WorldWideScience

Sample records for phase change polymers

  1. Polymers in phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, M.C.; Brites, M.J.; Alexandre, J.H. [National Lab. for Energy and Geology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2010-07-01

    Phase Change Materials (PCMs) which are the core of latent heat thermal energy storage systems are currently an area of investigation of increasing interest. Several substances differing in physical and chemical characteristics as well as in thermal behavior have been studied as PCMS{sup 1-3}. In order to meet the requisites of particular systems, auxiliary materials are often used with specific functions. This bibliographic survey shows that polymeric materials have been proposed either as the PCM itself in solid-liquid or solid-solid transitions or to perform auxiliary functions of shape stabilisation and microencapsulation for solid-liquid PCMs. The PCMs have an operating temperature ranging from around 0 C (for the system water/polyacrilamid) to around 127 C (for crosslinked HDPE). (orig.)

  2. Fabrication of Phase-Change Polymer Colloidal Photonic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyi Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the preparation of phase-change polymer colloidal photonic crystals (PCs by assembling hollow latex spheres encapsulated with dodecanol for the first time. The monodispersed hollow latex spheres were obtained by phase reversion of monodispersed core-shell latex spheres in the n-hexane, which dissolves the PS core and retains the PMMA/PAA shell. The as-prepared phase-change colloidal PCs show stable phase-change behavior. This fabrication of phase-change colloidal PCs would be significant for PC’s applications in functional coatings and various optic devices.

  3. Applications of fibrous substrates containing insolubilized phase change polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigo, Tyrone L.; Bruno, Joseph S.

    1993-01-01

    Incorporation of polyethylene glycols into fibrous substrates produces several improved functional properties when they are insolubilized by crosslinking with a methylolamide resin or by polyacetal formation by their reaction with glyoxal. The range of molecular weights of polyols that may be insolubilized is broad as are the curing conditions (0.25-10 min at 80-200C). Most representative fiber types and blends (natural and synthetic) and all types of fabric constructions (woven, nonwoven and knit) have been modified by incorporation of the bound polyols. The most novel property is the thermal adaptability of the modified substrates to many climatic conditions. This adaptability is due to the high latent heat of the crosslinked polyols that function as phase change materials, the hydrophilic nature of the crosslinked polymer and its enhanced thermal conductivity. Other enhanced properties imparted to fabrics include flex and flat abrasion, antimicrobial activity, reduced static charge, resistance to oily soils, resiliency, wind resistance and reduced lint loss. Applications commercialized in the U.S. and Japan include sportswear and skiwear. Several examples of electric sets of properties useful for specific end uses are given. In addition, other uses are biomedical horticultural, aerospace, indoor insulation, automotive interiors and components and packaging material.

  4. Applications of fibrous substrates containing insolubilized phase change polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigo, Tyrone L.; Bruno, Joseph S.

    1993-02-01

    Incorporation of polyethylene glycols into fibrous substrates produces several improved functional properties when they are insolubilized by crosslinking with a methylolamide resin or by polyacetal formation by their reaction with glyoxal. The range of molecular weights of polyols that may be insolubilized is broad as are the curing conditions (0.25-10 min at 80-200C). Most representative fiber types and blends (natural and synthetic) and all types of fabric constructions (woven, nonwoven and knit) have been modified by incorporation of the bound polyols. The most novel property is the thermal adaptability of the modified substrates to many climatic conditions. This adaptability is due to the high latent heat of the crosslinked polyols that function as phase change materials, the hydrophilic nature of the crosslinked polymer and its enhanced thermal conductivity. Other enhanced properties imparted to fabrics include flex and flat abrasion, antimicrobial activity, reduced static charge, resistance to oily soils, resiliency, wind resistance and reduced lint loss. Applications commercialized in the U.S. and Japan include sportswear and skiwear. Several examples of electric sets of properties useful for specific end uses are given. In addition, other uses are biomedical horticultural, aerospace, indoor insulation, automotive interiors and components and packaging material.

  5. Phase equilibria and phase structures of polymer blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalykh, Anatolii E; Gerasimov, Vladimir K

    2004-01-01

    Experimental, methodical and theoretical studies dealing with phase equilibria and phase structures of polymer blends are generalised. The general and specific features of the change in solubility of polymers with changes in the molecular mass and copolymer composition and upon the formation of three-dimensional cross-linked networks are described. The results of the effect of the prehistory on the phase structure and the non-equilibrium state of polymer blends are considered in detail.

  6. PEG encapsulated by porous triamide-linked polymers as support for solid-liquid phase change materials for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriamitantsoa, Radoelizo S.; Dong, Wenjun; Gao, Hongyi; Wang, Ge

    2017-03-01

    A series of porous triamide-linked polymers labeled as PTP were prepared by condensation of 1,3,5-benzenetricarbonyl trichloride with benzene-1,4-diamine (A), 4,4‧-methylenediamine (B) and 1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triamine (C) respectively. The as-synthesized polymers exhibit permanent porosity and high surface areas which guarantee to hold polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules in their network for shape-stabilized phase change materials. They possess different effects on the phase change properties of the composite due to their different porosities. PTP-A have intrinsic well-ordered morphology, microstructure and good enough pores to keep the PCMs compared to PTP-B and PTP-C. PEG 2000 used as PCMs could be retained up to 85 wt% in PTP-A polymer materials and these composites were defined as form-stable composite PCMs without the leakage of melted PCM. The thermal study revealed a good storage effect of encapsulated polymer and the enthalpy of melting increases in the order PTP-C PCMs.

  7. New polymers for phase partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The synthesizing of several polyethylene glycols having crown ethers attached is reported. This work led to the identification of three new polymer types which promise to be more effective at selectively binding specific cell types. Work was completed on identification of chemical properties of the new polymer crowns and on development of new techniques for determination of polymer-phase composition.

  8. Latent heat storage by silica-coated polymer beads containing organic phase change materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feczkó, T.; Trif, L.; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 132, July (2016), s. 405-414 ISSN 0038-092X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH14318 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : latent heat storage * phase change materials * porous beads by suspension polymerization Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.018, year: 2016

  9. Fluctuation effects in bulk polymer phase behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, F.S.; Rosedale, J.H.; Stepanek, P.; Lodge, T.P.; Wiltzius, P.; Hjelm R, Jr.; Fredrickson, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    Bulk polymer-polymer, and block copolymer, phase behaviors have traditionally been interpreted using mean-field theories. Recent small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of critical phenomena in model binary polymer mixtures confirm that non-mean-field behavior is restricted to a narrow range of temperatures near the critical point, in close agreement with the Ginzburg criterion. In contrast, strong derivations from mean-field behavior are evident in SANS and rheological measurements on model block copolymers more than 50C above the order-disorder transition (ODT), which can be attributed to sizeable composition fluctuations. Such fluctuation effects undermine the mean-field assumption, conventionally applied to bulk polymers, and result in qualitative changes in phase behavior, such as the elimination of a thermodynamic stability limit in these materials. The influence of fluctuation effects on block copolymer and binary mixture phase behavior is compared and contrasted in this presentation

  10. Phase transitions in polymer monolayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deschênes, Louise; Lyklema, J.; Danis, Claude; Saint-Germain, François

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the application of the two-dimensional Clapeyron law to polymer monolayers. This is a largely unexplored area of research. The main problems are (1) establishing if equilibrium is reached and (2) if so, identifying and defining phases as functions of the temperature.

  11. Synthesis and Performances of Phase Change Microcapsules with a Polymer/Diatomite Hybrid Shell for Thermal Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Sun

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical behavior of phase-change microcapsules (microPCMs is of vital significance for practical applications in thermal energy storage. Hence, a new type of microPCMs based on an n-octadecane (C18 core and a melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF/diatomite hybrid shell was developed through in situ polymerization. Based on SEM micrographs, most microPCMs exhibited a nearly spherical and smooth microstructure, with broadened particle size distributions. It was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR that successful polymerization of diatomite into the microPCMs occurred, and that additional diatomite had no effect on the core coated by the shell. In addition, the results of the differential scanning calorimeter (DSC and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the microPCMs were remarkably improved by the addition of a moderate amount of diatomite, but that the heat enthalpy and encapsulated efficiency (η decreased slightly. The incorporation of 2 wt % diatomite resulted in the average Young’s modulus of microPCMs, which was 1.64 times greater than those of microPCMs without diatomite. Furthermore, the melting and crystallization enthalpies and the encapsulated efficiency of the microPCMs were as high as 237.6 J/g, 234.4 J/g and 77.90%, respectively. The microPCMs with a polymer/diatomite hybrid shell may become the potential materials in the application of thermal energy storage.

  12. Phase formation of physically associating polymer blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Fumihiko

    1993-01-01

    Polymers exhibit a variety of condensed phases when some of their segments are capable of forming weak bonds which can be created and destroyed by thermal motion. Transition from one phase to another caused by such 'segment association' is reversible by the change of the temperature and the concentration, so that it is called 'reversible phase transition'. What types of reversible phase formation are possible for a given associative interaction? What is the most fundamental laws which govern the competition between molecular association and phase separation? This paper surveys, as typical examples of reversible phases, macroscopic phase separation, microphase formation, solvation, gelation, etc. from the unified point of view, and explores the possibility of new condensed phases caused by their mutual interference. (author)

  13. Phase change dynamics in a polymer thin film upon femtosecond and picosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonse, J.; Wiggins, S.M.; Solis, J.; Lippert, T.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of the pulse duration on the laser-induced changes in a thin triazenepolymer film on a glass substrate has been investigated for single, near-infrared (800 nm) Ti:sapphire laser pulses with durations ranging from 130 fs up to 2.6 ps. Post-irradiation optical microscopy has been used to quantitatively determine the damage threshold fluence. The latter decreases from ∼800 mJ/cm 2 for a 2.6 ps laser pulse to ∼500 mJ/cm 2 for a pulse duration of 130 fs. In situ real-time reflectivity (RTR) measurements have been performed using a ps-resolution streak camera set-up to study the transformation dynamics upon excitation with single pulses of duration of 130 fs and fluences close to the damage threshold. Very different reflectivity transients have been observed above and below the damage threshold fluence. Above the damage threshold, an extremely complicated behaviour with oscillations of up to 100% in the transient reflectivity has been observed. Below the damage threshold, the transient reflectivity decreases by as much as 70% within 1 ns with a subsequent recovery to the initial level occurring on the ms timescale. No apparent damage could be detected by optical microscopy under these irradiation conditions. Furthermore, within the 395-410 mJ/cm 2 fluence range, the transient reflectivity increases by ∼10%. The analysis of these results indicates that the observed transformations are thermal in nature, in contrast to the known photochemical decomposition of this triazenepolymer under UV irradiation

  14. Polymer solution phase separation: Microgravity simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Lawrence C.; Sutter, James K.

    1989-01-01

    In many multicomponent systems, a transition from a single phase of uniform composition to a multiphase state with separated regions of different composition can be induced by changes in temperature and shear. The density difference between the phase and thermal and/or shear gradients within the system results in buoyancy driven convection. These differences affect kinetics of the phase separation if the system has a sufficiently low viscosity. This investigation presents more preliminary developments of a theoretical model in order to describe effects of the buoyancy driven convection in phase separation kinetics. Polymer solutions were employed as model systems because of the ease with which density differences can be systematically varied and because of the importance of phase separation in the processing and properties of polymeric materials. The results indicate that the kinetics of the phase separation can be performed viscometrically using laser light scattering as a principle means of following the process quantitatively. Isopycnic polymer solutions were used to determine the viscosity and density difference limits for polymer phase separation.

  15. Polymers as reference partitioning phase: polymer calibration for an analytically operational approach to quantify multimedia phase partitioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Witt, Gesine; Smedes, Foppe

    2016-01-01

    Polymers are increasingly applied for the enrichment of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) from various types of samples and media in many analytical partitioning-based measuring techniques. We propose using polymers as a reference partitioning phase and introduce polymer-polymer partitioning......-air) and multimedia partition coefficients (lipid-water, air-water) were calculated by applying the new concept of a polymer as reference partitioning phase and by using polymer-polymer partition coefficients as conversion factors. The present study encourages the use of polymer-polymer partition coefficients...

  16. Synthesizing A Phase Changing Bistable Electroactive Polymer And Silver Nanoparticles Coated Fabric As A Resistive Heating Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhi

    Transducer technologies that convert energy from one form to another (e.g. electrical energy to mechanical energy or thermal energy and vise versa) are considered as the basic building blocks of robots and wearable electronics, two of the rapidly emerging technologies that impact our daily life. With an emphasis on developing the essential smart materials, this dissertation focuses on two specific transducer technologies, bistable large-strain electro-mechanical actuation and resistive Joule heating, in pursuit of refreshable Braille electronic displays and wearable thermal management element, respectively. Dielectric elastomers (DEs) have been intensively studied for their promising ability to mimic human muscles in providing efficient electro-mechanical actuation. They exhibit a unique combination of properties, including large strain, fast response, high energy density, mechanical compliancy, lightweight, and low cost. However, the softness of the DE materials, which is a prerequisite for electrically induced large actuation strain, has been hindering their application in adaptive structures. In these applications such as braille displays, a certain amount of mechanical support is necessary in addition to large strains for the device or system to function. Bistable electroactive polymers (BSEP) that leverage the electrically induced large-strain actuation of DE actuators and the bi-stable rigid-to-rigid deformation of shape memory polymers are innovated to provide large electrical actuation strain in their rubbery state and fix the deformation by cooling down to room temperature to incorporate mechanical rigidity. BSEP materials that can suppress electromechanical instability and exhibit stable mechanical properties in the rubbery state are desired. A bimodal BSEP material with a glass transition temperature right above room temperature has been synthesized employing simple UV curing process. The BSEP has a large storage modulus over 1GPa at room temperature

  17. Tethered Nanoparticle–Polymer Composites: Phase Stability and Curvature

    KAUST Repository

    Srivastava, Samanvaya; Agarwal, Praveen; Archer, Lynden A.

    2012-01-01

    different small-angle X-ray scattering signatures in comparison to phase-separated composites comprised of bare or sparsely grafted nanoparticles. A general diagram for the dispersion state and phase stability of polymer tethered nanoparticle-polymer

  18. Characterization of the polymer energy landscape in polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunctions with pure and mixed phases

    KAUST Repository

    Sweetnam, Sean

    2014-10-08

    Theoretical and experimental studies suggest that energetic offsets between the charge transport energy levels in different morphological phases of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunctions may improve charge separation and reduce recombination in polymer solar cells (PSCs). In this work, we use cyclic voltammetry, UV-vis absorption, and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy to characterize hole energy levels in the polymer phases of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunctions. We observe an energetic offset of up to 150 meV between amorphous and crystalline polymer due to bandgap widening associated primarily with changes in polymer conjugation length. We also observe an energetic offset of up to 350 meV associated with polymer:fullerene intermolecular interactions. The first effect has been widely observed, but the second effect is not always considered despite being larger in magnitude for some systems. These energy level shifts may play a major role in PSC performance and must be thoroughly characterized for a complete understanding of PSC function.

  19. Phase separation of comb polymer nanocomposite melts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qinzhi; Feng, Yancong; Chen, Lan

    2016-02-07

    In this work, the spinodal phase demixing of branched comb polymer nanocomposite (PNC) melts is systematically investigated using the polymer reference interaction site model (PRISM) theory. To verify the reliability of the present method in characterizing the phase behavior of comb PNCs, the intermolecular correlation functions of the system for nonzero particle volume fractions are compared with our molecular dynamics simulation data. After verifying the model and discussing the structure of the comb PNCs in the dilute nanoparticle limit, the interference among the side chain number, side chain length, nanoparticle-monomer size ratio and attractive interactions between the comb polymer and nanoparticles in spinodal demixing curves is analyzed and discussed in detail. The results predict two kinds of distinct phase separation behaviors. One is called classic fluid phase boundary, which is mediated by the entropic depletion attraction and contact aggregation of nanoparticles at relatively low nanoparticle-monomer attraction strength. The second demixing transition occurs at relatively high attraction strength and involves the formation of an equilibrium physical network phase with local bridging of nanoparticles. The phase boundaries are found to be sensitive to the side chain number, side chain length, nanoparticle-monomer size ratio and attractive interactions. As the side chain length is fixed, the side chain number has a large effect on the phase behavior of comb PNCs; with increasing side chain number, the miscibility window first widens and then shrinks. When the side chain number is lower than a threshold value, the phase boundaries undergo a process from enlarging the miscibility window to narrowing as side chain length increases. Once the side chain number overtakes this threshold value, the phase boundary shifts towards less miscibility. With increasing nanoparticle-monomer size ratio, a crossover of particle size occurs, above which the phase separation

  20. Industrialization of polymer solar cells - phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, H.; Krebs, F.C. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Energy Conversion, DTU Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark); Andersen, Rasmus B. [Mekoprint A/S, Stoevrimg (Denmark); Bork, J.; Bentzen, B.

    2012-03-15

    A three-phased project with the objective to industrialize DTU's basic polymer solar cell technology was started in the summer of 2009. The technology comprises a specific design of the polymer solar cell and a corresponding roll-to-roll manufacturing process. This basic technology is referred to as ProcessOne in the open literature. The present report relates to the project's phase 1.The key tasks in phase 1 are to stream-line DTU's tech-nology for the industrial utilization, to demonstrate production according to this stream-lined technology at Mekoprint A/S and finally to fertilize the market for polymer solar cells by demonstrating their use in appli-cations that harmonize with their present maturity level. The main focus in the stream-lining of DTU's technology has been to demonstrate a convincing rate of reduction for the production cost, and thereby make a competitive price plausible. This has been materialized as a learning curve showing that the polymer technology presently develops considerably faster than the silicon technology. The polymer solar cells will, under the assumption that both technologies follow a projection of the learning curve, gain a cost-leading position within a reasonable time. A production cost of 5 Euro/Wp has already been demonstrated in DTU's pilot plant, and a road map for the further decrease to 1 Euro/Wp is drawn. This target is expected to be reached in 2013 in the ongoing phase 2 of the project. Another activity essential for the industrialization has been the launch of specialized materials, equipment and services required for the processing of DTU's polymer solar cells. Relevant products and services are made available for sale on DTU's homepage, www.energyconversion.dtu.dk. A production line for polymer solar cells has been established at Mekoprint. For this a retrofit solution was chosen where the core of an existing screen-printing line was dismantled and fitted to a slot-die printing head manufactured in DTU's workshop

  1. Selective Template Wetting Routes to Hierarchical Polymer Films: Polymer Nanotubes from Phase-Separated Films via Solvent Annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hao-Wen; Cheng, Ming-Hsiang; Chi, Mu-Huan; Chang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Jiun-Tai

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel wetting method to prepare hierarchical polymer films with polymer nanotubes on selective regions. This strategy is based on the selective wetting abilities of polymer chains, annealed in different solvent vapors, into the nanopores of porous templates. Phase-separated films of polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), two commonly used polymers, are prepared as a model system. After anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates are placed on the films, the samples are annealed in vapors of acetic acid, in which the PMMA chains are swollen and wet the nanopores of the AAO templates selectively. As a result, hierarchical polymer films containing PMMA nanotubes can be obtained after the AAO templates are removed. The distribution of the PMMA nanotubes of the hierarchical polymer films can also be controlled by changing the compositions of the polymer blends. This work not only presents a novel method to fabricate hierarchical polymer films with polymer nanotubes on selective regions, but also gives a deeper understanding in the selective wetting ability of polymer chains in solvent vapors.

  2. Reclaimable Thermally Reversible Polymers for AM Feedstock, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CRG proposes to continue efforts from the 2016 NASA SBIR Phase I topic H5.04 Reclaimable Thermally Reversible Polymers for AM Feedstock. In Phase II, CRG will refine...

  3. Chain confinement, phase transitions, and lamellar structure in semicrystalline polymers, polymer blends and polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huipeng

    Recent studies suggest that there are three phase fractions in semicrystalline polymers, the crystalline, the mobile amorphous and the rigid amorphous phases. Due to the distinct properties of the rigid amorphous fraction, RAF, it has been investigated for more than twenty years. In this thesis, a general method using quasi-isothermal temperature-modulated differential scaning calorimetry, DSC, is provided for the first time to obtain the temperature dependent RAF and the other two fractions, crystalline fraction and mobile amorphous fraction, MAF. For poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET, our results show RAF was vitrified during quasi-isothermal cooling after crystallization had been completed and became totally devitrified during quasi-isothermal heating before the start of melting. Several years after people initially discovered the existence of RAF, another issue arose relating to the physical location of RAF and mobile amorphous fraction, MAF, within a lamellar stack model. Two very different models to describe the location of RAF were proposed. In the Heterogeneous Stack Model, HET, RAF is located outside the lamellar stacks. In the Homogeneous Stack Model, HSM, RAF was located inside the lamellar stacks. To determine the lamellar structure of semicrystalline polymers comprising three phase, a general method is given in this thesis by using a combination of the DSC and small angle X-ray scattering, SAXS techniques. It has been applied to Nylon 6, isotactic polystyrene, iPS, and PET. It was found for all of these materials, the HSM model is correct to describe the lamellar structure. In addition to the determination of lamellar structures, this method can also provide the exact fraction of MAF inside and outside lamellar stacks for binary polymer blends. For binary polymer blends, MAF, normally is located partially inside and partially outside the lamellar stacks. However, the quantification of the MAF inside and outside the lamellar stacks has now been provided

  4. Phase behaviour of rod-like colloid + flexible polymer mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Stroobants, A.

    The effect of non-adsorbing, flexible polymer on the isotropic-nematic transition in dispersions of rod-like colloids is investigated. A widening of the biphasic gap is observed, in combination with a marked polymer partitioning between the coexisting phases. Under certain conditions, areas of

  5. Tethered Nanoparticle–Polymer Composites: Phase Stability and Curvature

    KAUST Repository

    Srivastava, Samanvaya

    2012-04-17

    Phase behavior of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) tethered silica nanoparticles dispersed in PEG hosts is investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering. Phase separation in dispersions of densely grafted nanoparticles is found to display strikingly different small-angle X-ray scattering signatures in comparison to phase-separated composites comprised of bare or sparsely grafted nanoparticles. A general diagram for the dispersion state and phase stability of polymer tethered nanoparticle-polymer composites incorporating results from this as well as various other contemporary studies is presented. We show that in the range of moderate to high grafting densities the dispersion state of nanoparticles in composites is largely insensitive to the grafting density of the tethered chains and chemistry of the polymer host. Instead, the ratio of the particle diameter to the size of the tethered chain and the ratio of the molecular weights of the host and tethered polymer chains (P/N) are shown to play a dominant role. Additionally, we find that well-functionalized nanoparticles form stable dispersions in their polymer host beyond the P/N limit that demarcates the wetting/dewetting transition in polymer brushes on flat substrates interacting with polymer melts. A general strategy for achieving uniform nanoparticle dispersion in polymers is proposed. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  6. Phase change memory

    CERN Document Server

    Qureshi, Moinuddin K

    2011-01-01

    As conventional memory technologies such as DRAM and Flash run into scaling challenges, architects and system designers are forced to look at alternative technologies for building future computer systems. This synthesis lecture begins by listing the requirements for a next generation memory technology and briefly surveys the landscape of novel non-volatile memories. Among these, Phase Change Memory (PCM) is emerging as a leading contender, and the authors discuss the material, device, and circuit advances underlying this exciting technology. The lecture then describes architectural solutions t

  7. Competing dynamic phases of active polymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Simon; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R.

    Recent experiments on in-vitro reconstituted assemblies of F-actin, myosin-II motors, and cross-linking proteins show that tuning local network properties can changes the fundamental biomechanical behavior of the system. For example, by varying cross-linker density and actin bundle rigidity, one can switch between contractile networks useful for reshaping cells, polarity sorted networks ideal for directed molecular transport, and frustrated networks with robust structural properties. To efficiently investigate the dynamic phases of actomyosin networks, we developed a coarse grained non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of model semiflexible filaments, molecular motors, and cross-linkers with phenomenologically defined interactions. The simulation's accuracy was verified by benchmarking the mechanical properties of its individual components and collective behavior against experimental results at the molecular and network scales. By adjusting the model's parameters, we can reproduce the qualitative phases observed in experiment and predict the protein characteristics where phase crossovers could occur in collective network dynamics. Our model provides a framework for understanding cells' multiple uses of actomyosin networks and their applicability in materials research. Supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  8. Phase-change materials handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, D. V.; Hoover, M. J.; Oneill, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    Handbook describes relationship between phase-change materials and more conventional thermal control techniques and discusses materials' space and terrestrial applications. Material properties of most promising phase-change materials and purposes and uses of metallic filler materials in phase-change material composites are provided.

  9. Phase Equilibria for Complex Polymer Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvig, Thomas; Hestkjær, L. L.; Hansen, A. F.

    2002-01-01

    the content of organic solvents. This work presents an investigation of the three polymer models Entropic-FV (EFV). UNIFAC-FV (UFV) and GC-Flory (GCF) for their capability of predicting solvent activity coefficients in binary systems containing complex polymers. It is possible to obtain good predictions...... at finite concentrations and satisfactory predictions at infinite dilution, particularly with the EFV model. The investigation shows that EFV is the most robust and stable of the models, which indicates that it is the most well suited model for further development of methods for predicting the miscibility...

  10. Demonstration of an optical phased array using electro-optic polymer phase shifters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoshikuni; Motoyama, Yasushi; Tanaka, Katsu; Machida, Kenji; Yamada, Toshiki; Otomo, Akira; Kikuchi, Hiroshi

    2018-03-01

    We have been investigating an optical phased array (OPA) using electro-optic (EO) polymers in phase shifters to achieve ultrafast optical beam steering. In this paper, we describe the basic structures of the OPA using EO polymer phase shifters and show the beam steering capability of the OPA. The designed OPA has a multimode interference (MMI) beam splitter and 8-channel polymer waveguides with EO polymer phase shifters. We compare 1 × 8 MMI and cascaded 1 × 2 MMI beam splitters numerically and experimentally, and then obtain uniform intensity outputs from the 1 × 8 beam splitter. We fabricate the EO polymer OPA with a 1 × 8 MMI beam splitter to prevent intensity dispersion due to radiation loss in bending waveguides. We also evaluate the optical beam steering capability of the fabricated OPA and found a 2.7° deflection of far-field patterns when applying a voltage difference of 25 V in adjacent phase shifters.

  11. Gas-phase synthesis of magnetic metal/polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starsich, Fabian H. L.; Hirt, Ann M.; Stark, Wendelin J.; Grass, Robert N.

    2014-12-01

    Highly magnetic metal Co nanoparticles were produced via reducing flame spray pyrolysis, and directly coated with an epoxy polymer in flight. The polymer content in the samples varied between 14 and 56 wt% of nominal content. A homogenous dispersion of Co nanoparticles in the resulting nanocomposites was visualized by electron microscopy. The size and crystallinity of the metallic fillers was not affected by the polymer, as shown by XRD and magnetic hysteresis measurements. The good control of the polymer content in the product nanocomposite was shown by elemental analysis. Further, the successful polymerization in the gas phase was demonstrated by electron microscopy and size measurements. The presented effective, dry and scalable one-step synthesis method for highly magnetic metal nanoparticle/polymer composites presented here may drastically decrease production costs and increase industrial yields.

  12. Phase change materials handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, D. V.; Hoover, M. J.; Oneill, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    This handbook is intended to provide theory and data needed by the thermal design engineer to bridge the gap between research achievements and actual flight systems, within the limits of the current state of the art of phase change materials (PCM) technology. The relationship between PCM and more conventional thermal control techniques is described and numerous space and terrestrial applications of PCM are discussed. Material properties of the most promising PCMs are provided; the purposes and use of metallic filler materials in PCM composites are presented; and material compatibility considerations relevant to PCM design are included. The engineering considerations of PCM design are described, especially those pertaining to the thermodynamic and heat transfer phenomena peculiar to PCM design. Methods of obtaining data not currently available are presented. The special problems encountered in the space environment are described. Computational tools useful to the designer are discussed. In summary, each aspect of the PCM problem important to the design engineer is covered to the extent allowed by the scope of this effort and the state of the art.

  13. Unconventional phase transitions in a constrained single polymer chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klushin, L I; Skvortsov, A M

    2011-01-01

    Phase transitions were recognized among the most fascinating phenomena in physics. Exactly solved models are especially important in the theory of phase transitions. A number of exactly solved models of phase transitions in a single polymer chain are discussed in this review. These are three models demonstrating the second order phase transitions with some unusual features: two-dimensional model of β-structure formation, the model of coil–globule transition and adsorption of a polymer chain grafted on the solid surface. We also discuss models with first order phase transitions in a single macromolecule which admit not only exact analytical solutions for the partition function with explicit finite-size effects but also the non-equilibrium free energy as a function of the order parameter (Landau function) in closed analytical form. One of them is a model of mechanical desorption of a macromolecule, which demonstrates an unusual first order phase transition with phase coexistence within a single chain. Features of first and second order transitions become mixed here due to phase coexistence which is not accompanied by additional interfacial free energy. Apart from that, there exist several single-chain models belonging to the same class (adsorption of a polymer chain tethered near the solid surface or liquid–liquid interface, and escape transition upon compressing a polymer between small pistons) that represent examples of a highly unconventional first order phase transition with several inter-related unusual features: no simultaneous phase coexistence, and hence no phase boundary, non-concave thermodynamic potential and non-equivalence of conjugate ensembles. An analysis of complex zeros of partition functions upon approaching the thermodynamic limit is presented for models with and without phase coexistence. (topical review)

  14. Changes in polymer foils used in food packaging tested by using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    is the most important criterion from the consumers' point of view (Werlein 2001). The dependence of permeability on ..... phase change (figure 6). Different processes were simulated to show differences in polymer behaviour. For PE, sterilisation and rapid freezing were simulated. The phase changes show increasing ...

  15. Hydration-Induced Phase Separation in Amphiphilic Polymer Matrices and its Influence on Voclosporin Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, I. John [The State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Murthy, N. Sanjeeva [The State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Kohn, Joachim [The State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Voclosporin is a highly potent, new cyclosporine -- a derivative that is currently in Phase 3 clinical trials in the USA as a potential treatment for inflammatory diseases of the eye. Voclosporin represents a number of very sparingly soluble drugs that are difficult to administer. It was selected as a model drug that is dispersed within amphiphilic polymer matrices, and investigated the changing morphology of the matrices using neutron and x-ray scattering during voclosporin release and polymer resorption. The hydrophobic segments of the amphiphilic polymer chain are comprised of desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine ethyl ester (DTE) and desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine (DT), and the hydrophilic component is poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Water uptake in these matrices resulted in the phase separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains that are a few hundred Angstroms apart. These water-driven morphological changes influenced the release profile of voclosporin and facilitated a burst-free release from the polymer. No such morphological reorganization was observed in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), which exhibits an extended lag period, followed by a burst-like release of voclosporin when the polymer was degraded. An understanding of the effect of polymer composition on the hydration behavior is central to understanding and controlling the phase behavior and resorption characteristics of the matrix for achieving long-term controlled release of hydrophobic drugs such as voclosporin.

  16. Hydration-Induced Phase Separation in Amphiphilic Polymer Matrices and its Influence on Voclosporin Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Kohn

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Voclosporin is a highly potent, new cyclosporine-A derivative that is currently in Phase 3 clinical trials in the USA as a potential treatment for inflammatory diseases of the eye. Voclosporin represents a number of very sparingly soluble drugs that are difficult to administer. We therefore selected it as a model drug that is dispersed within amphiphilic polymer matrices, and investigated the changing morphology of the matrices using neutron and x-ray scattering during voclosporin release and polymer resorption. The hydrophobic segments of the amphiphilic polymer chain are comprised of desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine ethyl ester (DTE and desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine (DT, and the hydrophilic component is poly(ethylene glycol (PEG. Water uptake in these matrices resulted in the phase separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains that are a few hundred Angstroms apart. These water-driven morphological changes influenced the release profile of voclosporin and facilitated a burst-free release from the polymer. No such morphological reorganization was observed in poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA, which exhibits an extended lag period, followed by a burst-like release of voclosporin when the polymer was degraded. An understanding of the effect of polymer composition on the hydration behavior is central to understanding and controlling the phase behavior and resorption characteristics of the matrix for achieving long-term controlled release of hydrophobic drugs such as voclosporin.

  17. Thermodynamic phase behavior of API/polymer solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudic, Anke; Ji, Yuanhui; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2014-07-07

    To improve the bioavailability of poorly soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), these materials are often integrated into a polymer matrix that acts as a carrier. The resulting mixture is called a solid dispersion. In this work, the phase behaviors of solid dispersions were investigated as a function of the API as well as of the type and molecular weight of the carrier polymer. Specifically, the solubility of artemisinin and indomethacin was measured in different poly(ethylene glycol)s (PEG 400, PEG 6000, and PEG 35000). The measured solubility data and the solubility of sulfonamides in poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) K10 and PEG 35000 were modeled using the perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT). The results show that PC-SAFT predictions are in a good accordance with the experimental data, and PC-SAFT can be used to predict the whole phase diagram of an API/polymer solid dispersion as a function of the kind of API and polymer and of the polymer's molecular weight. This remarkably simplifies the screening process for suitable API/polymer combinations.

  18. Multiphase flows with phase change

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Multiphase flows with phase change are ubiquitous in many industrial sectors ranging from energy and infra-structure to specialty chemicals and pharmaceuticals. My own interest in mul- tiphase flows with phase change started more than 15 years ago when I had initiated work on riser reactor for fluid catalytic cracking and ...

  19. Analytical phase diagrams for colloids and non-adsorbing polymer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleer, G.J.; Tuinier, R.

    2008-01-01

    We review the free-volume theory (FVT) of Lekkerkerker et al. [Europhys. Lett. 20 (1992) 5591 for the phase behavior of colloids in the presence of non-adsorbing polymer and we extend this theory in several aspects: (i) We take the solvent into account as a separate component and show that the

  20. Phases of polymer systems in solution studied via molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Joshua Allen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Polymers are amazingly versatile molecules with a tremendous range of applications. Our lives would be very different without them. There would be no multitudes of plastic encased electronic gizmos, no latex paint on the walls and no rubber tires, just to name a few of the many commonplace polymer materials. In fact, life as we know it wouldn’t exist without polymers as two of the most essential types of molecules central to cellular life, Proteins and DNA, are both polymers! [1] With their wide range of application to a variety of uses, polymers are still a very active field in basic research. Of particular current interest is the idea of combining polymers with inorganic particles to form novel composite materials. [2] As computers are becoming faster, they are becoming all the more powerful tools for modeling and simulating real systems. With recent advances in computing on graphics processing units (GPUs) [3–7], questions can now be answered via simulation that could not even be asked before. This thesis focuses on the use of computer simulations to model novel polymerinorganic composite systems in order to predict what possible phases can form and under what conditions. The goal is to provide some direction for future experiments and to gain a deeper understanding of the fundamental physics involved. Along the way, there are some interesting and essential side-tracks in the areas of equilibrating complicated phases and accelerating the available computer power with GPU computing, both of which are necessary steps to enable the study of polymer nanocomposites.

  1. Nanoscale phase change memory materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Marissa A; Jeyasingh, Rakesh Gnana David; Wong, H-S Philip; Milliron, Delia J

    2012-08-07

    Phase change memory materials store information through their reversible transitions between crystalline and amorphous states. For typical metal chalcogenide compounds, their phase transition properties directly impact critical memory characteristics and the manipulation of these is a major focus in the field. Here, we discuss recent work that explores the tuning of such properties by scaling the materials to nanoscale dimensions, including fabrication and synthetic strategies used to produce nanoscale phase change memory materials. The trends that emerge are relevant to understanding how such memory technologies will function as they scale to ever smaller dimensions and also suggest new approaches to designing materials for phase change applications. Finally, the challenges and opportunities raised by integrating nanoscale phase change materials into switching devices are discussed.

  2. Synthesis and phase behavior of end-functionalized associating polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrue, Michelle H.

    We have explored polymer blend phase behavior in the presence of multiple hydrogen bonding end-groups. This work details the synthesis of functionalized polymers and their subsequent use in miscibility studies. The synthesis of end-functionalized hydrogen bonding polymers and the investigation of their physical properties and miscibility is presented. Mono-functional and telechelic ureidopyrimidinone (UPy) functionalized polymers were prepared by two main routes: post-polymerization functionalization (of commercially available or synthesized polymers); and polymerization of monomers using a functionalized initiator. UPy-functionalized polymers were prepared with a variety of polymer backbones including poly(ethylene oxide)s; poly(butadiene)s, poly(dimethyl siloxanxe)s; poly(styrene)s and poly(methyl methacrylate)s. The most successful route to polymers with UPy end-groups was atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) using a UPy-functionalized initiator, followed by atom transfer radical coupling (ATRC). The incorporation of ureidopyrimidinone end-groups was shown to affect the physical properties of the polymer backbone. Parent polymers that were liquids became viscous liquids or waxy solids upon UPy-functionalization of chain end. UPy-functionalization of a hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HO-PB-OH) resulted in a waxy solid while the HO-PB-OH precursor was a viscous liquid. The thermal properties of functionalized polymers also differed from those of the unfunctionalized parent polymers. Hot-stage optical microscopy revealed that UPy-functionalized PEO displayed a depressed melting point relative to the analogous unfunctionalized precursor. Differential scanning calorimetry was also used to investigate the synthesized UPy-polymers. UPy-functionalized polystyrenes and poly(methyl methacrylate)s showed an increased T g compared to the equivalent homopolymer standards. This increased Tg was determined to be dependent upon the fraction of UPy groups present and

  3. An extended study of the phase separation between phospholipids and grafted polymers on a bilayer biomembrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhamou, M; Joudar, I; Kaidi, H; Elhasnaoui, K; Ridouane, H; Qamar, H, E-mail: benhamou.mabrouk@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Physique des Polymeres et Phenomenes Critiques, Faculte des Sciences, Ben M' sik, PO Box 7955, Casablanca (Morocco)

    2011-06-01

    We re-examine here the phase separation between phospholipids and adsorbed polymer chains on a fluid membrane with a change in some suitable parameter (temperature). Our purpose is to quantify the significant effects of the solvent quality and of the polydispersity of adsorbed loops formed by grafted polymer chains on the segregation phenomenon. To this end, we elaborate on a theoretical model that allows us to derive the expression for the mixing free energy. From this, we extract the phase diagram shape in the composition-temperature plane. Our main conclusion is that the polymer chain condensation is very sensitive to the solvent quality and to the polydispersity of loops of adsorbed chains.

  4. Changes in polymer foils used in food packaging tested by using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    temperature range of phase changes is shifted to lower temperatures from 86 ... The dependence of permeability on orientation is relatively slight and is due mainly to a decrease in diffusivity with orientation rather than to change in solubility in a ... High stability of the polymer foils is desired and great demand exists for use ...

  5. Phase transitions of single polymer chains and of polymer solutions: insights from Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, K; Paul, W; Strauch, T; Rampf, F; Ivanov, V; Luettmer-Strathmann, J

    2008-01-01

    The statistical mechanics of flexible and semiflexible macromolecules is distinct from that of small molecule systems, since the thermodynamic limit can also be approached when the number of (effective) monomers of a single chain (realizable by a polymer solution in the dilute limit) is approaching infinity. One can introduce effective attractive interactions into a simulation model for a single chain such that a swollen coil contracts when the temperature is reduced, until excluded volume interactions are effectively canceled by attractive forces, and the chain conformation becomes almost Gaussian at the theta point. This state corresponds to a tricritical point, as the renormalization group theory shows. Below the theta temperature a fluid globule is predicted (at nonzero concentration then phase separation between dilute and semidilute solutions occurs), while at still lower temperature a transition to a solid phase (crystal or glass) occurs. Monte Carlo simulations have shown, however, that the fluid globule phase may become suppressed, when the range of the effective attractive forces becomes too short, with the result that a direct (ultimately first-order) transition from the swollen coil to the solid occurs. This behavior is analogous to the behavior of colloidal particles with a very short range of attractive forces, where liquid-vapor-type phase separation may be suppressed. Analogous first-order transitions from swollen coils to dense rodlike or toroidal structures occur for semiflexible polymers. Finally, the modifications of the behavior discussed when the polymers are adsorbed at surfaces are also mentioned, and possible relations to wetting behavior of polymer solutions are addressed.

  6. Industrialisation of polymer solar cells. Phase 2: Consolidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Hanne; Gevorgyan, Suren; Frausig, Jesper

    of the OPV devices – targets that are import both for niche applications and bulk power production. Besides the work dedicated to solving these three key targets, two more activities have been included in the project; a pre-study on OPV solar parks and an evaluation of the business opportunities arising......The present report refers to the project “Industrialization of polymer solar cells – phase 2”. Both the project and this report build directly upon the prior phase 1 where the basic OPV technology, ProcessOne, was transferred to Mekoprint. This second phase focuses on an anchoring......-scale power production. The project represents thus a crossroad, where Mekoprint and DTU gradually differentiate themselves with respect to applications and therefore also their R&D priorities. The key targets of phase 2 relate to production cost, stabilization of the production and operational lifetime...

  7. Biomolecule-recognition gating membrane using biomolecular cross-linking and polymer phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Hidenori; Ito, Taichi; Ohashi, Hidenori; Tamaki, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2011-12-15

    We present for the first time a biomolecule-recognition gating system that responds to small signals of biomolecules by the cooperation of biorecognition cross-linking and polymer phase transition in nanosized pores. The biomolecule-recognition gating membrane immobilizes the stimuli-responsive polymer, including the biomolecule-recognition receptor, onto the pore surface of a porous membrane. The pore state (open/closed) of this gating membrane depends on the formation of specific biorecognition cross-linking in the pores: a specific biomolecule having multibinding sites can be recognized by several receptors and acts as the cross-linker of the grafted polymer, whereas a nonspecific molecule cannot. The pore state can be distinguished by a volume phase transition of the grafted polymer. In the present study, the principle of the proposed system is demonstrated using poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) as the stimuli-responsive polymer and avidin-biotin as a multibindable biomolecule-specific receptor. As a result of the selective response to the specific biomolecule, a clear permeability change of an order of magnitude was achieved. The principle is versatile and can be applied to many combinations of multibindable analyte-specific receptors, including antibody-antigen and lectin-sugar analogues. The new gating system can find wide application in the bioanalytical field and aid the design of novel biodevices.

  8. Determination of Polymers Thermal Degradation by Color Change Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Felipe Rojas González

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: It has been observed that thermal degradation of thermoplastic polymers, when they are reprocessed by injection, extrusion and extrusion / injection, undergo color changes in the product, although it not has been established as this change occurs. Method: It analyzed the effect on thermal degradation caused by polymer type, processing type, polymer grade, rotation speed of the extrusion screw and number of reprocessing, which is quantified by the color change using an empirical equation, with experimental data obtained by analysis through a microcolor colorimeter. Results: It was found that the color change analysis provides information about progress of the thermal degradation and stability of thermoplastic polymers, which are undergoing to multiple reprocessing events and processes. Conclusions: It was established that this technique can be implemented as a simple and efficient measure of thermoplastic products quality control, according to their color change.

  9. Evaluation of Influence of Various Polymers on Dissolution and Phase Behavior of Carbamazepine-Succinic Acid Cocrystal in Matrix Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majeed Ullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of current study was to explore the influence of three commonly used polymers, that is, cellulosics and noncellulosics, for example, Methocel K4M, Kollidon VA/64, and Soluplus, on the phase disproportionation and drug release profile of carbamazepine-succinic acid (CBZ-SUC cocrystal at varying drug to polymer ratios (1 : 1 to 1 : 0.25 in matrix tablets. The polymorphic phase disproportionation during in-depth dissolution studies of CBZ-SUC cocrystals and its crystalline properties were scrutinized by X-ray powder diffractrometry and Raman spectroscopy. The percent drug release from HPMC formulations (CSH showed inverse relation with the concentration of polymer; that is, drug release increased with decrease in polymer concentration. On contrary, direct relation was observed between percent drug release and polymer concentrations of Kollidon VA 64/Soluplus (CSK, CSS. At similar polymer concentration, drug release from pure carbamazepine was slightly lower with HPMC formulations than that of cocrystal; however, opposite trend in release rate was observed with Kollidon VA/64 and Soluplus. The significant increase in dissolution rate of cocrystal occurred with Kollidon VA/64 and Soluplus at higher polymer concentration. Moreover, no phase change took place in Methocel and Kollidon formulations. No tablet residue was left for Soluplus formulation so the impact of polymer on cocrystal integrity cannot be predicted.

  10. Evaluation of Influence of Various Polymers on Dissolution and Phase Behavior of Carbamazepine-Succinic Acid Cocrystal in Matrix Tablets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Majeed; Ullah, Hanif; Mahmood, Qaisar; Hussain, Izhar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of current study was to explore the influence of three commonly used polymers, that is, cellulosics and noncellulosics, for example, Methocel K4M, Kollidon VA/64, and Soluplus, on the phase disproportionation and drug release profile of carbamazepine-succinic acid (CBZ-SUC) cocrystal at varying drug to polymer ratios (1 : 1 to 1 : 0.25) in matrix tablets. The polymorphic phase disproportionation during in-depth dissolution studies of CBZ-SUC cocrystals and its crystalline properties were scrutinized by X-ray powder diffractrometry and Raman spectroscopy. The percent drug release from HPMC formulations (CSH) showed inverse relation with the concentration of polymer; that is, drug release increased with decrease in polymer concentration. On contrary, direct relation was observed between percent drug release and polymer concentrations of Kollidon VA 64/Soluplus (CSK, CSS). At similar polymer concentration, drug release from pure carbamazepine was slightly lower with HPMC formulations than that of cocrystal; however, opposite trend in release rate was observed with Kollidon VA/64 and Soluplus. The significant increase in dissolution rate of cocrystal occurred with Kollidon VA/64 and Soluplus at higher polymer concentration. Moreover, no phase change took place in Methocel and Kollidon formulations. No tablet residue was left for Soluplus formulation so the impact of polymer on cocrystal integrity cannot be predicted. PMID:26380301

  11. Tuning of electrostatic vs. depletion interaction in deciding the phase behavior of nanoparticle-polymer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sugam, E-mail: sugam@barc.gov.in; Aswal, V. K. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, J. [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, H-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-06-24

    Nanoparticle-polymer system interestingly show a re-entrant phase behavior where charge stabilized silica nanoparticles (phase I) undergo particle clustering (phase II) and then back to individual particles (phase I) as a function of polymer concentration. Such phase behavior arises as a result of dominance of various interactions (i) nanoparticle-nanoparticle electrostatic repulsion (ii) polymer induced attractive depletion between nanoparticles and (iii) polymer-polymer repulsion, at different concentration regimes. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the evolution of interaction during this re-entrant phase behavior of nanoparticles by contrast-marching the polymer. The SANS data have been modeled using a two-Yukawa potential accounting for both attractive and repulsive parts of the interaction between nanoparticles. The degree of both of these parts has been separately tuned by varying the polymer concentration and ionic strength of the solution. Both of these parts are found to have long-range nature. At low polymer concentrations, the electrostatic repulsion dominates over the depletion attraction. The magnitude and the range of the depletion interaction increase with the polymer concentration leading to nanoparticle clustering. At higher polymer concentrations, the increased polymer-polymer repulsion reduces the strength of depletion leading to re-entrant phase behavior. The clusters formed under depletion attraction are found to have surface fractal morphology.

  12. Tuning of electrostatic vs. depletion interaction in deciding the phase behavior of nanoparticle-polymer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle-polymer system interestingly show a re-entrant phase behavior where charge stabilized silica nanoparticles (phase I) undergo particle clustering (phase II) and then back to individual particles (phase I) as a function of polymer concentration. Such phase behavior arises as a result of dominance of various interactions (i) nanoparticle-nanoparticle electrostatic repulsion (ii) polymer induced attractive depletion between nanoparticles and (iii) polymer-polymer repulsion, at different concentration regimes. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the evolution of interaction during this re-entrant phase behavior of nanoparticles by contrast-marching the polymer. The SANS data have been modeled using a two-Yukawa potential accounting for both attractive and repulsive parts of the interaction between nanoparticles. The degree of both of these parts has been separately tuned by varying the polymer concentration and ionic strength of the solution. Both of these parts are found to have long-range nature. At low polymer concentrations, the electrostatic repulsion dominates over the depletion attraction. The magnitude and the range of the depletion interaction increase with the polymer concentration leading to nanoparticle clustering. At higher polymer concentrations, the increased polymer-polymer repulsion reduces the strength of depletion leading to re-entrant phase behavior. The clusters formed under depletion attraction are found to have surface fractal morphology

  13. Analytical phase diagrams for colloids and non-adsorbing polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleer, Gerard J; Tuinier, Remco

    2008-11-04

    We review the free-volume theory (FVT) of Lekkerkerker et al. [Europhys. Lett. 20 (1992) 559] for the phase behavior of colloids in the presence of non-adsorbing polymer and we extend this theory in several aspects: (i) We take the solvent into account as a separate component and show that the natural thermodynamic parameter for the polymer properties is the insertion work Pi(v), where Pi is the osmotic pressure of the (external) polymer solution and v the volume of a colloid particle. (ii) Curvature effects are included along the lines of Aarts et al. [J. Phys.: Condens. Matt. 14 (2002) 7551] but we find accurate simple power laws which simplify the mathematical procedure considerably. (iii) We find analytical forms for the first, second, and third derivatives of the grand potential, needed for the calculation of the colloid chemical potential, the pressure, gas-liquid critical points and the critical endpoint (cep), where the (stable) critical line ends and then coincides with the triple point. This cep determines the boundary condition for a stable liquid. We first apply these modifications to the so-called colloid limit, where the size ratio q(R)=R/a between the radius of gyration R of the polymer and the particle radius a is small. In this limit the binodal polymer concentrations are below overlap: the depletion thickness delta is nearly equal to R, and Pi can be approximated by the ideal (van't Hoff) law Pi=Pi(0)=phi/N, where phi is the polymer volume fraction and N the number of segments per chain. The results are close to those of the original Lekkerkerker theory. However, our analysis enables very simple analytical expressions for the polymer and colloid concentrations in the critical and triple points and along the binodals as a function of q(R). Also the position of the cep is found analytically. In order to make the model applicable to higher size ratio's q(R) (including the so-called protein limit where q(R)>1) further extensions are needed. We

  14. Polymer confined in membrane phases: influences on stability, structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javierre, Isabelle

    1999-01-01

    The addition of a hydrosoluble polymer to the different structures obtained with mixtures of water/surfactant/alcohol/oil alters the thermodynamic stability of microemulsion and lamellar phases. The reverse sponge phase disappears while one can observe the occurrence of a new phase, labelled L5, at intermediate polymer concentration. In polymer-'doped' solvent lamellar phase, the polymer induces an attractive contribution to the interaction between bilayers while in polymer-'doped' bilayers lamellar phase, the polymer increases the flexibility. The L5 phase exhibits symmetric sponge properties and furthermore presents very strong symmetry fluctuations. The relaxation of these fluctuations were experimentally evidenced for the first time. This unusual dynamic behaviour was confronted to the one of other sponge phases, in a large range of concentrations. (author) [fr

  15. Industrialization of Polymer Solar Cells – phase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Hanne; Bork, Jakob; Andersen, Rasmus B.

    into more refined products. Such refined products might be self-powered electronic devices designed for easy integration in the customer’s production or solar-powered products for the end-user. A three-phased project with the objective to industrialize DTU’s basic polymer solar cell technology was started...... in the summer of 2009. The technology comprises a specific design of the polymer solar cell and a corresponding roll-to-roll manufacturing process. This basic technology is referred to as ProcessOne in the open literature. The present report relates to the project’s phase 1.The key tasks in phase 1...... to a slot-die printing head manufactured in DTU’s workshop. The line was at the same time adjusted and updated to handle the new production. The very first solar cells produced on this line appeared in July 2010. The line has subse-quently been upgraded on a running basis, and Mekoprint’s operators have...

  16. Automated Solid-Phase Radiofluorination Using Polymer-Supported Phosphazenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiessen, Bente; Zhuravlev, Fedor

    2013-01-01

    of [18F]FDG. The combination of compact form factor, simplicity of [18F]F− recovery and processing, and column reusability can make solid phase radiofluorination an attractive radiochemistry platform for the emerging dose-on-demand instruments for bedside production of PET radiotracers.......The polymer supported phosphazene bases PS-P2tBu and the novel PS-P2PEG allowed for efficient extraction of [18F]F− from proton irradiated [18O]H2O and subsequent radiofluorination of a broad range of substrates directly on the resin. The highest radiochemical yields were obtained with aliphatic...

  17. Crown ethers and phase transfer catalysis in polymer science

    CERN Document Server

    Carraher, Charles

    1984-01-01

    Phase transfer catalysis or interfacial catalysis is a syn­ thetic technique involving transport of an organic or inorganic salt from a solid or aqueous phase into an organic liquid where reaction with an organic-soluble substrate takes place. Over the past 15 years there has been an enormous amount of effort invested in the development of this technique in organic synthe­ sis. Several books and numerous review articles have appeared summarizing applications in which low molecular weight catalysts are employed. These generally include either crown ethers or onium salts of various kinds. While the term phase transfer catalysis is relatively new, the concept of using a phasetrans­ fer agent (PTA) is much older~ Both Schnell and Morgan employed such catalysts in synthesis of polymeric species in the early 1950's. Present developments are really extensions of these early applications. It has only been within the last several years that the use of phase transfer processes have been employed in polymer synthesis...

  18. Phase stability and dynamics of entangled polymer-nanoparticle composites.

    KAUST Repository

    Mangal, Rahul

    2015-06-05

    Nanoparticle-polymer composites, or polymer-nanoparticle composites (PNCs), exhibit unusual mechanical and dynamical features when the particle size approaches the random coil dimensions of the host polymer. Here, we harness favourable enthalpic interactions between particle-tethered and free, host polymer chains to create model PNCs, in which spherical nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in high molecular weight entangled polymers. Investigation of the mechanical properties of these model PNCs reveals that the nanoparticles have profound effects on the host polymer motions on all timescales. On short timescales, nanoparticles slow-down local dynamics of the host polymer segments and lower the glass transition temperature. On intermediate timescales, where polymer chain motion is typically constrained by entanglements with surrounding molecules, nanoparticles provide additional constraints, which lead to an early onset of entangled polymer dynamics. Finally, on long timescales, nanoparticles produce an apparent speeding up of relaxation of their polymer host.

  19. Phase stability and dynamics of entangled polymer-nanoparticle composites.

    KAUST Repository

    Mangal, Rahul; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle-polymer composites, or polymer-nanoparticle composites (PNCs), exhibit unusual mechanical and dynamical features when the particle size approaches the random coil dimensions of the host polymer. Here, we harness favourable enthalpic interactions between particle-tethered and free, host polymer chains to create model PNCs, in which spherical nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in high molecular weight entangled polymers. Investigation of the mechanical properties of these model PNCs reveals that the nanoparticles have profound effects on the host polymer motions on all timescales. On short timescales, nanoparticles slow-down local dynamics of the host polymer segments and lower the glass transition temperature. On intermediate timescales, where polymer chain motion is typically constrained by entanglements with surrounding molecules, nanoparticles provide additional constraints, which lead to an early onset of entangled polymer dynamics. Finally, on long timescales, nanoparticles produce an apparent speeding up of relaxation of their polymer host.

  20. Optical characterization of phase transitions in pure polymers and blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannella, Gianluca A.; Brucato, Valerio; La Carrubba, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.lacarrubba@unipa.it [Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospace and Materials Engineering (DICAM), University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Ed. 8, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    To study the optical properties of polymeric samples, an experimental apparatus was designed on purpose and set up. The sample is a thin film enclosed between two glass slides and a PTFE frame, with a very thin thermocouple placed on sample for direct temperature measurement. This sample holder was placed between two aluminum slabs, equipped with a narrow slit for optical measurements and with electrical resistances for temperature control. Sample was enlightened by a laser diode, whereas transmitted light was detected with a photodiode. Measurements were carried out on polyethylene-terephtalate (PET) and two different polyamides, tested as pure polymers and blends. The thermal history imposed to the sample consisted in a rapid heating from ambient temperature to a certain temperature below the melting point, a stabilization period, and then a heating at constant rate. After a second stabilization period, the sample was cooled. The data obtained were compared with DSC measurements performed with the same thermal history. In correspondence with transitions detected via DSC (e.g. melting, crystallization and cold crystallization), the optical signal showed a steep variation. In particular, crystallization resulted in a rapid decrease of transmitted light, whereas melting gave up an increase of light transmitted by the sample. Further variations in transmitted light were recorded for blends, after melting: those results may be related to other phase transitions, e.g. liquid-liquid phase separation. All things considered, the apparatus can be used to get reliable data on phase transitions in polymeric systems.

  1. Optical characterization of phase transitions in pure polymers and blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannella, Gianluca A.; Brucato, Valerio; La Carrubba, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    To study the optical properties of polymeric samples, an experimental apparatus was designed on purpose and set up. The sample is a thin film enclosed between two glass slides and a PTFE frame, with a very thin thermocouple placed on sample for direct temperature measurement. This sample holder was placed between two aluminum slabs, equipped with a narrow slit for optical measurements and with electrical resistances for temperature control. Sample was enlightened by a laser diode, whereas transmitted light was detected with a photodiode. Measurements were carried out on polyethylene-terephtalate (PET) and two different polyamides, tested as pure polymers and blends. The thermal history imposed to the sample consisted in a rapid heating from ambient temperature to a certain temperature below the melting point, a stabilization period, and then a heating at constant rate. After a second stabilization period, the sample was cooled. The data obtained were compared with DSC measurements performed with the same thermal history. In correspondence with transitions detected via DSC (e.g. melting, crystallization and cold crystallization), the optical signal showed a steep variation. In particular, crystallization resulted in a rapid decrease of transmitted light, whereas melting gave up an increase of light transmitted by the sample. Further variations in transmitted light were recorded for blends, after melting: those results may be related to other phase transitions, e.g. liquid-liquid phase separation. All things considered, the apparatus can be used to get reliable data on phase transitions in polymeric systems

  2. Industrialisation of polymer solar cells. Phase 2: Consolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, H.; Gevorgyan, S.; Frausig, J.; Andersen, Rasmus B.; Krebs, F. C.

    2013-03-15

    . This entails more advantages; the energy-intensive vacuum processing is eliminated, the number of process steps is reduced, and the substrate that comes with the ITO-electrode is saved. Replacement of the ITO electrode also means independence from the scarce resource indium which will hinder advancement of the technology to its full potential. Also silver has proved a critical resource. An intense rise of the silver price has caused the production cost for standard ProcessOne to more than double over the project period. Due to this new processes are developed where silver is replaced by organic material. International research settings are currently reporting >11 % efficiency for small organic solar cells. It has proven difficult to obtain equivalent efficiency by roll-to-roll manufacturing and at the scale investigated in this project. An efficiency of 4.5 % has been attained but with a proprietary material. This material is, however, so expensive that it will never meet the project's cost target of 1 Euro/Wp of a cost-competitive polymer solar cell even if meet the 4.5 efficiency target. The standard active material, P3HT:PCBM, is judged the best choice considering economy, stability and roll-to-roll process ability. A production cost for was 5 Euro/Wp was reported for ProcessOne by the end of phase 1. Due to the steep rise in the silver price the production cost has now increased to 11 Euro/Wp. The more advanced processes addressed in this project has reduced the production cost to 4 - 6 Euro/Wp dependent on whether silver form part of it or not. With an anticipated effect of economy-of-scale for the purchased materials the production cost will be <1 Euro/Wp. (Author)

  3. Industrialisation of polymer solar cells. Phase 2: Consolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, H.; Gevorgyan, S.; Frausig, J.; Andersen, Rasmus B.; Krebs, F.C.

    2013-03-15

    electrode. This entails more advantages; the energy-intensive vacuum processing is eliminated, the number of process steps is reduced, and the substrate that comes with the ITO-electrode is saved. Replacement of the ITO electrode also means independence from the scarce resource indium which will hinder advancement of the technology to its full potential. Also silver has proved a critical resource. An intense rise of the silver price has caused the production cost for standard ProcessOne to more than double over the project period. Due to this new processes are developed where silver is replaced by organic material. International research settings are currently reporting >11 % efficiency for small organic solar cells. It has proven difficult to obtain equivalent efficiency by roll-to-roll manufacturing and at the scale investigated in this project. An efficiency of 4.5 % has been attained but with a proprietary material. This material is, however, so expensive that it will never meet the project's cost target of 1 Euro/Wp of a cost-competitive polymer solar cell even if meet the 4.5 efficiency target. The standard active material, P3HT:PCBM, is judged the best choice considering economy, stability and roll-to-roll process ability. A production cost for was 5 Euro/Wp was reported for ProcessOne by the end of phase 1. Due to the steep rise in the silver price the production cost has now increased to 11 Euro/Wp. The more advanced processes addressed in this project has reduced the production cost to 4 - 6 Euro/Wp dependent on whether silver form part of it or not. With an anticipated effect of economy-of-scale for the purchased materials the production cost will be <1 Euro/Wp. (Author)

  4. Stabilization of two-phase octanol/water flows inside poly(dimethylsiloxane) microchannels using polymer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, H. J.; Jellema, L. C.; Holwerda, M.; Verpoorte, E.

    In this paper we present our first results on the realization of stable water/octanol, two-phase flows inside poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchannels. Native PDMS microchannels were coated with high molecular weight polymers to change the surface properties of the microchannels and thus

  5. Nanoscale phase-change materials and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Qinghui; Wang, Yuxi; Zhu, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) that can reversibly transit between crystalline and amorphous phases have been widely used for data-storage and other functional devices. As PCMs scale down to nanoscale, the properties and transition procedures can vary, bringing both challenges and opportunities in scalability. This article describes the physical structures, properties and applications of nanoscale phase-change materials and devices. The limitations and performance of scaling properties in phase-change materials and the recent progress and challenges in phase-change devices are presented. At the end, some emerging applications related to phase-change materials are also introduced. (topical review)

  6. Nanoscale phase-change materials and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qinghui; Wang, Yuxi; Zhu, Jia

    2017-06-01

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) that can reversibly transit between crystalline and amorphous phases have been widely used for data-storage and other functional devices. As PCMs scale down to nanoscale, the properties and transition procedures can vary, bringing both challenges and opportunities in scalability. This article describes the physical structures, properties and applications of nanoscale phase-change materials and devices. The limitations and performance of scaling properties in phase-change materials and the recent progress and challenges in phase-change devices are presented. At the end, some emerging applications related to phase-change materials are also introduced.

  7. Conducting polymer networks synthesized by photopolymerization-induced phase separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Yuki; Komori, Kana; Murata, Tasuku; Nakanishi, Hideyuki; Norisuye, Tomohisa; Yamao, Takeshi; Tran-Cong-Miyata, Qui

    2018-03-01

    Polymer mixtures composed of double networks of a polystyrene derivative (PSAF) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were alternatively synthesized by using ultraviolet (UV) and visible (Vis) light. The PSAF networks were generated by UV irradiation to photodimerize the anthracene (A) moieties labeled on the PSAF chains, whereas PMMA networks were produced by photopolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomer and the cross-link reaction using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) under Vis light irradiation. It was found that phase separation process of these networks can be independently induced and promptly controlled by using UV and Vis light. The characteristic length scale distribution of the resulting co-continuous morphology can be well regulated by the UV and Vis light intensity. In order to confirm and utilize the connectivity of the bicontinuous morphology observed by confocal microscopy, a very small amount, 0.1 wt%, of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was introduced into the mixture and the current-voltage (I-V) relationship was subsequently examined. Preliminary data show that MWCNTs are preferentially dispersed in the PSAF-rich continuous domains and the whole mixture became electrically conducting, confirming the connectivity of the observed bi-continuous morphology. The experimental data obtained in this study reveal a promising method to design various scaffolds for conducting soft matter taking advantages of photopolymerization-induced phase separation.

  8. Stochastic modelling of two-phase flows including phase change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurisse, O.; Minier, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic modelling has already been developed and applied for single-phase flows and incompressible two-phase flows. In this article, we propose an extension of this modelling approach to two-phase flows including phase change (e.g. for steam-water flows). Two aspects are emphasised: a stochastic model accounting for phase transition and a modelling constraint which arises from volume conservation. To illustrate the whole approach, some remarks are eventually proposed for two-fluid models. (authors)

  9. A phenomenological approach of solidification of polymeric phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Seyed Amir; Royon, Laurent; Abou, Bérengère; Osipian, Rémy; Azzouz, Kamel; Bontemps, André

    2017-01-01

    Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are widely used in thermal energy storage and thermal management systems due to their small volume for a given stored energy and their capability for maintaining nearly constant temperatures. However, their performance is limited by their low thermal conductivity and possible leaks while in the liquid phase. One solution is to imprison the PCM inside a polymer mesh to create a Polymeric Phase Change Material (PPCM). In this work, we have studied the cooling and solidification of five PPCMs with different PCMs and polymer fractions. To understand the heat transfer mechanisms involved, we have carried out micro- and macrorheological measurements in which Brownian motion of tracers embedded in PPCMs has been depicted and viscoelastic moduli have been measured, respectively. Beyond a given polymer concentration, it was shown that the Brownian motion of the tracers is limited by the polymeric chains and that the material exhibits an elastic behavior. This would suggest that heat transfer essentially occurs by conduction, instead of convection. Experiments were conducted to measure temperature variation during cooling of the five samples, and a semi-empirical model based on a phenomenological approach was proposed as a practical tool to choose and size PPCMs.

  10. Excitons in conjugated polymers: Do we need a paradigma change?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beenken, Wichard J.D. [Department of Theoretical Physics I, Ilmenau University of Thechnology (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    We have previously shown that both, polymer conformation and dynamics are crucial for the exciton transport in conjugated polymers. Thereby we found that the usual Foerster-type hopping transfer model - even if one applies the line-dipole approximation - falls short in one crucial aspect: the nature of the sites the excitons are transferred between is still unclear. We found that the simple model of spectroscopic units defined as segments of the polymer chains separated by structural defects breaking the {pi}-conjugation is only justified for chemical defects like hydrogenated double bonds, or extreme gauche (90 ) torsions between the monomers. Both defects are far too rare in a well-prepared conjugated polymer to explain the mean spectroscopic-unit length of typically 6-7 monomers. Meanwhile, also the concept of dynamical formation of the spectroscopic units, we had previously suggested, has also failed. Thus the question of a paradigma change concerning the exciton transport in conjugated polymers appears on the agenda. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Small angle neutron scattering form polymer melts: structural investigation and phase behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertugrul, O.

    2004-01-01

    The Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) techniques have been used to study the structural properties and phase behavior of polymer melts. A model based on Random Phase Approximation (RPA) is proposed to predict the experimental data. By fitting the model to data we could be able to obtain radius of gyration (a measure of size of a polymer) and phase transition for the sample. (author)

  12. Lateral phase separation of mixed polymer brushes on planar and spherical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lehn, Reid; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2012-02-01

    A mixed polymer brush consists of two (or more) polymer species grafted to a surface at a high density, inducing the polymers to highly stretch to maximize favorable solvent interactions while minimizing polymer overlap. The enthalpic and entropic interactions between the different polymers give rise to lateral phase behavior on the surface. Understanding this phase separation behavior is interesting for applications in nanotemplating and controlled protein adsorption. In this work, we present a novel theoretical model to quickly predict lateral phase separated morphologies of mixed polymer brushes on planar, cylindrical and spherical surfaces. The model combines a Flory-Huggins model for enthalpic interactions between the polymer components with an Alexander-de Gennes model for the entropy of the brush layers. When there is a length difference between the polymer components, these two interactions along with the conformational entropy of the system lead to a range of morphologies including stripes, dimples, mixing, and complete phase separation. The computational efficiency of this model allows for phase diagrams to be generated with great accuracy. The results of our model thus allow for the fast prediction of lateral morphologies on different geometries.

  13. Laser Photolytic Approach to Cu/polymer Sols and Cu/polymer Nanocomposites with Amorphous Cu Phase.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pola, Josef; Ouchi, A.; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Urbanová, Markéta; Boháček, Jaroslav; Šubrt, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 192, 2-3 (2007) , s. 84-92 ISSN 1010-6030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : Cu-polymer nanocomposite * laser solution photolysis * amorphous Cu phase Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry Impact factor: 1.911, year: 2007

  14. Polymer depletion-driven cluster aggregation and initial phase separation in charged nanosized colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gögelein, Christoph; Nägele, Gerhard; Buitenhuis, Johan; Tuinier, Remco; Dhont, Jan K. G.

    2009-05-01

    We study polymer depletion-driven cluster aggregation and initial phase separation in aqueous dispersions of charge-stabilized silica spheres, where the ionic strength and polymer (dextran) concentration are systematically varied, using dynamic light scattering and visual observation. Without polymers and for increasing salt and colloid content, the dispersions become increasingly unstable against irreversible cluster formation. By adding nonadsorbing polymers, a depletion-driven attraction is induced, which lowers the stabilizing Coulomb barrier and enhances the cluster growth rate. The initial growth rate increases with increasing polymer concentration and decreases with increasing polymer molar mass. These observations can be quantitatively understood by an irreversible dimer formation theory based on the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek pair potential, with the depletion attraction modeled by the Asakura-Oosawa-Vrij potential. At low colloid concentration, we observe an exponential cluster growth rate for all polymer concentrations considered, indicating a reaction-limited aggregation mechanism. At sufficiently high polymer and colloid concentrations, and lower salt content, a gas-liquidlike demixing is observed initially. Later on, the system separates into a gel and fluidlike phase. The experimental time-dependent state diagram is compared to the theoretical equilibrium phase diagram obtained from a generalized free-volume theory and is discussed in terms of an initial reversible phase separation process in combination with irreversible aggregation at later times.

  15. PCM Concrete. [Phase Change Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juul Andersen, T. [Danish Technological Institute, Taastrup (Denmark); Poulsen, H.-H. [BASF A/S, Roedekro (Denmark); Passov, F. [Spaencom A/S, Hedehusene (Denmark); Heiselberg, P. [Aalborg Univ..Aalborg (Denmark)

    2013-04-01

    PCM-Concrete was a research and development project launched in 2009 and finished in 2012. The project, which was funded by The Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation, had a total budget of 1.7 million Euros and included 4 partners: Danish Technological Institute (project manager), Aalborg University, BASF A/S and Spaencom A/S. The overall vision of the project was to reduce energy consumption for heating and cooling in buildings by developing high-performance concrete structures microencapsulated Phase Change Materials (PCM). The PCM used in the project was Micronal produced by BASF A/S. Micronal is small capsules with an acrylic shell and inside a wax with a melting point at approx. 23 deg. C equal to a comfortable indoor temperature. During the melting process thermal energy is transferred to chemical reaction (melting/solidification) depending on PCM being heated up or cooled down. Adding Micronal to concrete would theoretically increase the thermal mass of the concrete and improve the diurnal heat capacity which is the amount of energy that can be stored and released during 24 hours. Nevertheless, it is a relatively new technology that has not received much attention, yet. In the PCM-Concrete project 5 main investigations were carried out: 1) Development of concrete mix design with PCM. 2) Investigation of thermal properties of the PCM concrete: thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, density. 3) Up-scaling the research to industrial production of PCM-concrete structures. 4) Testing energy efficiency in full scale. 5) Confronting aesthetic and acoustic barriers to full exploitation of the potential of PCM-concrete structures. The results from the test program showed: 1) That the diurnal heat storage capacity is higher for all 4 hollow core decks with tiles attached compared to the reference hollow core deck. 2) The hollow core decks with concrete tiles without PCM performs slightly better than the tiles with PCM. 3) That is was impossible to

  16. Polymer Derived Rare Earth Silicate Nanocomposite Protective Coatings for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leveraging a rapidly evolving state-of-the-art technical base empowered by Phase I NASA SBIR funding, NanoSonic's polymer derived rare earth silicate EBCs will...

  17. Polymer Derived Rare Earth Silicate Nanocomposite Protective Coatings for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this Phase I SBIR program is to develop polymer derived rare earth silicate nanocomposite environmental barrier coatings (EBC) for providing...

  18. [Phase transition in polymer blends and structure of ionomers and copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The main thrust of the program in the past 3 years are summarized: SAXS instrumentation development; structure and dynamics of macro- and supra-molecules, phase transitions in polymer blends and solutions, structure of ionomers, and fractals and anisotropic systems.

  19. Preliminary evaluation of new polymer matrix for solid-phase extraction of nonylphenol from water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, António; Soares, Ana; Piletska, Elena; Mattiasson, Bo; Piletsky, Sergey

    2008-03-31

    Molecularly imprinted (MIP) and blank polymers with affinity for nonylphenol were designed using computational modelling. Chromatographic tests demonstrated higher affinity of imprinted polymers towards the template nonylphenol as compared with blank polymers. The performance of both polymers in solid-phase extraction was however very similar. Both blank and imprinted polymers appeared to be suitable for the removal and pre-concentration of nonylphenol from contaminated water samples with 99% efficiency of the recovery. The commercial resins PH(EC) (Biotage) and C18 (Varian) tested in the same conditions used for comparative purposes had recovery rate <84%. The polymer capacity for nonylphenol was 231 mg g(-1) for blank and 228 mg g(-1) for MIP. The synthesised materials can have significance for sample pre-concentration and environmental analysis of this class of compounds.

  20. Miscibility phase diagram of ring-polymer blends: A topological effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaue, Takahiro; Nakajima, Chihiro H

    2016-04-01

    The miscibility of polymer blends, a classical problem in polymer science, may be altered, if one or both of the component do not have chain ends. Based on the idea of topological volume, we propose a mean-field theory to clarify how the topological constraints in ring polymers affect the phase behavior of the blends. While the large enhancement of the miscibility is expected for ring-linear polymer blends, the opposite trend toward demixing, albeit comparatively weak, is predicted for ring-ring polymer blends. Scaling formulas for the shift of critical point for both cases are derived. We discuss the valid range of the present theory, and the crossover to the linear polymer blends behaviors, which is expected for short chains. These analyses put forward a view that the topological constraints could be represented as an effective excluded-volume effects, in which the topological length plays a role of the screening factor.

  1. Polymer Stabilization of Liquid-Crystal Blue Phase II toward Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Seong-Yong; Jeon, Sung-Wook; Kim, Byeong-Cheon; Bae, Jae-Hyun; Araoka, Fumito; Choi, Suk-Won

    2017-03-15

    The temperature ranges where a pure simple-cubic blue phase (BPII) emerges are quite narrow compared to the body-centered-cubic BP (BPI) such that the polymer stabilization of BPII is much more difficult. Hence, a polymer-stabilized BPII possessing a wide temperature range has been scarcely reported. Here, we fabricate a polymer-stabilized BPII over a temperature range of 50 °C including room temperature. The fabricated polymer-stabilized BPII is confirmed via polarized optical microscopy, Bragg reflection, and Kossel diagram observations. Furthermore, we demonstrate reflective BP liquid-crystal devices utilizing the reflectance-voltage performance as a potential application of the polymer-stabilized BPII. Our work demonstrates the possibility of practical application of the polymer-stabilized BPII to photonic crystals.

  2. Wire Insulation Incorporating Self-Healing Polymers (WIISP), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NextGen and Virginia Tech are developing a self-healing material for wire insulation using a class of ionomeric polymers. These ionomers exhibit self-healing...

  3. Safer Battery with Switchable Polymer Coating, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) proposes to utilize a switchable polymer (SWP) to prevent catastrophic failure due to internal shorting or overdischarge in lithium-ion...

  4. The local phase transitions of the solvent in the neighborhood of a solvophobic polymer at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budkov, Yu. A., E-mail: urabudkov@rambler.ru [G.A. Krestov Institute of Solution Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ivanovo (Russian Federation); National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vyalov, I. I. [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, Genova 16163 (Italy); Kolesnikov, A. L. [Ivanovo State University, Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Institut für Nichtklassische Chemie e.V., Universitat Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Georgi, N., E-mail: bancocker@mail.ru [Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, Leipzig (Germany); Chuev, G. N. [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden (Germany); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics, Russian Academy of Science, Pushchino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kiselev, M. G. [G.A. Krestov Institute of Solution Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-28

    We investigate local phase transitions of the solvent in the neighborhood of a solvophobic polymer chain which is induced by a change of the polymer-solvent repulsion and the solvent pressure in the bulk solution. We describe the polymer in solution by the Edwards model, where the conditional partition function of the polymer chain at a fixed radius of gyration is described by a mean-field theory. The contributions of the polymer-solvent and the solvent-solvent interactions to the total free energy are described within the mean-field approximation. We obtain the total free energy of the solution as a function of the radius of gyration and the average solvent number density within the gyration volume. The resulting system of coupled equations is solved varying the polymer-solvent repulsion strength at high solvent pressure in the bulk. We show that the coil-globule (globule-coil) transition occurs accompanied by a local solvent evaporation (condensation) within the gyration volume.

  5. Plastic phase change material and articles made therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhari, Ramin

    2016-04-19

    The present invention generally relates to a method for manufacturing phase change material (PCM) pellets. The method includes providing a melt composition, including paraffin and a polymer. The paraffin has a melt point of between about 10.degree. C. and about 50.degree. C., and more preferably between about 18.degree. C. and about 28.degree. C. In one embodiment, the melt composition includes various additives, such as a flame retardant. The method further includes forming the melt composition into PCM pellets. The method further may include the step of cooling the melt to increase the melt viscosity before pelletizing. Further, PCM compounds are provided having an organic PCM and a polymer. Methods are provided to convert the PCM compounds into various form-stable PCMs. A method of coating the PCMs is included to provide PCMs with substantially no paraffin seepage and with ignition resistance properties.

  6. Flexible, Phase Change Fabric for Deployable Decelerators, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SDMA proposes to develop a flexible fabric containing Phase Change Materials that is suitable for use on Deployable Decelerators. This technology will make...

  7. Blue laser phase change recording system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Holger; Dambach, S.Soeren; Richter, Hartmut

    2002-01-01

    The migration paths from DVD phase change recording with red laser to the next generation optical disk formats with blue laser and high NA optics are discussed with respect to optical aberration margins and disc capacities. A test system for the evaluation of phase change disks with more than 20 GB capacity is presented and first results of the recording performance are shown

  8. Flexible Photonics: Polymer LEDs Made from Monochromatic Red Emitting Lanthanide/Polymer Blends. Phase 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Regan, Marie

    1999-01-01

    .... Spectrally pure, red emitting flexible LEDs have been fabricated. Close to a four-fold increase in device efficiency is obtained when a suitable lanthanide complex is blended with the semi-conducting host polymer...

  9. Visualizing phase transition behavior of dilute stimuli responsive polymer solutions via Mueller matrix polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Amal; Chandel, Shubham; Ghosh, Nirmalya; De, Priyadarsi

    2015-09-15

    Probing volume phase transition behavior of superdiluted polymer solutions both micro- and macroscopically still persists as an outstanding challenge. In this regard, we have explored 4 × 4 spectral Mueller matrix measurement and its inverse analysis for excavating the microarchitectural facts about stimuli responsiveness of "smart" polymers. Phase separation behavior of thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and pH responsive poly(N,N-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and their copolymers were analyzed in terms of Mueller matrix derived polarization parameters, namely, depolarization (Δ), diattenuation (d), and linear retardance (δ). The Δ, d, and δ parameters provided useful information on both macro- and microstructural alterations during the phase separation. Additionally, the two step action ((i) breakage of polymer-water hydrogen bonding and (ii) polymer-polymer aggregation) at the molecular microenvironment during the cloud point generation was successfully probed via these parameters. It is demonstrated that, in comparison to the present techniques available for assessing the hydrophobic-hydrophilic switch over of simple stimuli-responsive polymers, Mueller matrix polarimetry offers an important advantage requiring a few hundred times dilute polymer solution (0.01 mg/mL, 1.1-1.4 μM) at a low-volume format.

  10. Theory and simulation studies of effective interactions, phase behavior and morphology in polymer nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Venkat; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2014-01-07

    Polymer nanocomposites are a class of materials that consist of a polymer matrix filled with inorganic/organic nanoscale additives that enhance the inherent macroscopic (mechanical, optical and electronic) properties of the polymer matrix. Over the past few decades such materials have received tremendous attention from experimentalists, theoreticians, and computational scientists. These studies have revealed that the macroscopic properties of polymer nanocomposites depend strongly on the (microscopic) morphology of the constituent nanoscale additives in the polymer matrix. As a consequence, intense research efforts have been directed to understand the relationships between interactions, morphology, and the phase behavior of polymer nanocomposites. Theory and simulations have proven to be useful tools in this regard due to their ability to link molecular level features of the polymer and nanoparticle additives to the resulting morphology within the composite. In this article we review recent theory and simulation studies, presenting briefly the methodological developments underlying PRISM theories, density functional theory, self-consistent field theory approaches, and atomistic and coarse-grained molecular simulations. We first discuss the studies on polymer nanocomposites with bare or un-functionalized nanoparticles as additives, followed by a review of recent work on composites containing polymer grafted or functionalized nanoparticles as additives. We conclude each section with a brief outlook on some potential future directions.

  11. Integral equation theory study on the phase separation in star polymer nanocomposite melts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Li, Yi-Gui; Zhong, Chongli

    2007-10-21

    The polymer reference interaction site model theory is used to investigate phase separation in star polymer nanocomposite melts. Two kinds of spinodal curves were obtained: classic fluid phase boundary for relatively low nanoparticle-monomer attraction strength and network phase boundary for relatively high nanoparticle-monomer attraction strength. The network phase boundaries are much more sensitive with nanoparticle-monomer attraction strength than the fluid phase boundaries. The interference among the arm number, arm length, and nanoparticle-monomer attraction strength was systematically investigated. When the arm lengths are short, the network phase boundary shows a marked shift toward less miscibility with increasing arm number. When the arm lengths are long enough, the network phase boundaries show opposite trends. There exists a crossover arm number value for star polymer nanocomposite melts, below which the network phase separation is consistent with that of chain polymer nanocomposite melts. However, the network phase separation shows qualitatively different behaviors when the arm number is larger than this value.

  12. Phase Relations and Miscibility in Polymer Blends Containing Copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-15

    MacKnight, W. J ., Pure Appl. Chem. 52, 409 (1980). 36. Vukovic , R., Kuresevic, V., Karasz, F. E., and MacKnight, W. J ., Thermochim. Acta 54, 349 (1982). 37... Vukovic , R., Karasz, F. E., and MacKnight, W. J ., Polymer 24, 529 (1983). 38. Vukovic , R., Karasz, F. E., and MacKnight, W. J ., J . Appl. Polymer Sci...28, 219 (1983). 39. Zacharius, S. L., ten Brinke, G., MacKnight, W. J ., and Karasz, F. E., Macromolecules 16, 381 (1983). 40. Vukovic , R., Kuresevic

  13. Engineering Changes During the Service Phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vianello, Giovanna; Ahmed, Saeema

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses upon understanding the characteristics of engineering changes, in particular changes that emerge during the service phase of complex products, and on how these changes can be related to the product development process. For this purpose, a set of engineering change reports from...... an aerospace engine has been analyzed and the findings have been compared with change documentation from drilling machinery for the oil industry. These findings give insights into which phases of the design process should be modified in order to reduce the number of change requests from the service phase...... and to enable designers to efficiently answer the unavoidable change requests. This can be used to improve the product development process in order to take into account the factors leading to changes....

  14. A NEW RENEWABLE POLYMER FROM BIO-OIL - PHASE I

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vast majority of today’s polymers, plastics, foams, synthetic fibers, adhesives, and coatings are made from oil, which is non-renewable, non-biodegradable, depends in large part on foreign sources, is highly sensitive to regional conflicts, and has a large carbon foo...

  15. On the location of the surface-attached globule phase in collapsing polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owczarek, A L; Rechnitzer, A; Krawczyk, J; Prellberg, T

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the existence and location of the surface phase known as the 'surface-attached globule' (SAG) conjectured previously to exist in lattice models of three-dimensional polymers when they are attached to a wall that has a short-range potential. The bulk phase, where the attractive intra-polymer interactions are strong enough to cause a collapse of the polymer into a liquid-like globule and the wall either has weak attractive or repulsive interactions, is usually denoted desorbed-collapsed or DC. Recently, this DC phase was conjectured to harbour two surface phases separated by a boundary where the bulk free energy is analytic while the surface free energy is singular. The surface phase for more attractive values of the wall interaction is the SAG phase. We discuss in more detail the properties of this proposed surface phase and provide Monte Carlo evidence for self-avoiding walks up to a length 256 that this surface phase most likely does exist. Importantly, we discuss alternatives for the surface phase boundary. In particular, we conclude that this boundary may lie along the zero wall interaction line and the bulk phase boundaries rather than any new phase boundary curve

  16. On the location of the surface-attached globule phase in collapsing polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owczarek, A L [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Rechnitzer, A [Department of Mathematics, University of British Columbia, BC V6T-1Z2 (Canada); Krawczyk, J [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Prellberg, T [School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-02

    We investigate the existence and location of the surface phase known as the 'surface-attached globule' (SAG) conjectured previously to exist in lattice models of three-dimensional polymers when they are attached to a wall that has a short-range potential. The bulk phase, where the attractive intra-polymer interactions are strong enough to cause a collapse of the polymer into a liquid-like globule and the wall either has weak attractive or repulsive interactions, is usually denoted desorbed-collapsed or DC. Recently, this DC phase was conjectured to harbour two surface phases separated by a boundary where the bulk free energy is analytic while the surface free energy is singular. The surface phase for more attractive values of the wall interaction is the SAG phase. We discuss in more detail the properties of this proposed surface phase and provide Monte Carlo evidence for self-avoiding walks up to a length 256 that this surface phase most likely does exist. Importantly, we discuss alternatives for the surface phase boundary. In particular, we conclude that this boundary may lie along the zero wall interaction line and the bulk phase boundaries rather than any new phase boundary curve.

  17. Encapsulation of phase change materials using rice-husk-char

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondora, Wayne; Doudin, Khalid; Nowakowski, Daniel J.; Xiao, Bo; Ding, Yulong; Bridgwater, Tony; Yuan, Qingchun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Rice-husk-char particles are successfully used in the encapsulation of phase change materials. • Carbon-based phase change microcapsules aim at using the high thermal conductivity of carbon materials. • Carbon from biomass can be used in low and intermediate heat harvest and storage. • Carbon in biomass is captured and to be used in improving energy efficiency. - Abstract: This paper explored a new approach to prepare phase change microcapsules using carbon-based particles via Pickering emulsions for energy storage applications. Rice-husk-char, a by-product in biofuel production, containing 53.58 wt% of carbon was used as a model carbon-based material to encapsulate hexadecane. As a model phase change material, hexadecane was emulsified in aqueous suspensions of rice-husk-char nanoparticles. Water soluble polymers poly(diallyldimethyl-ammonium chloride) and poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) were used to fix the rice-husk-char nanoparticles on the emulsion droplets through layer-by-layer assembly to enhance the structural stability of the microcapsules. The microcapsules formed are composed of a thin shell encompassing a large core consisting of hexadecane. Thermal gravimetrical and differential scanning calorimeter analyses showed the phase change enthalpy of 80.9 kJ kg"−"1 or 120.0 MJ m"−"3. Design criteria of phase change microcapsules and preparation considerations were discussed in terms of desired applications. This work demonstrated possible utilisations of biomass-originated carbon-based material for thermal energy recovery and storage applications, which can be a new route of carbon capture and utilisation.

  18. Multiple-phase behavior and memory effect of polymer gel

    CERN Document Server

    Annaka, M; Nakahira, T; Sugiyama, M; Hara, K; Matsuura, T

    2002-01-01

    A poly(4-acrylamidosalicylic acid) gel (PASA gel) exhibits multiple phases as characterized by distinct degrees of swelling; the gel can take one of four different swelling values, but none of the intermediate values. The gel has remarkable memory: the phase behavior of the gel depends on whether the gel has experienced the most swollen phase or the most collapsed phase in the immediate past. The information is stored and reversibly erased in the form of a macroscopic phase transition behavior. The structure factors corresponding to these four phases were obtained by SANS, which indicated the presence of characteristic structures depending on pH and temperature, particularly in the shrunken state. (orig.)

  19. Method and apparatus for selective capture of gas phase analytes using metal .beta.-diketonate polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Scott D [Kennewick, WA

    2011-06-21

    A process and sensor device are disclosed that employ metal .beta.-diketonate polymers to selectively capture gas-phase explosives and weaponized chemical agents in a sampling area or volume. The metal .beta.-diketonate polymers can be applied to surfaces in various analytical formats for detection of: improvised explosive devices, unexploded ordinance, munitions hidden in cargo holds, explosives, and chemical weapons in public areas.

  20. Matrix supported tailored polymer for solid phase extraction of fluoride from variety of aqueous streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Neha; Kumar, Sanjukta A.; Wagh, D.N.; Das, Sadananda; Pandey, Ashok K.; Kumar, Sangita D.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Th complexed with poly (bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethyl]phosphate) as tailored polymer membranes. ► Membranes offered high capacity and selectivity for fluoride in aqueous media. ► Quantitative uptake (80 ± 5%) of fluoride. ► Fast sorption kinetics. ► Reusability of polymer membranes. - Abstract: Fluoride related health hazards (fluorosis) are a major environmental problem in many regions of the world. It affects teeth; skeleton and its accumulation over a long period can lead to changes in the DNA structure. It is thus absolutely essential to bring down the fluoride levels to acceptable limits. Here, we present a new inorganic–organic hybrid polymer sorbent having tailored fixed-sites for fluoride sorption. The matrix supported poly (bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethyl]phosphate) was prepared by photo-initiator induced graft-polymerization in fibrous and microporous (sheet) host poly(propylene) substrates. These substrates were conditioned for selective fluoride sorption by forming thorium complex with phosphate groups on bis[2-methacryloyloxy)-ethyl] phosphate (MEP). These tailored sorbents were studied for their selectivity towards fluoride in aqueous media having different chemical conditions. The fibrous sorbent was found to take up fluoride with a faster rate (15 min for ≈76% sorption) than the sheet sorbent. But, the fluoride loading capacity of sheet sorbent (4320 mg kg −1 ), was higher than fibrous and any other sorbent reported in the literature so far. The sorbent developed in the present work was found to be reusable after desorption of fluoride using NaOH solution. It was tested for solid phase extraction of fluoride from natural water samples.

  1. From phase-change materials to thermoelectrics?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Matthias N.; Rosenthal, Tobias; Oeckler, Oliver [Dept. of Chemistry, Ludwig Maximilian Univ. Munich (Germany); Stiewe, Christian [German Aerospace Center, Cologne (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Metastable tellurides play an important role as phase-change materials in data storage media and non-volatile RAM devices. The corresponding crystalline phases with very simple basic structures are not stable as bulk materials at ambient conditions, however, for a broad range of compositions they represent stable high-temperature phases. In the system Ge/Sb/Te, rocksalt-type high-temperature phases are characterized by a large number of vacancies randomly distributed over the cation position, which order as 2D vacancy layers upon cooling. Short-range order in quenched samples produces pronounced nanostructures by the formation of twin domains and finite intersecting vacancy layers. As phase-change materials are usually semimetals or small-bandgap semiconductors and efficient data storage requires low thermal conductivity, bulk materials with similar compositions and properties can be expected to exhibit promising thermoelectric characteristics. Nanostructuring by phase transitions that involve partial vacancy ordering may enhance the efficiency of such thermoelectrics. We have shown that germanium antimony tellurides with compositions close to those used as phase-change materials in rewritable Blu-Ray Discs, e.g. (GeTe){sub 12}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, exhibit thermoelectric figures of merit of up to ZT = 1.3 at 450 C if a nanodomain structure is induced by rapidly quenching the cubic high-temperature phase. Structural changes have been elucidated by X-ray diffraction and high-resolution electron microscopy. (orig.)

  2. Phase change materials science and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Raoux, Simone

    2009-01-01

    ""Phase Change Materials: Science and Applications"" provides a unique introduction of this rapidly developing field. This clearly written volume describes the material science of these fascinating materials from a theoretical and experimental perspective.

  3. Non-uniformity of phase structure in immiscible polymer blends

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fortelný, Ivan; Lapčíková, Monika; Lednický, František; Starý, Zdeněk; Kruliš, Zdeněk

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 3 (2008), s. 564-571 ISSN 0032-3888 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/06/0729; GA ČR GA106/06/0761 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polymer blends * melt mixing * non-uniform morphology Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.245, year: 2008

  4. Tailoring polymer films for solar-collection use, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouser, J. P.

    1983-09-01

    Several types of Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) polymers in film form that could meet the performance criteria with respect to thermal, ultraviolet, and tensile strength stability for use as exterior glazing in a low cost solar collector or for the internal heat exchange component were evaluated. Seven film specimens were tested. It is concluded that acrylonitrile homopolymer films when properly cast and processed have good mechanical properties, have long uv stability, and are usable for prolonged periods at 300 F.

  5. Entransy in phase-change systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Junjie

    2014-01-01

    Entransy in Phase-Change Systems summarizes recent developments in the area of entransy, especially on phase-change processes. This book covers new developments in the area including the great potential for energy saving for process industries, decreasing carbon dioxide emissions, reducing energy bills and improving overall efficiency of systems. This concise volume is an ideal book for engineers and scientists in energy-related industries.

  6. Reversible switching in phase-change materials

    OpenAIRE

    Wojciech Wełnic; Matthias Wuttig

    2008-01-01

    Phase-change materials are successfully employed in optical data storage and are becoming a promising candidate for future electronic storage applications. Despite the increasing technological interest, many fundamental properties of these materials remain poorly understood. However, in the last few years the understanding of the material properties of phase-change materials has increased significantly. At the same time, great advances have been achieved in technological applications in elect...

  7. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Stiebra, L; Cabulis, U; Knite, M

    2014-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) for thermal energy storage (TES) have become an important subject of research in recent years. Using PCMs for thermal energy storage provides a solution to increase the efficiency of the storage and use of energy in many domestic and industrial sectors. Phase change TES systems offer a number of advantages over other systems (e.g. chemical storage systems): particularly small temperature distance between the storage and retrieval cycles, small unit sizes and lo...

  8. Constitutive model for a stress- and thermal-induced phase transition in a shape memory polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xiaogang; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Zhou, Bo; Leng, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, increasing applications of shape memory polymers have pushed forward the development of appropriate constitutive models for smart materials such as the shape memory polymer. During the heating process, the phase transition, which is a continuous time-dependent process, happens in the shape memory polymer, and various individual phases will form at different configuration temperatures. In addition, these phases can generally be divided into two parts: the frozen and active phase (Liu Y et al 2006 Int. J. Plast. 22 279–313). During the heating or cooling process, the strain will be stored or released with the occurring phase transition between these two parts. Therefore, a shape memory effect emerges. In this paper, a new type of model was developed to characterize the variation of the volume fraction in a shape memory polymer during the phase transition. In addition to the temperature variation, the applied stress was also taken as a significant influence factor on the phase transition. Based on the experimental results, an exponential equation was proposed to describe the relationship between the stress and phase transition temperature. For the sake of describing the mechanical behaviors of the shape memory polymer, a three-dimensional constitutive model was established. Also, the storage strain, which was the key factor of the shape memory effect, was also discussed in detail. Similar to previous works, we first explored the effect of applied stress on storage strain. Through comparisons with the DMA and the creep experimental results, the rationality and accuracy of the new phase transition and constitutive model were finally verified. (paper)

  9. Chalcogenides Metastability and Phase Change Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kolobov, Alexander V

    2012-01-01

    A state-of-the-art description of metastability observed in chalcogenide alloys is presented with the accent on the underlying physics. A comparison is made between sulphur(selenium)-based chalcogenide glasses, where numerous photo-induced phenomena take place entirely within the amorphous phase, and tellurides where a reversible crystal-to-amorphous phase-change transformation is a major effect. Applications of metastability in devices¿optical memories and nonvolatile electronic phase-change random-access memories among others are discussed, including the latest trends. Background material essential for understanding current research in the field is also provided.

  10. New polymers for low-gravity purification of cells by phase partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A potentially powerful technique for separating different biological cell types is based on the partitioning of these cells between the immiscible aqueous phases formed by solution of certain polymers in water. This process is gravity-limited because cells sediment rather than associate with the phase most favored on the basis of cell-phase interactions. In the present contract we have been involved in the synthesis of new polymers both to aid in understanding the partitioning process and to improve the quality of separations. The prime driving force behind the design of these polymers is to produce materials which will aid in space experiments to separate important cell types and to study the partitioning process in the absence of gravity (i.e., in an equilibrium state).

  11. Phase behaviour of charged colloidal sphere dispersions with added polymer chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortini, Andrea; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Tuinier, Remco

    2005-01-01

    We study the stability of mixtures of highly screened repulsive charged spheres and non-adsorbing ideal polymer chains in a common solvent using free volume theory. The effective interaction between charged colloids in an aqueous salt solution is described by a screened Coulomb pair potential, which supplements the pure hard-sphere interaction. The ideal polymer chains are treated as spheres that are excluded from the colloids by a hard-core interaction, whereas the interaction between two ideal chains is set to zero. In addition, we investigate the phase behaviour of charged colloid-polymer mixtures in computer simulations, using the two-body (Asakura-Oosawa pair potential) approximation to the effective one-component Hamiltonian of the charged colloids. Both our results obtained from simulations and from free volume theory show similar trends. We find that the screened Coulomb repulsion counteracts the effect of the effective polymer-mediated attraction. For mixtures of small polymers and relatively large charged colloidal spheres, the fluid-crystal transition shifts to significantly larger polymer concentrations with increasing range of the screened Coulomb repulsion. For relatively large polymers, the effect of the screened Coulomb repulsion is weaker. The resulting fluid-fluid binodal is only slightly shifted towards larger polymer concentrations upon increasing the range of the screened Coulomb repulsion. In conclusion, our results show that the miscibility of dispersions containing charged colloids and neutral non-adsorbing polymers increases upon increasing the range of the screened Coulomb repulsion, or upon lowering the salt concentration, especially when the polymers are small compared to the colloids

  12. Thermal Energy Storage with Phase Change Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Gabriela SOCACIU

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal energy storage (TES systems provide several alternatives for efficient energy use and conservation. Phase change materials (PCMs for TES are materials supplying thermal regulation at particular phase change temperatures by absorbing and emitting the heat of the medium. TES in general and PCMs in particular, have been a main topic in research for the last 30 years, but although the information is quantitatively enormous, it is also spread widely in the literature, and difficult to find. PCMs absorb energy during the heating process as phase change takes place and release energy to the environment in the phase change range during a reverse cooling process. PCMs possesses the ability of latent thermal energy change their state with a certain temperature. PCMs for TES are generally solid-liquid phase change materials and therefore they need encapsulation. TES systems using PCMs as a storage medium offers advantages such as high TES capacity, small unit size and isothermal behaviour during charging and discharging when compared to the sensible TES.

  13. Steric Pressure among Membrane-Bound Polymers Opposes Lipid Phase Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Zachary I; Kenyon, Laura E; Carrillo, Adelita; Espinoza, Isai; Nagib, Fatema; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2016-04-19

    Lipid rafts are thought to be key organizers of membrane-protein complexes in cells. Many proteins that interact with rafts have bulky polymeric components such as intrinsically disordered protein domains and polysaccharide chains. Therefore, understanding the interaction between membrane domains and membrane-bound polymers provides insights into the roles rafts play in cells. Multiple studies have demonstrated that high concentrations of membrane-bound polymeric domains create significant lateral steric pressure at membrane surfaces. Furthermore, our recent work has shown that lateral steric pressure at membrane surfaces opposes the assembly of membrane domains. Building on these findings, here we report that membrane-bound polymers are potent suppressors of membrane phase separation, which can destabilize lipid domains with substantially greater efficiency than globular domains such as membrane-bound proteins. Specifically, we created giant vesicles with a ternary lipid composition, which separated into coexisting liquid ordered and disordered phases. Lipids with saturated tails and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains conjugated to their head groups were included at increasing molar concentrations. When these lipids were sparse on the membrane surface they partitioned to the liquid ordered phase. However, as they became more concentrated, the fraction of GUVs that were phase-separated decreased dramatically, ultimately yielding a population of homogeneous membrane vesicles. Experiments and physical modeling using compositions of increasing PEG molecular weight and lipid miscibility phase transition temperature demonstrate that longer polymers are the most efficient suppressors of membrane phase separation when the energetic barrier to lipid mixing is low. In contrast, as the miscibility transition temperature increases, longer polymers are more readily driven out of domains by the increased steric pressure. Therefore, the concentration of shorter polymers required

  14. Influence of humidity on the phase behavior of API/polymer formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudic, Anke; Ji, Yuanhui; Luebbert, Christian; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Amorphous formulations of APIs in polymers tend to absorb water from the atmosphere. This absorption of water can induce API recrystallization, leading to reduced long-term stability during storage. In this work, the phase behavior of different formulations was investigated as a function of relative humidity. Indomethacin and naproxen were chosen as model APIs and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate) (PVPVA64) as excipients. The formulations were prepared by spray drying. The water sorption in pure polymers and in formulations was measured at 25°C and at different values of relative humidity (RH=25%, 50% and 75%). Most water was absorbed in PVP-containing systems, and water sorption was decreasing with increasing API content. These trends could also be predicted in good agreement with the experimental data using the thermodynamic model PC-SAFT. Furthermore, the effect of absorbed water on API solubility in the polymer and on the glass-transition temperature of the formulations was predicted with PC-SAFT and the Gordon-Taylor equation, respectively. The absorbed water was found to significantly decrease the API solubility in the polymer as well as the glass-transition temperature of the formulation. Based on a quantitative modeling of the API/polymer phase diagrams as a function of relative humidity, appropriate API/polymer compositions can now be selected to ensure long-term stable amorphous formulations at given storage conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Similarity solutions for phase-change problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canright, D.; Davis, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    A modification of Ivantsov's (1947) similarity solutions is proposed which can describe phase-change processes which are limited by diffusion. The method has application to systems that have n-components and possess cross-diffusion and Soret and Dufour effects, along with convection driven by density discontinuities at the two-phase interface. Local thermal equilibrium is assumed at the interface. It is shown that analytic solutions are possible when the material properties are constant.

  16. Ammonium nitrate-polymer glasses: a new concept for phase and thermal stabilization of ammonium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Anthony J; Vyazovkin, Sergey

    2008-09-11

    Dissolving of ammonium nitrate in highly polar polymers such as poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and/or poly(acrylamide) can result in the formation of single-phase glassy solid materials, in which NH 4 (+) and NO 3 (-) are separated through an ion-dipole interaction with the polymer matrix. Below the glass transition temperature of the polymer matrix the resulting materials remain phase and thermally stable as demonstrated through the absence of decomposition as well as the solid-solid transitions and melting of ammonium nitrate. The structure of the materials is explored by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and density functional calculations. Differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry, and isoconversional kinetic analysis are applied to characterize the thermal behavior of the materials.

  17. Electrically Tunable Binary-Phase Fresnel Lens Based on Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui LI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a proposal for a Fresnel lens with an electrically tunable binary-phase made of polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC, which has relatively fast response time and low applied voltage. Simple fabrication is the major advantage of the proposed method. In this study, NOA65 and E7 were utilized with weight ratios of 60 wt.%: 40 wt.%. There was also the utilization of a relatively low intensity UV-light, 0.53 mW/cm2. The duration time of exposure was about 30 hours. The performance improvement of the Fresnel lens resulted from the infiltration of large LC droplet into the PDLC film. The phenomenon of black cross strip patterns could be explained with the use of the electro-hydrodynamics theory. The diffraction efficiency of the proposed lens was from 31.1 % to 41 % with the changes of externally applied voltage. This work presents an effective approach to get relatively complete phase separation in PDLC. The proposed method also provides great potential in developing high performance Fresnel lens.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.2.16317

  18. Solid-Phase Synthesis of Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Nanoparticles with a Reusable Template - "Plastic Antibodies".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poma, Alessandro; Guerreiro, Antonio; Whitcombe, Michael J; Piletska, Elena V; Turner, Anthony P F; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2013-06-13

    Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) are generic alternatives to antibodies in sensors, diagnostics and separations. To displace biomolecules without radical changes in infrastructure in device manufacture, MIPs should share their characteristics (solubility, size, specificity and affinity, localized binding domain) whilst maintaining the advantages of MIPs (low-cost, short development time and high stability) hence the interest in MIP nanoparticles. Herein we report a reusable solid-phase template approach (fully compatible with automation) for the synthesis of MIP nanoparticles and their precise manufacture using a prototype automated UV photochemical reactor. Batches of nanoparticles (30-400 nm) with narrow size distributions imprinted with: melamine (d = 60 nm, K d = 6.3 × 10 -8 m), vancomycin (d = 250 nm, K d = 3.4 × 10 -9 m), a peptide (d = 350 nm, K d = 4.8 × 10 -8 m) and proteins have been produced. Our instrument uses a column packed with glass beads, bearing the template. Process parameters are under computer control, requiring minimal manual intervention. For the first time we demonstrate the reliable re-use of molecular templates in the synthesis of MIPs (≥ 30 batches of nanoMIPs without loss of performance). NanoMIPs are produced template-free and the solid-phase acts both as template and affinity separation medium.

  19. Shear viscosity of phase-separating polymer blends with viscous asymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, H. S.; Hobbie, E. K.

    2001-01-01

    Rheo-optical measurements of phase separating polymer mixtures under simple shear flow have been used to investigate the influence of domain morphology on the viscosity of emulsionlike polymer blends, in which the morphology under weak shear is droplets of one coexisting phase dispersed in a matrix of the second. The structure and viscosity of low-molecular-weight polybutadiene and polyisoprene mixtures, phase separated by quenching to a temperature inside the coexistence region of the phase diagram, were measured as a function of shear rate and composition. In the weak shear regime, the data are in qualitative agreement with an effective medium model for non-dilute suspensions of slightly deformed interacting droplets. In the strong shear regime, where a stringlike pattern appears en route to a shear-homogenized state, the data are in qualitative agreement with a simple model that accounts for viscous asymmetry in the components

  20. Moiré phase-shifted fiber Bragg gratings in polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Rui; Marques, Carlos; Bang, Ole

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple way to fabricate phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating in polymer optical fibers as a narrowband transmission filter for a variety of applications at telecom wavelengths. The filters have been fabricated by overlapping two uniform fiber Bragg gratings with slightly different...

  1. Crystallization kinetics of phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Michael; Sontheimer, Tobias; Wuttig, Matthias [I. Physikalisches Institut (1A), RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Phase change materials are fascinating materials. They can be rapidly switched between two metastable states, the amorphous and crystalline phase, which show pronounced contrast in their optical and electrical properties. They are already widely used as the active layer in rewritable optical media and are expected to be used in the upcoming phase change random access memory (PRAM). Here we show measurements of the crystallization kinetics of chalcogenide materials that lead to a deeper understanding of these processes. This work focuses mainly on the Ge-Sb-Te system but also includes Ag-In-Te materials. The crystallization behaviour of these materials was investigated with an ex-situ annealing method employing the precise oven of a differential scanning calorimeter and imaging techniques employing atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy.

  2. 25th Anniversary Article: Polymer-Particle Composites: Phase Stability and Applications in Electrochemical Energy Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Srivastava, Samanvaya

    2013-12-09

    Polymer-particle composites are used in virtually every field of technology. When the particles approach nanometer dimensions, large interfacial regions are created. In favorable situations, the spatial distribution of these interfaces can be controlled to create new hybrid materials with physical and transport properties inaccessible in their constituents or poorly prepared mixtures. This review surveys progress in the last decade in understanding phase behavior, structure, and properties of nanoparticle-polymer composites. The review takes a decidedly polymers perspective and explores how physical and chemical approaches may be employed to create hybrids with controlled distribution of particles. Applications are studied in two contexts of contemporary interest: battery electrolytes and electrodes. In the former, the role of dispersed and aggregated particles on ion-transport is considered. In the latter, the polymer is employed in such small quantities that it has been historically given titles such as binder and carbon precursor that underscore its perceived secondary role. Considering the myriad functions the binder plays in an electrode, it is surprising that highly filled composites have not received more attention. Opportunities in this and related areas are highlighted where recent advances in synthesis and polymer science are inspiring new approaches, and where newcomers to the field could make important contributions. Polymer-particle composites are used in virtually every field of technology. When the particles approach nanometer dimensions, large interfacial regions are created that can be exploited for applications. The fundamental approaches and bottom-up synthesis strategies for understanding and controlling nanoparticle dispersion in polymers are reviewed. Applications of these approaches for creating polymer-particle composite electrolytes and electrodes for energy storage are also considered. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. First order phase transition of a long polymer chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristoff, David; Radin, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We consider a model consisting of a self-avoiding polygon occupying a variable density of the sites of a square lattice. A fixed energy is associated with each 90 0 bend of the polygon. We use a grand canonical ensemble, introducing parameters μ and β to control average density and average (total) energy of the polygon, and show by Monte Carlo simulation that the model has a first order, nematic phase transition across a curve in the β-μ plane.

  4. A Facile Synthesis of Dynamic, Shape Changing Polymer Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Klinger, Daniel; Wang, Cynthia; Connal, Luke A.; Audus, Debra J.; Jang, Se Gyu; Kraemer, Stephan; Killops, Kato L.; Fredrickson, Glenn H.; Kramer, Edward J.; Hawker, Craig J.

    2014-01-01

    We herein report a new facile strategy to ellipsoidal block copolymer nanoparticles exhibiting a pH-triggered anistropic swelling profile. In a first step, elongated particles with an axially stacked lamellae structure are selectively prepared by utilizing functional surfactants to control the phase separation of symmetric PS-b-P2VP in dispersed droplets. In a second step, the dynamic shape change is realized by crosslinking the P2VP domains, hereby connecting glassy PS discs with pH-sensitiv...

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis of zinc(II)-phosphonate coordination polymers with different dimensionality (0D, 2D, 3D) and dimensionality change in the solid phase (0D→3D) induced by temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Zapico, Eva; Montejo-Bernardo, Jose; Fernández-González, Alfonso; García, José R., E-mail: jrgm@uniovi.es; García-Granda, Santiago

    2015-05-15

    Three new zinc(II) coordination polymers, [Zn(HO{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO)(C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2})(H{sub 2}O)] (1), [Zn{sub 3}(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2}(C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2})](H{sub 2}O){sub 3.40} (2) and [Zn{sub 5}(HO{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2}(O{sub 3}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2}(C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2}){sub 4}](H{sub 2}O){sub 0.32} (3), with different structural dimensionality (0D, 2D and 3D, respectively) have been prepared by hydrothermal synthesis, and their structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic system (P2{sub 1}/c) forming discrete dimeric units bonded through H-bonds, while compounds 2 and 3 crystallize in the triclinic (P−1) and the monoclinic (C2/c) systems, respectively. Compound 3, showing three different coordination numbers (4, 5 and 6) for the zinc atoms, has also been obtained by thermal treatment of 1 (probed by high-temperature XRPD experiments). The crystalline features of these compounds, related to the coordination environments for the zinc atoms in each structure, provoke the increase of the relative fluorescence for 2 and 3, compared to the free phenanthroline. Thermal analysis (TG and DSC) and XPS studies have been also carried out for all compounds. - Graphical abstract: Three new coordination compounds of zinc with 2-carboxyethylphosphonic acid (H{sub 2}PPA) and phenanthroline have been obtained by hydrothermal synthesis. The crystalline structure depends on the different coordination environments of the zinc atoms (see two comparative Zn{sub 6}-moieties). The influence of the different coordination modes of H{sub 2}PPA with the central atom in all structures have been studied, being found new coordination modes for this ligand. Several compounds show a significant increase in relative fluorescence with respect to the free phenanthroline. - Highlights: • Compounds have been obtained modifying the reaction time and the rate of

  6. Simulation studies of GST phase change alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyna, Glenn

    2008-03-01

    In order to help drive post-Moore's Law technology development, switching processes involving novel materials, in particular, GeSbTe (GST) alloys are being investigated for use in memory and eFuse applications. An anneal/quench thermal process crystallizes/amorphosizes a GST alloy which then has a low/high resistance and thereby forms a readable/writeable bit; for example, a ``one'' might be the low resistance, conducting crystalline state and a ``zero'' might be the high resistance, glassy state. There are many open questions about the precise nature of the structural transitions and the coupling to electronic structure changes. Computational and experimental studies of the effect of pressure on the GST materials were initiated in order to probe the physics behind the thermal switching process. A new pathway to reversible phase change involving pressure-induced structural metal insulator transitions was discovered. In a binary GS system, a room-temperature, direct, pressure-induced transformation from the high resistance amorphous phase to the low resistance crystalline phase was observed experimentally while the reverse process under tensile load was demonstrated via ab initio MD simulations performed on IBM's Blue Gene/L enabled by massively parallel software. Pressure induced transformations of the ternary material GST-225 (Ge2Sb2Te5) were, also, examined In the talk, the behavior of the two systems will be compared and insight into the nature of the phase change given.

  7. Quality criteria for phase change materials selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitorino, Nuno; Abrantes, João C.C.; Frade, Jorge R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Selection criteria of phase change materials for representative applications. • Selection criteria based on reliable solutions for latent heat transfer. • Guidelines for the role of geometry and heat transfer mechanisms. • Performance maps based on PCM properties, operating conditions, size and time scales. - Abstract: Selection guidelines are primary criterion for optimization of materials for specific applications in order to meet simultaneous and often conflicting requirements. This is mostly true for technologies and products required to meet the main societal needs, such as energy. In this case, gaps between supply and demand require strategies for energy conversion and storage, including thermal storage mostly based on phase change materials. Latent heat storage is also very versatile for thermal management and thermal control by allowing high storage density within narrow temperature ranges without strict dependence between stored thermal energy and temperature. Thus, this work addressed the main issues of latent heat storage from a materials selection perspective, based on expected requirements of applications in thermal energy storage or thermal regulation. Representative solutions for the kinetics of latent heat charge/discharge were used to derive optimization guidelines for high energy density, high power, response time (from fast response to thermal inertia), etc. The corresponding property relations were presented in graphical forms for a wide variety of prospective phase change materials, and for wide ranges of operating conditions, and accounting for changes in geometry and mechanisms.

  8. Shear-induced phase changes in mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romig, K.D.; Hanley, H.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    A thermodynamic theory to account for the behavior of liquid mixtures exposed to a shear is developed. One consequence of the theory is that shear-induced phase changes are predicted. The theory is based on a thermodynamics that includes specifically the shear rate in the formalism and is applied to mixtures by a straightforward modification of the corresponding states, conformalsolution approach. The approach is general but is used here for a mixture of Lennard-Jones particles with a Lennard-Jones equation of state as a reference fluid. The results are discussed in the context of the Scott and Van Konynenberg phase classification. It is shown that the influence of a shear does affect substantially the type of the phase behavior. Results from the model mixture are equated loosely with those from real polymeric liquids

  9. Role of the polymer phase in the mechanics of nacre-like composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebel, Tobias P.; Bouville, Florian; Kokkinis, Dimitri; Studart, André R.

    2016-11-01

    Although strength and toughness are often mutually exclusive properties in man-made structural materials, nature is full of examples of composite materials that combine these properties in a remarkable way through sophisticated multiscale architectures. Understanding the contributions of the different constituents to the energy dissipating toughening mechanisms active in these natural materials is crucial for the development of strong artificial composites with a high resistance to fracture. Here, we systematically study the influence of the polymer properties on the mechanics of nacre-like composites containing an intermediate fraction of mineral phase (57 vol%). To this end, we infiltrate ceramic scaffolds prepared by magnetically assisted slip casting (MASC) with monomers that are subsequently cured to yield three drastically different polymers: (i) poly(lauryl methacrylate) (PLMA), a soft and weak elastomer; (ii) poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), a strong, stiff and brittle thermoplastic; and (iii) polyether urethane diacrylate-co-poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PUA-PHEMA), a tough polymer of intermediate strength and stiffness. By combining our experimental data with finite element modeling, we find that stiffer polymers can increase the strength of the composite by reducing stress concentrations in the inorganic scaffold. Moreover, infiltrating the scaffolds with tough polymers leads to composites with high crack initiation toughness KIC. An organic phase with a minimum strength and toughness is also required to fully activate the mechanisms programmed within the ceramic structure for a rising R-curve behavior. Our results indicate that a high modulus of toughness is a key parameter for the selection of polymers leading to strong and tough bioinspired nacre-like composites.

  10. Core stress distribution of phase shifting multimode polymer optical fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Rei; Matsuura, Motoharu; Nagata, Morio; Mishima, Kenji; Inoue, Azusa; Tagaya, Akihiro; Koike, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Poly-(methyl methacrylate-co-benzyl methacrylate) polarization-maintaining optical fibers are known for their high response to normal stress. In this report, responses to higher stress levels up to 0.45 MPa were investigated. The stress amplitude and direction in the fiber cross section were calculated and analyzed with a coincident mode-field obtained from the near-field pattern. The stress amplitude varies significantly in the horizontal direction and is considered to create multiple phases, explaining the measurement results. To investigate possible permanent deformation, the core yield point profile was analyzed. Although it largely exceeds the average applied stress, the calculated stress distribution indicates that the core could partially experience stress that exceeds the yield point

  11. Exploring the dynamics of phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures with long range attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, Juan; Bailey, Arthur E; Frisken, Barbara J

    2016-06-28

    We have studied the kinetics of phase separation and gel formation in a low-dispersity colloid - non-adsorbing polymer system with long range attraction using small-angle light scattering. This system exhibits two-phase and three-phase coexistence of gas, liquid and crystal phases when the strength of attraction is between 2 and 4kBT and gel phases when the strength of attraction is increased. For those samples that undergo macroscopic phase separation, whether to gas-crystal, gas-liquid or gas-liquid-crystal coexistence, we observe dynamic scaling of the structure factor and growth of a characteristic length scale that behaves as expected for phase separation in fluids. In samples that gel, the power law associated with the growth of the dominant length scale is not equal to 1/3, but appears to depend mainly on the strength of attraction, decreasing from 1/3 for samples near the coexistence region to 1/27 at 8kBT, over a wide range of colloid and polymer concentrations.

  12. Transitional Phenomena on Phase Change Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wójcik Tadeusz M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most significant problem with technology development is transferring of large heat fluxes, which requires constant heat transfer temperature (in the specified temperature range. This problem concern mainly the nuclear energetics, space technologies, military technologies and most of all electronics containing integrated circuits with very large scale of integrations. Intensive heat transfer and thermal energy storage are possible by the use of phase change materials (PCMs. In the paper there are presented preliminary results of research on the use of liquid-gas (L-G PCMs and solid-solid phase change materials (S-S PCMs. For L-G PCMs the boiling characteristics were determined by increasing and decreasing the heat flux, which for certain sets of structural parameters of the heating surface and the physical properties of the liquid induce a variety of forms of transitional phenomena. Thermal energy storage is much more effective when using PCMs than sensible heat.

  13. Thermodynamics phase changes of nanopore fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Islam, Akand W.; Patzek, Tadeusz; Sun, Alexander Y.

    2015-01-01

    The van der Waals (vdW) equation (Eq.) is modified to describe thermodynamic of phase behavior of fluids confined in nanopore. Our aim is to compute pressures exerted by the fluid molecules and to investigate how they change due to pore proximity by assuming the pore wall is inert. No additional scaling of model parameters is imposed and original volume and energy parameters are used in the calculations. Our results clearly show the phase changes due to confinement. The critical shifts of temperatures and pressures are in good agreement compared to the laboratory data and molecular simulation. Peng-Robinson (PR) equation-of-state (EOS) has resulted in different effect than the vdW. This work delivers insights into the nature of fluid behavior in extremely low-permeability nanoporous media, especially in the tight shale reservoirs, below the critical temperatures. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Thermodynamics phase changes of nanopore fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Islam, Akand W.

    2015-07-01

    The van der Waals (vdW) equation (Eq.) is modified to describe thermodynamic of phase behavior of fluids confined in nanopore. Our aim is to compute pressures exerted by the fluid molecules and to investigate how they change due to pore proximity by assuming the pore wall is inert. No additional scaling of model parameters is imposed and original volume and energy parameters are used in the calculations. Our results clearly show the phase changes due to confinement. The critical shifts of temperatures and pressures are in good agreement compared to the laboratory data and molecular simulation. Peng-Robinson (PR) equation-of-state (EOS) has resulted in different effect than the vdW. This work delivers insights into the nature of fluid behavior in extremely low-permeability nanoporous media, especially in the tight shale reservoirs, below the critical temperatures. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  15. A stress-induced phase transition model for semi-crystallize shape memory polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaogang; Zhou, Bo; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2014-03-01

    The developments of constitutive models for shape memory polymer (SMP) have been motivated by its increasing applications. During cooling or heating process, the phase transition which is a continuous time-dependent process happens in semi-crystallize SMP and the various individual phases form at different temperature and in different configuration. Then, the transformation between these phases occurred and shape memory effect will emerge. In addition, stress applied on SMP is an important factor for crystal melting during phase transition. In this theory, an ideal phase transition model considering stress or pre-strain is the key to describe the behaviors of shape memory effect. So a normal distributed model was established in this research to characterize the volume fraction of each phase in SMP during phase transition. Generally, the experiment results are partly backward (in heating process) or forward (in cooling process) compared with the ideal situation considering delay effect during phase transition. So, a correction on the normal distributed model is needed. Furthermore, a nonlinear relationship between stress and phase transition temperature Tg is also taken into account for establishing an accurately normal distributed phase transition model. Finally, the constitutive model which taking the stress as an influence factor on phase transition was also established. Compared with the other expressions, this new-type model possesses less parameter and is more accurate. For the sake of verifying the rationality and accuracy of new phase transition and constitutive model, the comparisons between the simulated and experimental results were carried out.

  16. Dimension changing phase transitions in instanton crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplunovsky, Vadim; Sonnenschein, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    We investigate lattices of instantons and the dimension-changing transitions between them. Our ultimate goal is the 3D→4D transition, which is holographically dual to the phase transition between the baryonic and the quarkyonic phases of cold nuclear matter. However, in this paper (just as in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP11(2012)047) we focus on lower dimensions — the 1D lattice of instantons in a harmonic potential V∝M 2 2 x 2 2 +M 3 2 x 2 2 +M 4 2 x 4 2 , and the zigzag-shaped lattice as a first stage of the 1D→2D transition. We prove that in the low- and moderate-density regimes, interactions between the instantons are dominated by two-body forces. This drastically simplifies finding the ground state of the instantons’ orientations, so we made a numeric scan of the whole orientation space instead of assuming any particular ansatz. We find that depending on the M 2 /M 3 /M 4 ratios, the ground state of instanton orientations can follow a wide variety of patterns. For the straight 1D lattices, we found orientations periodically running over elements of a ℤ 2 , Klein, prismatic, or dihedral subgroup of the SU(2)/ℤ 2 , as well as irrational but link-periodic patterns. For the zigzag-shaped lattices, we detected 4 distinct orientation phases — the anti-ferromagnet, another abelian phase, and two non-abelian phases. Allowing the zigzag amplitude to vary as a function of increasing compression force, we obtained the phase diagrams for the straight and zigzag-shaped lattices in the (force,M 3 /M 4 ), (chemical potential,M 3 /M 4 ), and (density,M 3 /M 4 ) planes. Some of the transitions between these phases are second-order while others are first-order. Our techniques can be applied to other types of non-abelian crystals

  17. Adsorptive removal of phenol from aqueous phase by using a porous acrylic ester polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Bingjun; Pan Bingcai; Zhang Weiming; Zhang Qingrui; Zhang Quanxing; Zheng Shourong

    2008-01-01

    The removal of phenol from aqueous solution was examined by using a porous acrylic ester polymer (Amberlite XAD-7) as an adsorbent. Favorable phenol adsorption was observed at acidic solution pH and further increase of solution pH results in a marked decrease of adsorption capacity, and the coexisting inorganic salt NaCl exerts positive effect on the adsorption process. Adsorption isotherms of phenol were linearly correlated and found to be well represented by either the Langmuir or Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic parameters such as changes in the enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (ΔS) and free energy (ΔG) indicate that phenol adsorption onto XAD-7 is an exothermic and spontaneous process in nature, and lower ambient temperature results in more favorable adsorption. Kinetic experiments at different initial solute concentrations were investigated and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model was successfully represented the kinetic data. Additionally, the column adsorption result showed that a complete removal of phenol from aqueous phase can be achieved by XAD-7 beads and the exhausted adsorbent was amenable to an entire regeneration by using ethanol as the regenerant. More interestingly, relatively more volume of hot water in place of ethanol can also achieve a similar result for repeated use of the adsorbent

  18. Sprayable Phase Change Coating Thermal Protection Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Rod W.; Hayes, Paul W.; Kaul, Raj

    2005-01-01

    NASA has expressed a need for reusable, environmentally friendly, phase change coating that is capable of withstanding the heat loads that have historically required an ablative thermal insulation. The Space Shuttle Program currently relies on ablative materials for thermal protection. The problem with an ablative insulation is that, by design, the material ablates away, in fulfilling its function of cooling the underlying substrate, thus preventing the insulation from being reused from flight to flight. The present generation of environmentally friendly, sprayable, ablative thermal insulation (MCC-l); currently use on the Space Shuttle SRBs, is very close to being a reusable insulation system. In actual flight conditions, as confirmed by the post-flight inspections of the SRBs, very little of the material ablates. Multi-flight thermal insulation use has not been qualified for the Space Shuttle. The gap that would have to be overcome in order to implement a reusable Phase Change Coating (PCC) is not unmanageable. PCC could be applied robotically with a spray process utilizing phase change material as filler to yield material of even higher strength and reliability as compared to MCC-1. The PCC filled coatings have also demonstrated potential as cryogenic thermal coatings. In experimental thermal tests, a thin application of PCC has provided the same thermal protection as a much thicker and heavier application of a traditional ablative thermal insulation. In addition, tests have shown that the structural integrity of the coating has been maintained and phase change performance after several aero-thermal cycles was not affected. Experimental tests have also shown that, unlike traditional ablative thermal insulations, PCC would not require an environmental seal coat, which has historically been required to prevent moisture absorption by the thermal insulation, prevent environmental degradation, and to improve the optical and aerodynamic properties. In order to reduce

  19. A Facile Synthesis of Dynamic, Shape Changing Polymer Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Daniel; Wang, Cynthia; Connal, Luke A.; Audus, Debra J.; Jang, Se Gyu; Kraemer, Stephan; Killops, Kato L.; Fredrickson, Glenn H.; Kramer, Edward J.; Hawker, Craig J.

    2014-01-01

    We herein report a new facile strategy to ellipsoidal block copolymer nanoparticles exhibiting a pH-triggered anistropic swelling profile. In a first step, elongated particles with an axially stacked lamellae structure are selectively prepared by utilizing functional surfactants to control the phase separation of symmetric PS-b-P2VP in dispersed droplets. In a second step, the dynamic shape change is realized by crosslinking the P2VP domains, hereby connecting glassy PS discs with pH-sensitive hydrogel actuators. PMID:24700705

  20. A facile synthesis of dynamic, shape-changing polymer particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Daniel; Wang, Cynthia X; Connal, Luke A; Audus, Debra J; Jang, Se Gyu; Kraemer, Stephan; Killops, Kato L; Fredrickson, Glenn H; Kramer, Edward J; Hawker, Craig J

    2014-07-01

    We herein report a new facile strategy to ellipsoidal block copolymer nanoparticles that exhibit a pH-triggered anistropic swelling profile. In a first step, elongated particles with an axially stacked lamellae structure are selectively prepared by utilizing functional surfactants to control the phase separation of symmetric polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) in dispersed droplets. In a second step, the dynamic shape change is realized by cross-linking the P2VP domains, thereby connecting glassy PS discs with pH-sensitive hydrogel actuators. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Adhesion and adhesion changes at the copper metal-(acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene) polymer interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kisin, S.; Varst, van der P.G.T.; With, de G.

    2007-01-01

    It is known that the adhesive strength of metallic films on polymer substrates often changes in the course of time. To study this effect in more detail, the adhesion energy of sputtered and galvanically strengthened copper coatings on acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene polymer substrate was determined

  2. Pattern Formation During Phase Separation of Polymer-Ionic Liquid Co-Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhiyong; Osuji, Chinedum

    2010-03-01

    Co-solutions of polystyrene (PS) with a 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium based ionic liquid (IL) in DMF phase separated into IL-rich and PS-rich domains on solvent evaporation. Over a limited range of polymer molecular weights and substrate temperatures, a variety of striped and cellular or polygonal structures were found on the resulting film surface, as visualized using bright-field and phase-contrast optical microscopy. This effect appears to be due to a Benard-Marangoni instability at the free surface of the liquid film as it undergoes evaporation, setting up convection rolls inside the fluid which become locked in place as the system vitrifies on solvent removal. Differential scanning calorimetry shows that the IL does not significantly plasticize the polymer, suggesting that the viscosity of the polystyrene solution itself controls the formation of this instability.

  3. Frequency doubling in poled polymers using anomalous dispersion phase-matching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, T.C.; Singer, K.D. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Cahill, P.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The authors report on a second harmonic generation in a poled polymer waveguide using anomalous dispersion phase-matching. Blue light ({lambda} = 407 nm) was produced by phase-matching the lowest order fundamental and harmonic modes over a distance of 32 {micro}m. The experimental conversion efficiency was {eta} = 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}, in agreement with theory. Additionally, they discuss a method of enhancing the conversion efficiency for second harmonic generation using anomalous dispersion phase-matching to optimize Cerenkov second harmonic generation. The modeling shows that a combination of phase-matching techniques creates larger conversion efficiencies and reduces critical fabrication requirements of the individual phase-matching techniques.

  4. Automated solid-phase extraction of phenolic acids using layered double hydroxide-alumina-polymer disks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Milad; Palomino Cabello, Carlos; Saraji, Mohammad; Manuel Estela, Jose; Cerdà, Víctor; Turnes Palomino, Gemma; Maya, Fernando

    2018-01-26

    The application of layered double hydroxide-Al 2 O 3 -polymer mixed-matrix disks for solid-phase extraction is reported for the first time. Al 2 O 3 is embedded in a polymer matrix followed by an in situ metal-exchange process to obtain a layered double hydroxide-Al 2 O 3 -polymer mixed-matrix disk with excellent flow-through properties. The extraction performance of the prepared disks is evaluated as a proof of concept for the automated extraction using sequential injection analysis of organic acids (p-hydroxybenzoic acid, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, gallic acid) following an anion-exchange mechanism. After the solid-phase extraction, phenolic acids were quantified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection using a core-shell silica-C18 stationary phase and isocratic elution (acetonitrile/0.5% acetic acid in pure water, 5:95, v/v). High sensitivity and reproducibility were obtained with limits of detection in the range of 0.12-0.25 μg/L (sample volume, 4 mL), and relative standard deviations between 2.9 and 3.4% (10 μg/L, n = 6). Enrichment factors of 34-39 were obtained. Layered double hydroxide-Al 2 O 3 -polymer mixed-matrix disks had an average lifetime of 50 extractions. Analyte recoveries ranged from 93 to 96% for grape juice and nonalcoholic beer samples. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Moiré phase-shifted fiber Bragg gratings in polymer optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Rui; Marques, Carlos; Bang, Ole; Ortega, Beatriz

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate a simple way to fabricate phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating in polymer optical fibers as a narrowband transmission filter for a variety of applications at telecom wavelengths. The filters have been fabricated by overlapping two uniform fiber Bragg gratings with slightly different periods to create a Moiré grating with only two pulses (one pulse is 15 ns) of UV power. Experimental characterization of the filter is provided under different conditions where the strain and temperature sensitivities were measured.

  6. Enhancing heat capacity of colloidal suspension using nanoscale encapsulated phase-change materials for heat transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yan; Ding, Shujiang; Wu, Wei; Hu, Jianjun; Voevodin, Andrey A; Gschwender, Lois; Snyder, Ed; Chow, Louis; Su, Ming

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes a new method to enhance the heat-transfer property of a single-phase liquid by adding encapsulated phase-change nanoparticles (nano-PCMs), which absorb thermal energy during solid-liquid phase changes. Silica-encapsulated indium nanoparticles and polymer-encapsulated paraffin (wax) nanoparticles have been made using colloid method, and suspended into poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) and water for potential high- and low-temperature applications, respectively. The shells prevent leakage and agglomeration of molten phase-change materials, and enhance the dielectric properties of indium nanoparticles. The heat-transfer coefficients of PAO containing indium nanoparticles (30% by mass) and water containing paraffin nanoparticles (10% by mass) are 1.6 and 1.75 times higher than those of corresponding single-phase fluids. The structural integrity of encapsulation allows repeated use of such nanoparticles for many cycles in high heat generating devices.

  7. Determination of organophosphorus pesticides using molecularly imprinted polymer solid phase extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Marsin Sanagi; Syairah Salleh; Wan Aini Wan Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer solid phase extraction (MIP-SPE) method has been developed for the determination of organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in water samples. The MIP was prepared by thermo-polymerization method using methacrylic acid (MAA) as functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as crosslinker, acetonitrile as porogenic solvent and quinalphos as the template molecule. The three OPPs (diazinon, quinalphos and chloropyrifos) were selected as target analytes as they are widely used in agriculture sector. Various parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the imprinted polymers have been evaluated to optimize the selective preconcentration of OPPs from aqueous samples. The characteristics of the MIP-SPE method were validated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The accuracy and selectivity of the MIP-SPE process developed were verified using non-imprinted polymer solid phase extraction (NIP-SPE) and a commercial C 18 -SPE was used for comparison. The recoveries of the target analytes obtained using the MIPs as the solid phase sorbent ranged from 83% to 98% (RSDs 1.05 - 1.98 %; n=3) for water sample. The developed MIP-SPE method demonstrates that it could be applied for the determination of OPPs in water samples. (author)

  8. Photo polymerization-induced vertical phase separation and homeotropic alignment in liquid crystal and polymer mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyo; Joo, Sangwoo; Kang, Daeseung

    2012-01-01

    We presented a novel method for the homeotropic alignment of LC by using the irradiation of UV light on the LC/NOA65 mixture cell, in which the photo-initiated-polymerization-induced phase separation lowers the surface energy. When the amount of polymer content is sufficiently small, the gravel and network patterns were formed at the substrates via the vertical phase separation. We found that surface roughness plays an important role in the formation of the homeotropic alignment of LC. We also observed the alignment transition of the cells by varying the mixing ratio of LC/NOA65 or the UV radiation time. Furthermore, the present proposed method has great potential for application in display devices. For decades, studies on the alignment of liquid crystal (LC) molecules have been of significant interest due to their immediate applications for display devices and the intriguing physiochemical properties they exhibit at the surface of mixtures. Usually, homeotropic (or vertical) alignment, in which the long axes of the LC molecules are oriented in a direction perpendicular to the surface, is achieved by using surfactants such as lecithin, silanes or polyimide. Recently homeotropic alignment of liquid crystal molecules was achieved by irradiating photosensitive polymers, by doping nanoparticles into LC, by utilizing nano/micro patterns, or by incorporating self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). However, a clear understanding about the alignment mechanism is still elusive. In this paper, we report a novel method for homeotropic alignment of LC by utilizing the phase separation of LC/polymer mixtures

  9. interThermalPhaseChangeFoam—A framework for two-phase flow simulations with thermally driven phase change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The volume-of-fluid (VOF approach is a mature technique for simulating two-phase flows. However, VOF simulation of phase-change heat transfer is still in its infancy. Multiple closure formulations have been proposed in the literature, each suited to different applications. While these have enabled significant research advances, few implementations are publicly available, actively maintained, or inter-operable. Here, a VOF solver is presented (interThermalPhaseChangeFoam, which incorporates an extensible framework for phase-change heat transfer modeling, enabling simulation of diverse phenomena in a single environment. The solver employs object oriented OpenFOAM library features, including Run-Time-Type-Identification to enable rapid implementation and run-time selection of phase change and surface tension force models. The solver is packaged with multiple phase change and surface tension closure models, adapted and refined from earlier studies. This code has previously been applied to study wavy film condensation, Taylor flow evaporation, nucleate boiling, and dropwise condensation. Tutorial cases are provided for simulation of horizontal film condensation, smooth and wavy falling film condensation, nucleate boiling, and bubble condensation. Validation and grid sensitivity studies, interfacial transport models, effects of spurious currents from surface tension models, effects of artificial heat transfer due to numerical factors, and parallel scaling performance are described in detail in the Supplemental Material (see Appendix A. By incorporating the framework and demonstration cases into a single environment, users can rapidly apply the solver to study phase-change processes of interest.

  10. interThermalPhaseChangeFoam-A framework for two-phase flow simulations with thermally driven phase change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabil, Mahdi; Rattner, Alexander S.

    The volume-of-fluid (VOF) approach is a mature technique for simulating two-phase flows. However, VOF simulation of phase-change heat transfer is still in its infancy. Multiple closure formulations have been proposed in the literature, each suited to different applications. While these have enabled significant research advances, few implementations are publicly available, actively maintained, or inter-operable. Here, a VOF solver is presented (interThermalPhaseChangeFoam), which incorporates an extensible framework for phase-change heat transfer modeling, enabling simulation of diverse phenomena in a single environment. The solver employs object oriented OpenFOAM library features, including Run-Time-Type-Identification to enable rapid implementation and run-time selection of phase change and surface tension force models. The solver is packaged with multiple phase change and surface tension closure models, adapted and refined from earlier studies. This code has previously been applied to study wavy film condensation, Taylor flow evaporation, nucleate boiling, and dropwise condensation. Tutorial cases are provided for simulation of horizontal film condensation, smooth and wavy falling film condensation, nucleate boiling, and bubble condensation. Validation and grid sensitivity studies, interfacial transport models, effects of spurious currents from surface tension models, effects of artificial heat transfer due to numerical factors, and parallel scaling performance are described in detail in the Supplemental Material (see Appendix A). By incorporating the framework and demonstration cases into a single environment, users can rapidly apply the solver to study phase-change processes of interest.

  11. Modification of phase transitions in swift heavy ion irradiated and MMA-grafted ferroelectric fluoro-polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersohn, E.; Betz, N.; Le Moel, A.

    1994-01-01

    Ferroelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (β) and copolymers of vinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene (P(VDF/TrFE)) films were irradiated with swift heavy ions and post irradiation grafted with methyl methacrylate (MMA). We have studied the influence of irradiation parameters such as the ion fluence, the type of ion and the electronic stopping power, on the melting and crystallization temperatures and the ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transitions, by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dielectric measurements. The relation between the shift in the transition temperatures and the ion fluence is described by a single term equation. Ion track grafting with MMA affects the ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transitions in P(VDF/TrFE) and leads to a strong amorphization of the polymer films. The grafting in β PVDF occurs mainly on the surface of the samples and no change in the transition temperatures is observed. (authors). 12 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Changes in molecular structure and properties of irradiated polymers of different compositions - ESR and NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carswell-Pomerantz, T.; Babanalbandi, A.; Dong, L.; Hill, D.J.T.; Perera, M.C.S.; Pomery, P.J.; Saadat, G.; Whittaker, A.K.

    1999-01-01

    Investigations of molecular structural changes in polymers during exposure to high energy radiation is the long term interest of the Polymer Materials and Radiation Group at the University of Queensland. Recently, the group had looked at a range of polymers including natural and synthetic rubbers, methacrylates and polyesters. The objective of the work has been to investigate the relationships between polymer structure and sensitivity towards high energy radiation, including gamma radiation. This report will focus on the Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of the effects of gamma irradiation on these polymers. Other methods such as Gas Chromatography (GC), Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC), Fourier Transformed Infra Red (FTIR), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) have also been used as these methods combine with ESR and NMR, to provide a more complete picture of the mechanism of the structural changes. (author)

  13. Solid-phase synthesis of protein-polymers on reversible immobilization supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Hironobu; Carmali, Sheiliza; Baker, Stefanie L; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Russell, Alan J

    2018-02-27

    Facile automated biomacromolecule synthesis is at the heart of blending synthetic and biologic worlds. Full access to abiotic/biotic synthetic diversity first occurred when chemistry was developed to grow nucleic acids and peptides from reversibly immobilized precursors. Protein-polymer conjugates, however, have always been synthesized in solution in multi-step, multi-day processes that couple innovative chemistry with challenging purification. Here we report the generation of protein-polymer hybrids synthesized by protein-ATRP on reversible immobilization supports (PARIS). We utilized modified agarose beads to covalently and reversibly couple to proteins in amino-specific reactions. We then modified reversibly immobilized proteins with protein-reactive ATRP initiators and, after ATRP, we released and analyzed the protein polymers. The activity and stability of PARIS-synthesized and solution-synthesized conjugates demonstrated that PARIS was an effective, rapid, and simple method to generate protein-polymer conjugates. Automation of PARIS significantly reduced synthesis/purification timelines, thereby opening a path to changing how to generate protein-polymer conjugates.

  14. Electrical transport in crystalline phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woda, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, the electrical transport properties of crystalline phase change materials are discussed. Phase change materials (PCM) are a special class of semiconducting and metallic thin film alloys, typically with a high amount of the group five element antimony or the group six element tellurium, such as Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 . The unique property portfolio of this material class makes it suitable for memory applications. PCMs reveal fast switching between two stable room-temperature phases (amorphous and crystalline) realized by optical laser or electrical current pulses in memory devices. Additionally, a pronounced property contrast in form of optical reflectivity and electrical conductivity between the amorphous and crystalline phase is the characteristic fingerprint of PCMs. The emerging electrical solid state memory PCRAM is a very promising candidate to replace Flash memory in the near future or to even become a universal memory, which is non-volatile and shows the speed and cyclability of DRAM. One of the main technological challenges is the switching process into the amorphous state, which is the most power demanding step. In order to reduce the switching power, the crystalline resistivity needs to be increased at a given voltage. Thus understanding and tayloring of this property is mandatory. In this work, first the technological relevance, i.e. optical and electrical memory concepts based on PCMs are introduced. Subsequently a description of the physical properties of PCMs in four categories is given. Namely, structure, kinetics, optical properties and electrical properties are discussed. Then important recent developments such as the identification of resonant bonding in crystalline PCMs and a property predicting coordination scheme are briefly reviewed. The following chapter deals with the theoretical background of electrical transport, while the next chapter introduces the experimental techniques: Sputtering, XRR, XRD, DSC, thermal annealing

  15. Electrical transport in crystalline phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woda, Michael

    2012-01-06

    In this thesis, the electrical transport properties of crystalline phase change materials are discussed. Phase change materials (PCM) are a special class of semiconducting and metallic thin film alloys, typically with a high amount of the group five element antimony or the group six element tellurium, such as Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}. The unique property portfolio of this material class makes it suitable for memory applications. PCMs reveal fast switching between two stable room-temperature phases (amorphous and crystalline) realized by optical laser or electrical current pulses in memory devices. Additionally, a pronounced property contrast in form of optical reflectivity and electrical conductivity between the amorphous and crystalline phase is the characteristic fingerprint of PCMs. The emerging electrical solid state memory PCRAM is a very promising candidate to replace Flash memory in the near future or to even become a universal memory, which is non-volatile and shows the speed and cyclability of DRAM. One of the main technological challenges is the switching process into the amorphous state, which is the most power demanding step. In order to reduce the switching power, the crystalline resistivity needs to be increased at a given voltage. Thus understanding and tayloring of this property is mandatory. In this work, first the technological relevance, i.e. optical and electrical memory concepts based on PCMs are introduced. Subsequently a description of the physical properties of PCMs in four categories is given. Namely, structure, kinetics, optical properties and electrical properties are discussed. Then important recent developments such as the identification of resonant bonding in crystalline PCMs and a property predicting coordination scheme are briefly reviewed. The following chapter deals with the theoretical background of electrical transport, while the next chapter introduces the experimental techniques: Sputtering, XRR, XRD, DSC, thermal annealing

  16. [Phase transition in polymer blends and structure of ionomers and copolymers]. [Annual report, April 1, 1989--June 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The main thrust of the program in the past 3 years are summarized: SAXS instrumentation development; structure and dynamics of macro- and supra-molecules, phase transitions in polymer blends and solutions, structure of ionomers, and fractals and anisotropic systems.

  17. PHASE CHANGE AROUND A FINNED TUBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytunç EREK

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the heat transfer enhancement in the thermal energy storage system by using radially finned tube. The solution of the system consists of the solving the equations of the heat transfer fluid (HTF, the pipe wall and fin, and the phase change material (PCM as one domain. The control volume finite difference approach and the semi implicit solver (SIS are used to solve the equations. Fully developed velocity distribution is taken in the HTF. Flow parameters (Re number and inlet temperature of coolant and fin parameters (the number of fins, fin length, fin thickness are found to influence solidification fronts and the total stored energy.

  18. Phase change based cooling for high burst mode heat loads with temperature regulation above the phase change temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States of America as represented by the United States Department of Energy

    2009-12-15

    An apparatus and method for transferring thermal energy from a heat load is disclosed. In particular, use of a phase change material and specific flow designs enables cooling with temperature regulation well above the fusion temperature of the phase change material for medium and high heat loads from devices operated intermittently (in burst mode). Exemplary heat loads include burst mode lasers and laser diodes, flight avionics, and high power space instruments. Thermal energy is transferred from the heat load to liquid phase change material from a phase change material reservoir. The liquid phase change material is split into two flows. Thermal energy is transferred from the first flow via a phase change material heat sink. The second flow bypasses the phase change material heat sink and joins with liquid phase change material exiting from the phase change material heat sink. The combined liquid phase change material is returned to the liquid phase change material reservoir. The ratio of bypass flow to flow into the phase change material heat sink can be varied to adjust the temperature of the liquid phase change material returned to the liquid phase change material reservoir. Varying the flowrate and temperature of the liquid phase change material presented to the heat load determines the magnitude of thermal energy transferred from the heat load.

  19. Two-Phase Contiguous Supported Lipid Bilayer Model for Membrane Rafts via Polymer Blotting and Stenciling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Mark J; Daniel, Susan

    2017-02-07

    The supported lipid bilayer has been portrayed as a useful model of the cell membrane compatible with many biophysical tools and techniques that demonstrate its appeal in learning about the basic features of the plasma membrane. However, some of its potential has yet to be realized, particularly in the area of bilayer patterning and phase/composition heterogeneity. In this work, we generate contiguous bilayer patterns as a model system that captures the general features of membrane domains and lipid rafts. Micropatterned polymer templates of two types are investigated for generating patterned bilayer formation: polymer blotting and polymer lift-off stenciling. While these approaches have been used previously to create bilayer arrays by corralling bilayers patches with various types of boundaries impenetrable to bilayer diffusion, unique to the methods presented here, there are no physical barriers to diffusion. In this work, interfaces between contiguous lipid phases define the pattern shapes, with continuity between them allowing transfer of membrane-bound biomolecules between the phases. We examine effectors of membrane domain stability including temperature and cholesterol content to investigate domain dynamics. Contiguous patterning of supported bilayers as a model of lipid rafts expands the application of the SLB to an area with current appeal and brings with it a useful toolset for characterization and analysis. These combined tools should be helpful to researchers investigating lipid raft dynamics and function and biomolecule partitioning studies. Additionally, this patterning technique may be useful for applications such as bioseparations that exploit differences in lipid phase partitioning or creation of membranes that bind species like viruses preferentially at lipid phase boundaries, to name a few.

  20. Passive thermal management using phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganatra, Yash Yogesh

    The trend of enhanced functionality and reducing thickness of mobile devices has. led to a rapid increase in power density and a potential thermal bottleneck since. thermal limits of components remain unchanged. Active cooling mechanisms are not. feasible due to size, weight and cost constraints. This work explores the feasibility. of a passive cooling system based on Phase Change Materials (PCMs) for thermal. management of mobile devices. PCMs stabilize temperatures due to the latent heat. of phase change thus increasing the operating time of the device before threshold. temperatures are exceeded. The primary contribution of this work is the identification. of key parameters which influence the design of a PCM based thermal management. system from both the experiments and the numerical models. This work first identifies strategies for integrating PCMs in an electronic device. A. detailed review of past research, including experimental techniques and computational. models, yields key material properties and metrics to evaluate the performance of. PCMs. Subsequently, a miniaturized version of a conventional thermal conductivity. measurement technique is developed to characterize thermal resistance of PCMs. Further, latent heat and transition temperatures are also characterized for a wide. range of PCMs. In-situ measurements with PCMs placed on the processor indicate that some. PCMs can extend the operating time of the device by as much as a factor of 2.48. relative to baseline tests (with no PCMs). This increase in operating time is investigated. by computational thermal models that explore various integration locations, both at the package and device level.

  1. Thermodynamics and Phase Behavior of Miscible Polymer Blends in the Presence of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Nicholas Philip

    The design of environmentally-benign polymer processing techniques is an area of growing interest, motivated by the desire to reduce the emission of volatile organic compounds. Recently, supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO 2) has gained traction as a viable candidate to process polymers both as a solvent and diluent. The focus of this work was to elucidate the nature of the interactions between scCO2 and polymers in order to provide rational insight into the molecular interactions which result in the unexpected mixing thermodynamics in one such system. The work also provides insight into the nature of pairwise thermodynamic interactions in multicomponent polymer-polymer-diluent blends, and the effect of these interactions on the phase behavior of the mixture. In order to quantify the strength of interactions in the multicomponent system, the binary mixtures were characterized individually in addition to the ternary blend. Quantitative analysis of was made tractable through the use of a model miscible polymer blend containing styrene-acrylonitrile copolymer (SAN) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (dPMMA), a mixture which has been considered for a variety of practical applications. In the case of both individual polymers, scCO2 is known to behave as a diluent, wherein the extent of polymer swelling depends on both temperature and pressure. The solubility of scCO 2 in each polymer as a function of temperature and pressure was characterized elsewhere. The SAN-dPMMA blend clearly exhibited lower critical solution temperature behavior, forming homogeneous mixtures at low temperatures and phase separating at elevated temperature. These measurements allowed the determination of the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter chi23 for SAN (species 2) and dPMMA (species 3) as a function of temperature at ambient pressure, in the absence of scCO2 (species 1). Characterization of the phase behavior of the multicomponent (ternary) mixture was also carried out by SANS. An in situ SANS

  2. Development of andrographolide molecularly imprinted polymer for solid-phase extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaoying; Liu, Qingshan; Jiang, Yifan; Luo, Yongming

    2011-06-01

    A method employing molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) as selective sorbent for solid-phase extraction (SPE) to pretreat samples was developed. The polymers were prepared by precipitation polymerization with andrographolide as template molecule. The structure of MIP was characterized and its static adsorption capacity was measured by the Scatchard equation. In comparison with C 18-SPE and non-imprinted polymer (NIP) SPE column, MIP-SPE column displays high selectivity and good affinity for andrographolide and dehydroandrographolide for extract of herb Andrographis paniculata ( Burm.f.) Nees (APN). MIP-SPE column capacity was 11.9 ± 0.6 μmol/g and 12.1 ± 0.5 μmol/g for andrographolide and dehydroandrographolide, respectively and was 2-3 times higher than that of other two columns. The precision and accuracy of the method developed were satisfactory with recoveries between 96.4% and 103.8% (RSD 3.1-4.3%, n = 5) and 96.0% and 104.2% (RSD 2.9-3.7%, n = 5) for andrographolide and dehydroandrographolide, respectively. Various real samples were employed to confirm the feasibility of method. This developed method demonstrates the potential of molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction for rapid, selective, and effective sample pretreatment.

  3. Material Engineering for Phase Change Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, David M.

    As semiconductor devices continue to scale downward, and portable consumer electronics become more prevalent there is a need to develop memory technology that will scale with devices and use less energy, while maintaining performance. One of the leading prototypical memories that is being investigated is phase change memory. Phase change memory (PCM) is a non-volatile memory composed of 1 transistor and 1 resistor. The resistive structure includes a memory material alloy which can change between amorphous and crystalline states repeatedly using current/voltage pulses of different lengths and magnitudes. The most widely studied PCM materials are chalcogenides - Germanium-Antimony-Tellerium (GST) with Ge2Sb2Te3 and Germanium-Tellerium (GeTe) being some of the most popular stochiometries. As these cells are scaled downward, the current/voltage needed to switch these materials becomes comparable to the voltage needed to sense the cell's state. The International Roadmap for Semiconductors aims to raise the threshold field of these devices from 66.6 V/mum to be at least 375 V/mum for the year 2024. These cells are also prone to resistance drift between states, leading to bit corruption and memory loss. Phase change material properties are known to influence PCM device performance such as crystallization temperature having an effect on data retention and litetime, while resistivity values in the amorphous and crystalline phases have an effect on the current/voltage needed to write/erase the cell. Addition of dopants is also known to modify the phase change material parameters. The materials G2S2T5, GeTe, with dopants - nitrogen, silicon, titanium, and aluminum oxide and undoped Gallium-Antimonide (GaSb) are studied for these desired characteristics. Thin films of these compositions are deposited via physical vapor deposition at IBM Watson Research Center. Crystallization temperatures are investigated using time resolved x-ray diffraction at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  4. Sodium ion conducting polymer electrolyte membrane prepared by phase inversion technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshlata, Mishra, Kuldeep; Rai, D. K.

    2018-04-01

    A mechanically stable porous polymer membrane of Poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) has been prepared by phase inversion technique using steam as a non-solvent. The membrane possesses semicrystalline network with enhanced amorphicity as observed by X-ray diffraction. The membrane has been soaked in an electrolyte solution of 0.5M NaPF6 in Ethylene Carbonate/Propylene Carbonate (1:1) to obtain the gel polymer electrolyte. The porosity and electrolyte uptake of the membrane have been found to be 67% and 220% respectively. The room temperature ionic conductivity of the membrane has been obtained as ˜ 0.3 mS cm-1. The conductivity follows Arrhenius behavior with temperature and gives activation energy as 0.8 eV. The membrane has been found to possess significantly large electrochemical stability window of 5.0 V.

  5. Tunable Crystal-to-Crystal Phase Transition in a Cadmium Halide Chain Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulli Englert

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The chain polymer [{Cd(μ-X2py2}1∞] (X = Cl, Br; py = pyridine undergoes a fully reversible phase transition between a monoclinic low-temperature and an orthorhombic high-temperature phase. The transformation can be directly monitored in single crystals and can be confirmed for the bulk by powder diffraction. The transition temperature can be adjusted by tuning the composition of the mixed-halide phase: Transition temperatures between 175 K up to the decomposition of the material at ca. 350 K are accessible. Elemental analysis, ion chromatography and site occupancy refinements from single-crystal X-ray diffraction agree with respect to the stoichiometric composition of the samples.

  6. Polymer matrix of fiber-reinforced composites: Changes in the semi-interpenetrating polymer network during the shelf life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aftab A; Al-Kheraif, Abdulaziz A; Al-Shehri, Abdullah M; Säilynoja, Eija; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2018-02-01

    This laboratory study was aimed to characterize semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) prepregs that had been stored for up to two years before curing. Resin impregnated prepregs of everStick C&B (StickTech-GC, Turku, Finland) glass FRC were stored at 4°C for various lengths of time, i.e., two-weeks, 6-months and 2-years. Five samples from each time group were prepared with a light initiated free radical polymerization method, which were embedded to its long axis in self-curing acrylic. The nanoindentation readings on the top surface toward the core of the sample were made for five test groups, which were named as "stage 1-5". To evaluate the nanohardness and modulus of elasticity of the polymer matrix, a total of 4 slices (100µm each) were cut from stage 1 to stage 5. Differences in nanohardness values were evaluated with analysis of variance (ANOVA), and regression model was used to develop contributing effect of the material's different stages to the total variability in the nanomechanical properties. Additional chemical and thermal characterization of the polymer matrix structure of FRC was carried out. It was hypothesized that time of storage may have an influence on the semi-IPN polymer structure of the cured FRC. The two-way ANOVA test revealed that the storage time had no significant effect on the nanohardness of FRC (p = 0.374). However, a highly significant difference in nanohardness values was observed between the different stages of FRC (Pprepregs might be due to phase-segregation of components of semi-IPN structure of FRC prepregs before their use. This may have an influence to the surface bonding properties of the cured FRC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1992-01-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  8. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyer, I.O.

    1994-02-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a PCM material. The silica-PCM mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 2 figures.

  9. Projected phase-change memory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelmans, Wabe W; Sebastian, Abu; Jonnalagadda, Vara Prasad; Krebs, Daniel; Dellmann, Laurent; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2015-09-03

    Nanoscale memory devices, whose resistance depends on the history of the electric signals applied, could become critical building blocks in new computing paradigms, such as brain-inspired computing and memcomputing. However, there are key challenges to overcome, such as the high programming power required, noise and resistance drift. Here, to address these, we present the concept of a projected memory device, whose distinguishing feature is that the physical mechanism of resistance storage is decoupled from the information-retrieval process. We designed and fabricated projected memory devices based on the phase-change storage mechanism and convincingly demonstrate the concept through detailed experimentation, supported by extensive modelling and finite-element simulations. The projected memory devices exhibit remarkably low drift and excellent noise performance. We also demonstrate active control and customization of the programming characteristics of the device that reliably realize a multitude of resistance states.

  10. Fiber Optic Microcantilever Sensor Coupled with Reactive Polymers for Vapor Phase Detection of Ammonia, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations proposes to adapt its current aqueous-based, fiber-optic microcantilever sensor technology for real-time, monitoring of ammonia in air. Phase I...

  11. Phase boundary in compatible and incompatible polymer blends studied by micro indentation test and microscopic observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mina, M. F.; Akhtar, F.; Haque, M.E.

    2003-10-01

    The phase boundary of incompatible polymer blends such as poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/natural rubber (NR) and polyestyrene (PS)/NR as well as compatible blends such as PMMA/NR/epoxidizer NR (compatibilizer) and PS/NR/styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) block copolymer (compatibilizer) was studied by means of microhardness (H) technique and microscopy. Solution grown films of neat PMMA, PS and blended films of PMMA/NR, PS/NR, PMMA/NR/ENR and PS/NR/SBS were cast using a common solvent (toluene). While the neat PMMA and PS provide constant hardness values of 178 and 173 MPa, respectively, the binary (incompatible) and the ternary (compatible) blends show a conspicuous H-decrease (PMMA/NR=140 MPa, PS/NR=167 MPa, PMMA/NR/ENR=109 MPa and PS/NR/SBS=127 MPa). Scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy reveal clear difference of the phase boundary of compatible (smooth boundary) and incompatible (sharp boundary) blends. Besides, the compatibilizer blends are characterised by the thinnest phase boundary (30 μm), which is found about 60 μm in the incompatible blends, showing a final hardness value that demonstrates the compatibilizer to be smoothly distributed in the interface between the two blend components. Results highlight that microindentation technique, in combination with microscopic observations, is a sensitive tool for studying the breadth and quality of the interphase boundary in non- or compatibilized polymer blends and other inhomogeneous materials. (author)

  12. Imaging of Volume Phase Gratings in a Photosensitive Polymer, Recorded in Transmission and Reflection Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Sabel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Volume phase gratings, recorded in a photosensitive polymer by two-beam interference exposure, are studied by means of optical microscopy. Transmission gratings and reflection gratings, with periods in the order of 10 μm down to 130 nm, were investigated. Mapping of holograms by means of imaging in sectional view is introduced to study reflection-type gratings, evading the resolution limit of classical optical microscopy. In addition, this technique is applied to examine so-called parasitic gratings, arising from interference from the incident reference beam and the reflected signal beam. The appearance and possible avoidance of such unintentionally recorded secondary structures is discussed.

  13. Structuring polymer blends with bicontinuous phase morphology. Part II. Tailoring blends with ultralow critical volume fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngaae-Jørgensen, Jørgen; Utracki, Leszek

    2003-01-01

    A hypothesis providing a guideline for the development of immiscible polymer blends with co-continuous phase structure at very low critical volume fraction of one component is. postulated and experimentally verified. Based on a number of simplifying assumptions the following relation was derived......: phi(cr) = k(lambdagamma)(1-z)/(theta(b)(*))(z) where lambdagamma is a Deborah number and theta(b)(*) is a dimensionless break-up time. The equation parameters, k and z are constant that depend on the flow field hence on the blending equipment. For the studies an internal mixer with Walzenkneter...

  14. Phase change material thermal capacitor clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus and method for metabolic cooling and insulation of a user in a cold environment. In its preferred embodiment the apparatus is a highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The apparatus can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The apparatus may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the apparatus also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  15. Conductivity and phase morphology of carbon black-filled immiscible polymer blends under creep: an experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yamin; Liu, Xianhu; Hao, Xiaoqiong; Schubert, Dirk W

    2016-11-30

    Blends of carbon black (CB)-filled co-continuous immiscible polystyrene/poly(methyl-methacrylate) (PS/PMMA) with a PS/PMMA ratio of 50/50 and CB selectively located in the PS phase have been prepared by melt blending. The simultaneous evolution of conductivity and phase morphology of blend composites was investigated under shear and in the quiescent state at 200 °C. It was found that shear deformation had a significant influence on the conductivity of the unfilled PS/PMMA blend and its composites, which was attributed to the change of phase morphology during shear. After the shear stress of 10 kPa, the conductivity of PS/PMMA blends filled with 2 vol% of CB decreased by about two orders of magnitude and the phase morphology transformed from a fine co-continuous structure into a highly elongated lamellar structure. The deformation of phase morphology and the decrease of conductivity were weakened upon decreasing the shear stress or increasing the CB concentration. During subsequent recovery, pronounced phase structure coarsening was observed in the mixture and the conductivity increased as well. A simple model describing the behavior of conductivity under shear deformation was derived and utilized for the description of the experimental data. For the first time, the Burgers model was used to describe the conductivity, and the viscoelastic and viscoplastic parameters were deduced by fitting the conductivity under shear. The results obtained in this study provide a deeper insight into the evolution of phase structure in the conductive polymer blend composite induced by shear deformation.

  16. SMART POLYMERS: INNOVATIONS IN NOVEL DRUG DELIVERY

    OpenAIRE

    Apoorva Mahajan; Geeta Aggarwal

    2011-01-01

    Smart polymers are attracting the researchers for development of novel drug delivery systems. Importance of smart polymers is rising day by day as these polymers undergo large reversible, physical or chemical changes in response to small changes in the environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, dual- stimuli, light and phase transition. Smart polymers are representing promising means for targeted drug delivery, enhanced drug delivery, gene therapy, actuator stimuli and protein folders....

  17. Exploitation of a microporous organic polymer as a stationary phase for capillary gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Cuiming; Liu, Shuqin; Xu, Jianqiao; Ding, Yajuan; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Microporous organic polymers (MOPs) have emerged as a new class of functional porous materials with unique characteristics and potential uses in diverse areas. However, the field of MOPs for gas chromatographic (GC) separations has not been well explored. Herein, a MOP namely KAPs-1 was dynamic coated onto a capillary column for the first time. The fabricated column exhibited a nonpolar nature and the column efficiency for n-dodecane was up to 7769 plates m"−"1. The KAPs-1 coated column showed high GC separation performance for a series of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including the challenging ethylbenzene and xylene isomers, which could not be resolved at baseline on the commercial 5% phenyl polysiloxane stationary phase. Moreover, the relative standard deviations for five replicate determinations of the studied analytes were 0.0–0.6%, 0.9–3.2%, 1.1–5.9%, 0.8–3.7% for retention time, peak area, peak height and peak width, respectively. To investigate the interaction between some analytes and the stationary phase, thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were also evaluated. The results of this study show it is very promising to utilize MOPs as stationary phases for capillary GC. - Highlights: • A microporous organic polymer was explored as a novel stationary phase for capillary GC. • The column showed high separation performance for VOCs including the challenging ethylbenzene and xylene isomers. • Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for BTEXs were determined to study the analyte-stationary phase interaction.

  18. Exploitation of a microporous organic polymer as a stationary phase for capillary gas chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Cuiming; Liu, Shuqin; Xu, Jianqiao; Ding, Yajuan; Ouyang, Gangfeng, E-mail: cesoygf@mail.sysu.edu.cn

    2016-01-01

    Microporous organic polymers (MOPs) have emerged as a new class of functional porous materials with unique characteristics and potential uses in diverse areas. However, the field of MOPs for gas chromatographic (GC) separations has not been well explored. Herein, a MOP namely KAPs-1 was dynamic coated onto a capillary column for the first time. The fabricated column exhibited a nonpolar nature and the column efficiency for n-dodecane was up to 7769 plates m{sup −1}. The KAPs-1 coated column showed high GC separation performance for a series of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including the challenging ethylbenzene and xylene isomers, which could not be resolved at baseline on the commercial 5% phenyl polysiloxane stationary phase. Moreover, the relative standard deviations for five replicate determinations of the studied analytes were 0.0–0.6%, 0.9–3.2%, 1.1–5.9%, 0.8–3.7% for retention time, peak area, peak height and peak width, respectively. To investigate the interaction between some analytes and the stationary phase, thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were also evaluated. The results of this study show it is very promising to utilize MOPs as stationary phases for capillary GC. - Highlights: • A microporous organic polymer was explored as a novel stationary phase for capillary GC. • The column showed high separation performance for VOCs including the challenging ethylbenzene and xylene isomers. • Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for BTEXs were determined to study the analyte-stationary phase interaction.

  19. Structural Changes in Polymer Films by Fast Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parada, M. A.; Minamisawa, R. A.; Muntele, C.; Muntele, I.; De Almeida, A.; Ila, D.

    2006-11-01

    In applications from food wrapping to solar sails, polymers films can be subjected to intense charged panicle bombardment and implantation. ETFE (ethylenetetrafluoroethylene) with high impact resistance is used for pumps, valves, tie wraps, and electrical components. PFA (tetrafluoroethylene-per-fluoromethoxyethylene) and FEP (tetrafluoroethylene-hexa-fluoropropylene) are sufficiently biocompatible to be used as transcutaneous implants since they resist damage from the ionizing space radiation, they can be used in aerospace engineering applications. PVDC (polyvinyllidene-chloride) is used for food packaging, and combined with others plastics, improves the oxygen barrier responsible for the food preservation. Fluoropolymers are also known for their radiation dosimetry applications, dependent on the type and energy of the radiation, as well as of the beam intensity. In this work ETFE, PFA, FEP and PVDC were irradiated with ions of keV and MeV energies at several fluences and were analyzed through techniques as RGA, OAP, FTIR, ATR and Raman spectrophotometry. CF3 is the main specie emitted from PFA and FEP when irradiated with MeV protons. H and HF are released from ETFE due to the broken C-F and C-H bonds when the polymer is irradiated with keV Nitrogen ions and protons. At high fluence, especially for keV Si and N, damage due to carbonization is observed with the formation of hydroperoxide and polymer dehydroflorination. The main broken bonds in PVDC are C-O and C-Cl, with the release of Cl and the formation of double carbon bonds. The ion fluence that causes damage, which could compromise fluoropolymer film applications, has been determined.

  20. Surface directed phase separation of semiconductor ferroelectric polymer blends and their use in non-volatile memories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, A.J.J.M. van; Zaba, T.; Khikhlovskyi, V.; Michels, J.; Janssen, R.; Kemerink, M.; Gelinck, G.

    2015-01-01

    The polymer phase separation of P(VDF-TrFE):F8BT blends is studied in detail. Its morphology is key to the operation and performance of memory diodes. In this study, it is demonstrated that it is possible to direct the semiconducting domains of a phase-separating mixture of P(VDF-TrFE) and F8BT in a

  1. High-quality phase-shifted Bragg grating sensor inscribed with only one laser pulse in a polymer optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, C. A. F.; Pospori, A.; Pereira, L.

    2017-01-01

    We present the first phase-shifted polymer optical fiber Bragg grating sensor inscribed with only one KrF laser pulse. The phase shift defect was created directly during the grating inscription process by placing a very narrow blocking aperture, in the center of the UV beam. One laser pulse...

  2. Determination of enrofloxacin by room-temperature phosphorimetry after solid phase extraction on an acrylic polymer sorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Cabrini F.; Martins, Renata K. S.; da Silva, Andrea R.; da Cunha, Alessandra L. M. C.; Aucélio, Ricardo Q.

    A phosphorimetric method was developed to enable the determination of enrofloxacin using photochemical derivatization which was used to both improve detection limits and to minimize the uncertainty of measurements. Phosphorescence was induced on cellulose containing TlNO3. Absolute limit of detection at the ng range and linear analytical response over three orders of magnitude were achieved. A metrological study was made to obtain the combined uncertainty value and to identify that the precision was mainly affected by the changing of substrates when measuring the signal from each replicate. Pharmaceutical formulations containing enrofloxacin were successfully analyzed by the method and the results were similar to the ones achieved using a HPLC method. A solid phase extraction on an acrylic polymer was optimized to separate enrofloxacin from interferents such as diclofenac and other components from biological matrices, which allowed the successful use of the method in urine analysis.

  3. Self-Healing Phase Change Salogels with Tunable Gelation Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimineghlani, Parvin; Palanisamy, Anbazhagan; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A

    2018-04-19

    Chemically cross-linked polymer matrices have demonstrated strong potential for shape stabilization of molten phase change materials (PCM). However, they are not designed to be fillable and removable from a heat exchange module for an easy replacement with new PCM matrices and lack self-healing capability. Here, a new category of shapeable, self-healing gels, "salogels", is introduced. The salogels reversibly disassemble in a high-salinity environment of a fluid inorganic PCM [lithium nitrate trihydrate (LNH)], at a preprogrammed temperature. LNH was employed as a high latent heat PCM and simultaneously as a solvent, which supported the formation of a network of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) chains via physical cross-linking through poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of various generations. The existence of hydrogen bonding and the importance of low-hydration state of PVA for the efficient gelation were experimentally confirmed. The thermal behavior of PCM salogels was highly reversible and repeatable during multiple heating/cooling cycles. Importantly, the gel-sol transition temperature could be precisely controlled within a range of temperature above LNH's melting point by the choice of dendrimer generation and their concentration. Shape stabilization and self-healing properties of the salogels, taken together with tunability of their temperature-induced fluidization make these materials attractive for thermal energy storage applications that require on-demand removal and replacement of used inorganic PCM salt hydrates.

  4. THE EFFECT OF PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS ON THE TENSILE STRENGTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HERROELEN Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available PCM’s need some important properties to have use such as high heat storage capacity, easy availability and low cost and can have different effects such as flavour, softness or exchange of heat. They are put inside of microcapsules, so they can be inbedded inside the strain, otherwise it wouldn’t be so effective. So basically the microcapsules consist of a core that’s the PCM and a polymer shell. This shell needs to be strong enough to hold the PCM and also withstand up to a certain level of heat and mechanical damage. This study investigates the tensile strength of fabrics composed by fibres, some of these fibres have benn inbedded phase change microcapsules (PCM’s. The investigated fabrics are divided by composition and by structure. By knitting the fabrics in different structures you could be able to investigate which knitting way could be the most effective to have a high tensile strength. Tensile strength tests are performed on specimens with different structures but also with different compositions which could indicate that some strains are tougher then others and more specifically if the PCM’s have a different effect on them.

  5. Selecting polymers for two-phase partitioning bioreactors (TPPBs): Consideration of thermodynamic affinity, crystallinity, and glass transition temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Stuart L; Peterson, Eric C; Daugulis, Andrew J; Parent, J Scott

    2015-01-01

    Two-phase partitioning bioreactor technology involves the use of a secondary immiscible phase to lower the concentration of cytotoxic solutes in the fermentation broth to subinhibitory levels. Although polymeric absorbents have attracted recent interest due to their low cost and biocompatibility, material selection requires the consideration of properties beyond those of small molecule absorbents (i.e., immiscible organic solvents). These include a polymer's (1) thermodynamic affinity for the target compound, (2) degree of crystallinity (wc ), and (3) glass transition temperature (Tg ). We have examined the capability of three thermodynamic models to predict the partition coefficient (PC) for n-butyric acid, a fermentation product, in 15 polymers. Whereas PC predictions for amorphous materials had an average absolute deviation (AAD) of ≥16%, predictions for semicrystalline polymers were less accurate (AAD ≥ 30%). Prediction errors were associated with uncertainties in determining the degree of crystallinity within a polymer and the effect of absorbed water on n-butyric acid partitioning. Further complications were found to arise for semicrystalline polymers, wherein strongly interacting solutes increased the polymer's absorptive capacity by actually dissolving the crystalline fraction. Finally, we determined that diffusion limitations may occur for polymers operating near their Tg , and that the Tg can be reduced by plasticization by water and/or solute. This study has demonstrated the impact of basic material properties that affects the performance of polymers as sequestering phases in TPPBs, and reflects the additional complexity of polymers that must be taken into account in material selection. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  6. A self-resetting spiking phase-change neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobley, R. A.; Hayat, H.; Wright, C. D.

    2018-05-01

    Neuromorphic, or brain-inspired, computing applications of phase-change devices have to date concentrated primarily on the implementation of phase-change synapses. However, the so-called accumulation mode of operation inherent in phase-change materials and devices can also be used to mimic the integrative properties of a biological neuron. Here we demonstrate, using physical modelling of nanoscale devices and SPICE modelling of associated circuits, that a single phase-change memory cell integrated into a comparator type circuit can deliver a basic hardware mimic of an integrate-and-fire spiking neuron with self-resetting capabilities. Such phase-change neurons, in combination with phase-change synapses, can potentially open a new route for the realisation of all-phase-change neuromorphic computing.

  7. A self-resetting spiking phase-change neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobley, R A; Hayat, H; Wright, C D

    2018-05-11

    Neuromorphic, or brain-inspired, computing applications of phase-change devices have to date concentrated primarily on the implementation of phase-change synapses. However, the so-called accumulation mode of operation inherent in phase-change materials and devices can also be used to mimic the integrative properties of a biological neuron. Here we demonstrate, using physical modelling of nanoscale devices and SPICE modelling of associated circuits, that a single phase-change memory cell integrated into a comparator type circuit can deliver a basic hardware mimic of an integrate-and-fire spiking neuron with self-resetting capabilities. Such phase-change neurons, in combination with phase-change synapses, can potentially open a new route for the realisation of all-phase-change neuromorphic computing.

  8. High-performance ferroelectric memory based on phase-separated films of polymer blends

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Yasser; Bhansali, Unnat Sampatraj; Almadhoun, Mahmoud N.; Odeh, Ihab N.; Cha, Dong Kyu; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2013-01-01

    High-performance polymer memory is fabricated using blends of ferroelectric poly(vinylidene-fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) and highly insulating poly(p-phenylene oxide) (PPO). The blend films spontaneously phase separate into amorphous PPO nanospheres embedded in a semicrystalline P(VDF-TrFE) matrix. Using low molecular weight PPO with high miscibility in a common solvent, i.e., methyl ethyl ketone, blend films are spin cast with extremely low roughness (Rrms ≈ 4.92 nm) and achieve nanoscale phase seperation (PPO domain size < 200 nm). These blend devices display highly improved ferroelectric and dielectric performance with low dielectric losses (<0.2 up to 1 MHz), enhanced thermal stability (up to ≈353 K), excellent fatigue endurance (80% retention after 106 cycles at 1 KHz) and high dielectric breakdown fields (≈360 MV/m). © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Fluid phase passivation and polymer encapsulation of InP/InGaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxland, R K; Rahman, F

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of effective passivation techniques for improving and stabilizing the characteristics of InP/InGaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors. Two different methods for carrying out sulfur-based surface passivations are compared. These include exposure to gaseous hydrogen sulfide and immersion treatment in an ammonium sulfide solution. The temporal behaviour of effects resulting from such passivation treatments is reported. It is shown that liquid phase passivation has a larger beneficial effect on device performance than gas phase passivation. This is explained in terms of the polarity of passivating species and the exposed semiconductor surface. Finally, device encapsulation in a novel chalcogenide polymer is shown to be effective in preserving the benefits of surface passivation treatments. The relevant properties of this encapsulation material are also discussed

  10. High-performance ferroelectric memory based on phase-separated films of polymer blends

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Yasser

    2013-10-29

    High-performance polymer memory is fabricated using blends of ferroelectric poly(vinylidene-fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) and highly insulating poly(p-phenylene oxide) (PPO). The blend films spontaneously phase separate into amorphous PPO nanospheres embedded in a semicrystalline P(VDF-TrFE) matrix. Using low molecular weight PPO with high miscibility in a common solvent, i.e., methyl ethyl ketone, blend films are spin cast with extremely low roughness (Rrms ≈ 4.92 nm) and achieve nanoscale phase seperation (PPO domain size < 200 nm). These blend devices display highly improved ferroelectric and dielectric performance with low dielectric losses (<0.2 up to 1 MHz), enhanced thermal stability (up to ≈353 K), excellent fatigue endurance (80% retention after 106 cycles at 1 KHz) and high dielectric breakdown fields (≈360 MV/m). © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Helium ion microscopy based wall thickness and surface roughness analysis of polymer foams obtained from high internal phase emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenburg, C.; Viswanathan, P.; Jepson, M.A.E.; Liu, X.; Battaglia, G.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their wide range of applications, porous polymers obtained from high internal phase emulsions have been widely studied using scanning electron microscopy. However, due to their lack of electrical conductivity, quantitative information of wall thicknesses and surface roughness, which are of particular interest to tissue engineering, has not been obtained. Here, Helium Ion Microscopy is used to examine uncoated polymer foams and some very strong but unexpected contrast is observed, the origin of which is established here. Based on this analysis, a method for the measurement of wall thickness variations and wall roughness measurements has been developed, based on the modeling of Helium ion transmission. The results presented here indicate that within the walls of the void structure there exist small features with height variations of ∼30 nm and wall thickness variations from ∼100 nm to larger 340 nm in regions surrounding interconnecting windows within the structure. The suggested imaging method is applicable to other porous carbon based structures with wall thicknesses in the range of 40–340 nm. - Highlights: • The first helium ion microscopy image of uncoated structures formed from HIPEs is presented. • Unusually high contrast features that change with accelerating voltage are observed. • The origin of the observed contrast is determined to be mass thickness contrast. • A new method for quantitative wall thickness variation/roughness measurements is demonstrated

  12. Helium ion microscopy based wall thickness and surface roughness analysis of polymer foams obtained from high internal phase emulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenburg, C., E-mail: c.rodenburg@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Viswanathan, P. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sheffield, Firth Court, Western Bank Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2 TN (United Kingdom); Jepson, M.A.E. [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Liu, X. [Carl Zeiss Microscopy GmbH, Carl-Zeiss-Strasse 22, 73447 Oberkochen (Germany); Battaglia, G. [Department of Chemistry University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); The MRC/UCL Centre for Medical Molecular Virology, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    Due to their wide range of applications, porous polymers obtained from high internal phase emulsions have been widely studied using scanning electron microscopy. However, due to their lack of electrical conductivity, quantitative information of wall thicknesses and surface roughness, which are of particular interest to tissue engineering, has not been obtained. Here, Helium Ion Microscopy is used to examine uncoated polymer foams and some very strong but unexpected contrast is observed, the origin of which is established here. Based on this analysis, a method for the measurement of wall thickness variations and wall roughness measurements has been developed, based on the modeling of Helium ion transmission. The results presented here indicate that within the walls of the void structure there exist small features with height variations of ∼30 nm and wall thickness variations from ∼100 nm to larger 340 nm in regions surrounding interconnecting windows within the structure. The suggested imaging method is applicable to other porous carbon based structures with wall thicknesses in the range of 40–340 nm. - Highlights: • The first helium ion microscopy image of uncoated structures formed from HIPEs is presented. • Unusually high contrast features that change with accelerating voltage are observed. • The origin of the observed contrast is determined to be mass thickness contrast. • A new method for quantitative wall thickness variation/roughness measurements is demonstrated.

  13. Colloidal polymer particles as catalyst carriers and phase transfer agents in multiphasic hydroformylation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peral, D; Stehl, D; Bibouche, B; Yu, H; Mardoukh, J; Schomäcker, R; Klitzing, R von; Vogt, D

    2018-03-01

    Colloidal particles have been used to covalently bind ligands for the heterogenization of homogeneous catalysts. The replacement of the covalent bonds by electrostatic interactions between particles and the catalyst could preserve the selectivity of a truly homogeneous catalytic process. Functionalized polymer particles with trimethylammonium moieties, dispersed in water, with a hydrophobic core and a hydrophilic shell have been synthesized by emulsion polymerization and have been thoroughly characterized. The ability of the particles with different monomer compositions to act as catalyst carriers has been studied. Finally, the colloidal dispersions have been applied as phase transfer agents in the multiphasic rhodium-catalyzed hydroformylation of 1-octene. The hydrodynamic radius of the particles has been shown to be around 100 nm, and a core-shell structure could be observed by atomic force microscopy. The polymer particles were proven to act as carriers for the water-soluble hydroformylation catalyst, due to electrostatic interaction between the functionalized particles bearing ammonium groups and the sulfonated ligands of the catalyst. The particles were stable under the hydroformylation conditions and the aqueous catalyst phase could be recycled three times. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The IR environment of the space craft varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. The result is a situation where a radiator sized for the maximal heat load in the most adverse situation is subject to freezing on the dark side of the orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when there is too much being produced by the space craft to reject to space, and then feeding that energy back into the thermal loop when conditions are more favorable. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration LLO missions. In order to validate the performance of PCM Heat Exchangers, a life test is being conducted on four n-Pentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed.

  15. Reconfigurable Braille display with phase change locking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soule, Cody W.; Lazarus, Nathan

    2016-07-01

    Automatically updated signs and displays for sighted people are common in today’s world. However, there is no cheap, low power equivalent available for the blind. This work demonstrates a reconfigurable Braille cell using the solid-to-liquid phase change of a low melting point alloy as a zero holding power locking mechanism. The device is actuated with the alloy in the liquid state, and is then allowed to solidify to lock the Braille dot in the actuated position. A low-cost manufacturing process is developed that includes molding of a rigid silicone to create pneumatic channels, and bonding of a thin membrane of a softer silicone on the surface for actuation. A plug of Field’s metal (melting point 62 °C) is placed in the pneumatic channels below each Braille dot to create the final device. The device is well suited for low duty cycle operation in applications such as signs, and is able to maintain its state indefinitely without additional power input. The display requires a pneumatic pressure of only 24 kPa for actuation, and reconfiguration has been demonstrated in less than a minute and a half.

  16. A Survey of Phase Change Memory Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏飞; 蒋德钧; 熊劲; 孙凝晖

    2015-01-01

    As the scaling of applications increases, the demand of main memory capacity increases in order to serve large working set. It is difficult for DRAM (dynamic random access memory) based memory system to satisfy the memory capacity requirement due to its limited scalability and high energy consumption. Compared to DRAM, PCM (phase change memory) has better scalability, lower energy leakage, and non-volatility. PCM memory systems have become a hot topic of academic and industrial research. However, PCM technology has the following three drawbacks: long write latency, limited write endurance, and high write energy, which raises challenges to its adoption in practice. This paper surveys architectural research work to optimize PCM memory systems. First, this paper introduces the background of PCM. Then, it surveys research efforts on PCM memory systems in performance optimization, lifetime improving, and energy saving in detail, respectively. This paper also compares and summarizes these techniques from multiple dimensions. Finally, it concludes these optimization techniques and discusses possible research directions of PCM memory systems in future.

  17. Application of phase-change materials in memory taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Tu, Liang; Wen, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Phase-change materials are suitable for data storage because they exhibit reversible transitions between crystalline and amorphous states that have distinguishable electrical and optical properties. Consequently, these materials find applications in diverse memory devices ranging from conventional optical discs to emerging nanophotonic devices. Current research efforts are mostly devoted to phase-change random access memory, whereas the applications of phase-change materials in other types of memory devices are rarely reported. Here we review the physical principles of phase-change materials and devices aiming to help researchers understand the concept of phase-change memory. We classify phase-change memory devices into phase-change optical disc, phase-change scanning probe memory, phase-change random access memory, and phase-change nanophotonic device, according to their locations in memory hierarchy. For each device type we discuss the physical principles in conjunction with merits and weakness for data storage applications. We also outline state-of-the-art technologies and future prospects.

  18. Preparation and performance of porous phase change polyethylene glycol/polyurethane membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke Guizhen; Xie Huifang; Ruan Ruping; Yu Weidong

    2010-01-01

    Based on the theory of clotty porous phase change materials, the porous membrane was prepared with the blend of polyurethane (PU) and two polyethylene glycol (PEG) systems. Studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermo-gravimetric (TG) tests, the morphology structure, chemical composition, crystalline morphology, phase change behaviors and thermal stability of porous phase change membrane were investigated. The results showed that the PU/PEG membrane had obvious porous structural feature, suitable transition temperature and high transition enthalpy. It is a flexible membrane with good energy storage function. When it is between solid and liquid transfer state in microcosms, the membrane can still keep solid shape in macroscopic state at high temperature during phase transition processing. It means that porous membrane PCM can be regarded as functional polymer. This method solved the problem of low working materials content in phase change textile. It succeeded in introducing the porous technology into functional textile's formation, and developed a new way to improve the phase change enthalpy largely for adjustable textile.

  19. Hydration, phase separation and nonlinear rheology of temperature-sensitive water-soluble polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Fumihiko; Koga, Tsuyoshi [Department of Polymer Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Kaneda, Isamu [Department of Food Science, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501 (Japan); Winnik, Francoise M, E-mail: ftanaka@phys.polym.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry and Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Montreal, Montreal, H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2011-07-20

    The collapse of a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) chain upon heating and the phase diagrams of aqueous PNIPAM solutions with a very flat lower critical solution temperature (LCST) phase separation line are theoretically studied on the basis of cooperative dehydration (simultaneous dissociation of bound water molecules in a group of correlated sequence), and compared with the experimental observation of temperature-induced coil-globule transition by light scattering methods. The transition becomes sharper with the cooperativity parameter {sigma} of hydration. The reentrant coil-globule-coil transition and cononsolvency in a mixed solvent of water and methanol are also studied from the viewpoint of competitive hydrogen bonds between polymer-water and polymer-methanol. The downward shift of the cloud-point curves (LCST cononsolvency) with the mol fraction of methanol due to the competition is calculated and compared with the experimental data. Aqueous solutions of hydrophobically modified PNIPAM carrying short alkyl chains at both chain ends (telechelic PNIPAM) are theoretically and experimentally studied. The LCST of these solutions is found to shift downward along the sol-gel transition curve as a result of end-chain association (association-induced phase separation), and separate from the coil-globule transition line. Associated structures in the solution, such as flower micelles, mesoglobules, and higher fractal assembly, are studied by ultra small-angle neutron scattering with theoretical modeling of the scattering function. Dynamic-mechanical modulus, nonlinear stationary viscosity, and stress build-up in start-up shear flows of the associated networks are studied on the basis of the affine and non-affine transient network theory. The molecular conditions for thickening, strain hardening, and stress overshoot are found in terms of the nonlinear amplitude A of the chain tension and the tension-dissociation coupling constant g.

  20. Application of phase-change materials in memory taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lei; Tu, Liang; Wen, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Phase-change materials are suitable for data storage because they exhibit reversible transitions between crystalline and amorphous states that have distinguishable electrical and optical properties. Consequently, these materials find applications in diverse memory devices ranging from conventional optical discs to emerging nanophotonic devices. Current research efforts are mostly devoted to phase-change random access memory, whereas the applications of phase-change materials in other...

  1. Vapour-phase method in the synthesis of polymer-ibuprofen sodium-silica gel composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierys, Agnieszka; Krasucka, Patrycja; Grochowicz, Marta

    2017-11-01

    The study discusses the synthesis of polymer-silica composites comprising water soluble drug (ibuprofen sodium, IBS). The polymers selected for this study were poly(TRIM) and poly(HEMA- co -TRIM) produced in the form of permanently porous beads via the suspension-emulsion polymerization method. The acid and base set ternary composites were prepared by the saturation of the solid dispersions of drug (poly(TRIM)-IBS and/or poly(HEMA- co -TRIM)-IBS) with TEOS, and followed by their exposition to the vapour mixture of water and ammonia, or water and hydrochloric acid, at autogenous pressure. The conducted analyses reveal that the internal structure and total porosity of the resulting composites strongly depend on the catalyst which was used for silica precursor gelation. The parameters characterizing the porosity of both of the acid set composites are much lower than the parameters of the base set composites. Moreover, the basic catalyst supplied in the vapour phase does not affect the ibuprofen sodium molecules, whereas the acid one causes transformation of the ibuprofen sodium into the sodium chloride and a derivative of propanoic acid, which is poorly water soluble. The release profiles of ibuprofen sodium from composites demonstrate that there are differences in the rate and efficiency of drug desorption from them. They are mainly affected by the chemical character of the polymeric carrier but are also associated with the restricted swelling of the composites in the buffer solution after precipitation of silica gel.

  2. Vapor Phase Polymerization Deposition Conducting Polymer Nanocomposites on Porous Dielectric Surface as High Performance Electrode Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya jie Yang; Luning Zhang; Shibin Li; Zhiming Wang; Jianhua Xu; Wenyao Yang; Yadong Jiang

    2013-01-01

    We report chemical vapor phase polymerization(VPP) deposition of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)(PEDOT) and PEDOT/graphene on porous dielectric tantalum pentoxide(Ta2O5) surface as cathode films for solid tantalum electrolyte capacitors. The modified oxidant/oxidant-graphene films were first deposited on Ta2O5 by dip-coating, and VPP process was subsequently utilized to transfer oxidant/oxidant-graphene into PEDOT/PEDOT-graphene films. The SEM images showed PEDOT/PEDOT-graphene films was successfully constructed on porous Ta2O5 surface through VPP deposition, and a solid tantalum electrolyte capacitor with conducting polymer-graphene nano-composites as cathode films was constructed. The high conductivity nature of PEDOT-graphene leads to resistance decrease of cathode films and lower contact resistance between PEDOT/graphene and carbon paste. This nano-composite cathode films based capacitor showed ultralow equivalent series resistance(ESR) ca. 12 m? and exhibited excellent capacitance-frequency performance, which can keep 82% of initial capacitance at 500 KHz. The investigation on leakage current revealed that the device encapsulation process has no influence on capacitor leakage current, indicating the excellent mechanical strength of PEDOT/PEDOT-gaphene films. This high conductivity and mechanical strength of graphene-based polymer films shows promising future for electrode materials such as capacitors, organic solar cells and electrochemical energy storage devices.

  3. Knitting aromatic polymers for efficient solid-phase microextraction of trace organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuqin; Hu, Qingkun; Zheng, Juan; Xie, Lijun; Wei, Songbo; Jiang, Ruifen; Zhu, Fang; Liu, Yuan; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2016-06-10

    A series of knitting aromatic polymers (KAPs) were successfully synthesized using a simple one-step Friedel-Crafts alkylation of aromatic monomers and were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Then, as-synthesized KAPs with large surface areas, unique pore structures and high thermal stability were prepared as solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coatings that exhibited good extraction abilities for a series of benzene compounds (i.e., benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and m-xylene, which are referred to as BTEX) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Under the optimized conditions, the methodologies established for the determination of BTEX and PAHs using the KAPs-triPB and KAPs-B coatings, respectively, possessed wide linear ranges, low limits of detection (LODs, 0.10-1.13ngL(-1) for BTEX and 0.05-0.49ngL(-1) for PAHs) and good reproducibility. Finally, the proposed methods were successfully applied to the determination of BTEX and PAHs in environmental water samples, and satisfactory recoveries (93.6-124.2% for BTEX and 77.2-113.3% for PAHs) were achieved. This study provides a benchmark for exploiting novel microporous organic polymers (MOPs) for SPME applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Vapour-phase method in the synthesis of polymer-ibuprofen sodium-silica gel composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kierys

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The study discusses the synthesis of polymer-silica composites comprising water soluble drug (ibuprofen sodium, IBS. The polymers selected for this study were poly(TRIM and poly(HEMA-co-TRIM produced in the form of permanently porous beads via the suspension-emulsion polymerization method. The acid and base set ternary composites were prepared by the saturation of the solid dispersions of drug (poly(TRIM-IBS and/or poly(HEMA-co-TRIM-IBS with TEOS, and followed by their exposition to the vapour mixture of water and ammonia, or water and hydrochloric acid, at autogenous pressure. The conducted analyses reveal that the internal structure and total porosity of the resulting composites strongly depend on the catalyst which was used for silica precursor gelation. The parameters characterizing the porosity of both of the acid set composites are much lower than the parameters of the base set composites. Moreover, the basic catalyst supplied in the vapour phase does not affect the ibuprofen sodium molecules, whereas the acid one causes transformation of the ibuprofen sodium into the sodium chloride and a derivative of propanoic acid, which is poorly water soluble. The release profiles of ibuprofen sodium from composites demonstrate that there are differences in the rate and efficiency of drug desorption from them. They are mainly affected by the chemical character of the polymeric carrier but are also associated with the restricted swelling of the composites in the buffer solution after precipitation of silica gel.

  5. Anomalous phase change characteristics in Fe-Te materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, X. T.; Song, W. D.; Ji, R.; Ho, H. W.; Wang, L.; Hong, M. H.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials have become significantly attractive due to its unique characteristics for its extensive applications. In this paper, a kind of phase change material, which consists of Fe and Te components, is developed. The crystallization temperature of the Fe-Te materials is 180 deg. C for Fe 1.19 Te and can be adjusted by the Fe/Te ratio. High-speed phase change in the Fe-Te materials has been demonstrated by nanosecond laser irradiation. Comparing to conventional phase change materials, the Fe-Te materials exhibit an anomalous optical property that has higher reflectivity at amorphous than crystalline state, which is useful for data storage design.

  6. Gas Phase Sensing of Alcohols by Metal Organic Framework–Polymer Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Affinity layers play a crucial role in chemical sensors for the selective and sensitive detection of analytes. Here, we report the use of composite affinity layers containing Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) in a polymeric matrix for sensing purposes. Nanoparticles of NH2-MIL-53(Al) were dispersed in a Matrimid polymer matrix with different weight ratios (0–100 wt %) and drop-casted on planar capacitive transducer devices. These coated devices were electrically analyzed using impedance spectroscopy and investigated for their sensing properties toward the detection of a series of alcohols and water in the gas phase. The measurements indicated a reversible and reproducible response in all devices. Sensor devices containing 40 wt % NH2-MIL-53(Al) in Matrimid showed a maximum response for methanol and water. The sensor response time slowed down with increasing MOF concentration until 40 wt %. The half time of saturation response (τ0.5) increased by ∼1.75 times for the 40 wt % composition compared to devices coated with Matrimid only. This is attributed to polymer rigidification near the MOF/polymer interface. Higher MOF loadings (≥50 wt %) resulted in brittle coatings with a response similar to the 100 wt % MOF coating. Cross-sensitivity studies showed the ability to kinetically distinguish between the different alcohols with a faster response for methanol and water compared to ethanol and 2-propanol. The observed higher affinity of the pure Matrimid polymer toward methanol compared to water allows also for a higher uptake of methanol in the composite matrices. Also, as indicated by the sensing studies with a mixture of water and methanol, the methanol uptake is independent of the presence of water up to 6000 ppm of water. The NH2-MIL-53(Al) MOFs dispersed in the Matrimid matrix show a sensitive and reversible capacitive response, even in the presence of water. By tuning the precise compositions, the affinity kinetics and overall affinity can be tuned, showing

  7. Nano-scale patterns of polymers and their structural phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Yushu [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Solid State Physics

    1998-03-01

    Nano-scale patterns formed by polymers and their related soft materials were investigated by measuring neutron scattering from them. Two apparatuses installed at cold neutron guides in JRR-3M, a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) apparatus and a neutron reflectometer, which give out elastic scattering intensities, were used. Chain dimensions of polystyrenes diluted with low molecular weight homologous polystyrenes, orientation behaviour of microphase-separated block copolymer in concentrated solutions under shear, shrinkage and recovery of polyvinylalcohol gel with temperature and structural phase transition of microemulsion under high-pressure and so on were measured by SANS, while microphase-separated polystyrene(S)/poly(2-vinylpyridine)(P) interfaces of a PSP triblock copolymer was observed by specular neutron reflectivity measurements. (author)

  8. Crystal growth within a phase change memory cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Abu; Le Gallo, Manuel; Krebs, Daniel

    2014-07-07

    In spite of the prominent role played by phase change materials in information technology, a detailed understanding of the central property of such materials, namely the phase change mechanism, is still lacking mostly because of difficulties associated with experimental measurements. Here, we measure the crystal growth velocity of a phase change material at both the nanometre length and the nanosecond timescale using phase-change memory cells. The material is studied in the technologically relevant melt-quenched phase and directly in the environment in which the phase change material is going to be used in the application. We present a consistent description of the temperature dependence of the crystal growth velocity in the glass and the super-cooled liquid up to the melting temperature.

  9. Effects of gel composition on the radiation induced density change in PAG polymer gel dosimeters: a model and experimental investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilts, M; Jirasek, A; Duzenli, C

    2004-01-01

    Due to a density change that occurs in irradiated polyacrylamide gel (PAG), x-ray computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a feasible method of performing polymer gel dosimetry. However, applicability of the technique is currently limited by low sensitivity of the density change to dose. This work investigates the effect of PAG composition on the radiation induced density change and provides direction for future work in improving the sensitivity of CT polymer gel dosimetry. A model is developed that describes the PAG density change (Δρ gel ) as a function of both polymer yield (%P) and an intrinsic density change, per unit polymer yield, that occurs on conversion of monomer to polymer (Δρ polymer ). %P is a function of the fraction of monomer consumed and the weight fraction of monomer in the unirradiated gel (%T). Applying the model to experimental CT and Raman spectroscopic data, two important fundamental properties of the response of PAG density to dose (Δρ gel dose response) are discovered. The first property is that Δρ polymer depends on PAG %C (cross-linking fraction of total monomer) such that low and high %C PAGs exhibit a higher Δρ polymer than do more intermediate %C PAGs. This relationship is opposite to the relationship of polymer yield to %C and is explained by the effect of %C on the type of polymer formed. The second property is that the Δρ gel dose response is linearly dependent on %T. From the model, the inference is that, at least for %T≤12%, monomer consumption and Δρ polymer depend solely on %C. In terms of optimizing CT polymer gel dosimetry for high sensitivity, these results indicate that Δρ polymer can be expected to vary with each polymer gel system and thus should be considered when choosing a polymer gel for CT gel dosimetry. However, Δρ polymer and %P cannot be maximized simultaneously and maximizing %P, by choosing gels with intermediate %C and high %T, is found to have the greatest impact on increasing the

  10. Examine the impact of the changes in style of polymer fibers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Today , an increase of strength and form any more uses the most important and most construction materials , concrete, a large number of researchers and practitioners concern in this paper also based on experiments impact of the fibers changes took place in the style of the strength of concrete full - reinforced polymer fibers ...

  11. Controlling solution-phase polymer aggregation with molecular weight and solvent additives to optimize polymer-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Bartelt, Jonathan A.

    2014-03-20

    The bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell performance of many polymers depends on the polymer molecular weight (M n) and the solvent additive(s) used for solution processing. However, the mechanism that causes these dependencies is not well understood. This work determines how M n and solvent additives affect the performance of BHJ solar cells made with the polymer poly(di(2-ethylhexyloxy)benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b\\']dithiophene-co- octylthieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione) (PBDTTPD). Low M n PBDTTPD devices have exceedingly large fullerene-rich domains, which cause extensive charge-carrier recombination. Increasing the M n of PBDTTPD decreases the size of these domains and significantly improves device performance. PBDTTPD aggregation in solution affects the size of the fullerene-rich domains and this effect is linked to the dependency of PBDTTPD solubility on M n. Due to its poor solubility high M n PBDTTPD quickly forms a fibrillar polymer network during spin-casting and this network acts as a template that prevents large-scale phase separation. Furthermore, processing low M n PBDTTPD devices with a solvent additive improves device performance by inducing polymer aggregation in solution and preventing large fullerene-rich domains from forming. These findings highlight that polymer aggregation in solution plays a significant role in determining the morphology and performance of BHJ solar cells. The performance of poly(di(2-ethylhexyloxy) benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b\\']dithiophene-co-octylthieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione) (PBDTTPD) bulk heterojunction solar cells strongly depends on the polymer molecular weight, and processing these bulk heterojunctions with a solvent additive preferentially improves the performance of low molecular weight devices. It is demonstrated that polymer aggregation in solution significantly impacts the thin-film bulk heterojunction morphology and is vital for high device performance. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Solid-Phase Synthesis of Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Nanoparticles with a Reusable Template – “Plastic Antibodies”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poma, Alessandro; Guerreiro, Antonio; Whitcombe, Michael J.; Piletska, Elena V.; Turner, Anthony P.F.; Piletsky, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) are generic alternatives to antibodies in sensors, diagnostics and separations. To displace biomolecules without radical changes in infrastructure in device manufacture, MIPs should share their characteristics (solubility, size, specificity and affinity, localized binding domain) whilst maintaining the advantages of MIPs (low-cost, short development time and high stability) hence the interest in MIP nanoparticles. Herein we report a reusable solid-phase template approach (fully compatible with automation) for the synthesis of MIP nanoparticles and their precise manufacture using a prototype automated UV photochemical reactor. Batches of nanoparticles (30-400 nm) with narrow size distributions imprinted with: melamine (d = 60 nm, Kd = 6.3 × 10−8 m), vancomycin (d = 250 nm, Kd = 3.4 × 10−9 m), a peptide (d = 350 nm, Kd = 4.8 × 10−8 m) and proteins have been produced. Our instrument uses a column packed with glass beads, bearing the template. Process parameters are under computer control, requiring minimal manual intervention. For the first time we demonstrate the reliable re-use of molecular templates in the synthesis of MIPs (≥ 30 batches of nanoMIPs without loss of performance). NanoMIPs are produced template-free and the solid-phase acts both as template and affinity separation medium. PMID:26869870

  13. All-polymer bistable resistive memory device based on nanoscale phase-separated PCBM-ferroelectric blends

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Yasser; Bhansali, Unnat Sampatraj; Cha, Dong Kyu; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2012-01-01

    All polymer nonvolatile bistable memory devices are fabricated from blends of ferroelectric poly(vinylidenefluoride-trifluoroethylene (P(VDF-TrFE)) and n-type semiconducting [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The nanoscale phase

  14. Phase-Change Thermoplastic Elastomer Blends for Tunable Shape Memory by Physical Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mineart, Kenneth P.; Tallury, Syamal S.; Li, Tao; Lee, Byeongdu; Spontak, Richard J.

    2016-12-14

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) change shape upon exposure to an environmental stimulus.1-3 They are of considerable importance in the ongoing development of stimuli-responsive biomedical4,5 and deployable6 devices, and their function depends on the presence of two components.7 The first provides mechanical rigidity to ensure retention of one or more temporary strain states and also serves as a switch capable of releasing a temporary strain state. The second, a network-forming component, is required to restore the polymer to a prior strain state upon stimulation. In thermally-activated SMPs, the switching element typically relies on a melting or glass transition temperature,1-3,7 and broad or multiple switches permit several temporary strain states.8-10 Chemical integration of network-forming and switching species endows SMPs with specific properties.8,10,11 Here, we demonstrate that phase-change materials incorporated into network-forming macromolecules yield shape-memory polymer blends (SMPBs) with physically tunable switching temperatures and recovery kinetics for use in multi-responsive laminates and shape-change electronics.

  15. Phase characteristics of rheograms. Original classification of phase-related changes of rheos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Y. Rudenko

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The phase characteristics of a rheogram are described in literature in general only. The existing theory of impedance rheography is based on an analysis of the form of rheogram envelopes, but not on the phase-related processes and their interpretation according to the applicable laws of physics. The aim of the present paper is to describe the phase-related characteristics of a rheogram of the ascending aorta. The method of the heart cycle phase analysis has been used for this purpose. By synchronizing an ECG of the aorta and a rheogram, an analysis of specific changes in the aorta blood filling in each phase is provided. As a result, the phase changes of a rheogram associated with the ECG phase structure are described and tabulated for first time. The author hereof offers his own original classification of the phase-related changes of rheograms.

  16. Phase change materials in non-volatile storage

    OpenAIRE

    Ielmini, Daniele; Lacaita, Andrea L.

    2011-01-01

    After revolutionizing the technology of optical data storage, phase change materials are being adopted in non-volatile semiconductor memories. Their success in electronic storage is mostly due to the unique properties of the amorphous state where carrier transport phenomena and thermally-induced phase change cooperate to enable high-speed, low-voltage operation and stable data retention possible within the same material. This paper reviews the key physical properties that make this phase so s...

  17. Phase-change radiative thermal diode

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Biehs, Svend-Age

    2013-01-01

    A thermal diode transports heat mainly in one preferential direction rather than in the opposite direction. This behavior is generally due to the non-linear dependence of certain physical properties with respect to the temperature. Here we introduce a radiative thermal diode which rectifies heat transport thanks to the phase transitions of materials. Rectification coefficients greater than 70% and up to 90% are shown, even for small temperature differences. This result could have important ap...

  18. Heat storage system utilizing phase change materials government rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyer, Ival O.

    2000-09-12

    A thermal energy transport and storage system is provided which includes an evaporator containing a mixture of a first phase change material and a silica powder, and a condenser containing a second phase change material. The silica powder/PCM mixture absorbs heat energy from a source such as a solar collector such that the phase change material forms a vapor which is transported from the evaporator to the condenser, where the second phase change material melts and stores the heat energy, then releases the energy to an environmental space via a heat exchanger. The vapor is condensed to a liquid which is transported back to the evaporator. The system allows the repeated transfer of thermal energy using the heat of vaporization and condensation of the phase change material.

  19. Nanocomposites of iridium oxide and conducting polymers as electroactive phases in biological media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moral-Vico, J; Sánchez-Redondo, S; Lichtenstein, M P; Suñol, C; Casañ-Pastor, N

    2014-05-01

    Much effort is currently devoted to implementing new materials in electrodes that will be used in the central nervous system, either for functional electrostimulation or for tests on nerve regeneration. Their main aim is to improve the charge capacity of the electrodes, while preventing damaging secondary reactions, such as peroxide formation, occurring while applying the electric field. Thus, hybrids may represent a new generation of materials. Two novel hybrid materials are synthesized using three known biocompatible materials tested in the neural system: polypyrrole (PPy), poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and iridium oxide (IrO2). In particular, PPy-IrO2 and PEDOT-IrO2 hybrid nanocomposite materials are prepared by chemical polymerization in hydrothermal conditions, using IrO2 as oxidizing agent. The reaction yields a significant ordered new hybrid where the conducting polymer is formed around the IrO2 nanoparticles, encapsulating them. Scanning electron microscopy and backscattering techniques show the extent of the encapsulation. Both X-ray photoelectron and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies identify the components of the phases, as well as the absence of impurities. Electrochemical properties of the final phases in powder and pellet form are evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. Biocompatibility is tested with MTT toxicity tests using primary cultures of cortical neurons grown in vitro for 6 and 9days. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of itaconic acid-based polymers for solid-phase extraction of deoxynivalenol and application to pasta analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Michelangelo; De Girolamo, Annalisa; Visconti, Angelo; Magan, Naresh; Chianella, Iva; Piletska, Elena V; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2008-02-25

    Molecular modelling and computational design were used to identify itaconic acid (IA) as a functional monomer with high affinity towards deoxynivalenol (DON), a Fusarium-toxin frequently occurring in cereals. IA-based polymers were photochemically synthesised in dimethyl formamide (porogen) using ethylenglycol dimethacrylate as cross-linker and 1,1'-azo-bis(cyclohexane carbonitrile) as initiator, and the relevant binding interactions with DON in solvents with different polarity were investigated. The performances of the non-imprinted IA-based polymer (blank polymer, BP) and the corresponding molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) were compared using DON as a template. Both BP and MIP were able to bind about 90% DON either in toluene, water or water containing 5% polyethylene glycol. Non-imprinted polymers with different molar ratios of IA to cross-linker were evaluated as adsorbents for solid-phase extraction (SPE) clean-up and pre-concentration of DON from wheat and pasta samples prior to HPLC analysis. Samples were extracted with PBS/0.1M EDTA solution and cleaned up through a cartridge containing blank IA-based polymer. The column was washed with PBS (pH 9.2) and the toxin was eluted with methanol and quantified by reversed-phase HPLC with UV detector (lambda=220nm), using methanol:water:acetic acid (15:85:0.1, v/v/v) as the mobile phase. Effective removal of matrix interferences was observed only for pasta with DON recoveries higher than 70% (RSD<7%, n=3) at levels close to or higher than EU regulatory limit.

  1. Investigation of phase-change coatings for variable thermal control of spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelliher, W. C.; Young, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing a spacecraft coating system that could vary the ratio of its solar absorptance to thermal emittance to adjust automatically for changes in the thermal balance of a spacecraft. This study resulted in a new concept called the phase-change effect which uses the change that occurs in the optical properties of many materials during the phase transition from a crystalline solid to an amorphous material. A series of two-component model coatings was developed which, when placed on a highly reflecting substrate, exhibited a sharp decrease in solar absorptance within a narrow temperature range. A variable thermal control coating can have a significant amount of temperature regulation with the phase-change effect. Data are presented on several crystallite-polymer formulations, their physical and optical properties, and associated phase-change temperatures. Aspects pertaining to their use in a space environment and an example of the degree of thermal regulation attainable with these coatings is also given.

  2. Experimental evaluation of enthalpy efficiency and gas-phase contaminant transfer in an enthalpy recovery unit with polymer membrane foils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nie, Jinzhe; Yang, Jianrong; Fang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies were conducted in a laboratory setting to investigate the enthalpy efficiency and gas-phase contaminant transfer in a polymer membrane enthalpy recovery unit. One commercially available polymer membrane enthalpy recovery unit was used as a reference unit. Simulated indoor air...... and outdoor air by twin chambers was connected to the unit. Three chemical gases were dosed to the indoor exhaust air to mimic indoor air contaminants. Based on the measurements of temperature, humidity ratio, and contaminant concentrations of the indoor exhaust air and outdoor air supply upstream...

  3. Preparation and thermo-optical characteristics of a smart polymer-stabilized liquid crystal thin film based on smectic A–chiral nematic phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jian; Wang, Huihui; Cao, Hui; Ding, Hangjun; Yang, Zhou; Yang, Huai; Wang, Ling; Xie, Hui; Luo, Xueyao; Xiao, Jiumei

    2014-01-01

    A smart polymer stabilized liquid crystal (PSLC) thin film with temperature-controllable light transmittance was prepared based on a smectic-A (SmA)–chiral nematic (N*) phase transition, and then the effect of the composition and the preparation condition of the PSLC film on its thermo-optical (T-O) characteristics has been investigated in detail. Within the temperature range of the SmA phase, the PSLC shows a strong opaque state due to the focal conic alignment of liquid crystal (LC) molecules, while the film exhibits a transparent state result from the parallel alignment of N* phase LC molecules at a higher temperature. Importantly, the PSLC films with different temperature of phase transition and contrast ratio can be prepared by changing the composition of photo-polymerizable monomer/LC/chiral dopant. According to the competition between the polymerization of the curable monomers and the diffusion of LC molecules, the ultraviolet (UV) curing surrounding temperature and the intensity of UV irradiation play a critical role in tuning the size of the polymer network meshes, which in turn influence the contrast ratio and the switching speed of the film. Our observations are expected to pave the way for preparing smart PSLC thin films for applications in areas of smart windows, thermo-detectors and other information recording devices. (paper)

  4. Study on polyethylene glycol/epoxy resin composite as a form-stable phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Yutang; Kang Huiying; Wang Weilong; Liu Hong; Gao Xuenong

    2010-01-01

    Form-stable polyethylene glycol (PEG)/epoxy resin (EP) composite as a novel phase change material (PCM) was prepared using casting molding method. In this new material, PEG acts as the latent heat storage material and EP polymer serves as the supporting material, which provides structural strength and prevents the leakage of the melted PEG. The structure and morphology of the novel composite were observed using Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FTIR) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The thermo-mechanical property and transition behavior were characterized by polarizing optical microscope (POM), static thermo-mechanical analysis (TMA) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The experimental results show that, as a result of the physical tangled function of the epoxy resin carrier to the PEG segment, the composite macroscopically presents the solid-solid phase change characteristic.

  5. Characterization of a lime-pozzolan plaster containing phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek; Trník, Anton; Pokorný, Jaroslav; Černý, Robert

    2015-01-01

    A PCM (Phase Change Material) modified lime-pozzolan plaster for improvement of thermal energy storage of building envelopes is studied in the paper. The investigated plaster is composed of lime hydrate, pozzolan admixture based on metakaolin and mudstone, silica sand, water and paraffin wax encapsulated in polymer capsule. The reference plaster without PCM application is studied as well. The analyzed materials are characterized by bulk density, matrix density, total open porosity, compressive strength and pore size distribution. The temperature of phase change, heat of fusion and crystallization are studied using DSC (Difference Scanning Calorimetry) analysis performed in air atmosphere. In order to get information on materials hygrothermal performance, determination of thermal and hygric properties is done in laboratory conditions. Experimental data reveal a substantial improvement of heat storage capacity of PCM-modified plaster as compared to the reference material without PCM

  6. Preparation of Paraffin@Poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) Phase Change Nanocapsules via Combined Miniemulsion/Emulsion Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Liu, Tian-Yu; Hou, Gui-Hua; Guan, Rong-Feng; Zhang, Jun-Hao

    2018-06-01

    The fast development of solid-liquid phase change materials calls for nanomaterials with large specific surface area for rapid heat transfer and encapsulation of phase change materials to prevent potential leakage. Here we report a combined miniemulsion/emulsion polymerization method to prepare poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid)-encapsulated paraffin (paraffin@P(St-co-AA)) nanocapsules. The method could suppress the shortcomings of common miniemulsion polymerization (such as evaporation of monomer and decomposition of initiator during ultrasonication). The paraffin@P(St-co-AA) nanocapsules are uniform in size and the polymer shell can be controlled by the weight ratio of St to paraffin. The phase change behavior of the nanocapsules is similar to that of pure paraffin. We believe our method can also be utilized to synthesize other core-shell phase change materials.

  7. Nanographene synthesized in triple-phase plasmas as a highly durable support of catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Tomoki; Kondo, Hiroki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2018-04-01

    Nanographene was synthesized in triple-phase plasmas comprising a gaseous phase, a gas-liquid boundary layer, and an in-liquid phase using a setup in which one electrode was placed in the gaseous phase while the other was immersed in the liquid phase. The triple-phase plasmas were generated using a pure alcohol, such as ethanol, 1-propanol, or 1-butanol, by applying a high voltage to a pair of electrodes made of copper or graphite. The nanographene synthesized using ethanol had high durability and thus could serve as a catalyst support in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). The PEFCs exhibited low degradation rates in the high-potential cycle test of a half-cell, as a result of which, a loss of only 10% was observed in the effective electrochemical surface area of Pt, even after 10,000 cycles.

  8. Highly sensitive and selective hyphenated technique (molecularly imprinted polymer solid-phase microextraction-molecularly imprinted polymer sensor) for ultra trace analysis of aspartic acid enantiomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Bhim Bali; Srivastava, Amrita; Tiwari, Mahavir Prasad

    2013-03-29

    The present work is related to combination of molecularly imprinted solid-phase microextraction and complementary molecularly imprinted polymer-sensor. The molecularly imprinted polymer grafted on titanium dioxide modified silica fiber was used for microextraction, while the same polymer immobilized on multiwalled carbon nanotubes/titanium dioxide modified pencil graphite electrode served as a detection tool. In both cases, the surface initiated polymerization was found to be advantageous to obtain a nanometer thin imprinted film. The modified silica fiber exhibited high adsorption capacity and enantioselective diffusion of aspartic acid isomers into respective molecular cavities. This combination enabled double preconcentrations of d- and l-aspartic acid that helped sensing both isomers in real samples, without any cross-selectivity and matrix complications. Taking into account 6×10(4)-fold dilution of serum and 2×10(3)-fold dilution of cerebrospinal fluid required by the proposed method, the limit of detection for l-aspartic acid is 0.031ngmL(-1). Also, taking into account 50-fold dilution required by the proposed method, the limit of detection for d-aspartic acid is 0.031ngmL(-1) in cerebrospinal fluid. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Polarization selective phase-change nanomodulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appavoo, Kannatassen; Haglund, Richard F

    2014-10-27

    Manipulating optical signals below the diffraction limit is crucial for next-generation data-storage and telecommunication technologies. Although controlling the flow of light around nanoscale waveguides was achieved over a decade ago, modulating optical signals at terahertz frequencies within nanoscale volumes remains a challenge. Since the physics underlying any modulator relies on changes in dielectric properties, the incorporation of strongly electron-correlated materials (SECMs) has been proposed because they can exhibit orders of magnitude changes in electrical and optical properties with modest thermal, electrical or optical trigger signals. Here we demonstrate a hybrid nanomodulator of deep sub-wavelength dimensions with an active volume of only 0.002 µm(3) by spatially confining light on the nanometre length scale using a plasmonic nanostructure while simultaneously controlling the reactive near-field environment at its optical focus with a single, precisely positioned SECM nanostructure. Since the nanomodulator functionality hinges on this near-field electromagnetic interaction, the modulation is also selectively responsive to polarization. This architecture suggests one path for designing reconfigurable optoelectronic building blocks with responses that can be tailored with exquisite precision by varying size, geometry, and the intrinsic materials properties of the hybrid elements.

  10. Design and Construction of an Automatic Three-Phase Change ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The device can also amplify input voltage as low as 50V a.c to a constant 220V a.c. Furthermore, if no power is sensed, from the three live phases, that is if all the phases are in OFF STATE, the device auto-connect to a power generating plant. Keywords: Power Supply; stabilizer; phase Change-over Switch ...

  11. Low-Frequency Internal Friction Study on the Structural Changes in Polymer Melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue-Bang, Wu; Qiao-Ling, Xu; Shu-Ying, Shang; Jia-Peng, Shui; Chang-Song, Liu; Zhen-Gang, Zhu

    2008-01-01

    With the help of the low-frequency internal friction method, we investigate the structural properties of polymer melts, such as amorphous polystyrene (PS), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and semi-crystalline poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). An obvious peak of relaxation type is found in each of the internal friction curves. The peak temperature T p follows the relation T p ≈ (1.15 – 1.18) T g for PS and PMMA melts, while it follows T p ≈ 1.22T m for PEO melt, with T g being the glass transition temperature and T m the melting temperature. Based on the analysis of the features of this peak, it is found that this peak is related to the liquid-liquid transition temperature T u of polymer melts. Mechanism of the liquid-liquid transition is suggested to be thermally-activated collective relaxation through cooperation. This finding may be helpful to understand the structural changes in polymer melts. In addition, the internal friction technique proves to be effective in studying dynamics in polymer melts

  12. Monitoring the petroleum bitumen characteristics changes during their interaction with the polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, P. S.; Mishchenko, S. V.; Belyaev, V. P.; Frolov, V. A.

    2017-08-01

    The subject of the study is the characteristics (penetration, softening temperature, ductility and elasticity) of a road binder based on petroleum bitumen. The work purpose is to monitor the changes in the characteristics of petroleum bitumen when it interacting with polymers: thermoplastic elastomer, low-density polyethylene, including the adhesive additive presence. To carry out the research a special laboratory facility was designed and manufactured with two blade mixers providing intensive turbulent mixing and the possibility to effect on the transition process of combining the components in a polymer-bitumen binder. To construct a mathematical model of the polymer-bitumen binder characteristics dependence from the composition, methods of statistical experiments planning were used. The possibility of the expensive thermoplastic elastomers replacement with polyethylene is established while maintaining acceptable polymer-bitumen binder quality parameters. The obtained results are proposed for use in road construction. They allow to reduce the roads construction cost with solving the problem of recycling long-term waste packaging from polyethylene.

  13. Fabrication of flexible gold nanorods polymer metafilm via phase transfer method as SERS substrate for detecting food contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nan; You, Ting-Ting; Gao, Yu-Kun; Zhang, Chen-Meng; Yin, Penggang

    2018-06-08

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been widely used in detection of food safety due to the nondestructive examination property. Here, we reported a flexible SERS film based on polymer immobilized gold nanorods polymer metafilm. Polystyrene-polyisoprene-polystyrene (SIS), a transparent and flexible along with excellent elasticity polymer was chosen as main support of gold nanorods. A simple phase transfer progress was adopted to mix the gold nanorods with polymer which can further used in most water-insoluble polymers. The SERS film performed satisfactorily while tested in a series of standard Raman probes like crystal violet (CV) and malachite green (MG). Moreover, the excellent reproducibility and elastic properties make the film promising substrates in practical detection. Hence, the MG detection on fish surface and trace thiram detection on orange pericarp were inspected with the detection result of 1 × 10-10 M and 1 × 10-6 M which below the demand of National standard of China, exactly matching the realistic application requirements.

  14. Advanced Electroactive Single Crystal and Polymer Actuator Concepts for Passive Optics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TRS Technologies proposes large stroke and high precision piezoelectric single crystal and electroactive polymer actuator concepts?HYBrid Actuation System (HYBAS)...

  15. Vapor phase polymerization deposition of conducting polymer/graphene nanocomposites as high performance electrode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yajie; Li, Shibin; Zhang, Luning; Xu, Jianhua; Yang, Wenyao; Jiang, Yadong

    2013-05-22

    In this paper, we report chemical vapor phase polymerization (VPP) deposition of novel poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)/graphene nanocomposites as solid tantalum electrolyte capacitor cathode films. The PEDOT/graphene films were successfully prepared on porous tantalum pentoxide surface as cathode films through the VPP procedure. The results indicated that the high conductivity nature of PEDOT/graphene leads to the decrease of cathode films resistance and contact resistance between PEDOT/graphene and carbon paste. This nanocomposite cathode film based capacitor showed ultralow equivalent series resistance (ESR) ca. 12 mΩ and exhibited better capacitance-frequency performance than the PEDOT based capacitor. The leakage current investigation revealed that the device encapsulation process does not influence capacitor leakage current, indicating the excellent mechanical strength of PEDOT-graphene films. The graphene showed a distinct protection effect on the dielectric layer from possible mechanical damage. This high conductivity and mechanical strength graphene based conducting polymer nanocomposites indicated a promising application future for organic electrode materials.

  16. Changes in surface morphology and microcrack initiation in polymers under simultaneous exposure to stress and fast atom bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, R.S.; Frank, S.; Stulik, D.; Dickinson, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present studies of the changes in surface morphology due to simultaneous exposure of polymers to stress and fast atom bombardment. The polymers examined were Teflon, Kapton, Nylon, and Kevlar-49. The incident particles were 6 keV xenon atoms. The authors show that in the presence of mechanical stress these polymers show topographical changes at particle doses considerably lower than similar changes produced on unstressed material. Applied stress also promotes the formation of surface microcracks which could greatly reduce mechanical strength of the material

  17. Phase Change Material Thermal Power Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Chao, Yi (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An energy producing device, for example a submersible vehicle for descending or ascending to different depths within water or ocean, is disclosed. The vehicle comprises a temperature-responsive material to which a hydraulic fluid is associated. A pressurized storage compartment stores the fluid as soon as the temperature-responsive material changes density. The storage compartment is connected with a hydraulic motor, and a valve allows fluid passage from the storage compartment to the hydraulic motor. An energy storage component, e.g. a battery, is connected with the hydraulic motor and is charged by the hydraulic motor when the hydraulic fluid passes through the hydraulic motor. Upon passage in the hydraulic motor, the fluid is stored in a further storage compartment and is then sent back to the area of the temperature-responsive material.

  18. Structural and phase transitions of one and two polymer mushrooms in poor solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Delian; Wang, Qiang

    2014-05-01

    Using the recently proposed fast lattice Monte Carlo (FLMC) simulations and the corresponding lattice self-consistent field (LSCF) calculations based on the same model system, where multiple occupancy of lattice sites is allowed [Q. Wang, Soft Matter 5, 4564 (2009); Q. Wang, Soft Matter 5, 6206 (2010)], we studied the coil-globule transition (CGT) of one-mushroom systems and the fused-separated transition (FST) of two-mushroom systems, where a polymer mushroom is formed by a group of n homopolymer chains each of N segments end-grafted at the same point onto a flat substrate and immersed in a poor solvent. With our soft potential that allows complete particle overlapping, LSCF theory neglecting the system fluctuations/correlations becomes exact in the limit of n → ∞, and FLMC results approach LSCF predictions with increasing n. Using LSCF calculations, we systematically constructed the phase diagrams of one- and two-mushroom systems. A second-order symmetric-asymmetric transition (SAT) was found in the globule state of one-mushroom systems, where the rotational symmetry around the substrate normal passing through the grafting point is broken in each individual configuration but preserved by the degeneracy of different orientations of these asymmetric configurations. Three different states were also found in two-mushroom systems: separated coils, separated globules, and fused globule. We further studied the coupling between FST in two-mushroom systems and CGT and SAT of each mushroom. Finally, direct comparisons between our simulation and theoretical results, without any parameter-fitting, unambiguously and quantitatively revealed the fluctuation/correlation effects on these phase transitions.

  19. Characterization of bovine serum albumin partitioning behaviors in polymer-salt aqueous two-phase systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Yin Hui; Yap, Yee Jiun; Tan, Chin Ping; Anuar, Mohd Shamsul; Tejo, Bimo Ario; Show, Pau Loke; Ariff, Arbakariya Bin; Ng, Eng-Poh; Ling, Tau Chuan

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a linear relationship is proposed relating the natural logarithm of partition coefficient, ln K for protein partitioning in poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG)-phosphate aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) to the square of tie-line length (TLL(2)). This relationship provides good fits (r(2) > 0.98) to the partition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in PEG (1450 g/mol, 2000 g/mol, 3350 g/mol, and 4000 g/mol)-phosphate ATPS with TLL of 25.0-50.0% (w/w) at pH 7.0. Results also showed that the plot of ln K against pH for BSA partitioning in the ATPS containing 33.0% (w/w) PEG1450 and 8.0% (w/w) phosphate with varied working pH between 6.0 and 9.0 exhibited a linear relationship which is in good agreement (r(2) = 0.94) with the proposed relationship, ln K = α' pH + β'. These results suggested that both the relationships proposed could be applied to correlate and elucidate the partition behavior of biomolecules in the polymer-salt ATPS. The influence of other system parameters on the partition behavior of BSA was also investigated. An optimum BSA yield of 90.80% in the top phase and K of 2.40 was achieved in an ATPS constituted with 33.0% (w/w) PEG 1450 and 8.0% (w/w) phosphate in the presence of 8.5% (w/w) sodium chloride (NaCl) at pH 9.0 for 0.3% (w/w) BSA load. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Phase Change Permeation Technology for Environmental Control & Life Support Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is evaluating Dutyion™, a phase change permeation membrane technology developed by Design Technology and Irrigation (DTI), for use in future advanced life...

  1. Aging mechanisms in amorphous phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raty, Jean Yves; Zhang, Wei; Luckas, Jennifer; Chen, Chao; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Bichara, Christophe; Wuttig, Matthias

    2015-06-24

    Aging is a ubiquitous phenomenon in glasses. In the case of phase-change materials, it leads to a drift in the electrical resistance, which hinders the development of ultrahigh density storage devices. Here we elucidate the aging process in amorphous GeTe, a prototypical phase-change material, by advanced numerical simulations, photothermal deflection spectroscopy and impedance spectroscopy experiments. We show that aging is accompanied by a progressive change of the local chemical order towards the crystalline one. Yet, the glass evolves towards a covalent amorphous network with increasing Peierls distortion, whose structural and electronic properties drift away from those of the resonantly bonded crystal. This behaviour sets phase-change materials apart from conventional glass-forming systems, which display the same local structure and bonding in both phases.

  2. Freezing Point Depressions of Phase Change CO2 Solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arshad, Muhammad Waseem; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; von Solms, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Freezing point depressions (FPD) in phase change solvents containing 2-(diethylamino)ethanol (DEEA) and 3-(methylamino)propylamine (MAPA) were measured using a modified Beckmann apparatus. The measurements were performed for the binary aqueous DEEA and MAPA solutions, respectively...

  3. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIP for Selective Solid Phase Extraction of Celecoxib in Urine Samples Followed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Ansari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, for the analysis of human urine samples, a novel method explained for the determination of celecoxib, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, using molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The synthesis of the MIP was performed by precipitation polymerization in methacrylic acid (MAA, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA, chloroform, 2,2′-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN and celecoxib as the functional monomer, cross-linker monomer, solvent, initiator and target drug, respectively. The celecoxib imprinted polymer was utilized as a specific sorbent for the solid phase extraction (SPE of celecoxib from samples. The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP performance was compared with the synthesized non-molecularly imprinted polymer (NIP. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV-VIS spectrophotometry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTG were used for characterizing the synthesized polymers. Moreover, the MISPE procedure parameters such as pH, eluent solvent flow rate, eluent volume and sorbent mass that probably influence the extraction process have been optimized to achieve the highest celecoxib extraction efficiency. The relative standard deviation (RSD %, recovery percent, limit of detection (LOD and limit of quantification (LOQ of this proposed method were 1.12%, 96%, 8 µg L-1 and 26.7 µg L-1, respectively. The proposed MISPE-HPLC-UV method can be used for the separation and enrichment of trace amounts of celecoxib in human urine and biological samples.

  4. Organic Phase Change Materials And Their Textile Applications: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Sarıer, Nihal; Önder, Emel

    2012-01-01

    An organic phase change material (PCM) possesses the ability to absorb and release large quantity of latent heat during a phase change process over a certain temperature range. The use of PCMs in energy storage and thermal insulation has been tested scientifically and industrially in many applications. The broad based research and development studies concentrating on the characteristics of known organic PCMs and new materials as PCM candidates, the storage methods of PCMs, as well as the reso...

  5. Phase change materials in energy sector - applications and material requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuta, Marta; Wójcik, Tadeusz M.

    2015-05-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) have been applying in many areas. One of them is energy field. PCMs are interesting for the energy sector because their use enables thermal stabilization and storage of large amount of heat. It is major issue for safety of electronic devices, thermal control of buildings and vehicles, solar power and many others energy domains. This paper contains preliminary results of research on solid-solid phase change materials designed for thermal stabilisation of electronic devices.

  6. Recent Advances on Neuromorphic Systems Using Phase-Change Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Lu, Shu-Ren; Wen, Jing

    2017-05-01

    Realization of brain-like computer has always been human's ultimate dream. Today, the possibility of having this dream come true has been significantly boosted due to the advent of several emerging non-volatile memory devices. Within these innovative technologies, phase-change memory device has been commonly regarded as the most promising candidate to imitate the biological brain, owing to its excellent scalability, fast switching speed, and low energy consumption. In this context, a detailed review concerning the physical principles of the neuromorphic circuit using phase-change materials as well as a comprehensive introduction of the currently available phase-change neuromorphic prototypes becomes imperative for scientists to continuously progress the technology of artificial neural networks. In this paper, we first present the biological mechanism of human brain, followed by a brief discussion about physical properties of phase-change materials that recently receive a widespread application on non-volatile memory field. We then survey recent research on different types of neuromorphic circuits using phase-change materials in terms of their respective geometrical architecture and physical schemes to reproduce the biological events of human brain, in particular for spike-time-dependent plasticity. The relevant virtues and limitations of these devices are also evaluated. Finally, the future prospect of the neuromorphic circuit based on phase-change technologies is envisioned.

  7. Recent Advances on Neuromorphic Systems Using Phase-Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Lu, Shu-Ren; Wen, Jing

    2017-12-01

    Realization of brain-like computer has always been human's ultimate dream. Today, the possibility of having this dream come true has been significantly boosted due to the advent of several emerging non-volatile memory devices. Within these innovative technologies, phase-change memory device has been commonly regarded as the most promising candidate to imitate the biological brain, owing to its excellent scalability, fast switching speed, and low energy consumption. In this context, a detailed review concerning the physical principles of the neuromorphic circuit using phase-change materials as well as a comprehensive introduction of the currently available phase-change neuromorphic prototypes becomes imperative for scientists to continuously progress the technology of artificial neural networks. In this paper, we first present the biological mechanism of human brain, followed by a brief discussion about physical properties of phase-change materials that recently receive a widespread application on non-volatile memory field. We then survey recent research on different types of neuromorphic circuits using phase-change materials in terms of their respective geometrical architecture and physical schemes to reproduce the biological events of human brain, in particular for spike-time-dependent plasticity. The relevant virtues and limitations of these devices are also evaluated. Finally, the future prospect of the neuromorphic circuit based on phase-change technologies is envisioned.

  8. Microencapsulated Comb-Like Polymeric Solid-Solid Phase Change Materials via In-Situ Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the thermal stability and permeability resistance, a comb-like polymer with crystallizable side chains was fabricated as solid-solid phase change materials (PCMs inside the cores of microcapsules and nanocapsules prepared via in-situ polymerization. In this study, the effects on the surface morphology and microstructure of micro/nanocapsules caused by microencapsulating different types of core materials (i.e., n-hexadecane, ethyl hexadecanoate, hexadecyl acrylate and poly(hexadecyl acrylate were systematically studied via field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM. The confined crystallization behavior of comb-like polymer PCMs cores was investigated via differential scanning calorimeter (DSC. Comparing with low molecular organic PCMs cores, the thermal stability of PCMs microencapsulated comb-like polymer enhanced significantly, and the permeability resistance improved obviously as well. Based on these resultant analysis, the microencapsulated comb-like polymeric PCMs with excellent thermal stability and permeability resistance showed promising foreground in the field of organic solution spun, melt processing and organic coating.

  9. Confined crystallization, crystalline phase deformation and their effects on the properties of crystalline polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haopeng

    With the recent advances in processing and catalyst technology, novel morphologies have been created in crystalline polymers and they are expected to substantially impact the properties. To reveal the structure-property relationships of some of these novel polymeric systems becomes the primary focus of this work. In the first part, using an innovative layer-multiplying coextrusion process to obtain assemblies with thousands of polymer nanolayers, dominating "in-plane" lamellar crystals were created when the confined poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) layers were made progressively thinner. When the thickness was confined to 25 nanometers, the PEO crystallized as single, high-aspect-ratio lamellae that resembled single crystals. This crystallization habit imparted more than two orders of magnitude reduction in the gas permeability. The dramatic decrease in gas permeability was attributed to the reduced diffusion coefficient, because of the increase in gas diffusion path length through the in-plane lamellae. The temperature dependence of lamellar orientation and the crystallization kinetics in the confined nanolayers were also investigated. The novel olefinic block copolymer (OBC) studied in the second part consisted of long crystallizable sequences with low comonomer content alternating with rubbery amorphous blocks with high comonomer content. The crystallizable blocks formed lamellae that organized into space-filling spherulites even when the fraction of crystallizable block was so low that the crystallinity was only 7%. These unusual spherulites were highly elastic and recovered from strains as high as 300%. These "elastic spherulites" imparted higher strain recovery and temperature resistance than the conventional random copolymers that depend on isolated, fringed micellar-like crystals to provide the junctions for the elastomeric network. In the third part, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was used to obtain the temperature dependence of the free

  10. Molar mass fractionation in aqueous two-phase polymer solutions of dextran and poly(ethylene glycol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ziliang; Li, Qi; Ji, Xiangling; Dimova, Rumiana; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Liu, Yonggang

    2016-06-24

    Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in phase separated aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) of these two polymers, with a broad molar mass distribution for dextran and a narrow molar mass distribution for PEG, were separated and quantified by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Tie lines constructed by GPC method are in excellent agreement with those established by the previously reported approach based on density measurements of the phases. The fractionation of dextran during phase separation of ATPS leads to the redistribution of dextran of different chain lengths between the two phases. The degree of fractionation for dextran decays exponentially as a function of chain length. The average separation parameters, for both dextran and PEG, show a crossover from mean field behavior to Ising model behavior, as the critical point is approached. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Phase changes in superaustenitic steels after long-term annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svoboda, M.; Kroupa, A. [Inst. of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Brno (Czech Republic); Sopousek, J.; Vrest' al, J. [Inst. of Theoretical and Physical Chemistry, Masaryk Univ., Brno (Czech Republic); Miodownik, P. [Thermotech Ltd, The Surrey Research Park, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2004-11-01

    A structural study was performed on the austenitic steels Avesta 254 SMO and Avesta 654 SMO after annealing at 700 C for 500, 3188, and 6170 h. Both Avesta steels initially show an unexpectedly large amount of the Laves phase, followed by a relatively slow development of the Sigma phase with equilibrium apparently not yet reached after 3188 h. Thermodynamic calculations confirm that the driving forces for alternative precipitates are very similar thus making it easy to form metastable precipitates that only change very slowly to the equilibrium state. TTT calculations also confirm that the Laves phase precipitates earlier than the Sigma phase as the temperature is lowered. (orig.)

  12. Pipette-tip selective extraction of glycoproteins with lectin modified gold nano-particles on a polymer monolithic phase

    OpenAIRE

    Alwael, Hassan Omar Salem; Connolly, Damian; Clarke, Paul A.; Thompson, Roisin; Twamley, Brendan; O'Connor, Brendan; Paull, Brett

    2011-01-01

    The selective extraction of specific proteins (non glycosylated, glycosylated or different glycoforms) from complex sample matrices utilising selective solid phase extration (SPE) is of significant interest within the fields of proteomics and glycoproteomics. Polymer monoliths have proven to be an excellent solid support for SPE applications in bio-analysis due to their excellent mass transfer characteristics for large biomolecules. Although biorecognition molecules such as lectins can be cov...

  13. Phase separation of a Lennard-Jones fluid interacting with a long, condensed polymer chain: implications for the nuclear body formation near chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Inrok; Choi, Saehyun; Jung, YounJoon; Kim, Jun Soo

    2015-08-28

    Phase separation in a biological cell nucleus occurs in a heterogeneous environment filled with a high density of chromatins and thus it is inevitably influenced by interactions with chromatins. As a model system of nuclear body formation in a cell nucleus filled with chromatins, we simulate the phase separation of a low-density Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid interacting with a long, condensed polymer chain. The influence of the density variation of LJ particles above and below the phase boundary and the role of attractive interactions between LJ particles and polymer segments are investigated at a fixed value of strong self-interaction between LJ particles. For a density of LJ particles above the phase boundary, phase separation occurs and a dense domain of LJ particles forms irrespective of interactions with the condensed polymer chain whereas its localization relative to the polymer chain is determined by the LJ-polymer attraction strength. Especially, in the case of moderately weak attractions, the domain forms separately from the polymer chain and subsequently associates with the polymer chain. When the density is below the phase boundary, however, the formation of a dense domain is possible only when the LJ-polymer attraction is strong enough, for which the domain grows in direct contact with the interacting polymer chain. In this work, different growth behaviors of LJ particles result from the differences in the density of LJ particles and in the LJ-polymer interaction, and this work suggests that the distinct formation of activity-dependent and activity-independent nuclear bodies (NBs) in a cell nucleus may originate from the differences in the concentrations of body-specific NB components and in their interaction with chromatins.

  14. Modeling and impacts of the latent heat of phase change and specific heat for phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoggin, J.; Khan, R. S.; Silva, H.; Gokirmak, A.

    2018-05-01

    We model the latent heats of crystallization and fusion in phase change materials with a unified latent heat of phase change, ensuring energy conservation by coupling the heat of phase change with amorphous and crystalline specific heats. We demonstrate the model with 2-D finite element simulations of Ge2Sb2Te5 and find that the heat of phase change increases local temperature up to 180 K in 300 nm × 300 nm structures during crystallization, significantly impacting grain distributions. We also show in electrothermal simulations of 45 nm confined and 10 nm mushroom cells that the higher amorphous specific heat predicted by this model increases nucleation probability at the end of reset operations. These nuclei can decrease set time, leading to variability, as demonstrated for the mushroom cell.

  15. A phase change processor method for solving a one-dimensional phase change problem with convection boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halawa, E.; Saman, W.; Bruno, F. [Institute for Sustainable Systems and Technologies, School of Advanced Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes SA 5095 (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    A simple yet accurate iterative method for solving a one-dimensional phase change problem with convection boundary is described. The one-dimensional model takes into account the variation in the wall temperature along the direction of the flow as well as the sensible heat during preheating/pre-cooling of the phase change material (PCM). The mathematical derivation of convective boundary conditions has been integrated into a phase change processor (PCP) algorithm that solves the liquid fraction and temperature of the nodes. The algorithm is based on the heat balance at each node as it undergoes heating or cooling which inevitably involves phase change. The paper presents the model and its experimental validation. (author)

  16. Structural Changes of PVDF Membranes by Phase Separation Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Semin; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) and nonsolvent induced phase separation (NIPS) were simultaneously induced for the preparation of flat PVDF membranes. N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) was used as a solvent and dibutyl-phthlate (DBP) was used as a diluent for PVDF. When PVDF was melt blended with NMP and DBP, crystallization temperature was lowered for TIPS and unstable region was expanded for NIPS. Ratio of solvent to diluent changed the phase separation mechanism to obtain the various membrane structures. Contact mode of dope solution with nonsolvent determined the dominant phase separation behavior. Since heat transfer rate was greater than mass transfer rate, surface structure was formed by NIPS and inner structure was by TIPS. Quenching temperature of dope solution also affected the phase separation mechanism and phase separation rate to result in the variation of structure

  17. The effect of phase morphology on the nature of long-lived charges in semiconductor polymer:fullerene systems

    KAUST Repository

    Dou, Fei; Domingo, Ester; Sakowicz, Maciej; Rezasoltani, Elham; McCarthy-Ward, Thomas; Heeney, Martin; Zhang, Xinping; Stingelin, Natalie; Silva, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the effect of phase morphology on the nature of charges in poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecyl-thiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2,-b]thiophene) (pBTTT-C16) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) blends over timescales greater than hundreds of microseconds by quasi-steady-state photoinduced absorption spectroscopy. Specifically, we compare an essentially fully intermixed, one-phase system based on a 1 : 1 (by weight) pBTTT-C16 : PC61BM blend, known to form a co-crystal structure, with a two-phase morphology composed of relatively material-pure domains of the neat polymer and neat fullerene. The co-crystal occurs at a composition of up to 50 wt% PC61BM, because pBTTT-C16 is capable of hosting fullerene derivatives such as PC61BM in the cavities between its side chains. In contrast, the predominantly two-phase system can be obtained by manipulating a 1 : 1 polymer : fullerene blend with the assistance of a fatty acid methyl ester (dodecanoic acid methyl ester, Me12) as additive, which hinders co-crystal formation. We find that triplet excitons and polarons are generated in both phase morphologies. However, polarons are generated in the predominantly two-phase system at higher photon energy than for the structure based on the co-crystal phase. By means of a quasi-steady-state solution of a mesoscopic rate model, we demonstrate that the steady-state polaron generation efficiency and recombination rates are higher in the finely intermixed, one-phase system compared to the predominantly phase-pure, two-phase morphology. We suggest that the polarons generated in highly intermixed structures, such as the co-crystal investigated here, are localised polarons while those generated in the phase-separated polymer and fullerene systems are delocalised polarons. We expect this picture to apply generally to other organic-based heterojunctions of complex phase morphologies including donor:acceptor systems that form, for instance, molecularly mixed amorphous solid

  18. Prediction of crack density and electrical resistance changes in indium tin oxide/polymer thin films under tensile loading

    KAUST Repository

    Mora Cordova, Angel; Khan, Kamran; El Sayed, Tamer

    2014-01-01

    We present unified predictions for the crack onset strain, evolution of crack density, and changes in electrical resistance in indium tin oxide/polymer thin films under tensile loading. We propose a damage mechanics model to quantify and predict

  19. Supercooling suppression of microencapsulated phase change materials by optimizing shell composition and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Fangyu; Yang, Bao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new method for supercooling suppression of microPCMs by optimizing the structure of the microcapsule shell. • Large effective latent heat (up to 213 J/g) of the microPCMs, much higher than those using additive as nucleating agents. • Change of shell composition and structure significantly affects the phase transition processes of the encapsulated PCMs. • The latent heat of the shell-induced phase transition is maximized, reaching 83.7% of the latent heat of bulk octadecane. • Hollow spheres with porous rather than solid resin shell are also formed when the SDS concentration is very high. - Abstract: A new method for supercooling suppression of microencapsulated phase change materials (PCMs) has been developed by optimizing the composition and structure of the microcapsule resin shell. The microcapsules comprising paraffin octadecane encapsulated in melamine–formaldehyde resin shell were synthesized with the use the oil-in-water emulsion technique. These PCM microcapsules are 5–15 μm in diameter. The supercooling of these octadecane microcapsules can be as large as 13.6 °C, when the homogeneous nucleation is dominant during the melt crystallization into the thermodynamically stable triclinic phase. It is discovered that the homogeneous nucleation can be mediated by shell-induced nucleation of the triclinic phase and the metastable rotator phase when the shell composition and structure are optimized, without need of any nucleating additives. The effects of synthesis parameters, such as ratio of melamine to formaldehyde, pH of pre-polymer, and pH of emulsion, on the phase transition properties of the octadecane microcapsules have been investigated systemically. The optimum synthesis conditions have been identified in terms of minimizing the supercooling while maintaining heat capacity. Potential applications of this type of phase changeable microcapsules include high heat capacity thermal fluids, thermal management in smart buildings

  20. Corrosive effect of environmental change on selected properties of polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovičová, L.; Zatkalíková, V.

    2017-11-01

    The development of composite materials and the related design and manufacturing technologies is one of the most important advances in the history of materials. Composites are multifunctional materials having unprecedented mechanical and physical properties that can be tailored to meet the requirements of a particular application. Ageing is also important and it is defined as the process of deterioration of engineering materials resulting from the combined effects of atmospheric radiation, heat, oxygen, water, micro-organisms and other atmospheric factors. The present article deals with monitoring the changes in the mechanical properties of composites with polymer matrix. The composite was formed from the PA matrix and glass fibers (GF). The composite contains 10, 20 and 30 % of glass fibers. The mechanical properties were evaluated on samples of the composite before and after UV radiation on the sample. Light microscopy was evaluated distribution of glass fibers in the polymer matrix and the presence of cracks caused by UV radiation.

  1. Phase change materials and the perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kosters, N.D.; Kappers, A.M.L.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are increasingly incorporated in textiles in order to serve as a thermal buffer when humans change from a hot to a cold environment and the reverse. Due to the absence of wetness sensors in the skin, cooling of the skin may be perceived as a sensation of wetness instead

  2. Phase Change Materials and the perception of wetness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are increasingly incorporated in textiles in order to serve as a thermal buffer when humans change from a hot to a cold environment and the reverse. Due to the absence of wetness sensors in the skin, cooling of the skin may be perceived as a sensation of wetness instead

  3. An Energy Based Numerical Approach to Phase Change Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, Anders Boe; Damkilde, Lars; Krenk, Steen

    1996-01-01

    Phase change problems, occurring e.g. in melting, casting and freezing processes, are often characterized by a very narrow transition zone with very lareg changes in heat capacity and conductivity. This leads to problems in numerical procedures, where the transition zone propagates through a mesh...

  4. miRNA control of vegetative phase change in trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Wei Wang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available After germination, plants enter juvenile vegetative phase and then transition to an adult vegetative phase before producing reproductive structures. The character and timing of the juvenile-to-adult transition vary widely between species. In annual plants, this transition occurs soon after germination and usually involves relatively minor morphological changes, whereas in trees and other perennial woody plants it occurs after months or years and can involve major changes in shoot architecture. Whether this transition is controlled by the same mechanism in annual and perennial plants is unknown. In the annual forb Arabidopsis thaliana and in maize (Zea mays, vegetative phase change is controlled by the sequential activity of microRNAs miR156 and miR172. miR156 is highly abundant in seedlings and decreases during the juvenile-to-adult transition, while miR172 has an opposite expression pattern. We observed similar changes in the expression of these genes in woody species with highly differentiated, well-characterized juvenile and adult phases (Acacia confusa, Acacia colei, Eucalyptus globulus, Hedera helix, Quercus acutissima, as well as in the tree Populus x canadensis, where vegetative phase change is marked by relatively minor changes in leaf morphology and internode length. Overexpression of miR156 in transgenic P. x canadensis reduced the expression of miR156-targeted SPL genes and miR172, and it drastically prolonged the juvenile phase. Our results indicate that miR156 is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of vegetative phase change in both annual herbaceous plants and perennial trees.

  5. Shear-Induced Phase Separation in Aqueous Polymer Solutions: Temperature-Sensitive Microgels and Linear Polymer Chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieger, M.A.; Richtering, W.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of shear flow on the phase separation of aqueous poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAM) microgel suspensions was investigated by means of rheo-turbidity and rheo-small angle neutron scattering (rheo-SANS) and compared to the behavior of linear PNiPAM macromolecules. The rheological

  6. Effects of phase change on reflection in phase-measuring interference microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Dubois , Arnaud

    2004-01-01

    International audience; We show by analytical and numerical calculations that the phase change on reflection that occurs in interference microscopy is almost independent of the numerical aperture of the objective. The shift of the microscope interferogram response due to the phase change on reflection, however, increases with the numerical aperture. Measurements of the interferogram shift are made with a Linnik interference microscope equipped with various numerical-aperture objectives and ar...

  7. Vertical Phase Separation in Small Molecule:Polymer Blend Organic Thin Film Transistors Can Be Dynamically Controlled

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Kui

    2016-02-03

    © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Blending of small-molecule organic semiconductors (OSCs) with amorphous polymers is known to yield high performance organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). Vertical stratification of the OSC and polymer binder into well-defined layers is crucial in such systems and their vertical order determines whether the coating is compatible with a top and/or a bottom gate OTFT configuration. Here, we investigate the formation of blends prepared via spin-coating in conditions which yield bilayer and trilayer stratifications. We use a combination of in situ experimental and computational tools to study the competing effects of formulation thermodynamics and process kinetics in mediating the final vertical stratification. It is shown that trilayer stratification (OSC/polymer/OSC) is the thermodynamically favored configuration and that formation of the buried OSC layer can be kinetically inhibited in certain conditions of spin-coating, resulting in a bilayer stack instead. The analysis reveals here that preferential loss of the OSC, combined with early aggregation of the polymer phase due to rapid drying, inhibit the formation of the buried OSC layer. The fluid dynamics and drying kinetics are then moderated during spin-coating to promote trilayer stratification with a high quality buried OSC layer which yields unusually high mobility >2 cm2 V-1 s-1 in the bottom-gate top-contact configuration.

  8. Solution processing of polymer semiconductor: Insulator blends-Tailored optical properties through liquid-liquid phase separation control

    KAUST Repository

    Hellmann, Christoph

    2014-12-17

    © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. It has been demonstrated that the 0-0 absorption transition of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) in blends with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) could be rationally tuned through the control of the liquid-liquid phase separation process during solution deposition. Pronounced J-like aggregation behavior, characteristic for systems of a low exciton band width, was found for blends where the most pronounced liquid-liquid phase separation occurred in solution, leading to domains of P3HT and PEO of high phase purity. Since liquid-liquid phase separation could be readily manipulated either by the solution temperature, solute concentration, or deposition temperature, to name a few parameters, our findings promise the design from the out-set of semiconductor:insulator architectures of pre-defined properties by manipulation of the interaction parameter between the solutes as well as the respective solute:solvent system using classical polymer science principles.

  9. Solution processing of polymer semiconductor: Insulator blends-Tailored optical properties through liquid-liquid phase separation control

    KAUST Repository

    Hellmann, Christoph; Treat, Neil D.; Scaccabarozzi, Alberto D.; Razzell Hollis, Joseph; Fleischli, Franziska D.; Bannock, James H.; de Mello, John; Michels, Jasper J.; Kim, Ji-Seon; Stingelin, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. It has been demonstrated that the 0-0 absorption transition of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) in blends with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) could be rationally tuned through the control of the liquid-liquid phase separation process during solution deposition. Pronounced J-like aggregation behavior, characteristic for systems of a low exciton band width, was found for blends where the most pronounced liquid-liquid phase separation occurred in solution, leading to domains of P3HT and PEO of high phase purity. Since liquid-liquid phase separation could be readily manipulated either by the solution temperature, solute concentration, or deposition temperature, to name a few parameters, our findings promise the design from the out-set of semiconductor:insulator architectures of pre-defined properties by manipulation of the interaction parameter between the solutes as well as the respective solute:solvent system using classical polymer science principles.

  10. Understanding Phase-Change Memory Alloys from a Chemical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolobov, A. V.; Fons, P.; Tominaga, J.

    2015-09-01

    Phase-change memories (PCM) are associated with reversible ultra-fast low-energy crystal-to-amorphous switching in GeTe-based alloys co-existing with the high stability of the two phases at ambient temperature, a unique property that has been recently explained by the high fragility of the glass-forming liquid phase, where the activation barrier for crystallisation drastically increases as the temperature decreases from the glass-transition to room temperature. At the same time the atomistic dynamics of the phase-change process and the associated changes in the nature of bonding have remained unknown. In this work we demonstrate that key to this behavior is the formation of transient three-center bonds in the excited state that is enabled due to the presence of lone-pair electrons. Our findings additionally reveal previously ignored fundamental similarities between the mechanisms of reversible photoinduced structural changes in chalcogenide glasses and phase-change alloys and offer new insights into the development of efficient PCM materials.

  11. A review on phase change energy storage: materials and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farid, Mohammed M.; Khudhair, Amar M.; Razack, Siddique Ali K.; Al-Hallaj, Said

    2004-01-01

    Latent heat storage is one of the most efficient ways of storing thermal energy. Unlike the sensible heat storage method, the latent heat storage method provides much higher storage density, with a smaller temperature difference between storing and releasing heat. This paper reviews previous work on latent heat storage and provides an insight to recent efforts to develop new classes of phase change materials (PCMs) for use in energy storage. Three aspects have been the focus of this review: PCM materials, encapsulation and applications. There are large numbers of phase change materials that melt and solidify at a wide range of temperatures, making them attractive in a number of applications. Paraffin waxes are cheap and have moderate thermal energy storage density but low thermal conductivity and, hence, require large surface area. Hydrated salts have larger energy storage density and higher thermal conductivity but experience supercooling and phase segregation, and hence, their application requires the use of some nucleating and thickening agents. The main advantages of PCM encapsulation are providing large heat transfer area, reduction of the PCMs reactivity towards the outside environment and controlling the changes in volume of the storage materials as phase change occurs. The different applications in which the phase change method of heat storage can be applied are also reviewed in this paper. The problems associated with the application of PCMs with regards to the material and the methods used to contain them are also discussed

  12. State of the art on phase change material slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, Ziad; Delahaye, Anthony; Huang Li; Trinquet, François; Fournaison, Laurence; Pollerberg, Clemens; Doetsch, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A bibliographic study on PCM slurries. ► Clathrate Hydrate slurry, Microencapsulated PCM Slurry, shape-stabilized PCM slurries and Phase Change Material Emulsions. ► Formation, thermo-physical, rheological, heat transfers properties and applications of these four PCS systems. ► The use of thermal energy storage and distribution based on PCM slurries can improve the refrigerating machine performances. - Abstract: The interest in using phase change slurry (PCS) media as thermal storage and heat transfer fluids is increasing and thus leading to an enhancement in the number of articles on the subject. In air-conditioning and refrigeration applications, PCS systems represent a pure benefit resulting in the increase of thermal energy storage capacity, high heat transfer characteristics and positive phase change temperatures which can occur under low pressures. Hence, they allow the increase of energy efficiency and reduce the quantity of thermal fluids. This review describes the formation, thermo-physical, rheological, heat transfer properties and applications of four PCS systems: Clathrate hydrate slurry (CHS), Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials Slurry (MPCMS), shape-stabilized PCM slurries (SPCMSs) and Phase Change Material Emulsions (PCMEs). It regroups a bibliographic summary of important information that can be very helpful when such systems are used. It also gives interesting and valuable insights on the choice of the most suitable PCS media for laboratory and industrial applications.

  13. Repair of impact damaged utility poles with fiber reinforced polymers (FRP), phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Vehicle collisions with steel or aluminum utility poles are common occurrences that yield substantial but often repairable : damage. This project investigates the use of a fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite system for in situ repair that : mini...

  14. Carbon/Liquid Crystal Polymer Prepreg for Cryogenic and High-Temp Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — KaZaK Composites proposes to develop a pultrusion process to produce carbon fiber / liquid crystal polymer (LCP) prepreg, a first for this category of materials and...

  15. Parameterization of phase change of water in a mesoscale model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levkov, L; Eppel, D; Grassl, H

    1987-01-01

    A parameterization scheme of phase change of water is suggested to be used in the 3-D numerical nonhydrostatic model GESIMA. The microphysical formulation follows the so-called bulk technique. With this procedure the net production rates in the balance equations for water and potential temperature are given both for liquid and ice-phase. Convectively stable as well as convectively unstable mesoscale systems are considered. With 2 figs..

  16. Non-destructive characterisation of polymers and Al-alloys by polychromatic cone-beam phase contrast tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastner, Johann; Plank, Bernhard; Requena, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) has become a very important tool for the non-destructive characterisation of materials. Continuous improvements in the quality and performance of X-ray tubes and detectors have led to cone-beam XCT systems that can now achieve spatial resolutions down to 1 μm and even below. Since not only the amplitude but also the phase of an X-ray beam is altered while passing through an object, phase contrast effects can occur even for polychromatic sources when the spatial coherence due to a small focal spot size is high enough. This can lead to significant improvements over conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography. Phase contrast can increase by edge enhancement the visibility of small structures and of features which are only slightly different in attenuation. We report on the possibilities of polychromatic cone-beam phase contrast tomography for non-destructive characterisation of materials. A carbon fibre-reinforced polymer and the Al-alloys AlMg5Si7 and AlSi18 were investigated with high resolution cone-beam X-ray computed tomography with a polychromatic tube source. Under certain conditions strong phase contrast resulting in an upward and downward overshooting of the grey values across edges was observed. The phase effects are much stronger for the polymer than for the Al-alloys. The influence on the phase contrast of the parameters, including source-detector distance, focal spot size and tube acceleration voltage is presented. Maximum phase contrast was observed for a maximum distance between the source and the detector, for a low voltage and a minimum focal spot size at the X-ray source. The detectability of the different phases is improved by the edge enhancement and the resulting improvement of sharpness. Thus, a better segmentation of the carbon fibres in the fibre-reinforced polymer and of the Mg 2 Si-phase in the AlMg5Si7-alloy is achieved. Primary and eutectic Si cannot be detected by attenuation-based X

  17. Structure and Dynamics of Polymer/Polymer grafted nanoparticle composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Lynden

    Addition of nanoparticles to polymers is a well-practiced methodology for augmenting various properties of the polymer host, including mechanical strength, thermal stability, barrier properties, dimensional stability and wear resistance. Many of these property changes are known to arise from nanoparticle-induced modification of polymer structure and chain dynamics, which are strong functions of the dispersion state of the nanoparticles' and on their relative size (D) to polymer chain dimensions (e.g. Random coil radius Rg or entanglement mesh size a) . This talk will discuss polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) comprised of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) tethered silica nanoparticles (SiO2-PEG) dispersed in polymers as model systems for investigating phase stability and dynamics of PNCs. On the basis of small-angle X-ray Scattering, it will be shown that favorable enthalpic interactions between particle-tethered chains and a polymer host provides an important mechanism for creating PNCs in which particle aggregation is avoided. The talk will report on polymer and particle scale dynamics in these materials and will show that grafted nanoparticles well dispersed in a polymer host strongly influence the host polymer relaxation dynamics on all timescales and the polymers in turn produce dramatic changes in the nature (from diffusive to hyperdiffusive) and speed of nano particle decorrelation dynamics at the polymer entanglement threshold. A local viscosity model capable of explaining these observations is discussed and the results compared with scaling theories for NP motions in polymers This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation Award Nos. DMR-1609125 and CBET-1512297.

  18. Thermal Protection Performance of Phase Changing Material Based on Polyethylene Glycol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Sadat Ahmadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Phase change materials (PCM are substances with a high heat of fusion which, through melting and solidifying at certain temperatures, are capable to store or release a large amount of energy. This phenomenon can be utilized in designing heat protective materials as well as in thermal energy storage systems. One of the approaches to avoid materials leaching from a structure, where PCMs are incorporated, is to blend them with suitable polymers. To have a proper blend it is necessary to choose a compatible polymer with a PCM. It is important to assess the optimized concentration of PCM in polymer matrix and the phase structure and morphology of the blend, which causes the best heat protection. In this work, the influence of polyethylene glycol (PEG as PCMs in epoxy resin matrix on heat protection was investigated. A special performance test was designed to study timetemperature behavior of the prepared samples and DSC and SEM tests to observe the melting point, heat of fusion and morphology of the samples. The results indicated that increases in PCM content led to better heat protection and the best concentration for PEG was found to be 60% wt. Time-temperature curves show that increases of temperature for PCM samples is very slow compared with net epoxy sample. PCM samples curves show plateau in melting region. In this region, they show nearly 15°C temperature lower than a net epoxy sample. The plateau region makes a delay time in temperature increment, which is about 22 min for PEG samples compared with a net epoxy.

  19. Experimental study of the retention properties of a cyclo olefin polymer pillar array column in reversed-phase mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illa, Xavi; De Malsche, Wim; Gardeniers, Han; Desmet, Gert; Romano-Rodríguez, Albert

    2010-11-01

    Experimental measurements to study the retention capacity and band broadening under retentive conditions using micromachined non-porous pillar array columns fabricated in cyclo olefin polymer are presented. In particular, three columns with different depths but with the same pillar structure have been fabricated via hot embossing and pressure-assisted thermal bonding. Separations of a mixture of four coumarins using varying mobile phase compositions have been monitored to study the relation between the retention factor and the ratio of organic solvent in the aqueous mobile phase. Moreover, the linear relation between the retention and the surface/volume ratio predicted in theory has been observed, achieving retention factors up to k=2.5. Under the same retentive conditions, minimal reduced plate height values of h(min)=0.4 have been obtained at retention factors of k=1.2. These experimental results are compared with the case of non-porous and porous silicon pillars. Similar results for the plate heights are achieved while retention factors are higher than the non-porous silicon column and considerably smaller than the porous pillar column, given the non-porous nature of the used cyclo olefin polymer. The feasibility of using this polymer column as an alternative to the pillar array silicon columns is corroborated.

  20. SANS study of deformation and relaxation of a comb-like liquid crystal polymer in the nematic phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brûlet, A.; Boué, F.; Keller, P.; Davidson, P.; Strazielle, C.; Cotton, J. P.

    1994-06-01

    A comb-like liquid crystal polymer is stretched and quenched after a certain time in the nematic phase. The conformation of the deformed chain is determined using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) as a function of the temperature of stretching, the stretching ratio and the duration of the relaxation. The scattering data are well fitted to junction affine and phantom network models. Some data are even well fitted by a totally affine model that we call “ pseudo affine ” because the only parameter, the stretching ratio, is found to be well below the macroscopic stretching ratio. The latter result, never encountered with amorphous polymers, is attributed to the cooperative effects of the nematic phase. We also note that the form factors of the chain in the underformed sample remain similar in the isotropic, nematic and glassy state ; they correspond to a Gaussian chain. The same samples were studied by wide angle X-ray scattering. On one hand, the orientation of the mesogenic groups is found to be parallel or perpendicular to the stretching direction depending on the stretching temperature. This result is discussed as a function of the presence of smectic fluctuations. On the other hand, longer relaxations at constant elongation ratio do not lead to a disorganization of the mesogenic group orientation whereas the polymer chains are partly relaxed.

  1. Uncertainty in project phases: A framework for organisational change management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreye, Melanie; Balangalibun, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    in the early stage of the change project but was delayed until later phases. Furthermore, the sources of uncertainty were found to be predominantly within the organisation that initiated the change project and connected to the project scope. Based on these findings, propositions for future research are defined......Uncertainty is an integral challenge when managing organisational change projects (OCPs). Current literature highlights the importance of uncertainty; however, falls short of giving insights into the nature of uncertainty and suggestions for managing it. Specifically, no insights exist on how...... uncertainty develops over the different phases of OCPs. This paper presents case-based evidence on different sources of uncertainty in OCPs and how these develop over the different project phases. The results showed some surprising findings as the majority of the uncertainty did not manifest itself...

  2. Non-linear elastic thermal stress analysis with phase changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amada, S.; Yang, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    The non-linear elastic, thermal stress analysis with temperature induced phase changes in the materials is presented. An infinite plate (or body) with a circular hole (or tunnel) is subjected to a thermal loading on its inner surface. The peak temperature around the hole reaches beyond the melting point of the material. The non-linear diffusion equation is solved numerically using the finite difference method. The material properties change rapidly at temperatures where the change of crystal structures and solid-liquid transition occur. The elastic stresses induced by the transient non-homogeneous temperature distribution are calculated. The stresses change remarkably when the phase changes occur and there are residual stresses remaining in the plate after one cycle of thermal loading. (Auth.)

  3. Subthreshold electrical transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallo, Manuel Le; Kaes, Matthias; Sebastian, Abu; Krebs, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Chalcogenide-based phase-change materials play a prominent role in information technology. In spite of decades of research, the details of electrical transport in these materials are still debated. In this article, we present a unified model based on multiple-trapping transport together with 3D Poole–Frenkel emission from a two-center Coulomb potential. With this model, we are able to explain electrical transport both in as-deposited phase-change material thin films, similar to experimental conditions in early work dating back to the 1970s, and in melt-quenched phase-change materials in nanometer-scale phase-change memory devices typically used in recent studies. Experimental measurements on two widely different device platforms show remarkable agreement with the proposed mechanism over a wide range of temperatures and electric fields. In addition, the proposed model is able to seamlessly capture the temporal evolution of the transport properties of the melt-quenched phase upon structural relaxation. (paper)

  4. An SPICE model for phase-change memory simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xi; Song Zhitang; Cai Daolin; Chen Xiaogang; Chen Houpeng

    2011-01-01

    Along with a series of research works on the physical prototype and properties of the memory cell, an SPICE model for phase-change memory (PCM) simulations based on Verilog-A language is presented. By handling it with the heat distribution algorithm, threshold switching theory and the crystallization kinetic model, the proposed SPICE model can effectively reproduce the physical behaviors of the phase-change memory cell. In particular, it can emulate the cell's temperature curve and crystallinity profile during the programming process, which can enable us to clearly understand the PCM's working principle and program process. (semiconductor devices)

  5. Phase change material for temperature control and material storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessling, Jr., Francis C. (Inventor); Blackwood, James M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A phase change material comprising a mixture of water and deuterium oxide is described, wherein the mole fraction of deuterium oxide is selected so that the mixture has a selected phase change temperature within a range between 0.degree. C. and 4.degree. C. The mixture is placed in a container and used for passive storage and transport of biomaterials and other temperature sensitive materials. Gels, nucleating agents, freezing point depression materials and colorants may be added to enhance the characteristics of the mixture.

  6. Lightweight Phase-Change Material For Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Philip

    1993-01-01

    Lightweight panels containing phase-change materials developed for use as heat-storage elements of compact, lightweight, advanced solar dynamic power system. During high insolation, heat stored in panels via latent heat of fusion of phase-change material; during low insolation, heat withdrawn from panels. Storage elements consist mainly of porous carbon-fiber structures imbued with germanium. Developed for use aboard space station in orbit around Earth, also adapted to lightweight, compact, portable solar-power systems for use on Earth.

  7. Cold storage with phase change material for building ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Butala, Vincenc; Stritih, Uroš

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical analysis of building coolingusing night-time cold accumulation in phase change material (PCM), otherwise known as the "free-cooling" or "passive-cooling" principle. The phase change materials were used in ceilings and floors. The free-cooling principle is explained and some of the types of PCMs suitable for summer cooling are listed. An experiment was conducted using paraffin with a melting point of 22 °C as the PCM to store cold during the ni...

  8. Using adversary text to detect adversary phase changes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Doser, Adele Beatrice; Warrender, Christina E.

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to help develop a research roadmap and small proof ofconcept for addressing key problems and gaps from the perspective of using text analysis methods as a primary tool for detecting when a group is undergoing a phase change. Self- rganizing map (SOM) techniques were used to analyze text data obtained from the tworld-wide web. Statistical studies indicate that it may be possible to predict phase changes, as well as detect whether or not an example of writing can be attributed to a group of interest.

  9. Analysis of writing and erasing behaviours in phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyot, B. E-mail: bhyot@cea.fr; Poupinet, L.; Gehanno, V.; Desre, P.J

    2002-09-01

    An understanding of the process involved in writing and erasing of phase-change optical recording media is vital to the development of new, and the improvement of existing, products. The present work investigates both experimental and theoretical laser-induced fast structural transformations of GeSbTe thin films. Optical and microstructural changes are correlated using both a static tester and transmission electron microscopy. In the second part of this paper we try to elucidate the physics underlying the amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation under short-pulse laser excitation. Both thermal and thermodynamical behaviours must be taken into account to illustrate real processes.

  10. Nonvolatile memory design magnetic, resistive, and phase change

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hai

    2011-01-01

    The manufacture of flash memory, which is the dominant nonvolatile memory technology, is facing severe technical barriers. So much so, that some emerging technologies have been proposed as alternatives to flash memory in the nano-regime. Nonvolatile Memory Design: Magnetic, Resistive, and Phase Changing introduces three promising candidates: phase-change memory, magnetic random access memory, and resistive random access memory. The text illustrates the fundamental storage mechanism of these technologies and examines their differences from flash memory techniques. Based on the latest advances,

  11. Analysis of writing and erasing behaviours in phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyot, B.; Poupinet, L.; Gehanno, V.; Desre, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    An understanding of the process involved in writing and erasing of phase-change optical recording media is vital to the development of new, and the improvement of existing, products. The present work investigates both experimental and theoretical laser-induced fast structural transformations of GeSbTe thin films. Optical and microstructural changes are correlated using both a static tester and transmission electron microscopy. In the second part of this paper we try to elucidate the physics underlying the amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation under short-pulse laser excitation. Both thermal and thermodynamical behaviours must be taken into account to illustrate real processes

  12. An SPICE model for phase-change memory simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xi; Song Zhitang; Cai Daolin; Chen Xiaogang; Chen Houpeng, E-mail: ituluck@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Along with a series of research works on the physical prototype and properties of the memory cell, an SPICE model for phase-change memory (PCM) simulations based on Verilog-A language is presented. By handling it with the heat distribution algorithm, threshold switching theory and the crystallization kinetic model, the proposed SPICE model can effectively reproduce the physical behaviors of the phase-change memory cell. In particular, it can emulate the cell's temperature curve and crystallinity profile during the programming process, which can enable us to clearly understand the PCM's working principle and program process. (semiconductor devices)

  13. Inserting Phase Change Lines into Microsoft Excel® Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuque, Erick M

    2015-10-01

    Microsoft Excel® is a popular graphing tool used by behavior analysts to visually display data. However, this program is not always friendly to the graphing conventions used by behavior analysts. For example, adding phase change lines has typically been a cumbersome process involving the insertion of line objects that do not move when new data is added to a graph. The purpose of this article is to describe a novel way to add phase change lines that move when new data is added and when graphs are resized.

  14. Solid-phase microextraction of phthalate esters in water sample using different activated carbon-polymer monoliths as adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirio, Stephen; Fu, Chung-Wei; Lin, Jhih-Yun; Hsu, Meng-Ju; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2016-07-13

    In this study, the application of different activated carbon-polymer (AC-polymer) monoliths as adsorbents for the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of phthalate esters (PAEs) in water sample were investigated. The activated carbon (AC) was embedded in organic polymers, poly(butyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) (poly(BMA-EDMA)) or poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) (poly(STY-DVB)), via a 5-min microwave-assisted or a 15-min water bath heating polymerization. Preliminary investigation on the performance of the native poly(BMA-EDMA) and poly(STY-DVB) demonstrated remarkable adsorption efficiencies for PAEs. However, due to the strong hydrophobic, π-π, and hydrogen bonding interactions between the analytes and polymers, low extraction recoveries were achieved. In contrast, the presence of AC in native polymers not only enhanced the adsorption efficiencies but also assisted the PAE desorption, especially for AC-poly(STY-DVB) with extraction recovery ranged of 76.2-99.3%. Under the optimized conditions, the extraction recoveries for intra-, inter-day and column-to-column were in the range of 76.5-100.8% (<3.7% RSDs), 77.2-97.6% (<5.6% RSDs) and 75.5-99.7% (<6.2% RSDs), respectively. The developed AC-poly(STY-DVB) monolithic column showed good mechanical stability, which can be reused for more than 30 extraction times without any significant loss in the extraction recoveries of PAEs. The AC-poly(STY-DVB) monolithic column was successfully applied in SPME of PAEs in water sample with extraction recovery ranged of 78.8%-104.6% (<5.5% RSDs). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthesis of polymer membranes of different porosity and their application for phenol removal from liquid phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofman-Bieniek, Magdalena; Jasiewicz, Katarzyna; Pietrzak, Robert [Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Poznan (Poland)

    2014-02-15

    Preparation of polymeric membranes based on polyethersulfone (PES) modified by adding different amounts of a pore-forming agent (PVP) is presented, and potential application of the membranes obtained for removal of phenol from the liquid phase is examined. The addition of various amounts of PVP has been shown to bring about changes in the content of the surface oxygen groups, but has no significant effect on the chemical character of the groups and acidic groups dominate. Filtration by phenol solution leads to significant changes in the total content of surface oxides; however, the acidic groups remain dominant. Membranes characterized by higher porosity exhibited more stable and higher rejection ratio for phenol removal. Although all the membranes were characterized by similar rejection ratios for phenol removal, the cake resistance (Rc) and pore resistance (Rp) values were found to depend significantly on the structure and porosity of the membrane applied for filtration.

  16. Synthesis of polymer membranes of different porosity and their application for phenol removal from liquid phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman-Bieniek, Magdalena; Jasiewicz, Katarzyna; Pietrzak, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of polymeric membranes based on polyethersulfone (PES) modified by adding different amounts of a pore-forming agent (PVP) is presented, and potential application of the membranes obtained for removal of phenol from the liquid phase is examined. The addition of various amounts of PVP has been shown to bring about changes in the content of the surface oxygen groups, but has no significant effect on the chemical character of the groups and acidic groups dominate. Filtration by phenol solution leads to significant changes in the total content of surface oxides; however, the acidic groups remain dominant. Membranes characterized by higher porosity exhibited more stable and higher rejection ratio for phenol removal. Although all the membranes were characterized by similar rejection ratios for phenol removal, the cake resistance (Rc) and pore resistance (Rp) values were found to depend significantly on the structure and porosity of the membrane applied for filtration

  17. Vibration damping and heat transfer using material phase changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloucek, Petr (Inventor); Reynolds, Daniel R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and apparatus wherein phase changes in a material can dampen vibrational energy, dampen noise and facilitate heat transfer. One embodiment includes a method for damping vibrational energy in a body. The method comprises attaching a material to the body, wherein the material comprises a substrate, a shape memory alloy layer, and a plurality of temperature change elements. The method further comprises sensing vibrations in the body. In addition, the method comprises indicating to at least a portion of the temperature change elements to provide a temperature change in the shape memory alloy layer, wherein the temperature change is sufficient to provide a phase change in at least a portion of the shape memory alloy layer, and further wherein the phase change consumes a sufficient amount of kinetic energy to dampen at least a portion of the vibrational energy in the body. In other embodiments, the shape memory alloy layer is a thin film. Additional embodiments include a sensor connected to the material.

  18. Vibration damping and heat transfer using material phase changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloucek, Petr [Houston, TX; Reynolds, Daniel R [Oakland, CA

    2009-03-24

    A method and apparatus wherein phase changes in a material can dampen vibrational energy, dampen noise and facilitate heat transfer. One embodiment includes a method for damping vibrational energy in a body. The method comprises attaching a material to the body, wherein the material comprises a substrate, a shape memory alloy layer, and a plurality of temperature change elements. The method further comprises sensing vibrations in the body. In addition, the method comprises indicating to at least a portion of the temperature change elements to provide a temperature change in the shape memory alloy layer, wherein the temperature change is sufficient to provide a phase change in at least a portion of the shape memory alloy layer, and further wherein the phase change consumes a sufficient amount of kinetic energy to dampen at least a portion of the vibrational energy in the body. In other embodiments, the shape memory alloy layer is a thin film. Additional embodiments include a sensor connected to the material.

  19. High-pressure Raman spectroscopy of phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin, E-mail: wphsieh@stanford.edu; Mao, Wendy L. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Zalden, Peter [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Wuttig, Matthias [I. Physikalisches Institut (IA), RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); JARA – Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Lindenberg, Aaron M. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, PULSE Institute, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2013-11-04

    We used high-pressure Raman spectroscopy to study the evolution of vibrational frequencies of the phase change materials (PCMs) Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, GeSb{sub 2}Te{sub 4}, and SnSb{sub 2}Te{sub 4}. We found that the critical pressure for triggering amorphization in the PCMs decreases with increasing vacancy concentration, demonstrating that the presence of vacancies, rather than differences in the atomic covalent radii, is crucial for pressure-induced amorphization in PCMs. Compared to the as-deposited amorphous phase, the pressure-induced amorphous phase has a similar vibrational spectrum but requires much lower laser power to transform into the crystalline phase, suggesting different kinetics of crystallization, which may have implications for applications of PCMs in non-volatile data storage.

  20. Synthesis and nanoscale thermal encoding of phase-change nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xuhui; Yu Bin; Meyyappan, M.

    2007-01-01

    Low-dimensional phase-change nanostructures provide a valuable research platform for understanding the phase-transition behavior and thermal properties at nanoscale and their potential in achieving superdense data storage. Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 nanowires have been grown using a vapor-liquid-solid technique and shown to exhibit distinctive properties that may overcome the present data storage scaling barrier. Local heating of an individual nanowire with a focused electron beam was used to shape a nano-bar-code on a Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 nanowire. The data encoding on Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 nanowire may promote novel device concepts to implement ultrahigh density, low energy, high speed data storage using phase-change nanomaterials with diverse thermal-programing strategies

  1. Phase change in uranium: Discrepancy between experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akella, J.

    1996-01-01

    Using a diamond-anvil cell (DAC) phase transformation and room temperature Equation of State (EOS) for some actinides and lanthanides were studied to multimegabar (megabar = 100 GPa) pressures. Experimental data are compared with the theoretically predicted crystal structural changes and the pressure-volume relationships. There is a general agreement between theory and experiment for the structural changes in the lighter actinides, however in detail there are some discrepancies still. A generalized trend for the phase transformations in the lanthanides can be seen, which again has broad agreement with theory. We conclude that an accurate and robust theoretical base for predicting the phase transformations in the f-electron metals can be developed by incorporating the DAC data

  2. Controlling solution-phase polymer aggregation with molecular weight and solvent additives to optimize polymer-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Bartelt, Jonathan A.; Douglas, Jessica D.; Mateker, William R.; El Labban, Abdulrahman; Tassone, Christopher J.; Toney, Michael F.; Fré chet, Jean Mj J; Beaujuge, Pierre; McGehee, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell performance of many polymers depends on the polymer molecular weight (M n) and the solvent additive(s) used for solution processing. However, the mechanism that causes these dependencies is not well

  3. Ultrafast characterization of phase-change material crystallization properties in the melt-quenched amorphous phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyasingh, Rakesh; Fong, Scott W; Lee, Jaeho; Li, Zijian; Chang, Kuo-Wei; Mantegazza, Davide; Asheghi, Mehdi; Goodson, Kenneth E; Wong, H-S Philip

    2014-06-11

    Phase change materials are widely considered for application in nonvolatile memories because of their ability to achieve phase transformation in the nanosecond time scale. However, the knowledge of fast crystallization dynamics in these materials is limited because of the lack of fast and accurate temperature control methods. In this work, we have developed an experimental methodology that enables ultrafast characterization of phase-change dynamics on a more technologically relevant melt-quenched amorphous phase using practical device structures. We have extracted the crystallization growth velocity (U) in a functional capped phase change memory (PCM) device over 8 orders of magnitude (10(-10) 10(8) K/s), which reveals the extreme fragility of Ge2Sb2Te5 in its supercooled liquid phase. Furthermore, these crystallization properties were studied as a function of device programming cycles, and the results show degradation in the cell retention properties due to elemental segregation. The above experiments are enabled by the use of an on-chip fast heater and thermometer called as microthermal stage (MTS) integrated with a vertical phase change memory (PCM) cell. The temperature at the PCM layer can be controlled up to 600 K using MTS and with a thermal time constant of 800 ns, leading to heating rates ∼10(8) K/s that are close to the typical device operating conditions during PCM programming. The MTS allows us to independently control the electrical and thermal aspects of phase transformation (inseparable in a conventional PCM cell) and extract the temperature dependence of key material properties in real PCM devices.

  4. Unusual crystallization behavior in Ga-Sb phase change alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Putero

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Combined in situ X-ray scattering techniques using synchrotron radiation were applied to investigate the crystallization behavior of Sb-rich Ga-Sb alloys. Measurements of the sheet resistance during heating indicated a reduced crystallization temperature with increased Sb content, which was confirmed by in situ X-ray diffraction. The electrical contrast increased with increasing Sb content and the resistivities in both the amorphous and crystalline phases decreased. It was found that by tuning the composition between Ga:Sb = 9:91 (in at.% and Ga:Sb = 45:55, the change in mass density upon crystallization changes from an increase in mass density which is typical for most phase change materials to a decrease in mass density. At the composition of Ga:Sb = 30:70, no mass density change is observed which should be very beneficial for phase change random access memory (PCRAM applications where a change in mass density during cycling is assumed to cause void formation and PCRAM device failure.

  5. Kodak phase-change media for optical tape applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyan, Yuan-Sheng; Preuss, Donald R.; Olin, George R.; Vazan, Fridrich; Pan, Kee-Chuan; Raychaudhuri, Pranab. K.

    1993-01-01

    The SbInSn phase-change write-once optical medium developed by Eastman Kodak Company is particularly suitable for development into the next generation optical tape media. Its performance for optical recording has already been demonstrated in some of the highest performance optical disk systems. Some of the key performance features are presented.

  6. Phase Change Permeation Technology For Environmental Control Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Use of a phase change permeation membrane (Dutyion [Trademark]) to passively and selectively mobilize water in microgravity to enable improved water recovery from urine/brine for Environment Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) and water delivery to plans for potential use in microgravity.

  7. Doped SbTe phase change material in memory cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    in ‘t Zandt, M.A.A.; Jedema, F.J.; Gravesteijn, Dirk J; Gravesteijn, D.J.; Attenborough, K.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Phase Change Random Access Memory (PCRAM) is investigated as replacement for Flash. The memory concept is based on switching a chalcogenide from the crystalline (low ohmic) to the amorphous (high ohmic) state and vice versa. Basically two memory cell concepts exist: the Ovonic Unified Memory (OUM)

  8. Phase-change drywalls in a passive-solar building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darkwa, K.; O' Callaghan, P.W.; Tetlow, D. [School of the Built Environment, The Applied Energy and Environmental Engineering Group, Nottingham Trent University, Burton Street, Nottingham NG1 4BU (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    Integration of phase-change materials (PCMs) into building fabrics is considered to be one of the potential and effective ways of minimising energy-consumption and CO{sub 2}-emissions in the building sector. In order to assess the thermal effectiveness of this concept, composite PCM drywall samples (i.e., randomly mixed and laminated PCM drywalls) have been evaluated in a model passive-solar building. For a broader assessment, the effects of three phase-change zones (narrow, intermediate and wide) of the PCM sample were considered. The results showed that the laminated PCM sample with a narrow phase-change zone was capable of increasing the minimum room temperature by about 17% more than the randomly mixed type. Even though there was some display of a non-isothermal phase-change process, the laminated system proved to be thermally more effective in terms of evolution and utilisation of latent heat. A further heat-transfer enhancement process is, however, required for the development of the laminated system. . (author)

  9. Simulation of phase change drywalls in a passive solar building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darkwa, K.; O' Callaghan, P.W. [School of the Built Environment, The Applied Energy and Environmental Engineering Group, Nottingham Trent University, Burton Street, Nottingham NG1 4BU (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-15

    Integration of phase change materials (PCMs) into building fabrics is considered to be one of the potential and effective ways of minimizing energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions in the building sector. In order to assess the thermal effectiveness of this concept, composite PCM drywall samples (i.e. randomly-mixed and laminated PCM drywalls) have been evaluated in a model passive solar building. For a broader assessment, effects of three phase change zones (narrow, intermediate and wide) of the PCM sample were considered. The results showed that the laminated PCM sample with a narrow phase change zone was capable of increasing the minimum room temperature by about 17% more than the randomly-mixed type. Even though there was some display of non-isothermal phase change process, the laminated system proved to be thermally more effective in terms of evolution and utilization of latent heat. Further heat transfer enhancement process is however required towards the development of the laminated system. [Author].

  10. Performance enhancement of hermetic compressor using phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, I. M.; Rady, M. A.; Huzayyin, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    The present study is motivated by the need for the research of simple measures for increasing energy efficiency of hermetic compressor. The measure is the application of phase change materials for performance enhancement. The first experimental study should be guide for choice of PCM. It has been performed to investigate the effects of thermostat setting temperature on the performance of hermetic compressor. The effects of thermostat setting temperature with and without load on power consumption have been analyzed. Performance enhancement using phase change materials (PCMs) has been studied by employing a phase change material Rubitherm-42 (RT-42) on the top surface of compressor. Choice of PCM material is based on basic compressor performance measured in the first part of the present study. Experiments have been carried out for different load values and different quantities of PCM. The quantity and phase change characteristic of PCM are essential parameters that determine the percentage of performance enhancement in term of energy consumption. Reduction of energy consumption of about 10% has been achieved in the present study by using PCM. The present study shows that how to reduce the electrical power consumption to enhance compressor heat dissipation method to improve efficiency.

  11. Polymer boosting effect in the droplet phase studied by small-angle neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Frielinghaus, H; Allgaier, J; Richter, D; Jakobs, B; Sottmann, T; Strey, R

    2002-01-01

    Small-angle neutron-scattering experiments were performed in order to obtain the six partial scattering functions of a droplet microemulsion containing water, decane, C sub 1 sub 0 E sub 4 surfactant and PEP sub 5 -PEO sub 8 sub 0. We systematically varied the contrast around the polymer contrast, where only the polymer becomes visible, and we also measured bulk and film contrasts. With the singular value decomposition method we could extract the desired six partial scattering functions from the 15 measured spectra. We find a sphere-shell-shell structure of the droplets, where the innermost sphere consists of oil, the middle shell of surfactant and the outer shell is a depletion zone where the polymer is almost not present. (orig.)

  12. Phase change thermal energy storage methods for combat vehicles, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, F. E.

    1986-06-01

    Three alternative cooling methods, based on latent heat absorption during phase changes, were studied for potential use in combat vehicle microclimate temperature control. Metal hydrides absorb heat as they release hydrogen gas. Plastic crystals change from one solid phase to another, absorbing heat in the process. Liquid air boils at cryogenic temperature and absorbs additional sensible heat as the cold gas mixes with the microclimate air flow. System designs were prepared for each of the three microclimate cooling concepts. These designs provide details about the three phase change materials, their containers and the auxiliary equipment needed to implement each option onboard a combat vehicle. The three concepts were compared on the basis of system mass, system volume and the energy required to regenerate them after use. Metal hydrides were found to be the lightest and smallest option by a large margin. The energy needed to regenerate a hydride thermal storage system can be extracted from the vehicle's exhaust gases.

  13. Irreversible altering of crystalline phase of phase-change Ge-Sb thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krusin-Elbaum, L.; Shakhvorostov, D.; Cabral, C. Jr.; Raoux, S.; Jordan-Sweet, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    The stability of the crystalline phase of binary phase-change Ge x Sb 1-x films is investigated over a wide range of Ge content. From Raman spectroscopy we find the Ge-Sb crystalline structure irreversibly altered after exposure to a laser beam. We show that with increasing beam intensity/temperature Ge agglomerates and precipitates out in the amount growing with x. A simple empirical relation links Ge precipitation temperature T Ge p to the rate of change dT cryst /dx of crystallization, with the precipitation easiest on the mid-range x plateau, where T cryst is nearly constant. Our findings point to a preferable 15% < or approx. x < 50% window, that may achieve the desired cycling/archival properties of a phase-change cell.

  14. Structural changes of polymer-coated microgranules and excipients on tableting investigated by microtomography using synchrotron X-ray radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Ryusuke; Noguchi, Shuji; Iwao, Yasunori; Suzuki, Yoshio; Terada, Yasuko; Uesugi, Kentaro; Itai, Shigeru

    2015-03-15

    Multiple-unit tablets consisting of polymer-coated microgranules and excipients have a number of advantageous pharmaceutical properties. Polymer-coated microgranules are known to often lose their functionality because of damage to the polymer coating caused by tableting, and the mechanism of polymer coating damage as well as the structural changes of excipients upon tableting had been investigated but without in-situ visualization and quantitative analysis. To elucidate the mechanism of coating damage, the internal structures of multiple-unit tablets were investigated by X-ray computed microtomography using synchrotron X-rays. Cross sectional images of the tablets with sub-micron spatial resolution clearly revealed that void spaces remained around the compressed excipient particles in the tablets containing an excipient composed of cellulose and lactose (Cellactose(®) 80), whereas much smaller void spaces remained in the tablets containing an excipient made of sorbitol (Parteck(®) SI 150). The relationships between the void spaces and the physical properties of the tablets such as hardness and disintegration were investigated. Damage to the polymer coating in tablets was found mainly where polymer-coated microgranules were in direct contact with each other in both types of tablets, which could be attributed to the difference in hardness of excipient particles and the core of the polymer-coated microgranules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Physico-chemical and mechanical properties of microencapsulated phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giro-Paloma, Jessica; Oncins, Gerard; Barreneche, Camila; Martínez, Mònica; Fernández, A. Inés; Cabeza, Luisa F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Microencapsulated phase change material MPCM (Micronal∗ DS 5001) was evaluated in this study. ► Due to the reported microcapsules breakage, physical and mechanical properties were analysed. ► Mechanical response was evaluated by AFM with indentation mode under different temperatures. ► The main result is that stiffness of MPCM depends on the temperature assay and particle size. - Abstract: Microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM) are well known in advanced technologies for the utilization in active and passive systems, which have the capacity to absorb and slowly release the latent heat involved in a phase change process. Microcapsules consist of little containers, which are made of polymer on the outside, and paraffin wax as PCM in the inside. The use of microencapsulated PCM has many advantages as microcapsules can handle phase change materials as core allowing the preparation of slurries. However there are some concerns about cycling of MPCM slurries because of the breakage of microcapsules during charging/discharging and the subsequent loss of effectiveness. This phenomenon motivates the study of the mechanical response when a force is applied to the microcapsule. The maximum force that Micronal® DS 5001 can afford before breaking was determined by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). To simulate real conditions in service, assays were done at different temperatures: with the PCM in solid state at 25 °C, and with the PCM melted at 45 °C and 80 °C. To better understand the behavior of these materials, Micronal® DS 5001 microcapsules were characterized using different physic-chemical techniques. Microcapsules Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) results showed the main vibrations corresponding to acrylic groups of the outside polymer. Thermal stability was studied by Thermogravimetrical Analysis (TGA), and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) was used to characterize the resulting inorganic residue. The thermal properties were

  16. In situ diagnostic of two-phase flow phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells by neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Denis; Zhang, Jianbo; Shimoi, Ryoichi; Lehmann, Eberhard; Wokaun, Alexander; Shinohara, Kazuhiko; Scherer, Guenther G.

    2005-01-01

    Neutron radiographical measurements have been performed on operating hydrogen-fueled polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC). With the successful detection of liquid accumulation in flow field and gas diffusion layer (GDL) under various operating conditions a unique experimental approach for the investigation of two-phase flow phenomena in technical PEFC has been realized. The experimental setup will be described in detail. Algorithms for an enhanced quantitative evaluation of the obtained images are presented and successful application to the data demonstrated. Finally, results from PEFC investigations will be given. Different flow field geometries and their implications for liquid accumulation inside flow field and GDL are discussed

  17. Preparation and thermal properties of form stable paraffin phase change material encapsulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xing; Liu Hongyan; Wang Shujun; Zhang Lu; Cheng Hua

    2006-01-01

    Paraffin waxes are cheap and have moderate thermal energy storage density but low thermal conductivity and, hence, require large surface area to be used in energy storage. Form stable paraffin phase change materials (PCM) in which paraffin serves as a latent heat storage material and polyolefins act as a supporting material, because of paraffin leakage, are required to be improved. The form stable paraffin PCM in the present paper was encapsulated in an inorganic silica gel polymer successfully by in situ polymerization. The differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was used to measure its thermal properties. At the same time, the Washburn equation, which measures the wetting properties of powder materials, was used to test the hydrophilic-lipophilic properties of the PCMs. The result indicated that the enthalpy of the microencapsulated PCMs was reduced little, while their hydrophilic properties were enhanced largely

  18. Selective solid-phase extraction of Ni(II) by an ion-imprinted polymer from water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraji, Mohammad; Yousefi, Hamideh

    2009-01-01

    A new ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) material was synthesized by copolymerization of 4-vinylpyridine as monomer, ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate as crosslinking agent and 2,2'-azobis-sobutyronitrile as initiator in the presence of Ni-dithizone complex. The IIP was used as sorbent in a solid-phase extraction column. The effects of sampling volume, elution conditions, sample pH and sample flow rate on the extraction of Ni ions form water samples were studied. The maximum adsorption capacity and the relative selectivity coefficients of imprinted polymer for Ni(II)/Co(II), Ni(II)/Cu(II) and Ni(II)/Cd(II) were calculated. Compared with non-imprinted polymer particles, the IIP had higher selectivity for Ni(II). The relative selectivity factor (α r ) values of Ni(II)/Co(II), Ni(II)/Cu(II) and Ni(II)/Cd(II) were 21.6, 54.3, and 22.7, respectively, which are greater than 1. The relative standard deviation of the five replicate determinations of Ni(II) was 3.4%. The detection limit for 150 mL of sample was 1.6 μg L -1 using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of trace nickel in water samples with satisfactory results.

  19. Combining Pickering Emulsion Polymerization with Molecular Imprinting to Prepare Polymer Microspheres for Selective Solid-Phase Extraction of Malachite Green

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixin Liang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Malachite green (MG is currently posing a carcinogenic threat to the safety of human lives; therefore, it is highly desirable to develop an effective method for fast trace detection of MG. Herein, for the first time, this paper presents a systematic study on polymer microspheres, being prepared by combined Pickering emulsion polymerization and molecular imprinting, to detect and purify MG. The microspheres, molecularly imprinted with MG, show enhanced adsorption selectivity to MG, despite a somewhat lowered adsorption capacity, as compared to the counterpart without molecular imprinting. Structural features and adsorption performance of these microspheres are elucidated by different characterizations and kinetic and thermodynamic analyses. The surface of the molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres (M-PMs exhibits regular pores of uniform pore size distribution, endowing M-PMs with impressive adsorption selectivity to MG. In contrast, the microspheres without molecular imprinting show a larger average particle diameter and an uneven porous surface (with roughness and a large pore size, causing a lower adsorption selectivity to MG despite a higher adsorption capacity. Various adsorption conditions are investigated, such as pH and initial concentration of the solution with MG, for optimizing the adsorption performance of M-PMs in selectively tackling MG. The adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics are deeply discussed and analyzed, so as to provide a full picture of the adsorption behaviors of the polymer microspheres with and without the molecular imprinting. Significantly, M-PMs show promising solid-phase extraction column applications for recovering MG in a continuous extraction manner.

  20. Solid-phase extraction element based on epoxy polymer monolith for determination of polar organic compounds in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tadashi; Odagiri, Kayo; Watanabe, Atsushi; Watanabe, Chuichi; Kubo, Takuya; Hosoya, Ken

    2011-10-01

    A solid-phase extraction element based on epoxy polymer monolith was fabricated for sorptive enrichment of polar compounds from liquid and gaseous samples. After ultrasonication of the element in an aqueous solution for a given period of time, the thermal desorption (TD) using a pyrolyzer with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), in which TD temperature was programmed from 50 to 250 °C for the analytes absorbed in the element, was used to evaluate the element for basic extraction performance using the aqueous standard mixtures consisting of compounds having varied polarities such as hexanol, isoamyl acetate, linalool, furfural and decanoic acid, in concentrations ranging from 10 μg/L to 1 mg/L. Excellent linear relationships were observed for all compounds in the standard mixture, except decanoic acid. In the extraction of beverages such as red wine, the extraction element showed stronger adsorption characteristics for polar compounds such as alcohols and acids than a non-polar polydimethylsiloxane-based element. This feature is derived from the main polymer structure along with hydroxyl and amino groups present in the epoxy-based monolith polymer matrix. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Design of amine modified polymer dispersants for liquid-phase exfoliation of transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets and their photodetective nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinseong; Hahnkee Kim, Richard; Yu, Seunggun; Babu Velusamy, Dhinesh; Lee, Hyeokjung; Park, Chanho; Cho, Suk Man; Jeong, Beomjin; Sol Kang, Han; Park, Cheolmin

    2017-12-01

    Liquid-phase exfoliation (LPE) of transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) nanosheets is a facile, cost-effective approach to large-area photoelectric devices including photodetectors and non-volatile memories. Non-destructive exfoliation of nanosheets using macromolecular dispersing agents is beneficial in rendering the TMD nanocomposite films suitable for mechanically flexible devices. Here, an efficient LPE of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) with an amine modified poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) co-polymer (AM-PSMA) is demonstrated, wherein the maleic anhydrides were converted into maleic imides with primary amines using N-Boc-(CH2) n -NH2. The exfoliation of nanosheets was facilitated through Lewis acid-base interaction between the primary amine and transition metal. The results demonstrate that the exfoliation depends upon both the fraction of primary amines in the polymer chain and their distance from the polymer backbone. Under optimized conditions of primary amine content and its distance from the backbone, AM-PSMA gave rise to a highly concentrated MoS2 nanosheet suspension that was stable for over 10 d. Exfoliation of several other TMDs was also achieved using the optimized AM-PSMA, indicating the scope of AM-PSMA applications. Furthermore, a flexible composite film of AM-PSMA and MoS2 nanosheets fabricated by vacuum-assisted filtration showed excellent photoconductive performances including a high I on/I off ratio of 102 and a fast photocurrent switching of 300 ms.

  2. Phase behavior of binary polybutadiene copolymer mixtures as an example of weakly interacting polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Schwahn, D

    2002-01-01

    Binary blends of statistical polybutadiene copolymers of different vinyl content and molar volume were explored by small-angle neutron scattering. These samples represent the most simple class of statistical copolymer mixtures. In spite of this simplicity, changes in vinyl content, molar volume, and deuterium and hydrogen content of the chains give rise to strong effects; phase separation occurs from minus 230 C to more than plus 200 C and can even reverse from an enthalpically driven one at low temperatures to an entropically driven one at high temperatures. The entropic and enthalpic terms of the Flory-Huggins parameter as determined from the experiment are in excellent agreement with lattice cluster theory calculations. (orig.)

  3. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Observation of Nanostructural Changes in Phase-Change Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Meister, Stefan; Kim, SangBum; Cha, Judy J.; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Cui, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Phase-change memory (PCM) has been researched extensively as a promising alternative to flash memory. Important studies have focused on its scalability, switching speed, endurance, and new materials. Still, reliability issues and inconsistent

  4. Phase-change related epigenetic and physiological changes in Pinus radiata D. Don.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Mario F; Cañal, Maria Jesús; Rodríguez, Roberto

    2002-08-01

    DNA methylation and polyamine levels were analysed before and after Pinus radiata D. Don. phase change in order to identify possible molecular and physiological phase markers. Juvenile individuals (without reproductive ability) were characterised by a degree of DNA methylation of 30-35% and a ratio of free polyamines to perchloric acid-soluble polyamine conjugates greater than 1, while mature trees (with reproductive ability) had 60% 5-methylcytosine and a ratio of free polyamines to perchloric acid-soluble polyamine conjugates of less than 1. Results obtained with trees that attained reproductive capacity during the experimental period confirmed that changes in the degree of DNA methylation and polyamine concentrations found among juvenile and mature states come about immediately after the phase change. We suggest that both indicators may be associated with the loss of morphogenic ability during ageing, particularly after phase change, through a number of molecular interactions, which are subsequently discussed.

  5. Ratiometric Sensing of Hydrogen Peroxide Utilizing Conformational Change in Fluorescent Boronic Acid Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Takeshima

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that the copolymers containing boronic acid and pyrene units can be utilized for the fluorometric sensing of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in aqueous solutions. The copolymer exists in a relatively extended conformation in the absence of H2O2, whereas the polymer chain is contracted by the reaction of boronic acid moieties with H2O2 to form phenol groups. This conformational change induces aggregation of the originally isolated pyrene groups. As a result, relative intensity of excimer emission with respect to monomer emission increases with H2O2 concentration. Accordingly, the present methodology enables us to measure H2O2 by means of ratiometric fluorescence change in the range of 0–30 μM.

  6. Fundamental incorporation of the density change during melting of a confined phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ernesto M.; Otero, José A.

    2018-02-01

    The modeling of thermal diffusion processes taking place in a phase change material presents a challenge when the dynamics of the phase transition is coupled to the mechanical properties of the container. Thermo-mechanical models have been developed by several authors, however, it will be shown that these models only explain the phase transition dynamics at low pressures when the density of each phase experiences negligible changes. In our proposal, a new energy-mass balance equation at the interface is derived and found to be a consequence of mass conservation. The density change experienced in each phase is predicted by the proposed formulation of the problem. Numerical and semi-analytical solutions to the proposed model are presented for an example on a high temperature phase change material. The solutions to the models presented by other authors are observed to be well-behaved close to the isobaric limit. However, compared to the results obtained from our model, the change in the fusion temperature, latent heat, and absolute pressure is found to be greatly overestimated by other proposals when the phase transition is studied close to the isochoric regime.

  7. 3D-morphology reconstruction of nanoscale phase-separation in polymer memory blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khikhlovskyi, S.; Breemen, van A.J.J.M.; Michels, J.J.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Gelinck, G.; Kemerink, M.

    2015-01-01

    In many organic electronic devices functionality is achieved by blending two or more materials, typically polymers or molecules, with distinctly different optical or electrical properties in a single film. The local scale morphology of such blends is vital for the device performance. Here, a simple

  8. Polymer-induced liquid precursor (PILP) phases of calcium carbonate formed in the presence of synthetic acidic polypeptides - relevance to biomineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenk, A.S.; Zope, H.; Kim, Y.; Kros, A.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Meldrum, F.C.

    2012-01-01

    Polymer-induced liquid precursor (PILP) phases of calcium carbonate have attracted significant interest due to possible applications in materials synthesis, and their resemblance to intermediates seen in biogenic mineralisation processes. Further, these PILP phases have been formed in vitro using

  9. Void fraction prediction in two-phase flows independent of the liquid phase density changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazemi, E.; Feghhi, S.A.H.; Roshani, G.H.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray densitometry is a frequently used non-invasive method to determine void fraction in two-phase gas liquid pipe flows. Performance of flow meters using gamma-ray attenuation depends strongly on the fluid properties. Variations of the fluid properties such as density in situations where temperature and pressure fluctuate would cause significant errors in determination of the void fraction in two-phase flows. A conventional solution overcoming such an obstacle is periodical recalibration which is a difficult task. This paper presents a method based on dual modality densitometry using Artificial Neural Network (ANN), which offers the advantage of measuring the void fraction independent of the liquid phase changes. An experimental setup was implemented to generate the required input data for training the network. ANNs were trained on the registered counts of the transmission and scattering detectors in different liquid phase densities and void fractions. Void fractions were predicted by ANNs with mean relative error of less than 0.45% in density variations range of 0.735 up to 0.98 gcm −3 . Applying this method would improve the performance of two-phase flow meters and eliminates the necessity of periodical recalibration. - Highlights: • Void fraction was predicted independent of density changes. • Recorded counts of detectors/void fraction were used as inputs/output of ANN. • ANN eliminated necessity of recalibration in changeable density of two-phase flows

  10. Phase field modeling of rapid crystallization in the phase-change material AIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Fatemeh; Boussinot, Guillaume; Spatschek, Robert; Brener, Efim A.; Apel, Markus

    2017-07-01

    We carry out phase field modeling as a continuum simulation technique in order to study rapid crystallization processes in the phase-change material AIST (Ag4In3Sb67Te26). In particular, we simulate the spatio-temporal evolution of the crystallization of a molten area of the phase-change material embedded in a layer stack. The simulation model is adapted to the experimental conditions used for recent measurements of crystallization rates by a laser pulse technique. Simulations are performed for substrate temperatures close to the melting temperature of AIST down to low temperatures when an amorphous state is involved. The design of the phase field model using the thin interface limit allows us to retrieve the two limiting regimes of interface controlled (low temperatures) and thermal transport controlled (high temperatures) dynamics. Our simulations show that, generically, the crystallization velocity presents a maximum in the intermediate regime where both the interface mobility and the thermal transport, through the molten area as well as through the layer stack, are important. Simulations reveal the complex interplay of all different contributions. This suggests that the maximum switching velocity depends not only on material properties but also on the precise design of the thin film structure into which the phase-change material is embedded.

  11. US/French Joint Research Program regarding the behavior of polymer base materials subjected to beta radiation. Volume 1. Phase-1 normalization results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyant, F.J.; Buckalew, W.H.; Chenion, J.; Carlin, F.; Gaussens, G.; Le Tutour, P.; Le Meur, M.

    1986-06-01

    As part of the ongoing multi-year joint NRC/CEA international cooperative test program to investigate the dose-damage equivalence of gamma and beta radiation on polymer base materials, dosimetry and ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) specimens were exchanged, irradiated, and evaluated for property changes at research facilities in the US (Sandia National Laboratories) and France (Compagnie ORIS Industrie). The purpose of this Phase-1 test series was to normalize and cross-correlate the results obtained by one research center to the other, in terms of exposure (1.0 MeV accelerated electrons and 60 Co gammas) and postirradiation testing (ultimate elongation and tensile strength, hardness, and density) techniques. The dosimetry and material specimen results indicate good agreement between the two countries regarding the exposure conditions and postirradiation evaluation techniques employed

  12. Direct modification of hydrogen/deuterium-terminated diamond particles with polymers to form reversed and strong cation exchange solid phase extraction sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Jensen, David S; Vail, Michael A; Dadson, Andrew; Linford, Matthew R

    2010-12-03

    We describe direct polymer attachment to hydrogen and deuterium-terminated diamond (HTD and DTD) surfaces using a radical initiator (di-tert-amyl peroxide, DTAP), a reactive monomer (styrene) and a crosslinking agent (divinylbenzene, DVB) to create polystyrene encapsulated diamond. Chemisorbed polystyrene is sulfonated with sulfuric acid in acetic acid. Surface changes were followed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT). Finally, both polystyrene-modified DTD and sulfonated styrene-modified DTD were used in solid phase extraction (SPE). Percent recovery and column capacity were investigated for both phenyl (polystyrene) and sulfonic acid treated polystyrene SPE columns. These diamond-based SPE supports are stable under basic conditions, which is not the case for silica-based SPE supports. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Liquid carry-over in an injection moulded all-polymer chip system for immiscible phase magnetic bead-based solid-phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kistrup, Kasper, E-mail: kkis@nanotech.dtu.dk [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech, Building 345 East, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Skotte Sørensen, Karen, E-mail: karen@nanotech.dtu.dk [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech, Building 345 East, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Center for Integrated Point of Care Technologies (CiPoC), DELTA, Venlighedsvej 4, DK-2870 Hørsholm (Denmark); Wolff, Anders, E-mail: anders.wolff@nanotech.dtu.dk [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech, Building 345 East, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Fougt Hansen, Mikkel, E-mail: mikkel.hansen@nanotech.dtu.dk [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech, Building 345 East, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-04-15

    We present an all-polymer, single-use microfluidic chip system produced by injection moulding and bonded by ultrasonic welding. Both techniques are compatible with low-cost industrial mass-production. The chip is produced for magnetic bead-based solid-phase extraction facilitated by immiscible phase filtration and features passive liquid filling and magnetic bead manipulation using an external magnet. In this work, we determine the system compatibility with various surfactants. Moreover, we quantify the volume of liquid co-transported with magnetic bead clusters from Milli-Q water or a lysis-binding buffer for nucleic acid extraction (0.1 (v/v)% Triton X-100 in 5 M guanidine hydrochloride). A linear relationship was found between the liquid carry-over and mass of magnetic beads used. Interestingly, similar average carry-overs of 1.74(8) nL/µg and 1.72(14) nL/µg were found for Milli-Q water and lysis-binding buffer, respectively. - Highlights: • We present an all-polymer mass producible passive filled microfluidic chip system. • Rapid system fabrication is obtained by injection moulding and ultrasonic welding. • The system is made for single-use nucleic acid extraction using magnetic beads. • We systematically map compatibility of the chip system with various surfactants. • We quantify the volume carry-over of magnetic beads in water and 0.1% triton-X solution.

  14. Liquid carry-over in an injection moulded all-polymer chip system for immiscible phase magnetic bead-based solid-phase extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistrup, Kasper; Skotte Sørensen, Karen; Wolff, Anders; Fougt Hansen, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    We present an all-polymer, single-use microfluidic chip system produced by injection moulding and bonded by ultrasonic welding. Both techniques are compatible with low-cost industrial mass-production. The chip is produced for magnetic bead-based solid-phase extraction facilitated by immiscible phase filtration and features passive liquid filling and magnetic bead manipulation using an external magnet. In this work, we determine the system compatibility with various surfactants. Moreover, we quantify the volume of liquid co-transported with magnetic bead clusters from Milli-Q water or a lysis-binding buffer for nucleic acid extraction (0.1 (v/v)% Triton X-100 in 5 M guanidine hydrochloride). A linear relationship was found between the liquid carry-over and mass of magnetic beads used. Interestingly, similar average carry-overs of 1.74(8) nL/µg and 1.72(14) nL/µg were found for Milli-Q water and lysis-binding buffer, respectively. - Highlights: • We present an all-polymer mass producible passive filled microfluidic chip system. • Rapid system fabrication is obtained by injection moulding and ultrasonic welding. • The system is made for single-use nucleic acid extraction using magnetic beads. • We systematically map compatibility of the chip system with various surfactants. • We quantify the volume carry-over of magnetic beads in water and 0.1% triton-X solution

  15. Disorder-induced localization in crystalline phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegrist, T; Jost, P; Volker, H; Woda, M; Merkelbach, P; Schlockermann, C; Wuttig, M

    2011-03-01

    Localization of charge carriers in crystalline solids has been the subject of numerous investigations over more than half a century. Materials that show a metal-insulator transition without a structural change are therefore of interest. Mechanisms leading to metal-insulator transition include electron correlation (Mott transition) or disorder (Anderson localization), but a clear distinction is difficult. Here we report on a metal-insulator transition on increasing annealing temperature for a group of crystalline phase-change materials, where the metal-insulator transition is due to strong disorder usually associated only with amorphous solids. With pronounced disorder but weak electron correlation, these phase-change materials form an unparalleled quantum state of matter. Their universal electronic behaviour seems to be at the origin of the remarkable reproducibility of the resistance switching that is crucial to their applications in non-volatile-memory devices. Controlling the degree of disorder in crystalline phase-change materials might enable multilevel resistance states in upcoming storage devices.

  16. Chemical and structural changes at the ABS polymer-copper metal interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kisin, S.; Scaltro, F.; Malanowski, P.; Varst, van der P.G.T.; With, de G.

    2007-01-01

    Creating oxygen containing moieties (hydroxyl or carbonyl) on polymer substrate surfaces is known to increase the adhesion strength of polymers to metals. However, we noticed adhesion increase with time even though no pre- or post-treatment of the polymer substrate was done. In the case of sputtered

  17. An extension of the counterion condensation theory to conformational changes of flexible polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benegas, J.C.; Cesaro, A.

    1988-01-01

    A full report on a statistical model is presented in which an ionic polymer is taken as an aggregate of linear flexible segments (similar to the spring-bead model). This model is thought to represent fairly well some flexible ionic polymers in solution. The model assumes two factorizable energy contributions, one purely conformational the other electrostatic. The first contribution is calculated from distribution function of the end-to-end distances and can be obtained from numerical Monte Carlo calculations of chain conformations. The second contribution is the excess thermodynamic property and is calculated, by using Manning's theory of linear polyelectrolytes, as a function of the degree of ionization and of a number of physical variables. Procedures to evaluate changes in the chain conformation of polysaccharides and polypeptides bearing ionizable charged groups are presented. The results show excellent quantitative agreement of averaged functions and experimental data. They also show that statistical average over the conformational states is not equivalent to the thermodynamic property of the averaged conformation. (author). 37 refs, 17 figs

  18. Reconfigurable optical manipulation by phase change material waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianhang; Mei, Shengtao; Wang, Qian; Liu, Hong; Lim, Chwee Teck; Teng, Jinghua

    2017-05-25

    Optical manipulation by dielectric waveguides enables the transportation of particles and biomolecules beyond diffraction limits. However, traditional dielectric waveguides could only transport objects in the forward direction which does not fulfill the requirements of the next generation lab-on-chip system where the integrated manipulation system should be much more flexible and multifunctional. In this work, bidirectional transportation of objects on the nanoscale is demonstrated on a rectangular waveguide made of the phase change material Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 (GST) by numerical simulations. Either continuous pushing forces or pulling forces are generated on the trapped particles when the GST is in the amorphous or crystalline phase. With the technique of a femtosecond laser induced phase transition on the GST, we further proposed a reconfigurable optical trap array on the same waveguide. This work demonstrates GST waveguide's potential of achieving multifunctional manipulation of multiple objects on the nanoscale with plausible optical setups.

  19. Changes to the morphology, structure and properties as a consequence of polyethylene working in a polymer-metal kinematic pair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maszybrocka, Joanna; Cybo, Jerzy; Cwajna, Jan

    2009-01-01

    A change is presented of the orientation of lamellar structure, degree of crystallinity, the degree of the spatial arrangement of the structure, micromechanical properties, and the surface morphology and thickness of a plastically deformed upper layer. These changes are the effect of work in a polymer-metal kinematic pair, which have occurred as a result of plastic deformation of polyethylene during its service. It has been shown that, as a result of selecting proper parameters of UHMW polyethylene via the initial draft and electron-beam irradiation, such a structure of the polymer can be obtained, which will enable the above-mentioned changes in morphology and structure to take place during service. This in turn, will allow a reduction of the susceptibility of the polymer to permanent deformation by 3-6 times, and its wear by more than 5 times, compared to the initial material.

  20. The interplay between wetting and phase behaviour in binary polymer films and wedges: Monte Carlo simulations and mean field calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M; Binder, K

    2005-01-01

    By confining a binary mixture, one can profoundly alter its miscibility behaviour. The qualitative features of miscibility in confined geometry are rather universal and are shared by polymer mixtures as well as small molecules, but the unmixing transition in the bulk and the wetting transition are typically well separated in polymer blends. We study the interplay between wetting and miscibility of a symmetric polymer mixture via large scale Monte Carlo simulations in the framework of the bond fluctuation model and via numerical self-consistent field calculations. The film surfaces interact with the monomers via short-ranged potentials, and the wetting transition of the semi-infinite system is of first order. It can be accurately located in the simulations by measuring the surface and interface tensions and using Young's equation. If both surfaces in a film attract the same component, capillary condensation occurs and the critical point is close to the critical point of the bulk. If surfaces attract different components, an interface localization/delocalization occurs which gives rise to phase diagrams with two critical points in the vicinity of the pre-wetting critical point of the semi-infinite system. The crossover between these two types of phase diagrams as a function of the surface field asymmetry is studied. We investigate the dependence of the phase diagram on the film width Δ for antisymmetric surface fields. Upon decreasing the film width the two critical points approach the symmetry axis of the phase diagram, and below a certain width, Δ tri , there remains only a single critical point at symmetric composition. This corresponds to a second order interface localization/delocalization transition even though the wetting transition is of first order. At a specific film width, Δ tri , tricritical behaviour is found. The behaviour of antisymmetric films is compared with the phase behaviour in an antisymmetric double wedge. While the former is the analogy of

  1. Electrode Materials, Thermal Annealing Sequences, and Lateral/Vertical Phase Separation of Polymer Solar Cells from Multiscale Molecular Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Cheng-Kuang

    2014-12-10

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. The nanomorphologies of the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer of polymer solar cells are extremely sensitive to the electrode materials and thermal annealing conditions. In this work, the correlations of electrode materials, thermal annealing sequences, and resultant BHJ nanomorphological details of P3HT:PCBM BHJ polymer solar cell are studied by a series of large-scale, coarse-grained (CG) molecular simulations of system comprised of PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:PCBM/Al layers. Simulations are performed for various configurations of electrode materials as well as processing temperature. The complex CG molecular data are characterized using a novel extension of our graph-based framework to quantify morphology and establish a link between morphology and processing conditions. Our analysis indicates that vertical phase segregation of P3HT:PCBM blend strongly depends on the electrode material and thermal annealing schedule. A thin P3HT-rich film is formed on the top, regardless of bottom electrode material, when the BHJ layer is exposed to the free surface during thermal annealing. In addition, preferential segregation of P3HT chains and PCBM molecules toward PEDOT:PSS and Al electrodes, respectively, is observed. Detailed morphology analysis indicated that, surprisingly, vertical phase segregation does not affect the connectivity of donor/acceptor domains with respective electrodes. However, the formation of P3HT/PCBM depletion zones next to the P3HT/PCBM-rich zones can be a potential bottleneck for electron/hole transport due to increase in transport pathway length. Analysis in terms of fraction of intra- and interchain charge transports revealed that processing schedule affects the average vertical orientation of polymer chains, which may be crucial for enhanced charge transport, nongeminate recombination, and charge collection. The present study establishes a more detailed link between processing and morphology by combining multiscale molecular

  2. Controllable biomimetic adhesion using embedded phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahn, J; Sameoto, D; Menon, C

    2011-01-01

    In many cases, such as in the instance of climbing robots or temporary adhesives, there is the need to be able to dynamically control the level of adhesion a biomimetic dry adhesive can provide. In this study, the effect of changing the backing layer stiffness of a dry adhesive is examined. Embedding a phase change material within the backing of a synthetic dry adhesive sheet allows the stiffness to be tailored at different points of a preload and adhesion cycle. Larger contact areas and more equal load sharing between adhesive fibres can be achieved by increasing the backing layer stiffness after initial deformation when the adhesive backing is loaded in its softened state. Adhesion behaviour is examined when the backing layer is maintained in solid and softened phases during complete load cycles and for load cycles under the condition of contact with the softened phase backing followed by pull-off during the solid phase. Absolute adhesion force is increased for trials in which a soft backing layer hardens prior to pull-off. This effect is due to the increased contact area made between the rounded probe and the softened material during preloading and the more equal load sharing condition during pull-off when the backing layer becomes stiff again

  3. Design, fabrication, and properties of 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dongyu, Xu; Xin, Cheng; Shifeng, Huang; Banerjee, Sourav

    2014-01-01

    The laminated 2-2 connectivity cement/polymer based piezoelectric composites with varied piezoelectric phase distribution were fabricated by employing Lead Zirconium Titanate ceramic as active phase, and mixture of cement powder, epoxy resin, and hardener as matrix phase with a mass proportion of 4:4:1. The dielectric, piezoelectric, and electromechanical coupling properties of the composites were studied. The composites with large total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric strain constant and relative permittivity, and the piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composites are independent of the dimensional variations of the piezoelectric ceramic layer. The composites with small total volume fraction of piezoelectric phase have large piezoelectric voltage constant, but also large dielectric loss. The composite with gradually increased dimension of piezoelectric ceramic layer has the smallest dielectric loss, and that with the gradually increased dimension of matrix layer has the largest piezoelectric voltage constant. The novel piezoelectric composites show potential applications in fabricating ultrasonic transducers with varied surface vibration amplitude of the transducer

  4. Complex Nonlinearity Chaos, Phase Transitions, Topology Change and Path Integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Ivancevic, Vladimir G

    2008-01-01

    Complex Nonlinearity: Chaos, Phase Transitions, Topology Change and Path Integrals is a book about prediction & control of general nonlinear and chaotic dynamics of high-dimensional complex systems of various physical and non-physical nature and their underpinning geometro-topological change. The book starts with a textbook-like expose on nonlinear dynamics, attractors and chaos, both temporal and spatio-temporal, including modern techniques of chaos–control. Chapter 2 turns to the edge of chaos, in the form of phase transitions (equilibrium and non-equilibrium, oscillatory, fractal and noise-induced), as well as the related field of synergetics. While the natural stage for linear dynamics comprises of flat, Euclidean geometry (with the corresponding calculation tools from linear algebra and analysis), the natural stage for nonlinear dynamics is curved, Riemannian geometry (with the corresponding tools from nonlinear, tensor algebra and analysis). The extreme nonlinearity – chaos – corresponds to th...

  5. The role of phase change materials for the sustainable energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuta Marta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unceasing global economic development leads to continuous increase of energy demand. Considering the limited conventional resources of energy as well as impact on the environment associated with its use, it is important to focus on the rational management of energy resources and on supporting the development of new technologies related to both conventional and renewable energy resources. In a number of cases the use of phase change materials (PCMs turns out to be a reasonable solution. This paper contains a summary of well-studied and known, previously used solutions based on phase change materials as well as novel possibilities, which are under development. It has been decided to investigate this topic due to the wide range of highly effective solutions. The review is focused on selected applications of PCMs for technologies which are designed to improve energy efficiency and on PCMs used in technologies based on renewable energy sources.

  6. Development of Latent Heat Storage Phase Change Material Containing Plaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana BAJARE

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the development of latent heat storage Phase Change Material (PCM containing plaster as in passive application. Due to the phase change, these materials can store higher amounts of thermal energy than traditional building materials and can be used to add thermal inertia to lightweight constructions. It was shown that the use of PCMs have advantages stabilizing the room temperature variations during summer days, provided sufficient night ventilation is allowed. Another advantage of PCM usage is stabilized indoor temperature on the heating season. The goal of this study is to develop cement and lime based plaster containing microencapsulated PCM. The plaster is expected to be used for passive indoor applications and enhance the thermal properties of building envelope. The plaster was investigated under Scanning Electron Microscope and the mechanical, physical and thermal properties of created plaster samples were determined.

  7. Dynamically Reconfigurable Metadevice Employing Nanostructured Phase-Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhihua; Evans, Philip G; Haglund, Richard F; Valentine, Jason G

    2017-08-09

    Mastering dynamic free-space spectral control and modulation in the near-infrared (NIR) and optical regimes remains a challenging task that is hindered by the available functional materials at high frequencies. In this work, we have realized an efficient metadevice capable of spectral control by minimizing the thermal mass of a vanadium dioxide phase-change material (PCM) and placing the PCM at the feed gap of a bow-tie field antenna. The device has an experimentally measured tuning range of up to 360 nm in the NIR and a modulation depth of 33% at the resonant wavelength. The metadevice is configured for integrated and local heating, leading to faster switching and more precise spatial control compared with devices based on phase-change thin films. We envisage that the combined advantages of this device will open new opportunities for signal processing, memory, security, and holography at optical frequencies.

  8. Change in generally accepted regularity of phase transformations of quartzite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukartsev, V. A.; Kukartsev, V. V.; Chzhan, E. A.; Tynchenko, V. S.; Stupina, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    The subject of this research is phasic transformations of quartzites that are under temperature treatment to remove moisture. This technology is used in enterprises operating melting furnaces. The studies have shown that using a temperature regime consisting in heating to 800° C and holding for 2 hours, after cooling, quartzite changes its color and appears a shift in the angle of the interplanar distances of the crystal lattice by 6.6% in it. The use of a temperature treatment regime consisting in heating to 200° C and holding for 4 hours does not reveal such changes. With subsequent exposure to these samples of the temperature regime corresponding to the sintering process of the liner, the following is established. In a sample pretreated with a temperature of 800° C, at a temperature of 1550° C, a tridymite phase appears. In the sample of a 200° C pretreated with temperature, a phase of cristobalite appears without tridymite.

  9. Optimization of a phase change material wallboard for building use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznik, Frederic; Virgone, Joseph; Noel, Jean

    2008-01-01

    In construction, the use of phase change materials (PCM) allows the storage/release of energy from the solar radiation and/or internal loads. The application of such materials for lightweight construction (e.g., a wood house) makes it possible to improve thermal comfort and reduce energy consumption. A wallboard composed of a new PCM material is investigated in this paper to enhance the thermal behavior of a lightweight internal partition wall. The paper focuses on the optimization of phase change material thickness. The in-house software CODYMUR is used to optimize the PCM wallboard by the means of numerical simulations. The results show that an optimal PCM thickness exists. The optimal PCM thickness value is then calculated for use in construction

  10. Dynamics of energy storage in phase change drywall systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darkwa, K.; Kim, J.-S. [Nottingham Trent University (United Kingdom). School of the Built Environment

    2005-07-01

    Experimental evaluations of manufactured samples of laminated and randomly mixed phase change material (PCM) drywalls have been carried out and compared with numerical results. The analysis showed that the laminated PCM drywall performed thermally better. Even though there was a maximum 3% deviation of the average experimental result from the numerical values, the laminated PCM board achieved about 55% of the phase change process as against 48% for the randomly distributed drywall sample. The laminated board sample also released about 27% more latent heat than the randomly distributed type at the optimum time of 90 min thus validating previous simulation study. Given the experimental conditions and assumptions the experiment has proved that it is feasible to develop the laminated PCM technique for enhancing and minimising multi-dimensional heat transfers in drywall systems. Further practical developments are however encouraged to improve the overall level of heat transfer. (author)

  11. Heat transfer in neuron composite laminated phase-change drywall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darkwa, K.; Kim, J.S. [Nottingham Trent University (United Kingdom). School of Property and Construction

    2004-04-01

    Inadequate heat transfer and overall reduction in thermal conductivities during energy recovery are identified as the main barriers affecting the performance of a phase-change material (PCM) wallboard system. Two integrated PCM drywall systems have been evaluated numerically, and the results showed a great advantage of the laminated PCM wallboard system over the randomly mixed PCM type in terms of enhanced thermal performance and rapid heat transfer rates under a narrow temperature swing. For instance, the maximum instantaneous enhancement in heat flux obtained was between 20 and 50 per cent higher during the phase change process, with up to about 18 per cent more heat storage and release capacity. However, experimental evaluation is required for validation and development. (author)

  12. Optimization of a phase change material wallboard for building use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznik, Frederic; Virgone, Joseph [Thermal Sciences Center of Lyon, CNRS, UMR 5008, INSA de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Bat Freyssinet, 40 Rue des Arts, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Noel, Jean [Free-lance Scientific Software Developer, 15 Place Carnot, 69002 Lyon (France)

    2008-08-15

    In construction, the use of phase change materials (PCM) allows the storage/release of energy from the solar radiation and/or internal loads. The application of such materials for lightweight construction (e.g., a wood house) makes it possible to improve thermal comfort and reduce energy consumption. A wallboard composed of a new PCM material is investigated in this paper to enhance the thermal behavior of a lightweight internal partition wall. The paper focuses on the optimization of phase change material thickness. The in-house software CODYMUR is used to optimize the PCM wallboard by the means of numerical simulations. The results show that an optimal PCM thickness exists. The optimal PCM thickness value is then calculated for use in construction. (author)

  13. Round-Robin Test of Paraffin Phase-Change Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidi, S.; Mehling, H.; Hemberger, F.; Haussmann, Th.; Laube, A.

    2015-11-01

    A round-robin test between three institutes was performed on a paraffin phase-change material (PCM) in the context of the German quality association for phase-change materials. The aim of the quality association is to define quality and test specifications for PCMs and to award certificates for successfully tested materials. To ensure the reproducibility and comparability of the measurements performed at different institutes using different measuring methods, a round-robin test was performed. The sample was unknown. The four methods used by the three participating institutes in the round-robin test were differential scanning calorimetry, Calvet calorimetry and three-layer calorimetry. Additionally, T-history measurements were made. The aim of the measurements was the determination of the enthalpy as a function of temperature. The results achieved following defined test specifications are in excellent agreement.

  14. Mass transport aspects of polymer electrolyte fuel cells under two-phase flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, D.

    2007-03-15

    This well-illustrated, comprehensive dissertation by Dr. Ing. Denis Kramer takes an in-depth look at polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) and the possibilities for their application. First of all, the operating principles of polymer electrolyte fuel cells are described and discussed, whereby thermodynamics aspects and loss mechanisms are examined. The mass transport diagnostics made with respect to the function of the cells are discussed. Field flow geometry, gas diffusion layers and, amongst other things, liquid distribution, the influence of flow direction and the low-frequency behaviour of air-fed PEFCs are discussed. Direct methanol fuel cells are examined, as are the materials chosen. The documentation includes comprehensive mathematical and graphical representations of the mechanisms involved.

  15. Conducting polymers doped with a mineral phase: structural and electrical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González, C P; Montaño, A M; Estrada, S; Ortiz, C

    2013-01-01

    This work reports the results obtained of a series of novel doped conducting polymers (CPs) of polyaniline/hematite (PANI/HEM), which were synthesized in acidic aqueous solution by the in situ chemical oxidative polymerization, using ammonium peroxydisulfate as oxidant reagent. The synthesis was carried out with 20, 40 y 60 % (weight percent) contents of hematite (HEM) at 8 and 14 h of polymerization times (tP). These composites were structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). An electrochemical analysis was made by Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results of this study allow to evaluate the influence of hematite on the improvement of the structural properties and in the increase of the electric conductivity (sac) of the doped polymers compared to CPs without dopant agents

  16. Microencapsulated Phase-Change Materials For Storage Of Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes research on engineering issues related to storage and transport of heat in slurries containing phase-change materials in microscopic capsules. Specific goal of project to develop lightweight, compact, heat-management systems used safely in inhabited areas of spacecraft. Further development of obvious potential of technology expected to lead to commercialization and use in aircraft, electronic equipment, machinery, industrial processes, and other sytems in which requirements for management of heat compete with severe restrictions on weight or volume.

  17. Portable Thermoelectric Power Generator Coupled with Phase Change Material

    OpenAIRE

    Lim Chong C.; Al-Kayiem Hussain H.; Sing Chin Y.

    2014-01-01

    Solar is the intermittent source of renewable energy and all thermal solar systems having a setback on non-functioning during the night and cloudy environment. This paper presents alternative solution for power generation using thermoelectric which is the direct conversion of temperature gradient of hot side and cold side of thermoelectric material to electric voltage. Phase change material with latent heat effect would help to prolong the temperature gradient across thermoelectric material f...

  18. Innovative Phase Change Approach for Significant Energy Savings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    related to the production, use, transmission , storage, control, or conservation of energy that will – (A) reduce the need for additional energy supplies...Conditions set for operation were: a. The computer with the broadband wireless card is to be used for data collection, transmission and...FINAL REPORT Innovative Phase Change Approach for Significant Energy Savings ESTCP Project EW-201138 SEPTEMBER 2016 Dr. Aly H Shaaban Applied

  19. Study of large nonlinear change phase in Hibiscus Sabdariffa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo-Durán, M.; Alvarado-Méndez, E.; Andrade-Lucio, J. A.; Rojas-Laguna, R.; Vázquez-Guevara, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    High intensities electromagnetic energy interacting with organic media gives rise to nonlinear optical effects. Hibiscus Sabdariffa is a flower whose concentrated solution presents interesting nonlinear optical properties. This organic material shows an important self-phase modulation with changes bigger than 2π. We present a diffraction ring patterns study of the Hibiscus Sabdariffa solution. Numerical results of transmittance, with refraction and simultaneous absorption, are shown.

  20. Phase change - memory materials - composition, structure, and properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frumar, M.; Frumarová, Božena; Wágner, T.; Hrdlička, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 18, suppl.1 (2007), S169-S174 ISSN 0957-4522. [International Conference on Optical and Optoelectronic Properties of Materials and Applications 2006. Darwin, 16.06.2006-20.06.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/0627 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : phase change memory Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.947, year: 2007

  1. Compressive and flexural strength of high strength phase change mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Qingyao; Fang, Changle

    2018-04-01

    High-strength cement produces a lot of hydration heat when hydrated, it will usually lead to thermal cracks. Phase change materials (PCM) are very potential thermal storage materials. Utilize PCM can help reduce the hydration heat. Research shows that apply suitable amount of PCM has a significant effect on improving the compressive strength of cement mortar, and can also improve the flexural strength to some extent.

  2. Phase change induced by polypyrrole in iron-oxide polypyrrole ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    polymer. Polypyrrole, one of the conducting polymers, has received lot of attention in the preparation of nanocomposites due to its high stability in conducting oxidized form (Partch et al 1991; Huang and Matijevic. 1995; Maeda and Armes 1995). Nanocomposite materials based on nanosized magnetic materials have been ...

  3. Functionalized polymer-based spherical activated carbon for liquid and gas phase applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrage, Christian; Modrow, Antje; Fichtner, Sven; Giebelhausen, Jann Michael; Boehringer, Bertram

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-based spherical activated carbon (PBSAC) can be functionalized through the integration of reactive compounds. This offers new fields of applications for this adsorbent material. Impregnated PBSAC can be used as broadband sorbent material for respiratory protection, and for removal of certain metals from water, while the integration of nitrogen leads to a material suitable for the clean-up of gases. Functionalization through oxidation or integration of nitrogen atoms enables the concentration of valuable resources like uranium or gold.

  4. Preparation and Characterization of Silicone Liquid Core/Polymer Shell Microcapsules via Internal Phase Separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Lidia; Kostrzewska, Malgorzata; Ma, Baoguang

    2014-01-01

    Microcapsules with a silicone liquid core surrounded by a polymeric shell were synthesisedthrough the controlled phase separation. The dispersed silicone phase consisted of the shellpolymer PMMA, a good solvent for the PMMA (dichloromethane, DCM) and a poor solvent(methylhydrosiloxane dimethylsil......Microcapsules with a silicone liquid core surrounded by a polymeric shell were synthesisedthrough the controlled phase separation. The dispersed silicone phase consisted of the shellpolymer PMMA, a good solvent for the PMMA (dichloromethane, DCM) and a poor solvent...

  5. Properties of n-eicosane-filled microcapsules with different morphology. Phase Change Materials studied by positron spectroscopy and complementary methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zgardzińska, B., E-mail: bozena.zgardzinska@poczta.umcs.lublin.pl [Department of Nuclear Methods, Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Pl. M. Curie-Sklodowskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Filipek, M. [Department of Nuclear Methods, Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Pl. M. Curie-Sklodowskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Fortuniak, W. [Center of Molecular and Macromolecular Studies, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sienkiewicza 112, 90-363 Łódź (Poland); Mroczek, P. [Department of Geoecology and Palaeogeography, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Spatial Management, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Al. Kraśnicka 2cd, 20-718 Lublin (Poland)

    2016-07-01

    The Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) was used to investigate properties of selected Phase Change Materials (PCMs) as a function of temperature from 123 K to 333 K. Three different PCM microcapsules investigated in this work were built of n-eicosane filling and a siloxane polymer as a shell material. It has been found that the properties of ortho-positronium (o-Ps) annihilating in n-eicosane filler depend on the microcapsule morphology. In the samples where the whole interior is composed of n-eicosane and the polymer forms the outer shell only, the n-eicosane behaves like a neat macroscopic sample. In the microcapsules containing the network of polymer threads inside the globule, n-eicosane shows no rise of o-Ps intensity with time which is typical for all pure alkanes. For this morphology, the melting point of n-eicosane is preceded by the 4 K wide temperature range, where the structure resembling the rotator phase is observed (rotator phase appears in neat even-numbered alkanes with carbon chain over 20 atoms). Supplementary data were obtained by the DSC method. SEM images confirmed the morphological differentiation of microcapsules. Low temperature (close to liquid nitrogen) destroys the structure of microcapsules, particularly their outer shell. - Highlights: • Polymer-alkane microcapsules were synthesized with different morphology. • Morphological diversity of microcapsules is reflected in the parameters of the PALS. • PALS show the effect of spatial limitations on the formation of lamellar structure. • PALS is a new way to determine the percentage of microcapsules components.

  6. Forced Ion Migration for Chalcogenide Phase Change Memory Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kristy A (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Non-volatile memory devices with two stacked layers of chalcogenide materials comprising the active memory device have been investigated for their potential as phase-change memories. The devices tested included GeTe/SnTe, Ge2Se3/SnTe, and Ge2Se3/SnSe stacks. All devices exhibited resistance switching behavior. The polarity of the applied voltage with respect to the SnTe or SnSe layer was critical to the memory switching properties, due to the electric field induced movement of either Sn or Te into the Ge-chalcogenide layer. One embodiment of the invention is a device comprising a stack of chalcogenide-containing layers which exhibit phase-change switching only after a reverse polarity voltage potential is applied across the stack causing ion movement into an adjacent layer and thus "activating" the device to act as a phase-change random access memory device or a reconfigurable electronics device when the applied voltage potential is returned to the normal polarity. Another embodiment of the invention is a device that is capable of exhibiting more than two data states.

  7. Polymer Electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinan, Daniel T.; Balsara, Nitash P.

    2013-07-01

    This review article covers applications in which polymer electrolytes are used: lithium batteries, fuel cells, and water desalination. The ideas of electrochemical potential, salt activity, and ion transport are presented in the context of these applications. Potential is defined, and we show how a cell potential measurement can be used to ascertain salt activity. The transport parameters needed to fully specify a binary electrolyte (salt + solvent) are presented. We define five fundamentally different types of homogeneous electrolytes: type I (classical liquid electrolytes), type II (gel electrolytes), type III (dry polymer electrolytes), type IV (dry single-ion-conducting polymer electrolytes), and type V (solvated single-ion-conducting polymer electrolytes). Typical values of transport parameters are provided for all types of electrolytes. Comparison among the values provides insight into the transport mechanisms occurring in polymer electrolytes. It is desirable to decouple the mechanical properties of polymer electrolyte membranes from the ionic conductivity. One way to accomplish this is through the development of microphase-separated polymers, wherein one of the microphases conducts ions while the other enhances the mechanical rigidity of the heterogeneous polymer electrolyte. We cover all three types of conducting polymer electrolyte phases (types III, IV, and V). We present a simple framework that relates the transport parameters of heterogeneous electrolytes to homogeneous analogs. We conclude by discussing electrochemical stability of electrolytes and the effects of water contamination because of their relevance to applications such as lithium ion batteries.

  8. Drag reduction by polymer addition in single and two-phase gas-liquid flows in pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizotto, Vanessa Cristina; Paes, Diogo Melo; Franca, Fernando de Almeida [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Centro de Estudos de Petroleo. LabPetro]. E-mails: vanessa@cepetro.unicamp.br; diogopaes10@hotmail.com; Sabadini, Edvaldo [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mails: sabadini@iqm.unicamp.br; ffranca@fem.unicamp.br

    2008-07-01

    Turbulence mechanisms, as the eddies formation frequency and size, promote energy dissipation that appears as pressure drop in pipe flows. Adding minute amounts of polymers - ppm - of high molecular weight to the solution can lead to the reduction of the viscous dissipation. The formed macromolecules interact with the eddies, cause the eddies coherence breakdown, damp the energy transport and reduces the pressure drop. This phenomenon is known as the hydrodynamic drag reduction (DR, for short). Thus, for a given pipe flow rate there is decrease in pressure head, which is a desired operating strategy when transporting liquids. Studies on the hydrodynamic drag reduction in polymeric systems have been carried out in collaboration by the Chemistry Institute and the Petroleum Laboratory - LabPetro, UNICAMP. These studies have allowed microscopic approaches to the engineering scales, tackling the most usual processes - single phase flows, as well as gas-liquid two-phase flows in pipelines, which are quite common in the chemical and the petroleum industries. Tests conducted in the Chemistry Institute comprised over-the-bench experimentations made with a rotational double-gap type rheometer. These quick performed tests used small amount of polymers, and provided information on the additive concentration, the drag reduction and the solution mechanical stability along a turbulent shearing process. The results indicated that 17% is the limiting drag reduction achieved when a 2 ppm aqueous solution of polyacrylamide - PAM - was tested. These tests, besides giving preliminary estimations, are limited in terms of engineering application due to the low shearing rates applied by the viscometer. The tests performed at LabPetro comprised pressure drop measurements in actual pipe flows, both water single and air-water two-phase flows, using the previous knowledge acquired with the viscometer tests. In the former case, the Prandtl-von Karman map has been drawn to show the %DR in terms

  9. Electronic transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckas, Jennifer Maria

    2012-09-14

    Phase change materials combine a pronounced contrast in resistivity and reflectivity between their disordered amorphous and ordered crystalline state with very fast crystallization kinetics. Due to this exceptional combination of properties phase-change materials find broad application in non-volatile optical memories such as CD, DVD or Bluray Disc. Furthermore, this class of materials demonstrates remarkable electrical transport phenomena in their disordered state, which have shown to be crucial for their application in electronic storage devices. The threshold switching phenomenon denotes the sudden decrease in resistivity beyond a critical electrical threshold field. The threshold switching phenomenon facilitates the phase transitions at practical small voltages. Below this threshold the amorphous state resistivity is thermally activated and is observed to increase with time. This effect known as resistance drift seriously hampers the development of multi-level storage devices. Hence, understanding the physical origins of threshold switching and resistance drift phenomena is crucial to improve non-volatile phase-change memories. Even though both phenomena are often attributed to localized defect states in the band gap, the defect state density in amorphous phase-change materials has remained poorly studied. Starting from a brief introduction of the physics of phase-change materials this thesis summarizes the most important models behind electrical switching and resistance drift with the aim to discuss the role of localized defect states. The centerpiece of this thesis is the investigation of defects state densities in different amorphous phase-change materials and electrical switching chalcogenides. On the basis of Modulated Photo Current (MPC) Experiments and Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy, a sophisticated band model for the disordered phase of the binary phase-change alloy GeTe has been developed. By this direct experimental approach the band-model for a

  10. Electronic transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckas, Jennifer Maria

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials combine a pronounced contrast in resistivity and reflectivity between their disordered amorphous and ordered crystalline state with very fast crystallization kinetics. Due to this exceptional combination of properties phase-change materials find broad application in non-volatile optical memories such as CD, DVD or Bluray Disc. Furthermore, this class of materials demonstrates remarkable electrical transport phenomena in their disordered state, which have shown to be crucial for their application in electronic storage devices. The threshold switching phenomenon denotes the sudden decrease in resistivity beyond a critical electrical threshold field. The threshold switching phenomenon facilitates the phase transitions at practical small voltages. Below this threshold the amorphous state resistivity is thermally activated and is observed to increase with time. This effect known as resistance drift seriously hampers the development of multi-level storage devices. Hence, understanding the physical origins of threshold switching and resistance drift phenomena is crucial to improve non-volatile phase-change memories. Even though both phenomena are often attributed to localized defect states in the band gap, the defect state density in amorphous phase-change materials has remained poorly studied. Starting from a brief introduction of the physics of phase-change materials this thesis summarizes the most important models behind electrical switching and resistance drift with the aim to discuss the role of localized defect states. The centerpiece of this thesis is the investigation of defects state densities in different amorphous phase-change materials and electrical switching chalcogenides. On the basis of Modulated Photo Current (MPC) Experiments and Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy, a sophisticated band model for the disordered phase of the binary phase-change alloy GeTe has been developed. By this direct experimental approach the band-model for a

  11. A soluble star-shaped silsesquioxane-cored polymer-towards novel stabilization of pH-dependent high internal phase emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yuxiu; Peng, Jun; Xu, Kai; Gao, Shuxi; Gui, Xuefeng; Liang, Shengyuan; Sun, Longfeng; Chen, Mingcai

    2017-08-30

    A well-defined pH-responsive star-shaped polymer containing poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMA) arms and a cage-like methacryloxypropyl silsesquioxane (CMSQ-T 10 ) core was used as an interfacial stabilizer for emulsions consisting of m-xylene and water. We explored the properties of the CMSQ/PDMA star-shaped polymer using the characteristic results of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography (SEC), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and zeta potential and conductivity measurements. The interfacial tension results showed that the CMSQ/PDMA star-shaped polymer reduced the interfacial tension between water and oil in a pH-dependent manner. Gelled high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) including o/w and w/o types were formed in the pH ranges of 1.2-5.8 and 9.1-12.3 with the CMSQ/PDMA star-shaped polymer as a stabilizer, when the oil fractions were 80-90 vol% and 10-20 vol%, respectively. The soluble star-shaped polymer aggregated spontaneously to form a microgel that adsorbed to the two immiscible phases. Images of the fluorescently labeled polymers demonstrated that there was a star-shaped polymer in the continuous phase, and the non-Pickering stabilization based on the percolating network of the star-shaped polymer also contributed to the stabilization of the HIPE. This pH-dependent HIPE was prepared with a novel stabilization mechanism consisting of microgel adsorption and non-Pickering stabilization. Moreover, the preparation of HIPEs provided the possibility of their application in porous materials and responsive materials.

  12. Phase change materials and the perception of wetness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiest, Wouter M Bergmann; Kosters, N Dolfine; Kappers, Astrid M L; Daanen, Hein A M

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are increasingly incorporated in textiles in order to serve as a thermal buffer when humans change from a hot to a cold environment and the reverse. Due to the absence of wetness sensors in the skin, cooling of the skin may be perceived as a sensation of wetness instead of cold. In order to investigate if this phenomenon occurs when manipulating textiles, nine subjects were asked to touch or manipulate PCM-treated and untreated fabrics. In 75% of the cases, the subjects indicated that the treated material felt wetter than the untreated material independent of the way the textiles were manipulated. We conclude that incorporating PCMs in textiles may lead to a feeling of wetness which might be uncomfortable. Therefore, we recommend investigating a change in cooling properties to minimise this feeling. This article describes a psychophysical experiment into the sensation of wetness of textiles treated with phase change materials. It was found that in 75% of the cases, subjects found the treated fabric to feel wetter than the untreated. This may affect the comfort of wearing clothes made of these textiles.

  13. Recent progresses and achievements in photovoltaic-phase change material technology: A review with special treatment on photovoltaic thermal-phase change material systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, M.M.; Pandey, A.K.; Hasanuzzaman, M.; Rahim, N.A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Broad summary of phase change materials based cooling for photovoltaic modules. • Compendium on phase change materials that are mostly used in photovoltaic systems. • Extension of heat availability period by 75–100% with phase change material. • Heat storage potential improves by 33–50% more with phase change material. • Future trend and move in photovoltaic thermal research. - Abstract: This communication lays out an appraisal on the recent works of phase change materials based thermal management techniques for photovoltaic systems with special focus on the so called photovoltaic thermal-phase change material system. Attempt has also been made to draw wide-ranging classification of both photovoltaic and photovoltaic thermal systems and their conventional cooling or heat harvesting methods developed so far so that feasible phase change materials application area in these systems can be pointed out. In addition, a brief literature on phase change materials with particular focus on their solar application has also been presented. Overview of the researches and studies establish that using phase change materials for photovoltaic thermal control is technically viable if some issues like thermal conductivity or phase stability are properly addressed. The photovoltaic thermal-phase change material systems are found to offer 33% (maximum 50%) more heat storage potential than the conventional photovoltaic-thermal water system and that with 75–100% extended heat availability period and around 9% escalation in output. Reduction in temperature attained with photovoltaic thermal-phase change material system is better than that with regular photovoltaic-thermal water system, too. Studies also show the potential of another emerging technology of photovoltaic thermal-microencapsulated phase change material system that makes use of microencapsulated phase change materials in thermal regulation. Future focus areas on photovoltaic thermal-phase change

  14. Fabrication and characterization of microencapsulated phase change material with low supercooling for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Xiaofen; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xingxiang; Shi, Haifeng

    2014-01-01

    Microencapsulated phase change material with a low supercooling degree is one of the increasing important researches as well as industrial application for thermal energy storage. This study develops a novel and low supercooling microencapsulated n-octadecane (MicroC18) with n-octadecyl methacrylate (ODMA)–methacrylic acid (MAA) copolymer as shell using suspension-like polymerization. The fabrication and properties of MicroC18 were characterized by using a field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), particle size distribution analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The MicroC18 with spherical shapes and an average diameter of 1.60–1.68 μm are fabricated. The onset crystallizing temperatures of MicroC18 are only 4 °C below that of n-octadecane. The unique copolymer shell has a significant impact on the low supercooling of MicroC18. The n-octadecane in all of the samples crystalizes by heterogeneous nucleation. The content of n-octadecane in the microcapsules is low; however, the microcapsules still exhibit high enthalpy through the contribution of the shells. At a monomers/n-octadecane mass ratio is 2:1, as used in the recipes, the MicroC18 with highest phase change enthalpy was obtained. The temperature of thermal resistant of MicroC18 is approximately 235.6 °C, which is affected by the thickness of the polymer shell. - Highlights: • Microencapsulated n-octadecane with comb-like copolymer shell has low supercooling. • The unique shell plays a significant role in suppressing supercooling. • The types of cross-linker affect morphologies and heat enthalpies of microcapsules. • Microcapsules exhibit high phase change enthalpies and thermal stabilities

  15. Effects of Microencapsulated Phase Change Material (MPCM) on Critical Heat Flux in Pool Boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Dae; Kim, Seong Man; Kang, Sarah; Lee, Seung Won; Seo, Han; Bang, In Cheol

    2011-01-01

    Thermal power is limited by critical heat flux (CHF) in the nuclear power plant. And the in-vessel retention by external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC) is applied in some nuclear power plants; AP600, AP1000, Loviisa and APR1400. The heat removal capacity of IVR-ERVC is also restricted by CHF. So, it is essential to get CHF margin to improve an economics and a safety of the plant. There are some typical approaches to enhance CHF: vibrating the heater or fluid, coating with porous media on the heater surface, applying an electric field. The recent study related to the CHF is focus on using the nanofluid. In this paper, the new approach was investigated by using the microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM). MPCM is the particles whose diameter is from 0.1μm to 1000μm. The MPCM consists of the core material and the shell material. The core material can be solid, liquid, gas or even the mixture. The solid paraffin is the best candidate as the core material due to its stable chemical and thermal properties. And the shell material is generally synthesized polymer of about several micrometers in thickness. The most interesting feature of the MPCM is that the latent heat associated with the solid-liquid phase change is related to the heat transfer. When the MPCM is dispersed into the carrier fluid, a kind of suspension named as microencapsulated phase change slurry (MPCS) is formed. The study on the MPCS was conducted in field of both the heat transfer fluids and energy storage media. It is inspired by the fact that the latent heat can serve distribution to the additional CHF margin. The purpose of this work is to confirm whether or not the CHF is enhanced

  16. Solid phase extraction using molecular imprinting polymers (MISPE for the determination of estrogens in surface water by HPLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane do Nascimento Bianchi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Estrogens are emerging pollutants and traditional sewage treatments unable to remove them. They are harmful to human health and to the environment. It is therefore important to evaluate the presence and concentration of estrogens in water bodies and environmental matrices. This work presents the development and application of a methodology for the determination of E1, E3, EE2 and E2 in surface waters using solid phase extraction with molecular imprinting polymers (MISPE followed by identification and quantification by HPLC-DAD. Acetonitrile and water deionized acidified with phosphoric acid pH 3 (1:1, v/v, a flow rate of 1.0 ml min-1, at 40°C and an injection volume of 5 µL. The method was validated according to the protocol ICH Q2R. Reproducibility and repeatability tests resulted in a smaller variation coefficient of 10%; the calibration curves in the concentration ranged from 1 to 20 mg L-1, with return linearity values greater than 0.99. The limits of detection and quantification were less than 1 mg L-1 and the method was satisfactory for specificity and selectivity tests using caffeine, which is often found in water bodies receiving effluent, and DES, an estrogen used in the treatment of prostate cancer. Selected samples underwent clean-up and pre-concentration treatments using solid phase extraction with commercial phase (C18 and molecularly imprinted polymers (MISPE. The analysis of MISPE extracts indicate that it is possible to obtain results with greater sensitivity and precision for analyses of complex environmental matrices, demonstrating that the developed method can be applied in complex environmental matrices.

  17. Phase transformation changes in thermocycled nickel-titanium orthodontic wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzins, David W; Roberts, Howard W

    2010-07-01

    In the oral environment, orthodontic wires will be subject to thermal fluctuations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of thermocycling on nickel-titanium (NiTi) wire phase transformations. Straight segments from single 27 and 35 degrees C copper NiTi (Ormco), Sentalloy (GAC), and Nitinol Heat Activated (3M Unitek) archwires were sectioned into 5mm segments (n=20). A control group consisted of five randomly selected non-thermocycled segments. The remaining segments were thermocycled between 5 and 55 degrees C with five randomly selected segments analyzed with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC; -100150 degrees C at 10 degrees C/min) after 1000, 5000, and 10,000 cycles. Thermal peaks were evaluated with results analyzed via ANOVA (alpha=0.05). Nitinol HA and Sentalloy did not demonstrate qualitative or quantitative phase transformation behavior differences. Significant differences were observed in some of the copper NiTi transformation temperatures, as well as the heating enthalpy with the 27 degrees C copper NiTi wires (p<0.05). Qualitatively, with increased thermocycling the extent of R-phase in the heating peaks decreased in the 35 degrees C copper NiTi, and an austenite to martensite peak shoulder developed during cooling in the 27 degrees C copper NiTi. Repeated temperature fluctuations may contribute to qualitative and quantitative phase transformation changes in some NiTi wires. Copyright 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanical aspects of allotropic phase change at the mesoscopic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valance, St.

    2007-12-01

    The prediction of the mechanical state of steel structures submit to thermo-mechanical loading must take into account consequences of allotropic phase change. Indeed, phase change induce, at least for steels, a mechanism of TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) leading to irreversible deformation even for loading less than elastic yield limit. Homogenized analytical models generally fail to achieve a correct prediction for complex loading. In order to overcome these difficulties, we present a model achieving a sharper description of the phenomenon. The mesoscopic working scale we adopt here is the grain scale size. Hence, we consider that the behaviour of each phase is homogenous in the sense of continuous media mechanic, whereas the front is explicitly described. We work both experimentally and numerically. Experimentally, we designed a test facility enabling thermo mechanical loading of the sample under partial vacuum. Acquisition of sample surface while martensitic transformation is happening leads, under some hypothesis and thanks to Digital Image Correlation, to the partial identification of area affected by transformation. Numerically, the eXtended Finite Element Method is applied for weakly discontinuous displacement fields. Used of this method needs to numerically track the transformation front -discontinuity support. In that goal, based on level set method, we develop FEM numerical scheme enabling recognition and propagation of discontinuity support. Finally, this work is complete by an approach of driving forces introduced through Eshelbian mechanics which are dual of front velocity. (author)

  19. Microencapsulated Phase Change Composite Materials for Energy Efficient Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Alexander

    This study aims to elucidate how phase change material (PCM)-composite materials can be leveraged to reduce the energy consumption of buildings and to provide cost savings to ratepayers. Phase change materials (PCMs) can store thermal energy in the form of latent heat when subjected to temperatures exceeding their melting point by undergoing a phase transition from solid to liquid state. Reversibly, PCMs can release this thermal energy when the system temperature falls below their solidification point. The goal in implementing composite PCM walls is to significantly reduce and time-shift the maximum thermal load on the building in order to reduce and smooth out the electricity demand for heating and cooling. This Ph.D. thesis aims to develop a set of thermal design methods and tools for exploring the use of PCM-composite building envelopes and for providing design rules for their practical implementation. First, detailed numerical simulations were used to show that the effective thermal conductivity of core-shell-matrix composites depended only on the volume fraction and thermal conductivity of the constituent materials. The effective medium approximation reported by Felske (2004) was in very good agreement with numerical predictions of the effective thermal conductivity. Second, a carefully validated transient thermal model was used to simulate microencapsulated PCM-composite walls subjected to diurnal or annual outdoor temperature and solar radiation flux. It was established that adding microencapsulated PCM to concrete walls both substantially reduced and delayed the thermal load on the building. Several design rules were established, most notably, (i) increasing the volume fraction of microencapsulated PCM within the wall increases the energy savings but at the potential expense of mechanical properties [1], (ii) the phase change temperature leading to the maximum energy and cost savings should equal the desired indoor temperature regardless of the climate

  20. Gas phase detection of explosives such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene by molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunte, Gudrun; Hürttlen, Jürgen; Pontius, Heike; Hartlieb, Kerstin; Krause, Horst

    2007-05-15

    Fast, reliable and inexpensive analytical techniques for trace detection of explosive components are in high demand. Our approach is to develop specific sensor coating materials based on molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). Despite the known inhibition of radical polymerisations by nitro groups and the known shrinkage of the polymer lattice during/after drying we were able to synthesize particulate MIPs by suspension polymerisation as well as thin MIP coatings by direct surface polymerisation on quartz crystal microbalances (QCM). The best method to purify the porous beads was Soxhlet extraction followed by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SFE with sc-CO2) at mild conditions (150 bar, 50 degrees C). At least a removal of >99.7% of the template was achieved. Performance tests of TNT imprinted polymer beads showed that acrylamide (AA) and more pronounced also methacrylic acid (MAA) possessed an enhanced adsorption tendency for gaseous TNT. An adsorption of 2,4-DNT, dinitrotoluene, by these MIPs was not detected. Using 2,4-DNT as template and methacrylamide, MAAM, a positive imprint effect for gaseous 2,4-DNT was achieved with no measurable cross-sensitivity for 2,4,6-TNT. The thin MIP coatings directly synthesized on the QCMs showed thicknesses of 20 to up to 500 nm. Preliminary screening experiments were performed for five different monomers and three different solvents (acetonitrile, chloroform and dimethylformamide). Best adsorption properties for TNT vapour until now showed a PAA-MIP synthesized with chloroform. Direct measurements of the mass attachment, respectively frequency decrease of the coated QCMs during vapour treatment showed a TNT-uptake of about 150 pg per microg MIP per hour. Results look worthy for further studies.

  1. Three-dimensional nanomechanical mapping of amorphous and crystalline phase transitions in phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishin, Ilja; Huey, Bryan D; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2013-11-13

    The nanostructure of micrometer-sized domains (bits) in phase-change materials (PCM) that undergo switching between amorphous and crystalline phases plays a key role in the performance of optical PCM-based memories. Here, we explore the dynamics of such phase transitions by mapping PCM nanostructures in three dimensions with nanoscale resolution by combining precision Ar ion beam cross-sectional polishing and nanomechanical ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM) mapping. Surface and bulk phase changes of laser written submicrometer to micrometer sized amorphous-to-crystalline (SET) and crystalline-to-amorphous (RESET) bits in chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 PCM are observed with 10-20 nm lateral and 4 nm depth resolution. UFM mapping shows that the Young's moduli of crystalline SET bits exceed the moduli of amorphous areas by 11 ± 2%, with crystalline content extending from a few nanometers to 50 nm in depth depending on the energy of the switching pulses. The RESET bits written with 50 ps pulses reveal shallower depth penetration and show 30-50 nm lateral and few nanometer vertical wavelike topography that is anticorrelated with the elastic modulus distribution. Reverse switching of amorphous RESET bits results in the full recovery of subsurface nanomechanical properties accompanied with only partial topography recovery, resulting in surface corrugations attributed to quenching. This precision sectioning and nanomechanical mapping approach could be applicable to a wide range of amorphous, nanocrystalline, and glass-forming materials for 3D nanomechanical mapping of amorphous-crystalline transitions.

  2. Stable Biodegradable Polymers for Delivery of Both Polar and Non-Polar Drugs. Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    containing hydromorphone hydrochloride (HMh). In two, containing HMh at 25 and 50% (w/w), the lactide to glycolide ratio of the polymer was 85:15...semisynthetic opioid analgesic which meets these criteria. It is sold as the hydrochloride under the trade name Dilaudid. A dose of 1.5 mg can achieve a 50...Numorphan) 1.0-1.1 Slightly shorter Levorphanol tartrate (Levo-Dromoran) 2.0-2.3 Same Butorphanol tartrate (Stadol) 1.5-2.5 Same Methadone HC1 (Dolophine

  3. Multifunctional Metal/Polymer Composite Fiber for Space Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Small Business Innovation Research Phase II Program, Syscom Technology, Inc. will implement an integrated processing scheme to fabricate a conductive...

  4. Multifunctional Metal/Polymer Composite Fiber for Space Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Small Business Innovation Research Phase I Program, Syscom Technology, Inc. (STI) will fabricate a metallized multifunctional composite fiber from a...

  5. In vitro bioactivity of polymer matrices reinforced with a bioactive glass phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oréfice Rodrigo L.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Composites that can mimic the in vitro bioactive behavior of bioactive glasses were designed to fulfill two main features of bioactive glasses that are responsible for their high bond-to-bone rates: (1 capability of providing ions such as calcium and phosphate to the nearby environment and (2 ideal surface structure that allows fast heterogeneous precipitation of hydroxy-carbonate-apatite (HCA. The novel composites were prepared by incorporating bioactive glass particles into polymer matrices. The in vitro bioactivity test was performed by introducing samples into a buffered solution as well as into a simulated body fluid solution. FTIR was used to evaluate the kinetics of HCA (hydroxy-carbonate-apatite precipitation. The results showed that the obtained composites can supply ions, such as silicates and phosphates in rates and concentrations comparable or superior than bulk bioactive glasses. Moreover, the surface chemistry of the composites was altered to mimic the surface of bioactive glasses. It was demonstrated that the in vitro bioactivity of the composites was enhanced by chemically modifying polymer surfaces through the introduction of special alkoxysilane groups.

  6. Liquid carry-over in an injection moulded all-polymer chip system for immiscible phase magnetic bead-based solid-phase extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kistrup, Kasper; Sørensen, Karen Skotte; Wolff, Anders

    2014-01-01

    We present an all-polymer, single-use microfluidic chip system produced by injection moulding and bonded by ultrasonic welding. Both techniques are compatible with low-cost industrial mass-production. The chip is produced for magnetic bead-based solid-phase extraction facilitated by immiscible......-binding buffer for nucleic acid extraction (0.1 (v/v)% Triton X-100 in 5 M guanidine hydrochloride). A linear relationship was found between the liquid carry-over and mass of magnetic beads used. Interestingly, similar average carry-overs of 1.74(8) nL/µg and 1.72(14) nL/µg were found for Milli-Q water and lysis...

  7. Research on the Changes to the Lipid/Polymer Membrane Used in the Acidic Bitterness Sensor Caused by Preconditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhei Harada

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A taste sensor that uses lipid/polymer membranes can evaluate aftertastes felt by humans using Change in membrane Potential caused by Adsorption (CPA measurements. The sensor membrane for evaluating bitterness, which is caused by acidic bitter substances such as iso-alpha acid contained in beer, needs an immersion process in monosodium glutamate (MSG solution, called “MSG preconditioning”. However, what happens to the lipid/polymer membrane during MSG preconditioning is not clear. Therefore, we carried out three experiments to investigate the changes in the lipid/polymer membrane caused by the MSG preconditioning, i.e., measurements of the taste sensor, measurements of the amount of the bitterness substance adsorbed onto the membrane and measurements of the contact angle of the membrane surface. The CPA values increased as the preconditioning process progressed, and became stable after 3 d of preconditioning. The response potentials to the reference solution showed the same tendency of the CPA value change during the preconditioning period. The contact angle of the lipid/polymer membrane surface decreased after 7 d of MSG preconditioning; in short, the surface of the lipid/polymer membrane became hydrophilic during MSG preconditioning. The amount of adsorbed iso-alpha acid was increased until 5 d preconditioning, and then it decreased. In this study, we revealed that the CPA values increased with the progress of MSG preconditioning in spite of the decrease of the amount of iso-alpha acid adsorbed onto the lipid/polymer membrane, and it was indicated that the CPA values increase because the sensor sensitivity was improved by the MSG preconditioning.

  8. Screening of a Combinatorial Library of Organic Polymers for the Solid-Phase Extraction of Patulin from Apple Juice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannoli, Cristina; Spano, Giulia; Di Nardo, Fabio; Anfossi, Laura; Baggiani, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Patulin is a water-soluble mycotoxin produced by several species of fungi. Governmental bodies have placed it under scrutiny for its potential negative health effects, and maximum residue limits are fixed in specific food matrices to protect consumers’ health. Confirmatory analysis of patulin in complex food matrices can be a difficult task, and sample clean-up treatments are frequently necessary before instrumental analyses. With the aim of simplifying the clean-up step, we prepared a 256-member combinatorial polymeric library based on 16 functional monomers, four cross-linkers and four different porogenic solvents. The library was screened for the binding towards patulin in different media (acetonitrile and citrate buffer at pH 3.2), with the goal of identifying polymer formulations with good binding properties towards the target compound. As a proof of concept, a methacrylic acid-co-pentaerithrytole tetraacrylate polymer prepared in chloroform was successfully used as a solid-phase extraction material for the clean-up and extraction of patulin from apple juice. Clean chromatographic patterns and acceptable recoveries were obtained for juice spiked with patulin at concentration levels of 25 (64 ± 12%), 50 (83 ± 5.6%) and 100 μg L−1 (76 ± 4.5%). The within-day and between-day reproducibility evaluated at a concentration level of 25 μg L−1 were 5.6 and 7.6%, respectively. PMID:28531103

  9. All-polymer bistable resistive memory device based on nanoscale phase-separated PCBM-ferroelectric blends

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Yasser

    2012-11-21

    All polymer nonvolatile bistable memory devices are fabricated from blends of ferroelectric poly(vinylidenefluoride-trifluoroethylene (P(VDF-TrFE)) and n-type semiconducting [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The nanoscale phase separated films consist of PCBM domains that extend from bottom to top electrode, surrounded by a ferroelectric P(VDF-TrFE) matrix. Highly conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) polymer electrodes are used to engineer band offsets at the interfaces. The devices display resistive switching behavior due to modulation of this injection barrier. With careful optimization of the solvent and processing conditions, it is possible to spin cast very smooth blend films (Rrms ≈ 7.94 nm) and with good reproducibility. The devices exhibit high Ion/I off ratios (≈3 × 103), low read voltages (≈5 V), excellent dielectric response at high frequencies (Ïμr ≈ 8.3 at 1 MHz), and excellent retention characteristics up to 10 000 s. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Calcium carbonate interaction analysis in polypropylene compounds and their impact on the formation of beta crystalline phase of this polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakahara, Rogerio M.; Hui, Wang S.

    2011-01-01

    The insertion of calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) in polypropylene compound is a thoroughly known technique widely studied in the academic area and in the industry. Its wide application is due, mainly, to increase mechanical properties with low manufacturing cost. These improvements in this polymer make it more versatile and competitive compared to other expensive polymers. In this study, the incorporation of four types of CaCO3 from the same manufacturer were compared and the focus was on the size of this mineral filler. Furthermore, it was analyzed the interaction of graphitized polypropylene with maleic anhydride (PP-g-MA) in the same samples. All these samples were analyzed by WAXS and SEM. The physical properties of tensile strength and impact were also analyzed. It was observed from this study that the smallest CaCO3 produced with PP-g-MA resulted in better physical properties with the formation of a crystalline phase beta, as originally studied by other authors using other raw materials. (author)

  11. Thermal analysis of a double layer phase change material floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Xing; Zhang Xiaosong

    2011-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) can be used to shift the cooling or heating load from the peak period to the off-peak period. In this paper, a new double layer phase change material (PCM) floor is put forward. The two layers of PCM have different melting temperature. The system is used to store heat or cold energy in the off-peak period and release them in the peak period during heating or cooling. According to the numerical model built in this paper, the thermal performances of the floor are analyzed. The results show that the optimal melting temperatures of PCMs exist. The fluctuations of the floor surface temperatures and the heat fluxes will be reduced and the system still can provide a certain amount of heat or cold energy after the heat pump or chiller has been turned off for a long time. Compared to the floor without PCM, the energy released by the floor with PCM in peak period will be increased by 41.1% and 37.9% during heating and cooling when the heat of fusion of PCM is 150 kJ/kg. - Highlights: → A new double layer phase change material floor is put forward. → The system is used to store heat or cold energy in the off-peak period and release them in the peak period during heating or cooling. → The optimal melting temperatures of PCMs in the system exist. → The heat and cold energy released by the floor with PCM in peak period can be increased by 41.1% and 37.9%.

  12. Heat transfer characteristics of building walls using phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsyad, M.; Pasek, A. D.; Indartono, Y. S.; Pratomo, A. W.

    2017-03-01

    Minimizing energy consumption in air conditioning system can be done with reducing the cooling load in a room. Heat from solar radiation which passes through the wall increases the cooling load. Utilization of phase change material on walls is expected to decrease the heat rate by storing energy when the phase change process takes place. The stored energy is released when the ambient temperature is low. Temperature differences at noon and evening can be utilized as discharging and charging cycles. This study examines the characteristics of heat transfer in walls using phase change material (PCM) in the form of encapsulation and using the sleeve as well. Heat transfer of bricks containing encapsulated PCM, tested the storage and released the heat on the walls of the building models were evaluated in this study. Experiments of heat transfer on brick consist of time that is needed for heat transfer and thermal conductivity test as well. Experiments were conducted on a wall coated by PCM which was exposed on a day and night cycle to analyze the heat storage and heat release. PCM used in these experiments was coconut oil. The measured parameter is the temperature at some points in the brick, walls and ambient temperature as well. The results showed that the use of encapsulation on an empty brick can increase the time for thermal heat transfer. Thermal conductivity values of a brick containing encapsulated PCM was lower than hollow bricks, where each value was 1.3 W/m.K and 1.6 W/m.K. While the process of heat absorption takes place from 7:00 am to 06:00 pm, and the release of heat runs from 10:00 pm to 7:00 am. The use of this PCM layer can reduce the surface temperature of the walls of an average of 2°C and slows the heat into the room.

  13. Polymeric compositions incorporating polyethylene glycol as a phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyer, Ival O.; Griffen, Charles W.

    1989-01-01

    A polymeric composition comprising a polymeric material and polyethylene glycol or end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material, said polyethylene glycol and said end-capped polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight greater than about 400 and a heat of fusion greater than about 30 cal/g; the composition is useful in making molded and/or coated materials such as flooring, tiles, wall panels and the like; paints containing polyethylene glycols or end-capped polyethylene glycols are also disclosed.

  14. Thermal energy storage using phase change materials fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischer, Amy S

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the use of solid‐liquid phase change materials to store significant amounts of energy in the latent heat of fusion. The proper selection of materials for different applications is covered in detail, as is the use of high conductivity additives to enhance thermal diffusivity. Dr. Fleischer explores how applications of PCMS have expanded over the past 10 years to include the development of high efficiency building materials to reduce heating and cooling needs, smart material design for clothing, portable electronic systems thermal management, solar thermal power plant design and many others. Additional future research directions and challenges are also discussed.

  15. Multistate and phase change selection in constitutional multivalent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboiu, Mihail

    2012-01-01

    Molecular architectures and materials can be constitutionally self-sorted in the presence of different biomolecular targets or external physical stimuli or chemical effectors, thus responding to an external selection pressure. The high selectivity and specificity of different bioreceptors or self-correlated internal interactions may be used to describe the complex constitutional behaviors through multistate component selection from a dynamic library. The self-selection may result in the dynamic amplification of self-optimized architectures during the phase change process. The sol-gel resolution of dynamic molecular/supramolecular libraries leads to higher self-organized constitutional hybrid materials, in which organic (supramolecular)/inorganic domains are reversibily connected.

  16. Phase change thermal storage for a solar total energy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, R. E.; Cohen, B. M.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program is being conducted on a one-tenth scale model of a high-temperature (584 K) phase-change thermal energy storage system for installation in a solar total energy test facility at Albuquerque, New Mexico, U.S.A. The thermal storage medium is anhydrous sodium hydroxide with 8% sodium nitrate. The program will produce data on the dynamic response of the system to repeated cycles of charging and discharging simulating those of the test facility. Data will be correlated with a mathematical model which will then be used in the design of the full-scale system.

  17. Ex situ remediation of polluted soils by absorptive polymers, and a comparison of slurry and two-phase partitioning bioreactors for ultimate contaminant degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomei, M. Concetta, E-mail: tomei@irsa.cnr.it [Water Research Institute, C.N.R., Via Salaria km 29.300, Monterotondo Scalo, 00015 Rome (Italy); Mosca Angelucci, Domenica [Water Research Institute, C.N.R., Via Salaria km 29.300, Monterotondo Scalo, 00015 Rome (Italy); Annesini, M. Cristina [Department of Chemical Engineering Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Daugulis, Andrew J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • We investigate absorptive polymers for ex-situ soil bioremediation. • We compare the performance of the novel technology with a slurry bioreactor. • The polymer is very effective in decontaminating the soil (77% removal in 4 h). • The polymer is readily regenerated in a two phase partitioning bioreactor. -- Abstract: The present study has provided a comparison between a conventional ex situ method for the treatment of contaminated soil, a soil slurry bioreactor, with a novel technology in which a contaminant is rapidly and effectively removed from the soil by means of absorptive polymer beads, which are then added to a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) for biodegradation of the target molecule. 4-nitrophenol (4NP) was selected as a model contaminant, being representative of a large class of xenobiotics, and the DuPont thermoplastic Hytrel™ 8206 was utilized for its extraction from soil over ranges of soil contamination level, soil moisture content, and polymer:soil ratios. Since the polymers were able to rapidly (up to 77% and 85% in 4 and 24 h respectively) and selectively remove the contaminant, the soil retained its nutrient and microflora content, which is in contrast to soil washing which can remove these valuable soil resources. After 4 h of reaction time, the TPPB system demonstrated removal efficiency four times higher (77% vs 20%) than the slurry system, with expected concomitant savings in time and energy. A volumetric removal rate of 75 mg4NP h{sup −1} L{sup −1} was obtained in the TPPB, significantly greater than the value of 1.7 obtained in the slurry bioreactor. The polymers were readily regenerated for subsequent reuse, demonstrating the versatility of the polymer-based soil treatment technology.

  18. Automated baseline change detection phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD) project is supported by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) as part of its ER&WM cross-cutting technology program in robotics. Phase 1 of the Automated Baseline Change Detection project is summarized in this topical report. The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. In support of this primary objective, there are secondary objectives to determine DOE operational inspection requirements and DOE system fielding requirements.

  19. Automated baseline change detection phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD) project is supported by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) as part of its ER ampersand WM cross-cutting technology program in robotics. Phase 1 of the Automated Baseline Change Detection project is summarized in this topical report. The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. In support of this primary objective, there are secondary objectives to determine DOE operational inspection requirements and DOE system fielding requirements

  20. Isolation of plasma membranes from the nervous system by countercurrent distribution in aqueous polymer two-phase systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Jens; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane separates the cell-interior from the cell's environment. To maintain homeostatic conditions and to enable transfer of information, the plasma membrane is equipped with a variety of different proteins such as transporters, channels, and receptors. The kind and number of plasma membrane proteins are a characteristic of each cell type. Owing to their location, plasma membrane proteins also represent a plethora of drug targets. Their importance has entailed many studies aiming at their proteomic identification and characterization. Therefore, protocols are required that enable their purification in high purity and quantity. Here, we report a protocol, based on aqueous polymer two-phase systems, which fulfils these demands. Furthermore, the protocol is time-saving and protects protein structure and function.

  1. Quantum critical scaling for field-induced quantum phase transition in a periodic Anderson-like model polymer chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, L.J., E-mail: dinglinjie82@126.com; Zhong, Y.

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • The quantum critical scaling is investigated by Green’s function theory. • The obtained power-law critical exponents (β, δ and α) obey the critical scaling relation α + β(1 + δ) = 2. • The scaling hypothesis equations are proposed to verify the scaling analysis. - Abstract: The quantum phase transition and thermodynamics of a periodic Anderson-like polymer chain in a magnetic field are investigated by Green’s function theory. The T-h phase diagram is explored, wherein a crossover temperature T{sup ∗} denoting the gapless phase crossover into quantum critical regimes, smoothly connects near the critical fields to the universal linear line T{sup ∗} ∼ (h − h{sub c,s}), and ends at h{sub c,s}, providing a new route to capture quantum critical point (QCP). The quantum critical scaling around QCPs is demonstrated by analyzing magnetization, specific heat and Grüneisen parameter Γ{sub h}, which provide direct access to distill the power-law critical exponents (β, δ and α) obeying the critical scaling relation α + β(1 + δ) = 2, analogous to the quantum spin system. Furthermore, scaling hypothesis equations are proposed to check the scaling analysis, for which all the data collapse onto a single curve or two independent branches for the plot against an appropriate scaling variable, indicating the self-consistency and reliability of the obtained critical exponents.

  2. Analysis of Lipoplex Structure and Lipid Phase Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koynova, Rumiana

    2012-07-18

    Efficient delivery of genetic material to cells is needed for tasks of utmost importance in the laboratory and clinic, such as gene transfection and gene silencing. Synthetic cationic lipids can be used as delivery vehicles for nucleic acids and are now considered the most promising nonviral gene carriers. They form complexes (lipoplexes) with the polyanionic nucleic acids. A critical obstacle for clinical application of the lipid-mediated DNA delivery (lipofection) is its unsatisfactory efficiency for many cell types. Understanding the mechanism of lipid-mediated DNA delivery is essential for their successful application, as well as for a rational design and synthesis of novel cationic lipoid compounds for enhanced gene delivery. A viewpoint now emerging is that the critical factor in lipid-mediated transfection is the structural evolution of lipoplexes within the cell, upon interacting and mixing with cellular lipids. In particular, recent studies showed that the phase evolution of lipoplex lipids upon interaction and mixing with membrane lipids appears to be decisive for transfection success: specifically, lamellar lipoplex formulations, which were readily susceptible to undergoing lamellar-nonlamellar phase transition upon mixing with cellular lipids and were found rather consistently associated with superior transfection potency, presumably as a result of facilitated DNA release. Thus, understanding the lipoplex structure and the phase changes upon interacting with membrane lipids is important for the successful application of the cationic lipids as gene carriers.

  3. Directed ordering of phase separated domains and dewetting of thin polymer blend films on a topographically patterned substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandaru, Nandini; Karim, Alamgir; Mukherjee, Rabibrata

    2017-07-21

    Substrate pattern guided self-organization of ultrathin and confined polymeric films on a topographically patterned substrate is a useful approach for obtaining ordered meso and nano structures over large areas, particularly if the ordering is achieved during film preparation itself, eliminating any post-processing such as thermal or solvent vapor annealing. By casting a dilute solution of two immiscible polymers, polystyrene (PS) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), from a common solvent (toluene) on a topographically patterned substrate with a grating geometry, we show the formation of self-organized meso patterns with various degrees of ordering. The morphology depends on both the concentration of the dispensed solution (C n ) and the blend composition (R B ). Depending on the extent of dewetting during spin coating, the final morphologies can be classified into three distinct categories. At a very low C n the solution dewets fully, resulting in isolated polymer droplets aligned along substrate grooves (Type 1). Type 2 structures comprising isolated threads with aligned phase separated domains along each substrate groove are observed at intermediate C n . A continuous film (Type 3) is obtained above a critical concentration (C n *) that depends on R B . While the extent of ordering of the domains gradually diminishes with an increase in film thickness for Type 3 patterns, the size of the domains remains much smaller than that on a flat substrate, resulting in significant downsizing of the features due to the lateral confinement imposed on the phase separation process by the topographic patterns. Finally, we show that some of these structures exhibit excellent broadband anti-reflection (AR) properties.

  4. Encapsulation, solid-phases identification and leaching of toxic metals in cement systems modified by natural biodegradable polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasheras-Zubiate, M.; Navarro-Blasco, I.; Fernández, J.M.; Álvarez, J.I.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Speciation of Zn, Pb and Cr has been studied in chitosan-modified cement mortars. ► Metal retention mechanisms have been clarified by newly identified crystalline forms. ► Native chitosan induced and stabilized newly characterized Pb (IV) species. ► Dietrichite is responsible for the Zn immobilization in the polymer-modified mortar. ► Leaching of Zn decreased by 24% in the presence of low molecular weight chitosan. - Abstract: Cement mortars loaded with Cr, Pb and Zn were modified by polymeric admixtures [chitosans with low (LMWCH), medium (MMWCH) and high (HMWCH) molecular weight and hydroxypropylchitosan (HPCH)]. The influence of the simultaneous presence of the heavy metal and the polymeric additive on the fresh properties (consistency, water retention and setting time) and on the compressive strength of the mortars was assessed. Leaching patterns as well as properties of the cement mortars were related to the heavy metals-bearing solid phases. Chitosan admixtures lessened the effect of the addition of Cr and Pb on the setting time. In all instances, chitosans improved the compressive strength of the Zn-bearing mortars yielding values as high as 15 N mm −2 . A newly reported Zn phase, dietrichite (ZnAl 2 (SO 4 ) 4 ·22H 2 O) was identified under the presence of LMWCH: it was responsible for an improvement by 24% in Zn retention. Lead-bearing silicates, such as plumalsite (Pb 4 Al 2 (SiO 3 ) 7 ), were also identified by XRD confirming that Pb was mainly retained as a part of the silicate network after Ca ion exchange. Also, the presence of polymer induced the appearance and stabilization of some Pb(IV) species. Finally, diverse chromate species were identified and related to the larger leaching values of Cr(VI).

  5. Polymer scaffolds with no skin-effect for tissue engineering applications fabricated by thermally induced phase separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasoju, Naresh; Kubies, Dana; Sedlačík, Tomáš; Kumorek, Marta M.; Rypáček, František; Janoušková, Olga; Koubková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) based methods are widely used for the fabrication of porous scaffolds for tissue engineering and related applications. However, formation of a less-/non-porous layer at the scaffold’s outer surface at the air–liquid interface, often known as the skin-effect, restricts the cell infiltration inside the scaffold and therefore limits its efficacy. To this end, we demonstrate a TIPS-based process involving the exposure of the just quenched poly(lactide-co-caprolactone):dioxane phases to the pure dioxane for a short time while still being under the quenching strength, herein after termed as the second quenching (2Q). Scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry and contact angle analysis revealed a direct correlation between the time of 2Q and the gradual disappearance of the skin, followed by the widening of the outer pores and the formation of the fibrous filaments over the surface, with no effect on the internal pore architecture and the overall porosity of scaffolds. The experiments at various quenching temperatures and polymer concentrations revealed the versatility of 2Q in removing the skin. In addition, the in vitro cell culture studies with the human primary fibroblasts showed that the scaffolds prepared by the TIPS based 2Q process, with the optimal exposure time, resulted in a higher cell seeding and viability in contrast to the scaffolds prepared by the regular TIPS. Thus, TIPS including the 2Q step is a facile, versatile and innovative approach to fabricate the polymer scaffolds with a skin-free and fully open porous surface morphology for achieving a better cell response in tissue engineering and related applications. (paper)

  6. Numerical analysis of the heating phase and densification mechanism in polymers selective laser melting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrane, Aoulaiche; Boutaous, M'hamed; Xin, Shihe

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this work is to address a modeling of the SLS process at the scale of the part in PA12 polymer powder bed. The powder bed is considered as a continuous medium with homogenized properties, meanwhile understanding multiple physical phenomena occurring during the process and studying the influence of process parameters on the quality of final product. A thermal model, based on enthalpy approach, will be presented with details on the multiphysical couplings that allow the thermal history: laser absorption, melting, coalescence, densification, volume shrinkage and on numerical implementation using FV method. The simulations were carried out in 3D with an in-house developed FORTRAN code. After validation of the model with comparison to results from literature, a parametric analysis will be proposed. Some original results as densification process and the thermal history with the evolution of the material, from the granular solid state to homogeneous melted state will be discussed with regards to the involved physical phenomena.

  7. Towards fractional-order capacitors with broad tunable constant phase angles: Multi-walled carbon nanotube-polymer composite as a case study

    KAUST Repository

    Agambayev, Agamyrat; Rajab, Karam Hani; Hassan, Ali H.; Farhat, Mohamed; Bagci, Hakan; Salama, Khaled N.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) filled Polyevinelidenefluoride-trifluoroethylene-chlorofluoroethylene (PVDF-TrFE-CFE) composites are used to realize fractional-order capacitors (FOCs). A solution-mixing and drop-casting approach is used to fabricate the composite. Due to the high aspect ratio of MWCNTs, percolation regime starts at a small weight percentage (wt%), 1.00 % .The distributed MWCNTs inside the polymer act as an electrical network of micro-capacitors and micro-resistors, which, in effect, behaves like a FOC. The resulting FOCs' constant phase angle (CPA) can be tuned from to by changing the wt% of the MWCNTs. This is the largest dynamic range reported so far at the frequency range from 150 kHz to 2 MHz for an FOC. Furthermore, the CPA and pseudo-capacitance are shown to be practically stable (with less than 1% variation) when the applied voltage is, changed between 500 µV and 5V. For a fixed value of CPA, the pseudo-capacitance can be tuned by changing the thickness of the composite, which can be done in a straightforward manner via the solution-mixing and drop-casting fabrication approach. Finally, it is shown that the frequency of a Hartley oscillator built using an FOC is almost 15 times higher than that of a Hartley oscillator built using a conventional capacitor.

  8. Towards fractional-order capacitors with broad tunable constant phase angles: Multi-walled carbon nanotube-polymer composite as a case study

    KAUST Repository

    Agambayev, Agamyrat

    2018-01-03

    In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) filled Polyevinelidenefluoride-trifluoroethylene-chlorofluoroethylene (PVDF-TrFE-CFE) composites are used to realize fractional-order capacitors (FOCs). A solution-mixing and drop-casting approach is used to fabricate the composite. Due to the high aspect ratio of MWCNTs, percolation regime starts at a small weight percentage (wt%), 1.00 % .The distributed MWCNTs inside the polymer act as an electrical network of micro-capacitors and micro-resistors, which, in effect, behaves like a FOC. The resulting FOCs\\' constant phase angle (CPA) can be tuned from to by changing the wt% of the MWCNTs. This is the largest dynamic range reported so far at the frequency range from 150 kHz to 2 MHz for an FOC. Furthermore, the CPA and pseudo-capacitance are shown to be practically stable (with less than 1% variation) when the applied voltage is, changed between 500 µV and 5V. For a fixed value of CPA, the pseudo-capacitance can be tuned by changing the thickness of the composite, which can be done in a straightforward manner via the solution-mixing and drop-casting fabrication approach. Finally, it is shown that the frequency of a Hartley oscillator built using an FOC is almost 15 times higher than that of a Hartley oscillator built using a conventional capacitor.

  9. Towards fractional-order capacitors with broad tunable constant phase angles: multi-walled carbon nanotube-polymer composite as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agambayev, Agamyrat; Rajab, Karam H.; Hassan, Ali H.; Farhat, Mohamed; Bagci, Hakan; Salama, Khaled N.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) filled polyevinelidenefluoride-trifluoroethylene-chlorofluoroethylene composites are used to realize fractional-order capacitors (FOCs). A solution-mixing and drop-casting approach is used to fabricate the composite. Due to the high aspect ratio of MWCNTs, percolation regime starts at a small weight percentage (wt%), 1.00%.The distributed MWCNTs inside the polymer act as an electrical network of micro-capacitors and micro-resistors, which, in effect, behaves like a FOC. The resulting FOCs’ constant phase angle (CPA) can be tuned from -65{\\hspace{0pt}}^\\circ to -7{\\hspace{0pt}}^\\circ by changing the wt% of the MWCNTs. This is the largest dynamic range reported so far at the frequency range from 150 kHz to 2 MHz for an FOC. Furthermore, the CPA and pseudo-capacitance are shown to be practically stable (with less than 1% variation) when the applied voltage is, changed between 500 µV and 5 V. For a fixed value of CPA, the pseudo-capacitance can be tuned by changing the thickness of the composite, which can be done in a straightforward manner via the solution-mixing and drop-casting fabrication approach. Finally, it is shown that the frequency of a Hartley oscillator built using an FOC is almost 15 times higher than that of a Hartley oscillator built using a conventional capacitor.

  10. Composite advanced polymers for low moisture and oxygen permeability, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I program addresses NASA?s need for long duration shelf stable food by developing a high oxygen/moisture barrier...

  11. Polymer Flip Chips with Extreme Temperature Stability in Space, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed SBIR Phase I program is to develop highly thermally and electrically conductive nanocomposites for space-based flip chips for...

  12. Polymer-Reinforced, Nonbrittle, Lightweight Cryogenic Insulation for Reduced Life-Cycle Costs, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II SBIR project focuses to continue developing cryogenic insulation foams that are flexible, deforming under compression. InnoSense LLC (ISL) demonstrated...

  13. Subscale Water Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Rubik; Hansen, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Supplemental heat rejection devices are required in many spacecraft as the radiators are not sized to meet the full heat rejection demand. One means of obtaining additional heat rejection is through the use of phase change material heat exchangers (PCM HX's). PCM HX's utilize phase change to store energy in unfavorable thermal environments (melting) and reject the energy in favorable environments (freezing). Traditionally, wax has been used as a PCM on spacecraft. However, water is an attractive alternative because it is capable of storing about 40% more energy per unit mass due to its higher latent heat of fusion. The significant problem in using water as a PCM is its expansion while freezing, leading to structural integrity concerns when housed in an enclosed heat exchanger volume. Significant investigation and development has taken place over the past five years to understand and overcome the problems associated with water PCM HX's. This paper reports on the final efforts by Johnson Space Center's Thermal Systems Branch to develop a water based PCM HX. The test article developed and reported on is a subscale version of the full-scale water-based PCM HX's constructed by Mezzo Technologies. The subscale unit was designed by applying prior research on freeze front propagation and previous full-scale water PCM HX development. Design modifications to the subscale unit included use of urethane bladder, decreased aspect ratio, perforated protection sheet, and use of additional mid-plates. Testing of the subscale unit was successful and 150 cycles were completed without fail.

  14. Analysis of wallboard containing a phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, J. J.; Heberle, D. P.

    Phase change materials (PCMs) used on the interior of buildings hold the promise for improved thermal performance by reducing the energy requirements for space conditioning and by improving thermal comfort by reducing temperature swings inside the building. Efforts are underway to develop a gypsum wallboard containing a hydrocarbon PCM. With a phase change temperature in the room temperature range, the PCM wallboard adds substantially to the thermal mass of the building while serving the same architectural function as conventional wallboard. To determine the thermal and economic performance of this PCM wallboard, the Transient Systems Simulation Program (TRNSYS) was modified to accommodate walls that are covered with PCM plasterboard, and to apportion the direct beam solar radiation to interior surfaces of a building. The modified code was used to simulate the performance of conventional and direct-gain passive solar residential-sized buildings with and without PCM wallboard. Space heating energy savings were determined as a function of PCM wallboard characteristics. Thermal comfort improvements in buildings containing the PCM were qualified in terms of energy savings. The report concludes with a present worth economic analysis of these energy savings and arrives at system costs and economic payback based on current costs of PCMs under study for the wallboard application.

  15. Portable Thermoelectric Power Generator Coupled with Phase Change Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Chong C.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Solar is the intermittent source of renewable energy and all thermal solar systems having a setback on non-functioning during the night and cloudy environment. This paper presents alternative solution for power generation using thermoelectric which is the direct conversion of temperature gradient of hot side and cold side of thermoelectric material to electric voltage. Phase change material with latent heat effect would help to prolong the temperature gradient across thermoelectric material for power generation. Besides, the concept of portability will enable different power source like solar, wasted heat from air conditioner, refrigerator, stove etc, i.e. to create temperature different on thermoelectric material for power generation. Furthermore, thermoelectric will generate direct current which is used by all the gadgets like Smartphone, tablet, laptop etc. The portable concept of renewable energy will encourage the direct usage of renewable energy for portable gadgets. The working principle and design of portable thermoelectric power generator coupled with phase change material is presented in this paper.

  16. Control of group velocity by phase-changing collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goren, C.; Rosenbluh, M.; Wilson-Gordon, A.D.; Friedmann, H.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the influence of phase-changing collisions on the group velocities in Doppler-broadened, cycling, degenerate two-level systems where F e =F g +1 and F g >0, interacting with pump and probe lasers, that exhibit electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA). Two model systems are considered: the N system where the pump and probe are polarized perpendicularly, and EIA is due to transfer of coherence (TOC), and the double two-level system (TLS) where both lasers have the same polarization, and EIA is due to transfer of population (TOP). For the case of Doppler-broadened EIA TOC, which occurs at low pump intensity, there is a switch from positive to negative dispersion and group velocity, as the rate of phase-changing collisions is increased. For the case of EIA TOP at low pump intensity, the dispersion and group velocity remain negative even when the collision rate is increased. Pressure-induced narrowing, accompanied by an increase in the magnitude of the negative dispersion and a decrease in the magnitude of the negative group velocity, occurs in both EIA TOC and EIA TOP, at low pump intensity. When the pump intensity is increased, a switch from negative to positive dispersion and group velocity, with increasing collision rate, also occurs in the double TLS system. However, the effect is far smaller than in the case of the N system at low pump intensity

  17. Integrating Phase-Change Materials into Automotive Thermoelectric Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein Altstedde, Mirko; Rinderknecht, Frank; Friedrich, Horst

    2014-06-01

    Because the heat emitted by conventional combustion-engine vehicles during operation has highly transient properties, automotive thermoelectric generators (TEG) are intended for a particular operating state (design point). This, however, leads to two problems. First, whenever the combustion engine runs at low load, the maximum operating temperature cannot be properly utilised; second, a combustion engine at high load requires partial diversion of exhaust gas away from the TEG to protect the thermoelectric modules. An attractive means of stabilising dynamic exhaust behaviour (thereby keeping the TEG operating status at the design point for as long as possible) is use of latent heat storage, also known as phase-change materials (PCM). By positioning PCM between module and exhaust heat conduit, and choosing a material with a phase-change temperature matching the module's optimum operating temperature, it can be used as heat storage. This paper presents results obtained during examination of the effect of integration of latent heat storage on the potential of automotive TEG to convert exhaust heat. The research resulted in the development of a concept based on the initial integration idea, followed by proof of concept by use of a specially created prototype. In addition, the potential amount of energy obtained by use of a PCM-equipped TEG was calculated. The simulations indicated a significant increase in electrical energy was obtained in the selected test cycle.

  18. Direct numerical simulation of incompressible multiphase flow with phase change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moon Soo; Riaz, Amir; Aute, Vikrant

    2017-09-01

    Simulation of multiphase flow with phase change is challenging because of the potential for unphysical pressure oscillations, spurious velocity fields and mass flux errors across the interface. The resulting numerical errors may become critical when large density contrasts are present. To address these issues, we present a new approach for multiphase flow with phase change that features, (i) a smooth distribution of sharp velocity jumps and mass flux within a narrow region surrounding the interface, (ii) improved mass flux projection from the implicit interface onto the uniform Cartesian grid and (iii) post-advection velocity correction step to ensure accurate velocity divergence in interfacial cells. These new features are implemented in combination with a sharp treatment of the jumps in pressure and temperature gradient. A series of 1-D, 2-D, axisymmetric and 3-D problems are solved to verify the improvements afforded by the new approach. Axisymmetric film boiling results are also presented, which show good qualitative agreement with heat transfer correlations as well as experimental observations of bubble shapes.

  19. Phase change energy storage for solar dynamic power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, F. P.; Taylor, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a transient computer simulation that was developed to study phase change energy storage techniques for Space Station Freedom (SSF) solar dynamic (SD) power systems. Such SD systems may be used in future growth SSF configurations. Two solar dynamic options are considered in this paper: Brayton and Rankine. Model elements consist of a single node receiver and concentrator, and takes into account overall heat engine efficiency and power distribution characteristics. The simulation not only computes the energy stored in the receiver phase change material (PCM), but also the amount of the PCM required for various combinations of load demands and power system mission constraints. For a solar dynamic power system in low earth orbit, the amount of stored PCM energy is calculated by balancing the solar energy input and the energy consumed by the loads corrected by an overall system efficiency. The model assumes an average 75 kW SD power system load profile which is connected to user loads via dedicated power distribution channels. The model then calculates the stored energy in the receiver and subsequently estimates the quantity of PCM necessary to meet peaking and contingency requirements. The model can also be used to conduct trade studies on the performance of SD power systems using different storage materials.

  20. Oxygen incorporation into GST phase-change memory matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovchak, R., E-mail: holovchakr@apsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Austin Peay State University, Clarksville, TN 37044 (United States); Choi, Y.G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Aerospace University, Gyeonggi 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kozyukhin, S. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of RAS, 31 Leninsky Pr., Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Pr., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Chigirinsky, Yu. [Scientific-Research Physicotechnical Institute at the Nizhnii Novgorod State University, Nizhnii Novgorod 603600 (Russian Federation); Kovalskiy, A.; Xiong-Skiba, P.; Trimble, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Austin Peay State University, Clarksville, TN 37044 (United States); Pafchek, R.; Jain, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surfaces of GST-225 films are depleted in Te as a result of the reaction with oxygen. • Top layers of oxidized GST-225 are formed by Sb and Ge oxide complexes. • Depth profiles of Sb and Ge oxide complexes are found to be different. • Crystallization at 300 °C in O{sub 2} atmosphere leads to Ge redistribution. - Abstract: Structural changes in amorphous and crystallized GST-225 films induced by the reaction with oxygen are studied at different depth scales. The mechanism of interaction of the very top surface layers with oxygen is studied with low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) technique, while the modifications of chemistry in the underlying surface layers are investigated with high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The changes averaged through the overall film thickness are characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The oxygen exposure leads to a depletion of GST-225 film surfaces in Te and formation of the antimony and germanium oxides. The antimony oxide complexes are found throughout the whole thickness of the films after their prolonged storage in air, whereas no evidence for formation of pure GeO{sub 2} phase is found in the volume of the films through Raman spectroscopy. A tendency to form Ge-rich phase within the ∼10 nm surface layer is additionally observed by LEIS profiling during crystallization of GST-225 film at 300 °C in oxygen atmosphere.

  1. Gradient augmented level set method for phase change simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anumolu, Lakshman; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2018-01-01

    A numerical method for the simulation of two-phase flow with phase change based on the Gradient-Augmented-Level-set (GALS) strategy is presented. Sharp capturing of the vaporization process is enabled by: i) identification of the vapor-liquid interface, Γ (t), at the subgrid level, ii) discontinuous treatment of thermal physical properties (except for μ), and iii) enforcement of mass, momentum, and energy jump conditions, where the gradients of the dependent variables are obtained at Γ (t) and are consistent with their analytical expression, i.e. no local averaging is applied. Treatment of the jump in velocity and pressure at Γ (t) is achieved using the Ghost Fluid Method. The solution of the energy equation employs the sub-grid knowledge of Γ (t) to discretize the temperature Laplacian using second-order one-sided differences, i.e. the numerical stencil completely resides within each respective phase. To carefully evaluate the benefits or disadvantages of the GALS approach, the standard level set method is implemented and compared against the GALS predictions. The results show the expected trend that interface identification and transport are predicted noticeably better with GALS over the standard level set. This benefit carries over to the prediction of the Laplacian and temperature gradients in the neighborhood of the interface, which are directly linked to the calculation of the vaporization rate. However, when combining the calculation of interface transport and reinitialization with two-phase momentum and energy, the benefits of GALS are to some extent neutralized, and the causes for this behavior are identified and analyzed. Overall the additional computational costs associated with GALS are almost the same as those using the standard level set technique.

  2. Calculation of liquid-liquid phase separation in a ternary system of a polymer in a mixture of a solvent and a nonsolvent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altena, Frank W.; Smolders, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical method for the calculation of the binodal of liquid-liquid phase separation in a ternary system is described. The Flory-Huggins theory for three-component systems is used. Binodals are calculated for polymer/solvent/nonsolvent systems which are used in the preparation of asymmetric

  3. Temperature-induced phase separation and hydration in aqueous polymer solutions studied by NMR and IR spectroscopy: comparison of poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) and acrylamide-based polymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spěváček, Jiří; Dybal, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 336, č. 1 (2014), s. 39-46 ISSN 1022-1360. [International IUPAC Conference on Polymer-Solvent Complexes and Intercalates /9./ - POLYSOLVAT-9. Kiev, 11.09.2012-14.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1281 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : aqueous polymer solutions * FT-IR * NMR Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  4. A zero density change phase change memory material: GeTe-O structural characteristics upon crystallisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xilin; Dong, Weiling; Zhang, Hao; Simpson, Robert E

    2015-06-11

    Oxygen-doped germanium telluride phase change materials are proposed for high temperature applications. Up to 8 at.% oxygen is readily incorporated into GeTe, causing an increased crystallisation temperature and activation energy. The rhombohedral structure of the GeTe crystal is preserved in the oxygen doped films. For higher oxygen concentrations the material is found to phase separate into GeO2 and TeO2, which inhibits the technologically useful abrupt change in properties. Increasing the oxygen content in GeTe-O reduces the difference in film thickness and mass density between the amorphous and crystalline states. For oxygen concentrations between 5 and 6 at.%, the amorphous material and the crystalline material have the same density. Above 6 at.% O doping, crystallisation exhibits an anomalous density change, where the volume of the crystalline state is larger than that of the amorphous. The high thermal stability and zero-density change characteristic of Oxygen-incorporated GeTe, is recommended for efficient and low stress phase change memory devices that may operate at elevated temperatures.

  5. Liquid carry-over in an injection moulded all-polymer chip system for immiscible phase magnetic bead-based solid-phase extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistrup, Kasper; Skotte Sørensen, Karen; Wolff, Anders; Fougt Hansen, Mikkel

    2015-04-01

    We present an all-polymer, single-use microfluidic chip system produced by injection moulding and bonded by ultrasonic welding. Both techniques are compatible with low-cost industrial mass-production. The chip is produced for magnetic bead-based solid-phase extraction facilitated by immiscible phase filtration and features passive liquid filling and magnetic bead manipulation using an external magnet. In this work, we determine the system compatibility with various surfactants. Moreover, we quantify the volume of liquid co-transported with magnetic bead clusters from Milli-Q water or a lysis-binding buffer for nucleic acid extraction (0.1 (v/v)% Triton X-100 in 5 M guanidine hydrochloride). A linear relationship was found between the liquid carry-over and mass of magnetic beads used. Interestingly, similar average carry-overs of 1.74(8) nL/μg and 1.72(14) nL/μg were found for Milli-Q water and lysis-binding buffer, respectively.

  6. Investigation of the drastic change in the sputter rate of polymers at low ion fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zekonyte, J.; Zaporojtchenko, V.; Faupel, F.

    2005-01-01

    The polymer sputter rate dependence on ion fluence and ion chemistry (Ar, N 2 , O 2 ) at 1 keV energy was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) which allowed to do real time etch rate measurements and to study kinetics of sputtering. The obtained sputter rates differed drastically from polymer to polymer showing, that the chemical structure of polymer is an important factor in the polymer etch yield. A decrease in the sputter rate was observed up to ion fluence of 5 x 10 14 -5 x 10 15 cm -2 (depending on the polymer type and ion chemistry) followed by the saturation in the rate at prolonged ion bombardment. Polymer removal was accompanied by the formation of degradation products, cross-linking or branching, modification of the surface chemical structure, which was studied in situ using XPS. The dependence of the surface glass transition temperature, T gs on the ion fluence was studied using the method based on the embedding of metallic nanoparticles. The correlation between chemical yield data and ablation rate is discussed

  7. Experimental Studies of Phase Change and Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials in a Cold Storage/Transportation System with Solar Driven Cooling Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Zheng; Wei Zhang; Fei Liang; Shuang Lin; Xiangyu Jin

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the different properties of phase change material (PCM) and Microencapsulated phase change material (MEPCM) employed to cold storage/transportation system with a solar-driven cooling cycle. Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) tests have been performed to analyze the materials enthalpy, melting temperature range, and temperature range of solidification. KD2 Pro is used to test the thermal conductivities of phase change materials slurry and the results were used to compar...

  8. Changes in electrical transport and density of states of phase change materials upon resistance drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krebs, Daniel; Bachmann, Tobias; Jonnalagadda, Prasad; Dellmann, Laurent; Raoux, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Phase-change memory technology has become more mature in recent years. But some fundamental problems linked to the electrical transport properties in the amorphous phase of phase-change materials still need to be solved. The increase of resistance over time, called resistance drift, for example, poses a major challenge for the implementation of multilevel storage, which will eventually be necessary to remain competitive in terms of high storage densities. To link structural properties with electrical transport, a broader knowledge of (i) changes in the density of states (DoS) upon structural relaxation and (ii) the influence of defects on electrical transport is required. In this paper, we present temperature-dependent conductivity and photo-conductivity measurements on the archetype phase change material GeTe. It is shown that trap-limited band transport at high temperatures (above 165 K) and variable range hopping at low temperatures are the predominating transport mechanism. Based on measurements of the temperature dependence of the optical band gap, modulated photo-conductivity and photo-thermal deflection spectroscopy, a DoS model for GeTe was proposed. Using this DoS, the temperature dependence of conductivity and photo-conductivity has been simulated. Our work shows how changes in the DoS (band gap and defect distributions) will affect the electrical transport before and after temperature-accelerated drift. The decrease in conductivity upon annealing can be explained entirely by an increase of the band gap by about 12%. However, low-temperature photo-conductivity measurements revealed that a change in the defect density may also play a role

  9. Tracking of Nuclear Cable Insulation Polymer Structural Changes using the Gel Fraction and Uptake Factor Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Miguel; Huang, Qian; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2018-04-11

    Cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) cable insulation samples were exposed to heat and gamma radiation at a series of temperatures, dose rates, and exposure times to evaluate the effects of these variables on material degradation. The samples were tested using the solvent incubation method to collect gel fraction and uptake factor data in order to assess the crosslinking and chain scission occurring in polymer samples with aging. Consistent with previous reports, gel fraction values were observed to increase and uptake factor values to decrease with radiation and thermal exposure. The trends seen were also more prominent as exposure time increased, suggesting this to be a viable method of tracking structural changes in the XLPE-insulated cable material over extended periods. For the conditions explored, the cable insulation material evaluated did not indicate signs of anomalous aging such as inverse temperature effect in which radiation-induced aging is more severe at lower temperature. Ongoing aging under identical radiation conditions and at lower temperature will further inform conclusions regarding the importance of inverse temperature effects for this material under these conditions.

  10. Characterization of particle morphology of biochanin A molecularly imprinted polymers and their properties as a potential sorbent for solid-phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowska, Anna M.; Poliwoda, Anna, E-mail: Anna.Poliwoda@uni.opole.pl; Wieczorek, Piotr P.

    2015-04-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with biochanin A as a template were obtained using a bulk polymerization with non-covalent imprinting approach. The polymers were prepared in acetonitrile as porogen, using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) as cross-linking agent. The synthesis, with an application of 1′,1′-azobis(cyclohexanecarbonitrile) (ACHN) as an initiator, has been performed thermally. During the synthesis process the effect of different functional monomers such as methacrylic acid (MAA), acrylamide (AA) and 4-vinylpyridine (4-VP) was investigated. The application of nitrogen sorption porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) permitted the characterization and evaluation of synthesized polymers. The adsorption capacity of obtained MIPs was checked by using the binding testing. All synthesized polymers were evaluated as solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbents for isolation and preconcentration of biochanin A and its analogues, daidzein and genistein. The MIPs exhibited higher affinity for biochanin A over competitive compounds. - Highlights: • The molecularly imprinted polymers with biochanin A as a template were synthesized. • The surface of synthesized monoliths was formed mainly from mesopores (73–77%). • Biochanin A was effectively concentrated in each of the synthesized polymers (recovery > 89.8%). • The results show potential ability of synthesized MIPs in analysis of phytoestrogens in real samples.

  11. Preparation, characterization, and thermal properties of the microencapsulation of a hydrated salt as phase change energy storage materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jin; Wang, Tingyu; Zhu, Panpan; Xiao, Junbin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Phase change point and fusion heat of samples are about 51 °Cand 150 J/g respectively. ► DSC results indicated the core material is not Na 2 HPO 4 ·12H 2 O but Na 2 HPO 4 ·7H 2 O. ► Encapsulation takes a significant role in reducing subcooling degree. - Abstract: Microcapsules loaded by disodium hydrogen phosphate heptahydrate (Na 2 HPO 4 ·7H 2 O) were prepared by means of the suspension copolymerization-solvent volatile method, with modified polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as coating polymer under the conditions of various organic solvents. The formation of the microencapsulated phase change materials (MEPCMs)-PMMA/Na 2 HPO 4 ·7H 2 O was investigated and analyzed. The morphology of the resultant materials was characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and phase contrast microscope. Its final composition was confirmed by the Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR). Thermo gravimetric analyzer (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were adopted to reveal its thermal stability and thermal properties. Results indicated that the materials owned improved subcooling degree and good thermal properties, enabling the materials to be one promising phase change materials for thermal energy storage

  12. Preparation, characterization, and thermal properties of the microencapsulation of a hydrated salt as phase change energy storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jin, E-mail: huangjiner@126.com [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, 510006 Guangzhou (China); Wang, Tingyu; Zhu, Panpan; Xiao, Junbin [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, 510006 Guangzhou (China)

    2013-04-10

    Highlights: ► Phase change point and fusion heat of samples are about 51 °Cand 150 J/g respectively. ► DSC results indicated the core material is not Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}·12H{sub 2}O but Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}·7H{sub 2}O. ► Encapsulation takes a significant role in reducing subcooling degree. - Abstract: Microcapsules loaded by disodium hydrogen phosphate heptahydrate (Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}·7H{sub 2}O) were prepared by means of the suspension copolymerization-solvent volatile method, with modified polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as coating polymer under the conditions of various organic solvents. The formation of the microencapsulated phase change materials (MEPCMs)-PMMA/Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}·7H{sub 2}O was investigated and analyzed. The morphology of the resultant materials was characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and phase contrast microscope. Its final composition was confirmed by the Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR). Thermo gravimetric analyzer (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were adopted to reveal its thermal stability and thermal properties. Results indicated that the materials owned improved subcooling degree and good thermal properties, enabling the materials to be one promising phase change materials for thermal energy storage.

  13. Investigating the effects of polymer molecular weight and non-solvent content on the phase separation, surface morphology and hydrophobicity of polyvinyl chloride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoryani, Zahra; Seyfi, Javad; Nekoei, Mehdi

    2018-01-01

    The main aim of this research is to study the effects of polymer molecular weight as well as non-solvent concentration on the phase separation, surface morphology and wettability of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) films. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) results showed that the Mn of the used PVC grades is 6 × 104, 8.7 × 104 and 1.26 × 105 g/mol. It was found that a proper combination of polymer molecular weight and non-solvent content could result in superhydrophobic and self-cleaning behaviors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results demonstrated that addition of ethanol causes the polymer chains to be severely aggregated at the films' surface forming strand-like structures decorated by nano-scale polymer spheres. The polymer molecular weight was found to affect the degree of porosity which is highly influential on the hydrophobicity of the films. The mechanism of phase separation process was also discussed and it was found that the instantaneous demixing is the dominant mechanism once higher contents of non-solvent were used. However, a delayed demixing mechanism was detected when the lower molecular weight PVC has been used which resulted in a pore-less and dense skin layer. Differential scanning calorimetry was also utilized to study the crystallization and glass transition behavior of samples.

  14. Temporary Vascular Occlusion by Rapid Reverse Phase Polymer: A Preliminary In Vitro Study of Retrograde Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einar Dregelid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During vascular surgical operations, there is a need for a simpler and more reliable method of temporary arterial occlusion than those currently employed, especially of heavily calcified arteries. A thermosensitive polymer, LeGoo (LG (Pluromed, Woburn, MA, has been used successfully for temporary vascular occlusion. It has hitherto been injected by a cannula that has been introduced into the artery to be occluded, here henceforth called the “cannulation method.” Injection into arterial ostia without cannulation, using an injection device that arrests blood flow during the injection, here henceforth called “a retrograde method” may enable temporary hemostasis when ostial stenoses render it impossible to inject LG using the cannulation method. The objective of the present study was to study the feasibility of a retrograde method and to compare it with the cannulation method in an in vitro model, incorporating a narrow orifice to simulate ostial stenosis, using tap water at 37°C instead of blood. The retrograde method of LG injection, using a modified paediatric Foley catheter, turned out to be feasible to produce a durable LG plug more reliably, at higher water pressure and with less deep LG injection than with the cannulation method.

  15. Development of polymer concrete for dike insulation at LNG facilities: Phase 4, Low cost materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Earlier GRI-sponsored work at Brookhaven National Laboratory has resulted in the development and utilization of insulating polymer concrete composites (IPC) as a means of reducing the evaporation rate of liquified natural gas in the event of a spill into a containment dike, thereby improving the safety at these sites. Although all of the required properties can be attained with the IPC, it was estimated that a low-cost replacement for the expensive organic binder would be necessary before use of the material would be cost-effective. In the current program, several latex modified cement formulations were evaluated and the most promising one identified. A mixture of two carboxylated styrene-butadiene latexes was selected for use in detailed laboratory property characterizations and a subsequent field evaluation. When compared to the properties of IPC, the latex-modified insulating materials display somewhat higher thermal conductivities, greater permeability to water, and reduced strength. However, these properties still meet most of the performance criteria, and the unit cost of the material is less than one-fifth that of IPC made with epoxy binders. When installed as a 0.75-in. thick overlay, material costs are estimated to be $1.00/ft{sup 2}.

  16. New three-phase polymer-ceramic composite materials for miniaturized microwave antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Jie; Yue, Zhenxing; Li, Longtu

    2016-09-01

    Unique polymer-ceramic composites for microwave antenna applications were prepared via melt extrusion using high-density polyethylene (HDPE) as the matrix and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) coated BaO-Nd2O3-TiO2 (BNT) ceramic-powders as the filler. By incorporating LDPE into the composites via a coating route, high ceramic-powder volume content (up to 50 vol%) could be achieved. The composites exhibited good microwave dielectric and thermomechanical behaviors. As BNT ceramic content increased from 10 vol% to 50 vol%, the permittivity of the composites increased from 3.45 (9 GHz) to 11.87 (7 GHz), while the dielectric loss remained lower than 0.0016. Microstrip antennas for applications in global positioning systems (GPS) were designed and fabricated from the composites containing 50 vol% BNT ceramics. The results indicate that the composites that have suitable permittivity and low dielectric loss are promising candidates for applications in miniaturized microwave devices, such as antennas.

  17. A sensitive chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay based on molecularly imprinted polymers solid-phase extraction of parathion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ge; Jin, Maojun; Du, Pengfei; Zhang, Chan; Cui, Xueyan; Zhang, Yudan; She, Yongxin; Shao, Hua; Jin, Fen; Wang, Shanshan; Zheng, Lufei; Wang, Jing

    2017-08-01

    The chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) method responds differently to various sample matrices because of the matrix effect. In this work, the CLEIA method was coupled with molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) synthesized by precipitation polymerization to study the matrix effect. The sample recoveries ranged from 72.62% to 121.89%, with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 3.74-18.14%.The ratio of the sample matrix-matched standard curve slope rate to the solvent standard curve slope was 1.21, 1.12, 1.17, and 0.85 for apple, rice, orange and cabbage in samples pretreated with the mixture of PSA and C 18 . However, the ratio of sample (apple, rice, orange, and cabbage) matrix-matched standard-MIPs curve slope rate to the solvent standard curve was 1.05, 0.92, 1.09, and 1.05 in samples pretreated with MIPs, respectively. The results demonstrated that the matrices of the samples greatly interfered with the detection of parathion residues by CLEIA. The MIPs bound specifically to the parathion in the samples and eliminated the matrix interference effect. Therefore, the CLEIA method have successfully applied MIPs in sample pretreatment to eliminate matrix interference effects and provided a new sensitive assay for agro-products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. New three-phase polymer-ceramic composite materials for miniaturized microwave antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Unique polymer-ceramic composites for microwave antenna applications were prepared via melt extrusion using high-density polyethylene (HDPE as the matrix and low-density polyethylene (LDPE coated BaO–Nd2O3–TiO2 (BNT ceramic-powders as the filler. By incorporating LDPE into the composites via a coating route, high ceramic-powder volume content (up to 50 vol% could be achieved. The composites exhibited good microwave dielectric and thermomechanical behaviors. As BNT ceramic content increased from 10 vol% to 50 vol%, the permittivity of the composites increased from 3.45 (9 GHz to 11.87 (7 GHz, while the dielectric loss remained lower than 0.0016. Microstrip antennas for applications in global positioning systems (GPS were designed and fabricated from the composites containing 50 vol% BNT ceramics. The results indicate that the composites that have suitable permittivity and low dielectric loss are promising candidates for applications in miniaturized microwave devices, such as antennas.

  19. Chemical and phase structure of poly cyanurate-polyurethane grafted semi interpenetrating polymer networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainleib, A.M.; Gomza, Yu.P.; Privalko, V.P.; Bershtein, V.A.; Carini, G.

    2001-01-01

    In this research the phase morphology and properties of dicyanate ester of bisphenol A (DCEBA) based poly cyanurate network (PCN) modified with linear polyurethane (LPU) were successfully studied by the combination of infra-red spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA), differential scanning calorimetry and laser-interferometric creep rate spectroscopy

  20. How do evaporating thin films evolve? Unravelling phase-separation mechanisms during solvent-based fabrication of polymer blends

    KAUST Repository

    Wodo, Olga

    2014-10-13

    © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. Solvent-based fabrication is a flexible and affordable approach to manufacture polymer thin films. The properties of products made from such films can be tailored by the internal organization (morphology) of the films. However, a precise knowledge of morphology evolution leading to the final film structure remains elusive, thus limiting morphology control to a trial and error approach. In particular, understanding when and where phases are formed, and how they evolve would provide rational guidelines for more rigorous control. Here, we identify four modes of phase formation and subsequent propagation within the thinning film during solvent-based fabrication. We unravel the origin and propagation characteristics of each of these modes. Finally, we construct a mode diagram that maps processing conditions with individual modes. The idea introduced here enables choosing processing conditions to tailor film morphology characteristics and paves the ground for a deeper understanding of morphology control with the ultimate goal of precise, yet affordable, morphology manipulation for a large spectrum of applications.

  1. How do evaporating thin films evolve? Unravelling phase-separation mechanisms during solvent-based fabrication of polymer blends

    KAUST Repository

    Wodo, Olga; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. Solvent-based fabrication is a flexible and affordable approach to manufacture polymer thin films. The properties of products made from such films can be tailored by the internal organization (morphology) of the films. However, a precise knowledge of morphology evolution leading to the final film structure remains elusive, thus limiting morphology control to a trial and error approach. In particular, understanding when and where phases are formed, and how they evolve would provide rational guidelines for more rigorous control. Here, we identify four modes of phase formation and subsequent propagation within the thinning film during solvent-based fabrication. We unravel the origin and propagation characteristics of each of these modes. Finally, we construct a mode diagram that maps processing conditions with individual modes. The idea introduced here enables choosing processing conditions to tailor film morphology characteristics and paves the ground for a deeper understanding of morphology control with the ultimate goal of precise, yet affordable, morphology manipulation for a large spectrum of applications.

  2. Simple fabrication of solid phase microextraction fiber employing nitrogen-doped ordered mesoporous polymer by in situ polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Juan; Liang, Yeru; Liu, Shuqin; Jiang, Ruifen; Zhu, Fang; Wu, Dingcai; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2016-01-04

    A combination of nitrogen-doped ordered mesoporous polymer (NOMP) and stainless steel wires led to highly sensitive, selective, and stable solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers by in situ polymerization for the first time. The ordered structure of synthesized NOMP coating was illustrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and microscopy analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed a homogenous morphology of the NOMP-coated fiber. The NOMP-coated fiber was further applied for the extraction of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) with direct-immersion solid-phase microextraction (DI-SPME) method followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) quantification. Under the optimized conditions, low detection limits (0.023-0.77 ng L(-1)), a wide linear range (9-1500 ng L(-1)), good repeatability (3.5-8.1%, n=6) and excellent reproducibility (1.5-8.3%, n=3) were achieved. Moreover, the practical feasibility of the proposed method was evaluated by determining OCPs in environmental water samples with satisfactory recoveries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Tensiometric investigation of the interaction and phase separation in a polymer mixture–ionic surfactant ternary system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAROSLAV M. KATONA

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction and phase separation in a ternary mixture composed of hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC, and sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS were investigated by tensiometry. Surface tension measurements of binary mixtures (0.7 % HPMC and 0.00–2.00 % SDS and of ternary mixtures (0.7 % HPMC, 0.3 % NaCMC, and 0.00–2.00 % SDS were performed. The measurements indicated interaction between HPMC and SDS, which resulted in HPMC–SDS complex formation. The critical association concentration, CAC, and polymer saturation point, PSP, were determined. Phase separation of ternary HPMC/SDS/NaCMC mixtures occurs at SDS concentration > CAC, i.e., when the HPMC–SDS complex is formed. The volume of the coacervate increases with increasing SDS concentration, and at SDS concentrations > 1.00 %, the coacervate vanishes. The surface tensions (s of ternary HPMC/SDS/NaCMC mixtures in the pre-coacervation region and at the onset of the coacervation region are similar to the σ of the corresponding binary HPMC–SDS mixtures, while in the coacervation and post coacervation region, they are close to the s of the corresponding SDS solutions

  4. Heat-transfer testing procedures in phase B shuttle studies with emphasis on phase change data improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throckmorton, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The procedures used in the application of the phase change technique to the phase B shuttle configuration are discussed along with factors which may affect data accuracy. These factors include variation of thermal properties of phase change model material, sensitivity of measured heat transfer coefficients to the assumed value of the adiabatic to total temperature ratio, and wall temperature effects. These sensitivities are illustrated in sample calculations for a shuttle geometry. Factors which may affect the visual clarity and interpretation of phase change data are discussed, and a method of improving photographic data quality through the use of polarized light is presented.

  5. Preparation and characterization of form-stable paraffin/polycaprolactone composites as phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aludin M.S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraffin is Phase Change Materials (PCM that possesses desirable properties such as high thermal energy storage and thermal stability to make it suitable for thermal energy storage applications. However, paraffin has been reported to leak out during the melting process. In this study, composites were prepared by dissolving paraffin and polycaprolactone (PCL at varied mass percent compositions in chloroform and then purified through precipitation techniques. The leakage test was conducted by placing the composite samples on a set of four-layer filter papers and left in a furnace at 90°C for 1 hour. By incorporating PCL into paraffin phase, the leakage mass percentage was drastically reduced. The PCL polymer matrix in the composites may have trapped the paraffin molecules during melting process thus prevent it from leaking.

  6. Phase Change Material Heat Sink for an ISS Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gregory; Stieber, Jesse; Sheth, Rubik; Ahlstrom, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A flight experiment is being constructed to utilize the persistent microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) to prove out operation of a microgravity compatible phase change material (PCM) heat sink. A PCM heat sink can help to reduce the overall mass and volume of future exploration spacecraft thermal control systems (TCS). The program is characterizing a new PCM heat sink that incorporates a novel phase management approach to prevent high pressures and structural deformation that often occur with PCM heat sinks undergoing cyclic operation in microgravity. The PCM unit was made using brazed aluminum construction with paraffin wax as the fusible material. It is designed to be installed into a propylene glycol and water cooling loop, with scaling consistent with the conceptual designs for the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. This paper reports on the construction of the PCM heat sink and on initial ground test results conducted at UTC Aerospace Systems prior to delivery to NASA. The prototype will be tested later on the ground and in orbit via a self-contained experiment package developed by NASA Johnson Space Center to operate in an ISS EXPRESS rack.

  7. Phase Change Energy Storage Material Suitable for Solar Heating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Li, Haihua; Zhang, Lihui; Liu, Zhenfa

    2018-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to investigate the thermal properties of palmitic acid, myristic acid, laurel acid and the binary composite of palmitic/laurel acid and palmitic/myristic acid. The results showed that the phase transition temperatures of the three monomers were between 46.9-65.9°C, and the latent heats were above 190 J/g, which could be used as solar energy storage material. When the mass ratio of Palmitic acid and myristic was 1:1, the eutectic mixture could be formed. The latent heat of the eutectic mixture was 186.6 J/g, the melting temperature and the solidification temperature was 50.6°C and 43.8°C respectively. The latent heat of phase change and the melting temperature had not obvious variations after 400 thermal cycles, which proved that the binary composite had good thermal stability and was suitable for solar floor radiant heating system.

  8. Combined conduction and radiation with phase change in teflon slabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, T.M.; Hsu, I.C.; Cunnington, G.R. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A new approach to investigate, numerically, an one-dimensional Stefan problem with combined radiation and conduction has been developed. This numerical scheme is a modified version of the heat flux method and the scheme tracks the moving phase changing interface by coordinate transformation. The physical problem involves the radiative heating on one side of a Teflon slab; causing the material to melt and sublime as the melt-solid interface recedes. The other side of the Teflon slab is insulated. The results of this numerical scheme has been compared with results reported in the literature; before attempting to use this scheme to predict the experimental data. Satisfactory agreement between numerical results and the results in the literature as well as the experimental data has been obtained in both comparisons

  9. Electric vehicles batteries thermal management systems employing phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianniciello, Lucia; Biwolé, Pascal Henry; Achard, Patrick

    2018-02-01

    Battery thermal management is necessary for electric vehicles (EVs), especially for Li-ion batteries, due to the heat dissipation effects on those batteries. Usually, air or coolant circuits are employed as thermal management systems in Li-ion batteries. However, those systems are expensive in terms of investment and operating costs. Phase change materials (PCMs) may represent an alternative which could be cheaper and easier to operate. In fact, PCMs can be used as passive or semi-passive systems, enabling the global system to sustain near-autonomous operations. This article presents the previous developments introducing PCMs for EVs battery cooling. Different systems are reviewed and solutions are proposed to enhance PCMs efficiency in those systems.

  10. Characterization of Concrete Mixes Containing Phase Change Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksoy, H.; Kardas, G.; Konuklu, Y.; Cellat, K.; Tezcan, F.

    2017-10-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) can be used in passive building applications to achieve near zero energy building goals. For this purpose PCM can be added in building structures and materials in different forms. Direct incorporation, form stabilization and microencapsulation are different forms used for PCM integration in building materials. In addition to thermal properties of PCM itself, there are several other criteria that need to be fulfilled for the PCM enhanced building materials. Mechanical properties, corrosive effects, morphology and thermal buffering have to be determined for reliable and long-term applications in buildings. This paper aims to give an overview of characterization methods used to determine these properties in PCM added fresh concrete mixes. Thermal, compressive strength, corrosion, and microscopic test results for concrete mixes with PCM are discussed.

  11. Modeling of subcooling and solidification of phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Eva; Mehling, Harald; Hiebler, Stefan

    2007-12-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) are able to store thermal energy in small temperature intervals very efficiently due to their high latent heat. Particularly high storage capacity is found in salt hydrates. Salt hydrates however often show subcooling, thus inhibiting the release of the stored heat. In the state of the art simulations of PCM, the effect of subcooling is almost always neglected. This is a practicable approach for small subcooling, but it is problematic for subcooling in the order of the driving temperature gradient on unloading the storage. In this paper, we first present a new algorithm to simulate subcooling in a physically proper way. Then, we present a parametric study to demonstrate the main features of the algorithm and a comparison of computed and experimentally obtained data. The new algorithm should be particularly useful in simulating applications with low cooling rates, for example building applications.

  12. Color printing enabled by phase change materials on paper substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Kai Ji

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We have coated phase change materials (PCMs on rough and flexible substrates to achieve multicolor changeable devices. The principle of the device is based on an earlier discovery that lights have strong interference effect in PCM films, leading to various colors by reflection. In this work, paper substrates are laminated by parylene layers to protect the device from water before coated with functional PCM films. The PCM-based color printing (PCP on paper is not affected by rough surfaces and shows a similar color appearance as that on smooth surfaces. In particular, the color-printed device can be patterned by UV lithography to display a clear and tunable optical image, and it exhibits a low sensitivity to the angle of view. Such PCP has potential applications for low-cost, disposable, and flexible displays.

  13. Review on phase change materials for building applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia SOCACIU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In nowadays, the Phase Change Material (PCM is a viable alternative for reducing the energy consumption and for increase the thermal comfort in buildings. The use of PCM in building applications provides the potential to increase the indoor thermal comfort for occupants due to the reduced indoor temperature fluctuations and lower global energy consumption. The possibility to incorporate the PCM into the material of construction for cooling and heating the buildings gained the interest of researchers from all the world because the PCM have a high heat of fusion, meaning it is capable to storing and release large amounts of energy in the form of heat during its melting and solidifying process at a specific temperature.

  14. Color printing enabled by phase change materials on paper substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hong-Kai; Tong, Hao; Qian, Hang; Liu, Nian; Xu, Ming; Miao, Xiang-Shui

    2017-12-01

    We have coated phase change materials (PCMs) on rough and flexible substrates to achieve multicolor changeable devices. The principle of the device is based on an earlier discovery that lights have strong interference effect in PCM films, leading to various colors by reflection. In this work, paper substrates are laminated by parylene layers to protect the device from water before coated with functional PCM films. The PCM-based color printing (PCP) on paper is not affected by rough surfaces and shows a similar color appearance as that on smooth surfaces. In particular, the color-printed device can be patterned by UV lithography to display a clear and tunable optical image, and it exhibits a low sensitivity to the angle of view. Such PCP has potential applications for low-cost, disposable, and flexible displays.

  15. Investigation of switching region in superlattice phase change memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyanagi, T.; Takaura, N.

    2016-10-01

    We investigated superlattice phase change memories (PCMs) to clarify which regions were responsible for switching. We observed atomic structures in a superlattice PCM film with a stack of GeTe / Sb2Te3 layers using atomically resolved EDX maps, and we found an intermixed region with three atom species of the Ge, Sb and Te around the top GeTe layer under the top electrode. We also found that a device with a GeTe layer on an Sb2Te3 layer without superlattice structure had the same switching characteristics as a device with a superlattice PCM, that had the same top GeTe layer. We developed and fabricated a modified superlattice PCM that attained ultra low Reset / Set currents under 60 μ A .

  16. Highly selective solid phase extraction and preconcentration of Azathioprine with nano-sized imprinted polymer based on multivariate optimization and its trace determination in biological and pharmaceutical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davarani, Saied Saeed Hosseiny; Rezayati zad, Zeinab; Taheri, Ali Reza; Rahmatian, Nasrin

    2017-01-01

    In this research, for first time selective separation and determination of Azathioprine is demonstrated using molecularly imprinted polymer as the solid-phase extraction adsorbent, measured by spectrophotometry at λ max 286 nm. The selective molecularly imprinted polymer was produced using Azathioprine and methacrylic acid as a template molecule and monomer, respectively. A molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction procedure was performed in column for the analyte from pharmaceutical and serum samples. The synthesized polymers were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (IR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). In order to investigate the effect of independent variables on the extraction efficiency, the response surface methodology (RSM) based on Box–Behnken design (BBD) was employed. The analytical parameters such as precision, accuracy and linear working range were also determined in optimal experimental conditions and the proposed method was applied to analysis of Azathioprine. The linear dynamic range and limits of detection were 2.5–0.01 and 0.008 mg L ‐1 respectively. The recoveries for analyte were higher than 95% and relative standard deviation values were found to be in the range of 0.83–4.15%. This method was successfully applied for the determination of Azathioprine in biological and pharmaceutical samples. - Graphical abstract: A new-nano sized imprinted polymer was synthesized and applied as sorbent in SPE in order to selective recognition, preconcentration, and determination of Azathioprine with the response surface methodology based on Box–Behnken design and was successfully investigated for the clean-up of human blood serum and pharmaceutical samples. - Highlights: • The nanosized-imprinted polymer has been synthesized by precipitation polymerization technique. • A molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction procedure was performed for determination of Azathioprine. • The Azathioprine-molecular imprinting

  17. Pickering emulsion: A novel template for microencapsulated phase change materials with polymer–silica hybrid shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Dezhong; Ma, Li; Liu, Jinjie; Zhang, Qiuyu

    2014-01-01

    MePCMs (microencapsulated phase change materials) with covalently bonded SiO 2 /polymer hybrid as shell were fabricated via Pickering emulsion polymerization stabilized solely by organically-modified SiO 2 particles. Morphology and core–shell structure of these microcapsules were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermal properties of microencapsulated 1-dodecanol were determined using DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) and TGA (thermal gravimetric analysis). The results indicate that mass ratio of St (styrene)/DVB (divinylbenzene)/dodecanol has great effect on the morphology, inner structure, microencapsulation efficiency and durability of resultant MePCMs. When ratio of St/DVB/dodecanol was 5/1/12, dodecanol content of as much as 62.8% is obtained and the utility efficiency of dodecanol reaches 94.2%. The prepared MePCMs present good durability and thermal reliability. 2.2% of core material leached away the microcapsule after suspended in water for 10 days and 5.8% of core material leached after 2000 accelerated thermal cycling. Our study demonstrated that Pickering emulsion polymerization is a simple and robust method for the preparation of MePCMs with polymer–inorganic hybrids as shell. - Highlights: • We fabricated MePCM via surfactant-free Pickering emulsion polymerization. • The shell of MePCM was composed of PS/SiO 2 organic–inorganic hybrids. • The phase change enthalpy of MePCM is 125.0 J g −1 and the utility efficiency of 1-dodecanol reached 94.2%. • Only 2.2% and 5.8% of core material lost after durability test and 2000 accelerated thermal cycling respectively

  18. Use of two-phase aqueous systems based on water-soluble polymers in thin-layer and extraction chromatography for recovery and separtion of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molochnikova, N.P.; Shkinev, V.M.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility has been demonstrated of using two-phase aqueous systems based on water-soluble polymers, polyethylene glycol and dextran sulfate, in thin-layer and extraction chromatography for recovery and separation of actinides. A convenient method has been proposed for continuous recovery of 239 Np from 243 Am, originating from differences in sorption of tri- and pentavalent actinides from sulfate solutions containing potassium phosphotungstate by silica gel impregnated with polyethylene glycol. New plates for thin-layer chromatography using water-soluble polymers have been developed. These plates were used to study behavior of americium in various oxidation states in thin sorbent layers

  19. Sb-Te Phase-change Materials under Nanoscale Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihalawela, Chandrasiri A.

    Size, speed and efficiency are the major challenges of next generation nonvolatile memory (NVM), and phase-change memory (PCM) has captured a great attention due to its promising features. The key for PCM is rapid and reversible switching between amorphous and crystalline phases with optical or electrical excitation. The structural transition is associated with significant contrast in material properties which can be utilized in optical (CD, DVD, BD) and electronic (PCRAM) memory applications. Importantly, both the functionality and the success of PCM technology significantly depend on the core material and its properties. So investigating PC materials is crucial for the development of PCM technology to realized enhanced solutions. In regards to PC materials, Sb-Te binary plays a significant role as a basis to the well-known Ge-Sb-Te system. Unlike the conventional deposition methods (sputtering, evaporation), electrochemical deposition method is used due to its multiple advantages, such as conformality, via filling capability, etc. First, the controllable synthesis of Sb-Te thin films was studied for a wide range of compositions using this novel deposition method. Secondly, the solid electrolytic nature of stoichiometric Sb2Te3 was studied with respect to precious metals. With the understanding of 2D thin film synthesis, Sb-Te 1D nanowires (18 - 220 nm) were synthesized using templated electrodeposition, where nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) was used as a template for the growth of nanowires. In order to gain the controllability over the deposition in high aspect ratio structures, growth mechanisms of both the thin films and nanowires were investigated. Systematic understanding gained thorough previous studies helped to formulate the ultimate goal of this dissertation. In this dissertation, the main objective is to understand the size effect of PC materials on their phase transition properties. The reduction of effective memory cell size in conjunction with

  20. Alcohol vapour detection at the three phase interface using enzyme-conducting polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther-Jensen, Orawan; Kerr, Robert; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn

    2014-02-15

    Immobilisation of enzymes on a breathable electrode can be useful for various applications where the three-phase interface between gas or chemical vapour, electrolyte and electrode is crucial for the reaction. In this paper, we report the further development of the breathable electrode concept by immobilisation of alcohol dehydrogenase into vapour-phase polymerised poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) that has been coated onto a breathable membrane. Typical alcohol sensing, whereby the coenzyme β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is employed as a redox-mediator, was successfully used as a model reaction for the oxidation of ethanol. This indicates that the ethanol vapour from the backside of the membrane has access to the active enzyme embedded in the electrode. The detecting range of the sensor is suitable for the detection of ethanol in fruit juices and for the baseline breath ethanol concentration of drunken driving. After continuous operation for 4.5h the system only showed a 20% decrease in the current output. The electrodes maintained 62% in current output after being refrigerated for 76 days. This work is continuing the progress of the immobilisation of specific enzymes for certain electrochemical reactions whereby the three-phase interface has to be maintained and/or the simultaneous separation of gas from liquid is required. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of x-Linkable Polymer Blends on Phase Morphology and Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun; Wan, Grace; Keene, Ellen; Harris, Joseph; Zhang, Sipei; Anderson, Stephanie; Li Pi Shan, Colin

    Adhesion to dissimilar substrate is highly important to multiple industrial applications such as automotive adhesives, food packaging, transportation etc. Adhesive design has to include components that are affinity to both substrates, e.g. high surface energy polar and low surface non-polar substrates. Typically, these adhesive components are thermodynamically incompatible with each other, leading to macrophase separation and thus adhesive failure. By using functional adhesive components plus some additives, the adhesive can be in-situ cross-linked to prevent the macrophase separation with controlled phase morphology. Herein, we present the study on a cross-linkable adhesive formulation consisting of acrylic emulsion and polyolefin aqueous dispersion with additives for enhancing cross-linking and controlled phase morphologies. Contact angle measurement and ATR-IR spectroscopy are used to characterize the properties of adhesive surface. DMA is used to study the mechanical property of adhesive before and after cross-linking. The detailed phase morphologies are revealed by AFM, SEM and TEM. The resulting adhesive morphologies are correlated with the adhesive performance to establish structure-property relationship.

  2. Young's modulus and residual stress of GeSbTe phase-change thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazeer, H.; Bhaskaran, Harish; Woldering, L.A.; Abelmann, Leon

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of phase change materials alter when the phase is transformed. In this paper, we report on experiments that determine the change in crucial parameters such as Young's modulus and residual stress for two of the most widely employed compositions of phase change films,

  3. In situ diagnostic of two-phase flow phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells by neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianbo; Kramer, Denis; Shimoi, Ryoichi; Ono, Yoshitaka; Lehmann, Eberhard; Wokaun, Alexander; Shinohara, Kazuhiko; Scherer, Guenther G.

    2006-01-01

    The formation of liquid water in operating polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) of industrial and laboratory size has been investigated by in situ neutron imaging. The influence of the materials chosen for the structural components of the cell on droplet formation and transport in flow fields and on liquid formation in gas diffusion layers has been studied. The changing of the cathodic gas diffusion layer material allowed the relationship between materials, liquid accumulation, and electrochemical performance to be examined. It has been shown that material choice has considerable bearing on the presence of liquid inside the porous structures and the electrochemical characteristics. A simplified quasi one-dimensional cell with an active area of 25 cm 2 was used for materials comparison, and the results were related to technically relevant operating conditions - where inhomogeneities have to be considered - by subsequent examination of cells with an active area of 100 cm 2

  4. Temporal viscosity modulations driven by a pH sensitive polymer coupled to a pH-changing chemical reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escala, D M; Muñuzuri, A P; De Wit, A; Carballido-Landeira, J

    2017-05-17

    The Formaldehyde-Sulfite (FS) and the Formaldehyde-Sulfite-Gluconolactone (FSG) systems are examples of complex chemical reactions accompanied by well-controlled variations in pH. While the FS system exhibits a clock behavior, in the FSG reaction, this mechanism is coupled with the hydrolysis of the gluconolactone which gives the possibility to show large temporal oscillations of pH in an open reactor. In this work, we show how these reactive systems, due to their organic nature, can be coupled with pH sensitive polymers, particularly with polyacrylic acid (PAA) to trigger temporal changes of viscosity. We characterize this coupled reactive system showing the effects of changes in the initial concentrations of the polymer and in the chemical reagents on the induction time, the magnitude of the pH variations and the temporal modifications of the viscosity.

  5. Phase change thermal control materials, method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for metabolic cooling and insulation of a user in a cold environment. In its preferred embodiment the apparatus is a highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The apparatus can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The apparatus may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the apparatus also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  6. Flexible composite material with phase change thermal storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The composite material can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The composite may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the PCM composite also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, ,gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  7. Si-Sb-Te materials for phase change memory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Feng; Song Zhitang; Ren Kun; Zhou Xilin; Cheng Yan; Wu Liangcai; Liu Bo

    2011-01-01

    Si-Sb-Te materials including Te-rich Si 2 Sb 2 Te 6 and Si x Sb 2 Te 3 with different Si contents have been systemically studied with the aim of finding the most suitable Si-Sb-Te composition for phase change random access memory (PCRAM) use. Si x Sb 2 Te 3 shows better thermal stability than Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 or Si 2 Sb 2 Te 6 in that Si x Sb 2 Te 3 does not have serious Te separation under high annealing temperature. As Si content increases, the data retention ability of Si x Sb 2 Te 3 improves. The 10 years retention temperature for Si 3 Sb 2 Te 3 film is ∼ 393 K, which meets the long-term data storage requirements of automotive electronics. In addition, Si richer Si x Sb 2 Te 3 films also show improvement on thickness change upon annealing and adhesion on SiO 2 substrate compared to those of Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 or Si 2 Sb 2 Te 6 films. However, the electrical performance of PCRAM cells based on Si x Sb 2 Te 3 films with x > 3.5 becomes worse in terms of stable and long-term operations. Si x Sb 2 Te 3 materials with 3 < x < 3.5 are proved to be suitable for PCRAM use to ensure good overall performance.

  8. FPGA-based prototype storage system with phase change memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gezi; Chen, Xiaogang; Chen, Bomy; Li, Shunfen; Zhou, Mi; Han, Wenbing; Song, Zhitang

    2016-10-01

    With the ever-increasing amount of data being stored via social media, mobile telephony base stations, and network devices etc. the database systems face severe bandwidth bottlenecks when moving vast amounts of data from storage to the processing nodes. At the same time, Storage Class Memory (SCM) technologies such as Phase Change Memory (PCM) with unique features like fast read access, high density, non-volatility, byte-addressability, positive response to increasing temperature, superior scalability, and zero standby leakage have changed the landscape of modern computing and storage systems. In such a scenario, we present a storage system called FLEET which can off-load partial or whole SQL queries to the storage engine from CPU. FLEET uses an FPGA rather than conventional CPUs to implement the off-load engine due to its highly parallel nature. We have implemented an initial prototype of FLEET with PCM-based storage. The results demonstrate that significant performance and CPU utilization gains can be achieved by pushing selected query processing components inside in PCM-based storage.

  9. Phase behavior of diblock copolymer/star-shaped polymer thin film mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junnan; Sakellariou, Georgios; Green, Peter F

    2016-05-07

    We investigated the phase behavior of thin film, thickness h≈ 100 nm, mixtures of a polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) diblock copolymer with star-shaped polystyrene (SPS) molecules of varying functionalities f, where 4 ≤f≤ 64, and molecular weights per arm Marm. The miscibility of the system and the surface composition varied appreciably with Marm and f. For large values of Marm, regardless of f, the miscibility of the system was qualitatively similar to that of linear chain PS/PS-b-P2VP mixtures - the copolymer chains aggregate to form micelles, each composed of an inner P2VP core and PS corona, which preferentially segregate to the free surface. On the other hand, for large f and small Marm, SPS molecules preferentially resided at the free surface. Moreover, blends containing SPS molecules with the highest values of f and lowest values of Marm were phase separated. These observations are rationalized in terms of competing entropic interactions and the dependence of the surface tension of the star-shaped molecules on Marm and f.

  10. Solar-absorbing metamaterial microencapsulation of phase change materials for thermo-regulating textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Tong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel concept for designing solar-absorbing metamaterial microcapsules of phase change materials (PCMs integrated with thermo-regulating smart textiles intended for coats or garments, especially for wear in space or cold weather on earth. The metamaterial is a periodically nanostructured metal-dielectric-metal thin film and can acquire surface plasmons to trap or absorb solar energy at subwavelength scales. This kind of metamaterial microencapsulation is not only able to take advantage of latent heat that can be stored or released from the PCMs over a tunable temperature range, but also has other advantages over conventional polymer microencapsulation of PCMs, such as enhanced thermal conductivity, improved flame-retardant capabilities, and usage as an extra solar power resource. The thermal analysis for this kind of microencapsulation has been done and can be used as a guideline for designing integrated thermo-regulating smart textiles in the future. These metamaterial microcapsules may open up new routes to enhancing thermo-regulating textiles with novel properties and added value.

  11. Selective Dispersive Solid Phase Extraction of Ser-traline Using Surface Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Grafted on SiO2/Graphene Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Khalilian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A surface molecularly imprinted dispersive solid phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography–ultraviolet detection is proposed as a selective and fast clean-up technique for the determination of sertraline in biological sample. Surface sertraline-molecular imprinted polymer was grafted and synthesized on the SiO2/graphene oxide surface. Firstly SiO2 was coated on synthesized graphene oxide sheet using sol-gel technique. Prior to polymerization, the vinyl group was incorporated on to the surface of SiO2/graphene oxide to direct selective polymerization on the surface. Methacrylic acid, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and ethanol were used as monomer, cross-linker and progen, respectively. Non-imprinted polymer was also prepared for comparing purposes. The properties of the molecular imprinted polymer were characterized using field emission-scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy methods. The surface molecular imprinted polymer was utilized as an adsorbent of dispersive solid phase extraction for separation and preconcentration of sertraline. The effects of the different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency, such as sample pH were investigated and optimized. The specificity of the molecular imprinted polymer over the non-imprinted polymer was examined in absence and presence of competitive drugs. Sertraline calibration curve showed linearity in the ranges 1–500 µg L-1. The limits of detection and quantification under optimized conditions were obtained 0.2 and 0.5 µg L-1. The within-day and between-day relative standard deviations (n=3 were 4.3 and 7.1%, respectively. Furthermore, the relative recoveries for spiked biological samples were above 92%.

  12. A new ion imprinted polymer based on Ru(III)-thiobarbituric acid complex for solid phase extraction of ruthenium(III) prior to its determination by ETAAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrzycka, Elżbieta; Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2014-01-01

    A new ruthenium ion imprinted polymer was prepared from the Ru(III) 2-thiobarbituric acid complex (the template), methacrylic acid or acrylamide (the functional monomers), and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (the cross-linking agent) using 2,2′-azobisisobutyronitrile as the radical initiator. The ion imprinted polymer was characterized and used as a selective sorbent for the solid phase extraction of Ru(III) ions. The effects of type of functional monomer, sample volume, solution pH and flow rate on the extraction efficiency were studied in the dynamic mode. Ru(III) ion was quantitatively retained on the sorbents in the pH range from 3.5 to 10, and can be eluted with 4 mol L−1 aqueous ammonia. The affinity of Ru(III) for the ion imprinted polymer based on the acrylamide monomer is weaker than that for the polymer based on the methacrylic acid monomer, which therefore was used in interference studies and in analytical applications. Following extraction of Ru(III) ions with the imprint and their subsequent elution from the polymer with aqueous ammonia, Ru(III) was detected by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with a detection limit of 0.21 ng mL −1 . The method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of Ru(III) in water, waste, road dust and platinum ore (CRM SARM 76) with a reproducibility (expressed as RSD) below 6.4 %. (author)

  13. Ex situ remediation of polluted soils by absorptive polymers, and a comparison of slurry and two-phase partitioning bioreactors for ultimate contaminant degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, M Concetta; Mosca Angelucci, Domenica; Annesini, M Cristina; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2013-11-15

    The present study has provided a comparison between a conventional ex situ method for the treatment of contaminated soil, a soil slurry bioreactor, with a novel technology in which a contaminant is rapidly and effectively removed from the soil by means of absorptive polymer beads, which are then added to a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) for biodegradation of the target molecule. 4-nitrophenol (4NP) was selected as a model contaminant, being representative of a large class of xenobiotics, and the DuPont thermoplastic Hytrel™ 8206 was utilized for its extraction from soil over ranges of soil contamination level, soil moisture content, and polymer:soil ratios. Since the polymers were able to rapidly (up to 77% and 85% in 4 and 24h respectively) and selectively remove the contaminant, the soil retained its nutrient and microflora content, which is in contrast to soil washing which can remove these valuable soil resources. After 4h of reaction time, the TPPB system demonstrated removal efficiency four times higher (77% vs 20%) than the slurry system, with expected concomitant savings in time and energy. A volumetric removal rate of 75 mg4NPh(-1) L(-1) was obtained in the TPPB, significantly greater than the value of 1.7 obtained in the slurry bioreactor. The polymers were readily regenerated for subsequent reuse, demonstrating the versatility of the polymer-based soil treatment technology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A new strategy to engineer polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells with thick active layers via self-assembly of the tertiary columnar phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongfei; Yang, Zhenhua; Pan, Cheng; Jiang, Naisheng; Satija, Sushil K; Xu, Di; Gersappe, Dilip; Nam, Chang-Yong; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2017-08-17

    We report that the addition of a non-photoactive tertiary polymer phase in the binary bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cell leads to a self-assembled columnar nanostructure, enhancing the charge mobilities and photovoltaic efficiency with surprisingly increased optimal active blend thicknesses over 300 nm, 3-4 times larger than that of the binary counterpart. Using the prototypical poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):fullerene blend as a model BHJ system, we discover that the inert poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) added in the binary BHJ blend self-assembles into vertical columns, which not only template the phase segregation of electron acceptor fullerenes but also induce the out-of-plane rotation of the edge-on-orientated crystalline P3HT phase. Using complementary interrogation methods including neutron reflectivity, X-ray scattering, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the enhanced charge transport originates from the more randomized molecular stacking of the P3HT phase and the spontaneous segregation of fullerenes at the P3HT/PMMA interface, driven by the high surface tension between the two polymeric components. The results demonstrate a potential method for increasing the thicknesses of high-performance polymer BHJ solar cells with improved photovoltaic efficiency, alleviating the burden of stringently controlling the ultrathin blend thickness during the roll-to-roll-type large-area manufacturing environment.

  15. Development of Phase Change Materials for RF Switch Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew Russell

    For decades chalcogenide-based phase change materials (PCMs) have been reliably implemented in optical storage and digital memory platforms. Owing to the substantial differences in optical and electronic properties between crystalline and amorphous states, device architectures requiring a "1" and "0" or "ON" and "OFF" states are attainable with PCMs if a method for amorphizing and crystallizing the PCM is demonstrated. Taking advantage of more than just the binary nature of PCM electronic properties, recent reports have shown that the near-metallic resistivity of some PCMs allow one to manufacture high performance RF switches and related circuit technologies. One of the more promising RF switch technologies is the Inline Phase Change Switch (IPCS) which utilizes GeTe as the active material. Initial reports show that an electrically isolated, thermally coupled thin film heater can successfully convert GeTe between crystalline and amorphous states, and with proper design an RF figure of merit cutoff frequency (FCO) of 12.5 THz can be achieved. In order to realize such world class performance a significant development effort was undertaken to understand the relationship between fundamental GeTe properties, thin film deposition method and resultant device properties. Deposition pressure was found to be the most important deposition process parameter, as it was found to control Ge:Te ratio, oxygen content, Ar content, film density and surface roughness. Ultimately a first generation deposition process produced GeTe films with a crystalline resistivity of 3 ohm-mum. Upon implementing these films into IPCS devices, post-cycling morphological analysis was undertaken using STEM and related analyses. It was revealed that massive structural changes occur in the GeTe during switching, most notably the formation of an assembly of voids along the device centerline and large GeTe grains on either side of the so-called active region. Restructuring of this variety was tied to

  16. A stretchable polymer-carbon nanotube composite electrode for flexible lithium-ion batteries: porosity engineering by controlled phase separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hojun; Yoo, Jung-Keun; Jung, Yeon Sik [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong-Hyun [Material R and D Department, LG Display Co., Ltd., Paju-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Ho [Icheon Branch, Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology, Icheon-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Kisuk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Flexible energy-storage devices have attracted growing attention with the fast development of bendable electronic systems. However, it still remains a challenge to find reliable electrode materials with both high mechanical flexibility/toughness and excellent electron and lithium-ion conductivity. This paper reports the fabrication and characterization of highly porous, stretchable, and conductive polymer nanocomposites embedded with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for application in flexible lithium-ion batteries. The systematic optimization of the porous morphology is performed by controllably inducing the phase separation of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and removing PMMA, in order to generate well-controlled pore networks. It is demonstrated that the porous CNT-embedded PDMS nanocomposites are capable of good electrochemical performance with mechanical flexibility, suggesting these nanocomposites could be outstanding anode candidates for use in flexible lithium-ion batteries. The optimization of the pore size and the volume fraction provides higher capacity by nearly seven-fold compared to a nonporous nanocomposite. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Observation of Nanostructural Changes in Phase-Change Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Meister, Stefan

    2011-04-26

    Phase-change memory (PCM) has been researched extensively as a promising alternative to flash memory. Important studies have focused on its scalability, switching speed, endurance, and new materials. Still, reliability issues and inconsistent switching in PCM devices motivate the need to further study its fundamental properties. However, many investigations treat PCM cells as black boxes; nanostructural changes inside the devices remain hidden. Here, using in situ transmission electron microscopy, we observe real-time nanostructural changes in lateral Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) PCM bridges during switching. We find that PCM devices with similar resistances can exhibit distinct threshold switching behaviors due to the different initial distribution of nanocrystalline and amorphous domains, explaining variability of switching behaviors of PCM cells in the literature. Our findings show a direct correlation between nanostructure and switching behavior, providing important guidelines in the design and operation of future PCM devices with improved endurance and lower variability. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  19. Continued Water-Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott W.; Sheth, Rubik B.; Poynot, Joe; Giglio, Tony; Ungar, Gene K.

    2015-01-01

    In a cyclical heat load environment such as low Lunar orbit, a spacecraft's radiators are not sized to meet the full heat rejection demands. Traditionally, a supplemental heat rejection device (SHReD) such as an evaporator or sublimator is used to act as a "topper" to meet the additional heat rejection demands. Utilizing a Phase Change Material (PCM) heat exchanger (HX) as a SHReD provides an attractive alternative to evaporators and sublimators as PCM HX's do not use a consumable, thereby leading to reduced launch mass and volume requirements. In continued pursuit of water PCM HX development two full-scale, Orion sized water-based PCM HX's were constructed by Mezzo Technologies. These HX's were designed by applying prior research on freeze front propagation to a full-scale design. Design options considered included bladder restraint and clamping mechanisms, bladder manufacturing, tube patterns, fill/drain methods, manifold dimensions, weight optimization, and midplate designs. Two units, Units A and B, were constructed and differed only in their midplate design. Both units failed multiple times during testing. This report highlights learning outcomes from these tests and are applied to a final sub-scale PCM HX which is slated to be tested on the ISS in early 2017.

  20. Bonding in phase change materials: concepts and misconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. O.

    2018-04-01

    Bonding concepts originating in chemistry are surveyed from a condensed matter perspective, beginning around 1850 with ‘valence’ and the word ‘bond’ itself. The analysis of chemical data in the 19th century resulted in astonishing progress in understanding the connectivity and stereochemistry of molecules, almost without input from physicists until the development of quantum mechanics in 1925 and afterwards. The valence bond method popularized by Pauling and the molecular orbital methods of Hund, Mulliken, Bloch, and Hückel play major roles in the subsequent development, as does the central part played by the kinetic energy in covalent bonding (Ruedenberg and others). ‘Metallic’ (free electron) and related approaches, including pseudopotential and density functional theories, have been remarkably successful in understanding structures and bonding in molecules and solids. We discuss these concepts in the context of phase change materials, which involve the rapid and reversible transition between amorphous and crystalline states, and note the confusion that some have caused, in particular ‘resonance’ and ‘resonant bonding’.

  1. Study of Phase Change Materials Applied to CPV Receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zun-Hao Shih

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are lots of factors which can directly affect output efficiency of photovoltaic device. One of them is high temperature which would cause adverse effect to solar cell. When solar cell is operated in high temperature, the cell’s output efficiency will become low. Therefore, improving thermal spreading of solar cell is an important issue. In this study, we focused on finding new materials to enhance the thermal dispreading and keep the temperature of solar cell as low as possible. The new materials are different from conventional metal ones; they are called “phase change materials (PCMs” which are mainly applied to green buildings. We chose two kinds of PSMs to study their thermal dispreading ability and to compare them with traditional aluminum material. These two kinds of PCMs are wax and lauric acid. We made three aluminum-based cuboids as heat sinking units and two of them were designed with hollow space to fill in the PCMs. We applied electric forward bias on solar cells to simulate the heat contributed from the concentrated sunlight. Then we observed the thermal distribution of these three kinds of thermal spreading materials. Two levels of forward biases were chosen to test the samples and analyze the experiment results.

  2. Modeling of MEMS Mirrors Actuated by Phase-Change Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Torres

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Given the multiple applications for micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS mirror devices, most of the research efforts are focused on improving device performance in terms of tilting angles, speed, and their integration into larger arrays or systems. The modeling of these devices is crucial for enabling a platform, in particular, by allowing for the future control of such devices. In this paper, we present the modeling of a MEMS mirror structure with four actuators driven by the phase-change of a thin film. The complexity of the device structure and the nonlinear behavior of the actuation mechanism allow for a comprehensive study that encompasses simpler electrothermal designs, thus presenting a general approach that can be adapted to most MEMS mirror designs based on this operation principle. The MEMS mirrors presented in this work are actuated by Joule heating and tested using optical techniques. Mechanical and thermal models including both pitch and roll displacements are developed by combining theoretical analysis (using both numerical and analytical tools with experimental data and subsequently verifying with quasi-static and dynamic experiments.

  3. Radiation and phase change of lithium fluoride in an annulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Kurt O.

    1993-01-01

    A one-dimensional thermal model is developed to evaluate the effect of radiation on the phase change of lithium-fluoride (LiF) in an annular canister under gravitational and microgravitational conditions. Specified heat flux at the outer wall of the canister models focused solar flux; adiabatic and convective conditions are considered for the inner wall. A two-band radiation model is used for the combined-mode heat transfer within the canister, and LiF optical properties relate metal surface properties in vacuum to those in LiF. For axial gravitational conditions, the liquid LiF remains in contact with the two bounding walls, whereas a void gap is used at the outer wall to model possible microgravitational conditions. For the adiabatic cases, exact integrals are obtained for the time required for complete melting of the LiF. Melting was found to occur primarily from the outer wall in the 1-g model, whereas it occurred primarily from the inner wall in the mu-g model. For the convective cases, partially melted steady-state conditions and fully melted conditions are determined to depend on the source flux level, with radiation extending the melting times.

  4. Automated first-principles mapping for phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Marc; Maintz, Stefan; Dronskowski, Richard

    2017-04-05

    Plotting materials on bi-coordinate maps according to physically meaningful descriptors has a successful tradition in computational solid-state science spanning more than four decades. Equipped with new ab initio techniques introduced in this work, we generate an improved version of the treasure map for phase-change materials (PCMs) as introduced previously by Lencer et al. which, other than before, charts all industrially used PCMs correctly. Furthermore, we suggest seven new PCM candidates, namely SiSb 4 Te 7 , Si 2 Sb 2 Te 5 , SiAs 2 Te 4 , PbAs 2 Te 4 , SiSb 2 Te 4 , Sn 2 As 2 Te 5 , and PbAs 4 Te 7 , to be used as synthetic targets. To realize aforementioned maps based on orbital mixing (or "hybridization") and ionicity coordinates, structural information was first included into an ab initio numerical descriptor for sp 3 orbital mixing and then generalized beyond high-symmetry structures. In addition, a simple, yet powerful quantum-mechanical ionization measure also including structural information was introduced. Taken together, these tools allow for (automatically) generating materials maps solely relying on first-principles calculations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Enhanced laminated composite phase change material for energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darkwa, J.; Zhou, T. [Centre for Sustainable Energy Technologies (CSET), The University of Nottingham Ningbo, 199 Taikang East Road, Ningbo 315100 (China)

    2011-02-15

    This paper summarises studies undertaken towards the development of a laminated composite aluminium/hexadecane phase change material (PCM) drywall based on previous analytical work. The study also covered the selection and testing of various types of adhesive materials and identified Polyvinyl acetate (PVA) material as a suitable bonding material. For the purpose of comparison pure hexadecane and composite aluminium/hexadecane samples were developed and tested. The test results revealed faster thermal response by the aluminium/hexadecane sample regarding the rate of heat flux and also achieved about 10% and 15% heat transfer enhancements during the charging and discharging periods respectively. Its measured effective thermal conductivity also increased remarkably to 1.25 W/mK as compared with 0.15 W/mK for pure hexadecane. However there was about 5% less total cumulative thermal energy discharged at the end of the test which indicates that its effective thermal capacity was reduced by the presence of the aluminium particles. The study has shown that some of the scientific and technical barriers associated with the development of laminated composite PCM drywall systems can be overcome but further investigations of effects of adhesive materials are needed. (author)

  6. Water Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott W.; Sheth, Ribik B.; Atwell, Matt; Cheek, Ann; Agarwal, Muskan; Hong, Steven; Patel, Aashini,; Nguyen, Lisa; Posada, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    In a cyclical heat load environment such as low Lunar orbit, a spacecraft’s radiators are not sized to reject the full heat load requirement. Traditionally, a supplemental heat rejection device (SHReD) such as an evaporator or sublimator is used to act as a “topper” to meet the additional heat rejection demands. Utilizing a Phase Change Material (PCM) heat exchanger (HX) as a SHReD provides an attractive alternative to evaporators and sublimators as PCM HXs do not use a consumable, thereby leading to reduced launch mass and volume requirements. Studies conducted in this paper investigate utilizing water’s high latent heat of formation as a PCM, as opposed to traditional waxes, and corresponding complications surrounding freezing water in an enclosed volume. Work highlighted in this study is primarily visual and includes understanding ice formation, freeze front propagation, and the solidification process of water/ice. Various test coupons were constructed of copper to emulate the interstitial pin configuration (to aid in conduction) of the proposed water PCM HX design. Construction of a prototypic HX was also completed in which a flexible bladder material and interstitial pin configurations were tested. Additionally, a microgravity flight was conducted where three copper test articles were frozen continuously during microgravity and 2-g periods and individual water droplets were frozen during microgravity.

  7. Continued Water-Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott; Poynot, Joe

    2014-01-01

    In a cyclical heat load environment such as low Lunar orbit, a spacecraft's radiators are not sized to reject the full heat load requirement. Traditionally, a supplemental heat rejection device (SHReD) such as an evaporator or sublimator is used to act as a "topper" to meet the additional heat rejection demands. Utilizing a Phase Change Material (PCM) heat exchanger (HX) as a SHReD provides an attractive alternative to evaporators and sublimators as PCM HXs do not use a consumable, thereby leading to reduced launch mass and volume requirements. In continued pursuit of water PCM HX development two full-scale, Orion sized water-based PCM HX's were constructed by Mezzo Technologies. These HX's were designed by applying prior research and experimentation to the full scale design. Design options considered included bladder restraint and clamping mechanisms, bladder manufacturing, tube patterns, fill/drain methods, manifold dimensions, weight optimization, and midplate designs. Design and construction of these HX's led to successful testing of both PCM HX's.

  8. A numerical model to simulate foams during devolatilization of polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Irfan; Dixit, Ravindra

    2014-11-01

    Customers often demand that the polymers sold in the market have low levels of volatile organic compounds (VOC). Some of the processes for making polymers involve the removal of volatiles to the levels of parts per million (devolatilization). During this step the volatiles are phase separated out of the polymer through a combination of heating and applying lower pressure, creating foam with the pure polymer in liquid phase and the volatiles in the gas phase. The efficiency of the devolatilization process depends on predicting the onset of solvent phase change in the polymer and volatiles mixture accurately based on the processing conditions. However due to the complex relationship between the polymer properties and the processing conditions this is not trivial. In this work, a bubble scale model is coupled with a bulk scale transport model to simulate the processing conditions of polymer devolatilization. The bubble scale model simulates the nucleation and bubble growth based on the classical nucleation theory and the popular ``influence volume approach.'' As such it provides the information of bubble size distribution and number density inside the polymer at any given time and position. This information is used to predict the bulk properties of the polymer and its behavior under the applied processing conditions. Initial results of this modeling approach will be presented.

  9. Dielectric and piezoelectric properties of percolative three-phase piezoelectric polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Udhay

    Three-phase piezoelectric bulk composites were fabricated using a mix and cast method. The composites were comprised of lead zirconate titanate (PZT), aluminum (Al) and an epoxy matrix. The volume fraction of the PZT and Al were varied from 0.1 to 0.3 and 0.0 to 0.17, respectively. The influences of three entities on piezoelectric and dielectric properties: inclusion of an electrically conductive filler (Al), poling process (contact and Corona) and Al surface treatment, were observed. The piezoelectric strain coefficient, d33, effective dielectric constant, epsilon r, capacitance, C, and resistivity were measured and compared according to poling process, volume fraction of constituent phases and Al surface treatment. The maximum values of d33 were 3.475 and 1.0 pC/N for Corona and contact poled samples respectively, for samples with volume fractions of 0.40 and 0.13 of PZT and Al (surface treated) respectively. Also, the maximum dielectric constant for the surface treated Al samples was 411 for volume fractions of 0.40 and 0.13 for PZT and Al respectively. The percolation threshold was observed to occur at an Al volume fraction of 0.13. The composites achieved a percolated state for Al volume fractions >0.13 for both contact and corona poled samples. In addition, a comparative time study was conducted to examine the influence of surface treatment processing time of Al particles. The effectiveness of the surface treatment, sample morphology and composition was observed with the aid of SEM and EDS images. These images were correlated with piezoelectric and dielectric properties. PZT-epoxy-aluminum thick films (200 mum) were also fabricated using a two-step spin coat deposition and annealing method. The PZT volume fraction were varied from 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4, wherein the Aluminum volume fraction was varied from 0.1 to 0.17 for each PZT volume fraction, respectively. The two-step process included spin coating the first layer at 500 RPM for 30 seconds, and the second

  10. Mass transport aspects of polymer electrolyte fuel cells under two-phase flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, D.

    2007-03-27

    This work deals with selected aspects of mass transport phenomena in PEFCs and DMFCs. Emphasis is placed on the implications originating from the occurrence of two-phase flow within these devices. Optimality of supply, distribution, and removal of the fuel, the oxidant, and the reaction products is of utmost importance for the stability, efficiency, and durability of the devices. Being a prerequisite for high current densities while maintaining sufficient voltage, mass transport optimization contributes to the development of cost effective as well as compact designs and hence competitive fuel cells. [German] Die Visualisierung und Quantifizierung von Fluessigwasseransammlungen in Polymerelektrolytmembran-Brennstoffzellen konnte mittels Neutronenradiographie erreicht werden. Dank dieser neuartigen diagnostischen Methode konnte erstmals die Fluessigwasseransammlung in den poroesen Gasdiffusionsschichten direkt nachgewiesen und quantifiziert werden. Die Kombination von Neutronenradiographie mit ortsaufgeloesten Stromdichtemessungen bzw. lokaler Impedanzspektroskopie erlaubte die Korrelation des inhomogenen Fluessigwasseranfalls mit dem lokalen elektrochemischen Leistungsverhalten. Systematische Untersuchungen an Polymerelektrolyt- und Direkt-Methanol-Brennstoffzellen verdeutlichen sowohl den Einfluss von Betriebsbedingungen als auch die Auswirkung von Materialeigenschaften auf die Ausbildung zweiphasiger Stroemungen.

  11. Development of form stable Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) coated thermal phase change material for solar water heater applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munusamy, Y.; Shanmugam, S.; Shi-Ying, Kee

    2018-04-01

    Phase change material (PCM) is one of the most popular and widely used thermal energy storage material in solar water heater because it able to absorb and release a large amount of latent heat during a phase change process over a narrow temperature range. However the practical application of PCM is limited by two major issues; 1) leakage which leads to material loss and corrosion of tank and 2) large volume change during phase change process which cause pressure build up in the tank. In this work, form-stable PCM was prepared by coating myristic acid with Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to prevent leakage of PCM. PMMA was mixed with different weight percentage (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 wt%) of dicumyl peroxide (DCP). The purpose of adding DCP to PMMA is to crosslink the polymer and to increase the mechanical strength of PMMA to hold the myristic acid content inside the coating during the phase change process. Leakage test results showed that PMMA mixed with 0.1% DCP exhibit 0% leakage. This result is further supported by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) images and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis results, where a compact and uniform coating without cracks were formed for PCM coated with PMMA with 0.1% DCP. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results shows that the melting point of form-stable PCM is 55°C, freezing point is 50°C, the latent heat of melting and freezing is 67.59 J/g.

  12. The use of lipids as phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are substances capable of absorbing and releasing large 2 amounts of thermal energy (heat or cold) as latent heat over constant temperature as they 3 undergo a change in state of matter (phase transition), commonly, between solid and 4 liquid phases. Since the late 194...

  13. Porous and Phase Change Nanomaterials For Photonic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-28

    Y. Han , M. S. Zhao, G. Morthier, and R. Baets. Athermal silicon-on-insulator ring resonators by overlaying a polymer cladding on narrowed waveguides...integrated photonics. Advanced Materials, 22(23):2561, 2010. [152] T. Sondergaard, S. M. Novikov, T. Holmgaard, R. L. Eriksen, J. Beermann, Z. H. Han , K...726, 2011. [181] N. N. Feng, D. Z. Feng, S. R. Liao, X. Wang, P. Dong, H. Liang, C. C. Kung , W. Qian, J. Fong, R. Shafiiha, Y. Luo, J. Cunningham, A. V

  14. Personality Change in the Preclinical Phase of Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Antonio; An, Yang; Sutin, Angelina R; Thambisetty, Madhav; Resnick, Susan M

    2017-12-01

    Changes in behavior and personality are 1 criterion for the diagnosis of dementia. It is unclear, however, whether such changes begin before the clinical onset of the disease. To determine whether increases in neuroticism, declines in conscientiousness, and changes in other personality traits occur before the onset of mild cognitive impairment or dementia. A cohort of 2046 community-dwelling older adults who volunteered to participate in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging were included. The study examined personality and clinical assessments obtained between 1980 and July 13, 2016, from participants with no cognitive impairment at first assessment who were followed up for as long as 36 years (mean [SD], 12.05 [9.54] years). The self-report personality scales were not considered during consensus diagnostic conferences. Change in self-rated personality traits assessed in the preclinical phase of Alzheimer disease and other dementias with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory, a 240-item questionnaire that assesses 30 facets, 6 for each of the 5 major dimensions: neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. Of the 2046 participants, 931 [45.5%] were women; mean (SD) age at first assessment was 62.56 (14.63) years. During 24 569 person-years, mild cognitive impairment was diagnosed in 104 (5.1%) individuals, and all-cause dementia was diagnosed in 255 (12.5%) participants, including 194 (9.5%) with Alzheimer disease. Multilevel modeling that accounted for age, sex, race, and educational level found significant differences on the intercept of several traits: individuals who developed dementia scored higher on neuroticism (β = 2.83; 95% CI, 1.44 to 4.22; P Alzheimer disease groups (eg, neuroticism: β = 0.00; 95% CI, -0.08 to 0.08; P = .91; conscientiousness: β = -0.06; 95% CI, -0.16 to 0.04; P = .24). Slopes for individuals who developed mild cognitive impairment (eg, neuroticism: β = 0.00; 95% CI, -0

  15. How Thermal Fatigue Cycles Change the Rheological Behavior of Polymer Modified Bitumen?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glaoui, B.; Merbouh, M.; Van de Ven, M.F.C.; Chailleux, E.; Youcefi, A.

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of thermal fatigue cycles phenomenon, which affects the performance of flexible pavement. The purpose of the paper is to extent the knowledge on the rheology of polymer modified bitumen which was affected by cycles of thermal fatigue. The aim of this research is to

  16. Changes in polymer foils used in food packaging tested by using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This work is an experimental study of the differential scanning calorimetry characterisation of polymer materials used in food packaging materials, such as polypropylene (0.03 mm), polyethylene (0.1 and 0.03 mm), ... Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology, University of Zagreb, Pierottijeva 6, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia ...

  17. Geometric structure and information change in phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-jin; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2017-06-01

    We propose a toy model for a cyclic order-disorder transition and introduce a geometric methodology to understand stochastic processes involved in transitions. Specifically, our model consists of a pair of forward and backward processes (FPs and BPs) for the emergence and disappearance of a structure in a stochastic environment. We calculate time-dependent probability density functions (PDFs) and the information length L , which is the total number of different states that a system undergoes during the transition. Time-dependent PDFs during transient relaxation exhibit strikingly different behavior in FPs and BPs. In particular, FPs driven by instability undergo the broadening of the PDF with a large increase in fluctuations before the transition to the ordered state accompanied by narrowing the PDF width. During this stage, we identify an interesting geodesic solution accompanied by the self-regulation between the growth and nonlinear damping where the time scale τ of information change is constant in time, independent of the strength of the stochastic noise. In comparison, BPs are mainly driven by the macroscopic motion due to the movement of the PDF peak. The total information length L between initial and final states is much larger in BPs than in FPs, increasing linearly with the deviation γ of a control parameter from the critical state in BPs while increasing logarithmically with γ in FPs. L scales as |lnD | and D-1 /2 in FPs and BPs, respectively, where D measures the strength of the stochastic forcing. These differing scalings with γ and D suggest a great utility of L in capturing different underlying processes, specifically, diffusion vs advection in phase transition by geometry. We discuss physical origins of these scalings and comment on implications of our results for bistable systems undergoing repeated order-disorder transitions (e.g., fitness).

  18. Nature of phase transitions in crystalline and amorphous GeTe-Sb2Te3 phase change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, B; Sen, S; Clark, S M

    2011-09-28

    The thermodynamic nature of phase stabilities and transformations are investigated in crystalline and amorphous Ge(1)Sb(2)Te(4) (GST124) phase change materials as a function of pressure and temperature using high-resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell. The phase transformation sequences upon compression, for cubic and hexagonal GST124 phases are found to be: cubic → amorphous → orthorhombic → bcc and hexagonal → orthorhombic → bcc. The Clapeyron slopes for melting of the hexagonal and bcc phases are negative and positive, respectively, resulting in a pressure dependent minimum in the liquidus. When taken together, the phase equilibria relations are consistent with the presence of polyamorphism in this system with the as-deposited amorphous GST phase being the low entropy low-density amorphous phase and the laser melt-quenched and high-pressure amorphized GST being the high entropy high-density amorphous phase. The metastable phase boundary between these two polyamorphic phases is expected to have a negative Clapeyron slope. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  19. Effects of configurational changes on molecular dynamics in polyvinylidene fluoride and poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) ferroelectric polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalarvo, N., E-mail: jalarvonh@ornl.gov, E-mail: abhijit.pramanick@gmail.com, E-mail: omardiallos@ornl.gov [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52428 Jülich (Germany); Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Pramanick, A., E-mail: jalarvonh@ornl.gov, E-mail: abhijit.pramanick@gmail.com, E-mail: omardiallos@ornl.gov [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Do, C. [Biology and Soft-Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Diallo, S. O., E-mail: jalarvonh@ornl.gov, E-mail: abhijit.pramanick@gmail.com, E-mail: omardiallos@ornl.gov [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-08-24

    We present a comparative study of proton dynamics in unpoled non-ferroelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and in its trifluoroethylene containing ferroelectric copolymer (with 70/30 molar proportion), using quasi-elastic neutron scattering. The neutron data reveal the existence of two distinct types of molecular motions in the temperature range investigated. The slower motion, which is characterized in details here, is ascribed to protons jump diffusion along the polymeric carbon chains, while the faster motion could be attributed to localized rotational motion of methylene groups. At temperatures below the Curie point (T{sub c} ∼ 385 K) of the composite polymer, the slower diffusive mode experiences longer relaxation times in the ferroelectric blend than in the bare PVDF, although the net corresponding diffusion coefficient remains comparatively the same in both polymers with characteristic activation energy of E{sub A} ≈ 27–33 kJ/mol. This arises because of a temperature dependent jump length r{sub 0}, which we observe to be effectively longer in the copolymer, possibly due to the formation of ordered ferroelectric domains below T{sub c}. Above T{sub c}, there is no appreciable difference in r{sub 0} between the two systems. This observation directly relates the known dependence of T{sub c} on molar ratio to changes in r{sub 0}, providing fundamental insight into the ferroelectric properties of PVDF-based copolymers.

  20. Physical and chemical changes induced by 70 MeV carbon ions in polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virk, H.S.; Chandi, P.S.; Srivastava, A.K.

    2001-01-01

    Physical and chemical changes induced by 70 MeV carbon ions ( 12 C 5+ ) have been investigated in bulk polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymer. The induced changes have been studied with respect to their optical, chemical and structural response using UV-visible, FTIR and XRD techniques. The ion fluences ranging from 2.5x10 11 to 9x10 13 ions cm -2 have been used to study the irradiation effects. It has been observed that at the fluence of 9x10 13 ions cm -2 the PVDF sample became brittle and practically it was not possible to handle it for any further measurements. The recorded UV-visible spectra show that the optical absorption increases with increasing fluence, indicating maximum absorption at 200 nm. An interesting feature of UV-visible spectra is that dips change into peaks and vice versa with increase of fluence. In the FTIR spectra, development of new peaks at 1714 and 3692 cm -1 along with disappearance of peaks at 2363 and 3025 cm -1 and shifting of peak at 2984-2974 cm -1 have been observed due to high energy irradiation, indicating the chemical changes induced by 12 C 5+ . The diffraction pattern of PVDF indicates that this polymer is semi-crystalline in nature; a large decrease in the diffraction intensity indicates decrease in crystallinity. Increase in crystallite size has also been observed due to heavy ion irradiation