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Sample records for pharmacokinetics pharmacodynamics tolerability

  1. Tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of TA-8995, a selective cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor, in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ford, John; Lawson, Matt; Fowler, David; Maruyama, Nobuko; Mito, Seiji; Tomiyasu, Koichi; Kinoshita, Shuji; Suzuki, Chisa; Kawaguchi, Atsuhiro; Round, Patrick; Boyce, Malcolm; Warrington, Steve; Weber, Werner; van Deventer, Sander; Kastelein, John J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Two double-blind, randomized studies were conducted to assess the tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral TA-8995, a new cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor, in healthy subjects. Study 1: Subjects received single doses of TA-8995 or placebo (fasted). Doses were 5,

  2. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, tolerability, and safety of exenatide in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothare, Prajakti A; Linnebjerg, Helle; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Uenaka, Kazunori; Yamamura, Ayuko; Yeo, Kwee Poo; de la Peña, Amparo; Teng, Choo Hua; Mace, Kenneth; Fineman, Mark; Shigeta, Hirofumi; Sakata, Yukikuni; Irie, Shin

    2008-12-01

    In this single-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled study, the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, tolerability, and safety of subcutaneous exenatide were evaluated in 40 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients were allocated to 4 groups and randomized to receive exenatide (n = 8/group) or placebo (n = 2/group), with all receiving placebo on day 1. On day 2, patients received single-dose exenatide (2.5 microg [group A] or 5 microg [groups B, C, and D]) or placebo and then bid on days 3 to 5. On days 6 to 10, groups A and B continued on 2.5 and 5 microg bid; groups C and D received 10 and 15 microg bid, respectively. The last dose was given on the morning of day 10. All adverse events were mild or moderate in severity. Exenatide was generally well tolerated up to 10 microg. Exenatide was well absorbed with a median t(max) of 1.5 hours and mean t((1/2)) of 1.6 hours; exposure increased with dose. Up to 10 microg, exenatide reduced postprandial glucose concentrations in a dose-dependent fashion compared with placebo; decreases were similar for 10 and 15 microg. An E(max) model demonstrated that doses higher than 2.5 microg were necessary for adequate glycemic response. Based on tolerability and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships, 5 and 10 microg exenatide may be considered for further clinical development in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

  3. An Allometric Model of Remifentanil Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleveld, Douglas J.; Proost, Johannes H.; Vereecke, Hugo; Absalom, Anthony R.; Olofsen, Erik; Vuyk, Jaap; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    Background: Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models are used to predict and explore drug infusion schemes and their resulting concentration profiles for clinical application. Our aim was to develop a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for remifentanil that is accurate in patients with a wide

  4. Drugs in space: Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in astronauts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Johannes; Yu, Yichao; Seubert, Christoph N; Wotring, Virginia E; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2017-11-15

    Space agencies are working intensely to push the current boundaries of human spaceflight by sending astronauts deeper into space than ever before, including missions to Mars and asteroids. Spaceflight alters human physiology due to fluid shifts, muscle and bone loss, immune system dysregulation, and changes in the gastrointestinal tract and metabolic enzymes. These alterations may change the pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics of medications used by astronauts and subsequently might impact drug efficacy and safety. Most commonly, medications are administered during space missions to treat sleep disturbances, allergies, space motion sickness, pain, and sinus congestion. These medications are administered under the assumption that they act in a similar way as on Earth, an assumption that has not been investigated systematically yet. Few inflight pharmacokinetic data have been published, and pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies during spaceflight are also lacking. Therefore, bed-rest models are often used to simulate physiological changes observed during microgravity. In addition to pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic changes, decreased drug and formulation stability in space could also influence efficacy and safety of medications. These alterations along with physiological changes and their resulting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects must to be considered to determine their ultimate impact on medication efficacy and safety during spaceflight. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic (PKPD) Analysis with Drug Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negus, S Stevens; Banks, Matthew L

    2016-08-30

    Discriminative stimulus and other drug effects are determined by the concentration of drug at its target receptor and by the pharmacodynamic consequences of drug-receptor interaction. For in vivo procedures such as drug discrimination, drug concentration at receptors in a given anatomical location (e.g., the brain) is determined both by the dose of drug administered and by pharmacokinetic processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion that deliver drug to and from that anatomical location. Drug discrimination data are often analyzed by strategies of dose-effect analysis to determine parameters such as potency and efficacy. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic (PKPD) analysis is an alternative to conventional dose-effect analysis, and it relates drug effects to a measure of drug concentration in a body compartment (e.g., venous blood) rather than to drug dose. PKPD analysis can yield insights on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic determinants of drug action. PKPD analysis can also facilitate translational research by identifying species differences in pharmacokinetics and providing a basis for integrating these differences into interpretation of drug effects. Examples are discussed here to illustrate the application of PKPD analysis to the evaluation of drug effects in rhesus monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of mivacurium in young adult and elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Doris; Viby-Mogensen, Jørgen; Pedersen, N.A.

    2002-01-01

    age factors; butyrylcholinesterase; cholinesterase; dose-response curves; enzymes; metabolites; mivacurium; neuromuscular relaxants; pharmacodynamics; pharmacokinetics; pharmacology; pseudocholinesterase; stereoisomers......age factors; butyrylcholinesterase; cholinesterase; dose-response curves; enzymes; metabolites; mivacurium; neuromuscular relaxants; pharmacodynamics; pharmacokinetics; pharmacology; pseudocholinesterase; stereoisomers...

  7. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Homan; Mintri, Shrutika; Menon, Archita Venugopal; Lee, Hea Yeon; Choi, Hak Soo; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are considered a promising tool in both diagnosis and therapeutics. Theranostic NPs possess the combined properties of targeted imaging and drug delivery within a single entity. While the categorization of theranostic NPs is based on their structure and composition, the pharmacokinetics of NPs are significantly influenced by the physicochemical properties of theranostic NPs as well as the routes of administration. Consequently, altered pharmacokinetics modify the pharmacodynamic efficacy and toxicity of NPs. Although theranostic NPs hold great promise in nanomedicine and biomedical applications, a lack of understanding persists on the mechanisms of the biodistribution and adverse effects of NPs. To better understand the diagnostic and therapeutic functions of NPs, this review discusses the factors that influence the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic NPs, along with several strategies for developing novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

  8. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and the pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic relationship of zolpidem in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haas, S L; Schoemaker, R C; van Gerven, J M A; Hoever, P; Cohen, A F; Dingemanse, J

    2010-11-01

    Zolpidem is one of the most frequently prescribed hypnotics, as it is a very short-acting compound with relatively few side effects. Zolpidem's short duration of action is partly related to its short elimination half-life, but the associations between plasma levels and pharmacodynamic (PD) effects are not precisely known. In this study, the concentration-effect relationships for zolpidem were modelled. Zolpidem (10 mg) was administered in a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial to determine PD and pharmacokinetics (PK) in 14 healthy volunteers. Zolpidem was absorbed and eliminated quickly, with a median T(max) of 0.78 h (range: 0.33-2.50) and t(1/2) of 2.2 h. Zolpidem reduced saccadic peak velocity (SPV), adaptive tracking performance, electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha power and visual analogue scale (VAS) alertness score and increased body sway, EEG beta power and VAS 'feeling high'. Short- and long-term memory was not affected. Central nervous system effects normalised more rapidly than the decrease of plasma concentrations. For most effects, zolpidem's short duration of action could be adequately described by both a sigmoid E(max) model and a transit tolerance model. For SPV and EEG alpha power, the tolerance model seemed less suitable. These PK/PD models have different implications for the mechanism underlying zolpidem's short duration of action. A sigmoid E(max) model (which is based on ligand binding theory) would imply a threshold value for the drug's effective concentrations. A transit tolerance model (in which a hypothetical factor builds up with time that antagonises the effects of the parent compound) is compatible with a rapid reversible desensitisation of GABAergic subunits.

  9. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Albiglutide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønden, Andreas; Knop, Filip K; Christensen, Mikkel B

    2017-01-01

    Albiglutide is a long-acting, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist for subcutaneous administration with a recommended dose of 30-50 mg once weekly. The aim of this article is to outline the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of albiglutide including the clinical efficacy and safet...

  10. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modelling of the Analgesic and Antihyperalgesic Effects of Morphine after Intravenous Infusion in Human Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Foster, David J. R.; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2014-01-01

    Using a modelling approach, this study aimed to (i) examine whether the pharmacodynamics of the analgesic and antihyperalgesic effects of morphine differ; (ii) investigate the influence of demographic, pain sensitivity and genetic (OPRM1) variables on between-subject variability of morphine...... pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in human experimental pain models. The study was a randomized, double-blind, 5-arm, cross-over, placebo-controlled study. The psychophysical cutaneous pain tests, electrical pain tolerance (EPTo) and secondary hyperalgesia areas (2HA) were studied in 28 healthy individuals (15...

  11. Atomoxetine pharmacogenetics: associations with pharmacokinetics, treatment response and tolerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacob T; Bishop, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Atomoxetine is indicated for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and is predominantly metabolized by the CYP2D6 enzyme. Differences in pharmacokinetic parameters as well as clinical treatment outcomes across CYP2D6 genotype groups have resulted in dosing recommendations within the product label, but clinical studies supporting the use of genotype guided dosing are currently lacking. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic and clinical studies have primarily focused on extensive as compared with poor metabolizers, with little information known about other metabolizer categories as well as genes involved in the pharmacodynamics of atomoxetine. This review describes the pharmacogenetic associations with atomoxetine pharmacokinetics, treatment response and tolerability with considerations for the clinical utility of this information.

  12. Dose optimisation of antibiotics in children: application of pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics in paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, Kevin J; Hahn, Andrea; Wiles, Jason; Courter, Joshua D; Vinks, Alexander A

    2014-03-01

    The judicious use of antibiotics to combat infections in children relies upon appropriate selection of an agent, dose and duration to maximise efficacy and to minimise toxicity. Critical to dose optimisation is an understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of available drugs. Optimal dosing strategies may take advantage of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) principles so that antibiotic dosing can be individualised to assure effective bacterial killing in patients who have altered pharmacokinetics or who have infections with less susceptible or resistant organisms. This review will outline the fundamentals of antimicrobial pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics through discussion of antibacterial agents most often used in children. We aim to highlight the importance of dose optimisation in paediatrics and describe non-conventional dosing strategies that can take advantage of PK/PD principles at the bedside. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  13. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic guided trial design in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kesteren, Ch; Mathôt, R. A. A.; Beijnen, J. H.; Schellens, J. H. M.

    2003-01-01

    The application of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) modeling in drug development has emerged during the past decades and it is has been suggested that the investigation of PK-PD relationships during drug development may facilitate and optimize the design of subsequent clinical

  14. Grey-Box Modelling of Pharmacokinetic /Pharmacodynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Jacobsen, Judith L.; Pedersen, Oluf

    2004-01-01

    Grey-box pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling is presented as a promising way of modelling PK/PD systems. The concept behind grey-box modelling is based on combining physiological knowledge along with information from data in the estimation of model parameters. Grey-box modelling...

  15. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the cathepsin S inhibitor, LY3000328, in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Christopher D; Deeg, Mark A; Chan, Melanie; Tan, Lai Hock; LaBell, Elizabeth Smith; Shen, Tong; DeBrota, David J

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the safety and tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of LY3000328 when administered as single escalating doses to healthy volunteers. This was a phase 1, placebo-controlled, dose escalation study with LY3000328 in 21 healthy male volunteers. Subjects were administered escalating LY3000328 doses up to 300 mg with food in this single dose study. Blood samples were collected at set times post-dose for the assessment of LY3000328 pharmacokinetics and the measurement of cathepsin S (CatS) activity, CatS mass and calculated CatS specific activity. All doses of LY3000328 were well tolerated, with linear pharmacokinetics up to the 300 mg dose. The pharmacodynamic activity of LY3000328 was measured ex vivo showing a biphasic response to LY3000328, where CatS activity declines, then returns to baseline, and then increases to a level above baseline. CatS mass was also assessed post-dose which increased in a dose-dependent manner, and continued to increase after LY3000328 had been cleared from the body. CatS specific activity was additionally calculated to normalize CatS activity for changes in CatS mass. This demonstrated the increase in CatS activity was attributable to the increase in CatS mass detected in plasma. A specific inhibitor of CatS which is cleared quickly from plasma may produce a transient decrease in plasma CatS activity which is followed by a more prolonged increase in plasma CatS mass which may have implications for the future clinical development of inhibitors of CatS. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Effect of tramadol on metamizol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics after single and repeated administrations in arthritic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alfonso Moreno-Rocha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Combined administration of certain doses of opioid compounds with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug can produce additive or supra-additive effects while reducing unwanted effects. We have recently reported that co-administration of metamizol with tramadol produces antinociceptive effect potentiation, after acute treatment. However, none information about the effect produced by the combination after chronic or repeated dose administration exists. The aims of this study were to investigate whether the antinociceptive synergism produced by the combination of metamizol and tramadol (177.8 + 17.8 mg/kg, s.c. respectively is maintained after repeated treatment and whether the effects observed are primarily due to pharmacodynamic interactions or may be related to pharmacokinetics changes. Administration of metamizol plus tramadol acute treatment significantly enhanced the antinociceptive effect of the drugs given alone (P  0.05. The mechanism involved in the synergism of the antinociceptive effect observed with the combination of metamizol and tramadol in single dose cannot be attributed to a pharmacokinetic interaction, and other pharmacodynamic interactions have to be considered. On the other hand, when metamizol and tramadol were co-administered under repeated administrations, a pharmacokinetic interaction and tolerance development occurred. Differences found in metamizol active metabolites’ pharmacokinetics (P < 0.05 were related to the development of tolerance produced by the combination after repeated doses. This work shows an additional preclinical support for the combination therapy. The clinical utility of this combination in a suitable dose range should be evaluated in future studies.

  17. Dose optimisation of antibiotics in children: application of pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics in paediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Downes, Kevin J.; Hahn, Andrea; Wiles, Jason; Courter, Joshua D.; Vinks, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    The judicious use of antibiotics to combat infections in children relies upon appropriate selection of an agent, dose and duration to maximise efficacy and to minimise toxicity. Critical to dose optimisation is an understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of available drugs. Optimal dosing strategies may take advantage of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) principles so that antibiotic dosing can be individualised to assure effective bacterial killing in patients who hav...

  18. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics study of rhein treating renal fibrosis based on metabonomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Luo, Guangwen; Xiang, Zheng; Cai, Xiaojun; Chen, Dahui

    2016-12-01

    The selection of effect indicators in the pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic study of complex diseases to describe the relationship between plasma concentration and effect indicators is difficult. Three effect indicators of renal fibrosis were successfully determined. The relationship between pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of rhein in rhubarb was elucidated. The study was a metabolomics analysis of rat plasma and pharmacokinetics/ pharmacodynamics of rhein. A sensitive and simple ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was applied to determine the rhein plasma concentration in the rat model of renal fibrosis and rat sham-operated group after the administration of rhubarb decoction. Then, the ultra performance liquid chromatography-Micromass quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF/MS) metabolomics method was used to screen biomarkers of renal fibrosis in rat plasma. Furthermore, the relationship between the plasma concentration of rhein and the concentration of three biomarkers directly related to renal fibrosis were analyzed. The three screened biomarkers could represent the effect of rhein treatment on renal fibrosis. Increasing the plasma concentration of rhein tended to restore the concentration of the three biomarkers in the model group compared with that in the sham-operated group. Evident differences in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of rhein were also observed under different pathological states. The results provide valuable information for the clinical application of rhubarb. Rhein intervention could recover the physiological balance in living organisms from the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic levels. New information on the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study of complex diseases is provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of methylphenidate and MDMA administered alone or in combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysek, Cédric M; Simmler, Linda D; Schillinger, Nathalie; Meyer, Nicole; Schmid, Yasmin; Donzelli, Massimiliano; Grouzmann, Eric; Liechti, Matthias E

    2014-03-01

    Methylphenidate and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') are widely misused psychoactive drugs. Methylphenidate increases brain dopamine and norepinephrine levels by blocking the presynaptic reuptake transporters. MDMA releases serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine through the same transporters. Pharmacodynamic interactions of methylphenidate and MDMA are likely. This study compared the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic effects of methylphenidate and MDMA administered alone or in combination in healthy subjects using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design. Methylphenidate did not enhance the psychotropic effects of MDMA, although it produced psychostimulant effects on its own. The haemodynamic and adverse effects of co-administration of methylphenidate and MDMA were significantly higher compared with MDMA or methylphenidate alone. Methylphenidate did not change the pharmacokinetics of MDMA and vice versa. Methylphenidate and MDMA shared some subjective amphetamine-type effects; however, 125 mg of MDMA increased positive mood more than 60 mg of methylphenidate, and methylphenidate enhanced activity and concentration more than MDMA. Methylphenidate and MDMA differentially altered facial emotion recognition. Methylphenidate enhanced the recognition of sad and fearful faces, whereas MDMA reduced the recognition of negative emotions. Additionally, the present study found acute pharmacodynamic tolerance to MDMA but not methylphenidate. In conclusion, the combined use of methylphenidate and MDMA does not produce more psychoactive effects compared with either drug alone, but potentially enhances cardiovascular and adverse effects. The findings may be of clinical importance for assessing the risks of combined psychostimulant misuse. Trial registration identification number: NCT01465685 (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01465685).

  20. Modeling in biopharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics homogeneous and heterogeneous approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Macheras, Panos

    2016-01-01

    The state of the art in Biopharmaceutics, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics Modeling is presented in this new second edition book. It shows how advanced physical and mathematical methods can expand classical models in order to cover heterogeneous drug-biological processes and therapeutic effects in the body. The book is divided into four parts; the first deals with the fundamental principles of fractals, diffusion and nonlinear dynamics; the second with drug dissolution, release, and absorption; the third with epirical, compartmental, and stochastic pharmacokinetic models, with two new chapters, one on fractional pharmacokinetics and one on bioequivalence; and the fourth mainly with classical and nonclassical aspects of pharmacodynamics. The classical models that have relevance and application to these sciences are also considered throughout. This second edition has new information on reaction limited models of dissolution, non binary biopharmaceutic classification system, time varying models, and interf...

  1. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions with ethanol (alcohol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander; Anderson, Gail D

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol (alcohol) is one of the most widely used legal drugs in the world. Ethanol is metabolized by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 drug-metabolizing enzyme that is also responsible for the biotransformation of xenobiotics and fatty acids. Drugs that inhibit ADH or CYP2E1 are the most likely theoretical compounds that would lead to a clinically significant pharmacokinetic interaction with ethanol, which include only a limited number of drugs. Acute ethanol primarily alters the pharmacokinetics of other drugs by changing the rate and extent of absorption, with more limited effects on clearance. Both acute and chronic ethanol use can cause transient changes to many physiologic responses in different organ systems such as hypotension and impairment of motor and cognitive functions, resulting in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Evaluating drug interactions with long-term use of ethanol is uniquely challenging. Specifically, it is difficult to distinguish between the effects of long-term ethanol use on liver pathology and chronic malnutrition. Ethanol-induced liver disease results in decreased activity of hepatic metabolic enzymes and changes in protein binding. Clinical studies that include patients with chronic alcohol use may be evaluating the effects of mild cirrhosis on liver metabolism, and not just ethanol itself. The definition of chronic alcohol use is very inconsistent, which greatly affects the quality of the data and clinical application of the results. Our study of the literature has shown that a significantly higher volume of clinical studies have focused on the pharmacokinetic interactions of ethanol and other drugs. The data on pharmacodynamic interactions are more limited and future research addressing pharmacodynamic interactions with ethanol, especially regarding the non-central nervous system effects, is much needed.

  2. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of SCT800, a new recombinant FVIII, in hemophilia A mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ruo-lan; Liu, Liang; Xie, Liang-zhi; Gai, Wen-lin; Cao, Si-shuo; Meng, Zhi-yun; Gan, Hui; Wu, Zhuo-na; Li, Jian; Zheng, Ying; Zhu, Xiao-xia; Dou, Gui-fang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: SCT800 is a new third-generation recombinant FVIII agent that is undergoing promising preclinical study. This study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of SCT800 in hemophilia A mice. Methods: After hemophilia A mice were intravenously injected with single dose of SCT800 (80, 180, and 280 IU/kg) or the commercially available product Xyntha (280 IU/kg), pharmacokinetics profiles were evaluated based on measuring plasma FVIII: C. For pharmacodynamics study, dose-response curves of SCT800 and Xyntha (1–200 IU/kg) were constructed using a tail bleeding model monitoring both bleeding time and blood loss. Results: Pharmacokinetics profile analysis showed a dose independency of SCT800 ranging from 80 to 280 IU/kg and comparable pharmacokinetic profiles between SCT800 and Xyntha at the doses tested. Pharmacodynamics study revealed comparable ED50 values of SCT800 and Xyntha in the tail bleeding model: 14.78 and 15.81 IU/kg for bleeding time, respectively; 13.50 and 13.58 IU/kg for blood loss, respectively. Moreover, at the doses tested, the accompanying dose-related safety evaluation in the tail bleeding model showed lower hypercoagulable tendency and wider dosage range potential for SCT800 than Xyntha. Conclusion: In hemophilia A mice, SCT800 shows comparable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics to Xyntha at the doses tested, and possibly with better safety properties. PMID:26806305

  3. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of linezolid-induced thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Yasuhiro; Holford, Nicholas H G; Kasai, Hidefumi; Ogami, Chika; Heo, Young-A; Higashi, Yoshitsugu; Mizoguchi, Akiko; To, Hideto; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro

    2017-08-01

    Thrombocytopenia is among the most important adverse effects of linezolid treatment. Linezolid-induced thrombocytopenia incidence varies considerably but has been associated with impaired renal function. We investigated the pharmacodynamic mechanism (myelosuppression or enhanced platelet destruction) and the role of impaired renal function (RF) in the development of thrombocytopenia. The pharmacokinetics of linezolid were described with a two-compartment distribution model with first-order absorption and elimination. RF was calculated using the expected creatinine clearance. The decrease platelets by linezolid exposure was assumed to occur by one of two mechanisms: inhibition of the formation of platelets (PDI) or stimulation of the elimination (PDS) of platelets. About 50% of elimination was found to be explained by renal clearance (normal RF). The population mean estimated plasma protein binding of linezolid was 18% [95% confidence interval (CI) 16%, 20%] and was independent of the observed concentrations. The estimated mixture model fraction of patients with a platelet count decreased due to PDI was 0.97 (95% CI 0.87, 1.00), so the fraction due to PDS was 0.03. RF had no influence on linezolid pharmacodynamics. We have described the influence of weight, renal function, age and plasma protein binding on the pharmacokinetics of linezolid. This combined pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and turnover model identified that the most common mechanism of thrombocytopenia associated with linezolid is PDI. Impaired RF increases thrombocytopenia by a pharmacokinetic mechanism. The linezolid dose should be reduced in RF. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. A Multi-Route Model of Nicotine-Cotinine Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Brain Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Housand, Conrad; Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

  5. [Research progress of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of total glucosides of peony in hepatoprotective effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Zhi-Yan; Zhan, Shu-Yu; Huang, Xuan; Ding, Bao-Yue; Liu, Yu-Qian; Ruan, Yu-Er; Jiang, Ning-Hua

    2017-10-01

    Total glucosides of peony (TGP), containing the effective components of paeoniflorin (Pae), albiflorin (Alb) and so on, are effective parts of Radix Paeoniae Alba. And it possesses extensive pharmacological actions, one of which is hepatoprotective effect. In recent years, abundant of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics research of TGP in hepatoprotective effects have been performed. However, the relative medicine of TGP in hepatoprotective effect has not been developed for clinical application. In order to provide reference for the development and rational clinical application of TGP, the research progresses of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of TGP in hepatoprotective effect were summarized in this paper. Pharmacokinetics research has clarified the process of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of TGP in vivo, and liver injury disease can significantly influence its metabolic processes. Pharmacodynamics studies suggested that TGP can protect against acute liver injury, non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD), chronic liver fibrosis and liver cancer. However, the action mechanism and in vivo process about hepatoprotective effects of TGP have not been clearly revealed. How liver injury influences the metabolism of TGP and its integrated regulation through multiple targets need to be further studied. The combined pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies should be performed in favour of medicine development and clinical application of TGP in hepatoprotective effects. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  6. A review of morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide's pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationships in experimental and clinical pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrisdóttir, Eva; Lund, Trine Meldgaard; Olesen, Anne Estrup

    2015-01-01

    Morphine is a widely used opioid for treatment of moderate to severe pain, but large interindividual variability in patient response and no clear guidance on how to optimise morphine dosage regimen complicates treatment strategy for clinicians. Population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models can...... a detailed overview of the published human population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies for morphine analgesia in addition to basic drug disposition and pharmacological properties of morphine and its analgesic active metabolite, morphine-6-glucuronide, that may help identify future covariates....... Furthermore, based on simulations from key pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models, the contribution of morphine-6-glucuronide to the analgesic response in patients with renal insufficiency was investigated. Simulations were also used to examine the impact of effect-site equilibration half-life on time course...

  7. Modeling in biopharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics homogeneous and heterogeneous approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Macheras, Panos

    2006-01-01

    The state of the art in Biopharmaceutics, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics Modeling is presented in this book. It shows how advanced physical and mathematical methods can expand classical models in order to cover heterogeneous drug-biological processes and therapeutic effects in the body. The book is divided into four parts; the first deals with the fundamental principles of fractals, diffusion and nonlinear dynamics; the second with drug dissolution, release, and absorption; the third with empirical, compartmental, and stochastic pharmacokinetic models, and the fourth mainly with nonclassical aspects of pharmacodynamics. The classical models that have relevance and application to these sciences are also considered throughout. Many examples are used to illustrate the intrinsic complexity of drug administration related phenomena in the human, justifying the use of advanced modeling methods. This timely and useful book will appeal to graduate students and researchers in pharmacology, pharmaceutical scienc...

  8. A pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interaction between rosuvastatin and valsartan in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung JA

    2015-03-01

    -desmethyl rosuvastatin AUC to rosuvastatin AUC between coadministration and rosuvastatin alone. No interaction was found in terms of systolic or diastolic blood pressure or lipid profiles. Combined treatment with valsartan and rosuvastatin was generally well tolerated without serious adverse events.Conclusion: The pharmacokinetic profiles of rosuvastatin and valsartan in combination were comparable with those of rosuvastatin and valsartan administered individually, suggesting that their individual pharmacokinetics were not affected by their coadministration. No dose adjustment was required and the results are supportive of a study in a larger patient population.Keywords: pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, hypertension, dyslipidemia 

  9. A pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interaction between rosuvastatin and valsartan in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jin Ah; Lee, Soo-Yun; Kim, Jung-Ryul; Ko, Jae-Wook; Jang, Seong Bok; Nam, Su Youn; Huh, Wooseong

    2015-01-01

    Valsartan, an angiotensin-receptor blocker, and rosuvastatin, a competitive inhibitor of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, are frequently coadministered to treat patients with hypertension and dyslipidemia. The study reported here sought to evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between rosuvastatin and valsartan in healthy Korean subjects. Thirty healthy male Korean subjects were administered with rosuvastatin (20 mg/day), valsartan (160 mg/day), and both drugs concomitantly for 4 days in a randomized, open-label, multiple-dose, three-treatment, three-period crossover study. Plasma concentrations of rosuvastatin, N-desmethyl rosuvastatin, and valsartan were determined using validated high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Lipid profiles and vital signs (systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate) were measured for the pharmacodynamic assessment. For rosuvastatin, the geometric mean ratios (90% confidence intervals [CIs]) of coadministration to mono-administration were 0.8809 (0.7873-0.9857) for maximum plasma concentration at steady state and 0.9151 (0.8632-0.9701) for area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) over a dosing interval at steady state. For valsartan, the geometric mean ratios (90% CIs) of those were 0.9300 (0.7946-1.0884) and 1.0072 (0.8893-1.1406), respectively. There were no significant differences in the metabolic ratio of N-desmethyl rosuvastatin AUC to rosuvastatin AUC between coadministration and rosuvastatin alone. No interaction was found in terms of systolic or diastolic blood pressure or lipid profiles. Combined treatment with valsartan and rosuvastatin was generally well tolerated without serious adverse events. The pharmacokinetic profiles of rosuvastatin and valsartan in combination were comparable with those of rosuvastatin and valsartan administered individually, suggesting that their individual pharmacokinetics were not affected by their

  10. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug's effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed

  11. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the proton pump inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jai Moo; Kim, Nayoung

    2013-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is a prodrug which is activated by acid. Activated PPI binds covalently to the gastric H(+), K(+)-ATPase via disulfide bond. Cys813 is the primary site responsible for the inhibition of acid pump enzyme, where PPIs bind. Omeprazole was the first PPI introduced in market, followed by pantoprazole, lansoprazole and rabeprazole. Though these PPIs share the core structures benzimidazole and pyridine, their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are a little different. Several factors must be considered in understanding the pharmacodynamics of PPIs, including: accumulation of PPI in the parietal cell, the proportion of the pump enzyme located at the canaliculus, de novo synthesis of new pump enzyme, metabolism of PPI, amounts of covalent binding of PPI in the parietal cell, and the stability of PPI binding. PPIs have about 1hour of elimination half-life. Area under the plasmic concentration curve and the intragastric pH profile are very good indicators for evaluating PPI efficacy. Though CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 polymorphism are major components of PPI metabolism, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of racemic mixture of PPIs depend on the CYP2C19 genotype status. S-omeprazole is relatively insensitive to CYP2C19, so better control of the intragastric pH is achieved. Similarly, R-lansoprazole was developed in order to increase the drug activity. Delayed-release formulation resulted in a longer duration of effective concentration of R-lansoprazole in blood, in addition to metabolic advantage. Thus, dexlansoprazole showed best control of the intragastric pH among the present PPIs. Overall, PPIs made significant progress in the management of acid-related diseases and improved health-related quality of life.

  12. A distributed delay approach for modeling delayed outcomes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuhua; Dunlavey, Michael; Guzy, Serge; Teuscher, Nathan

    2018-04-01

    A distributed delay approach was proposed in this paper to model delayed outcomes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies. This approach was shown to be general enough to incorporate a wide array of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models as special cases including transit compartment models, effect compartment models, typical absorption models (either zero-order or first-order absorption), and a number of atypical (or irregular) absorption models (e.g., parallel first-order, mixed first-order and zero-order, inverse Gaussian, and Weibull absorption models). Real-life examples were given to demonstrate how to implement distributed delays in Phoenix ® NLME™ 8.0, and to numerically show the advantages of the distributed delay approach over the traditional methods.

  13. A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined with Enzalutamide in Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0021 TITLE: A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined...way it adapts is by upregulating another hormone receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which may compensate for diminished AR activity. The

  14. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics in biofilm infections of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengzhuang, Wang; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2014-01-01

    Although progress on biofilm research has been obtained during the past decades, the treatment of biofilm infections with antibiotics remains a riddle. The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of an antimicrobial agent provide important information helping to establish an effici......Although progress on biofilm research has been obtained during the past decades, the treatment of biofilm infections with antibiotics remains a riddle. The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of an antimicrobial agent provide important information helping to establish...

  15. Practical concept of pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics in the management of skin and soft tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pea, Federico

    2016-04-01

    This article gives an overview of the practical concept of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles useful for clinicians in the management of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Recent studies suggest that distinguishing between bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity when choosing an antimicrobial for the treatment of severe infections could probably be clinically irrelevant. Conversely, what could help clinicians in maximizing the therapeutic efficacy of the various drugs in routine practice is taking care of some pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles. Concentration-dependent agents may exhibit more rapid bacterial killing than observed with time-dependent agents. Serum concentrations may not always adequately predict tissue exposure in patients with SSTIs, and measuring concentrations at the infection site is preferable. Hydrophilic antimicrobials showed generally lower penetration rates than the lipophilic ones and might require alternative dosing approaches in the presence of severe sepsis or septic shock. Conversely, tissue penetration of lipophilic antimicrobials is often unaffected by the pathophysiological status. Real-time therapeutic drug monitoring may be a very helpful tool for optimizing therapy of severe infections. Taking care of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles deriving from the most recent findings may help clinicians in maximizing treatment of SSTIs with antimicrobials in every situation.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolder, Patrick C; Schmid, Yasmin; Steuer, Andrea E; Kraemer, Thomas; Rentsch, Katharina M; Hammann, Felix; Liechti, Matthias E

    2017-10-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is used recreationally and in clinical research. The aim of the present study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics and exposure-response relationship of oral LSD. We analyzed pharmacokinetic data from two published placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over studies using oral administration of LSD 100 and 200 µg in 24 and 16 subjects, respectively. The pharmacokinetics of the 100-µg dose is shown for the first time and data for the 200-µg dose were reanalyzed and included. Plasma concentrations of LSD, subjective effects, and vital signs were repeatedly assessed. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using compartmental modeling. Concentration-effect relationships were described using pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling. Geometric mean (95% confidence interval) maximum plasma concentration values of 1.3 (1.2-1.9) and 3.1 (2.6-4.0) ng/mL were reached 1.4 and 1.5 h after administration of 100 and 200 µg LSD, respectively. The plasma half-life was 2.6 h (2.2-3.4 h). The subjective effects lasted (mean ± standard deviation) 8.2 ± 2.1 and 11.6 ± 1.7 h for the 100- and 200-µg LSD doses, respectively. Subjective peak effects were reached 2.8 and 2.5 h after administration of LSD 100 and 200 µg, respectively. A close relationship was observed between the LSD concentration and subjective response within subjects, with moderate counterclockwise hysteresis. Half-maximal effective concentration values were in the range of 1 ng/mL. No correlations were found between plasma LSD concentrations and the effects of LSD across subjects at or near maximum plasma concentration and within dose groups. The present pharmacokinetic data are important for the evaluation of clinical study findings (e.g., functional magnetic resonance imaging studies) and the interpretation of LSD intoxication. Oral LSD presented dose-proportional pharmacokinetics and first-order elimination up to 12 h. The effects of LSD were related

  17. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of activity of ceftazidime during continuous and intermittent infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Mouton (Johan); A.A. Vinks; N.C. Punt

    1997-01-01

    textabstractWe developed and applied pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) models to characterize in vitro bacterial rate of killing as a function of ceftazidime concentrations over time. For PK-PD modeling, data obtained during continuous and intermittent infusion of

  18. Improving Predictive Modeling in Pediatric Drug Development: Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Mechanistic Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slikker, William; Young, John F.; Corley, Rick A.; Dorman, David C.; Conolly, Rory B.; Knudsen, Thomas; Erstad, Brian L.; Luecke, Richard H.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Timchalk, Chuck; Mattison, Donald R.

    2005-07-26

    A workshop was conducted on November 18?19, 2004, to address the issue of improving predictive models for drug delivery to developing humans. Although considerable progress has been made for adult humans, large gaps remain for predicting pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) outcome in children because most adult models have not been tested during development. The goals of the meeting included a description of when, during development, infants/children become adultlike in handling drugs. The issue of incorporating the most recent advances into the predictive models was also addressed: both the use of imaging approaches and genomic information were considered. Disease state, as exemplified by obesity, was addressed as a modifier of drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics during development. Issues addressed in this workshop should be considered in the development of new predictive and mechanistic models of drug kinetics and dynamics in the developing human.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of vildagliptin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Yan-Ling; Serra, Denise; Wang, Yibin

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vildagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) inhibitor currently under development for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics and tolerability of vildagliptin at doses of 10 mg, 25 mg and 100 mg twice...... daily following oral administration in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Thirteen patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled in this randomised, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled, four-period, crossover study. Patients received vildagliptin 10 mg, 25 mg and 100 mg as well as placebo...... twice daily for 28 days. RESULTS: Vildagliptin was absorbed rapidly (median time to reach maximum concentration 1 hour) and had a mean terminal elimination half-life ranging from 1.32 to 2.43 hours. The peak concentration and total exposure increased in an approximately dose-proportional manner...

  20. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single doses of empagliflozin, a sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, in healthy Japanese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarashina, Akiko; Koiwai, Kazuki; Seman, Leo J; Yamamura, Norio; Taniguchi, Atsushi; Negishi, Takahiro; Sesoko, Shogo; Woerle, Hans J; Dugi, Klaus A

    2013-01-01

    This randomized, placebo-controlled within dose groups, double-blind, single rising dose study investigated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of 1 mg to 100 mg doses of empagliflozin in 48 healthy Japanese male subjects. Empagliflozin was rapidly absorbed, reaching peak levels in 1.25 to 2.50 h; thereafter, plasma concentrations declined in a biphasic fashion, with mean terminal elimination half-life ranging from 7.76 to 11.7 h. Increase in empagliflozin exposure was proportional to dose. Oral clearance was dose independent and ranged from 140 to 172 mL/min. In the 24 h following 100 mg empagliflozin administration, the mean (%CV) amount of glucose excreted in urine was 74.3 (17.1) g. The amount and the maximum rate of glucose excreted via urine increased with dose of empagliflozin. Nine adverse events, all of mild intensity, were reported by 8 subjects (7 with empagliflozin and 1 with the placebo). No hypoglycemia was reported. In conclusion, 1 mg to 100 mg doses of empagliflozin had a good safety and tolerability profile in healthy Japanese male subjects. Exposure to empagliflozin was dose proportional. The amount and rate of urinary glucose excretion were higher with empagliflozin than with the placebo, and increased with empagliflozin dose.

  1. Steady-state pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cysteamine bitartrate in paediatric nephropathic cystinosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belldina, Eric B; Huang, Mei Y; Schneider, Jerry A; Brundage, Richard C; Tracy, Timothy S

    2003-11-01

    Cysteamine is used to reduce tissue cystine content in patients suffering from nephropathic cystinosis. The objectives of the current study were to investigate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cysteamine bitartrate in children and young adults with nephropathic cystinosis. Cysteamine bitartrate was administered to 11 cystinosis patients at their regular dose level in a single-dose, open-label, steady-state study. Blood samples were collected and analysed for plasma cysteamine and white blood cell cystine content and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters estimated by NONMEM analysis using a linked pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model. Cysteamine was rapidly cleared from the plasma (mean CL/F = 32.3 ml min(-1) kg(-1), range = 17.3-52.2), appeared to be extensively distributed (mean Vss/F = 15.1 l, range 2.7-32.3) and exhibited a mean Tmax of 1.4 h. White blood cell cystine content post-dosing was significantly decreased compared with pre- and post-dose values (average decrement approximately 47%). A counter-clockwise hysteresis was noted in all patients, suggestive of a lag time (mean Tlag = 0.44 h, range 0.22-0.92) between drug concentration and effect. The results of this study establish that cysteamine is rapidly cleared from the plasma but that an every 6 h dosing interval adequately maintains white blood cell cystine content below the target of 1 nmol cystine per mg protein.

  2. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of diclofenac in normal and Freund's complete adjuvant-induced arthritic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Pei; Guo, Hai-fang; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To characterize pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of diclofenac in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA)-induced arthritic rats using prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as a biomarker. Methods: The pharmacokinetics of diclofenac was investigated using 20-day-old arthritic rats. PGE2 level in the rats was measured using an enzyme immunoassay. A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model was developed to illustrate the relationship between the plasma concentration of diclofenac and the inhibition of PGE2 production. The inhibition of diclofenac on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PGE2 production in blood cells was investigated in vitro. Results: Similar pharmacokinetic behavior of diclofenac was found both in normal and FCA-induced arthritic rats. Diclofenac significantly decreased the plasma levels of PGE2 in both normal and arthritic rats. The inhibitory effect on PGE2 levels in the plasma was in proportion to the plasma concentration of diclofenac. No delay in the onset of inhibition was observed, suggesting that the effect compartment was located in the central compartment. An inhibitory effect sigmoid Imax model was selected to characterize the relationship between the plasma concentration of diclofenac and the inhibition of PGE2 production in vivo. The Imax model was also used to illustrate the inhibition of diclofenac on LPS-induced PGE2 production in blood cells in vitro. Conclusion: Arthritis induced by FCA does not alter the pharmacokinetic behaviors of diclofenac in rats, but the pharmacodynamics of diclofenac is slightly affected. A PK-PD model characterizing an inhibitory effect sigmoid Imax can be used to fit the relationship between the plasma PGE2 and diclofenac levels in both normal rats and FCA-induced arthritic rats. PMID:22842736

  3. Comparison of Dapivirine Vaginal Gel and Film Formulation Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics (FAME 02B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jennifer A; Marzinke, Mark A; Bakshi, Rahul P; Fuchs, Edward J; Radebaugh, Christine L; Aung, Wutyi; Spiegel, Hans M L; Coleman, Jenell S; Rohan, Lisa C; Hendrix, Craig W

    2017-04-01

    While preexposure prophylaxis with oral tenofovir/emtricitabine reduces HIV acquisition rates, poor adherence to and acceptability of vaginal gels and the potential for evolving drug resistance have led to development of vaginal film formulations and other antiretroviral drugs, respectively, including the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor dapivirine. In this two-arm crossover study of a novel fast-dissolving dapivirine film and a previously studied semisolid dapivirine gel, 10 healthy women received a single 1.25 mg vaginal dose of each study product; one withdrew after the first dose. Clinical, pharmacokinetic, and antiviral pharmacodynamic assessments (ex vivo HIV-BaL challenge of tissue explants) were performed over 168 h postdose. Six of ten participants experienced mild to moderate adverse effects, similar between products, with no severe adverse events or adverse events attributed to study products. There were no statistically significant differences in plasma, cervicovaginal fluid (CVF), or cervical tissue dapivirine concentrations between the gel and film (all p > .05). CVF dapivirine concentrations were 1.5 and 6 log 10 greater than tissue and plasma concentrations, respectively (p dapivirine film and gel performed similarly in terms of tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and antiviral effect. Dapivirine film may provide an alternative to pharmacokinetically comparable dapivirine gel formulations. Effectiveness remains to be tested.

  4. Considerations on pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics: can everything be explained by the extent of drug binding to its receptor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Hernández, G; Granados-Soto, V

    2000-03-01

    It is frequently assumed that pharmacological responses depend solely on the extent of drug binding to its receptor according to the occupational theory. It is therefore presumed that the intensity of the effect is determined by drug concentration at its receptor site, yielding a unique concentration-effect relationship. However, when dependence, abstinence, and tolerance phenomena occur, as well as for pharmacological responses in vivo that are modulated by homeostatic mechanisms, the rate of drug input shifts the concentration-effect relationship. Hence, such responses cannot be explained on the sole basis of the extent of drug binding to its receptor. Information on the cellular and molecular processes involved in the generation of abstinence, dependence, and tolerance will undoubtedly result in the development of pharmacodynamic models allowing a satisfactory explanation of drug effects modulated by these phenomena. Notwithstanding, integrative physiology concepts are required to develop pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models allowing the description of drug effects in an intact organism. It is therefore important to emphasize that integrative physiology cannot be neglected in pharmacology teaching and research, but should be considered as an equally valuable tool as molecular biology and other biomedical disciplines for the understanding of pharmacological effects.

  5. Effect of antibodies to calcitonin on the pharmacokinetics and the pharmacodynamics of the hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliaro, F; Dorizzi, R; Luisetto, G

    1995-01-01

    Calcitonin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics were studied in two groups of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis, who, treated for one year with intranasal Asu1.7-eel calcitonin (eCT), had (Ab+) and had not (Ab-) developed a specific immune response to the drug. The treatment consisted of daily intranasal administrations of eCT (80 IU/die) with 1 g supplemental calcium. Eight women who had developed specific antibodies and 5 who had not, were given 50 IU of CT i.m., in order to assess the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the drug. The rise of serum levels of the hormone was significantly greater in Ab+ than in Ab- patients. At the end of the study, no significant differences in mineral bone loss between the two groups were found. In conclusion, the presence of antibodies to eCT does not represent a negative event in the therapy of osteoporosis, but significantly affects the pharmacokinetics of the drug.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of various glucagon dosages at different blood glucose levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blauw, H.; Wendl, I.; DeVries, J. H.; Heise, T.; Jax, T.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of different doses of glucagon administered subcutaneously (s.c.) at different blood glucose levels. This study was an open-label, randomized, three-period, cross-over experiment in 6 patients with type 1 diabetes. During each of the three

  7. Single- and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of apixaban in healthy Chinese subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Y

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Yimin Cui,1 Yan Song,2 Jessie Wang,2 Zhigang Yu,2 Alan Schuster,2 Yu Chen Barrett,2 Charles Frost2 1Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ, USA Background: The pharmacokinetics (PK, pharmacodynamics (PD, and safety of apixaban were assessed in healthy Chinese subjects in this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, single-sequence, single- and multiple-dose study. Subjects and methods: Eighteen subjects 18–45 years of age were randomly assigned (2:1 ratio to receive apixaban or matched placebo. Subjects received a single 10 mg dose of apixaban or placebo on day 1, followed by 10 mg apixaban or placebo twice daily for 6 days (days 4–9. The PK and PD of apixaban were assessed by collecting plasma samples for 72 hours following the dose on day 1 and the morning dose on day 9, and measuring apixaban concentration and anti-Xa activity. Safety was assessed via physical examinations, vital sign measurements, electrocardiograms, and clinical laboratory evaluations. Results: PK analysis showed similar characteristics of apixaban after single and multiple doses, including a median time to maximum concentration of ~3 hours, mean elimination half-life of ~11 hours, and renal clearance of ~1.2 L/hour. The accumulation index was 1.7, consistent with twice-daily dosing and the observed elimination half-life. Single-dose data predict multiple-dose PK, therefore apixaban PK are time-independent. The relationship between anti-Xa activity and plasma apixaban concentrations appears to be linear. Apixaban was safe and well tolerated, with no bleeding-related adverse events reported. Conclusion: Apixaban was safe and well tolerated in healthy Chinese subjects. Apixaban PK and PD were predictable and consistent with findings from previous studies in Asian and non-Asian subjects. The administration of apixaban does not require any dose modification based on race. Keywords: apixaban, oral

  8. Modeling Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Glucagon for Simulation of the Glucoregulatory System in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye

    The goal of this thesis was to develop a pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) model for glucagon. The proposed PD model included multiplication of the stimulating glucagon effect and inhibiting insulin effect on the endogenous glucose production (EGP). Moreover, the concentration-response re......The goal of this thesis was to develop a pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) model for glucagon. The proposed PD model included multiplication of the stimulating glucagon effect and inhibiting insulin effect on the endogenous glucose production (EGP). Moreover, the concentration...

  9. Minocycline pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maaland, Marit Gaastra; Guardabassi, Luca; Papich, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although minocycline is not licensed for use in dogs, this tetracycline has therapeutic potential against meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to establish rational dosage recommendations for minocycline use in dogs....... Specific objectives were to generate and analyse minocycline pharmacokinetic (PK) data on plasma and interstitial fluid (ISF) concentrations, plasma protein binding and pharmacodynamic (PD) data on antimicrobial activity against S. pseudintermedius. ANIMALS: Six healthy dogs from a research colony were...... used in this study. METHODS: Dogs were administered 5 mg/kg intravenously and 10 mg/kg orally (p.o.) of minocycline hydrochloride in separate crossover experiments. In vivo drug concentrations in plasma and in ISF collected by ultrafiltration were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography...

  10. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of rhubarb anthraquinones extract in normal and disease rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peijin; Lu, Qianfeng; Jiang, Wenjiao; Pei, Xue; Sun, Yilin; Hao, Haiping; Hao, Kun

    2017-07-01

    Anthraquinones extract from Rheum palmatum L. (rhubarb) including rhein, emodin, aloe-emodin, chrysophanol, physcion and sennoside A, has been widely used in China to treat various diseases. This study was designed to explore the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of rhubarb anthraquinones extract in diabetic nephropathy and acute liver injury rats. The diabetic nephropathy and acute liver injury rats were induced by intraperitoneal injection with streptozotocin (STZ) and carbon tetrachloride (CCL 4 ), respectively. The rats were treated with different doses of rhubarb anthraquinones extract (37.5, 75 and 150mg/kg) as administration groups. For pharmacokinetics, the drug concentrations of rhubarb anthraquinones consisting of rhein, emodin, aloe-emodin, chrysophanol, physcion and sennoside A were determined. For pharmacodynamics, the anti-diabetic nephropathy and hepatoprotective effects were assessed under different dosage regimens. The rhein, emodin, aloe-emodin, chrysophanol were considered as pharmacokinetic markers at three doses of rhubarb anthraquinones extract. In diabetic nephropathy rats, no obvious pharmacokinetic change of the four ingredients was observed compared with control rats. However, the plasma exposures of the four ingredients increased in acute liver injury rats compared with control rats. The serum creatinine (SCr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and urine protein (UP) values in diabetic nephropathy rats decreased compared with those in the model group, which suggested that rhubarb anthraquinones extract displayed certain therapeutic and preventive effects against the diabetic nephropathy. However, rhubarb anthraquinones extract cannot ameliorate the CCL 4 -induced liver injury under the three different dosage regimens. There was no significant pharmacokinetic difference after a single oral administration of rhubarb anthraquinones extract between control and diabetic nephropathy rats. However, apparent pharmacokinetic differences were

  11. A study of potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between dextromethorphan/quinidine and memantine in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Laura E; Schoedel, Kerri A; Bartlett, Cynthia; Sellers, Edward M

    2012-08-01

    Dextromethorphan/quinidine (DMQ) is the first agent indicated for the treatment of pseudobulbar affect. Dextromethorphan, the active ingredient, is a low-affinity, uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist. This study evaluated the potential for a drug-drug interaction (DDI) of DMQ with memantine, which is also an NMDA receptor antagonist. This open-label, randomized, parallel-group study enrolled healthy adults who were randomized into one of two treatment groups. Group 1 subjects were administered memantine at a starting dose of 5 mg once daily, which was titrated over a 3-week period to a dose of 10 mg twice daily (every 12 hours) and continued for another 11 days to attain steady state; DMQ 30 mg (dextromethorphan 30 mg/quinidine 30 mg) every 12 hours was then added for a further 8 days. Group 2 subjects received DMQ 30 mg every 12 hours for 8 days to attain steady state; memantine was then added, titrated on the same schedule as in group 1, and continued at 10 mg every 12 hours for an additional 11 days. Pharmacokinetic blood sampling was performed to assess the primary endpoints of the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the geometric mean ratios of the areas under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUCs) for memantine, dextromethorphan, dextrorphan - the dextromethorphan metabolite - and quinidine during concomitant therapy versus monotherapy. Safety/tolerability and pharmacodynamic variables were also assessed. A total of 52 subjects were randomized. In both group 1 (n = 23) and group 2 (n = 29), the 90% CIs for the ratios of the AUCs during concomitant therapy versus monotherapy were within the predefined range to indicate similarity (0.8-1.25) for memantine, dextromethorphan and dextrorphan, indicating no pharmacokinetic DDI. The 90% CI for the AUC ratio for quinidine was slightly above the predefined range; however, the mean AUC increased by only 25%. In both groups, incidence of adverse events was similar, and pharmacodynamic

  12. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of eltanolone (pregnanolone), a new steroid intravenous anaesthetic, in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carl, Peder; Høgskilde, S; Lang-Jensen, T

    1994-01-01

    Eltanolone, a new intravenous steroid anaesthetic agent was administered intravenously in a dose of 0.6 mg.kg-1 over 45 s to eight healthy male volunteers to evaluate some of its pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects. Drug concentration-time data were analysed by PCNONLIN, a non...

  13. A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model of morphine exposure and subsequent morphine consumption in postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Nyberg, Joakim; Lund, Trine Meldgaard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) relationship between exposure of morphine and subsequent morphine consumption and to develop simulation tools for model validation. Methods Dose, formulation and time of morphine administration was available from a published study...

  14. Simultaneous versus sequential pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic population analysis using an iterative two-stage Bayesian technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Proost, Johannes H.; Schiere, Sjouke; Eleveld, Douglas J.; Wierda, J. Mark K. H.

    A method for simultaneous pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) population analysis using an Iterative Two-Stage Bayesian (ITSB) algorithm was developed. The method was evaluated using clinical data and Monte Carlo simulations. Data from a clinical study with rocuronium in nine anesthetized

  15. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Lisdexamfetamine Compared with D-Amphetamine in Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C. Dolder

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Lisdexamfetamine is a prodrug of D-amphetamine used for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Lisdexamfetamine is thought to have a prolonged pharmacokinetic profile compared with oral D-amphetamine, possibly associated with lower drug liking and a lower risk of oral misuse. However, differences in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lisdexamfetamine and D-amphetamine have not been directly compared.Methods: Equimolar doses of D-amphetamine (40 mg and lisdexamfetamine (100 mg, and placebo were administered in 24 healthy subjects in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Plasma concentrations of amphetamine, subjective effects, and vital signs were repeatedly assessed. The pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using compartmental modeling.Results: The increase in plasma concentrations of amphetamine had a 0.6 ± 0.6 h (mean ± SD longer lag time and reached peak levels 1.1 ± 1.5 h later after lisdexamfetamine administration compared with D-amphetamine administration, but no differences in maximal concentrations or total exposure (AUC were found between the two treatments. Consistent with the pharmacokinetics, the subjective and cardiovascular stimulant effects of lisdexamfetamine also occurred later compared with D-amphetamine. However, no differences in peak ratings of potentially abuse-related subjective drug effects (e.g., drug liking, drug high, stimulation, happy, well-being, and self-confidence were observed after lisdexamfetamine administration compared with D-amphetamine administration. Lisdexamfetamine and D-amphetamine also produced similar peak increases in mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, pupil size, and adverse effects.Conclusion: The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lisdexamfetamine are similar to D-amphetamine administered 1h later. Lisdexamfetamine is likely associated with a similar risk of oral abuse as D

  16. A Phase 1, Single-center, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Study in Healthy Subjects to Assess the Safety, Tolerability, Clinical Effects, and Pharmacokinetics-Pharmacodynamics of Intravenous Cyclopropyl-methoxycarbonylmetomidate (ABP-700) after a Single Ascending Bolus Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struys, Michel M R F; Valk, Beatrijs I; Eleveld, Douglas J; Absalom, Anthony R; Meyer, Peter; Meier, Sascha; den Daas, Izaak; Chou, Thomas; van Amsterdam, Kai; Campagna, Jason A; Sweeney, Steven P

    2017-07-01

    Cyclopropyl-methoxycarbonylmetomidate (ABP-700) is a new "soft" etomidate analog. The primary objectives of this first-in-human study were to describe the safety and efficacy of ABP-700 and to determine its maximum tolerated dose. Secondary objectives were to characterize the pharmacokinetics of ABP-700 and its primary metabolite (cyclopropyl-methoxycarbonyl acid), to assess the clinical effects of ABP-700, and to investigate the dose-response and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships. Sixty subjects were divided into 10 cohorts and received an increasing, single bolus of either ABP-700 or placebo. Safety was assessed by clinical laboratory evaluations, infusion-site reactions, continuous monitoring of vital signs, physical examination, adverse event monitoring, and adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation testing. Clinical effects were assessed with modified observer's assessment of alertness/sedation and Bispectral Index monitoring. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. Stopping criteria were met at 1.00 mg/kg dose. No serious adverse events were reported. Adverse events were dose-dependent and comprised involuntary muscle movement, tachycardia, and ventilatory effects. Adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation evoked a physiologic cortisol response in all subjects, no different from placebo. Pharmacokinetics were dose-proportional. A three-compartment pharmacokinetic model described the data well. A rapid onset of anesthesia/sedation after bolus administration and also a rapid recovery were observed. A quantitative concentration-effect relationship was described for the modified observer's assessment of alertness/sedation and Bispectral Index. This first-in-human study of ABP-700 shows that ABP-700 was safe and well tolerated after single-bolus injections up to 1.00 mg/kg. Bolus doses of 0.25 and 0.35 mg/kg were found to provide the most beneficial clinical effect versus side-effect profile.

  17. A new reversible and potent P2Y12 receptor antagonist (ACT-246475): tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics in a first-in-man trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldoni, Daniela; Bruderer, Shirin; Krause, Andreas; Gutierrez, Marcello; Gueret, Pierre; Astruc, Béatrice; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2014-11-01

    ACT-246475 is a new reversible, selective, and potent antagonist of the platelet P2Y12 receptor. This study was a first-in-man trial investigating the tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of single oral doses of ACT-246475 and its di-ester prodrug (ACT-281959) in healthy males. The study had a double-blind, randomized, ascending single-dose design with an oral formulation F1 (i.e., ACT-281959 or placebo) (Part I) and an open-label, randomized, 3-period, crossover design comparing exploratory formulations of ACT-281959 (F2) 70 mg and ACT-246475 (dF) 50 mg to F1 70 mg (Part II). In Part I, doses up to 1,000 mg were tested in 40 healthy subjects. Nine healthy subjects were enrolled in Part II. Standard safety parameters, inhibition of platelet aggregation, and ACT-246475 plasma concentrations were measured. Non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. All doses and formulations were well tolerated. The most frequent adverse event was headache, whereas no events of bleeding or dyspnea were reported. In Part I, ACT-246475 area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) increased dose-proportionally whereas maximum plasma concentration (C max) was less than dose-proportional. The highest C max [geometric mean (95 % CI)] at 1,000 mg was 13.8 (9.7, 19.5) pmol/mL at 4.5 h post-dose, terminal half-life (t ½) was ~10 h. ACT-246475 C max and AUC0-∞ ratios of geometric means (90 % CI) using F1 as reference, for F2 were 8.5 (5.42, 13.35) and 3.4 (2.40, 4.82), respectively, and for dF 2.2 (1.42, 3.49) and 1.5 (1.07, 2.16), respectively. Mean peak platelet inhibition was 31.0 % after F1 (1,000 mg) and 47.8 % after F2. Oral doses of ACT-281959 and ACT-246475 were well tolerated. Platelet inhibition correlated with ACT-246475 exposure. Exploratory formulations enhanced the bioavailability and antiplatelet effect of ACT-246475.

  18. Quantification of metoprolol beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonism in asthmatic patients by pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braat, M. C.; Jonkers, R. E.; van Boxtel, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    An integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model was used to quantify the beta 2-blocking activity of metoprolol in seven asthmatic patients. The patients received a subcutaneous dose of terbutaline on two consecutive days. On day 1 they were pretreated with placebo and on day 2 with metoprolol

  19. Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacokinetics of Morphine After Cardiac Surgery in Children With and Without Down Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, Abraham J.; Calvier, Elisa A. M.; van Dijk, Monique; Krekels, Elke H. J.; O'Hare, Brendan P.; Casey, William F.; Mathôt, Ron A. A.; Knibbe, Catherijne A. J.; Tibboel, Dick; Breatnach, Cormac V.

    2016-01-01

    To compare the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of IV morphine after cardiac surgery in two groups of children-those with and without Down syndrome. Prospective, single-center observational trial. PICU in a university-affiliated pediatric teaching hospital. Twenty-one children with Down

  20. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and tolerability of verinurad, a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor, in healthy adult male subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Z

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Zancong Shen,1 Michael Gillen,2 Jeffrey N Miner,1 Gail Bucci,1 David M Wilson,1 Jesse W Hall1 1Ardea Biosciences, Inc., San Diego, CA, 2AstraZeneca, Gaithersburg, MD, USA Purpose: Verinurad (RDEA3170 is a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor in clinical development for the treatment of gout and asymptomatic hyperuricemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and tolerability of verinurad in healthy adult males.Subjects and methods: This was a Phase I, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single and multiple ascending dose study. Panels of eight male subjects received a single oral dose of verinurad or placebo in either a fasted or fed state; panels of 10–12 male subjects received ascending doses of once-daily verinurad or placebo in a fasted state for 10 days. Serial blood and urine samples were assayed for verinurad and uric acid. Safety was assessed by adverse event (AE reports, laboratory tests, vital signs, and electrocardiograms (ECGs.Results: A total of 81 adult males completed the study. Following single doses of verinurad, maximum observed plasma concentration (Cmax and area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC increased in a dose-proportional manner; Cmax occurred at 0.5–0.75 hours and 1.25 hours in the fasted and fed states, respectively. Food decreased AUC by 23% and Cmax by 37%-53%. There was a modest accumulation of verinurad following multiple daily doses. Verinurad reduced serum urate levels by up to 62% (40 mg, single dose and 61% (10 mg, multiple dose. The increase in urinary excretion of uric acid was greatest in the first 6 hours after dosing and was still evident ≥24 hours for verinurad doses ≥2 mg. Verinurad was well tolerated at all doses. No serious AEs, severe AEs, discontinuations due to AEs, or clinically significant laboratory or ECG abnormalities were reported.Conclusion: Single and multiple doses of verinurad were well tolerated

  1. Application of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Product Life Cycle Management. A Case Study with a Carbidopa-Levodopa Extended-Release Formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Nishit B

    2017-05-01

    Increasing costs in discovering and developing new molecular entities and the continuing debate on limited company pipelines mean that pharmaceutical companies are under significant pressure to maximize the value of approved products. Life cycle management in the context of drug development comprises activities to maximize the effective life of a product. Life cycle approaches can involve new formulations, new routes of delivery, new indications or expansion of the population for whom the product is indicated, or development of combination products. Life cycle management may provide an opportunity to improve upon the current product through enhanced efficacy or reduced side effects and could expand the therapeutic market for the product. Successful life cycle management may include the potential for superior efficacy, improved tolerability, or a better prescriber or patient acceptance. Unlike generic products where bioequivalence to an innovator product may be sufficient for drug approval, life cycle management typically requires a series of studies to characterize the value of the product. This review summarizes key considerations in identifying product candidates that may be suitable for life cycle management and discusses the application of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in developing new products using a life cycle management approach. Examples and a case study to illustrate how pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics contributed to the selection of dosing regimens, demonstration of an improved therapeutic effect, or regulatory approval of an improved product label are presented.

  2. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variability as possible causes for different drug responses in migraine. A comment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, P; Edvinsson, L

    2007-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of antimigraine drugs zolmitriptan and sumatriptan varied considerably with a fourfold to 10-fold variation in plasma levels. In addition, the pharmacodynamics of triptans as investigated in vitro also varied considerably. In theory, there should probably be a 10-fold variation...

  3. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of candesartan cilexetil in patients with normal to severely impaired renal function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buter, H; Navis, GY; Woittiez, AJJ; de Zeeuw, D; de Jong, PE

    Objective: We studied the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single and multiple doses of candesartan cilexetil 8 mg per day in hypertensive patients with different degrees of renal function impairment. Candesartan is an angiotensin II subtype I (AT1) receptor antagonist that is administered

  4. Non-invasive monitoring of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for pharmacological drug profiling in children and adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrier, Lenneke

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the potential role of non-invasive measurement of pharmacokinetics (pk) and pharmacodynamics (pd) in the research and development of central nervous system (cns) stimulants or depressants for children and adolescents. First, we evaluated the feasibility of using saliva as an

  5. PKSolver: An add-in program for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data analysis in Microsoft Excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Huo, Meirong; Zhou, Jianping; Xie, Shaofei

    2010-09-01

    This study presents PKSolver, a freely available menu-driven add-in program for Microsoft Excel written in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), for solving basic problems in pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data analysis. The program provides a range of modules for PK and PD analysis including noncompartmental analysis (NCA), compartmental analysis (CA), and pharmacodynamic modeling. Two special built-in modules, multiple absorption sites (MAS) and enterohepatic circulation (EHC), were developed for fitting the double-peak concentration-time profile based on the classical one-compartment model. In addition, twenty frequently used pharmacokinetic functions were encoded as a macro and can be directly accessed in an Excel spreadsheet. To evaluate the program, a detailed comparison of modeling PK data using PKSolver and professional PK/PD software package WinNonlin and Scientist was performed. The results showed that the parameters estimated with PKSolver were satisfactory. In conclusion, the PKSolver simplified the PK and PD data analysis process and its output could be generated in Microsoft Word in the form of an integrated report. The program provides pharmacokinetic researchers with a fast and easy-to-use tool for routine and basic PK and PD data analysis with a more user-friendly interface. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic evaluation of buprenorphine + samidorphan for the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragguett, Renee-Marie; Rong, Carola; Rosenblat, Joshua D; Ho, Roger C; McIntyre, Roger S

    2018-04-01

    Treatment resistant depression (TRD) represents approximately 20% of all individuals receiving care for major depressive disorder. The opioidergic system is identified as a novel target which hitherto has not been sufficiently investigated in adults with TRD. The combination product buprenorphine + samidorphan is an opioid modulatory agent which has demonstrated replicated evidence of efficacy in TRD without abuse liability. Areas covered: Databases Pubmed, Google Scholar and clinicaltrials.gov were searched from inception through December 2017 for clinical trial information, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of buprenorphine + samidorphan. Herein we provide a summary of the available information. Eight clinical trials were identified for inclusion, of the eight trials, five trials had available results and are included in detail in our review. Expert opinion: Buprenorphine + samidorphan has demonstrated efficacy in TRD. Extant evidence surrounding the safety and tolerability profile of buprenorphine + samidorphan does not identify any significant safety concerns. Additional studies are needed in order to assess the long-term safety and efficacy of this product.

  7. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Interaction of Andrographolide and Standardized Extract of Andrographis paniculata (Nees) with Nabumetone in Wistar Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balap, Aishwarya; Lohidasan, Sathiyanarayanan; Sinnathambi, Arulmozhi; Mahadik, Kakasaheb

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the herb-drug interaction of Andrographis paniculata Nees (Acanthaceae) and Andrographolide (AN) with nabumetone (NAB) in wistar rats. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions were studied after co-administration of APE and AN with NAB in Wistar rats. In pharmacokinetic studies, significant decrease in Cmax, AUC 0-t and AUC 0-∞ of 6-MNA after co-administration with pure AN and APE has been observed. T max of 6-MNA has been increased to 2 h from 1.5 h in AN + NAB treated group. Changes in mean residential time, clearance and volume of distribution of 6-MNA in APE + NAB treated group and AN + NAB treated group indicated interference of other components of APE other than AN. In pharmacodynamic study, significant decrease in antiarthritic activity of NAB on concomitant administration with APE and AN has been observed. The study concludes that NAB exhibits pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions with APE and AN in rats thus alarms the concomitant use of herbal preparations containing APE and AN with NAB. Further study is needed to understand the mechanism and predict the herb-drug interaction in humans. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Prediction of clinical response based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models of 5-hydroxytryptamine reuptake inhibitors in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreilgaard, Mads; Smith, D. G.; Brennum, L. T.

    2008-01-01

    Bridging the gap between preclinical research and clinical trials is vital for drug development. Predicting clinically relevant steady-state drug concentrations (Css) in serum from preclinical animal models may facilitate this transition. Here we used a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK...

  9. Analysis of the safety and pharmacodynamics of human fibrinogen concentrate in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyerle, Andrea; Nolte, Marc W.; Solomon, Cristina; Herzog, Eva; Dickneite, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Fibrinogen, a soluble 340 kDa plasma glycoprotein, is critical in achieving and maintaining hemostasis. Reduced fibrinogen levels are associated with an increased risk of bleeding and recent research has investigated the efficacy of fibrinogen concentrate for controlling perioperative bleeding. European guidelines on the management of perioperative bleeding recommend the use of fibrinogen concentrate if significant bleeding is accompanied by plasma fibrinogen levels less than 1.5–2.0 g/l. Plasma-derived human fibrinogen concentrate has been available for therapeutic use since 1956. The overall aim of the comprehensive series of non-clinical investigations presented was to evaluate i) the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic characteristics and ii) the safety and tolerability profile of human fibrinogen concentrate Haemocomplettan P® (RiaSTAP®). Pharmacodynamic characteristics were assessed in rabbits, pharmacokinetic parameters were determined in rabbits and rats and a safety pharmacology study was performed in beagle dogs. Additional toxicology tests included: single-dose toxicity tests in mice and rats; local tolerance tests in rabbits; and neoantigenicity tests in rabbits and guinea pigs following the introduction of pasteurization in the manufacturing process. Human fibrinogen concentrate was shown to be pharmacodynamically active in rabbits and dogs and well tolerated, with no adverse events and no influence on circulation, respiration or hematological parameters in rabbits, mice, rats and dogs. In these non-clinical investigations, human fibrinogen concentrate showed a good safety profile. This data adds to the safety information available to date, strengthening the current body of knowledge regarding this hemostatic agent. - Highlights: • A comprehensive series of pre-clinical investigations of human fibrinogen concentrate. • Human fibrinogen concentrate was shown to be pharmacodynamically active. • Human fibrinogen concentrate was well tolerated

  10. Analysis of the safety and pharmacodynamics of human fibrinogen concentrate in animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyerle, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.beyerle@cslbehring.com [CSL Behring GmbH, Preclinical Research and Development, Marburg (Germany); Nolte, Marc W. [CSL Behring GmbH, Preclinical Research and Development, Marburg (Germany); Solomon, Cristina [CSL Behring GmbH, Medical Affairs, Marburg (Germany); Department of Anaesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and General Intensive Care, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria); Herzog, Eva; Dickneite, Gerhard [CSL Behring GmbH, Preclinical Research and Development, Marburg (Germany)

    2014-10-01

    Fibrinogen, a soluble 340 kDa plasma glycoprotein, is critical in achieving and maintaining hemostasis. Reduced fibrinogen levels are associated with an increased risk of bleeding and recent research has investigated the efficacy of fibrinogen concentrate for controlling perioperative bleeding. European guidelines on the management of perioperative bleeding recommend the use of fibrinogen concentrate if significant bleeding is accompanied by plasma fibrinogen levels less than 1.5–2.0 g/l. Plasma-derived human fibrinogen concentrate has been available for therapeutic use since 1956. The overall aim of the comprehensive series of non-clinical investigations presented was to evaluate i) the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic characteristics and ii) the safety and tolerability profile of human fibrinogen concentrate Haemocomplettan P® (RiaSTAP®). Pharmacodynamic characteristics were assessed in rabbits, pharmacokinetic parameters were determined in rabbits and rats and a safety pharmacology study was performed in beagle dogs. Additional toxicology tests included: single-dose toxicity tests in mice and rats; local tolerance tests in rabbits; and neoantigenicity tests in rabbits and guinea pigs following the introduction of pasteurization in the manufacturing process. Human fibrinogen concentrate was shown to be pharmacodynamically active in rabbits and dogs and well tolerated, with no adverse events and no influence on circulation, respiration or hematological parameters in rabbits, mice, rats and dogs. In these non-clinical investigations, human fibrinogen concentrate showed a good safety profile. This data adds to the safety information available to date, strengthening the current body of knowledge regarding this hemostatic agent. - Highlights: • A comprehensive series of pre-clinical investigations of human fibrinogen concentrate. • Human fibrinogen concentrate was shown to be pharmacodynamically active. • Human fibrinogen concentrate was well tolerated

  11. A review on dronedarone: Pharmacological, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Iram

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dronedarone, a benzofuran containing chemical compound, is a derivative of amiodarone which is classified as a Class III antiarrhythmic agent. It is prescribed to the cardiovascular patients who have paroxysmal or persistent atrial fibrillation to lower the chances of hospitalization. Amiodarone, sotalol, procainamide dofetilide, quinidine, ibutilide, flecainide, and propafenone are the other useful medicinal products used to treat atrial fibrillation or cardiac arrhythmia. Dronedarone was approved for clinical use in atrial fibrillation by the Food and Drug Administration in 2009. The generic name for dronedarone is Multaq (Sanofi Aventis. This article briefly highlights the important pharmacological, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of dronedarone.

  12. Comparative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of branded and generic formulations of meloxicam in healthy male volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Tacca M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mario Del Tacca,1,2 Giuseppe Pasqualetti,3 Giovanni Gori,1 Pasquale Pepe,1 Antonello Di Paolo,2 Marianna Lastella,2 Ferdinando De Negri,1 Corrado Blandizzi2 1Clinical Pharmacology Centre for Drug Experimentation, Pisa University Hospital, 2Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, 3Geriatrics Unit, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Purpose: The primary aim of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetic bioequivalence between a generic formulation of meloxicam 15 mg tablets (Meloxicam Hexal and its respective brand product (Mobic, in order to verify whether the generic product conforms to the regulatory standards of bioequivalence in the postmarketing setting. As a secondary exploratory aim, the pharmacodynamic effects of the two formulations were also evaluated by means of rating scales following hyperalgesia induced by cutaneous freeze injury. Subjects and methods: A single 15 mg dose of generic or branded meloxicam tablets was administered to 24 healthy male volunteers in a crossover fashion. Plasma samples, collected for 24 hours after dosing, were assayed for meloxicam concentration by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method. Results: The analysis of pharmacokinetic parameters did not show any significant difference between the two meloxicam formulations: the 90% confidence intervals fell within the acceptance range of 80%–125% (0.84–1.16 for area under the curve [0–24], and 0.89–1.23 for peak concentration. No difference in the pharmacodynamic end point was observed between the two groups. Conclusion: The pharmacokinetic profiles of the two meloxicam formulations confirm the regulatory criteria for bioequivalence; pharmacodynamic data indicate a similar antihyperalgesic effect. The two formulations can be used interchangeably in the clinical setting. Keywords: meloxicam, pharmacokinetics, healthy volunteers, generic drug, bioequivalence, postmarketing

  13. Population Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Meropenem in Nonobese, Obese, and Morbidly Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Kyoung; Cheatham, S Christian; Fleming, Megan R; Healy, Daniel P; Kays, Michael B

    2017-03-01

    The study objective was to evaluate meropenem population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in nonobese, obese, and morbidly obese patients. Forty adult patients-11 nonobese (body mass index [BMI] calculate probability of target attainment (PTA) for 5 dosing regimens, infused over 0.5 and 3 hours, using fT>MIC of 40%, 54%, and 100% of the dosing interval. A 2-compartment linear-elimination model best described the serum concentration-time data, and creatinine clearance was significantly associated with systemic clearance. Pharmacokinetic parameters were not significantly different among patient groups. In patients with creatinine clearances ≥50 mL/min, all simulated dosing regimens achieved >90% PTA at 40% fT>MIC in all patient groups at MICs ≤2 mg/L. Only 500 mg q8h, infused over 0.5 hour, did not achieve >90% PTA at 54% fT>MIC in nonobese and morbidly obese patients. At 100% fT>MIC, 1 g q6h and 2 g q8h, infused over 3 hours, reliably achieved >90% PTA in all patient groups. Meropenem pharmacokinetics are comparable among nonobese, obese, and morbidly obese patients. Standard dosing regimens provide adequate pharmacodynamic exposures for susceptible pathogens at 40% and 54% fT>MIC, but prolonged infusions of larger doses are needed for adequate exposures at 100% fT>MIC. Dosage adjustments based solely on body weight are unnecessary. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  14. Dose Assessment of Cefquinome by Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling in Mouse Model of Staphylococcus aureus Mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to characterize the mammary gland pharmacokinetics of cefquinome after an intramammary administration and integrate pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model. The pharmacokinetic profiles of cefquinome in gland tissue were measured using high performance liquid chromatograph. Therapeutic regimens covered various dosages ranging from 25 to 800 μg/gland and multiple dosing intervals of 8, 12, and 24 h. The in vivo bacterial killing activity elevated when dosage increased or when dosing intervals were shortened. The best antibacterial effect was demonstrated by a mean 1.5 log10CFU/gland visible count reduction. On the other hand, the results showed that the percentage of time duration of drug concentration exceeding the MIC during a dose interval (%T > MIC was generally 100% because of the influence of drug distribution caused by the blood-milk barrier. Therefore, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameter of the ratio of area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h to the MIC (AUC0-24/MIC was used to describe the efficacy of cefquinome instead of %T > MIC. When the magnitude of AUC0-24/MIC exceeding 16571.55 h•mL/g, considerable activity of about 1.5 log10CFU/g gland bacterial count reduction was observed in vivo. Based on the Monte Carlo simulation, the clinical recommended regimen of three infusions of 75 mg per quarter every 12 h can achieve a 76.67% cure rate in clinical treatment of bovine mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection.

  15. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of two omeprazole formulations on stomach pH and gastric ulcer scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raidal, S L; Andrews, F M; Nielsen, S G; Trope, G

    2017-11-01

    Limited data are available on the relative pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of different omeprazole formulations. To compare pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of a novel omeprazole formulation against a currently registered product. Masked 2 period, 2 treatment crossover. Twelve clinically healthy horses were studied over two 6-day treatment periods. Horses were randomly assigned to receive a novel omeprazole paste (Ulcershield: ULS) or a currently registered reference omeprazole product (OMO). Gastric pH was measured continuously for 10 h on the day prior to commencing treatment (Day -1) and after 6 days of oral treatment (Day 5) using in situ antimony pH probes within an indwelling nasogastric tube. Plasma pharmacokinetics were determined on Days 0 and 6. Treatment significantly (Pulcer severity scores (both P = 0.004), with no difference between treatments (P = 0.688). Comparison of mean log area under time-plasma concentration curves demonstrated that, although the lower limit of the 90% confidence interval was within the -20% limit for bioequivalence, the upper limit was exceeded, suggesting that the test product could have greater bioavailability than the reference product. The small sample size, large interhorse plasma omeprazole concentrations, and low bioavailability of omeprazole impacted the sensitivity of the bioequivalence analysis. ULS matched or slightly exceeded OMO plasma concentrations. Both products resulted in equivalent increases in gastric pH, gastric pH profiles and decrease in gastric ulcer scores. Thus, ULS was pharmacodynamically equivalent to OMO and was associated with an equivalent beneficial effect on gastric squamous mucosal ulceration. © 2017 EVJ Ltd.

  16. Obesity and drug pharmacology: a review of the influence of obesity on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C.; Hoogd, S. De; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Knibbe, C.A.

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The rising prevalence of obesity confronts clinicians with dosing problems in the (extreme) overweight population. Obesity has a great impact on key organs that play a role in the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of drugs, however the ultimate impact of these changes on

  17. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analysis of mnesic effects of lorazepam in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blin, O; Jacquet, A; Callamand, S; Jouve, E; Habib, M; Gayraud, D; Durand, A; Bruguerolle, B; Pisano, P

    1999-10-01

    To describe the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling of the psychomotor and mnesic effects of a single 2 mg oral dose of lorazepam in healthy volunteers. This was a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled two-way cross-over study. The effect of lorazepam was examined with the following tasks: choice reaction time, immediate and delayed cued recall of paired words and immediate and delayed free recall and recognition of pictures. The mean calculated EC50 values derived from the PK/PD modelling of the different tests ranged from 12.2 to 15.3 ng ml-1. On the basis of the statistical comparison of the EC50 values, the delayed recall trials seemed to be more impaired than the immediate recall trials; similar observations were made concerning the recognition vs recall tasks. The parameter values derived from PK/PD modelling, and especially the EC50 values, may provide sensitive indices that can be used, rather than the raw data derived from pharmacodynamic measurements, to compare CNS effects of benzodiazepines.

  18. Efficacy of Cefquinome against Escherichia coli Environmental Mastitis Assessed by Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Integration in Lactating Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the pharmacodynamic effectiveness of cefquinome against environmental Escherichia coli mastitis infection, following an intramammary administration. We established the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD model in lactating mice. The PK/PD parameters were identified to achieve an antibacterial efficacy as indicated by PD activity, cytokine expression and PK/PD simulation. From our findings, given an 200 μg/gland dose once daily can achieve a considerable therapeutic effectiveness in experimental circumstance.

  19. Population Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Haloperidol in Patients With Schizophrenia Using Positive and Negative Syndrome Rating Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddy, Venkatesh Pilla; Kozielska, Magdalena; Johnson, Martin; Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Vermeulen, An; Liu, Jing; de Greef, Rik; Rujescu, Dan; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Danhof, Meindert; Proost, Johannes H.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model that quantifies the efficacy of haloperidol, accounting for the placebo effect, the variability in exposure-response, and the dropouts. Subsequently, the developed model was utilized to characterize an effective

  20. Levodopa pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling and 6-[F-18]levodopa positron emission tomography in patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, M; Harder, S; Graff, J; Kunig, G; Vontobel, P; Leenders, KL; Baas, H

    Objective: Parameters of a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model of levodopa have been claimed to reflect the magnitude of the dopaminergic deficit in patients with Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to correlate such parameters with positron emission tomography (PET) with

  1. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of diclofenac in the presence and absence of glibenclamide in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Reyes, María R; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Ortiz, Mario I

    2008-01-01

    There are evidences that glibenclamide, a sulfonylurea antidiabetic agent, reduces the analgesic action of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids and neuromodulators in animal models. The purpose of this work was to examine in the rat if such interaction involves pharmacokinetic mechanisms or is solely limited to the pharmacodynamic level. All studies were carried out in female Wistar rats. Analgesia was assessed using the formalin test. Fifty microliters of diluted formalin was injected subcutaneously into the dorsal surface of the right hind paw. Nociceptive behavior was quantified as the number of flinches of the injected paw during 60 min after injection and a reduction in formalin-induced flinching was interpreted as an analgesic response. Rats were treated with oral diclofenac (3-18 mg/kg) in presence and the absence of oral glibenclamide (1-30 mg/kg). To evaluate the possibility of a pharmacokinetic interaction, the oral bioavailability of diclofenac (18 mg/kg) was studied in presence and the absence of glibenclamide (10 mg/kg). Oral administration of diclofenac produced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in the formalin test. Coadministration of glibenclamide significantly reduced diclofenac-induced antinociception. Notwithstanding, the interaction does no appear to involve pharmacokinetic mechanisms, as oral glibenclamide failed to produce any significant alteration in oral diclofenac bioavailability. Concomitant systemic administration of glibenclamide and diclofenac results in a reduction of the analgesic effect of the NSAID in the formalin test in the rat. This interaction, however, appears due solely to a pharmacodynamic mechanisms as diclofenac pharmacokinetics are not altered.

  2. Pharmacodynamic-pharmacokinetic integration as a guide to medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Johan; Fjellström, Ola; Ulander, Johan; Rowley, Michael; Van Der Graaf, Piet H

    2011-01-01

    A primary objective of pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) reasoning is to identify key in vivo drug and system proper¬ties, enabling prediction of the magnitude and time course of drug responses under physiological and pathological conditions in animals and man. Since the pharmacological response generated by a drug is highly dependent on the actual system used to study its action, knowledge about its potency and efficacy at a given concentration or dose is insufficient to obtain a proper understanding of its pharmacodynamic profile. Hence, the output of PKPD activities extends beyond the provision of quantitative measures (models) of results, to the design of future protocols. Furthermore, because PKPD integrates DMPK (e.g. clearance) and pharmacology (e.g. potency),it provides an anchor point for compound selection, and, as such, should be viewed as an important weapon in medicinal chemistry. Here we outline key PK concepts relevant to PD, and then consider real-life experiments to illustrate the importance to the medicinal chemist of data obtained by PKPD. Useful assumptions and potential pitfalls are described, providing a holistic view of the plethora of determinants behind in vitro-in vivo correlations. By condensing complexity to simplicity, there are not only consequences for experimental design, and for the ranking and design of compounds, but it is also possible to make important predictions such as the impact of changes in drug potency and kinetics. In short, by using quantitative methods to tease apart pharmacodynamic complexities such as temporal differences and changes in plasma protein binding, it is possible to target the changes necessary for improving a compound's profile.

  3. Gap analysis of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in burn patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Amanda N; Grimsrud, Kristin N; Sen, Soman; Palmieri, Tina L; Greenhalgh, David G; Tran, Nam K

    2015-01-01

    Severe burn injury results in a multifaceted physiological response that significantly alters drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD). This response includes hypovolemia, increased vascular permeability, increased interstitial hydrostatic pressure, vasodilation, and hypermetabolism. These physiologic alterations impact drug distribution and excretion-thus varying the drug therapeutic effect on the body or microorganism. To this end, in order to optimize critical care for the burn population it is essential to understand how burn injury alters PK/PD parameters. The purpose of this article is to describe the relationship between burn injury and drug PK/PD. We conducted a literature review via PubMed and Google to identify burn-related PK/PD studies. Search parameters included "pharmacokinetics," "pharmacodynamics," and "burns." Based on our search parameters, we located 38 articles that studied PK/PD parameters specifically in burns. Twenty-seven articles investigated PK/PD of antibiotics, 10 assessed analgesics and sedatives, and one article researched an antacid. Out of the 37 articles, there were 19 different software programs used and eight different control groups. The mechanisms behind alterations in PK/PD in burns remain poorly understood. Dosing techniques must be adapted based on burn injury-related changes in PK/PD parameters in order to ensure drug efficacy. Although several PK/PD studies have been undertaken in the burn population, there is wide variation in the analytical techniques, software, and study sample sizes used. In order to refine dosing techniques in burns and consequently improve patient outcomes, there must be harmonization among PK/PD analyses.

  4. A fixed-dose combination tablet of gemigliptin and metformin sustained release has comparable pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and tolerability profiles to separate tablets in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-In; Lee, Howard; Oh, Jaeseong; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Jang, In-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Ae; Jung, Jong Hyuk; Yu, Kyung-Sang

    2015-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes mellitus, fixed-dose combination (FDC) can provide the complementary benefits of correction of multiple pathophysiologic defects such as dysfunctions in glycemic or metabolic control while improving compliance compared with separate tablets taken together. The objective of the study reported here was to compare the pharmacodynamic (PD), pharmacokinetic (PK), and tolerability profiles of gemigliptin and extended-release metformin (metformin XR) between FDC and separate tablets. A randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-way, two-period, crossover study was conducted in 28 healthy male volunteers. Two FDC tablets of gemigliptin/metformin 25/500 mg or separate tablets of gemigliptin (50 mg ×1) and metformin XR (500 mg ×2) were orally administered in each period. Serial blood samples were collected up to 48 hours post-dose to determine dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) activity using spectrophotometric assay and concentrations of gemigliptin and metformin using tandem mass spectrometry. Geometric mean ratios (GMRs) of FDC to separate tablet formulations and their 90% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to compare the PD and PK parameters between the two formulations. Tolerability was assessed throughout the study. The plasma DPP-4 activity-time curves of the FDC and the separate tablets almost overlapped, leading to a GMR (90% CI) of the FDC to separate tablets for the plasma DPP-4 activity and its maximum inhibition of 1.00 (0.97-1.04) and 0.92 (0.82-1.05), respectively. Likewise, all of the GMRs (90% CIs) of FDC to separate tablets for the area under the plasma concentration-time curve and maximum plasma concentration of gemigliptin and metformin fell entirely within the conventional bioequivalence range of 0.80-1.25. Both the FDC and separate tablets were well tolerated. The PD, PK, and tolerability profiles of gemigliptin and metformin XR in FDC and separate tablets were found to be comparable. The FDC tablet of gemigliptin and metformin

  5. Influence of oxytetracycline on carprofen pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brentnall, C; Cheng, Z; McKellar, Q A; Lees, P

    2013-08-01

    A tissue cage model of inflammation in calves was used to determine the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of individual carprofen enantiomers, following the administration of the racemate. RS(±) carprofen was administered subcutaneously both alone and in combination with intramuscularly administered oxytetracycline in a four-period crossover study. Oxytetracycline did not influence the pharmacokinetics of R(-) and S(+) carprofen enantiomers, except for a lower maximum concentration (Cmax ) of S(+) carprofen in serum after co-administration with oxytetracycline. S(+) enantiomer means for area under the serum concentration-time curve (AUC0-96 h were 136.9 and 128.3 μg·h/mL and means for the terminal half-life (T(1/2) k10 ) were = 12.9 and 17.3 h for carprofen alone and in combination with oxytetracycline, respectively. S(+) carprofen AUC0-96 h in both carprofen treatments and T(1/2) k10 for carprofen alone were lower (P oxytetracycline in calves and indicate that no alteration to carprofen dosage is required when the drugs are co-administered. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. COMPARISON OF PHARMACOKINETICS AND PHARMACODYNAMICS OF THE ORIGINAL AND GENERIC ENALAPRIL IN THE ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Bobrova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and pharmacoeconomic parameters of the original and generic enalaprils in the treatment of the elderly patients with hypertension (HT. Material and Methods. Patients (n=40 75–90 years with HT were included in the open randomized comparative study. Patients were randomized into two groups. Patients of the group 1 received generic enalapril, patients of the group 2 — the original enalapril consisting of combined therapy. Pharmacokinetic single-dose study of original and generic enalapril were carried out with high-performance liquid chromatography. Pharmacodynamic study was carried out in single-dose administration as well as after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment with original and generic enalapril. Pharmacoeconomic evaluation of antihypertensive drugs was carried out on the basis of cost minimization analysis. Results. Original enalapril dose necessary to achieve the target blood pressure (BP was 10 mg/day as a part of two-component therapy. This for generic enalapril was 20 mg/day consisting of three- or four-component therapy. Both drugs have shown an acceptable safety profile. Pharmacokinetic differences were revealed between original and generic enalapril: area under pharmacokinetic curve 204.14 (202.25–206.05 vs 136.23 (134.17–137.65 ng*h/ml, respectively; time of the drug retention in the blood plasma 5.42 (5.26–5.76 vs 4.88 (4.86–4.94 hours, respectively; p<0.001. Original enalapril demonstrated more stable 24-hour antihypertensive effect in once daily administration in comparison with this in generic enalapril: trough/peak ratio 78.67% (47.61–91.35% vs 44.96% (32.44–55.49%, respectively , p<0.01. The average daily cost of combined therapy containing generic enalapril was 15.91 rubles per patient, while this in combined therapy containing original enalapril — 13.78 rubles per patient. Conclusion. Medicines on the basis of original and generic enalapril have pharmacokinetic

  7. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Relationship of Gabapentin in a CFA-induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia Rat Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Malte Selch; Keizer, Ron; Munro, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Gabapentin displays non-linear drug disposition, which complicates dosing for optimal therapeutic effect. Thus, the current study was performed to elucidate the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) relationship of gabapentin's effect on mechanical hypersensitivity in a rat model of CFA......-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. METHODS: A semi-mechanistic population-based PKPD model was developed using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling, based on gabapentin plasma and brain extracellular fluid (ECF) time-concentration data and measurements of CFA-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia following administration...

  8. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Profiles of Tiamulin in an Experimental Intratracheal Infection Model of Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Xia; Sun, Jian; Yang, Tao; Fang, Xi; Cheng, Jie; Xiong, Yan Q.; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is the most important pathogen in poultry among four pathogenic Mycoplasma species. Tiamulin is a pleuromutilin antibiotic that shows a great activity against M. gallisepticum and has been approved for use in veterinary medicine particularly for poultry. However, the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) profiles of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum are not well understood. Therefore, in the current studies, we investigated the in vivo PK/PD profiles of tiamulin us...

  9. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Profiles of Tiamulin in an Experimental Intratracheal Infection Model of Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    OpenAIRE

    Xia Xiao; Xia Xiao; Jian Sun; Tao Yang; Xi Fang; Jie Cheng; Yan Q. Xiong; Yan Q. Xiong; Ya-Hong Liu; Ya-Hong Liu

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is the most important pathogen in poultry among four pathogenic Mycoplasma species. Tiamulin is a pleuromutilin antibiotic that shows a great activity against M. gallisepticum and has been approved for use in veterinary medicine particularly for poultry. However, the Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) profiles of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum are not well understood. Therefore, in the current studies, we investigated the in vivo PK/PD profiles of tiamulin us...

  10. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, efficacy, and safety of a new recombinant asparaginase preparation in children with previously untreated acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A randomized phase 2 clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Pieters (Rob); I.M. Appel (Inge); H.J. Kuehnel; I. Tetzlaff-Fohr (Iris); U. Pichlmeier (Uwe); I. van der Vaart (Inekee); E. Visser (Eline); R.L. Stigter

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynam-ics, efficacy, and safety of a new recom-binant Escherichia coli - asparaginase preparation was compared withAsparagi-nase medac. Thirty-two children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were randomized to receive one of both agents at a dose of 5000

  11. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of novel glucokinase activator HMS5552: results from a first-in-human single ascending dose study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu HR

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hongrong Xu,1,* Lei Sheng,1,* Weili Chen,1 Fei Yuan,1 Mengjie Yang,1 Hui Li,1 Xuening Li,1 John Choi,2 Guiyu Zhao,2 Tianxin Hu,2 Yongguo Li,2 Yi Zhang,2 Li Chen2 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, 2Department of Clinical Research & Development, Hua Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors have contributed equally to this work Background: HMS5552, a novel fourth-generation glucokinase (GK activator, has demonstrated promising effects on glycemic control in preclinical models of type 2 diabetes. This single ascending dose study was conducted to investigate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK, and pharmacodynamics (PD of HMS5552 during its first-in-human exposure.Methods: Sixty healthy subjects were enrolled. In each of six dose-cohorts (5, 10, 15, 25, 35, and 50 mg, ten subjects were randomized with eight subjects receiving the same cohort-dose of HMS5552 and two receiving placebo. Plasma HMS5552 exposure, glucose, and insulin were measured repeatedly during fasting and after a standardized meal. Assessment included safety, PK, and PD endpoints.Results: HMS5552 showed dose-proportional increases in area under the curve 0 to the last quantifiable concentration (AUC0–t and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax. Slopes estimated by linear regression for AUC0–t and Cmax were ~1.0 (0.932 and 0.933, respectively. Geometric mean elimination half-life ranged from 4.48 to 7.51 hours and apparent clearance ranged from 11.5 to 13.1 L/h across all doses. No significant sex effect was observed in PK parameters. HMS5552 also demonstrated dose-related PD responses in terms of maximum glucose change from baseline (% and mean glucose area under effect curve 0–4 hours change from baseline (% (P<0.001. Fifteen adverse events were reported by nine subjects (ten with HMS5552 and five with the placebo. All adverse events were mild in intensity and resolved without any treatment

  12. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and local tolerance at injection site of marbofloxacin administered by regional intravenous limb perfusion in standing horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallemand, Elodie; Trencart, Pierre; Tahier, Carine; Dron, Frederic; Paulin, Angelique; Tessier, Caroline

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic variables and local tolerance at injection-site of marbofloxacin administered via regional intravenous limb perfusion (RIVLP) in standing horses. Adult horses (n = 6). RIVLP were performed with rubber tourniquets applied to the forelimbs of standing sedated horses. Marbofloxacin (0.67 mg/kg) was randomly injected in 1 forelimb, with the contralateral limb serving as a control (0.9% NaCl solution). Samples of jugular blood and synovial fluid from the radiocarpal joint of the marbofloxacin-perfused limb were collected before and at intervals after RIVLP for determination of drug concentrations. All injection sites were evaluated before, 24 and 48 hours after RIVLP by means of ultrasonographic examination, circumferential measurements and subjective visible inflammation scores by veterinarians unaware of treatment received. No adverse effects associated with the technique or antibiotic were observed. High marbofloxacin concentrations were obtained in the synovial fluid, AUCINF was significantly higher in synovial fluid than in plasma (78.64 ± 49.41 and 2.85 ± 0.60 µg h/mL respectively, P = .028). The efficacy indices, AUC0-24 /MIC90 and Cmaxobs/MIC90 , predicted a favorable outcome in the treatment of synovial fluid infections caused by enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus aureus. After RIVLP, there was no statistically significant difference between marbofloxacin-injected and control limbs for lameness, visual inflammation score, limb circumference, and ultrasonographic appearance of the veins. Marbofloxacin injected limbs had a significantly greater subcutaneous thickness, compared with control limbs. These data suggest that RIVLP of marbofloxacin (0.67 mg/kg) could be a safe and effective method for treatment of infections of the distal portion of the limb for susceptible organisms. © Copyright 2013 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  13. Effect of Co-Administration of Rivaroxaban and Clopidogrel on Bleeding Time, Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacokinetics: A Phase I Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Becka

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Dual antiplatelet therapy with acetylsalicylic acid and a thienopyridine, such as clopidogrel, is effective for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndrome, but there is still a substantial residual risk of recurrence. Although anticoagulant therapy with a vitamin K antagonist (e.g. warfarin in conjunction with antiplatelet therapy has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events, the rates of bleeding were increased with these combination therapies; hence, triple therapy with warfarin is currently only recommended in patients at low risk of bleeding. In addition, there are other limitations associated with vitamin K antagonist therapy, including the need for routine coagulation monitoring and dose adjustment to maintain the treatment within the therapeutic range. Rivaroxaban is an oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor; in clinical practice, it is likely that rivaroxaban will be given to patients who also receive antiplatelet therapy, such as clopidogrel. This randomized, non-blinded, three-way crossover study investigated the effect of rivaroxaban on bleeding time when co­administered with clopidogrel. In addition, the influence of clopidogrel on the safety, tolerability, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of rivaroxaban was investigated. Of 27 healthy male subjects who received a single 300 mg dose of clopidogrel, 14 were identified as clopidogrel responders and were then randomized to the following three treatments: (A two doses of clopidogrel on two consecutive days (300 mg on day 1; 75 mg on day 2; (B one dose of rivaroxaban (15 mg; or (C a combination of treatments A and B (rivaroxaban given on day 2. All treatments were well tolerated. Bleeding time with co­administration of rivaroxaban and clopidogrel was significantly prolonged in four subjects, compared with either drug alone: combination treatment increased the overall least squares-means to 3.77 times baseline (90% confidence

  14. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interaction for a binary mixture of chlorpyrifos and diazinon in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timchalk, C.; Poet, T.S.; Hinman, M.N.; Busby, A.L.; Kousba, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) and diazinon (DZN) are two commonly used organophosphorus (OP) insecticides and a potential exists for concurrent exposures. The primary neurotoxic effects from OP pesticide exposures result from the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic impact of acute binary exposures of rats to CPF and DZN was evaluated in this study. Rats were orally administered CPF, DZN, or a CPF/DZN mixture (0, 15, 30, or 60 mg/kg) and blood (plasma and RBC), and brain were collected at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h postdosing, urine was also collected at 24 h. Chlorpyrifos, DZN, and their respective metabolites, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) and 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (IMHP), were quantified in blood and/or urine and cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition was measured in brain, RBC, and plasma. Coexposure to CPF/DZN at the low dose of 15/15 mg/kg did not alter the pharmacokinetics of CPF, DZN, or their metabolites in blood. A high binary dose of 60/60 mg/kg increased the C max and AUC and decreased the clearance for both parent compounds, likely due to competition between CPF and DZN for CYP450 metabolism. At lower doses, most likely to be encountered in occupational or environmental exposures, the pharmacokinetics were linear. A dose-dependent inhibition of ChE was noted in tissues for both the single and coexposures, and the extent of inhibition was plasma > RBC ≥ brain. The overall relative potency for ChE inhibition was CPF/DZN > CPF > DZN. A comparison of the ChE response at the low binary dose (15/15 mg/kg), where there were no apparent pharmacokinetic interactions, suggested that the overall ChE response was additive. These experiments represent important data concerning the potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions for pesticide mixtures and will provide needed insight for assessing the potential cumulative risk associated with occupational or environmental exposures to these insecticides

  15. Pharmacokinetic studies of neuromuscular blocking agents: Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viby-Mogensen, J.; Østergaard, D.; Donati, F.

    2000-01-01

    Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP), neuromuscular blocking agents, pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling, population pharmacokinetics, statistics, study design......Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP), neuromuscular blocking agents, pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling, population pharmacokinetics, statistics, study design...

  16. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenetics of hydroxyurea treatment for children with sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despotovic, Jenny M.; Mortier, Nicole A.; Flanagan, Jonathan M.; He, Jin; Smeltzer, Matthew P.; Kimble, Amy C.; Aygun, Banu; Wu, Song; Howard, Thad; Sparreboom, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxyurea therapy has proven laboratory and clinical efficacies for children with sickle cell anemia (SCA). When administered at maximum tolerated dose (MTD), hydroxyurea increases fetal hemoglobin (HbF) to levels ranging from 10% to 40%. However, interpatient variability of percentage of HbF (%HbF) response is high, MTD itself is variable, and accurate predictors of hydroxyurea responses do not currently exist. HUSTLE (NCT00305175) was designed to provide first-dose pharmacokinetics (PK) data for children with SCA initiating hydroxyurea therapy, to investigate pharmacodynamics (PD) parameters, including HbF response and MTD after standardized dose escalation, and to evaluate pharmacogenetics influences on PK and PD parameters. For 87 children with first-dose PK studies, substantial interpatient variability was observed, plus a novel oral absorption phenotype (rapid or slow) that influenced serum hydroxyurea levels and total hydroxyurea exposure. PD responses in 174 subjects were robust and similar to previous cohorts; %HbF at MTD was best predicted by 5 variables, including baseline %HbF, whereas MTD was best predicted by 5 variables, including serum creatinine. Pharmacogenetics analysis showed single nucleotide polymorphisms influencing baseline %HbF, including 5 within BCL11A, but none influencing MTD %HbF or dose. Accurate prediction of hydroxyurea treatment responses for SCA remains a worthy but elusive goal. PMID:21876119

  17. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling of an antagonist (SM-406/AT-406) of multiple inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) in a mouse xenograft model of human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Li, Yanyan; Zou, Peng; Yu, Jing-yu; McEachern, Donna; Wang, Shaomeng; Sun, Duxin

    2013-09-01

    The inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are a class of key apoptosis regulators overexpressed or dysregulated in cancer. SM-406/AT-406 is a potent and selective small molecule mimetic of Smac that antagonizes the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). A physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK-PD) model was developed to predict the tissue concentration-time profiles of SM-406, the related onco-protein levels in tumor, and the tumor growth inhibition in a mouse model bearing human breast cancer xenograft. In the whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for pharmacokinetics characterization, a well stirred (perfusion rate-limited) model was used to describe SM-406 pharmacokinetics in the lung, heart, kidney, intestine, liver and spleen, and a diffusion rate-limited (permeability limited) model was used for tumor. Pharmacodynamic (PD) models were developed to correlate the SM-406 concentration in tumor to the cIAP1 degradation, pro-caspase 8 decrease, CL-PARP accumulation and tumor growth inhibition. The PBPK-PD model well described the experimental pharmacokinetic data, the pharmacodynamic biomarker responses and tumor growth. This model may be helpful to predict tumor and plasma SM-406 concentrations in the clinic. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Obesity and drug pharmacology: a review of the influence of obesity on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Cornelis; De Hoogd, Sjoerd; Brüggemann, Roger J M; Knibbe, Catherijne A J

    2018-03-01

    The rising prevalence of obesity confronts clinicians with dosing problems in the (extreme) overweight population. Obesity has a great impact on key organs that play a role in the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of drugs, however the ultimate impact of these changes on how to adapt the dose may not always be known. Areas covered: In this review, physiological changes associated with obesity are discussed. An overview is provided on the alterations in absorption, distribution, drug metabolism and clearance in (morbid) obesity focusing on general principles that can be extracted from pharmacokinetic studies. Also, relevant pharmacodynamic considerations in obesity are discussed. Expert opinion: Over the last two decades, increased knowledge is generated on PK and PD in obesity. Future research should focus on filling in the knowledge gaps that remain, especially in connecting obesity-related physiological changes with changes in PK and/or PD and vice versa. Ultimately, this knowledge can be used to develop physiologically based PK and PD models on the basis of quantitative systems pharmacology principles. Moreover, efforts should focus on thorough prospective evaluation of developed model-based doses with subsequent implementation of these dosing recommendations in clinical practice.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of high doses of pharmaceutically prepared heroin, by intravenous or by inhalation route in opioid-dependent patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rook, Elisabeth J.; van Ree, Jan M.; van den Brink, Wim; Hillebrand, Michel J. X.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.; Hendriks, Vincent M.; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2006-01-01

    A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study was performed in opioid-dependent patients in the Netherlands, who were currently treated with high doses of pharmaceutically prepared heroin on medical prescription. Besides intravenous heroin, heroin was prescribed for inhalation by "chasing the dragon"

  20. Effect of treatment duration on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic indices correlating with therapeutic efficacy of ceftazidime in experimental Klebsiella pneumoniae lung infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A.J.M. Bakker-Woudenberg (Irma); M.T. ten Kate (Marian); W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); J.W. Mouton (Johan)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) indices that define the therapeutic effect of the betalactam ceftazidime in a rat model of Klebsiella pneumoniae lung infection were investigated in relation to treatment duration and treatment endpoint. Treatment was started 24 h after

  1. Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of the CGRP Binding Monoclonal Antibody LY2951742 (Galcanezumab in Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Monteith

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP is pivotal in the pathophysiology of migraine headaches and represents a promising target for migraine treatment. The humanized monoclonal antibody galcanezumab (LY2951742 binds to CGRP and may be effective in migraine prophylaxis.Objectives: The primary objective was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of single and multiple doses of galcanezumab in humans. Secondary objectives included assessing the pharmacokinetics and evaluating target engagement.Methods: A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study (NCT 01337596 with single escalating and multiple subcutaneous (SC doses of galcanezumab was performed in healthy male volunteers. Single doses of 1, 5, 25, 75, 200, and 600 mg of galcanezumab (n = 7/dose or placebo (n = 2/dose were injected SC in six consecutive cohorts of nine subjects each. One cohort of nine subjects received multiple (4 150 mg doses of galcanezumab or placebo every other week. Target engagement was evaluated by measuring inhibition of capsaicin-induced increase in dermal blood flow (DBF.Findings: Sixty-three subjects were randomized and included in the safety analyses. Galcanezumab was well tolerated in single doses (1–600 mg SC and consecutive doses (150 mg SC. There was no dose-dependent difference in type or frequency of treatment-emergent adverse events, and no clinically meaningful difference when compared with placebo. Pharmacokinetics were linear. Galcanezumab induced a robust, dose-dependent, and durable inhibition of capsaicin-induced increase in DBF, supporting the continued clinical development of galcanezumab for prophylaxis in migraine patients.

  2. Inflight Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Responses to Medications Commonly Used in Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotring, V. E.; Derendorf, H.; Kast, J.; Barger, L.; Basner, M.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers do not know if medications act the same in the spaceflight environment as they do on Earth. Aspects of the spaceflight environment (low gravity, radiation exposure, closed environment, stress) have been shown to alter human physiology. Some of these physiological changes could be expected to alter either pharmacokinetics (PK, how the body absorbs, distributes, metabolizes and excretes administered medications) or pharmacodynamics (PD, receptors or signaling systems that are the targets of medication action). Anecdotal data has suggested that, at least for certain medications or indications, inflight medication efficacy is poor. In order to prepare for exploration missions where speedy evacuation to Earth may not be a possibility, the likelihood of unexpected medication action must be determined.

  3. Factors affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of PEGylated liposomal irinotecan (IHL-305 in patients with advanced solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu H

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Huali Wu,1 Jeffrey R Infante,2 Vicki L Keedy,3 Suzanne F Jones,2 Emily Chan,3 Johanna C Bendell,2 Wooin Lee,4 Whitney P Kirschbrown,1 Beth A Zamboni,5 Satoshi Ikeda,6 Hiroshi Kodaira,6 Mace L Rothenberg,3 Howard A Burris III,2 William C Zamboni1,7–9 1UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 2Sarah Cannon Research Institute/Tennessee Oncology, PLLC, 3Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 4Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 5Department of Mathematics, Carlow University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 6Yakult Honsha Co., Ltd., Medical Development Department, Tokyo, Japan; 7UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, 8UNC Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, 9Carolina Center for Cancer Nanotechology Excellence, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Abstract: IHL-305 is a PEGylated liposomal formulation of irinotecan (CPT-11. The objective of this study was to evaluate the factors associated with interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of IHL-305 in patients with advanced solid tumors. IHL-305 was administered intravenously once every 4 weeks as part of a Phase I study. Pharmacokinetic studies of the liposomal sum total CPT-11, released CPT-11, SN-38, SN-38G, 7-ethyl-10-[4-N-(5-aminopentanoic acid-1-piperidino]-carbonyloxycamptothecin, and 7-ethyl-10-[4-amino-1-piperidino]-carbonyloxycamptothecin in plasma were performed. Noncompartmental and compartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were conducted using pharmacokinetic data for sum total CPT-11. The pharmacokinetic variability of IHL-305 is associated with linear and nonlinear clearance. Patients whose age and body composition (ratio of total body weight to ideal body weight [TBW/IBW] were greater than the median age and TBW/IBW of the study had a 1.7-fold to 2.6-fold higher ratio of released CPT-11 area under the concentration versus time

  4. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions between cilnidipine and valsartan, in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieon; Lee, Howard; Jang, Kyungho; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Shin, Dongseong; Yu, Kyung-Sang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although cilnidipine and valsartan are widely coadministered to patients with hypertension, their drug–drug interaction potential has not been investigated. This study compared the pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamic (PD), and tolerability profiles of cilnidipine and valsartan, both alone and in combination, in healthy male subjects. Patients and methods Fifty-four subjects, enrolled into an open-label, single-dose, three-treatment, three-period crossover study, randomly received cilnidipine (10 mg), valsartan (160 mg), or both according to one of six sequences. Blood samples were collected at baseline and up to 24 hours after drug administration in each period. Plasma concentrations of cilnidipine and valsartan were determined by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to the last measurable time (AUClast) were estimated using a noncompartmental method. Tolerability was evaluated by assessing adverse events (AEs), vital signs, electrocardiograms, and clinical laboratory tests. Blood pressure was also measured for PD assessment. Results A total of 51 subjects completed the study. The PK profile of cilnidipine was not significantly affected by coadministered valsartan; the geometric mean ratio and 90% confidence interval (90% CI) of AUClast for cilnidipine with and without valsartan was 1.04 (0.98–1.10). Likewise, cilnidipine did not affect the PK of valsartan; the geometric mean ratio (90% CI) of AUClast for valsartan with and without cilnidipine was 0.94 (0.83–1.07). Coadministration of cilnidipine and valsartan reduced blood pressure in an additive way. No serious AEs were reported, and both cilnidipine and valsartan were well tolerated. Conclusion Coadministered cilnidipine and valsartan do not cause a significant PK or PD interaction, and they are well tolerated. PMID:25336921

  5. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety of CKD-519, a CETP inhibitor, in healthy subjects

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    Kim CO

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Choon Ok Kim,1 Eun Sil Oh,2 Chungam Choi,1 Yeonjoo Kim,3 Sera Lee,4 Semi Kim,4 Min Soo Park1,5 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Medicines and Regulatory Science, Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy, Yonsei University, Incheon, 3Chong Kun Dang Clinical Research, Chong Kun Dang Pharmaceutical Corp., 4Chong Kun Dang Research Institute, Chong Kun Dang Pharmaceutical Corp., 5Department of Pediatrics, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Abstract: CKD-519 is a selective and potent cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP inhibitor being developed for the treatment of dyslipidemia to raise high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. We investigated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of single doses of CKD-519 in healthy adult subjects. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, single ascending dose study was performed. Eight healthy subjects were enrolled in each CKD-519 dose group (25, 50, 100, 200, or 400 mg and randomized to CKD-519 (n=6 or matching placebo (n=2. CKD-519 reached the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax at 5–6 h post-dose, and had a long terminal half-life ranging between 40–70 h. The area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC and Cmax increased with the dose, however, Cmax and AUC normalized by dose decreased with each incremental dose. CETP activity decreased with dose, and the maximum decrease (63%–83% was observed at 6–8 h post-dose. A sigmoid Emax model best described the relationship between CKD-519 plasma concentrations and CETP activity with an EC50 of 17.3 ng/mL. Overall, 11 adverse events (AEs were observed. All AEs were mild or moderate in intensity, and resolved without any complications. There were no clinically significant effects on blood pressure. In conclusion, single doses of CKD-519 up to 400 mg were well tolerated and showed potent

  6. A Novel Domperidone Hydrogel: Preparation, Characterization, Pharmacokinetic, and Pharmacodynamic Properties

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    Chun-Hui Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to prepare a novel domperidone hydrogel. The domperidone dispersion was prepared by the solvent evaporation method. The characteristics of domperidone dispersion were measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, X-ray diffractometry, and solubility test, respectively. Domperidone hydrogel was prepared by directly incorporating the domperidone dispersion in Carbopol hydrogel to increase its mucoadhesive properties to gastrointestinal tract (GIT. The in vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies were investigated to evaluate the relative oral bioavailability and the propulsion efficacy of domperidone hydrogel as compared with market domperidone tablet (Motilium tablet. The particle size of domperidone dispersion in distilled water was 454.0 nm. The results of DSC and X-ray indicated that domperidone in dispersion was in amorphous state. The solubility of domperidone in the dispersion in distilled water, pH of 1, 5, and 7 buffer solution was 45.7-, 63.9-, 13.1-, and 3.7-fold higher than that of raw domperidone, respectively. The area under the plasma concentration curve (AUC0–24 in domperidone hydrogel was 2.2-fold higher than that of tablet. The prolonged propulsion efficacy in the domperidone hydrogel group compared to that in tablet group was observed in the pharmacodynamic test.

  7. Study of GABA in healthy volunteers: pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics

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    Junfeng eLi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical studies show that GABA exerts anti-diabetic effects in rodent models of type 1 diabetes. Because little is known about its absorption and effects in humans, we investigated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of GABA in healthy volunteers. Twelve subjects were subjected to an open-labeled, three-period trial involving sequential oral administration of placebo, 2g GABA once, and 2g GABA three times/day for seven days, with a 7-day washout between each period. GABA was rapidly absorbed (Tmax: 0.5~1 h with the half-life (t1/2 of 5 h. No accumulation was observed after repeated oral GABA administration for 7 days. Remarkably, GABA significantly increased circulating insulin levels in the subjects under either fasting (1.6-fold, single dose; 2.0-fold, repeated dose; p<0.01 or fed conditions (1.4-fold, single dose; 1.6-fold, repeated dose; p<0.01. GABA also increased glucagon levels only under fasting conditions (1.3-fold, single dose, p<0.05; 1.5-fold, repeated dose, p<0.01. However, there were no significant differences in the insulin-to-glucagon ratio and no significant change in glucose levels in these healthy subjects during the study period. Importantly, GABA significantly decreased glycated albumin levels in the repeated dosing period. Subjects with repeated dosing showed an elevated incidence of minor adverse events in comparison to placebo or the single dosing period, most notably transitional discomforts such as dizziness and sore throat. However, there were no serious adverse events observed throughout the study. Our data show that GABA is rapidly absorbed and tolerated in human beings; its endocrine effects, exemplified by increasing islet hormonal secretion, suggest potential therapeutic benefits for diabetes.

  8. Effect of gemfibrozil on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of racemic warfarin in healthy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Jari J; Backman, Janne T; Neuvonen, Pertti J

    2005-01-01

    Aims Case reports suggest that gemfobrozil can increase the anticoagulant effect of warfarin. Because gemfibrozil inhibits CYP2C9 in vitro, we studied its effects on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of racemic warfarin. Methods In a randomized cross-over study, 10 healthy subjects ingested 600 mg gemfibrozil or placebo twice daily for 8 days. On day 3, they were administered a single dose of 10 mg racemic R-S-warfarin orally. The concentrations of R- and S-warfarin in plasma and thromboplastin time were monitored up to 168 h. Results Gemfibrozil decreased the mean (±SD) area under the plasma concentration-time curve [AUC(0–∞)] of S-warfarin by 11%, from 19.9 ± 5.2 mg l−1 h to 17.6 ± 4.7 mg l−1 h (95% CI on the difference −3.7, −0.78; P gemfibrozil phase to 29.5 ± 6.9 mg l−1 h during the placebo phase (95% CI −3.3, −0.33; P Gemfibrozil did not alter the anticoagulant effect of warfarin. Conclusion Unexpectedly, gemfibrozil slightly decreased the plasma concentrations of R- and S-warfarin. Displacement of warfarin from plasma albumin by gemfibrozil or its interference with the absorption of warfarin could explain the present findings. Usual therapeutic doses of gemfibrozil seem to have limited effects on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single dose warfarin in healthy subjects. PMID:15801938

  9. Evaluating Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Interactions with Computational Models in Supporting Cumulative Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yu-Mei; Clewell, Harvey; Campbell, Jerry; Andersen, Melvin

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous or sequential exposure to multiple chemicals may cause interactions in the pharmacokinetics (PK) and/or pharmacodynamics (PD) of the individual chemicals. Such interactions can cause modification of the internal or target dose/response of one chemical in the mixture by other chemical(s), resulting in a change in the toxicity from that predicted from the summation of the effects of the single chemicals using dose additivity. In such cases, conducting quantitative cumulative risk assessment for chemicals present as a mixture is difficult. The uncertainties that arise from PK interactions can be addressed by developing physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to describe the disposition of chemical mixtures. Further, PK models can be developed to describe mechanisms of action and tissue responses. In this article, PBPK/PD modeling efforts conducted to investigate chemical interactions at the PK and PD levels are reviewed to demonstrate the use of this predictive modeling framework in assessing health risks associated with exposures to complex chemical mixtures. PMID:21655141

  10. Pharmacokinetic profile and pharmacodynamic effects of romifidine hydrochloride in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtasiak-Wypart, M; Soma, L R; Rudy, J A; Uboh, C E; Boston, R C; Driessen, B

    2012-10-01

    Romifidine HCl (romifidine) is an α(2)-agonist commonly used in horses. This study was undertaken to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) of romifidine following intravenous (i.v.) administration and describe the relationship between PK parameters and simultaneously recorded pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters. Romifidine (80 μg/kg) was administered by i.v. infusion over 2 min to six adult Thoroughbred horses, and plasma samples were collected and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Limit of quantification was index and an increase in mean arterial pressure (P analytical technique for the detection of romifidine in equine plasma allowed detailed description of its PK profile. The drug produces long-lasting sedation in horses that corresponds with the long terminal elimination half-life of the drug. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. The influence of morbid obesity on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs in adolescents and adults : focus on propofol and nadroparin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepstraten, Jeroen

    2013-01-01

    For most commonly used drugs in morbidly obese patients evidence based dosing guidelines are not available. Therefore, current dosing is based on experience of the prescriber rather than on clinical evidence. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics data in non-obese patients are extrapolated without

  12. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of antipsychotic drugs in patients with schizophrenia Part I : The use of PANSS total score and clinical utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddy, Venkatesh Pilla; Kozielska, Magdalena; Suleiman, Ahmed Abbas; Johnson, Martin; Vermeulen, An; Liu, Jing; de Greef, Rik; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Danhof, Meindert; Proost, Johannes H.

    Background: To develop a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model using individual-level data of Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score to characterize the antipsychotic drug effect taking into account the placebo effect and dropout rate. In addition, a clinical utility (CU)

  13. Predicting drug?drug interactions through drug structural similarities and interaction networks incorporating pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Takeda, Takako; Hao, Ming; Cheng, Tiejun; Bryant, Stephen H.; Wang, Yanli

    2017-01-01

    Drug?drug interactions (DDIs) may lead to adverse effects and potentially result in drug withdrawal from the market. Predicting DDIs during drug development would help reduce development costs and time by rigorous evaluation of drug candidates. The primary mechanisms of DDIs are based on pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD). This study examines the effects of 2D structural similarities of drugs on DDI prediction through interaction networks including both PD and PK knowledge. Our a...

  14. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling for the determination of a cimicoxib dosing regimen in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeunesse, Elisabeth C; Schneider, Marc; Woehrle, Frederique; Faucher, Mathieu; Lefebvre, Herve P; Toutain, Pierre-Louis

    2013-12-11

    Cimicoxib is a new coxib anti-inflammatory drug for use in the dog. To determine a preclinical dosage regimen for cimicoxib in dog, a reversible model of kaolin-induced paw inflammation was used. Dosage regimens were established using pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling approach (indirect response model). Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic endpoints investigated with the inflammation model established the efficacy of cimicoxib at a dose of 2 mg/kg administered orally (single dose) in 12 beagle dogs.For both the oral and IV route of administration two groups of dogs to be identified namely Poor Metabolizers (PM) and Extensive Metabolizers (EM).The terminal half-life after oral administration was 8.0 ± 0.6 h for the PM and 4.6 ± 2.6 h for the EM groups, with the corresponding values after the IV route being 5.6 ± 1.7 h and 2.7 ± 0.9 h (mean ± SD).The main pharmacodynamic parameters (potency, efficacy, and sensitivity) were estimated for four endpoints (body temperature, creeping speed, ground vertical reaction force and clinical lameness score). The plasma concentration corresponding to half the maximum of the indirect effect were 239 μg/L for creeping speed, 284 μg/L for the lameness score, 161 μg/L for the ground reaction vertical force and 193 μg/L for the body temperature.To document possible polymorphism of the cimicoxib disposition in the target dog population, cimicoxib was administered by the intravenous route to 40 dogs (four different sized breeds). The cimicoxib half-lives in these 40 dogs were of same order of the magnitude as those of the EM beagle dogs. Thus pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters obtained from the EM beagle dogs were selected to simulate the dose-effect relationship of cimicoxib after an oral administration allowing a dosage regimen to be selected for confirmation by a clinical trial. Cimicoxib was an efficacious anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic drug and a dosage regimen of 2 mg

  15. [Study on differences between pharmacokinetics and chromatopharmacodynamics for Chinese materia medica formulae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fuyuan; Deng, Kaiwen; Zou, Huan; Qiu, Yun; Chen, Feng; Zhou, Honghao

    2011-01-01

    To study on the differences between chromatopharmacokinetics (pharmacokinetics with fingerprint chromatography) and chromatopharmacodynamics (pharmacodynamics with fingerprint chromatography) of Chinese materia medica formulae to answer the question whether the pharmacokinetic parameters of multiple composites can be utilized to guide the medication of multiple composites. On the base of established four chromatopharmacology (pharmacology with chromatographic fingerprint), the pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics were analyzed comparably on their mathematical model and parameter definition. On the basis of quantitative pharmacology, the function expressions and total statistical parameters, such as total zero moment, total first moment, total second moment of the pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics were analyzed to the common expressions and elucidated results for single and multiple components in Chinese materia medica formulae. Total quantitative pharmacokinetic, i.e., chromatopharmacokinetic parameter were decided by each component pharmacokinetic parameters, whereas the total quantitative pharmacodynamic, i.e., chromatopharmacodynamic parameter were decided by both of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of each components. The pharmacokinetic parameters were corresponded to pharmacodynamic parameters with an existing stable effective coefficient when the constitutive ratio of each composite was a constant. The effects of Chinese materia medica were all controlled by pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic coefficient. It is a special case that the pharmacokinetic parameter could independently guide the clinical medication for single component whereas the chromatopharmacokinetic parameters are not applied to the multiple drug combination system, and not be used to solve problems of chromatopharmacokinetic of Chinese materia medica formulae.

  16. Optimisation of antimicrobial dosing based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles

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    Grace Si Ru Hoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While suboptimal dosing of antimicrobials has been attributed to poorer clinical outcomes, clinical cure and mortality advantages have been demonstrated when target pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD indices for various classes of antimicrobials were achieved to maximise antibiotic activity. Dosing optimisation requires a good knowledge of PK/PD principles. This review serves to provide a foundation in PK/PD principles for the commonly prescribed antibiotics (β-lactams, vancomycin, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides, as well as dosing considerations in special populations (critically ill and obese patients. PK principles determine whether an appropriate dose of antimicrobial reaches the intended pathogen(s. It involves the fundamental processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination, and is affected by the antimicrobial's physicochemical properties. Antimicrobial pharmacodynamics define the relationship between the drug concentration and its observed effect on the pathogen. The major indicator of the effect of the antibiotics is the minimum inhibitory concentration. The quantitative relationship between a PK and microbiological parameter is known as a PK/PD index, which describes the relationship between dose administered and the rate and extent of bacterial killing. Improvements in clinical outcomes have been observed when antimicrobial agents are dosed optimally to achieve their respective PK/PD targets. With the rising rates of antimicrobial resistance and a limited drug development pipeline, PK/PD concepts can foster more rational and individualised dosing regimens, improving outcomes while simultaneously limiting the toxicity of antimicrobials.

  17. Application of a pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics approach to the free propofol plasma levels during coronary artery bypass grafting surgery with hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Silva-Filho

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to apply a pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics approach to investigate the free propofol plasma levels in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting under hypothermic conditions compared with the off-pump procedure. METHODS: Nineteen patients scheduled for on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting under hypothermic conditions (n=10 or the equivalent off-pump surgery (n=9 were anesthetized with sufentanil and propofol target-controlled infusion (2 μg/mL during surgery. The propofol concentration was then reduced to 1 μg/mL, and a pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics analysis using the maximum-effect-sigmoid model obtained by plotting the bispectral index values against the free propofol plasma levels was performed. RESULTS: Significant increases (two- to five-fold in the free propofol plasma levels were observed in the patients subjected to coronary artery bypass grafting under hypothermic conditions. The pharmacokinetics of propofol varied according to the free drug levels in the hypothermic on-pump group versus the off-pump group. After hypothermic coronary artery bypass was initiated, the distribution volume increased, and the distribution half-life was prolonged. Propofol target-controlled infusion was discontinued when orotracheal extubation was indicated, and the time to patient extubation was significantly higher in the hypothermic on-pump group than in the off-pump group (459 versus 273 min, p=0.0048. CONCLUSIONS: The orotracheal intubation time was significantly longer in the hypothermic on-pump group than in the off-pump group. Additionally, residual hypnosis was identified through the pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics approach based on decreases in drug plasma protein binding in the hypothermic on-pump group, which could explain the increased hypnosis observed with this drug in this group of patients.

  18. Amphetamine-type medicines: a review of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and toxicological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Kristianee C; Rossato, Luciana G; Fröehlich, Pedro E; Limberger, Renata P

    2013-11-01

    Amphetamine-like drugs are sympathomimetic agents with marked central and peripheral stimulant properties. Despite the street illegal drugs such as amphetamine and ecstasy, some amphetamine-like compounds are also legally marketed under medical prescription in the treatment of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (methylphenidate) and obesity/overweight (fenproporex and diethylpropione). However, similar with what happens with their illicit analogues, therapeutic amphetamine-like drugs also share important toxicological risks. Although methylphenidate is considered the first choice in the treatment of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, its high popularity among teenagers and children is raising concern in the medical community. Regarding weight-loss purposes, the use of amphetamine-like compounds are very controversial, though. Thus, the present review will address pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and toxicological aspects of amphetamine-like compounds used with therapeutic aims.

  19. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations for the next generation protein therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhaval K

    2015-10-01

    Increasingly sophisticated protein engineering efforts have been undertaken lately to generate protein therapeutics with desired properties. This has resulted in the discovery of the next generation of protein therapeutics, which include: engineered antibodies, immunoconjugates, bi/multi-specific proteins, antibody mimetic novel scaffolds, and engineered ligands/receptors. These novel protein therapeutics possess unique physicochemical properties and act via a unique mechanism-of-action, which collectively makes their pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) different than other established biological molecules. Consequently, in order to support the discovery and development of these next generation molecules, it becomes important to understand the determinants controlling their PK/PD. This review discusses the determinants that a PK/PD scientist should consider during the design and development of next generation protein therapeutics. In addition, the role of systems PK/PD models in enabling rational development of the next generation protein therapeutics is emphasized.

  20. Lack of a meaningful effect of anacetrapib on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of warfarin in healthy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Rajesh; Stypinski, Daria; Ali, Melissa; Garg, Amit; Cote, Josee; Maes, Andrea; DeGroot, Bruce; Liu, Yang; Li, Susie; Connolly, Sandra M; Wagner, John A; Stoch, S Aubrey

    2012-01-01

    AIM Anacetrapib is currently being developed for the treatment of dyslipidaemia. Since warfarin, an anticoagulant with a narrow therapeutic index, is expected to be commonly prescribed in this population, a drug interaction study was conducted. METHODS In a randomized, open-label, two-period fixed-sequence design, 12 healthy male subjects received two different treatments (treatment A followed by treatment B). In treatment A, a single oral dose of 30 mg warfarin (3 × 10 mg CoumadinTM) was administered on day 1. After a washout interval, subjects began treatment B, where they were given daily 100 mg doses of anacetrapib (1 × 100 mg) beginning on day −14 and continuing through day 7, with concomitant administration of 30 mg warfarin (3 × 10 mg) on day 1. All anacetrapib and warfarin doses were administered with a standard low fat breakfast. After warfarin concentrations and prothrombin time were measured, standard pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and statistical (linear mixed effects model) analyses were applied. RESULTS Anacetrapib was generally well tolerated when co-administered with warfarin in the healthy males in this study. The geometric mean ratios (GMRs) for warfarin + anacetrapib : warfarin alone and 90% confidence interval (CIs) for warfarin AUC(0–∞) were 0.94 (0.90, 0.97) for the R(+) warfarin enantiomer and 0.93 (0.87, 0.98) for the S(−) warfarin enantiomer, both being contained in the interval (0.80, 1.25), supporting the primary hypothesis of the study. The GMRs warfarin + anacetrapib : warfarin alone and 90% CIs for the statistical comparison of warfarin Cmax were 1.01 (0.97, 1.05) for both the R(+) warfarin and the S(−) warfarin enantiomers, and were also contained in the interval (0.80, 1.25). The GMR (warfarin + anacetrapib : warfarin alone) and 90% CI for the statistical comparison of INR AUC(0–168 h) was 0.93 (0.89, 0.96). CONCLUSION The single dose pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of orally administered warfarin were not

  1. Preclinical Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling and Simulation in the Pharmaceutical Industry: An IQ Consortium Survey Examining the Current Landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Schuck, Edgar; Bohnert, Tonika; Chakravarty, Arijit; Damian-Iordache, Valeriu; Gibson, Christopher; Hsu, Cheng-Pang; Heimbach, Tycho; Krishnatry, Anu Shilpa; Liederer, Bianca M; Lin, Jing; Maurer, Tristan; Mettetal, Jerome T; Mudra, Daniel R; Nijsen, Marjoleen JMA; Raybon, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The application of modeling and simulation techniques is increasingly common in preclinical stages of the drug discovery and development process. A survey focusing on preclinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) analysis was conducted across pharmaceutical companies that are members of the International Consortium for Quality and Innovation in Pharmaceutical Development. Based on survey responses, ~68% of companies use preclinical PK/PD analysis in all therapeutic areas indicating its...

  2. Effect of Gymnema sylvestre on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of 0.5mg & 0.6mg Glibenclamide in diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shravan Kumar Dholi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Traditional medicines derived from medicinal plants are used by about 60 per cent world population. Diabetes is an important human ailment officiating many from various walk of life in different countries including India. It providing to a major health problem, especially in the rural and subrural  areas.  Gymnema sylvestre R.Br. (Asclepiadaceae is a herb distributed throughout the world. The leaves of the plant are widely used for the treatment of diabetes and as diuretic in India proprietary medicine. Gymnema sylvestre an Ayurvedic herb, came to be known as “destroyer of sugar” because, in ancient times, Ayurvedia physicians observed that chewing a few  leaves of G. sylvestre suppressed the taste of sugar. It is used totally all over India for controlling blood sugar. This study was to determine effect of Gymnema sylvestre on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Glibenclamide in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Results have indicated the negative effect of Gymnema Sylvestre on pharmacokinetics but positive effect on pharmacodynamics of Glibenclamide.

  3. Comparable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of two epoetin alfa formulations Eporon® and Eprex® following a single subcutaneous administration in healthy male volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sumin Yoon,1 Su-jin Rhee,1 Sun Ju Heo,2 Tae Young Oh,2 Seo Hyun Yoon,1 Joo-Youn Cho,1 SeungHwan Lee,1,3 Kyung-Sang Yu1,3 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Hospital, Seoul, 2Dong-A ST Co. Ltd., Seoul, 3Clinical Trials Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea Purpose: This study aimed to assess and compare the pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD properties following a single subcutaneous injection of epoetin alfa (Eporon® with those of the comparator (Eprex® in healthy male subjects. Subjects and methods: A randomized, double-blind, two-sequence, crossover study was conducted. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive a single dose, that is, 4,000 IU, of the test or comparator epoetin alfa. After 4 weeks, all subjects received the alternative formulation. The primary PK parameters, maximum observed concentration (Cmax and area under the curve extrapolated to infinity (AUCinf, were calculated with the serum erythropoietin (EPO concentrations from blood samples collected for 144 h after dosing. The reticulocyte, hematocrit, hemoglobin and red blood cell counts were measured up to 312 h as PD markers. The primary PD parameters, maximum observed effect (Emax and area under the effect curve (AUEC, were obtained from the baseline-corrected reticulocyte count. The serum EPO concentration and the reticulocyte count were used to assess the concentration–response relationship. The tolerability and immunogenicity profiles were assessed together. Results: Forty-two subjects completed the study. The mean EPO concentration–time profiles were comparable between the two formulations. The geometric mean ratios (90% CI of the Cmax and AUCinf were 0.908 (0.843–0.978 and 1.049 (0.999–1.101, respectively, both of which were within the regulatory range of 0.80–1.25. Additionally, the PD and tolerability profiles were similar between the two

  4. THE PHARMACODYNAMICS AND PHARMACOKINETICS OF ORG-9426, A NEW NONDEPOLARIZING NEUROMUSCULAR BLOCKING-AGENT, IN PATIENTS ANESTHETIZED WITH NITROUS-OXIDE, HALOTHANE AND FENTANYL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERDA, JMKH; KLEEF, UW; LAMBALK, LM; KLOPPENBURG, WD; AGOSTON, S

    The pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of a new non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent, Org 9426, were investigated. Ten patients undergoing elective head and neck surgery and anaesthetized with nitrous oxide, halothane and fentanyl, received a bolus dose of Org 9426 (1 mg.kg-1, 3 x ED90).

  5. An oracle: antituberculosis pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics, clinical correlation, and clinical trial simulations to predict the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasipanodya, Jotam; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) science and clinical trial simulations have not been adequately applied to the design of doses and dose schedules of antituberculosis regimens because many researchers are skeptical about their clinical applicability. We compared findings of preclinical PK/PD studies of current first-line antituberculosis drugs to findings from several clinical publications that included microbiologic outcome and pharmacokinetic data or had a dose-scheduling design. Without exception, the antimicrobial PK/PD parameters linked to optimal effect were similar in preclinical models and in tuberculosis patients. Thus, exposure-effect relationships derived in the preclinical models can be used in the design of optimal antituberculosis doses, by incorporating population pharmacokinetics of the drugs and MIC distributions in Monte Carlo simulations. When this has been performed, doses and dose schedules of rifampin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and moxifloxacin with the potential to shorten antituberculosis therapy have been identified. In addition, different susceptibility breakpoints than those in current use have been identified. These steps outline a more rational approach than that of current methods for designing regimens and predicting outcome so that both new and older antituberculosis agents can shorten therapy duration.

  6. A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model capturing the time course of torasemide-induced diuresis in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulin, A; Schneider, M; Dron, F; Woehrlé, F

    2016-12-01

    A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling approach was used to determine a dosage regimen which maximizes diuretic efficiency of torasemide in dogs. Kinetic profiles of plasma concentration, torasemide excretion rate in urine (TERU) and diuresis were investigated in 10 dogs after single oral administrations at 3 dose levels, 0.2, 0.8 and 1.6 mg/kg, and an intravenous injection of 0.2 mg/kg. Endogenous regulation was evidenced by a proteresis loop between TERU and diuresis. To describe the diuresis-time profile, TERU served as input into a turnover model with inhibition of loss of response, extended by a moderator acting on both loss and production of response. Estimated maximum inhibition of loss of response, I max , was 0.984 showing that torasemide is an efficacious diuretic able to suppress almost total water reabsorption. A TERU 50, value producing half of I max , of 1.45 μg/kg/h was estimated from the model. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters were used to simulate the torasemide dose-effect relationship after oral administration. Model predictions were in good agreement with diuresis measured in a validation study conducted in 10 dogs, which were administered oral doses of 0.15, 0.4, 0.75, 1.5 and 4.5 mg/kg for 5 days. Finally, oral dose associated with the highest daily diuretic efficiency was predicted to be 0.1 mg/kg. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Time-dependent pharmacokinetics of dexamethasone and its efficacy in human breast cancer xenograft mice: a semi-mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Chen, Rong; Yao, Qing-Yu; Liu, Sheng-Jun; Tian, Xiu-Yun; Hao, Chun-Yi; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-Yan

    2018-03-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX) is the substrate of CYP3A. However, the activity of CYP3A could be induced by DEX when DEX was persistently administered, resulting in auto-induction and time-dependent pharmacokinetics (pharmacokinetics with time-dependent clearance) of DEX. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetic profiles of DEX after single or multiple doses in human breast cancer xenograft nude mice and established a semi-mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model for characterizing the time-dependent PK of DEX as well as its anti-cancer effect. The mice were orally given a single or multiple doses (8 mg/kg) of DEX, and the plasma concentrations of DEX were assessed using LC-MS/MS. Tumor volumes were recorded daily. Based on the experimental data, a two-compartment model with first order absorption and time-dependent clearance was established, and the time-dependence of clearance was modeled by a sigmoid E max equation. Moreover, a semi-mechanism-based PK/PD model was developed, in which the auto-induction effect of DEX on its metabolizing enzyme CYP3A was integrated and drug potency was described using an E max equation. The PK/PD model was further used to predict the drug efficacy when the auto-induction effect was or was not considered, which further revealed the necessity of adding the auto-induction effect into the final PK/PD model. This study established a semi-mechanism-based PK/PD model for characterizing the time-dependent pharmacokinetics of DEX and its anti-cancer effect in breast cancer xenograft mice. The model may serve as a reference for DEX dose adjustments or optimization in future preclinical or clinical studies.

  8. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of the antihypertensive interaction between azilsartan medoxomil and chlorthalidone in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Puttrevu, Santosh; Ramakrishna, Rachumallu; Bhateria, Manisha; Jain, Moon; Hanif, Kashif; Bhatta, Rabi Sankar

    2017-05-01

    A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model was developed to describe the time course of blood pressure following oral administration of azilsartan medoxomil (AZM) and/or chlorthalidone (CLT) in spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. The drug concentration and pharmacological effects, including systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and tail-cuff manometry, respectively. Sequential PK-PD analysis was performed, wherein the plasma concentration-time data was modeled by one compartmental analysis. Subsequently PD parameters were calculated to describe the time-concentration-response relationship using indirect response (IDR) PK-PD model. The combination of AZ and CLT had greater BP lowering effect compared to AZ or CLT alone, despite of no pharmacokinetic interaction between two drugs. These findings suggest synergistic antihypertensive pharmacodynamic interaction between AZ and CLT noncompetitively, which was simulated by inhibitory function of AZ and stimulatory function of CLT after concomitant administration of the two drugs. The present model was able to capture the turnover of blood pressure adequately at different time points at two different dose levels. The current PK-PD model was successfully utilized in the simulation of PD effect at a dose combination of 0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg for AZ and CLT, respectively. The developed preclinical PK-PD model may provide guidance in the optimization of dose ratio of individual drugs in the combined pharmacotherapy of AZ and CLT at clinical situations.

  9. Assessment of the Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Safety of Single Doses of TV-1106, a Long-Acting Growth Hormone, in Healthy Japanese and Caucasian Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Barak, Orit; Barkay, Hadas; Rasamoelisolo, Michele; Butler, Kathleen; Yamada, Kazumasa; Bassan, Merav; Yoon, Esther; Spiegelstein, Ofer

    2017-07-01

    TV-1106 is a human serum albumin genetically fused to recombinant human growth hormone, designed to provide a long-acting alternative to daily growth hormone (GH) injections in patients with GH deficiency. This study investigated the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of single subcutaneous doses of TV-1106 (7.5, 15, 50, and 100 mg) in Japanese (n = 44) and caucasian (n = 44) healthy subjects. TV-1106 pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics were comparable in Japanese and caucasian populations. TV-1106 demonstrated relatively slow absorption (median t max , 10-30 hours) and a mean elimination half-life of 26-36 hours. Apparent clearance and volume of distribution decreased with increasing TV-1106 doses in both populations and appeared to increase more than dose proportionality across the tested doses. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) increased in a dose-related manner, with maximum responses observed at 33-96 and 42-109 hours, respectively. IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 returned to baseline values at 168 hours following 7.5 and 15 mg of TV-1106, and 336 hours following 50 and 100 mg of TV-1106. TV-1106 appeared safe in both populations. There was no evidence of differences in pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, or safety of TV-1106 between Japanese and caucasian populations. The data also demonstrate long-acting growth hormone properties of TV-1106 and support its potential for once-weekly dosing. © 2016, The Authors. Clinical Pharmacology in Drug Development Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  10. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of fosfomycin in non-critically ill patients with bacteremic urinary infection caused by multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Bohórquez, V; Docobo-Pérez, F; Sojo, J; Morales, I; Lupión, C; Martín, D; Cameán, M; Hope, W; Pascual, Á; Rodríguez-Baño, J

    2018-04-10

    To describe the population pharmacokinetics of fosfomycin for patients with bacteraemic urinary tract infection (BUTI). The analysis identified optimal regimens on the basis of pharmacodynamic targets and assessed the adequacy of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) susceptibility breakpoints for Escherichia coli. Data of 16 patients with BUTI caused by multidrug-resistant E. coli (FOREST clinical trial) received intravenous fosfomycin (4 g every 6 hours) were analysed. A population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed, and Monte Carlo simulations were undertaken using 4 g every 6 hours and 8 g every 8 hours. The probability of pharmacodynamic target attainment was assessed using pharmacodynamic targets for E. coli for static effect, 1-log drop in bacterial burden and resistance suppression. Sixty-four plasma samples were collected over a single dosing interval (day 2 or 3 after starting fosfomycin treatment). Fosfomycin concentrations were highly variable. Pharmacodynamic target attainment analysis showed mild improvement by increasing fosfomycin dosing (4 g every 6 hours vs. every 8 hours). These dosages showed success for decreasing 1-log bacterial burden in 89% to 96% (EUCAST breakpoints) and 33% to 54% (CLSI breakpoints) of patients, but they were unable to reach bacterial resistance suppression targets. Fosfomycin concentrations are highly variable-a fact partially explained by renal impairment. The present work supports the use of 4 g every 6 hours as an effective regimen for the treatment of non-critically ill patients with BUTI caused by multidrug-resistant E. coli, as higher dosages might increase toxicity but may not significantly increase efficacy. The current information may suggest that fosfomycin susceptibility breakpoints need to be reappraised. Copyright © 2018 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by

  11. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Characteristics of a New Pediatric Formulation of Artemether-Lumefantrine in African Children with Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria▿

    OpenAIRE

    Djimdé, Abdoulaye A.; Tekete, Mamadou; Abdulla, Salim; Lyimo, John; Bassat, Quique; Mandomando, Inacio; Lefèvre, Gilbert; Borrmann, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of a new pediatric formulation of artemether-lumefantrine, dispersible tablet, were determined within the context of a multicenter, randomized, parallel-group study. In an exploratory approach, we compared a new pediatric formulation with the tablet formulation administered crushed in the treatment of African children with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Patients were randomized to 3 different dosing groups (weights of 5 to

  12. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics with Extended Dosing of CC-486 in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Laille

    Full Text Available CC-486 (oral azacitidine is an epigenetic modifier in development for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia. In part 1 of this two-part study, a 7-day CC-486 dosing schedule showed clinical activity, was generally well tolerated, and reduced DNA methylation. Extending dosing of CC-486 beyond 7 days would increase duration of azacitidine exposure. We hypothesized that extended dosing would therefore provide more sustained epigenetic activity. Reported here are the pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD profiles of CC-486 extended dosing schedules in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML or acute myeloid leukemia (AML from part 2 of this study. PK and/or PD data were available for 59 patients who were sequentially assigned to 1 of 4 extended CC-486 dosing schedules: 300mg once-daily or 200mg twice-daily for 14 or 21 days per 28-day cycle. Both 300mg once-daily schedules and the 200mg twice-daily 21-day schedule significantly (all P < .05 reduced global DNA methylation in whole blood at all measured time points (days 15, 22, and 28 of the treatment cycle, with sustained hypomethylation at cycle end compared with baseline. CC-486 exposures and reduced DNA methylation were significantly correlated. Patients who had a hematologic response had significantly greater methylation reductions than non-responding patients. These data demonstrate that extended dosing of CC-486 sustains epigenetic effects through the treatment cycle.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00528983.

  13. Impact of imipenem and amikacin pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameters on microbiological outcome of Gram-negative bacilli ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajot, O; Burdet, C; Couffignal, C; Massias, L; Armand-Lefevre, L; Foucrier, A; Da Silva, D; Lasocki, S; Laouénan, C; Mentec, H; Mentré, F; Wolff, M

    2015-05-01

    Despite recent advances, antibiotic therapy of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in ICU patients is still challenging. We assessed the impact of imipenem and amikacin pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters on microbiological outcome in these patients. Patients with Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) VAP were prospectively included. Blood samples for pharmacokinetic analysis were collected after empirical administration of a combination of imipenem three times daily and one single dose of amikacin. MICs were estimated for each GNB obtained from respiratory samples. Microbiological success was defined as a ≥10(3) cfu/mL decrease in bacterial count in quantitative cultures between baseline and the third day of treatment. Thirty-nine patients [median (min-max) age = 60 years (28-84) and median SAPS2 at inclusion = 40 (19-73)] were included. Median MICs of imipenem and amikacin were 0.25 mg/L (0.094-16) and 2 mg/L (1-32), respectively. Median times over MIC and over 5× MIC for imipenem were 100% (8-100) and 74% (3-100), respectively. The median C1/MIC ratio for amikacin was 23 (1-76); 34 patients (87%) achieved a C1/MIC ≥10. Microbiological success occurred in 29 patients (74%). No imipenem pharmacodynamic parameter was significantly associated with the microbiological success. For amikacin, C1/MIC was significantly higher in the microbiological success group: 26 (1-76) versus 11 (3-26) (P = 0.004). In ICU patients with VAP, classic imipenem pharmacodynamic targets are easily reached with usual dosing regimens. In this context, for amikacin, a higher C1/MIC ratio than previously described might be necessary. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Effect of the angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor sacubitril/valsartan on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a single dose of furosemide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalasomayajula, Surya; Schuehly, Uwe; Pal, Parasar; Chen, Fabian; Zhou, Wei; Sunkara, Gangadhar; Langenickel, Thomas H

    2018-05-01

    Sacubitril/valsartan is indicated for the treatment of heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Furosemide, a loop diuretic commonly used for the treatment of HFrEF, may be coadministered with sacubitril/valsartan in clinical practice. The effect of sacubitril/valsartan on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of furosemide was evaluated in this open label, two-period, single-sequence study in healthy subjects. All subjects (n = 28) received 40 mg oral single-dose furosemide during period 1, followed by a washout of 2 days. In period 2, sacubitril/valsartan 200 mg (97/103 mg) was administered twice daily for 5 days and a single dose of 40 mg furosemide was coadministered on day 6. Serial plasma and urine samples were collected to determine the pharmacokinetics of furosemide and sacubitril/valsartan and the pharmacodynamics of furosemide. The point estimates and the associated 90% confidence intervals for pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated. Coadministration of furosemide with sacubitril/valsartan decreased the maximum observed plasma concentration (C max ) [estimated geometric mean ratio (90% confidence interval): 0.50 (0.44, 0.56)], area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from time 0 to infinity [0.72 (0.67, 0.77)] and 24-h urinary excretion of furosemide [0.74 (0.69, 0.79)]. When coadministered with sacubitril/valsartan, 0-4-h, 4-8-h and 0-24-h diuresis in response to furosemide was reduced by ~7%, 21% and 0.2%, respectively, while natriuresis was reduced by ~ 28.5%, 7% and 15%, respectively. Post hoc analysis of the pivotal phase III Prospective comparison of ARNI with ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and morbidity in Heart Failure trial (PARADIGM-HF) indicated that the median furosemide dose was similar at baseline and at the end of the study in the sacubitril/valsartan group. Sacubitril/valsartan reduced plasma C max and AUC and 24-h urinary excretion of furosemide, while not significantly affecting its

  15. Effect of the angiotensin receptor–neprilysin inhibitor sacubitril/valsartan on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a single dose of furosemide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalasomayajula, Surya; Schuehly, Uwe; Pal, Parasar; Chen, Fabian; Zhou, Wei; Sunkara, Gangadhar

    2018-01-01

    Aims Sacubitril/valsartan is indicated for the treatment of heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Furosemide, a loop diuretic commonly used for the treatment of HFrEF, may be coadministered with sacubitril/valsartan in clinical practice. The effect of sacubitril/valsartan on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of furosemide was evaluated in this open label, two‐period, single‐sequence study in healthy subjects. Methods All subjects (n = 28) received 40 mg oral single‐dose furosemide during period 1, followed by a washout of 2 days. In period 2, sacubitril/valsartan 200 mg (97/103 mg) was administered twice daily for 5 days and a single dose of 40 mg furosemide was coadministered on day 6. Serial plasma and urine samples were collected to determine the pharmacokinetics of furosemide and sacubitril/valsartan and the pharmacodynamics of furosemide. The point estimates and the associated 90% confidence intervals for pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated. Results Coadministration of furosemide with sacubitril/valsartan decreased the maximum observed plasma concentration (Cmax) [estimated geometric mean ratio (90% confidence interval): 0.50 (0.44, 0.56)], area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC) from time 0 to infinity [0.72 (0.67, 0.77)] and 24‐h urinary excretion of furosemide [0.74 (0.69, 0.79)]. When coadministered with sacubitril/valsartan, 0–4‐h, 4–8‐h and 0–24‐h diuresis in response to furosemide was reduced by ~7%, 21% and 0.2%, respectively, while natriuresis was reduced by ~ 28.5%, 7% and 15%, respectively. Post hoc analysis of the pivotal phase III Prospective comparison of ARNI with ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and morbidity in Heart Failure trial (PARADIGM‐HF) indicated that the median furosemide dose was similar at baseline and at the end of the study in the sacubitril/valsartan group. Conclusions Sacubitril/valsartan reduced plasma Cmax and AUC and 24‐h urinary excretion

  16. Isoniazid Pharmacokinetics-Pharmacodynamics in an Aerosol Infection Model of Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Ramesh; Shandil, Radha. K.; Gaonkar, Sheshagiri; Kaur, Parvinder; Suresh, B. L.; Mahesh, B. N.; Jayashree, R.; Nandi, Vrinda; Bharath, Sowmya; Kantharaj, E.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2004-01-01

    Limited data exist on the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) parameters of the bactericidal activities of the available antimycobacterial drugs. We report on the PK-PD relationships for isoniazid. Isoniazid exhibited concentration (C)-dependent killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv in vitro, with a maximum reduction of 4 log10 CFU/ml. In these studies, 50% of the maximum effect was achieved at a C/MIC ratio of 0.5, and the maximum effect did not increase with exposure times of up to 21 days. Conversely, isoniazid produced less than a 0.5-log10 CFU/ml reduction in two different intracellular infection models (J774A.1 murine macrophages and whole human blood). In a murine model of aerosol infection, isoniazid therapy for 6 days produced a reduction of 1.4 log10 CFU/lung. Dose fractionation studies demonstrated that the 24-h area under the concentration-time curve/MIC (r2 = 0.83) correlated best with the bactericidal efficacy, followed by the maximum concentration of drug in serum/MIC (r2 = 0.73). PMID:15273105

  17. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of triptolide-loaded liposome hydrogel patch under microneedles on rats with collagen-induced arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui Chen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Triptolide (TP, a major active component of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook.F. (TWHF, is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, it has a narrow therapeutic window due to its serious toxicities. To increase the therapeutic index, a new triptolide-loaded transdermal delivery system, named triptolide-loaded liposome hydrogel patch (TP-LHP, has been developed. In this paper, we used a micro-needle array to deliver TP-LHP to promote transdermal absorption and evaluated this treatment on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of TP-LHP in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA. The pharmacokinetic results showed that transdermal delivery of microneedle TP-LHP yielded plasma drug levels which fit a one-compartment open model. The relationship equation between plasma concentration and time was C=303.59×(e−0.064t−e−0.287t. The results of pharmacodynamic study demonstrated that TP-LHP treatment mitigated the degree of joint swelling and suppressed the expressions of fetal liver kinase-1, fetal liver tyrosine kinase-4 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in synovium. Other indicators were also reduced by TP-LHP, including hyperfunction of immune, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 levels in serum. The therapeutic mechanism of TP-LHP might be regulation of the balance between Th1 and Th2, as well as inhibition of the expression and biological effects of vascular endothelial growth factor.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of meldonium in exercised thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knych, Heather K; Stanley, Scott D; McKemie, Dan S; Arthur, Rick M; Bondesson, Ulf; Hedeland, Mikael; Thevis, Mario; Kass, Philip H

    2017-09-01

    Although developed as a therapeutic medication, meldonium has found widespread use in human sports and was recently added to the World Anti-Doping Agency's list of prohibited substances. Its reported abuse potential in human sports has led to concern by regulatory authorities about the possible misuse of meldonium in equine athletics. The potential abuse in equine athletes along with the limited data available regarding the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of meldonium in horses necessitates further study. Eight exercised adult thoroughbred horses received a single oral dose of 3.5, 7.1, 14.3 or 21.4 mg/kg of meldonium. Blood and urine samples were collected and analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using non-compartmental analysis. Maximum serum concentrations ranged from 440.2 to 1147 ng/mL and the elimination half-life from 422 to 647.8 h. Serum concentrations were below the limit of quantitation by days 4, 7, 12 and 12 for doses of 3.5, 7.1, 14.3 and 21.4 mg/kg, respectively. Urine concentrations were below the limit of detection by day 44 following administration of 3.5 mg/kg and day 51 for all other dose groups. No adverse effects were observed following meldonium administration. While the group numbers were small, changes in heart rate were observed in the 3.5 mg/kg dose group (n = 1). Glucose concentrations changed significantly in all dose groups studied (n = 2 per dose group). Similar to that reported for humans, the detection time of meldonium in biological samples collected from horses is prolonged, which should allow for satisfactory regulation in performance horses. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The Use of Physiology-Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Modeling in the Discovery of the Dual Orexin Receptor Antagonist ACT-541468.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiber, Alexander; de Kanter, Ruben; Roch, Catherine; Gatfield, John; Boss, Christoph; von Raumer, Markus; Schindelholz, Benno; Muehlan, Clemens; van Gerven, Joop; Jenck, Francois

    2017-09-01

    The identification of new sleep drugs poses particular challenges in drug discovery owing to disease-specific requirements such as rapid onset of action, sleep maintenance throughout major parts of the night, and absence of residual next-day effects. Robust tools to estimate drug levels in human brain are therefore key for a successful discovery program. Animal models constitute an appropriate choice for drugs without species differences in receptor pharmacology or pharmacokinetics. Translation to man becomes more challenging when interspecies differences are prominent. This report describes the discovery of the dual orexin receptor 1 and 2 (OX 1 and OX 2 ) antagonist ACT-541468 out of a class of structurally related compounds, by use of physiology-based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK-PD) modeling applied early in drug discovery. Although all drug candidates exhibited similar target receptor potencies and efficacy in a rat sleep model, they exhibited large interspecies differences in key factors determining their pharmacokinetic profile. Human PK models were built on the basis of in vitro metabolism and physicochemical data and were then used to predict the time course of OX 2 receptor occupancy in brain. An active ACT-541468 dose of 25 mg was estimated on the basis of OX 2 receptor occupancy thresholds of about 65% derived from clinical data for two other orexin antagonists, almorexant and suvorexant. Modeling predictions for ACT-541468 in man were largely confirmed in a single-ascending dose trial in healthy subjects. PBPK-PD modeling applied early in drug discovery, therefore, has great potential to assist in the identification of drug molecules when specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic requirements need to be met. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Characteristics of Subcutaneously Applied PTH-1-37

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf-Georg Forssmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Parathyroid hormone (PTH derivatives exert pronounced renal and osteoanabolic properties when given intermittently. The current study was performed to assess the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties as well as safety of subcutaneously applied PTH-1-37 after repeated dosing in healthy subjects. Methods: This randomized, double-blind, dose-escalating, placebo and active comparator controlled study was conducted in 33 healthy postmenopausal women. Subjects were allocated to one of five treatment options: 10, 20, or 40 µg PTH-1-37, 20 µg PTH-1-34 or placebo, administered as once daily subcutaneous doses for three days. Plasma drug concentrations and serum levels of endogenous PTH-1-84, and calcium as markers of biological activity were monitored during the treatment. Results: PTH was absorbed rapidly from the subcutaneous tissue with a median tmax of 30 minutes for 20 and 40 µg of PTH-1-37. tmax was 45 minutes for 20 µg PTH-1-34. Elimination half-lives were estimated as 76 ± 34 min and 70 ± 13 min for 20 µg and 40 µg PTH-1-37 (mean ± SD, and 78 ± 34 for 20 µg PTH-1-34. Both PTH fragments (PTH-1-37 and PTH-1-34 increased serum calcium. For PTH-1-37 the effect on serum calcium was dose-dependent. Suppression of endogenous PTH-1-84 was seen after the application of both PTH-1-37 and PTH-1-34. During the study period, the subjects experienced no unexpected or serious adverse events. Conclusions: PTH-1-37 is rapidly absorbed after s.c. injection, has a short plasma elimination half-life, and does not accumulate during multiple dosing. Biological activity was demonstrated by rising serum calcium and decreasing endogenous PTH-1-84 in blood plasma. The study drugs were well tolerated and safe. Our investigation presents data that PTH-1-37 is an excellent drug candidate for intervening with syndromes of dysregulation of calcium metabolism.

  1. Milrinone Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Neonates with Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of the Newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaccone, Annie; Zuppa, Athena F; Sood, Beena; Cohen, Meryl S; O'Byrne, Michael L; Moorthy, Ganesh; Mathur, Amit; Kirpalani, Haresh

    2017-07-01

    Objective  To describe the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of milrinone in infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) and to explore the impact of age on milrinone disposition. Design  Randomized, open label pilot study. Setting  Multicenter; level 3 and level 4 neonatal intensive care units. Patients  Six infants ≥34 weeks' gestational age and milrinone lactate in one of two dosing regimens: (1) low dose, 20 mcg/kg bolus followed by 0.2 mcg/kg/minute, and (2) standard dose, 50 mcg/kg bolus followed by 0.5 mcg/kg/minute. Measurements and Main Results  The final structural model was a two-compartment disposition model with interindividual variability estimated on clearance (CL). The estimated value of CL is 7.65 mL/minute/3.4 kg (3.05 mL/minute/kg). The addition of age improved the precision of the CL estimate, and CL increased with chronological age in days. The oxygenation index was highly variable within each participant and improved with time. There were no observed safety concerns in either dosing group. Conclusion  The CL of milrinone in newborns with PPHN is reduced and increases with age. In this pilot study, we did not see significant pharmacodynamic or safety effects associated with drug exposure. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Pharmacodynamic and Pharmacokinetic Profiles of Sacubitril/Valsartan (LCZ696) in Patients with Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobalava, Zhanna; Kotovskaya, Yulia; Averkov, Oleg; Pavlikova, Elena; Moiseev, Valentine; Albrecht, Diego; Chandra, Priya; Ayalasomayajula, Surya; Prescott, Margaret F; Pal, Parasar; Langenickel, Thomas H; Jordaan, Pierre; Rajman, Iris

    2016-08-01

    Concomitant renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade and natriuretic peptide system enhancement may provide unique therapeutic benefits to patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). This study assessed the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of LCZ696 in patients with HFrEF. This was an open-label, noncontrolled single-sequence study. After a 24-h run-in period, patients (n = 30) with HFrEF (EF ≤ 40%; NYHA class II-IV) received LCZ696 100 mg twice daily (bid) for 7 days and 200 mg bid for 14 days, along with standard treatment for heart failure (HF) (except angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors [ACEIs] or angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs]). On Day 21, significant increases were observed in the plasma biomarkers indicative of neprilysin and RAAS inhibition (ratio-to-baseline: cyclic guanosine monophosphate [cGMP], 1.38; renin concentration and activity, 3.50 and 2.27, respectively; all, P sacubitril (neprilysin inhibitor prodrug), LBQ657 (active neprilysin inhibitor), and valsartan were reached within 0.5, 2.5, and 2 h. Between 100- and 200-mg doses, the Cmax and AUC0-12 h for sacubitril and LBQ657 were approximately dose-proportional while that of valsartan was less than dose-proportional. Treatment with LCZ696 for 21 days was well tolerated and resulted in plasma biomarker changes indicative of neprilysin and RAAS inhibition in patients with HF. The pharmacokinetic exposure of the LCZ696 analytes in patients with HF observed in this study is comparable to that observed in the pivotal Phase III study. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A fixed-dose combination tablet of gemigliptin and metformin sustained release has comparable pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and tolerability profiles to separate tablets in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park SI

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sang-In Park,1,* Howard Lee,1,2,* Jaeseong Oh,1 Kyoung Soo Lim,3 In-Jin Jang,1 Jeong-Ae Kim,4 Jong Hyuk Jung,4 Kyung-Sang Yu1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Hospital, Seoul, 2Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Clinical Trials Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, 3Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, CHA University School of Medicine and CHA Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam, 4LG Life Sciences, Ltd, Seoul, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: In type 2 diabetes mellitus, fixed-dose combination (FDC can provide the complementary benefits of correction of multiple pathophysiologic defects such as dysfunctions in glycemic or metabolic control while improving compliance compared with separate tablets taken together. The objective of the study reported here was to compare the pharmacodynamic (PD, pharmacokinetic (PK, and tolerability profiles of gemigliptin and extended-release metformin (metformin XR between FDC and separate tablets.Methods: A randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-way, two-period, crossover study was conducted in 28 healthy male volunteers. Two FDC tablets of gemigliptin/metformin 25/500 mg or separate tablets of gemigliptin (50 mg ×1 and metformin XR (500 mg ×2 were orally administered in each period. Serial blood samples were collected up to 48 hours post-dose to determine dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4 activity using spectrophotometric assay and concentrations of gemigliptin and metformin using tandem mass spectrometry. Geometric mean ratios (GMRs of FDC to separate tablet formulations and their 90% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated to compare the PD and PK parameters between the two formulations. Tolerability was assessed throughout the study.Results: The plasma DPP-4 activity

  4. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ponesimod, a selective S1P1 receptor modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Andreas; Brossard, Patrick; D'Ambrosio, Daniele; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2014-06-01

    Ponesimod (ACT-128800), a reversible, orally active, selective S1P1 receptor modulator, prevents the egress of lymphocytes from the lymph node into the systemic circulation. It is currently in clinical development for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis. Modulation of circulating lymphocytes serves as biomarker of efficacy and safety, such that the quantitative characterization of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationship guides the clinical development of the compound. The availability of a variety of doses, dosing regimens, and treatment durations permitted estimation of the pharmacokinetics characterized by an absorption lag time followed by a sequential zero/first-order absorption and two compartments with first-order elimination. The PD are modeled as an indirect-effect model with rates of appearance and disappearance of lymphocytes in blood with a circadian rhythm and a drug effect on the rate of appearance. The model suggests a circadian variation of 9% and a maximum inhibition of 86% of total lymphocyte count with high doses at steady state. It was instrumental for the selection of doses for subsequent studies that confirmed the effect plateau in total lymphocyte count at approximately 0.5 × 10(9) counts/L.

  5. Inference from some pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of busulfan through the analysis of its induction kinetics of micronuclei polychromated erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez I, M.R.; Vallarino K, T.; Morales R, P.

    2001-01-01

    The induction kinetics of micronuclei polychromated eritrocites (EPC-MN) which is produced by busulfan and compared with that produced by the ionizing radiation, allows to make inferences over the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of busulfan. Observing two induction mechanisms of MN, this one early at low doses and other later at high doses, this last is presented to a critical dose being very sheer and associated with an increase of the cytotoxicity. The data suggest the transformation or dependence between these two types of leisures, which to determine the narrow therapeutical margin of busulfan. The pharmacokinetic parameters determined in the early mechanisms kinetics indicate a latency period, a time of effective activity and of half life 5.7, 5.2 and 2.6 h respectively. (Author)

  6. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of insulin analogs in special populations with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morello CM

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Candis M Morello1,21Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California San Diego, 2School of Pharmacy, University of California San Francisco, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA, USAIntroduction: The goal of insulin therapy in patients with either type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is to match as closely as possible normal physiologic insulin secretion to control fasting and postprandial plasma glucose. Modifications of the insulin molecule have resulted in two long-acting insulin analogs (glargine and detemir and three rapid-acting insulins (aspart, lispro, and glulisine with improved pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD profiles. These agents can be used together in basal-bolus therapy to more closely mimic physiologic insulin secretion patterns.Methods: This study reviews effects of the multiple demographic and clinical parameters in the insulin analogs glargine, detemir, lispro, aspart, and glulisine in patients with T2DM. A search was conducted on PubMed for each major topic considered (effects of injection site, age, race/ethnicity, obesity, renal or hepatic dysfunction, pregnancy, exercise, drug interactions using the topic words and name of each type of insulin analog. Information was also obtained from the prescribing information for each insulin analog.Results: The PK/PD profiles for insulin analogs may be influenced by many variables including age, weight, and hepatic and renal function. However, these variables do not have equivalent effects on all long-acting or rapid-acting insulin analogs.Conclusion: Rapid-acting and long-acting insulin analogs represent major advances in treatment for patients with T2DM who require insulin therapy. However, there are potentially important PK and PD differences between the two long-acting agents and among the three rapid-acting insulin analogs, which should be considered when designing treatment regimens for

  7. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the injectable formulation of methadone hydrochloride and methadone in lipid nanocarriers administered orally to horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosignani, N; Luna, S P; Dalla Costa, T; Pimenta, E L; Detoni, C B; Guterres, S S; Puoli Filho, J N; Pantoja, J C; Pigatto, M C

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the thermal, electrical and mechanical antinociceptive and physiological effects (heart rate, respiratory rate, arterial blood pressure, head height and abdominal auscultation score), and pharmacokinetics, of 0.5 mg/kg of the injectable formulation (ORAL) or nanoparticulated methadone (NANO) given orally, in six adult mares, using a crossover, blind and prospective design. Repeated-measure models were used to compare parametric data between and within treatments, followed by Tukey's test. Nonparametric data were analysed with Wilcoxon signed-rank, adjusted by Bonferroni tests. Blood samples were also collected up to 6 h after dosing for plasma drug quantification by LC-MS/MS. Methadone pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by noncompartmental and compartmental approaches. There were no differences in pharmacodynamic parameters. No statistical differences were observed in the pharmacokinetic parameters from noncompartmental analysis for both groups, except a significant decrease in peak plasma concentration, increase in apparent volume of distribution per fraction absorbed (Vd ss /F) and increased mean residence time (MRT) for NANO. One-compartment open model with first order elimination best described the pharmacokinetic profiles for both groups. Neither ORAL nor NANO administered orally to horses produced antinociception. The nanoencapsulated formulation of methadone given orally to horses did not improve methadone pharmacokinetic parameters or increased systemic body exposure to methadone. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Allopregnanolone preclinical acute pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies to predict tolerability and efficacy for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald W Irwin

    Full Text Available To develop allopregnanolone as a therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease, we investigated multiple formulations and routes of administration in translationally relevant animal models of both sexes. Subcutaneous, topical (transdermal and intranasal, intramuscular, and intravenous allopregnanolone were bolus-administered. Pharmacokinetic analyses of intravenous allopregnanolone in rabbit and mouse indicated that peak plasma and brain levels (3-fold brain/plasma ratios at 5min were sufficient to activate neuroregenerative responses at sub-sedative doses. Slow-release subcutaneous suspension of allopregnanolone displayed 5-fold brain/plasma ratio at Cmax at 30min. At therapeutic doses by either subcutaneous or intravenous routes, allopregnanolone mouse plasma levels ranged between 34-51ng/ml by 30min, comparable to published endogenous human level in the third trimester of pregnancy. Exposure to subcutaneous, topical, intramuscular, and intravenous allopregnanolone, at safe and tolerable doses, increased hippocampal markers of neurogenesis including BrdU and PCNA in young 3xTgAD and aged wildtype mice. Intravenous allopregnanolone transiently and robustly phosphorylated CREB within 5min and increased levels of neuronal differentiation transcription factor NeuroD within 4h. Neurogenic efficacy was achieved with allopregnanolone brain exposure of 300-500hr*ng/g. Formulations were tested to determine the no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL and maximally tolerated doses (MTD in male and female rats by sedation behavior time course. Sex differences were apparent, males exhibited ≥40% more sedation time compared to females. Allopregnanolone formulated in sulfobutyl-ether-beta-cyclodextrin at optimized complexation ratio maximized allopregnanolone delivery and neurogenic efficacy. To establish the NOAEL and MTD for Allo-induced sedation using a once-per-week intravenous regenerative treatment regimen: In female rats the NOAEL was 0.5mg/kg and MTD 2mg

  9. A comparison in young and elderly subjects of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single and multiple doses of benazepril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, N J; Elliott, H L; Hughes, D M; Reid, J L

    1993-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single and multiple oral doses of the ACE inhibitor benazepril were investigated in young and elderly normotensive subjects. 2. Following multiple doses the trough concentrations were significantly higher in the elderly and the areas under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUC0-24) were significantly greater, by approximately 23%. 3. The fall in blood pressure tended to be greater in the elderly subjects but this is likely to be attributable to their higher initial blood pressures, although it may reflect the small differences in pharmacokinetics. 4. The age related differences in kinetics and dynamics following multiple dosing are quantitatively similar to those obtained with single doses. However, there appears to be a quantitative difference between benazepril and other ACE inhibitors in that the age related increases were of a relatively smaller magnitude. PMID:9114904

  10. Prediction of the Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Efficacy of a Monoclonal Antibody, Using a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic FcRn Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Manoranjenni; Li, Linzhong; Rose, Rachel; Machavaram, Krishna; Jamei, Masoud; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Gardner, Iain

    2015-01-01

    Although advantages of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models (PBPK) are now well established, PBPK models that are linked to pharmacodynamic (PD) models to predict pharmacokinetics (PK), PD, and efficacy of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in humans are uncommon. The aim of this study was to develop a PD model that could be linked to a physiologically based mechanistic FcRn model to predict PK, PD, and efficacy of efalizumab. The mechanistic FcRn model for mAbs with target-mediated drug disposition within the Simcyp population-based simulator was used to simulate the pharmacokinetic profiles for three different single doses and two multiple doses of efalizumab administered to virtual Caucasian healthy volunteers. The elimination of efalizumab was modeled with both a target-mediated component (specific) and catabolism in the endosome (non-specific). This model accounted for the binding between neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and efalizumab (protective against elimination) and for changes in CD11a target concentration. An integrated response model was then developed to predict the changes in mean Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) scores that were measured in a clinical study as an efficacy marker for efalizumab treatment. PASI scores were approximated as continuous and following a first-order asymptotic progression model. The reported steady state asymptote (Y ss) and baseline score [Y (0)] was applied and parameter estimation was used to determine the half-life of progression (Tp) of psoriasis. Results suggested that simulations using this model were able to recover the changes in PASI scores (indicating efficacy) observed during clinical studies. Simulations of both single dose and multiple doses of efalizumab concentration-time profiles as well as suppression of CD11a concentrations recovered clinical data reasonably well. It can be concluded that the developed PBPK FcRn model linked to a PD model adequately predicted PK, PD, and efficacy of efalizumab. PMID

  11. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of d-chlorpheniramine following intravenous and oral administration in healthy Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Taisuke; Nagata, Shun-ichi; Takizawa, Yoshimasa; Tamura, Norihisa; Kusano, Kanichi; Mizobe, Fumiaki; Hariu, Kazuhisa

    2013-08-01

    The pharmacokinetics of d-chlorpheniramine (CPM), a histamine H1-receptor antagonist, and its ability to inhibit of histamine-induced cutaneous wheal formation, were studied in healthy Thoroughbred horses (n=5). Following an intravenous (IV) dose of 0.5mg/kg bodyweight (BW), plasma drug disposition was very rapid, with the mean terminal half-life and total body clearance calculated as 2.7h and 0.7 L/h/kg, respectively. The observed maximal inhibition of wheal formation following IV doses of 0.1 and 0.5mg/kg BW were 37.8% and 60.6% at 0.5h, respectively. Oral administration of CPM (0.5mg/kg BW) resulted in a bioavailability of 38%, which induced a peak plasma drug concentration at 1h and a maximal inhibition of wheal formation (39%) at 2h. A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic link model showed that CPM in horses has lower efficacy, much lower potency and slightly lower sensitivity than other reported antihistamines. These results indicated that CPM should be administered at frequent intervals or at large dose rates to maintain therapeutic concentrations in horses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Valacyclovir Pharmacokinetics and Exploratory Pharmacodynamics in Young Adults With Epstein-Barr Virus Infectious Mononucleosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezina, Heather E.; Balfour, Henry H.; Weller, Dennis R.; Anderson, Bruce J.; Brundage, Richard C.

    2017-01-01

    Primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection often results in infectious mononucleosis and is associated with serious sequelae. No treatment is approved for EBV infection, and an antiviral intervention would be significant. The objectives of this study are to characterize the pharmacokinetics and explore the pharmacodynamics of acyclovir in plasma and oral washings of 8 subjects receiving 7 days of valacyclovir 1500 mg twice daily for EBV infectious mononucleosis. Virologic and clinical responses are assessed over 12 days. Acyclovir is measured by liquid chromatography/ultraviolet detection. EBV DNA is quantitated by TaqMan polymerase chain reaction. NONMEM VI and linear regression are used for data analysis. Acyclovir profiles in plasma and oral washings are consistent with a 1-compartment model. Final model estimates of clearance, volume of distribution, and fraction of acyclovir in oral wash supernatant are 49.9 L/h, 74.1 L, and 1.14%, respectively. The quantity of EBV DNA in oral washings and blood, and the severity of illness, measured by a graded scale, decrease during treatment. After treatment, viral rebound occurs in oral washings but not in blood, and the severity of illness continues to decline. Acyclovir pharmacokinetic parameters do not correlate with response metrics. These results support further studies of valacyclovir for EBV infectious mononucleosis. PMID:19897764

  13. Valacyclovir pharmacokinetics and exploratory pharmacodynamics in young adults with Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezina, Heather E; Balfour, Henry H; Weller, Dennis R; Anderson, Bruce J; Brundage, Richard C

    2010-07-01

    Primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection often results in infectious mononucleosis and is associated with serious sequelae. No treatment is approved for EBV infection, and an antiviral intervention would be significant. The objectives of this study are to characterize the pharmacokinetics and explore the pharmacodynamics of acyclovir in plasma and oral washings of 8 subjects receiving 7 days of valacyclovir 1500 mg twice daily for EBV infectious mononucleosis. Virologic and clinical responses are assessed over 12 days. Acyclovir is measured by liquid chromatography/ultraviolet detection. EBV DNA is quantitated by TaqMan polymerase chain reaction. NONMEM VI and linear regression are used for data analysis. Acyclovir profiles in plasma and oral washings are consistent with a 1-compartment model. Final model estimates of clearance, volume of distribution, and fraction of acyclovir in oral wash supernatant are 49.9 L/h, 74.1 L, and 1.14%, respectively. The quantity of EBV DNA in oral washings and blood, and the severity of illness, measured by a graded scale, decrease during treatment. After treatment, viral rebound occurs in oral washings but not in blood, and the severity of illness continues to decline. Acyclovir pharmacokinetic parameters do not correlate with response metrics. These results support further studies of valacyclovir for EBV infectious mononucleosis.

  14. A first‐in‐human pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic study of a fully human anti‐glucagon receptor monoclonal antibody in normal healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostic, Ana; King, Thomas Alexander; Yang, Feng; Chan, Kuo‐Chen; Yancopoulos, George D.; Gromada, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Aims Glucagon receptor (GCGR) blockers are being investigated as potential therapeutics for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Here we report the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of REGN1193, a fully human glucagon receptor blocking monoclonal antibody from a first‐in‐human healthy volunteer randomized double‐blinded trial. Methods Healthy men and women received single ascending doses of REGN1193 ranging from 0.05 to 0.6 mg/kg (n = 42) or placebo (n = 14) intravenously. Safety, tolerability and PK were assessed over 106 days. The glucose‐lowering effect of REGN1193 was assessed after induction of hyperglycaemia by serial glucagon challenges. Results REGN1193 was generally well tolerated. There were small (50 mg/dL, and did not require treatment or medical assistance. Concentration‐time profiles suggest a 2‐compartment disposition and marked nonlinearity, consistent with target‐mediated clearance. REGN1193 inhibited the glucagon‐stimulated glucose increase in a dose‐dependent manner. The 0.6 mg/kg dose inhibited the glucagon‐induced glucose area under the curve for 0 to 90 minutes (AUC0‐90 minutes) by 80% to 90% on days 3 and 15, while blunting the increase in C‐peptide. REGN1193 dose‐dependently increased total GLP‐1, GLP‐2 and glucagon, with plasma levels returning to baseline by day 29 in all dose groups. Conclusion REGN1193, a GCGR‐blocking monoclonal antibody, produced a safety, tolerability and PK/PD profile suitable for further clinical development. The occurrence of transient elevations in serum hepatic aminotransferases observed here and reported with several small molecule glucagon receptor antagonists suggests an on‐target effect of glucagon receptor blockade. The underlying mechanism is unknown. PMID:28755409

  15. Herb-drug interaction of Andrographis paniculata (Nees) extract and andrographolide on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic of naproxen in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balap, Aishwarya; Lohidasan, Sathiyanarayanan; Sinnathambi, Arulmozhi; Mahadik, Kakasaheb

    2017-01-04

    Andrographis paniculata Nees (Acanthacae) have broad range of pharmacological effects such as hepatoprotective, antifertility, antimalarial, antidiabetic, suppression of various cancer cells and anti-inflammatory properties and is widely used medicinal plant in the traditional Unani and Ayurvedic medicinal systems. Andrographolide (AN) is one of the active constituent of the A. paniculata Nees extract (APE). They have been found in many traditional herbal formulations in India and proven to be effective as anti-inflammatory drug. To evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (anti arthritic) herb-drug interactions of A. paniculata Nees extract (APE) and pure andrographolide (AN) with naproxen (NP) after oral co-administration in wistar rats. After oral co-administration of APE (200mg/Kg) and AN (60mg/kg) with NP (7.5mg/kg) in rats, drug concentrations in plasma were determined using HPLC method. The main pharmacokinetic parameters of C max , t max , t 1/2 , MRT, Vd, CL, and AUC were calculated by non-compartment model. Change in paw volume, mechanical nociceptive threshold, mechanical hyperalgesia, histopathology and hematological parameters were evaluated to study antiarthritic activity. Co-administration of NP with APE and pure AN decreased systemic exposure level of NP in vivo. The C max , t max, AUC 0-t of NP was decreased. In pharmacodynamic study, NP (10mg/kg) alone and NP+AN (10+60mg/kg) groups exhibited significant synergistic anti-arthritic activity as compared to groups NP+APE, APE and AN alone. The results obtained from this study suggested that NP, APE and pure AN existed pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions in rat which is correlated with anti-arthritic study. The knowledge regarding possible herb-drug interaction of NP might be helpful for physicians as well as patients using AP. So further studies should be done to understand the effect of other herbal ingredients of APE on NP as well as to predict the herb-drug interaction in humans

  16. Combined autophagy and HDAC inhibition: a phase I safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic analysis of hydroxychloroquine in combination with the HDAC inhibitor vorinostat in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Devalingam; Mita, Monica; Sarantopoulos, John; Wood, Leslie; Amaravadi, Ravi K; Davis, Lisa E; Mita, Alain C; Curiel, Tyler J; Espitia, Claudia M; Nawrocki, Steffan T; Giles, Francis J; Carew, Jennifer S

    2014-08-01

    We previously reported that inhibition of autophagy significantly augmented the anticancer activity of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat (VOR) through a cathepsin D-mediated mechanism. We thus conducted a first-in-human study to investigate the safety, preliminary efficacy, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) of the combination of the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and VOR in patients with advanced solid tumors. Of 27 patients treated in the study, 24 were considered fully evaluable for study assessments and toxicity. Patients were treated orally with escalating doses of HCQ daily (QD) (d 2 to 21 of a 21-d cycle) in combination with 400 mg VOR QD (d one to 21). Treatment-related adverse events (AE) included grade 1 to 2 nausea, diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss, anemia, and elevated creatinine. Grade 3 fatigue and/or myelosuppression were observed in a minority of patients. Fatigue and gastrointestinal AE were dose-limiting toxicities. Six-hundred milligrams HCQ and 400 mg VOR was established as the maximum tolerated dose and recommended phase II regimen. One patient with renal cell carcinoma had a confirmed durable partial response and 2 patients with colorectal cancer had prolonged stable disease. The addition of HCQ did not significantly impact the PK profile of VOR. Treatment-related increases in the expression of CDKN1A and CTSD were more pronounced in tumor biopsies than peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Based on the safety and preliminary efficacy of this combination, additional clinical studies are currently being planned to further investigate autophagy inhibition as a new approach to increase the efficacy of HDAC inhibitors.

  17. A Single-Center, Open-Label, 3-Way Crossover Trial to Determine the Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Interaction Between Nebivolol and Valsartan in Healthy Volunteers at Steady State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun Lin; Desai-Krieger, Daksha; Ortiz, Stephan; Kerolous, Majid; Wright, Harold M; Ghahramani, Parviz

    2015-01-01

    Combining different classes of antihypertensives is more effective for reducing blood pressure (BP) than increasing the dose of monotherapies. The aims of this phase I study were to investigate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between nebivolol, a vasodilatory β1-selective blocker, and valsartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker, and to assess safety and tolerability of the combination. This was a single-center, randomized, open-label, multiple-dose, 3-way crossover trial in 30 healthy adults aged 18-45 years. Participants were randomized into 1 of 6 treatment sequences (1:1:1:1:1:1) consisting of three 7-day treatment periods followed by a 7-day washout. Once-daily oral treatments comprised nebivolol (20 mg), valsartan (320 mg), and nebivolol-valsartan combination (20/320 mg). Outcomes included AUC0-τ,ss, Cmax,ss, Tmax,ss, changes in BP, pulse rate, plasma angiotensin II, plasma renin activity, 24-hour urinary aldosterone, and adverse events. Steady-state pharmacokinetic interactions were observed but deemed not clinically significant. Systolic and diastolic BP reduction was significantly greater with nebivolol-valsartan combination than with either monotherapy. The mean pulse rate associated with nebivolol and nebivolol-valsartan treatments was consistently lower than that associated with valsartan monotherapy. A sharp increase in mean day 7 plasma renin activity and plasma angiotensin II that occurred in valsartan-treated participants was significantly attenuated with concomitant nebivolol administration. Mean 24-hour urine aldosterone at day 7 was substantially decreased after combined treatment, as compared with either monotherapy. All treatments were safe and well tolerated. In conclusion, nebivolol and valsartan coadministration led to greater reductions in BP compared with either monotherapy; nebivolol and valsartan lower BP through complementary mechanisms.

  18. Exploring inductive linearization for pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic systems of nonlinear ordinary differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Chihiro; Duffull, Stephen B

    2018-02-01

    Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic systems are often expressed with nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). While there are numerous methods to solve such ODEs these methods generally rely on time-stepping solutions (e.g. Runge-Kutta) which need to be matched to the characteristics of the problem at hand. The primary aim of this study was to explore the performance of an inductive approximation which iteratively converts nonlinear ODEs to linear time-varying systems which can then be solved algebraically or numerically. The inductive approximation is applied to three examples, a simple nonlinear pharmacokinetic model with Michaelis-Menten elimination (E1), an integrated glucose-insulin model and an HIV viral load model with recursive feedback systems (E2 and E3, respectively). The secondary aim of this study was to explore the potential advantages of analytically solving linearized ODEs with two examples, again E3 with stiff differential equations and a turnover model of luteinizing hormone with a surge function (E4). The inductive linearization coupled with a matrix exponential solution provided accurate predictions for all examples with comparable solution time to the matched time-stepping solutions for nonlinear ODEs. The time-stepping solutions however did not perform well for E4, particularly when the surge was approximated by a square wave. In circumstances when either a linear ODE is particularly desirable or the uncertainty in matching the integrator to the ODE system is of potential risk, then the inductive approximation method coupled with an analytical integration method would be an appropriate alternative.

  19. Phase I clinical, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic study of KOS-862 (Epothilone D) in patients with advanced solid tumors and lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konner, Jason; Grisham, Rachel N; Park, Jae; O'Connor, Owen A; Cropp, Gillian; Johnson, Robert; Hannah, Alison L; Hensley, Martee L; Sabbatini, Paul; Mironov, Svetlana; Miranov, Svetlana; Danishefsky, Samuel; Hyman, David; Spriggs, David R; Dupont, Jakob; Aghajanian, Carol

    2012-12-01

    To determine the maximum tolerated dose and safety of the epothilone, KOS-862, in patients with advanced solid tumors or lymphoma. Patients were treated weekly for 3 out of 4 weeks (Schedule A) or 2 out of 3 weeks (Schedule B) with KOS-862 (16-120 mg/m(2)). Pharmacokinetic (PK) sampling was performed during cycles 1 and 2; pharmacodynamic (PD) assessment for microtubule bundle formation (MTBF) was performed after the 1st dose, only at or above 100 mg/m(2). Thirty-two patients were enrolled, and twenty-nine completed ≥1 cycle of therapy. Dose limiting toxicity [DLT] was observed at 120 mg/m(2). PK data were linear from 16 to 100 mg/m(2), with proportional increases in mean C(max) and AUC(tot) as a function of dose. Full PK analysis (mean ± SD) at 100 mg/m(2) revealed the following: half-life (t (½)) = 9.1 ± 2.2 h; volume of distribution (V(z)) = 119 ± 41 L/m(2); clearance (CL) = 9.3 ± 3.2 L/h/m(2). MTBF (n = 9) was seen in 40% of PBMCs within 1 h and in 15% of PBMC at 24-hours post infusion at 100 mg/m(2). Tumor shrinkage (n = 2, lymphoma), stable disease >3 months (n = 5, renal, prostate, oropharynx, cholangiocarcinoma, and Hodgkin lymphoma), and tumor marker reductions (n = 1, colorectal cancer/CEA) were observed. KOS-862 was well tolerated with manageable toxicity, favorable PK profile, and the suggestion of clinical activity. The maximum tolerated dose was determined to be 100 mg/m(2) weekly 3-on/1-off. MTBF can be demonstrated in PBMCs of patients exposed to KOS-862.

  20. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic properties of oral DEBIO1143 (AT-406) in patients with advanced cancer: results of a first-in-man study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Herbert I; Smith, David C; Pitot, Henry C; Brill, Jeffrey M; Chugh, Rashmi; Rouits, Elisabeth; Rubin, Joseph; Strickler, John; Vuagniaux, Gregoire; Sorensen, J Mel; Zanna, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    To assess safety/tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and antitumor activity of DEBIO1143, an antagonist of inhibitor apoptosis proteins. This first-in-man study in patients with advanced cancer used an accelerated dose titration design. DEBIO1143 was given orally once daily on days 1-5 every 2 or 3 weeks until disease progressed or patients dropped out. The starting dose of 5 mg was escalated by 100% in single patients until related grade 2 toxicity occurred. This triggered expansion to cohorts of three and subsequently six patients and reduction in dose increments to 50%. Maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was exceeded when any two patients within the same cohort experienced dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). On days 1 and 5, PK and PD samples were taken. Thirty-one patients received doses from 5 to 900 mg. Only one DLT was reported at 180 mg. No MTD was found. Most common adverse drug reactions were fatigue (26%), nausea (23%), and vomiting (13%). Average t max and T 1/2 was about 1 and 6 h, respectively. Exposure increased proportionally with doses from 80 to 900 mg, without accumulation over 5 days. Plasma CCL2 increased at 3-6 h postdose and epithelial apoptosis marker M30 on day 5; cIAP-1 levels in PBMCs decreased at all doses >80 mg. Five patients (17%) had stable disease as the best treatment response. DEBIO1143 was well tolerated at doses up to 900 mg and elicited PD effects at doses greater 80 mg. Limited antitumor activity may suggest development rather as adjunct treatment.

  1. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling of cardiac toxicity in human acute overdoses: utility and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mégarbane, Bruno; Aslani, Arsia Amir; Deye, Nicolas; Baud, Frédéric J

    2008-05-01

    Hypotension, cardiac failure, QT interval prolongation, dysrhythmias, and conduction disturbances are common complications of overdoses with cardiotoxicants. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationships are useful to assess diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment efficacy in acute poisonings. To review the utility and limits of PK/PD studies of cardiac toxicity. Discussion of various models, mainly those obtained in digitalis, cyanide, venlafaxine and citalopram poisonings. A sigmoidal E(max) model appears adequate to represent the PK/PD relationships in cardiotoxic poisonings. PK/PD correlations investigate the discrepancies between the time course of the effect magnitude and its evolving concentrations. They may help in understanding the mechanisms of occurrence as well as disappearance of a cardiotoxic effect. When data are sparse, population-based PK/PD modeling using computer-intensive algorithms is helpful to estimate population mean values of PK parameters as well as their individual variability. Further PK/PD studies are needed in medical toxicology to allow understanding of the meaning of blood toxicant concentration in acute poisonings and thus improve management.

  2. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Relationship of Gabapentin in a CFA-induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Malte Selch; Keizer, Ron; Munro, Gordon; Mørk, Arne; Holm, René; Savic, Rada; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2016-05-01

    Gabapentin displays non-linear drug disposition, which complicates dosing for optimal therapeutic effect. Thus, the current study was performed to elucidate the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) relationship of gabapentin's effect on mechanical hypersensitivity in a rat model of CFA-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. A semi-mechanistic population-based PKPD model was developed using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling, based on gabapentin plasma and brain extracellular fluid (ECF) time-concentration data and measurements of CFA-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia following administration of a range of gabapentin doses (oral and intravenous). The plasma/brain ECF concentration-time profiles of gabapentin were adequately described with a two-compartment plasma model with saturable intestinal absorption rate (K m  = 44.1 mg/kg, V max  = 41.9 mg/h∙kg) and dose-dependent oral bioavailability linked to brain ECF concentration through a transit compartment. Brain ECF concentration was directly linked to a sigmoid E max function describing reversal of hyperalgesia (EC 50, plasma  = 16.7 μg/mL, EC 50, brain  = 3.3 μg/mL). The proposed semi-mechanistic population-based PKPD model provides further knowledge into the understanding of gabapentin's non-linear pharmacokinetics and the link between plasma/brain disposition and anti-hyperalgesic effects. The model suggests that intestinal absorption is the primary source of non-linearity and that the investigated rat model provides reasonable predictions of clinically effective plasma concentrations for gabapentin.

  3. Evaluation of Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Drug–Drug Interaction of Sacubitril/Valsartan (LCZ696) and Sildenafil in Patients With Mild‐to‐Moderate Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenickel, TH; Petruck, J; Kode, K; Ayalasomayajula, S; Schuehly, U; Greeley, M; Pal, P; Zhou, W; Prescott, MF; Sunkara, G; Rajman, I

    2017-01-01

    Sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) is indicated for the treatment of patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Since patients with HFrEF may receive sacubitril/valsartan and sildenafil, both increasing cyclic guanosine monophosphate, the present study evaluated the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interaction potential between sacubitril/valsartan and sildenafil. In this open‐label, three‐period, single sequence study, patients with mild‐to‐moderate hypertension (153.8 ± 8.2 mmHg mean systolic blood pressure (SBP)) received a single dose of sildenafil 50 mg, sacubitril/valsartan 400 mg once daily for 5 days, and sacubitril/valsartan and sildenafil coadministration. When coadministered with sildenafil, the AUC and Cmax of valsartan decreased by 29% and 39%, respectively. Coadministration of sacubitril/valsartan and sildenafil resulted in a greater decrease in BP (–5/–4/–4 mmHg mean ambulatory SBP/DBP/MAP (mean arterial pressure)) than with sacubitril/valsartan alone. Both treatments were generally safe and well tolerated in this study; however, the additional BP reduction suggests that sildenafil should be administered cautiously in patients receiving sacubitril/valsartan. Unique identifier: NCT01601470. PMID:28599060

  4. A novel oil-body nanoemulsion formulation of ginkgolide B: pharmacokinetics study and in vivo pharmacodynamics evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pengfei; Cai, Xiaolei; Zhou, Kai; Lu, Chuanhua; Chen, Weidong

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a novel oil-body nanoemulsion (ONE) for Ginkgolide B (GB) and to conduct pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics evaluations. GB-ONE was prepared by O/O emulsion method. The differences in pharmacokinetics parameters and tissue distribution of rats after oral administrated with GB-ONE were investigated by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Changes in the ethological and pathological characterizations of the Alzheimer's disease rats after treated with GB-ONE were evaluated by Morris water maze (MWM) and pathological section, respectively. Furthermore, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity in hippocampus was analyzed by spectrophotometric method. The results indicated that the AUC of GB in rats' plasma was significantly improved after incorporated into ONE, and GB-ONE was significantly targeted into brain. In MWM experiment, memory improvement of rats with cognition impaired was confirmed after administrated with GB-ONE. Furthermore, GB-ONE significantly inhibited AchE activity and enhanced the activity of ChAT in the hippocampus. The overall results implicated that the novel ONE was effective for improving the drawbacks of GB and showed great potential for clinical application. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  5. Using pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling as a tool for prediction of therapeutic effective plasma levels of antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Christina Kurre; Brennum, Lise Tøttrup; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2008-01-01

    response behaviour correlates well with the relationship between human dopamine D2 receptor occupancy and clinical effect. The aim of the present study was to evaluate how pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) predictions of therapeutic effective steady-state plasma levels by means of conditioned...... the rat dopamine D2 receptor occupancy levels providing 50% response in the conditioned avoidance response test and the dopamine D2 receptor occupancy levels reported from responding schizophrenic patients treated with antipsychotics. Predictions of therapeutically effective steady-state levels...... for sertindole (+dehydrosertindole) and olanzapine were 3-4-fold too high whereas for haloperidol, clozapine and risperidone the predicted steady-state EC50 in conditioned avoidance responding rats correlated well with the therapeutically effective plasma levels observed in patients. Accordingly, the proposed PK...

  6. Characterization and comparison of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors in pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacologic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuo Tahara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT 2 offer a novel approach to treating type 2 diabetes by reducing hyperglycaemia via increased urinary glucose excretion. In the present study, the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacologic properties of all six SGLT2 inhibitors commercially available in Japan were investigated and compared. Based on findings in normal and diabetic mice, the six drugs were classified into two categories, long-acting: ipragliflozin and dapagliflozin, and intermediate-acting: tofogliflozin, canagliflozin, empagliflozin, and luseogliflozin. Long-acting SGLT2 inhibitors exerted an antihyperglycemic effect with lower variability of blood glucose level via a long-lasting increase in urinary glucose excretion. In addition, ipragliflozin and luseogliflozin exhibited superiority over the others with respect to fast onset of pharmacological effect. Duration and onset of the pharmacologic effects seemed to be closely correlated with the pharmacokinetic properties of each SGLT2 inhibitor, particularly with respect to high distribution and long retention in the target organ, the kidney. While all six SGLT2 inhibitors were significantly effective in increasing urinary glucose excretion and reducing hyperglycemia, our findings suggest that variation in the quality of daily blood glucose control associated with duration and onset of pharmacologic effects of each SGLT2 inhibitor might cause slight differences in rates of improvement in type 2 diabetes.

  7. Randomized, open-label, 5-way crossover study to evaluate the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic interaction between furosemide and the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs diclofenac and ibuprofen in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, C A; Jacobs, D; Rasmussen, S; Youngberg, S P; McGuinness, N

    2011-08-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can induce renal complications in patients taking loop diuretics. This study investigated the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic effects and safety profile of orally administered diclofenac sodium, ibuprofen and diclofenac epolamine topical patch (DETP) on furosemide in healthy adult subjects. This open-label, randomized, 5-way crossover study was conducted in 40 subjects (aged 19 - 45 y). Diclofenac (75 mg taken orally twice daily), DETP (1.3% applied topically twice daily), or ibuprofen (800 mg taken orally thrice daily) was administered for 3 consecutive days, followed by co-administration with furosemide (given intravenously as 20 mg/2 min). Plasma furosemide and NSAID concentrations, urine furosemide, sodium and potassium concentrations and urine output were determined throughout the 24 h period following furosemide administration. Orally administered ibuprofen significantly increased furosemide AUC(0-t) (37%) and AUC(0-inf) (36%) and decreased total body CL (27%), R(max) (19%) and CLR (23%) geometric mean ratios compared with furosemide control. Oral and topical diclofenac had no pharmacokinetic effects on furosemide. Ibuprofen increased sodium excretion (Ae(0-24), 16%) and decreased sodium R(max) (15%), and oral diclofenac decreased urine output (Vu(0-24), 15%). DETP had no effect on furosemide pharmacodynamics; total systemic exposure to diclofenac during DETP treatment was diclofenac. Treatments were generally safe, with 25 subjects reporting a total of 112 adverse events. Pharmacodynamic effects were seen with oral diclofenac (urine output) and ibuprofen (urine sodium excretion). Furosemide also affected plasma and urine pharmacokinetic profiles. Pharmacologic effects of DETP on furosemide were not observed under these conditions. Additional research is warranted to delineate the potential interactions of other NSAIDs with furosemide and other loop diuretics.

  8. First-in-human study of the toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of CG200745, a pan-HDAC inhibitor, in patients with refractory solid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyu-pyo; Park, Seong Joon; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Bae, Kyun-Seop; Cha, Hyunju; Kwon, Sool-Ki; Ro, Seonggu; Cho, JoongMyung; Kim, Tae Won

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and efficacy of single and multiple doses of intravenous CG200745, a novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid malignancies. Two to six patients received intravenous CG200745 according to the 2 + 4 dose-escalating method. This first-in-human trial was comprised of two parts: Part 1 was a single ascending dose, and Part 2 was multiple ascending doses weekly for 3 weeks, and then 1 week off. For the first cycle, pharmacokinetic sampling for CG200745 and pharmacodynamic sampling for acetylated histone H4 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were performed on day 1 for Part 1 and on days 1 and 15 for Part 2. Examination of acetylated histone H4 in pre- and post-biopsy samples was performed in accessible patients. In all, 28 patients were treated at 13 dose levels (1.8-250 mg/m(2)) and received a total of 71 cycles of CG200745. Hematologic toxicities included grade 3/4 neutropenia (22.2 %) that did not last a week and non-hematologic toxicities included fatigue (22.2 %) and anorexia (16.7 %) that did not exceed grade 2. No dose-limiting toxic effects were noted. Dose proportionality was observed for both the maximum concentration and area under the curve. The elimination half-life was 5.67 ± 2.69 h (mean ± standard deviation). An increase in PBMC acetylated histone H4 was observed at dose levels up to 51 mg/m(2), which plateaued at higher dose levels. At 24 h, 75 % of patients (6/8) showed higher relative acetylation in tumor tissue compared to PBMCs. Although there was no partial or complete response, 57.1 % of patients (16/28) had stable disease that lasted at least 6 weeks. CG200745 can be safely administered at effective dose levels that inhibit HDAC in PBMCs and tumor tissue. Although MTD was not reached, further escalation was not performed because acetylated histone H4 plateaued at dose

  9. Effects of the TRPV1 antagonist ABT-102 on body temperature in healthy volunteers: pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis of three phase 1 trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Ahmed A; Nothaft, Wolfram; Awni, Walid M; Dutta, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Aim To characterize quantitatively the relationship between ABT-102, a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, exposure and its effects on body temperature in humans using a population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling approach. Methods Serial pharmacokinetic and body temperature (oral or core) measurements from three double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies [single dose (2, 6, 18, 30 and 40 mg, solution formulation), multiple dose (2, 4 and 8 mg twice daily for 7 days, solution formulation) and multiple-dose (1, 2 and 4 mg twice daily for 7 days, solid dispersion formulation)] were analyzed. nonmem was used for model development and the model building steps were guided by pre-specified diagnostic and statistical criteria. The final model was qualified using non-parametric bootstrap and visual predictive check. Results The developed body temperature model included additive components of baseline, circadian rhythm (cosine function of time) and ABT-102 effect (Emax function of plasma concentration) with tolerance development (decrease in ABT-102 Emax over time). Type of body temperature measurement (oral vs. core) was included as a fixed effect on baseline, amplitude of circadian rhythm and residual error. The model estimates (95% bootstrap confidence interval) were: baseline oral body temperature, 36.3 (36.3, 36.4)°C; baseline core body temperature, 37.0 (37.0, 37.1)°C; oral circadian amplitude, 0.25 (0.22, 0.28)°C; core circadian amplitude, 0.31 (0.28, 0.34)°C; circadian phase shift, 7.6 (7.3, 7.9) h; ABT-102 Emax, 2.2 (1.9, 2.7)°C; ABT-102 EC50, 20 (15, 28) ng ml−1; tolerance T50, 28 (20, 43) h. Conclusions At exposures predicted to exert analgesic activity in humans, the effect of ABT-102 on body temperature is estimated to be 0.6 to 0.8°C. This effect attenuates within 2 to 3 days of dosing. PMID:22966986

  10. Effects of the TRPV1 antagonist ABT-102 on body temperature in healthy volunteers: pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic analysis of three phase 1 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Ahmed A; Nothaft, Wolfram; Awni, Walid M; Dutta, Sandeep

    2013-04-01

    To characterize quantitatively the relationship between ABT-102, a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, exposure and its effects on body temperature in humans using a population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling approach. Serial pharmacokinetic and body temperature (oral or core) measurements from three double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies [single dose (2, 6, 18, 30 and 40 mg, solution formulation), multiple dose (2, 4 and 8 mg twice daily for 7 days, solution formulation) and multiple-dose (1, 2 and 4 mg twice daily for 7 days, solid dispersion formulation)] were analyzed. NONMEM was used for model development and the model building steps were guided by pre-specified diagnostic and statistical criteria. The final model was qualified using non-parametric bootstrap and visual predictive check. The developed body temperature model included additive components of baseline, circadian rhythm (cosine function of time) and ABT-102 effect (Emax function of plasma concentration) with tolerance development (decrease in ABT-102 Emax over time). Type of body temperature measurement (oral vs. core) was included as a fixed effect on baseline, amplitude of circadian rhythm and residual error. The model estimates (95% bootstrap confidence interval) were: baseline oral body temperature, 36.3 (36.3, 36.4)°C; baseline core body temperature, 37.0 (37.0, 37.1)°C; oral circadian amplitude, 0.25 (0.22, 0.28)°C; core circadian amplitude, 0.31 (0.28, 0.34)°C; circadian phase shift, 7.6 (7.3, 7.9) h; ABT-102 Emax , 2.2 (1.9, 2.7)°C; ABT-102 EC50 , 20 (15, 28) ng ml(-1) ; tolerance T50 , 28 (20, 43) h. At exposures predicted to exert analgesic activity in humans, the effect of ABT-102 on body temperature is estimated to be 0.6 to 0.8°C. This effect attenuates within 2 to 3 days of dosing. © 2012 Abbott Laboratories. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. The effects of age on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single oral doses of benazepril and enalapril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, N J; Sioufi, A; Howie, C A; Wade, J R; Elliott, H L

    1993-01-01

    1. Eighteen healthy, normotensive subjects (nine young and nine elderly) participated in a double-blind, 3-way, crossover study to compare aspects of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single oral doses of 10 mg benazepril, 10 mg enalapril and placebo. 2. The hypotensive effect was similar after both drugs but the absolute reductions were greater in the elderly who had higher initial levels of blood pressure. 3. The AUCs for both benazeprilat and enalaprilat were higher in the elderly but by a significantly greater amount for enalaprilat (+ 113% vs 40%; P benazepril are qualitatively similar to those with other ACE inhibitors. The clinical significance of the quantitative differences requires further investigation. PMID:9114905

  12. Clinical pharmacology of CAR-T cells: Linking cellular pharmacodynamics to pharmacokinetics and antitumor effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norelli, M; Casucci, M; Bonini, C; Bondanza, A

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer of T cells genetically modified with tumor-reactive chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a rapidly emerging field in oncology, which in preliminary clinical trials has already shown striking antitumor efficacy. Despite these premises, there are still a number of open issues related to CAR-T cells, spanning from their exact mechanism of action (pharmacodynamics), to the factors associated with their in vivo persistence (pharmacokinetics), and, finally, to the relative contribution of each of the two in determining the antitumor effects and accompanying toxicities. In light of the unprecedented curative potential of CAR-T cells and of their predicted wide availability in the next few years, in this review we will summarize the current knowledge on the clinical pharmacology aspects of what is anticipated to be a brand new class of biopharmaceuticals to join the therapeutic armamentarium of cancer doctors. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics of xylazine administered to exercised thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knych, Heather K; Stanley, Scott D; McKemie, Daniel S; Arthur, Rick M; Kass, Phil H

    2017-05-01

    There is limited data describing xylazine serum concentrations in the horse and no reports of concentrations beyond 24 hours. The primary goal of the study reported here was to update the pharmacokinetics of xylazine following intravenous (IV) administration in order to assess the applicability of current regulatory recommendations. Pharmacodynamic parameters were determined using PK-PD modeling. Sixteen exercised adult Thoroughbred horses received a single IV dose of 200 mg of xylazine. Blood and urine samples were collected at time 0 and at various times for up to 96 hours and analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Xylazine serum concentrations were best fit by a 3-compartment model. Mean ± SEM systemic clearance, volume of distribution at steady state, beta half-life and gamma half-life were 12.7 ± 0.735 mL/min/kg, 0.660 ± 0.053 L/kg, 2.79 ± 0.105 hours and 26.0 ± 1.9, respectively. Immediately following administration, horses appeared sedate as noted by a decrease in chin-to-ground distance, decreased locomotion and decreased heart rate (HR). Sedation lasted approximately 45 minutes. Glucose concentrations were elevated for 1-hour post administration. The EC50 (IC50) was 636.1, 702.2, 314.1 and 325.7 ng/mL for HR, atrioventricular block, chin-to-ground distance and glucose concentrations, respectively. The Emax (Imax) was 27.3 beats per minute, 47.5%, 42.4 cm and 0.28 mg/dL for HR, atrioventricular block, chin-to-ground distance and glucose concentrations, respectively. Pharmacokinetic parameters differ from previous reports and a prolonged detection time suggests that an extended withdrawal time, beyond current regulatory recommendations, is warranted to avoid inadvertent positive regulatory findings in performance horses. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A randomized, 2-period, crossover design study to assess the effects of dexlansoprazole, lansoprazole, esomeprazole, and omeprazole on the steady-state pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frelinger, Andrew L; Lee, Ronald D; Mulford, Darcy J; Wu, Jingtao; Nudurupati, Sai; Nigam, Anu; Brooks, Julie K; Bhatt, Deepak L; Michelson, Alan D

    2012-04-03

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of different proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on the steady-state pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel. Metabolism of clopidogrel requires cytochrome P450s (CYPs), including CYP2C19. However, PPIs may inhibit CYP2C19, potentially reducing the effectiveness of clopidogrel. A randomized, open-label, 2-period, crossover study of healthy subjects (n = 160, age 18 to 55 years, homozygous for CYP2C19 extensive metabolizer genotype, confined, standardized diet) was conducted. Clopidogrel 75 mg with or without a PPI (dexlansoprazole 60 mg, lansoprazole 30 mg, esomeprazole 40 mg, or, as a positive control to maximize potential interaction and demonstrate assay sensitivity, omeprazole 80 mg) was given daily for 9 days. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics were assessed on days 9 and 10. Pharmacodynamic end-points were vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein P2Y(12) platelet reactivity index, maximal platelet aggregation to 5 and 20 μmol/l adenosine diphosphate, and VerifyNow P2Y12 platelet response units. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses with omeprazole demonstrated assay sensitivity. The area under the curve for clopidogrel active metabolite decreased significantly with esomeprazole but not with dexlansoprazole or lansoprazole. Similarly, esomeprazole but not dexlansoprazole or lansoprazole significantly reduced the effect of clopidogrel on vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein platelet reactivity index. All PPIs decreased the peak plasma concentration of clopidogrel active metabolite (omeprazole > esomeprazole > lansoprazole > dexlansoprazole) and showed a corresponding order of potency for effects on maximal platelet aggregation and platelet response units. Generation of clopidogrel active metabolite and inhibition of platelet function were reduced less by the coadministration of dexlansoprazole or lansoprazole with clopidogrel than by the coadministration of esomeprazole or omeprazole. These

  15. Pharmacodynamics of doxycycline and tetracycline against Staphylococcus pseudintermedius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maaland, Marit Gaastra; Papich, Mark G.; Turnidge, John

    2013-01-01

    pharmacodynamic and target animal pharmacokinetic data were analyzed by Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) for development of MIC interpretive criteria. Optimal zone diameter breakpoints were defined using the standard error-rate bounded method.Both drugs displayed bacteriostatic activity and bimodal MIC distributions...

  16. Optimization of linezolid treatment regimens for Gram-positive bacterial infections based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minjie; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Yuancheng; Liang, Xiaoyu; Guo, Yan; Yu, Jicheng; Zhu, Demei; Zhang, Yingyuan

    2017-01-01

    To optimize linezolid treatment regimens for Gram-positive bacterial infections based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distribution of 572 Gram-positive strains from patients with clinically confirmed infections was analyzed. Using the Monte Carlo simulation method, the cumulative fraction of response and probability of target attainment were determined for linezolid regimens of 600 mg q.12h and q.8h Results: Linezolid dosage of 600 mg q.12h yielded >90% cumulative fraction of response and probability of target attainment for staphylococcal infections with an MIC of ≤1 mg/l, enterococcal infections with higher MIC values required 600 mg q.8h. Linezolid 600 mg q.12h is still the clinically recommended empirical dosage for Gram-positive bacterial infections. However, as bacterial MICs increase, 600 mg q.8h may be required to achieve better efficacy.

  17. Single-dose pharmacokinetics and tolerability of oral delta-9- tetrahydrocannabinol in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joerger, Markus; Wilkins, Justin; Fagagnini, Stefania; Baldinger, Reto; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Schneider, Ursula; Goldman, Bea; Weber, Markus

    2012-06-01

    Cannabinoids exert neuroprotective and symptomatic effects in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We assessed the pharmacokinetics (PK) and tolerability of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in ALS patients. Nine patients received THC single oral doses of 5mg and 10mg, separated by a wash-out period of two weeks. Blood samples for the determination of THC, 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH) and hydroxy-THC (THC-OH) were taken up to 8 hours after intake. Adverse events were assessed by visual analogue scales (VAS). Plasma concentrations of the active metabolite THC-OH were submitted to sequential pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic population modeling on individual heart rate as a proxy for THC's cardiovasculatory effects. Drowsiness, euphoria, orthostasis, sleepiness, vertigo and weakness were significantly more frequent in patients receiving 10mg compared to 5 mg THC. A marked interindividual variability was found for the absorption of oral THC (84%) and elimination of THC-COOH (45%). PK data did not support any clinically relevant deviation from linear PK in the investigated range of concentrations. Plasma concentrations of THC-OH were positively correlated with the individual heart rate. An E(max-model) was successfully fitted to individual heart rate, with a THC-OH plasma concentration of 3.2 x 10(-4) μmol/L for EC(50) and an E(max) of 93 bpm for heart rate. The higher 10mg dose of THC was dose-limiting in patients with ALS. High interindividual PK variability requires individuell titration of THC for potential therapeutic use in patients with ALS.

  18. Switching from rivaroxaban to warfarin: an open label pharmacodynamic study in healthy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kenneth Todd; Byra, William; Vaidyanathan, Seema; Natarajan, Jaya; Ariyawansa, Jay; Salih, Hiba; Turner, Kenneth C

    2015-01-01

    Aims The primary objective was to explore the pharmacodynamic changes during transition from rivaroxaban to warfarin in healthy subjects. Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics were assessed as secondary objectives. Methods An open label, non-randomized, sequential two period study. In treatment period 1 (TP1), subjects received rivaroxaban 20 mg once daily (5 days), followed by co-administration with a warfarin loading dose regimen of 5 or 10 mg (for the 10 mg regimen, the dose could be uptitrated to attain target international normalized ratio [INR] ≥2.0) once daily (2–4 days). When trough INR values ≥2.0 were attained, rivaroxaban was discontinued and warfarin treatment continued as monotherapy (INR 2.0–3.0). During treatment period 2, subjects received the same warfarin regimen as in TP1, but without rivaroxaban. Results During co-administration, maximum INR and prothrombin time (PT) values were higher than with rivaroxaban or warfarin monotherapy. The mean maximum effect (Emax) for INR after co-administration was 2.79–4.15 (mean PT Emax 41.0–62.7 s), compared with 1.41–1.74 (mean PT Emax 20.1–25.2 s) for warfarin alone. However, rivaroxaban had the smallest effect on INR at trough rivaroxaban concentrations. Neither rivaroxaban nor warfarin significantly affected maximum plasma concentrations of the other drug. Conclusions The combined pharmacodynamic effects during co-administration of rivaroxaban and warfarin were greater than additive, but the pharmacokinetics of both drugs were unaffected. Co-administration was well tolerated. When transitioning from rivaroxaban to warfarin, INR monitoring during co-administration should be performed at the trough rivaroxaban concentration to minimize the effect of rivaroxaban on INR. PMID:25475601

  19. Clinical perspectives on the influence of drug formulation on patient tolerability and use of commonly prescribed antidepressants in major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Fuller

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to summarize the formulation options for currently available antidepressants, and discuss examples of the influence that formulation may have on the pharmacologic and clinical profiles of the medications. A review of current literature suggests that differences in drug-delivery technologies can lead to variations in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of generic and branded drugs, despite generic drugs being required to meet bioequivalence standards compared with their branded counterparts. These differences may influence the effectiveness and tolerability of treatment. Recent reports have highlighted the need for individualized treatment regimens and careful assessment of tolerability and efficacy when switching patients from brand to generic formulations. There is a growing body of evidence indicating that differences in formulation can substantially impact drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, which in turn, can affect drug effects. The clinical impact of these differences remains unclear. Further research is needed to clarify the influence of antidepressant formulations on treatment adherence, patient preference, and quality of life, and how this impacts clinical practice with regard to brand versus generic treatment selection.

  20. Enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants increase plasma clearance of dexmedetomidine: a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Alana M; Wong, Harvey; Riggs, K Wayne; Shih, Tina; Garcia, Paul A; Vacas, Susana; Talke, Pekka O

    2014-05-01

    Dexmedetomidine is useful during mapping of epileptic foci as it facilitates electrocorticography unlike most other anesthetic agents. Patients with seizure disorders taking enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants appear to be resistant to its sedative effects. The objective of the study was to compare the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of dexmedetomidine in healthy volunteers with volunteers with seizure disorders receiving enzyme-inducing anticonvulsant medications. Dexmedetomidine was administered using a step-wise, computer-controlled infusion to healthy volunteers (n = 8) and volunteers with seizure disorders (n = 8) taking phenytoin or carbamazapine. Sedation and dexmedetomidine plasma levels were assessed at baseline, during the infusion steps, and after discontinuation of the infusion. Sedation was assessed by using the Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale, Ramsay Sedation Scale, and Visual Analog Scale and processed electroencephalography (entropy) monitoring. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed on both groups, and differences between groups were determined using the standard two-stage approach. A two-compartment model was fit to dexmedetomidine concentration-time data. Dexmedetomidine plasma clearance was 43% higher in the seizure group compared with the control group (42.7 vs. 29.9 l/h; P = 0.007). In contrast, distributional clearance and the volume of distribution of the central and peripheral compartments were similar between the groups. No difference in sedation was detected between the two groups during a controlled range of target plasma concentrations. This study demonstrates that subjects with seizure disorders taking enzyme-inducing anticonvulsant medications have an increased plasma clearance of dexmedetomidine as compared with healthy control subjects.

  1. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic herb-drug interaction of Andrographis paniculata (Nees) extract and andrographolide with etoricoxib after oral administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balap, Aishwarya; Atre, Bhagyashri; Lohidasan, Sathiyanarayanan; Sinnathambi, Arulmozhi; Mahadik, Kakasaheb

    2016-05-13

    Andrographis paniculata Nees (Acanthacae) is commonly used medicinal plant in the traditional. Unani and Ayurvedic medicinal systems. It has broad range of pharmacological effects such as hepatoprotective, antioxidant, antivenom, antifertility, inhibition of replication of the HIV virus, antimalarial, antifungal, antibacterial, antidiabetic, suppression of various cancer cells and anti-inflammatory properties. Andrographolide (AN) is one of the active constituent of the A. paniculata Nees extract (APE). They have been found in many traditional herbal formulations in India and proven to be effective as anti-inflammatory drug To evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (anti-arthritic) herb-drug interactions of A. paniculata Nees extract (APE) and pure andrographolide (AN) with etoricoxib (ETO) after oral co-administration in wistar rats. After oral co-administration of APE (200mg/Kg) and AN (60mg/kg) with ETO (10mg/kg) in rats, drug concentrations in plasma were determined using HPLC method. The main pharmacokinetic parameters of Cmax, tmax, t1/2, MRT, Vd, CL, and AUC were calculated by non-compartment model. Change in paw volume, mechanical nociceptive threshold, mechanical hyperalgesia, histopathology and hematological parameters were evaluated to study antiarthritic activity. Co-administration of ETO with APE and pure AN decreased systemic exposure level of each compound in vivo. The Cmax, AUC, t1/2 of ETO was decreased whereas Vd and CL of ETO was increased significantly after co-administration of ETO with pure AN and APE. In pharmacodynamic study, ETO alone and ETO+APE (10+200mg/kg) groups exhibited significant synergistic anti-arthritic activity as compared to groups ETO+AN, APE and AN alone. The results obtained from this study suggested that ETO, APE and pure AN existed pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions in rat which is correlated with anti-arthritic study. Physicians and patients using A. paniculata should have the knowledge about its possible

  2. Clinical and Genetic Determinants of Warfarin Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics during Treatment Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Inna Y.; Schwarz, Ute I.; Crown, Natalie; Dresser, George K.; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro; Zou, GuangYong; Roden, Dan M.; Stein, C. Michael; Rodger, Marc; Wells, Philip S.; Kim, Richard B.; Tirona, Rommel G.

    2011-01-01

    Variable warfarin response during treatment initiation poses a significant challenge to providing optimal anticoagulation therapy. We investigated the determinants of initial warfarin response in a cohort of 167 patients. During the first nine days of treatment with pharmacogenetics-guided dosing, S-warfarin plasma levels and international normalized ratio were obtained to serve as inputs to a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model. Individual PK (S-warfarin clearance) and PD (Imax) parameter values were estimated. Regression analysis demonstrated that CYP2C9 genotype, kidney function, and gender were independent determinants of S-warfarin clearance. The values for Imax were dependent on VKORC1 and CYP4F2 genotypes, vitamin K status (as measured by plasma concentrations of proteins induced by vitamin K absence, PIVKA-II) and weight. Importantly, indication for warfarin was a major independent determinant of Imax during initiation, where PD sensitivity was greater in atrial fibrillation than venous thromboembolism. To demonstrate the utility of the global PK-PD model, we compared the predicted initial anticoagulation responses with previously established warfarin dosing algorithms. These insights and modeling approaches have application to personalized warfarin therapy. PMID:22114699

  3. A human life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic model for chlorpyrifos: development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jordan Ned; Hinderliter, Paul M; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, Michael J; Poet, Torka S

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to some chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to predict disposition of chlorpyrifos and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, previously measured age-dependent metabolism of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon were integrated into age-related descriptions of human anatomy and physiology. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ⩾0.6mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (100- to 1000-fold higher than environmental exposure levels), 6months old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent doses. At lower doses more relevant to environmental exposures, simulations predict that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict chlorpyrifos disposition and biological response over various postnatal life stages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Relationship between pharmacodynamic indices and killing patterns in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouton, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents are conventionally categorized in three classes based on their pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, based on their exposure response relationship in vivo with either area under the concentration-time curve, C(max) or T>MIC. Alternatively, they are often categorized as

  5. Evaluation of Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Drug-Drug Interaction of Sacubitril/Valsartan (LCZ696) and Sildenafil in Patients With Mild-to-Moderate Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, H-L; Langenickel, T H; Petruck, J; Kode, K; Ayalasomayajula, S; Schuehly, U; Greeley, M; Pal, P; Zhou, W; Prescott, M F; Sunkara, G; Rajman, I

    2018-03-01

    Sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) is indicated for the treatment of patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Since patients with HFrEF may receive sacubitril/valsartan and sildenafil, both increasing cyclic guanosine monophosphate, the present study evaluated the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interaction potential between sacubitril/valsartan and sildenafil. In this open-label, three-period, single sequence study, patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension (153.8 ± 8.2 mmHg mean systolic blood pressure (SBP)) received a single dose of sildenafil 50 mg, sacubitril/valsartan 400 mg once daily for 5 days, and sacubitril/valsartan and sildenafil coadministration. When coadministered with sildenafil, the AUC and C max of valsartan decreased by 29% and 39%, respectively. Coadministration of sacubitril/valsartan and sildenafil resulted in a greater decrease in BP (-5/-4/-4 mmHg mean ambulatory SBP/DBP/MAP (mean arterial pressure)) than with sacubitril/valsartan alone. Both treatments were generally safe and well tolerated in this study; however, the additional BP reduction suggests that sildenafil should be administered cautiously in patients receiving sacubitril/valsartan. Unique identifier: NCT01601470. © 2017 The Authors Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  6. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic evaluation of marbofloxacin as a single injection for Pasteurellaceae respiratory infections in cattle using population pharmacokinetics and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulin, A; Schneider, M; Dron, F; Woehrle, F

    2018-02-01

    Population pharmacokinetic of marbofloxacin was investigated with 52 plasma concentration-time profiles obtained after intramuscular administration of Forcyl® in cattle. Animal's status, pre-ruminant, ruminant, or dairy cow, was retained as a relevant covariate for clearance. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using a stratification by status, and 1000 virtual disposition curves were generated in each bovine subpopulation for the recommended dosage regimen of 10 mg/kg as a single injection. The probability of target attainment (PTA) of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) ratios associated with clinical efficacy and prevention of resistance was determined in each simulated subpopulation. The cumulative fraction of response (CFR) of animals achieving a PK/PD ratio predictive of positive clinical outcome was then calculated for the simulated dosage regimen, taking into account the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distribution of Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica, and Histophilus somni. When considering a ratio of AUC 0-24 hr /MIC (area under the curve/minimum inhibitory concentration) greater than 125 hr, CFRs ranging from 85% to 100% against the three Pasteurellaceae in each bovine subpopulation were achieved. The PTA of the PK/PD threshold reflecting the prevention of resistances was greater than 90% up to MPC (mutant prevention concentration) values of 1 μg/ml in pre-ruminants and ruminants and 0.5 μg/ml in dairy cows. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling in Pediatric Drug Development, and the Importance of Standardized Scaling of Clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germovsek, Eva; Barker, Charlotte I S; Sharland, Mike; Standing, Joseph F

    2018-04-19

    Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modeling is important in the design and conduct of clinical pharmacology research in children. During drug development, PKPD modeling and simulation should underpin rational trial design and facilitate extrapolation to investigate efficacy and safety. The application of PKPD modeling to optimize dosing recommendations and therapeutic drug monitoring is also increasing, and PKPD model-based dose individualization will become a core feature of personalized medicine. Following extensive progress on pediatric PK modeling, a greater emphasis now needs to be placed on PD modeling to understand age-related changes in drug effects. This paper discusses the principles of PKPD modeling in the context of pediatric drug development, summarizing how important PK parameters, such as clearance (CL), are scaled with size and age, and highlights a standardized method for CL scaling in children. One standard scaling method would facilitate comparison of PK parameters across multiple studies, thus increasing the utility of existing PK models and facilitating optimal design of new studies.

  8. Pharmacokinetic Comparison of Inhaled Fixed Combination vs. the Free Combination of Beclomethasone and Formoterol pMDIs in Asthmatic Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bl; Piccinno, A; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil

    2012-01-01

    /mL) ratio Test/Reference 0.97 [0.85-1.10]. All pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic endpoints showed non-superiority in favour of the Test drug. One adverse event (vertigo) occurred but was not considered treatment-related. CONCLUSION: BDP and Formoterol pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects are non...

  9. A phase I, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic study of panobinostat, an HDAC inhibitor, combined with erlotinib in patients with advanced aerodigestive tract tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jhanelle E; Haura, Eric; Chiappori, Alberto; Tanvetyanon, Tawee; Williams, Charles C; Pinder-Schenck, Mary; Kish, Julie A; Kreahling, Jenny; Lush, Richard; Neuger, Anthony; Tetteh, Leticia; Akar, Angela; Zhao, Xiuhua; Schell, Michael J; Bepler, Gerold; Altiok, Soner

    2014-03-15

    Panobinostat, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, enhances antiproliferative activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines when combined with erlotinib. We evaluated this combination in patients with advanced NSCLC and head and neck cancer. Eligible patients were enrolled in a 3+3 dose-escalation design to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of twice weekly panobinostat plus daily erlotinib at four planned dose levels (DL). Pharmacokinetics, blood, fat pad biopsies (FPB) for histone acetylation, and paired pre and posttherapy tumor biopsies for checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) expression were assessed. Of 42 enrolled patients, 33 were evaluable for efficacy. Dose-limiting toxicities were prolonged-QTc and nausea at DL3. Adverse events included fatigue and nausea (grades 1-3), and rash and anorexia (grades 1-2). Disease control rates were 54% for NSCLC (n = 26) and 43% for head and neck cancer (n = 7). Of 7 patients with NSCLC with EGF receptor (EGFR) mutations, 3 had partial response, 3 had stable disease, and 1 progressed. For EGFR-mutant versus EGFR wild-type patients, progression-free survival (PFS) was 4.7 versus 1.9 months (P = 0.43) and overall survival was 41 (estimated) versus 5.2 months (P = 0.39). Erlotinib pharmacokinetics was not significantly affected. Correlative studies confirmed panobinostat's pharmacodynamic effect in blood, FPB, and tumor samples. Low CHK1 expression levels correlated with PFS (P = 0.006) and response (P = 0.02). We determined MTD at 30 mg (panobinostat) and 100 mg (erlotinib). Further studies are needed to further explore the benefits of HDAC inhibitors in patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC, investigate FPB as a potential surrogate source for biomarker investigations, and validate CHK1's predictive role. ©2014 AACR.

  10. Use of old antibiotics now and in the future from a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, A E; Theuretzbacher, U; Mouton, J W

    2015-10-01

    Because of the increase in bacterial resistance to commonly used antibacterial drugs, old antibiotics are being 'revived' and, once again, are attracting interest. Many of these old antibiotics were approved long ago, in an era when there was no clear process for development, and requirements for efficacy to be demonstrated in rigorous clinical trials did not exist. At the time of these approvals, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles were largely unknown, and did not inform the dose-finding process or recommendations for optimal usage. Indeed, the task of generating basic vital information for these old antibiotics remains to be performed. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the most essential data needed for dose justification and optimization. An overview of the shortage of data for selected old antibiotics illustrates the scope of the problem. In order to prevent harming patients with clinical decisions based on inadequate evidence, a redevelopment procedure for old antibiotics is urgently needed, including a regulatory framework. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and clinical efficacy of omalizumab for the treatment of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Maxime; Bardou, Marc; Bonniaud, Philippe; Goirand, Françoise

    2016-12-01

    Omalizumab is a subcutaneously administrated monoclonal anti-IgE antibody indicated in adults, adolescents and children 6 years of age and older with moderate to severe allergic asthma uncontrolled by conventional pharmacological treatments and sensitization to at least one perennial allergen. Area covered: This drug evaluation summarizes published data on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of omalizumab, on clinical efficacy and safety, including real-world evidence, and provides a medico-economic evaluation of the drug. Expert opinion: Omalizumab represents an efficient therapeutic option for the management of patients with uncontrolled moderate/severe allergic asthma. It provides a significant reduction in the asthma exacerbation rate with a steroid-sparing effect, an improvement in quality of life in adults and adolescents, despite a lack of evidence about its efficacy specifically in severe allergic asthma. Clinical trials have demonstrated its efficacy in the pediatric population but further real-life evidence is expected to better characterize long-term effects in this population. There is still some debate about the optimal treatment duration but, to date, it is recommended not to stop the treatment as cessation has resulted in symptom recurrence. Omalizumab is an expensive treatment, but a key therapeutic option when used for uncontrolled severe allergic asthma.

  12. Effect of in vivo nicotine exposure on chlorpyrifos pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soo Kwang; Poet, Torka S.; Smith, Jordan N.; Busby-Hjerpe, Andrea L.; Timchalk, Charles

    2010-03-30

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is one of the most studied and widely used broad spectrum organophosphorus (OP) insecticides. The neurotoxicity of CPF results from inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) by its metabolite, chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPF-oxon), which subsequently leads to cholinergic hyperstimulation. The routine consumption of alcoholic beverages and tobacco products will modify a number of metabolic and physiological processes which may impact the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of other xenobiotics including pesticides. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of repeated ethanol and nicotine co-exposure on in vivo CPF pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The major CPF metabolite, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) in blood and urine along with changes in plasma and brain AChE activities were measured in male Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats. Animals were repeatedly treated with either saline or ethanol (1 g/kg/day, po) and nicotine (1 mg/kg/day, sc) in addition to CPF (1 or 5 mg/kg/day, po) for 7 days. Rats were sacrificed at times from 1 to 24 hr post-last dosing of CPF. There were apparent differences in blood TCPy pharmacokinetics following ethanol and nicotine pretreatments in both CPF dose groups, which showed higher TCPy peak concentrations and increased blood TCPy AUC in ethanol and nicotine groups over CPF-only (~1.8- and 3.8-fold at 1 and 5 mg CPF doses, respectively). Brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities from both ethanol and nicotine-treated groups showed substantially less inhibition following repeated 5 mg CPF/kg dosing compared to CPF-only controls (96 ± 13 and 66 ± 7% of naïve at 4 hr post-last CPF dosing, respectively). Inhibition of brain AChE activities was minimal in both 1 mg CPF/kg/day dosing groups, but a similar trend indicating less inhibition following ethanol/nicotine pretreatment was apparent. No differences were observed in plasma ChE activities due to the combined alcohol and nicotine treatments. In vitro, CPF

  13. Phase 1 Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of Dapivirine and Maraviroc Vaginal Rings: A Double-Blind Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Beatrice A; Panther, Lori; Marzinke, Mark A; Hendrix, Craig W; Hoesley, Craig J; van der Straten, Ariane; Husnik, Marla J; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Nel, Annalene; Johnson, Sherri; Richardson-Harman, Nicola; Rabe, Lorna K; Dezzutti, Charlene S

    2015-11-01

    Variable adherence limits effectiveness of daily oral and intravaginal tenofovir-containing pre-exposure prophylaxis. Monthly vaginal antiretroviral rings are one approach to improve adherence and drug delivery. MTN-013/IPM 026, a multisite, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in 48 HIV-negative US women, evaluated vaginal rings containing dapivirine (DPV) (25 mg) and maraviroc (MVC) (100 mg), DPV only, MVC only, and placebo used continuously for 28 days. Safety was assessed by adverse events. Drug concentrations were quantified in plasma, cervicovaginal fluid (CVF), and cervical tissue. Cervical biopsy explants were challenged with HIV ex vivo to evaluate pharmacodynamics. There was no difference in related genitourinary adverse events between treatment arms compared with placebo. DPV and MVC concentrations rose higher initially before falling more rapidly with the combination ring compared with relatively stable concentrations with the single-drug rings. DPV concentrations in CVF were 1 and 5 log10 greater than cervical tissue and plasma for both rings. MVC was consistently detected only in CVF. DPV and MVC CVF and DPV tissue concentrations dropped rapidly after ring removal. Cervical tissue showed a significant inverse linear relationship between HIV replication and DPV levels. In this first study of a combination microbicide vaginal ring, all 4 rings were safe and well tolerated. Tissue DPV concentrations were 1000 times greater than plasma concentrations and single drug rings had more stable pharmacokinetics. DPV, but not MVC, demonstrated concentration-dependent inhibition of HIV-1 infection in cervical tissue. Because MVC concentrations were consistently detectable only in CVF and not in plasma, improved drug release of MVC rings is needed.

  14. Visceral leishmaniasis relapse hazard is linked to reduced miltefosine exposure in patients from Eastern Africa: a population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorlo, Thomas P C; Kip, Anke E; Younis, Brima M; Ellis, Sally J; Alves, Fabiana; Beijnen, Jos H; Njenga, Simon; Kirigi, George; Hailu, Asrat; Olobo, Joseph; Musa, Ahmed M; Balasegaram, Manica; Wasunna, Monique; Karlsson, Mats O; Khalil, Eltahir A G

    2017-11-01

    Low efficacy of miltefosine in the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis was recently observed in Eastern Africa. To describe the pharmacokinetics and establish a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship for miltefosine in Eastern African patients with visceral leishmaniasis, using a time-to-event approach to model relapse of disease. Miltefosine plasma concentrations from 95 patients (48 monotherapy versus 47 combination therapy) were included in the population pharmacokinetic model using non-linear mixed effects modelling. Subsequently a time-to-event model was developed to model the time of clinical relapse. Various summary pharmacokinetic parameters (various AUCs, Time > EC50, Time > EC90), normalized within each treatment arm to allow simultaneous analysis, were evaluated as relapse hazard-changing covariates. A two-compartment population model with first-order absorption fitted the miltefosine pharmacokinetic data adequately. Relative bioavailability was reduced (-74%, relative standard error 4.7%) during the first week of treatment of the monotherapy arm but only the first day of the shorter combination regimen. Time to the relapse of infection could be described using a constant baseline hazard (baseline 1.8 relapses/year, relative standard error 72.7%). Miltefosine Time > EC90 improved the model significantly when added in a maximum effect function on the baseline hazard (half maximal effect with Time > EC90 6.97 days for monotherapy). Miltefosine drug exposure was found to be decreased in Eastern African patients with visceral leishmaniasis, due to a (transient) initial lower bioavailability. Relapse hazard was inversely linked to miltefosine exposure. Significantly lower miltefosine exposure was observed in children compared with adults, further urging the need for implementation of dose adaptations for children. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  15. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of escitalopram in overdose and the effect of activated charcoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gorp, Freek; Duffull, Stephen; Hackett, L Peter; Isbister, Geoffrey K

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To describe the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PKPD) of escitalopram in overdose and its effect on QT prolongation, including the effectiveness of single dose activated charcoal (SDAC). METHODS The data set included 78 escitalopram overdose events (median dose, 140 mg [10–560 mg]). SDAC was administered 1.0 to 2.6 h after 12 overdoses (15%). A fully Bayesian analysis was undertaken in WinBUGS 1.4.3, first for a population pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis followed by a PKPD analysis. The developed PKPD model was used to predict the probability of having an abnormal QT as a surrogate for torsade de pointes. RESULTS A one compartment model with first order input and first-order elimination described the PK data, including uncertainty in dose and a baseline concentration for patients taking escitalopram therapeutically. SDAC reduced the fraction absorbed by 31% and reduced the individual predicted area under the curve adjusted for dose (AUCi/dose). The absolute QT interval was related to the observed heart rate with an estimated individual heart rate correction factor (α = 0.35). The heart rate corrected QT interval (QTc) was linearly dependent on predicted escitalopram concentration [slope = 87 ms/(mg l–1)], using a hypothetical effect-compartment (half-life of effect-delay, 1.0h). Administration of SDAC significantly reduced QT prolongation and was shown to reduce the risk of having an abnormal QT by approximately 35% for escitalopram doses above 200 mg. CONCLUSIONS There was a dose-related lengthening of the QT interval that lagged the increase in drug concentration. SDAC resulted in a moderate reduction in fraction of escitalopram absorbed and reduced the risk of the QT interval being abnormal. PMID:21883384

  16. Nonlinear pharmacokinetics of (+/-)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and its pharmacodynamic consequences in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concheiro, Marta; Baumann, Michael H; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Rothman, Richard B; Marrone, Gina F; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a widely abused illicit drug that can cause severe and even fatal adverse effects. However, interest remains for its possible clinical applications in posttraumatic stress disorder and anxiety treatment. Preclinical studies to determine MDMA's safety are needed. We evaluated MDMA's pharmacokinetics and metabolism in male rats receiving 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg s.c. MDMA, and the associated pharmacodynamic consequences. Blood was collected via jugular catheter at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 16, and 24 hours, with simultaneous serotonin (5-HT) behavioral syndrome and core temperature monitoring. Plasma specimens were analyzed for MDMA and the metabolites (±)-3,4-dihydroxymethamphetamine (HHMA), (±)-4-hydroxy-3-methoxymethamphetamine (HMMA), and (±)-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. After 2.5 mg/kg MDMA, mean MDMA Cmax was 164 ± 47.1 ng/ml, HHMA and HMMA were major metabolites, and MDMA was metabolized to MDA. After 5- and 10-mg/kg doses, MDMA areas under the curve (AUCs) were 3- and 10-fold greater than those after 2.5 mg/kg; HHMA and HMMA AUC values were relatively constant across doses; and MDA AUC values were greater than dose-proportional. Our data provide decisive in vivo evidence that MDMA and MDA display nonlinear accumulation via metabolic autoinhibition in the rat. Importantly, 5-HT syndrome severity correlated with MDMA concentrations (r = 0.8083; P MDMA's behavioral and hyperthermic effects may involve distinct mechanisms. Given key similarities between MDMA pharmacokinetics in rats and humans, data from rats can be useful when provided at clinically relevant doses.

  17. Integrated pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics parameters-based dosing guidelines of enrofloxacin in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella to minimize selection of drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lijuan; Wang, Hao; Yang, Xianle; Lu, Liqun

    2013-06-25

    Antibiotic resistance has become a serious global problem and is steadily increasing worldwide in almost every bacterial species treated with antibiotics. In aquaculture, the therapeutic options for the treatment of A. hydrophila infection were only limited to several antibiotics, which contributed for the fast-speed emergence of drug tolerance. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to establish a medication regimen to prevent drug resistant bacteria. To determine a rational therapeutic guideline, integrated pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics parameters were based to predict dose and dosage interval of enrofloxacin in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella infected by a field-isolated A. hydrophila strain. The pathogenic A. hydrophila strain (AH10) in grass carp was identified and found to be sensitive to enrofloxacin. The mutant selection window (MSW) of enrofloxacin on isolate AH10 was determined to be 0.5-3 μg/mL based on the mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value. By using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system, the Pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin in grass carp were monitored after a single oral gavage of 10, 20, 30 μg enrofloxacin per g body weight. Dosing of 30 μg/g resulted in serum maximum concentration (Cmax) of 7.151 μg/mL, and concentration in serum was above MPC till 24 h post the single dose. Once-daily dosing of 30 μg/g was determined to be the rational choice for controlling AH10 infection and preventing mutant selection in grass carp. Data of mean residue time (MRT) and body clearance (CLz) indicated that both enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin present similar eliminating rate and pattern in serum, muscle and liver. A withdraw time of more than 32 d was suggested based on the drug eliminating rate and pharmacokinetic model described by a polyexponential equation. Based on integrated PK/PD parameters (AUC/MIC, Cmax/MIC, and T

  18. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling to Study the Antipyretic Effect of Qingkailing Injection on Pyrexia Model Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Qingkailing injection (QKLI is a modern Chinese medicine preparation derived from a well-known classical formulation, An-Gong-Niu-Huang Wan. Although the clinical efficacy of QKLI has been well defined, its severe adverse drug reactions (ADRs were extensively increased. Through thorough attempts to reduce ADR rates, it was realized that the effect-based rational use plays the key role in clinical practices. Hence, the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD model was introduced in the present study, aiming to link the pharmacokinetic profiles with the therapeutic outcomes of QKLI, and subsequently to provide valuable guidelines for the rational use of QKLI in clinical settings. The PK properties of the six dominant ingredients in QKLI were compared between the normal treated group (NTG and the pyrexia model group (MTG. Rectal temperatures were measured in parallel with blood sampling for NTG, MTG, model control group (MCG, and normal control group (NCG. Baicalin and geniposide exhibited appropriate PK parameters, and were selected as the PK markers to map the antipyretic effect of QKLI. Then, a PK-PD model was constructed upon the bacalin and geniposide plasma concentrations vs. the rectal temperature variation values, by a two-compartment PK model with a Sigmoid Emax PD model to explain the time delay between the drug plasma concentration of PK markers and the antipyretic effect after a single dose administration of QKLI. The findings obtained would provide fundamental information to propose a more reasonable dosage regimen and improve the level of individualized drug therapy in clinical settings.

  19. A Human Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model for Chlorpyrifos: Development and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, M. J.; Poet, Torka S.

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to computationally predict disposition of CPF and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, age-dependent body weight was calculated from a generalized Gompertz function, and compartments (liver, brain, fat, blood, diaphragm, rapid, and slow) were scaled based on body weight from polynomial functions on a fractional body weight basis. Blood flows among compartments were calculated as a constant flow per compartment volume. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Model simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ≥ 0.55 mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (significantly higher than environmental exposure levels), 6 mo old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent oral doses of chlorpyrifos. At lower doses that are more relevant to environmental exposures, the model predicts that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict CPF disposition and biological response over various postnatal life-stages.

  20. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Luseogliflozin, a Selective SGLT2 Inhibitor, in Japanese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes With Mild to Severe Renal Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samukawa, Yoshishige; Haneda, Masakazu; Seino, Yutaka; Sasaki, Takashi; Fukatsu, Atsushi; Kubo, Yusuke; Sato, Yuri; Sakai, Soichi

    2018-04-25

    This open-label, parallel-group, multicenter study aimed to assess the effects of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of luseogliflozin. A single 5-mg dose of luseogliflozin was administered to Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the following groups: G1, normal renal function; G2, mild renal impairment; G3a, mild to moderate impairment; G3b, moderate to severe impairment; G4, severe impairment, based on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; ≥90, 60-89, 45-59, 30-44, 15-29 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , respectively). While luseogliflozin pharmacokinetics were similar for patients across all renal function groups, the increase in plasma concentration was slightly slower and maximum concentration was slightly reduced in the lower eGFR groups compared with the other groups. However, luseogliflozin pharmacodynamics were affected by the severity of renal impairment. Urinary glucose excretion (UGE) increased in all groups relative to baseline levels, but the degree of UGE increase was smaller in the lower eGFR groups. Moreover, plasma glucose AUC changes from baseline tended to be smaller in the lower eGFR groups. No clear trends were observed between eGFR and incidence, type, or severity of adverse events. Thus, luseogliflozin administration should be carefully considered, as patients with renal impairment may show an insufficient response to treatment. © 2018 The Authors. Clinical Pharmacology in Drug Development Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  1. Pharmacokinetic Profile of Oral Cannabis in Humans: Blood and Oral Fluid Disposition and Relation to Pharmacodynamic Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandrey, Ryan; Herrmann, Evan S; Mitchell, John M; Bigelow, George E; Flegel, Ronald; LoDico, Charles; Cone, Edward J

    2017-03-01

    Most research on cannabis pharmacokinetics has evaluated inhaled cannabis, but oral ("edible") preparations comprise an increasing segment of the cannabis market. To assess oral cannabis pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, healthy adults (N = 6 per dose) were administered cannabis brownies containing 10, 25 or 50 mg 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Whole blood and oral fluid specimens were obtained at baseline and then for 9 days post-exposure; 6 days in a residential research setting and 3 days as outpatients. Measures of subjective, cardiovascular and performance effects were obtained at baseline and for 8 h post-ingestion. The mean Cmax for THC in whole blood was 1, 3.5 and 3.3 ng/mL for the 10, 25 and 50 mg THC doses, respectively. The mean maximum concentration (Cmax) and mean time to maximum concentration (Tmax) of 11-OH-THC in whole blood were similar to THC. Cmax blood concentrations of THCCOOH were generally higher than THC and had longer Tmax values. The mean Tmax for THC in oral fluid occurred immediately following oral dose administration, and appear to reflect local topical residue rather than systemic bioavailbility. Mean Cmax oral fluid concentrations of THCCOOH were lower than THC, erratic over time and mean Tmax occurred at longer times than THC. The window of THC detection ranged from 0 to 22 h for whole blood (limit of quantitation (LOQ) = 0.5 ng/mL) and 1.9 to 22 h for oral fluid (LOQ = 1.0 ng/mL). Subjective drug and cognitive performance effects were generally dose dependent, peaked at 1.5-3 h post-administration, and lasted 6-8 h. Whole blood cannabinoid concentrations were significantly correlated with subjective drug effects. Correlations between blood cannabinoids and cognitive performance measures, and between oral fluid and all pharmacodynamic outcomes were either non-significant or not orderly by dose. Quantitative levels of cannabinoids in whole blood and oral fluid were low compared with levels observed following inhalation of

  2. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic assessment of electronic cigarettes, combustible cigarettes, and nicotine gum: implications for abuse liability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Mitchell F; Campbell, Leanne R; Graff, Donald W; Jones, Bobbette A; Fant, Reginald V; Henningfield, Jack E

    2017-09-01

    Electronic cigarettes (ECs) are becoming popular alternatives for smokers, but there has been limited study of their abuse liability. The objective of this study was to evaluate the abuse liability of three Vuse Solo ECs, ranging from 14 to 36 mg in nicotine content, relative to high- and low-abuse liability comparator products (usual brand combustible cigarettes and nicotine gum, respectively) in a group of 45 EC-naïve smokers. Enrolled subjects' ratings of subjective effects and nicotine uptake over 6 h were used to measure abuse liability and pharmacokinetics following in-clinic use of each EC. Use of Vuse Solo resulted in subjective measures and nicotine uptake that were between those of combustible cigarettes and nicotine gum, although generally closer to nicotine gum. Compared to combustible cigarettes, use of Vuse Solo resulted in significantly lower scores in measures of product liking, positive effects, and intent to use again. These pharmacodynamic findings were consistent with the pharmacokinetic data, showing that cigarettes produced substantially faster and higher levels of nicotine uptake as compared to Vuse Solo and nicotine gum. Vuse Solo resulted in more rapid initial uptake of nicotine compared to nicotine gum, but peak concentration and long-term extent of uptake were not different or were lower with Vuse. Collectively, these findings suggest that Vuse Solo likely has an abuse liability that is somewhat greater than nicotine gum but lower than cigarettes. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02269514.

  3. Prediction of a Therapeutic Dose for Buagafuran, a Potent Anxiolytic Agent by Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling Starting from Pharmacokinetics in Rats and Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK/pharmacodynamic (PD models can contribute to animal-to-human extrapolation and therapeutic dose predictions. Buagafuran is a novel anxiolytic agent and phase I clinical trials of buagafuran have been completed. In this paper, a potentially effective dose for buagafuran of 30 mg t.i.d. in human was estimated based on the human brain concentration predicted by a PBPK/PD modeling. The software GastroPlusTM was used to build the PBPK/PD model for buagafuran in rat which related the brain tissue concentrations of buagafuran and the times of animals entering the open arms in the pharmacological model of elevated plus-maze. Buagafuran concentrations in human plasma were fitted and brain tissue concentrations were predicted by using a human PBPK model in which the predicted plasma profiles were in good agreement with observations. The results provided supportive data for the rational use of buagafuran in clinic.

  4. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of detomidine following sublingual administration to horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimaio Knych, Heather K; Stanley, Scott D

    2011-10-01

    To characterize pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of detomidine gel administered sublingually in accordance with label instructions to establish appropriate withdrawal guidelines for horses before competition. 12 adult racehorses. Horses received a single sublingual administration of 0.04 mg of detomidine/kg. Blood samples were collected before and up to 72 hours after drug administration. Urine samples were collected for 5 days after detomidine administration. Plasma and urine samples were analyzed via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and resulting data were analyzed by use of noncompartmental analysis. Chin-to-ground distance, heart rate and rhythm, glucose concentration, PCV, and plasma protein concentration were also assessed following detomidine administration. Mean ± SD terminal elimination half-life of detomidine was 1.5 ± 1 hours. Metabolite concentrations were below the limit of detection (0.02, 0.1, and 0.5 ng/mL for detomidine, carboxydetomidine, and hydroxydetomidine, respectively) in plasma by 24 hours. Concentrations of detomidine and its metabolites were below the limit of detection (0.05 ng/mL for detomidine and 0.10 ng/mL for carboxydetomidine and hydroxydetomidine) in urine by 3 days. All horses had various degrees of sedation after detomidine administration. Time of onset was ≤ 40 minutes, and duration of sedation was approximately 2 hours. Significant decreases, relative to values at time 0, were detected for chin-to-ground distance and heart rate. There was an increased incidence and exacerbation of preexisting atrioventricular blocks after detomidine administration. A 48-hour and 3-day withdrawal period for detection in plasma and urine samples, respectively, should be adopted for sublingual administration of detomidine gel.

  5. Ethnic sensitivity assessment of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of omalizumab with dosing table expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Wataru; Gautier, Aurélie; Paule, Ines; Yamaguchi, Masayuki; Lowe, Philip J

    2016-06-01

    A three-part license expansion for omalizumab (Xolair(®)), humanized anti-IgE antibody, was recently made in Japan for paediatric use, additional higher doses and revised dosing frequency in allergic asthma. The dosing level and frequency of omalizumab are guided by a dosing table based on the total serum IgE and bodyweight. Nonlinear mixed-effect pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) modeling and simulation techniques described the binding between omalizumab and its target IgE. The population PKPD analysis was conducted using data from the nine studies included originally in the European application of dosing table expansion together with three Japanese clinical studies to assess the influence of the ethnicity. Statistically significant differences between the ethnic groups were detected. These were small, within or close to bioequivalence criteria. The model described the primary pharmacology in Caucasian and Japanese patients, both adult and paediatric, with simulations showing that the interplay between the clearance, volume and binding affinity parameters was such that there was no clinical impact of the Japanese ethnic differences on either drug PK or free IgE suppression and hence the required posology. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Phase I Studies of Acebilustat: Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, Food Effect, and CYP3A Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elborn, J S; Bhatt, L; Grosswald, R; Ahuja, S; Springman, E B

    2017-01-01

    Acebilustat is a new once-daily oral antiinflammatory drug in development for treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) and other diseases. It is an inhibitor of leukotriene A4 hydrolase; therefore, production of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in biological fluids provides a direct measure of the pharmacodynamic (PD) response to acebilustat treatment. Here we compare the pharmacokinetics (PK) and PD between CF patients and healthy volunteers, and investigate the food effect and CYP3A4 induction in healthy volunteers. No significant differences between study populations were observed for peak plasma level (C max ) or exposure (AUC). In healthy volunteers, a shift in time to C max (T max ) was observed after a high-fat meal, but there was no change in AUC. LTB4 production was reduced in the blood of both populations and in sputum from CF patients. Acebilustat did not induce CYP3A4. These results support continued clinical study of once-daily oral acebilustat in CF at doses of 50 and 100 mg. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical and Translational Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in HIV prevention; current status and future directions: a summary of the DAIDS and BMGF sponsored think tank on pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) in HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Joseph; Kashuba, Angela; Becker, Stephen; Cummins, James; Turpin, Jim; Veronese, Fulvia

    2013-11-01

    Thirty years after its beginning, the HIV/AIDS epidemic is still raging around the world. According to UNAIDS, in 2011 alone 1.7M deaths were attributable to AIDS, and 2.5M people were newly infected by the virus. Despite the success in treating HIV-infected people with potent antiretroviral drugs, preventing HIV infection is the key to ending the epidemic. Recently, the efficacy of topical and systemic antiviral chemoprophylaxis (i.e., preexposure prophylaxis or "PrEP"), using the same drugs used for HIV treatment, has been demonstrated in a number of clinical trials. However, results from other trials have been inconsistent, especially those evaluating PrEP in women. These inconsistencies may result from our incomplete understanding of pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) at the mucosal sites of sexual transmission: the male and female gastrointestinal and reproductive tracts. The drug concentrations used in these trials were derived from those used for treatment; however, we still do not know the relationship between the therapeutic and the preventive dose. This article presents the first comprehensive review of the available data in the HIV pharmacology field from animal models to human studies, and outlines gaps, challenges, and future directions. Addressing these pharmacological gaps and challenges will be critical in selecting and advancing future PrEP candidates and strategies with the greatest impact on the HIV epidemic.

  8. Population pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic analysis for sugammadex-mediated reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijn, Huub J; Zollinger, Daniel P; van den Heuvel, Michiel W; Kerbusch, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    AIMS An integrated population pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic model was developed with the following aims: to simultaneously describe pharmacokinetic behaviour of sugammadex and rocuronium; to establish the pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic model for rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade and reversal by sugammadex; to evaluate covariate effects; and to explore, by simulation, typical covariate effects on reversal time. METHODS Data (n = 446) from eight sugammadex clinical studies covering men, women, non-Asians, Asians, paediatrics, adults and the elderly, with various degrees of renal impairment, were used. Modelling and simulation techniques based on physiological principles were applied to capture rocuronium and sugammadex pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and to identify and quantify covariate effects. RESULTS Sugammadex pharmacokinetics were affected by renal function, bodyweight and race, and rocuronium pharmacokinetics were affected by age, renal function and race. Sevoflurane potentiated rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade. Posterior predictive checks and bootstrapping illustrated the accuracy and robustness of the model. External validation showed concordance between observed and predicted reversal times, but interindividual variability in reversal time was pronounced. Simulated reversal times in typical adults were 0.8, 1.5 and 1.4 min upon reversal with sugammadex 16 mg kg−1 3 min after rocuronium, sugammadex 4 mg kg−1 during deep neuromuscular blockade and sugammadex 2 mg kg−1 during moderate blockade, respectively. Simulations indicated that reversal times were faster in paediatric patients and slightly slower in elderly patients compared with adults. Renal function did not affect reversal time. CONCLUSIONS Simulations of the therapeutic dosing regimens demonstrated limited impact of age, renal function and sevoflurane use, as predicted reversal time in typical subjects was always <2 min. PMID:21535448

  9. Lack of genetic association between OCT1, ABCB1, and UGT2B7 variants and morphine pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, L M; Sverrisdóttir, E; Stage, T B

    2017-01-01

    from a double-blinded, randomized, crossover trial in 37 healthy subjects. Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed in NONMEM®, and the time-concentration relationship of morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide, and morphine-6-glucuronide was parameterized as the transit compartment rate constant (ktr), clearance...... (CL), and volume of distribution (VD). The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-150min) and the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) were also calculated. Pharmacodynamic data were measured as pain tolerance thresholds to mechanical stimulation of the rectum and muscle, as well as tonic...

  10. "The relationship between pharmacokinetic variables and pharmacodynamic profiles of bolus versus continuous infusion of furosemide in critically ill patients"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Mojtaba Mojtahedzadeh

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the pharmacokinetic variables of continuous infusion and intermittent bolus injection of furosemide and the possible relationship between its pharmacokinetic characteristics and pharmacodynamic profile among intensive care unit (ICU patients were studied. In this prospective, randomized, clinical trial, twelve patients received IV bolus of 20 mg of the drug during 3 hours period and, the drug dose was doubled, when the urine output was less than 1 ml/kg/h (group 1. The other nine patients received a continuous intravenous furosemide infusion at the rate of 0.1 mg/kg/h (group 2. The amount of furosemide in serum was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Results showed a positive correlation between plasma clearance of furosemide and its diuretic activity (P=0.01. The pharmacokinetic parameters such as Vd (l, CL (ml/min, Ke (min-1 and t½ (min in continuous infusion patients were not significantly differed from the bolus patients (P-values 0.5, 0.9, 0.9,0.9, respectively. Nevertheless the observed plasma clearance of drug in the continuous infusion group was clinically higher than bolus injection group and as a result the cumulative urine output per hour per mg of furosemide in a continuous infusion was observed to be higher than bolus(P=0.2. Changes in serum sodium and potassium were similar for both groups, but bolus injection patients were associated with higher potassium depletion (P=0.001. Therefore, continuous infusion seems to be better means of diuretic therapy in critically ill patients.

  11. Nonlinear Pharmacokinetics of (±)3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and Its Pharmacodynamic Consequences in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concheiro, Marta; Baumann, Michael H.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Rothman, Richard B.; Marrone, Gina F.

    2014-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a widely abused illicit drug that can cause severe and even fatal adverse effects. However, interest remains for its possible clinical applications in posttraumatic stress disorder and anxiety treatment. Preclinical studies to determine MDMA’s safety are needed. We evaluated MDMA’s pharmacokinetics and metabolism in male rats receiving 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg s.c. MDMA, and the associated pharmacodynamic consequences. Blood was collected via jugular catheter at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 16, and 24 hours, with simultaneous serotonin (5-HT) behavioral syndrome and core temperature monitoring. Plasma specimens were analyzed for MDMA and the metabolites (±)-3,4-dihydroxymethamphetamine (HHMA), (±)-4-hydroxy-3-methoxymethamphetamine (HMMA), and (±)-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. After 2.5 mg/kg MDMA, mean MDMA Cmax was 164 ± 47.1 ng/ml, HHMA and HMMA were major metabolites, and MDMA was metabolized to MDA. After 5- and 10-mg/kg doses, MDMA areas under the curve (AUCs) were 3- and 10-fold greater than those after 2.5 mg/kg; HHMA and HMMA AUC values were relatively constant across doses; and MDA AUC values were greater than dose-proportional. Our data provide decisive in vivo evidence that MDMA and MDA display nonlinear accumulation via metabolic autoinhibition in the rat. Importantly, 5-HT syndrome severity correlated with MDMA concentrations (r = 0.8083; P MDMA’s behavioral and hyperthermic effects may involve distinct mechanisms. Given key similarities between MDMA pharmacokinetics in rats and humans, data from rats can be useful when provided at clinically relevant doses. PMID:24141857

  12. Florfenicol - pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of oral formulations in domestic animals: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ščuka Leon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC is a major economic problem for swine producers world-wide. Pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of florfenicol oral formulations in domestic animals were evaluated. For this purpose the systematic review and meta-analysis were done. In vitro efficacy of florfenicol showed that this drug is highly effective against most important respiratory pathogens. All these facts are shown in our survey. Three studies in pigs were relevant to include in the meta-analysis, which showed that results in the florfenicol group were better than in comparative control groups in all observed parameters: clinical signs, lung lesions and resolution of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (P<0,001. A second meta-analysis with 7 studies showed that the usage of florfenicol reduces mortality in pig herds with PRDC (P<0.05. Other field trials in pigs using florfenicol oral forms where reviewed. After treatment with florfenicol oral solution there was a significant drop of mortality in both groups of pigs (P<0.01; eg. one using florfenicol oral solution in treating PRDC (n=85 and another mixed pneumoenteric infection (n=54. Analysis of data when using premix in pigs (n=118 also suggests that a medicated premix has a favorable anti-infectious effect on pigs, irrespective of the group of animals or the evolution stage of the disease. Finally, favorable effect of florfenicol in treating swine ileitis was also presented. Regarding their pharmacokinetics, in vitro and clinical efficacy of florfenicol oral forms, they should be considered as a powerful tool for combating complex infections that are frequently met in intensive animal production.

  13. Comparison of beta-lactam regimens for the treatment of gram-negative pulmonary infections in the intensive care unit based on pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, David S; Frei, Christopher R

    2005-11-01

    This study utilized pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics to compare beta-lactam regimens for the empirical and definitive treatment of gram-negative pulmonary infections in the ICU. Susceptibility data were extracted from the 2002 Intensive Care Unit Surveillance System (ISS) and pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained from published human studies. Monte Carlo simulation was used to model the free percent time above the MIC (free %T > MIC) for 18 beta-lactam regimens against all gram-negative isolates, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. The cumulative fraction of response (CFR) was determined for bacteriostatic and bactericidal targets (free %T > MIC): penicillins (> or = 30/50%), cephalosporins/monobactams (> or = 40/70%) and carbapenems (> or = 20/40%). The 2002 ISS database contained MICs for 2408 gram-negative isolates including 1430 Enterobacteriaceae, 799 P. aeruginosa, and 179 A. baumannii. Imipenem had the highest percentage susceptible for all gram-negatives, Enterobacteriaceae and A. baumannii, while piperacillin/tazobactam had the highest percentage susceptible for P. aeruginosa. For empirical therapy, imipenem 0.5 g every 6 h, cefepime 2 g every 8 h and ceftazidime 2 g every 8 h demonstrated the highest CFR. For definitive therapy, imipenem 0.5 g every 6 h, ertapenem 1 g daily and cefepime 2 g every 8 h, cefepime 1 g every 8 h and cefepime 1 g every 12 h had the highest bactericidal CFR against Enterobacteriaceae; ceftazidime 2 g every 8 h, cefepime 2 g every 8 h, piperacillin/tazobactam 3.375 g every 4 h, ceftazidime 1 g every 8 h and aztreonam 1 g every 8 h against P. aeruginosa; and imipenem 0.5 g every 6 h, ticarcillin/clavulanate 3.1 g every 4 h, ceftazidime 2 g every 8 h, cefepime 2 g every 8 h and ticarcillin/clavulanate 3.1 g every 6 h against A. baumannii. Based on pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, imipenem 0.5 g every 6 h, cefepime 2 g every 8 h and ceftazidime 2 g every 8 h should be the preferred beta

  14. An Age-Dependent Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model for the Organophosphorus Insecticide Chlorpyrifos in the Preweanling Rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timchalk, Chuck; Kousba, Ahmed A.; Poet, Torka S.

    2007-08-01

    Juvenile rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute toxicity of organophosphorus insecticides like chlorpyrifos (CPF). Age- and dose-dependent differences in metabolism may be responsible. Of importance is CYP450 activation and detoxification of CPF to chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPF-oxon) and trichloropyridinol (TCP), as well as B-esterase (cholinesterase; ChE) and A-esterase (PON-1) detoxification of CPF-oxon to TCP. In the current study, a modified physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model incorporating age-dependent changes in CYP450, PON-1, and tissue ChE levels for rats was developed. In this model, age was used as a dependent function to estimate body weight which was then used to allometrically scale both metabolism and tissue ChE levels. Model simulations suggest that preweanling rats are particularly sensitive to CPF toxicity, with levels of CPF-oxon in blood and brain disproportionately increasing, relative to the response in adult rats. This age-dependent non-linear increase in CPF-oxon concentration may potentially result from the depletion of non-target B-esterases, and a lower PON-1 metabolic capacity in younger animals. These results indicate that the PBPK/PD model behaves consistently with the general understanding of CPF toxicity, pharmacokinetics and tissue ChE inhibition in neonatal and adult rats. Hence, this model represents an important starting point for developing a computational model to assess the neurotoxic potential of environmentally relevant organophosphate exposures in infants and children.

  15. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic modeling of enrofloxacin against Escherichia coli in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang eKana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to establish a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD modeling approach for the dosage schedule design and decreasing the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of 929 E. coli isolates from broilers to enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were determined following CLSI guidance. The MIC50 was calculated as the populational PD parameter for enrofloxacin against E. coli in broilers. The 101 E. coli strains with MIC closest to the MIC50 (0.05µg/mL were submitted for serotype identification. The 13 E. coli strains with O and K serotype were further utilitzed for determining pathogencity in mice. Of all the strains tested, the E. coli designated strain Anhui 112 was selected for establishing the disease model and PK/PD study. The pharmacokinetics (PKs of enrofloxacin after oral administration at the dose of 10mg/kg body weights (BW in healthy and infected broilers was evaluated with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method. For intestinal contents after oral administration, the peak concentration (Cmax, the time when the maximum concentration reached (Tmax, and the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC were 21.69~31.69μg/mL, 1.13~1.23h, and 228.97~444.86μg.hr/mL, respectively. The MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC of enrofloxacin against E. coli (Anhui 112 in Mueller-Hinton (MH broth and intestinal contents were determined to be similar, 0.25μg/mL and 0.5μg/mL respectively. In this study, the sum of concentrations of enrofloxacin and its metabolite (ciprofloxacin was used for the PK/PD integration and modeling. The ex vivo growth inhibition data were fitted to the sigmoid Emax (Hill equation to provide values for intestinal contents of 24h area under concentration–time curve/MIC ratios (AUC0~24h/MIC producing, bacteriostasis (624.94h, bactericidal activity (1065.93h and bacterial eradication (1343.81h. PK/PD modeling was established to

  16. Mechanism-based pharmacodynamic modeling of the interaction of midazolam, bretazenil, and zolpidem with ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuk, Bert; van Gool, Toon; Danhof, Meindert

    2002-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of ethanol with the full benzodiazepine agonist midazolam, the partial agonist bretazenil and the benzodiazepine BZ1 receptor subtype selective agonist zolpidem have been determined in the rat in vivo, using an integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic approach. Ethanol was administered as a constant rate infusion resulting in constant plasma concentrations of 0.5 g/l. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of midazolam, bretazenil, and zolpidem were determined following an intravenous infusion of 5.0, 2.5, and 18 mg/kg respectively. The amplitude in the 11.5-30 Hz frequency band of the EEG was used as measure of the pharmacological effect. For each of the benzodiazepines the concentration-EEG effect relationship could be described by the sigmoid Emax pharmacodynamic model. Significant differences in both EC50 and Emax were observed. The values of the EC50 were 76 +/- 11, 12 +/- 3, and 512 +/- 116 ng/ml for midazolam, bretazenil, and zolpidem respectively. The values of the Emax were 113 +/- 9, 44 +/- 3, and 175 +/- 10 microV/s. In the presence of ethanol the values of the EC50 of midazolam and zolpidem were reduced to approximately 50% of the original value. The values for Emax and Hill-factor were unchanged Due to a large interindividual variability no significant change in EC50 was observed for bretazenil. Analysis of the data on basis of a mechanism-based model showed only a decrease in the apparent affinity constant KPD for all three drugs, indicating that changes in EC50 can be explained entirely by a change in the apparent affinity constant KPD without concomitant changes in the efficacy parameter ePD and the stimulus-effect relationship. The findings of this study show that the pharmacodynamic interactions with a low dose of ethanol in vivo are qualitatively and quantitatively similar for benzodiazepine receptor full agonists, partial agonists, and benzodiazepine BZ1 receptor subtype selective

  17. Design of optimized hypoxia-activated prodrugs using pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Bettina Foehrenbacher

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia contributes to resistance of tumors to some cytotoxic drugs and to radiotherapy, but can in principle be exploited with hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAP. HAP in clinical development fall into two broad groups. Class I HAP (like the benzotriazine N-oxides tirapazamine and SN30000, are activated under relatively mild hypoxia. In contrast, Class II HAP (such as the nitro compounds PR-104A or TH-302 are maximally activated only under extreme hypoxia, but their active metabolites (effectors diffuse to cells at intermediate O2 and thus also eliminate moderately hypoxic cells. Here, we use a spatially resolved pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (SR-PK/PD model to compare these two strategies and to identify the features required in an optimal Class II HAP. The model uses a Green’s function approach to calculate spatial and longitudinal gradients of O2, prodrug and effector concentrations, and resulting killing in a digitized 3D tumor microregion to estimate activity as monotherapy and in combination with radiotherapy. An analogous model for a normal tissue with mild hypoxia and short intervesssel distances (based on a cremaster muscle microvessel network was used to estimate tumor selectivity of cell killing. This showed that Class II HAP offer advantages over Class I including higher tumor selectivity and greater freedom to vary prodrug diffusibility and rate of metabolic activation. The model suggests that the largest gains in class II HAP antitumor activity could be realized by optimizing effector stability and prodrug activation rates. We also use the model to show that diffusion of effector into blood vessels is unlikely to materially increase systemic exposure for realistic tumor burdens and effector clearances. However, we show that the tumor selectivity achievable by hypoxia-dependent prodrug activation alone is limited if dose-limiting normal tissues are even mildly hypoxic

  18. Exploring colistin pharmacodynamics against Klebsiella pneumoniae: A need to revise current susceptibility breakpoints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Tsala (Marilena); S. Vourli (Sophia); Georgiou, P.-C. (Panagiota-Christina); S. Pournaras (Spyros); A. Tsakris (Athanassios); G.L. Daikos (George); J.W. Mouton (Johan); J. Meletiadis (Joseph)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: Because the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) characteristics of colistin against Enterobacteriaceae are not well explored, we studied the activity of colistin against K. pneumoniae in an in vitro PK/PD model simulating different dosing regimens. Methods: Three clinical

  19. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TV-1380, a novel mutated butyrylcholinesterase treatment for cocaine addiction, after single and multiple intramuscular injections in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Barak, Orit; Wildeman, Jacqueline; van de Wetering, Jeroen; Hettinga, Judith; Schuilenga-Hut, Petra; Gross, Aviva; Clark, Shane; Bassan, Merav; Gilgun-Sherki, Yossi; Mendzelevski, Boaz; Spiegelstein, Ofer

    2015-05-01

    Human plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) contributes to cocaine metabolism and has been considered for use in treating cocaine addiction and cocaine overdose. TV-1380 is a recombinant protein composed of the mature form of human serum albumin fused at its amino terminus to the carboxy-terminus of a truncated and mutated BChE. In preclinical studies, TV-1380 has been shown to rapidly eliminate cocaine in the plasma thus forestalling entry of cocaine into the brain and heart. Two randomized, blinded phase I studies were conducted to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TV-1380, following single and multiple administration in healthy subjects. TV-1380 was found to be safe and well tolerated with a long half-life (43-77 hours) and showed a dose-proportional increase in systemic exposure. Consistent with preclinical results, the ex vivo cocaine hydrolysis, TV-1380 activity clearly increased upon treatment in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, there was a direct relationship between ex vivo cocaine hydrolysis (kel ) and TV-1380 serum concentrations. There was no evidence that TV-1380 affected heart rate, the uncorrected QT interval, or the heart-rate-corrected QTcF interval. TV-1380, therefore, offers a safe once-weekly therapy to increase cocaine hydrolysis. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  20. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of single oral doses of tofacitinib, a Janus kinase inhibitor, in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswami, Sriram; Boy, Mary; Chow, Vincent; Chan, Gary

    2015-03-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor. This randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study was the first evaluation of tofacitinib in humans. The objectives were to characterize the safety and tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics of escalating single tofacitinib doses in healthy subjects. Tofacitinib (0.1, 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 30, 60, and 100 mg) or placebo was administered as oral powder for constitution. For each dose, 7-9 subjects were randomized to tofacitinib and 3-5 subjects to placebo. Ninety-five males and females (age range 19-45) completed the study. Forty-nine treatment-emergent all-causality adverse events (AEs) were observed; nausea and headache were the most frequently reported. Tofacitinib PK was characterized by rapid absorption (time to peak serum concentration [Tmax ] 0.5-1 hour), rapid elimination (mean terminal half-lives 2.3-3.1 hours), and dose-proportional systemic exposures (peak serum concentration [Cmax ] and area under the serum concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity [AUC0-∞ ]). No appreciable correlation was observed between tofacitinib dose and lymphocyte subset counts. Single-dose tofacitinib up to 100 mg in healthy subjects had a safety profile of mostly mild AEs, and no deaths, serious AEs, severe AEs or discontinuations due to AEs. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  1. Population pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic modelling of eltrombopag in healthy volunteers and subjects with chronic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Colm; Hayes, Siobhan C; Wire, Mary; Zhang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Aims To characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) of eltrombopag in chronic liver disease (CLD). Methods The PK/PD model was developed using data from 79 CLD patients using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. Results The PK of eltrombopag were described by a two-compartment model with dual sequential first-order absorption. Gender, race and severity of CLD were predictors of the apparent clearance of eltrombopag. The PD of eltrombopag in CLD were adequately described by a four-compartment lifespan model, in which eltrombopag stimulated platelet precursor production rate. East Asian CLD patients were less sensitive to the stimulatory effect of eltrombopag. Following a daily dose regimen of 50 mg eltrombopag, the time to achieve peak platelet counts was longer for the CLD population compared with patients who had immune thrombocytopenic purpura, but was comparable to patients with hepatitis C. Likewise, it took a longer time for platelet counts to rebound back to baseline once eltrombopag treatment was discontinued. Conclusions The time course of the platelet response in CLD was different from that in immune thrombocytopenic purpura but comparable to that in hepatitis C. PMID:24117976

  2. Bench to Bed Evidences for Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Interactions Involving Oseltamivir and Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oseltamivir (OA, an ethyl ester prodrug of oseltamivir carboxylate (OC, is clinically used as a potent and selective inhibitor of neuraminidase. Chinese medicines have been advocated to combine with conventional drug for avian influenza. The current study aims to investigate the potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of a Chinese medicine formula, namely, Yin Qiao San and Sang Ju Yin (CMF1, commonly used for anti-influenza in combination with OA in both rat and human, and to reveal the underlined mechanisms. It was found that although Cmax, AUC and urinary recovery of OC, as well as metabolic ratio (AUCOC/AUCOA, were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner following combination use of CMF1 and OA in rat studies (P<0.01, such coadministration in 14 healthy volunteers only resulted in a trend of minor decrease in the related parameters. Further mechanistic studies found that although CMF1 could reduce absorption and metabolism of OA, it appears to enhance viral inhibition of OA (P<0.01. In summary, although there was potential interaction between OA and CMF1 found in rat studies, its clinical impact was expected to be minimal. The coadministration of OA and CMF1 at the clinical recommended dosages is, therefore, considered to be safe.

  3. Population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target attainment analysis of imipenem plasma and urine data in neonates and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Kenichi; Ikawa, Kazuro; Ikeda, Kayo; Ohge, Hiroki; Morikawa, Norifumi

    2013-11-01

    Population pharmacokinetic (PK)-pharmacodynamic target attainment analysis of imipenem was performed to elucidate the PK properties in neonates and children and to rationalize and optimize dosing regimens. Population PK models were separately developed in neonates and children by simultaneously fitting plasma and urine data from 60 neonates and 39 children. The newly developed models were then used to estimate the probability of attaining the pharmacodynamic target (40% of the time above the minimum inhibitory concentration) against clinical isolates of common bacteria in pediatric patients. The data were best described by a 1-compartment model in neonates and a 2-compartment model in children, respectively. Renal clearance in children (0.187 L/h/kg) was double that of neonates (0.0783 L/h/kg), whereas the volume of distribution at steady-state was approximately 1.8-fold larger in neonates (0.466 L/kg) than in children (0.260 L/kg). Age was not a statistically significant covariate in the PK of both groups. Infusions (0.5 h) of 15 mg/kg every 8 h (45 mg/kg/day) and 25 mg/kg every 12 h (50 mg/kg/day) were shown to be sufficient against common bacterial isolates in both patient populations. However, 1.5-h infusions of 25 mg/kg every 8 h (75 mg/kg/day) in neonates and 25 mg/kg every 6 h (100 mg/kg/day) in children were required to be effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (minimum inhibitory concentration for 90% of the isolates=16 μg/mL). These results explain the changes in imipenem PK properties during the human growth process and provide guidance for tailoring dosing regimens in each pediatric age group.

  4. A randomized direct comparison of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of apixaban and rivaroxaban

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frost C

    2014-11-01

    : Apixaban 2.5 mg BID demonstrated less intersubject variability in exposure, lower AXA AUC, and higher trough and smaller peak-to-trough fluctuations in plasma concentration and AXA, suggesting more constant anticoagulation compared with rivaroxaban 10 mg QD. However, the clinical impact of these differences on the relative efficacy and safety of apixaban and rivaroxaban remains to be determined. Keywords: apixaban, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, rivaroxaban, safety

  5. Applications of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis of antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asín-Prieto, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia; Isla, Arantxazu

    2015-05-01

    The alarming increase of resistance against multiple currently available antibiotics is leading to a rapid lose of treatment options against infectious diseases. Since the antibiotic resistance is partially due to a misuse or abuse of the antibiotics, this situation can be reverted when improving their use. One strategy is the optimization of the antimicrobial dosing regimens. In fact, inappropriate drug choice and suboptimal dosing are two major factors that should be considered because they lead to the emergence of drug resistance and consequently, poorer clinical outcomes. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis in combination with Monte Carlo simulation allows to optimize dosing regimens of the antibiotic agents in order to conserve their therapeutic value. Therefore, the aim of this review is to explain the basis of the PK/PD analysis and associated techniques, and provide a brief revision of the applications of PK/PD analysis from a therapeutic point-of-view. The establishment and reevaluation of clinical breakpoints is the sticking point in antibiotic therapy as the clinical use of the antibiotics depends on them. Two methodologies are described to establish the PK/PD breakpoints, which are a big part of the clinical breakpoint setting machine. Furthermore, the main subpopulations of patients with altered characteristics that can condition the PK/PD behavior (such as critically ill, elderly, pediatric or obese patients) and therefore, the outcome of the antibiotic therapy, are reviewed. Finally, some recommendations are provided from a PK/PD point of view to enhance the efficacy of prophylaxis protocols used in surgery. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and therapeutics of pradofloxacin in the dog and cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, P

    2013-06-01

    Pradofloxacin is a third-generation fluoroquinolone, licensed in the EU for use in a range of indications in the dog and cat and authorized more recently in the USA for one therapeutic indication (skin infections) in the cat. This review summarizes and appraises current knowledge on the physico-chemical, pharmacological [pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD)], safety and therapeutic properties of pradofloxacin in the target species. Pradofloxacin contains two centres of asymmetry and is the pure SS enantiomer. After oral dosing of tablets (dog) or tablets and oral suspension (cat), maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax ) are achieved in less than 3.0 h, and terminal half-life is of the order of 5-10 h. Accumulation is slight or absent with once daily oral dosing. Free drug concentrations in plasma are in the range of 63-71% of total concentration. As for other fluoroquinolones, antibacterial activity is attributable to inhibition of bacterial replication at two sites, subunit A of topoisomerase II and topoisomerase IV. The antimicrobial spectrum includes gram-negative and gram-positive organisms, anaerobes, Mycoplasma spp. and some intracellular organisms (Rickettsia spp. and Mycobacterium spp.). The killing action is of the concentration-dependent type. Pradofloxacin has high potency (low MIC values) in comparison with first- and second-generation fluoroquinolones. Integration of in vivo PK and in vitro PD data provides values of Cmax /MIC and area under plasma concentration-time curve (AUC24 h )/MIC ratios predictive of good clinical efficacy against sensitive organisms, when administered at recommended dose rates. Clinical trial evaluation of pradofloxacin, in comparison with other authorized antimicrobial drugs, has demonstrated either noninferiority or superiority of pradofloxacin. Data indicating clinical and, in some instances, bacteriological cure have been reported: (i) in cats, for wound infections, abscesses, upper respiratory tract infections

  7. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic modelling of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth and kill rates is predictive of clinical treatment duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljayyoussi, Ghaith; Jenkins, Victoria A; Sharma, Raman; Ardrey, Alison; Donnellan, Samantha; Ward, Stephen A; Biagini, Giancarlo A

    2017-03-29

    Tuberculosis (TB) treatment is long and complex, typically involving a combination of drugs taken for 6 months. Improved drug regimens to shorten and simplify treatment are urgently required, however a major challenge to TB drug development is the lack of predictive pre-clinical tools. To address this deficiency, we have adopted a new high-content imaging-based approach capable of defining the killing kinetics of first line anti-TB drugs against intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) residing inside macrophages. Through use of this pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) approach we demonstrate that the killing dynamics of the intracellular Mtb sub-population is critical to predicting clinical TB treatment duration. Integrated modelling of intracellular Mtb killing alongside conventional extracellular Mtb killing data, generates the biphasic responses typical of those described clinically. Our model supports the hypothesis that the use of higher doses of rifampicin (35 mg/kg) will significantly reduce treatment duration. Our described PK-PD approach offers a much needed decision making tool for the identification and prioritisation of new therapies which have the potential to reduce TB treatment duration.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of edivoxetine (LY2216684), a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, in pediatric patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielbasa, William; Quinlan, Tonya; Jin, Ling; Xu, Wen; Lachno, D Richard; Dean, Robert A; Allen, Albert J

    2012-08-01

    Edivoxetine (LY2216684) is a selective and potent norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (NERI). The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of edivoxetine were assessed in children and adolescent patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) following single and once-daily oral doses of edivoxetine. During a phase 1 open-label safety, tolerability, and PK study, pediatric patients were administered edivoxetine at target doses of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 mg/kg, and blood samples were collected to determine plasma concentrations of edivoxetine for PK assessments and plasma 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) concentrations for PD assessments. Edivoxetine plasma concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection, and DHPG was measured using liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Edivoxetine PK was comparable between children and adolescents. The time to maximum concentration (t(max)) of edivoxetine was ∼2 hours, which was followed by a mono-exponential decline in plasma concentrations with a terminal elimination half-life (t(1/2)) of ∼6 hours. Dose-dependent increases in area under the edivoxetine plasma concentration versus time curve from zero to infinity (AUC(0-∞)) and maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) were observed, and there was no discernable difference in the apparent clearance (CL/F) or the apparent volume of distribution at steady state (V(ss)/F) across the dose range. In adolescents, edivoxetine caused a maximum decrease in plasma DHPG concentrations from baseline of ∼28%, most notably within 8 hours of edivoxetine administration. This initial study in pediatric patients with ADHD provides new information on the PK profile of edivoxetine, and exposures that decrease plasma DHPG consistent with the mechanism of action of a NERI. The PK and PD data inform edivoxetine pharmacology and can be used to develop comprehensive population PK and/or PK-PD models to guide dosing

  9. Market entry, power, pharmacokinetics: what makes a successful drug innovation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Susanne; Helmstädter, Axel

    2018-02-01

    Depending on the timing of market entry, radical innovations can be distinguished from incremental innovations. Whereas a radical innovation typically is the first available derivative of a drug class, incremental innovations are launched later and show a certain benefit compared with the radical innovation. Here, we use historical market data relating to pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamic (PD), and other drug-related properties to investigate which derivatives within certain drug classes have been most successful on the market. Based on our investigations, we suggest naming the most successful drugs 'overtaking innovation', because they often exceed the market share of all the other derivatives. Seven drug classes showed that the overtaking innovation is never a radical innovation, but rather an early incremental innovation, with advantages in manageability and/or tolerance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Estimating Margin of Exposure to Thyroid Peroxidase Inhibitors Using High-Throughput in vitro Data, High-Throughput Exposure Modeling, and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Jeremy A.; Tan, Yu-Mei; Gilbert, Mary; Isaacs, Kristin; El-Masri, Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Some pharmaceuticals and environmental chemicals bind the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) enzyme and disrupt thyroid hormone production. The potential for TPO inhibition is a function of both the binding affinity and concentration of the chemical within the thyroid gland. The former can be determined through in vitro assays, and the latter is influenced by pharmacokinetic properties, along with environmental exposure levels. In this study, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was integrated with a pharmacodynamic (PD) model to establish internal doses capable of inhibiting TPO in relation to external exposure levels predicted through exposure modeling. The PBPK/PD model was evaluated using published serum or thyroid gland chemical concentrations or circulating thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) hormone levels measured in rats and humans. After evaluation, the model was used to estimate human equivalent intake doses resulting in reduction of T4 and T3 levels by 10% (ED10) for 6 chemicals of varying TPO-inhibiting potencies. These chemicals were methimazole, 6-propylthiouracil, resorcinol, benzophenone-2, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole, and triclosan. Margin of exposure values were estimated for these chemicals using the ED10 and predicted population exposure levels for females of child-bearing age. The modeling approach presented here revealed that examining hazard or exposure alone when prioritizing chemicals for risk assessment may be insufficient, and that consideration of pharmacokinetic properties is warranted. This approach also provides a mechanism for integrating in vitro data, pharmacokinetic properties, and exposure levels predicted through high-throughput means when interpreting adverse outcome pathways based on biological responses. PMID:26865668

  11. New dosing strategies for an old antibiotic: pharmacodynamics of front-loaded regimens of colistin at simulated pharmacokinetics in patients with kidney or liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gauri G; Ly, Neang S; Haas, Curtis E; Garonzik, Samira; Forrest, Alan; Bulitta, Jurgen B; Kelchlin, Pamela A; Holden, Patricia N; Nation, Roger L; Li, Jian; Tsuji, Brian T

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that colistin monotherapy is suboptimal at currently recommended doses. We hypothesized that front-loading provides an improved dosing strategy for polymyxin antibiotics to maximize killing and minimize total exposure. Here, we utilized an in vitro pharmacodynamic model to examine the impact of front-loaded colistin regimens against a high bacterial density (10(8) CFU/ml) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The pharmacokinetics were simulated for patients with hepatic (half-life [t1/2] of 3.2 h) or renal (t1/2 of 14.8 h) disease. Front-loaded regimens (n=5) demonstrated improvement in bacterial killing, with reduced overall free drug areas under the concentration-time curve (fAUC) compared to those with traditional dosing regimens (n=14) with various dosing frequencies (every 12 h [q12h] and q24h). In the renal failure simulations, front-loaded regimens at lower exposures (fAUC of 143 mg · h/liter) obtained killing activity similar to that of traditional regimens (fAUC of 268 mg · h/liter), with an ∼97% reduction in the area under the viable count curve over 48 h. In hepatic failure simulations, front-loaded regimens yielded rapid initial killing by up to 7 log10 within 2 h, but considerable regrowth occurred for both front-loaded and traditional regimens. No regimen eradicated the high bacterial inoculum of P. aeruginosa. The current study, which utilizes an in vitro pharmacodynamic infection model, demonstrates the potential benefits of front-loading strategies for polymyxins simulating differential pharmacokinetics in patients with hepatic and renal failure at a range of doses. Our findings may have important clinical implications, as front-loading polymyxins as a part of a combination regimen may be a viable strategy for aggressive treatment of high-bacterial-burden infections.

  12. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modelling of Receptor Internalization with CRTH2 Antagonists to Optimize Dose Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Andreas; Zisowsky, Jochen; Strasser, Daniel S; Gehin, Martine; Sidharta, Patricia N; Groenen, Peter M A; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2016-07-01

    The chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T helper-2 cells (CRTH2) is a G-protein-coupled receptor for prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), a key mediator in inflammatory disorders. Two selective and potent CRTH2 antagonists currently in clinical development, ACT-453859 and setipiprant, were compared with respect to their (predicted) clinical efficacy. Population pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) models were developed to characterize how plasma concentrations (PK) of ACT-453859, its active metabolite ACT-463036 and setipiprant related to their effect on blocking PGD2-induced internalization of CRTH2 on eosinophils (PD). Simulations were used to identify doses and dosing regimens leading to 90 % of maximum blockade of CRTH2 internalization at trough. A combined concentration of ACT-453859 and its metabolite ACT-463036, with weights proportional to potency (based on an eosinophil shape change assay), enabled good characterization of the PD effect. The modelling and simulation results facilitated decision making by suggesting an ACT-453859 dose of 400 mg once daily (or 100 mg twice daily) for clinically relevant CRTH2 antagonism. Pharmacometric quantification demonstrated that CRTH2 internalization is a useful new biomarker to study CRTH2 antagonism. Ninety percent of maximum blockade of CRTH2 internalization at trough is suggested as a quantitative PD target in clinical studies.

  13. [Research progress on current pharmacokinetic evaluation of Chinese herbal medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guofu; Zhao, Haoru; Yang, Jin

    2011-03-01

    In order to prove safety and efficacy, herbal medicines must undergo the rigorous scientific researches such as pharmacokinetic and bioavailability, before they are put on the market in the foreign countries. Botanical Drug Products promulgated by the US FDA could guide industry sponsors to develop herbal drugs, which was also an important reference for investigating Chinese herbal medicines. This paper reviews and discusses novel approaches for how to assess systemic exposure and pharmacokinetic of Chinese herbal medicines, which were in line with FDA guidance. This mainly focus on identifying pharmacokinetic markers of botanical products, integral pharmacokinetic study of multiple components, Biopharmaceutics drug disposition classification system, and population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study in herb-drug interaction.

  14. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic effects of amiodarone in plasma of ponies after single intravenous administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trachsel, D.; Tschudi, P.; Portier, C.J.; Kuhn, M.; Thormann, W.; Scholtysik, G.; Mevissen, M.

    2004-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a well-known heart disease in horses. The common therapy consists of administration of quinidine. More potent antiarrhythmic drugs have become available for human therapy and the use of these as alternatives to quinidine for equine antiarrhythmic therapy is a matter of interest. Amiodarone (AMD) is used in human medicine for treatment of many arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation. Its disposition in horses has not yet been investigated. The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of single intravenous doses of amiodarone (5 and 7 mg/kg) on the surface electrocardiogram (ECG) of healthy minishetland ponies during the first 2 days after drug administration and to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters with a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model (PBPK) using amiodarone and desethylamiodarone (DAMD) plasma levels that were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). As expected for a K + -channel-blocker, the main effect on the measured ECG could be seen on the ventricular complex, as the QT interval and the T wave showed statistically significant alterations. The doses investigated were well tolerated clinically. Results from the pharmacokinetic model were found to compare well with literature data of rats, dogs, and humans. It showed a rapid distribution in the tissue, beginning with the rapidly perfused tissue, like the heart, followed by slowly perfused tissues, and finally an accumulation in fat. The half-life for total elimination was calculated to be 16.3 days with 99% eliminated by 97 days. The model predicts that approximately 96% of amiodarone is eliminated as desethylamiodarone in urine, 2% eliminated as desethylamiodarone in bile, and 2% as other metabolites

  15. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cysteamine in nephropathic cystinosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouazza Naïm

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nephropathic cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting in an impaired transport of cystine trough the lysosomal membrane causing an accumulation of free cystine in lysosomes. The only specific treatment for nephropathic cystinosis is cysteamine bitartrate. This study was aimed to describe the relationship between cysteamine plasma concentrations and white blood cell cystine levels, and to simulate an optimized administration scheme to improve the management of patients with cystinosis. Methods Cysteamine and cystine concentrations were measured in 69 nephropathic cystinosis patients. A total of 250 cysteamine plasma concentrations and 243 intracellular cystine concentrations were used to perform a population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis. An optimized administration scheme was simulated in order to maintain cystine levels below 1 nmol half-cystine/mg of protein and to investigate the possibility of administrating the treatment less than 4 times a day (QID, recommended. The current dosing recommendations are 1.3 g/m2/day for less than 50 kg BW and 2 g/day thereafter; the maximum dose should not exceed 1.95 g/m2/day. Results Cysteamine concentrations were satisfactorily described by a one-compartment model. Parameter estimates were standardized for a mean standard bodyweight using an allometric model. WBC cystine levels were adequately described by an indirect response model where the first-order removal rate constant is stimulated by the cysteamine concentrations. Conclusions According to simulations, in order to increase the percentage of patient with cystine levels below 1 nmol half-cystine/mg of protein, the current dosages could be changed as follows: 80 mg/kg/day (QID from 10 to 17 kg, 70 mg/kg/day (QID from 17 to 25 kg, 60 mg/kg/day (QID from 25 to 40 kg and 50 mg/kg/day (QID from 40 to 70 kg (these dosages remain under the maximum recommended dose. However an 8-hourly daily treatment (TID

  16. Spatiotemporal pharmacodynamics of meropenem- and tobramycin-treated Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Verotta, Davide; Huang, Liusheng

    2017-01-01

    The selection and dose of antibiotic therapy for biofilm-related infections are based on traditional pharmacokinetic studies using planktonic bacteria. The objective of this study was to characterize the time course and spatial activity of human exposure levels of meropenem and tobramycin against...... Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown in an in vitro flow-chamber model. Pharmacokinetic profiles of meropenem and tobramycin used in human therapy were administered to GFP-labelled P. aeruginosa PAO1 grown in flow chambers for 24 or 72 h. Images were acquired using confocal laser scanning microscopy...... throughout antibiotic treatment. Bacterial biomass was measured using COMSTAT and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models were fitted using NONMEM7. Meropenem treatment resulted in more rapid and sustained killing of both the 24 and 72 h PAO1 biofilm compared with tobramycin. Biofilm regrowth after antibiotic...

  17. Assessment of the pharmacodynamics of intranasal, intravenous and oral scopolamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietze, Karen J.

    1990-01-01

    Space motion sickness is an important issue in the space medical sciences program. One of the objectives of the ongoing clinical experimental protocol Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine in Normal Subjects is to evaluate the pharmacodynamics of scopolamine using salivary flow rate and pH profiles and cognitive performance tests as pharmacodynamic parameters. Normal volunteers collected saliva and performed the NTI Multiresource Performance Battery tests at designed time intervals to establish control saliva flow rates, salivary pH profiles, and the characteristics of the learning curve for the performance program under normal conditions. In the clinical part of the study, saliva samples and performance test scores are collected from healthy nonsmoking subjects after receiving a single 0.4 mg dose of either intranasal, intravenous, or oral scopolamine.

  18. Population Pharmacokinetics of Tracers: A New Tool for Medical Imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandia, Peggy; Jaudet, Cyril; Chatelut, Etienne; Concordet, Didier

    2017-02-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography is a medical imaging method measuring the activity of a radiotracer chosen to accumulate in cancer cells. A recent trend of medical imaging analysis is to account for the radiotracer's pharmacokinetic properties at a voxel (three-dimensional-pixel) level to separate the different tissues. These analyses are closely linked to population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling. Kineticists possess the cultural background to improve medical imaging analysis. This article stresses the common points with population pharmacokinetics and highlights the methodological locks that need to be lifted.

  19. Clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and pharmacodynamics of artemether-lumefantrine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, N. J.; van Vugt, M.; Ezzet, F.

    1999-01-01

    The combination of artemether and lumefantrine (benflumetol) is a new and very well tolerated oral antimalarial drug effective even against multidrug-resistant falciparum malaria. The artemether component is absorbed rapidly and biotransformed to dihydroartemisinin, and both are eliminated with

  20. Pharmacokinetics and Concentration-Effect Relationship of Oral LSD in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolder, Patrick C; Schmid, Yasmin; Haschke, Manuel; Rentsch, Katharina M; Liechti, Matthias E

    2015-06-24

    The pharmacokinetics of oral lysergic acid diethylamide are unknown despite its common recreational use and renewed interest in its use in psychiatric research and practice. We characterized the pharmacokinetic profile, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship, and urine recovery of lysergic acid diethylamide and its main metabolite after administration of a single oral dose of lysergic acid diethylamide (200 μg) in 8 male and 8 female healthy subjects. Plasma lysergic acid diethylamide concentrations were quantifiable (>0.1 ng/mL) in all the subjects up to 12 hours after administration. Maximal concentrations of lysergic acid diethylamide (mean±SD: 4.5±1.4 ng/mL) were reached (median, range) 1.5 (0.5-4) hours after administration. Concentrations then decreased following first-order kinetics with a half-life of 3.6±0.9 hours up to 12 hours and slower elimination thereafter with a terminal half-life of 8.9±5.9 hours. One percent of the orally administered lysergic acid diethylamide was eliminated in urine as lysergic acid diethylamide, and 13% was eliminated as 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-lysergic acid diethylamide within 24 hours. No sex differences were observed in the pharmacokinetic profiles of lysergic acid diethylamide. The acute subjective and sympathomimetic responses to lysergic acid diethylamide lasted up to 12 hours and were closely associated with the concentrations in plasma over time and exhibited no acute tolerance. These first data on the pharmacokinetics and concentration-effect relationship of oral lysergic acid diethylamide are relevant for further clinical studies and serve as a reference for the assessment of intoxication with lysergic acid diethylamide. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  1. PHARMACOKINETIC-PHARMACODYNAMIC DRUG-INTERACTIONS WITH NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWERS, JRBJ; DESMET, PAGM

    1994-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are very commonly prescribed, especially in the elderly population. In many countries more than 10 different NSAIDs are available. As the older pyrazole compounds like phenylbutazone, oxyphenbutazone and azapropazone are most prone to pharmacokinetic

  2. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of medication in asphyxiated newborns during controlled hypothermia. The PharmaCool multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Haan Timo R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Netherlands, perinatal asphyxia (severe perinatal oxygen shortage necessitating newborn resuscitation occurs in at least 200 of the 180–185.000 newly born infants per year. International randomized controlled trials have demonstrated an improved neurological outcome with therapeutic hypothermia. During hypothermia neonates receive sedative, analgesic, anti-epileptic and antibiotic drugs. So far little information is available how the pharmacokinetics (PK and pharmacodynamics (PD of these drugs are influenced by post resuscitation multi organ failure and the metabolic effects of the cooling treatment itself. As a result, evidence based dosing guidelines are lacking. This multicenter observational cohort study was designed to answer the question how hypothermia influences the distribution, metabolism and elimination of commonly used drugs in neonatal intensive care. Methods/Design Multicenter cohort study. All term neonates treated with hypothermia for Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE resulting from perinatal asphyxia in all ten Dutch Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs will be eligible for this study. During hypothermia and rewarming blood samples will be taken from indwelling catheters to investigate blood concentrations of several antibiotics, analgesics, sedatives and anti-epileptic drugs. For each individual drug the population PK will be characterized using Nonlinear Mixed Effects Modelling (NONMEM. It will be investigated how clearance and volume of distribution are influenced by hypothermia also taking maturation of neonate into account. Similarly, integrated PK-PD models will be developed relating the time course of drug concentration to pharmacodynamic parameters such as successful seizure treatment; pain assessment and infection clearance. Discussion On basis of the derived population PK-PD models dosing guidelines will be developed for the application of drugs during neonatal hypothermia treatment. The

  3. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis comparing diverse effects of detomidine, medetomidine, and dexmedetomidine in the horse: a population analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsrud, K N; Ait-Oudhia, S; Durbin-Johnson, B P; Rocke, D M; Mama, K R; Rezende, M L; Stanley, S D; Jusko, W J

    2015-02-01

    The present study characterizes the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) relationships of the α2-adrenergic receptor agonists detomidine (DET), medetomidine (MED) and dexmedetomidine (DEX) in parallel groups of horses from in vivo data after single bolus doses. Head height (HH), heart rate (HR), and blood glucose concentrations were measured over 6 h. Compartmental PK and minimal physiologically based PK (mPBPK) models were applied and incorporated into basic and extended indirect response models (IRM). Population PK/PD analysis was conducted using the Monolix software implementing the stochastic approximation expectation maximization algorithm. Marked reductions in HH and HR were found. The drug concentrations required to obtain inhibition at half-maximal effect (IC50 ) were approximately four times larger for DET than MED and DEX for both HH and HR. These effects were not gender dependent. Medetomidine had a greater influence on the increase in glucose concentration than DEX. The developed models demonstrate the use of mechanistic and mPBPK/PD models for the analysis of clinically obtainable in vivo data. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Nonstandard Finite Difference Method Applied to a Linear Pharmacokinetics Model

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    Oluwaseun Egbelowo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We extend the nonstandard finite difference method of solution to the study of pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic models. Pharmacokinetic (PK models are commonly used to predict drug concentrations that drive controlled intravenous (I.V. transfers (or infusion and oral transfers while pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PD interaction models are used to provide predictions of drug concentrations affecting the response of these clinical drugs. We structure a nonstandard finite difference (NSFD scheme for the relevant system of equations which models this pharamcokinetic process. We compare the results obtained to standard methods. The scheme is dynamically consistent and reliable in replicating complex dynamic properties of the relevant continuous models for varying step sizes. This study provides assistance in understanding the long-term behavior of the drug in the system, and validation of the efficiency of the nonstandard finite difference scheme as the method of choice.

  5. Bioavailability and Pharmacodynamics of Promethazine in Human Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, J. L.; Boster, B.; Wang, Z.; Shah, V.; Berens, K. L.; Sipes, W. E.; Anderson, K. E.; Putcha, L.

    2004-01-01

    The acute effects of exposure to microgravity include the development of space motion sickness, which usually requires therapeutic intervention. The current drug of choice, promethazine (PMZ), is available to astronauts in three different dosage forms during space flight; its side effects include nausea, dizziness, sedation and impaired psychomotor performance. This ground-based study is designed to validate flight-suitable methods for pharmacodynamic evaluation of PMZ and to estimate bioavailability and pharmacodynamics of PMZ. Experimental design consists of intramuscular administration of three doses of PMZ (12.5,25 and 50 mg) and placebo in a randomized double blind fashion to human subjects and collecting blood, urine and saliva samples for 72 h. Subjects also complete cognitive performance test batteries, WinSCAT (Windows based Space Cognitive Assessment Test) and ARES (ANAM Readiness Evaluation System). Preliminary results indicate a significant relationship (p=9.88e-05) between circulating PMZ levels and cognitive performance parameters. Time to accurately complete memory tasks increases significantly with concentrations; higher concentrations also increase response time and decrease accuracy of substitution and matching tasks. AUC and half-life estimates for PMZ ranged between 0.12 and 1.7 mg.h/L and 15 and 50 h, respectively. These preliminary results indicate that PMZ may exhibit dose-dependent pharmacokinetics in humans; also, WinSCAT and ARES are sensitive for pharmacodynamic assessment of PMZ, and may be applicable for assessing the pharmacodynamics of other neurocognitive drugs.

  6. Improving pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling to investigate anti-infective chemotherapy with application to the current generation of antimalarial drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Kay

    Full Text Available Mechanism-based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD modelling is the standard computational technique for simulating drug treatment of infectious diseases with the potential to enhance our understanding of drug treatment outcomes, drug deployment strategies, and dosing regimens. Standard methodologies assume only a single drug is used, it acts only in its unconverted form, and that oral drugs are instantaneously absorbed across the gut wall to their site of action. For drugs with short half-lives, this absorption period accounts for a significant period of their time in the body. Treatment of infectious diseases often uses combination therapies, so we refined and substantially extended the PK/PD methodologies to incorporate (i time lags and drug concentration profiles resulting from absorption across the gut wall and, if required, conversion to another active form; (ii multiple drugs within a treatment combination; (iii differing modes of action of drugs in the combination: additive, synergistic, antagonistic; (iv drugs converted to an active metabolite with a similar mode of action. This methodology was applied to a case study of two first-line malaria treatments based on artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs, artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-mefloquine where the likelihood of increased artemisinin tolerance/resistance has led to speculation on their continued long-term effectiveness. We note previous estimates of artemisinin kill rate were underestimated by a factor of seven, both the unconverted and converted form of the artemisinins kill parasites and the extended PK/PD methodology produced results consistent with field observations. The simulations predict that a potentially rapid decline in ACT effectiveness is likely to occur as artemisinin resistance spreads, emphasising the importance of containing the spread of artemisinin resistance before it results in widespread drug failure. We found that PK/PD data is generally very

  7. Novel CNS drug discovery and development approach: model-based integration to predict neuro-pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Elizabeth C M; van den Brink, Willem; Yamamoto, Yumi; de Witte, Wilhelmus E A; Wong, Yin Cheong

    2017-12-01

    CNS drug development has been hampered by inadequate consideration of CNS pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD) and disease complexity (reductionist approach). Improvement is required via integrative model-based approaches. Areas covered: The authors summarize factors that have played a role in the high attrition rate of CNS compounds. Recent advances in CNS research and drug discovery are presented, especially with regard to assessment of relevant neuro-PK parameters. Suggestions for further improvements are also discussed. Expert opinion: Understanding time- and condition dependent interrelationships between neuro-PK and neuro-PD processes is key to predictions in different conditions. As a first screen, it is suggested to use in silico/in vitro derived molecular properties of candidate compounds and predict concentration-time profiles of compounds in multiple compartments of the human CNS, using time-course based physiology-based (PB) PK models. Then, for selected compounds, one can include in vitro drug-target binding kinetics to predict target occupancy (TO)-time profiles in humans. This will improve neuro-PD prediction. Furthermore, a pharmaco-omics approach is suggested, providing multilevel and paralleled data on systems processes from individuals in a systems-wide manner. Thus, clinical trials will be better informed, using fewer animals, while also, needing fewer individuals and samples per individual for proof of concept in humans.

  8. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of hydroxyurea in sickle cell anemia patients, a basis for optimizing the dosing regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galactéros Frédéric

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydroxyurea (HU is the first approved pharmacological treatment of sickle cell anemia (SCA. The objectives of this study were to develop population pharmacokinetic(PK-pharmacodynamic(PD models for HU in order to characterize the exposure-efficacy relationships and their variability, compare two dosing regimens by simulations and develop some recommendations for monitoring the treatment. Methods The models were built using population modelling software NONMEM VII based on data from two clinical studies of SCA adult patients receiving 500-2000 mg of HU once daily. Fetal hemoglobin percentage (HbF% and mean corpuscular volume (MCV were used as biomarkers for response. A sequential modelling approach was applied. Models were evaluated using simulation-based techniques. Comparisons of two dosing regimens were performed by simulating 10000 patients in each arm during 12 months. Results The PK profiles were described by a bicompartmental model. The median (and interindividual coefficient of variation (CV of clearance was 11.6 L/h (30%, the central volume was 45.3 L (35%. PK steady-state was reached in about 35 days. For a given dosing regimen, HU exposure varied approximately fivefold among patients. The dynamics of HbF% and MCV were described by turnover models with inhibition of elimination of response. In the studied range of drug exposures, the effect of HU on HbF% was at its maximum (median Imax was 0.57, CV was 27%; the effect on MCV was close to its maximum, with median value of 0.14 and CV of 49%. Simulations showed that 95% of the steady-state levels of HbF% and MCV need 26 months and 3 months to be reached, respectively. The CV of the steady-state value of HbF% was about 7 times larger than that of MCV. Simulations with two different dosing regimens showed that continuous dosing led to a stronger HbF% increase in some patients. Conclusions The high variability of response to HU was related in part to pharmacokinetics and

  9. Revisiting Dosing Regimen Using Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Mathematical Modeling: Densification and Intensification of Combination Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meille, Christophe; Barbolosi, Dominique; Ciccolini, Joseph; Freyer, Gilles; Iliadis, Athanassios

    2016-08-01

    Controlling effects of drugs administered in combination is particularly challenging with a densified regimen because of life-threatening hematological toxicities. We have developed a mathematical model to optimize drug dosing regimens and to redesign the dose intensification-dose escalation process, using densified cycles of combined anticancer drugs. A generic mathematical model was developed to describe the main components of the real process, including pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy pharmacodynamics, and non-hematological toxicity risk. This model allowed for computing the distribution of the total drug amount of each drug in combination, for each escalation dose level, in order to minimize the average tumor mass for each cycle. This was achieved while complying with absolute neutrophil count clinical constraints and without exceeding a fixed risk of non-hematological dose-limiting toxicity. The innovative part of this work was the development of densifying and intensifying designs in a unified procedure. This model enabled us to determine the appropriate regimen in a pilot phase I/II study in metastatic breast patients for a 2-week-cycle treatment of docetaxel plus epirubicin doublet, and to propose a new dose-ranging process. In addition to the present application, this method can be further used to achieve optimization of any combination therapy, thus improving the efficacy versus toxicity balance of such a regimen.

  10. Two-dose-level confirmatory study of the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of everolimus in Chinese patients with advanced solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jappe Annette

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This phase I, randomized, multicenter, open-label study investigated the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of the oral mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus in Chinese patients with advanced solid tumors. Methods A total of 24 patients with advanced breast cancer (n = 6, gastric cancer (n = 6, non-small cell lung cancer (n = 6, or renal cell carcinoma (n = 6 who were refractory to/unsuitable for standard therapy were randomized 1:1 to oral everolimus 5 or 10 mg/day. Primary end points were pharmacokinetic parameters and safety and tolerability. Pharmacokinetic 24-h profiles were measured on day 15; trough level was measured on days 2, 8, 15, 16, and 22. Tolerability was assessed continuously. This final analysis was performed after all patients had received 6 months of study drug or had discontinued. Results Everolimus was absorbed rapidly; median Tmax was 3 h (range, 1-4 and 2 h (range, 0.9-6 in the 5 and 10 mg/day groups, respectively. Pharmacokinetic parameters increased dose proportionally from the 5 and 10 mg/day doses. Steady-state levels were achieved by day 8 or earlier. The most common adverse events suspected to be related to everolimus therapy were increased blood glucose (16.7% and 41.7% and fatigue (16.7% and 33.3% in the everolimus 5 and 10 mg/day dose cohorts, respectively. Best tumor response was stable disease in 10 (83% and 6 (50% patients in the 5 and 10 mg/day groups, respectively. Conclusions Everolimus 5 or 10 mg/day was well tolerated in Chinese patients with advanced solid tumors. The observed safety and pharmacokinetic profile of everolimus from this study were consistent with previous studies. Trial registration Chinese Health Authorities 2008L09346

  11. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model to Determine Dosimetry and Cholinesterase Inhibition for a Binary Mixture of Chlorpyrifos and Diazinon in the Rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timchalk, Chuck; Poet, Torka S.

    2008-05-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models have been developed and validated for the organophosphorus (OP) insecticides chlorpyrifos (CPF) and diazinon (DZN). Based on similar pharmacokinetic and mode of action properties it is anticipated that these OPs could interact at a number of important metabolic steps including: CYP450 mediated activation/detoxification, and blood/tissue cholinesterase (ChE) binding/inhibition. We developed a binary PBPK/PD model for CPF, DZN and their metabolites based on previously published models for the individual insecticides. The metabolic interactions (CYP450) between CPF and DZN were evaluated in vitro and suggests that CPF is more substantially metabolized to its oxon metabolite than is DZN. These data are consistent with their observed in vivo relative potency (CPF>DZN). Each insecticide inhibited the other’s in vitro metabolism in a concentration-dependent manner. The PBPK model code used to described the metabolism of CPF and DZN was modified to reflect the type of inhibition kinetics (i.e. competitive vs. non-competitive). The binary model was then evaluated against previously published rodent dosimetry and ChE inhibition data for the mixture. The PBPK/PD model simulations of the acute oral exposure to single- (15 mg/kg) vs. binary-mixtures (15+15 mg/kg) of CFP and DZN at this lower dose resulted in no differences in the predicted pharmacokinetics of either the parent OPs or their respective metabolites; whereas, a binary oral dose of CPF+DZN at 60+60 mg/kg did result in observable changes in the DZN pharmacokinetics. Cmax was more reasonably fit by modifying the absorption parameters. It is anticipated that at low environmentally relevant binary doses, most likely to be encountered in occupational or environmental related exposures, that the pharmacokinetics are expected to be linear, and ChE inhibition dose-additive.

  12. Population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of ketamine-induced pain relief of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Albert; Olofsen, Erik; Sigtermans, Marnix; Noppers, Ingeborg; Niesters, Marieke; Aarts, Leon; Bauer, Martin; Sarton, Elise

    2011-03-01

    Pharmacological treatment of chronic (neuropathic) pain is often disappointing. In order to enhance our insight in the complex interaction between analgesic drug and chronic pain relief, we performed a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling study on the effect of S(+)-ketamine on pain scores in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) patients. Sixty CRPS-1 patients were randomly allocated to received a 100-h infusion of S(+)-ketamine or placebo. The drug infusion rate was slowly increased from 5 mg/h (per 70 kg) to 20 mg/h based upon the effect/side effect profile. Pain scores and drug blood samples were obtained during the treatment phase and pain scores were further obtained weekly for another 11 weeks. A population PK-PD model was developed to analyze the S(+)-ketamine-pain data. Plasma concentrations of S(+)-ketamine and its metabolite decreased rapidly upon the termination of S(+)-ketamine infusion. The chance for an analgesic effect from ketamine and placebo treatment was 67±10% and 23±9% (population value±SE), respectively. The pain data were well described by the PK-PD model with parameters C(50)=10.5±4.8 ng/ml (95% ci 4.37-21.2 ng/ml) and t½ for onset/offset=10.9±4.0 days (5.3-20.5 days). Long-term S(+)-ketamine treatment is effective in causing pain relief in CRPS-1 patients with analgesia outlasting the treatment period by 50 days. These data suggest that ketamine initiated a cascade of events, including desensitization of excitatory receptor systems in the central nervous system, which persisted but slowly abated when ketamine molecules were no longer present. Copyright © 2010 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Erythromycin potentiates PR interval prolonging effect of verapamil in the rat: A pharmacodynamic drug interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dakhel, Yaman; Jamali, Fakhreddin

    2006-01-01

    Calcium channel blockers and macrolide antibiotics account for many drug interactions. Anecdotal reports suggest interactions between the two resulting in severe side effects. We studied the interaction between verapamil and erythromycin in the rat to see whether it occurs at the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamic level. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received doses of 1 mg/kg verapamil or 100 mg/kg erythromycin alone or in combination (n = 6/group). Serial blood samples (0-6 h) were taken for determination of the drug concentrations using HPLC. Electrocardiograms were recorded (0-6 h) through subcutaneously inserted lead II. Binding of the drugs to plasma proteins was studied using spiked plasma. Verapamil prolonged PR but not QT interval. Erythromycin prolonged QT but not PR interval. The combination resulted in a significant increase in PR interval prolongation and AV node blocks but did not further prolong QT interval. Pharmacokinetics and protein binding of neither drug were altered by the other. Our rat data confirm the anecdotal human case reports that combination of erythromycin and verapamil can result in potentiation of the cardiovascular response. The interaction appears to be at the pharmacodynamic rather than pharmacokinetic level hence may be extrapolated to other calcium channel antagonists

  14. Lisdexamfetamine: A pharmacokinetic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiran, Eloisa; Kessler, Félix Henrique; Fröehlich, Pedro Eduardo; Limberger, Renata Pereira

    2016-06-30

    Lisdexamfetamine (LDX) is a d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) pro-drug used to treat Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) symptoms. The in vivo pharmacodynamics of LDX is the same as that of its active product d-AMPH, although there are a few qualitative and quantitative differences due to pharmacokinetics. Due to the specific pharmacokinetics of the long-acting stimulants, this article revises the pharmacokinetic studies on LDX, the newest amphetamine pro-drug. The Medline/Pubmed, Science Direct and Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (Lilacs and Ibecs) (2007-2016) databases were searched for articles and their list of references. As for basic pharmacokinetics studies, since LDX is a newly developed medication, there are few results concerning biotransformation, distribution and the use of different biological matrices for analysis. This is the first robust review on this topic, gathering data from all clinical pharmacokinetics studies available in the literature. The particular pharmacokinetics of LDX plays a major role in studying this pro-drug, since this knowledge was essential to understand some reports on clinical effects in literature, e.g. the small likelihood of reducing the effect by interactions, the effect of long duration use and the still questionable reduction of the potential for abuse. In general the already well-known pharmacokinetic properties of amphetamine make LDX relatively predictable, simplifying the use of LDX in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, characteristics of medication use, and relevant pharmacological interventions on fall risk in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Falls among the elderly are an issue internationally and a public health problem that brings substantial economic and quality-of-life burdens to individuals and society. Falls prevention is an important measure of nursing quality and patient safety. Numerous studies have evaluated the association of medication use with fall risk in elderly patients. However, an up-to-date review has not been available to summarize the multifaceted pharmaceutical concerns in the prevention of medication-related falls. Relevant literature was identified by performing searches in PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library, covering the period until February 2014. We included studies that described an association between medications and falls, and effects of drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, characteristics of medication use, and pharmacological interventions on fall risk in elderly patients. The full text of each included article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed. Fall-risk-increasing drugs (FRIDs) include central nervous system-acting agents, cough preparations, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-Alzheimer's agents, antiplatelet agents, calcium antagonists, diuretics, α-blockers, digoxin, hypoglycemic drugs, neurotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, nasal preparations, and antiglaucoma ophthalmic preparations. The degree of medication-related fall risk was dependent on one or some of the following factors: drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties (eg, elimination half-life, metabolic pathway, genetic polymorphism, risk rating of medications despite belonging to the same therapeutic class) and/or characteristics of medication use (eg, number of medications and drug-drug interactions, dose strength, duration of medication use and time since stopping, medication change, prescribing appropriateness, and medication adherence). Pharmacological interventions, including withdrawal of FRIDs, pharmacist-conducted clinical medication

  16. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic effects of the intravenous CB1 receptor agonist Org 26828 in healthy male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuurman, Lineke; Passier, Paul C C M; de Kam, Marieke L; Kleijn, Huub J; Cohen, Adam F; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2010-11-01

    An ideal drug for outpatient treatments under conscious sedation would have both sedative and analgesic properties. CB1/CB2 agonists are expected to have sedative, amnestic, analgesic and anti-emetic properties. The main objective of this first study in humans was to assess the sedative properties of intravenous Org 26828. In addition, pharmacokinetics, amnestic properties, postural stability, and behavioural and cardiovascular effects were studied. Midazolam intravenous 0.1 mg/kg and placebo were used as controls. The pharmacokinetic parameters (Cmax and AUC0-inf) of the main metabolite Org 26761 were proportional to dose. No effects were observed after doses up to 0.3 μg/kg of Org 26828. Dose-related effects were observed at higher doses. Although subjects reported subjective sedation after administration of Org 26828 at 3 and 6 μg/kg, the observed sedation was considerably less than after midazolam. Doses higher than the maximum tolerated dose of 1 μg/kg of Org 26828 caused unpleasant central nervous system effects (anxiety, paranoia, hallucinations). Therefore, Org 26828 is not suitable for providing sedation for outpatient surgical procedures.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and tolerance study of intravitreal injection of dexamethasone-loaded nanoparticles in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hongfan

    2009-01-01

    Linhua Zhang1, Yue Li2, Chao Zhang1, Yusheng Wang2, Cunxian Song11Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Tianjin, China; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Ophthalmology of Chinese PLA, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, ChinaAbstract: The aim of the study was to investigate the tolerance and pharmacokinetics of dexamethasone (DEX)-loaded poly(lactic acid–co-glycolic acid) ...

  18. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Lacosamide in Norway: Focus on Pharmacokinetic Variability, Efficacy and Tolerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Torleiv; Brodtkorb, Eylert; Baftiu, Arton; Burns, Margrete Larsen; Johannessen, Svein I; Johannessen Landmark, Cecilie

    2017-07-01

    Lacosamide (LCM) is a new antiepileptic drug (AED). Experience from therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) in clinical practice is limited. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the pharmacokinetic variability of LCM in relation to efficacy and tolerability in patients with refractory epilepsy in a real-life setting. Variables included age, gender, daily doses and serum concentrations of LCM and other AEDs from the TDM-database at the National Center for Epilepsy in Norway. Clinical data regarding efficacy and tolerability were collected from medical records. The Norwegian Prescription Database (NorPD) was used to include population-based numbers of users. TDM-data from 344 patients were included. The median dose, serum concentration, and concentration/dose (C/D)-ratio of LCM was 350 (range 25-700) mg/day, 19.7 (range 8.1-56.2) µmol/L, and 0.06 (0.02-0.82) µmol/L/mg, respectively. Serum concentrations were reduced by 28% by concomitant use of enzyme inducers and increased by 30% in patients aged >65 years. Efficacy and tolerability were assessed in 227 patients: 29% had >50% seizure reduction (eight seizure free), 30% had no effect, and 44% reported adverse effects. In Norway, there were on average 500 patients per year using LCM in this period based on NorPD. The study demonstrated pharmacokinetic variability and use of TDM of LCM in Norway. Data were collected from multiple sources for improved pharmacovigilance. Serum concentrations were influenced by enzyme inducers and ageing, indicating the usefulness of TDM. Effect and tolerability were favorable within a suggested reference range of 10-40 µmol/L given drug-fasting conditions.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of intravenous artesunate during severe malaria treatment in Ugandan adults

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byakika-Kibwika, Pauline

    2012-04-27

    AbstractBackgroundSevere malaria is a medical emergency with high mortality. Prompt achievement of therapeutic concentrations of highly effective anti-malarial drugs reduces the risk of death. The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of intravenous artesunate in Ugandan adults with severe malaria.MethodsFourteen adults with severe falciparum malaria requiring parenteral therapy were treated with 2.4 mg\\/kg intravenous artesunate. Blood samples were collected after the initial dose and plasma concentrations of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin measured by solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The study was approved by the Makerere University Faculty of Medicine Research and Ethics Committee (Ref2010-015) and Uganda National Council of Science and Technology (HS605) and registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01122134).ResultsAll study participants achieved prompt resolution of symptoms and complete parasite clearance with median (range) parasite clearance time of 17 (8–24) hours. Median (range) maximal artesunate concentration (Cmax) was 3260 (1020–164000) ng\\/mL, terminal elimination half-life (T1\\/2) was 0.25 (0.1-1.8) hours and total artesunate exposure (AUC) was 727 (290–111256) ng·h\\/mL. Median (range) dihydroartemisinin Cmax was 3140 (1670–9530) ng\\/mL, with Tmax of 0.14 (0.6 – 6.07) hours and T1\\/2 of 1.31 (0.8–2.8) hours. Dihydroartemisinin AUC was 3492 (2183–6338) ng·h\\/mL. None of the participants reported adverse events.ConclusionsPlasma concentrations of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin were achieved rapidly with rapid and complete symptom resolution and parasite clearance with no adverse events.

  20. Enhancement of skin permeation of flurbiprofen via its transdermal patches using isopulegol decanoate (ISO-C10) as an absorption enhancer: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Quan, Peng; Liu, Xiaochang; Guo, Wenjia; Song, Wenting; Cun, Dongmei; Wang, Zhongyan; Fang, Liang

    2015-09-01

    The study aimed to prepare a transdermal patch for flurbiprofen using isopulegol decanoate (ISO-C10) as a permeation enhancer, and to evaluate the in-vitro and in-vivo percutaneous permeation of the drug, as well as the pharmacodynamic efficacy of the formulation. The permeation experiments were conducted on rabbit skin, and the pharmacokinetic profiles and synovial fluid drug concentration were measured after in-vivo transdermal administration. A deconvolution approach was employed to analyse the correlation between the in-vitro and in-vivo drug permeation. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects were, respectively, assessed using the adjuvant arthritis model and the acetic acid induced pain model. ISO-C10 could increase the in-vitro permeation of flurbiprofen from 46.22 ± 5.65 μg/cm(2) to 101.07 ± 10.85 μg/cm(2) . The in-vivo absorption of the drug was also improved by the enhancer, and a good linear correlation was observed between the in-vitro and in-vivo drug permeation. Meanwhile, the ISO-C10 contained patches increased the drug disposition in synovial fluid and enhanced the pharmacodynamic efficacy of the formulation. ISO-C10 would be a promising permeation enhancer for improving the in-vitro and in-vivo delivery of flurbiprofen from its transdermal patches. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  1. Preclinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamic Target of SCY-078, a First-in-Class Orally Active Antifungal Glucan Synthesis Inhibitor, in Murine Models of Disseminated Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wring, Stephen A; Randolph, Ryan; Park, SeongHee; Abruzzo, George; Chen, Qing; Flattery, Amy; Garrett, Graig; Peel, Michael; Outcalt, Russell; Powell, Kendall; Trucksis, Michelle; Angulo, David; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna

    2017-04-01

    SCY-078 (MK-3118) is a novel, semisynthetic derivative of enfumafungin and represents the first compound of the triterpene class of antifungals. SCY-078 exhibits potent inhibition of β-(1,3)-d-glucan synthesis, an essential cell wall component of many pathogenic fungi, including Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. SCY-078 is currently in phase 2 clinical development for the treatment of invasive fungal diseases. In vitro disposition studies to assess solubility, intestinal permeability, and metabolic stability were predictive of good oral bioavailability. Preclinical pharmacokinetic studies were consistent with once-daily administration to humans. After intravenous delivery, plasma clearance in rodents and dogs was low, representing candidiasis, exceeded plasma by 20- to 25-fold for the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to infinity (AUC 0-∞ ) and C max SCY-078 achieved efficacy endpoints following oral delivery across multiple murine models of disseminated candidiasis. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic indices C max /MIC and AUC/MIC correlated with outcome. Target therapeutic exposure, expressed as the plasma AUC 0-24 , was comparable across models, with an upper value of 11.2 μg·h/ml (15.4 μM·h); the corresponding mean value for free drug AUC/MIC was ∼0.75. Overall, these results demonstrate that SCY-078 has the oral and intravenous (i.v.) pharmacokinetic properties and potency in murine infection models of disseminated candidiasis to support further investigation as a novel i.v. and oral treatment for invasive fungal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Wring et al.

  2. Preclinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamic Target of SCY-078, a First-in-Class Orally Active Antifungal Glucan Synthesis Inhibitor, in Murine Models of Disseminated Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Ryan; Park, SeongHee; Abruzzo, George; Chen, Qing; Flattery, Amy; Garrett, Graig; Peel, Michael; Outcalt, Russell; Powell, Kendall; Trucksis, Michelle; Angulo, David; Borroto-Esoda, Katyna

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT SCY-078 (MK-3118) is a novel, semisynthetic derivative of enfumafungin and represents the first compound of the triterpene class of antifungals. SCY-078 exhibits potent inhibition of β-(1,3)-d-glucan synthesis, an essential cell wall component of many pathogenic fungi, including Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. SCY-078 is currently in phase 2 clinical development for the treatment of invasive fungal diseases. In vitro disposition studies to assess solubility, intestinal permeability, and metabolic stability were predictive of good oral bioavailability. Preclinical pharmacokinetic studies were consistent with once-daily administration to humans. After intravenous delivery, plasma clearance in rodents and dogs was low, representing candidiasis, exceeded plasma by 20- to 25-fold for the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to infinity (AUC0–∞) and Cmax. SCY-078 achieved efficacy endpoints following oral delivery across multiple murine models of disseminated candidiasis. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic indices Cmax/MIC and AUC/MIC correlated with outcome. Target therapeutic exposure, expressed as the plasma AUC0–24, was comparable across models, with an upper value of 11.2 μg·h/ml (15.4 μM·h); the corresponding mean value for free drug AUC/MIC was ∼0.75. Overall, these results demonstrate that SCY-078 has the oral and intravenous (i.v.) pharmacokinetic properties and potency in murine infection models of disseminated candidiasis to support further investigation as a novel i.v. and oral treatment for invasive fungal diseases. PMID:28137806

  3. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Profiles of Tiamulin in an Experimental Intratracheal Infection Model of Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xia; Sun, Jian; Yang, Tao; Fang, Xi; Cheng, Jie; Xiong, Yan Q; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is the most important pathogen in poultry among four pathogenic Mycoplasma species. Tiamulin is a pleuromutilin antibiotic that shows a great activity against M. gallisepticum and has been approved for use in veterinary medicine particularly for poultry. However, the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) profiles of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum are not well understood. Therefore, in the current studies, we investigated the in vivo PK/PD profiles of tiamulin using a well-established experimental intratracheal infection model of M. gallisepticum. The efficacy of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum was studied in 8-day-old chickens after intramuscular (i.m.) administration at 10 doses between 0-80 mg/kg. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to evaluate the PK parameters of tiamulin following i.m. administration at doses of 5, 40, and 80 mg/kg in Mycoplasma gallisepticum-infected neutropenic chickens. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) was used for quantitative detection of M. gallisepticum. The MIC of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum strain S6 was 0.03 μg/mL. The PK/PD index, AUC24h/MIC, correlated well with the in vivo antibacterial efficacy. The in vivo data suggest that animal dosage regimens should supply AUC24h/MIC of tiamulin of 382.68 h for 2 log10 ccu equivalents M. gallisepticum reduction. To attain that goal, the administered dose is expected to be 45 mg/kg b.w. for treatment of M. gallisepticum infection with an MIC90 of 0.03 μg/mL.

  4. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Profiles of Tiamulin in an Experimental Intratracheal Infection Model of Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Xiao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma gallisepticum is the most important pathogen in poultry among four pathogenic Mycoplasma species. Tiamulin is a pleuromutilin antibiotic that shows a great activity against M. gallisepticum and has been approved for use in veterinary medicine particularly for poultry. However, the Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamics (PK/PD profiles of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum are not well understood. Therefore, in the current studies, we investigated the in vivo PK/PD profiles of tiamulin using a well-established experimental intratracheal infection model of M. gallisepticum. The efficacy of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum was studied in 8-day-old chickens after intramuscular (i.m. administration at 10 doses between 0-80 mg/kg. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS was used to evaluate the PK parameters of tiamulin following i.m. administration at doses of 5, 40 and 80 mg/kg in Mycoplasma gallisepticum infected neutropenic chickens. Real time PCR (RT-PCR was used for quantitative detection of M. gallisepticum. The MIC of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum strain S6 was 0.03 μg/mL. The PK/PD index, AUC24h/MIC, correlated well with the in vivo antibacterial efficacy. The in vivo data suggest that animal dosage regimens should supply AUC24h/MIC of tiamulin of 382.68 h for 2 log10 ccu equivalents M. gallisepticum reduction. To attain that goal, the administered dose is expected to be 45 mg/kg b.w. for treatment of M. gallisepticum infection with an MIC90 of 0.03 μg/mL.

  5. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Analysis on Inflammation Rat Model after Oral Administration of Huang Lian Jie Du Decoction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ren

    Full Text Available Huang-Lian-Jie-Du Decoction (HLJDD is a classical Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM formula with heat-dissipating and detoxifying effects. It is used to treat inflammation-associated diseases. However, no systematic pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD data concerning the activity of HLJDD under inflammatory conditions is available to date. In the present study, the concentration-time profiles and the hepatic clearance rates (HCR of 41 major components in rat plasma in response to the oral administration of a clinical dose of HLJDD were investigated by LC-QqQ-MS using a dynamic multiple reaction monitoring (DMRM method. Additionally, the levels of 7 cytokines (CKs in the plasma and the body temperature of rats were analyzed. Furthermore, a PK-PD model was established to describe the time course of the hemodynamic and anti-inflammatory effects of HLJDD. As one of the three major active constituents in HLJDD, iridoids were absorbed and eliminated more easily and quickly than alkaloids and flavonoids. Compared with the normal controls, the flavonoids, alkaloids and iridoids in inflamed rats exhibited consistently changing trends of PK behaviors, such as higher bioavailability, slower elimination, delays in reaching the maximum concentration (Tmax and longer substantivity. The HCR of iridoids was different from that of alkaloids and flavonoids in inflamed rats. Furthermore, excellent pharmacodynamic effects of HLJDD were observed in inflamed rats. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-1β, IL-10, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2 and body temperature significantly decreased after the administration of HLJDD. Based on PK-PD modeling with the three-phase synchronous characterization of time-concentration-effect, flavonoids exhibited one mechanism of action in the anti-inflammatory process, while iridoids and alkaloids showed another mechanism of action. Taken together, the results demonstrated that

  6. A Mathematical Model of the Effect of Immunogenicity on Therapeutic Protein Pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaoying; Hickling, Timothy; Kraynov, Eugenia; Kuang, Bing; Parng, Chuenlei; Vicini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical pharmacokinetic/anti-drug-antibody (PK/ADA) model was constructed for quantitatively assessing immunogenicity for therapeutic proteins. The model is inspired by traditional pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models, and is based on the observed impact of ADA on protein drug clearance. The hypothesis for this work is that altered drug PK contains information about the extent and timing of ADA generation. By fitting drug PK profiles while accounting for ADA-mediated drug cle...

  7. Pegylated Long-Acting Human Growth Hormone Possesses a Promising Once-Weekly Treatment Profile, and Multiple Dosing Is Well Tolerated in Adult Patients with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Esben; Klose, Marianne Christina; Hansen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recombinant human GH (rhGH) replacement therapy in children and adults currently requires daily sc injections for several years or lifelong, which may be both inconvenient and distressing for patients. NNC126-0083 is a pegylated rhGH developed for once-weekly administration. Objectives......: Our objective was to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of multiple doses of NNC126-0083 in adult patients with GH deficiency (GHD). Subjects and Methods: Thirty-three adult patients with GHD, age 20-65 yr, body mass index 18.5-35.0 kg/m(2), and glycated...... to 240 h after the third dosing. Physical examination, antibodies, and local tolerability were assessed. Results: NNC126-0083 was well tolerated with no difference in local tolerability compared with placebo and with no signs of lipoatrophy. A more than dose-proportional exposure was observed...

  8. Differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of colistimethate sodium (CMS) and colistin between three different CMS dosage regimens in a critically ill patient infected by a multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Sònia; Grau, Santiago; Valle, Marta; Sorlí, Luisa; Horcajada, Juan Pablo; Segura, Concha; Alvarez-Lerma, Francisco

    2013-08-01

    Use of colistin has re-emerged for the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria, but information on its pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is limited, especially in critically ill patients. Recent data from pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) population studies have suggested that this population could benefit from administration of higher than standard doses of colistimethate sodium (CMS), but the relationship between administration of incremental doses of CMS and corresponding PK/PD parameters as well as its efficacy and toxicity have not yet been investigated in a clinical setting. The objective was to study the PK/PD differences of CMS and colistin between three different CMS dosage regimens in the same critically ill patient. A critically ill patient with nosocomial pneumonia caused by a MDR Acinetobacter baumannii received incremental doses of CMS. During administration of the different CMS dosage regimens, CMS and colistin plasma concentrations were determined and PK/PD indexes were calculated. With administration of the highest CMS dose once daily (720 mg every 24h), the peak plasma concentration of CMS and colistin increased to 40.51 mg/L and 1.81 mg/L, respectively, and the AUC0-24/MIC of colistin was 184.41. This dosage regimen was efficacious, and no nephrotoxicity or neurotoxicity was observed. In conclusion, a higher and extended-interval CMS dosage made it possible to increase the exposure of CMS and colistin in a critically ill patient infected by a MDR A. baumannii and allowed a clinical and microbiological optimal response to be achieved without evidence of toxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of a microemulsion vehicle on cutaneous bioequivalence of a lipophilic model drug assessed by microdialysis and pharmacodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreilgaard, Mads; Kemme, M J; Burggraaf, J

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the cutaneous bioequivalence of a lipophilic model drug (lidocaine) applied in a novel topical microemulsion vehicle, compared to a conventional oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion, assessed by a pharmacokinetics microdialysis model and a pharmacodynamic method....

  10. Semi-physiological pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling and simulation of 5-fluorouracil for thrombocytopenia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobuchi, Shinji; Ito, Yukako; Hayakawa, Taro; Nishimura, Asako; Shibata, Nobuhito; Takada, Kanji; Sakaeda, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to develop a simple pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model that could characterize the complete time-course of alterations in platelet counts to predict the onset and degree of thrombocytopenia, which severely limits the use of the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), in rats. 2. Platelet counts were measured in rats following the intravenous administration of various doses of 5-FU for 4 days to obtain data for an analysis of the PK-PD model. Our PK-PD model consisted of a two-compartment PK model, with three compartments for the PD model and 10 structural PK-PD model parameters. 3. After the 5-FU treatment, platelet counts transiently decreased to a nadir level, showed a rebound to above the baseline level before recovering to baseline levels. Nadir platelet counts and rebounds varied with the AUC0-∞ level. The final PK-PD model effectively characterized platelet count data and final PD parameters were estimated with high certainty. 4. This PK-PD model and simulation may represent a valuable tool for quantifying and predicting the complete time-course of alterations in blood cell counts, and could contribute to the development of therapeutic strategies with 5-FU and assessments of various novel anticancer agents that are difficult to examine in humans.

  11. Is prolonged infusion of piperacillin/tazobactam and meropenem in critically ill patients associated with improved pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic and patient outcomes? An observation from the Defining Antibiotic Levels in Intensive care unit patients (DALI) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Mohd H; Lipman, Jeffrey; Akova, Murat; Bassetti, Matteo; De Waele, Jan J; Dimopoulos, George; Dulhunty, Joel; Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija; Koulenti, Despoina; Martin, Claude; Montravers, Philippe; Rello, Jordi; Rhodes, Andrew; Starr, Therese; Wallis, Steven C; Roberts, Jason A

    2016-01-01

    We utilized the database of the Defining Antibiotic Levels in Intensive care unit patients (DALI) study to statistically compare the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic and clinical outcomes between prolonged-infusion and intermittent-bolus dosing of piperacillin/tazobactam and meropenem in critically ill patients using inclusion criteria similar to those used in previous prospective studies. This was a post hoc analysis of a prospective, multicentre pharmacokinetic point-prevalence study (DALI), which recruited a large cohort of critically ill patients from 68 ICUs across 10 countries. Of the 211 patients receiving piperacillin/tazobactam and meropenem in the DALI study, 182 met inclusion criteria. Overall, 89.0% (162/182) of patients achieved the most conservative target of 50% fT>MIC (time over which unbound or free drug concentration remains above the MIC). Decreasing creatinine clearance and the use of prolonged infusion significantly increased the PTA for most pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic targets. In the subgroup of patients who had respiratory infection, patients receiving β-lactams via prolonged infusion demonstrated significantly better 30 day survival when compared with intermittent-bolus patients [86.2% (25/29) versus 56.7% (17/30); P = 0.012]. Additionally, in patients with a SOFA score of ≥9, administration by prolonged infusion compared with intermittent-bolus dosing demonstrated significantly better clinical cure [73.3% (11/15) versus 35.0% (7/20); P = 0.035] and survival rates [73.3% (11/15) versus 25.0% (5/20); P = 0.025]. Analysis of this large dataset has provided additional data on the niche benefits of administration of piperacillin/tazobactam and meropenem by prolonged infusion in critically ill patients, particularly for patients with respiratory infections. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  12. Rectal methadone in cancer patients with pain. A preliminary clinical and pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, C; Zecca, E; Brunelli, C; Rizzio, E; Saita, L; Lodi, F; De Conno, F

    1995-10-01

    Cancer pain can be treated in most cases with oral analgesics. However, during their clinical history, 53% to 70% of patients will need alternative routes of opioid administration. The rectal administration of opioids is a simple alternative route for many patients. There are no data in the literature regarding the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of rectal methadone. We evaluated the analgesia, tolerability and absorption profile of methadone hydrochloride in six opioid-naive cancer patients with pain. A blood sample was collected before administration of a single dose of drug (10 mg) and then again after fixed times. At these fixed times the patients were asked about pain, nausea and drowsiness by means of a visual analogue scale of 0-100 mm (VAS). Pain relief was statistically significant as early as 30 minutes and up to eight hours after methadone administration. None of the patients reported significant side effects. The pharmacokinetics of rectal methadone showed rapid and extensive distribution phases followed by a slow elimination phase. Rectal methadone can be considered an effective analgesic therapy for patients with cancer pain for whom oral and/or parenteral opioids are not indicated or available.

  13. Pharmacodynamics of Imipenem in Combination with beta-Lactamase Inhibitor MK7655 in a Murine Thigh Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mavridou, E.; Melchers, M.J.B.; Mil, A.C. van; Mangin, E.; Motyl, M.R.; Mouton, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    MK7655 is a newly developed beta-lactamase inhibitor of class A and class C carbapenemases. Pharmacokinetics (PK) of imipenem-cilastatin (IMP/C) and MK7655 were determined for intraperitoneal doses of 4 mg/kg to 128 mg/kg of body weight. MIC and pharmacodynamics (PD) studies of MK7655 were performed

  14. Pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of phenobarbital in asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia: a thermopharmacological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, M P H; Groenendaal, F; Toet, M C; van Straaten, H L M; van Hasselt, J G C; Huitema, A D R; de Vries, L S; Egberts, A C G; Rademaker, C M A

    2012-10-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia can influence the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs, the discipline which is called thermopharmacology. We studied the effect of therapeutic hypothermia on the pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in asphyxiated neonates, and the clinical efficacy and the effect of phenobarbital on the continuous amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) in a prospective study. Data were obtained from the prospective SHIVER study, performed in two of the ten Dutch level III neonatal intensive care units. Phenobarbital data were collected between 2008 and 2010. Newborns were eligible for inclusion if they had a gestational age of at least 36 weeks and presented with perinatal asphyxia and encephalopathy. According to protocol in both hospitals an intravenous (repeated) loading dose of phenobarbital 20 mg/kg divided in 1-2 doses was administered if seizures occurred or were suspected before or during the hypothermic phase. Phenobarbital plasma concentrations were measured in plasma using a fluorescence polarization immunoassay. aEEG was monitored continuously. A one-compartmental population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was developed using a multi-level Markov transition model. No (clinically relevant) effect of moderate therapeutic hypothermia on phenobarbital pharmacokinetics could be identified. The observed responsiveness was 66%. While we still advise an initial loading dose of 20 mg/kg, clinicians should not be reluctant to administer an additional dose of 10-20 mg/kg. An additional dose should be given before switching to a second-line anticonvulsant drug. Based on our pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model, administration of phenobarbital under hypothermia seems to reduce the transition rate from a continuous normal voltage (CNV) to discontinuous normal voltage aEEG background level in hypothermic asphyxiated newborns, which may be attributed to the additional neuroprotection of phenobarbital in infants with a CNV pattern.

  15. In Vivo Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics of Colistin and Imipenem in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Ciofu, Oana; Song, Zhijun; Høiby, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Many Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are sensitive to antibiotics in susceptibility testing, but eradication of the infection is difficult. The main reason is the biofilm formation in the airways of patients with CF. The pharmacokinetics (PKs) and pharmacodynamics (PDs) of antimicrobials can reliably be used to predict whether antimicrobial regimens will achieve the maximum bactericidal effect against infections. Unfortunately, however, most PK/PD studies of antimicrobials have been done on planktonic cells and very few PK/PD studies have been done on biofilms, partly due to the lack of suitable models in vivo. In the present study, a biofilm lung infection model was developed to provide an objective and quantitative evaluation of the PK/PD profile of antimicrobials. Killing curves were set up to detect the antimicrobial kinetics on planktonic and biofilm P. aeruginosa cells in vivo. Colistin showed concentration-dependent killing, while imipenem showed time-dependent killing on both planktonic and biofilm P. aeruginosa cells in vivo. The parameter best correlated to the elimination of bacteria in lung by colistin was the area under the curve (AUC) versus MIC (AUC/MIC) for planktonic cells or the AUC versus minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC; AUC/MBIC) for biofilm cells. The best-correlated parameter for imipenem was the time that the drug concentration was above the MIC for planktonic cells (TMIC) or time that the drug concentration was above the MBIC (TMBIC) for biofilm cells. However, the AUC/MIC of imipenem showed a better correlation with the efficacy of imipenem for biofilm infections (R2 = 0.89) than planktonic cell infections (R2 = 0.38). The postantibiotic effect (PAE) of colistin and imipenem was shorter in biofilm infections than planktonic cell infections in this model. PMID:22354300

  16. Pharmacokinetic drug evaluation of paliperidone in the treatment of schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, Matthew; Oliver, Hannah; Sohail, Zohaib

    2017-08-01

    This paper reviews the pharmacokinetics, receptor binding, clinical efficacy and safety of paliperidone in the treatment of patients with schizoaffective disorder. Areas covered: We reviewed the literature using keywords 'paliperidone', 'schizoaffective disorder' and 'clinical trials' with a focus on seminal data papers and information that is clinically relevant to the treatment of schizoaffective disorder. The purpose of this paper is to provide a clinically oriented review of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of paliperidone including receptor binding, clinical efficacy, safety and tolerability. Expert opinion: Paliperidone is currently the only medication FDA approved specifically for the treatment of schizoaffective disorder. Paliperidone is an active metabolite of risperidone, is minimally metabolized in the liver and is primarily known to be cleared through the kidneys. For this reason, paliperidone could be considered for some patients with schizoaffective disorder who also have hepatic impairment. After correcting for the reduced protein binding that is characteristic of hepatically impaired patients, the Cmax was 12% lower than in healthy subjects while the AUC and CL/F were comparable [14]. In addition, the availability of long acting injectable formulations may be useful for patients who are non-adherent with oral medications. The cost of paliperidone may be a disadvantage.

  17. [New method for analyzing pharmacodynamic material basis of traditional Chinese medicines by using specific knockout technology with monoclonal antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Qu, Hui-Hua; Wang, Qing-Guo

    2013-09-01

    Study on pharmacodynamic material basis of traditional Chinese medicines is one of the key issues for the modernization of traditional Chinese medicine. Having introduced the monoclonal antibody technology into the study on pharmacodynamic material basis of traditional Chinese medicines, the author prepared the immunoaffinity chromatography column by using monoclonal antibodies in active components of traditional Chinese medicines, so as to selectively knock out the component from herbs or traditional Chinese medicine compounds, while preserving all of the other components and keeping their amount and ratio unchanged. A comparative study on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was made to explicitly reveal the correlation between the component and the main purpose of traditional Chinese medicines and compounds. The analysis on pharmacodynamic material basis of traditional Chinese medicines by using specific knockout technology with monoclonal antibodies is a new method for study pharmacodynamic material basis in line with the characteristics of traditional Chinese medicines. Its results can not only help study material basis from a new perspective, but also help find the modern scientific significance in single herb or among compounds of traditional Chinese medicines.

  18. Pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of rocuronium in intensive care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparr, H.J; Wierda, J.MKH; Proost, Johannes H.; Keller, C; Khuenl-Brady, K.S

    We have studied dose requirements, recovery times and pharmacokinetics of rocuronium in 32 intensive care patients. After an initial dose of 50 mg, rocuronium was administered as maintenance doses of 25 mg whenever two responses to train-of-four (TOF) stimulation reappeared (bolus group; n=27) or by

  19. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Renin-Angiotensin Aldosterone Biomarkers Following Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibition Therapy with Benazepril in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochel, Jonathan P; Fink, Martin; Peyrou, Mathieu; Soubret, Antoine; Giraudel, Jérôme M; Danhof, Meindert

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this research was to provide a comprehensive description of the effect of benazepril on the dynamics of the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) in dogs. Blood specimens for renin activity (RA), angiotensin II (AII), and aldosterone (ALD) quantitation in plasma were drawn from 12 healthy adult beagle dogs randomly allocated to 2 treatment groups: (i) benazepril 5 mg PO, q24 h (n: 6) and (ii) placebo (n: 6), in a cross-over design. A mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model, which includes the periodic nature of RA, AII, and ALD during placebo treatment and the subsequent changes in dynamics following repeated dosing with benazepril, was developed. The disposition kinetics of benazepril active metabolite, benazeprilat, was characterized using a saturable binding model to the angiotensin converting enzyme. The modulatory effect of benazeprilat on the RAAS was described using a combination of immediate response models. Our data show that benazepril noticeably influences the dynamics of the renin cascade, resulting in a substantial decrease in AII and ALD, while increasing RA throughout the observation span. The model provides a quantitative framework for better understanding the effect of ACE inhibition on the dynamics of the systemic RAAS in dogs.

  20. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling and the rational selection of dosage regimes for the prudent use of antimicrobial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papich, Mark G

    2014-07-16

    One of the strategies to decrease inappropriate antimicrobial use in veterinary medicine is to apply pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) principles to dosing regimens. If antimicrobials are used appropriately by applying these principles to attain targets for area-under-the-curve to MIC ratio (AUC/MIC), peak concentration to MIC ratio (CMAX/MIC), and time above MIC (T>MIC), more effective antibiotic therapy is possible, thus avoiding ineffective administration. Another mechanism whereby inappropriate antibiotic administration can be avoided is to use accurate Interpretive Criteria established by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) for breakpoint selection. Inaccurate breakpoints will encourage antibiotic administration that is likely to be ineffective. For newly approved antimicrobials, three criteria are used for determining breakpoints: PK-PD criteria, MIC distributions, and clinical response. For older (often generic drugs) evaluated by the CLSI, recent clinical data may not be available and breakpoints are derived from PK-PD principles, wild-type distributions, and Monte Carlo simulations. It is the goal of the CLSI subcommittee that these revised breakpoints will encourage more effective antimicrobial use and avoid unnecessary antimicrobial administration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic integration and modelling of florfenicol for the pig pneumonia pathogens Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Pasteurella multocida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Dorey

    Full Text Available Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD integration and modelling were used to predict dosage schedules for florfenicol for two pig pneumonia pathogens, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Pasteurella multocida. Pharmacokinetic data were pooled for two bioequivalent products, pioneer and generic formulations, administered intramuscularly to pigs at a dose rate of 15 mg/kg. Antibacterial potency was determined in vitro as minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and Mutant Prevention Concentration in broth and pig serum, for six isolates of each organism. For both organisms and for both serum and broth MICs, average concentration:MIC ratios over 48 h were similar and exceeded 2.5:1 and times greater than MIC exceeded 35 h. From in vitro time-kill curves, PK/PD modelling established serum breakpoint values for the index AUC24h/MIC for three levels of inhibition of growth, bacteriostasis and 3 and 4log10 reductions in bacterial count; means were 25.7, 40.2 and 47.0 h, respectively, for P. multocida and 24.6, 43.8 and 58.6 h for A. pleuropneumoniae. Using these PK and PD data, together with literature MIC distributions, doses for each pathogen were predicted for: (1 bacteriostatic and bactericidal levels of kill; (2 for 50 and 90% target attainment rates (TAR; and (3 for single dosing and daily dosing at steady state. Monte Carlo simulations for 90% TAR predicted single doses to achieve bacteriostatic and bactericidal actions over 48 h of 14.4 and 22.2 mg/kg (P. multocida and 44.7 and 86.6 mg/kg (A. pleuropneumoniae. For daily doses at steady state, and 90% TAR bacteriostatic and bactericidal actions, dosages of 6.2 and 9.6 mg/kg (P. multocida and 18.2 and 35.2 mg/kg (A. pleuropneumoniae were required. PK/PD integration and modelling approaches to dose determination indicate the possibility of tailoring dose to a range of end-points.

  2. Effects of drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, characteristics of medication use, and relevant pharmacological interventions on fall risk in elderly patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Background Falls among the elderly are an issue internationally and a public health problem that brings substantial economic and quality-of-life burdens to individuals and society. Falls prevention is an important measure of nursing quality and patient safety. Numerous studies have evaluated the association of medication use with fall risk in elderly patients. However, an up-to-date review has not been available to summarize the multifaceted pharmaceutical concerns in the prevention of medication-related falls. Materials and methods Relevant literature was identified by performing searches in PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library, covering the period until February 2014. We included studies that described an association between medications and falls, and effects of drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, characteristics of medication use, and pharmacological interventions on fall risk in elderly patients. The full text of each included article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed. Results Fall-risk-increasing drugs (FRIDs) include central nervous system-acting agents, cough preparations, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-Alzheimer’s agents, antiplatelet agents, calcium antagonists, diuretics, α-blockers, digoxin, hypoglycemic drugs, neurotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, nasal preparations, and antiglaucoma ophthalmic preparations. The degree of medication-related fall risk was dependent on one or some of the following factors: drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties (eg, elimination half-life, metabolic pathway, genetic polymorphism, risk rating of medications despite belonging to the same therapeutic class) and/or characteristics of medication use (eg, number of medications and drug–drug interactions, dose strength, duration of medication use and time since stopping, medication change, prescribing appropriateness, and medication adherence). Pharmacological interventions, including withdrawal of

  3. Immune mechanisms regulating pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of PEGylated liposomal anticancer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gina

    Nanotechnology has made significant advances in drug delivery system for the treatment of cancer. Among various nanoparticle (NP) platforms, liposomes have been most widely used as a NP drug carrier for cancer therapy. High variation in pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of liposome-based therapeutics has been reported. However, the interaction of liposome-based therapeutics with the immune system, specifically the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS), and underlying molecular mechanisms for variable responses to liposomal drugs remain poorly understood. The objective of this dissertation was to elucidate immune mechanisms for the variable responses to PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD; DoxilRTM), a clinically relevant NP, in animal models and in patients. In vitro, in vivo and clinical systems were investigated to evaluate the effects of chemokines (CCL2 and CCL5), heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment, and genetic variations on PK and PD of PLD. Results showed that there was a significantly positive linear relationship between PLD exposure (AUC) and total amount of CCL2 and CCL5, most prevalent chemokines in plasma, in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer. Consistent with these findings, preclinical studies using mice bearing SKOV3 orthotopic ovarian cancer xenografts demonstrated that PLD induced the production and secretion of chemokines into plasma. In addition, in vitro studies using human monocytic THP-1 cells demonstrated that PLD altered monocyte migration towards CCL2 and CCL5. The PK and efficacy studies of PLD in murine models of breast cancer showed that heterogeneous tumor microenvironment was associated with significantly different tumor delivery and efficacy of PLD, but not small molecule doxorubicin between two breast tumor models. A candidate genetic locus that was associated with clearance of PLD in 23 inbred mouse strains contains a gene that encodes for engulfment adapter PTB domain containing 1 (Gulp1). By using

  4. A Mathematical Model for Cisplatin Cellular Pharmacodynamics

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    Ardith W. El-Kareh

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A simple theoretical model for the cellular pharmacodynamics of cisplatin is presented. The model, which takes into account the kinetics of cisplatin uptake by cells and the intracellular binding of the drug, can be used to predict the dependence of survival (relative to controls on the time course of extracellular exposure. Cellular pharmacokinetic parameters are derived from uptake data for human ovarian and head and neck cancer cell lines. Survival relative to controls is assumed to depend on the peak concentration of DNA-bound intracellular platinum. Model predictions agree well with published data on cisplatin cytotoxicity for three different cancer cell lines, over a wide range of exposure times. In comparison with previously published mathematical models for anticancer drug pharmacodynamics, the present model provides a better fit to experimental data sets including long exposure times (∼100 hours. The model provides a possible explanation for the fact that cell kill correlates well with area under the extracellular concentration-time curve in some data sets, but not in others. The model may be useful for optimizing delivery schedules and for the dosing of cisplatin for cancer therapy.

  5. In vivo pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of colistin and imipenem in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengzhuang, Wang; Wu, Hong; Ciofu, Oana

    2012-01-01

    ) and pharmacodynamics (PDs) of antimicrobials can reliably be used to predict whether antimicrobial regimens will achieve the maximum bactericidal effect against infections. Unfortunately, however, most PK/PD studies of antimicrobials have been done on planktonic cells and very few PK/PD studies have been done...

  6. Antibacterial effect evaluation of moxalactam against extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae with in vitro pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang C

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chen Huang,1,* Beiwen Zheng,1,* Wei Yu,2 Tianshui Niu,1 Tingting Xiao,1 Jing Zhang,1 Yonghong Xiao1 1State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China; 2Department of Infectious Diseases, Zhejiang Provincial People’s Hospital, Hangzhou, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal effects of moxalactam (MOX, cefotaxime (CTX, and cefoperazone/sulbactam (CFZ/SBT against extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, using an in vitro pharmacokinetics (PK/pharmacodynamics model.Methods: Two clinical ESBL-producing strains (blaCTX-M-15 positive E. coli 3376 and blaCTX-M-14 positive K. pneumoniae 2689 and E. coli American Type Culture Collection (ATCC25922 were used in the study. The PK Auto Simulation System 400 was used to simulate the human PK procedures after intravenous administration of different doses of MOX, CTX, and CFZ/SBT. Bacterial growth recovery time (RT and the area between the control growth curve and bactericidal curves (IE were employed to assess the antibacterial efficacies of all the agents.Results: The minimum inhibitory concentrations of MOX, CTX, and CFZ/SBT against E. coli ATCC25922, 3376, and 2689 strains were 0.5, 0.5, 0.25; 0.06, >256, 256; and 0.5/0.5, 16/16, 32/32 mg/L. All the agents demonstrated outstanding bactericidal effects against E. coli ATCC25922 (RT >24 h and IE >120 log10 CFU/mL·h−1 with simulating PK procedures, especially in the multiple dose administration models. Against ESBL producers, CTX and CFZ/SBT displayed only weak bactericidal effects, and subsequent regrowth was evident. MOX exhibited potent antibacterial activity against all the strains tested. The values of effective parameters of

  7. Personalized therapeutics for levofloxacin: a focus on pharmacokinetic concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chu-Han; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su; Huang, Yu-Wen; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine should be encouraged because patients are complex, and this complexity results from biological, medical (eg, demographics, genetics, polypharmacy, and multimorbidities), socioeconomic, and cultural factors. Levofloxacin (LVX) is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic. Awareness of personalized therapeutics for LVX seems to be poor in clinical practice, and is reflected in prescribing patterns. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies have raised concerns about suboptimal patient outcomes with the use of LVX for some Gram-negative infections. Meanwhile, new findings in LVX therapeutics have only been sporadically reported in recent years. Therefore, an updated review on personalized LVX treatment with a focus on pharmacokinetic concerns is necessary. Relevant literature was identified by performing a PubMed search covering the period from January 1993 to December 2013. We included studies describing dosage adjustment and factors determining LVX pharmacokinetics, or pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies exploring how best to prevent the emergence of resistance to LVX. The full text of each included article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed. In addition to limiting the use of fluoroquinolones, measures such as reducing the breakpoints for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, choice of high-dose short-course of once-daily LVX regimen, and tailoring LVX dose in special patient populations help to achieve the validated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target and combat the increasing LVX resistance. Obese individuals with normal renal function cleared LVX more efficiently than normal-weight individuals. Compared with the scenario in healthy subjects, standard 2-hour spacing of calcium formulations and oral LVX was insufficient to prevent a chelation interaction in cystic fibrosis patients. Inconsistent conclusions were derived from studies of the influence of sex on the pharmacokinetics of LVX, which might be

  8. Pharmacokinetics of drugs in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feghali, Maisa; Venkataramanan, Raman; Caritis, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Pregnancy is a complex state where changes in maternal physiology have evolved to favor the development and growth of the placenta and the fetus. These adaptations may affect preexisting disease or result in pregnancy-specific disorders. Similarly, variations in physiology may alter the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics that determines drug dosing and effect. It follows that detailed pharmacologic information is required to adjust therapeutic treatment strategies during pregnancy. Understanding both pregnancy physiology and the gestation-specific pharmacology of different agents is necessary to achieve effective treatment and limit maternal and fetal risk. Unfortunately, most drug studies have excluded pregnant women based on often-mistaken concerns regarding fetal risk. Furthermore, over two-thirds of women receive prescription drugs while pregnant, with treatment and dosing strategies based on data from healthy male volunteers and non-pregnant women, and with little adjustment for the complex physiology of pregnancy and its unique disease states. This review will describe basic concepts in pharmacokinetics and their clinical relevance and highlight the variations in pregnancy that may impact the pharmacokinetic properties of medications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Differing disintegration and dissolution rates, pharmacokinetic profiles and gastrointestinal tolerability of over the counter ibuprofen formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnason, Ingvar; Sancak, Ozgur; Crossley, Anne; Penrose, Andrew; Lanas, Angel

    2018-02-01

    Formulations of over the counter (OTC) NSAIDs differ substantially, but information is lacking on whether this alters their gastrointestinal profiles. To assess disintegration and dissolution rates and pharmacokinetics of four preparations of OTC ibuprofen and relate these with spontaneously reported gastrointestinal adverse events. Disintegration and dissolution rates of ibuprofen tablets as (a) acid, (b) sodium salt, (c) lysine salt, and (d) as a liquid gelatine capsule were assessed. Pharmacokinetic data gastrointestinal and spontaneously reported adverse events arising from global sales were obtained from files from Reckitt Benckiser. Disintegration at low pH was progressively shorter for the preparations from a-to-d with formation of correspondingly smaller ibuprofen crystals, while dissolution was consistently poor. Dissolution at a neutral pH was least rapid for the liquid gelatine capsule. Pharmacokinetic data showed a shorter t max and a higher C max for preparations b-d as compared with ibuprofen acid. Spontaneously reported abdominal symptoms were rare with the liquid gelatine preparation. The formulations of OTC ibuprofen differ in their disintegration and dissolution properties, pharmacokinetic profiles and apparent gastrointestinal tolerability. Spontaneously reported abdominal symptoms were five times lower with the liquid gelatine capsule as compared with ibuprofen acid despite a 30% increase in C max . © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. Inference from some pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of busulfan through the analysis of its induction kinetics of micronuclei polychromated erythrocytes; Inferencia de algunos parametros farmacocineticos y farmacodinamicos de busulfan, mediante el analisis de su cinetica de induccion de eritrocitos policromaticos micronucleados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez I, M.R.; Vallarino K, T.; Morales R, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    The induction kinetics of micronuclei polychromated eritrocites (EPC-MN) which is produced by busulfan and compared with that produced by the ionizing radiation, allows to make inferences over the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of busulfan. Observing two induction mechanisms of MN, this one early at low doses and other later at high doses, this last is presented to a critical dose being very sheer and associated with an increase of the cytotoxicity. The data suggest the transformation or dependence between these two types of leisures, which to determine the narrow therapeutical margin of busulfan. The pharmacokinetic parameters determined in the early mechanisms kinetics indicate a latency period, a time of effective activity and of half life 5.7, 5.2 and 2.6 h respectively. (Author)

  11. Lecithin and PLGA-based self-assembled nanocomposite, Lecithmer: preparation, characterization, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Seby Elsy; Fariya, Mayur K; Rajawat, Gopal Singh; Steiniger, Frank; Fahr, Alfred; Nagarsenker, Mangal S

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigates the drug delivery potential of polymer lipid hybrid nanocomposites (Lecithmer®) composed of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) and soya lecithin. Core-shell structure of Lecithmer was evident from cryo-TEM images. Daunorubicin (DNR) and lornoxicam (LNX)-incorporated Lecithmer nanocomposites were evaluated for anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity. DNR- and LNX-loaded Lecithmer had mean particle size of ∼335 and ∼282.7 nm, respectively. Lecithmer formulated with different cationic lipids resulted in lower particle size (∼120 nm) and positive zeta potential. Entrapment efficiency of DNR and LNX was 93.16 and 88.59 %, respectively. In vitro release of DNR from Lecithmer was slower compared to PLGA nanoparticles. DNR release from Lecithmer was significantly higher at pH 5.5 (80.96 %) as compared to pH 7.4 (55.95 %), providing advantage for selective tumor therapy. Similarly, sustained release of LNX (30 % in 10 h) was observed at pH 7.4. DNR in Lecithmer showed superior cytotoxicity on human erythroleukemic K562 cells. Pharmacokinetic study in Wistar rats with i.v. administered DNR-loaded Lecithmer showed higher volume of distribution, lower elimination rate constant, and longer half-life (81.68 L, 0.3535 h(-1), 1.96 h) as compared to DNR solution (57.46 L, 0.4237 h(-1), 1.635 h). Pharmacodynamic evaluation of orally administered LNX-loaded Lecithmer showed superior anti-inflammatory activity with maximum inhibition of 81.2 % vis-à-vis 53.57 % in case of LNX suspension. In light of these results, Lecithmer can be envisaged as a promising nanosystem for parenteral as well as oral drug delivery.

  12. A systematic review of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of herbal medicine with warfarin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songie Choi

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to systematically review data regarding pharmacokinetic (PK-pharmacodynamic (PD parameters from randomized controlled trials relating to interactions between herbal medicines and warfarin.Three electronic databases were searched to identify relevant trials. Two reviewers independently performed the study selection and data extraction. The risk of bias and reporting quality were also assessed independently by two reviewers using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and the consolidated standards of reporting trials (CONSORT. Outcomes were measured for all reported PK-PD parameters and adverse events.Nine randomized controlled trials met our inclusion criteria. Most of the included studies were unclear regarding the risk of bias and had a low quality of methodology. Using CONSORT, the reporting percentages for the articles ranged from 36.5% to 61.5% and the mean percentage for all articles was 45.6%. St John's wort and echinacea affected the PK parameters of warfarin. Ginseng, ginger, garlic, and cranberry had no significant effect on the PK parameters. American ginseng altered the PD parameters of warfarin. St John's wort, ginseng, Korea red ginseng, ginkgo, ginger, garlic, aged garlic, and echincea did not significantly alter the PD parameters. Studies of ginkgo and cranberry showed conflicting results on the PK parameters and PD parameters, respectively. The incidence of adverse events in all trials was low and no major adverse events were reported.It was difficult to determine whether ten herbal medicines had significant effects on the PK-PD parameters of warfarin. Low quality of evidence, different compounds within and different compositions of the herbs, and methodological limitations of the crossover study, which is a clinical study in which subjects receive a sequence of different interventions, made it difficult to form conclusions. Additional studies that remedy these vulnerabilities are necessary to verify these

  13. Does gestational age affect the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lidocaine in mother and fetus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, H; Santos, A C; Morishima, H O; Finster, M; Plosker, H; Arthur, G R; Covino, B G

    1988-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lidocaine were studied in nine chronically prepared pregnant ewes and their fetuses at a mean ( +/- SE) gestation of 119 +/- 1.0 days, and the results were compared to the data previously published for ten animals at 138 +/- 1.2 days of gestation (term 148 days). Lidocaine was infused intravenously to the mother at a constant rate of 0.1 mg.kg-1.min-1 over a period of 180 min, in order to reach a steady-state maternal plasma lidocaine concentration of approximately 2 micrograms/ml. Maternal and fetal blood samples and maternal urine were collected at intervals throughout the infusion for determination of pH, blood gases, and lidocaine concentrations. Maternal and fetal heart rate, blood pressure, and intraamniotic pressure were continuously recorded. Fetal cardiac output and organ blood flow were determined before and at the end of lidocaine infusion using radionuclide-labeled microspheres. Lidocaine tissue concentrations were determined in several maternal and fetal organs excised at the end of infusion. In both groups, the steady-state plasma concentrations of lidocaine were similar; namely, 2.3 +/- 0.17 and 2.1 +/- 0.21 micrograms/ml in preterm and term ewes, respectively. There were also no significant differences in steady-state plasma drug concentrations in preterm and term fetuses (1.3 +/- 0.11 and 1.2 +/- 0.15 micrograms/ml). The mean fetal maternal concentration ratios (F/M) were the same; namely, 0.6. Maternal urinary excretion of lidocaine correlated with urine pH, being greater in the more acid urine. Tissue uptake of drug tended to be higher in the preterm than term mothers, but only significantly so in the brain and adrenals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Phase I safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetic study of recombinant human mannan-binding lectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K.A.; Matthiesen, F.; Agger, T.

    2006-01-01

    (rhMBL) is in development as a novel therapeutic approach. To assess the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of rhMBL, a placebo-controlled double-blinded study was performed in MBL-deficient healthy male subjects. rhMBL was administered as both single intravenous (i.v.) infusions (0.01, 0...... mild and no serious adverse events were recorded. There were no clinically significant changes in laboratory evaluations, ECG or vital signs, and no anti-MBL antibodies were detected following rhMBL administration. After single i.v. doses of rhMBL the maximal plasma levels increased in a dose...... of the complement system without non-specific activation of the complement cascade.In conclusion, no safety or tolerability concern was raised following rhMBL administration no signs of immunogenicity detected, and an rhMBL plasma level judged sufficient to achieve therapeutic benefit (>1000 ng/mL) can be achieved....

  15. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Enrofloxacin Against Escherichia coli in Broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, KaNa; Hao, HaiHong; Huang, LingLi; Wang, Xu; Yuan, ZongHui

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to establish a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling approach for the dosage schedule design and decreasing the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 929 Escherichia coli isolates from broilers to enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin was determined following CLSI guidance. The MIC50 was calculated as the populational PD parameter for enrofloxacin against E. coli in broilers. The 101 E. coli strains with MIC closest to the MIC50 (0.05 μg/mL) were submitted for serotype identification. The 13 E. coli strains with O and K serotype were further utilized for determining pathogencity in mice. Of all the strains tested, the E. coli designated strain Anhui 112 was selected for establishing the disease model and PK/PD study. The PKs of enrofloxacin after oral administration at the dose of 10 mg/kg body weights (BW) in healthy and infected broilers was evaluated with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. For intestinal contents after oral administration, the peak concentration (C max), the time when the maximum concentration reached (T max), and the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) were 21.69-31.69 μg/mL, 1.13-1.23 h, and 228.97-444.86 μg h/mL, respectively. The MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of enrofloxacin against E. coli (Anhui 112) in Mueller-Hinton (MH) broth and intestinal contents were determined to be similar, 0.25 and 0.5 μg/mL respectively. In this study, the sum of concentrations of enrofloxacin and its metabolite (ciprofloxacin) was used for the PK/PD integration and modeling. The ex vivo growth inhibition data were fitted to the sigmoid E max (Hill) equation to provide values for intestinal contents of 24 h area under concentration-time curve/MIC ratios (AUC0-24 h/MIC) producing, bacteriostasis (624.94 h), bactericidal activity (1065.93 h) and bacterial eradication (1343.81 h). PK/PD modeling was

  16. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of a new pediatric formulation of artemether-lumefantrine in African children with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djimdé, Abdoulaye A; Tekete, Mamadou; Abdulla, Salim; Lyimo, John; Bassat, Quique; Mandomando, Inacio; Lefèvre, Gilbert; Borrmann, Steffen

    2011-09-01

    The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of a new pediatric formulation of artemether-lumefantrine, dispersible tablet, were determined within the context of a multicenter, randomized, parallel-group study. In an exploratory approach, we compared a new pediatric formulation with the tablet formulation administered crushed in the treatment of African children with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Patients were randomized to 3 different dosing groups (weights of 5 to DHA), were determined at 1 and 2 h after the first dose of dispersible (n = 91) and crushed (n = 93) tablets. A full pharmacokinetic profile of lumefantrine was reconstituted on the basis of 310 (dispersible tablet) and 315 (crushed tablet) plasma samples, collected at 6 different time points (1 sample per patient). Dispersible and crushed tablets showed similar artemether and DHA maximum concentrations in plasma (C(max)) for the different body weight groups, with overall means of 175 ± 168 and 190 ± 168 ng/ml, respectively, for artemether and 64.7 ± 58.1 and 63.7 ± 65.0 ng/ml, respectively, for DHA. For lumefantrine, the population C(max) were 6.3 μg/ml (dispersible tablet) and 7.7 μg/ml (crushed tablet), whereas the areas under the concentration-time curves from time zero to the time of the last quantifiable plasma concentration measured were 574 and 636 μg · h/ml, respectively. For both formulations, descriptive quintile analyses showed no apparent association between artemether/DHA C(max) and parasite clearance time or between the lumefantrine C(max) and the occurrence of adverse events or corrected QT interval changes. The results suggest that the dispersible tablet provides adequate systemic exposure to artemether, DHA, and lumefantrine in African children with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria.

  17. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Clinical Use of SGLT2 Inhibitors in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J

    2015-07-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) are proposed as a novel approach for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. SGLT2 cotransporters are responsible for reabsorption of 90 % of the glucose filtered by the kidney. The glucuretic effect resulting from SGLT2 inhibition contributes to reduce hyperglycaemia and also assists weight loss and blood pressure reduction. Several SGLT2 inhibitors are already available in many countries (dapagliflozin, canagliflozin, empagliflozin) and in Japan (ipragliflozin, tofogliflozin). These SGLT2 inhibitors share similar pharmacokinetic characteristics with a rapid oral absorption, a long elimination half-life allowing once-daily administration, an extensive hepatic metabolism mainly via glucuronidation to inactive metabolites and a low renal elimination as a parent drug. Pharmacokinetic parameters are slightly altered in the case of chronic kidney disease (CKD). While no dose adjustment is required in the case of mild CKD, SGLT2 inhibitors may not be used or only at a lower daily dose in patients with moderate CKD. Furthermore, the pharmacodynamic response to SGLT2 inhibitors as assessed by urinary glucose excretion declines with increasing severity of renal impairment as assessed by a reduction in the estimated glomerular filtration rate. Nevertheless, the glucose-lowering efficacy and safety of SGLT2 inhibitors are almost comparable in patients with mild CKD as in patients with normal kidney function. In patients with moderate CKD, the efficacy tends to be dampened and safety concerns may occur. In patients with severe CKD, the use of SGLT2 inhibitors is contraindicated. Thus, prescribing information should be consulted regarding dosage adjustments or restrictions in the case of renal dysfunction for each SGLT2 inhibitor. The clinical impact of SGLT2 inhibitors on renal function and their potential to influence the course of diabetic nephropathy deserve attention because of preliminary favourable results

  18. Dose study of the multikinase inhibitor, LY2457546, in patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia to assess safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wacheck V

    2011-05-01

    /day. The most commonly observed adverse events were febrile neutropenia, epistaxis, petechiae, and headache. The majority of adverse events (81% were Grade 1 or 2. One patient had generalized muscle weakness (Grade 3, which was deemed to be a dose-limiting toxicity. Notably, the pharmacokinetic profile of LY2457546 showed virtually no elimination of LY2457546 within 24 hours, and thus prevented further dose escalation. No significant DDI were observed. Ex vivo flow cytometry studies showed downregulation of the phosphoproteins, pcKIT, pFLT3, and pS6, in AML blasts after LY2457546 administration. No medically relevant responses were observed in the five treated patients.Conclusion: No biologically effective dose could be established for LY2457546 in chemotherapy-resistant AML patients. Lack of drug clearance prevented safe dose escalation, and the study was terminated early. Future efforts should be made to develop derivatives with a more favorable pharmacokinetic profile.Keywords: multikinase inhibitor, pharmacokinetics, safety, acute myeloid leukemia, pharmacodynamics 

  19. Effects of drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, characteristics of medication use, and relevant pharmacological interventions on fall risk in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Y

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ying Chen,1 Ling-Ling Zhu,2 Quan Zhou3 1Liaison Office of Geriatric VIP Patients, 2First Geriatric VIP Ward, Division of Nursing, 3Department of Pharmacy, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: Falls among the elderly are an issue internationally and a public health problem that brings substantial economic and quality-of-life burdens to individuals and society. Falls prevention is an important measure of nursing quality and patient safety. Numerous studies have evaluated the association of medication use with fall risk in elderly patients. However, an up-to-date review has not been available to summarize the multifaceted pharmaceutical concerns in the prevention of medication-related falls. Materials and methods: Relevant literature was identified by performing searches in PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library, covering the period until February 2014. We included studies that described an association between medications and falls, and effects of drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, characteristics of medication use, and pharmacological interventions on fall risk in elderly patients. The full text of each included article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed. Results: Fall-risk-increasing drugs (FRIDs include central nervous system-acting agents, cough preparations, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-Alzheimer’s agents, antiplatelet agents, calcium antagonists, diuretics, α-blockers, digoxin, hypoglycemic drugs, neurotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, nasal preparations, and antiglaucoma ophthalmic preparations. The degree of medication-related fall risk was dependent on one or some of the following factors: drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties (eg, elimination half-life, metabolic pathway, genetic polymorphism, risk rating of medications despite belonging to the same therapeutic class and

  20. Effects of continuous renal replacement therapy on linezolid pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Gianluca; Di Maggio, Paola; De Gaudio, A Raffaele; Novelli, Andrea; Antoniotti, Riccardo; Fiaccadori, Enrico; Adembri, Chiara

    2016-11-19

    Major alterations in linezolid pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) parameters might be expected in critically ill septic patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) who are undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). The present review is aimed at describing extracorporeal removal of linezolid and the main PK-PD parameter changes observed in critically ill septic patients with AKI, who are on CRRT. Citations published on PubMed up to January 2016 were systematically reviewed according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement. All authors assessed the methodological quality of the studies and consensus was used to ensure studies met inclusion criteria. In-vivo studies in adult patients with AKI treated with linezolid and on CRRT were considered eligible for the analysis only if operational settings of the CRRT machine, membrane type, linezolid blood concentrations and main PK-PD parameters were all clearly reported. Among 68 potentially relevant articles, only 9 were considered eligible for the analysis. Across these, 53 treatments were identified among the 49 patients included (46 treated with high-flux and 3 with high cut-off membranes). Continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH) was the most frequent treatment performed amongst the studies. The extracorporeal clearance values of linezolid across the different modalities were 1.2-2.3 L/h for CVVH, 0.9-2.2 L/h for hemodiafiltration and 2.3 L/h for hemodialysis, and large variability in PK/PD parameters was reported. The optimal area under the curve/minimum inhibitory concentration (AUC/MIC) ratio was reached for pathogens with an MIC of 4 mg/L in one study only. Wide variability in linezolid PK/PD parameters has been observed across critically ill septic patients with AKI treated with CRRT. Particular attention should be paid to linezolid therapy in order to avoid antibiotic failure in these patients. Strategies to improve the effectiveness of

  1. Cimetidine Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacokinetics in Healthy Subjects: A Comparison of Tablets and Suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare the effect of cimetidine 200 mg tablet with that of cimetidine suspension (200 mg/10 mL, a 20 mL suspension of 800 mg magnesium hydroxide and 912 mg aluminum hydroxide, and matching placebo on intragastric pH of healthy volunteers. There were 13 males and seven females, mean age 23 years (range 20 to 32 and mean weight 72 kg (range 55 to 89. The intragastric pH of each subject was measured over 6 h starting immediately before dosing on each of five study days. Cimetidine plasma levels were measured for 6 h after dosing on each of the cimetidine study days. Cimetidine tablet and suspension were superior to placebo tablet or suspension or to the magnesium hydroxide/aluminum hydroxide suspension in the area under the pH time curve from 0 to 6 h, percentage time pH of at least 3.5, change from pretreatment pH area under the pH time curve (0 to 6 h and maximum increase in pH. Mean plasma cimetidine levels were significantly and positively correlated to mean intragastric pH for both cimetidine tablets and cimetidine suspension. Comparing cimetidine concentration (Cmax and lower percentage time plasma cimetidine concentration was at least 0.5 μg/mL (the minimum therapeutic level. These pharmacokinetic variations between cimetidine suspension and tablets may have partially explained the pharmacodynamic differences of the lower area under the pH time curve (0 to 6 h. The results indicate that both cimetidine tablets and cimetidine suspension significantly increase intragastric pH relative to the magnesium hydroxide/aluminum hydroxide suspension, placebo tablets or placebo suspension. Based on the assumption that elevation of intragastric pH is an important factor for alleviation of the symptoms and for the healing of peptic disorders, the results of this study suggest that both cimetidine tablets and cimetidine suspension should be effective treatment.

  2. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of a 13-mer LNA-inhibitor-miR-221 in Mice and Non-human Primates

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    Maria Eugenia Gallo Cantafio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Locked nucleic acid (LNA oligonucleotides have been successfully used to efficiently inhibit endogenous small noncoding RNAs in vitro and in vivo. We previously demonstrated that the direct miR-221 inhibition by the novel 13-mer LNA-i-miR-221 induces significant antimyeloma activity and upregulates canonical miR-221 targets in vitro and in vivo. To evaluate the LNA-i-miR-221 pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, novel assays for oligonucleotides quantification in NOD.SCID mice and Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis plasma, urine and tissues were developed. To this aim, a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method, after solid-phase extraction, was used for the detection of LNA-i-miR-221 in plasma and urine, while a specific in situ hybridization assay for tissue uptake analysis was designed. Our analysis revealed short half-life, optimal tissue biovailability and minimal urine excretion of LNA-i-miR-221 in mice and monkeys. Up to 3 weeks, LNA-i-miR-221 was still detectable in mice vital organs and in xenografted tumors, together with p27 target upregulation. Importantly, no toxicity in the pilot monkey study was observed. Overall, our findings indicate the suitability of LNA-i-miR-221 for clinical use and we provide here pilot data for safety analysis and further development of LNA-miRNA-based therapeutics for human cancer.

  3. The effects of Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f. Nees on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of midazolam in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinee Wongnawa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f. Nees has been widely used for centuries in Asia for the treatment of common coldand diarrhea. Although it was previously reported to inhibit cytochrome P450 in vitro, the potential to cause herb-druginteraction has been questioned. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of A. paniculata on the pharmacokineticsand pharmacodynamics of midazolam, a CYP3A4 probe drug, in normal healthy volunteers. The study was anopen-label, randomized, 2-phase crossover design with a 2-weeks washout period. Twelve healthy male volunteers received4 capsules of 250 mg A. paniculata 3 times a day orally for 7 days. Midazolam plasma concentration time profiles werecharacterized after a single oral dose of 7.5 mg midazolam on the day before and after A. paniculata medication. Pharmacodynamicsof midazolam were also evaluated. The results demonstrated that pretreatment with A. paniculata did not changemean pharmacokinetic parameters (Cmax, Tmax, AUC0-12, AUC0-”, T1/2, Cl/F of oral midazolam. Since midazolam is the mostsensitive substrate for CYP3A4, thus, herb-drug interaction caused by CYP3A4 inhibition after A. paniculata in healthyvolunteers was considered not clinically relevant. However, A. paniculata potentiated the effect of midazolam in loweringblood pressure and pulse rate. Therefore, co-administration of A. paniculata with midazolam should be warranted.

  4. Endogenous concentrations, pharmacokinetics, and selected pharmacodynamic effects of a single dose of exogenous GABA in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knych, H K; Steinmetz, S J; McKemie, D S

    2015-04-01

    The anti-anxiety and calming effects following activation of the GABA receptor have been exploited in performance horses by administering products containing GABA. The primary goal of the study reported here was to describe endogenous concentrations of GABA in horses and the pharmacokinetics, selected pharmacodynamic effects, and CSF concentrations following administration of a GABA-containing product. The mean (±SD) endogenous GABA level was 36.4 ± 12.5 ng/mL (n = 147). Sixteen of these horses received a single intravenous and oral dose of GABA (1650 mg). Blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid (n = 2) samples were collected at time 0 and at various times for up to 48 h and analyzed using LC-MS. Plasma clearance and volume of distribution was 155.6 and 147.6 L/h and 0.154 and 7.39 L for the central and peripheral compartments, respectively. Terminal elimination half-life was 22.1 (intravenous) and 25.1 (oral) min. Oral bioavailability was 9.81%. Urine GABA concentrations peaked rapidly returning to baseline levels by 3 h. Horses appeared behaviorally unaffected following oral administration, while sedative-like changes following intravenous administration were transient. Heart rate was increased for 1 h postintravenous administration, and gastrointestinal sounds decreased for approximately 30 min following both intravenous and oral administration. Based on a limited number of horses and time points, exogenously administered GABA does not appear to enter the CSF to an appreciable extent. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analysis of antipsychotics-induced extrapyramidal symptoms based on receptor occupancy theory incorporating endogenous dopamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui-Sakata, Akiko; Ohtani, Hisakazu; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2005-06-01

    We aimed to analyze the risks of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) induced by typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs using a common pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model based on the receptor occupancy. We collected the data for EPS induced by atypical antipsychotics, risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine, and a typical antipsychotic, haloperidol from literature and analyzed the following five indices of EPS, the ratio of patients obliged to take anticholinergic medication, the occurrence rates of plural extrapyramidal symptoms (more than one of tremor, dystonia, hypokinesia, akathisia, extrapyramidal syndrome, etc.), parkinsonism, akathisia, and extrapyramidal syndrome. We tested two models, i.e., a model incorporating endogenous dopamine release owing to 5-HT2A receptor inhibition and a model not considering the endogenous dopamine release, and used them to examine the relationship between the D2 receptor occupancy of endogenous dopamine and the extent of drug-induced EPS. The model incorporating endogenous dopamine release better described the relationship between the mean D2 receptor occupancy of endogenous dopamine and the extent of EPS than the other model, as assessed by the final sum of squares of residuals (final SS) and Akaike's Information Criteria (AIC). Furthermore, the former model could appropriately predict the risks of EPS induced by two other atypical antipsychotics, clozapine and ziprasidone, which were not incorporated into the model development. The developed model incorporating endogenous dopamine release owing to 5-HT2A receptor inhibition may be useful for the prediction of antipsychotics-induced EPS.

  6. A reversible albumin-binding growth hormone derivative is well tolerated and possesses a potential once-weekly treatment profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Michael Højby; Olsen, Minna W Brændholt; Alifrangis, Lene; Klim, Søren; Suntum, Mette

    2014-10-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) replacement therapy currently requires daily sc injections for years/lifetime, which may be both inconvenient and distressing for patients. NNC0195-0092 is a novel hGH derivative intended for once-weekly treatment of GH deficiency. A noncovalent albumin binding moiety is attached to the hGH backbone. Clearance is reduced as a consequence of a reversible binding to circulating serum albumin, which prolongs the pharmacodynamic (PD) effect. To evaluate safety, local tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a single dose (SD) and multiple doses (MD) of NNC0195-0092. Randomized, single-center, placebo-controlled, double-blind, SD/MD, dose-escalation trial of 105 healthy male subjects. NNC0195-0092 sc administration: Five cohorts of eight subjects received one dose of NNC0195-0092 (0.01-0.32 mg/kg) (n = 6) or placebo (n = 2). Sixteen subjects (equal numbers of Japanese and non-Asian) received once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092 (0.02-0.24 mg/kg; n=12) or placebo (n=4) for 4 weeks. Blood samples were drawn for assessment of safety, PK, IGF-1, and IGF binding protein 3 profiles and anti-drug antibodies. SD and MD of NNC0195-0092 were well tolerated at all dose levels. No safety concerns or local tolerability issues were identified. A dose-dependent IGF-1 response was observed. IGF-1 profiles suggest that NNC0195-0092 may be suitable for once-weekly dosing, with a clinically relevant dose ≤0.08 mg/kg/week. No differences in PK and PD were observed between Japanese and non-Asian subjects. SD and MD of NNC0195-0092 administered to healthy Japanese and non-Asian male subjects were well tolerated at all doses. The present trial suggests that NNC0195-0092 has the potential for an efficacious, well-tolerated, once-weekly GH treatment.

  7. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, toxicology and therapeutics of mavacoxib in the dog: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, P; Pelligand, L; Elliott, J; Toutain, P-L; Michels, G; Stegemann, M

    2015-02-01

    Mavacoxib is a novel nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), with a preferential action on the cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 isoform of COX and a long duration of action. It is classified chemically as a member of the sulphonamide subgroup of coxibs. Mavacoxib is highly lipid but very poorly water soluble. In the dog, the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile comprises very slow body clearance, long elimination half-life and a relatively large distribution volume. Biotransformation and renal excretion are very limited, and elimination occurs primarily by biliary secretion and excretion of unchanged drug in faeces. The PK profile of mavacoxib differs quantitatively between young healthy dogs (Beagles and mongrels) and clinical cases with osteoarthritis (OA). In OA dogs, mavacoxib exhibits a much longer terminal half-life, associated principally with their greater median body weight compared with dogs used in preclinical studies. There is also some evidence of breed differences and a small effect of age on mavacoxib PK in the OA canine population. The pharmacodynamics (PD) of mavacoxib has been established: (i) in whole blood assays at the molecular level (inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 isoforms); (ii) in preclinical models of inflammation and pain; and (iii) in clinical OA subjects treated with mavacoxib. The dosage schedule of mavacoxib for clinical use has been determined by owner and veterinary clinical assessments and is supported by integration of PK and PD preclinical data with clinical responses in canine disease models and in dogs with naturally occurring OA. The dosage regimen has been further confirmed by correlating levels of inhibition of COX isoforms in in vitro whole blood assays with plasma concentrations of mavacoxib achieved in OA dogs. In addition to the specific properties of mavacoxib, some general aspects of the PK and PD of other agents of the NSAID group, together with pathophysiological and clinical aspects of OA, are reviewed, as a basis for correlating

  8. Personalized therapeutics for levofloxacin: a focus on pharmacokinetic concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao CH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chu-Han Gao,1 Lu-Shan Yu,2 Su Zeng,2 Yu-Wen Huang,1 Quan Zhou11Department of Pharmacy, the Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis and Drug Metabolism, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Personalized medicine should be encouraged because patients are complex, and this complexity results from biological, medical (eg, demographics, genetics, polypharmacy, and multimorbidities, socioeconomic, and cultural factors. Levofloxacin (LVX is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic. Awareness of personalized therapeutics for LVX seems to be poor in clinical practice, and is reflected in prescribing patterns. Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic studies have raised concerns about suboptimal patient outcomes with the use of LVX for some Gram-negative infections. Meanwhile, new findings in LVX therapeutics have only been sporadically reported in recent years. Therefore, an updated review on personalized LVX treatment with a focus on pharmacokinetic concerns is necessary.Methods: Relevant literature was identified by performing a PubMed search covering the period from January 1993 to December 2013. We included studies describing dosage adjustment and factors determining LVX pharmacokinetics, or pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic studies exploring how best to prevent the emergence of resistance to LVX. The full text of each included article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed.Results: In addition to limiting the use of fluoroquinolones, measures such as reducing the breakpoints for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, choice of high-dose short-course of once-daily LVX regimen, and tailoring LVX dose in special patient populations help to achieve the validated pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic target and combat the increasing LVX resistance. Obese individuals with normal renal function cleared LVX

  9. Non-linear mixed-effects pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling in NLME using differential equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Agersø, Henrik; Madsen, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    The standard software for non-linear mixed-effect analysis of pharmacokinetic/phar-macodynamic (PK/PD) data is NONMEM while the non-linear mixed-effects package NLME is an alternative as tong as the models are fairly simple. We present the nlmeODE package which combines the ordinary differential...... equation (ODE) solver package odesolve and the non-Linear mixed effects package NLME thereby enabling the analysis of complicated systems of ODEs by non-linear mixed-effects modelling. The pharmacokinetics of the anti-asthmatic drug theophylline is used to illustrate the applicability of the nlme...

  10. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Atazanavir in HIV-1-Infected Children Treated With Atazanavir Powder and Ritonavir: Combined Analysis of the PRINCE-1 and -2 Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevinsky, Heather; Zaru, Luna; Wang, Reena; Xu, Xiaohui; Pikora, Cheryl; Correll, Todd A; Eley, Timothy

    2018-06-01

    Two clinical studies (PRINCE-1 and -2) in HIV-1-infected children assessed the safety, efficacy and pharmacokinetics of dual nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor background therapy plus once-daily atazanavir (ATV) powder formulation boosted with ritonavir (ATV + RTV). Here, we present a combined analysis of ATV pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics across these studies. Intensive 24-hour pharmacokinetic profiles at steady state compared ATV exposures (area under the concentration-time curve in one dosing interval) in 5 ATV + RTV baseline weight-band dosing categories, with historic data in adults receiving ATV + RTV 300/100 mg capsules. Repeated ATV Ctrough measurements over 48 weeks explored relationships between ATV composite Ctrough quartiles (CCQs) with virologic efficacy and key safety parameters. Of 146 children included in this combined analysis, 49.3% were male, 56.8% were Black/African American and 62.3% were antiretroviral experienced. Proportions with HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL at week 48 were 13/32, 24/32, 19/32 and 13/28 in the lowest through highest ATV CCQs, respectively. Mean changes from baseline in total bilirubin at week 48 were +0.3, +0.5, +0.6 and +1.0 mg/dL in the lowest through highest ATV CCQs, respectively. Corresponding proportions with adverse events of hyperbilirubinemia by week 48 were 1/36, 4/36, 5/36 and 13/35, respectively. Changes from baseline in total amylase or electrocardiogram parameters and adverse events of diarrhea did not vary by ATV CCQs. Weight-band dosing of ATV + RTV plus optimized dual nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors in young HIV-1-infected children achieved similar ATV exposure to that in adults; no unexpected safety findings occurred, and with the exception of lower virologic suppression in the lowest ATV CCQ, there was no apparent trend in virologic suppression across ATV CCQs.

  11. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat for pediatric and adult patients and its application for dose specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moj, Daniel; Britz, Hannah; Burhenne, Jürgen; Stewart, Clinton F; Egerer, Gerlinde; Haefeli, Walter E; Lehr, Thorsten

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed at recommending pediatric dosages of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat and potentially more effective adult dosing regimens than the approved standard dosing regimen of 400 mg/day, using a comprehensive physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) modeling approach. A PBPK/PD model for vorinostat was developed for predictions in adults and children. It includes the maturation of relevant metabolizing enzymes. The PBPK model was expanded by (1) effect compartments to describe vorinostat concentration-time profiles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), (2) an indirect response model to predict the HDAC inhibition, and (3) a thrombocyte model to predict the dose-limiting thrombocytopenia. Parameterization of drug and system-specific processes was based on published and unpublished in silico, in vivo, and in vitro data. The PBPK modeling software used was PK-Sim and MoBi. The PBPK/PD model suggests dosages of 80 and 230 mg/m 2 for children of 0-1 and 1-17 years of age, respectively. In comparison with the approved standard treatment, in silico trials reveal 11 dosing regimens (9 oral, and 2 intravenous infusion rates) increasing the HDAC inhibition by an average of 31%, prolonging the HDAC inhibition by 181%, while only decreasing the circulating thrombocytes to a tolerable 53%. The most promising dosing regimen prolongs the HDAC inhibition by 509%. Thoroughly developed PBPK models enable dosage recommendations in pediatric patients and integrated PBPK/PD models, considering PD biomarkers (e.g., HDAC activity and platelet count), are well suited to guide future efficacy trials by identifying dosing regimens potentially superior to standard dosing regimens.

  12. The Novel N-Substituted Benztropine Analog GA2-50 Possesses Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Profiles Favorable for a Candidate Substitute Medication for Cocaine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    OTHMAN, AHMED A.; NEWMAN, AMY H.; EDDINGTON, NATALIE D.

    2009-01-01

    GA2-50 is a novel N-substituted benztropine analog with improved potency and selectivity for the dopamine transporter. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of GA2-50 were characterized as a part of its preclinical evaluation as a substitute medication for cocaine abuse. In vitro transport and metabolism studies as well as pharmacokinetic studies in rats were conducted. Effect of GA2-50 on the extracelluar nucleus accumbens (NAc) dopamine levels and on cocaine’s induced dopamine elevation was evaluated using intracerebral microdialysis. GA2-50 showed high transcellular permeability despite being a P-glycoprotein substrate. GA2-50 was a substrate of human CYP2D6, CYP2C19, CYP2E1, rat CYP2C11, CYP2D1, CYP3A1, and CYP1A2; with low intrinsic clearance values. In vivo, GA2-50 showed high brain uptake (Ri ~ 10), large volume of distribution (Vss =37 L/kg), and long elimination half-life (t½ =19 h). GA2-50 resulted in 1.6- and 2.7-fold dopamine elevation at the 5 and 10 mg/kg i.v. doses. Dopamine elevation induced by GA2-50 was significantly reduced, slower and longer lasting than previously observed for cocaine. GA2-50 had no significant effect on cocaine’s induced dopamine elevation upon simultaneous administration. Results from the present study indicate that GA2-50 possesses several attributes sought after for a substitute medication for cocaine abuse. PMID:18425847

  13. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction and their implication in clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palleria, Caterina; Di Paolo, Antonello; Giofrè, Chiara; Caglioti, Chiara; Leuzzi, Giacomo; Siniscalchi, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2013-07-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are one of the commonest causes of medication error in developed countries, particularly in the elderly due to poly-therapy, with a prevalence of 20-40%. In particular, poly-therapy increases the complexity of therapeutic management and thereby the risk of clinically important DDIs, which can both induce the development of adverse drug reactions or reduce the clinical efficacy. DDIs can be classify into two main groups: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic. In this review, using Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library and Reference lists we searched articles published until June 30 2012, and we described the mechanism of pharmacokinetic DDIs focusing the interest on their clinical implications.

  14. Antifungal pharmacodynamics: Latin America's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier M. Gonzalez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current increment of invasive fungal infections and the availability of new broad-spectrum antifungal agents has increased the use of these agents by non-expert practitioners, without an impact on mortality. To improve efficacy while minimizing prescription errors and to reduce the high monetary cost to the health systems, the principles of pharmacokinetics (PK and pharmacodynamics (PD are necessary. A systematic review of the PD of antifungals agents was performed aiming at the practicing physician without expertise in this field. The initial section of this review focuses on the general concepts of antimicrobial PD. In vitro studies, fungal susceptibility and antifungal serum concentrations are related with different doses and dosing schedules, determining the PD indices and the magnitude required to obtain a specific outcome. Herein the PD of the most used antifungal drug classes in Latin America (polyenes, azoles, and echinocandins is discussed.

  15. Pharmacokinetics and tolerability of the new second-generation nonnucleoside reverse- transcriptase inhibitor KM-023 in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cha YJ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Jung Cha,1,* Kyoung Soo Lim,2,* Min-Kyu Park,1 Stephen Schneider,3 Brian Bray,3 Myung-Chol Kang,3 Jae-Yong Chung,1 Seo Hyun Yoon,1 Joo-Youn Cho,1 Kyung-Sang Yu11Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Hospital, Seoul, South Korea; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, CHA University School of Medicine and CHA Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam, South Korea; 3Kainos Medicine USA Inc., Morrisville, NC, USA *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: KM-023 is a new second-generation nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor that is under development for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type 1 infection. Objective: This study determined KM-023 tolerability and pharmacokinetic characteristics in healthy subjects. Materials and methods: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation study was conducted in 80 healthy South Korean male volunteers. The subjects were allocated to single- or multiple-dose (once daily for 7 days groups that received 75, 150, 300, or 600 mg drug or placebo in a 4:1 ratio. Safety and pharmacokinetic assessments were performed during the study. Plasma and urine concentrations were quantified using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Results: The average maximum concentration (Cmax and area under the concentration–time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC∞ values of KM-023 for the 75–600 mg doses in the single-dose study ranged from 440.2 ng/mL to 1,245.4 ng/mL and 11,142.4 ng • h/mL to 33,705.6 ng • h/mL, respectively. Values of the mean Cmax at a steady state and AUC within the dosing interval ranged from 385.1 ng/mL to 1,096.7 ng/mL and 3,698.9 ng • h/mL to 10,232.6 ng • h/mL, respectively, following 75–600 mg doses in the multiple-dose study. Dose proportionality was not observed for KM-023. KM-023 showed a 0.6-fold accumulation after multiple doses in the 600

  16. Phase 1 dose-escalation study of the antiplacental growth factor monoclonal antibody RO5323441 combined with bevacizumab in patients with recurrent glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Ulrik; Chinot, Olivier L; McBain, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We conducted a phase 1 dose-escalation study of RO5323441, a novel antiplacental growth factor (PlGF) monoclonal antibody, to establish the recommended dose for use with bevacizumab and to investigate the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety/tolerability, and preliminary clinica...

  17. Phase I and pharmacologic study of the combination paclitaxel and carboplatin as first-line chemotherapy in stage III and IV ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizing, M. T.; van Warmerdam, L. J.; Rosing, H.; Schaefers, M. C.; Lai, A.; Helmerhorst, T. J.; Veenhof, C. H.; Birkhofer, M. J.; Rodenhuis, S.; Beijnen, J. H.; ten Bokkel Huinink, W. W.

    1997-01-01

    To determine the maximum-tolerated dose for the combination paclitaxel and carboplatin administered every 4 weeks and to gain more insight into the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of this combination in previously untreated ovarian cancer patients. Thirty-five chemotherapy-naive patients with

  18. Benzodiazepines: minder gebruiken is beter gebruiken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, T.T.; Loonen, A.J.M.

    1981-01-01

    The benzodiazepines take an important place in the treatment of anxiety and sleep-disorders. The pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and therapeutic properties of these drugs are shortly dealt with, whereafter the development of tolerance and dependence is considered in more detail. The clinical

  19. The importance of clinical pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic studies in unraveling the determinants of early and late tuberculosis outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    McCallum, Andrew; Sloan, Derek

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major infectious cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current antibiotic regimens, constructed prior to the development of modern pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK–PD) tools, are based on incomplete understanding of exposure–response relationships in drug susceptible and multidrug resistant tuberculosis. Preclinical and population PK data suggest that clinical PK–PD studies may enable therapeutic drug monitoring for some agents and revised dosingf or others. Fu...

  20. Population pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its metabolites theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline after inhalation in combination with diacetylmorphine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandvliet, Anthe S.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.; de Jonge, Milly E.; den Hoed, Rob; Sparidans, Rolf W.; Hendriks, Vincent M.; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M.; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2005-01-01

    The stimulant effect of caffeine, as an additive in diacetylmorphine preparations for study purposes, may interfere with the pharmacodynamic effects of diacetylmorphine. In order to obtain insight into the pharmacology of caffeine after inhalation in heroin users, the pharmacokinetics of caffeine

  1. Target-mediated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model based meta-analysis and dosing regimen optimization of a long-acting release formulation of exenatide in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanqing Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD model with extended-release (ER process and target mediated drug disposition (TMDD was developed for exenatide ER to account for its complex absorption process and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R-mediated non-linear PK behaviors along with its influences to fasting plasma glucose (FPG and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c. Using hybrid PK/PD model, simulations were done to explore the potential dosing regimens which could achieve likelihood of more pharmacodynamic exposure with respect to FPG and HbA1c over a much shorter period compared with the currently used treatment protocol. The mean PK/PD data about exenatide ER for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM were digitized from the publications, and the hybrid PK/PD model was performed using the Monolix 4.3 program. The plasma concentration-time and FPG/HbA1c-time profiles for exenatide ER subcutaneously administrated to patients with T2DM were well described by this hybrid model. Monte Carlo simulation was applied to mimic the PK profiles when higher loading dose 7.5 and 5.0 mg exenatide ER were subcutaneously administrated with different dosing intervals at the first 3 weeks of 30-week treatment. Two potentially optimizing schedules could improve the likelihood of achieving much more FPG and HbA1c exposures than currently used clinical treatment protocol.

  2. A study of the relationship between serum bile acids and propranolol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in patients with liver cirrhosis and in healthy controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne B Taegtmeyer

    Full Text Available The main objectives of the study were to determine the exposure and bioavailability of oral propranolol and to investigate their associations with serum bile acid concentration in patients with liver cirrhosis and in healthy controls. A further objective was to study the pharmacodynamics of propranolol. An open-label crossover study was performed to determine the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of propranolol after oral (40 mg and intravenous (1 mg administration as well as the concentration of total and individual fasting serum bile acids in 15 patients with liver cirrhosis and 5 healthy controls. After intravenous propranolol, patients showed a 1.8-fold increase in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-∞, a 1.8-fold increase in volume of distribution and a 3-fold increase in the elimination half-life (mean ± SEM: 641±100 vs. 205±43 minutes compared to controls. After oral application, AUC0-∞ and elimination half-life of propranolol were increased 6- and 4-fold, respectively, and bioavailability 3-fold (83±8 vs. 27±9.2%. Maximal effects on blood pressure and heart rate occurred during the first 4 and first 2 hours, respectively, after intravenous and oral application in both patients and controls. Total serum bile acid concentrations were higher in patients than controls (42±11 vs. 2.7±0.3 µmol/L and were linearly correlated with the serum chenodeoxycholic acid concentration. There was a linear correlation between the SBA concentration and propranolol oral AUC0-∞ in subjects not receiving interacting drugs (r2 = 0.73, n = 18. The bioavailability of and exposure to oral propranolol are increased in patients with cirrhosis. Fasting serum bile acid concentration may be helpful in predicting the exposure to oral propranolol in these patients.

  3. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 1 study of the safety, tolerability and pharmacodynamics of volixibat in overweight and obese but otherwise healthy adults: implications for treatment of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Melissa; Jennings, Lee; Silberg, Debra G; Bliss, Caleb; Martin, Patrick

    2018-03-16

    Accumulation of toxic free cholesterol in hepatocytes may cause hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Volixibat inhibits bile acid reuptake via the apical sodium bile acid transporter located on the luminal surface of the ileum. The resulting increase in bile acid synthesis from cholesterol could be beneficial in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. This adaptive dose-finding study investigated the safety, tolerability, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of volixibat. Overweight and obese adults were randomised 3:1 to double-blind volixibat or placebo, respectively, for 12 days. Volixibat was initiated at a once-daily dose of 20 mg, 40 mg or 80 mg. Based on the assessment of predefined safety events, volixibat dosing was either escalated or reduced. Other dose regimens (titrations and twice-daily dosing) were also evaluated. Assessments included safety, tolerability, stool hardness, faecal bile acid (FBA) excretion, and serum levels of 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and lipids. All 84 randomised participants (volixibat, 63; placebo, 21) completed the study, with no serious adverse events at doses of up to 80 mg per day (maximum assessed dose). The median number of daily bowel evacuations increased from 1 (range 0-4) to 2 (0-8) during volixibat treatment, and stool was looser with volixibat than placebo. Volixibat was minimally absorbed; serum levels were rarely quantifiable at any dose or sampling time point, thereby precluding pharmacokinetic analyses. Mean daily FBA excretion was 930.61 μmol (standard deviation [SD] 468.965) with volixibat and 224.75 μmol (195.403) with placebo; effects were maximal at volixibat doses ≥20 mg/day. Mean serum C4 concentrations at day 12 were 98.767 ng/mL (standard deviation, 61.5841) with volixibat and 16.497 ng/mL (12.9150) with placebo. Total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels decreased in the volixibat group, with median changes of - 0.70 mmol/L (range - 2.8 to 0.4) and - 0.6990

  4. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling of benazepril and benazeprilat after administration of intravenous and oral doses of benazepril in healthy horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Rodríguez, Juan Manuel; Gómez-Díez, Manuel; Esgueva, María; Castejón-Riber, Cristina; Mena-Bravo, Antonio; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Ayala, Nahúm; Caballero, Juan Manuel Serrano; Muñoz, Ana

    2017-10-01

    Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) properties of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) benazeprilat have not been evaluated in horses. This study was designed to establish PK profiles for benazepril and benazeprilat after intravenous (IV) and oral (PO) administration of benazepril using a PK/PD model. This study also aims to determine the effects of benazeprilat on serum angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), selecting the most appropriate dose that suppresses ACE activity. Six healthy horses in a crossover design received IV benazepril at 0.50mg/kg and PO at doses 0 (placebo), 0.25, 0.50 and 1.00mg/kg. Blood pressures (BP) were measured and blood samples were obtained at different times in order to measure serum drug concentrations and serum ACE activity, using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and spectrophotometry, respectively. Systemic bioavailability of benazeprilat after PO benazepril was 3-4%. Maximum ACE inhibitions from baseline were 99.63% (IV benazepril), 6.77% (placebo) and 78.91%, 85.74% and 89.51% (for the three PO benazepril doses). Significant differences in BP were not found. Although oral availability was low, benazeprilat 1.00mg/kg, reached sufficient serum concentrations to induce long lasting serum ACE inhibitions (between 88 and 50%) for the first 48h. Additional research on benazepril administration in equine patients is indicated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of qinghaosu derivatives: how do they impact on the choice of drug and the dosage regimens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, D E; Teja-Isavadharm, P; Li, Q; Leo, K

    1998-01-01

    The critical decisions of which artemisinin derivative(s) to use and by which route(s) of administration for falciparum malaria are complex scientifically and politically. Despite the need for additional pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and toxicokinetic data, these drugs are too important to delay concise, rational recommendations any longer. These types of decisions must be made now, implemented on a multinational level with WHO leadership, and revised as new findings emerge. For acute, uncomplicated disease, per os dosing of artesunate or artemether for three days is recommended, but only in combination with other antimalarial drugs like mefloquine. For severe falciparum malaria, intravenous administration is the preferred route, yet current formulations for intravenous dosing are not optimal and should be an area for future development emphasis. Clearly intramuscular administration of artemether has proven effective for severe disease, yet dosing regimens shouldn't be designed with ultimate parasitological cure as the aim and the problem of bioavailability of the sesame oil formulations must be examined further. Once the life-saving reduction in parasitemia and pathophysiological sequelae have been achieved, the patient can be given oral medication to affect radical cure. Much more data will be required to define the role of per rectum dosing for the treatment of severe malaria, yet this approach holds great promise as a life-saving intervention in rural areas where this disease has it most dramatic impact.

  6. Assessment of celecoxib poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoformulation on drug pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harirforoosh, S; West, K O; Murrell, D E; Denham, J W; Panus, P C; Hanley, G A

    2016-11-01

    Celecoxib (CEL) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) showing selective cycloxygenase-2 inhibition. While effective as a pain reducer, CEL exerts some negative influence on renal and gastrointestinal parameters. This study examined CEL pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics following drug reformulation as a poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticle (NP). Rats were administered either vehicle (VEH) (methylcellulose solution), blank NP, 40 mg/kg CEL in methylcellulose, or an equivalent NP dose (CEL-NP). Plasma and urine (over 12 hrs) samples were collected prior to and post-treatment. The mean percent change from baseline of urine flow rate along with electrolyte concentrations in plasma and urine were assessed based on 100 g body weight. Using tissues collected 24 hrs post-treatment, gastrointestinal inflammation was estimated through duodenal and gastric prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and duodenal myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels; while kidney tissue was examined for dilatation and necrosis. CEL concentration was assayed in renal tissue and plasma utilizing high-performance liquid chromatography. Although there were significant changes when comparing CEL and CEL-NP to VEH in plasma sodium concentration and potassium excretion rate, there was no significant variation between CEL and CEL-NP. There was a significant reduction of protective duodenal PGE2 in CEL compared to VEH (p = 0.0088) and CEL-NP (p = 0.02). In the CEL-NP formulation, t1/2, Cmax, AUC0-∞, and Vd/F increased significantly when compared to CEL. At the observed dosage and duration, CEL-NP may not affect CEL-associated electrolyte parameters in either plasma or urine; however, it does provide increased systemic exposure while potentially alleviating some gastrointestinal outcomes related to inflammation.

  7. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic integration and modelling of oxytetracycline for the porcine pneumonia pathogens Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Pasteurella multocida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorey, L; Pelligand, L; Cheng, Z; Lees, P

    2017-10-01

    Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) integration and modelling were used to predict dosage schedules of oxytetracycline for two pig pneumonia pathogens, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Pasteurella multocida. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and mutant prevention concentration (MPC) were determined in broth and porcine serum. PK/PD integration established ratios of average concentration over 48 h (C av0-48 h )/MIC of 5.87 and 0.27 μg/mL (P. multocida) and 0.70 and 0.85 μg/mL (A. pleuropneumoniae) for broth and serum MICs, respectively. PK/PD modelling of in vitro time-kill curves established broth and serum breakpoint values for area under curve (AUC 0-24 h )/MIC for three levels of inhibition of growth, bacteriostasis and 3 and 4 log 10 reductions in bacterial count. Doses were then predicted for each pathogen, based on Monte Carlo simulations, for: (i) bacteriostatic and bactericidal levels of kill; (ii) 50% and 90% target attainment rates (TAR); and (iii) single dosing and daily dosing at steady-state. For 90% TAR, predicted daily doses at steady-state for bactericidal actions were 1123 mg/kg (P. multocida) and 43 mg/kg (A. pleuropneumoniae) based on serum MICs. Lower TARs were predicted from broth MIC data; corresponding dose estimates were 95 mg/kg (P. multocida) and 34 mg/kg (A. pleuropneumoniae). © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A novel once daily microparticulate dosage form comprising lansoprazole to prevent nocturnal acid breakthrough in the case of gastro-esophageal reflux disease: preparation, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alai, Milind; Lin, Wen Jen

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to formulate and evaluate the lansoprazole (LPZ)-loaded microparticles to prevent nocturnal acid breakthrough in the case of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The microparticulate delivery system was prepared by solvent evaporation method using Eudragit RS100 as a matrix polymer followed by enteric coated with Eudragit S100 and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate HP55 using spray drying method. The enteric coated microparticles were stable in gastric pH condition. In vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies in male Wistar rats demonstrated that enteric coated microparticles sustained release of LPZ and promoted ulcer healing activity. In other words, the microparticulate dosage form provided effective drug concentration for a longer period as compared to conventional extended release dosage form, and showed sufficient anti-acid secretion activity to treat acid related disorders including the enrichment of nocturnal acid breakthrough event based on a once daily administration.

  9. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction and their implication in clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palleria Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-drug interactions (DDIs are one of the commonest causes of medication error in developed countries, particularly in the elderly due to poly-therapy, with a prevalence of 20-40%. In particular, poly-therapy increases the complexity of therapeutic management and thereby the risk of clinically important DDIs, which can both induce the development of adverse drug reactions or reduce the clinical efficacy. DDIs can be classify into two main groups: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic. In this review, using Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library and Reference lists we searched articles published until June 30 2012, and we described the mechanism of pharmacokinetic DDIs focusing the interest on their clinical implications.

  10. Comparison of propofol pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models for awake craniotomy: A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soehle, Martin; Wolf, Christina F; Priston, Melanie J; Neuloh, Georg; Bien, Christian G; Hoeft, Andreas; Ellerkmann, Richard K

    2015-08-01

    Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy aims for an unconscious patient at the beginning and end of surgery but a rapidly awakening and responsive patient during the awake period. Therefore, an accurate pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model for propofol is required to tailor depth of anaesthesia. To compare the predictive performances of the Marsh and the Schnider PK/PD models during awake craniotomy. A prospective observational study. Single university hospital from February 2009 to May 2010. Twelve patients undergoing elective awake craniotomy for resection of brain tumour or epileptogenic areas. Arterial blood samples were drawn at intervals and the propofol plasma concentration was determined. The prediction error, bias [median prediction error (MDPE)] and inaccuracy [median absolute prediction error (MDAPE)] of the Marsh and the Schnider models were calculated. The secondary endpoint was the prediction probability PK, by which changes in the propofol effect-site concentration (as derived from simultaneous PK/PD modelling) predicted changes in anaesthetic depth (measured by the bispectral index). The Marsh model was associated with a significantly (P = 0.05) higher inaccuracy (MDAPE 28.9 ± 12.0%) than the Schnider model (MDAPE 21.5 ± 7.7%) and tended to reach a higher bias (MDPE Marsh -11.7 ± 14.3%, MDPE Schnider -5.4 ± 20.7%, P = 0.09). MDAPE was outside of accepted limits in six (Marsh model) and two (Schnider model) of 12 patients. The prediction probability was comparable between the Marsh (PK 0.798 ± 0.056) and the Schnider model (PK 0.787 ± 0.055), but after adjusting the models to each individual patient, the Schnider model achieved significantly higher prediction probabilities (PK 0.807 ± 0.056, P = 0.05). When using the 'asleep-awake-asleep' anaesthetic technique during awake craniotomy, we advocate using the PK/PD model proposed by Schnider. Due to considerable interindividual variation, additional monitoring of anaesthetic depth is

  11. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacological Effect of (S)-5-OH-DPAT Following Controlled Delivery with Transdermal Iontophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ackaert, Oliver W.; De Graan, Jeroen; Shi, Shanna; Vreeken, Rob; Della Pasqua, Oscar E.; Dijkstra, Durk; Westerink, Ben H.; Danhof, Meindert; Bouwstra, Joke A.

    The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of the active (S)-enantiomer of the potent dopamine (DA) agonist 5-hydroxy-2-(N,N,-di-n-propylamino)tetralin (5-OH-DPAT) were investigated in a novel anesthetized animal model. First, the relationship between current density, in vivo

  12. Antibiotics: Pharmacokinetics, toxicity, resistance and multidrug efflux pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Çiğdem; Özcengiz, Gülay

    2017-06-01

    The discovery of penicillin followed by streptomycin, tetracycline, cephalosporins and other natural, semi-synthetic and synthetic antimicrobials completely revolutionized medicine by reducing human morbidity and mortality from most of the common infections. However, shortly after they were introduced to clinical practice, the development of resistance was emerged. The decreasing interest from antibiotic industry in spite of rapid global emergence of antibiotic resistance is a tough dilemma from the pointview of public health. The efficiency of antimicrobial treatment is determined by both pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In spite of their selective toxicity, antibiotics still cause severe, life-threatening adverse reactions in host body mostly due to defective drug metabolism or excessive dosing regimen. The present article aims at updating current knowledge on pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics concepts and models, toxicity of antibiotics as well as antibiotic resistance mechanisms, resistome analyses and search for novel antibiotic resistance determinants with special emphasis given to the-state-of-the-art regarding multidrug efflux pumps and their additional physiological functions in stress adaptation and virulence of bacteria. All these issues are highly linked to each other and not only important for most efficient and prolonged use of current antibiotics, but also for discovery and development of new antibiotics and novel inhibitors of antibiotic resistance determinants of pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of ketoconazole on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ixabepilone: a first in class epothilone B analogue in late-phase clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Sanjay; Cohen, Marvin; Cömezoglu, S Nilgün; Perrin, Lionel; André, François; Jayabalan, David; Iacono, Lisa; Comprelli, Adriana; Ly, Van T; Zhang, Donglu; Xu, Carrie; Humphreys, W Griffith; McDaid, Hayley; Goldberg, Gary; Horwitz, Susan B; Mani, Sridhar

    2008-05-01

    To determine if ixabepilone is a substrate for cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and if its metabolism by this cytochrome is clinically important, we did a clinical drug interaction study in humans using ketoconazole as an inhibitor of CYP3A4. Human microsomes were used to determine the cytochrome P450 enzyme(s) involved in the metabolism of ixabepilone. Computational docking (CYP3A4) studies were done for epothilone B and ixabepilone. A follow-up clinical study was done in patients with cancer to determine if 400 mg/d ketoconazole (inhibitor of CYP3A4) altered the pharmacokinetics, drug-target interactions, and pharmacodynamics of ixabepilone. Molecular modeling and human microsomal studies predicted ixabepilone to be a good substrate for CYP3A4. In patients, ketoconazole coadministration resulted in a maximum ixabepilone dose administration to 25 mg/m(2) when compared with single-agent therapy of 40 mg/m(2). Coadministration of ketoconazole with ixabepilone resulted in a 79% increase in AUC(0-infinity). The relationship of microtubule bundle formation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells to plasma ixabepilone concentration was well described by the Hill equation. Microtubule bundle formation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells correlated with neutropenia. Ixabepilone is a good CYP3A4 substrate in vitro; however, in humans, it is likely to be cleared by multiple mechanisms. Furthermore, our results provide evidence that there is a direct relationship between ixabepilone pharmacokinetics, neutrophil counts, and microtubule bundle formation in PBMCs. Strong inhibitors of CYP3A4 should be used cautiously in the context of ixabepilone dosing.

  14. Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of the histamine H3 receptor antagonist, ABT-288, in healthy young adults and elderly volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Ahmed A; Haig, George; Florian, Hana; Locke, Charles; Zhang, Jun; Dutta, Sandeep

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this work was to characterize the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of ABT-288, a highly selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, in healthy young adults and elderly subjects following single and multiple dosing in a phase 1 setting. Single doses (0.1, 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 20 and 40 mg ABT-288) and multiple doses (0.5, 1.5, 3 and 6 mg ABT-288 once-daily for 14 days) were evaluated in young adults and multiple doses (0.5, 1.5, 3 and 5 mg ABT-288 once-daily for 12 days) were evaluated in elderly subjects using randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating study designs. The effect of food on ABT-288 pharmacokinetics (5 mg single dose) was evaluated using an open label, randomized, crossover design. ABT-288 safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics were comparable in young and elderly subjects. Single doses up to 40 mg and multiple doses up to 3 mg once-daily were generally safe and well tolerated. The most frequently reported adverse events were hot flush, headache, abnormal dreams, insomnia, nausea and dizziness. ABT-288 exposure (AUC) was dose-proportional over the evaluated dose ranges. The mean elimination half-life ranged from 40 to 61 h across dose groups. Steady state was achieved by day 10 of once-daily dosing with 3.4- to 4.2-fold accumulation. Food did not have a clinically meaningful effect on ABT-288 exposure. Based on the above results, 1 and 3 mg once-daily doses of ABT-288 were advanced to phase 2 evaluation in Alzheimer's patients. © 2012 Abbott Laboratories. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Vancomycin Used in Open Heart Surgery: Model-Based Evaluation of Standard Dosing Regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Saeed A; Alsultan, Abdullah S; Alqattan, Hussain M; Eldemerdash, Ahmed; Albacker, Turki B

    2018-04-23

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the population pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in patients undergoing open heart surgery. In this observational pharmacokinetic study, multiple blood samples were drawn over a 48-h period of intravenous vancomycin in patients who were undergoing open heart surgery. Blood samples were analysed using the Architect i4000SR Immunoassay Analyzer. Population pharmacokinetic models were developed using Monolix 4.4 software. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) simulations were performed to explore the ability of different dosage regimens to achieve the pharmacodynamic targets. One-hundred and sixty-eight blood samples were analysed from 28 patients. The pharmacokinetics of vancomycin was best described by a two-compartment model with between-subject variability in CL, V of the central compartment, and V of the peripheral compartment. CL and central compartment V of vancomycin were related to CL CR , body weight, and albumin concentration. Dosing simulations showed that standard dosing regimens of 1 and 1.5 g failed to achieve the PK-PD target of AUC 0--24 /MIC > 400 for an MIC of 1 mg/L, while high weight-based dosing regimens were able to achieve the PK-PD target. In summary, administration of standard doses of 1 and 1.5 g of vancomycin two times daily provided inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis in patients undergoing open heart surgery. The same findings were obtained when 15 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg doses of vancomycin were administered. Achieving the PK-PD target required higher doses (25 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg) of vancomycin. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Investigation of a Potential Pharmacokinetic Interaction Between Nebivolol and Fluvoxamine in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheldiu, Ana-Maria; Vlase, Laurian; Popa, Adina; Briciu, Corina; Muntean, Dana; Bocsan, Corina; Buzoianu, Anca; Achim, Marcela; Tomuta, Ioan; Todor, Ioana; Neag, Maria

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether fluvoxamine coadministration can influence the pharmacokinetic properties of nebivolol and its active hydroxylated metabolite (4-OH-nebivolol) and to assess the consequences of this potential pharmacokinetic interaction upon nebivolol pharmacodynamics. This open-label, non-randomized, sequential clinical trial consisted of two periods: Period 1 (Reference), during which each volunteer received a single dose of 5 mg nebivolol and Period 2 (Test), when a combination of 5 mg nebivolol and 100 mg fluvoxamine was given to all subjects, after a 6-days pretreatment regimen with fluvoxamine (50-100 mg/day). Non-compartmental analysis was used to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of nebivolol and its active metabolite. The pharmacodynamic parameters (blood pressure and heart rate) were assessed at rest after each nebivolol intake, during both study periods. Fluvoxamine pretreatment increased Cmax and AUC0-∞  of nebivolol (Cmax: 1.67 ± 0.690  vs 2.20 ± 0.970  ng/mL; AUC0-∞: 12.1 ± 11.0  vs 19.3 ± 19.5  ng*h/mL ) and of its active metabolite (Cmax: 0.680  ± 0.220  vs 0.960 ± 0.290  ng/mL; AUC0-∞: 17.6 ±20.1  vs 25.5 ± 29.9  ng*h/mL). Apart from Cmax,AUC0-t and AUC0-∞, the other pharmacokinetic parameters (tmax, kel and t½) were not significantly different between study periods. As for the pharmacodynamic analysis, decreases in blood pressure and heart rate after nebivolol administration were similar with and without fluvoxamine concomitant intake. Due to enzymatic inhibition, fluvoxamine increases the exposure to nebivolol and its active hydroxylated metabolite in healthy volunteers. This did not influence the blood pressure and heart-rate lowering effects of the beta-blocker administered as single-dose. However, more detail studies involving actual patients are required to further investigate the clinical relevance of this drug interaction. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For

  17. Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of neratinib in HER2-positive breast cancer and breast cancer with HER2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Chaix, Marie; Gombos, Andrea; Aftimos, Phillippe; Awada, Ahmad

    2016-08-01

    Despite the availability of several potent HER2-directed targeted agents, primary and acquired resistance continues to influence patient outcomes in HER2-positive breast cancer. Neratinib is an irreversible pan-HER tyrosine kinase inhibitor in late-phase clinical development. This review article focuses on neratinib in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer - early and metastatic stage - and HER2-mutant breast cancer, with particular emphasis on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the drug. The phase III ExteNET trial shows that neratinib improves 2-year invasive disease-free survival after trastuzumab-based adjuvant therapy in early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer, and in particular HER2+/HR+ tumors. Survival data are awaited. The investigational role of neratinib in high-risk patients or conversely in de-escalation dual regimens with other anti-HER2 therapies and without chemotherapy are of interest. Phase II trials show that neratinib has efficacy, either as monotherapy or in combination with other chemotherapeutic or endocrine agents, in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer and in tumors harboring HER2 mutations. The role of neratinib in therapeutic algorithms of HER2-positive patients, as well as delaying CNS events, awaits the results of ongoing trials such as NALA. Diarrhea, the main toxicity of neratinib, can be effectively managed with early loperamide prophylaxis.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the myotoxic venom of Pseudechis australis (mulga snake) in the anesthetised rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, A J; Hodgson, W C; O'Leary, M; Isbister, G K

    2014-07-01

    Myotoxicity is a common clinical effect of snake envenoming and results from either local or systemic myotoxins in snake venoms. Although numerous myotoxins have been isolated from snake venoms, there has been limited study on the relationship between the time course of venom concentrations (pharmacokinetics) and the time course of muscle injury measured as a rise in creatine kinase (CK) (pharmacodynamics). The aim of this study was to develop an in vivo model of myotoxicity to investigate the time course of myotoxicity and the effect of antivenom. Anesthetised rats were administered Pseudechis australis (mulga snake) venom either through i.v., i.m. or s.d. route, including a range of doses (5-100 μg/kg). Serial blood samples were collected for measurement of venom using enzyme immunoassay and measurement of CK and creatinine. Antivenom was administered before, 1 and 6 h after venom administration to investigate its effect on muscle injury. Plots of venom and CK versus time were made and the area under the curve (AUC) was calculated. There was a significant dose-dependent increase in CK concentration after administration of P. australis venom, which was greatest for i.v. administration. Timed measurement of venom concentrations showed a rapid absorption through s.d. and i.m. routes and a delayed rise in CK concentrations following any route. Antivenom prevented myotoxicity shown by a decrease in the CK AUC, which was most effective if given earliest. There was a rise in creatinine following i.v. venom administration. The study shows the delayed relationship between venom absorption and the rise in CK, consistent with the delayed onset of myotoxicity in human envenoming. Antivenom prevented myotoxicity more effectively if given earlier.

  19. A comprehensive review of recent studies on pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicines (2014-2017) and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peiying; Lin, Xinhua; Yao, Hong

    2018-05-01

    Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) have a long history for safely treating human diseases. Unlike western medicine, TCMs usually contain multiple components synergistically and holistically acting on the diseases. It remains a big challenge to represent rationally the in vivo process of multiple components of TCMs for understanding the relationship between administration and therapeutic effects. For years, efforts were always made to face the challenge, and the achievements were obvious. Here, we give an comprehensive overview of the recent investigation progress (from 2015 to 2017, except the part of 'integrated pharmacokinetics of TCMs' from 2014 to 2017 and the part of 'reverse pharmacokinetics in drug discovery from natural medicines' in 2014) on pharmacokinetics of TCMs, mainly referring to the following six aspects: (1) classical pharmacokinetic studies on TCMs; (2) absorbed components and metabolites identification of TCMs; (3) pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions and herb-herb interactions with TCMs; (4) integrated pharmacokinetics of TCMs; (5) pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic combination studies to dissect the action mechanisms of TCMs; and (6) reverse pharmacokinetics in drug discovery from natural medicines. Finally, based on the insights from the recent progress and our latest efforts, we propose new perspectives on the integrated pharmacokinetics of TCMs.

  20. Evaluation of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics relationships for Salvianolic Acid B micro-porous osmotic pump pellets in angina pectoris rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ling Kan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The work aims to investigate the in vitro release, pharmacokinetics (PK, pharmacodynamics (PD and PK–PD relationships of Salvianolic Acid B micro-porous osmotic pump pellets (SalB-MPOPs in angina pectoris New Zealand White (NZW rabbits, compared with those of SalB immediate-release pellets (SalB-IRPs. The SalB plasma concentrations and Superoxide dismutase levels (PD index were recorded continuously at predetermined time interval after administration, and the related parameters were calculated by using WinNonlin software. The release profile of MPOPs was more sustained than that of IRPs. PK results indicated that the mean Cmax was significantly lower, the SalB plasma concentrations were steadier, both area under concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0–24 h and from 0 to infinity (AUC0–∞ were presented larger, and both the peak concentration time (Tmax and mean residence time (MRT were prolonged for MPOPs, as compared with those of IRPs. PD results suggested that peak drug effect (Emax was lower and the equilibration rate constant (ke0 between the central compartment and the effect compartment was higher of MPOPs vs. those of IRPs. PK–PD relationships demonstrated that the effect-concentration-time (ECT course of MPOPs was clockwise hysteresis loop, and that of IRPs was counter-clockwise hysteresis loop. Collectively, those results demonstrated that MPOPs were potential formulations in treating angina pectoris induced by atherosclerosis.

  1. An integrated disease/pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model suggests improved interleukin-21 regimens validated prospectively for mouse solid cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran Elishmereni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-21 is an attractive antitumor agent with potent immunomodulatory functions. Yet thus far, the cytokine has yielded only partial responses in solid cancer patients, and conditions for beneficial IL-21 immunotherapy remain elusive. The current work aims to identify clinically-relevant IL-21 regimens with enhanced efficacy, based on mathematical modeling of long-term antitumor responses. For this purpose, pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD data were acquired from a preclinical study applying systemic IL-21 therapy in murine solid cancers. We developed an integrated disease/PK/PD model for the IL-21 anticancer response, and calibrated it using selected "training" data. The accuracy of the model was verified retrospectively under diverse IL-21 treatment settings, by comparing its predictions to independent "validation" data in melanoma and renal cell carcinoma-challenged mice (R(2>0.90. Simulations of the verified model surfaced important therapeutic insights: (1 Fractionating the standard daily regimen (50 µg/dose into a twice daily schedule (25 µg/dose is advantageous, yielding a significantly lower tumor mass (45% decrease; (2 A low-dose (12 µg/day regimen exerts a response similar to that obtained under the 50 µg/day treatment, suggestive of an equally efficacious dose with potentially reduced toxicity. Subsequent experiments in melanoma-bearing mice corroborated both of these predictions with high precision (R(2>0.89, thus validating the model also prospectively in vivo. Thus, the confirmed PK/PD model rationalizes IL-21 therapy, and pinpoints improved clinically-feasible treatment schedules. Our analysis demonstrates the value of employing mathematical modeling and in silico-guided design of solid tumor immunotherapy in the clinic.

  2. Evaluation of a Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Model for Hypouricemic Effects of Febuxostat Using Datasets Obtained from Real-world Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Toshinori; Itoh, Toshimasa; Kimura, Toshimi; Echizen, Hirotoshi

    2018-06-06

    Febuxostat is an active xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor that is widely used in the hyperuricemia treatment. We aimed to evaluate the predictive performance of a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model for hypouricemic effects of febuxostat. Previously, we have formulated a PK--PD model for predicting hypouricemic effects of febuxostat as a function of baseline serum urate levels, body weight, renal function, and drug dose using datasets reported in preapproval studies (Hirai T et al., Biol Pharm Bull 2016; 39: 1013-21). Using an updated model with sensitivity analysis, we examined the predictive performance of the PK-PD model using datasets obtained from the medical records of patients who received febuxostat from March 2011 to December 2015 at Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to explore clinical variables to improve the predictive performance of the model. A total of 1,199 serum urate data were retrieved from 168 patients (age: 60.5 ±17.7 years, 71.4% males) who received febuxostat as hyperuricemia treatment. There was a significant correlation (r=0.68, p<0.01) between serum urate levels observed and those predicted by the modified PK-PD model. A multivariate regression analysis revealed that the predictive performance of the model may be improved further by considering comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and co-administration of loop diuretics (r = 0.77, p<0.01). The PK-PD model may be useful for predicting individualized maintenance doses of febuxostat in real-world patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. A Phase 1 Trial to Assess the Safety, Acceptability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of a Novel Dapivirine Vaginal Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunge, Katherine E; Dezzutti, Charlene S; Rohan, Lisa C; Hendrix, Craig W; Marzinke, Mark A; Richardson-Harman, Nicola; Moncla, Bernard J; Devlin, Brid; Meyn, Leslie A; Spiegel, Hans M L; Hillier, Sharon L

    2016-04-15

    Films may deliver antiretroviral drugs efficiently to mucosal tissues. In this first in-human trial of a vaginal film for delivering the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor dapivirine, safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of film and gel formulations were compared with placebo. Sixty-one healthy HIV-negative women were randomized to daily dapivirine (0.05%) or placebo gel, or dapivirine (1.25 mg) or placebo film for seven days. The proportion of participants experiencing grade 2 and higher adverse events related to study product were compared. Plasma dapivirine concentrations were quantified. Paired cervical and vaginal tissue biopsies obtained ∼2 hours after the last dose were measured for tissue drug concentration and exposed to HIV in an ex vivo challenge assay. Two grade 2 related adverse events occurred in the placebo film group. Women randomized to gel and film products had 4 log10 higher of dapivirine in cervical and vaginal tissues than plasma. Although gel and film users had comparable plasma dapivirine concentrations, tissue concentrations of dapivirine were 3-5 times higher in the gel users when compared with film users. HIV replication in the ex vivo challenge assay was significantly reduced in vaginal tissues from women randomized to dapivirine film or gel; furthermore, tissue drug concentrations were highly correlated with HIV protection. Women rated the film more comfortable with less leakage but found it more difficult to insert than gel. Both film and gel delivered dapivirine at concentrations sufficient to block HIV ex vivo. This proof-of-concept study suggests film formulations for microbicides merit further investigation.

  4. Exposure and Tumor Fn14 Expression as Determinants of Pharmacodynamics of the Anti-TWEAK Monoclonal Antibody RG7212 in Patients with Fn14-Positive Solid Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meulendijks, Didier; Lassen, Ulrik N; Siu, Lillian L

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The TWEAK-Fn14 pathway represents a novel anticancer target that is being actively investigated. Understanding the relationship between pharmacokinetics of anti-TWEAK therapeutics and tumor pharmacodynamics is critical. We investigated exposure-response relationships of RG7212, an anti...... changes in tumor TWEAK-Fn14 signaling in paired pre- and posttreatment tumor biopsies. The objectives of the analysis were to define exposure-response relationships and the relationship between pretreatment tumor Fn14 expression and pharmacodynamic effect. Associations between changes in TWEAK-Fn14...... longer time on study was observed with high versus low RG7212 exposure. CONCLUSIONS: RG7212 reduced tumor TWEAK-Fn14 signaling in a systemic exposure-dependent manner. In addition to higher exposure, relatively high Fn14 expression might be required for pharmacodynamic effect of anti-TWEAK monoclonal...

  5. Evaluation of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interaction between repaglinide and atazanavir in healthy, diabetic and hepatic impaired rats: possible inhibition of CYP3A, OATP, and P-glycoprotein transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirumal Eswara Goud

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome in HIV infected patients is particularly associated with the use protease inhibitors. Atazanavir is an inhibitor of the cytochrome P 450 (CYP system, in particular CYP3A4 and CYP2C9 which can affect the metabolism of several drugs. To treat metabolic syndrome in HIV patients repaglinide is used and it is a short acting insulin secretagogues undergoing metabolism with CYP 3A4 and CYP 2C8 enzyme system. The purpose of this study was to assess the possible pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interaction of repaglinide and atazanavir in healthy, diabetic and impaired hepatic function rats. Human oral therapeutic doses of atazanavir and repaglinide were extrapolated to rats based on the body surface area. The pharmacokinetic parameters and blood glucose concentrations of repaglinide were determined after oral administration of repaglinide alone (0.5 mg/kg and in the presence of atazanavir (36 mg/kg in normal, diabetic and hepatic impaired rats. The pharmacokinetics (PK and blood glucose concentrations of repaglinide were significantly altered in the presence of atazanavir. The peak plasma concentration (Cmax, area under the plasma concentration time profile (AUC and elimination half-life of repaglinide were significantly (P<0.0001 increased. The repaglinide clearance (CL was significantly (P<0.0001 decreased in the presence of atazanavir treatment. In the presence of atazanavir, repaglinide hypoglycaemic activity was increased significantly (P<0.0001 when compared with the repaglinide control group. The present study demonstrated the significant difference in the PK/PD changes due to the enhanced bioavailability and decreased total body clearance of repaglinide may be due to the inhibition of the CYP P450 metabolic system, OATP and P-gp transporters by atazanavir.

  6. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction and their implication in clinical management

    OpenAIRE

    Palleria, Caterina; DI PAOLO, Antonello; Giofrè, Chiara; Caglioti, Chiara; Leuzzi, Giacomo; Siniscalchi, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are one of the commonest causes of medication error in developed countries, particularly in the elderly due to poly-therapy, with a prevalence of 20-40%. In particular, poly-therapy increases the complexity of therapeutic management and thereby the risk of clinically important DDIs, which can both induce the development of adverse drug reactions or reduce the clinical efficacy. DDIs can be classify into two main groups: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic. In thi...

  7. Pharmacokinetic/pharmaco-dynamic modelling and simulation of the effects of different cannabinoid receptor type 1 antagonists on (9)-tetrahydrocannabinol challenge tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guan, Zheng; Klumpers, Linda E.; Oyetayo, Olubukayo-Opeyemi; Heuberger, Jules; van Gerven, Joop M. A.; Stevens, Jasper

    Aim: The severe psychiatric side effects of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonists hampered their wide development but this might be overcome by careful management of drug development with pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analyses. PK/PD models suitable for direct comparison of

  8. Pharmacokinetics and tolerability of DA-8031, a novel selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor for premature ejaculation in healthy male subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin D

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Dongseong Shin,1 SeungHwan Lee,2 Sojeong Yi,2 Seo Hyun Yoon,2 Joo-Youn Cho,2 Mi Young Bahng,3 In-Jin Jang,2 Kyung-Sang Yu2 1Clinical Trials Center, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Hospital, 3Department of Product Development, Dong-A ST, Seoul, Korea Objective: DA-8031 is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor under development for the treatment of premature ejaculation. This is the first-in-human study aimed at evaluating the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of DA-8031 and its metabolites (M1, M2, M4, and M5 in the plasma and urine after administration of a single oral dose in healthy male subjects.Methods: A dose block-randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single ascending dose study was conducted. Subjects received either placebo or a single dose of DA-8031 at 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, or 120 mg. DA-8031 and its four metabolites were analyzed in the plasma and urine for pharmacokinetic evaluation. The effect of genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome-P450 (CYP enzymes on the pharmacokinetics of DA-8031 was evaluated.Results: After a single dose, plasma DA-8031 reached the maximum concentration at a median of 2–3 h and was eliminated with terminal elimination half-life of 17.9–28.7 h. The mean renal clearance was 3.7–5.6 L/h. Dose-proportional pharmacokinetics was observed over the dose range of 20–80 mg. Among the metabolites, M4 had the greatest plasma concentration, followed by M5 and M1. Subjects with CYP2D6 intermediate metabolizer had significantly greater dose-normalized Cmax and AUC0–t of DA-8031 as well as smaller metabolic ratios than those subjects with CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer. The most common adverse events were nausea, dizziness, and headache, and no serious adverse events were reported.Conclusion: In conclusion, the systemic exposure of DA-8031 was increased proportionally to the dose within 20

  9. The effect of chlorpromazine on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of phenobarbital in X-irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okulicz-Kozaryn, I.; Wojciakowa, Z.; Godlewski, J.; Nowakowska, E.

    1984-01-01

    Male Wistar rats were irradiated with a single 600R dose of X-rays on the whole body. Chlorpromazine was given 30 min before phenobarbital. Phenobarbital sleeping time was prolonged by chlorpromazine both in irradiated and non-irradiated rats. On the 3rd day after irradiation the prolongation of the phenobarbital sleep by chlorpromazine was more marked than on the 6th day. No correlation between the pharmacodynamic action of phenobarbital and its cerebral level was noted. (author)

  10. A novel approach to pharmacodynamic assessment of antimicrobial agents: new insights to dosing regimen design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent H Tam

    Full Text Available Pharmacodynamic modeling has been increasingly used as a decision support tool to guide dosing regimen selection, both in the drug development and clinical settings. Killing by antimicrobial agents has been traditionally classified categorically as concentration-dependent (which would favor less fractionating regimens or time-dependent (for which more frequent dosing is preferred. While intuitive and useful to explain empiric data, a more informative approach is necessary to provide a robust assessment of pharmacodynamic profiles in situations other than the extremes of the spectrum (e.g., agents which exhibit partial concentration-dependent killing. A quantitative approach to describe the interaction of an antimicrobial agent and a pathogen is proposed to fill this unmet need. A hypothetic antimicrobial agent with linear pharmacokinetics is used for illustrative purposes. A non-linear functional form (sigmoid Emax of killing consisted of 3 parameters is used. Using different parameter values in conjunction with the relative growth rate of the pathogen and antimicrobial agent concentration ranges, various conventional pharmacodynamic surrogate indices (e.g., AUC/MIC, Cmax/MIC, %T>MIC could be satisfactorily linked to outcomes. In addition, the dosing intensity represented by the average kill rate of a dosing regimen can be derived, which could be used for quantitative comparison. The relevance of our approach is further supported by experimental data from our previous investigations using a variety of gram-negative bacteria and antimicrobial agents (moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, gentamicin, amikacin and meropenem. The pharmacodynamic profiles of a wide range of antimicrobial agents can be assessed by a more flexible computational tool to support dosing selection.

  11. Genetic Variants in Transcription Factors Are Associated With the Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Metformin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, S; Yee, SW; Stocker, S; Mosley, JD; Kubo, M; Castro, R; Mefford, JA; Wen, C; Liang, X; Witte, J; Brett, C; Maeda, S; Simpson, MD; Hedderson, MM; Davis, RL; Roden, DM; Giacomini, KM; Savic, RM

    2014-01-01

    One-third of type 2 diabetes patients do not respond to metformin. Genetic variants in metformin transporters have been extensively studied as a likely contributor to this high failure rate. Here, we investigate, for the first time, the effect of genetic variants in transcription factors on metformin pharmacokinetics (PK) and response. Overall, 546 patients and healthy volunteers contributed their genome-wide, pharmacokinetic (235 subjects), and HbA1c data (440 patients) for this analysis. Five variants in specificity protein 1 (SP1), a transcription factor that modulates the expression of metformin transporters, were associated with changes in treatment HbA1c (P < 0.01) and metformin secretory clearance (P < 0.05). Population pharmacokinetic modeling further confirmed a 24% reduction in apparent clearance in homozygous carriers of one such variant, rs784888. Genetic variants in other transcription factors, peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-α and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-α, were significantly associated with HbA1c change only. Overall, our study highlights the importance of genetic variants in transcription factors as modulators of metformin PK and response. PMID:24853734

  12. Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Tolerability of Sacubitril/Valsartan (LCZ696) After Single-Dose Administration in Healthy Chinese Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yi; Ayalasomayajula, Surya; Pan, Wei; Yang, Fan; Yuan, Yaozong; Langenickel, Thomas; Hinder, Markus; Kalluri, Sampath; Pal, Parasar; Sunkara, Gangadhar

    2017-02-01

    Sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) is a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNI) and has been recently approved in several countries for the treatment of patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. This was the first study conducted to characterise the pharmacokinetics of LCZ696 analytes (pro-drug sacubitril, active neprilysin inhibitor LBQ657 and valsartan) after single-dose administration of LCZ696 in healthy Chinese subjects. In this open-label, randomised, parallel-group study, following screening and baseline evaluation, eligible healthy subjects received single oral doses of LCZ696 50, 100, 200 or 400 mg. The pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of LCZ696 were assessed up to 72 h after dosing. A total of 40 healthy male subjects were enrolled, and all completed the study. Following oral administration, LCZ696 delivered systemic exposure to sacubitril, LBQ657 and valsartan with a median time to reach maximum plasma concentration (T max ) ranging from 0.50 to 1.25, 2.00 to 3.00 and 1.50 to 2.50 h, respectively, over the investigated dose range. The mean terminal elimination half-life (T 1/2 ) ranged from 0.89 to 1.35, 8.57 to 9.24 and 5.33 to 7.91 h for sacubitril, LBQ657 and valsartan, respectively. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to the time of the last quantifiable concentration (AUC 0-last ), and maximum plasma concentration (C max ) for LBQ657 increased dose proportionally over the entire dose range. Dose linear increase in the exposure was observed across the dose range for sacubitril and valsartan. LCZ696 was safe and well tolerated at all doses in this study. Adverse events of only mild intensity, which required no treatment, were reported in 6 (15 %) subjects. The pharmacokinetic profiles of LCZ696 analytes in Chinese subjects are similar to those reported previously in Caucasian subjects.

  13. Relevance of the Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Profiles of Puerariae lobatae Radix to Aggregation of Multi-Component Molecules in Aqueous Decoctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bili Su

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs is related to their multi-component system. TCM aqueous decoction is a common clinical oral formulation. Between molecules in solution, there exist intermolecular strong interactions to form chemical bonds or weak non-bonding interactions such as hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals forces, which hold molecules together to form “molecular aggregates”. Taking the TCM Puerariae lobatae Radix (Gegen as an example, we explored four Gegen decoctions of different concentration of 0.019, 0.038, 0.075, and 0.30 g/mL, named G-1, G-2, G-3, and G-4. In order of molecular aggregate size (diameter the four kinds of solution were ranked G-1 < G-2 < G-3 < G-4 by Flow Cell 200S IPAC image analysis. A rabbit vertebrobasilar artery insufficiency (VBI model was set up and they were given Gegen decoction (GGD at a clinical dosage of 0.82 g/kg (achieved by adjusting the gastric perfusion volume depending on the concentration. The HPLC fingerprint of rabbit plasma showed that the chemical component absorption into blood in order of peak area values was G-1 < G-2 > G-3 > G-4. Puerarin and daidzin are the major constituents of Gegen, and the pharmacokinetics of G-1 and G-2 puerarin conformed with the two compartment open model, while for G-3 and G-4, they conformed to a one compartment open model. For all four GGDs the pharmacokinetics of daidzin complied with a one compartment open model. FQ-PCR assays of rabbits’ vertebrobasilar arterial tissue were performed to determine the pharmacodynamic profiles of the four GGDs. GGD markedly lowered the level of AT1R mRNA, while the AT2R mRNA level was increased significantly vs. the VBI model, and G-2 was the most effective. In theory the dosage was equal to the blood drug concentration and should be consistent; however, the formation of molecular aggregates affects drug absorption and metabolism, and therefore influences drugs’ effects. Our data provided references for

  14. [Integration of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics based on the in vivo analysis of drug-receptor binding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shizuo

    2015-01-01

      As I was deeply interested in the effects of drugs on the human body, I chose pharmacology as the subject of special study when I became a 4th year student at Shizuoka College of Pharmacy. I studied abroad as a postdoctoral fellow for two years, from 1978, under the tutelage of Professor Henry I. Yamamura (pharmacology) in the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona, USA. He taught me a variety of valuable skills such as the radioreceptor binding assay, which represented the most advanced technology developed in the US at that time. After returning home, I engaged in clarifying receptor abnormalities in pathological conditions, as well as in drug action mechanisms, by making the best use of this radioreceptor binding assay. In 1989, following the founding of the University of Shizuoka, I was invited by Professor Ryohei Kimura to join the Department of Pharmacokinetics. This switch in discipline provided a good opportunity for me to broaden my perspectives in pharmaceutical sciences. I worked on evaluating drug-receptor binding in vivo as a combined index for pharmacokinetics and pharmacological effect manifestation, with the aim of bridging pharmacology and pharmacokinetics. In fact, by focusing on data from in vivo receptor binding, it became possible to clearly rationalize the important consideration of drug dose-concentration-action relationships, and to study quantitative and kinetic analyses of relationships among pharmacokinetics, receptor binding and pharmacological effects. Based on this concept, I was able to demonstrate the utility of dynamic analyses of drug-receptor binding in drug discovery, drug fostering, and the proper use of pharmacokinetics with regard to many drugs.

  15. Determinants of the over-anticoagulation response during warfarin initiation therapy in Asian patients based on population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Minami; Takahashi, Harumi; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Wen, Ming-Shien; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Chuang, Hui-Ping; Luo, Chen-Hui; Arima, Aki; Onozuka, Akiko; Nagai, Rui; Shiomi, Mari; Mihara, Kiyoshi; Morita, Takashi; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2014-01-01

    To clarify pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) factors associated with the over-anticoagulation response in Asians during warfarin induction therapy, population PK-PD analyses were conducted in an attempt to predict the time-courses of the plasma S-warfarin concentration, Cp(S), and coagulation and anti-coagulation (INR) responses. In 99 Chinese patients we analyzed the relationships between dose and Cp(S) to estimate the clearance of S-warfarin, CL(S), and that between Cp(S) and the normal prothrombin concentration (NPT) as a coagulation marker for estimation of IC50. We also analyzed the non-linear relationship between NPT inhibition and the increase in INR to derive the non-linear index λ. Population analyses accurately predicted the time-courses of Cp(S), NPT and INR. Multivariate analysis showed that CYP2C9*3 mutation and body surface area were predictors of CL(S), that VKORC1 and CYP4F2 polymorphisms were predictors of IC50, and that baseline NPT was a predictor of λ. CL(S) and λ were significantly lower in patients with INR≥4 than in those with INR<4 (190 mL/h vs 265 mL/h, P<0.01 and 3.2 vs 3.7, P<0.01, respectively). Finally, logistic regression analysis revealed that CL(S), ALT and hypertension contributed significantly to INR≥4. All these results indicate that factors associated with the reduced metabolic activity of warfarin represented by CL(S), might be critical determinants of the over-anticoagulation response during warfarin initiation in Asians. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02065388.

  16. Determinants of the over-anticoagulation response during warfarin initiation therapy in Asian patients based on population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minami Ohara

    Full Text Available To clarify pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD factors associated with the over-anticoagulation response in Asians during warfarin induction therapy, population PK-PD analyses were conducted in an attempt to predict the time-courses of the plasma S-warfarin concentration, Cp(S, and coagulation and anti-coagulation (INR responses. In 99 Chinese patients we analyzed the relationships between dose and Cp(S to estimate the clearance of S-warfarin, CL(S, and that between Cp(S and the normal prothrombin concentration (NPT as a coagulation marker for estimation of IC50. We also analyzed the non-linear relationship between NPT inhibition and the increase in INR to derive the non-linear index λ. Population analyses accurately predicted the time-courses of Cp(S, NPT and INR. Multivariate analysis showed that CYP2C9*3 mutation and body surface area were predictors of CL(S, that VKORC1 and CYP4F2 polymorphisms were predictors of IC50, and that baseline NPT was a predictor of λ. CL(S and λ were significantly lower in patients with INR≥4 than in those with INR<4 (190 mL/h vs 265 mL/h, P<0.01 and 3.2 vs 3.7, P<0.01, respectively. Finally, logistic regression analysis revealed that CL(S, ALT and hypertension contributed significantly to INR≥4. All these results indicate that factors associated with the reduced metabolic activity of warfarin represented by CL(S, might be critical determinants of the over-anticoagulation response during warfarin initiation in Asians.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02065388.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of DSTA4637A: A novel THIOMAB™ antibody antibiotic conjugate against Staphylococcus aureus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chenguang; Lehar, Sophie; Gutierrez, Johnny; Rosenberger, Carrie M; Ljumanovic, Nina; Dinoso, Jason; Koppada, Neelima; Hong, Kyu; Baruch, Amos; Carrasco-Triguero, Montserrat; Saad, Ola; Mariathasan, Sanjeev; Kamath, Amrita V

    DSTA4637A, a novel THIOMAB™ antibody antibiotic conjugate (TAC) against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), is currently being investigated as a potential therapy against S. aureus infections. Structurally, TAC is composed of an anti-S. aureus antibody linked to a potent antibiotic, dmDNA31. The goal of the current study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) of TAC in mice, assess the effect of S. aureus infection on its PK, and evaluate its pharmacodynamics (PD) by measuring the bacterial load in various organs at different timepoints following TAC treatment. Plasma concentrations of 3 analytes, total antibody (TAb), antibody-conjugated dmDNA31 (ac-dmDNA31), and unconjugated dmDNA31, were measured in these studies. In non-infected mice (target antigen absent), following intravenous (IV) administration of a single dose of TAC, systemic concentration-time profiles of both TAb and ac-dmDNA31 were bi-exponential and characterized by a short distribution phase and a long elimination phase as expected for a monoclonal antibody-based therapeutic. Systemic exposures of both TAb and ac-dmDNA31 were dose proportional over the dose range tested (5 to 50 mg/kg). In a mouse model of systemic S. aureus infection (target antigen present), a single IV dose of TAC demonstrated PK behavior similar to that in the non-infected mice, and substantially reduced bacterial load in the heart, kidney, and bones on 7 and 14 d post dosing. These findings have increased our understanding of the PK and PK/PD of this novel molecule, and have shown that at efficacious dose levels the presence of S. aureus infection had minimal effect on TAC PK.

  18. Steady-State pharmacokinetics and tolerability of trans-resveratrol 2000 mg twice daily with food, quercetin and alcohol (ethanol) in healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    la Porte, Charles; Voduc, Nha; Zhang, Guijun; Seguin, Isabelle; Tardiff, Danielle; Singhal, Neera; Cameron, D William

    2010-07-01

    Trans-resveratrol is a polyphenol, which is found in red wine and has cancer chemo-preventive properties and disease-preventive properties. The pharmacokinetics of trans-resveratrol have been investigated in single-dose studies and in studies with relatively low dosages. The present study aimed to investigate the steady-state pharmacokinetics and tolerability of trans-resveratrol 2000 mg twice daily with food, quercetin and alcohol (ethanol). This was a two-period, open-label, single-arm, within-subject control study in eight healthy subjects. The steady-state 12-hour pharmacokinetics of trans-resveratrol 2000 mg twice daily were studied with a standard breakfast, a high-fat breakfast, quercetin 500 mg twice daily and 5% alcohol 100 mL. Trans-resveratrol plasma concentrations were determined using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. The mean (SD) area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 12 hours (AUC(12)) and maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) of trans-resveratrol were 3558 (2195) ng * h/mL and 1274 (790) ng/mL, respectively, after the standard breakfast. The high-fat breakfast significantly decreased the AUC(12) and C(max) by 45% and 46%, respectively, when compared with the standard breakfast. Quercetin 500 mg twice daily or 5% alcohol 100 mL did not influence trans-resveratrol pharmacokinetics. Diarrhoea was reported in six of the eight subjects. Significant but not clinically relevant changes from baseline were observed in serum potassium and total bilirubin levels. Trans-resveratrol 2000 mg twice daily resulted in adequate exposure and was well tolerated by healthy subjects, although diarrhoea was frequently observed. In order to maximize trans-resveratrol exposure, it should be taken with a standard breakfast and not with a high-fat meal. Furthermore, combined intake with quercetin or alcohol did not influence trans-resveratrol exposure.

  19. Dataset for Phase I randomized clinical trial for safety and tolerability of GET 73 in single and repeated ascending doses including preliminary pharmacokinetic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina L. Haass-Koffler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The data in this article outline the methods used for the administration of GET 73 in the first time-in-human manuscript entitled “Phase I randomized clinical trial for the safety, tolerability and preliminary pharmacokinetics of the mGluR5 negative allosteric modulator GET 73 following single and repeated doses in healthy male volunteers” (Haass-Koffler et al., 2017 [1]. Data sets are provided in two different manners. The first series of tables provided includes procedural information about the experiments conducted. The next series of tables provided includes Pharmacokinetic (PK parameters for GET 73 and its main metabolite MET 2. This set of data is comprised by two experiments: Experiment 1 references a single ascending dose administration of GET 73 and Experiment 2 references a repeated ascending dose administration of GET 73. Keywords: Glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5, Allosteric modulator, GET 73, Safety, Tolerability

  20. Influence of obstructive jaundice on pharmacodynamics of rocuronium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Meng; Zhang, Peng; Lin, Mi-Jia; Tan, Bo; Qiu, Hai-Bo; Yu, Wei-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Anesthetics are variable in patients with obstructive jaundice. The minimum alveolar concentration awake of desflurane is reduced in patients with obstructive jaundice, while it has no effect on pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of propofol. In this study, we investigated the influence of obstructive jaundice on the pharmacodynamics and blood concentration of rocuronium. Included in this study were 26 control patients and 27 patients with obstructive jaundice. Neuromuscular block of rocuronium was monitored by acceleromyography. Onset time, spontaneous recovery of the height of twitch first (T1) to 25% of the final T1 value (Duration 25%, Dur 25%), recovery index (RI), and spontaneous recovery of train-of-four (TOF) ratios to 70% were measured. The plasma rocuronium concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography using berberine as an internal standard. There was no significant difference in onset time between the two groups. The Dur 25%, the recovery index and the time of recovery of the TOF ratios to 70% were all prolonged in the obstructive jaundice group compared with the control group. The plasma concentration of rocuronium at 60, 90 and 120 min after bolus administration was significantly higher in the obstructive jaundice group. The neuromuscular blockade by rocuronium is prolonged in obstructive jaundice patients, and therefore precautions should be taken in case of postoperative residual neuromuscular block. The possible reason is impedance of rocuronium excretion due to biliary obstruction and increased plasma unbound rocuronium because of free bilirubin competing with it for albumin binding.

  1. Pharmacokinetic properties and tolerability of low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Paul J; Olugemo, Kemi; Solorio, Daniel; Young, Clarence L

    2015-02-01

    This study compared the pharmacokinetic properties and safety profile of low-dose (18- and 35-mg) diclofenac capsules manufactured using SoluMatrix Fine Particle Technology (Trademark of iCeutica Inc. (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), and the technology is licensed to Iroko Pharmaceuticals, LLC (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) for exclusive use in NSAIDs), which produces submicron-sized drug particles with enhanced dissolution properties, to those of diclofenac potassium immediate-release (IR) 50-mg tablets. This Phase 1, single-center, randomized, open-label, single-dose crossover study was conducted in 40 healthy volunteers. Subjects received, in randomized order, SoluMatrix diclofenac 18- or 35-mg capsules in the fasting condition, SoluMatrix diclofenac 35-mg capsules under fed conditions, and diclofenac potassium IR 50-mg tablets under fasting and fed conditions. Pharmacokinetic parameters (T(max), C(max), AUC(0-t), AUC(0-∞)) were calculated from the concentrations of diclofenac in the plasma. Absorption, food effect, and dose proportionality were determined using a mixed-model ANOVA for C(max), AUC(0-t), AUC(0-∞). Tolerability was assessed by recording adverse events, physical examination findings, vital sign measurements: clinical laboratory test results. Overall, 35 healthy volunteers aged 18 to 52 years completed the study. The mean age of the subjects was 33.4 years, and approximately half were men (47.5%). Median T(max) values were similar between the low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac 35-mg capsules and the diclofenac potassium IR 50-mg tablets (both, ~1.0 hour). The mean maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) after the administration of low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac 35-mg capsules was 26% lower than that with diclofenac potassium IR 50-mg tablets under fasting conditions (868.72 vs 1194.21 ng/mL). The administration of low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac 35-mg capsules was associated with a 23% lower overall systemic exposure compared with that of diclofenac

  2. Pharmacodynamics and tolerance of X-ray contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmiedel, E.

    1987-01-01

    The improved tolerance of nonionic contrast media compared with conventional contrast media is mainly due to their lower osmolality and reduced allergoid potential. Tolerance advantages that have been definitely proven are, for example, low-pain contrast medium injection and superior systemic tolerance; side effects of an allergic pattern occur less often. Animals experiments have established that nonionic contrast media exercise a comparatively lower influence on the cardiovascular system. The haemodynamics of pulmonary circulation are less adversely affected on intravenous bolus injection. Reduced potential risk is to be expected especially in cardiac and bronchopulmonary high-risk patients. The reduced nephrotoxicity of nonionic contrast media was definitely established by clinical studies. Further systematic studies will however be required to provide an answer to the question whether this also entails a reduction in the incidence of renal failures induced by contrast media. (orig.) [de

  3. Comparative efficacies of candidate antibiotics against Yersinia pestis in an in vitro pharmacodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Arnold; Vanscoy, Brian; Liu, Weiguo; Kulawy, Robert; Brown, David; Heine, Henry S; Drusano, George L

    2011-06-01

    Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes plague, is a potential agent of bioterrorism. Streptomycin is the "gold standard" for the treatment of plague infections in humans, but the drug is not available in many countries, and resistance to this antibiotic occurs naturally and has been generated in the laboratory. Other antibiotics have been shown to be active against Y. pestis in vitro and in vivo. However, the relative efficacies of clinically prescribed regimens of these antibiotics with streptomycin and with each other for the killing of Yersinia pestis are unknown. The efficacies of simulated pharmacokinetic profiles for human 10-day clinical regimens of ampicillin, meropenem, moxifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and gentamicin were compared with the gold standard, streptomycin, for killing of Yersinia pestis in an in vitro pharmacodynamic model. Resistance amplification with therapy was also assessed. Streptomycin killed the microbe in one trial but failed due to resistance amplification in the second trial. In two trials, the other antibiotics consistently reduced the bacterial densities within the pharmacodynamic systems from 10⁸ CFU/ml to undetectable levels (pestis and deserve further evaluation.

  4. Physiologic and Pharmacokinetic Changes in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maged eCostantine

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Physiologic changes in pregnancy induce profound alterations to the pharmacokinetic properties of many medications. These changes affect distribution, absorption, metabolism, and excretion of drugs, and thus may impact their pharmacodynamic properties during pregnancy. Pregnant women undergo several adaptations in many organ systems. Some adaptations are secondary to hormonal changes in pregnancy, while others occur to support the gravid woman and her developing fetus. Some of the changes in maternal physiology during pregnancy include, for example, increased maternal fat and total body water, decreased plasma protein concentrations, especially albumin, increased maternal blood volume, cardiac output and blood flow to the kidneys and uteroplacental unit, and decreased blood pressure. The maternal blood volume expansion occurs at a larger proportion than the increase in red blood cell mass, which results in physiologic anemia and hemodilution. Other physiologic changes include increased tidal volume, partially compensated respiratory alkalosis, delayed gastric emptying and gastrointestinal motility, and altered activity of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes. Understating these changes and their profound impact on the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs in pregnancy is essential to optimize maternal and fetal health.

  5. Population pharmacokinetic modelling of the enterohepatic recirculation of diclofenac and rofecoxib in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntjens, D R H; Strougo, A; Chain, A; Metcalf, A; Summerfield, S; Spalding, D J M; Danhof, M; Della Pasqua, O

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Enterohepatic recirculation (EHC) is a common pharmacokinetic phenomenon that has been poorly modelled in animals. The presence of EHC leads to the appearance of multiple peaks in the concentration-time profile and increased exposure, which may have implications for drug effect and extrapolation across species. The aim of this investigation was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for diclofenac and rofecoxib that describes EHC and to assess its consequence for the pharmacodynamics of both drugs. Experimental approach: The pharmacokinetics of diclofenac and rofecoxib was characterized in male rats following intravenous, intraperitoneal and oral administration. Blood samples were collected at pre-defined time points after dosing to determine plasma concentrations over time. A parametric approach using nonlinear mixed effects modelling was applied to describe EHC, whilst simulations were used to evaluate its impact on PGE2 inhibition. Key results: For diclofenac, EHC was described by a compartmental model with periodic transfer rate and metabolite formation rate. For rofecoxib, EHC modelling required a conversion compartment with first-order recycling rate and lag time. Based on model predictions, EHC causes an increase of 95% in the systemic exposure to diclofenac and of 15% in the exposure to rofecoxib. In addition, EHC prolongs the inhibition of PGE2 and increases the duration of the anti-inflammatory effect (24 h for rofecoxib 10 mg kg−1) without affecting maximum inhibition. Conclusions and implications: Our findings show the relevance of exploring EHC in a quantitative manner to accurately interpret pharmacodynamic findings in vivo, in particular when scaling across species. PMID:18193075

  6. The Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Warfarin When Combined with Compound Danshen: A Case Study for Combined Treatment of Coronary Heart Diseases with Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiao Lv

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Warfarin is used as anticoagulant and Compound Danshen prescription (CDP is able to promote blood circulation. The combination might produce a synergic effect for patients of coronary heart diseases (CHDs with atrial fibrillation (AF. Whether the combination increases the bleeding risk of warfarin is unclear, so the effects of Compound Danshen dripping pill (CDDP on the pharmacokinetics (PK and pharmacodynamics (PD profiles of warfarin was investigated in patients. The dose and blood concentrations of warfarin, the four indicators of blood coagulation, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplatin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen, and international normalized ratio value were compared when with and without CDDP treatment. The population PK (PPK and PPK-PD models were established to assess patient demographics, genetic polymorphisms and CDDP as covariates. And the Seattle Angina Questionnaire was used to evaluate clinical efficacy, and the bleeding risk of combination was analyzed. The results indicated that CDDP had little influence on PK and PD profiles of warfarin in most patients and the combination of CCDP and warfarin would be a promising alternative regime for CHD with AF patients. The study was registered on China Clinical Trial Registry with number ChiCTR-ONRC-13003523.

  7. Ocular pharmacokinetics and tolerability of bimatoprost ophthalmic solutions administered once or twice daily in rabbits, and clinical dosing implications

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    Shen J

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Jie Shen,1 Margot L Goodkin,2 Warren Tong,2 Mayssa Attar3 1Clinical Pharmacology, 2Clinical Development, 3Clinical Pharmacology, Metabolism and Immunology, Allergan plc, Irvine, CA, USA Purpose: Fixed-combination medications can benefit patients requiring multiple agents to lower their intraocular pressure (IOP, but combining agents with complementary mechanisms of action is challenging if their dosing frequency differs. This study compares in vivo pharmacokinetic and ocular tolerability of bimatoprost 0.01% ophthalmic solutions dosed once or twice daily. Reports of twice-daily dosing in glaucoma patients are also reviewed.Methods: New Zealand White rabbits were administered bimatoprost 0.01% monotherapy or fixed-combination bimatoprost 0.01%/brimonidine 0.1%, once or twice daily in both eyes for 4 days. Ocular tissues were harvested and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The pharmacokinetic parameters calculated included maximum observed concentration, time to maximum concentration, and area under the concentration-time curve.Results: Due to extensive metabolism, bimatoprost concentration was below the quantitation limit by 1 hour post-dose in all samples. Bimatoprost acid exposure, however, could be measured up to 6–8 hours post-dose and was similar in the aqueous humor and iris-ciliary body (pharmacological site of action of animals treated once or twice daily with either bimatoprost 0.01% or fixed-combination bimatoprost 0.01%/brimonidine 0.1%. Increasing dosage frequency in rabbits did not raise the incidence of drug-related conjunctival hyperemia (most common adverse event associated with bimatoprost use in humans, suggesting comparable ocular tolerability of the once- and twice-daily regimens for each formulation.Conclusion: Bimatoprost 0.01% administered once or twice daily as monotherapy and in fixed-combination with brimonidine 0.1% in rabbits show similar pharmacokinetic profiles of bimatoprost acid

  8. Mutant prevention concentration, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic integration, and modeling of enrofloxacin data established in diseased buffalo calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, B; Sidhu, P K; Kaur, G; Venkatachalam, D; Rampal, S

    2015-12-01

    The pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling of enrofloxacin data using mutant prevention concentration (MPC) of enrofloxacin was conducted in febrile buffalo calves to optimize dosage regimen and to prevent the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The serum peak concentration (Cmax ), terminal half-life (t1/2 K10) , apparent volume of distribution (Vd(area) /F), and mean residence time (MRT) of enrofloxacin were 1.40 ± 0.27 μg/mL, 7.96 ± 0.86 h, 7.74 ± 1.26 L/kg, and 11.57 ± 1.01 h, respectively, following drug administration at dosage 12 mg/kg by intramuscular route. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration, and MPC of enrofloxacin against Pasteurella multocida were 0.055, 0.060, and 1.45 μg/mL, respectively. Modeling of ex vivo growth inhibition data to the sigmoid Emax equation provided AUC24 h /MIC values to produce effects of bacteriostatic (33 h), bactericidal (39 h), and bacterial eradication (41 h). The estimated daily dosage of enrofloxacin in febrile buffalo calves was 3.5 and 8.4 mg/kg against P. multocida/pathogens having MIC90 ≤0.125 and 0.30 μg/mL, respectively, based on the determined AUC24 h /MIC values by modeling PK/PD data. The lipopolysaccharide-induced fever had no direct effect on the antibacterial activity of the enrofloxacin and alterations in PK of the drug, and its metabolite will be beneficial for its use to treat infectious diseases caused by sensitive pathogens in buffalo species. In addition, in vitro MPC data in conjunction with in vivo PK data indicated that clinically it would be easier to eradicate less susceptible strains of P. multocida in diseased calves. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic integration and modelling of oxytetracycline administered alone and in combination with carprofen in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brentnall, C; Cheng, Z; McKellar, Q A; Lees, P

    2013-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of oxytetracycline were investigated, when administered both alone and in the presence of carprofen, in healthy calves. The study comprised a four treatment, four sequences, and four period cross-over design and used a tissue cage model, which permitted the collection of serum, inflamed tissue cage fluid (exudate) and non-inflamed tissue cage fluid (transudate). There were no clinically relevant differences in the PK profile of oxytetracycline when administered alone and when administered with carprofen. PK-PD integration was undertaken for a pathogenic strain of Mannheimia haemolytic (A1 76/1), by correlating in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and time-kill data with in vivo PK data obtained in the cross-over study. Based on in vitro susceptibility in cation adjusted Mueller Hinton Broth (CAMHB) and in vivo determined PK variables, ratios of maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under curve (AUC) to MIC and time for which concentration exceeded MIC (T>MIC) were determined. The CAMHB MIC data satisfied integrated PK/PD relationships predicted to achieve efficacy for approximately 48 h after dosing; mean values for serum were 5.13 (Cmax/MIC), 49.3 h (T>MIC) and 126.6 h (AUC(96h)/MIC). Similar findings were obtained when oxytetracycline was administered in the presence of carprofen, with PK-PD indices based on MIC determined in CAMHB. However, PK-PD integration of data, based on oxytetracycline MICs determined in the biological fluids, serum, exudate and transudate, suggest that it possesses, at most, limited direct killing activity against the M. haemolytica strain A1 76/1; mean values for serum were 0.277 (Cmax/MIC), 0 h (T>MIC) and 6.84 h (AUC(96h)/MIC). The data suggest that the beneficial therapeutic effects of oxytetracycline may depend, at least in part, on actions other than direct inhibition of bacterial growth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacokinetic drug evaluation of extended release lorcaserin for the treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurren, Kathryn M; Dunham, Marissa W

    2017-08-01

    Lorcaserin is a serotonin 2C receptor antagonist that was FDA approved in 2012. Lorcaserin is recently available as an extended-release (ER) formulation for the treatment of obesity as an adjunct to lifestyle modification. Areas covered: The pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, efficacy, and safety of lorcaserin ER will be reviewed. Expert opinion: Lorcaserin ER 20mg daily provides drug exposure bioequivalent to lorcaserin immediate release (IR) 10mg twice daily. Lorcaserin IR is associated with 3.3 and 3.0% placebo-subtracted weight loss in patients without and with diabetes, respectively. A1C was reduced by 0.9% in patients with diabetes. Common side effects include headache, dry mouth, constipation, dizziness, fatigue, and nausea. Lorcaserin provides potential advantages over other antiobesity medications in regards to tolerability and simplicity of medication initiation, but may not be as effective as other options. Lorcaserin ER offers improved ease of administration and anticipated adherence compared to the IR formulation. The place in therapy for lorcaserin ER and other antiobesity medications will be further clarified by results of pending clinical trials addressing cardiovascular outcomes as well as the role pharmacogenomics and comorbid disease states may play in choosing patient-specific therapy.

  11. Pharmacology of new oral anticoagulants: mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their mechanism of action, the new oral anticoagulants are named direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs. Dabigatran is a selective, competitive, direct inhibitor of thrombin (Factor IIa while rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban act by directly inhibiting the activated Factor X (FXa in a selective and competitive manner. DOACs have a relatively short half-life and almost immediate anticoagulant activity, and rapidly reach the plasma peak concentration. Therefore, they do not need a phase of overlapping with parenteral anticoagulants. After their withdrawal, their removal is sufficiently rapid, although influenced by renal function. Dabigatran is the only DOACs to be administered as a pro-drug and becomes active after drug metabolization. The route of elimination of dabigatran is primarily renal, whereas FXa inhibitors are mainly eliminated by the biliary-fecal route. The drug interactions of DOACs are mainly limited to drugs that act on P-glycoprotein for dabigatran and on P-glycoprotein and/or cytochrome P3A4 for anti-Xa. DOACs have no interactions with food. Given their linear pharmacodynamics, with a predictable dose/response relationship and anticoagulant effect, DOACs are administered at a fixed dose and do not require routine laboratory monitoring.

  12. Sex- and dose-dependency in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of (+)-methamphetamine and its metabolite (+)-amphetamine in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milesi-Halle, Alessandra; Hendrickson, Howard P.; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M.; Gentry, W. Brooks; Owens, S. Michael

    2005-01-01

    These studies investigated how (+)-methamphetamine (METH) dose and rat sex affect the pharmacological response to METH in Sprague-Dawley rats. The first set of experiments determined the pharmacokinetics of METH and its pharmacologically active metabolite (+)-amphetamine (AMP) in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats after 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg METH doses. The results showed significant sex-dependent changes in METH pharmacokinetics, and females formed significantly lower amounts of AMP. While the area under the serum concentration-time curve in males increased proportionately with the METH dose, the females showed a disproportional increase. The sex differences in systemic clearance, renal clearance, volume of distribution, and percentage of unchanged METH eliminated in the urine suggested dose-dependent pharmacokinetics in female rats. The second set of studies sought to determine the behavioral implications of these pharmacokinetic differences by quantifying locomotor activity in male and female rats after saline, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg METH. The results showed sex- and dose-dependent differences in METH-induced locomotion, including profound differences in the temporal profile of effects at higher dose. These findings show that the pharmacokinetic and metabolic profile of METH (slower METH clearance and lower AMP metabolite formation) plays a significant role in the differential pharmacological response to METH in male and female rats

  13. Development of a mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model to characterize the thermoregulatory effects of serotonergic drugs in mice

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    Xi-Ling Jiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have shown recently that concurrent harmaline, a monoamine oxidase-A inhibitor (MAOI, potentiates serotonin (5-HT receptor agonist 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT-induced hyperthermia. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD model to characterize and predict the thermoregulatory effects of such serotonergic drugs in mice. Physiological thermoregulation was described by a mechanism-based indirect-response model with adaptive feedback control. Harmaline-induced hypothermia and 5-MeO-DMT–elicited hyperthermia were attributable to the loss of heat through the activation of 5-HT1A receptor and thermogenesis via the stimulation of 5-HT2A receptor, respectively. Thus serotonergic 5-MeO-DMT–induced hyperthermia was readily distinguished from handling/injection stress-provoked hyperthermic effects. This PK/PD model was able to simultaneously describe all experimental data including the impact of drug-metabolizing enzyme status on 5-MeO-DMT and harmaline PK properties, and drug- and stress-induced simple hypo/hyperthermic and complex biphasic effects. Furthermore, the modeling results revealed a 4-fold decrease of apparent SC50 value (1.88–0.496 µmol/L for 5-MeO-DMT when harmaline was co-administered, providing a quantitative assessment for the impact of concurrent MAOI harmaline on 5-MeO-DMT–induced hyperthermia. In addition, the hyperpyrexia caused by toxic dose combinations of harmaline and 5-MeO-DMT were linked to the increased systemic exposure to harmaline rather than 5-MeO-DMT, although the body temperature profiles were mispredicted by the model. The results indicate that current PK/PD model may be used as a new conceptual framework to define the impact of serotonergic agents and stress factors on thermoregulation.

  14. Use of mefloquine in children - a review of dosage, pharmacokinetics and tolerability data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaerer Martin T

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of anti-malarial medication in children is hampered by a paucity of dosage, pharmacokinetic and tolerability data. Methods Data on the use of mefloquine in children, particularly in young children weighing less than 20 kg, were reviewed using PubMed literature and reports on file. Results Chemoprophylaxis data: Two studies with a total of 170 children were found. A simulated mefloquine plasma profile showed that doses to achieve protective chemoprophylaxis blood concentration of mefloquine of approximately 620 ng/mL (or 1.67 μmol/L in children should be at least 5 mg/kg. This simulated plasma profile in children corresponds to that seen in adult travellers using a weekly prophylaxis dose of 250 mg. This reinforces current practice of using weight-based dosage for children. Clearance per body weight is higher in older children. For children who travel to malaria risk areas tablets can be broken and crushed as required. It is necessary to disguise the bitter taste of the drug. Treatment data: Mefloquine treatment (alone or in combination data are available for more than 6000 children of all age and weight categories. The stereoselectivity and pharmacokinetic profile of mefloquine in children is similar to that observed in adults. There is higher clearance in older children (aged 5-12 years compared to younger children (aged 6-24 months. Mefloquine treatment is well tolerated in infants (5-12 kg but vomiting is a problem at high doses. This led to the use of a "split dose" regimen with 15 mg/kg initially, followed 12 hours later by 10 mg/kg. Mefloquine 125 mg has been used as intermittent preventive treatment (IPT and was found to be efficacious in reducing episodes of malaria in a moderate-transmission setting but vomiting was a problem in 8% of children aged 2-11 months. Mefloquine is also used as a component of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT in small children. The combination artesunate plus mefloquine is a WHO

  15. Betahistine Treatment in a Cat Model of Vestibular Pathology: Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Approaches

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    Brahim Tighilet

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is a pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamics (PD approach using betahistine doses levels in unilateral vestibular neurectomized cats (UVN comparable to those used in humans for treating patients with Menière's disease. The aim is to investigate for the first time oral betahistine administration (0.2 and 2 mg/kg/day with plasma concentrations of betahistine and its major metabolite 2-pyridylacetic acid (2-PAA (N = 9 cats, the time course of posture recovery (N = 13 cats, and the regulation of the enzyme synthesizing histamine (histidine decarboxylase: HDC in the tuberomammillary nuclei (TMN of UVN treated animals (N = the same 13 cats plus 4 negative control cats. In addition the effect of co-administration of the lower betahistine dose (0.2 mg/kg/day and selegiline (1 mg/kg/day, an inhibitor of the monamine oxidase B (MAOBi implicated in betahistine catabolism was investigated. The PK parameters were the peak concentration (Cmax, the time when the maximum concentration is reached (Tmax for both betahistine and 2-PAA and the area under the curve (AUC. The PD approach consisted at quantifying the surface support area, which is a good estimation of posture recovery. The plasma concentration-time-profiles of betahistine and 2-PAA in cats were characterized by early Cmax-values followed by a phase of rapid decrease of plasma concentrations and a final long lasting low level of plasma concentrations. Co administration of selegiline and betahistine increased values of Cmax and AUC up to 146- and 180-fold, respectively. The lowest dose of betahistine (0.2 mg/kg has no effects on postural function recovery but induced an acute symptomatic effect characterized by a fast balance improvement (4–6 days. The higher dose (2 mg/kg and the co-administration treatment induced both this acute effect plus a significant acceleration of the recovery process. The histaminergic activity of the neurons in the TMN was significantly increased under

  16. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of QRS-prolongation by flecainide: heart rate-dependent effects during sinus rhythm in conscious telemetered dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sällström, Johan; Al-Saffar, Ahmad; Pehrson, Rikard

    2014-01-01

    The duration of the QRS interval is determined by the ion currents involved in cardiac depolarization. Class I antiarrhythmic drugs reduce cardiac excitability and conduction by inhibiting Nav1.5 channels responsible for I(Na), thus increasing the QRS interval. Previous studies in humans as well as in animal models have demonstrated a more pronounced effect on QRS-prolongation during higher heart rates. In the present study, the effects of the Nav1.5 inhibitor flecainide on cardiovascular parameters, were studied in the telemetered beagle dog under normal autonomic control. The heart rate dependency of QRS prolongation was characterized using pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modeling. Four male telemetered beagle dogs were administered placebo or flecainide (100, 150 and 200 mg) in a Latin square design. The QRS interval and heart rate were recorded, and blood samples were taken. Plasma concentrations of flecainide were fitted to a one compartment oral model and the intrapolated plasma concentrations were fitted to QRS and heart rate data sampled during 5 h after dosing. Flecainide increased the QRS interval in all dogs, whereas there were no effects on heart rate. Using the PKPD model, a statistically significant heart rate-dependent QRS prolongation was linked to individual concentration-time profiles of flecainide. PKPD analysis of QRS interval data from unrestrained dogs with sinus rhythm can elucidate mechanisms previously only described during controlled heart rhythm. Specific questions can therefore be addressed in generically designed cardiovascular telemetry safety studies and different types of relationships between parameters can be uncovered. In addition, the present approach can be used to better characterize drug-induced QRS effects in cardiovascular dog models. © 2013.

  17. Mycophenolate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in belatacept treated renal allograft recipients – a pilot study

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    Stenstrøm Jean

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycophenolic acid (MPA is widely used as part of immunosuppressive regimens following allograft transplantation. The large pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD variability and narrow therapeutic range of MPA provide a potential for therapeutic drug monitoring. The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the MPA PK and PD relation in combination with belatacept (2nd generation CTLA4-Ig or cyclosporine (CsA. Methods Seven renal allograft recipients were randomized to either belatacept (n = 4 or cyclosporine (n = 3 based immunosuppression. Samples for MPA PK and PD evaluations were collected predose and at 1, 2 and 13 weeks posttransplant. Plasma concentrations of MPA were determined by HPLC-UV. Activity of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH and the expressions of two IMPDH isoforms were measured in CD4+ cells by HPLC-UV and real-time reverse-transcription PCR, respectively. Subsets of T cells were characterized by flow cytometry. Results The MPA exposure tended to be higher among belatacept patients than in CsA patients at week 1 (P = 0.057. Further, MPA concentrations (AUC0–9 h and C0 increased with time in both groups and were higher at week 13 than at week 2 (P = 0.031, n = 6. In contrast to the postdose reductions of IMPDH activity observed early posttransplant, IMPDH activity within both treatment groups was elevated throughout the dosing interval at week 13. Transient postdose increments were also observed for IMPDH1 expression, starting at week 1. Higher MPA exposure was associated with larger elevations of IMPDH1 (r = 0.81, P = 0.023, n = 7 for MPA and IMPDH1 AUC0–9 h at week 1. The maximum IMPDH1 expression was 52 (13–177% higher at week 13 compared to week 1 (P = 0.031, n = 6. One patient showed lower MPA exposure with time and did neither display elevations of IMPDH activity nor IMPDH1 expression. No difference was observed in T cell subsets between treatment groups. Conclusion The

  18. The pharmacodynamic effect of amoxicillin and danofloxacin against Salmonella typhimurium in an in-vitro pharmacodynamic model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindecrona, R.H.; Friis, C.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2000-01-01

    The pharmacodynamic effect of amoxicillin and danofloxacin against two strains of Salmonella typhimurium was examined in an in-vitro pharmacodynamic model. For amoxicillin, peak concentrations of 1, 2 and 4 mu g ml(-1) and half-lives (t(1/2) of 3 and 15 hours were evaluated. For danofloxacin peak...... concentrations of 0.25, 0.50 and 1.50 mu g ml(-1) and half-lives of 7 and 15 hours were examined. For amoxicillin both the peak concentration and the half-life influenced the pharmacodynamic effect (P pharmacodynamic effect was observed when the antibiotic concentration was greater than minimum...... inhibitory concentration for 79 per cent or more of the dosing interval. The hires of the isolates increased when the amoxicillin concentrations were close to the nac during the first hours of exposure. For danofloxacin the pharmacodynamic effect was dependent on the peak concentration only (P

  19. Insulin aspart pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christian Hove; Roge, Rikke Meldgaard; Ma, Zhulin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insulin aspart (IAsp) is used by many diabetics as a meal-time insulin to control postprandial glucose levels. As is the case with many other insulin types, the pharmacokinetics (PK), and consequently the pharmacodynamics (PD), is associated with clinical variability, both between...... to investigate and quantify the properties of the subcutaneous depot. Data from Brange et al. (1990) are used to determine the effects of insulin chemistry in subcutis on the absorption rate. Intravenous (i.v.) bolus and infusion PK data for human insulin are used to understand and quantify the systemic...... distribution and elimination (Porksen et al., 1997; Sjostrand et al., 2002). PK and PD profiles for type 1 diabetics from Chen et al. (2005) are analyzed to demonstrate the effects of IAsp antibodies in terms of bound and unbound insulin. PK profiles from Thorisdottir et al. (2009) and Ma et al. (2012b...

  20. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of orally administered acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone), a highly potent Nrf2 activator with a reversible covalent mode of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostov, Rumen V.; Knatko, Elena V.; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J. [Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Research, Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 9SY, Scotland (United Kingdom); Zheng, Suqing [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Chemical Biology & Drug Discovery, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794 (United States); Huang, Jeffrey T.-J. [Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Research, Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 9SY, Scotland (United Kingdom); Honda, Tadashi [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Chemical Biology & Drug Discovery, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794 (United States); Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T., E-mail: a.dinkovakostova@dundee.ac.uk [Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Research, Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 9SY, Scotland (United Kingdom); Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21205 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21205 (United States)

    2015-09-25

    The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone) TBE-31 is a highly potent cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action; its best-characterized target being Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1), the cellular sensor for oxidants and electrophiles. TBE-31 reacts with cysteines of Keap1, impairing its ability to target nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) for degradation. Consequently, Nrf2 accumulates and orchestrates cytoprotective gene expression. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of TBE-31 in C57BL/6 mice. After a single oral dose of 10 μmol/kg (∼200 nmol/animal), the concentration of TBE-31 in blood exhibited two peaks, at 22.3 nM and at 15.5 nM, 40 min and 4 h after dosing, respectively, as determined by a quantitative stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method. The AUC{sub 0–24h} was 195.5 h/nmol/l, the terminal elimination half-life was 10.2 h, and the k{sub el} was 0.068 h{sup −1}. To assess the pharmacodynamics of Nrf2 activation by TBE-31, we determined the enzyme activity of its prototypic target, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and found it elevated by 2.4- and 1.5-fold in liver and heart, respectively. Continuous feeding for 18 days with diet delivering the same daily doses of TBE-31 under conditions of concurrent treatment with the immunosuppressive agent azathioprine had a similar effect on Nrf2 activation without any indications of toxicity. Together with previous reports showing the cytoprotective effects of TBE-31 in animal models of carcinogenesis, our results demonstrate the high potency, efficacy and suitability for chronic administration of cysteine targeting reversible covalent drugs. - Highlights: • TBE-31 is a cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action. • After a single oral dose, the blood concentration of TBE-31 exhibits two peaks. • Oral TBE-31 is a potent activator of Nrf2-dependent enzymes in

  1. The Pharmacodynamics, Pharmacokinetics, and Safety of Arhalofenate in Combination with Febuxostat When Treating Hyperuricemia Associated with Gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Alexandra S; Vince, Bradley D; Choi, Yun-Jung; Martin, Robert L; McWherter, Charles A; Boudes, Pol F

    2017-03-01

    Arhalofenate (ARH), in development for gout, has uricosuric and anti-flare activities. ARH plus febuxostat (FBX) were evaluated in subjects with gout for serum uric acid (SUA) lowering, drug interaction, and safety. Open phase II trial in gout volunteers (NCT02252835). Cohort 1 received ARH 600 mg for 2 weeks, followed by sequential 1-week co-administration of FBX 80 mg followed by 40 mg. FBX 40 mg was continued alone for 2 weeks. Cohort 2 received ARH 800 mg for 2 weeks, followed by sequential 1-week co-administration of FBX 40 mg followed by 80 mg. FBX 80 mg was continued alone for 2 weeks. SUA, its fractional excretion (FEUA), and plasma oxypurines were assessed. Pharmacokinetics of FBX and ARH were determined alone and in combination for cohort 2. Baseline mean SUA was 9.4 mg/dl for cohort 1 (n = 16) and 9.2 mg/dl for cohort 2 (n = 16). The largest SUA decrease (63%) was observed with ARH 800 mg + FBX 80 mg, with all subjects reaching SUA < 6 mg/dl and 93% < 5 mg/dl. The area under the curve (AUC) (0-t) of ARH acid + FBX/ARH acid was 108%. The AUC (0-t) of FBX + ARH acid/FBX was 87%. As expected, FBX increased oxypurines and increases were unaffected by ARH co-administration. Baseline FEUA were low (3.5%-4.6%) and ARH increased them toward normal without overexcretion of UA. ARH was well tolerated and appeared safe. ARH and FBX lowered SUA by complementary mechanisms. The combination provided greater decreases than each drug alone. The combination was well tolerated and appeared safe. NCT02252835.

  2. Role of aldo-keto reductases and other doxorubicin pharmacokinetic genes in doxorubicin resistance, DNA binding, and subcellular localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heibein, Allan D; Guo, Baoqing; Sprowl, Jason A; MacLean, David A; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2012-01-01

    Since proteins involved in chemotherapy drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have a strong impact on the uptake, metabolism, and efflux of such drugs, they likely play critical roles in resistance to chemotherapy drugs in cancer patients. To investigate this hypothesis, we conducted a whole genome microarray study to identify difference in the expression of genes between isogenic doxorubicin-sensitive and doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 breast tumour cells. We then assessed the degree of over-representation of doxorubicin pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic genes in the dataset of doxorubicin resistance genes. Of 27,958 Entrez genes on the array, 7.4 per cent or 2,063 genes were differentially expressed by ≥ 2-fold between wildtype and doxorubicin-resistant cells. The false discovery rate was set at 0.01 and the minimum p value for significance for any gene within the “hit list” was 0.01. Seventeen and 43 per cent of doxorubicin pharmacokinetic genes were over-represented in the hit list, depending upon whether the gene name was identical or within the same gene family, respectively. The most over-represented genes were within the 1C and 1B families of aldo-keto reductases (AKRs), which convert doxorubicin to doxorubicinol. Other genes convert doxorubicin to other metabolites or affect the influx, efflux, or cytotoxicity of the drug. In further support of the role of AKRs in doxorubicin resistance, we observed that, in comparison to doxorubicin, doxorubincol exhibited dramatically reduced cytotoxicity, reduced DNA-binding activity, and strong localization to extra nuclear lysosomes. Pharmacologic inhibition of the above AKRs in doxorubicin-resistant cells increased cellular doxorubicin levels, restored doxorubicin cytotoxicity and re-established doxorubicin localization to the nucleus. The properties of doxorubicinol were unaffected. These findings demonstrate the utility of using curated pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic knowledge bases to identify

  3. Pharmacokinetics and toxicology of therapeutic proteins: Advances and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vugmeyster, Yulia; Xu, Xin; Theil, Frank-Peter; Khawli, Leslie A; Leach, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), as well as toxicity profiles of therapeutic proteins in animals and humans, which have been in commercial development for more than three decades. However, in the PK arena, many fundamental questions remain to be resolved. Investigative and bioanalytical tools need to be established to improve the translation of PK data from animals to humans, and from in vitro assays to in vivo readouts, which would ultimately lead to a higher success rate in drug development. In toxicology, it is known, in general, what studies are needed to safely develop therapeutic proteins, and what studies do not provide relevant information. One of the major complicating factors in nonclinical and clinical programs for therapeutic proteins is the impact of immunogenicity. In this review, we will highlight the emerging science and technology, as well as the challenges around the pharmacokinetic- and safety-related issues in drug development of mAbs and other therapeutic proteins. PMID:22558487

  4. Intake of St John's wort improves the glucose tolerance in healthy subjects who ingest metformin compared with metformin alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Pedersen, Rasmus Steen; Damkier, Per

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Our objective was to investigate the steady-state pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interaction between the antidepressive herbal medicine St John's wort and the antidiabetic drug metformin. METHODS: We performed an open cross-over study in 20 healthy male subjects, who received 1 g...

  5. Considerations for effect site pharmacokinetics to estimate drug exposure: concentrations of antibiotics in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodvold, Keith A; Hope, William W; Boyd, Sara E

    2017-10-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and microdialysis have become the most reliable and relevant methods for measuring lung concentrations of antibiotics, with the majority of BAL studies involving either healthy adult subjects or patients undergoing diagnostic bronchoscopy. Emphasis on the amount of drug that reaches the site of infection is increasingly recognized as necessary to determine whether a dose selection will translate to good clinical outcomes in the treatment of patients with pneumonia. Observed concentrations and/or parameters of exposure (e.g. area-under-the-curve) need to be incorporated with pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic indices so that rational dose selection can be identified for specific pathogens and types of pneumonic infection (community-acquired vs hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia, including ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia). Although having measured plasma or lung concentration-time data from critically ill patients to incorporate into pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models is very unlikely during drug development, it is essential that altered distribution, augmented renal clearance, and renal or hepatic dysfunction should be considered. Notably, the number of published studies involving microdialysis and intrapulmonary penetration of antibiotics has been limited and mainly involve beta-lactam agents, levofloxacin, and fosfomycin. Opportunities to measure in high-resolution effect site spatial pharmacokinetics (e.g. with MALDI-MSI or PET imaging) and in vivo continuous drug concentrations (e.g. with aptamer-based probes) now exist. Going forward these studies could be incorporated into antibiotic development programs for pneumonia in order to further increase the probability of candidate success. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic based dosing of ciprofloxacin in complicated urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sabo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ciprofloxacin is often used in treatment of complicated urinary tract infections in areas with high rates of resistance to first line agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy of ciprofloxacin in standard dosing regimens in treatment of complicated urinary tract infections. Plasma concentration curves were simulated and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and post-antibiotic effect were determined. Ciprofloxacin MIC ranged from 0.0156 for Gram-negative and to 0.125-0.5 µg/mL for Gram-positive bacteria. Both dosing regimens were suitable for eradication of Gram-negative bacteria, with slight supremacy of 750 mg/12 hours over 500 mg/12 hours dosing regimen. Even though all strains were fully susceptible to ciprofloxacin, pharmaco-kinetic/pharmacodynamic parameters did not meet target thresholds for pathogens with MIC over 0.1-0.2 µg/mL regardless of the administered dose. Ciprofloxacin remains an excellent choice for treatment of complicated urinary tract infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, but in infection caused by Gram-positive strains, deeper analysis is necessary in order to achieve optimal results.

  7. Antibody glycosylation and its impact on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of monoclonal antibodies and Fc-fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the impact of glycosylation and keeping a close control on glycosylation of product candidates are required for both novel and biosimilar monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and Fc-fusion protein development to ensure proper safety and efficacy profiles. Most therapeutic mAbs are of IgG class and contain a glycosylation site in the Fc region at amino acid position 297 and, in some cases, in the Fab region. For Fc-fusion proteins, glycosylation also frequently occurs in the fusion partners. Depending on the expression host, glycosylation patterns in mAb or Fc-fusions can be significantly different, thus significantly impacting the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of mAbs. Glycans that have a major impact on PK and PD of mAb or Fc-fusion proteins include mannose, sialic acids, fucose (Fuc), and galactose (Gal). Mannosylated glycans can impact the PK of the molecule, leading to reduced exposure and potentially lower efficacy. The level of sialic acid, N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), can also have a significant impact on the PK of Fc-fusion molecules. Core Fuc in the glycan structure reduces IgG antibody binding to IgG Fc receptor IIIa relative to IgG lacking Fuc, resulting in decreased antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activities. Glycoengineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) expression systems can produce afucosylated mAbs that have increased ADCC activities. Terminal Gal in a mAb is important in the complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) in that lower levels of Gal reduce CDC activity. Glycans can also have impacts on the safety of mAb. mAbs produced in murine myeloma cells such as NS0 and SP2/0 contain glycans such as Galα1-3Galβ1-4N-acetylglucosamine-R and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NGNA) that are not naturally present in humans and can be immunogenic when used as therapeutics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  8. Ocular pharmacokinetics and tolerability of bimatoprost ophthalmic solutions administered once or twice daily in rabbits, and clinical dosing implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Goodkin, Margot L; Tong, Warren; Attar, Mayssa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Fixed-combination medications can benefit patients requiring multiple agents to lower their intraocular pressure (IOP), but combining agents with complementary mechanisms of action is challenging if their dosing frequency differs. This study compares in vivo pharmacokinetic and ocular tolerability of bimatoprost 0.01% ophthalmic solutions dosed once or twice daily. Reports of twice-daily dosing in glaucoma patients are also reviewed. Methods New Zealand White rabbits were administered bimatoprost 0.01% monotherapy or fixed-combination bimatoprost 0.01%/brimonidine 0.1%, once or twice daily in both eyes for 4 days. Ocular tissues were harvested and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The pharmacokinetic parameters calculated included maximum observed concentration, time to maximum concentration, and area under the concentration-time curve. Results Due to extensive metabolism, bimatoprost concentration was below the quantitation limit by 1 hour post-dose in all samples. Bimatoprost acid exposure, however, could be measured up to 6–8 hours post-dose and was similar in the aqueous humor and iris-ciliary body (pharmacological site of action) of animals treated once or twice daily with either bimatoprost 0.01% or fixed-combination bimatoprost 0.01%/brimonidine 0.1%. Increasing dosage frequency in rabbits did not raise the incidence of drug-related conjunctival hyperemia (most common adverse event associated with bimatoprost use in humans), suggesting comparable ocular tolerability of the once- and twice-daily regimens for each formulation. Conclusion Bimatoprost 0.01% administered once or twice daily as monotherapy and in fixed-combination with brimonidine 0.1% in rabbits show similar pharmacokinetic profiles of bimatoprost acid, especially in the iris-ciliary body. Key findings from previous clinical studies suggest that by varying the concentration of benzalkonium chloride (a preservative with corneal penetration-enhancing properties

  9. In Silico Ocular Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Delivery of Topical FK962 to Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Ayumi; Yabuta, Chiho; Kishimoto, Yayoi; Kozai, Seiko; Ohtori, Akira; Shearer, Thomas R; Azuma, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-09-01

    To establish the in silico ocular pharmacokinetic modeling for eye drops, and to simulate the dose regimen for FK962 in human choroid/retinal diseases. Pharmacokinetics for FK962 in vivo was performed by a single instillation of drops containing 0.1% 14 C-FK962 in rabbit eyes. Permeation of FK962 across the cornea, sclera, and choroid/retina was measured in vitro. Neurite elongation by FK962 was measured in cultured rat retinal ganglion cells. Parameters from the experimental data were used in an improved in silico model of ocular pharmacokinetics of FK962 in man. The mean concentration of FK962 in ocular tissues predicted by in silico modeling was consistent with in vivo results, validating the in silico model. FK962 rapidly penetrated into the anterior and posterior segments of the eye and then diffused into the vitreous body. The in silico pharmacokinetic modeling also predicted that a dose regimen of 0.0054% FK962 twice per day would produce biologically effective concentrations of FK962 in the choroid/retina, where FK962 facilitates rat neurite elongation. Our in silico model for ocular pharmacokinetics is useful (1) for predicting drug concentrations in specific ocular tissues after topical instillation, and (2) for suggesting the optimal dose regimens for eye drops. The pharmacodynamics for FK962 produced by this model may be useful for clinical trials against retinal neuropathy.

  10. Safety, Tolerability and Pharmacokinetics of the Serotonin 5-HT6 Receptor Antagonist, SUVN-502, in Healthy Young Adults and Elderly Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Mudigonda, Koteshwara; Bhyrapuneni, Gopinadh; Muddana, Nageswara Rao; Goyal, Vinod Kumar; Pandey, Santosh Kumar; Palacharla, Raghava Choudary

    2018-05-01

    SUVN-502, a selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist, was found to be active in preclinical models of cognitive deterioration suggesting a potential role in the treatment of dementia related to Alzheimer's disease. The objective of this study was to characterize the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of SUVN-502 in healthy young adults and elderly subjects following single and multiple oral doses. Single doses (5, 15, 50, 100 and 200 mg SUVN-502) and multiple doses (50, 100 and 130 mg SUVN-502 once daily for 7 days) were evaluated in healthy young adults and multiple doses (50 and 100 mg SUVN-502 once daily for 14 days) were evaluated in elderly subjects using randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating study designs. The effect of food, gender and age on SUVN-502 pharmacokinetics (100 mg single dose) was evaluated using an open-label, two-period, randomized, fed and fasted in a crossover design. SUVN-502 and M1 (major metabolite of SUVN-502) were monitored using validated analytical methods. SUVN-502 is safe and well tolerated up to the highest tested single dose of 200 mg in healthy young adults and multiple doses up to 130 mg for 7 days and 100 mg for 14 days in healthy young adults and elderly subjects, respectively. Exposures of SUVN-502 and M1 were more than dose-proportional over the evaluated dose range. Food and gender did not have a clinically meaningful effect on SUVN-502 exposure. The mean SUVN-502 total (AUC 0-∞ , and AUC 0-last ) and peak exposures (C max ) were 2.9- and 2.2-fold higher, respectively, in elderly subjects compared to young subjects. Steady-state was achieved for SUVN-502 and M1 within 7 days after once-daily dosing of SUVN-502. SUVN-502 exhibited an acceptable safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetic profile in healthy young adults and elderly subjects. Based on the above results, 50 and 100 mg once-daily doses of SUVN-502 were advanced to Phase 2 evaluation in patients with moderate AD.

  11. Pharmacokinetic considerations and recommendations in palliative care, with focus on morphine, midazolam and haloperidol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, L G; de Winter, B C M; van Esch, H J; van Zuylen, L; Baar, F P M; Tibboel, D; Mathôt, R A A; van Gelder, T; Koch, B C P

    2016-06-01

    A variety of medications are used for symptom control in palliative care, such as morphine, midazolam and haloperidol. The pharmacokinetics of these drugs may be altered in these patients as a result of physiological changes that occur at the end stage of life. This review gives an overview of how the pharmacokinetics in terminally ill patients may differ from the average population and discusses the effect of terminal illness on each of the four pharmacokinetic processes absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination. Specific considerations are also given for three commonly prescribed drugs in palliative care: morphine, midazolam and haloperidol). The pharmacokinetics of drugs in terminally ill patients can be complex and limited evidence exists on guided drug use in this population. To improve the quality of life of these patients, more knowledge and more pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics studies in terminally ill patients are needed to develop individualised dosing guidelines. Until then knowledge of pharmacokinetics and the physiological changes that occur in the final days of life can provide a base for dosing adjustments that will improve the quality of life of terminally ill patients. As the interaction of drugs with the physiology of dying is complex, pharmacological treatment is probably best assessed in a multi-disciplinary setting and the advice of a pharmacist, or clinical pharmacologist, is highly recommended.

  12. Effects of strong CYP2D6 and 3A4 inhibitors, paroxetine and ketoconazole, on the pharmacokinetics and cardiovascular safety of tamsulosin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troost, Joachim; Tatami, Shinji; Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Mattheus, Michaela; Mehlburger, Ludwig; Wein, Martina; Michel, Martin C.

    2011-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT: Tamsulosin metabolism involves both CYP2D6 and 3A4. However, data on potential drug-drug interactions between tamsulosin and inhibitors of CYP2D6 and 3A4 are limited and information on potential pharmacodynamic consequences of such pharmacokinetic

  13. Effect of In Vivo Nicotine Exposure on Chlorpyrifos Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sookwang; Poet, Torka S.; Smith, Jordan N.; Busby-Hjerpe, Andrea L.; Timchalk, Charles

    2010-03-30

    Routine use of tobacco products may modify physiological and metabolic functions, including drug metabolizing enzymes, which may impact the pharmacokinetics of environmental contaminants. Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphorus (OP) insecticide that is bioactivated to chlorpyrifos-oxon, and manifests its neurotoxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of repeated nicotine exposure on the pharmacokinetics of chlorpyrifos (CPF) and its major metabolite, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) in blood and urine and also to determine the impact on cholinesterase (ChE) activity in plasma and brain. Animals were exposed to 7-daily doses of either 1 mg nicotine/kg or saline (sc), and to either a single oral dose of 35 mg CPF/kg or a repeated dose of 5 mg CPF/kg/day for 7 days. Groups of rats were then sacrificed at multiple time-points after receiving the last dose of CPF. Repeated nicotine and CPF exposures resulted in enhanced metabolism of CPF to TCPy, as evidenced by increases in the measured TCPy concentration and AUC in blood. However, there was no significant difference in the amount of TCPy (free or total) excreted in the urine. The extent of brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition was reduced due to nicotine co-exposure consistent with an increase in CYP450-mediated dearylation (detoxification) versus desulfuration. It was of interest to note that the impact of nicotine co-exposure was experimentally observed only after repeated CPF doses. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic model simulations of CPF-oxon concentrations in blood and brain were predicted to be lower in nicotine treated groups, which were simulated by increasing the dearylation Vmax based upon previously conducted in vitro metabolism studies. These results were consistent with the experimental data. The current study demonstrated that repeated nicotine exposure could alter CPF metabolism in vivo, further modulating brain AChE inhibition.

  14. Pharmacokinetics and tolerance study of intravitreal injection of dexamethasone-loaded nanoparticles in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhua Zhang

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Linhua Zhang1, Yue Li2, Chao Zhang1, Yusheng Wang2, Cunxian Song11Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Tianjin, China; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Ophthalmology of Chinese PLA, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, ChinaAbstract: The aim of the study was to investigate the tolerance and pharmacokinetics of dexamethasone (DEX-loaded poly(lactic acid–co-glycolic acid nanoparticles (DEX-NPs in rabbits after intravitreal injection. The DEX-NPs were prepared and characterized in terms of morphology, particle size and size distribution, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro release. Ophthalmic investigations were performed, including fundus observation and photography, intraocular pressure measurement, and B-scan ocular ultrasonography. There were no abnormalities up to 50 days after administration of DEX-NPs in rabbits. The DEX concentrations in plasma and the ocular tissues such as the cornea, aqueous humor, lens, iris, vitreous humor, and chorioretina were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The DEX-NPs maintained a sustained release of DEX for about 50 days in vitreous and provided relatively constant DEX levels for more than 30 days with a mean concentration of 3.85 mg/L-1. Based on the areas under the curve, the bioavailability of DEX in the experimental group was significantly higher than that in the control group injected with regular DEX. These results suggest that intravitreal injection of DEX-NPs lead to a sustained release of DEX with a high bioavailability, providing a basis for a novel approach to the treatment of posterior segment diseases.Keywords: dexamethasone, nanoparticles, intravitreal injection, pharmacokinetics

  15. Assessing the utility of an anti-malarial pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for aiding drug clinical development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaloumis Sophie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanistic within-host models relating blood anti-malarial drug concentrations with the parasite-time profile help in assessing dosing schedules and partner drugs for new anti-malarial treatments. A comprehensive simulation study to assess the utility of a stage-specific pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD model for predicting within-host parasite response was performed. Methods Three anti-malarial combination therapies were selected: artesunate-mefloquine, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, and artemether-lumefantrine. The PK-PD model included parameters to represent the concentration-time profiles of both drugs, the initial parasite burden and distribution across the parasite life cycle, and the parasite multiplication factor due to asexual reproduction. The model also included the maximal killing rate of each drug, and the blood drug concentration associated with half of that killing effect (in vivo EC50, derived from the in vitro IC50, the extent of binding to 0.5% Albumax present in the in vitro testing media, and the drugs plasma protein binding and whole blood to plasma partitioning ratio. All stochastic simulations were performed using a Latin-Hypercube-Sampling approach. Results The simulations demonstrated that the proportion of patients cured was highly sensitive to the in vivo EC50 and the maximal killing rate of the partner drug co-administered with the artemisinin derivative. The in vivo EC50 values that corresponded to on average 95% of patients cured were much higher than the adjusted values derived from the in vitro IC50. The proportion clinically cured was not strongly influenced by changes in the parameters defining the age distribution of the initial parasite burden (mean age of 4 to 16 hours and the parasite multiplication factor every life cycle (ranging from 8 to 12 fold/cycle. The median parasite clearance times, however, lengthened as the standard deviation of the initial parasite burden increased (i

  16. Development of a novel nano-sized anti-VEGFA nanobody with enhanced physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodabakhsh, Farnaz; Norouzian, Dariush; Vaziri, Behrouz; Ahangari Cohan, Reza; Sardari, Soroush; Mahboudi, Fereidoun; Behdani, Mahdi; Mansouri, Kamran; Mehdizadeh, Ardavan

    2017-08-25

    Since physiological and pathological processes occur at nano-environments, nanotechnology has considered as an efficient tool for designing of next generation specific biomolecules with enhanced pharmacodynamic and pharmacodynamic properties. In the current investigation, by control of the size and hydrodynamic volume at the nanoscale, for the first time, physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of an anti-VEGFA nanobody was remarkably improved by attachment of a Proline-Alanine-Serine (PAS) rich sequence. The results elucidated unexpected impressive effects of PAS sequence on physicochemical properties especially on size, hydrodynamics radius, and even solubility of nanobody. CD analysis revealed an increment in random coil structure of the PASylated protein in comparison to native one without any change in charge state or binding kinetic parameters of nanobody assessed by isoelectric focusing and surface plasmon resonance measurements, respectively. In vitro biological activities of nanobody were not affected by coupling of the PAS sequence. In contrast, the terminal half-life was significantly increased by a factor of 14 for the nanobody-PAS after single dose IV injection to the mice. Our study demonstrated that the control of size in the design of small therapeutic proteins has a promising effect on the stability and solubility, in addition to their physiochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. The designed new anti-VEGFA nanobody could promise a better therapeutic agent with a long administration intervals and lower dose, which in turn leads to a better patient compliance. Size adjustment of an anti-VEGF nanobody at the nanoscale by the attachment of a natural PAS polymer remarkably improves physicochemical properties, as well as a pharmacokinetic profile without any change in biological activity of the miniaturized antibody.

  17. Effect of Coadministered Fat on the Tolerability, Safety, and Pharmacokinetic Properties of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine in Papua New Guinean Children with Uncomplicated Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, B. R.; Benjamin, J. M.; Salman, S.; Griffin, S.; Ginny, E.; Page-Sharp, M.; Robinson, L. J.; Siba, P.; Batty, K. T.; Mueller, I.; Davis, T. M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Coadministration of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PQ) with fat may improve bioavailability and antimalarial efficacy, but it might also increase toxicity. There have been no studies of these potential effects in the pediatric age group. The tolerability, safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of DHA-PQ administered with or without 8.5 g fat were investigated in 30 Papua New Guinean children aged 5 to 10 years diagnosed with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Three daily 2.5:11.5-mg-base/...

  18. The pharmacodynamic effect of amoxycillin and danofloxacin against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in an in-vitro pharmacodynamic model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindecrona, R.H.; Friis, C.; Jensen, N.E.

    1999-01-01

    The pharmacodynamic effect of amoxycillin and danofloxacin against two strains of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was evaluated in an in-vitro pharmacodynamic model. For amoxycillin peak concentrations of 0.5, 1, and 4 mu g ml(-1) and half-lives of 3 and 15 hours were examined. For danofloxacin...... peak concentrations of 0.125, 0.5, and 1.5 mu g ml(-1) and half-lives of 1.5 and 7 hours were evaluated. The initial bactericidal effect was measured as the reduction in colony count (log CFU ml(-1)) during the first three hours, and the overall pharmacodynamic effect as the area under the bacterial...... growth versus time curve (AUBC). The initial bactericidal effect of amoxycillin was maximal at peak concentrations of two to four times the hnc. Peak concentration and half-life only influenced the pharmacodynamic effect of amoxycillin if the antibiotic concentration fell below the MIC during...

  19. In vitro efficacy and pharmacodynamic indices for antibiotics against coagulase-negative staphylococcus endophthalmitis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Tom; Miller, Darlene; Flynn, Harry W

    2007-05-01

    To compare pharmacodynamic indices and minimal inhibitory concentrations for vancomycin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, linezolid, and combined quinupristin and dalfopristin for historic and current human coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CoNS) endophthalmitis isolates. Experimental study. Fifty-nine CoNS endophthalmitis isolates retrieved from patients at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute from 1993 through 2006. Coagulase-negative staphylococcal endophthalmitis isolates were recovered from the microbiology specimen bank, rehydrated, and processed for susceptibility testing using standard microbiological protocols. E tests were used to determine and compare mean inhibitory concentration for 50% of isolates (MIC50) and mean inhibitory concentration for 90% of isolates (MIC90) values. Peak concentration (C(max)) was defined as the maximum attainable aqueous concentration using topical or oral therapy, or both. The MIC50 and MIC90 values for each antibiotic are the minimum concentrations that inhibit 50% and 90% of CoNS endophthalmitis isolates, respectively. Significance was determined by the McNemar test. Pharmacodynamic indices (C(max)/MIC) were calculated using determined MIC values and published intraocular drug concentrations for topical and oral dosing. The pharmacodynamic index was defined as the achievable aqueous humor concentration of an antibiotic divided by the concentration of the antibiotic required to inhibit a specified percentage of microbiologic isolates. Pharmacodynamic indices for new and conventional antibiotics. General in vitro susceptibility patterns in descending order were vancomycin (100%), linezolid (100%), quinupristin and dalfopristin (98%), moxifloxacin (48%), and gatifloxacin (47%). The corresponding MIC50 and MIC90 values were vancomycin, 2 microg/ml and 3 microg/ml, respectively; linezolid, 1 microg/ml and 4 microg/ml; quinupristin and dalfopristin, 0.25 microg/ml and 0.5 microg/ml; moxifloxacin, 0.75 microg/ml and > or =32 microg

  20. A Phase I Dose-Escalation Study of Antibody BI-505 in Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Markus; Gimsing, Peter; Badros, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This multicenter, first-in-human study evaluated safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of BI-505, a human anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibody, in advanced relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma patients. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: BI-505 was given intravenously, every 2 weeks...... generally mild to moderate, and those attributed to study medication were mostly limited to the first dose and manageable with premedication and slower infusion. No maximum tolerated dose was identified. BI-505's half-life increased with dose while clearance decreased, suggesting target-mediated clearance...

  1. Evaluation of efficacy, pharmacokinetics and tolerability of peptidomimetic aspartic proteinase inhibitors as cream formulation in experimental vaginal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Tringali, Giuseppe; Greco, Maria Cristina; Ragazzoni, Enzo; Calugi, Chiara; Trabocchi, Andrea; Sandini, Silvia; Graziani, Sofia; Cauda, Roberto; Cassone, Antonio; Guarna, Antonio; Navarra, Pierluigi

    2014-08-01

    It has been previously shown that the treatment with the two protease inhibitors APG12 and APG19 confers protection in a rat model of mucosal candidiasis; in this study, we examined whether these peptidomimetic inhibitors are also effective as a cream formulation in reducing Candida albicans vaginal infection. These efficacy studies were performed in a rat model of estrogen-dependent rat vaginitis by C. albicans on both azole-susceptible and azole-resistant C. albicans, and on both caspofungin-susceptible and caspofungin-resistant C. albicans strains. In vivo studies were also conducted in female albino rats and rabbits to obtain information about the safety, local tolerability and principal pharmacokinetics parameters of the two compounds. Both hit compounds showed remarkable results within the 48-h range as effective inhibitors of the infection, particularly causing rapid decay of vaginal C. albicans burden. Importantly, the two compounds showed marked acceleration of fungus clearance in the rats challenged with the fluconazole-resistant as well as with the capsofungin-resistant strain of C. albicans. Both compounds showed fast elimination rates when given by the intravenous route, and poor systemic absorption after intravaginal cream administration. Test drugs were also well tolerated in 7-day local tolerability experiments in the rabbit. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  2. AUC versus peak-trough dosing of vancomycin: applying new pharmacokinetic paradigms to an old drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daniel L; Lalla, Christina D; Masselink, Andrew J

    2013-08-01

    To compare and contrast the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic foundations of traditional "peak-trough" vancomycin dosing methods versus newer "area under the curve" (AUC) strategies. To propose a new AUC-based dosing chart for empirically determining an initial vancomycin dosing regimen designed to achieve a desired AUC24 using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), creatinine clearance (CrCl), and vancomycin clearance (ClVanco). Peak-trough vancomycin dosing is designed to achieve a Cpeak of 20-40 mg/L and a Ctrough of 10-15 or 15-20 mg/L, depending on the severity of the infection and the nature of the pathogen. New treatment guidelines for vancomycin suggest that therapy should achieve an AUC24/MIC of ≥400. AUC-based vancomycin dosing derives the daily dose from ClVanco, MIC, and the desired AUC24/MIC, without consideration of the patient's weight. A vancomycin dosing chart is proposed that estimates ClVanco using the following formula developed by Matzke et al: ClVanco in L/h = [(CrClmL/min × 0.689) + 3.66] × 0.06, which simplifies to (CrClmL/min × 0.41) + 0.22. Two levels of dosing are included-high dose (Ctrough: 15-20 mg/L) and moderate dose (Ctrough: 10-15 mg/L). Although the chart has not been validated clinically, it represents the product of standard dosing equations that are used to determine a starting dosing regimen based on well-established vancomycin pharmacokinetic parameters. An understanding of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles, including the relevance of AUC in relation to MIC, enables clinicians to make the best use of vancomycin dosing options. The proposed dosing chart is pharmacokinetically valid but has yet to be applied clinically. It provides a foundation for further study of how clinicians can determine an optimal AUC-based starting vancomycin dosing regimen without having to derive ClVanco or AUC24.

  3. Dataset for Phase I randomized clinical trial for safety and tolerability of GET 73 in single and repeated ascending doses including preliminary pharmacokinetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haass-Koffler, Carolina L; Goodyear, Kimberly; Long, Victoria M; Tran, Harrison H; Loche, Antonella; Cacciaglia, Roberto; Swift, Robert M; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2017-12-01

    The data in this article outline the methods used for the administration of GET 73 in the first time-in-human manuscript entitled "Phase I randomized clinical trial for the safety, tolerability and preliminary pharmacokinetics of the mGluR5 negative allosteric modulator GET 73 following single and repeated doses in healthy male volunteers" (Haass-Koffler et al., 2017) [1]. Data sets are provided in two different manners. The first series of tables provided includes procedural information about the experiments conducted. The next series of tables provided includes Pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters for GET 73 and its main metabolite MET 2. This set of data is comprised by two experiments: Experiment 1 references a single ascending dose administration of GET 73 and Experiment 2 references a repeated ascending dose administration of GET 73.

  4. Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Cognitive Function Profile of Rupatadine 10, 20 and 40 mg in Healthy Japanese Subjects: A Randomised Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Täubel

    Full Text Available Rupatadine is a marketed second generation antihistamine, with anti-PAF activity, indicated for symptomatic treatment of allergic rhinitis and urticaria. This study was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK, pharmacodynamics (PD, safety and tolerability of rupatadine in healthy Japanese subjects after single and multiple oral doses.In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 27 male and female healthy Japanese subjects were administered single and multiple escalating rupatadine dose of 10, 20 and 40 mg or placebo. Blood samples were collected at different time points for PK measurements and subjects were assessed for safety and tolerability. The effect of rupatadine on cognitive functioning was evaluated by means of computerized cognitive tests: rapid visual information processing (RVP, reaction time (RT, spatial working memory (SWM and visual analogue scales (VAS.Exposure to rupatadine as measured by Cmax and AUC was found to increase in a dose dependent manner over the dose range of 10-40 mg for both single and multiple dose administration. The safety assessments showed that all treatment related side effects were of mild intensity and there were no serious adverse events (SAEs or withdrawals due to treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs in this study. The therapeutic dose of rupatadine did not show any CNS impairment in any of the cognitive tests.This study demonstrated that rupatadine is safe and well tolerated by Japanese healthy subjects. The PK-PD profile confirmed previous experience with rupatadine.

  5. The use of virtual simulation allows students to interactive learning with creativity and clarity in the theoretical foundation of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the drugs used in pharmacology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Dorila Placencia Medina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of virtual simulation allows students to interactive learning with creativity and clarity in the theoretical foundation of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the drugs used in pharmacology. Objective: Know the level of satisfaction of students in the design and implementation of virtual simulation laboratory in the Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine of San Marcos Material and Methods: Descriptive, qualitative study of research-action type. The design and implementation of a virtual simulation laboratory, the intervention of improvement and perfection of teaching materials for the development of practical section of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine of San Marcos was planned, using the software Microlab® and CV Rat. A survey of user satisfaction virtual laboratory technique the interview was conducted, as an instrument, using a Likert scale of minimum satisfaction starting in 1 to maximum of 10. Sample size of 26 students. Results: A new process was implemented teaching - learning of Experimental Pharmacology Laboratory using virtual simulation. Most students in the virtual classroom lab have a satisfaction level 9-10 / 10 on the Likert scale. Conclusions: The virtual simulation laboratory Section of Pharmacology got a good level of satisfaction among students.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and safety of fentanyl sublingual spray and fentanyl citrate intravenous: a multiple ascending dose study in opioid-naïve healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauck, Richard L; Oh, D Alexander; Singla, Neil; Koch, Christian; Parikh, Neha; Nalamachu, Srinivas; Wilson, Daniel; Yu, Jin; Vetticaden, Santosh

    2017-11-01

    Fentanyl sublingual spray, with its rapid onset for pain relief, may be efficacious in the management of acute or post-operative pain. Because patients in these settings may be opioid-naïve, the study was conducted to determine the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of multiple dose administration of fentanyl sublingual spray in an opioid-naïve population. Fentanyl sublingual spray (100 mcg, 200 mcg, and 400 mcg) and fentanyl citrate intravenous (IV; 50 mcg) were administered every 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 h for up to three doses per cohort in opioid-naïve subjects (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02641340). Eight subjects in each cohort were randomly assigned (six subjects received fentanyl sublingual spray; two subjects received fentanyl citrate IV). Pharmacokinetic and safety-related pharmacodynamic assessments were performed through 24 h post-first dose. Safety assessments were collected through Day 7. Ninety-six opioid-naïve subjects, aged 20-55 years, with a body mass index of 18.7-31.5 kg/m 2 , participated in the study. Multiple doses of fentanyl sublingual spray (100, 200, and 400 mcg) were generally well tolerated. Hypoxia, observed in the 200-mcg and 400-mcg dose groups, increased with increasing doses and higher dosing frequency, but was readily managed by nasal cannula oxygenation. Overall, nausea increased with increasing doses, and ∼52.6% (10 out of 19) cases of nausea that occurred at the highest dose of 400 mcg were treated with concomitant medication. Overall, the reported adverse events were consistent with the known safety profile of fentanyl. Fentanyl sublingual spray (100 mcg, 200 mg, and 400 mcg) administered every 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h was generally well tolerated in an opioid-naïve population. The results suggest that doses of 200 mcg or lower may be safe for use in an opioid-naïve population.

  7. A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic investigation: assessment of edivoxetine and atomoxetine on systemic and central 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol, a biochemical marker for norepinephrine transporter inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielbasa, William; Pan, Alan; Pereira, Alvaro

    2015-03-01

    Inhibition of norepinephrine (NE) reuptake into noradrenergic nerves is a common therapeutic target in the central nervous system (CNS). In noradrenergic nerves, NE is oxidized by monoamine oxidase to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG). In this study, 40 healthy male subjects received the NE transporter (NET) inhibitor edivoxetine (EDX) or atomoxetine (ATX), or placebo. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of these drugs in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was assessed. In Part A, subjects received EDX once daily (QD) for 14 or 15 days at targeted doses of 6mg or 9mg. In Part B, subjects received 80mg ATX QD for 14 or 15 days. Each subject received a lumbar puncture before receiving drug and after 14 or 15 days of dosing. Plasma and urine were collected at baseline and after 14 days of dosing. Edivoxetine plasma and CSF concentrations increased dose dependently. The time to maximum plasma concentration of EDX was 2h, and the half-life was 9h. At the highest EDX dose of 9mg, DHPG concentrations were reduced from baseline by 51% at 8h postdose in CSF, and steady-state plasma and urine DHPG concentrations decreased by 38% and 26%, respectively. For 80mg ATX, the decrease of plasma, CSF, or urine DHPG was similar to EDX. Herein we provide clinical evidence that EDX and ATX decrease DHPG concentrations in the periphery and CNS, presumably via NET inhibition. EDX and ATX concentrations measured in the CSF confirmed the availability of those drugs in the CNS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  8. Population pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of erlotinib and pharmacogenomic analysis of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid drug concentrations in Japanese patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukudo, Masahide; Ikemi, Yasuaki; Togashi, Yosuke; Masago, Katsuhiro; Kim, Young Hak; Mio, Tadashi; Terada, Tomohiro; Teramukai, Satoshi; Mishima, Michiaki; Inui, Ken-Ichi; Katsura, Toshiya

    2013-07-01

    Erlotinib shows large inter-patient pharmacokinetic variability, but the impact of early drug exposure and genetic variations on the clinical outcomes of erlotinib remains fully investigated. The primary objective of this study was to clarify the population pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of erlotinib in Japanese patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The secondary objective was to identify genetic determinant(s) for the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) permeability of erlotinib and its active metabolite OSI-420. A total of 88 patients treated with erlotinib (150 mg/day) were enrolled, and CSF samples were available from 23 of these patients with leptomeningeal metastases. Plasma and CSF concentrations of erlotinib and OSI-420 were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed with the nonlinear mixed-effects modelling program NONMEM. Germline mutations including ABCB1 (1236C>T, 2677G>T/A, 3435C>T), ABCG2 (421C>A), and CYP3A5 (6986A>G) polymorphisms, as well as somatic EGFR activating mutations if available, were examined. Early exposure to erlotinib and its safety/efficacy relationship were evaluated. The apparent clearance of erlotinib and OSI-420 were significantly decreased by 24 and 35 % in patients with the ABCG2 421A allele, respectively (p OSI-420 (p model showed that erlotinib trough (C0) levels on day 8 were an independent risk factor for the development of grade ≥2 diarrhea (p = 0.037) and skin rash (p = 0.031). Interstitial lung disease (ILD)-like events occurred in 3 patients (3.4 %), and the median value of erlotinib C0 levels adjacent to these events was approximately 3 times higher than that in patients who did not develop ILD (3253 versus 1107 ng/mL; p = 0.014). The objective response rate in the EGFR wild-type group was marginally higher in patients achieving higher erlotinib C0 levels (≥1711 ng/mL) than that in patients having lower erlotinib C0

  9. Phase I safety, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of the vascular disrupting agent ombrabulin (AVE8062) in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Cristiana; Lorusso, Patricia; Tolcher, Anthony; Farace, Françoise; Lassau, Nathalie; Delmonte, Angelo; Braghetti, Antonio; Bahleda, Rastislav; Cohen, Patrick; Hospitel, Marie; Veyrat-Follet, Christine; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2013-09-01

    The vascular disrupting agent ombrabulin rapidly reduces tumor blood flow and causes necrosis in vivo. A phase I dose-escalation study was designed to determine the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of single-agent ombrabulin administered once every three weeks in patients with advanced solid malignancies. Ombrabulin (30-minute infusion) was escalated from 6 to 60 mg/m2, with RP2D cohort expansion. Safety, tumor response, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic biomarkers were evaluated. Eleven dose levels were evaluated in 105 patients. Two patients had dose-limiting toxicities in cycle 1 during escalation: grade 3 abdominal pain at 50 mg/m2, grade 3 tumor pain/grade 3 hypertension at 60 mg/m2, and the RP2D was 50 mg/m2 (39 patients). Common toxicities were headache, asthenia, abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea, transient hypertension, anemia, and lymphopenia. No clinically significant QTc prolongations or left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) decreases occurred. Ombrabulin was rapidly converted to its active metabolite RPR258063 (half-life 17 minutes and 8.7 hours, respectively), both having dose-proportional exposure. Weak inhibition of CYP2C19-mediated metabolism occurred at the clinical doses used and there was no effect on CYP1A2 and CYP3A4. A patient with rectal cancer had a partial response and eight patients had stable disease lasting four months or more. Circulating endothelial cells (CEC), VEGF, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 levels increased significantly six to 10 hours postinfusion in a subset of patients. The recommended schedule for single-agent ombrabulin is 50 mg/m2 every 3 weeks. CECs, VEGF, and MMP-9 are potential biomarkers of ombrabulin activity. ©2013 AACR.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of LGD-3303 [9-chloro-2-ethyl-1-methyl-3-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-3H-pyrrolo-[3,2-f]quinolin-7(6H)-one], an orally available nonsteroidal-selective androgen receptor modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajda, Eric G; López, Francisco J; Rix, Peter; Hill, Robert; Chen, Yanling; Lee, Kyoung-Jin; O'Brien, Z; Chang, William Y; Meglasson, Martin D; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2009-02-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a new class of molecules in development to treat a variety of diseases. SARMs maintain the beneficial effects of androgens, including increased muscle mass and bone density, while having reduced activity on unwanted side effects. The mechanisms responsible for the tissue-selective activity of SARMs are not fully understood, and the pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) relationships are poorly described. Tissue-specific compound distribution potentially could be a mechanism responsible for apparent tissue selectivity. We examined the PK/PD relationship of a novel SARM, LGD-3303 [9-chloro-2-ethyl-1-methyl-3-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-3H-pyrrolo[3,2-f]quinolin-7(6H)-one], in a castrated rat model of androgen deficiency. LGD-3303 has potent activity on levator ani muscle but is a partial agonist on the preputial gland and ventral prostate. LGD-3303 never stimulated ventral prostate above intact levels despite increasing plasma concentrations of compound. Tissue-selective activity was maintained when LGD-3303 was dosed orally or by continuous infusion, two routes of administration with markedly different time versus exposure profiles. Despite the greater muscle activity relative to prostate activity, local tissue concentrations of LGD-3303 were higher in the prostate than in the levator ani muscle. LGD-3303 has SARM properties that are independent of its pharmacokinetic profile, suggesting that the principle mechanism for tissue-selective activity is the result of altered molecular interactions at the level of the androgen receptor.

  11. Effects of etravirine on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of warfarin in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, J; John, M; Wu, L; Hsiao, C; Abobo, CV; Liang, D

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Warfarin is often used with etravirine (ETV) to prevent HIV-related thromboembolic events. As both warfarin and ETV bind to plasma proteins and are metabolized by hepatic cytochrome P450s, they are likely to interact. Hence, we evaluated the effect of ETV on the pharmacokinetics and blood clotting time of racemic warfarin in rats. Experimental Approach Two groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats, in which the jugular vein had been cannulated, were studied. The control group (n = 10) received 1 mg·kg−1 racemic warfarin i.v., and the test group (n = 13) 1 mg·kg−1 of racemic warfarin followed by 25 mg·kg−1 ETV i.v. Serial blood samples were collected for up to 144 h and the blood clotting time (calculated as international normalized ratio [INR]) measured in blood plasma at each sample point. Plasma concentrations of R-warfarin, S-warfarin, R-7-hydroxywarfarin and S-7-hydroxywarfarin were measured by a LC/MS/MS method using a chiral lux cellulose-1 column. Pharmacokinetic parameters were analysed using non-compartmental methods. Key Results ETV significantly increased, by threefold, the systemic clearance and volume of distribution of S-warfarin, but not those of R-warfarin. ETV decreased the total AUC of warfarin, but had no effect on its elimination half-life. ETV also increased the systemic clearance of both R-7-hydroxywarfarin and S-7-hydroxywarfarin but only increased the volume of distribution of R-7-hydroxywarfarin. Interestingly, the effect of warfarin on blood clotting time (INR) was significantly increased in the presence of etravirine. Conclusion and Implications Our data suggest that etravirine may potentiate the anticoagulant effect of warfarin and this could have clinical significance. PMID:23215758

  12. Can Saliva and Plasma Methadone Concentrations Be Used for Enantioselective Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Studies in Patients With Advanced Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Rani; Haywood, Alison; Good, Phillip; Hennig, Stefanie; Khan, Sohil; Norris, Ross; Hardy, Janet

    2017-09-01

    Methadone is a potent analgesic used to treat refractory cancer pain. It is administered as a racemic mixture, with the l-enantiomer being primarily a μ-receptor agonist, whereas the d-enantiomer is an N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonist and inhibits serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake. Dose requirements vary greatly among patients to achieve optimal pain control and to avoid the risk of adverse effects. The relationship between plasma and saliva methadone enantiomer concentrations was investigated to determine if saliva could be a substitute for plasma in pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies for clinical monitoring and dose optimization of methadone in patients with advanced cancer. Patients with advanced cancer who were prescribed varying doses of oral methadone for pain management were recruited to obtain paired plasma and saliva samples. Pain scores were recorded at the time of sampling. The total and unbound plasma and saliva concentrations of the l- and d-enantiomers of methadone were quantified by using an HPLC-MS/MS method. The relationship between plasma (total and unbound) and saliva concentrations were compared. The saliva-to-plasma concentration ratio was compared versus the dose administered and the time after dosing for both enantiomers. The association of methadone concentrations with reported pain scores was compared by using a Mann-Whitney U test for significance. Fifty patients receiving a mean dose of 11mg/d of methadone provided 151 paired plasma and saliva samples. The median age of the population was 61 years with an interquartile range of 53-71 years with total body weight ranging from 59-88 kg. Median (interquartile) total plasma concentrations for l- and d-methadone were 50.78 ng/mL (30.6-113.0 ng/mL) and 62.0 ng/mL (28.7-116.0 ng/mL), respectively. Median (interquartile range) saliva concentrations for l- and d-methadone were 81.5 ng/mL (28.0-203.2 ng/mL) and 44.2 (16.2-149.7 ng/mL). No relationship could be established between

  13. Curcumin as a clinically-promising anti-cancer agent: pharmacokinetics and drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiwidjaja, Jeffry; McLachlan, Andrew J; Boddy, Alan V

    2017-09-01

    Curcumin has been extensively studied for its anti-cancer properties. While a diverse array of in vitro and preclinical research support the prospect of curcumin use as an anti-cancer therapeutic, most human studies have failed to meet the intended clinical expectation. Poor systemic availability of orally-administered curcumin may account for this disparity. Areas covered: This descriptive review aims to concisely summarise available clinical studies investigating curcumin pharmacokinetics when administered in different formulations. A critical analysis of pharmacokinetic- and pharmacodynamic-based interactions of curcumin with concomitantly administered drugs is also provided. Expert opinion: The encouraging clinical results of curcumin administration are currently limited to people with colorectal cancer, given that sufficient curcumin concentrations persist in colonic mucosa. Higher parent curcumin systemic exposure, which can be achieved by several newer formulations, has important implications for optimal treatment of cancers other than those in gastrointestinal tract. Curcumin-drug pharmacokinetic interactions are also almost exclusively in the enterocytes, owing to extensive first pass metabolism and poor curcumin bioavailability. Greater scope of these interactions, i.e. modulation of the systemic elimination of co-administered drugs, may be expected from more-bioavailable curcumin formulations. Further studies are still warranted, especially with newer formulations to support the inclusion of curcumin in cancer therapy regimens.

  14. Flucytosine Pharmacokinetics in a Critically Ill Patient Receiving Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunka, Megan E; Cady, Elizabeth A; Woo, Heejung C; Thompson Bastin, Melissa L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. A case report evaluating flucytosine dosing in a critically ill patient receiving continuous renal replacement therapy. Summary. This case report outlines an 81-year-old male who was receiving continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) for acute renal failure and was being treated with flucytosine for the treatment of disseminated Cryptococcus neoformans infection. Due to patient specific factors, flucytosine was empirically dose adjusted approximately 50% lower than intermittent hemodialysis (iHD) recommendations and approximately 33% lower than CRRT recommendations. Peak and trough levels were obtained, which were supratherapeutic, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. The patient experienced thrombocytopenia, likely due to elevated flucytosine levels, and flucytosine was ultimately discontinued. Conclusion. Despite conservative flucytosine dosing for a patient receiving CVVH, peak and trough serum flucytosine levels were supratherapeutic (120 μg/mL at 2 hours and 81 μg/mL at 11.5 hours), which increased drug-related adverse effects. The results indicate that this conservative dosing regimen utilizing the patient's actual body weight was too aggressive. This case report provides insight into flucytosine dosing in CVVH, a topic that has not been investigated previously. Further pharmacokinetic studies of flucytosine dosing in critically ill patients receiving CVVH are needed in order to optimize pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters while avoiding toxic flucytosine exposure.

  15. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodinamics Integration of Sulfametazine in buffalo and cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. San Andrés

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Sulfamethazine is a sulfonamide that presents a broad spectrum of activity, including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, Chlamydia spp. and some protozoa and it commonly used in ruminants. The aim of our work was to study the possible inter-species differences in the pharmacokinetic behavior and pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic(PK/PD integration of sulfamethazine after intravenous administration in buffalo and bovine. A single intravenous dose of 60 mg/kg was administered to six bovine and five buffalo (3-4 month old and weighting 120±15kg. Plasma concentrations of sulfamethazine were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Differences between bovine and buffalo calves were found in t½λ (buffaloes: t1/2λ =6.17±0.58h; bovine t1/2λ=7.46±1.05h, Cl (buffaloes: 45.31ml/h·kg; bovines 30.34ml/h·kg. As a consequence of the lower clearance in bovines, the AUC and t½λ values were higher in this species. Important differences between bovine and buffalo exist for microorganisms that have a MIC value<32μg/ml related to time over minimum inhibitory concentration and weighted AUC.

  16. A paradigm shift in pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modeling: rule of thumb for estimating free drug level in tissue compared with plasma to guide drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    A basic assumption in pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics research is that the free drug concentration is similar in plasma and tissue, and, hence, in vitro plasma data can be used to estimate the in vivo condition in tissue. However, in a companion manuscript, it has been demonstrated that this assumption is violated for the ionized drugs. Nonetheless, these observations focus on in vitro static environments and do not challenge data with an in vivo dynamic system. Therefore, an extension from an in vitro to an in vivo system becomes the necessary next step. The objective of this study was to perform theoretical simulations of the free drug concentration in tissue and plasma by using a physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) model reproducing the in vivo conditions in human. Therefore, the effects of drug ionization, lipophilicity, and clearance have been taken into account in a dynamic system. This modeling exercise was performed as a proof of concept to demonstrate that free drug concentration in tissue and plasma may also differ in a dynamic system for passively permeable drugs that are ionized at the physiological pH. The PBPK model simulations indicated that free drug concentrations in tissue cells and plasma significantly differ for the ionized drugs because of the pH gradient effect between cells and interstitial space. Hence, a rule of thumb for potentially performing more accurate PBPK/PD modeling is suggested, which states that the free drug concentration in tissue and plasma will differ for the ionizable drugs in contrast to the neutral drugs. In addition to the pH gradient effect for the ionizable drugs, lipophilicity and clearance effects will increase or decrease the free drug concentration in tissue and plasma for each class of drugs; thus, higher will be the drug lipophilicity and clearance, lower would be the free drug concentration in plasma, and, hence, in tissue, in a dynamic in vivo system. Therefore, only considering the value of free

  17. Influence of the Size of Cohorts in Adaptive Design for Nonlinear Mixed Effects Models: An Evaluation by Simulation for a Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model for a Biomarker in Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestini, Giulia; Dumont, Cyrielle; Mentré, France

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In this study we aimed to evaluate adaptive designs (ADs) by clinical trial simulation for a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model in oncology and to compare them with one-stage designs, i.e. when no adaptation is performed, using wrong prior parameters. Methods We evaluated two one-stage designs, ξ0 and ξ*, optimised for prior and true population parameters, Ψ0 and Ψ*, and several ADs (two-, three- and five-stage). All designs had 50 patients. For ADs, the first cohort design was ξ0. The next cohort design was optimised using prior information updated from the previous cohort. Optimal design was based on the determinant of the Fisher information matrix using PFIM. Design evaluation was performed by clinical trial simulations using data simulated from Ψ*. Results Estimation results of two-stage ADs and ξ* were close and much better than those obtained with ξ0. The balanced two-stage AD performed better than two-stage ADs with different cohort sizes. Three-and five-stage ADs were better than two-stage with small first cohort, but not better than the balanced two-stage design. Conclusions Two-stage ADs are useful when prior parameters are unreliable. In case of small first cohort, more adaptations are needed but these designs are complex to implement. PMID:26123680

  18. Part 1. Effect of pyralgine on pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in irradiated animals (600 R)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozaryn, I.; Wojciak, Z.; Godlewski, J.; Nowakowska, E.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in order to check the influence of pyralgine (40 mg/kg i.p.) on the hypnotic activity of phenobarbital (70 mg/kg i.p.) in rats after whole-body irradiation (600 R). Premedication with pyralgine produced statistically significant prolongation of animals sleep and shortened the time necessary for falling asleep after phenobarbital. The results seem to be connected with more rapid absorption of phenobarbital and its higher level in plasma and, first of all, in the brain tissue after premedication with pyralgine. We suggest that pharmacodynamical interaction between phenobarbital and pyralgine also exists. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs. (author)

  19. Enhancement of curcumin oral absorption and pharmacokinetics of curcuminoids and curcumin metabolites in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhongfa, Liu; Chiu, Ming; Wang, Jiang; Chen, Wei; Yen, Winston; Fan-Havard, Patty; Yee, Lisa D.; Chan, Kenneth K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Curcumin has shown a variety of biological activity for various human diseases including cancer in preclinical setting. Its poor oral bioavailability poses significant pharmacological barriers to its clinical application. Here, we established a practical nano-emulsion curcumin (NEC) containing up to 20% curcumin (w/w) and conducted the pharmacokinetics of curcuminoids and curcumin metabolites in mice. Methods This high loading NEC was formulated based on the high solubility of curcumin in polyethylene glycols (PEGs) and the synergistic enhancement of curcumin absorption by PEGs and Cremophor EL. The pharmacokinetics of curcuminoids and curcumin metabolites was characterized in mice using a LC–MS/MS method, and the pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using WinNonlin computer software. Results A tenfold increase in the AUC0→24h and more than 40-fold increase in the Cmax in mice were observed after an oral dose of NEC compared with suspension curcumin in 1% methylcellulose. The plasma pharmacokinetics of its two natural congeners, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, and three metabolites, tetrahydrocurcumin (THC), curcumin-O-glucuronide, and curcumin-O-sulfate, was characterized for the first time in mice after an oral dose of NEC. Conclusion This oral absorption enhanced NEC may provide a practical formulation to conduct the correlative study of the PK of curcuminoids and their pharmacodynamics, e.g., hypomethylation activity in vivo. PMID:21968952

  20. Characterization of Pharmacologic and Pharmacokinetic Properties of CCX168, a Potent and Selective Orally Administered Complement 5a Receptor Inhibitor, Based on Preclinical Evaluation and Randomized Phase 1 Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, Pirow; Dairaghi, Daniel; Seitz, Lisa; Leleti, Manmohan; Wang, Yu; Ertl, Linda; Baumgart, Trageen; Shugarts, Sarah; Lohr, Lisa; Dang, Ton; Miao, Shichang; Zeng, Yibin; Fan, Pingchen; Zhang, Penglie; Johnson, Daniel; Powers, Jay; Jaen, Juan; Charo, Israel; Schall, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    The complement 5a receptor has been an attractive therapeutic target for many autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. However, development of a selective and potent C5aR antagonist has been challenging. Here we describe the characterization of CCX168 (avacopan), an orally administered selective and potent C5aR inhibitor. CCX168 blocked the C5a binding, C5a-mediated migration, calcium mobilization, and CD11b upregulation in U937 cells as well as in freshly isolated human neutrophils. CCX168 retains high potency when present in human blood. A transgenic human C5aR knock-in mouse model allowed comparison of the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of the molecule. CCX168 effectively blocked migration in in vitro and ex vivo chemotaxis assays, and it blocked the C5a-mediated neutrophil vascular endothelial margination. CCX168 was effective in migration and neutrophil margination assays in cynomolgus monkeys. This thorough in vitro and preclinical characterization enabled progression of CCX168 into the clinic and testing of its safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic profiles in a Phase 1 clinical trial in 48 healthy volunteers. CCX168 was shown to be well tolerated across a broad dose range (1 to 100 mg) and it showed dose-dependent pharmacokinetics. An oral dose of 30 mg CCX168 given twice daily blocked the C5a-induced upregulation of CD11b in circulating neutrophils by 94% or greater throughout the entire day, demonstrating essentially complete target coverage. This dose regimen is being tested in clinical trials in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. Trial Registration ISRCTN registry with trial ID ISRCTN13564773.

  1. Modeling Tolerance Development for the Effect on Heart Rate of the Selective S1P1 Receptor Modulator Ponesimod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Dominik; Lehr, Thorsten; Dingemanse, Jasper; Krause, Andreas

    2017-09-15

    Ponesimod is a selective sphingosine-1-phosphate-1 (S1P 1 ) receptor modulator currently under investigation for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. S1P receptor modulators reduce heart rate following treatment initiation. This effect disappears with repeated dosing, enabling development of innovative uptitration regimens to optimize patient safety. There are currently no published pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models describing the heart rate reduction of S1P receptor modulators in humans. The model developed here provides quantification of this effect for ponesimod. A direct-effect I max model with estimated maximum reduction of 45%, tolerance development, and circadian variation best described this effect. The pooled data from nine clinical studies enabled characterization of interindividual variability. The model was used to simulate different treatment regimens to compare the effect of high initial doses vs. gradual uptitration with respect to the occurrence of bradycardia. The results indicate a better safety profile when using gradual uptitration. The model allows studying dosing regimens not clinically tested in silico. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  2. Warning against co-administration of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) with methamphetamine from the perspective of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluations in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuki, Fuchigami; Rie, Ikeda; Miki, Kuzushima; Mitsuhiro, Wada; Naotaka, Kuroda; Kenichiro, Nakashima

    2013-04-11

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine often cause serious adverse effects (e.g., rhabdomyolysis, and cardiac disease) following hyperthermia triggered by release of brain monoamines such as dopamine and serotonin. Therefore, evaluation of brain monoamine concentrations is useful to predict these drugs' risks in human. This study aimed to evaluate risks of co-administration of MDMA and methamphetamine, both of which are abused frequently in Japan, based on drug distribution and monoamine level in the rat brain. Rats were allocated to three groups: (1) sole MDMA administration (12 or 25 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), (2) sole methamphetamine administration (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and (3) co-administration of MDMA (12 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and methamphetamine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). We monitored pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variables for drugs and monoamines in the rat brain. Area under the curve for concentration vs. time until 600 min from drug administration (AUC₀₋₆₀₀) increased from 348.0 to 689.8 μgmin/L for MDMA and from 29.9 to 243.4 μMmin for dopamine in response to co-administration of methamphetamine and MDMA compared to sole MDMA (12 mg/kg) administration. After sole methamphetamine or that with MDMA administration, AUC₀₋₆₀₀ of methamphetamine were 401.8 and 671.1 μgmin/L, and AUC₀₋₆₀₀ of dopamine were 159.9 and 243.4 μMmin. In conclusion, the brain had greater exposure to MDMA, methamphetamine and dopamine after co-administration of MDMA and methamphetamine than when these two drugs were given alone. This suggests co-administration of MDMA with methamphetamine confers greater risk than sole administration, and that adverse events of MDMA ingestion may increase when methamphetamine is co-administered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of teicoplanin in neonates: making better use of C-reactive protein to deliver individualized therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Martín, V; Neely, M N; McGowan, P; Siner, S; Padmore, K; Peak, M; Beresford, M W; Turner, M A; Paulus, S; Hope, W W

    2016-11-01

    There is uncertainty about the optimal teicoplanin regimens for neonates. The study aim was to determine the population pharmacokinetics (PK) of teicoplanin in neonates, evaluate currently recommended regimens and explore the exposure-effect relationships. An open-label PK study was conducted. Neonates from 26 to 44 weeks post-menstrual age were recruited (n = 18). The teicoplanin regimen was a 16 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 8 mg/kg once daily. Therapeutic drug monitoring and dose adjustment were not conducted. A standard two-compartment PK model was developed, followed by models that incorporated weight. A PK/pharmacodynamic (PD) model with C-reactive protein serial measurements as the PD input was fitted to the data. Monte Carlo simulations (n = 5000) were performed using Pmetrics. The AUCs at steady state and the proportion of patients achieving the recommended drug exposures (i.e. C min >15 mg/L) were determined. The study was registered in the European Clinical Trials Database Registry (EudraCT: 2012-005738-12). The PK allometric model best accounted for the observed data. The PK parameters medians were: clearance = 0.435 × (weight/70) 0.75 (L/h); volume = 0.765 (L); K cp  = 1.3 (h -1 ); and K pc  = 0.629 (h -1 ). The individual time-course of C-reactive protein was well described using the Bayesian posterior estimates for each patient. The simulated median AUC 96-120 was 302.3 mg·h/L and the median C min at 120 h was 12.9 mg/L; 38.8% of patients attained a C min >15 mg/L by 120 h. Teicoplanin population PK is highly variable in neonates, weight being the best descriptor of PK variability. A low percentage of neonates were able to achieve C min >15 mg/L. The routine use of therapeutic drug monitoring and improved knowledge on the PD of teicoplanin is required. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  4. Population pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its metabolites theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline after inhalation in combination with diacetylmorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandvliet, Anthe S; Huitema, Alwin D R; de Jonge, Milly E; den Hoed, Rob; Sparidans, Rolf W; Hendriks, Vincent M; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2005-01-01

    The stimulant effect of caffeine, as an additive in diacetylmorphine preparations for study purposes, may interfere with the pharmacodynamic effects of diacetylmorphine. In order to obtain insight into the pharmacology of caffeine after inhalation in heroin users, the pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its dimethylxanthine metabolites were studied. The objectives were to establish the population pharmacokinetics under these exceptional circumstances and to compare the results to published data regarding intravenous and oral administration in healthy volunteers. Diacetylmorphine preparations containing 100 mg of caffeine were used by 10 persons by inhalation. Plasma concentrations of caffeine, theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Non-linear mixed effects modelling was used to estimate population pharmacokinetic parameters. The model was evaluated by the jack-knife procedure. Caffeine was rapidly and effectively absorbed after inhalation. Population pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its dimethylxanthine metabolites could adequately and simultaneously be described by a linear multi-compartment model. The volume of distribution for the central compartment was estimated to be 45.7 l and the apparent elimination rate constant of caffeine at 8 hr after inhalation was 0.150 hr(-1) for a typical individual. The bioavailability was approximately 60%. The presented model adequately describes the population pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its dimethylxanthine metabolites after inhalation of the caffeine sublimate of a 100 mg tablet. Validation proved the stability of the model. Pharmacokinetics of caffeine after inhalation and intravenous administration are to a large extent similar. The bioavailability of inhaled caffeine is approximately 60% in experienced smokers.

  5. Clinical Determinants of Target Non-Attainment of Linezolid in Plasma and Interstitial Space Fluid: A Pooled Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis with Focus on Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minichmayr, Iris K; Schaeftlein, André; Kuti, Joseph L; Zeitlinger, Markus; Kloft, Charlotte

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to assess linezolid pharmacokinetics in the plasma and interstitial space fluid (ISF) of patients with sepsis, diabetic foot infections or cystic fibrosis and healthy volunteers. The impacts of joint characteristics and disease on plasma and target-site exposure were to be identified together with the benefit of dose intensification in critically ill patients. Rich plasma (n = 1598) and ISF concentrations in subcutaneous adipose (n = 1430) and muscle tissue (n = 1089) measured by microdialysis were pooled from three clinical trials with 51 individuals receiving 600 mg of intravenous and oral linezolid. All data were analysed simultaneously by a population approach also considering methodological aspects of microdialysis. The impact of covariates on the attainment of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic targets, AUC/MIC = 100 (area under the concentration-time curve/minimum inhibitory concentration) and fT >MIC  = 99 % (time that unbound concentrations exceed the MIC), was assessed by deterministic and Monte Carlo simulations. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model with nonlinear elimination and tissue distribution factors accounting for differences between plasma and ISF concentrations adequately predicted all measurements. Clearance (CL) was highest in septic patients (11.2 L/h vs. CL Healthy /CL Cystic fibrosis /CL Diabetic  = 7.67/6.87/6.35 L/h). Penetration into subcutaneous adipose ISF was lowest in diabetic patients (-34.9 % compared with healthy volunteers). Creatinine clearance and total body weight further impacted linezolid exposure. To achieve timely efficacious therapy, front-loaded dosing and continuous infusion seemed beneficial in septic patients. Our analysis suggests that after standard linezolid doses, particularly patients with sepsis and conserved renal function are at risk of not attaining pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic targets and would benefit from initial dose intensification.

  6. Phase I study of TP300 in patients with advanced solid tumors with pharmacokinetic, pharmacogenetic and pharmacodynamic analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthoney, D Alan; Miwa, Masanori; Twelves, Christopher; Evans, TRJ; Naik, Jay; MacPherson, Iain RJ; Crawford, Donna; Hartley, John M; Hartley, Janet A; Saito, Tomohisa; Abe, Masaichi; Jones, Keith

    2012-01-01

    A Phase I dose escalation first in man study assessed maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and recommended Phase II dose of TP300, a water soluble prodrug of the Topo-1 inhibitor TP3076, and active metabolite, TP3011. Eligible patients with refractory advanced solid tumors, adequate performance status, haematologic, renal, and hepatic function. TP300 was given as a 1-hour i.v. infusion 3-weekly and pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of TP300, TP3076 and TP3011 were analysed. Polymorphisms in CYP2D6, AOX1 and UGT1A1 were studied and DNA strand-breaks measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). 32 patients received TP300 at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 mg/m 2 . MTD was 10 mg/m 2 ; DLTs at 12 (2/4 patients) and 10 mg/m 2 (3/12) included thrombocytopenia and febrile neutropenia; diarrhoea was uncommon. Six patients (five had received irinotecan), had stable disease for 1.5-5 months. TP3076 showed dose proportionality in AUC and C max from 1–10 mg/m 2 . Genetic polymorphisms had no apparent influence on exposure. DNA strand-breaks were detected after TP300 infusion. TP300 had predictable hematologic toxicity, and diarrhoea was uncommon. AUC at MTD is substantially greater than for SN38. TP3076 and TP3011 are equi-potent with SN38, suggesting a PK advantage. EU-CTR2006-001345-33

  7. Rifapentine Pharmacokinetics and Tolerability in Children and Adults Treated Once Weekly With Rifapentine and Isoniazid for Latent Tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Marc; Savic, Radojka M; Kenzie, William R Mac; Wing, Diane; Peloquin, Charles A; Engle, Melissa; Bliven, Erin; Prihoda, Thomas J; Gelfond, Jonathan A L; Scott, Nigel A; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M; Kearns, Gregory L; Burman, William J; Sterling, Timothy R; Villarino, M Elsa

    2014-06-01

    In a phase 3, randomized clinical trial (PREVENT TB) of 8053 people with latent tuberculosis infection, 12 once-weekly doses of rifapentine and isoniazid had good efficacy and tolerability. Children received higher rifapentine milligram per kilogram doses than adults. In the present pharmacokinetic study (a component of the PREVENT TB trial), rifapentine exposure was compared between children and adults. Rifapentine doses in children ranged from 300 to 900 mg, and adults received 900 mg. Children who could not swallow tablets received crushed tablets. Sparse pharmacokinetic sampling was performed with 1 rifapentine concentration at 24 hours after drug administration (C24). Rifapentine area under concentration-time curve (AUC) was estimated from a nonlinear, mixed effects regression model (NLME). There were 80 children (age: median, 4.5 years; range, 2-11 years) and 77 adults (age: median, 40 years; all ≥18 years) in the study. The geometric mean rifapentine milligram per kilogram dose was greater in children than in adults (children, 23 mg/kg; adults, 11 mg/kg). Rifapentine geometric mean AUC and C24 were 1.3-fold greater in children (all children combined) than in adults. Children who swallowed whole tablets had 1.3-fold higher geometric mean AUC than children who received crushed tablets, and children who swallowed whole tablets had a 1.6-fold higher geometric mean AUC than adults. The higher rifapentine doses in children were well tolerated. To obtain rifapentine exposures comparable in children to adults, dosing algorithms modeled by NLME were developed. A 2-fold greater rifapentine dose for all children resulted in a 1.3-fold higher AUC compared to adults administered a standard dose. Use of higher weight-adjusted rifapentine doses for young children are warranted to achieve systemic exposures that are associated with successful treatment of latent tuberculosis infection in adults. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious

  8. Flucytosine Pharmacokinetics in a Critically Ill Patient Receiving Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E. Kunka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. A case report evaluating flucytosine dosing in a critically ill patient receiving continuous renal replacement therapy. Summary. This case report outlines an 81-year-old male who was receiving continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH for acute renal failure and was being treated with flucytosine for the treatment of disseminated Cryptococcus neoformans infection. Due to patient specific factors, flucytosine was empirically dose adjusted approximately 50% lower than intermittent hemodialysis (iHD recommendations and approximately 33% lower than CRRT recommendations. Peak and trough levels were obtained, which were supratherapeutic, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. The patient experienced thrombocytopenia, likely due to elevated flucytosine levels, and flucytosine was ultimately discontinued. Conclusion. Despite conservative flucytosine dosing for a patient receiving CVVH, peak and trough serum flucytosine levels were supratherapeutic (120 μg/mL at 2 hours and 81 μg/mL at 11.5 hours, which increased drug-related adverse effects. The results indicate that this conservative dosing regimen utilizing the patient’s actual body weight was too aggressive. This case report provides insight into flucytosine dosing in CVVH, a topic that has not been investigated previously. Further pharmacokinetic studies of flucytosine dosing in critically ill patients receiving CVVH are needed in order to optimize pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters while avoiding toxic flucytosine exposure.

  9. Review of some pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of anti-infective medicines administered to the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govendir, M

    2018-02-01

    Although koalas are iconic Australian animals, no pharmacokinetic studies of any first-line medicines used to treat diseased or injured koalas had been published prior to 2010. Traditionally, medicine dosages suggested for this species underwent linear extrapolation from those recommended for domesticated species. The koala, a specialist folivore whose natural diet consists of almost exclusively Eucalyptus spp. foliage has anatomical and physiological adaptations for detoxifying their diet which also affect medicine pharmacokinetic profiles. This review addresses aspects of medicine absorption, clearance, and other indices (such as medicine binding to plasma proteins) of enrofloxacin/marbofloxacin and chloramphenicol used for the systemic treatment of chlamydiosis, and fluconazole ± amphotericin, and posaconazole for the treatment of cryptococcosis. Based on observations from published studies, this review includes suggestions to improve therapeutic outcomes when administering medicines to diseased koalas. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Excipient-drug pharmacokinetic interactions: Effect of disintegrants on efflux across excised pig intestinal tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Gerber

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical excipients were designed originally to be pharmacologically inert. However, certain excipients were found to have altering effects on drug pharmacodynamics and/or pharmacokinetics. Pharmacokinetic interactions may be caused by modulation of efflux transporter proteins, intercellular tight junctions and/or metabolic enzyme amongst others. In this study, five disintegrants from different chemical classes were evaluated for P-glycoprotein (P-gp related inhibition and tight junction modulation effects. Bi-directional transport studies of the model compound, Rhodamine 123 (R123 were conducted in the absence (control group and presence (experimental groups of four concentrations of each selected disintegrant across excised pig jejunum tissue. The results showed that some of the selected disintegrants (e.g. Ac-di-sol® and Kollidon® CL-M increased R123 absorptive transport due to inhibition of P-gp related efflux, while another disintegrant (e.g. sodium alginate changed R123 transport due to inhibition of P-gp in conjunction with a transient opening of the tight junctions in a concentration dependent way. It may be concluded that the co-application of some disintegrants to the intestinal epithelium may lead to pharmacokinetic interactions with drugs that are susceptible to P-gp related efflux. However, the clinical significance of these in vitro permeation findings should be confirmed by means of in vivo studies. Keywords: Disintegrants, Excipient, Ex vivo, P-glycoprotein, Pharmacokinetic interactions, Rhodamine 123

  11. The Epidemiologic and Pharmacodynamic Cutoff Values of Tilmicosin against Haemophilus parasuis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihong eHao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to establish antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints for tilmicosin against Haemophilus parasuis, which is an important pathogen of respiratory tract infections. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of 103 H. parasuis isolates were determined by the agar dilution method. The wild-type (WT distribution and epidemiologic cutoff value (ECV were evaluated by statistical analysis. The new bronchoaveolar lavage (BAL was used to establish intrapulmonary pharmacokinetic (PK model in swine. The pharmacokinetic (PK parameters of tilmicosin, both in pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF and in plasma, were determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method and WinNonlin software. The pharmacodynamic cutoff (COPD was calculated using Monte Carlo simulation. Our results showed that 100% of WT isolates were covered when the ECV was set at 16μg/mL. The tilmicosin had concentration-dependent activity against H. parasuis. The PK data indicated that tilmicosin concentrations in PELF was rapidly increased to high levels at 4 hours and kept stable until 48 hours after drug administration, while the tilmicosin concentration in plasma reached maximum levels at 4 hours and continued to decrease during 4-72 hours. Using Monte Carlo simulation, COPD was defined as 1 μg/mL. Conclusively, the ECV and COPD of tilmicosin against H. parasuis were established for the first time based on the MIC distribution and PK-PD analysis in the target tissue, respectively. These values are of great importance for detection of tilmicosin-resistant H. parasuis and for effective treatment of clinical intrapulmonary infection caused by H. parasuis.

  12. Wild-type MIC distributions of four fluoroquinolones active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in relation to current critical concentrations and available pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeby, K A; Jureen, P; Giske, C G; Chryssanthou, E; Sturegård, E; Nordvall, M; Johansson, A G; Werngren, J; Kahlmeter, G; Hoffner, S E; Schön, T

    2010-05-01

    To describe wild-type distributions of the MIC of fluoroquinolones for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in relation to current critical concentrations used for drug susceptibility testing and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) data. A 96-stick replicator on Middlebrook 7H10 medium was used to define the MICs of ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, moxifloxacin and levofloxacin for 90 consecutive clinical strains and 24 drug-resistant strains. The MICs were compared with routine BACTEC 460 susceptibility results and with MIC determinations in the BACTEC MGIT 960 system in a subset of strains using ofloxacin as a class representative. PK/PD data for each drug were reviewed in relation to the wild-type MIC distribution. The wild-type MICs of ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, moxifloxacin and levofloxacin were distributed from 0.125 to 1, 0.25 to 1, 0.032 to 0.5 and 0.125 to 0.5 mg/L, respectively. The MIC data correlated well with the BACTEC 960 MGIT and BACTEC 460 results. PD indices were the most favourable for levofloxacin, followed by moxifloxacin, ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin. We propose S (susceptible)

  13. Changes in ceftriaxone pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics during the early phase of sepsis: a prospective, experimental study in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Selmi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sepsis is characterized by the loss of the perm-selectivity properties of the glomerular filtration barrier (GFB with consequent albuminuria. We examined whether the pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics (PK/PD of ceftriaxone (CTX, an extensively protein-bound 3rd generation cephalosporin, is altered during early sepsis and whether an increase in urinary loss of bound-CTX, due to GFB alteration, can occur in this condition. Methods A prospective, experimental, randomized study was carried out in adult male Sprague–Dawley rats. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP. Rats were divided into two groups: Sham-operated and CLP. CTX (100 mg i.p., equivalent to 1 g dose in humans was administered in order to measure plasma and lung CTX concentrations at several time-points: baseline and 1, 2, 4 and 6 h after administration. CTX was measured by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC. The morphological status of the sialic components of the GFB barrier was assessed by lectin histo-chemistry. Monte Carlo simulation was performed to calculate the probability of target attainment (PTA >90% for 80 and 100% of Tfree > minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC for 80 and 100% of dosing interval. Measurements and main results After CLP, sepsis developed in rats as documented by the growth of polymicrobial flora in the peritoneal fluid (≤1 × 101 CFU in sham rats vs 5 × 104–1 × 105 CFU in CLP rats. CTX plasma concentrations were higher in CLP than in sham rats at 2 and 4 h after administration (difference at 2 h was 47.3, p = 0.012; difference at 4 h was 24.94, p = 0.004, while lung penetration tended to be lower. An increased urinary elimination of protein-bound CTX occurred (553 ± 689 vs 149 ± 128 mg/L, p  90% for 100% of the dosing interval was reached neither for sham nor CLP rats using MIC = 1 mg/L, the clinical breakpoint for Enterobacteriacee. Conclusions Sepsis causes changes in

  14. Ultra-long pharmacokinetic properties of insulin degludec are comparable in elderly subjects and younger adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsatko, S; Deller, S; Mader, J K; Glettler, K; Koehler, G; Treiber, G; Urschitz, M; Wolf, M; Hastrup, H; Søndergaard, F; Haahr, H; Pieber, T R

    2014-01-01

    Management of diabetes in elderly subjects is complex and careful management of glucose levels is of particular importance in this population because of an increased risk of diabetes-related complications and hypoglycaemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of insulin degludec (IDeg), a basal insulin with an ultra-long duration of action, in elderly subjects with type 1 diabetes compared with younger adults. This trial was a randomised, double-blind, two-period, crossover trial conducted in a single centre and included both inpatient and outpatient periods. Subjects were men and women aged 18-35 years inclusive (younger adult group) or ≥65 years (elderly group) with type 1 diabetes who received IDeg (0.4 U/kg) via subcutaneous injection in the thigh once-daily for six days. Following 6-day dosing, a 26-hour euglycaemic glucose clamp procedure was conducted to evaluate the steady-state pharmacodynamic effects of IDeg. Blood samples were taken for pharmacokinetic analysis up to 120 h post-dose. Pharmacokinetic endpoints included the total exposure of IDeg, ie the area under the IDeg serum concentration curve during one dosing interval at steady state (AUC(IDeg,τ,SS)) (τ = 0-24 h, equal to one dosing interval) and the maximum IDeg serum concentration at steady state (C(max,IDeg,SS)). Pharmacodynamic endpoints included the total glucose-lowering effect of IDeg, ie the area under the glucose infusion rate (GIR) curve at steady state (AUC(GIR,τ,SS)), and the maximum GIR at steady state (GIR(max,IDeg,SS)). Total exposure (AUC(IDeg,τ,SS)) and maximum concentration (C(max,IDeg,SS)) of IDeg were comparable between elderly subjects and younger adults. Estimated mean age group ratios (elderly/younger adult) for AUC(IDeg,τ,SS) and C(max,IDeg,SS) and corresponding two-sided 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were 1.04 (95 % CI 0.73-1.47) and 1.02 (95 % CI 0.74-1.39), respectively. Mean AUC(IDeg,0-12h

  15. Characterization of Pharmacologic and Pharmacokinetic Properties of CCX168, a Potent and Selective Orally Administered Complement 5a Receptor Inhibitor, Based on Preclinical Evaluation and Randomized Phase 1 Clinical Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirow Bekker

    Full Text Available The complement 5a receptor has been an attractive therapeutic target for many autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. However, development of a selective and potent C5aR antagonist has been challenging. Here we describe the characterization of CCX168 (avacopan, an orally administered selective and potent C5aR inhibitor. CCX168 blocked the C5a binding, C5a-mediated migration, calcium mobilization, and CD11b upregulation in U937 cells as well as in freshly isolated human neutrophils. CCX168 retains high potency when present in human blood. A transgenic human C5aR knock-in mouse model allowed comparison of the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of the molecule. CCX168 effectively blocked migration in in vitro and ex vivo chemotaxis assays, and it blocked the C5a-mediated neutrophil vascular endothelial margination. CCX168 was effective in migration and neutrophil margination assays in cynomolgus monkeys. This thorough in vitro and preclinical characterization enabled progression of CCX168 into the clinic and testing of its safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic profiles in a Phase 1 clinical trial in 48 healthy volunteers. CCX168 was shown to be well tolerated across a broad dose range (1 to 100 mg and it showed dose-dependent pharmacokinetics. An oral dose of 30 mg CCX168 given twice daily blocked the C5a-induced upregulation of CD11b in circulating neutrophils by 94% or greater throughout the entire day, demonstrating essentially complete target coverage. This dose regimen is being tested in clinical trials in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. Trial Registration ISRCTN registry with trial ID ISRCTN13564773.

  16. Overview of the anti-inflammatory effects, pharmacokinetic properties and clinical efficacies of arctigenin and arctiin from Arctium lappa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiong; Yang, Mengbi; Zuo, Zhong

    2018-05-01

    Arctigenin (AR) and its glycoside, arctiin, are two major active ingredients of Arctium lappa L (A lappa), a popular medicinal herb and health supplement frequently used in Asia. In the past several decades, bioactive components from A lappa have attracted the attention of researchers due to their promising therapeutic effects. In the current article, we aimed to provide an overview of the pharmacology of AR and arctiin, focusing on their anti-inflammatory effects, pharmacokinetics properties and clinical efficacies. Compared to acrtiin, AR was reported as the most potent bioactive component of A lappa in the majority of studies. AR exhibits potent anti-inflammatory activities by inhibiting inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) via modulation of several cytokines. Due to its potent anti-inflammatory effects, AR may serve as a potential therapeutic compound against both acute inflammation and various chronic diseases. However, pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated the extensive glucuronidation and hydrolysis of AR in liver, intestine and plasma, which might hinder its in vivo and clinical efficacy after oral administration. Based on the reviewed pharmacological and pharmacokinetic characteristics of AR, further pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies of AR via alternative administration routes are suggested to promote its ability to serve as a therapeutic agent as well as an ideal bioactive marker for A lappa.

  17. Interrogating two schedules of the AKT inhibitor MK-2206 in patients with advanced solid tumors incorporating novel pharmacodynamic and functional imaging biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Timothy A; Yan, Li; Patnaik, Amita; Tunariu, Nina; Biondo, Andrea; Fearen, Ivy; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos P; Olmos, David; Baird, Richard; Delgado, Liliana; Tetteh, Ernestina; Beckman, Robert A; Lupinacci, Lisa; Riisnaes, Ruth; Decordova, Shaun; Heaton, Simon P; Swales, Karen; deSouza, Nandita M; Leach, Martin O; Garrett, Michelle D; Sullivan, Daniel M; de Bono, Johann S; Tolcher, Anthony W

    2014-11-15

    Multiple cancers harbor genetic aberrations that impact AKT signaling. MK-2206 is a potent pan-AKT inhibitor with a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) previously established at 60 mg on alternate days (QOD). Due to a long half-life (60-80 hours), a weekly (QW) MK-2206 schedule was pursued to compare intermittent QW and continuous QOD dosing. Patients with advanced cancers were enrolled in a QW dose-escalation phase I study to investigate the safety and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic profiles of tumor and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The QOD MTD of MK-2206 was also assessed in patients with ovarian and castration-resistant prostate cancers and patients with advanced cancers undergoing multiparametric functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, including dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and intrinsic susceptibility-weighted MRI. A total of 71 patients were enrolled; 38 patients had 60 mg MK-2206 QOD, whereas 33 received MK-2206 at 90, 135, 150, 200, 250, and 300 mg QW. The QW MK-2206 MTD was established at 200 mg following dose-limiting rash at 250 and 300 mg. QW dosing appeared to be similarly tolerated to QOD, with toxicities including rash, gastrointestinal symptoms, fatigue, and hyperglycemia. Significant AKT pathway blockade was observed with both continuous QOD and intermittent QW dosing of MK-2206 in serially obtained tumor and PRP specimens. The functional imaging studies demonstrated that complex multiparametric MRI protocols may be effectively implemented in a phase I trial. Treatment with MK-2206 safely results in significant AKT pathway blockade in QOD and QW schedules. The intermittent dose of 200 mg QW is currently used in phase II MK-2206 monotherapy and combination studies (NCT00670488). ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Pharmacokinetics, Dose Proportionality, and Bioavailability of Bazedoxifene in Healthy Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeand, William

    2017-09-01

    Bazedoxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that has estrogen agonist effects on bone and lipid metabolism while having neutral or estrogen antagonist effects on the breast and endometrium. The present report describes findings from 3 Phase I clinical studies that evaluated the single-dose pharmacokinetics (study 1; n = 84), multiple-dose pharmacokinetics (study 2; n = 23), and absolute bioavailability (study 3; n = 18) of bazedoxifene. All 3 studies enrolled healthy postmenopausal women who were either naturally postmenopausal or had undergone bilateral oophorectomy at least 6 months before the start of the study. Study 1 showed that unconjugated and total (unconjugated and conjugated) bazedoxifene levels increased proportionally with ascending oral doses of bazedoxifene (through the dose range of 5-120 mg). Evaluation with or without food intake was conducted at the 10-mg dose, with no clinically relevant effect on pharmacokinetic parameters. Study 2 showed that bazedoxifene achieved steady state in 1 week and exhibited linear pharmacokinetics in doses of 5 to 40 mg with no unexpected accumulation over the dose range. In accordance with a linear pharmacokinetic profile, mean maximum plasma concentration values increased with increasing dose, with values of 1.6, 6.2, and 12.5 ng/mL for the 5-, 20-, and 40-mg doses, respectively. In study 3, tablet and capsule formulations of bazedoxifene formulations had an estimated oral bioavailability of ~6%. The clearance of bazedoxifene was 0.4 (0.1) L/h/kg based on intravenous administration. The oral formulations had comparable exposure profiles with respect to AUC and AUC0-t, and the 90% CIs for these values were within the bioequivalence limits of 80% to 125%. Bazedoxifene was safe and well tolerated in all 3 studies. These pharmacokinetic evaluations in healthy postmenopausal women found that bazedoxifene displayed linear pharmacokinetics with doses ranging from 5 to 40 mg, with no unexpected accumulation

  19. CLINICAL AND PHARMACOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO OPTIMIZE THE DOSING REGIMEN OF ANTIBACTERIAL DRUGS IN PEDIATRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natal’ya B. Lazareva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The rational use of antibacterial drugs in children implies an adequate choice of the necessary medication, its dosing regimen, and the duration of treatment in order to achieve maximum efficacy and minimize toxic effects. The knowledge of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of the antibacterial drug plays a crucial role for optimizing the dosing regimen. The strategy of individual choice of the dosing regimen, taking into account the principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, can be especially effective in patients with the expectedly changed parameters of pharmacokinetics and in infections caused by bacteria strains with low sensitivity to antibiotics. The review presents a contemporary view of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of antibacterial drugs most commonly used in pediatrics and their relationship to the clinical efficacy of the administered therapy.

  20. A study of the relationship between serum bile acids and propranolol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in patients with liver cirrhosis and in healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taegtmeyer, Anne B.; Haschke, Manuel; Tchambaz, Lydia; Buylaert, Mirabel; Tschöpl, Martin; Beuers, Ulrich; Drewe, Jürgen; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    The main objectives of the study were to determine the exposure and bioavailability of oral propranolol and to investigate their associations with serum bile acid concentration in patients with liver cirrhosis and in healthy controls. A further objective was to study the pharmacodynamics of

  1. A phase I/II trial of AT9283, a selective inhibitor of aurora kinase in children with relapsed or refractory acute leukemia: challenges to run early phase clinical trials for children with leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vormoor, B; Veal, G J; Griffin, M J; Boddy, A V; Irving, J; Minto, L; Case, M; Banerji, U; Swales, K E; Tall, J R; Moore, A S; Toguchi, M; Acton, G; Dyer, K; Schwab, C; Harrison, C J; Grainger, J D; Lancaster, D; Kearns, P; Hargrave, D; Vormoor, J

    2017-06-01

    Aurora kinases regulate mitosis and are commonly overexpressed in leukemia. This phase I/IIa study of AT9283, a multikinase inhibitor, was designed to identify maximal tolerated doses, safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic activity in children with relapsed/refractory acute leukemia. The trial suffered from poor recruitment and terminated early, therefore failing to identify its primary endpoints. AT9283 caused tolerable toxicity, but failed to show clinical responses. Future trials should be based on robust preclinical data that provide an indication of which patients may benefit from the experimental agent, and recruitment should be improved through international collaborations and early combination with established treatment strategies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Clinical pharmacokinetics of Icotinib, an anti-cancer drug: evaluation of dose proportionality, food effect, and tolerability in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongyang; Jiang, Ji; Zhang, Li; Tan, Fenlai; Wang, Yingxiang; Zhang, Don; Hu, Pei

    2014-04-01

    Icotinib, an oral epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has proved effectiveness in xenografted nude mice. Purpose of the present studies was to investigate tolerability and pharmacokinetics of Icotinib in healthy subjects for the first time, including dose proportionality, food effect, and tolerability. Two studies were conducted in total of 22 healthy subjects: a randomized, two-Latin-square crossover, dose proportional study (n = 12) and a randomized two-way crossover food-effect study (n = 10). Plasma concentration of Icotinib reached peak at a median Tmax of 0.75-3.5 h after single dose and then declined with a mean t1/2β of 6.02-7.83 h. Over the dose range of 100-600 mg, AUC values were proportional to dose and Cmax showed a slight saturation when dose increases. Only 0.2 % of the dose was excreted through kidney in unchanged Icotinib. After dosing 400 mg of Icotinib with high-fat and high-calorie meal, mean Cmax and AUC were significantly increased by 59 and 79 %, respectively. Three subjects experienced four adverse events (rash, increase in AST and ALT, and external injury). Rash and increased levels of AST and ALT were considered as drug-related. No serious adverse events were reported. The current work demonstrated that Icotinib was well tolerated in healthy male subjects (n = 22) over the dose range of 100-600 mg with or without food. Icotinib exposure, expressed in AUC, was proportionally increased with dose over the above dose range. Food intake significantly increased the absorption and exposure of Icotinib in healthy subjects.

  3. Examination of Org 26576, an AMPA receptor positive allosteric modulator, in patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder: an exploratory, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nations, Kari R; Dogterom, Peter; Bursi, Roberta; Schipper, Jacques; Greenwald, Scott; Zraket, David; Gertsik, Lev; Johnstone, Jack; Lee, Allen; Pande, Yogesh; Ruigt, Ge; Ereshefsky, Larry

    2012-12-01

    Org 26576 acts by modulating ionotropic AMPA-type glutamate receptors to enhance glutamatergic neurotransmission. The aim of this Phase 1b study (N=54) was to explore safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of Org 26576 in depressed patients. Part I (N=24) evaluated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and optimal titration schedule in a multiple rising dose paradigm (range 100 mg BID to 600 mg BID); Part II (N=30) utilized a parallel groups design (100 mg BID, 400 mg BID, placebo) to examine all endpoints over a 28-day dosing period. Based on the number of moderate intensity adverse events reported at the 600 mg BID dose level, the MTD established in Part I was 450 mg BID. Symptomatic improvement as measured by the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale was numerically greater in the Org 26576 groups than in the placebo group in both study parts. In Part II, the 400 mg BID dose was associated with improvements in executive functioning and speed of processing cognitive tests. Org 26576 was also associated with growth hormone increases and cortisol decreases at the end of treatment but did not influence prolactin or brain-derived neurotrophic factor. The quantitative electroencephalogram index Antidepressant Treatment Response at Week 1 was able to significantly predict symptomatic response at endpoint in the active treatment group, as was early improvement in social acuity. Overall, Org 26576 demonstrated good tolerability and pharmacokinetic properties in depressed patients, and pharmacodynamic endpoints suggested that it may show promise in future well-controlled, adequately powered proof of concept trials.

  4. Long-acting rilpivirine as potential pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV-1 prevention (the MWRI-01 study): an open-label, phase 1, compartmental, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic a