set recorded in the Gulf of Mexico. With more iterations, the LSRTM image quality is further improved. We conclude that LSRTM with frequency-selection is an efficient migration method that can sometimes produce more focused images than conventional RTM.

  14. Least-squares reverse time migration of marine data with frequency-selection encoding

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wei

    2013-06-24

    The phase-encoding technique can sometimes increase the efficiency of the least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) by more than one order of magnitude. However, traditional random encoding functions require all the encoded shots to share the same receiver locations, thus limiting the usage to seismic surveys with a fixed spread geometry. We implement a frequency-selection encoding strategy that accommodates data with a marine streamer geometry. The encoding functions are delta functions in the frequency domain, so that all the encoded shots have unique nonoverlapping frequency content, and the receivers can distinguish the wavefield from each shot with a unique frequency band. Because the encoding functions are orthogonal to each other, there will be no crosstalk between different shots during modeling and migration. With the frequency-selection encoding method, the computational efficiency of LSRTM is increased so that its cost is comparable to conventional RTM for the Marmousi2 model and a marine data set recorded in the Gulf of Mexico. With more iterations, the LSRTM image quality is further improved by suppressing migration artifacts, balancing reflector amplitudes, and enhancing the spatial resolution. We conclude that LSRTM with frequency-selection is an efficient migration method that can sometimes produce more focused images than conventional RTM. © 2013 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  15. A case of Marchiafava-Bignami disease: MRI findings on spin-echo and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Ashikaga, Ryuichiro; Araki, Yutaka; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2000-01-01

    Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD) was diagnosed in a 56-year-old man. Spin-echo (SE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the acute phase showed normal signal areas in the central layer of the corpus callosum (CC), although the intensity of these areas revealed abnormal hyperintensity on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). On follow-up SE MRI at the late phase, the central layer of the CC showed fluid-like intensity. On FLAIR MRI, the lesions of the CC turned into hypointense cores surrounded by hyperintense rims indicating central necrosis and peripheral demyelination. Degenerative changes of the CC in MBD were clearly demonstrated by FLAIR MRI

  16. Staying cool when things get hot: Emotion regulation modulates neural mechanisms of memory encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmeet P Hayes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available During times of emotional stress, individuals often engage in emotion regulation to reduce the experiential and physiological impact of negative emotions. Interestingly, emotion regulation strategies also influence memory encoding of the event. Cognitive reappraisal is associated with enhanced memory while expressive suppression is associated with impaired explicit memory of the emotional event. However, the mechanism by which these emotion regulation strategies affect memory is unclear. We used event-related fMRI to investigate the neural mechanisms that give rise to memory formation during emotion regulation. Twenty-five participants viewed negative pictures while alternately engaging in cognitive reappraisal, expressive suppression, or passive viewing. As part of the subsequent memory design, participants returned to the laboratory two weeks later for a surprise memory test. Behavioral results showed a reduction in negative affect and a retention advantage for reappraised stimuli relative to the other conditions. Imaging results showed that successful encoding during reappraisal was uniquely associated with greater co-activation of the left inferior frontal gyrus, amygdala and hippocampus, suggesting a possible role for elaborative encoding of negative memories. This study provides neurobehavioral evidence that engaging in cognitive reappraisal is advantageous to both affective and mnemonic processes.

  17. Segregated encoding of reward-identity and stimulus-reward associations in human orbitofrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Flügge, Miriam Cornelia; Barron, Helen Catharine; Brodersen, Kay Henning; Dolan, Raymond J; Behrens, Timothy Edward John

    2013-02-13

    A dominant focus in studies of learning and decision-making is the neural coding of scalar reward value. This emphasis ignores the fact that choices are strongly shaped by a rich representation of potential rewards. Here, using fMRI adaptation, we demonstrate that responses in the human orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) encode a representation of the specific type of food reward predicted by a visual cue. By controlling for value across rewards and by linking each reward with two distinct stimuli, we could test for representations of reward-identity that were independent of associative information. Our results show reward-identity representations in a medial-caudal region of OFC, independent of the associated predictive stimulus. This contrasts with a more rostro-lateral OFC region encoding reward-identity representations tied to the predicate stimulus. This demonstration of adaptation in OFC to reward specific representations opens an avenue for investigation of more complex decision mechanisms that are not immediately accessible in standard analyses, which focus on correlates of average activity.

  18. DS-OCDMA Encoder/Decoder Performance Analysis Using Optical Low-Coherence Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fsaifes, Ihsan; Lepers, Catherine; Obaton, Anne-Francoise; Gallion, Philippe

    2006-08-01

    Direct-sequence optical code-division multiple-access (DS-OCDMA) encoder/decoder based on sampled fiber Bragg gratings (S-FBGs) is characterized using phase-sensitive optical low-coherence reflectometry (OLCR). The OLCR technique allows localized measurements of FBG wavelength and physical length inside one S-FBG. This paper shows how the discrepancies between specifications and measurements of the different FBGs have some impact on spectral and temporal pulse responses of the OCDMA encoder/decoder. The FBG physical lengths lower than the specified ones are shown to affect the mean optical power reflected by the OCDMA encoder/decoder. The FBG wavelengths that are detuned from each other induce some modulations of S-FBG reflectivity resulting in encoder/decoder sensitivity to laser wavelength drift of the OCDMA system. Finally, highlighted by this OLCR study, some solutions to overcome limitations in performance with the S-FBG technology are suggested.

  19. Actual imaging time in fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, Peter C.; Prayer, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Safety issues in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important, especially in fetal MRI. However, since basic data with respect of the effective exposure time in fetal MRI are not available, this study aimed to determine the actual imaging time during a fetal MRI study. Methods: 100 fetal MRI studies of singleton pregnancies performed on a 1.5 T system were analysed with respect to study duration (from starting the survey scan until the end of study), the number of sequences acquired, and the actual imaging time, which was calculated by adding up scan time of each sequence. Furthermore, each sequence type was analysed regarding the number of acquisitions, specific absorption rates (SAR), and duration. Results: Mean study duration was 34.6 min (range: 14–58 min; standard deviation (SD): 9.7 min), the average number of sequences acquired was 26.6 (range: 11–44, SD: 6.6). Actual scan time averaged 11.4 min (range: 4–19 min, SD: 4.0 min). Ultrafast T2-weighted and steady-state free-precession sequences accounted for 62.3% of actual scan time, and were distributed over the whole duration of the study. Conclusion: Actual imaging time only accounts for 33% of total study time and is not continuous. The remaining time is consumed by the preparation phases of the scanner, and is spent with planning sequences and the eventual repositioning of the coil and/or pregnant woman. These data may help to more accurately estimate the exposure to radiofrequency deposition and noise during fetal MRI studies.

  20. Effects of pointing compared with naming and observing during encoding on item and source memory in young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwehand, Kim; van Gog, Tamara; Paas, Fred

    2016-10-01

    Research showed that source memory functioning declines with ageing. Evidence suggests that encoding visual stimuli with manual pointing in addition to visual observation can have a positive effect on spatial memory compared with visual observation only. The present study investigated whether pointing at picture locations during encoding would lead to better spatial source memory than naming (Experiment 1) and visual observation only (Experiment 2) in young and older adults. Experiment 3 investigated whether response modality during the test phase would influence spatial source memory performance. Experiments 1 and 2 supported the hypothesis that pointing during encoding led to better source memory for picture locations than naming or observation only. Young adults outperformed older adults on the source memory but not the item memory task in both Experiments 1 and 2. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants manually responded in the test phase. Experiment 3 showed that if participants had to verbally respond in the test phase, the positive effect of pointing compared with naming during encoding disappeared. The results suggest that pointing at picture locations during encoding can enhance spatial source memory in both young and older adults, but only if the response modality is congruent in the test phase.

  1. Values of kinetic features measured by computer-aided for breast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lina; Zhao Zuowei; Song Qingwei; Wang Shaowu; Miao Yanwei

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of kinetic features measured by computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) for breast MRI. Methods: One hundred and sixty four lesions diagnosed pathologically by operation or biopsy comprised the analysis set. Automated lesion kinetic information from CADStream programs for breast MRI was identified. Three CAD variables were compared for benign and malignant lesions: initial phase peak enhancement (greatest percentage of signal intensity increase on first contrast enhanced sequence), delayed phase enhancement categorized by a single type of kinetics comprising the largest percentage of enhancement (washout, plateau, or persistent), and delayed phase enhancement categorized by single most suspicious type of kinetics (any washout > any plateau > any persistent). Morphological characteristics of breast lesions were described according to breast imaging and reporting data system (BI-RADS). Initial phase peak enhancement mean values between benign and malignant breast lesions were compared by using Wilcoxon rank-sum test, delayed phase enhancement categorized by a single type of kinetics comprising the largest percentage of enhancement or by single most suspicious type of kinetics between benign and malignant breast lesions were compared by using Chi-square test. Results: There were 72 benign and 92 malignant breast lesions. A total of 123 (75.0%) mass lesions were identified,and the other 41 (25.0%) lesions showed no mass. Thirty lesions were BI-RADS-MRI 2, 68 lesions were BI-RADS-MRI 3, 43 lesions were BI-RADS-MRI 4, 23 lesions were BI-RADS-MRI 5. Initial phase peak enhancement mean values of benign and malignant lesions were 237% (69% to 629%) and 336% (86% to 793%), respectively. There was no significant difference between benign and malignant lesions in initial peak enhancement mean value (Z=-1.626, P=0.104). Delayed phase enhancement categorized by single most suspicious type of kinetics (any washout > any plateau > any persistent) for

  2. Sodium-23 MRI of whole spine at 3 Tesla using a 5-channel receive-only phased-array and a whole-body transmit resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malzacher, Matthias; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Haneder, Stefan [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; University Hospital of Cologne, Koeln (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2016-05-01

    Sodium magnetic resonance imaging ({sup 23}Na MRI) is a unique and non-invasive imaging technique which provides important information on cellular level about the tissue of the human body. Several applications for {sup 23}Na MRI were investigated with regard to the examination of the tissue viability and functionality for example in the brain, the heart or the breast. The {sup 23}Na MRI technique can also be integrated as a potential monitoring instrument after radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The main contribution in this work was the adaptation of {sup 23}Na MRI for spine imaging, which can provide essential information on the integrity of the intervertebral disks with respect to the early detection of disk degeneration. In this work, a transmit-only receive-only dual resonator system was designed and developed to cover the whole human spine using {sup 23}Na MRI and increase the receive sensitivity. The resonator system consisted of an already presented {sup 23}Na whole-body resonator and a newly developed 5-channel receive-only phased-array. The resonator system was first validated using bench top and phantom measurements. A threefold SNR improvement at the depth of the spine (∝7 cm) over the whole-body resonator was achieved using the spine array. {sup 23}Na MR measurements of the human spine using the transmit-only receive-only resonator system were performed on a healthy volunteer within an acquisition time of 10 minutes. A density adapted 3D radial sequence was chosen with 6 mm isotropic resolution, 49 ms repetition time and a short echo time of 540 μs. Furthermore, it was possible to quantify the tissue sodium concentration in the intervertebral discs in the lumbar region (120 ms repetition time) using this setup.

  3. Dynamic MRI study for breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Tsuneaki

    1990-01-01

    Application of MRI for diagnosis of breast tumors was retrospectively examined in 103 consecutive cases. Contrast enhancement, mostly by dynamic study, was performed in 83 cases using Gd-DTPA and 0.5 T superconductive apparatus. Results were compared to those of mammography and sonography. On dynamic study, carcinoma showed abrupt rise of signal intensity with clear-cut peak formation in early phase, while benign fibroadenoma showed slow rise of signal intensity and prolonged enhancement without peak formation. In 12 of 33 carcinomas (33%), peripheral ring enhancement was noted reflecting vascular stroma of histologic sections. All fibroadenomas showed homogenous enhancement without peripheral ring. In MRI, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 86%, 96%, 91%. In mammography 82%, 95%, 87% and in ultrasonography 91%, 95%, 93%. Although MRI should not be regarded as routine diagnostic procedure because of expense and limited availability, it may afford useful additional information when standard mammographic findings are not conclusive. (author)

  4. Led into temptation? Rewarding brand logos bias the neural encoding of incidental economic decisions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Murawski

    Full Text Available Human decision-making is driven by subjective values assigned to alternative choice options. These valuations are based on reward cues. It is unknown, however, whether complex reward cues, such as brand logos, may bias the neural encoding of subjective value in unrelated decisions. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study, we subliminally presented brand logos preceding intertemporal choices. We demonstrated that priming biased participants' preferences towards more immediate rewards in the subsequent temporal discounting task. This was associated with modulations of the neural encoding of subjective values of choice options in a network of brain regions, including but not restricted to medial prefrontal cortex. Our findings demonstrate the general susceptibility of the human decision making system to apparently incidental contextual information. We conclude that the brain incorporates seemingly unrelated value information that modifies decision making outside the decision-maker's awareness.

  5. Differentiation of osteoporotic and neoplastic vertebral fractures by chemical shift {in-phase and out-of phase} MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragab, Yasser; Emad, Yasser; Gheita, Tamer; Mansour, Maged; Abou-Zeid, A.; Ferrari, Serge; Rasker, Johannes J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to establish the cut-off value of the signal intensity drop on chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with appropriate sensitivity and specificity to differentiate osteoporotic from neoplastic wedging of the spine. Patients and methods: All patients with wedging of vertebral bodies were included consecutively between February 2006 and January 2007. A chemical shift MRI was performed and signal intensity after (in-phase and out-phase) images were obtained. A DXA was performed in all. Results: A total of 40 patients were included, 20 with osteoporotic wedging (group 1) and 20 neoplastic (group 2). They were 21 males and 19 females. Acute vertebral collapse was observed in 15 patients in group 1 and subacute collapse in another 5 patients, while in group 2, 11 patients showed acute collapse and 9 patients (45%) showed subacute vertebral collapse. On the chemical shift MRI a substantial reduction in signal intensity was found in all lesions in both groups. The proportional changes observed in signal intensity of bone marrow lesions on in-phase compared with out-of-phase images showed significant differences in both groups (P < 0.05). At a cut-off value of 35%, the observed sensitivity of out-of-phase images was 95%, specificity was 100%, positive predictive value was 100% and negative predictive value was 95.2%. Conclusion: A chemical shift MRI is useful in order to differentiate patients with vertebral collapse due to underlying osteoporosis or neoplastic process.

  6. Quantitative Assessment of Degenerative Cartilage and Subchondral Bony Lesions in a Preserved Cadaveric Knee: Propagation-Based Phase-Contrast CT Versus Conventional MRI and CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geith, Tobias; Brun, Emmanuel; Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergei; Weber, Loriane; Adam-Neumair, Silvia; Bravin, Alberto; Reiser, Maximilian; Coan, Paola; Horng, Annie

    2018-04-09

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess hyaline cartilage and subchondral bone conditions in a fully preserved cadaveric human knee joint using high-resolution x-ray propagation-based phase-contrast imaging (PBI) CT and to compare the performance of the new technique with conventional CT and MRI. A cadaveric human knee was examined using an x-ray beam of 60 keV, a detector with a 90-mm 2 FOV, and a pixel size of 46 × 46 μm 2 . PBI CT images were reconstructed with both the filtered back projection algorithm and the equally sloped tomography method. Conventional 3-T MRI and CT were also performed. Measurements of cartilage thickness, cartilage lesions, International Cartilage Repair Society scoring, and detection of subchondral bone changes were evaluated. Visual inspection of the specimen akin to arthroscopy was conducted and served as a standard of reference for lesion detection. Loss of cartilage height was visible on PBI CT and MRI. Quantification of cartilage thickness showed a strong correlation between the two modalities. Cartilage lesions appeared darker than the adjacent cartilage on PBI CT. PBI CT showed similar agreement to MRI for depicting cartilage substance defects or lesions compared with the visual inspection. The assessment of subchondral bone cysts showed moderate to strong agreement between PBI CT and CT. In contrast to the standard clinical methods of MRI and CT, PBI CT is able to simultaneously depict cartilage and bony changes at high resolution. Though still an experimental technique, PBI CT is a promising high-resolution imaging method to evaluate comprehensive changes of osteoarthritic disease in a clinical setting.

  7. Respiratory motion-resolved, self-gated 4D-MRI using Rotating Cartesian K-space (ROCK): Initial clinical experience on an MRI-guided radiotherapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fei; Zhou, Ziwu; Du, Dongsu; Gao, Yu; Rashid, Shams; Cao, Minsong; Shaverdian, Narek; Hegde, John V; Steinberg, Michael; Lee, Percy; Raldow, Ann; Low, Daniel A; Sheng, Ke; Yang, Yingli; Hu, Peng

    2018-06-01

    To optimize and evaluate the respiratory motion-resolved, self-gated 4D-MRI using Rotating Cartesian K-space (ROCK-4D-MRI) method in a 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRgRT) system. The study included seven patients with abdominal tumors treated on the MRgRT system. ROCK-4D-MRI and 2D-CINE, was performed immediately after one of the treatment fractions. Motion quantification based on 4D-MRI was compared with those based on 2D-CINE. The image quality of 4D-MRI was evaluated against 4D-CT. The gross tumor volumes (GTV) were defined based on individual respiratory phases of both 4D-MRI and 4D-CT and compared for their variability over the respiratory cycle. The motion measurements based on 4D-MRI matched well with 2D-CINE, with differences of 1.04 ± 0.52 mm in the superior-inferior and 0.54 ± 0.21 mm in the anterior-posterior directions. The image quality scores of 4D-MRI were significantly higher than 4D-CT, with better tumor contrast (3.29 ± 0.76 vs. 1.86 ± 0.90) and less motion artifacts (3.57 ± 0.53 vs. 2.29 ± 0.95). The GTVs were more consistent in 4D-MRI than in 4D-CT, with significantly smaller GTV variability (9.31 ± 4.58% vs. 34.27 ± 23.33%). Our study demonstrated the clinical feasibility of using the ROCK-4D-MRI to acquire high quality, respiratory motion-resolved 4D-MRI in a low-field MRgRT system. The 4D-MRI image could provide accurate dynamic information for radiotherapy treatment planning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Complete Fourier Direct Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CFD-MRI for Diffusion MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alpay eÖzcan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The foundation for an accurate and unifying Fourier based theory of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI is constructed by carefully re-examining the first principles of DW-MRI signal formation and deriving its mathematical model from scratch. The derivations are specifically obtained for DW-MRI signal by including all of its elements (e.g., imaging gradients using complex values. Particle methods are utilized in contrast to conventional partial differential equations approach. The signal is shown to be the Fourier transform of the joint distribution of number of the magnetic moments (at a given location at the initial time and magnetic moment displacement integrals. In effect, the k-space is augmented by three more dimensions, corresponding to the frequency variables dual to displacement integral vectors. The joint distribution function is recovered by applying the Fourier transform to the complete high-dimensional data set. In the process, to obtain a physically meaningful real valued distribution function, phase corrections are applied for the re-establishment of Hermitian symmetry in the signal. Consequently, the method is fully unconstrained and directly presents the distribution of displacement integrals without any assumptions such as symmetry or Markovian property. The joint distribution function is visualized with isosurfaces, which describe the displacement integrals, overlaid on the distribution map of the number of magnetic moments with low mobility. The model provides an accurate description of the molecular motion measurements via DW-MRI. The improvement of the characterization of tissue microstructure leads to a better localization, detection and assessment of biological properties such as white matter integrity. The results are demonstrated on the experimental data obtained from an ex-vivo baboon brain.

  9. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  10. Improvement of encoding and retrieval in normal and pathological aging with word-picture paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iodice, Rosario; Meilán, Juan José G; Carro, Juan

    2015-01-01

    During the aging process, there is a progressive deficit in the encoding of new information and its retrieval. Different strategies are used in order to maintain, optimize or diminish these deficits in people with and without dementia. One of the classic techniques is paired-associate learning (PAL), which is based on improving the encoding of memories, but it has yet to be used to its full potential in people with dementia. In this study, our aim is to corroborate the importance of PAL tasks as instrumental tools for creating contextual cues, during both the encoding and retrieval phases of memory. Additionally, we aim to identify the most effective form of presenting the related items. Pairs of stimuli were shown to healthy elderly people and to patients with moderate and mild Alzheimer's disease. The encoding conditions were as follows: word/word, picture/picture, picture/word, and word/picture. Associative cued recall of the second item in the pair shows that retrieval is higher for the word/picture condition in the two groups of patients with dementia when compared to the other conditions, while word/word is the least effective in all cases. These results confirm that PAL is an effective tool for creating contextual cues during both the encoding and retrieval phases in people with dementia when the items are presented using the word/picture condition. In this way, the encoding and retrieval deficit can be reduced in these people.

  11. Physical exercise during encoding improves vocabulary learning in young female adults: a neuroendocrinological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Deusser, Marie; Thiel, Christian; Otterbein, Sascha; Montag, Christian; Reuter, Martin; Banzer, Winfried; Kaiser, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Acute physical activity has been repeatedly shown to improve various cognitive functions. However, there have been no investigations comparing the effects of exercise during verbal encoding versus exercise prior to encoding on long-term memory performance. In this current psychoneuroendocrinological study we aim to test whether light to moderate ergometric bicycling during vocabulary encoding enhances subsequent recall compared to encoding during physical rest and encoding after being physically active. Furthermore, we examined the kinetics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in serum which has been previously shown to correlate with learning performance. We also controlled for the BDNF val66met polymorphism. We found better vocabulary test performance for subjects that were physically active during the encoding phase compared to sedentary subjects. Post-hoc tests revealed that this effect was particularly present in initially low performers. BDNF in serum and BDNF genotype failed to account for the current result. Our data indicates that light to moderate simultaneous physical activity during encoding, but not prior to encoding, is beneficial for subsequent recall of new items.

  12. MRI of the cardiomyopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Cesare, Ernesto

    2001-01-01

    We examined the potentialities of Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of the main cardiomyopathies: hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive and arrhythmogenic right ventricular. The hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is generally adequately investigated by echocardiography, that well defines the myocardial thickening and the obstruction of the left ventricular output. However, by echocardiography we still have difficulties in the evaluation of the apex of the left ventricle and the right ventricle involvement. MRI provides a complete evaluation of the heart with a clear evidence also of the echocardiographic dark zones by means of a clear evidence of the apex of the right ventricle. The dilated form is also well investigated by MRI that provides a clear evaluation of the volumes, mass and ejection fraction by means of the 3D analysis including conditions of the ventricular remodelling. Moreover, this technique helps in the differential diagnosis of acute myocarditis. In the acute phase of myocarditis (first 2 weeks), in fact, the myocardium produces high signal intensity on the T2 weighted sequences due to the presence of oedema. The third form of cardiomyopathy is the restrictive one, characterised by reduced diastolic filling and diastolic volume, normality of the systolic function and parietal thickness, interstitial fibrosis and enlargement of both atria. The mean potentiality of MRI is related to the differential diagnosis with constrictive pericarditis. Only in the former, the pericardium appears irregularly thickened with areas exceeding 4 mm of pericardial thickness. Finally, the right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy represents the main indication to MRI evaluation. With this imaging modality we are can obtain a clear morpho-functional evaluation of the right ventricle and distinguish the intramyocardial adipose substitution characterised by areas of high signal in the myocardium

  13. The list-composition effect in memory for emotional and neutral pictures: Differential contribution of ventral and dorsal attention networks to successful encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnacle, Gemma E; Montaldi, Daniela; Talmi, Deborah; Sommer, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    The Emotional enhancement of memory (EEM) is observed in immediate free-recall memory tests when emotional and neutral stimuli are encoded and tested together ("mixed lists"), but surprisingly, not when they are encoded and tested separately ("pure lists"). Here our aim was to investigate whether the effect of list-composition (mixed versus pure lists) on the EEM is due to differential allocation of attention. We scanned participants with fMRI during encoding of semantically-related emotional (negative valence only) and neutral pictures. Analysis of memory performance data replicated previous work, demonstrating an interaction between list composition and emotional valence. In mixed lists, neural subsequent memory effects in the dorsal attention network were greater for neutral stimulus encoding, while neural subsequent memory effects for emotional stimuli were found in a region associated with the ventral attention network. These results imply that when life experiences include both emotional and neutral elements, memory for the latter is more highly correlated with neural activity representing goal-directed attention processing at encoding. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Gender-specific cerebral activation during cognitive tasks using functional MRI: comparison of women in mid-luteal phase and men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gizewski, Elke R.; Wanke, Isabel; Forsting, Michael; Krause, Eva; Senf, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies of gender-specific differences in functional imaging during spatial and language tasks have been inconclusive. Furthermore, among women, such differences may occur during mid-luteal phase compared to the rest of the menstrual cycle. In order to examine further gender differences, functional MRI was performed in 12 male volunteers and 12 female volunteers (in the mid-luteal phase) during mental rotation and verb-generation tests. Two-sample t-tests with uncorrected P values of <0.001 for the specific regions of interest (ROIs) revealed cerebral activation differences in both stimuli. During mental rotation tests, higher levels of activation were noted in the right medial frontal, precentral, and bilateral inferior parietal cortex, while in women this occurred in the right inferior and medial temporal, right superior frontal cortex, and left fusiform gyrus. During verb-generation tests, higher levels of activation in men was found in the left medial temporal and precentral cortex. Our results indicate that differences in cerebral activity during cognitive tasks can be shown between men and women in the mid-luteal phase. Gender differences while performing a mental rotation task were more prominent than during a verb-generation task. (orig.)

  15. Building on prior knowledge: schema-dependent encoding processes relate to academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kesteren, Marlieke T R; Rijpkema, Mark; Ruiter, Dirk J; Morris, Richard G M; Fernández, Guillén

    2014-10-01

    The acquisition and retention of conceptual knowledge is more effective in well-structured curricula that provide an optimal conceptual framework for learning new material. However, the neural mechanisms by which preexisting conceptual schemas facilitate learning are not yet well understood despite their fundamental importance. A preexisting schema has been shown to enhance memory by influencing the balance between activity within the medial-temporal lobe and the medial pFC during mnemonic processes such as encoding, consolidation, and retrieval. Specifically, correctly encoding and retrieving information that is related to preexisting schemas appears rather related to medial prefrontal processing, whereas information unrelated or inconsistent with preexisting schemas rather relates to enhanced medial temporal processing and enhanced interaction between these structures. To further investigate interactions between these regions during conceptual encoding in a real-world university setting, we probed human brain activity and connectivity using fMRI during educationally relevant conceptual encoding carefully embedded within two course programs. Early second-year undergraduate biology and education students were scanned while encoding new facts that were either related or unrelated to the preexisting conceptual knowledge they had acquired during their first year of study. Subsequently, they were tested on their knowledge of these facts 24 hr later. Memory scores were better for course-related information, and this enhancement was associated with larger medial-prefrontal, but smaller medial-temporal subsequent memory effects. These activity differences went along with decreased functional interactions between these regions. Furthermore, schema-related medial-prefrontal subsequent memory effects measured during this experiment were found to be predictive of second-year course performance. These results, obtained in a real-world university setting, reveal brain

  16. Metal artefact reduction in MRI at both 1.5 and 3.0 T using slice encoding for metal artefact correction and view angle tilting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, M; Morelli, J N; Nittka, M; Attenberger, U; Runge, V M

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare metal artefact reduction in MRI at both 3.0 T and 1.5 T using different sequence strategies. Methods: Metal implants of stainless steel screw and plate within agarose phantoms and tissue specimens as well as three patients with implants were imaged at both 1.5 T and 3.0 T, using view angle tilting (VAT), slice encoding for metal artefact correction with VAT (SEMAC-VAT) and conventional sequence. Artefact reduction in agarose phantoms was quantitatively assessed by artefact volume measurements. Blinded reads were conducted in tissue specimen and human imaging, with respect to artefact size, distortion, blurring and overall image quality. Wilcoxon and Friedman tests for multiple comparisons and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for interobserver agreement were performed with a significant level of p 3.0 T (p 3.0 T. Advances in knowledge: The feasibility of metal artefact reduction with SEMAC-VAT was demonstrated at 3.0-T MR. SEMAC-VAT significantly reduced metal artefacts at both 1.5 and 3.0 T. SEMAC-VAT allowed for better visualization of the tissue structures adjacent to the metal implants. SEMAC-VAT produced consistently better image quality in both tissue specimen and human imaging. PMID:25613398

  17. NIRS report of utilization of MRI machine for research. Results in 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    The report is an achievement of cooperative research and development by private and official facilities of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) MRI machine, and its applied and medical uses in 2003. Contained are the reports on the magnet (1 topic), antennae (4), physical mensurations (5), basic biological researches (6), basic studies on human body (6) and clinical studies (13), which are finally summarized in the list of the personnel, event calendar and published scientific papers. The basic studies by the MRI involve those of the brain damage by heavy particle irradiation, pediatric surgical diseases by MR-microscopy, implanted tumor volumetry in the rat, biodistribution of BPA- gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) for neutron capture therapy, ultra-high speed microscopic MRI measurement of microcirculation in the tumor, micro-imaging of human eye, hepatic glycogen content by MRS, flow analysis of cerebrospinal fluid, autopsy imaging system, numerical phantom of human body and so on. Clinical studies involve those of the drug metabolism and disposition, efficacy evaluation of radiotherapy, PET-CT-MRI image, schizophrenia, GSH detection, MP4A-PET image standardization, intracranial lymph systems, brain function, GSH in schizophrenia, obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cholangiography, glycosaminoglycan in cartilage and high-speed imaging of prostate cancer by sensitivity encoding. (T.I.)

  18. ERP Correlates of Encoding Success and Encoding Selectivity in Attention Switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Long-term memory encoding depends critically on effective processing of incoming information. The degree to which participants engage in effective encoding can be indexed in electroencephalographic (EEG) data by studying event-related potential (ERP) subsequent memory effects. The current study investigated ERP correlates of memory success operationalised with two different measures—memory selectivity and global memory—to assess whether previously observed ERP subsequent memory effects reflect focused encoding of task-relevant information (memory selectivity), general encoding success (global memory), or both. Building on previous work, the present study combined an attention switching paradigm—in which participants were presented with compound object-word stimuli and switched between attending to the object or the word across trials—with a later recognition memory test for those stimuli, while recording their EEG. Our results provided clear evidence that subsequent memory effects resulted from selective attentional focusing and effective top-down control (memory selectivity) in contrast to more general encoding success effects (global memory). Further analyses addressed the question of whether successful encoding depended on similar control mechanisms to those involved in attention switching. Interestingly, differences in the ERP correlates of attention switching and successful encoding, particularly during the poststimulus period, indicated that variability in encoding success occurred independently of prestimulus demands for top-down cognitive control. These results suggest that while effects of selective attention and selective encoding co-occur behaviourally their ERP correlates are at least partly dissociable. PMID:27907075

  19. Developing a comprehensive presurgical functional MRI protocol for patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deblaere, K.; Vandemaele, P.; Achten, E.; Backes, W.H.; Hofman, P.; Wilmink, J.; Boon, P.A.; Vonck, K.; Boon, P.; Troost, J.; Vermeulen, J.; Aldenkamp, A.

    2002-01-01

    Our aim was to put together and test a comprehensive functional MRI (fMRI) protocol which could compete with the intracarotid amytal (IAT) or Wada test for the localisation of language and memory function in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. The protocol was designed to be performed in under 1 h on a standard 1.5 tesla imager. We used five paradigms to test nine healthy right-handed subjects: complex scene-encoding, picture-naming, reading, word-generation and semantic-decision tasks. The combination of these tasks generated two activation maps related to memory in the mesial temporal lobes, and three language-related maps of activation in a major part of the known language network. The functional maps from the encoding and naming tasks showed typical and symmetrical posterior mesial temporal lobe activation related to memory in all subjects. Only four of nine subjects also showed symmetrical anterior hippocampal activation. Language lateralisation was best with the word generation and reading paradigms and proved possible in all subjects. The reading paradigm enables localisation of language function in the left anterior temporal pole and middle temporal gyrus, areas typically resected during epilepsy surgery. The combined results of this comprehensive f MRI protocol are adequate for a comparative study with the IAT in patients with epilepsy being assessed for surgery. (orig.)

  20. Developing a comprehensive presurgical functional MRI protocol for patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deblaere, K.; Vandemaele, P.; Achten, E. [MRI Department -1 K12, Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Backes, W.H.; Hofman, P.; Wilmink, J. [Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital Maastricht, Postbus 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Boon, P.A.; Vonck, K. [Department of Neurology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Boon, P. [Department of Medical Psychology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Troost, J. [Department of Neurology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Vermeulen, J. [S.E.I.N Heemstede, Psychological Laboratory, Achterweg 5, 2103 SW Heemstede (Netherlands); Aldenkamp, A. [Epilepsy Center ' Kempenhaeghe' , Postbus 61, 5900 AB Heeze (Netherlands)

    2002-08-01

    Our aim was to put together and test a comprehensive functional MRI (fMRI) protocol which could compete with the intracarotid amytal (IAT) or Wada test for the localisation of language and memory function in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. The protocol was designed to be performed in under 1 h on a standard 1.5 tesla imager. We used five paradigms to test nine healthy right-handed subjects: complex scene-encoding, picture-naming, reading, word-generation and semantic-decision tasks. The combination of these tasks generated two activation maps related to memory in the mesial temporal lobes, and three language-related maps of activation in a major part of the known language network. The functional maps from the encoding and naming tasks showed typical and symmetrical posterior mesial temporal lobe activation related to memory in all subjects. Only four of nine subjects also showed symmetrical anterior hippocampal activation. Language lateralisation was best with the word generation and reading paradigms and proved possible in all subjects. The reading paradigm enables localisation of language function in the left anterior temporal pole and middle temporal gyrus, areas typically resected during epilepsy surgery. The combined results of this comprehensive f MRI protocol are adequate for a comparative study with the IAT in patients with epilepsy being assessed for surgery. (orig.)

  1. Diffractive generalized phase contrast for adaptive phase imaging and optical security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) when the input phase modulation is implemented using diffractive gratings. In GPC applications for patterned illumination, the use of a dynamic diffractive optical element for encoding the GPC input phase allows for onthe- fly optimiza...... security applications and can be used to create phasebased information channels for enhanced information security....

  2. Steganographic optical image encryption system based on reversible data hiding and double random phase encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Cheng-Hung; Chen, Yen-Lin

    2013-02-01

    This study presents a steganographic optical image encryption system based on reversible data hiding and double random phase encoding (DRPE) techniques. Conventional optical image encryption systems can securely transmit valuable images using an encryption method for possible application in optical transmission systems. The steganographic optical image encryption system based on the DRPE technique has been investigated to hide secret data in encrypted images. However, the DRPE techniques vulnerable to attacks and many of the data hiding methods in the DRPE system can distort the decrypted images. The proposed system, based on reversible data hiding, uses a JBIG2 compression scheme to achieve lossless decrypted image quality and perform a prior encryption process. Thus, the DRPE technique enables a more secured optical encryption process. The proposed method extracts and compresses the bit planes of the original image using the lossless JBIG2 technique. The secret data are embedded in the remaining storage space. The RSA algorithm can cipher the compressed binary bits and secret data for advanced security. Experimental results show that the proposed system achieves a high data embedding capacity and lossless reconstruction of the original images.

  3. EPOXI EARTH OBS - MRI CALIBRATED IMAGES V2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains calibrated, 750-nm filter images of Earth acquired by the Deep Impact Medium Resolution Visible CCD (MRI) during the EPOCh and Cruise 2 phases...

  4. Multiscale mining of fMRI data with hierarchical structured sparsity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenatton, R.; Obozinski, G.; Bach, F.; Gramfort, Alexandre; Michel, Vincent; Thirion, Bertrand; Eger, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Reverse inference, or 'brain reading', is a recent paradigm for analyzing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, based on pattern recognition and statistical learning. By predicting some cognitive variables related to brain activation maps, this approach aims at decoding brain activity. Reverse inference takes into account the multivariate information between voxels and is currently the only way to assess how precisely some cognitive information is encoded by the activity of neural populations within the whole brain. However, it relies on a prediction function that is plagued by the curse of dimensionality, since there are far more features than samples, i.e., more voxels than fMRI volumes. To address this problem, different methods have been proposed, such as, among others, univariate feature selection, feature agglomeration and regularization techniques. In this paper, we consider a sparse hierarchical structured regularization. Specifically, the penalization we use is constructed from a tree that is obtained by spatially-constrained agglomerative clustering. This approach encodes the spatial structure of the data at different scales into the regularization, which makes the overall prediction procedure more robust to inter-subject variability. The regularization used induces the selection of spatially coherent predictive brain regions simultaneously at different scales. We test our algorithm on real data acquired to study the mental representation of objects, and we show that the proposed algorithm not only delineates meaningful brain regions but yields as well better prediction accuracy than reference methods. (authors)

  5. Menstrual cyclic changes of human physiological uterus analized by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuzawa, Michio

    1989-01-01

    MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) is useful facilitation to perform analysis of tissue structures with the gray scale. By use of super-conducting MRI with 0.5T resistive magnet, present study was designed to analyse characteristic features of the human uterus throughout menstrual cycle. Both T 1 and T 2 values of the endometrium, the junctional zone and the myometrium were estimated on total nine volunteers of nomal healthy women aged from 21 to 30 y.o. during menstrual cycle. MRI was taken in the mid ∼ late proliferative, the secretory, and the menstrual stage. Moreover, relative square ratio of the endometrium and the junctional zone to the corpus uteri were measured by computed image analyser (Lusex 500). Following results were obtained. 1) Both T 1 and T 2 values of the endometrium and the junctional zone were lowest in the menstrual phase. In the myometrium, T 1 values were shown as same tendency comparing with the above two layers but T 2 values were lowest in the proliferative phase and the menstrual one. 2) Proportional values of the endometrium to the corpus uteri increased from 13.8% in the proliferative phase to 17.9% in the secretory phase and decreased to 8.0% in the menstrual phase. While that in the junctional zone decreased from 26.6% to 23.4% in secretory phase and increased to 35.0% in the menstrual phase. (author)

  6. Menstrual cyclic changes of human physiological uterus analized by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuzawa, Michio

    1989-05-01

    MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) is useful facilitation to perform analysis of tissue structures with the gray scale. By use of super-conducting MRI with 0.5T resistive magnet, present study was designed to analyse characteristic features of the human uterus throughout menstrual cycle. Both T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ values of the endometrium, the junctional zone and the myometrium were estimated on total nine volunteers of nomal healthy women aged from 21 to 30 y.o. during menstrual cycle. MRI was taken in the mid /similar to/ late proliferative, the secretory, and the menstrual stage. Moreover, relative square ratio of the endometrium and the junctional zone to the corpus uteri were measured by computed image analyser (Lusex 500). Following results were obtained. (1) Both T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ values of the endometrium and the junctional zone were lowest in the menstrual phase. In the myometrium, T/sub 1/ values were shown as same tendency comparing with the above two layers but T/sub 2/ values were lowest in the proliferative phase and the menstrual one. (2) Proportional values of the endometrium to the corpus uteri increased from 13.8% in the proliferative phase to 17.9% in the secretory phase and decreased to 8.0% in the menstrual phase. While that in the junctional zone decreased from 26.6% to 23.4% in secretory phase and increased to 35.0% in the menstrual phase. (author).

  7. Developing a hippocampal neural prosthetic to facilitate human memory encoding and recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Robert E.; Song, Dong; Robinson, Brian S.; Fetterhoff, Dustin; Dakos, Alexander S.; Roeder, Brent M.; She, Xiwei; Wicks, Robert T.; Witcher, Mark R.; Couture, Daniel E.; Laxton, Adrian W.; Munger-Clary, Heidi; Popli, Gautam; Sollman, Myriam J.; Whitlow, Christopher T.; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.; Berger, Theodore W.; Deadwyler, Sam A.

    2018-06-01

    Objective. We demonstrate here the first successful implementation in humans of a proof-of-concept system for restoring and improving memory function via facilitation of memory encoding using the patient’s own hippocampal spatiotemporal neural codes for memory. Memory in humans is subject to disruption by drugs, disease and brain injury, yet previous attempts to restore or rescue memory function in humans typically involved only nonspecific, modulation of brain areas and neural systems related to memory retrieval. Approach. We have constructed a model of processes by which the hippocampus encodes memory items via spatiotemporal firing of neural ensembles that underlie the successful encoding of short-term memory. A nonlinear multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) model of hippocampal CA3 and CA1 neural firing is computed that predicts activation patterns of CA1 neurons during the encoding (sample) phase of a delayed match-to-sample (DMS) human short-term memory task. Main results. MIMO model-derived electrical stimulation delivered to the same CA1 locations during the sample phase of DMS trials facilitated short-term/working memory by 37% during the task. Longer term memory retention was also tested in the same human subjects with a delayed recognition (DR) task that utilized images from the DMS task, along with images that were not from the task. Across the subjects, the stimulated trials exhibited significant improvement (35%) in both short-term and long-term retention of visual information. Significance. These results demonstrate the facilitation of memory encoding which is an important feature for the construction of an implantable neural prosthetic to improve human memory.

  8. The Effects of Emotional Visual Context on the Encoding and Retrieval of Body Odor Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parma, Valentina; Macedo, Stephanie; Rocha, Marta; Alho, Laura; Ferreira, Jacqueline; Soares, Sandra C

    2018-04-01

    Conditions during information encoding and retrieval are known to influence the sensory material stored and its recapitulation. However, little is known about such processes in olfaction. Here, we capitalized on the uniqueness of body odors (BOs) which, similar to fingerprints, allow for the identification of a specific person, by associating their presentation to a negative or a neutral emotional context. One hundred twenty-five receivers (68 F) were exposed to a male BO while watching either criminal or neutral videos (encoding phase) and were subsequently asked to recognize the target BO within either a congruent or an incongruent visual context (retrieval phase). The results showed that criminal videos were rated as more vivid, unpleasant, and arousing than neutral videos both at encoding and retrieval. Moreover, in terms of BO ratings, we found that odor intensity and arousal allow to distinguish the target from the foils when congruent criminal information is presented at encoding and retrieval. Finally, the accuracy performance was not significantly different from chance level for either condition. These findings provide insights on how olfactory memories are processed in emotional situations.

  9. MRI-based diagnostic imaging of the intratemporal facial nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kress, B.; Baehren, W.

    2001-01-01

    Detailed imaging of the five sections of the full intratemporal course of the facial nerve can be achieved by MRI and using thin tomographic section techniques and surface coils. Contrast media are required for tomographic imaging of pathological processes. Established methods are available for diagnostic evaluation of cerebellopontine angle tumors and chronic Bell's palsy, as well as hemifacial spasms. A method still under discussion is MRI for diagnostic evaluation of Bell's palsy in the presence of fractures of the petrous bone, when blood volumes in the petrous bone make evaluation even more difficult. MRI-based diagnostic evaluation of the idiopatic facial paralysis currently is subject to change. Its usual application cannot be recommended for routine evaluation at present. However, a quantitative analysis of contrast medium uptake of the nerve may be an approach to improve the prognostic value of MRI in acute phases of Bell's palsy. (orig./CB) [de

  10. Diffusion weighted MRI in intrahepatic bile duct adenoma arising from the cirrhotic liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Chansik [Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sumi; Choi, Yoon Jung [National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    A 64-year-old male patient with liver cirrhosis underwent a CT study for hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance, which demonstrated a 1.4-cm hypervascular subcapsular tumor in the liver. On gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI, the tumor showed brisk arterial enhancement and persistent hyperenhancement in the portal phase, but hypointensity in the hepatobiliary phase. On diffusion-weighted MRI, the tumor showed an apparent diffusion coefficient twofold greater than that of the background liver parenchyma, which suggested that the lesion was benign. The histologic diagnosis was intrahepatic bile duct adenoma with alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

  11. Diffusion-weighted MRI in intrahepatic bile duct adenoma arising from the cirrhotic liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chansik; Park, Sumi; Choi, Yoon Jung

    2013-01-01

    A 64-year-old male patient with liver cirrhosis underwent a CT study for hepatocellular carcinoma surveillance, which demonstrated a 1.4-cm hypervascular subcapsular tumor in the liver. On gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI, the tumor showed brisk arterial enhancement and persistent hyperenhancement in the portal phase, but hypointensity in the hepatobiliary phase. On diffusion-weighted MRI, the tumor showed an apparent diffusion coefficient twofold greater than that of the background liver parenchyma, which suggested that the lesion was benign. The histologic diagnosis was intrahepatic bile duct adenoma with alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

  12. Impact of the MLC on the MRI field distortion of a prototype MRI-linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolling, Stefan; Keall, Paul; Oborn, Brad

    2013-01-01

    generally smaller in the perpendicular beam orientation. The peak-to-peak DSV distortion was below 300 μT at SID≥130 cm (perpendicular) and SID≥140 cm (inline) for the 1.0 T design. (4) The simulation of different treatment fields was identified to cause dynamic changes in the field distribution. However, the estimated residual distortion was below 1.2 mm geometric distortion at SID≥120 cm (perpendicular) and SID≥130 cm (inline) for a 10 mT/m frequency-encoding gradient. (5) Due to magnetic saturation of the MLC materials, the field distortion remained constant at B 0 >1.0 T.Conclusions: This work shows that the MRI field distortions caused by the MLC cannot be ignored and must be thoroughly investigated for any MRI-linac system. The numeric distortion values obtained for our 1.0 T magnet may vary for other magnet designs with substantially different fringe fields, however the concept of modest increases in the SID to reduce the distortion to a shimmable level is generally applicable

  13. Utility of Gd-EOB-DTPA-Enhanced MRI in Diagnosing Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Ryang Kim

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe an 8-mm hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC with hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis in a 74-year-old woman. Ultrasound (US revealed an 8-mm hyperechoic nodule in segment 6 of the liver. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT and US revealed no hypervascularity in the early phase and no washout in the late phase and the Kupffer phase, respectively. CT during arteriography revealed no hypervascularity and CT during arterial portography disclosed no perfusion defect. Gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed no hypervascularity in the early phase, but disclosed a defect in the hepatobiliary phase. Histologically, the nodule was diagnosed as well-differentiated HCC characterized by more than two-fold the cellularity of the non-tumorous area, with a high nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio, increased cytoplasmic eosinophilia, fatty change, and slight cell atypia with an irregular thin trabecular pattern. Our case demonstrates the utility of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI in the diagnosis of small HCC.

  14. Cryptanalysis and improvement of an optical image encryption scheme using a chaotic Baker map and double random phase encoding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jun-Xin; Fu, Chong; Zhu, Zhi-Liang; Zhang, Li-Bo; Zhang, Yushu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the security of an enhanced double random phase encoding (DRPE) image encryption scheme (2013 J. Lightwave Technol. 31 2533). The original system employs a chaotic Baker map prior to DRPE to provide more protection to the plain image and hence promote the security level of DRPE, as claimed. However, cryptanalysis shows that this scheme is vulnerable to a chosen-plaintext attack, and the ciphertext can be precisely recovered. The corresponding improvement is subsequently reported upon the basic premise that no extra equipment or computational complexity is required. The simulation results and security analyses prove its effectiveness and security. The proposed achievements are suitable for all cryptosystems under permutation and, following that, the DRPE architecture, and we hope that our work can motivate the further research on optical image encryption. (paper)

  15. Cryptanalysis and improvement of an optical image encryption scheme using a chaotic Baker map and double random phase encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-Xin; Zhu, Zhi-Liang; Fu, Chong; Zhang, Li-Bo; Zhang, Yushu

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the security of an enhanced double random phase encoding (DRPE) image encryption scheme (2013 J. Lightwave Technol. 31 2533). The original system employs a chaotic Baker map prior to DRPE to provide more protection to the plain image and hence promote the security level of DRPE, as claimed. However, cryptanalysis shows that this scheme is vulnerable to a chosen-plaintext attack, and the ciphertext can be precisely recovered. The corresponding improvement is subsequently reported upon the basic premise that no extra equipment or computational complexity is required. The simulation results and security analyses prove its effectiveness and security. The proposed achievements are suitable for all cryptosystems under permutation and, following that, the DRPE architecture, and we hope that our work can motivate the further research on optical image encryption.

  16. A SSVEP Stimuli Encoding Method Using Trinary Frequency-Shift Keying Encoded SSVEP (TFSK-SSVEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Zhao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available SSVEP is a kind of BCI technology with advantage of high information transfer rate. However, due to its nature, frequencies could be used as stimuli are scarce. To solve such problem, a stimuli encoding method which encodes SSVEP signal using Frequency Shift–Keying (FSK method is developed. In this method, each stimulus is controlled by a FSK signal which contains three different frequencies that represent “Bit 0,” “Bit 1” and “Bit 2” respectively. Different to common BFSK in digital communication, “Bit 0” and “Bit 1” composited the unique identifier of stimuli in binary bit stream form, while “Bit 2” indicates the ending of a stimuli encoding. EEG signal is acquired on channel Oz, O1, O2, Pz, P3, and P4, using ADS1299 at the sample rate of 250 SPS. Before original EEG signal is quadrature demodulated, it is detrended and then band-pass filtered using FFT-based FIR filtering to remove interference. Valid peak of the processed signal is acquired by calculating its derivative and converted into bit stream using window method. Theoretically, this coding method could implement at least 2n−1 (n is the length of bit command stimulus while keeping the ITR the same. This method is suitable to implement stimuli on a monitor and where the frequency and phase could be used to code stimuli is limited as well as implementing portable BCI devices which is not capable of performing complex calculations.

  17. Robust preprocessing for stimulus-based functional MRI of the moving fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Wonsang; Evangelou, Iordanis E; Zun, Zungho; Andescavage, Nickie; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    Fetal motion manifests as signal degradation and image artifact in the acquired time series of blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. We present a robust preprocessing pipeline to specifically address fetal and placental motion-induced artifacts in stimulus-based fMRI with slowly cycled block design in the living fetus. In the proposed pipeline, motion correction is optimized to the experimental paradigm, and it is performed separately in each phase as well as in each region of interest (ROI), recognizing that each phase and organ experiences different types of motion. To obtain the averaged BOLD signals for each ROI, both misaligned volumes and noisy voxels are automatically detected and excluded, and the missing data are then imputed by statistical estimation based on local polynomial smoothing. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed pipeline was effective in mitigating the motion-induced artifacts in stimulus-based fMRI data of the fetal brain and placenta.

  18. Least Square NUFFT Methods Applied to 2D and 3D Radially Encoded MR Image Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiayu; Liu, Qing H.; Gewalt, Sally L.; Cofer, Gary; Johnson, G. Allan

    2009-01-01

    Radially encoded MR imaging (MRI) has gained increasing attention in applications such as hyperpolarized gas imaging, contrast-enhanced MR angiography, and dynamic imaging, due to its motion insensitivity and improved artifact properties. However, since the technique collects k-space samples nonuniformly, multidimensional (especially 3D) radially sampled MRI image reconstruction is challenging. The balance between reconstruction accuracy and speed becomes critical when a large data set is processed. Kaiser-Bessel gridding reconstruction has been widely used for non-Cartesian reconstruction. The objective of this work is to provide an alternative reconstruction option in high dimensions with on-the-fly kernels calculation. The work develops general multi-dimensional least square nonuniform fast Fourier transform (LS-NUFFT) algorithms and incorporates them into a k-space simulation and image reconstruction framework. The method is then applied to reconstruct the radially encoded k-space, although the method addresses general nonuniformity and is applicable to any non-Cartesian patterns. Performance assessments are made by comparing the LS-NUFFT based method with the conventional Kaiser-Bessel gridding method for 2D and 3D radially encoded computer simulated phantoms and physically scanned phantoms. The results show that the LS-NUFFT reconstruction method has better accuracy-speed efficiency than the Kaiser-Bessel gridding method when the kernel weights are calculated on the fly. The accuracy of the LS-NUFFT method depends on the choice of scaling factor, and it is found that for a particular conventional kernel function, using its corresponding deapodization function as scaling factor and utilizing it into the LS-NUFFT framework has the potential to improve accuracy. When a cosine scaling factor is used, in particular, the LS-NUFFT method is faster than Kaiser-Bessel gridding method because of a quasi closed-form solution. The method is successfully applied to 2D and

  19. When the Brain Takes 'BOLD' Steps: Real-Time fMRI Neurofeedback Can Further Enhance the Ability to Gradually Self-regulate Regional Brain Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorger, Bettina; Kamp, Tabea; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Peters, Judith Caroline; Goebel, Rainer

    2018-05-15

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) based on real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rtfMRI) are currently explored in the context of developing alternative (motor-independent) communication and control means for the severely disabled. In such BCI systems, the user encodes a particular intention (e.g., an answer to a question or an intended action) by evoking specific mental activity resulting in a distinct brain state that can be decoded from fMRI activation. One goal in this context is to increase the degrees of freedom in encoding different intentions, i.e., to allow the BCI user to choose from as many options as possible. Recently, the ability to voluntarily modulate spatial and/or temporal blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD)-signal features has been explored implementing different mental tasks and/or different encoding time intervals, respectively. Our two-session fMRI feasibility study systematically investigated for the first time the possibility of using magnitudinal BOLD-signal features for intention encoding. Particularly, in our novel paradigm, participants (n=10) were asked to alternately self-regulate their regional brain-activation level to 30%, 60% or 90% of their maximal capacity by applying a selected activation strategy (i.e., performing a mental task, e.g., inner speech) and modulation strategies (e.g., using different speech rates) suggested by the experimenters. In a second step, we tested the hypothesis that the additional availability of feedback information on the current BOLD-signal level within a region of interest improves the gradual-self regulation performance. Therefore, participants were provided with neurofeedback in one of the two fMRI sessions. Our results show that the majority of the participants were able to gradually self-regulate regional brain activation to at least two different target levels even in the absence of neurofeedback. When provided with continuous feedback on their current BOLD-signal level, most

  20. Enhancement pattern of small hepatic hemangioma: findings on multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung In; Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Myeong Jin; Chung, Jae Joon; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Lee, Jong Tae

    1999-01-01

    To compare the enhancement characteristics of small hemangiomas seen on multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MR imaging. Thirteen patients with 20 hepatic hemangiomas less than 25mm in diameter underwent both multiphase spiral CT and dynamic MR imaging. All lesions were assigned to one of three classified into 3 categories according to the enhancement pattern seen on multiphase spiral CT : typical delayed pooling, atypical early enhancement, or continuous low attenuation. The enhancement patterns seen on spiral CT and on dynamic MRI were correlated. On CT scans, ten lesions (50%) showed delayed pooling. Six (30%) showed early arterial enhancement and four (20%) showed continuous low attenuation. On delayed-phase MRI, all lesions showed delayed high signal intensity compared to adjacent liver parenchyma. Four of six lesions with early enhancement on CT showed peripheral globular enhancement on early arterial-phase MRI. On multiphase spiral CT scans, small hemangiomas can show variable atypical enhancement features. In this situation, contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI is helpful for the diagnosis of hemangiomas

  1. Phased transducer array for acoustic energy harvesting inside an MRI machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klymko, V.; Roes, M.G.L.; Duivenbode, van J.; Lomonova, E.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, an array of piezoelectric speakers is used to focus acoustic energy on a single transducer that acts as a harvester. The transmitting transducers are located along a curve that fits inside the magnetic resonance interferometer (MRI) torus interior. The numerical results for the

  2. Superconducting magnetic Wollaston prism for neutron spin encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, F., E-mail: fankli@indiana.edu; Parnell, S. R.; Wang, T.; Baxter, D. V. [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Hamilton, W. A. [Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Maranville, B. B. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Semerad, R. [Ceraco Ceramic Coating GmbH, Ismaning 85737 (Germany); Cremer, J. T. [Adelphi Technology Inc., Redwood City, California 94063 (United States); Pynn, R. [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    A magnetic Wollaston prism can spatially split a polarized neutron beam into two beams with different neutron spin states, in a manner analogous to an optical Wollaston prism. Such a Wollaston prism can be used to encode the trajectory of neutrons into the Larmor phase associated with their spin degree of freedom. This encoding can be used for neutron phase-contrast radiography and in spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME). In this paper, we show that magnetic Wollaston prisms with highly uniform magnetic fields and low Larmor phase aberration can be constructed to preserve neutron polarization using high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials. The Meissner effect of HTS films is used to confine magnetic fields produced electromagnetically by current-carrying HTS tape wound on suitably shaped soft iron pole pieces. The device is cooled to ∼30 K by a closed cycle refrigerator, eliminating the need to replenish liquid cryogens and greatly simplifying operation and maintenance. A HTS film ensures that the magnetic field transition within the prism is sharp, well-defined, and planar due to the Meissner effect. The spin transport efficiency across the device was measured to be ∼98.5% independent of neutron wavelength and energizing current. The position-dependent Larmor phase of neutron spins was measured at the NIST Center for Neutron Research facility and found to agree well with detailed simulations. The phase varies linearly with horizontal position, as required, and the neutron beam shows little depolarization. Consequently, the device has advantages over existing devices with similar functionality and provides the capability for a large neutron beam (20 mm × 30 mm) and an increase in length scales accessible to SESAME to beyond 10 μm. With further improvements of the external coupling guide field in the prototype device, a larger neutron beam could be employed.

  3. Superconducting magnetic Wollaston prism for neutron spin encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Parnell, S. R.; Hamilton, W. A.; Maranville, B. B.; Wang, T.; Semerad, R.; Baxter, D. V.; Cremer, J. T.; Pynn, R.

    2014-05-01

    A magnetic Wollaston prism can spatially split a polarized neutron beam into two beams with different neutron spin states, in a manner analogous to an optical Wollaston prism. Such a Wollaston prism can be used to encode the trajectory of neutrons into the Larmor phase associated with their spin degree of freedom. This encoding can be used for neutron phase-contrast radiography and in spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME). In this paper, we show that magnetic Wollaston prisms with highly uniform magnetic fields and low Larmor phase aberration can be constructed to preserve neutron polarization using high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials. The Meissner effect of HTS films is used to confine magnetic fields produced electromagnetically by current-carrying HTS tape wound on suitably shaped soft iron pole pieces. The device is cooled to ˜30 K by a closed cycle refrigerator, eliminating the need to replenish liquid cryogens and greatly simplifying operation and maintenance. A HTS film ensures that the magnetic field transition within the prism is sharp, well-defined, and planar due to the Meissner effect. The spin transport efficiency across the device was measured to be ˜98.5% independent of neutron wavelength and energizing current. The position-dependent Larmor phase of neutron spins was measured at the NIST Center for Neutron Research facility and found to agree well with detailed simulations. The phase varies linearly with horizontal position, as required, and the neutron beam shows little depolarization. Consequently, the device has advantages over existing devices with similar functionality and provides the capability for a large neutron beam (20 mm × 30 mm) and an increase in length scales accessible to SESAME to beyond 10 μm. With further improvements of the external coupling guide field in the prototype device, a larger neutron beam could be employed.

  4. Comparison of pelvic phased-array versus endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla for local staging of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2012-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the superiority of endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over pelvic phased-array coil MRI at 1.5 Tesla for local staging of prostate cancer. However, few have studied which evaluation is more accurate at 3 Tesla MRI. In this study, we compared the accuracy of local staging of prostate cancer using pelvic phased-array coil or endorectal coil MRI at 3 Tesla. Between January 2005 and May 2010, 151 patients underwent radical prostatectomy. All patients were evaluated with either pelvic phased-array coil or endorectal coil prostate MRI prior to surgery (63 endorectal coils and 88 pelvic phased-array coils). Tumor stage based on MRI was compared with pathologic stage. We calculated the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of each group in the evaluation of extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion. Both endorectal coil and pelvic phased-array coil MRI achieved high specificity, low sensitivity and moderate accuracy for the detection of extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion. There were statistically no differences in specificity, sensitivity and accuracy between the two groups. Overall staging accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were not significantly different between endorectal coil and pelvic phased-array coil MRI.

  5. Age-related effects on perceptual and semantic encoding in memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, M C C; Liu, K P Y; Ting, K H; Chan, C C H

    2014-03-07

    This study examined the age-related subsequent memory effect (SME) in perceptual and semantic encoding using event-related potentials (ERPs). Seventeen younger adults and 17 older adults studied a series of Chinese characters either perceptually (by inspecting orthographic components) or semantically (by determining whether the depicted object makes sounds). The two tasks had similar levels of difficulty. The participants made studied or unstudied judgments during the recognition phase. Younger adults performed better in both conditions, with significant SMEs detected in the time windows of P2, N3, P550, and late positive component (LPC). In the older group, SMEs were observed in the P2 and N3 latencies in both conditions but were only detected in the P550 in the semantic condition. Between-group analyses showed larger frontal and central SMEs in the younger sample in the LPC latency regardless of encoding type. Aging effect appears to be stronger on influencing perceptual than semantic encoding processes. The effects seem to be associated with a decline in updating and maintaining representations during perceptual encoding. The age-related decline in the encoding function may be due in part to changes in frontal lobe function. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of incidentally encoded memory from a single experience in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Saho; Tsuzuki, Mana; Chijiiwa, Hitomi; Arahori, Minori; Watanabe, Arii; Saito, Atsuko; Fujita, Kazuo

    2017-08-01

    We examined whether cats could retrieve and utilize incidentally encoded information from a single past event in a simple food-exploration task previously used for dogs (Fujita et al., 2012). In Experiment 1, cats were led to four open, baited containers and allowed to eat from two of them (Exposure phase). After a 15-min delay during which the cats were absent and all containers were replaced with empty ones, the cats were unexpectedly returned to the room and allowed to explore the containers (Test phase). Although the cats' first choice of container to visit was random, they explored containers from which they had not previously eaten for longer than those from which they did previously eat. In the Exposure phase of Experiment 2, two containers held food, one held a nonedible object, and the fourth was empty. Cats were allowed to eat from one of them. In the post-delay Test phase, the cats first visited the remaining baited-uneaten container significantly more often than chance and they spent more time exploring this container. Because the cats' behavior in the Test phase cannot be explained by association of the container with a pleasant experience (eating), the results suggest that cats retrieved and utilized "what" and "where" information from an incidentally encoded memory from a single experience. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Reduced prefrontal activation in pediatric patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder during verbal episodic memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistuzzo, Marcelo Camargo; Balardin, Joana Bisol; Martin, Maria da Graça Morais; Hoexter, Marcelo Queiroz; Bernardes, Elisa Teixeira; Borcato, Sonia; Souza, Marina de Marco E; Querido, Cicero Nardini; Morais, Rosa Magaly; de Alvarenga, Pedro Gomes; Lopes, Antonio Carlos; Shavitt, Roseli Gedanke; Savage, Cary R; Amaro, Edson; Miguel, Euripedes C; Polanczyk, Guilherme V; Miotto, Eliane C

    2015-10-01

    Patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) often present with deficits in episodic memory, and there is evidence that these difficulties may be secondary to executive dysfunction, that is, impaired selection and/or application of memory-encoding strategies (mediation hypothesis). Semantic clustering is an effective strategy to enhance encoding of verbal episodic memory (VEM) when word lists are semantically related. Self-initiated mobilization of this strategy has been associated with increased activity in the prefrontal cortex, particularly the orbitofrontal cortex, a key region in the pathophysiology of OCD. We therefore studied children and adolescents with OCD during uncued semantic clustering strategy application in a VEM functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)-encoding paradigm. A total of 25 pediatric patients with OCD (aged 8.1-17.5 years) and 25 healthy controls (HC, aged 8.1-16.9) matched for age, gender, handedness, and IQ were evaluated using a block design VEM paradigm that manipulated semantically related and unrelated words. The semantic clustering strategy score (SCS) predicted VEM performance in HC (p semantic clustering in OCD. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fearful contextual expression impairs the encoding and recognition of target faces: an ERP study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyan eLin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous event-related potential (ERP studies have shown that the N170 to faces is modulated by the emotion of the face and its context. However, it is unclear how the encoding of emotional target faces as reflected in the N170 is modulated by the preceding contextual facial expression when temporal onset and identity of target faces are unpredictable. In addition, no study as yet has investigated whether contextual facial expression modulates later recognition of target faces. To address these issues, participants in the present study were asked to identify target faces (fearful or neutral that were presented after a sequence of fearful or neutral contextual faces. The number of sequential contextual faces was random and contextual and target faces were of different identities so that temporal onset and identity of target faces were unpredictable. Electroencephalography (EEG data was recorded during the encoding phase. Subsequently, participants had to perform an unexpected old/new recognition task in which target face identities were presented in either the encoded or the non-encoded expression. ERP data showed a reduced N170 to target faces in fearful as compared to neutral context regardless of target facial expression. In the later recognition phase, recognition rates were reduced for target faces in the encoded expression when they had been encountered in fearful as compared to neutral context. The present findings suggest that fearful compared to neutral contextual faces reduce the allocation of attentional resources towards target faces, which results in limited encoding and recognition of target faces.

  9. White matter lesions in watershed territories studied with MRI and parenchymography: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minkner, K; Lovblad, K.O.; Yilmaz, H; Alimenti, A.; Delavelle, J; Ruefenacht, D.A. [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Sekoranja, L; Sztajzel, R [University Hospital of Geneva, Clinic of Neurology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2005-06-01

    Brain aging affects an increasing segment of the population and the role of chronic cerebrovascular disease is considered to be one of the main parameters involved. For this purpose we compared retrospectively MRI data with digitized subtraction angiography (DSA) data in a group of 50 patients focusing onto the watershed area of the carotid artery vascular territories. In order to evaluate the presence of white matter lesions (WML) in the hemispheric watershed areas, coronal fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery or axial T2 weighted MRI images of patients with symptomatic cerebrovascular insufficiency areas were compared with the capillary phase of DSA studies in anterior-posterior projection. Presence of cerebrovascular occlusive disease was evaluated on DSA using North American symptomatic carotid endarterectomy trial criteria and including evaluation of collateral vascular supply. Pathological MRI findings in the region of the watershed territories correlated overall in 66% of cases with a defect or delayed filling on DSA. In the case of asymmetrical MRI findings, there was a pathological finding of the capillary phase in the watershed area in 92% of DSA studies. Hypoperfusion in the capillary phase of the watershed area as seen on DSA correlated with the stenosis degree of the concerned carotid artery. Our findings suggest that asymmetrical findings of WML in the watershed areas as seen on MRI are caused by hemodynamic effect and a differentiation between small vessel disease and a consequence of distant stenosis may be possible under such conditions. (orig.)

  10. Contrasting visual working memory for verbal and non-verbal material with multivariate analysis of fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeck, Christian; Rakitin, Brian; Steffener, Jason; Stern, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    We performed a delayed-item-recognition task to investigate the neural substrates of non-verbal visual working memory with event-related fMRI (‘Shape task’). 25 young subjects (mean age: 24.0 years; STD=3.8 years) were instructed to study a list of either 1,2 or 3 unnamable nonsense line drawings for 3 seconds (‘stimulus phase’ or STIM). Subsequently, the screen went blank for 7 seconds (‘retention phase’ or RET), and then displayed a probe stimulus for 3 seconds in which subject indicated with a differential button press whether the probe was contained in the studied shape-array or not (‘probe phase’ or PROBE). Ordinal Trend Canonical Variates Analysis (Habeck et al., 2005a) was performed to identify spatial covariance patterns that showed a monotonic increase in expression with memory load during all task phases. Reliable load-related patterns were identified in the stimulus and retention phase (pmemory loads (pmemory load, and mediofrontal and temporal regions that were decreasing. Mean subject expression of both patterns across memory load during retention also correlated positively with recognition accuracy (dL) in the Shape task (prehearsal processes. Encoding processes, on the other hand, are critically dependent on the to-be-remembered material, and seem to necessitate material-specific neural substrates. PMID:22652306

  11. Phase-synchronization-based parcellation of resting state fMRI signals reveals topographically organized clusters in early visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gravel, Nicolás G; Harvey, Ben M; Renken, Remco K; Dumoulin, Serge O; Cornelissen, Frans W

    2018-01-01

    Resting-state fMRI is widely used to study brain function and connectivity. However, interpreting patterns of resting state (RS) fMRI activity remains challenging as they may arise from different neuronal mechanisms than those triggered by exogenous events. Currently, this limits the use of RS-fMRI

  12. Study for synovial lesions by MRI using gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) in patients with early phase of rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Keiyu (Saint Marianna Univ., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-02-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonanse imaging (MRI) enhanced with gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) for the detection of the inflamed synovium and for the evaluation of the responce to therapy in rheumatoid arthritis, we studied 49 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) according to the 1987 revised criteria of American Rheumatism Association (ARA), 6 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) complicated by arthritis, 3 patients with osteoarthritis (OA), 2 patients with Sjoegren syndrome, 2 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis and 10 healthy volunteers as an age matched control. The 49 patients with RA were divided into three groups: (1) early phase of RA, (2) non progressing RA and (3) slowly progressing RA, and the stage classification of plain X-ray film and enhancement pattern of MR imaging were classified into three groups. Synovial enhancement showed a linear, band-like or diffuse pattern. Almost all cases in early phase of RA group and non progressing RA group showed a linear pattern, a band-like pattern or even no enhancement, while slowly progressing group of stage II or higher showed the diffuse pattern of enhancement in all except 2 cases. Moreover, the linear pattern, the band-like pattern or even no contrast enhancement were seen in all except 1 stage I patient, whereas 26 out of 29 patients with stage II or higher change showed diffuse contrast enhancement. Furthermore, a comparison of MR images before and after administration of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in 10 patients showed that the improvement of clinical symptomes correlated fairly well with reduction of contrast enhancement. The present study suggested that MRI of the wrist using Gd-DTPA enhancement may be useful for the diagnosis of RA, the prediction of articular damage, and judgement of the response to therapy. (author).

  13. Robust high-resolution quantification of time signals encoded by in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkić, Dževad; Belkić, Karen

    2018-01-01

    This paper on molecular imaging emphasizes improving specificity of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) for early cancer diagnostics by high-resolution data analysis. Sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is excellent, but specificity is insufficient. Specificity is improved with MRS by going beyond morphology to assess the biochemical content of tissue. This is contingent upon accurate data quantification of diagnostically relevant biomolecules. Quantification is spectral analysis which reconstructs chemical shifts, amplitudes and relaxation times of metabolites. Chemical shifts inform on electronic shielding of resonating nuclei bound to different molecular compounds. Oscillation amplitudes in time signals retrieve the abundance of MR sensitive nuclei whose number is proportional to metabolite concentrations. Transverse relaxation times, the reciprocal of decay probabilities of resonances, arise from spin-spin coupling and reflect local field inhomogeneities. In MRS single voxels are used. For volumetric coverage, multi-voxels are employed within a hybrid of MRS and MRI called magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Common to MRS and MRSI is encoding of time signals and subsequent spectral analysis. Encoded data do not provide direct clinical information. Spectral analysis of time signals can yield the quantitative information, of which metabolite concentrations are the most clinically important. This information is equivocal with standard data analysis through the non-parametric, low-resolution fast Fourier transform and post-processing via fitting. By applying the fast Padé transform (FPT) with high-resolution, noise suppression and exact quantification via quantum mechanical signal processing, advances are made, presented herein, focusing on four areas of critical public health importance: brain, prostate, breast and ovarian cancers.

  14. Quantitative measurement of hemodynamics of inferior vena in healthy volunteers with phase-contrast MR imaging at 3.0 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan Zhibing; Fan Guangming; Jiao Jun; Min Dingyu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of quantitative hemodynamics measurement of inferior vena cava (IVC) in healthy volunteers with phase-contrast sequence on 3.0 T MR system (3.0 T PC-MRI), and to evaluate the relationship between IVC lumen area, blood flow, and velocity. Methods: Fifty healthy adult volunteers prospective underwent IVC PC-MRI at 3.0 T MR system. All volunteers were from our hospital for the routine chest or abdomen examinations, no heart disease and lung disease always, heart rate, blood pressure, electrocardiogram was in normal range, no abnormalities were found in clinical and abdominal imaging examinations, and IVC disease was excluded by ultrasonic examination. The area (A), mean velocity (MV), mean flux (MF), regurgitant fraction (RF) and time-flow curve of upper and middle segments of IVC during one cardiac cycle were observed. Independent samples t test was used to compare IVC lumen area and blood flow, velocity between different genders, different age groups (18 to 30 years old group, more than 30 years old group) and different phase velocity encoding value of IVC middle segment, one-way ANOVA was used to compare different phase velocity encoding value of IVC upper segment [(60, 80, 100)cm/s]. Pearson correlation coefficient and regression equation were used to evaluate the relationships between area, blood flow, and velocity. Results: Among 50 patients with successful completion of the examination, significant difference was found in A, MV, MF and RF between the different IVC segments. MF of the IVC middle segment were (37.94 ± 7.32) and (33.68 ± 6.65) ml/s in male (n=24) and female (n=26), respectively; significant difference was found in different genders (t=2.49, P=0.017). MF of upper segment and middle segments of IVC were (54.89 ± 10.98) and (38.29 ± 7.54) ml/s in 18 to 30 years old group (n=27), while MF of upper segment and the middle of IVC were (44.96 ± 8.49) and (32.65 ± 5.59) ml/s in older than 30 years old group (n=23

  15. Simultaneous transmission for an encrypted image and a double random-phase encryption key

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sheng; Zhou, Xin; Li, Da-Hai; Zhou, Ding-Fu

    2007-06-01

    We propose a method to simultaneously transmit double random-phase encryption key and an encrypted image by making use of the fact that an acceptable decryption result can be obtained when only partial data of the encrypted image have been taken in the decryption process. First, the original image data are encoded as an encrypted image by a double random-phase encryption technique. Second, a double random-phase encryption key is encoded as an encoded key by the Rivest-Shamir-Adelman (RSA) public-key encryption algorithm. Then the amplitude of the encrypted image is modulated by the encoded key to form what we call an encoded image. Finally, the encoded image that carries both the encrypted image and the encoded key is delivered to the receiver. Based on such a method, the receiver can have an acceptable result and secure transmission can be guaranteed by the RSA cipher system.

  16. Hippocampal Contribution to Context Encoding across Development Is Disrupted following Early-Life Adversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Hilary K; Sheridan, Margaret A; Sambrook, Kelly A; Rosen, Maya L; Askren, Mary K; McLaughlin, Katie A

    2017-02-15

    Context can drastically influence responses to environmental stimuli. For example, a gunshot should provoke a different response at a public park than a shooting range. Little is known about how contextual processing and neural correlates change across human development or about individual differences related to early environmental experiences. Children ( N = 60; 8-19 years, 24 exposed to interpersonal violence) completed a context encoding task during fMRI scanning using a delayed match-to-sample design with neutral, happy, and angry facial cues embedded in realistic background scenes. Outside the scanner, participants completed a memory test for context-face pairings. Context memory and neural correlates of context encoding did not vary with age. Larger hippocampal volume was associated with better context memory. Posterior hippocampus was recruited during context encoding, and greater activation in this region predicted better memory for contexts paired with angry faces. Children exposed to violence had poor memory of contexts paired with angry faces, reduced hippocampal volume, and atypical neural recruitment on encoding trials with angry faces, including reduced hippocampal activation and greater functional connectivity between hippocampus and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC). Greater hippocampus-vlPFC connectivity was associated with worse memory for contexts paired with angry faces. Posterior hippocampus appears to support context encoding, a process that does not exhibit age-related variation from middle childhood to late adolescence. Exposure to dangerous environments in childhood is associated with poor context encoding in the presence of threat, likely due to greater vlPFC-dependent attentional narrowing on threat cues at the expense of hippocampus-dependent processing of the broader context. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The ability to use context to guide reactions to environmental stimuli promotes flexible behavior. Remarkably little research has

  17. Reward modulation of hippocampal subfield activation during successful associative encoding and retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolosin, Sasha M.; Zeithamova, Dagmar; Preston, Alison R.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that motivation enhances episodic memory formation through interactions between medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures and dopaminergic midbrain. In addition, recent theories propose that motivation specifically facilitates hippocampal associative binding processes, resulting in more detailed memories that are readily reinstated from partial input. Here, we used high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine how motivation influences associative encoding and retrieval processes within human MTL subregions and dopaminergic midbrain. Participants intentionally encoded object associations under varying conditions of reward and performed a retrieval task during which studied associations were cued from partial input. Behaviorally, cued recall performance was superior for high-value relative to low-value associations; however, participants differed in the degree to which rewards influenced memory. The magnitude of behavioral reward modulation was associated with reward-related activation changes in dentate gyrus/CA2,3 during encoding and enhanced functional connectivity between dentate gyrus/CA2,3 and dopaminergic midbrain during both the encoding and retrieval phases of the task. These findings suggests that within the hippocampus, reward-based motivation specifically enhances dentate gyrus/CA2,3 associative encoding mechanisms through interactions with dopaminergic midbrain. Furthermore, within parahippocampal cortex and dopaminergic midbrain regions, activation associated with successful memory formation was modulated by reward across the group. During the retrieval phase, we also observed enhanced activation in hippocampus and dopaminergic midbrain for high-value associations that occurred in the absence of any explicit cues to reward. Collectively, these findings shed light on fundamental mechanisms through which reward impacts associative memory formation and retrieval through facilitation of MTL and VTA/SN processing

  18. Levels-of-processing effect on frontotemporal function in schizophrenia during word encoding and recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragland, J Daniel; Gur, Ruben C; Valdez, Jeffrey N; Loughead, James; Elliott, Mark; Kohler, Christian; Kanes, Stephen; Siegel, Steven J; Moelter, Stephen T; Gur, Raquel E

    2005-10-01

    Patients with schizophrenia improve episodic memory accuracy when given organizational strategies through levels-of-processing paradigms. This study tested if improvement is accompanied by normalized frontotemporal function. Event-related blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure activation during shallow (perceptual) and deep (semantic) word encoding and recognition in 14 patients with schizophrenia and 14 healthy comparison subjects. Despite slower and less accurate overall word classification, the patients showed normal levels-of-processing effects, with faster and more accurate recognition of deeply processed words. These effects were accompanied by left ventrolateral prefrontal activation during encoding in both groups, although the thalamus, hippocampus, and lingual gyrus were overactivated in the patients. During word recognition, the patients showed overactivation in the left frontal pole and had a less robust right prefrontal response. Evidence of normal levels-of-processing effects and left prefrontal activation suggests that patients with schizophrenia can form and maintain semantic representations when they are provided with organizational cues and can improve their word encoding and retrieval. Areas of overactivation suggest residual inefficiencies. Nevertheless, the effect of teaching organizational strategies on episodic memory and brain function is a worthwhile topic for future interventional studies.

  19. All-phase MR angiography using independent component analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI time series. φ-MRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kiyotaka; Matsuzawa, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Masaki; Nakada, Tsutomu; Nakayama, Naoki; Kwee, I.L.

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (dynamic MRI) represents a MRI version of non-diffusible tracer methods, the main clinical use of which is the physiological construction of what is conventionally referred to as perfusion images. The raw data utilized for constructing MRI perfusion images are time series of pixel signal alterations associated with the passage of a gadolinium containing contrast agent. Such time series are highly compatible with independent component analysis (ICA), a novel statistical signal processing technique capable of effectively separating a single mixture of multiple signals into their original independent source signals (blind separation). Accordingly, we applied ICA to dynamic MRI time series. The technique was found to be powerful, allowing for hitherto unobtainable assessment of regional cerebral hemodynamics in vivo. (author)

  20. Wall morphology, blood flow and wall shear stress: MR findings in patients with peripheral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galizia, Mauricio S.; Barker, Alex; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Liao, Yihua [Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); McDermott, Mary M. [Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-04-15

    To investigate the influence of atherosclerotic plaques on femoral haemodynamics assessed by two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with three-directional velocity encoding. During 1 year, patients with peripheral artery disease and an ankle brachial index <1.00 were enrolled. After institutional review board approval and written informed consent, 44 patients (age, 70 ± 12 years) underwent common femoral artery MRI. Patients with contra-indications for MRI were excluded. Sequences included 2D time-of-flight, proton-density, T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated 2D PC-MRI with 3D velocity encoding was acquired. A radiologist classified images in five categories. Blood flow, velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) along the vessel circumference were quantified from the PC-MRI data. The acquired images were of good quality for interpretation. There were no image quality problems related to poor ECG-gating or slice positioning. Velocities, oscillatory shear stress and total flow were similar between patients with normal arteries and wall thickening/plaque. Patients with plaques demonstrated regionally increased peak systolic WSS and enhanced WSS eccentricity. Combined multi-contrast morphological imaging of the peripheral arterial wall with PC-MRI with three-directional velocity encoding is a feasible technique. Further study is needed to determine whether flow is an appropriate marker for altered endothelial cell function, vascular remodelling and plaque progression. (orig.)

  1. Displacement encoder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesketh, T.G.

    1983-01-01

    In an optical encoder, light from an optical fibre input A is encoded by means of the encoding disc and is subsequently collected for transmission via optical fibre B. At some point in the optical path between the fibres A and B, the light is separated into component form by means of a filtering or dispersive system and each colour component is associated with a respective one of the coding channels of the disc. In this way, the significance of each bit of the coded information is represented by a respective colour thereby enabling the components to be re-combined for transmission by the fibre B without loss of information. (author)

  2. The neural encoding of guesses in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Stefan; Bogler, Carsten; Soon, Chun Siong; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2012-01-16

    Human perception depends heavily on the quality of sensory information. When objects are hard to see we often believe ourselves to be purely guessing. Here we investigated whether such guesses use brain networks involved in perceptual decision making or independent networks. We used a combination of fMRI and pattern classification to test how visibility affects the signals, which determine choices. We found that decisions regarding clearly visible objects are predicted by signals in sensory brain regions, whereas different regions in parietal cortex became predictive when subjects were shown invisible objects and believed themselves to be purely guessing. This parietal network was highly overlapping with regions, which have previously been shown to encode free decisions. Thus, the brain might use a dedicated network for determining choices when insufficient sensory information is available. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Similar patterns of neural activity predict memory function during encoding and retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragel, James E; Ezzyat, Youssef; Sperling, Michael R; Gorniak, Richard; Worrell, Gregory A; Berry, Brent M; Inman, Cory; Lin, Jui-Jui; Davis, Kathryn A; Das, Sandhitsu R; Stein, Joel M; Jobst, Barbara C; Zaghloul, Kareem A; Sheth, Sameer A; Rizzuto, Daniel S; Kahana, Michael J

    2017-07-15

    Neural networks that span the medial temporal lobe (MTL), prefrontal cortex, and posterior cortical regions are essential to episodic memory function in humans. Encoding and retrieval are supported by the engagement of both distinct neural pathways across the cortex and common structures within the medial temporal lobes. However, the degree to which memory performance can be determined by neural processing that is common to encoding and retrieval remains to be determined. To identify neural signatures of successful memory function, we administered a delayed free-recall task to 187 neurosurgical patients implanted with subdural or intraparenchymal depth electrodes. We developed multivariate classifiers to identify patterns of spectral power across the brain that independently predicted successful episodic encoding and retrieval. During encoding and retrieval, patterns of increased high frequency activity in prefrontal, MTL, and inferior parietal cortices, accompanied by widespread decreases in low frequency power across the brain predicted successful memory function. Using a cross-decoding approach, we demonstrate the ability to predict memory function across distinct phases of the free-recall task. Furthermore, we demonstrate that classifiers that combine information from both encoding and retrieval states can outperform task-independent models. These findings suggest that the engagement of a core memory network during either encoding or retrieval shapes the ability to remember the past, despite distinct neural interactions that facilitate encoding and retrieval. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Establishing a clinical cardiac MRI service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Regan, D.P.; Schmitz, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    After several years of research development cardiovascular MRI has evolved into a widely accepted clinical tool. It offers important diagnostic and prognostic information for a variety of clinical indications, which include ischaemic heart disease, cardiomyopathies, valvular dysfunction and congenital heart disorders. It is a safe non-invasive technique that employs a variety of imaging sequences optimized for temporal or spatial resolution, tissue-specific contrast, flow quantification or angiography. Cardiac MRI offers specific advantages over conventional imaging techniques for a significant number of patients. The demand for cardiac MRI studies from cardiothoracic surgeons, cardiologists and other referrers is likely to continue to rise with pressure for more widespread local service provision. Setting up a cardiac MRI service requires careful consideration regarding funding issues and how it will be integrated with existing service provision. The purchase of cardiac phased array coils, monitoring equipment and software upgrades must also be considered, as well as the training needs of those involved. The choice of appropriate imaging protocols will be guided by operator experience, clinical indication and equipment capability, and is likely to evolve as the service develops. Post-processing and offline analysis form a significant part of the time taken to report studies and an efficient method of providing quantitative reports is an important requirement. Collaboration between radiologists and cardiologists is needed to develop a successful service and multi-disciplinary meetings are key component of this. This review will explore these issues from our perspective of a new clinical cardiac MRI service operating over its first year in a teaching hospital imaging department

  5. A short overview of MRI artefacts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    sampling in the phase-encoding direction is the significant difference in the time of acquisition in the fre- ... Department of Medical Physics. University of the Free State. Bloemfontein. Fig. 1. Motion artefact (T1 ..... to image expansion for improved definition. IEEE Trans Med Imaging 1994; 3:233-242. 13. Holden M, Breeuwer ...

  6. Classification of fMRI independent components using IC-fingerprints and support vector machine classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, Federico; Gentile, Francesco; Esposito, Fabrizio; Balsi, Marco; Di Salle, Francesco; Goebel, Rainer; Formisano, Elia

    2007-01-01

    We present a general method for the classification of independent components (ICs) extracted from functional MRI (fMRI) data sets. The method consists of two steps. In the first step, each fMRI-IC is associated with an IC-fingerprint, i.e., a representation of the component in a multidimensional space of parameters. These parameters are post hoc estimates of global properties of the ICs and are largely independent of a specific experimental design and stimulus timing. In the second step a machine learning algorithm automatically separates the IC-fingerprints into six general classes after preliminary training performed on a small subset of expert-labeled components. We illustrate this approach in a multisubject fMRI study employing visual structure-from-motion stimuli encoding faces and control random shapes. We show that: (1) IC-fingerprints are a valuable tool for the inspection, characterization and selection of fMRI-ICs and (2) automatic classifications of fMRI-ICs in new subjects present a high correspondence with those obtained by expert visual inspection of the components. Importantly, our classification procedure highlights several neurophysiologically interesting processes. The most intriguing of which is reflected, with high intra- and inter-subject reproducibility, in one IC exhibiting a transiently task-related activation in the 'face' region of the primary sensorimotor cortex. This suggests that in addition to or as part of the mirror system, somatotopic regions of the sensorimotor cortex are involved in disambiguating the perception of a moving body part. Finally, we show that the same classification algorithm can be successfully applied, without re-training, to fMRI collected using acquisition parameters, stimulation modality and timing considerably different from those used for training.

  7. Sensitivity quantification of remote detection NMR and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granwehr, J.; Seeley, J. A.

    2006-04-01

    A sensitivity analysis is presented of the remote detection NMR technique, which facilitates the spatial separation of encoding and detection of spin magnetization. Three different cases are considered: remote detection of a transient signal that must be encoded point-by-point like a free induction decay, remote detection of an experiment where the transient dimension is reduced to one data point like phase encoding in an imaging experiment, and time-of-flight (TOF) flow visualization. For all cases, the sensitivity enhancement is proportional to the relative sensitivity between the remote detector and the circuit that is used for encoding. It is shown for the case of an encoded transient signal that the sensitivity does not scale unfavorably with the number of encoded points compared to direct detection. Remote enhancement scales as the square root of the ratio of corresponding relaxation times in the two detection environments. Thus, remote detection especially increases the sensitivity of imaging experiments of porous materials with large susceptibility gradients, which cause a rapid dephasing of transverse spin magnetization. Finally, TOF remote detection, in which the detection volume is smaller than the encoded fluid volume, allows partial images corresponding to different time intervals between encoding and detection to be recorded. These partial images, which contain information about the fluid displacement, can be recorded, in an ideal case, with the same sensitivity as the full image detected in a single step with a larger coil.

  8. The application of MRI and MRS in psychiatry and performance evaluation of magnetic field homogeneity in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua Hsuan

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a safe non-invasive tool to study the physiological mechanisms of the human brain. MRS has the capability to provide the information regarding neurochemicals in brains of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. Therefore, to produce measurable and interpretable information in MRI and MRS, a quality control (QC) program is required. Magnetic field homogeneity (MFH) is an important factor for QC when the volume sizes and neurochemical levels are quantified. Poor main (B0) MFH leads to artifacts, signal losses and broadened line widths. The American College of Radiology's (ACR) MRI QC manual mandates annual checks of MFH, suggesting tests using spectral line widths (FWHM) and phase-difference (Deltaϕ) maps. A new method, dubbed the bandwidth-difference (DeltaBW) method, is proposed along with a prototype phantom for determining MFH. The DeltaBW method is compared with standard methods and has also been tested in different model MRI systems from various manufacturers. Direct comparisons of the data obtained using the DeltaBW method demonstrated good agreement with data obtained using the linewidth method and the frequency map data provided by one MRI system manufacturer. As a result, the DeltaBW method produces measurements of MFH at various Diameter Sphere Volume (DSV) values that can be obtained from a single set of phantom images. The conclusion of the study is that the accuracy of DeltaBW B0 homogeneity measurements of MFH is comparable to the other methods tested while the ease of measurement in practical clinical setting is considerably improved.

  9. A Preliminary fMRI Study of a Novel Self-Paced Written Fluency Task: Observation of Left-Hemispheric Activation, and Increased Frontal Activation in Late vs. Early Task Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh eGolestanirad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychological tests of verbal fluency are very widely used to characterize impaired cognitive function. For clinical neuroscience studies and potential medical applications, measuring the brain activity that underlies such tests with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is of significant interest - but a challenging proposition because overt speech can cause signal artifacts, which tend to worsen as the duration of speech tasks becomes longer. In a novel approach, we present the group brain activity of 12 subjects who performed a self-paced written version of phonemic fluency using fMRI-compatible tablet technology that recorded responses and provided task-related feedback on a projection screen display, over long-duration task blocks (60 s. As predicted, we observed robust activation in the left anterior inferior and medial frontal gyri, consisting with previously reported results of verbal fluency tasks which established the role of these areas in strategic word retrieval. In addition, the number of words produced in the late phase (last 30 s of written phonemic fluency was significantly less (p < 0.05 than the number produced in the early phase (first 30 s. Activation during the late phase vs. the early phase was also assessed from the first 20 s and last 20 s of task performance, which eliminated the possibility that the sluggish hemodynamic response from the early phase would affect the activation estimates of the late phase. The last 20 s produced greater activation maps covering extended areas in bilateral precuneus, cuneus, middle temporal gyrus, insula, middle frontal gyrus and cingulate gyrus. Among them, greater activation was observed in the bilateral middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann area BA 9 and cingulate gyrus (BA 24, 32 likely as part of the initiation, maintenance, and shifting of attentional resources.

  10. Pathological findings of uterine tumors preoperatively diagnosed as red degeneration of leiomyoma by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Go; Yamada, Takashi; Hamada, Takamitsu; Atsukawa, Natsuko; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Yamamoto, Kiyohito; Higashiyama, Akira; Juri, Hiroshi; Nakamoto, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Ohmichi, Masahide; Narumi, Yoshifumi

    2017-07-01

    Venous infarction of a leiomyoma is known as red degeneration of leiomyoma (RDL) and can be a cause of acute abdomen. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the only modality that can depict the inner condition of a leiomyoma, the typical MR findings of RDL are sometimes identified incidentally even in asymptomatic patients. The purpose of this study is to clarify common pathological findings of uterine tumors preoperatively diagnosed as RDL by MRI. We diagnosed 28 cases of RDL by MRI from March 2007 to April 2015. The ten lesions subjected to pathological analysis after resection were included in the study and reviewed by a gynecological pathologist. The average time from MRI to operation was 4.7 months. The typical beefy-red color was not observed on the cut surface of the tumor except in one tumor resected during the acute phase. All lesions diagnosed as RDL by MRI had common pathological findings consistent with red degeneration of leiomyoma, including coagulative necrosis. Other common pathological features of RDL besides extensive coagulative necrosis appear to be a lack of inflammatory cell infiltrate or hemorrhage in the entire lesion. Although RDL is known to cause acute abdomen, its typical MR findings can be observed even in asymptomatic patients in a condition that manifests long after red degeneration. The characteristic pathological findings in both the acute phase and the chronic phase that we found in this study, along with radiology reports, will be helpful references for gynecologists and pathologists in suspecting a history of red degeneration and confirming the diagnosis.

  11. Tradeoff between insensitivity to depth-induced spherical aberration and resolution of 3D fluorescence imaging due to the use of wavefront encoding with a radially symmetric phase mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doblas, Ana; Dutta, Ananya; Saavedra, Genaro; Preza, Chrysanthe

    2018-02-01

    Previously, a wavefront encoded (WFE) imaging system implemented using a squared cubic (SQUBIC) phase mask has been verified to reduce the sensitivity of the imaging system to spherical aberration (SA). The strength of the SQUBIC phase mask and, as consequence, the performance of the WFE system are controlled by a design parameter, A. Although the higher the A-value, the more tolerant the WFE system is to SA, this is accomplished at the expense of the effective imaging resolution. In this contribution, we investigate this tradeoff in order to find an optimal A-value to balance the effect of SA and loss of resolution.

  12. A Hybrid of Deep Network and Hidden Markov Model for MCI Identification with Resting-State fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Heung-Il; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method for modelling functional dynamics in resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) identification. Specifically, we devise a hybrid architecture by combining Deep Auto-Encoder (DAE) and Hidden Markov Model (HMM). The roles of DAE and HMM are, respectively, to discover hierarchical non-linear relations among features, by which we transform the original features into a lower dimension space, and to model dynamic characteristics inherent in rs-fMRI, i.e. , internal state changes. By building a generative model with HMMs for each class individually, we estimate the data likelihood of a test subject as MCI or normal healthy control, based on which we identify the clinical label. In our experiments, we achieved the maximal accuracy of 81.08% with the proposed method, outperforming state-of-the-art methods in the literature.

  13. Event-related fMRI studies of false memory: An Activation Likelihood Estimation meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkela, Kyle A; Dennis, Nancy A

    2016-01-29

    Over the last two decades, a wealth of research in the domain of episodic memory has focused on understanding the neural correlates mediating false memories, or memories for events that never happened. While several recent qualitative reviews have attempted to synthesize this literature, methodological differences amongst the empirical studies and a focus on only a sub-set of the findings has limited broader conclusions regarding the neural mechanisms underlying false memories. The current study performed a voxel-wise quantitative meta-analysis using activation likelihood estimation to investigate commonalities within the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) literature studying false memory. The results were broken down by memory phase (encoding, retrieval), as well as sub-analyses looking at differences in baseline (hit, correct rejection), memoranda (verbal, semantic), and experimental paradigm (e.g., semantic relatedness and perceptual relatedness) within retrieval. Concordance maps identified significant overlap across studies for each analysis. Several regions were identified in the general false retrieval analysis as well as multiple sub-analyses, indicating their ubiquitous, yet critical role in false retrieval (medial superior frontal gyrus, left precentral gyrus, left inferior parietal cortex). Additionally, several regions showed baseline- and paradigm-specific effects (hit/perceptual relatedness: inferior and middle occipital gyrus; CRs: bilateral inferior parietal cortex, precuneus, left caudate). With respect to encoding, analyses showed common activity in the left middle temporal gyrus and anterior cingulate cortex. No analysis identified a common cluster of activation in the medial temporal lobe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Yifan; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics.

  15. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2016-09-16

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics.

  16. Exploring fMRI Data for Periodic Signal Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Nielsen, Finn Årup; Larsen, Jan

    2002-01-01

    We use a Bayesian framework to detect periodic components in fMRI data. The resulting detector is sensitive to periodic components with a flexible number of harmonics and with arbitrary amplitude and phases of the harmonics. It is possible to detect the correct number of harmonics in periodic sig...

  17. Cloud-based uniform ChIP-Seq processing tools for modENCODE and ENCODE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Quang M; Jen, Fei-Yang Arthur; Zhou, Ziru; Chu, Kar Ming; Perry, Marc D; Kephart, Ellen T; Contrino, Sergio; Ruzanov, Peter; Stein, Lincoln D

    2013-07-22

    Funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the aim of the Model Organism ENCyclopedia of DNA Elements (modENCODE) project is to provide the biological research community with a comprehensive encyclopedia of functional genomic elements for both model organisms C. elegans (worm) and D. melanogaster (fly). With a total size of just under 10 terabytes of data collected and released to the public, one of the challenges faced by researchers is to extract biologically meaningful knowledge from this large data set. While the basic quality control, pre-processing, and analysis of the data has already been performed by members of the modENCODE consortium, many researchers will wish to reinterpret the data set using modifications and enhancements of the original protocols, or combine modENCODE data with other data sets. Unfortunately this can be a time consuming and logistically challenging proposition. In recognition of this challenge, the modENCODE DCC has released uniform computing resources for analyzing modENCODE data on Galaxy (https://github.com/modENCODE-DCC/Galaxy), on the public Amazon Cloud (http://aws.amazon.com), and on the private Bionimbus Cloud for genomic research (http://www.bionimbus.org). In particular, we have released Galaxy workflows for interpreting ChIP-seq data which use the same quality control (QC) and peak calling standards adopted by the modENCODE and ENCODE communities. For convenience of use, we have created Amazon and Bionimbus Cloud machine images containing Galaxy along with all the modENCODE data, software and other dependencies. Using these resources provides a framework for running consistent and reproducible analyses on modENCODE data, ultimately allowing researchers to use more of their time using modENCODE data, and less time moving it around.

  18. MRI in staging of rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourtsoyianni, S.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: MRI of the rectum is performed for initial local staging of primary rectal cancer in order to identify locally advanced rectal cancers and for assessment of treatment response after completion of neoadjuvant therapy. Introduction of new generation MRI scanners with optimal phased array body coils, resulting in improved contrast and spatial resolution images due to better signal to noise ratio, have contributed to production of high resolution images in which visualization of anatomical details such as the mesorectal fascia and the bowel wall layers are feasible. Pre-operative MRI of the rectum using mainly high resolution T2 weighted sequences has gained significant accreditation, especially after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery and neoadjuvant therapy in the treatment regimen of rectal cancer. MR Imaging is so far the only method that can preoperatively identify patients most likely to benefit from neoadjuvant therapy as well as demonstrate high risk patients for local recurrence. Regarding N stage besides of mesorectal lymph nodes which are removed during TME, especially in case of low lying rectal cancers, MRI may provide information regarding external/internal iliac lymph node involvement. High resolution MRI images may demonstrate lymph nodes with a diameter down to 2 mm, however these are still characterized based on their morphological features. Patients identified at initial MRI staging as having locally advanced rectal cancer undergo neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in order for their tumor to be downsized and downstaged, especially in low rectal cancers so that sphincter sparing surgery may be performed. In 15-30% of patients complete pathological response is achieved. Reimaging with MRI at 6 weeks post treatment is of great importance for assessing tumor response. Conventional MRI has a reported moderate accuracy for prediction of mesorectal fascia (MF) involvement after CRT therapy, mainly due to its

  19. Differentiation of osteoporotic and neoplastic vertebral fractures by chemical shift {l_brace}in-phase and out-of phase{r_brace} MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragab, Yasser [Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University (Egypt); Radiology Department, Dr Erfan and Bagedo General Hospital (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: yragab61@hotmail.com; Emad, Yasser [Rheumatology and Rehabilitation Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University (Egypt); Rheumatology and Rehabilitation Department, Dr Erfan and Bagedo General Hospital (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: yasseremad68@yahoo.com; Gheita, Tamer [Rheumatology and Rehabilitation Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University (Egypt)], E-mail: gheitamer@yahoo.com; Mansour, Maged [Oncology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University (Egypt); Oncology Department, Dr Erfan and Bagedo General Hospital (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: magedmansour@yahoo.com; Abou-Zeid, A. [Public Health Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt)], E-mail: alaabouzeid@yahoo.com; Ferrari, Serge [Division of Bone Diseases, Department of Rehabilitation and Geriatrics, and WHO, Collaborating Center for Osteoporosis Prevention, Geneva University Hospital (Switzerland)], E-mail: serge.ferrari@medecine.unige.ch; Rasker, Johannes J. [Rheumatologist University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands)], E-mail: j.j.rasker@utwente.nl

    2009-10-15

    Objective: The objective of this study was to establish the cut-off value of the signal intensity drop on chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with appropriate sensitivity and specificity to differentiate osteoporotic from neoplastic wedging of the spine. Patients and methods: All patients with wedging of vertebral bodies were included consecutively between February 2006 and January 2007. A chemical shift MRI was performed and signal intensity after (in-phase and out-phase) images were obtained. A DXA was performed in all. Results: A total of 40 patients were included, 20 with osteoporotic wedging (group 1) and 20 neoplastic (group 2). They were 21 males and 19 females. Acute vertebral collapse was observed in 15 patients in group 1 and subacute collapse in another 5 patients, while in group 2, 11 patients showed acute collapse and 9 patients (45%) showed subacute vertebral collapse. On the chemical shift MRI a substantial reduction in signal intensity was found in all lesions in both groups. The proportional changes observed in signal intensity of bone marrow lesions on in-phase compared with out-of-phase images showed significant differences in both groups (P < 0.05). At a cut-off value of 35%, the observed sensitivity of out-of-phase images was 95%, specificity was 100%, positive predictive value was 100% and negative predictive value was 95.2%. Conclusion: A chemical shift MRI is useful in order to differentiate patients with vertebral collapse due to underlying osteoporosis or neoplastic process.

  20. Distinct medial temporal networks encode surprise during motivation by reward versus punishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, Vishnu P.; LaBar, Kevin S.; Adcock, R. Alison

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive motivated behavior requires predictive internal representations of the environment, and surprising events are indications for encoding new representations of the environment. The medial temporal lobe memory system, including the hippocampus and surrounding cortex, encodes surprising events and is influenced by motivational state. Because behavior reflects the goals of an individual, we investigated whether motivational valence (i.e., pursuing rewards versus avoiding punishments) also impacts neural and mnemonic encoding of surprising events. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), participants encountered perceptually unexpected events either during the pursuit of rewards or avoidance of punishments. Despite similar levels of motivation across groups, reward and punishment facilitated the processing of surprising events in different medial temporal lobe regions. Whereas during reward motivation, perceptual surprises enhanced activation in the hippocampus, during punishment motivation surprises instead enhanced activation in parahippocampal cortex. Further, we found that reward motivation facilitated hippocampal coupling with ventromedial PFC, whereas punishment motivation facilitated parahippocampal cortical coupling with orbitofrontal cortex. Behaviorally, post-scan testing revealed that reward, but not punishment, motivation resulted in greater memory selectivity for surprising events encountered during goal pursuit. Together these findings demonstrate that neuromodulatory systems engaged by anticipation of reward and punishment target separate components of the medial temporal lobe, modulating medial temporal lobe sensitivity and connectivity. Thus, reward and punishment motivation yield distinct neural contexts for learning, with distinct consequences for how surprises are incorporated into predictive mnemonic models of the environment. PMID:26854903

  1. Distinct medial temporal networks encode surprise during motivation by reward versus punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, Vishnu P; LaBar, Kevin S; Adcock, R Alison

    2016-10-01

    Adaptive motivated behavior requires predictive internal representations of the environment, and surprising events are indications for encoding new representations of the environment. The medial temporal lobe memory system, including the hippocampus and surrounding cortex, encodes surprising events and is influenced by motivational state. Because behavior reflects the goals of an individual, we investigated whether motivational valence (i.e., pursuing rewards versus avoiding punishments) also impacts neural and mnemonic encoding of surprising events. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), participants encountered perceptually unexpected events either during the pursuit of rewards or avoidance of punishments. Despite similar levels of motivation across groups, reward and punishment facilitated the processing of surprising events in different medial temporal lobe regions. Whereas during reward motivation, perceptual surprises enhanced activation in the hippocampus, during punishment motivation surprises instead enhanced activation in parahippocampal cortex. Further, we found that reward motivation facilitated hippocampal coupling with ventromedial PFC, whereas punishment motivation facilitated parahippocampal cortical coupling with orbitofrontal cortex. Behaviorally, post-scan testing revealed that reward, but not punishment, motivation resulted in greater memory selectivity for surprising events encountered during goal pursuit. Together these findings demonstrate that neuromodulatory systems engaged by anticipation of reward and punishment target separate components of the medial temporal lobe, modulating medial temporal lobe sensitivity and connectivity. Thus, reward and punishment motivation yield distinct neural contexts for learning, with distinct consequences for how surprises are incorporated into predictive mnemonic models of the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.