WorldWideScience

Sample records for perspective previous work

  1. SAFEGUARDS ENVELOPE: PREVIOUS WORK AND EXAMPLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, Richard; Bevill, Aaron; Charlton, William; Bean, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The future expansion of nuclear power will require not just electricity production but fuel cycle facilities such as fuel fabrication and reprocessing plants. As large reprocessing facilities are built in various states, they must be built and operated in a manner to minimize the risk of nuclear proliferation. Process monitoring has returned to the spotlight as an added measure that can increase confidence in the safeguards of special nuclear material (SNM). Process monitoring can be demonstrated to lengthen the allowable inventory period by reducing accountancy requirements, and to reduce the false positive indications. The next logical step is the creation of a Safeguards Envelope, a set of operational parameters and models to maximize anomaly detection and inventory period by process monitoring while minimizing operator impact and false positive rates. A brief example of a rudimentary Safeguards Envelope is presented, and shown to detect synthetic diversions overlaying a measured processing plant data set. This demonstration Safeguards Envelope is shown to increase the confidence that no SNM has been diverted with minimal operator impact, even though it is based on an information sparse environment. While the foundation on which a full Safeguards Envelope can be built has been presented in historical demonstrations of process monitoring, several requirements remain yet unfulfilled. Future work will require reprocessing plant transient models, inclusion of 'non-traditional' operating data, and exploration of new methods of identifying subtle events in transient processes

  2. Working Women: Indian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmendra MEHTA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In India, due to unprecedented rise in the cost of living, ris-ing prices of commodities, growing expenses on children ed-ucation, huge rate of unemployment, and increasing cost of housing properties compel every Indian family to explore all the possible ways and means to increase the household income. It is also witnessed that after globalization Indian women are able to get more jobs but the work they get is more casual in nature or is the one that men do not prefer to do or is left by them to move to higher or better jobs. Working women refers to those in paid employment. They work as lawyers, nurses, doctors, teachers and secretaries etc. There is no profession today where women are not employed. University of Oxford’s Professor Linda Scott recently coined the term the Double X Economy to describe the global economy of women. The present paper makes an attempt to discuss issues and challenges that are being faced by Indian working women at their respective workstations.

  3. Alternative Work Schedules: A Labor Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalusky, John L.

    1977-01-01

    The compressed work week, flexitime, and job sharing are discussed from the labor perspective. The author suggests that it is unlikely that unions will endorse flexible work arrangements that jeopardize the eight-hour-day concept. (LBH)

  4. Work-home Balance: a Management Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Farrell, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Work-home balance issues have become a very important challenge for both management and employees in the 21st century. The purpose of this paper is to examine work-home balance practices from a management perspective in the Irish hotel industry. There is a dearth of research in relation to work-home balance practices in the hotel sector. The study included a sample of all hotels including Northern Ireland. It found that the needs of the organisation are paramount with profitability considerat...

  5. Visual Working Memory Supports the Inhibition of Previously Processed Information: Evidence from Preview Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aidroos, Naseem; Emrich, Stephen M.; Ferber, Susanne; Pratt, Jay

    2012-01-01

    In four experiments we assessed whether visual working memory (VWM) maintains a record of previously processed visual information, allowing old information to be inhibited, and new information to be prioritized. Specifically, we evaluated whether VWM contributes to the inhibition (i.e., visual marking) of previewed distractors in a preview search.…

  6. Impact of previous pharmacy work experience on pharmacy school academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Ellena; Barnett, Mitchell J; T-L Tang, Terrill; Sasaki-Hill, Debra; Kuperberg, James R; Knapp, Katherine

    2010-04-12

    To determine whether students' previous pharmacy-related work experience was associated with their pharmacy school performance (academic and clinical). The following measures of student academic performance were examined: pharmacy grade point average (GPA), scores on cumulative high-stakes examinations, and advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) grades. The quantity and type of pharmacy-related work experience each student performed prior to matriculation was solicited through a student survey instrument. Survey responses were correlated with academic measures, and demographic-based stratified analyses were conducted. No significant difference in academic or clinical performance between those students with prior pharmacy experience and those without was identified. Subanalyses by work setting, position type, and substantial pharmacy work experience did not reveal any association with student performance. A relationship was found, however, between age and work experience, ie, older students tended to have more work experience than younger students. Prior pharmacy work experience did not affect students' overall academic or clinical performance in pharmacy school. The lack of significant findings may have been due to the inherent practice limitations of nonpharmacist positions, changes in pharmacy education, and the limitations of survey responses.

  7. Impact of Previous Pharmacy Work Experience on Pharmacy School Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Ellena; T-L Tang, Terrill; Sasaki-Hill, Debra; Kuperberg, James R.; Knapp, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether students' previous pharmacy-related work experience was associated with their pharmacy school performance (academic and clinical). Methods The following measures of student academic performance were examined: pharmacy grade point average (GPA), scores on cumulative high-stakes examinations, and advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) grades. The quantity and type of pharmacy-related work experience each student performed prior to matriculation was solicited through a student survey instrument. Survey responses were correlated with academic measures, and demographic-based stratified analyses were conducted. Results No significant difference in academic or clinical performance between those students with prior pharmacy experience and those without was identified. Subanalyses by work setting, position type, and substantial pharmacy work experience did not reveal any association with student performance. A relationship was found, however, between age and work experience, ie, older students tended to have more work experience than younger students. Conclusions Prior pharmacy work experience did not affect students' overall academic or clinical performance in pharmacy school. The lack of significant findings may have been due to the inherent practice limitations of nonpharmacist positions, changes in pharmacy education, and the limitations of survey responses. PMID:20498735

  8. Perspectives on Nordic Working Life Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Ch. Karlsson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Welcome to this Thematic Issue on Perspectives on Nordic Working Life Research! It is perhaps not that surprising that a journal called Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies contains many discussions about “Nordic Models”: What is the Nordic Welfare State Model? What has happened to it lately? Is there still one? Has there ever been one? What about the Nordic Industrial Relations Model—is it on its way to be abandoned? And the Nordic Labor Market Model? Or the Nordic Work Environment Model? In contrast, in the Thematic Issue part of this issue of NJWLS Nordic working life research itself is discussed. Editing the issue has led me to some (selfcritical reflections on Nordic working life research—or perhaps rather reflections on the self-image of Nordic working life researchers. We often say that two of the cornerstones of Nordic working life research are the assumption that there is a positive correlation between employee autonomy at work and higher productivity, and that our research tradition is different from those found in other geographical areas (and, implicitly, probably better. Being part of the Nordic tradition, I too have claimed both, but I now think both needs to be qualified and critically discussed. Or rather, the first needs to be qualified and the consequences of the other critically evaluated (...

  9. Service for victims of crime VDS info and victims’ support: Analysis of the previous work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćopić Sanja M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The first victim support service in our country VDS info and victims’ support started with its work in April 2003 within the Victimology Society of Serbia. This service is aimed at victims of crime (women and men, primarily at victims of violent crime, but also of some forms of property crime (such as burglary. The aim of the Service is to offer victims of crime information on their rights and the ways of how to realize them, emotional support, as well as to refer them to other institutions/organizations depending on the certain victim’s needs. Coordinators and volunteers, who passed the appropriate training, are responsible for that. Bearing that in mind, this paper will give the brief glens on the Service itself, its organization and the way of work, followed by the analysis of the results of previous work.

  10. Perspectives for the Development of a Working Life Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Helge; Hasle, Peter

    2003-01-01

    A discussion of the perspectives in a working life policy with development of both a humane working life and productivity.......A discussion of the perspectives in a working life policy with development of both a humane working life and productivity....

  11. Visual working memory supports the inhibition of previously processed information: evidence from preview search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aidroos, Naseem; Emrich, Stephen M; Ferber, Susanne; Pratt, Jay

    2012-06-01

    In four experiments we assessed whether visual working memory (VWM) maintains a record of previously processed visual information, allowing old information to be inhibited, and new information to be prioritized. Specifically, we evaluated whether VWM contributes to the inhibition (i.e., visual marking) of previewed distractors in a preview search. We evaluated this proposal by testing three predictions. First, Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that preview inhibition is more effective when the number of previewed distractors is below VWM capacity than above; an effect that can only be observed at small preview set sizes (Experiment 2A) and when observers are allowed to move their eyes freely (Experiment 2B). Second, Experiment 3 shows that, when quantified as the number of inhibited distractors, the magnitude of the preview effect is stable across different search difficulties. Third, Experiment 4 demonstrates that individual differences in preview inhibition are correlated with individual differences in VWM capacity. These findings provide converging evidence that VWM supports the inhibition of previewed distractors. More generally, these findings demonstrate how VWM contributes to the efficiency of human visual information processing--VWM prioritizes new information by inhibiting old information from being reselected for attention.

  12. Perspectives on projects, project success and team work

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper brings together perspectives on projects, project success and team work as a background to two graphical tools for considering project success and individual capabilities for working in a project team.

  13. Charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates: IV. Comparison to previous work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliadis, C.; Longland, R.; Champagne, A.E.; Coc, A.

    2010-01-01

    We compare our Monte Carlo reaction rates (see Paper II of this issue) to previous results that were obtained by using the classical method of computing thermonuclear reaction rates. For each reaction, the comparison is presented using two types of graphs: the first shows the change in reaction rate uncertainties, while the second displays our new results normalized to the previously recommended reaction rate. We find that the rates have changed significantly for almost all reactions considered here. The changes are caused by (i) our new Monte Carlo method of computing reaction rates (see Paper I of this issue), and (ii) newly available nuclear physics information (see Paper III of this issue).

  14. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in developmental stuttering: Relations with previous neurophysiological research and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busan, P; Battaglini, P P; Sommer, M

    2017-06-01

    Developmental stuttering (DS) is a disruption of the rhythm of speech, and affected people may be unable to execute fluent voluntary speech. There are still questions about the exact causes of DS. Evidence suggests there are differences in the structure and functioning of motor systems used for preparing, executing, and controlling motor acts, especially when they are speech related. Much research has been obtained using neuroimaging methods, ranging from functional magnetic resonance to diffusion tensor imaging and electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography. Studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in DS have been uncommon until recently. This is surprising considering the relationship between the functionality of the motor system and DS, and the wide use of TMS in motor-related disturbances such as Parkinson's Disease, Tourette's Syndrome, and dystonia. Consequently, TMS could shed further light on motor aspects of DS. The present work aims to investigate the use of TMS for understanding DS neural mechanisms by reviewing TMS papers in the DS field. Until now, TMS has contributed to the understanding of the excitatory/inhibitory ratio of DS motor functioning, also helping to better understand and critically review evidence about stuttering mechanisms obtained from different techniques, which allowed the investigation of cortico-basal-thalamo-cortical and white matter/connection dysfunctions. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Navigation and Comprehension of Digital Expository Texts: Hypertext Structure, Previous Domain Knowledge, and Working Memory Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burin, Debora I.; Barreyro, Juan P.; Saux, Gastón; Irrazábal, Natalia C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In contemporary information societies, reading digital text has become pervasive. One of the most distinctive features of digital texts is their internal connections via hyperlinks, resulting in non-linear hypertexts. Hypertext structure and previous knowledge affect navigation and comprehension of digital expository texts. From the…

  16. Nuclear thermal rocket clustering: 1, A summary of previous work and relevant issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buksa, J.J.; Houts, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    A general review of the technical merits of nuclear thermal rocket clustering is presented. A summary of previous analyses performed during the Rover program is presented and used to assess clustering in the context of projected Space Exploration Initiative missions. A number of technical issues are discussed including cluster reliability, engine-out operation, neutronic coupling, shutdown core power generation, shutdown reactivity requirements, reactor kinetics, and radiation shielding. 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Feature binding and attention in working memory: a resolution of previous contradictory findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Richard J; Hitch, Graham J; Mate, Judit; Baddeley, Alan D

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to resolve an apparent contradiction between previous experiments from different laboratories, using dual-task methodology to compare effects of a concurrent executive load on immediate recognition memory for colours or shapes of items or their colour-shape combinations. Results of two experiments confirmed previous evidence that an irrelevant attentional load interferes equally with memory for features and memory for feature bindings. Detailed analyses suggested that previous contradictory evidence arose from limitations in the way recognition memory was measured. The present findings are inconsistent with an earlier suggestion that feature binding takes place within a multimodal episodic buffer Baddeley, ( 2000 ) and support a subsequent account in which binding takes place automatically prior to information entering the episodic buffer Baddeley, Allen, & Hitch, ( 2011 ). Methodologically, the results suggest that different measures of recognition memory performance (A', d', corrected recognition) give a converging picture of main effects, but are less consistent in detecting interactions. We suggest that this limitation on the reliability of measuring recognition should be taken into account in future research so as to avoid problems of replication that turn out to be more apparent than real.

  18. Working Towards Diversity with a Postmigrant Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitting-Seerup, Sabrina

    2017-01-01

    This article presents ways for researchers and cultural workers to find and examine versions of representation in cultural institutions through a postmigrant perspective. The starting point is Denmark—a European nation state with, like many others, a diverse composition of citizens. This diversit...

  19. Working time, satisfaction and work life balance: A European perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Humpert, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses gender-specific differences in working time mismatches by using three different measures for representing satisfaction and work life balance. Results show that, while male satisfaction with life or work is in general not affected by working for more or less hours, over-time is found to significantly lower male work life balance. Women are more sensitive to the amount of working hours as they prefer part-time employment and they are dissatisfied with changes ...

  20. Examining the work-home interface: an ecological systems perspective

    OpenAIRE

    MacKinnon, Richard A,

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation outlines a mixed-methods investigation of work-life balance, examining the construct from an ecological systems theory perspective. This necessitated research at the individual, group, organisational and wider societal levels and included three studies: two using quantitative methodology and one using qualitative.\\ud The quantitative phase included two studies that examined the experience of the home-work interface from the perspective of the employee, examining the impact o...

  1. A sector perspective on working conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jettinghoff, K.; Houtman, I.

    2009-01-01

    Every five years the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (Eurofound) conducts the European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS). The survey provides an overview of the state of working conditions throughout Europe and indicates the nature and content of changes

  2. Cancer survivors' perspectives and experiences regarding behavioral determinants of return to work and continuation of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijts, Saskia F A; van Egmond, Martine P; Gits, Maxime; van der Beek, Allard J; Bleiker, Eveline M

    2017-10-01

    Supportive interventions to enhance return to work (RTW) in cancer survivors hardly showed positive effects so far. Behavioral determinants might have to be considered in the development of interventions to achieve sustained employability. This study aimed to explore cancer survivors' perspectives and experiences regarding behavioral determinants of RTW and continuation of work. In this qualitative study, semi-structured telephone interviews were held with 28 cancer survivors. All participants were at working age, 1-2 years after diagnosis and employed at time of diagnosis. Thematic content analysis was performed. Work turned out to be a meaningful aspect of cancer survivors' life, and most participants reported a positive attitude towards their job. Social support to RTW or to continue working was mainly received from family and friends, but pressure to RTW from the occupational physician was also experienced. Changes in expectations regarding work ability from negative to positive during the treatment process were observed. Those who applied active coping mechanisms felt equipped to deal with difficulties regarding work. Behavioral determinants should be taken into account in the development of future interventions to support cancer survivors' RTW. However, the causal relationship still has to be determined. Implications for rehabilitation Factors influencing occupational motivation among cancer survivors need to be understood in more detail. Previous studies in non-cancer populations have demonstrated that behavioral determinants, such as a positive attitude towards work, high social support and self-efficacy may increase return to work rates or shorten the time to return to work. Addressing behavioral determinants in future development of work-related interventions for cancer survivors is essential in achieving sustained employability.

  3. PERSPECTIVES ON GROUP WORK IN DISTANCE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Sarromaa HAUSSTÄTTER

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Current distance education benefits greatly from educational software that makes group work possible for students who are separated in time and space. However, some students prefer distance education because they can work on their own. This paper explores how students react to expectations on behalf of the course provider to do their assignments in collaborative groups. They are seemingly both positively surprised by the challenges that group work offer, and they are less positive to the downsides of group work. The paper discusses both sides of the experiences and suggests why this might be a paradox to live with.

  4. Three perspectives on physical therapist managerial work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, D Sue

    2002-03-01

    The nature of managerial work in the commercial sector has not been studied since the 1970s, and little is known about the work of managers in the health care sector. In this study, the perceived importance of managerial role and skill categories among 3 groups of physical therapists were studied to better understand the work priorities of physical therapist managers. Two groups of subjects were physical therapist managers in hospitals or private practices. A third group consisted of faculty members in professional physical therapist education programs. Respondents (n=343) rated the importance of 75 managerial activities. Responses related to 16 predetermined work categories were placed in rank order by group. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to identify differences among groups. All groups identified communication, financial control, entrepreneur, resource allocator, and leader as the 5 most important categories and rated technical expert and figurehead as least important. The MANOVA showed differences between faculty members and private practice managers in 15 work categories, between hospital-based managers and private practice managers in 9 categories, and between faculty members and hospital-based managers in 8 categories. Work setting appears to have an impact on level of importance placed on managerial work categories. The strongest candidates for "universal" physical therapist managerial work categories were communication, financial control, and resource allocator.

  5. What's Working in Working Memory Training? An Educational Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redick, Thomas S.; Shipstead, Zach; Wiemers, Elizabeth A.; Melby-Lervåg, Monica; Hulme, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Working memory training programs have generated great interest, with claims that the training interventions can have profound beneficial effects on children's academic and intellectual attainment. We describe the criteria by which to evaluate evidence for or against the benefit of working memory training. Despite the promising results of initial…

  6. Healthcare quality improvement work: a professional employee perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadolin, Christian; Andersson, Thomas

    2017-06-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze conditions that influence how employees engage in healthcare quality improvement (QI) work. Design/methodology/approach Qualitative case study based on interviews ( n=27) and observations ( n=10). Findings The main conditions that influence how employees engage in healthcare QI work are professions, work structures and working relationships. These conditions can both prevent and facilitate healthcare QI. Professions and work structures may cement existing institutional logics and thus prevent employees from engaging in healthcare QI work. However, attempts to align QI with professional logics, together with work structures that empower employees, can make these conditions increase employee engagement, which can be accomplished through positive working relationships that foster institutional work, which bridge different competing institutional logics, making it possible to overcome barriers that professions and work structures may constitute. Practical implications Understanding the conditions that influence how employees engage in healthcare QI work will make initiatives more likely to succeed. Originality/value Healthcare QI has mainly been studied from an implementer perspective, and employees have either been neglected or seen as passive resisters. Weak employee perspectives make healthcare QI research incomplete. In our research, healthcare QI work is studied closely at the actor level to understand healthcare QI from an employee perspective.

  7. Conceptualising Work Engagement: An Individual, Collective and Organisational Efficacy Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearon, Colm; McLaughlin, Heather; Morris, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of multi-level forms of efficacy and organisational interactions necessary for promoting effective work engagement. Design/methodology/approach: Work engagement is explored from a multi-level efficacy perspective (self, collective and organisational). Based on the ideas of Bandura,…

  8. What works in auditory working memory? A neural oscillations perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsch, Anna; Obleser, Jonas

    2016-06-01

    Working memory is a limited resource: brains can only maintain small amounts of sensory input (memory load) over a brief period of time (memory decay). The dynamics of slow neural oscillations as recorded using magneto- and electroencephalography (M/EEG) provide a window into the neural mechanics of these limitations. Especially oscillations in the alpha range (8-13Hz) are a sensitive marker for memory load. Moreover, according to current models, the resultant working memory load is determined by the relative noise in the neural representation of maintained information. The auditory domain allows memory researchers to apply and test the concept of noise quite literally: Employing degraded stimulus acoustics increases memory load and, at the same time, allows assessing the cognitive resources required to process speech in noise in an ecologically valid and clinically relevant way. The present review first summarizes recent findings on neural oscillations, especially alpha power, and how they reflect memory load and memory decay in auditory working memory. The focus is specifically on memory load resulting from acoustic degradation. These findings are then contrasted with contextual factors that benefit neural as well as behavioral markers of memory performance, by reducing representational noise. We end on discussing the functional role of alpha power in auditory working memory and suggest extensions of the current methodological toolkit. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Working class conservatism: a system justification perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, John T

    2017-12-01

    Working class conservatism is a perennial issue in social science, but researchers have struggled to provide an adequate characterization. In social psychology, the question has too often been framed in 'either/or' terms of whether the disadvantaged are more or less likely to support the status quo than the advantaged. This is a crude rendering of the issue obscuring the fact that even if most working class voters are not conservative, millions are-and conservatives could not win elections without their support. System justification theory highlights epistemic, existential, and relational needs to reduce uncertainty, threat, and social discord that are shared by everyone-and that promote conservative attitudes. I summarize qualitative and quantitative evidence of system justification among the disadvantaged and consider prospects for more constructive political activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Creating healthy work environments: a strategic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Bonnie J

    2010-01-01

    Although I find Graham Lowe and Ben Chan's logic model and work environment metrics thought provoking, a healthy work environment framework must be more comprehensive and consider the addition of recommended diagnostic tools, vehicles to deliver the necessary change and a sustainability strategy that allows for the tweaking and refinement of ideas. Basic structure is required to frame and initiate an effective process, while allowing creativity and enhancements to be made by organizations as they learn. I support the construction of a suggested Canadian health sector framework for measuring the health of an organization, but I feel that organizations need to have some freedom in that design and the ability to incorporate their own indicators within the established proven drivers. Reflecting on my organization's experience with large-scale transformation efforts, I find that emotional intelligence along with formal leadership development and front-line engagement in Lean process improvement activities are essential for creating healthy work environments that produce the balanced set of outcomes listed in my hospital's Balanced Scorecard.

  11. Violence prevention at work. A business perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, C W

    2001-02-01

    The risk of workplace violence varies depending on the type and location of the business. Business managers should assess violence risk and develop a program based on the level of risk faced by their employees. This assessment should include: (1) a review of workplace security and identification of positions with increased risk of exposure to violence, (2) risk reduction through environmental design and employee training, (3) development of a plan and identification of professional resources to respond to incidents should they occur, and (4) communication of the employer's commitment to providing a safe work environment for employees. For most businesses, threat assessment and management comprise the cornerstone of a workplace violence-prevention program. Planning and preparation are key to workplace violence prevention.

  12. A medical social work perspective on rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugl-Meyer, Kerstin Sjögren

    2016-10-12

    This paper introduces a biopsychosocial model for use as a tool by medical social workers and other rehabilitation professionals for the descriptive analysis of the case history and follow-up of patients needing rehabilitative support. The model is based on action theory and emphasizes the demands on evidence-based clarification of the interplay between a subject's contextual life situation, their ability to act in order to realize their goals, and their emotional adaptation. Using clinical experience and literature searches, a standard operations procedure to adequately document the case history in clinical practice is suggested, thus providing strategies through which the work of medical social workers can be based on evidence. Some specific areas of concern for the medical social worker within the rehabilitation of disabled people are highlighted.

  13. Work stress and cardiovascular disease: a life course perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Loerbroks, Adrian; Bosma, Hans; Angerer, Peter

    2016-05-25

    Individuals in employment experience stress at work, and numerous epidemiological studies have documented its negative health effects, particularly on cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although evidence on the various interrelationships between work stress and CVD has been accumulated, those observations have not yet been conceptualized in terms of a life course perspective. Using the chain of risk model, we would like to propose a theoretical model incorporating six steps: (1) work stress increases the risk of incident CVD in healthy workers. (2) Among those whose work ability is not fully and permanently damaged, work stress acts as a determinant of the process of return to work after CVD onset. (3) CVD patients experience higher work stress after return to work. (4) Work stress increases the risk of recurrent CVD in workers with prior CVD. (5) CVD patients who fully lose their work ability transit to disability retirement. (6) Disability retirees due to CVD have an elevated risk of CVD mortality. The life course perspective might facilitate an in-depth understanding of the diverse interrelationships between work stress and CVD, thereby leading to work stress management interventions at each period of the lifespan and three-level prevention of CVD.

  14. Indigenous Women College Students' Perspectives on College, Work, and Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Jennie L.; Adolpho, Quintina Bearchief; Jackson, Aaron P.; Alexitch, Louise R.

    2014-01-01

    Native American and First Nations (herein collectively referred to as Indigenous) women college students are faced with the challenge of balancing their cultural imperatives and the demands of the dominant Western culture in family, school, and work/employment roles. In order to explore these women's experiences and perspectives, this study…

  15. Technology Change And Working Conditions – A Cultural Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole Henning

    2004-01-01

    When technology change improves working conditions, the success is often attributed to skilful change agents. When it is not, the blame is on “resistance to change” and “resilient cultures”. How can these failures be understood differently? A cultural perspective on technology change might be a way...... to facilitate technology change processes that lead to improved working conditions. The research based project described here has developed a special homepage that explains how this might be achieved. The homepage is targeted at working life professionals. The homepage presents theoretical explanations...... of the concept of organizational culture, a model for analysis and several practical case stories. This paper explains how the project tries to reach a broad spectrum of professionals in order to facilitate their use of a cultural perspective. It also discusses the ethical consequences of the cultural...

  16. Work engagement in nursing practice: a relational ethics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyko, Kacey

    2014-12-01

    The concept of work engagement has existed in business and psychology literature for some time. There is a significant body of research that positively correlates work engagement with organizational outcomes. To date, the interest in the work engagement of nurses has primarily been related to these organizational outcomes. However, the value of work engagement in nursing practice is not only an issue of organizational interest, but of ethical interest. The dialogue on work engagement in nursing must expand to include the ethical importance of engagement. The relational nature of work engagement and the multiple levels of influence on nurses' work engagement make a relational ethics approach to work engagement in nursing appropriate and necessary. Within a relational ethics perspective, it is evident that work engagement enables nurses to have meaningful relationships in their work and subsequently deliver ethical care. In this article, I argue that work engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice. If engagement is essential for ethical nursing practice, the environmental and organizational factors that influence work engagement must be closely examined to pursue the creation of moral communities within healthcare environments. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. A Perspective on Consumers 3.0: They Are Not Better Decision-Makers Than Previous Generations

    OpenAIRE

    Petr eHoudek; Petr eHoudek; Petr eHoudek

    2016-01-01

    This perspective article builds upon the theory of local thinking in interpretation and prediction of consumer behavior in a contemporary world of information overload. It is shown that even informed and socially and environmentally responsible consumers (consumers 3.0) exhibit selective recall, limited attention and bounded search in the perception and interpretation of price and quality of purchases. Their decisions fall into local cognitive frames, which specifically focus attention only o...

  18. A Perspective on Consumers 3.0: They Are Not Better Decision-Makers than Previous Generations

    OpenAIRE

    Houdek, Petr

    2016-01-01

    This perspective article builds upon the theory of local thinking in interpretation and prediction of consumer behavior in a contemporary world of information overload. It is shown that even informed and socially and environmentally responsible consumers (consumers 3.0) exhibit selective recall, limited attention, and bounded search in the perception and interpretation of price and quality of purchases. Their decisions fall into local cognitive frames, which specifically focus attention only ...

  19. Perspectives on working memory: introduction to the special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Robert H; Cowan, Nelson

    2015-04-01

    More than 40 years ago, Baddeley and Hitch (1974) published an article with a wealth of experimentation and theorization on working memory, the small amount of information held in mind and often used within cognitive processes such as language comprehension and production, reasoning, and problem solving. We honor this seminal accomplishment in the present special issue, and take this opportunity to provide an introduction to our perspectives on the origin of the theory of working memory, how it has affected our work, what may be coming in the near future, and how the research articles in the present issue contribute to several related themes within the clearly thriving field of working memory.

  20. Flexicurity from the Individual's Work/Life Balance Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Trine Pernille

    forms of numerical flexibility, income support and active labour market and educational policy. Indeed, flexicurity studies often neglect other forms of flexibility and security, which appears crucial for individual employees, mainly women's, work/life balance, although Wilthagen and colleagues stress......., 2008:14). This paper calls for a more nuanced concept of flexicurity, which takes the individual's work/life balance perspective into consideration. It will argue that the constraints employees' face in their daily lives due to caring responsibilities have significant implications for their flexibility...... balance literature, this paper argues that inadequate workplace policies and in particular insufficient child- and elder care services often account for employees' work/life balance problems and in some instances force them to reduce their weekly working hours, seek new employment or prevent them from...

  1. Flexicurity from the Individual's Work-Life Balance Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Trine Pernille

    2010-01-01

    , such work—life balance constraints are rarely examined in most flexicurity studies and their effects on other forms of flexibility and security are therefore often overlooked. This article calls for a more nuanced concept of flexicurity, which takes the individual’s work—life balance perspective......Based on a comparative analysis of work and care situations of employees with caring responsibilities in Finland, Portugal and the UK, this article argues that workers with eldercare responsibilities seem more likely to face difficulties than working parents, although many working parents also...... struggle to combine work and childrearing. The constraints such employees face in their daily lives due to caring responsibilities have significant implications for their flexibility and employability in the labour market — mainly because of inadequate care services and inflexible employers. However...

  2. [Estimating non work-related sickness leave absences related to a previous occupational injury in Catalonia (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero-Ruiz, Emilia; Navarro, Albert; Moriña, David; Albertí-Casas, Constança; Jardí-Lliberia, Josefina; de Montserrat-Nonó, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the frequency of non-work sickness absence (ITcc) related to previous occupational injuries with (ATB) or without (ATSB) sick leave. Prospective longitudinal study. Workers with ATB or ATSB notified to the Occupational Accident Registry of Catalonia were selected in the last term of 2009. They were followed-up for six months after returning to work (ATB) or after the accident (ATSB), by sex and occupation. Official labor and health authority registries were used as information sources. An "injury-associated ITcc" was defined when the sick leave occurred in the following six months and within the same diagnosis group. The absolute and relative frequency were calculated according to time elapsed and its duration (cumulated days, measures of central trend and dispersion), by diagnosis group or affected body area, as compared to all of Catalonia. 2,9%of ATB (n=627) had an injury-associated ITcc, with differences by diagnosis, sex and occupation; this was also the case for 2,1% of ATSB (n=496).With the same diagnosis, duration of ITcc was longer among those who had an associated injury, and with respect to all of Catalonia. Some of the under-reporting of occupational pathology corresponds to episodes initially recognized as being work-related. Duration of sickness absence depends not only on diagnosis and clinical course, but also on criteria established by the entities managing the case. This could imply that more complicated injuries are referred to the national health system, resulting in personal, legal, healthcare and economic cost consequences for all involved stakeholders. Copyright belongs to the Societat Catalana de Salut Laboral.

  3. Revising laboratory work: sociological perspectives on the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobér, Anna

    2017-09-01

    This study uses sociological perspectives to analyse one of the core practices in science education: schoolchildren's and students' laboratory work. Applying an ethnographic approach to the laboratory work done by pupils at a Swedish compulsory school, data were generated through observations, field notes, interviews, and a questionnaire. The pupils, ages 14 and 15, were observed as they took a 5-week physics unit (specifically, mechanics). The analysis shows that the episodes of laboratory work could be filled with curiosity and exciting challenges; however, another picture emerged when sociological concepts and notions were applied to what is a very common way of working in the classroom. Laboratory work is characterised as a social activity that is expected to be organised as a group activity. This entails groups becoming, to some extent, `safe havens' for the pupils. On the other hand, this way of working in groups required pupils to subject to the groups and the peer effect, sometimes undermining their chances to learn and perform better. In addition, the practice of working in groups when doing laboratory work left some pupils and the teacher blaming themselves, even though the outcome of the learning situation was a result of a complex interplay of social processes. This article suggests a stronger emphasis on the contradictions and consequences of the science subjects, which are strongly influenced by their socio-historical legacy.

  4. Association between age, critical skills and work perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Krüger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to report on the associations between age, critical skills and work perspectives (job satisfaction, career/organizational commitment and job characteristics as perceived by resort employees. It highlights that age and critical skills play an important role towards work perspectives. A descriptive research design approach was followed. Three hundred and eighteen fully completed questionnaires were included in the statistical analysis, which included exploratory factor analysis, Spearman's rho and a structural equation model. Resort employees of different ages do not experience job characteristics differently. Older employees are often more experienced in the work environment, which contributes to an increase in job satisfaction, while younger employees who start building a career in the hospitality sector experience less job satisfaction. Older employees are more committed to their careers than younger employees. Critical skills have no influence on participants' perception of job characteristics. However, resort employees who have a variety of critical skills experience an increase in job satisfaction.

  5. Working Memory From the Psychological and Neurosciences Perspectives: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Wen Jia; Abd Hamid, Aini Ismafairus; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2018-01-01

    Since the concept of working memory was introduced over 50 years ago, different schools of thought have offered different definitions for working memory based on the various cognitive domains that it encompasses. The general consensus regarding working memory supports the idea that working memory is extensively involved in goal-directed behaviors in which information must be retained and manipulated to ensure successful task execution. Before the emergence of other competing models, the concept of working memory was described by the multicomponent working memory model proposed by Baddeley and Hitch. In the present article, the authors provide an overview of several working memory-relevant studies in order to harmonize the findings of working memory from the neurosciences and psychological standpoints, especially after citing evidence from past studies of healthy, aging, diseased, and/or lesioned brains. In particular, the theoretical framework behind working memory, in which the related domains that are considered to play a part in different frameworks (such as memory's capacity limit and temporary storage) are presented and discussed. From the neuroscience perspective, it has been established that working memory activates the fronto-parietal brain regions, including the prefrontal, cingulate, and parietal cortices. Recent studies have subsequently implicated the roles of subcortical regions (such as the midbrain and cerebellum) in working memory. Aging also appears to have modulatory effects on working memory; age interactions with emotion, caffeine and hormones appear to affect working memory performances at the neurobiological level. Moreover, working memory deficits are apparent in older individuals, who are susceptible to cognitive deterioration. Another younger population with working memory impairment consists of those with mental, developmental, and/or neurological disorders such as major depressive disorder and others. A less coherent and organized neural

  6. Working Memory From the Psychological and Neurosciences Perspectives: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Wen Jia; Abd Hamid, Aini Ismafairus; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2018-01-01

    Since the concept of working memory was introduced over 50 years ago, different schools of thought have offered different definitions for working memory based on the various cognitive domains that it encompasses. The general consensus regarding working memory supports the idea that working memory is extensively involved in goal-directed behaviors in which information must be retained and manipulated to ensure successful task execution. Before the emergence of other competing models, the concept of working memory was described by the multicomponent working memory model proposed by Baddeley and Hitch. In the present article, the authors provide an overview of several working memory-relevant studies in order to harmonize the findings of working memory from the neurosciences and psychological standpoints, especially after citing evidence from past studies of healthy, aging, diseased, and/or lesioned brains. In particular, the theoretical framework behind working memory, in which the related domains that are considered to play a part in different frameworks (such as memory’s capacity limit and temporary storage) are presented and discussed. From the neuroscience perspective, it has been established that working memory activates the fronto-parietal brain regions, including the prefrontal, cingulate, and parietal cortices. Recent studies have subsequently implicated the roles of subcortical regions (such as the midbrain and cerebellum) in working memory. Aging also appears to have modulatory effects on working memory; age interactions with emotion, caffeine and hormones appear to affect working memory performances at the neurobiological level. Moreover, working memory deficits are apparent in older individuals, who are susceptible to cognitive deterioration. Another younger population with working memory impairment consists of those with mental, developmental, and/or neurological disorders such as major depressive disorder and others. A less coherent and organized

  7. Working Memory From the Psychological and Neurosciences Perspectives: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Jia Chai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the concept of working memory was introduced over 50 years ago, different schools of thought have offered different definitions for working memory based on the various cognitive domains that it encompasses. The general consensus regarding working memory supports the idea that working memory is extensively involved in goal-directed behaviors in which information must be retained and manipulated to ensure successful task execution. Before the emergence of other competing models, the concept of working memory was described by the multicomponent working memory model proposed by Baddeley and Hitch. In the present article, the authors provide an overview of several working memory-relevant studies in order to harmonize the findings of working memory from the neurosciences and psychological standpoints, especially after citing evidence from past studies of healthy, aging, diseased, and/or lesioned brains. In particular, the theoretical framework behind working memory, in which the related domains that are considered to play a part in different frameworks (such as memory’s capacity limit and temporary storage are presented and discussed. From the neuroscience perspective, it has been established that working memory activates the fronto-parietal brain regions, including the prefrontal, cingulate, and parietal cortices. Recent studies have subsequently implicated the roles of subcortical regions (such as the midbrain and cerebellum in working memory. Aging also appears to have modulatory effects on working memory; age interactions with emotion, caffeine and hormones appear to affect working memory performances at the neurobiological level. Moreover, working memory deficits are apparent in older individuals, who are susceptible to cognitive deterioration. Another younger population with working memory impairment consists of those with mental, developmental, and/or neurological disorders such as major depressive disorder and others. A less coherent

  8. A Perspective on Consumers 3.0: They Are Not Better Decision-Makers than Previous Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdek, Petr

    2016-01-01

    This perspective article builds upon the theory of local thinking in interpretation and prediction of consumer behavior in a contemporary world of information overload. It is shown that even informed and socially and environmentally responsible consumers (consumers 3.0) exhibit selective recall, limited attention, and bounded search in the perception and interpretation of price and quality of purchases. Their decisions fall into local cognitive frames, which specifically focus attention only on a narrow structure and content of the choice. The cognitive frames can be established by recent or regular purchases, but also extreme or primary purchase experiences. The article includes a short conceptual review of car, food, clothing, insurance, drugs, paintings, and other product purchases showing that the local cognitive frames often lead to bad bargains across various sectors. The article presents several suggestions for future research.

  9. A Perspective on Consumers 3.0: They Are Not Better Decision-Makers than Previous Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdek, Petr

    2016-01-01

    This perspective article builds upon the theory of local thinking in interpretation and prediction of consumer behavior in a contemporary world of information overload. It is shown that even informed and socially and environmentally responsible consumers (consumers 3.0) exhibit selective recall, limited attention, and bounded search in the perception and interpretation of price and quality of purchases. Their decisions fall into local cognitive frames, which specifically focus attention only on a narrow structure and content of the choice. The cognitive frames can be established by recent or regular purchases, but also extreme or primary purchase experiences. The article includes a short conceptual review of car, food, clothing, insurance, drugs, paintings, and other product purchases showing that the local cognitive frames often lead to bad bargains across various sectors. The article presents several suggestions for future research. PMID:27375527

  10. A Perspective on Consumers 3.0: They Are Not Better Decision-Makers Than Previous Generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr eHoudek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This perspective article builds upon the theory of local thinking in interpretation and prediction of consumer behavior in a contemporary world of information overload. It is shown that even informed and socially and environmentally responsible consumers (consumers 3.0 exhibit selective recall, limited attention and bounded search in the perception and interpretation of price and quality of purchases. Their decisions fall into local cognitive frames, which specifically focus attention only on a narrow structure and content of the choice. The cognitive frames can be established by recent or regular purchases, but also extreme or primary purchase experiences. The article includes a short conceptual review of car, food, clothing, insurance, drugs, paintings and other product purchases showing that the local cognitive frames often lead to bad bargains across various sectors. The article presents several suggestions for future research.

  11. The effects of autobiographical memory and visual perspective on working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zenghu; She, Yugui

    2018-08-01

    The present research aims to explore whether recalling and writing about autobiographical memory from different perspectives (first-person perspective vs. third-person perspective) could affect cognitive function. The participants first performed a working memory task to evaluate their working memory capacity as a baseline and then were instructed to recall (Study 1) or write about (Study 2) personal events (failures vs. successes) from the first-person perspective or the third-person perspective. Finally, they performed the working memory task again. The results suggested that autobiographical memory and perspective influence working memory interactively. When recalling a success, the participants who recalled from the third-person perspective performed better than those who recalled from the first-person perspective on the working memory capacity task; when recalling a failure, the opposite was true.

  12. Well-being at work--overview and perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Paul; Vainio, Harri

    2010-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of and perspective on the concept of well-being at work. Well-being is a term that reflects not only on one's health but satisfaction with work and life. Well-being is a summative concept that characterizes the quality of working lives, including occupational safety and health (OSH) aspects, and it may be a major determinant of productivity at the individual, enterprise and societal levels. Based on a review of the literature and a recent conference, we suggest a model linking workforce well-being, productivity, and population well-being. To appraise the validity of the model, we consider five questions: (i) is there a robust and usable definition of workplace well-being? (ii) have the variables that influence well-being been aptly described and can they be measured and used in risk assessments? (iii) what is the nature of evidence that well-being is linked to productivity? (iv) what is the state of knowledge on the effectiveness of interventions to promote workplace well-being? and (v) should interventions aimed at improving well-being at work focus on more than work-related factors?

  13. Emotion work and emotional exhaustion in teachers: The job and individual perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Näring, G.W.B.; Vlerick, P.; Ven, B. van de

    2012-01-01

    Teaching requires much emotion work which takes its toll on teachers. Emotion work is usually studied from one of two perspectives, a job or an individual perspective. In this study, we assessed the relative importance of these two perspectives in predicting emotional exhaustion. More than 200

  14. Emotion work and emotional exhaustion in teachers: The job and individual perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Näring, Gérard; Vlerick, Peter; Van de Ven, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Teaching requires much emotion work which takes its toll on teachers. Emotion work is usually studied from one of two perspectives, a job or an individual perspective. In this study we assessed the relative importance of these two perspectives in predicting emotional exhaustion. More than 200

  15. Understanding the Work-Life Interaction from a Working Time Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Vivi Bach

    time not only defines the temporal structure of work, but also determines the individual’s social time. The theoretical framework is based on theories concerning influence, in particular Organizational Participation (e.g. Heller, Pusic, Strauss & Wilpert, 1998) and Self-Determination Theory (e.g. Deci...... & Ryan, 2002). Through theoretical analyses it is shown that a participatory influence approach reveals new perspectives in understanding the complexity of the work-life phenomenon and help counteracting the undesirable split-up between the existing conflict versus balance approaches. Participants from...

  16. Romanians’ attitudes towards mobility for work from a gendered perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andra-Bertha SĂNDULEASA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Employment strategies in the European Union laid stress on the importance and on the need to increase the participation of women on labour market. On the other hand, evidence shows that international migration has been feminised in Europe and that, in the past decades, geopolitical conflicts and economic restructuring in Eastern Europe and the Third World generated new patterns of female migration. This article explores Romanians’ attitudes towards mobility for work from a gendered perspective. Based on the Special Euro-barometer 337 – Geographical and labour market mobility – conducted in 2009 on behalf of the European Commission, the main findings of the article are that gender is an important aspect in analysing people’s economic behaviour. The research argues that in order to increase women’s participation on labour market, a deeper understanding of the situation of females on labour market is required.

  17. Group work is political work: a feminist perspective of interpersonal group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, A; Ewashen, C

    2000-01-01

    When practicing as group leaders, mental health nurses often incorporate Irvin Yalom's (1995, 1998) concepts of social microcosm and here-and-now. This article examines these concepts from a feminist perspective and offers an approach to group psychotherapy that processes gender issues and fosters collective consciousness-raising. A feminist perspective in group therapy challenges us to view the social microcosm as a reenactment of sociopolitical contexts and the here-and-now as a medium for developing personal and social responsibility. Therapy is not only about individual and interpersonal change in group members, but is an opportunity for healthy social change. Therapy becomes political work, raising the social consciousness of each participant as well as the group as a whole.

  18. Building a healthy work environment: a nursing resource team perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Leslie; Slinger, Trisha

    2013-01-01

    Leadership and staff from the London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC) Nursing Resource Team (NRT), including members of their Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) Council, attended the first Southern Ontario Nursing Resource Team Conference (SONRTC), held March 2012 in Toronto. The SONRTC highlighted healthy work environments (HWEs), noting vast differences among the province's various organizations. Conversely, CQI Council members anecdotally acknowledged similar inconsistencies in HWEs across the various inpatient departments at LHSC. In fact, the mobility of the NRT role allows these nurses to make an unbiased observation about the culture, behaviours and practices of specific units as well as cross-reference departments regarding HWEs. Studies have documented that HWEs have a direct impact on the quality of patient care. Furthermore, the literature supports a relationship between HWEs and nurse job satisfaction. Based on this heightened awareness, the NRT CQI Council aimed to investigate HWEs at LHSC. The American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN) Standards for Establishing and Sustaining Healthy Work Environments was adapted in developing a survey for measuring HWEs based on the perceptions of NRT staff. Each of the departments was evaluated in terms of the following indicators: skilled communication, true collaboration, effective decision-making, appropriate staffing, meaningful recognition and authentic leadership (AACN 2005). Ultimately, the Building a Healthy Work Environment: A Nursing Resource Team Perspective survey was employed with NRT nurses at LHSC, and data was collected for use by leadership and staff for creating HWE strategies aimed at improving the quality of patient care.

  19. Baricitinib for Previously Treated Moderate or Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shijie; Bermejo, Iñigo; Simpson, Emma; Wong, Ruth; Scott, David L; Young, Adam; Stevenson, Matt

    2018-03-03

    As part of its single technology appraisal process, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence invited the manufacturer (Eli Lilly) of baricitinib (BARI; Olumiant ® ; a Janus kinase inhibitor that is taken orally) to submit evidence of its clinical and cost effectiveness for the treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) after the failure of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group at the University of Sheffield was commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). The ERG produced a detailed review of the evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of the technology, based on the company's submission (CS) to NICE. The clinical-effectiveness evidence in the CS for BARI was based predominantly on three randomised controlled trials comparing the efficacy of BARI against adalimumab or placebo, as well as one long-term extension study. The clinical-effectiveness review identified no head-to-head evidence on the efficacy of BARI against all the comparators within the scope. Therefore, the company performed network meta-analyses (NMAs) in two different populations: one in patients who had experienced an inadequate response to conventional DMARDs (cDMARD-IR), and the other in patients who had experienced an inadequate response to tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi-IR). The company's NMAs concluded BARI had comparable efficacy as the majority of its comparators in both populations. The company submitted a de novo discrete event simulation model that analysed the incremental cost-effectiveness of BARI versus its comparators for the treatment of RA from the perspective of the National Health Service (NHS) in four different populations: (1) cDMARD-IR patients with moderate RA, defined as a 28-Joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) > 3.2 and no more than 5.1; (2) cDMARD-IR patients with severe RA (defined as a DAS28 > 5.1); (3) TNFi-IR patients

  20. Investigating the relationship between work values and work ethics: A South African perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petronella Jonck

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: As a result of the proliferation of unethical behaviour in the workplace, the study of work ethics has received new impetus. Research purpose: The research study sought to determine the relationship between work ethics and work values, with the objective of determining whether work ethics statistically significantly predict work values. Motivation for the study: As work ethics (i.e. behavioural intent are a determinant of work values (i.e. overt behaviour, researchers are investigating their potential in preventing unethical behaviour. Research design, approach and method: A descriptive quantitative research design was employed in the study. A survey was conducted using the Multidimensional Work Ethic Profile and the Values Scale, which in previous studies have produced acceptable Cronbach’s alpha coefficients. Data were collected from 301 respondents in one geographical area in South Africa. Main findings: Work values did not appear to be highly esteemed by respondents, as only 6 of the 22 dimensions had a positive score. However, all seven dimensions of work ethics had positive scores. A negative correlation was found between work ethics and work values. In addition, work ethics predicted 9% of the variance in work values, providing sufficient evidence to accept the postulated research hypothesis. Practical implications: The findings of the study could be used by human resource managers to promote ethical behaviour, by focusing not only on work ethics but also on the relationship between work ethics and work values. Contribution: The study provides evidence of a relationship between work ethics and work behaviours, such as work values, within the South African context, and it thus addresses a research gap in this area.

  1. Mary Richmond in the perspective of Social Work in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Barriga Muñoz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Our personal experience has shown that, although nobody questions that Mary Richmond received a Ph.D. Honoris Causa «for having set the scientific bases of a new profession», (ours such scientific bases still remain unknown, due to never having been taught as such and due to the lack of theoretical production aimed at refuting, developing or, at least, transmitting them without tergiversation.In this article, we try to present just some quick brush strokes of those scientific bases, mainly because we are conscious of the fact that, in our country, our profession is being rapidly devaluated from many standpoints, identifying it only with resource management and social control and, in the current situation in which social theory finds itself, appearing to have no possibility of modifying that trend.It would be easy to state that the solution would be simply to recover Mary Richmond’s works, but it is not as simple as that since conceptions, ideology, perspectives and finally, the ways of conceiving the present social reality are opposed to those underlying those works. So, we believe that we need an unencumbered view, independent of social sciences, to rediscover our origins, in which we really were a profession, a social discipline with its own know-how and its own way of working, and not just an office to receive those who request an appointment. On the contrary, we aim to influence other sciences, enrich them and demonstrate that social work is a profession necessary to humanity.

  2. Changes in work affect in response to lunchtime walking in previously physically inactive employees: A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thøgersen-Ntoumani, C; Loughren, E A; Kinnafick, F-E; Taylor, I M; Duda, J L; Fox, K R

    2015-12-01

    Physical activity may regulate affective experiences at work, but controlled studies are needed and there has been a reliance on retrospective accounts of experience. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of lunchtime walks on momentary work affect at the individual and group levels. Physically inactive employees (N = 56; M age = 47.68; 92.86% female) from a large university in the UK were randomized to immediate treatment or delayed treatment (DT). The DT participants completed both a control and intervention period. During the intervention period, participants partook in three weekly 30-min lunchtime group-led walks for 10 weeks. They completed twice daily affective reports at work (morning and afternoon) using mobile phones on two randomly chosen days per week. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze the data. Lunchtime walks improved enthusiasm, relaxation, and nervousness at work, although the pattern of results differed depending on whether between-group or within-person analyses were conducted. The intervention was effective in changing some affective states and may have broader implications for public health and workplace performance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Barriers and facilitators to work reintegration and burn survivors' perspectives on educating work colleagues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Tram; Lorrain, Mélyssa; Pognon-Hanna, Joe Nayima; Elfassy, Caroline; Calva, Valerie; de Oliveira, Ana; Nedelec, Bernadette

    2016-11-01

    Work reintegration constitutes a major milestone in the rehabilitation process of adults who have sustained a burn. Research studies with other conditions demonstrated that open, explicit communication about the worker's condition and potential limitations may facilitate this transition. However, the best approach to enable this discussion to occur has yet to be described. The aim of this exploratory qualitative study was to investigate burn survivors' and clinicians' perspectives of the barriers and facilitators to work reintegration that could be addressed through education of work colleagues, which information to communicate to the workplace and the most effective method to disseminate this knowledge. Five semi-structured focus groups were conducted with three groups of informants including: (1) 13 burn survivors who had already returned to work; (2) 7 who were planning on returning; and (3) 9 burn care professionals. Qualitative data were inductively analyzed employing constant comparative techniques. Key barriers and facilitators that were identified included residual impairments, individual characteristics, support from the social environment, work accommodations and resources from the healthcare and compensation systems. Burn survivors agreed that return to work efforts were not adequately supported and that education should be provided to work colleagues about the burn and rehabilitation process, but that information on residual impairments should be communicated judiciously as it may be used prejudiciously against those seeking new employment. In the latter case, it is preferable to inform the workplace of their strengths and abilities. Extensive literature demonstrating the benefits of educational programs for the peers and teachers of pediatric burn survivors when they return to school already exists. This study provides evidence that there is a need for a similar process for adult burn survivors returning to work. The educational material must be

  4. When Affect Supports Cognitive Control – A Working Memory Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolańczyk Alina

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper delineates a study of executive functions (EFs, construed as procedural working memory (WM, from a motivational perspective. Since WM theories and motivation theories are both concerned with purposive activity, the role of implicit evaluations (affects observed in goal pursuit can be anticipated to arise also in the context of cognitive control, e.g., during the performance of the Stroop task. The role of positive and negative affect in goal pursuit consists in controlling attention resources according to the goal and situational requirements. Positive affect serves to maintain goals and means in the scope of attention (EF1, whereas negative affect activates the inhibition of non-functional contents, e.g., distractors and irrelevant objects (resulting in attention disengagement; EF2. Adaptation to conflict proceeds via sequential triggering of negative and positive affect (EF3. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the focus on action or reflection changes the scope of contents subjected to implicit (affective control. Therefore, I suggest that the motivational system, to a large extent, plays the role of the Central Executive. The paper opens a discussion and proposes studies on affective mechanisms of cognitive control.

  5. The Expanded Public Works Programme: Perspectives of direct beneficiaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondli S. Hlatshwayo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Scholarship on the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP in South Africa tends to focus on quantitative evaluation to measure the progress made in the implementation of EPWP projects. The number of employment opportunities created by EPWP, demographic profiling, skills acquired by beneficiaries and training opportunities related to the Programme form the basis of typical statistical evaluations of it, but exclude comment by the workers who participate in its projects. Based on primary sources, including in-depth interviews, newspaper reports and internet sources, this article seeks to provide a qualitative review of the EPWP from the perspective of the beneficiaries of municipal EPWP projects. Various South African government sectors hire EPWP workers to provide local services such as cleaning and maintaining infrastructure, but the employment of these workers can still be regarded as precarious, in the sense that they have no job security, earn low wages and have no benefits such as medical aid or pension fund. The interviewees indicated that, although they appreciate the temporary employment opportunities provided by the EPWP, they also experience health and safety risks and lack the advantages of organised labour groupings. Their main disadvantage, however, is that they cannot access permanent employment, which offers better wages and concomitant benefits.

  6. How public relations works: theoretical roots and public relations perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ihlen, Ø.; van Ruler, B.

    2007-01-01

    Public relations is often studied from a managerial, instrumental perspective or a psychological, behavioral perspective. To understand the role of public relations in building trust or mistrust and to develop - or destroy - a license to operate, it needs also to be studied as a social phenomenon.

  7. Book Review: The Political Economy of Work Security and Flexibility. Italy in Comparative Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leschke, Janine

    2013-01-01

    Review of F.. Berton, M Richiardi, S. Sacchi: The Political Economy of Work Security and Flexibility: Italy in Comparative Perspective. Policy Press: Bristol, 2012. 190 pp.......Review of F.. Berton, M Richiardi, S. Sacchi: The Political Economy of Work Security and Flexibility: Italy in Comparative Perspective. Policy Press: Bristol, 2012. 190 pp....

  8. The Work Compatibility Improvement Framework: an integrated perspective of the human-at-work system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genaidy, Ash; Salem, Sam; Karwowski, Waldemar; Paez, Omar; Tuncel, Setenay

    2007-01-15

    The industrial revolution demonstrated the limitations of a pure mechanistic approach towards work design. Human work is now seen as a complex entity that involves different scientific branches and blurs the line between mental and physical activities. Job design has been a traditional concern of applied psychology, which has provided insight into the interaction between the individual and the work environment. The goal of this paper is to introduce the human-at-work system as a holistic approach to organizational design. It postulates that the well-being of workers and work outcomes are issues that need to be addressed jointly, moving beyond traditional concepts of job satisfaction and work stress. The work compatibility model (WCM) is introduced as an engineering approach that seeks to integrate previous constructs of job and organizational design. The WCM seeks a balance between energy expenditure and replenishment. The implementation of the WCM in industrial settings is described within the context of the Work Compatibility Improvement Framework. A sample review of six models (motivation-hygiene theory; job characteristics theory; person-environment fit; demand-control model; and balance theory) provides the foundation for the interaction between the individual and the work environment. A review of three workload assessment methods (position analysis questionnaire, job task analysis and NASA task load index) gives an example of the foundation for the taxonomy of work environment domains. Previous models have sought to identify a balance state for the human-at-work system. They differentiated between the objective and subjective effects of the environment and the worker. An imbalance between the person and the environment has been proven to increase health risks. The WCM works with a taxonomy of 12 work domains classified in terms of the direct (acting) or indirect (experienced) effect on the worker. In terms of measurement, two quantitative methods are proposed

  9. [Working conditions in outpatient clinics adjacent to private pharmacies in Mexico City: perspective of physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Portillo, Sandra P; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Cuadra-Hernández, Silvia Magali; Idrovo, Álvaro J; Nigenda, Gustavo; Dreser, Anahí

    To analyse the working conditions of physicians in outpatient clinics adjacent to pharmacies (CAFs) and their organizational elements from their own perspective. We carried out an exploratory qualitative study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 32 CAF physicians in Mexico City. A directed content analysis technique was used based on previously built and emerging codes which were related to the experience of the subjects in their work. Respondents perceive that work in CAFs does not meet professional expectations due to low pay, informality in the recruitment process and the absence of minimum labour guarantees. This prevents them from enjoying the benefits associated with formal employment, and sustains their desire to work in CAF only temporarily. They believe that economic incentives related to number of consultations, procedures and sales attained by the pharmacy allow them to increase their income without influencing their prescriptive behaviour. They express that the monitoring systems and pressure exerted on CAFs seek to affect their autonomy, pushing them to enhance the sales of medicines in the pharmacy. Physicians working in CAFs face a difficult employment situation. The managerial elements used to induce prescription and enhance pharmacy sales create a work environment that generates challenges for regulation and underlines the need to monitor the services provided at these clinics and the possible risk for users. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Making Materials Matter—A Contribution to a Sociomaterial Perspective on Work Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Simonsen Abildgaard

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to discuss the implications of adopting an STS (science and technology studies- based conceptualization of the psychosocial work environment. We problematize how work environment research presently divides elements of working conditions into separate physical and psychosocial dimensions. Based on actor network theory, a currently dominant perspective in the field of STS, we discuss the concept of sociomaterial work environment. An ANT perspective on work environment is relevant and timely, we argue, first and foremost because more entities are embraced in the analyses. We argue that the ANT perspective leads to a more nuanced understanding of the work environment where it is not a set of predefined categories that is the focus of interest, but rather the work environment as multiple locally performed aspects of agency, translation, and collectively constructed reality. This perspective on work environment, we argue, addresses pivotal issues raised in the work environment debate during the last ten years, for instance of how the work environment as a concept saliently belongs to a social democratic Scandinavian agenda in which the singular employee in a work environment context is predominantly seen as a victim. This trope, which was peaking in the 1970s, is increasingly becoming obsolete in a changing economy with still more flexible jobs. The contribution of this paper is to provide a presentation and a discussion of the potentials and pitfalls provided by a shift toward a sociomaterial work environment perspective, as well as an empirical exemplification of a sociomaterial approach to work environment assessment.

  11. Work-related boredom and depressed mood from a daily perspective: The moderating roles of work centrality and need satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooff, M.L.M. van; Hooft, E.A.J. van

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to advance insight into inter- and intrapersonal processes that may affect the associations between work-related boredom and employee well-being. We employed a daily perspective to examine (1) the relations between work-related boredom and depressed mood at the end of the workday

  12. A gender perspective on work-related accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sune Qvotrup; Kyed, Morten; Christensen, Ann Dorte

    2014-01-01

    relevant to safety researchers are introduced: The first position outlined is the theory of hegemonic masculinity which highlights the privileged position of men who represent dominant and legitimate form of masculinity. The next two positions outlined represent a classic distinction in gender theory......The key argument in the article is that a perspective on gender and masculinity could be beneficial to safety research. The aim is to outline a theoretical framework for combining gender research and safety research. In the first part of the article four strands of gender and masculinity theory...... is outlined. The second part of the article re-interprets two examples of existing outstanding safety research which have all been published in Safety Science. The two contributions are re-interpreted through a gender lens illustrating how gender and masculinity perspectives can be crucial for understandings...

  13. Work-Family Balance: Perspectives from Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Soma; Abhayawansa, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    The article examines different types of work-family pressures amongst people working within the Australian university sector. We were specifically interested in work-family experiences between domestic and migrant Australians. Among the major findings, domestic Australians experience greater levels of work-family imbalance across most of the…

  14. Consciousness and working memory: Current trends and research perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velichkovsky, Boris B

    2017-10-01

    Working memory has long been thought to be closely related to consciousness. However, recent empirical studies show that unconscious content may be maintained within working memory and that complex cognitive computations may be performed on-line. This promotes research on the exact relationships between consciousness and working memory. Current evidence for working memory being a conscious as well as an unconscious process is reviewed. Consciousness is shown to be considered a subset of working memory by major current theories of working memory. Evidence for unconscious elements in working memory is shown to come from visual masking and attentional blink paradigms, and from the studies of implicit working memory. It is concluded that more research is needed to explicate the relationship between consciousness and working memory. Future research directions regarding the relationship between consciousness and working memory are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Crossover of work engagement among Japanese couples : perspective taking by both partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A.B.; Shimazu, A.; Demerouti, E.; Shimada, K.; Kawakami, N.

    2011-01-01

    This study among 426 Japanese couples working in different occupational sectors tested the hypothesis that perspective taking moderates the crossover of work engagement. More specifically, we predicted that husbands' work engagement would cross over to their wives, particularly when wives scored

  16. Return to Work after an Acute Coronary Syndrome: Patients’ Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans G. Slebus

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Within 2 years, 36% of the patients had not returned to work at their pre-ACS levels. Disease factors, functional capacity, environmental factors, and personal factors were listed as affecting subjects’ work ability level.

  17. Health at Work and Low-pay:a European Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Cottini; Claudio Lucifora

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between health, working conditions and pay in Europe. In particular, we measure health at work using self-assessed indicators for overall, as well as physical and mental health, using the 2005 wave of the EWCS (European Working Conditions Survey) for 15 EU countries. We find that, controlling for personal characteristics, (adverse) working conditions are associated with poor health status – both physical and mental. Low pay plays a role, mainly for men...

  18. Designing Pervasive Computing Technology - In a Nomadic Work Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jannie Friis

    2002-01-01

    In my thesis work I am investigating how the design of pervasive/ubiquitous computing technology, relate to the flexible and individual work practice of nomadic workers. Through empirical studies and with an experimental systems development approach, the work is focused on: a) Supporting...

  19. Flow at work : A self-determination perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A.B.; van Woerkom, M.

    2017-01-01

    Flow at work refers to a short-term peak experience that is characterized by absorption, work enjoyment, and intrinsic work motivation, and is positively related to various indicators of job performance. In an organizational context, research has predominantly focused on situational predictors of

  20. Work-related limitations and return-to-work experiences in prolonged fatigue: workers' perspectives before and after vocational treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosen, Margot C. W.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2011-01-01

    To gain insight into fatigued workers' perspectives regarding work experience before and after receiving vocational rehabilitation (VR) treatments. A qualitative survey was conducted using semi-structured interviews with 21 fatigued workers who attended an outpatient multi-component VR treatment.

  1. Perspectives on the working hours of Australian junior doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Nicholas J; Bonning, Michael; Mitchell, Rob

    2014-01-01

    The working hours of junior doctors have been a focus of discussion in Australia since the mid-1990s. Several national organizations, including the Australian Medical Association (AMA), have been prominent in advancing this agenda and have collected data (most of which is self-reported) on the working hours of junior doctors over the last 15 years. Overall, the available data indicate that working hours have fallen in a step-wise fashion, and AMA data suggest that the proportion of doctors at high risk of fatigue may be declining. It is likely that these changes reflect significant growth in the number of medical graduates, more detailed specifications regarding working hours in industrial agreements, and a greater focus on achieving a healthy work-life balance. It is notable that reductions in junior doctors' working hours have occurred despite the absence of a national regulatory framework for working hours. Informed by a growing international literature on working hours and their relation to patient and practitioner safety, accreditation bodies such as the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care (ACSQHC) and the Australian Medical Council (AMC) are adjusting their standards to encourage improved work and training practices.

  2. Global issues put a new perspective on working life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirana, Josep

    2016-03-19

    Having worked in general practice, Josep Subirana decided to broaden his experience in animal welfare and get involved in international development. Since then, he has worked across the world helping charities, universities and organisations with animal welfare issues. British Veterinary Association.

  3. Reconceptualizing Social Work Behaviors from a Human Rights Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Julie A.

    2018-01-01

    Although the human rights philosophy has relevance for many segments of the social work curriculum, the latest version of accreditation standards only includes a few behaviors specific to human rights. This deficit can be remedied by incorporating innovations found in the social work literature, which provides a wealth of material for…

  4. Clinical Perspective Working with a child's envy in the transference ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Karl Abrahams and Melanie Klein later placed envy at the crucial developing stages of the relationship between primary caregiver and infant. Klein boldly identified envy as a primary constitutional emotion. However, the presence and difficulties of envy in clinical work remain largely underreported, more so in work with ...

  5. Understanding Organizational Agility: A Work-Design Perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holsapple, Clyde W; Li, Xun

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces a unified theoretical model of organizational agility and investigates the attributes of knowledge-intensive work-design systems, which contribute to achieving and sustaining organizational agility...

  6. Dental restorative materials from a work environmental perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Lönnroth, Emma-Christin

    1999-01-01

    The main occupational health hazard for dental personnel is muscle-skeletal problem, followed by symptoms caused by exposure to chemicals. Clinical dental work includes exposure to a number of products like soap, detergents, disinfectants, amalgam, mono- and oligomers, catalysts, inhibitors, solvents and adhesives. Some are chemically very active. The aims of this thesis have been to survey the occurrence of symptoms from skin, eyes and respiratory tract among dental personnel working in gene...

  7. Work and family decision-making framework: A motivational perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Chinchilla, Nuria; Moragas, Maruja; Kim, Sowon

    2012-01-01

    We introduce motivation theory as a way of understanding the decision-making process in the work and family context. We use core concepts from motivation theory - extrinsic, intrinsic and prosocial motivation - and link them to motivational learning to build our framework. We then propose a framework illustrating motivational factors that influence work-family decision-making and offer propositions focusing on the motivational consequences for individuals which will impact their future decisi...

  8. James Clerk Maxwell perspectives on his life and work

    CERN Document Server

    McCartney, Mark; Whitaker, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879) had a relatively brief, but remarkable life, lived in his beloved rural home of Glenlair, and variously in Edinburgh, Aberdeen, London and Cambridge. His scholarship also ranged wide - covering all the major aspects of Victorian natural philosophy. He was one of the most important mathematical physicists of all time, coming only after Newton and Einstein. In scientific terms his immortality is enshrined in electromagnetism and Maxwell's equations, but as this book shows, there was much more to Maxwell than electromagnetism, both in terms of his science and his wider life. Maxwell's life and contributions to science are so rich that they demand the expertise of a range of academics - physicists, mathematicians, and historians of science and literature - to do him justice. The various chapters will enable Maxwell to be seen from a range of perspectives. Chapters 1 to 4 deal with wider aspects of his life in time and place, at Aberdeen, King's College London and the Cavendish Labo...

  9. 'It depends': medical residents' perspectives on working with nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Dana B; Miner, Dianne Cooney; Rivlin, Leetal

    2009-07-01

    Using the theory of relational coordination, which holds that in high-pressure settings such as hospitals, high-quality communication and strong relationships are necessary for coordinated action, we sought to determine the quality of the nurse-physician relationship by examining the communication and interaction between nurses and residents from the residents' perspective. A sample of 20 medical and surgical residents, selected by a snowball sampling technique, were interviewed about the quality of their communication and relationships with nurses in the workplace. Residents' responses were influenced by their perceptions of nurses' cooperativeness and competence, and their impressions of nurses' professional preparation and demeanor varied widely. Although 19 of 20 residents reported instances of poor communication or problematic relationships with nurses, most believed that this posed no significant threat to patient care because the nurses' role, as they saw it, was one of simply following orders. Given the strong doubts some residents expressed about nurses' cooperativeness and competence, the nursing profession should consider strengthening nursing education and clearly delineating nurses' roles and competencies.

  10. Social Work Education through Open and Distance Learning: An Indian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Bishnu Mohan; Botcha, Rambabu

    2018-01-01

    The paper traces the historical perspectives of open and distance education in India. It also discusses the various modalities and standards followed by various universities in offering social work education through open and distance learning (ODL) mode. It also highlights the achievements and challenges of social work education through ODL mode…

  11. Contracting: The modern way to work. A professional's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, C.D.; Pavan, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between employers and employees in the oil and gas industry has undergone some fundamental changes, including increasing use of contract professionals, work sharing, more work done at home, individuals partnering or in association with groups of professionals, and transfer of properties to subsidiaries or contract management organizations. The use of contract professionals and technical personnel within an existing corporate structure is examined. Reasons for individuals to choose contracting include career choice, early- or semi-retired status, between jobs, and family/personal reasons. Contracting provides a more open relationship between the professional and the contractor, allows professionals to pursue a career of choice, and gives time flexibility. By contracting through a linking company, a professional can earn about the same annual income as through regular employment if 220 days of work a year can obtained. 1 tab

  12. Survey of survivors' perspective on return to work after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartke, Robert J; Trierweiler, Robert

    2015-10-01

    To describe the development and results of a detailed survey on return to work (RTW) after stroke completed by survivors at various stages of recovery. This study used a multi-method qualitative and quantitative research strategy to design and implement a 39-item survey for stroke survivors. Individual interviews, focus groups, and working committees were used to conceptualize the issues and translate them into a survey format. Surveys were distributed in regular and electronic mail. Groups of rehabilitation professionals, employers, and stroke survivors were assembled to review findings and obtain feedback to aide in interpretation. Overall 715 surveys were completed. The respondents were on average 54 years of age, mostly white, well-educated, urban dwelling, and in skilled occupations. Results are described in seven areas: financial, stroke impairments, organizational, work and psychological issues, interpersonal support, and therapy. Several salient findings are described including the role of fatigue, under utilization of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, and motivational factors related to finances, self-esteem, work, and workplace relationships. Although earning an income is a strong motivation to RTW, salary decreases in importance when compared with other psychological benefits. Fatigue was rated as the second highest impairment barrier to RTW and persisted as a relevant impediment over time. Attitudes of co-workers and flexibility in work schedule were viewed as most helpful to the RTW process, whereas work stress was viewed as the greatest impediment to return. Only 24% of the sample received VR counseling with more respondents receiving counseling if they returned 6 months or longer after their stroke. Other trends and clinical and research implications are discussed.

  13. Why Lesson Study Works in Japan: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebaeguin, Marlon; Stephens, Max

    2014-01-01

    Japanese lesson study has attracted many international educators who have been impressed by its capacity to foster student learning and sustained professional growth of teachers. This paper reports a study on its cultural orientations that may explain why lesson study works seamlessly in Japan. Hofstede's dimensions of national culture are…

  14. Working with the Oglala Lakota: An Outsider's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broken Nose, Mary Ann

    1992-01-01

    Explores how difficult it is for a non-Indian to obtain an accurate view of American Indians. Helping professionals are not immune; they also have absorbed the views of the dominant culture. The author's work with the Oglala Lakota people of South Dakota illustrates the difficulties that therapists face. (SLD)

  15. Wearables at work : preferences from an employee’s perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentferink, Aniek Joset; Oldenhuis, Hilbrand; de Groot, Martijn; Polstra, Louis; Velthuijsen, Hugo; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.

    This exploratory study aims to obtain a first impression of the wishes and needs of employees on the use of wearables at work for health promotion. 76 employ-ees with a mean age of 40 years old (SD ±11.7) filled in a survey after trying out a wearable. Most employees see the potential of using

  16. Wearables at work : preferences from an employee’s perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentferink, Aniek; Oldenhuis, Hilbrand; de Groot, Martijn; Polstra, Louis; Velthuijsen, Hugo; van Gemert-Pijnen, Lisette

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study aims to obtain a first impression of the wishes and needs of employees on the use of wearables at work for health promotion. 76 employ-ees with a mean age of 40 years old (SD ±11.7) filled in a survey after trying out a wearable. Most employees see the potential of using

  17. Musicians working in community contexts : perspectives of learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilde, Rineke

    2012-01-01

    This paper will explore types of learning, which takes place when musicians work in situations where they have to connect to community contexts. It will first address musicians’ changing professional roles in the changing sociocultural landscape and the need for lifelong learning and emergence of

  18. New Perspectives on Regulation of the Working Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The Scandinavian countries adopted new legislation on the working environment in the 1970s which moved away from detailed technical rules and towards a reflexive legisla-tion. In the following period the working environment got received higher political pri-ority in the society. Evaluating...... the development during the last 25-30 years, a number of successful improvements can be identified. However, the general development has not been as positive as expected. It seems that new problems are emerging while the traditionally physical and chemical problems are becoming under better control....... It is therefore necessary to develop new strategies for prevention and regulation. But that is also a difficult exercise due to the fairly different political interests of all the involved parties....

  19. Theory or practice? : Perspectives on police education and police work

    OpenAIRE

    Aas, Geir

    2016-01-01

    This article explores interview data taken from a study of Norwegian police training, and discusses whether police education is perceived as providing a relevant and sufficient platform for performing police work. Since the police have monopoly status when it comes to the general use of physical force, the police practice appears boundless. How should police education be directed towards covering such a diverse and complex role? The article will demonstrate how differently police officers ass...

  20. Understanding organizational agility: a work-design perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Holsapple, Clyde W.; Li, Xun

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces a unified theoretical model of organizational agility and investigates the attributes of knowledge-intensive work-design systems, which contribute to achieving and sustaining organizational agility. Even though there has been considerable research on the topic of agility, these studies are not unified regarding their conceptualizations of agility and/or tend to adopt fairly limited views of agility dimensionality. Here, we organize a review of existing definitions and ...

  1. Perspectives for research of the procrastination phenomenon in professional work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina V. Barabanshchikova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the current state of the procrastination phenomenon in professional work, reviews the basic unexplored aspects in this area, and highlights the promising areas of scientific analysis. The survey of the existing literature periodization shows that the quantity of researches devoted to procrastination is growing exponentially every year. In spite of a pronounced research interest in this construct, in native and foreign psychological science procrastination phenomenon in the professional work is represented insufficiently. Firstly, there is no common and generally accepted definition of procrastination (Corkin, Yu, Lindt, 2011; Steel, 2010; Krause, Freund, 2014, that suggests that there is a deep terminological crisis in this area. Secondly, the characteristic of delaying the implementation of the elements of workload is represented only by the example of a fairly narrow range of professional activities, which makes it relevant to study the specificity of the differentiated functioning of the phenomenon on the material of a wide range of professions. Thirdly, in psychology there are no information about the peculiarities of the so-called “active” procrastination manifestations in professional activity, which is the tendency of conscious assignments delaying to achieve the optimum final result (Chu, Choi, 2005; Choi, Moran, 2009. Fourthly, there is an acute shortage of standardized psychodiagnostic tools to evaluate this phenomenon in work (most of the existing methods have been tested on samples of students and are aimed at identifying academic procrastination. In the fifth place, there are no science-based allocation of methods of coping with destructive manifestations of the psychological strategy of the job functions postponement in a professional work.

  2. The Expanded Public Works Programme: Perspectives of direct beneficiaries

    OpenAIRE

    Mondli S. Hlatshwayo

    2017-01-01

    Scholarship on the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) in South Africa tends to focus on quantitative evaluation to measure the progress made in the implementation of EPWP projects. The number of employment opportunities created by EPWP, demographic profiling, skills acquired by beneficiaries and training opportunities related to the Programme form the basis of typical statistical evaluations of it, but exclude comment by the workers who participate in its projects. Based on primary source...

  3. Characteristics of safety critical organizations . work psychological perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oedewald, P.; Reiman, T.

    2006-02-01

    This book deals with organizations that operate in high hazard industries, such as the nuclear power, aviation, oil and chemical industry organisations. The society puts a great strain on these organisations to rigorously manage the risks inherent in the technology they use and the products they produce. In this book, an organisational psychology view is taken to analyse what are the typical challenges of daily work in these environments. The analysis is based on a literature review about human and organisational factors in safety critical industries, and on the interviews of Finnish safety experts and safety managers from four different companies. In addition to this, personnel interviews conducted in the Finnish nuclear power plants are utilised. The authors come up with eight themes that seem to be common organizational challenges cross the industries. These include e.g. how does the personnel understand the risks and what is the right level for rules and procedures to guide the work activities. The primary aim of this book is to contribute to the Finnish nuclear safety research and safety management discussion. However, the book is equally suitable for risk management, organizational development and human resources management specialists in different industries. The purpose is to encourage readers to consider how the human and organizational factors are seen in the field they work in. (orig.)

  4. Job Insecurity and Innovative Work Behaviour: A Psychological Contract Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Niesen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovation is considered to be of crucial importance for organisational survival and growth, and in this respect employees play a leading role, as they are the ones who develop innovative ideas. At the same time, the struggle for organisational survival and growth gives rise to perceptions of job insecurity. To date, few studies have explored how employees’ innovative work behaviour (IWB is influenced by the perceived threat of job loss (i.e. job insecurity. As both job insecurity and IWB are increasingly salient in light of organisational change and competition, the present study examines the relationship between job insecurity and IWB, as well as the role of psychological contract breach in explaining this relationship. We hypothesized a negative relation between job insecurity and innovative work behaviour, with psychological contract breach as a mediator in this relationship. Participants were 190 employees from an industrial organisation that had faced restructuring and downsizing for several years. Contrary to our predictions, no direct association was found between job insecurity and the two sub-dimensions of innovative work behaviour (i.e., idea generation and idea implementation. Indirect relationships, however, were found between job insecurity and the two types of IWB through psychological contract breach. Surprisingly, psychological contract breach was positively related to idea generation and idea implementation. These findings shed new light on the relationship between job insecurity and IWB.

  5. Special characteristics of safety critical organizations. Work psychological perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oedewald, P.; Reiman, T.

    2007-03-15

    This book deals with organizations that operate in high hazard industries, such as the nuclear power, aviation, oil and chemical industry organizations. The society puts a great strain on these organizations to rigorously manage the risks inherent in the technology they use and the products they produce. In this book, an organizational psychology view is taken to analyse what are the typical challenges of daily work in these environments. The analysis is based on a literature review about human and organizational factors in safety critical industries, and on the interviews of Finnish safety experts and safety managers from four different companies. In addition to this, personnel interviews conducted in the Finnish nuclear power plants are utilised. The authors come up with eight themes that seem to be common organizational challenges cross the industries. These include e.g. how does the personnel understand the risks and what is the right level for rules and procedures to guide the work activities. The primary aim of this book is to contribute to the nuclear safety research and safety management discussion. However, the book is equally suitable for risk management, organizational development and human resources management specialists in different industries. The purpose is to encourage readers to consider how the human and organizational factors are seen in the field they work in. (orig.)

  6. Determinants of procurement strategy for construction works: quantity surveyors’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olanrewaju AbdulLateef

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The selection of the ‘appropriate’ procurement strategy is a prerequisite to the success or failure of a construction project. This paper investigates the factors determining the selection of appropriate procurement strategy for construction works in Nigeria. Data for the study was collected through an online survey questionnaire. The survey administration involves only quantity surveyors. Quantity surveyors were targeted because they advise clients and other stakeholders on procurement and contractual issues on construction works. A total of 33 usable responses were received and analysed for this study. On the basis of the results, it is concluded that the selection of procurement strategies for construction depend on complex interrelated factors. The study could not detect a particular factor or few factors responsible for a procurement strategy selection. The findings of this study is useful because it argues that the construction sector needs to broaden its considerations on the procurement strategy’s determinants rather than focusing solely on the client’s type and nature of projects as is often cited. Future research could segment these factors in terms of class of construction works or increase the sample size, which might lead to different findings.

  7. Special characteristics of safety organizations. Work psychological perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oedewald, P.; Reiman, T.

    2007-03-15

    This book deals with organizations that operate in high hazard industries, such as the nuclear power, aviation, oil and chemical industry organizations. The society puts a great strain on these organizations to rigorously manage the risks inherent in the technology they use and the products they produce. In this book, an organizational psychology view is taken to analyse what are the typical challenges of daily work in these environments. The analysis is based on a literature review about human and organizational factors in safety critical industries, and on the interviews of Finnish safety experts and safety managers from four different companies. In addition to this, personnel interviews conducted in the Finnish nuclear power plants are utilised. The authors come up with eight themes that seem to be common organizational challenges cross the industries. These include e.g. how does the personnel understand the risks and what is the right level for rules and procedures to guide the work activities. The primary aim of this book is to contribute to the nuclear safety research and safety management discussion. However, the book is equally suitable for risk management, organizational development and human resources management specialists in different industries. The purpose is to encourage readers to consider how the human and organizational factors are seen in the field they work in. (orig.)

  8. Special characteristics of safety organizations. Work psychological perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oedewald, P.; Reiman, T.

    2007-03-01

    This book deals with organizations that operate in high hazard industries, such as the nuclear power, aviation, oil and chemical industry organizations. The society puts a great strain on these organizations to rigorously manage the risks inherent in the technology they use and the products they produce. In this book, an organizational psychology view is taken to analyse what are the typical challenges of daily work in these environments. The analysis is based on a literature review about human and organizational factors in safety critical industries, and on the interviews of Finnish safety experts and safety managers from four different companies. In addition to this, personnel interviews conducted in the Finnish nuclear power plants are utilised. The authors come up with eight themes that seem to be common organizational challenges cross the industries. These include e.g. how does the personnel understand the risks and what is the right level for rules and procedures to guide the work activities. The primary aim of this book is to contribute to the nuclear safety research and safety management discussion. However, the book is equally suitable for risk management, organizational development and human resources management specialists in different industries. The purpose is to encourage readers to consider how the human and organizational factors are seen in the field they work in. (orig.)

  9. Amount of work : studies on premature death and subjective health in a work life balance perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Nylén, Charlotta

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to increase knowledge about the association between amount of work and health. Amount of work is measured as unemployment, excessive work, and interference between work and home. Two studies, based on the Swedish Twin Register, consider amount of work in work-related settings and focus on mortality in both sexes (n=20 632). Two studies take into account demands from both professional and domestic settings and consider their impact on subjective heal...

  10. Social Pedagogy and Social Work: An analysis of their Relationship from a Socio-pedagogical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Marynowicz-Hetka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A proposal for the relationship between social pedagogy and social work will be made in this manuscript. It is assumed that social work is a certain type of practice cultivated by representatives of the social professions. Social pedagogy can provide an analysis of the field of social work, helping to orient activities within the field and to determine the proper selection of ways of conduct, a kind of a meta-theory. Such an approach enables interaction and cooperation between representatives of multiple disciplines within the humanities and social sciences who are engaged in social work. It also has consequences for the acceptance of multi-faceted and multi-dimensional approaches to activities in the field of social work, which is recognized as an important field for social pedagogues, allowing them to carry out social actions from various perspectives, socio-pedagogical among them. The socio-pedagogical perspective on social work will be analyzed in this article.

  11. Stress, work and mental health: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deVries, Marten W; Wilkerson, Bill

    2003-02-01

    The United Nations, WHO and the World Bank have called the current prevalence rate of neuro-psychiatric disorder approaches of 1 in 4 individuals worldwide and 'unheralded public health crisis'. Rates are driven by an early onset, high impairment and high chronicity of these disorders. Most importantly, detection and treatment rates are low, estimated at les than 10% worldwide resulting in 500 million people underserved. The related economic costs soared in 1999 to 120 billion dollars in Europe and North America, with over 60 billion dollars assigned to stress related disorders. Contributing factors are bio-psycho-social and include rapid social change as well as the time compression of modern life resulting in the experience of increased work-life stress that parallels a decade long intensification of activities in the workplace. Coping with the requirements of the new economy of mental performance has lagged behind at many individual and social levels as we cling to adjustments made during the industrial economy of the last century. A climate of transition, and more recently, terror and fear have stressed the landscape of mental health and work already ravaged by the destructive forces of stigma. This presentation will examine the other side of prosperity from the point of view of stress in the workplace as two global problems converge at this time in history, the escalation of neuro-psychiatric disorders and the increasing dependence on the mental faculties of the world's citizens. In this paper we also discuss how the international community can work together to help reduce the burden of mental disorders worldwide and sketch the implications for research and policy. Ultimately the media will need to be enlisted to educate the public on the value of investments in mental health.

  12. Wearables at work: preferences from an employee’s perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Lentferink, Aniek Joset; Oldenhuis, Hilbrand; de Groot, Martijn; Polstra, Louis; Velthuijsen, Hugo; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study aims to obtain a first impression of the wishes and needs of employees on the use of wearables at work for health promotion. 76 employ-ees with a mean age of 40 years old (SD ±11.7) filled in a survey after trying out a wearable. Most employees see the potential of using wearable devices for workplace health promotion. However, according to employees, some negative aspects should be overcome before wearables can effectively contribute to health promotion. The most menti...

  13. Email solicitation for scholarly work--a single researcher's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugeja, Justine; Grech, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Publishing is important for career progression. The traditional journal model results in subscribers bearing publication costs. The eagerness with which researchers seek journals for the publishing of their work, along with the internet, has resulted in the creation of a new model called open access (OA). Author/s or their institution/s pay an actual publication fee. This has in turn resulted in the creation of questionable journals which charge steep publishing fees. Emails soliciting publication to one of the authors (VG) were collected for the month of March 2015. Information collected included costs of OA publishing, and whether or not this information was readily available. The appropriateness of said solicitations was also assessed with regard to topics with which the targeted author was familiar. There was a total of 44 solicitations: 3 were duplicates. Out of 41 solicitations, 20 (49%) were appropriate. The open access fee was readily available in 27 out of 41 solicitations (66%). The open access fee averaged $475, ranging from $25 to $1500. The only journal which provided true OA was Medical Principles and Practice, with no fees charged whatsoever. Potential authors should carefully investigate OA journals prior to choosing journals wherein to submit their work.

  14. Gender at Work Within the Software Industry: AN Indian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Shoba; Arun, T. G.

    Increasing globalization and the massive growth of the software Industry have created new opportunities for a skilled workforce in developing countries such as India. This study examines the impact of these changes on women's work in the state of Kerala, India, where there are high claims for social development, especially for women. The study indicates that although women tend to possess equal or better credentials than men, the nature of the labor market often renders it difficult for women to progress through their careers compared with men. The project-based,competltive nature of software development reproduces a masculine culture, which further interacts with the different career patterns of women and social norms and tends to disadvantage women. Most significantly, the centrality of social norms and gender ideologies within the workplace affects the Income and progression of women In the Internal labor market to a large extent.

  15. Working towards the SDGs: measuring resilience from a practitioner's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, S. M.; Both, M.

    2015-12-01

    The broad universal nature of the SDGs requires integrated approaches across development sectors and action at a variety of scales: from global to local. In humanitarian and development contexts, particularly at the local level, working towards these goals is increasingly approached through the concept of resilience. Resilience is broadly defined as the ability to minimise the impact of, cope with and recover from the consequences of shocks and stresses, both natural and manmade, without compromising long-term prospects. Key in this are the physical resources required and the ability to organise these prior to and during a crisis. However, despite the active debate on the theoretical foundations of resilience there is a comparative lack in the development of measurement approaches. The conceptual diversity of the few existing approaches further illustrates the complexity of operationalising the concept. Here we present a practical method to measure community resilience using a questionnaire composed of a generic set of household-level indicators. Rooted in the sustainable livelihoods approach it considers 6 domains: human, social, natural, economic, physical and political, and evaluates both resources and socio-cognitive factors. It is intended to be combined with more specific intervention-based questionnaires to systematically assess, monitor and evaluate the resilience of a community and the contribution of specific activities to resilience. Its use will be illustrated using a Haiti-based case study. The method presented supports knowledge-based decision making and impact monitoring. Furthermore, the evidence-based way of working contributes to accountability to a range of stakeholders and can be used for resource mobilisation. However, it should be noted that due to its inherent complexity and comprehensive nature there is no method or combination of methods and data types that can fully capture resilience in and across all of its facets, scales and domains.

  16. Work-related limitations and return-to-work experiences in prolonged fatigue: workers' perspectives before and after vocational treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosen, Margot C W; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Sluiter, Judith K

    2011-01-01

    To gain insight into fatigued workers' perspectives regarding work experience before and after receiving vocational rehabilitation (VR) treatments. A qualitative survey was conducted using semi-structured interviews with 21 fatigued workers who attended an outpatient multi-component VR treatment. Six months after treatment, work-related limitations and employed VR strategies at work before treatment were explored. Next, VR treatment experiences regarding return-to-work (RTW) were explored. Two researchers performed partially independent, qualitative analyses that revealed topics, discussed by the project team, and organised into domains, categories and sub-categories. Work-related limitations were: symptoms of prolonged fatigue, personal limitations (e.g. lack of self-reflection on individual capacity and limitations), interpersonal factors, activities and conditions at work and life/work imbalance. Before the treatment, VR strategies such as work adaptations, well-intentioned advice and support, and/or referral to psychological or physical care were employed. VR treatment experiences on RTW were: personal challenges (e.g. gained awareness and coping skills), improved activities during work, work adaptations and unresolved problems (e.g. remaining fatigue symptoms and sickness absence). New information about work experiences before and after multi-component VR treatments in workers with prolonged fatigue may help employers, occupational physicians and other caregivers to develop VR strategies that better meet individuals' needs.

  17. Developing Mathematical Literacy through project work: A teacher/teaching perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renuka Vithal

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of the new Mathematical Literacy curriculum in South Africa is assuming several different conceptions of mathematics and therefore also being realised through a range of different pedagogies. In this paper I begin from a particular privileging of a critical perspective in mathematics education, which I argue is one (among others of the forces shaping the new South African curriculum reforms, particularly the Mathematical Literacy curriculum. If so, then the case for a specific pedagogy, that of project work, can be shown to support the development of a mathematical literacy from a critical perspective. In this paper a particular set of conceptual tools, principles and practices associated with project work, as developed in the Scandanavian context but researched in South Africa, are elaborated from the perspective of teachers/teaching of mathematical literacy.

  18. Perspectives on making big data analytics work for oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Naqa, Issam

    2016-12-01

    Oncology, with its unique combination of clinical, physical, technological, and biological data provides an ideal case study for applying big data analytics to improve cancer treatment safety and outcomes. An oncology treatment course such as chemoradiotherapy can generate a large pool of information carrying the 5Vs hallmarks of big data. This data is comprised of a heterogeneous mixture of patient demographics, radiation/chemo dosimetry, multimodality imaging features, and biological markers generated over a treatment period that can span few days to several weeks. Efforts using commercial and in-house tools are underway to facilitate data aggregation, ontology creation, sharing, visualization and varying analytics in a secure environment. However, open questions related to proper data structure representation and effective analytics tools to support oncology decision-making need to be addressed. It is recognized that oncology data constitutes a mix of structured (tabulated) and unstructured (electronic documents) that need to be processed to facilitate searching and subsequent knowledge discovery from relational or NoSQL databases. In this context, methods based on advanced analytics and image feature extraction for oncology applications will be discussed. On the other hand, the classical p (variables)≫n (samples) inference problem of statistical learning is challenged in the Big data realm and this is particularly true for oncology applications where p-omics is witnessing exponential growth while the number of cancer incidences has generally plateaued over the past 5-years leading to a quasi-linear growth in samples per patient. Within the Big data paradigm, this kind of phenomenon may yield undesirable effects such as echo chamber anomalies, Yule-Simpson reversal paradox, or misleading ghost analytics. In this work, we will present these effects as they pertain to oncology and engage small thinking methodologies to counter these effects ranging from

  19. Re-sourcing teacher work and interaction : new perspectives on resource design, use and teacher collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pepin, B.; Gueudet, G.; Trouche, L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the theme of mathematics teachers’ work and interactions with resources, taking a particular perspective, the so-called ‘collective perspective’ on resources, their use and transformation. The review is presented under three headings: (1) theoretical frameworks

  20. Perspectives of unemployed workers with mental health problems: barriers to and solutions for return to work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Audhoe, Selwin S.; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Hoving, Jan L.; Sluiter, Judith K.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the barriers to and solutions for return to work (RTW) from the perspective of unemployed workers who were sick-listed due to mental health problems. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 25 sick-listed unemployed workers with mental health problems. Qualitative data analysis was

  1. "Serving Two Masters"--Academics' Perspectives on Working at an Offshore Campus in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobos, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the effects of the internationalisation of higher education on the working lives of academics at an offshore campus in eastern Malaysia. Using the interpretivist paradigm and grounded theory methods it investigates their perspectives on various themes as those emerge during a series of interviews. These emerging themes are:…

  2. Social Workers' Perspectives Regarding the DSM: Implications for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLendon, Tara

    2014-01-01

    There is a decades-old debate in social work regarding the appropriateness of the use of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM) by clinicians in this profession. Despite often contentious perspectives, there has been very little study regarding clinical social workers' experiences, attitudes, and beliefs about…

  3. Towards a Knowledge Communication Perspective on Designing Artefacts Supporting Knowledge Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niclas Eberhagen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The designing of computer-based artefacts to support knowledge work is far from a straightforward rational process. Characteristics of knowledge work have a bearing upon how developers (or designers, together with users, come to approach and capture the rich and tacit knowing of the practice. As all knowledge work is about the production of knowledge, transforming it, so is the design practice for developing artefacts to occupy space within that same practice. There is a need for providing a conceptual language to better reflect the nature of this design work that goes beyond those dressed in the managerial (or rational language of planned activities and deliverables. Towards this end, a conceptual frame is presented that makes several important aspects of the design practice visible. The frame brings together both nature of design work and characteristics of knowledge work to extend the frame of knowledge in user-developer communication of Kensing and Munk-Madsen. Thereby, providing a means to focus attention and dress debate on what situated designing is. By using explicit concepts, such as types knowledge domains embedded in the design situation, the transitional paths between them, and design engagements, it arms practitioners with specific linguistic constructs to direct attention and efforts in planning and organizing development undertakings.Purpose – the purpose of this work is to present and argue for a perspective on designing of computer-based artefacts supporting knowledge work. This is done to inform practitioners, directing their attention and dressing debate, and providing a conceptual language to better capture design activities in planning and organizing development undertakings.Design/Methodology/Approach – The approach presented in this article is conceptual in so far that a model or frame providing linguistic constructs is constructed and argued, building upon scholarly work of knowledge communication and drawing upon

  4. What’s working in working memory training? An educational perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redick, Thomas S.; Shipstead, Zach; Wiemers, Elizabeth A.; Melby-Lervåg, Monica; Hulme, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Working memory training programs have generated great interest, with claims that the training interventions can have profound beneficial effects on children’s academic and intellectual attainment. We describe the criteria by which to evaluate evidence for or against the benefit of working memory training. Despite the promising results of initial research studies, the current review of all of the available evidence of working memory training efficacy is less optimistic. Our conclusion is that working memory training produces limited benefits in terms of specific gains on short-term and working memory tasks that are very similar to the training programs, but no advantage for academic and achievement-based reading and arithmetic outcomes. PMID:26640352

  5. Future Time Perspective in the Work Context: A Systematic Review of Quantitative Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Hélène; Zacher, Hannes; Desmette, Donatienne

    2017-01-01

    A core construct in the lifespan theory of socioemotional selectivity, future time perspective (FTP) refers to individuals’ perceptions of their remaining time in life. Its adaptation to the work context, occupational future time perspective (OFTP), entails workers’ perceptions of remaining time and opportunities in their careers. Over the past decade, several quantitative studies have investigated antecedents and consequences of general FTP and OFTP in the work context (i.e., FTP at work). We systematically review and critically discuss this literature on general FTP (k = 17 studies) and OFTP (k = 16 studies) and highlight implications for future research and practice. Results of our systematic review show that, in addition to its strong negative relationship with age, FTP at work is also associated with other individual (e.g., personality traits) and contextual variables (e.g., job characteristics). Moreover, FTP at work has been shown to mediate and moderate relationships of individual and contextual antecedents with occupational well-being, as well as motivational and behavioral outcomes. As a whole, findings suggest that FTP at work is an important variable in the field of work and aging, and that future research should improve the ways in which FTP at work is measured and results on FTP at work are reported. PMID:28400741

  6. Future Time Perspective in the Work Context: A Systematic Review of Quantitative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Hélène; Zacher, Hannes; Desmette, Donatienne

    2017-01-01

    A core construct in the lifespan theory of socioemotional selectivity, future time perspective (FTP) refers to individuals' perceptions of their remaining time in life. Its adaptation to the work context, occupational future time perspective (OFTP), entails workers' perceptions of remaining time and opportunities in their careers. Over the past decade, several quantitative studies have investigated antecedents and consequences of general FTP and OFTP in the work context (i.e., FTP at work). We systematically review and critically discuss this literature on general FTP ( k = 17 studies) and OFTP ( k = 16 studies) and highlight implications for future research and practice. Results of our systematic review show that, in addition to its strong negative relationship with age, FTP at work is also associated with other individual (e.g., personality traits) and contextual variables (e.g., job characteristics). Moreover, FTP at work has been shown to mediate and moderate relationships of individual and contextual antecedents with occupational well-being, as well as motivational and behavioral outcomes. As a whole, findings suggest that FTP at work is an important variable in the field of work and aging, and that future research should improve the ways in which FTP at work is measured and results on FTP at work are reported.

  7. Faculty perspectives on the inclusion of work-related learning in engineering curricula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnell, Marie; Geschwind, Lars Allan; Kolmos, Anette

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify faculty perspectives on the integration of work-related issues in engineering education. A mixed methods approach was used to explore faculty attitudes towards work-related learning, to describe activities related to working life that have been introduced...... into the curriculum and to identify factors that faculty see as important if the amount of work-related learning is to increase. The results show that faculty members are positive about integrating work-related issues into the curriculum. Programmes with more extensive connections to industry offer more integrated...... activities, such as projects with external actors, and use professional contacts established through research in their teaching. In order to increase work-related learning in engineering curricula, faculty request clear goals and pedagogical tools. Other options to increase work-related learning include...

  8. A benchmarking project on the quality of previous guidelines about the management of malignant pleural effusion from the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) Pleural Diseases Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolaccini, Luca; Bedetti, Benedetta; Brunelli, Alessandro; Marinova, Katerina; Raveglia, Federico; Rocco, Gaetano; Shargall, Yaron; Solli, Piergiorgio; Varela, Gonzalo; Papagiannopoulos, Kostas; Kuzdzal, Jaroslaw; Massard, Gilbert; Ruffini, Enrico; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel; Martinez-Barenys, Carlos; Opitz, Isabelle; Batirel, Hasan F; Toker, Alper; Scarci, Marco

    2017-08-01

    In the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) survey about management of malignant pleural effusions (MPE), 56% of respondents are not informed of any relevant clinical guidelines and 52%, who are aware of the existence of guidelines, declared that they are in need of updating or revision. The ESTS Pleural Diseases Working Group developed a benchmarking project on quality of previous guidelines on the management of MPE. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument was used to assess each guideline. Each item was scored on a 7-point scale. Scores for each domain were calculated. Economic data for the nations which have issued the guidelines were collected from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development health statistics database. Six guidelines fitted the inclusion criteria and were assessed. Five out of 6 guidelines were produced by a multinational collaboration. Observers would recommend only 2 guidelines with minimal modification. Two areas that received the best score were clarity of presentation and scope and purpose (objectives and health questions target population). The applicability of guideline domain had the lowest score. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that clarity of presentation, international guidelines and publication through medical journal were related to improved scores. A strong correlation was observed between the measures of economic status. The quality of guidelines assessed by the AGREE II criteria was found to be extremely variable. Guidelines achieving higher AGREE II scores were more likely to come from the European Union with the direct involvement of scientific societies in their development. It was also recognized that some fundamental unanswered questions remain about the management of MPE. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Shift work to balance everyday life - a salutogenic nursing perspective in home help service in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Agosti, Madelaine T?rnquist; Andersson, Ingemar; Ejlertsson, G?ran; Janl?v, Ann-Christin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nurses in Sweden have a high absence due to illness and many retire before the age of sixty. Factors at work as well as in private life may contribute to health problems. To maintain a healthy work–force there is a need for actions on work-life balance in a salutogenic perspective. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of resources in everyday life to balance work and private life among nurses in home help service. Methods: Thirteen semi-structured individual interviews...

  10. A Resource Perspective on the Work-Home Interface: The Work-Home Resources Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brummelhuis, Lieke L.; Bakker, Arnold B.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to provide a theoretical framework explaining positive and negative work-home processes integrally. Using insights from conservation of resources theory, we explain how personal resources (e.g., time, energy, and mood) link demanding and resourceful aspects of one domain to outcomes in the other domain. The…

  11. Teaching about Faith-Based Organizations in the Social Work Curriculum: Perspectives of Social Work Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Samta P.

    2016-01-01

    Faith-based organizations (FBOs) have an important presence in contemporary civil society and have gained further prominence through their repertoire of social welfare and services. This study engaged social work educators (n = 316) across nine countries to examine their perceptions of including discourses on faith and FBOs in the social work…

  12. Overcoming cross-cultural group work tensions: mixed student perspectives on the role of social relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mittelmeier, Jenna; Rienties, Bart; Tempelaar, Dirk; Whitelock, Denise

    As universities worldwide rapidly internationalise, higher education classrooms have become unique spaces for collaboration between students from different countries. One common way to encourage collaboration between diverse peers is through group work. However, previous research has highlighted

  13. An Interpretative Study on Nurses' Perspectives of Working in an Overcrowded Emergency Department in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chin Chen, MSN

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to gain in-depth understanding of nurses' perspectives of working in an overcrowded emergency. Methods: Symbolic interactionism and Charmaz’s construction of grounded theory were used. Purposive sampling at the start of the study and a further theoretical sampling by snowball technique were used to recruit 40 registered nurses (RN to participate in in-depth, semi-structured interviews between May and November, 2014. Data analysis included analytic techniques of initial, focused and theoretical coding. Results: Study findings showed searching for work role is derived by the themes of Finding the role of positioning in Emergency Department (ED, Recognizing causes of ED overcrowding, and Confined working environment. Nurses' work experience which represents the RNs not gained control over their work, as care actions influenced by the problematic overcrowded circumstance of the ED environment. Conclusion: The findings fill a gap in knowledge about how RNs experience their work role in the context of an overcrowded Emergency Department in Taiwan. Arising from the study result include taking account of nurses' perspectives when planning staff/patient ratios, strategies to reduce waiting time and ensure that clients receive appropriate care. Keywords: crowding, emergency department, grounded theory, nurses

  14. Future time perspective and promotion focus as determinants of intraindividual change in work motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooij, Dorien T A M; Bal, P Matthijs; Kanfer, Ruth

    2014-06-01

    In the near future, workforces will increasingly consist of older workers. At the same time, research has demonstrated that work-related growth motives decrease with age. Although this finding is consistent with life span theories, such as the selection optimization and compensation (SOC) model, we know relatively little about the process variables that bring about this change in work motivation. Therefore, we use a 4-wave study design to examine the mediating role of future time perspective and promotion focus in the negative association between age and work-related growth motives. Consistent with the SOC model, we found that future time perspective was negatively associated with age, which, in turn, was associated with lower promotion focus, lower work-related growth motive strength, and lower motivation to continue working. These findings have important theoretical implications for the literature on aging and work motivation, and practical implications for how to motivate older workers. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. An Interpretative Study on Nurses' Perspectives of Working in an Overcrowded Emergency Department in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Chin; Lin, Chun-Chih; Han, Chin-Yen; Hsieh, Chun-Lan; Wu, Chiung-Jung Jo; Liang, Hwey-Fang

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to gain in-depth understanding of nurses' perspectives of working in an overcrowded emergency. Symbolic interactionism and Charmaz's construction of grounded theory were used. Purposive sampling at the start of the study and a further theoretical sampling by snowball technique were used to recruit 40 registered nurses (RN) to participate in in-depth, semi-structured interviews between May and November, 2014. Data analysis included analytic techniques of initial, focused and theoretical coding. Study findings showed searching for work role is derived by the themes of Finding the role of positioning in Emergency Department (ED), Recognizing causes of ED overcrowding, and Confined working environment. Nurses' work experience which represents the RNs not gained control over their work, as care actions influenced by the problematic overcrowded circumstance of the ED environment. The findings fill a gap in knowledge about how RNs experience their work role in the context of an overcrowded Emergency Department in Taiwan. Arising from the study result include taking account of nurses' perspectives when planning staff/patient ratios, strategies to reduce waiting time and ensure that clients receive appropriate care. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Fulfillment of work-life balance from the organizational perspective: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Goodman, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Researchers studying work-life balance have examined policy development and implementation to create a family-friendly work environment from an individualistic perspective rather than from a cohort of employees working under the same supervisor. To investigate what factors influence work-life balance within the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I clinical setting from the perspective of an athletic training staff. Qualitative study. Web-based management system. Eight athletic trainers (5 men, 3 women; age = 38 ± 7 years) in the NCAA Division I setting. Participants responded to a series of questions by journaling their thoughts and experiences. We included data-source triangulation, multiple-analyst triangulation, and peer review to establish data credibility. We analyzed the data via a grounded theory approach. Three themes emerged from the data. Family-oriented and supportive work environment was described as a workplace that fosters and encourages work-life balance through professionally and personally shared goals. Nonwork outlets included activities, such as exercise and personal hobbies, that provide time away from the role of the athletic trainer. Individualistic strategies reflected that although the athletic training staff must work together and support one another, each staff member must have his or her own personal strategies to manage personal and professional responsibilities. The foundation for a successful work environment in the NCAA Division I clinical setting potentially can center on the management style of the supervisor, especially one who promotes teamwork among his or her staff members. Although a family-friendly work environment is necessary for work-life balance, each member of the athletic training staff must have personal strategies in place to fully achieve a balance.

  17. Fulfillment of Work-Life Balance From the Organizational Perspective: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Goodman, Ashley

    2013-04-18

      Researchers studying work-life balance have examined policy development and implementation to create a family-friendly work environment from an individualistic perspective rather than from a cohort of employees working under the same supervisor.   To investigate what factors influence work-life balance within the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I clinical setting from the perspective of an athletic training staff.   Qualitative study.   Web-based management system.   Eight athletic trainers (5 men, 3 women; age = 38 ± 7 years) in the NCAA Division I setting.   Participants responded to a series of questions by journaling their thoughts and experiences. We included data-source triangulation, multiple analyst triangulation, and peer review to establish data credibility. We analyzed the data via a grounded theory approach.   Three themes emerged from the data. Family-oriented and supportive work environment was described as a workplace that fosters and encourages work-life balance through professionally and personally shared goals. Nonwork outlets included activities, such as exercise and personal hobbies, that provide time away from the role of the athletic trainer. Individualistic strategies reflected that although the athletic training staff must work together and support one another, each staff member must have his or her own personal strategies to manage personal and professional responsibilities.   The foundation for a successful work environment in the NCAA Division I clinical setting potentially can center on the management style of the supervisor, especially one who promotes teamwork among his or her staff members. Although a family-friendly work environment is necessary for work-life balance, each member of the athletic training staff must have personal strategies in place to fully achieve a balance.

  18. Overcoming Cross-Cultural Group Work Tensions: Mixed Student Perspectives on the Role of Social Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelmeier, Jenna; Rienties, Bart; Tempelaar, Dirk; Whitelock, Denise

    2018-01-01

    As universities worldwide rapidly internationalise, higher education classrooms have become unique spaces for collaboration between students from different countries. One common way to encourage collaboration between diverse peers is through group work. However, previous research has highlighted that cross-cultural group work can be challenging…

  19. Tearing down the Berlin wall: social workers' perspectives on joint working with general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharicha, Kalpa; Iliffe, Steve; Levin, Enid; Davey, Barbara; Fleming, Cass

    2005-08-01

    The arrangements for delivering social work and primary health care to older people in England and Wales are currently subject to rapid re-configuration, with the development of integrated primary care and social services trusts. To investigate perceptions of joint working in social services and general practice. The study setting was two London boroughs covered by one health authority, one NHS Community Health Services Trust, four Primary Care Groups and two social services departments. All social work team managers in both areas were interviewed together with a purposive sample of social workers with a high number of older clients on their caseloads. A sample of GPs was sought using a sampling frame of practice size in each borough. Structured interviews with open and closed questions were used. Tape-recorded interviews were transcribed and subject to thematic analysis. Analysis of emergent themes was aided by the use of Atlas-ti. Social workers and GPs agree on the need for joint working, but have different understandings of it, each profession wanting the other to change its organizational culture. Co-location of social and health care is seen as desirable, but threatening to social work. Concerns about differences in power and hierarchical authority are evident and explicit in social work perspectives. Conflict resolution strategies include risk minimization, adopting pragmatic, case-specific solutions rather than remaining consistent with policy, using nurses as mediators, and resorting to authority. Although this is a study from urban areas in England, its findings may have wider significance since we have found that resources and professional skills may be more important than organizational arrangements in collaborative working between disciplines. Primary Care Trusts in England and Wales should promote awareness of these different perspectives, perceived risks and conflict minimization strategies in their work on clinical governance and professional

  20. Ramucirumab for Treating Advanced Gastric Cancer or Gastro-Oesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Previously Treated with Chemotherapy: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükkaramikli, Nasuh C; Blommestein, Hedwig M; Riemsma, Rob; Armstrong, Nigel; Clay, Fiona J; Ross, Janine; Worthy, Gill; Severens, Johan; Kleijnen, Jos; Al, Maiwenn J

    2017-12-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the company that manufactures ramucirumab (Cyramza ® , Eli Lilly and Company) to submit evidence of the clinical and cost effectiveness of the drug administered alone (monotherapy) or with paclitaxel (combination therapy) for treating adults with advanced gastric cancer or gastro-oesophageal junction (GC/GOJ) adenocarcinoma that were previously treated with chemotherapy, as part of the Institute's single technology appraisal (STA) process. Kleijnen Systematic Reviews Ltd (KSR), in collaboration with Erasmus University Rotterdam, was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This paper describes the company's submission, the ERG review, and NICE's subsequent decisions. Clinical effectiveness evidence for ramucirumab monotherapy (RAM), compared with best supportive care (BSC), was based on data from the REGARD trial. Clinical effectiveness evidence for ramucirumab combination therapy (RAM + PAC), compared with paclitaxel monotherapy (PAC), was based on data from the RAINBOW trial. In addition, the company undertook a network meta-analysis (NMA) to compare RAM + PAC with BSC and docetaxel. Cost-effectiveness evidence of monotherapy and combination therapy relied on partitioned survival, cost-utility models. The base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of the company was £188,640 (vs BSC) per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained for monotherapy and £118,209 (vs BSC) per QALY gained for combination therapy. The ERG assessment indicated that the modelling structure represented the course of the disease; however, a few errors were identified and some of the input parameters were challenged. The ERG provided a new base case, with ICERs (vs BSC) of £188,100 (monotherapy) per QALY gained and £129,400 (combination therapy) per QALY gained and conducted additional exploratory analyses. The NICE Appraisal Committee (AC), considered the company's decision problem was in

  1. Do Women Have a Choice? Care Providers' and Decision Makers' Perspectives on Barriers to Access of Health Services for Birth after a Previous Cesarean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Sarah; Kornelsen, Jude; Corbett, Kitty; Wilcox, Elizabeth; Bansback, Nick; Janssen, Patricia

    2017-06-01

    Repeat cesarean delivery is the single largest contributor to the escalating cesarean rate worldwide. Approximately 80 percent of women with a past cesarean are candidates for vaginal birth after a cesarean (VBAC), but in Canada less than one-third plan VBAC. Emerging evidence suggests that these trends may be due in part to nonclinical factors, including care provider practice patterns and delays in access to surgical and anesthesia services. This study sought to explore maternity care providers' and decision makers' attitudes toward and experiences with providing and planning services for women with a previous cesarean. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with family physicians, midwives, obstetricians, nurses, anesthetists, and health service decision makers recruited from three rural and two urban Canadian communities. Constructivist grounded theory informed iterative data collection and analysis. Analysis of interviews (n = 35) revealed that the factors influencing decisions resulted from interactions between the clinical, organizational, and policy levels of the health care system. Physicians acted as information providers of clinical risks and benefits, with limited discussion of patient preferences. Decision makers serving large hospitals revealed concerns related to liability and patient safety. These stemmed from competing access to surgical resources. To facilitate women's increased access to planned VBAC, it is necessary to address the barriers perceived by care providers and decision makers. Strategies to mitigate concerns include initiating decision support immediately after the primary cesarean, addressing the social risks that influence women's preferences, and managing perceptions of patient and litigation risks through shared decision making. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Shift work to balance everyday life - a salutogenic nursing perspective in home help service in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosti, Madelaine Törnquist; Andersson, Ingemar; Ejlertsson, Göran; Janlöv, Ann-Christin

    2015-01-01

    Nurses in Sweden have a high absence due to illness and many retire before the age of sixty. Factors at work as well as in private life may contribute to health problems. To maintain a healthy work-force there is a need for actions on work-life balance in a salutogenic perspective. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of resources in everyday life to balance work and private life among nurses in home help service. Thirteen semi-structured individual interviews and two focus group interviews were conducted with home help service nurses in Sweden. A qualitative content analysis was used for the analyses. In the analyses, six themes of perceptions of recourses in everyday life emerged; (i) Reflecting on life. (ii) Being healthy and taking care of yourself. (iii) Having a meaningful job and a supportive work climate. (iv) Working shifts and part time. (v) Having a family and a supporting network. (vi) Making your home your castle. The result points out the complexity of work-life balance and support that the need for nurses to balance everyday life differs during different phases and transitions in life. In this salutogenic study, the result differs from studies with a pathogenic approach. Shift work and part time work were seen as two resources that contributed to flexibility and a prerequisite to work-life balance. To have time and energy for both private life and work was seen as essential. To reflect on and discuss life gave inner strength to set boundaries and to prioritize both in private life and in work life. Managers in nursing contexts have a great challenge to maintain and strengthen resources which enhance the work-life balance and health of nurses. Salutogenic research is needed to gain an understanding of resources that enhance work-life balance and health in nursing contexts.

  3. Mixed methods study examining work reintegration experiences from perspectives of Veterans with mental health disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Marina; Rattray, Nicholas A; Salyers, Michelle P

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings have demonstrated that reintegration for Veterans is often challenging. One difficult aspect of reintegration—transitioning into the civilian workplace—has not been fully explored in the literature. To address this gap and examine work reintegration, this mixed methods study examined the perspectives of Veterans with mental health disorders receiving Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare. Forty Veterans rated factors that affect work success; participants also provided narratives on their most and least successful work experiences. We used t-tests and qualitative analysis to compare participants who did and did not serve in combat. Several themes relevant to work reintegration emerged in the narratives, particularly for Veterans who served in combat. An array of work difficulties were reported in the months following military discharge. In addition, Veterans who served in combat reported significantly more work barriers than Veterans who did not serve in combat, particularly health-related barriers. In conclusion, Veterans with mental health disorders who served in combat experienced more work reintegration difficulty than their counterparts who did not serve in combat. The role of being a Veteran affected how combat Veterans formed their self-concept, which also shaped their work success and community reintegration, especially during the early transition period.

  4. Three Norwegian Varieties of a Nordic Model — A Historical Perspective on Working Life Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Heiret

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Through the use of a historical perspective, the aim of this article is to discuss and clarify the concurrent and conflicting interests and norms that have characterized the establishment and development of important institutions in Norwegian working life. The article concentrates on collective bargaining systems, the arrangements for codetermination, and the working environment regulations in both the public and private sector, which are regarded as the main institutions in the Norwegian and Nordic models of working life relations. The article is structured by an analytical distinction between three different historical periods that have constituted three distinct versions of the Norwegian model. By presenting a historical synthesis of Norwegian experiences, the article is a contribution to the ongoing debate on the varieties in the Nordic model, as to further comparisons and broader transnational studies.

  5. [Health promotion based on assets: how to work with this perspective in local interventions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofiño, Rafael; Aviñó, Dory; Benedé, Carmen Belén; Botello, Blanca; Cubillo, Jara; Morgan, Antony; Paredes-Carbonell, Joan Josep; Hernán, Mariano

    2016-11-01

    An asset-based approach could be useful to revitalise health promotion or community health interventions combining work with multiple partnerships, positive health, community engagement, equity and orientation of health determinants. We set some recommendations about how to incorporate the assets model in programmes, projects and interventions in health promotion. Some techniques are described for assets mapping and some experiences with this methodology being developed in different regions are systematised. We propose the term "Asset-based Health Promotion/Community Health" as an operational definition to work at the local level with a community engagement and participatory approach, building alliances between different institutions at the state-regional level and trying to create a framework for action with the generation of evaluations and evidence to work on population interventions from the perspective of positive health. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Cabazitaxel for Hormone-Relapsed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Previously Treated With a Docetaxel-Containing Regimen: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Benjamin; Pandor, Abdullah; Stevenson, Matt; Hamilton, Jean; Chambers, Duncan; Clowes, Mark; Graham, John; Kumar, M Satish

    2017-04-01

    As part of its single technology appraisal (STA) process, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the company that manufactures cabazitaxel (Jevtana ® , Sanofi, UK) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of cabazitaxel for treatment of patients with metastatic hormone-relapsed prostate cancer (mHRPC) previously treated with a docetaxel-containing regimen. The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group at the University of Sheffield was commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). The ERG produced a critical review of the evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of the technology based upon the company's submission to NICE. Clinical evidence for cabazitaxel was derived from a multinational randomised open-label phase III trial (TROPIC) of cabazitaxel plus prednisone or prednisolone compared with mitoxantrone plus prednisone or prednisolone, which was assumed to represent best supportive care. The NICE final scope identified a further three comparators: abiraterone in combination with prednisone or prednisolone; enzalutamide; and radium-223 dichloride for the subgroup of people with bone metastasis only (no visceral metastasis). The company did not consider radium-223 dichloride to be a relevant comparator. Neither abiraterone nor enzalutamide has been directly compared in a trial with cabazitaxel. Instead, clinical evidence was synthesised within a network meta-analysis (NMA). Results from TROPIC showed that cabazitaxel was associated with a statistically significant improvement in both overall survival and progression-free survival compared with mitoxantrone. Results from a random-effects NMA, as conducted by the company and updated by the ERG, indicated that there was no statistically significant difference between the three active treatments for both overall survival and progression-free survival. Utility data were not collected as part of the TROPIC trial, and

  7. Utilizing Social Work Skills to Enhance Entrepreneurship Training for Women: A Ghanaian Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbényiga, Debrenna L; Ahmedani, Brian K

    2008-12-01

    This article describes a women's entrepreneurship exchange program that was designed and facilitated with the cooperation of various governmental and nongovernmental entities in Ghana for Ghanaian women. The article briefly reviews the entrepreneurship development literature from an international perspective and discusses the Entrepreneurship Program as a targeted approach for empowering and sustaining women's economic situation in Ghana. Emphasis is placed on understanding the impact of cultural and social networks and the women's ability to succeed as entrepreneurs through the use of social work skills.

  8. Utilizing Social Work Skills to Enhance Entrepreneurship Training for Women: A Ghanaian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbényiga, DeBrenna L.; Ahmedani, Brian K.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a women’s entrepreneurship exchange program that was designed and facilitated with the cooperation of various governmental and nongovernmental entities in Ghana for Ghanaian women. The article briefly reviews the entrepreneurship development literature from an international perspective and discusses the Entrepreneurship Program as a targeted approach for empowering and sustaining women’s economic situation in Ghana. Emphasis is placed on understanding the impact of cultural and social networks and the women’s ability to succeed as entrepreneurs through the use of social work skills. PMID:20011682

  9. Quality in Modern Nordic Working Life—Investigating Three Related Research Perspectives and Their Possible Cross-Fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine Jacobsen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nordic working life balance is important in the context of a highly developed welfare state, budget collaboration between the State and municipalities, and a unified labor movement. In working life studies, various research perspectives create meaning around and propose solutions for the many quality issues of modern working life. Welfare research, working environment research, and human resource management (HRM research attack the multiple challenges of working life in different ways and share the overall objective of solving issues in modern working life. Research from the three perspectives, however, tends to compartmentalize life spheres. They conceptualize the modern working person as an individual, employee, or citizen, neglecting the complexity of lived life where all three spheres blur together, which possibly reflects the difficulty of making modern work life function well. This article is based on a structured literature review of the three main research perspectives (welfare, working environment, and HRM. We review existing international research, observing where the three perspectives show overlaps and identify 24 studies which cross-fertilize in the sense that two or more of the perspectives are applied at the same time in the same study. Our results show that while the perspectives share a common interest in solving the problems of the overlapping working life (OWL, they do so with different methods and criteria for success, and offer different solutions. We propose the concept “OWL” to analyze how working life studies create meaning around quality issues of modern working life. OWL’s main focus is the multiple challenges faced by working people who are simultaneously individuals, citizens, and employees. We arrive at two main cross-disciplinary themes: boundary and quality. The boundary theme reflects an approach to solving the issues of modern working life through improvements of the working life balance. The quality theme

  10. A life course perspective on working beyond retirement-results from a longitudinal study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, A. de; Pas S. van der; Beek, A.J. van der

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a societal need that workers prolong their working lives. By adopting a life course perspective, this study aimed to investigate the influence of work motives and motivation, health, job characteristics, skills, and financial and social situation on working beyond retirement, and

  11. Seeing their side versus feeling their pain: Differential consequences of perspective-taking and empathy at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, Natalie H; Harrison, David A

    2018-04-16

    Perspective taking and empathic concern (empathy) have each been proposed as constructive approaches to social relationships. However, their potential distinctions, limitations, and consequences in task contexts are not well understood. We meta-analytically examined 304 independent samples to uncover unique effects of perspective taking and empathic concern on important work-related outcomes. We develop and test a contingency model of those effects, based on three facets of psychological interdependence: outcome, hierarchical (or power asymmetry), and social category (or in-group/out-group distinctions). Results revealed perspective taking and empathic concern to have positive impacts on being supportive of others, but the effects of empathic concern were stronger. In contrast, perspective taking was an asset and empathy was a liability for capturing value in strategic interactions (e.g., negotiations). Effects of perspective taking and empathic concern were differentially contingent on psychological interdependence. The impact of perspective taking, but not of empathic concern, was attenuated or reversed under negative outcome interdependence; perspective-taking leads to advantage taking in competitive contexts. Perspective taking was particularly beneficial when the actor had high power, but empathic concern's benefits were independent of hierarchy. Finally, social dissimilarity had no detectable impact on the effects of perspective taking or empathic concern, contrary to our theorizing. Overall results suggest two key conclusions. First, perspective taking and empathic concern have powerful effects on work-related outcomes. Second, each construct has its own distinctive and predictable impacts. We conclude by offering practical suggestions for improving workplace interactions through perspective taking and empathic concern. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Quality in Modern Nordic Working Life—Investigating Three Related Research Perspectives and Their Possible Cross-Fertilization

    OpenAIRE

    Stine Jacobsen; Pia Bramming; Helle Holt; Henrik Holt Larsen

    2013-01-01

    Nordic working life balance is important in the context of a highly developed welfare state, budget collaboration between the State and municipalities, and a unified labor movement. In working life studies, various research perspectives create meaning around and propose solutions for the many quality issues of modern working life. Welfare research, working environment research, and human resource management (HRM) research attack the multiple challenges of working life in different ways and sh...

  13. Work-Family facilitation: a positive psychological perspective on role combination

    OpenAIRE

    Steenbergen, Elianne Florence van

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation provides a balanced picture of the experiences that individuals can have in the combination of their work and family roles. Extending the common focus in previous literature on experiences of role conflict (and their detrimental consequences), the present research also addresses the positive side of role combination and reveals the different ways in which work and family roles can facilitate each other (energy-based, time-based, behavioral, and psychological facilitation). T...

  14. Expectations from different perspectives on future work outcome of young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holwerda, Anja; Brouwer, Sandra; de Boer, Michiel R; Groothoff, Johan W; van der Klink, Jac J L

    2015-03-01

    Expectations strongly influence future employment outcomes and social networks seem to mediate employment success of young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The aim of this study is to examine the expectations of young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities from special needs education, their parents and their school teachers regarding future work and the extent to which these expectations predict work outcome. Data on 341 young adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities, coming from special needs education, aged 17-20 years, and with an ability to work according to the Social Security Institute were examined. The school teacher's expectation was the only perspective that significantly predicted entering competitive employment, with a complementary effect of the expectation of parents and a small additional effect of the expectation of the young adult. Expectations of school teachers and parents are valuable in predicting work outcome. Therefore, it is important for professionals working with the young adult in the transition from school to work to incorporate the knowledge of school teachers and parents regarding the abilities of the young adult to enter competitive employment as a valuable source of information.

  15. Faculty perspectives on rewards and incentives for community-engaged work: A multinational exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trang Vuong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Universities around the world are grappling with the challenge of how to best recognise and support community-engaged teaching, research and scholarship. The status quo reveals two major problems: many faculty members express the sentiment that such work is often discounted, and there is a dearth of available information on faculty perspectives at non-US, especially non-Western, institutions. Understanding faculty needs and perceptions may help institutions improve reward systems and community research and engagement. Also, filling the information gap between the Global North and Global South may help policy-makers and educators make higher education more civically engaged and socially responsible. As a global coalition of universities moving beyond the ivory tower, the Talloires Network (TN is uniquely positioned to provide support for and conduct research on community-engaged work. To better understand engaged faculty attitudes about rewards and incentives, TN launched a pilot survey involving 14 institutions in 11 countries. All of these institutions are members of TN, an international association of 368 institutions in 77 countries committed to strengthening civic engagement. Thirty-eight respondents were chosen based on diverse recruiting requirements. This exploratory study highlights some common opinions about what kind of faculty work is encouraged; whether institutional policies regarding engaged work exist; and how community-engaged work is perceived by colleagues. More importantly, this study contributes to the design and administration of larger surveys on community-engaged work.

  16. Interdisciplinary technology assessment of service robots: the psychological/work science perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Martin

    2012-12-01

    The article sheds light on psychological and work science aspects of the design and utilization of service robots. An initial presentation of the characteristics of man-robot interaction is followed by a discussion of the principles of the division of functions between human beings and robots in service area work systems. The following aspects are to be considered: (1) the organisation of societal work (such as the different employment and professional profiles of service employees), (2) the work tasks to be performed by humans and robots (such as handling, monitoring or decision-making tasks), (3) the possibilities and the limitations of realizing such tasks by means of information technology (depending, for example, on the motoric capabilities, perception and cognition of the robot). Consideration of these three design perspectives gives rise to criteria of usability. Current debate focuses on the (work science) principles of man-machine communication, though in future these should be supplemented with robot-specific criteria such as "motoric capabilities" or "relationship quality." The article concludes by advocating the convergence and combination of work science criteria with ideas drawn from participative design approaches in the development and utilization of service robots.

  17. “Back to Bedside”: Residents' and Fellows' Perspectives on Finding Meaning in Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Dustin M.; Rialon, Kristy L.; Nevel, Kathryn; Kothari, Anai N.

    2017-01-01

    Background Physician burnout is common and associated with significant consequences for physicians and patients. One mechanism to combat burnout is to enhance meaning in work. Objective To provide a trainee perspective on how meaning in work can be enhanced in the clinical learning environment through individual, program, and institutional efforts. Methods “Back to Bedside” resulted from an appreciative inquiry exercise by 37 resident and fellow members of the ACGME's Council of Review Committee Residents (CRCR), which was guided by the memoir When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi. The exercise was designed to (1) discover current best practices in existing learning environments; (2) dream of ideal ways to enhance meaning in work; (3) design solutions that move toward this optimal environment; and (4) support trainees in operationalizing innovative solutions. Results Back to Bedside consists of 5 themes for how the learning environment can enhance meaning in daily work: (1) more time at the bedside, engaged in direct patient care, dialogue with patients and families, and bedside clinical teaching; (2) a shared sense of teamwork and respect among multidisciplinary health professionals and trainees; (3) decreasing the time spent on nonclinical and administrative responsibilities; (4) a supportive, collegial work environment; and (5) a learning environment conducive to developing clinical mastery and progressive autonomy. Participants identified actions to achieve these goals. Conclusions A national, multispecialty group of trainees developed actionable recommendations for how clinical learning environments can be improved to combat physician burnout by fostering meaning in work. These improvements can be championed by trainees. PMID:28439376

  18. "Back to Bedside": Residents' and Fellows' Perspectives on Finding Meaning in Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Dustin M; Rialon, Kristy L; Nevel, Kathryn; Kothari, Anai N; Jardine, Lcdr Dinchen A

    2017-04-01

    Physician burnout is common and associated with significant consequences for physicians and patients. One mechanism to combat burnout is to enhance meaning in work. To provide a trainee perspective on how meaning in work can be enhanced in the clinical learning environment through individual, program, and institutional efforts. "Back to Bedside" resulted from an appreciative inquiry exercise by 37 resident and fellow members of the ACGME's Council of Review Committee Residents (CRCR), which was guided by the memoir When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi. The exercise was designed to (1) discover current best practices in existing learning environments; (2) dream of ideal ways to enhance meaning in work; (3) design solutions that move toward this optimal environment; and (4) support trainees in operationalizing innovative solutions. Back to Bedside consists of 5 themes for how the learning environment can enhance meaning in daily work: (1) more time at the bedside, engaged in direct patient care, dialogue with patients and families, and bedside clinical teaching; (2) a shared sense of teamwork and respect among multidisciplinary health professionals and trainees; (3) decreasing the time spent on nonclinical and administrative responsibilities; (4) a supportive, collegial work environment; and (5) a learning environment conducive to developing clinical mastery and progressive autonomy. Participants identified actions to achieve these goals. A national, multispecialty group of trainees developed actionable recommendations for how clinical learning environments can be improved to combat physician burnout by fostering meaning in work. These improvements can be championed by trainees.

  19. Understanding Dieting and Previous Weight Loss Attempts among Overweight and Obese Participants: Insights into My Body Is Fit and Fabulous at Work Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Tengku Alina Tengku; Jalil, Rohana Abdul; Wan Ishak, Wan Rosli; Hamid, Noor Fadzlina; Wan Nik, Wan Suriati; Jan Mohamed, Hamid Jan; Mohd, Nor Haslina; Arifin, Wan Nor; Mohamed, Wan Mohd Izani Wan; Ibrahim, Mohd Ismail; Ismail, Rohaida; Hassim, Tengku Fatimatul Tengku; Aris, Tahir; Wan Muda, Wan Manan

    2018-01-01

    A qualitative study providing an in-depth exploration of people's view and the increasing burden of overweight and obesity is required. This study aimed to explore the understanding of dieting and previous experiences on weight loss attempts among overweight and obese government employees in Kelantan, Malaysia, prior to recruitment into the intervention program. Thirteen focus group discussions involving 129 participants from a weight-loss intervention program were conducted within the first 1 month of recruitment. These discussions were moderated by two trained researchers in the Malay language and assisted by an interview guide. They were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. A thematic analysis was performed, and codes and themes from each discussion were constructed. The participants understood dieting with various meanings, including skipping meals and removing rice from daily diets. They applied numerous methods to lose weight and achieved various outcomes. Health and appearance, social support, and compliance with current trends were the factors motivating these participants to lose weight. Their determination to lose weight was limited by lack of self-control and motivation, experiences of unpleasant effects, influence on weight, and environmental and health factors. Real-life weight loss experiences and perceptions provided relevant insights into current weight loss management strategies. Some of these issues and misunderstandings should be emphasized in weight loss strategies during health promotion.

  20. Review and interpretation of previous work and new data on the hydrogeology of the Schwartzwalder Uranium Mine and vicinity, Jefferson County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Jonathan S.; Johnson, Raymond H.; Wild, Emily C.

    2011-01-01

    The Schwartzwalder deposit is the largest known vein type uranium deposit in the United States. Located about eight miles northwest of Golden, Colorado it occurs in Proterozoic metamorphic rocks and was formed by hydrothermal fluid flow, mineralization, and deformation during the Laramide Orogeny. A complex brittle fault zone hosts the deposit comprising locally brecciated carbonate, oxide, and sulfide minerals. Mining of pitchblende, the primary ore mineral, began in 1953 and an extensive network of underground workings was developed. Mine dewatering, treatment of the effluent and its discharge into the adjacent Ralston Creek was done under State permit from about 1990 through about 2008. Mining and dewatering ceased in 2000 and natural groundwater rebound has filled the mine workings to a current elevation that is above Ralston Creek but that is still below the lowest ground level adit. Water in the 'mine pool' has concentrations of dissolved uranium in excess of 1,000 times the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water standard of 30 milligrams per liter. Other dissolved constituents such as molybdenum, radium, and sulfate are also present in anomalously high concentrations. Ralston Creek flows in a narrow valley containing Quaternary alluvium predominantly derived from weathering of crystalline bedrock including local mineralized rock. Just upstream of the mine site, two capped and unsaturated waste rock piles with high radioactivity sit on an alluvial terrace. As Ralston Creek flows past the mine site, a host of dissolved metal concentrations increase. Ralston Creek eventually discharges into Ralston Reservoir about 2.5 miles downstream. Because of highly elevated uranium concentrations, the State of Colorado issued an enforcement action against the mine permit holder requiring renewed collection and treatment of alluvial groundwater. As part of planned mine reclamation, abundant data were collected and compiled into a report by Wyman and Effner

  1. Work-Family facilitation : a positive psychological perspective on role combination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergen, Elianne Florence van

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation provides a balanced picture of the experiences that individuals can have in the combination of their work and family roles. Extending the common focus in previous literature on experiences of role conflict (and their detrimental consequences), the present research also addresses

  2. A generational perspective on work values in a South African sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petronella Jonck

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: In order to ensure harmonious relationships in the workplace, work values of different generational cohorts need to be investigated and understood. Research purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the work values of a South African sample from a generational perspective, in order to foster an understanding of the similarities and differences of different generational cohorts in terms of work values. Motivation of the study: Understanding the work values of different generational cohorts could assist organisations to manage and retain human capital in an increasingly competitive environment. Furthermore, it could assist organisations to develop an advanced understanding of employee behaviour, which should inform conflict-resolution strategies to deal with reported conflict between different generational cohorts. Research design, approach and method: The study was conducted within the positivist paradigm and was quantitative in nature. Data were gathered from 301 employees representing three different generational cohorts, namely the Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y. A cross-sectional study was conducted, and data were collected once off by means of the Values Scale. The psychometric properties of the Values Scale have a reliability coefficient of 0.95, and the scale has been applied successfully in various iterations. Main findings: The findings indicate statistically significant differences and similarities between the various generational cohorts in terms of work values. More specifically, similarities and differences between the various generational cohorts were observed with regard to the values of authority, creativity, risk and social interaction in the work context. Practical/managerial implications: Organisations can use the findings of the study to strengthen employee interaction within the work environment. In addition, the findings can be used to inform retention and management strategies, in order

  3. Using Voice, Meaning, Mutual Construction of Knowledge, and Transfer of Learning to Apply an Ecological Perspective to Group Work Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Jonathan J.; Hulse-Killacky, Diana

    2006-01-01

    Concepts of voice, meaning, mutual construction of knowledge, and transfer of learning are presented in this paper as critical ingredients that support the teaching of group work from an ecological perspective. Examples of these concepts are given to illustrate their application in group work classes. (Contains 1 table.)

  4. Examining the Influence of Selected Factors on Perceived Co-Op Work-Term Quality from a Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewery, David; Nevison, Colleen; Pretti, T. Judene; Cormier, Lauren; Barclay, Sage; Pennaforte, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    This study discusses and tests a conceptual model of co-op work-term quality from a student perspective. Drawing from an earlier exploration of co-op students' perceptions of work-term quality, variables related to role characteristics, interpersonal dynamics, and organizational elements were used in a multiple linear regression analysis to…

  5. Module 3: Workplace Policy, Practice and Culture--Employer and Employee Perspectives. Work-Family Curriculum Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Leana, Carrie; MacDermid, Shelley; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Raskin, Patricia; Secret, Mary; Sweet, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The contents of this module have been prepared to address some of challenges associated with teaching about work-family issues from a human resource management and employment perspective. The goals of this module are: (1) To develop an understanding that work-family policies are part of a human resource management system and the employment…

  6. Standardized Patients' Perspectives on Workplace Satisfaction and Work-Related Relationships: A Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Claudia; Bonvin, Raphael; Rethans, Jan-Joost; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2016-08-01

    The use of standardized patients (SPs) in health care education has grown in the last 50 years. In addition, the requirements for SPs have increased steadily, and thus, the work of SPs has become more difficult and demanding. It has been claimed that SP programs are highly contextualized, having emerged from local, institutional, professional, and national conditions, but their effects on SPs have not been investigated. We have studied the effects of this job development on SPs and their programs. The study was conducted using a qualitative research design, with semistructured individual in-depth interviews to understand the reactions, values, and perceptions that underlie and influence SP behavior. To cover SP perspectives from more than 1 SP program, a total of 15 SPs from 8 different nursing schools and medical schools in Switzerland were asked to participate. Standardized patients feel motivated, engaged, and willing to invest effort in their task and do not mind demands increasing as long as the social environment in SP programs is supportive. The role of the SP trainer and the use of feedback are considered very important. Standardized patient programs require concepts in which the SP perspective has been integrated to better serve SPs' well-being. Standardized patients are valuable partners in the training of health professionals-we need to take care of them.

  7. GPs' perspectives on the diagnostic work-up in patients with shoulder pain: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenheijm, Ramon P G; Hesselmans, Nicolle J J M; Kemper, Anouk; Moser, Albine; de Bie, Rob A; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Cals, Jochen W L

    2014-06-01

    The diagnostic work-up of patients with shoulder pain in general practice is complex. General practitioners' (GPs) guidelines advise a pragmatic diagnostic work-up in which additional imaging has a limited role. However, diagnostic ultrasounds are increasingly ordered by GPs, which seems to reflect complexity in management of shoulder pain. This study aimed to explore GPs' perspectives on the diagnostic work-up of patients with shoulder pain. This study has a qualitative exploratory design with an inductive approach and was carried out in Dutch general practice. The study population consisted of 18 Dutch GPs who were sampled purposefully with a spread in clinical experience and ordering diagnostic ultrasound. Data were gathered by means of semi-structured interviews and analysed following principles of the constant comparative method. Three main categories with subcategories emerged that captured the diagnostic work-up of shoulder pain: variety in diagnostic classifications [(non-)specific diagnosis and interdisciplinary differences], establishing strategies for diagnostic work-up (use of existing tools and motives to deviate from existing tools), and strategies dealing with diagnostic uncertainties (accepting diagnostic uncertainties, diagnostic imaging tests, and interdisciplinary consultation and referral). Despite the availability of evidence-based shoulder guidelines, GPs experience uncertainties during diagnostic work-up and apply different strategies when dealing with these uncertainties. At some point, GPs as well as patients seem to have a need for a specific diagnosis. Currently, there appears to be little agreement if, or in which phase of shoulder pain, diagnostic ultrasound is useful or indicated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. [Return to Work Strategies of Employees who Experienced Depression: Employers and HR's Perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbière, Marc; Lecomte, Tania; Lachance, Jean-Philippe; Coutu, Marie-France; Negrini, Alessia; Laberon, Sonia

    Major depression is one of the leading causes of work disability across the world. In Canada, the lifetime prevalence of depression varies from 10 to 12%. Depression impacts not only the employee who is often stigmatized and can lose his professional identity, but also has consequences on colleagues and supervisors in organizations. In the literature, four models are described from which employers and managers use in their organizations to make decisions regarding the work disability of employees on sick leave: biomedical, financial management, personnel management, and organizational development. These models can also be supported by economic, legal and ethical interests. Even though these models are essential to better understand the decision of employers and HR regarding work disability, information remains scarce regarding the concrete strategies used by these stakeholders to facilitate the return to work for employees on sick leave due to depression.Objectives the aim of this paper is to document, considering employers' and human resources' perspectives, the best strategies to put in place to facilitate the return to work of employees on sick leave due to depression.Method This study was part of a larger study carried out in Canada to assess factors influencing the return to work after a depression-related sick leave, taking into account the viewpoint of four types of stakeholders: employers/human resources, supervisors, unions and people diagnosed with depression. 219 employers (68.5%) and human resources directors (31.5%) from 82.6% organizations having more than 100 employees accepted to answer a telephone semi-structured interview. The question of interest in this study is: In your opinion, what are the best strategies to help an employee who has had a depression to return to work? Coding was influenced by empirical findings and theories related to psychosocial risk factors that the authors use in their respective disciplines as well as return to work

  9. Working with leadership development and organizational learning from a dialogical perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Hersted; Frimann, Søren

    on the individual school's current challenges and special conditions. The ten schools involved in the project each have their own history, background, demographics and socioeconomic foundation. Not surprisingly, each of these schools is characterized by having its own leadership style, school culture and identity......Abstract: Working with leadership development and organizational learning from a dialogical perspective By Lone Hersted and Søren Frimann Department of Learning and Philosophy Aalborg University (DK) Lone Hersted, assistant professor, email address: lhersted@learning.aau.dk Søren Frimann, associate...... professor, email address: frimann@learning.aau.dk Key words: Dialogue, action research, organizational learning and reflexivity INTRODUCTION These years we notice a considerable amount of research on top-down implementation of standardized concepts for organizational development and leadership...

  10. African American therapists working with African American families: an exploration of the strengths perspective in treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell-Tolliver, LaVerne; Burgess, Ruby; Brock, Linda J

    2009-07-01

    With the exception of Hill's (1971, 1999) work, historically much of the literature on African American families has focused more on pathology than strengths. This study used interviews with 30 African American psychotherapists, self-identified as employing a strengths perspective with African American families, to investigate which strengths they identified in the families and how they use those strengths in therapy. Themes emerging from data analysis confirmed the continued importance of the five strengths Hill noted. In addition, two new strengths were identified by the participants: a willingness of a greater number of families to seek therapy, and the importance of family structure. Strategies used in engaging the families in therapy and practice implications for family therapists are discussed.

  11. PROTECTION OF WORKS TITLES FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF COPYRIGHT PROTECTION AND TRADEMARK PROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George-Mihai IRIMESCU

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the paper is assessing the possibilities of protecting the titles of works. One possibility is the protection by means of registered or unregistered trademarks. This route presents difficulties because of the distinctiveness perspective. In this sense, the European case-law has recently developed a constant practice and outlined a series of criteria that should be taken into consideration when examining a trademark consisting of a title. Another possibility is protecting the title under the provisions of the copyright law. From this respect, the practice has not yet determined a constant practice. However, the dominant opinion is that the originality criterion should be taken into consideration when assessing the protection of a tile. Finally, brief conclusion are made, including short remarks on the cumulative protection of titles, both as trademarks and under the copyright law.

  12. a Gender Perspective on Peace Education and the Work for Peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock-Utne, Birgit

    2009-05-01

    This article offers a gender perspective on peace education and the work for peace. To what extent are girls and boys in our society being socialised equally or differently when it comes to learning how to care, empathise with others and engage in or endure violent behaviour? Why are women generally more likely than men to support conscientious objectors, and oppose war toys and war itself? Gender is a powerful legitimator of war and national security. As in other conflict situations around the world, gendered discourses were used in the US following 11 September 2001 in order to reinforce mutual hostilities. Our acceptance of a remasculinised society rises considerably during times of war and uncertainty. War as a masculine activity has been central to feminist investigations.

  13. Betwixt and between: workplace perspectives on work reintegration in the eldercare sector in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladekjær Larsen, Eva; Labriola, Merete; Vinther Nielsen, Claus; Schultz Petersen, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary return-to-work (RTW) policies in Denmark and other welfare nations recommend employees on long-term sick leave, due to physical or mental health problems, to RTW gradually. Factors that influence the process of work reintegration (WR) is well documented, however, co-workers experiences of this process are a rather new research topic. Moreover, in the context of the present research, no studies have so far explored the workplace as an arena for social interaction. The aim of this study was to explore co-workers' experiences of the reintegration process and how these experiences are related to social positions at the workplace. Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted at two nursing homes that were in a process WR after long-term sick leave. The data consist of field notes, policy documents, individual interviews, and focus group interviews. Data were organized by use of NVivo. A theoretical framework was adopted which enabled us to approach and interpret the reintegration process as one that changed the social position of the returning employee. The dataset demonstrates how the returnee is in a state of being betwixt and between the social positions of a co-worker and a non-co-worker. This is illustrated in three cases which show that this state prevents the returnee from taking on the role as a co-worker, excludes the returnee from the workplace, and creates uncertainty for all workplace actors. The study highlighted that WR creates a social position for the returnee that complicates the working routine and causes uncertainty in social interactions. Implications for Rehabilitation Work reintegration (WR) after long-term sick leave is commonly characterized by reduced working hours and modified working tasks. The WR process influences the whole work place including co-workers' everyday working life and complicates work situations where work tasks and roles are negotiated between the returning worker and co-workers. Future WR policies and guidelines could

  14. Effects of occupational future time perspective on managing stressful work situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Henry C Y; Yeung, Dannii Y

    2016-08-01

    According to the socioemotional selectivity theory (SST; Carstensen, 2006), older adults perceive their future time as increasingly limited, which motivates them to focus more on emotional goals and prefer passive emotion-focused strategies. This study aims to investigate the effect of occupational future time perspective (OFTP) on the use of problem-solving strategies in stressful work situations and to examine the effectiveness of these strategies on psychological well-being. A sample of 199 Chinese clerical workers responded to a structured questionnaire on problem-solving strategy use in relation to hypothetical work scenarios. Results revealed that relative to those with limited OFTP, workers with expansive OFTP preferred problem-focused and proactive strategies in both low- and high-emotionally salient scenarios. Workers with limited OFTP consistently preferred passive strategies irrespective of emotional salience. OFTP moderated the effect of problem-focused strategies on psychological distress. In particular, there was a significant negative relationship between problem-focused strategies and psychological distress among workers with expansive OFTP, but such pattern of relationship was not observed among workers with limited OFTP. Findings of this study inform the training strategies employed by practitioners to fit the developmental goals of workers in order to maximise their strengths at work. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  15. Perspectives on parenthood and working of female athletic trainers in the secondary school and collegiate settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahanov, Leamor; Loebsack, Alice R; Masucci, Matthew A; Roberts, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Female athletic trainers (ATs) are currently underrepresented in the collegiate setting. Parenting and family obligations may play a role in this underrepresentation. To examine female ATs' perspectives on parenting and working in the secondary school and collegiate employment settings. Cross-sectional study. Online survey. A total of 1000 nonstudent, female certified ATs who were currently members of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. An original survey was developed to assess perceptions related to motherhood and work responsibilities. Descriptive statistics were used to assess age, years of experience as a certified AT, employment position, and parent or nonparent status. A correlation matrix was conducted to determine factors among parent and nonparent status, perceptions of motherhood, and employment-setting decisions. Of the 1000 surveys sent via e-mail, 411 (41.1%) female ATs responded. Responses indicated that a majority of the female ATs worked in the secondary school setting. Sixty-one percent of the respondents did not have children. Past female ATs' experiences indicated a perception that motherhood created more challenges or struggles (or both) in the work and family settings. Whether parents considered children a factor in employment-setting changes produced conflicting results: no significant correlations or differences were found among responses. Parenting considerations had influences on both the home and employment settings. Although parents and nonparents had different views on the implications of parenting in the workplace, both groups agreed that parenting could affect the work environment and the choice to change employment settings and careers. Administrative decisions need to be considered in relation to parenting concerns. Mentoring that includes employment-setting choices relative to life goals should be provided to ATs, regardless of sex.

  16. [Care work in the health sector based on the psychodynamics of work and the care perspective: An interview with Pascale Molinier].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlosko, Miriam; Ros, Cecilia

    2015-09-01

    This interview with Pascale Molinier was carried out in Buenos Aires in October 2014, in the context of activities organized by the Health and Work Program at the Department of Community Health of the Universidad Nacional de Lanús, Argentina. The interview explores the relationship between work and subjectivation, examining the role of work in the structuring of the psyche, in the dynamics of pleasure and suffering, and in the construction of gender identities. "Feminized" work - that of nurses, caregivers and maids, among others - is examined from a "care" perspective, analyzing its intrinsic invisibility and impossibility of being quantified and measured, which makes it a challenge to management-based logic.

  17. Working with Bangladeshi patients in Britain: perspectives from Primary Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Kamila; Rahman, Jasmin; Pill, Roisin

    2003-04-01

    The difficulties of ethnic minority communities in accessing appropriate primary care are well documented, but little is known about the experiences of Primary Health Care Teams (PHCTs) serving these communities, or their strategies to help patients overcome these difficulties. The purpose of the study was to explore the PHCT perspective of working with Bangladeshi patients. Qualitative group discussions with PHCTs were set up by four health centres in the Grangetown area of Cardiff, where a large proportion of the Bangladeshi community lives. Experiences of and attitudes to working with Bangladeshi patients were explored. Discussions were taped and transcribed for independent analysis by two researchers. Comparisons within and between PHCTs were made. PHCTs largely entered into full and frank discussions. Health visitors had made significantly more effort than others to get to know their Bangladeshi patients. This had costs in terms of time and effort, with no reduction in caseload. Cutting across this difference were common themes such as communication and cultural differences, and patients' difficulties in using NHS services appropriately, which caused disruption and frustration. While there was an awareness of the reasons for these difficulties, PHCTs generally were not able to allow for them because of the inflexibility of their workload and systems of working. Group discussions are a useful way to encourage PHCTs to reflect on their practice and share experiences. PHCTs are aware of their patients' needs and keen to explore racial awareness training and new ways of looking at how they work. However, the grind of heavy workloads makes this process unlikely without outside facilitation.

  18. Motivational power of future time perspective: Meta-analyses in education, work, and health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucija Andre

    Full Text Available Future time perspective (FTP may predict individual attitudes and behaviors. However, FTP research includes different FTP conceptualizations and outcomes which hinder generalizing its findings. To solve the inconsistencies in FTP research and generalize the magnitude of FTP as a driver of motivation and behavior, we conducted the first systematical synthesis of FTP relationships in three crucial life domains. Our meta-analyses of FTP studies in education (k = 28, work (k = 17, and health (k = 32 involved N = 31,558 participants, and used a conceptual model for grouping FTP constructs. To address different outcome types, we applied the Theory of Planned Behavior when coding the studies. FTP relationships with outcomes were small-to-medium, were generalizable across domains, and were strongest when the FTP construct included a mixture of cognition, behavioral intention, and affect and, in education, when the FTP measure was domain specific rather than general. There were cross-cultural differences in FTP-outcome relationships. The strength of the FTP-outcome types relationship varied for attitudes, perceived behavioral control, behavioral intention, and behaviors. The lowest effect sizes were found for FTP predicting actual behaviors in education, work, and health and between FTP and health attitudes. Theoretical implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed.

  19. Work-based assessment: qualitative perspectives of novice nutrition and dietetics educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, C; Beck, E J; Chung, A; Ash, S; Capra, S; Truby, H; Jolly, B

    2014-10-01

    The assessment of competence for health professionals including nutrition and dietetics professionals in work-based settings is challenging. The present study aimed to explore the experiences of educators involved in the assessment of nutrition and dietetics students in the practice setting and to identify barriers and enablers to effective assessment. A qualitative research approach using in-depth interviews was employed with a convenience sample of inexperienced dietitian assessors. Interviews explored assessment practices and challenges. Data were analysed using a thematic approach within a phenomenological framework. Twelve relatively inexperienced practice educators were purposefully sampled to take part in the present study. Three themes emerged from these data. (i) Student learning and thus assessment is hindered by a number of barriers, including workload demands and case-mix. Some workplaces are challenged to provide appropriate learning opportunities and environment. Adequate support for placement educators from the university, managers and their peers and planning are enablers to effective assessment. (ii) The role of the assessor and their relationship with students impacts on competence assessment. (iii) There is a lack of clarity in the tasks and responsibilities of competency-based assessment. The present study provides perspectives on barriers and enablers to effective assessment. It highlights the importance of reflective practice and feedback in assessment practices that are synonymous with evidence from other disciplines, which can be used to better support a work-based competency assessment of student performance. © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  20. Constructing Family from a Social Work Perspective in Child Welfare: A Juggling Act at Best

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy Johner

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The transformative reality of diverse Canadian families is outpacing national and provincial statutes and policies. Social workers in child welfare agencies are faced with the complex task of making decisions about families while working within the confines of national/provincial statutes and social policies, as well as within agency structures. They attempt to balance the rights of diverse Canadian families and still protect children at risk of harm with the principle of the ‘best interest of the child’. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore the construction of ‘family’ and decisions about family life in protection services from the perspective of professional social workers in the prairie region of Canada. Social workers from several urban communities were invited to participate in focus groups. During the focus group discussions, themes of social worker’s nuanced and somewhat fluid understandings of family did not always converge with current legal and professional notions of families. Study findings suggest that social workers’ construction of family and the decisions they make about family life involve three primary themes: ‘acceptance of diverse understandings of family’; ‘safety and the best interest of the child’, and ‘professional discretionary decisions’This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

  1. Stigma and sex work from the perspective of female sex workers in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, William C W; Holroyd, Eleanor; Bingham, Amie

    2011-01-01

    While the stigma surrounding sex work is both well documented and easily recognised, few studies examine stigma in this context from the perspective of the sex workers themselves. In this article we report on a study using a modified grounded theory approach to analyse a series of semi-structured interviews with 49 female sex workers in Hong Kong, in order to examine the ways in which this group experiences and negotiates the stigma which arises from their employment in the sex industry. Sex workers in Hong Kong were subject to various stigmatising forces in their daily lives in their interactions with the public, the police and their families. These processes could have a negative impact on the sex workers' health, both through obvious manifestations such as physical or verbal abuse and through more subtle processes such as those which generated or perpetuated vulnerability and those which compelled the sex workers to conceal their identities and withdraw themselves from social networks. These findings are situated in the context of broader research surrounding sex work, drawing attention to the consequences of stigma on health and their interaction with health-service providers, before briefly discussing possible means of overcoming stigma-related barriers to providing adequate healthcare for this marginalised group. © 2010 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2010 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Motivational power of future time perspective: Meta-analyses in education, work, and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Lucija; van Vianen, Annelies E M; Peetsma, Thea T D; Oort, Frans J

    2018-01-01

    Future time perspective (FTP) may predict individual attitudes and behaviors. However, FTP research includes different FTP conceptualizations and outcomes which hinder generalizing its findings. To solve the inconsistencies in FTP research and generalize the magnitude of FTP as a driver of motivation and behavior, we conducted the first systematical synthesis of FTP relationships in three crucial life domains. Our meta-analyses of FTP studies in education (k = 28), work (k = 17), and health (k = 32) involved N = 31,558 participants, and used a conceptual model for grouping FTP constructs. To address different outcome types, we applied the Theory of Planned Behavior when coding the studies. FTP relationships with outcomes were small-to-medium, were generalizable across domains, and were strongest when the FTP construct included a mixture of cognition, behavioral intention, and affect and, in education, when the FTP measure was domain specific rather than general. There were cross-cultural differences in FTP-outcome relationships. The strength of the FTP-outcome types relationship varied for attitudes, perceived behavioral control, behavioral intention, and behaviors. The lowest effect sizes were found for FTP predicting actual behaviors in education, work, and health and between FTP and health attitudes. Theoretical implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed.

  3. Good practices in managing work-related indoor air problems: a psychosocial perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahtinen, Marjaana; Huuhtanen, Pekka; Vähämäki, Kari; Kähkönen, Erkki; Mussalo-Rauhamaa, Helena; Reijula, Kari

    2004-07-01

    Indoor air problems at workplaces are often exceedingly complex. Technical questions are interrelated with the dynamics of the work community, and the cooperation and interaction skills of the parties involved in the problem solving process are also put to the test. The objective of our study was to analyze the process of managing and solving indoor air problems from a psychosocial perspective. This collective case study was based on data from questionnaires, interviews and various documentary materials. Technical inspections of the buildings and indoor air measurements were also carried out. The following four factors best differentiated successful cases from impeded cases: extensive multiprofessional collaboration and participative action, systematic action and perseverance, investment in information and communication, and process thinking and learning. The study also proposed a theoretical model for the role of the psychosocial work environment in indoor air problems. The expertise related to social and human aspects of problem solving plays a significant role in solving indoor air problems. Failures to properly handle these aspects may lead to resources being wasted and result in a problematic situation becoming stagnant or worse. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Motivational power of future time perspective: Meta-analyses in education, work, and health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Future time perspective (FTP) may predict individual attitudes and behaviors. However, FTP research includes different FTP conceptualizations and outcomes which hinder generalizing its findings. To solve the inconsistencies in FTP research and generalize the magnitude of FTP as a driver of motivation and behavior, we conducted the first systematical synthesis of FTP relationships in three crucial life domains. Our meta-analyses of FTP studies in education (k = 28), work (k = 17), and health (k = 32) involved N = 31,558 participants, and used a conceptual model for grouping FTP constructs. To address different outcome types, we applied the Theory of Planned Behavior when coding the studies. FTP relationships with outcomes were small-to-medium, were generalizable across domains, and were strongest when the FTP construct included a mixture of cognition, behavioral intention, and affect and, in education, when the FTP measure was domain specific rather than general. There were cross-cultural differences in FTP-outcome relationships. The strength of the FTP-outcome types relationship varied for attitudes, perceived behavioral control, behavioral intention, and behaviors. The lowest effect sizes were found for FTP predicting actual behaviors in education, work, and health and between FTP and health attitudes. Theoretical implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed. PMID:29364917

  5. The Mother's Perspective: Factors Considered When Choosing to Enter a Stay-at-Home Father and Working Mother Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushing, Cassie; Sparks, Misti

    2017-07-01

    A qualitative study was conducted to examine the decision-making factors of entering a stay-at-home father and working mother relationship based on the mother's perspective. A total of 20 married, heterosexual, working mothers with biological children aged 1 to 4 years were asked questions regarding how they decided to enter a stay-at-home father and working mother relationship as well as contributing factors to this decision. The findings presented in this article were part of a larger study that examined mothers' overall perspectives of the working mother stay-at-home father dynamics. The themes that emerged regarding how the decision was made to enter this kind of relationship were creating a work-family life balance, utilizing the cost-benefit ratio, and applying personality/trait strengths.

  6. Temporary Service? A Global Perspective on Domestic Work and the Life Cycle from Pre-Industrial Times to the Present

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederveen Meerkerk, van E.J.V.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, labor history has taken a “global turn”, increasingly focusing on labor relations in the non-Western world. This article aims to challenge existing perceptions of the history of domestic work in Europe from a global labor history perspective by comparing them with the histories of

  7. Towards a New Definition of Return-to-Work Outcomes in Common Mental Disorders from a Multi-Stakeholder Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, Hiske L.; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Bultmann, Ute; Schene, Aart H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the perspectives of key stakeholders involved in the return-to-work (RTW) process regarding the definition of successful RTW outcome after sickness absence related to common mental disorders (CMD's). Methods: A mixed-method design was used: First, we used qualitative methods

  8. The influence of future time perspective on work engagement and job performance: the role of job crafting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, T.A.M.; Tims,; Akkermans,

    2017-01-01

    This two-wave study aimed to examine future time perspective (FTP) as an antecedent of job crafting, and in turn job crafting as a mediator in associations between FTP and work outcomes. Based on the lifespan socio-emotional selectivity theory, we expected that open-ended and limited FTP would evoke

  9. Preventing work disability among employees with rheumatoid arthritis: what medical professionals can learn from the patients' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varekamp, Inge; Haafkens, Joke A.; Detaille, Sarah I.; Tak, Paul P.; van Dijk, Frank J. H.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the perspectives of employees with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with those of medical professionals regarding what persons with RA need to prevent work disability. METHODS: Concept mapping was conducted in a group session with 21 employees and by mail with 17 medical

  10. Only one previous owner .

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snieckus, Darius

    1999-01-01

    In the light of the large number of offshore platforms earmarked for decommissioning in the next 30 years, a case for re-use is advanced. Henk Vreeswijk of the Netherlands believes that governments should encourage re-use; it makes sense from both an economical and an environmental perspective. Indeed, in the Netherlands, platforms are now being produced with re-use in mind. Elf has recently taken the unprecedented step of advertising a used platform and a subsea installation on the internet. (UK)

  11. How Do High-Performance Work Systems Affect Individual Outcomes: A Multilevel Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junwei; Akhtar, M Naseer; Bal, P Matthijs; Zhang, Yajun; Talat, Usman

    2018-01-01

    Research on high-performance work systems (HPWS) has suggested that a potential disconnection may exist between organizational-level HPWS and employee experienced HPWS. However, few studies have identified factors that are implied within such a relationship. Using a sample of 397 employees, 84 line managers, and 21 HR executives in China, we examined whether line managers' goal congruence can reduce the difference between organizational-level HPWS and employee experienced HPWS. Furthermore, this study also theorized and tested organization-based self-esteem (OBSE) as a mediator in the associations between employee experienced HPWS and job performance and job satisfaction. Using multilevel analyses, we found that line managers' goal congruence strengthened the relationship between organizational-level HPWS and employee experienced HPWS, such that the relationship was significant and positive when line managers' goal congruence was high, but a non-significant relationship when line managers' goal congruence was low. Moreover, employee experienced HPWS indirectly affected job performance and job satisfaction through the mechanism of OBSE beyond social exchange perspective.

  12. How Do High-Performance Work Systems Affect Individual Outcomes: A Multilevel Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junwei; Akhtar, M. Naseer; Bal, P. Matthijs; Zhang, Yajun; Talat, Usman

    2018-01-01

    Research on high-performance work systems (HPWS) has suggested that a potential disconnection may exist between organizational-level HPWS and employee experienced HPWS. However, few studies have identified factors that are implied within such a relationship. Using a sample of 397 employees, 84 line managers, and 21 HR executives in China, we examined whether line managers’ goal congruence can reduce the difference between organizational-level HPWS and employee experienced HPWS. Furthermore, this study also theorized and tested organization-based self-esteem (OBSE) as a mediator in the associations between employee experienced HPWS and job performance and job satisfaction. Using multilevel analyses, we found that line managers’ goal congruence strengthened the relationship between organizational-level HPWS and employee experienced HPWS, such that the relationship was significant and positive when line managers’ goal congruence was high, but a non-significant relationship when line managers’ goal congruence was low. Moreover, employee experienced HPWS indirectly affected job performance and job satisfaction through the mechanism of OBSE beyond social exchange perspective. PMID:29743875

  13. How Do High-Performance Work Systems Affect Individual Outcomes: A Multilevel Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junwei Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Research on high-performance work systems (HPWS has suggested that a potential disconnection may exist between organizational-level HPWS and employee experienced HPWS. However, few studies have identified factors that are implied within such a relationship. Using a sample of 397 employees, 84 line managers, and 21 HR executives in China, we examined whether line managers’ goal congruence can reduce the difference between organizational-level HPWS and employee experienced HPWS. Furthermore, this study also theorized and tested organization-based self-esteem (OBSE as a mediator in the associations between employee experienced HPWS and job performance and job satisfaction. Using multilevel analyses, we found that line managers’ goal congruence strengthened the relationship between organizational-level HPWS and employee experienced HPWS, such that the relationship was significant and positive when line managers’ goal congruence was high, but a non-significant relationship when line managers’ goal congruence was low. Moreover, employee experienced HPWS indirectly affected job performance and job satisfaction through the mechanism of OBSE beyond social exchange perspective.

  14. Work-home interaction from a work psychological perspective : Development and validation of a new questionnaire, the SWING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, S.A.E.; Taris, T.W.; Kompier, M.A.J.; Dikkers, J.S.E.; Hooff, M.L.M. van; Kinnunen, U.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on the stepwise development of a new questionnaire for measuring work-home interaction, i.e. the Survey Work-home Interaction—NijmeGen, the SWING). Inspired by insights from work psychology, more specifically from Effort-Recovery Theory (Meijman & Mulder, 1998), we defined

  15. Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kussmann, Martin; Morine, Melissa J; Hager, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    We review here the status of human type 2 diabetes studies from a genetic, epidemiological, and clinical (intervention) perspective. Most studies limit analyses to one or a few omic technologies providing data of components of physiological processes. Since all chronic diseases are multifactorial...... at different time points along this longitudinal investigation are performed with a comprehensive set of omics platforms. These data sets are generated in a biological context, rather than biochemical compound class-driven manner, which we term "systems omics."...

  16. Parents' Perspectives on Navigating the Work of Speaking Up in the NICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyndon, Audrey; Wisner, Kirsten; Holschuh, Carrie; Fagan, Kelly M; Franck, Linda S

    To describe parents' perspectives and likelihood of speaking up about safety concerns in the NICU and identify barriers and facilitators to parents speaking up. Exploratory, qualitatively driven, mixed-methods design. A 50-bed U.S. academic medical center, open-bay NICU. Forty-six parents completed questionnaires, 14 of whom were also interviewed. Questionnaires, interviews, and observations with parents of newborns in the NICU were used. The qualitative investigation was based on constructivist grounded theory. Quantitative measures included ratings and free-text responses about the likelihood of speaking up in response to a hypothetical scenario about lack of clinician hand hygiene. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were integrated in the final interpretation. Most parents (75%) rated themselves likely or very likely to speak up in response to lack of hand hygiene; 25% of parents rated themselves unlikely to speak up in the same situation. Parents engaged in a complex process of Navigating the work of speaking up in the NICU that entailed learning the NICU, being deliberate about decisions to speak up, and at times choosing silence as a safety strategy. Decisions about how and when to speak up were influenced by multiple factors including knowing my baby, knowing the team, having a defined pathway to voice concerns, clinician approachability, clinician availability and friendliness, and clinician responsiveness. To engage parents as full partners in safety, clinicians need to recognize the complex social and personal dimensions of the NICU experience that influence parents' willingness to speak up about their safety concerns. Copyright © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Youth work in the registered religious communities from the positive youth development perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Snoj, Emilija

    2016-01-01

    This Master’s Thesis presents the theory behind a contemporary perspective called positive youth development. This perspective, paradigm, approach or concept touches different fields and draws from interdisciplinary research, philosophy, policy formation, Youth program description and others. Its theoretical background consists of developmental system theories combined with the idea that the fundamental process of development is marked by mutually influential relations between the developing ...

  18. Laparoscopy After Previous Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfo Godinjak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the abdominal surgery, extensive adhesions often occur and they can cause difficulties during laparoscopic operations. However, previous laparotomy is not considered to be a contraindication for laparoscopy. The aim of this study is to present that an insertion of Veres needle in the region of umbilicus is a safe method for creating a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic operations after previous laparotomy. In the last three years, we have performed 144 laparoscopic operations in patients that previously underwent one or two laparotomies. Pathology of digestive system, genital organs, Cesarean Section or abdominal war injuries were the most common causes of previouslaparotomy. During those operations or during entering into abdominal cavity we have not experienced any complications, while in 7 patients we performed conversion to laparotomy following the diagnostic laparoscopy. In all patients an insertion of Veres needle and trocar insertion in the umbilical region was performed, namely a technique of closed laparoscopy. Not even in one patient adhesions in the region of umbilicus were found, and no abdominal organs were injured.

  19. Formulation of work stress in 1960-2000: analysis of scientific works from the perspective of historical sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väänänen, Ari; Anttila, Erkko; Turtiainen, Jussi; Varje, Pekka

    2012-09-01

    During the latter part of the 20th century, work stress became an important societal issue and a huge amount of scientific attention went to studying it. This paper examines the process of formulating and defining the concept of work stress in the occupational health sciences and in industrial and organizational psychology from the early 1960s to the late 1990s. The empirical material of the study encompasses 108 scientific articles, books, book chapters, 'state of the art' reviews, book reviews, and written conference presentations. The data are analysed in the frameworks of historical sociology, critical psychology, and the anthropology of knowledge. We argue that work stress as a life-structuring concept gained ground in psychosocial and occupational health sciences (and also in lay understanding) in the 1960s simultaneously with the rise of social reformist movements that called for fundamental changes emphasizing democratic and human-orientated work organizations and socially responsible values. With the passing of time, however, the focus on structural improvement of work life waned and the emphasis shifted towards the apolitical occupational health aspects of work stress. Researchers with a psychological orientation emphasized micro-level characteristics as factors affecting work stress, whereas stress-orientated epidemiologists turned to the study of specific occupational stress models and/or risk factors. The emergence and development of work stress research can be seen as a chain of attempts to define and identify new risks and experiences occurring in work life. The process, driven by a gradual shift from industrial environments towards organizational frameworks characterized by social and psychological dimensions, reflected the overall shift towards modern democratic work life and the information society in which employees' emotions and well-being became an issue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Towards a new definition of return-to-work outcomes in common mental disorders from a multi-stakeholder perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hees, Hiske L; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Koeter, Maarten W J; Bültmann, Ute; Schene, Aart H

    2012-01-01

    To examine the perspectives of key stakeholders involved in the return-to-work (RTW) process regarding the definition of successful RTW outcome after sickness absence related to common mental disorders (CMD's). A mixed-method design was used: First, we used qualitative methods (focus groups, interviews) to identify a broad range of criteria important for the definition of successful RTW (N = 57). Criteria were grouped into content-related clusters. Second, we used a quantitative approach (online questionnaire) to identify, among a larger stakeholder sample (N = 178), the clusters and criteria most important for successful RTW. A total of 11 clusters, consisting of 52 unique criteria, were identified. In defining successful RTW, supervisors and occupational physicians regarded "Sustainability" and "At-work functioning" most important, while employees regarded "Sustainability," "Job satisfaction," "Work-home balance," and "Mental Functioning" most important. Despite agreement on the importance of certain criteria, considerable differences among stakeholders were observed. Key stakeholders vary in the aspects and criteria they regard as important when defining successful RTW after CMD-related sickness absence. Current definitions of RTW outcomes used in scientific research may not accurately reflect these key stakeholder perspectives. Future studies should be more aware of the perspective from which they aim to evaluate the effectiveness of a RTW intervention, and define their RTW outcomes accordingly.

  1. Towards a new definition of return-to-work outcomes in common mental disorders from a multi-stakeholder perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiske L Hees

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine the perspectives of key stakeholders involved in the return-to-work (RTW process regarding the definition of successful RTW outcome after sickness absence related to common mental disorders (CMD's. METHODS: A mixed-method design was used: First, we used qualitative methods (focus groups, interviews to identify a broad range of criteria important for the definition of successful RTW (N = 57. Criteria were grouped into content-related clusters. Second, we used a quantitative approach (online questionnaire to identify, among a larger stakeholder sample (N = 178, the clusters and criteria most important for successful RTW. RESULTS: A total of 11 clusters, consisting of 52 unique criteria, were identified. In defining successful RTW, supervisors and occupational physicians regarded "Sustainability" and "At-work functioning" most important, while employees regarded "Sustainability," "Job satisfaction," "Work-home balance," and "Mental Functioning" most important. Despite agreement on the importance of certain criteria, considerable differences among stakeholders were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Key stakeholders vary in the aspects and criteria they regard as important when defining successful RTW after CMD-related sickness absence. Current definitions of RTW outcomes used in scientific research may not accurately reflect these key stakeholder perspectives. Future studies should be more aware of the perspective from which they aim to evaluate the effectiveness of a RTW intervention, and define their RTW outcomes accordingly.

  2. Work-family conflict and enrichment from the perspective of psychosocial resources: comparing Finnish healthcare workers by working schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauno, Saija; Ruokolainen, Mervi; Kinnunen, Ulla

    2015-05-01

    We examined work-family conflict (WFC) and work-family enrichment (WFE) by comparing Finnish nurses, working dayshifts (non-shiftworkers, n = 874) and non-dayshifts. The non-dayshift employees worked either two different dayshifts (2-shiftworkers, n = 490) or three different shifts including nightshifts (3-shiftworkers, n = 270). Specifically, we investigated whether different resources, i.e. job control, managers' work-family support, co-workers' work-family support, control at home, personal coping strategies, and schedule satisfaction, predicted differently WFC and WFE in these three groups. Results showed that lower managers' work-family support predicted higher WFC only among 3-shiftworkers, whereas lower co-workers' support associated with increased WFC only in non-shiftworkers. In addition, shiftworkers reported higher WFC than non-shiftworkers. However, the level of WFE did not vary by schedule types. Moreover, the predictors of WFE varied only very little across schedule types. Shiftwork organizations should pay more attention to family-friendly management in order to reduce WFC among shiftworkers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  3. How do people with different attachment styles balance work and family? A personality perspective on work-family linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumer, H C; Knight, P A

    2001-08-01

    This study explored whether different models of work-family relationship were possible for individuals with different attachment styles. A mail survey was conducted using employees (N = 481) at a midwestern university in the United States. Results suggested that (a) individuals with a preoccupied attachment pattern were more likely to experience negative spillover from the family/home to the work domain than those with a secure or dismissing style, (b) securely attached individuals experienced positive spillover in both work and family domains more than those in the other groups, and (c) preoccupied individuals were much less likely to use a segmentation strategy than the other 3 attachment groups. However, when the conventional job satisfaction life satisfaction relationship was examined, the data provided unique support for the spillover model. Implications of the findings for both attachment and work family relationship literatures are discussed.

  4. Children’s Perspectives of their Responsibilities in Household Work in their Families in the Sekyere South District of Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Brobbey, Charles

    2011-01-01

    There has been a lot of research about children’s household work. However, most of these researches in developing countries give less importance to children’s views and rely mainly on perspectives of adults when talking about what children do. It is for this reason that I decided to look at children’s unpaid household work mainly from children’s point of view. The main purpose of the study was to explore the everyday life experiences of children who take up many responsibilities within th...

  5. What do working menopausal women want? A qualitative investigation into women’s perspectives on employer and line manager support

    OpenAIRE

    Hardy, Claire; Griffiths, Amanda; Hunter, Myra S.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To explore women’s perspectives on what employers and managers should, and should not do in relation to women going through the menopause at work.\\ud Methods: An online questionnaire was used to collect qualitative data in a cross-sectional study of working women. Three open-ended questions asked peri- and post-menopausal women, aged 45-65 years: (i) what they thought employers could do, or should do, to help menopausal women who may be experiencing difficult menopausal symptoms a...

  6. Working together versus working autonomously: a new power-dependence perspective on the individual-level of analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Simon B

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that it is important to investigate the interaction between task interdependence and task autonomy because this interaction can affect team effectiveness. However, only a limited number of studies have been conducted and those studies focused solely on the team level of analysis. Moreover, there has also been a dearth of theoretical development. Therefore, this study develops and tests an alternative theoretical perspective in an attempt to understand if, and if so why, this interaction is important at the individual level of analysis. Based on interdependence theory and power-dependence theory, we expected that highly task-interdependent individuals who reported high task autonomy would be more powerful and better performers. In contrast, we expected that similarly high task-interdependent individuals who reported less task autonomy would be less powerful and would be weaker performers. These expectations were supported by multi-level and bootstrapping analyses performed on a multi-source dataset (self-, peer-, manager-ratings) comprised of 182 employees drawn from 37 teams. More specifically, the interaction between task interdependence and task autonomy was γ =.128, p power and γ =.166, p <.05 for individual performance. The 95% bootstrap interval ranged from .0038 to .0686.

  7. Jan Fook: Social Work: Critical Theory and Practice & Karen Healy: Social Work Practices: Contemporary Perspectives on Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available In his recent book on the contemporary politics of social work, Powell (2001 nominates Jan Fook and Karen Healy as two Australian authors who have made significant contributions to the radical or critical social work tradition. I have chosen to review them together, as each, in different ways, attempts to achieve the same purpose. That is, they attempt to provide a convincing account for adopting a critical approach to practice in the contemporary conditions of the 21st century and, in doing so, re-invigorate the radical tradition of social work practice. My first comment, important for the readership of this international journal, is that both books easily 'travel' beyond the Australian context.

  8. Integrating Recovery and the Narrative Attachment Systems Perspective to Working through Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardon, Stephanie; Pernice-Duca, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) presents a number of symptoms and adjustment issues for individuals, but it is also associated with a myriad of risks for the larger family system. A systemic perspective is crucial to comprehending the development of BPD. Promoting healthy relationships with one or more supportive adult enables the child to…

  9. Motivational power of future time perspective : Meta-analyses in education, work, and health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andre, L.; van Vianen, A.E.M.; Peetsma, T.T.D.; Oort, F.J.

    2018-01-01

    Future time perspective (FTP) may predict individual attitudes and behaviors. However, FTP research includes different FTP conceptualizations and outcomes which hinder generalizing its findings. To solve the inconsistencies in FTP research and generalize the magnitude of FTP as a driver of

  10. Human Resource Management and Sustainability at work across the lifespan : An Integrative Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beatrice van der Heijden; Dorien Kooij; Annet de Lange

    2015-01-01

    Facing the Challenges of a Multi-Age Workforce examines the shifting economic, cultural, and technological trends in the modern workplace that are taking place as a result of the aging global workforce. Taking an international perspective, contributors address workforce aging issues around the

  11. Psychological Harassment At Work Under The Perspective Of Social Security And The Suitability Of Its Equalization To Work Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Ota Longo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was intended to investigate the treatment given to psychological harassment by Social Security, from the analysis of data extracted from its Statistical Yearbooks, and to situate it as contemporary factor of precarious work, seeking to expand the view of occupational accident. As psychological harassment is a serious problem to challenge an urgent solution to the effective protection of worker’s mental health, among the proposals based on the legal and social impact of the phenomenon, it was evidenced, through critical analysis of Bill n. 7.202/2010, the suitability of equalization of psychological harassment in employment context to accident work (FAPESP.

  12. Work-family interface from a life and career stage perspective: the role of demands and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerouti, Evangelia; Peeters, Maria C W; van der Heijden, Beatrice I J M

    2012-01-01

    Work-family conflict and enrichment are experiences that occur daily and have substantial consequences for employees, their families, and the organizations that employ them. The aim of the current review is to make a link between life and career stage, work and family conditions, and the work-family interface. The basic proposition is that life stages partly determine career development, and consequently the specific working conditions (job demands and job resources) and family conditions (family demands and family resources) that individuals are exposed to. As a result, the specific demands and resources in the work and family domains determine to what extent individuals experience that work and family are conflicting or enriching life domains. In this review we suggest that individuals in early adulthood will experience high inter-role conflict and low facilitation due to high demands and low resources in both life domains, while individuals in late adulthood will experience the opposite pattern; that is, low conflict and high facilitation due to low demands and high resources in both domains. Individuals in middle adulthood will experience high work-family conflict but also high family-work facilitation due to the presence of high job demands and resources in both life domains. Integrating life and career stage perspectives and the experience of work-family interface is of notable practical utility because it provides a mechanism to make more informed decisions about the relative need for and corresponding benefits of work-family programs.

  13. Buyer-Supplier Relationships in the Perspective of Working Environment and Organizational Performance: Review and Research Agenda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imranul, Hoque; Rana, Mohammad Bakhtiar

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to review and synthesise how extant literature understand different natures of buyer supplier relationships (BSR) and how BSR affect, and are affected by, the working environment (WE), and how both BSR and WE affect organisational performance (OP). Following...... a systematic review protocol and literature corroboration, we map the literature covering BSR, WE, and OP and conduct a thematic analysis on three themes (i.e. buyer supplier relationships, working environment, organisational performance) and their relationships. Our review synthesises BSR typologies and group......, working environment and organisational performance. Our findings illustrate that working environment is becoming important in cross-border sourcing and supply management, but this has been neglected in BSR literature from almost every disciplinary perspective. No study has directly linked the three themes...

  14. Perspectives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    geneticist, Hitoshi Kihara, hired me to work in his private institute. .... remarked in his book, “Life Game”, that evolution may ... mutations, whereas the latter was kept by balancing .... is because the average effect is negative and the variance.

  15. Emotion management strategies in PR firms: senior level perspectives of professional relationships (working paper)

    OpenAIRE

    Yeomans, L

    2016-01-01

    Much of the PR literature tends to focus on engagement in building relationships between organisations and publics or stakeholders. However, less is known about everyday interpersonal engagement, especially in regard to the professional context of the PR consulting firm (Sissons, 2015). This paper asks what it means to engage with clients and journalists, from the perspectives of managing directors and owners of London-based public relations agencies. What are the “feeling rules” (Hochschild,...

  16. Working with language learner histories from three perspectives: Teachers, learners and researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mercer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in SLA, such as learner-centredness, social constructivism, the postmethod era, and complexity perspectives, have highlighted the need for more localized, situated understandings of teaching and learning and greater recognition of learner individuality and diversity. In this article, I suggest an effective way of meeting these needs is to employ learner histories. This powerful form of writing allows learners to use their L2 to engage in authentic, personally meaningful communication with others about their identities, experiences, perceptions and emotions related to their language learning histories. As a text type, they are able to facilitate a more holistic perspective of the learner’s life and reveal the unique interconnections that an individual makes across various domains. They also enable the situated, contextualised and dynamic nature of their learning experiences to become apparent and provide learners with a genuine, motivating purpose for writing. Exploring data generated in Austria with tertiary-level EFL learners, I seek to illustrate some of the rich potential of these text types from three perspectives, namely, those of the teacher, learner and researcher.

  17. The changing role of women and work concerning gender, the family and childcare issues: A work-life balance perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Within Ireland, the number of women in employment has increased, where the female participation in 1985 was around 30% and in 2004 was over 49%'. Over 50% of Irish mothers who have at least one child under 5 are now in the labor force . This thesis examines the framework that points to and informs changes of the role and status of women and work in Ireland over time. The paper observes the ambiguity of women and employment concerning the family, childcare issues and gender rela...

  18. Gender, life role importance, and work-family conflict in Indonesia: A non-western perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuntari, I.S.R.; Janssens, J.M.A.M.; Ginting, H.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined gender differences among profiles based on life role importance on work-family conflict. The sample consisted of 404 Indonesia working couples with children. We found four profiles based on their work and family role importance that is a Family, Work, Dual and a Low profile. More

  19. Work related characteristics, work-home and home-work interference and burnout among primary healthcare physicians: a gender perspective in a Serbian context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnik, Katarina; Houkes, Inge

    2011-09-23

    Little information exists on work and stress related health of medical doctors in non-EU countries. Filling this knowledge gap is needed to uncover the needs of this target population and to provide information on comparability of health related phenomena such as burnout across countries. This study examined work related characteristics, work-home and home-work interference and burnout among Serbian primary healthcare physicians (PHPs) and compared burnout levels with other medical doctors in EU countries. Data were collected via surveys which contained Maslach Burnout Inventory and other validated instruments measuring work and home related characteristics. The sample consisted of 373 PHPs working in 12 primary healthcare centres. Data were analysed using t-tests and Chi square tests. No gender differences were detected on mean scores of variables among Serbian physicians, who experience high levels of personal accomplishment, workload, job control and social support, medium to high levels of emotional exhaustion, medium levels of depersonalisation and work-home interference, and low levels of home-work interference. There were more women than men who experienced low job control and high depersonalisation. Serbian physicians experienced significantly higher emotional exhaustion and lower depersonalisation than physicians in some other European countries. To diminish excessive workload, the number of physicians working in primary healthcare centres in Serbia should be increased. Considering that differences between countries were detected on all burnout subcomponents, work-related interventions for employees should be country specific. The role of gender needs to be closely examined in future studies as well.

  20. Work values and career anchors: the perspective of students of higher education in classroom methods and distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tais de Andrade

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study takes into account the factors that interfere with career decisions from the internal demands of individuals, represented by the work values. Investigated university students’ perspective on work values and career anchors. For this, we used a survey along the 958 undergraduate students of face and distance higher education institutions in the interior of Rio Grande do Sul. The data collection instrument was developed from the Work Values Scale Revised developed by Porto and Pilati (2010 and the Inventory of Career Anchors proposed by Schein (1993; 1996. As for the results, there were significant differences between the perceptions of the two methods of teaching, but the hierarchy assigned to the values and anchors in both was similar, which shows certain pattern of agreement as to the perception of importance attached to each dimension studied.

  1. Sick Leave—A Signal of Unequal Work Organizations? Gender perspectives on work environment and work organizations in the health care sector: a knowledge review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Vänje

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The background to this article review is governmental interest in finding reasons why a majority of the employees in Sweden who are on sick leave are women. In order to find answers to these questions three issues will be discussed from a meso-level: (i recent changes in the Swedish health care sector’s working organization and their effects on gender, (ii what research says about work health and gender in the health care sector, and (iii the meaning of gender at work. The aim is to first discuss these three issues to give a picture of what gender research says concerning work organization and work health, and second to examine the theories behind the issue. In this article the female-dominated health care sector is in focus. This sector strives for efficiency relating to invisible job tasks and emotional work performed by women. In contemporary work organizations gender segregation has a tendency to take on new and subtler forms. One reason for this is today’s de-hierarchized and flexible organizations. A burning question connected to this is whether new constructions of masculinities and femininities really are ways of relating to the prevailing norm in a profession or are ways of deconstructing the gender order. To gain a deeper understanding of working life we need multidisciplinary research projects where gender-critical knowledge is interwoven into research not only on organizations, but also into research concerning the physical work environment, in order to be able to develop good and sustainable work environments, in this case in the health care sector

  2. Work related characteristics, work-home and home-work interference and burnout among primary healthcare physicians: A gender perspective in a Serbian context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houkes Inge

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little information exists on work and stress related health of medical doctors in non-EU countries. Filling this knowledge gap is needed to uncover the needs of this target population and to provide information on comparability of health related phenomena such as burnout across countries. This study examined work related characteristics, work-home and home-work interference and burnout among Serbian primary healthcare physicians (PHPs and compared burnout levels with other medical doctors in EU countries. Methods Data were collected via surveys which contained Maslach Burnout Inventory and other validated instruments measuring work and home related characteristics. The sample consisted of 373 PHPs working in 12 primary healthcare centres. Data were analysed using t-tests and Chi square tests. Results No gender differences were detected on mean scores of variables among Serbian physicians, who experience high levels of personal accomplishment, workload, job control and social support, medium to high levels of emotional exhaustion, medium levels of depersonalisation and work-home interference, and low levels of home-work interference. There were more women than men who experienced low job control and high depersonalisation. Serbian physicians experienced significantly higher emotional exhaustion and lower depersonalisation than physicians in some other European countries. Conclusions To diminish excessive workload, the number of physicians working in primary healthcare centres in Serbia should be increased. Considering that differences between countries were detected on all burnout subcomponents, work-related interventions for employees should be country specific. The role of gender needs to be closely examined in future studies as well.

  3. A Historical Perspective on the Future of Innovation in Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpych, Nathanael J.

    2017-01-01

    Changing social work from a profession with innovators to a profession that innovates will likely require an innovation movement. This article draws on lessons from a prior movement in social work to suggest implications for a future innovation movement. Empirical clinical practice (ECP), a movement in social work in the 1970-1990s, sought to…

  4. The management of work-related asthma guidelines: a broader perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baur, X.; Aasen, T.B.; Burge, P.S.; Heederik, D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the European Respiratory Society work-related asthma guidelines is to present the management and prevention options of work-related asthma and their effectiveness. Work-related asthma accounts for 5-25% of all adult asthma cases and is responsible for a significant socioeconomic burden.

  5. Investigating the Missing Link in Flexible Work Arrangement Utilization: An Individual Difference Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shockley, Kristen M.; Allen, Tammy D.

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between individual differences and flexible work arrangement use. Three need-based motivational factors (need for affiliation at work, need for segmentation of work from other life roles, need for occupational achievement) were examined in relation to extent of flextime and flexplace use.…

  6. Cancer survivors' views of work 3 years post diagnosis: a UK perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ziv; Neary, David; Luker, Karen

    2008-07-01

    The impact of cancer on people's working lives is an increasingly important concern but knowledge on this issue is very limited in the UK. Forty-one people of working age were purposively selected from the North Western Cancer Intelligence Service and interviewed by telephone to describe their experiences to returning to work following diagnosis and treatment. The data was subject to qualitative thematic analysis using NVIVO software. The results indicated the importance of returning to work from diagnosis and through treatment which was then followed by a re-assessment of work-life balance when people recovered from primary treatment and were back in employment. The principle motivations for returning to work were a quest for normality and financial pressures. One barrier to returning to work was the lack of medical advice from cancer specialists and general practitioners regarding the appropriate time to get back to work. A good relationship with their employer/manager was a major influence on returning to work and appeared to be related to duration of service rather than occupational status. These findings demonstrate the importance of paid work to people diagnosed with cancer and highlight the need to improve the support from medical professionals, especially oncology nurses.

  7. CAREER AND WORK RELATIONS IN THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICE INDUSTRY: THE PERSPECTIVES OF IT PROFESSIONALS AND THEIR MANAGERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Moreno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates work relations and career perspectives of IT professionals in the information technology service industry. The research is based on the case of executives, managers and technical professionals which work in a large Brazilian company that provides consulting and systems development and implementation services, and reveals a considerable vulnerability in the relationship between the company and such professionals. The human resources business model adopted seems to impose restrictions to the development of the professionals, consequently limiting their future performance, and concurring for the continuing devaluation of IT as a profession. The sustainability of such a model is discussed, given its long term risks for the companies’ service quality and competitiveness, as well as its implications for the attractiveness of Information Technology as a career.

  8. Work Identity and Contradictory Experiences of Welfare Workers in a Life-history Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybbroe, Betina

    2013-01-01

    in these changes and are changed in the psycho-social setting of the workplace. This article presents research about care work in Denmark with a focus on subjective processing of work identity, applying a psycho-societal theoretical and methodical approach. A life historical and experiential understanding...... of identification. Social dynamics interact with subjective dynamics in ways that illuminate not only habitual and creative orientations and practices of professionals in care, but also the contradictory transformations of the work, e.g. marketization and democratization in the work place....

  9. Concerning Collaboration: Teachers' Perspectives on Working in Partnerships to Develop Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthouse, Rachel; Thomas, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Teachers are often encouraged to work in partnerships to support their professional development. In this article we focus on three forms of working partnerships based in English secondary schools. Each has an intended function of developing teaching practices. The cases of mentoring, coaching and an adapted lesson study come from both initial…

  10. Conference Report: Quo Vadis Reconstructive Social Work Research? Traditions—State of the Art—Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Loch

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This conference report gives an overview of the 3rd annual conference of the "Network for Reconstructive Research and Biography" held at the Alice-Salomon-University of Applied Science, Berlin, Germany, on 23rd and 24th March, 2007. The aim of this year's conference was to report on the state of the art of research on social work, the current research situations at various universities in Germany, and the discourse on reconstructive social work within the discipline. This was to serve as a basis for the planned next step regarding the further development of the Network, i.e. intensive exchange, promotion of networking with colleagues and concrete forms of co-operation and strategies designed to further consolidate reconstructive social work in the Federal Republic of Germany. The keynote speakers gave further particulars about the state of the art of social work research, the workshops explored this situation in the areas of international social work practice and research, the teaching of research, junior researchers, research funding and new bachelor and master degree programs in the reconstructive social work. Approximately 40 participants met and provided new trend-setting ideas for qualitative research in social work and for the work and structure of the Network. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0801338

  11. Research in the Work of New Zealand Teacher Educators: A Cultural-Historical Activity Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, David A. G.; Gunn, Alexandra C.; Hill, Mary F.; Haigh, Mavis

    2016-01-01

    In this article we use cultural-historical activity theory to explore the place of research in the work of New Zealand university-based teacher educators (TEs). We consider how aspirations for a research-informed initial teacher education are served by New Zealand universities' recruitment practices and TEs' actual work. We suggest that TEs value…

  12. Emotion-Work Performance among Dual-Earner Couples: Testing Four Theoretical Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnotte, Krista Lynn; Stevens, Daphne Pedersen; Minnotte, Michael C.; Kiger, Gary

    2007-01-01

    This study compares four theories of domestic labor in their ability to predict relative emotion-work performance among dual-earner couples. Specifically, the authors investigate the effects of gender ideology, time availability, relative resources, and crossover factors on the dependent variable of relative emotion-work performance using…

  13. The Use of Work-Based Learning Pedagogical Perspectives to Inform Flexible Practice within Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Paula

    2016-01-01

    The renewed emphasis on developing flexible learning practices in higher education (HE) underscores the importance of understanding pedagogies for students who are based in the workplace or undertake significant work-related elements of study. This paper draws on research that explores how work-based learning (WBL) pedagogy operates in UK HE using…

  14. Perspectives of General Education Teachers Who Work with Students with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Beth Jolene

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand how general education teachers perceive their experiences working with students in their classrooms who have been diagnosed with autism. The study addressed the following research question: How do secondary school general educators perceive their experiences working with students in…

  15. Organising and Leading Systematic Quality Work in the Preschool -- Preschool Managers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkansson, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Preschool managers' responsibility for and leadership of systematic quality work has come to the fore in connection with changes made to the Swedish preschool curriculum. The aim of this study is to contribute to the understanding of preschool managers' leadership and management of the systematic quality work in Swedish preschools with reference…

  16. Harming High Performers : A Social Comparison Perspective on Interpersonal Harming in Work Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, Catherine K.; Van der Vegt, Gerben S.; Walter, Frank; Huang, Xu; Huang, Xin

    This study developed a multilevel model of the interpersonal harming behavior associated with social comparison processes in work teams. We tested this model using temporally lagged data from a sample of student teams (Study 1) and cross-sectional data from a sample of work teams in a

  17. Was That Levity or Livor Mortis? Crime Scene Investigators' Perspectives on Humor and Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivona, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    Humor is common and purposeful in most work settings. Although researchers have examined humor and joking behavior in various work settings, minimal research has been done on humor applications in the field of crime scene investigation. The crime scene investigator encounters death, trauma, and tragedy in a more intimate manner than any other…

  18. Predictors of Return to Work for People with Psychiatric Disabilities: A Private Sector Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, David J.; Accordino, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    This investigation was a baseline study to determine if the speed of return to work could be predicted for people with psychiatric disabilities in a private sector setting. Participants with psychiatric disability claims who returned to work (N = 300) were obtained from a nationwide "Fortune 500" insurance company. The authors compared the speed…

  19. [Social companies and solidary economy: perspectives for the work inclusion of individuals with mental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussi, Isabela Aparecida de Oliveira; Pereira, Maria Alice Ornellas

    2011-04-01

    The psychiatric reform process requires the implementation of public policies that guarantee the work inclusion of individuals with mental disorders. To do this, work must be understood as a promoter of autonomy, emancipation and citizenship. The objective of this study is to reflect on the theoretical concepts related to social insertion through work, with the purpose of exploring the inclusion of individuals with mental disorders in the work market. The concepts social company and solidary economy where selected as fundamental for the study. In the social company, the subject is considered to be a social being, focusing on the development process towards emancipation. In solidary economy, the objective is to develop an economy that is more just, equal and solidary. Further discussions on these concepts should be developed to support the implementation of projects for social inclusion through work.

  20. Inflammatory bowel disease: Greek patients' perspective on quality of life, information on the disease, work productivity and family support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viazis, Nikos; Mantzaris, Gerasimos; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Polymeros, Dimitrios; Kouklakis, George; Maris, Theofanis; Karagiannis, John; Karamanolis, Dimitrios G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients' perspectives regarding everyday life issues. From October 2010 till April 2011, 1,181 IBD patients completed an anonymous questionnaire through the internet (827 cases) or at the outpatient clinic of the participating centers (354 cases), aiming to identify: a) the impact of disease on social life, emotional status and work productivity; b) the source of disease information; and c) the level of support from family members and friends. Fifty-five percent of the patients reported that IBD interferes with their social life, while 65% felt stressed, 60% depressed and 19% tired because of it. Disease information (physician/ internet) was reported only by 31%, while 26% admitted not discussing their therapy with their gastroenterologist. Forty percent felt that the health service they receive is not satisfactory, with 76% desiring more gastroenterologists, 67% more outpatient clinics, 49% more dieticians and 42% more psychologists specialized in IBD. IBD interfered with working capacity in 40% of the participants, while 57% needed time off of work (ranging from 1-20 days per year). One of three patients (32%) has not informed his work environment about the disease; however, 88% had the support of their family and friends for coping with it. Greek IBD patients claim that health-related social life, emotional status and work productivity are severely affected by their disease, whereas they complain about lack of information regarding the therapy. These unmet demands call for immediate action by healthcare providers and society.

  1. Studies of safety and critical work situations in nuclear power plants: A human factors perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsson Kecklund, L.

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to develop and apply different approaches for analyzing safety in critical work situations in real work settings in nuclear power plants, and also to identify safety enhancing measures by using the framework of interaction between human, organizational and technical subsystems. A Cognitive Psychology as well as a Stress Psychology framework was used. All studies were related to the annual outage operational state where the need for coping with many infrequent tasks, often carried out under high time pressure, puts great strain on the staff and organisation of the plant. In three studies the natural variations in the plant state, normal operation and annual outage operation, were used to explore human performance, work-related factors as well as coping and the operators' own resources and the relationship between them. In the annual outage condition high work demands, decreased sleepiness at night shift, more errors and less satisfaction with work performance quality was reported by maintenance as well as by control room operators. A relationship between high work demands and more organizational problems and reports of more frequent human errors and lower satisfactions with work performance quality was also identified in the annual outage condition. Moreover, a relationship between increased sleepiness during night shift, more frequent use of coping strategies and a higher frequency of human errors was reported. In two studies the Event and Barrier Function Model was applied to analyze the safety of barrier function systems inserted into work process sequences to protect the systems from the negative consequences of failures and errors. The model was also used to assess safety in relation to a technical and organizational change. The last study addressed changes in work performance and work-related factors in relation to a technical and organizational change of a safety significant work process involving increased automation and new

  2. A generational perspective on working in travel industry : Managing a Multigenerational Workforce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godfried, S. (Shira); Lub, X. (Xander); Radstake, F. (Frank)

    2011-01-01

     High actual turnover rates in Dutch travel industry in combination with demographic changes in the workforce, may have consequences for economic sustainability for Dutch travel companies. A previous study has shown significant differences in the psychological contract of generations in the

  3. A work-life perspective on sleep and fatigue—looking beyond shift workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    SKINNER, Natalie; DORRIAN, Jill

    2015-01-01

    This study examines sleep and fatigue through a work-life lens. Whilst most often thought of as an issue for shift workers, this study observed that self-reported insufficient sleep and fatigue were prevalent for workers on standard daytime schedules. Using a representative sample of 573 daytime workers (51.3% men; 70.7% aged 25−54 yr) from one Australian state, it was observed that 26.4% of daytime workers never or rarely get the seven hours of sleep a night that is recommended for good health. Those with parenting responsibilites (29.4%) or working long (45+) hours (37.4%) were most likely to report insufficient sleep. Whereas mothers in full-time work were most likely to report frequent fatigue (42.5%). This study highlights the common experience of insufficient sleep and fatigue in a daytime workforce, with significant implications for health and safety at work and outside of work. Stronger and more effective legislation addressing safe and ‘decent’ working time is clearly needed, along with greater awareness and acceptance within workplace cultures of the need to support reasonable workloads and working hours. PMID:26027709

  4. Nursing Students' Perceptions of the Transition to Shift Work: A Total Worker Health Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Julie; Tuell, Erica; James, Lois; Graves, Janessa M; Butterfield, Patricia

    2017-11-01

    Nursing students make an abrupt transition from traditional classes to clinical rotations and shift work. Little is known about students' sleep, sleep disturbances, and safe practice behaviors during this critical phase of professional development. The purpose of this study was to identify nursing students' perceptions of problems and potential solutions related to shift work and long work hours. This qualitative, descriptive study used two nursing student focus groups which engaged in a two-round participatory process aimed at framing future interventions. Participants identified problems and solutions related to personal and workplace well-being. Findings will inform undergraduate curricular revisions, and hospital hiring and managerial practices.

  5. New Men and New Women? A Comparison of Paid Work Propensities from a Panel Data Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, Alison L; Jenkins, Stephen P; Serrano, Carlos

    1997-01-01

    The paper uses BHPS waves 1–5 (1991–5) to compare paid work participation rates of men and women. Year-on-year persistence in paid work propensities is high, but greater for men than women. Non-work persistence is higher for women. Using panel data probit regression models, the paper also investigates why men’s and women’s participation rates differ, comparing the roles of differences in observable characteristics and differences in rates of return to these characteristics, while also control...

  6. Applying Structural Systems Thinking to Frame Perspectives on Social Work Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringfellow, Erin J

    2017-03-01

    Innovation will be key to the success of the Grand Challenges Initiative in social work. A structural systems framework based in system dynamics could be useful for considering how to advance innovation. Diagrams using system dynamics conventions were developed to link common themes across concept papers written by social work faculty members and graduate students ( N = 19). Transdisciplinary teams and ethical partnerships with communities and practitioners will be needed to responsibly develop high-quality innovative solutions. A useful next step would be to clarify to what extent factors that could "make or break" these partnerships arise from within versus outside of the field of social work and how this has changed over time. Advancing innovation in social work will mean making decisions in a complex, ever-changing system. Principles and tools from methods that account for complexity, such as system dynamics, can help improve this decision-making process.

  7. The influence of the work environment on cardiovascular health: a historical, conceptual, and methodological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasl, S V

    1996-01-01

    The framework of psychosocial epidemiology is used to examine research developments that characterize the accumulation of knowledge regarding the role of the work environment in cardiovascular health and disease. The discussion of current programs of research focuses on the work of T. Theorell and R. Karasek (1996) and J. Siegrist (1996) as exemplars of European and American studies that have contributed the most to the understanding of occupational cardiovascular health. It is argued that researchers need to maintain and nurture relatively broad conceptual models of etiology because cardiovascular disease involves multiple biomedical risk factors and because specific aspects of the work environment are embedded in a large, complex matrix of other psychosocial influences. At the same time, investigators need to push ahead with focused research strategies to clarify the precise nature of the work environmental risk factors that emerge in the broad, somewhat imprecise epidemiologic study designs.

  8. The situation of nursing work and occupational risks from an ergological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Teresinha Fontana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to understand the work environment according to the concepts, knowledge and values expressed and practiced by nursing professionals in occupational risk management. METHODS: this was an ergology-based participant study. Data collection was performed through interviews with key informants and 25 workers, as well as observations and measurements at a Basic Health Unit located in Rio Grande do Sul. Data analysis was based on the Three-Pole Dynamic Device. RESULTS: work conditions were found to be precarious, and workers are exposed to verbal violence and other psychosocial, biological and ergonomic risks. Chemical and physical risks are neglected, and activity is constantly restandardized toward service effectiveness. CONCLUSION: the studied subjects worked in risky conditions on a daily basis, and this information was expressed through synergistic dialogues and participant observations. Based on the contributions of these individuals, it is possible to merge knowledge obtained from work environments with science in order to address this issue.

  9. Sense and Meanings of Work: An Analysis from Different Theoretical-Epistemological Perspectives in Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chalfin Coutinho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Amidst changes in the contemporary world of labour, issues such as globalization, deregulation, (unemployment, precarization, among others, preoccupy researchers and professionals. In this context questions regarding the work centrality in its social and psychological dimensions emerge, as well as the meaning processes associated with working. This paper presents and analyzes the main theoretical approaches identified in the international and Brazilian literatures in the field of psychology making reference to meanings and senses, particularly those attributed to working. Different epistemological grounds supporting the current studies have been identified: cognitive, constructionist, cultural studies, existentialist and sociohistorical. The conclusions highlight that the concepts still lack precision. Different authors often adopt meanings and senses of working as if both were the same phenomenon.

  10. A Buddhist perspective on industrial engineering and the design of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Tau; Blumenthal, James A; Funk, Kenneth H

    2014-06-01

    The modern way of life is highly dependent upon the production of goods by industrial organizations that are in turn dependent upon their workers for their ongoing operations. Even though more than a century has passed since the dawn of the industrial revolution, many dangerous aspects of work, both physical and mental, remain in the workplace today. Using Buddhist philosophical principles, this paper suggests that although many sources of the problem reside within the larger society, the industrial engineer is still a key factor in bettering work and providing a workplace suitable for their fellow workers. Drawing on these insights, we present a number of work design guidelines that industrial engineers who abide by Buddhist principles could practice to help overcome some of the many sufferings produced by modern work.

  11. CTBTO international monitoring system: Status of work in Cameroon and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyobe, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    The presentation outlines Cameroon's participation in CTBTO programme and its seismic activities. Areas of inter-regional and international cooperation are described. Suggestions are made on ways in which Cameroon can contribute to the work of the commission

  12. Hygiene at Work: An Engineering Perspective on the Development of Hygiene Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Pityn

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article examines the work of contemporary hygiene practitioners. Discussion converges from a broad examination of hygiene at work in our society serving the common good to occupational hygiene in the workplace. The article considers the expanding role of hygiene today, juxtaposed against the lack of awareness and perceptions of hygiene. It considers some of the current social challenges facing hygiene, perceptions of risk and problems specifically encountered by occupational hygienists.

  13. A cross-modal perspective on the relationships between imagery and working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lora T Likova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mapping the distinctions and interrelationships between imagery and working memory remains challenging. Although each of these major cognitive constructs is defined and treated in various ways across studies, most accept that both imagery and working memory involve a form of internal representation available to our awareness. In working memory, there is a further emphasis on active maintenance and use of this conscious representation to guide voluntary action. Multicomponent working memory models incorporate representational buffers, such as the visuo-spatial sketchpad, plus central executive functions. If there is a visuo-spatial ‘sketchpad’ for working memory, does imagery involve the same representational buffer? Alternatively, does working memory employ an imagery-specific representational mechanism to occupy our awareness? Or do both constructs utilize a more generic ‘projection screen’ of an amodal nature? In a cross-modal fMRI study a novel memory paradigm is introduced based on drawing, which may be conceptualized as a complex behaviour adaptable to learning in the tactile modality. Blindfolded participants were trained to draw complex objects guided purely by the memory of felt tactile images. If this working memory task had been mediated by transfer of the felt spatial configuration to the visual imagery mechanism, the response profile in visual cortex would be predicted to have the ‘top-down’ signature of propagation of the imagery signal downwards through the visual hierarchy. Remarkably, the pattern of cross-modal occipital activation generated by the non-visual memory drawing was essentially the inverse of this typical ‘imagery signature’, with the sole visual hierarchy activation occurring in V1, accompanied by deactivation of the entire extrastriate part of the hierarchy. The implications of these findings for the debate on the interrelationships between the core cognitive constructs of working memory and imagery

  14. A life course perspective on mental health problems, employment, and work outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldman, Karin; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Verhulst, Frank C; Ortiz, Josue Almansa; Bültmann, Ute

    2017-07-01

    Objectives Little is known about how employment and work outcomes among young adults are influenced by their life-course history of mental health problems. Therefore, the aims of this study were to (i) identify trajectories of mental health problems from childhood to young adulthood and (ii) investigate the association between these trajectories and employment and work outcomes among young adults. Methods Data were used from 360 participants of the Tracking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS), a Dutch prospective cohort study, with 12-year follow-up. Trajectories of externalizing and internalizing problems were identified with latent class growth models. Employment conditions and work outcomes (ie, psychosocial work characteristics) were measured at age 22. We assessed the association between mental health trajectories and employment conditions and work outcomes. Results Four trajectories of mental health problems were identified: high-stable, decreasing, moderate-stable and low-stable. Young adults with high-stable trajectories of externalizing problems worked over six hours more [B=6.71, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.82-10.6] and had a higher income [odds ratio (OR) 0.33, 95% CI 0.15-0.71], than young adults with low-stable trajectories. Young adults with high-stable trajectories of internalizing problems worked six hours less per week (B=-6.07, 95% CI -10.1- -2.05) and reported lower income (OR 3.44, 95% CI 1.53-7.74) and poorer psychosocial work characteristics, compared to young adults with low-stable trajectories. Conclusions Among young adults who had a paid job at the age of 22 (and were not a student or unemployed), those with a history of internalizing problems are less likely to transition successfully into the labor market, compared to other young adults.

  15. ‘Employers’ perspectives on maximising undergraduate student learning from the outdoor education centre work placement

    OpenAIRE

    Lawton, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Recognising the growth in provision of vocational undergraduate programmes and the requirement for high quality work placement opportunities, managers from four residential outdoor education centres were interviewed to determine their perceptions on the components necessary to maximise student learning. The findings showed that the managers greatly valued the potential of a work placement; a need for clarity over the expectations for all stakeholders and that the placement remained authentic ...

  16. Management of eWork health issues: a new perspective on an old problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Elizabeth; Strong, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Contact centres are vehicles for a rapidly growing group of knowledge workers, or eWorkers. Using computers and high-speed telecommunications connections as work tools, these employees spend long hours performing mentally demanding work while maintaining static, physically stressful, seated positions. The complex interplay between job demands, work environment, and individual differences combine to produce high levels of physical discomfort among eWorkers. This paper discusses a new view that has emerged, one that focuses on the management rather than the elimination of work related upper limb disorders (WRULD) and computer vision syndrome (CVS) issues that are prevalent among eWorkers. It also reviews a cultural shift among practitioners and business that moves towards a consultative process and the sharing of knowledge among all stakeholders. The controlled work conditions and large single location workforce found within contact centres provide the opportunity to understand the personal and industry cost of eWork injuries and the ability to develop and review new multifaceted interventions. Advances in training and workplace design aimed at decreasing discomfort and injury and reducing the associated economic burden may then be adapted for all eWorkforce groups.

  17. Vocational Rehabilitation: Supporting Ill or Disabled Individuals in (to Work: A UK Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Frank

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Work is important for one’s self-esteem, social standing and ability to participate in the community as well as for the material advantages it brings to individuals and their families. The evidence suggests that the benefits of employment outweigh the risks of work and are greater than the risks of long-term unemployment or sickness absence. Individuals may be born with physical or intellectual disadvantages (e.g., cerebral palsy, or they may be acquired during childhood or adult life. Some progressive conditions may present in childhood or adolescence (e.g., some muscular dystrophies and these need to be distinguished from those presenting later in life (e.g., trauma, stroke. Vocational rehabilitation (VR thus takes three forms: preparing those with a disability, health or mental health condition for the world of work, job retention for those in work and assisting those out of work into new work. Important components of VR consist of the attributes of the individual, the skills/knowledge of their health professionals, the knowledge and attitudes of actual or potential employers and the assistance that is provided by the state or other insurance facility. Charities are playing an increasing role.

  18. Perspective: creating an ethical workplace: reverberations of resident work hours reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Lenny; Katz, Joel T

    2009-03-01

    Medical professionals are a community of highly educated individuals with a commitment to a core set of ideals and principles. This community provides both technical and ethical socialization. The development of ethical physicians is highly linked to experiences in the training period. Moral traits are situation-sensitive psychological and behavioral dispositions. The consequence of long duty hours on the moral development of physicians is less understood. The clinical environment of medical training programs can be so intense as to lead to conditions that may actually deprofessionalize trainees. The dynamic relationship between individual character traits and the situational dependence of their expression suggests that a systems approach will help promote and nurture moral development. Ethical behavior can be supported by systems that make it more difficult to veer from the ideal. Work hours limits are a structural change that will help preserve public safety by preventing physicians from taking the moral shortcuts that can occur with increasing work and time pressures. Work hours rules are beneficial but insufficient to optimize an ethical work and training environment. Additional measures need to be put in place to ensure that ethical tensions are not created between the patient's well-being and the resident's adherence to work hours rules. The ethical ideals of physician autonomy, selflessness, and accountability to the patient must be protected through the judicious and flexible use of work hours limits, physician extenders, census caps, nonteaching services, and high-quality handoffs.

  19. What do working menopausal women want? A qualitative investigation into women's perspectives on employer and line manager support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Claire; Griffiths, Amanda; Hunter, Myra S

    2017-07-01

    To explore women's perspectives on what employers and managers should and should not do in relation to women going through the menopause. An online questionnaire was used to collect qualitative data in a cross-sectional study of working women. Three open-ended questions asked peri- and post-menopausal women, aged 45-65 years: (i) what they thought employers could do, or should do, to help menopausal women who may be experiencing difficult menopausal symptoms at work; (ii) how managers should behave; and (iii) how managers should not behave towards women going through the menopause. 137 women responded to the open questions in the survey. An inductive thematic analysis was conducted and three overarching themes emerged. Theme 1 related to employer/manager awareness, specifically to knowledge about the menopause and awareness of how the physical work environment might impact on menopausal women. Theme 2 related to employer/manager communication skills and behaviors, specifically those considered helpful and desired and those considered unhelpful and undesired. Theme 3 described employer actions, involving staff training and raising awareness, and supportive policies such as those relating to sickness absence and flexible working hours. The menopause can be difficult for some women to deal with at work, partly due to the working environment. To our knowledge, this is the first study to explore women's descriptions of how they would like to be treated by employers/managers, and what would be helpful and unhelpful. The results have clear implications for communication about menopause at work and for employer-level policy and practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. A generational perspective on working in travel industry: Managing a Multigenerational Workforce

    OpenAIRE

    Godfried, S. (Shira); Lub, X. (Xander); Radstake, F. (Frank)

    2011-01-01

     High actual turnover rates in Dutch travel industry in combination with demographic changes in the workforce, may have consequences for economic sustainability for Dutch travel companies. A previous study has shown significant differences in the psychological contract of generations in the workplace in travel industry. This study was aimed at providing insights for creating generation-sensitive HR management. The research design included a qualitative in-depth study exploring meanings, ...

  1. Changed nursing scheduling for improved safety culture and working conditions - patients' and nurses' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullberg, Anna; Bergenmar, Mia; Sharp, Lena

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate fixed scheduling compared with self-scheduling for nursing staff in oncological inpatient care with regard to patient and staff outcomes. Various scheduling models have been tested to attract and retain nursing staff. Little is known about how these schedules affect staff and patients. Fixed scheduling and self-scheduling have been studied to a small extent, solely from a staff perspective. We implemented fixed scheduling on two of four oncological inpatient wards. Two wards kept self-scheduling. Through a quasi-experimental design, baseline and follow-up measurements were collected among staff and patients. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire was used among staff, as well as study-specific questions for patients and staff. Fixed scheduling was associated with less overtime and fewer possibilities to change shifts. Self-scheduling was associated with more requests from management for short notice shift changes. The type of scheduling did not affect patient-reported outcomes. Fixed scheduling should be considered in order to lower overtime. Further research is necessary and should explore patient outcomes to a greater extent. Scheduling is a core task for nurse managers. Our study suggests fixed scheduling as a strategy for managers to improve the effective use of resources and safety. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Sociological Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Charles; Middleton, Mike

    This monograph examines sociological perspectives and their applications. It is intended to help the college student coming to sociology for the first time to recognize that there are several perspectives within sociology and to disentangle the mass of terms associated with each. The first distinctive sociological perspective came from the work of…

  3. The German DEMO working group. Perspectives of a fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesch, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Fusion development has many different challenges in the areas of plasma physics, fusion technologies, materials development and plasma wall interaction. For making fusion power a reality, a coherent approach is necessary, interlinking the different areas of work. To this end, the German fusion program started in 2010 the German DEMO Working Group, bringing together high-level experts from all the different fields, from the 3 German fusion centers Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP), Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT) and Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ). An encompassing view of what will be needed with high priority, in plasma physics, in fusion technology and in the interrelation of the fields, to make fusion energy real, has been elaborated, and is presented here in a condensed way. On this basis, the 3 German fusion centers now are composing their work program, towards a fusion demonstration reactor DEMO. (orig.)

  4. Understanding Work-related Musculoskeletal Injuries in Rehabilitation from a Nursing Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhimani, Rozina

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal nursing injuries is a top concern for nurses. These injuries are thought to be a dynamic interplay of multiple factors. A literature review reveals a knowledge gap in understanding context-specific patterns of nursing injuries. Using a cross-sectional descriptive research design, 58 rehabilitation nurses participated in this study. Anonymous paper surveys were sent to all rehabilitation nursing personnel on the unit. Six themes emerged: lack of time and help, patient acuity, ergonomics, body movement issues, knowledge deficit, and communication. Nursing input is critical in understanding and reducing context-specific work-related musculoskeletal injuries. Further research that includes nursing voices is advocated. Rehabilitation nursing injuries appear to be a complex interaction of multiple determinants; therefore, multifaceted solutions using a quality improvement lens are recommended to improve the working conditions on the units. © 2014 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  5. Perspective: The missing link in academic career planning and development: pursuit of meaningful and aligned work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieff, Susan J

    2009-10-01

    Retention of faculty in academic medicine is a growing challenge. It has been suggested that inattention to the humanistic values of the faculty is contributing to this problem. Professional development should consider faculty members' search for meaning, purpose, and professional fulfillment and should support the development of an ability to reflect on these issues. Ensuring the alignment of academic physicians' inner direction with their outer context is critical to professional fulfillment and effectiveness. Personal reflection on the synergy of one's strengths, passions, and values can help faculty members define meaningful work so as to enable clearer career decision making. The premise of this article is that an awareness of and the pursuit of meaningful work and its alignment with the academic context are important considerations in the professional fulfillment and retention of academic faculty. A conceptual framework for understanding meaningful work and alignment and ways in which that framework can be applied and taught in development programs are presented and discussed.

  6. Applying gene flow science to environmental policy needs: a boundary work perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Caroline E; Alexander, Laurie C

    2016-08-01

    One application of gene flow science is the policy arena. In this article, we describe two examples in which the topic of gene flow has entered into the U.S. national environmental policymaking process: regulation of genetically engineered crops and clarification of the jurisdictional scope of the Clean Water Act. We summarize both current scientific understanding and the legal context within which gene flow science has relevance. We also discuss the process by which scientific knowledge has been synthesized and communicated to decision-makers in these two contexts utilizing the concept of 'boundary work'. Boundary organizations, the work they engage in to bridge the worlds of science, policy, and practice, and the boundary objects they produce to translate scientific knowledge existed in both examples. However, the specific activities and attributes of the objects produced varied based on the needs of the decision-makers. We close with suggestions for how scientists can contribute to or engage in boundary work with policymakers.

  7. Women, work and health between the nineteenth and twentieth centuries from a national and international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Silvana

    2014-11-16

    A few years after a series of meetings of Italian scientists were convened prior to the unification of Italy, the first women qualified in medicine and other dedicated women participated in founding a movement for the improvement of living and working conditions of women and children in Italy. analysis of Italian women's contributions in the proceedings of the International Council of Women Congresses and their impact on increasing the number of women's occupational health studies presented at the fourth National Congress on Occupational Diseases held in Rome in 1914. Analysis of the proceedings of the International Council of Women Congresses (Washington, Chicago, London), and of the Women's National Council and other documents so as to obtain a picture of Italian women's working conditions at that time. Women and children worked an excessive number of hours per day, were underpaid, and had a legal status of inferiority. The main work sectors were sewing, embroidery, lace making, ironing, cooking, washing, dressmaking, millinery, fashion design, typing, weaving, artificial flowers, etc. The same sort of work was available to Italian women who emigrated to the United States of America. The success achieved by the women's movement is shown in the paper presented by Irene de Bonis "Occupational diseases among women" and published in the proceedings of the fourth National Congress on Occupational Diseases held in Rome, 9-14 June 1914. The article outlines the main features of the women's movement at the turn of the twentieth century, focussing on their publications describing Italian women's working conditions, considered in an international context. The movement's engagement in the promotion of women's occupational health at international and national level was successful but the First World War was to transform this achievement into the women's peace movement.

  8. Classifying and Citing Schumpeter's Works From the Perspective of English Availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    This paper presents a selective and annotated bibliography of Schumpeter's works together with a system for citing and referencing them. Schumpeter wrote about 12 books and booklets, 200 articles, and 50 reviews in two languages. Since the world of economics is increasingly an Anglophone world...... in English; and the citation clearly indicates whether a work is in English or German. The system also gives priority to an article's availability in an easily accessible collection so that the original sources are only included as additional information in the reference. The paper presents a large selection...

  9. Work Identity and Contradictory Experiences of Welfare Workers in a Life-history Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybbroe, Betina

    2012-01-01

    Transformation of the welfare sectors challenge professional identities of care and welfare workers in Scandinavia. At the same time welfare and care workers take part in these changes and are changed in the psycho-social setting of the workplace. This article presents research about care work...... in nursing and involves a young nurse in scenes of the hospital, where gendered life history is re-enacted and present in a gendered work life with fragile possibilities of identification . Social dynamics interact with subjective dynamics in ways that illuminate not only habitual and creative orientations...

  10. Relationship between protean career orientation and work-life balance: A resource perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Direnzo, Marco S.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Weer, Christy H.

    2015-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/job.1996 Despite the commonly held belief that a protean career orientation (PCO) enables employees to achieve more balance in their lives, little is known about the relationship between PCO and work-life balance. Using two waves of data collection separated by 2.5 years, this study examined the relationship between PCO and work-life balance among a sample of 367 college-educated employees in the Unite...

  11. The Black Woman Worker: A Minority Group Perspective on Women at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene

    1986-01-01

    Being black and female is a double disadvantage in the labor market. Black women work in higher proportions than other women, but their wages are less and many have undesirable jobs. Some black women are experiencing more employment success, but as racial discrimination lessens, they face sexism. (VM)

  12. A life course perspective on mental health problems, employment, and work outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, Karin; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Verhulst, Frank C; Ortiz, Josue Almansa; Bültmann, Ute

    Objectives Little is known about how employment and work outcomes among young adults are influenced by their life-course history of mental health problems. Therefore, the aims of this study were to (i) identify trajectories of mental health problems from childhood to young adulthood and (ii)

  13. Applying Structural Systems Thinking to Frame Perspectives on Social Work Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringfellow, Erin J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Innovation will be key to the success of the Grand Challenges Initiative in social work. A structural systems framework based in system dynamics could be useful for considering how to advance innovation. Method: Diagrams using system dynamics conventions were developed to link common themes across concept papers written by social work…

  14. Making Sense of the Works of Amar Kanwar: A Phenomenological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Vial Kayser

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Amar Kanwar (b. 1964 is an Indian video and installation artist whose stated concern is violence in the context of South Asia. This article will examine two works, 'A Season Outside' (1997 and 'The Lightning ­Testimonies' (2007, proposing that empathy, intersubjectivity and a search for ­harmony, influenced both by Gandhi and Buddhism, are key concepts relevant to their interpretation while the choice of images and the editing process convey an embodied, phenomenological experience that is coherent with these influences. In addition it will infer from some evidence given by the works and by the artist that this search for social and collective harmony also has a psychological and individual dimension. It will be argued that the latter constitutes the true power of the works as the spectator does not so much reflect upon the violence exercised by the various perpetrators and experienced by the victims in a rational and political manner, but, rather, witnesses the film-maker’s reaction to the experience of violence; a situation which Vivian Sobchack has characterised as phenomenological. Through this process the spectator can empathise with the narrator and reflect on the affects examined by the works: namely violence and loss, but also love and compassion.

  15. Group work in the English language curriculum sociocultural and ecological perspectives on second language classroom learning

    CERN Document Server

    Chappell, P

    2014-01-01

    This book explores how using small groups in second language classrooms supports language learning. Chappell's experience as a language teacher equips him to present a clear, evidence-based argument for the powerful influence group work has upon the opportunities for learning, and how it should therefore be an integral part of language lessons.

  16. Industrial Work, Instrumentalism, Learning Processes: An Old Debate in a Utopian Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsén, Peter; Nielsen, Kurt Aagaard; Nielsen, Birger Steen

    1993-01-01

    of the article: In an action research project, called 'Industry and Happiness', an egalitarian co-operation between unskilled workers and researchers has been developed. Through a utopian working method the workers have developed autonomous learning processes. On the basis of their own experiences they have...

  17. Barriers and facilitators to return to work in mental disorders : Multi-stakeholder perspective study (poster)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosen, M.C.W.; Arends, I.; Lugtenberg, M.; van Gestel, J.A.W.M.; Schaapveld, B.C.T.M.; Terluin, B.; van Weeghel, J.; van der Klink, J.J.L.; Brouwers, E.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Common mental disorders (CMDs) are among the leading causes of disability worldwide and are a pressing issue for society. CMDs are the most prevalent causes of sickness absence and different stakeholders are involved in facilitating return to work. In this qualitative study, the

  18. Effective Laboratory Work in Biochemistry Subject: Students' and Lecturers' Perspective in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Yunita Arian Sani; Senam; Laksono F. X., Endang Widjajanti

    2017-01-01

    Biochemistry subject had problem in learning and teaching, especially in laboratory work. We explored laboratory learning implementation in Biochemistry subject. Participants of this research were 195 students who took biochemistry subject and 4 lecturers of biochemistry in three universities in Indonesia. We obtained data using questionnaires and…

  19. Perspective: A Pull in Two Directions--Mothers Torn between Work and Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Anne Pleshette

    2004-01-01

    This article was excerpted from the author's "The 7 Stages of Motherhood: Making the Most of Your Life as a Mom," published by Alfred A. Knopf in 2004. The author describes the experiences of several professional women, including herself, returning to work from maternity leave. The article examines the varied and sometimes ambivalent responses…

  20. Early Childhood Educators' Perspectives of the Swedish National Curriculum for Preschool and Quality Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Jane; Renblad, Karin

    2015-01-01

    There is today an increasing global interest in early childhood education, especially with regard to curriculum and quality work. The aim of this article is to study preschool teachers' and child care workers' views on the revised national curriculum for preschool in Sweden (Lpfö 98, rev. 2010), and if the educators perceive that they can conduct…

  1. Social Work Home Visits to Children and Families in the UK: A Foucauldian Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Karen; Cree, Viviene E

    2016-07-01

    The home visit is at the heart of social work practice with children and families; it is what children and families' social workers do more than any other single activity (except for recording), and it is through the home visit that assessments are made on a daily basis about risk, protection and welfare of children. And yet it is, more than any other activity, an example of what Pithouse has called an 'invisible trade': it happens behind closed doors, in the most secret and intimate spaces of family life. Drawing on conceptual tools associated with the work of Foucault, this article sets out to provide a critical, chronological review of research, policy and practice on home visiting. We aim to explain how and in what ways changing discourses have shaped the emergence, legitimacy, research and practice of the social work home visit to children and families at significant time periods and in a UK context. We end by highlighting the importance for the social work profession of engagement and critical reflection on the identified themes as part of their daily practice.

  2. The effect of limiting residents' work hours on their surgical training: a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanchuk, Ken

    2004-05-01

    Restrictions in residents' work hours have been in place in Canada for roughly a decade, having been negotiated rather than imposed. The changes in residents' schedules that resulted are roughly equivalent to the limitation of 80 duty hours per week in the United States. When work-hours restrictions began, surgery faculty were worried that residents' experience would be compromised. But these fears have not materialized. Why? The author maintains there are many reasons. (1) Most surgical procedures are now faster, and lengthy inpatient care has diminished, all of which saves time. (2) Formerly difficult or risky procedures are now performed more frequently and safely, which increases residents' education about difficult conditions. (3) A variety of resources (e.g., skills-transfer courses, surgical simulators, etc.) are now available for residents to learn and evolve surgical techniques, and residents take advantage of these resources, being highly motivated to learn the best in the time available to them. (4) There have been positive changes in residents' education that have helped them become more efficient learners than before, with improved resources and skills for faster access to information. The author maintains that in his present surgery residency program, the residents still work extremely hard but are more protected from the unending demands for patient care. They have more time for orderly study and greater opportunities to develop skills other than technical ones. They are in a happier work setting, which the author strongly believes facilitates improved patient care.

  3. The Strategic and Legal Risks of Work-Integrated Learning: An Enterprise Risk Management Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) is a risky business for universities. WIL is a strategic risk worthy of pursuing by universities in the prevailing higher education environment, which is characterized by competition, changes in funding arrangements and stakeholder demand for WIL. Nevertheless the strategic opportunities that WIL presents cannot be…

  4. A Psychobiological Perspective on Working Memory Performance at 8 Months of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Martha Ann

    2012-01-01

    Fifty 8-month-old infants participated in a study of the interrelations among cognition, temperament, and electrophysiology. Better performance on a working memory task (assessed using a looking version of the A-not-B task) was associated with increases in frontal-parietal EEG coherence from baseline to task, as well as elevated levels of…

  5. A Study on Literary Criticism from the Perspective of Ethics——Taking Amy Tan's Works for Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yali; Yang Fan

    2017-01-01

    Amy Tan is a rnaster of describing the ethical relationship between people,and her novels focus particularly on family ethics.After interpretation of the setting of the ethical knots,.the trend of the ethical lines,and the structure of ethics in her novels from the perspective of literary ethics,we find out that every novel has its own characteristics and angle,and they share some commonality too.The analysis of the formation and deconstruction of the ethical knots,the ethical lines and the ethical structure in her novels give us an insight into Amy Tan's ethical philosophy that she wants to convey to readers through her novels,that is,harrnonious relationship will ultimately be built as long as people communicate sincerely,regardless of barriers and contradictions.This is not only the ethical ideas the author wants to convey,but also the ethical orientation of her works.

  6. Work-loss years among people diagnosed with diabetes: a reappraisal from a life course perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B; von Bonsdorff, Monika E; Haanpää, Maija; Salonen, Minna; Mikkola, Tuija M; Kautiainen, Hannu; Eriksson, Johan G

    2018-05-01

    Early exit from the workforce has been proposed to be one of the unfavorable consequences of diabetes. We examined whether early exit from the workforce differed between persons who were and were not diagnosed with diabetes during their work career. The cohort included 12,726 individuals of the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study, born between 1934 and 1944. Using data from nationwide registers, the cohort was followed up from early adulthood until they transitioned into retirement or died. Work-loss years were estimated using the restricted mean work years method. During a follow-up of 382,328 person-years for men and 349 894 for women, 36.8% transitioned into old age pension and 63.2% exited workforce early. Among men, 40.5% of those with and 32.8% of those without diabetes transitioned into old age pension (p=0.003). The corresponding numbers for women were 48.6% and 40.4% (p = 0.013), respectively. Mean age at exit from the workforce was 60.1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 59.6 to 60.7) years among men with diabetes and 57.6 (95% CI, 57.2 to 58.0) years among men without diabetes (p = 0.016). Among women, corresponding ages were 61.4 (95% CI, 60.8 to 61.9) years for those with diabetes and 59.5 (95% CI, 59.3 to 59.7) years for those without diabetes (p work-loss years according to diabetes was 2.5 (95% CI 0.5 to 4.6) for men and 1.9 (95% CI 1.0 to 2.8) for women. Among individuals followed up throughout their work career, those with a diabetes diagnosis exited the workforce approximately two years later compared to those without diabetes.

  7. Assessing the Present in Perspective of the Past: Experiences from a Chronicle Workshop on Company-Level Work Disability Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrik Gensby

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Participatory approaches to jointly address development and change processes are increasingly applied in Nordic working life research. One approach, the Chronicle Workshop (CW, aims at facilitating collective history through collaborative exploration and joint analysis of organizational development and change processes to guide forthcoming change. This study presents the CW methodology as an interactive research process. The study examines how the CW can facilitate mutual understanding and explanation of sickness absence and return to work efforts in the healthcare workplace, and discuss the extent to which the CW methodology can inform researchers involved in organizational development and change to address some potential limitations that exist. The CW encouraged the expression of diverse perspectives, incorporating insight from different organizational levels, and identified various kinds of resources and dilemmas in mapping the collective history of company-level sickness absence and return to work efforts. More attention to consensus building and power relations, greater explicitness about theoretical groundings, researcher role, and follow-up action ought to be considered prospectively to develop the method further. Inspiration from action research principles and the combined use of critical realism and interactive research may guide future development of the CW methodology.

  8. "… Trial and error …": Speech-language pathologists' perspectives of working with Indigenous Australian adults with acquired communication disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Frances Clare; Brown, Louise; Siyambalapitiya, Samantha; Plant, Christopher

    2016-10-01

    This study explored speech-language pathologists' (SLPs) perspectives about factors that influence clinical management of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults with acquired communication disorders (e.g. aphasia, motor speech disorders). Using a qualitative phenomenological approach, seven SLPs working in North Queensland, Australia with experience working with this population participated in semi-structured in-depth interviews. Qualitative content analysis was used to identify categories and overarching themes within the data. Four categories, in relation to barriers and facilitators, were identified from participants' responses: (1) The Practice Context; (2) Working Together; (3) Client Factors; and (4) Speech-Language Pathologist Factors. Three overarching themes were also found to influence effective speech pathology services: (1) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Practices; (2) Information and Communication; and (3) Time. This study identified many complex and inter-related factors which influenced SLPs' effective clinical management of this caseload. The findings suggest that SLPs should employ a flexible, holistic and collaborative approach in order to facilitate effective clinical management with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with acquired communication disorders.

  9. The recall of information from working memory : insights from behavioural and chronometric perspectives.

    OpenAIRE

    Towse, John N.; Cowan, Nelson; Hitch, Graham J.; Horton, Neil

    2008-01-01

    We describe and evaluate a recall reconstruction hypothesis for working memory (WM), according to which items can be recovered from multiple memory representations. Across four experiments, participants recalled memoranda that were either integrated with or independent of the sentence content. We found consistently longer pauses accompanying the correct recall of integrated compared with independent words, supporting the argument that sentence memory could scaffold the access of target items....

  10. A Cross-Modal Perspective on the Relationships between Imagery and Working Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Likova, Lora T.

    2013-01-01

    Mapping the distinctions and interrelationships between imagery and working memory (WM) remains challenging. Although each of these major cognitive constructs is defined and treated in various ways across studies, most accept that both imagery and WM involve a form of internal representation available to our awareness. In WM, there is a further emphasis on goal-oriented, active maintenance, and use of this conscious representation to guide voluntary action. Multicomponent WM models incorporat...

  11. Comparative Perspectives on Work-Life Balance and Gender Equality: Fathers on Leave Alone

    OpenAIRE

    O'Brien, Margaret; Wall, Karin

    2017-01-01

    This book portrays men’s experiences of home alone leave and how it affects their lives and family gender roles in different policy contexts and explores how this unique parental leave design is implemented in these contrasting policy regimes. The book brings together three major theoretical strands: social policy, in particular the literature on comparative leave policy developments; family and gender studies, in particular the analysis of gendered divisions of work and care and recent shi...

  12. Opportunities and barriers for successful return to work after acquired brain injury: A patient perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matérne, Marie; Lundqvist, Lars-Olov; Strandberg, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Many people who suffer an acquired brain injury (ABI) are of working age. There are benefits, for the patient, the workplace, and society, to finding factors that facilitate successful return to work (RTW). The aim was to increase knowledge of opportunities and barriers for a successful RTW in patients with ABI. Five men and five women with ABI participated. All had successfully returned to work at least 20 hours a week. Their experiences were gathered by semi-structured interviews, which were subsequently subjected to qualitative content analysis. Three themes that influenced RTW were identified: individually adapted rehabilitation; motivation for RTW; and cognitive and social abilities. An individually adapted rehabilitation was judged important because the patients were involved in their own rehabilitation and required individually adapted support from rehabilitation specialists, employers, and colleagues. A moderate level of motivation for RTW was needed. Awareness of the person's cognitive and social abilities is essential, in finding compensatory strategies and adaptations. It seems that the vocational rehabilitation process is a balancing act in individualized planning and support, as a partnership with the employer needs to be developed, motivation needs to be generated, and awareness built of abilities that facilitate or hinder RTW.

  13. Resident Perspectives on Work-Life Policies and Implications for Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westercamp, Nicole; Wang, Raziya S; Fassiotto, Magali

    2018-02-01

    As resident burnout increases, there is a need for better awareness, resources, and interventions. Challenges in balancing work and life priorities have been implicated in contributing to physician burnout. Institutional work-life policies (WLPs) are critical tools to meet work-life needs. This study investigates the influence of WLPs on residents' experiences. The authors emailed a SurveyMonkey link to the APA chief resident and Minority Fellow listservs and directly to 94 psychiatry program directors and 52 fellowship directors nationwide to distribute a survey to residents regarding WLP use and barriers, as well as burnout. Estimated response rate was 12-23%. The authors assessed the anonymous responses using SPSS to evaluate for relationships between awareness of WLPs, perceptions/barriers surrounding their usage, and burnout. The authors analyzed 255 responses. Awareness and use of policies ranged from 2 to 33%. A prominent barrier to WLPs is that use results in shifting workload to co-residents (48% agree). Respondents who perceived leadership to view use of WLPs as a sign of weakness (16% agree) were less likely to use WLPs (t (89) = -3.52, p burnout (41%) perceived vastly higher barriers to using WLPs as compared to those without burnout. This study supports the need for further investigation of WLPs to mitigate resident burnout and identifies important perceived barriers that affect the use of WLPs including low awareness, potential for shifting workload to co-residents, and negative perceptions of leadership attitudes toward WLPs.

  14. Characteristics of safety critical organizations . work psychological perspective; Turvallisuuskriittisten organisaatioiden toiminnan erityispiirteet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oedewald, P.; Reiman, T. [VTT, Espoo (Finland)

    2006-02-15

    This book deals with organizations that operate in high hazard industries, such as the nuclear power, aviation, oil and chemical industry organisations. The society puts a great strain on these organisations to rigorously manage the risks inherent in the technology they use and the products they produce. In this book, an organisational psychology view is taken to analyse what are the typical challenges of daily work in these environments. The analysis is based on a literature review about human and organisational factors in safety critical industries, and on the interviews of Finnish safety experts and safety managers from four different companies. In addition to this, personnel interviews conducted in the Finnish nuclear power plants are utilised. The authors come up with eight themes that seem to be common organizational challenges cross the industries. These include e.g. how does the personnel understand the risks and what is the right level for rules and procedures to guide the work activities. The primary aim of this book is to contribute to the Finnish nuclear safety research and safety management discussion. However, the book is equally suitable for risk management, organizational development and human resources management specialists in different industries. The purpose is to encourage readers to consider how the human and organizational factors are seen in the field they work in. (orig.)

  15. Through doctors' eyes: A qualitative study of hospital doctor perspectives on their working conditions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGowan, Yvonne

    2013-03-11

    BACKGROUND: Hospital doctors face significant challenges in the current health care environment, working with staff shortages and cutbacks to health care expenditure, alongside increased demand for health care and increased public expectations. OBJECTIVE: This article analyses challenges faced by junior hospital doctors, providing insight into the experiences of these frontline staff in delivering health services in recessionary times. DESIGN: A qualitative methodology was chosen. METHODS: Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 doctors from urban Irish hospitals. Interviews were recorded via note taking. Full transcripts were analysed thematically using NVivo software. RESULTS: Dominant themes included the following: (1) unrealistic workloads: characterised by staff shortages, extended working hours, irregular and frequently interrupted breaks; (2) fatigue and its impact: the quality of care provided to patients while doctors were sleep-deprived was questioned; however, little reflection was given to any impact this may have had on junior doctors own health; (3) undervalued and disillusioned: insufficient training, intensive workloads and a perceived lack of power to influence change resulted in a sense of detachment among junior doctors. They appeared immune to their surroundings. CONCLUSION: Respondents ascribed little importance to the impact of current working conditions on their own health. They felt their roles were underappreciated and undervalued by policy makers and hospital management. Respondents were concerned with the lack of time and opportunity for training. This study highlighted several \\'red flags\\

  16. Factors promoting a successful return to work: from an employer and employee perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Klara; Lillefjell, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Efforts have been made to explain the inability to return to work (RTW) due to employees' chronic musculoskeletal pain. Knowledge of factors facilitating the RTW process is however still limited. Based on the experiences of employees and employers, this study aims to identify factors promoting a successful return process for persons with chronic musculoskeletal pain. The findings from interviews, involving six employees with musculoskeletal pain, and five employers with various work experience, were analysed by Giorgi's phenomenological analysis through four stages. The major themes underlying the employees' comments for a successful RTW were identifying and mobilizing their personal resources, adapting a balanced daily life, and requiring a positive dialogue with family and their employer, while the employers underlined the need for a helpful adjustment at work and how they wanted to become more involved in the rehabilitation process. In conclusion our findings underline the need for extended collaboration between the employees, employer, and rehabilitation staff, and should encourage occupational therapists to direct even more of their expertise towards the situation at the workplace.

  17. Do they see eye to eye? Management and employee perspectives of high-performance work systems and influence processes on service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hui; Toya, Keiko; Lepak, David P; Hong, Ying

    2009-03-01

    Extant research on high-performance work systems (HPWSs) has primarily examined the effects of HPWSs on establishment or firm-level performance from a management perspective in manufacturing settings. The current study extends this literature by differentiating management and employee perspectives of HPWSs and examining how the two perspectives relate to employee individual performance in the service context. Data collected in three phases from multiple sources involving 292 managers, 830 employees, and 1,772 customers of 91 bank branches revealed significant differences between management and employee perspectives of HPWSs. There were also significant differences in employee perspectives of HPWSs among employees of different employment statuses and among employees of the same status. Further, employee perspective of HPWSs was positively related to individual general service performance through the mediation of employee human capital and perceived organizational support and was positively related to individual knowledge-intensive service performance through the mediation of employee human capital and psychological empowerment. At the same time, management perspective of HPWSs was related to employee human capital and both types of service performance. Finally, a branch's overall knowledge-intensive service performance was positively associated with customer overall satisfaction with the branch's service. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. The role of private organisations in welfare work. The historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastrup, B

    1992-06-01

    The Danish welfare measures originated in private initiatives. From the end of the last century, welfare activities have developed through private relief organisations and with support from the State, local governments, and counties. Since the 1960s, many institutions which had been built up by private relief organisations were actually taken over by local governments or counties. By way of illustration, the development of EGV DaneCare (the Danish Association for the Care of the Elderly), from its origin as a voluntary relief organisation based on voluntary work and collected funds, is described. From 1910, EGV was the pioneer within the field of, for example, old people's homes, winter shelters, and holidays in the country for elderly people. In the 1960s, EGV became a professional service organisation which assisted the local governments in developing a wide range of variegated offers within the work for elderly people. Assistance offered to the local governments became the organisation's principal project up to the 1980s. The population's confidence in the ability of the public authorities to cope with the social tasks was at the time undermined by increasing scepticism. That was why EGV founded the DaneAge Association, which soon became a national cause with more than 200,000 members. The DaneAge Association operates as an association independent of the public authorities pursuing both local and national policies concerning the elderly and implementing humanitarian initiatives based on voluntary work. Studies made by the DaneAge Association show, among other things, that 20 per cent of the people aged 60 and over need practical assistance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Working Group 3: Broader Perspectives on Non-proliferation and Nuclear Verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, M.; Pregenzer, A.; Stein, G.

    2013-01-01

    This working group (WG) focused on the technical topics related to international security and stability in global nonproliferation and arms control regimes and asked how nonproliferation tools and culture might facilitate verification of future nuclear treaties. The review of existing and future nonproliferation and disarmament regimes (Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty - CTBT, UNSC Resolution 1540, UK/Norway/VERTIC exercise, Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty - FMCT) offered a view on challenges, possibilities, and limitations for future initiatives. The concepts that the WG considered, with potential use in implementing future nuclear verification treaties, are: Triple S Culture (Safety, Security, Safeguards), State-Level Approach, Safeguards-by-Design, risk-based approaches, managed access, inspections, and protection of sensitive information. Under these concepts, many existing tools, considered by the WG could be used for nuclear verification. Export control works to control sensitive technology and expertise. Global implementation is complicated and multi-faceted and would benefit from greater consistency and efficiency. In most cases, international cooperation and development international capability would supplement efforts. This document is composed of the slides and the paper of the presentation. (A.C.)

  20. Physical, social and emotional function after work accidents: a medicolegal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtedahl, Robin; Veiersted, Kaj Bo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse social and functional consequences of work accidents in a group of workers' compensation claimants who had been referred from the National Insurance Administration for a medicolegal assessment. The injured workers were evaluated on average 3 years after their accidents. Their medical records were analysed, and each injury was scored according to the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). Participants completed the Short Form Questionnaire (SF-36). Factors relating to outcome on SF-36 were analysed using univariate and multivariate methods. 191 claimants returned the SF-36 (62%), 83% of the respondents had an AIS score of less than two, 33% reported working full time. Compared to population-based norms, the respondents reported significantly reduced health on all eight scales of SF-36. Better health and function was mainly associated with a higher level of education and more serious injuries. The extent of social support in the workplace after the accident was only partly related to outcome. The importance of psychosocial factors when making injury assessments in a medicolegal setting is highlighted.

  1. Australian and South African perspectives on the implementation of flexible work practices (Fwp: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aletta Odendaal

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify examples of good and innovative practices of Flexible Work Practices to benchmark against and then to use the information to develop strategies of implementation that will assist South African organisations to emulate their success. One hundred-and-twenty (120 individuals, representing different stakeholder groups were requested to complete a questionnaire, based on an Australian study. Comparative findings of both countries strongly confirmed variables that are positively associated with the adoption and successful implementation of Flexible Work Practices (FWP. Opsomming Die doel van hierdie studie was om voorbeelde van goeie en innoverende gebruike van Buigsame Werkspraktyke te identifiseer ten einde daarteen te kan vergelyk, en dan om hierdie inligting te gebruik ten einde implementeringstrategieë te ontwikkel wat Suid Afrikaanse maatskappye kan gebruik om sukses na te volg. Honderd en twintig (120 individue, wat verskillende belangegroepe verteenwoordig, is genader om ‘n vraelys, gebaseer op ‘n Australiese studie, te voltooi. Vergelykende bevindinge van beide lande bevestig veranderlikes wat positief geassosieer word met die aanvaarding en suksesvolle implementering van Buigsame Werkspraktyke (BWP.

  2. Child Work Safety on the Farms of Local Agricultural Market Producers: Parent and Child Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Phillip; Quandt, Sara A; Spears Johnson, Chaya R; Arcury, Thomas A

    2018-01-01

    Agriculture is a hazardous industry, yet there are few regulations on the ages at which children may engage in farm work. Local agricultural market producers (LAMPs) are a growing subset of farmers within "sustainable agriculture" who engage in direct-to-consumer and direct-to-retailer enterprises. This study explores the occupational health and safety perceptions of parents and children for children who work on their families' LAMP farms. In-depth interviews were conducted with 12 parent-child dyads from LAMP farms in Illinois and North Carolina. Four themes emerged from these 24 interviews; parents and children perceived that: (1) the nature of small farms makes them safer than industrial agricultural operations; (2) child safety on farms is common sense; (3) avoiding hazardous tasks keeps children safe; and (4) parents know best (compared to regulations) about ways to keep their children safe. Some of these themes echo the results of earlier studies conducted with more conventional farms. Further research is needed to develop programs to improve child occupational safety on LAMP farms.

  3. Social intervention with syrian refugees from a resilient perspective through Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Fernández-López

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The current globalization system interconnects conflicts, problems and social policies in such a way that they do not only concern their countries of origin, but all the nations in the world. This paper is a bibliographic review with two main lines. The first one is focused on the root causes of the Syrian War and, as a consequence, the thousands of Syrian refugees it created. They were forced to flee from their country, and had to face several difficulties and overcome all kind of obstacles, which has been the source of many tragedies. The contribution of resilience as a social intervention approach with Syrian refugees from the point of view of Social Work is the second line of this paper. This social intervention approach is aimed at strengthening and empowering people against adversity in order to cope with trauma. This objective and the purpose of Social Work are one and the same: to guarantee and promote Human Rights all over the world.  

  4. The nature and workings of sacred intellect from the perspective of Avicenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einollah Khademi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sacred intellect in Avicenna, a degree of rationality in which the highest form of communication is done with the intellectual world. Reasonable time to the times of human rationality is achieved without difficulty, pain and time, only be achieved by applying guess. The owners of Avicenna's top intellects in human beings are sacred and highest prophet for them. These people are the first intelligible human teachers perceive first and put it to other people. . Bu-Ali about how to communicate the power of the active intellect and innate or acquired its own works differently to comment the funds are somehow retractable. To prove his philosophical question of the nature and functions of the sacred intellect as much existence of intellect, perception as well as all forms of The Holy Quran verses seeks help.

  5. The effects of the European Working Time Directive on surgical training: the basic surgical trainee's perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, B D

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: On the 1 August 2009, the implementation of European Working Time Directive became European law and was implemented in Galway University Hospital (GUH). AIMS: The aim of the study is to ascertain the opinion of the 25 surgical SHOs in GUH on the effect of the implementation of an EWTD compliant roster had on the quality of their training. METHODS: A questionnaire was circulated to all 25 surgical SHOs. RESULTS: Twenty-two (88%) SHOs report a reduction in the quality of their training. 18 (72%) report a reduction in the development of their operative skills. The SHOs believed the EWTD Rotas would encourage Irish graduates to train abroad. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical training faces a challenge with the implementation of EWTD Rotas. Major changes need to be made to the surgical training structure to train surgeons to the highest standard and to retain Irish-trained surgeons in the Irish healthcare system.

  6. A study of the main ideas in Beauvoir’s works from perspective of existentialism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyuan Bai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Simone de Beauvoir is one of the main representatives of existential philosophy which was the most influential philosophy school in 20th century. She is also the most famous feminist in the west. After Le Deuxième Sexe, Simone de Beauvoir wrote another brilliant work describing intellectuals’ destiny — Les Mandarins. This is a book deeply manifests the French intellectual faces during hesitation on crossroads and struggling for progress after World War II. Intellectuals, women & love, revolution & politics are the main themes in this novel. This thesis aims to analyze Simone de Beauvoir’s creation ideas of literature through the social reality in which French intellectual circles lived and from the characters’ love experience. It will mainly focus on stating Simone de Beauvoir’s feminism vision of love and her ethics of the self and the other advocated in the novel.

  7. Apron strings of working mothers: Maternal employment and housework in cross-national perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treas, Judith; Tai, Tsui-O

    2012-07-01

    This paper asks whether maternal employment has a lasting influence on the division of household labor for married women and men. Employing multi-level models with 2002 ISSP survey data for 31 countries, we test the lagged accommodation hypothesis that a long societal history of maternal employment contributes to more egalitarian household arrangements. Our results find that living in a country with a legacy of high maternal employment is positively associated with housework task-sharing, even controlling for the personal socialization experience of growing up with a mother who worked for pay. In formerly socialist countries, however, there is less gender parity in housework than predicted by the high historical level of maternal employment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The recall of information from working memory. Insights from behavioural and chronometric perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towse, John N; Cowan, Nelson; Hitch, Graham J; Horton, Neil J

    2008-01-01

    We describe and evaluate a recall reconstruction hypothesis for working memory (WM), according to which items can be recovered from multiple memory representations. Across four experiments, participants recalled memoranda that were either integrated with or independent of the sentence content. We found consistently longer pauses accompanying the correct recall of integrated compared with independent words, supporting the argument that sentence memory could scaffold the access of target items. Integrated words were also more likely to be recalled correctly, dependent on the details of the task. Experiment 1 investigated the chronometry of spoken recall for word span and reading span, with participants completing an unfinished sentence in the latter case. Experiments 2 and 3 confirm recall time differences without using word generation requirements, while Experiment 4 used an item and order response choice paradigm with nonspoken responses. Data emphasise the value of recall timing in constraining theories of WM functioning.

  9. On the activities and perspective works of Soviet Scientist Committee for peace against nuclear hazard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velikhov, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    Activities of Soviet Scientists' Committee for peace against nuclear hazard established in May 1983 was considered. Committee efforts are directed at struggle for nuclear weapon destruction, for stopping of all kinds of its tests against disposition of nuclear waepon in space. Soviet scientist report on SDI says that such system may serve not only as defensive means but also as means of destruction of earth, air and other objects and represents the most serious danger. Together with american scientists the Committee investigated ecological consequencies of nuclear war which results strongly impressed all over the world. Attention is paid to prospects in the Committee work related to the development of nuclear weapon destribution procedures as well as procedures and means of controls for destruction and limitation of weapons

  10. [Neighborhood Systematic Social Observation; The Case of Chile and its Perspectives for Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhueza, Guillermo E; Delva, Jorge; Andrade, Fernando H; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Bares, Cristina; Castillo, Marcela

    2011-12-01

    The study of neighborhood characteristics and their effects on individuals has become an area of increasing attention by scholars from various disciplines in developed countries. Although there are various methods to study neighborhoods and their impact on human populations, one of the most used is the Systematic Social Observation -Observación Sistemática de Vecindarios (OSV), in Spanish-because it allows the collection of information about various features of the physical, social, environmental and economic characteristics of neighborhoods. The purpose of this article is to (i) briefly present some research on neighborhood effects influential in the U.S., ii) describe how they Systematic Social Observation was designed and implemented in the city of Santiago, Chile, iii) discuss some facilitators and obstacles of the implementation process and, finally iv) list possible contributions and limitations this approach would offer the profession of social work in Chile.

  11. The regulatory authorities` perspective of environmental impact assessment (EIA). Report of the Joint Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Haegg, C. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Larsen, B. [Boverket, Stockholm (Sweden); Loefgren, T. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Schibbye, K. [Riksantikvarieaembetet, Stockholm (Sweden); Timm, B. [Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, Solna (Sweden)

    1995-12-01

    The present paper is a highly abridged version of the report SSI--95-05 (available in Swedish only). The report mainly deals with the broad basis for decision-making which is necessary for licensing by the government in accordance with section 4 of the Act (1987:12) concerning the Management of Natural Resources etc (Natural Resources Act) for the siting of facilities for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel that is planned in Sweden. Licensing issues which currently are of interest concern decisions on the siting of an encapsulation facility and detailed characterization of potential sites for a repository. Several governmental authorities will be involved in these licensing issues. Furthermore, it is noted that decisions regarding the different facilities will be made in several stages e g feasibility studies, site investigations, detailed characterizations, siting, construction and commissioning. The joint group issued recommendations with regard to the content of the EIS and how the EIA should be worked out.

  12. The relation between working memory components and ADHD symptoms from a developmental perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Carin; Eninger, Lilianne; Forssman, Linda; Bohlin, Gunilla

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to examine the relations between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and four working memory (WM) components (short-term memory and central executive in verbal and visuospatial domains) in 284 6-16-year-old children from the general population. The results showed that verbal and visuospatial short-term memory and verbal central executive uniquely contributed to inattention symptoms. Age interacted with verbal short-term memory in predicting inattention, with the relation being stronger in older children. These findings support the notion of ADHD as a developmental disorder, with changes in associated neuropsychological deficits across time. The results further indicate ADHD-related deficits in several specific WM components.

  13. Interplay Wellbeing Framework: Community Perspectives on Working Together for Effective Service Delivery in Remote Aboriginal Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva McRae-Williams

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Access to effective services and programs is necessary to improve wellbeing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote Australia. Without genuine participation of Aboriginal community members in the design, governance, and delivery of services, desired service delivery outcomes are rarely achieved. Using a "shared space" model, Aboriginal communities, governments, and scientists came together to design and develop the Interplay Wellbeing Framework. This Framework brings together stories and numbers (or qualitative and quantitative data to represent community values for the purpose of informing program and policy agendas. This article unpacks what community members saw as making a service work well and why. The domains of empowerment and community functioning are discussed and their relationship to effective service delivery demonstrated.

  14. Social Determinants of Health: Perspective of the ALAMES Social Determinants Working Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Escudero

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The recent discussion of the social determinants of health, which has been promoted by the WHO as a way to approach global health conditions is neither a new nor a foreign subject for Latin American social medicine or collective health. Indeed, this approach to health derives from the principles of 19th century European social medicine which accepted that the health of the population is a matter of social concern, that social and economic conditions have an important bearing on health and disease, and that these relationships should be subjected to scientific enquiry. (Rosen, 1985:81 The specific socio-historical conditions of Latin America in the 1970’s fostered the development of an innovative, critical, and socially-based based health analysis, which was seen in an evolving theoretical approach with deep social roots. (Cohn, 2003 This analysis calls for scientific work which is committed to changing living and working conditions and to improving the health of the popular classes. (Waitzkin y col. 2001; Iriart y col. 2002. From its beginning, this school of socio-medical thought recognized that collective health has two main areas of research: 1 the distribution and determinants of health and disease and 2 the interpretation, technical knowledge, and specialized practices concerning health, disease, and death. The goal is to understand health and disease as differentiated moments in the human lifecycle, subject to permanent change, and expressing the biological nature of the human body under specific forms of social organization, all this in such a way as to allow discussion of causality and determination. (Breilh y Granda,1982; Laurell, 1982. Latin American social medicine criticized biomedical and conventional epidemiological approaches for isolating health and disease from social context, misinterpreting social processes as biological, conceptualizing health phenomena in individualistic terms, and adopting the methodological

  15. Effectiveness of technology to support work based learning: the stakeholders' perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Penlington

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Higher education provision typically requires learners to physically attend sessions on campus. The economic climate has changed significantly over the past few years in the UK and globally. Inevitably changes to student funding and the increased competitive nature of the job market have impacted on university teaching. The use of work based learning (WBL is an alternative flexible form of learning that attempts to tackle these issues. It enables students to learn whilst they work, addressing the funding issues, and enhancing their employability through the acquisition of higher professional qualifications. Often such WBL programmes are designed, delivered and supported from the view of the student and academic staff with little consideration of other stakeholders such as employers, workplace mentors and professional bodies and the input they can bring to enrich the learning and teaching provision. This paper presents the findings from a survey conducted among stakeholders from all four pillars of WBL, namely the learner, the academic environment, the workplace and the external context. Online questionnaires and interviews were carried out with students, tutors, program leaders, employers and professional bodies from four postgraduate programmes at the university. The results show that while there is a reluctance to embrace technology among some academic staff, students are generally positive about using the technology. The survey also demonstrates that there is a lack of creativity and imagination in the use of technology, where often platforms such as virtual learning environments are used simply as repositories for presentation slides, handouts, etc. The results of the study conclude or rather remind all involving parties to pay more emphasis on quality of online programme delivery by embracing technology and use it in novel and imaginative ways to provide a learning and teaching provision fit for the twenty-first century.

  16. Interpersonal and systemic aspects of emotional abuse at work: the target's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keashly, L

    2001-06-01

    The most frequent form of workplace aggression is not physical, it is emotional and psychological in nature. Known by many names, emotional abuse at work is rapidly becoming recognized as pervasive and costly both in individual and organizational terms. Most of the research to date on emotional abuse at work has utilized survey and other quantitative methodologies in an effort to document the presence, prevalence, and impact of these behaviors. However, these methodologies are based on researchers' definitions and theories of what constitutes emotional abuse rather than on the meaning given to these experiences by the targets of these behaviors. A thorough understanding of this phenomenon requires a scholarly appreciation of the target's experience. Taking "feeling abused" as the criterion variable, this study examined target's experiences based on interviews with people who self-identifed as having experienced difficulties with a boss, coworker, or subordinate. The interpersonal aspects of emotional abuse focused on the nature of behaviors exhibited and the respondents' labeling of their experience. Consistent with elements of researchers' definitions, behaviors were defined as abusive when they were repetitive, resulted in injury or harm to target, and were experienced as a lack of recognition of the individual's integrity. Judgments of violation of standards of conduct and unsolicited nature of the behaviors were also related to respondents' experiences. Relative power differential was also an important element. However, contrary to researchers' definitions, actor intent was not central in defining the experience as abusive. The systemic aspect of emotional abuse was illustrated in the nature of organizational responding to concerns raised by respondents. These responses were of critical importance in respondents' labeling of their experiences as abusive. The focus on the meaning of the behaviors for the respondents provides an enriched picture of key

  17. Supporting the role of community members employed as research staff: Perspectives of community researchers working in addiction research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, Gala; Alexander, Leslie B; Fisher, Celia B

    2017-08-01

    Community researchers are laypersons who conduct research activities in their own communities. In addiction and HIV research, community researchers are valued for their insider status and knowledge. At the same time, their presence on the research team raises concerns about coercion and confidentiality when community researchers and participants know each other personally, and the work of navigating between the worlds of research and community leads to moral distress and burnout for some community researchers. In this paper, we draw upon the concept of 'moral experience' to explore the local moral worlds of community researchers in the context of addiction research. In February and March 2010, we conducted focus groups with 36 community researchers employed on community-based addiction studies in the United States to elicit perspectives on ethical and moral challenges they face in their work and insights on best practices to support their role in research. Community researchers described how their values were realized or thwarted in the context of research, and their strategies for coping with shifting identities and competing priorities. They delineated how their knowledge could be used to inform development of research protocols and help principal investigators build and maintain trust with the community researchers on their teams. Our findings contribute to current understandings of the moral experiences of community members employed in research, and inform policies and practices for the growing field of community-engaged research. Funders, research organizations, and research ethics boards should develop guidelines and standards to ensure studies have key resources in place to support community researchers and ensure quality and integrity of community-engaged work. Investigators who work with community researchers should ensure channels for frontline staff to provide input on research protocols and to create an atmosphere where challenges and concerns can be

  18. A Narrative Approach to Authorship: The Work of Evi Tampold from Her Mother/Publisher’s (and Her Own Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Nash

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative authorship in graphic medicine is examinable from a number of perspectives.  One neglected approach is to look for developments in how an individual artist collaborates over the course of illustrating different graphic medicine novels.  In the first, the artist collaborated with her younger self in trying to regain memories of an until then forgotten past.  In the second, she worked closely with the writer to try to determine exactly what the author intended, adding a new dimension to the piece unavailable without the illustrations.  In the third still to be completed work, her illustrations are based on collaboration with only the text and a few photographs, lacking direct contact with the author.  How this artist’s three methods of collaboration have defined her collaborative authorship will be the focus.  What is unique is this study will be undertaken from the stand point of the illustrator’s publisher, who is also her mother.

  19. Retaining nurses and other hospital workers: an intergenerational perspective of the work climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Melanie; Paquet, Maxime; Duchesne, Marie-Anick; Santo, Anelise; Gavrancic, Ana; Courcy, François; Gagnon, Serge

    2010-12-01

    This article describes and compares work climate perceptions and intentions to quit among three generations of hospital workers and nurses. Never before in history has the workplace comprised such a span of generations. The current workforce includes three main generations: Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1963), Generation X (born between 1964 and 1980), and Generation Y (born between 1981 and 2000). However, very little research has linked turnover among nurses and other healthcare workers to their generational profile. A quantitative study with a correlational descriptive design was used. 1,376 hospital workers of the three generations (with 42.1% nurses, 15.6% support staff, 20.1% office employees, and 22.1% health professionals or technicians), employed in a university-affiliated hospital, completed a self-administered questionnaire. They answered the Psychological Climate Questionnaire and a measure of turnover intention. Generation Y hospital workers obtained a significantly lower score on the "Challenge" scale than did Baby Boomers. On the "Absence of Conflict" and "Warmth" scales, the opposite occurred, with Baby Boomers obtaining a significantly lower score than Generation Y respondents. If the nurse job category is taken separately, Generation Y nurses expressed a negative perception of the "Goal Emphasis" scale, compared with Baby Boomers. The proportion of Generation Y nurses who intend to quit is almost three times higher than that of other hospital workers from Generation Y. The main reason given by workers from Generations Y and X who intend to quit the organization is their own career advancement. The main reason given by Baby Boomers who intend to quit is retirement. Retention strategies that focus on improving the work climate are beneficial to all generations of hospital workers and nurses. If generation-specific retention strategies are developed, these should focus on the three areas identified to have intergenerational differences

  20. Parenting in low-income families from the perspective of social work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banovcinova A.

    2018-01-01

    The goal of the study was to find how poverty affects parenting. For the data collection was used questionnaire Alabama Parenting Questionnaire (APQ, which measures parenthood through five dimensions (1 positive involvement with children, (2 Supervision and monitoring, (3 use of positive discipline techniques, (4 consistency in Theus of discipline chniques, (5 use of corporal punishment. The sample was divided into two groups, with the first group consisted of 188 parents living in poverty The reference group consisted of parents living in households with income standard (N−188.Analysis of the results showed differences between parents living in poverty and between parents with a standard rate of income especially in monitoring and supervision, and also in the use of positive disciplinary techniques. On the contrary, there were no significant differences in cooperation between the parents or the use of corporal punishment. Based on the results it is clear that poverty is one of the factors affecting parenting. Therefore, social worker who works with low-income families should focus attention on this area of family functioning.

  1. How does morality work in the brain? A functional and structural perspective of moral behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Leo; Rodrigues, Paulo; Gallardo-Pujol, David

    2013-01-01

    Neural underpinnings of morality are not yet well understood. Researchers in moral neuroscience have tried to find specific structures and processes that shed light on how morality works. Here, we review the main brain areas that have been associated with morality at both structural and functional levels and speculate about how it can be studied. Orbital and ventromedial prefrontal cortices are implicated in emotionally-driven moral decisions, while dorsolateral prefrontal cortex appears to moderate its response. These competing processes may be mediated by the anterior cingulate cortex. Parietal and temporal structures play important roles in the attribution of others' beliefs and intentions. The insular cortex is engaged during empathic processes. Other regions seem to play a more complementary role in morality. Morality is supported not by a single brain circuitry or structure, but by several circuits overlapping with other complex processes. The identification of the core features of morality and moral-related processes is needed. Neuroscience can provide meaningful insights in order to delineate the boundaries of morality in conjunction with moral psychology. PMID:24062650

  2. Insights into workplace Return to Work Coordinator training: An Australian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohatko-Naismith, Joanna; Guest, Maya; Rivett, Darren A; James, Carole

    2016-09-27

    Following brief training, an Australian workplace Return to Work (RTW) Coordinator is expected to provide information to the injured worker, liaise with key stakeholders and maintain workplace policies and procedures in accordance with legislative requirements. The aim of this study was to provide insights into the experiences and perceptions of the Australian Workplace RTW Coordinator in relation to current training practices and to identify any existing inadequacies within the available training. Twenty-five workplace RTW Coordinators from five Australian states participated in six focus groups.Participants with a minimum of two years' experience as a workplace RTW Coordinator and involved with the development and implementation of workplace policies and procedures, were included in the study. Thematic analysis was performed to identity meaningful themes and patterns. The findings highlighted specific training requirements and additional support mechanisms recommended by current workplace RTW Coordinators. Four key themes clearly emerged: inadequate training; irrelevant content; the need for specialised trainers; and network support services. RTW Coordinators require effective training and support to ensure the appropriate and timely delivery of services to all stakeholders involved in the RTW process. The results of this study may inform future training practices for RTW Coordinators.

  3. Double actorship in community health work from the perspectives of presence and empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariet Paes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a qualitative case study that was carried out in a health community practice of 25 years’ standing. In this study ‘double actorship’ emerged as one of the most important elements in the health-based community approach. The people in this community are regarded as active individuals who are able, to a greater or lesser degree, to improve their health autonomously by engaging in sustainable, confidential and supportive relationships. When we analysed the strategies of the professionals and volunteers we found that they took account of both the limitations and potential of the clients. We conclude that both presence and empowerment are necessary factors in community-based health work. The strengths and the weaknesses of people are taken into consideration and attention is paid to how they can help themselves and each other. Double actorship occurs when a relationship develops in which worker and client are both subject and actor; a mutual relationship with a place for limitations and potential, for weakness and strength, even in the case of the most vulnerable people.

  4. A socially committed literary work: perspectives on Elliot Zondi’s Insumansumane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.N. Mathonsi

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article Elliot Zondi’s historical drama, “Insumansumane”, is discussed as a committed literary work. The main character, Bhambada, urges his contemporaries to challenge the ideological domination of the apartheid system and to fight for their freedom to the last man, if necessary. According to Elliot Zondi, the 1906 Bhambada Rebellion was caused by a lack of consultation and utter disregard for the feelings of the African majority regarding taxation. The rebellion was also caused by the forceful introduction of Western culture and social values. The play in itself is actually a metaphor for the Zulu people living in the 1980s under the iron rule of President P.W. Botha. In this play the Zulu are urged to live up to the freedom ideals for which their forefathers had been ready to fight and to die. The development of the plot in the play emphasises that the “winds of change” at that time were becoming stronger, causing the undercurrent that was to bring about liberation in 1992 and in 1994.

  5. Flexible Working Time Arrangements in Bulgaria

    OpenAIRE

    Beleva, Iskra

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyze the flexible working time arrangements in Bulgaria, using a life-course perspective. Two important features have to be outlined, namely: underdeveloped flexible forms of employment in the country, including working time arrangement, and lack of previous analysis on flexible working time arrangements from the angle of life-course perspective. The author describes the regulatory framework, collective agreements at national and company level as a frame w...

  6. International perspectives on work-family policies: lessons from the world's most competitive economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, Alison; Mokomane, Zitha; Heymann, Jody

    2011-01-01

    The United States does not guarantee families a wide range of supportive workplace policies such as paid maternity and paternity leave or paid leave to care for sick children. Proposals to provide such benefits are invariably met with the complaint that the costs would reduce employment and undermine the international competitiveness of American businesses. In this article, Alison Earle, Zitha Mokomane, and Jody Heymann explore whether paid leave and other work-family policies that support children's development exist in countries that are economically competitive and have low unemployment rates. Their data show that the answer is yes. Using indicators of competitiveness gathered by the World Economic Forum, the authors identify fifteen countries, including the United States, that have been among the top twenty countries in competitiveness rankings for at least eight of ten years. To this group they add China and India, both rising competitors in the global economy. They find that every one of these countries, except the United States, guarantees some form of paid leave for new mothers as well as annual leave. And all but Switzerland and the United States guarantee paid leave for new fathers. The authors perform a similar exercise to identify thirteen advanced countries with consistently low unemployment rates, again including the United States. The majority of these countries provide paid leave for new mothers, paid leave for new fathers, paid leave to care for children's health care needs, breast-feeding breaks, paid vacation leave, and a weekly day of rest. Of these, the United States guarantees only breast-feeding breaks (part of the recently passed health care legislation). The authors' global examination of the most competitive economies as well as the economies with low unemployment rates makes clear that ensuring that all parents are available to care for their children's healthy development does not preclude a country from being highly competitive

  7. PERSPECTIVE Working towards a community-wide understanding of satellite skin temperature observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreve, Cheney

    2010-12-01

    cover, water vapor, cloud cover), they show that skin temperature is clearly a different physical parameter from air temperature and varies from air temperature in magnitude, response to atmospheric conditions, and diurnal phase. Although the accuracy of skin temperature (Tskin) algorithms has improved to within 0.5-1°C for field measurements and clear-sky satellite observations (Becker and Li 1995, Goetz et al 1995, Wan and Dozier 1996), general confusion regarding the physical definition of 'surface temperature' and how it can be used for climate studies has persisted throughout the scientific community and limited the applications of these data (Jin and Dickinson 2010). For example, satellite sea surface temperature was used as evidence of global climate change instead of skin temperature in the IPCC 2001 and 2007 reports (Jin and Dickinson 2010). This work provides clarity in the theoretical definition of temperature variables, demonstrates the difference between air and skin temperature, and aids the understanding of the MODIS Tskin product, which could be very beneficial for future climate studies. As outlined by Jin and Dickinson, 'surface temperature' is a vague term commonly used in reference to air temperature, aerodynamic temperature, and skin temperature. Air temperature (Tair), or thermodynamic temperature, is measured by an in situ instrument usually 1.5-2 m above the ground. Aerodynamic temperature (Taero) refers to the temperature at the height of the roughness length of heat. Satellite derived skin temperature (Tskin) is the radiometric temperature derived from the inverse of Planck's function. While these different temperature variables are typically correlated, they differ as a result of environmental conditions (e.g. land cover and sky conditions; Jin and Dickinson 2010). With an extensive network of Tair measurements, some have questioned the benefits of using Tskin at all (Peterson et al 1997, 1998). Tskin and Tair can vary depending on land cover

  8. Temporary service? : A global perspective on domestic work and the life cycle from pre-industrial times to the present day

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nederveen Meerkerk, E.J.V.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, labor history has taken a “global turn” and the focus has increasingly been on labor relations in the non-Western context. This article aims to challenge existing perceptions of the history of domestic work in Europe from a global labor history perspective, by comparing as well as

  9. The Mother’s Perspective: Factors Considered When Choosing to Enter a Stay-at-Home Father and Working Mother Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushing, Cassie; Sparks, Misti

    2017-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted to examine the decision-making factors of entering a stay-at-home father and working mother relationship based on the mother’s perspective. A total of 20 married, heterosexual, working mothers with biological children aged 1 to 4 years were asked questions regarding how they decided to enter a stay-at-home father and working mother relationship as well as contributing factors to this decision. The findings presented in this article were part of a larger study that examined mothers’ overall perspectives of the working mother stay-at-home father dynamics. The themes that emerged regarding how the decision was made to enter this kind of relationship were creating a work–family life balance, utilizing the cost-benefit ratio, and applying personality/trait strengths. PMID:28198208

  10. The Importance of Work-Life Balance Opportunities and Support from the Perspective of Nursing Stu-dents in Dalarna, Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Hank, Nadine; Wänn, Anna

    2016-01-01

    There is a shortage of nurses leading to challenges in recruitment in Sweden and many other countries. Especially for less populated regions recruitment can be chal-lenging. Nurses often face difficulties with work-life balance (WLB). This study aims to identify the importance of WLB opportunities and support that make a work-place attractive from the perspective of nursing students studying in Dalarna. A questionnaire was distributed via email to 525 students enrolled in the nursing bach-elo...

  11. The influence of institutional discourses on the work of informal carers: an institutional ethnography from the perspective of informal carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øydgard, Guro Wisth

    2017-09-07

    The growing numbers of seniors worldwide and the need for support and services that follow from a higher standard of living have led to an increased focus on scarce benefits and limited human resources. At the same time, many western countries have had to make welfare cuts to balance budgets. This has brought the contributions of informal carers to the fore. Thus far, the focus has generally been on the need for the informal carers to receive information and support; to enable them to contribute. The study is designed as an institutional ethnography. The article describes the social processes of informal caregiving and how it interacts with formal caregiving, from the perspective of informal carers. The research question for the study is How do institutional discourses on the work of informal carers influence informal carework? Data for the article comes from qualitative semi-structured interviews with 26 informal carers caring for persons with dementia in Norway, and with 7 administrators working in the allocation divisions of five different municipalities. The results demonstrate how three institutional discourses of informal carers' work influence the allocation divisions' practices and the work of informal carers in caring for their next of kin. The three discourses are categorised as moral and family obligation, shared care and task specificity. The informal carers want to contribute, as they feel a family and moral obligation to their next of kin. In the interaction with the allocation division, they find that the expectation that they will share in the carework and perform specific tasks forces them to perform care within a framework set by the public services. The findings suggest that further research should challenge how services are distributed and allocated rather than focus on how to enable informal carers to fulfil their role better. Because of their moral and family obligation, the informal carers do not have to be forced to perform certain tasks or

  12. Nurse Perspectives on the Practical, Emotional, and Professional Impacts of Living and Working in Post-earthquake Canterbury, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johal, Sarbjit S; Mounsey, Zoe; Brannelly, Petula; Johnston, David M

    2016-02-01

    This report explores nurses' perspectives following the Canterbury (New Zealand) 2010-2011 earthquake sequence and the subsequent recovery process. Problem Little is known about the experiences of health care professionals during a disaster recovery process, and this research generates insights about the challenges faced. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 11 nurses from the Christchurch (New Zealand) area to explore the challenges faced by the nurses during and following the earthquakes. The interviews took place three years after the start of the earthquake experience to enable exploration of longer term aspects of the recovery process. The interview transcripts were analyzed and coded using a grounded theory approach. The data analysis identified that the nurses had faced a number of challenges and these were characterized as practical, emotional, and professional. While some of the challenges were short-lived in the aftermath of the earthquakes, some were long-lasting due to the extended nature of the recovery process. Dealing with house damage, insurance negotiations, and working in damaged environments had a negative impact on the nurses. The nurses experienced a range of emotions, both negative and positive, after the disaster, though many had needed time to elapse before feeling able to reflect on their experiences. The findings suggest that secondary stressors have a negative impact on the psychosocial recovery process. The nurses recognized that they received support from others and were also required to focus on others. Keeping busy appeared to be the most common coping strategy. This lack of reflection on their experiences may have resulted in delayed emotional responses. Some of the nurses changed their work role, hours, and responsibilities suggesting that working in this environment was having a detrimental impact. The research indicates the challenges faced by nurses in the initial impact of the earthquakes and during the

  13. Conception of spent fuel and radioactive wastes management in Poland based on the results of the previous work performed in the frames of Governmental Strategic Programme realised under patronate of National Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wlodarski, J.; Chwaszczewski, S.; Slizowski, K.; Frankowski, Z.

    1999-01-01

    About 300 cubic meters of solid and solidified radioactive wastes of low and medium activity are produced each year in Poland. Such materials, after processing, are stored in the Institute of Atomic Energy at Swierk or in the National Repository for Radioactive Wastes in Rozan. About 6000 spent fuel elements are temporarily stored in water pools at Swierk. Assumptions and strategy of future spent fuel and radioactive wastes management are presented taking into account operation of the first nuclear power plants (after 2010). Then Governmental Strategic Programme (GSP) for the year 1997-1999 concerning such topic is described and some results of the work performed in the frames of the GSP are given

  14. Working with previously anonymous gamete donors and donor-conceived adults: recent practice experiences of running the DNA-based voluntary information exchange and contact register, UK DonorLink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawshaw, Marilyn; Gunter, Christine; Tidy, Christine; Atherton, Freda

    2013-03-01

    This article describes recent practice experiences with donor conceived adults, donors, non-donor-conceived adult children of donors using the voluntary DNA-based register, UK DonorLink. It highlights additional complexities faced when using DNA rather than paper records for searching, in particular from the risk of false positives, low chances of success and potential inclusion of biological parents' DNA. Professionals' experiences in supporting those being "linked" suggest challenges as well as rewards. Registration carries the potential to be therapeutic for donor-conceived adults and donors and to enhance their political awareness regardless of links being made. Registrants value both peer and professional support, providing the latter can respond flexibly and be delivered by staff experienced in intermediary work. Given that the majority of those affected by donor conception internationally come from anonymous donation systems, these findings are highly pertinent and argue the need for political and moral debate about such service provision.

  15. The incidence of congenital heart disease: Previous findings and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranović Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart defects (CHD are the most common of all congenital anomalies, and represent a significant global health problem. Involvement of medical professionals of different profiles has led to drastic changes in survival and quality of life of children with CHD. The motivation for the implementation of the first large population studies on this subject was not only to obtain answers to the question on the level of incidence of CHD, but the harmonization of criteria and protocols for monitoring and treatment of certain defects as well as the planning of medical staff dealing with children with CHD. Data on the incidence varies from 4-10/1000 live births. Fetal echocardiography can have potential impact on decrease of CHD incidence. The increase in incidence may be due to the possibility that children with CHD will grow up and have offsprings. Owing to the progress that has been made, an increasing number of patients experiences adulthood, creating an entirely new and growing population of patients: patients with “adult” CHD. Survivors suffer morbidity resulting from their circulatory abnormalities as well as from medical and surgical therapies they have been subjected to. Application of the achievements of human genome projects will in time lead to drastic changes in the approach to the patients with CHD. Until the time when it is possible, the goal will be further improvement of the existing system of service: networking in a unique, multicenter clinical registry of patients with CHD, as well as upgrading of technical and non-technical conditions for the treatment of patients with CHD. We are in an unprecedented time of change, but are actually at the end of the beginning of making pediatric cardiac care a highly reliable institution.

  16. A task-level perspective on work engagement: A new approach that helps to differentiate the concepts of engagement and burnout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Sonnentag

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This theoretical paper differentiates work engagement from the burnout concept by using a task-level perspective. Specifically, I argue that work engagement (i.e., the experience of vigor, dedication and absorption, Schaufeli & Bakker, 2004 emerges during the process of working. It does not only differ between persons and does not only fluctuate from one day to the other (or even within the course of a day, but can vary largely between different work tasks. Burnout (and particularly exhaustion as a chronic state does not differ from one work task to the other. I describe task features derived from the job characteristics model (Hackman & Oldham, 1976 as predictors of task-specific work engagement and discuss interaction effects between task features on the one hand and job-level social and personal resources on the other hand. I outline possible avenues for future research and address practical implications, including task design and employee's energy management throughout the workday.

  17. Achieving work-life balance in the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I setting, part II: perspectives from head athletic trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Ashley; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Pitney, William A

    2015-01-01

    Work-life balance has been examined at the collegiate level from multiple perspectives except for the athletic trainer (AT) serving in a managerial or leadership role. To investigate challenges and strategies used in achieving work-life balance from the perspective of the head AT at a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university. Qualitative study. Web-based management system. A total of 18 head ATs (13 men, 5 women; age = 44 ± 8 years, athletic training experience = 22 ± 7 years) volunteered. Participants journaled their thoughts and experiences in response to a series of questions. To establish data credibility, we included multiple-analyst triangulation, stakeholder checks, and peer review. We used a general inductive approach to analyze the data. Two higher-order themes emerged from our analysis of the data: organizational challenges and work-life balance strategies. The organizational challenges theme contained 2 lower-order themes: lack of autonomy and role demands. The work-life balance strategies theme contained 3 lower-order themes: prioritization of commitments, strategic boundary setting, and work-family integration. Head ATs are susceptible to experiencing work-life imbalance just as ATs in nonsupervisory roles are. Although not avoidable, the causes are manageable. Head ATs are encouraged to prioritize their personal time, make efforts to spend time away from their demanding positions, and reduce the number of additional responsibilities that can impede time available to spend away from work.

  18. Women and work : an exploratory study on problems and perspectives relating to the apparent inability of women teachers to break through the glass ceiling

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.B.A. The aim of this research is to determine whether a glass ceiling does exist in education, and if so, possible reasons why women teachers fail to break through the so-called "glass ceiling". Objectives The objectives identified include the following: To determine historical perspectives on women and work To explore the incidence of glass ceilings To ascertain the value the Department of Education places on women teachers To determine by means of questionnaires whether there is a 'gla...

  19. Actualizing Notions of Perspective Transformation Using Web 2.0: Student Views on What Works for Language and Culture Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson Devall, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    The framework of perspective transformation (Mezirow, 1994) provides a rich context for the conceptualization of technology use in language and culture learning. Although others have focused on the processes of becoming interculturally competent (Taylor, 1994) and changing language structures (Foster, 1997), more exploration of how technology aids…

  20. Who are the objects of positive and negative gossip at work? A social network perspective on workplace gossip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellwardt, Lea; Labianca, Giuseppe (Joe); Wittek, Rafael

    Gossip is informal talking about colleagues. Taking a social network perspective, we argue that group boundaries and social status in the informal workplace network determine who the objects of positive and negative gossip are. Gossip networks were collected among 36 employees in a public child care

  1. An Analysis of Bronfenbrenner's Bio-Ecological Perspective for Early Childhood Educators: Implications for Working with Families Experiencing Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Kevin James; Williams, Reginald D.

    2006-01-01

    Today's families face many stressors during the early childhood years. Particular stressors like homelessness, violence, and chemical dependence, play havoc with the family system. Urie Bronfenbrenner's bio-ecological perspective offers an insightful lens for understanding and supporting families under stress. This article presents the key…

  2. Previously unknown species of Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, M; Normand, A-C; Ranque, S

    2016-08-01

    The use of multi-locus DNA sequence analysis has led to the description of previously unknown 'cryptic' Aspergillus species, whereas classical morphology-based identification of Aspergillus remains limited to the section or species-complex level. The current literature highlights two main features concerning these 'cryptic' Aspergillus species. First, the prevalence of such species in clinical samples is relatively high compared with emergent filamentous fungal taxa such as Mucorales, Scedosporium or Fusarium. Second, it is clearly important to identify these species in the clinical laboratory because of the high frequency of antifungal drug-resistant isolates of such Aspergillus species. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has recently been shown to enable the identification of filamentous fungi with an accuracy similar to that of DNA sequence-based methods. As MALDI-TOF MS is well suited to the routine clinical laboratory workflow, it facilitates the identification of these 'cryptic' Aspergillus species at the routine mycology bench. The rapid establishment of enhanced filamentous fungi identification facilities will lead to a better understanding of the epidemiology and clinical importance of these emerging Aspergillus species. Based on routine MALDI-TOF MS-based identification results, we provide original insights into the key interpretation issues of a positive Aspergillus culture from a clinical sample. Which ubiquitous species that are frequently isolated from air samples are rarely involved in human invasive disease? Can both the species and the type of biological sample indicate Aspergillus carriage, colonization or infection in a patient? Highly accurate routine filamentous fungi identification is central to enhance the understanding of these previously unknown Aspergillus species, with a vital impact on further improved patient care. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and

  3. Collective work with resources : an essential dimension for teacher documentation : re-sourcing teacher work and interaction: new perspectives on resource design, use and teacher collaboration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gueudet, G.; Pepin, B.; Trouche, L.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study the collective dimensions of teachers’ work in their ordinary daily practice. We argue that teachers’ ordinary work comprises many collaborative aspects, and that the interactions with colleagues, often through resources, are crucial for teacher professional development. Using

  4. Attention, Working Memory, and Long-Term Memory in Multimedia Learning: An Integrated Perspective Based on Process Models of Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweppe, Judith; Rummer, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive models of multimedia learning such as the Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (Mayer 2009) or the Cognitive Load Theory (Sweller 1999) are based on different cognitive models of working memory (e.g., Baddeley 1986) and long-term memory. The current paper describes a working memory model that has recently gained popularity in basic…

  5. Work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict among Japanese dual-earner couples with preschool children: a spillover-crossover perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shimazu, A.; Kubota, K.; Bakker, A.B.; Demerouti, E.; Shimada, K.; Kawakami, N.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study among Japanese dual-earner couples examined the independent and combined associations of work-to-family conflict (WFC) and family-to-work conflict (FWC) with psychological health of employees and their partners and the relationship quality between partners. Methods: The

  6. Perspective of midwives working at hospitals affiliated to the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences regarding medical errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboubeh Valiani

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Based on the results of this study on the perspectives of participants, among the three factors of medical errors (human factors, structural factors, and management factors, human factors are the biggest threat in committing medical errors. Modification in the pattern of teaching by the midwifery professors and their presence in the hospitals, creating a no-blame culture, and sharing of alerts in medical errors are among appropriate actions in the dimensions of human, structural, and managerial factors.

  7. Sex work in geographic perspective: a multi-disciplinary approach to mapping and understanding female sex work venues in Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorway, Robert; Khan, Shamshad; Chevrier, Claudyne; Huynh, Anthony; Zhang, Juying; Ma, Xiao; Blanchard, James; Yu, Nancy

    2017-05-01

    This paper examines the findings from an extensive geographic mapping study of female sex work venues located in the south western Chinese city of Zigong, in Sichuan province. Drawing upon the findings from quantitative research, secondary historical sources and field notes, composed during participant observation, we provide a nuanced portrait of how the operation of sex work can be conceptualised in spatial terms, where 'space' is regarded as something socially constructed and historically contingent. The sex work geographies we analyse hold important implications for prevention work conducted in the region. When the sexual practices between sex workers and their clients are viewed against a wider geographic and historical backdrop, focus shifts from the properties and intentionalities of individuals towards the kinds of spaces where sex work operates, the organisation of which are underpinned by economic forces that have given rise to the rapid proliferation of small urban spaces in contemporary China.

  8. Application of the perspective-based reading technique in the nuclear I and C context. CORSICA work report 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahtinen, J.

    2012-07-01

    Inspections and reviews are one of the most effective ways of detecting errors in software development. The methods are also cost-effective because defects can be spotted early in the development, and thus the cost of repairing the defects is lower. Reading techniques are the procedures that are used in the inspection or review of a software artefact. The most common procedures are simple ad-hoc reading and a checklist- based reading technique. However, more advanced and detailed procedures have been created for various purposes. This report reviews the state-of-the-art software reading techniques used in inspections and reviews, and briefly reviews some of the empirical research in this context. The majority of the empirical research results indicate that, for example, perspective-based reading is more cost-effective and can detect more defects than more basic reading techniques. This report also describes how perspective-based reading can be applied to the inspection of nuclear-domain requirement specifications. For this purpose, seven perspective-based reading scenarios have been created. (orig.)

  9. Achieving Work-Life Balance in the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Setting, Part II: Perspectives From Head Athletic Trainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Ashley; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pitney, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Work-life balance has been examined at the collegiate level from multiple perspectives except for the athletic trainer (AT) serving in a managerial or leadership role. Objective: To investigate challenges and strategies used in achieving work-life balance from the perspective of the head AT at a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Web-based management system. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 18 head ATs (13 men, 5 women; age = 44 ± 8 years, athletic training experience = 22 ± 7 years) volunteered. Data Collection and Analysis: Participants journaled their thoughts and experiences in response to a series of questions. To establish data credibility, we included multiple-analyst triangulation, stakeholder checks, and peer review. We used a general inductive approach to analyze the data. Results: Two higher-order themes emerged from our analysis of the data: organizational challenges and work-life balance strategies. The organizational challenges theme contained 2 lower-order themes: lack of autonomy and role demands. The work-life balance strategies theme contained 3 lower-order themes: prioritization of commitments, strategic boundary setting, and work-family integration. Conclusions: Head ATs are susceptible to experiencing work-life imbalance just as ATs in nonsupervisory roles are. Although not avoidable, the causes are manageable. Head ATs are encouraged to prioritize their personal time, make efforts to spend time away from their demanding positions, and reduce the number of additional responsibilities that can impede time available to spend away from work. PMID:25098746

  10. General practice and specialist palliative care teams: an exploration of their working relationship from the perspective of clinical staff working in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Barry; Bellamy, Gary; Gott, Merryn

    2017-01-01

    With the future focus on palliative and end-of-life care provision in the community, the role of the general practice team and their relationship with specialist palliative care providers is key to responding effectively to the projected increase in palliative care need. Studies have highlighted the potential to improve co-ordination and minimise fragmentation of care for people living with palliative care need through a partnership between generalist services and specialist palliative care. However, to date, the exact nature of this partnership approach has not been well defined and debate exists about how to make such partnerships work successfully. The aim of this study was to explore how general practice and specialist palliative care team (SPCT) members view their relationship in terms of partnership working. Five focus group discussions with general practices and SPCT members (n = 35) were conducted in 2012 in two different regions of New Zealand and analysed using a general inductive approach. The findings indicate that participants' understanding of partnership working was informed by their identity as a generalist or specialist, their existing rules of engagement and the approach they took towards sustaining the partnership. Considerable commitment to partnership working was shown by all participating teams. However, their working relationship was based primarily on trust and personal liaison, with limited formal systems in place to enable partnership working. Tensions between the cultures of 'generalism' and 'specialism' also provided challenges for those endeavouring to meet palliative care need collaboratively in the community. Further research is required to better understand the factors associated with successful partnership working between general practices and specialist palliative care in order to develop robust strategies to support a more sustainable model of community palliative care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Voluntary work and the relationship with unemployment, health, and well-being: a two-year follow-up study contrasting a materialistic and psychosocial pathway perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griep, Yannick; Hyde, Martin; Vantilborgh, Tim; Bidee, Jemima; De Witte, Hans; Pepermans, Roland

    2015-04-01

    In the present study we contrast materialistic (i.e., income and economic inequality) and psychosocial (i.e., social circumstances) pathway perspectives on whether volunteering while being unemployed mitigates the well-documented negative effects of unemployment on health, health behaviors, and well-being. We test our hypotheses using data from the 2010 and 2012 waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Study of Health (SLOSH; n = 717). This is a nationally representative, longitudinal, cohort survey. We compared groups of individuals who were (a) unemployed and volunteering during both SLOSH waves (n = 58), (b) unemployed and not volunteering during both SLOSH waves (n = 194), (c) employed and volunteering during both SLOSH waves (n = 139), and (d) employed and not volunteering during both SLOSH waves (n = 326). Conducting a path analysis in Mplus, we examined the interaction effects between labor market status (i.e., employed or unemployed) and voluntary work (i.e., volunteering or not) when predicting changes in health, health behaviors, and psychological well-being. Our results indicate that volunteering during unemployment significantly decreased the likelihood to smoke, the amount of cigarettes smoked, the likelihood of consuming alcohol, and the likelihood of being diagnosed with hypertension. These results support a psychosocial pathway perspective. For all other indicators no such buffering interaction effect was obtained, thereby supporting a materialistic pathway perspective. Nevertheless, for some indicators, volunteering was found to be beneficial for both the unemployed and employed. Consequently, integrating both perspectives might offer a better explanation for the onset of ill-health and ill-being. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Innovations in Community-Based and Interdisciplinary Research: A Network Perspective on Innovation in Social Work Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Eric; Petering, Robin; Stringfellow, Erin; Craddock, Jaih B.

    2017-01-01

    We present a preliminary theory of innovation in social work science. The focus of the piece is two case studies from our work that illustrate the social nature of innovations in the science of social work. This inductive theory focuses on a concept we refer to as transformative innovation, wherein two sets of individuals who possess different…

  13. Hours of Paid Work in Duel Earner Couples: The U.S. in Cross-National Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, Jerry A.; Gornick, Janet C.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we examine the hours of paid work of husbands and wives in ten industrialized countries, using data from the Luxembourg Income Study. We present results on the average hours of paid work put in jointly by couples, on the proportion working very long weekly hours, and on gender equality in working time within families. The United States ranks at or near the top on most indicators of working time for couples, because of 1) a high proportion of dual-earner couples; 2) long average ...

  14. "If You Don't Do Parking Management .. Forget Your Behaviour Change, It's Not Going to Work.": Health and Transport Practitioner Perspectives on Workplace Active Travel Promotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Petrunoff

    Full Text Available After having conducted two studies of the effectiveness of workplace travel plans for promoting active travel, we investigated health and transport practitioners' perspectives on implementing workplace travel plans to share some of the lessons learnt. The objectives of this study were to describe perceived elements of effective workplace travel plans, barriers and enablers to workplace travel planning, their experiences of working with the other profession on travel plan implementation, their recommendations for workplace travel planning, and also to explore similarities and differences in transport and health practitioner perspectives.Fourteen health and ten transport practitioners who had prior involvement in workplace travel plan programs were purposefully selected from workplaces in Australia. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews since data saturation had been reached at this point, and data were subject to framework analysis.Perceived essential elements of effective workplace travel plans included parking management; leadership, organisational commitment and governance; skills and other resources like a dedicated travel plan coordinator; and, pre-conditions including supportive transport infrastructure in the surrounds. Recommendations for promoting travel plans included supportive government policy, focusing on business benefits and working at different scales of implementation (e.g. single large worksites and business precincts. Health and transport practitioner perspectives differed, with transport practitioners believing that parking management is the key action for managing travel demand at a worksite.Health practitioners implementing travel plans may require training including concepts of travel demand management, and support from transport planners on parking management strategies. Promoting an understanding of the shared travel behaviour change skills of transport and health practitioners may assist further collaboration. For take

  15. "If You Don't Do Parking Management .. Forget Your Behaviour Change, It's Not Going to Work.": Health and Transport Practitioner Perspectives on Workplace Active Travel Promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrunoff, Nick; Rissel, Chris; Wen, Li Ming

    2017-01-01

    After having conducted two studies of the effectiveness of workplace travel plans for promoting active travel, we investigated health and transport practitioners' perspectives on implementing workplace travel plans to share some of the lessons learnt. The objectives of this study were to describe perceived elements of effective workplace travel plans, barriers and enablers to workplace travel planning, their experiences of working with the other profession on travel plan implementation, their recommendations for workplace travel planning, and also to explore similarities and differences in transport and health practitioner perspectives. Fourteen health and ten transport practitioners who had prior involvement in workplace travel plan programs were purposefully selected from workplaces in Australia. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews since data saturation had been reached at this point, and data were subject to framework analysis. Perceived essential elements of effective workplace travel plans included parking management; leadership, organisational commitment and governance; skills and other resources like a dedicated travel plan coordinator; and, pre-conditions including supportive transport infrastructure in the surrounds. Recommendations for promoting travel plans included supportive government policy, focusing on business benefits and working at different scales of implementation (e.g. single large worksites and business precincts). Health and transport practitioner perspectives differed, with transport practitioners believing that parking management is the key action for managing travel demand at a worksite. Health practitioners implementing travel plans may require training including concepts of travel demand management, and support from transport planners on parking management strategies. Promoting an understanding of the shared travel behaviour change skills of transport and health practitioners may assist further collaboration. For take-up by

  16. Social Policies and Families in Stress: Gender and Educational Differences in Work-Family Conflict from a European Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notten, Natascha; Grunow, Daniela; Verbakel, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    In modern welfare states, family policies may resolve the tension between employment and care-focused demands. However these policies sometimes have adverse consequences for distinct social groups. This study examined gender and educational differences in working parents' perceived work-family conflict and used a comparative approach to test whether family policies, in particular support for child care and leave from paid work, are capable of reducing work-family conflict as well as the gender and educational gaps in work-family conflict. We use data from the European Social Survey 2010 for 20 countries and 5296 respondents (parents), extended with information on national policies for maternity and parental leave and child care support from the OECD Family Database. Employing multilevel analysis, we find that mothers and the higher educated report most work-family conflict. Policies supporting child care reduce the level of experienced work-family conflict; family leave policy appears to have no alleviating impact on working parents' work-family conflict. Our findings indicate that family policies appear to be unable to reduce the gender gap in conflict perception and even widen the educational gap in work-family conflict.

  17. An exploratory study of work-life balance in Nigeria: Employees’ perspectives of coping with the role conflicts

    OpenAIRE

    Babatunde Oluwatoyin Akanji

    2013-01-01

    Using a phenomenological methodology, the purpose of this study is to examine the prevalence of work-life conflicts (WLC) in Nigeria. Evidently, work-life research is a social concept originating from the western societies but over the years, advanced management and business studies are beginning to emerge showcasing the relevance, significance and challenges of Work-Life Balance (WLB) practices in developing nations. Against this backdrop, 51 in-depth interviews were conducted with employees...

  18. The influence of previous low back trouble, general health, and working conditions on future sick-listing because of low back trouble. A 15-year follow-up study of risk indicators for self-reported sick-listing caused by low back trouble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, C F; Monrad, T; Biering-Sørensen, F; Darre, E; Deis, A; Kryger, P

    1999-08-01

    A 15-year follow-up study. To find risk indicators for self-reported sick-listing because of low back trouble and to evaluate which variables were the most important indicators of work incapacity resulting from low back trouble during the follow-up period of 15 years. The initial data were obtained from a health survey conducted in a general population from the Municipality of Glostrup, Denmark. The follow-up data included information from the Central Person Register, the Early Retirement Pension Register, and a postal questionnaire regarding self-reported sick-listing because of low back trouble. An epidemiologic study, in which logistic regression analyses were used for evaluation of the data. The model used consisted of the variable in question, age, gender, and previous experience of low back trouble, along with interactions. It was found that 22 of 37 variables were risk indicators for later self-reported sick-listing because of low back trouble during the preceding year or the 7 years before the date of follow-up evaluation. In analyzing the most significant variables simultaneously, it was found that information from the initial investigation about sick-listing in general during the previous 10 years, sciatic pain, use of analgesics for low back trouble, previous sick-listing because of low back trouble, and occupation were the most important risk indicators for self-reported work incapacity resulting from low back trouble during the follow-up period of 15 years. Findings showed that the strongest prognostic indicators of later sick-listing because of low back trouble involve information from the person about previous sick-listing behavior in general and previous experience of low back trouble episodes, especially if these had been accompanied by sciatic pain, use of analgesics, or previous low back trouble sick-listing.

  19. PERSPECTIVES OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF AGRICULTURE OF THE RUSSIA IN MODERN TIMES. RESULT OF WORK OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE STATE DUMA ON NATURAL RESOURCES, MANAGEMENT AND ECOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Kashin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The perspectives of the development of agriculture in Russia in modern times and main results of work of the Committee of the State Duma on Natural Resources, Management and Ecology are presented in the article. For the purpose of food sovereignty, the import ration should not be exceeded 25% from overall volume of food production. The Russian Academy of Agricultural Science worked on the potential of agricultural sector, which has to be the duty-bearer of food supply security of Russia and the source of raw materials for the trade. Up to now, the Russian scientists have developed a lot of competitive varieties and hybrids, widespread commercial introduction of which is able to guarantee of high quality products.

  20. The employee perspective of formation, fulfilment and outcomes of the work-life balance (WLB) psychological contract

    OpenAIRE

    Grigg, Kerry Merle

    2017-01-01

    Employees' concern for striking a better balance between their work and non-working life has become a feature of the modern workplace in recent times because of significant shifts in both demographic and socio-cultural norms, and this has driven significant changes in the structure and requirements of the labour market. As a result organisations are developing work-life balance (WLB) strategies to enhance the autonomy of employees in the process of co-ordinating and integrating the work and n...

  1. What works to promote classroom well-being and learning from the perspective of children and young people?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Kevin Anthony

    2016-01-01

    the impact that this new practice has on the overall classroom well-being and the learning environment. The aim of this project is to help fill this knowledge gap by investigating what impact this new practice has on classroom well-being and learning from the perspectives of students. The study takes place...... findings and give participants backstage insights about what students perceive promotes (or hinders) classroom well-being and learning, thereby giving participants new ideas that could be applied in their settings. Secondly, the presenter will gain insights from Australian practitioners concerning...... in ten local authority run schools and contributes towards understanding the micro-processes at play that either promote or obstruct classroom well-being and learning. The workshop draws on data gathered through thirty focus group interviews with children across the school age spectrum as well classroom...

  2. Working with local nurses to promote hospital-nursing care during humanitarian assignments overseas: experiences from the perspectives of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoflåt, Ingrid; Karlsen, Bjørg; Saetre Hansen, Britt

    2016-06-01

    To describe how Norwegian expatriate nurses engaged in humanitarian assignments overseas experience working with the local nurses promoting nursing care in the hospital ward. Western countries have a long tradition of providing nurses with expert knowledge in nursing care for humanitarian projects and international work overseas. Studies from humanitarian mission revealed that health workers rarely acknowledge or use the local knowledge. However, there is a lack of studies highlighting expatriate nurses' experiences working with local nurses to promote nursing care in the hospital ward. This study applies a descriptive explorative qualitative design. The data were collected in 2013 by means of seven semi-structured interviews and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The data analyses revealed three themes related to the expatriate nurses' experiences of working with the local nurses to promote nursing care in the hospital ward: (1) Breaking the code, (2) Colliding worlds and (3) Challenges in sharing knowledge. The findings reflect different challenges when working with the local nurses. Findings indicate valuable knowledge gained about local nursing care and the local health and educational system. They also demonstrate challenges for the expatriate nurses related to the local nursing standard in the wards and using the local nurses' experiences and knowledge when working together. The findings can inform nurses, humanitarian organisations and institutions working overseas regarding the recruitment and the preparation of nurses who want to work cross- culturally or in humanitarian missions overseas. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Social policies and families in stress: Gender and educational differences in work-family conflict from a European perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, N.J.W.R.; Grunow, D.; Verbakel, C.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    In modern welfare states, family policies may resolve the tension between employment and care-focused demands. However these policies sometimes have adverse consequences for distinct social groups. This study examined gender and educational differences in working parents' perceived work-family

  4. Increasing Employability by Implementing a Work-Integrated Learning Partnership Model in South Africa--A Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Susanne; Govender, Cookie M.

    2017-01-01

    In South Africa, 70 per cent of the population is under 35 years old. South Africa has a vision to increase youth employment by focusing on education, training and skills development that will promote employment opportunities. A work-integrated learning (WIL) partnership model was developed to provide students with work experience and to increase…

  5. How can an existential-phenomenological Bildung perspective throw light on the potentials and workings of Problem-Based Learning?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feilberg, Casper

    at a deeper understanding of the workings and potential of Problem-Based Learning, and of the demands that this educational philosophy places on the institution, supervisors, and students. Through case studies it is demonstrated that project work contributes to psychology students’ embodiment of the habits...

  6. The Role of Labour Inspectorates in Tackling the Psychosocial Risks at Work in Europe: Problems and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Toukas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Significant changes in the past year have taken place in the world of work that are bringing new challenges with regard to employee safety and health. These changes have led to emerging psychosocial risks (PSRs at work. The risks are primarily linked to how work is designed, organized, and managed, and to the economic and social frame of work. These factors have increased the level of work-related stress and can lead to serious deterioration in mental and physical health. In tackling PSRs, the European labor inspectorates can have an important role by enforcing preventive and/or corrective interventions in the content and context of work. However, to improve working conditions, unilateral interventions in the context and content of work are insufficient and require adopting a common strategy to tackle PSRs, based on a holistic approach. The implementation of a common strategy by the European Labor Inspectorate for tackling PSRs is restricted by the lack of a common legislative frame with regard to PSR evaluation and management, the different levels of labor inspectors' training, and the different levels of employees' and employers' health and safety culture.

  7. Working hours of surgical residence: perspective of a group of surgeons in a regional hospital in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Siu-Fai; Spurgeon, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and European working time directive have restricted residents' workweek to 80 and 48 hours, respectively. Impacts on resident's training and health services are under evaluation in western countries. However, relevant studies are deficient in Hong Kong. Surgeons in a regional hospital of Hong Kong were recruited. Opinions were collected by semi-structured questionnaire. Response rate was 82%. Most respondents agreed that residents' work hours should be limited. Seventy-two percent thought that the addition of physician assistants, nurse practitioners and ancillary staff could help decrease the workload of residents. More than 60% thought that residents should have post-call afternoon off. Seventy-two percent worried that the number of operations residents performed would decrease. Only half agreed that long work hours was part of resident training and 56.3% agreed that the training period should be lengthened because of limiting work hours. Ninety-four percent agreed that sleep-deprived residents would create more medical errors; 72% thought that long work hours would impair quality of care. Surprisingly, only 28% thought that limiting work hours would compromise continued patient care. Most respondents opine that resident work hours should be regulated and welcome minor rescheduling of residents' workflow. The impacts on residents' training and patient care require further evaluation.

  8. Absence of back disorders in adults and work-related predictive factors in a 5-year perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigo, T; Tropp, H; Timpka, T

    2001-06-01

    Factors important for avoiding back disorders in different age-groups have seldom been compared and studied over time. We therefore set out to study age-related differences in socio-economic and work-related factors associated with the absence of back disorders in a 5-year comparative cohort study using a mailed questionnaire. Two subgroups (aged 25-34 and 54-59 years) derived from a representative sample of the Swedish population were followed at baseline, 1 year and 5 years. Questions were asked about the duration of back pain episodes, relapses, work changes and work satisfaction. A work adaptability, partnership, growth, affection, resolve (APGAR) score was included in the final questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors predicting the absence of back disorders. Absence of physically heavy work predicted an absence of back disorders [odds ratio (OR), 2.86; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.3-6.3] in the older group. In the younger age-group, the absence of stressful work predicted absence of back disorders (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.6). Thirty-seven per cent of the younger age-group and 43% of the older age-group did not experience any back pain episodes during the study period. The exploratory work APGAR scores indicated that back disorders were only associated with lower work satisfaction in the older group. The analyses point out the importance of avoiding perceived psychological stress in the young and avoiding perceived physically heavy work in the older age-group for avoiding back disorders. The results suggest a need for different programmes at workplaces to avoid back disorders depending on the age of the employees concerned.

  9. How can we help employees with chronic diseases to stay at work? A review of interventions aimed at job retention and based on an empowerment perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varekamp, Inge; Verbeek, Jos H A M; van Dijk, Frank J H

    2006-11-01

    A growing number of persons aged 16-65 is hampered by a chronic condition in performing job activities. Some of them quit the labour market prematurely. Vocational rehabilitation used to focus on (re)entering the labour market. Recently more attention is paid to interventions aimed at job retention. Some of these use an empowerment perspective. The objective of this study is to describe the characteristics, feasibility and effectiveness of such vocational rehabilitation interventions in order to decide which approaches are fruitful. The Medline, Embase, Cinahl and Psycinfo databases were systematically researched for studies published between 1988 and March 2004. Studies were included if they were experimental, included an intervention that aimed at job retention by means of solving work-related problems, used an empowerment perspective and concerned employees with one of the following chronic illnesses: diabetes mellitus, rheumatic diseases, hearing disorders, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, epilepsy, chronic kidney failure, COPD and asthma. Nine studies were detected. The aims of the intervention programs were to improve psychosocial skills or implement work accommodations. They were structured as individual (6x) or group programmes (3x). They used methods like education (9x), assessment (7x), counselling (5x), training or role playing (5x). The most important outcome measures were employment status (5x), actions to arrange work accommodations (3x), and psychosocial measures like self-efficacy and social competence (3x). Employment status was claimed to be positively influenced in four out of five studies, obtaining work accommodations was successful in all three studies and psychological outcome measures improved in two out of three studies. There is some evidence that vocational rehabilitation interventions that pay attention to training in requesting work accommodations and feelings of self-confidence or self-efficacy in dealing with work

  10. High performance work practices in small firms : A resource-poverty and strategic decision-making perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, B.; van de Voorde, F.C.; Timmers, J.

    2013-01-01

    High performance work practices (HPWPs) are human resource management practices aimed at stimulating employee and organisational performance. The application of HPWPs is not widespread in small organisations. We examine whether the implementation of coherent bundles of HPWPs (aimed at employee

  11. Working Hours of Surgical Residence: Perspective of a Group of Surgeons in a Regional Hospital in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu-Fai Lo

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: Most respondents opine that resident work hours should be regulated and welcome minor rescheduling of residents' workflow. The impacts on residents' training and patient care require further evaluation.

  12. High performance work practices in small firms: a resource-poverty and strategic decision-making perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, B.; Voorde, F.C. van de; Timmers, J.

    2013-01-01

    High performance work practices (HPWPs) are human resource management practices aimed at stimulating employee and organisational performance. The application of HPWPs is not widespread in small organisations. We examine whether the implementation of coherent bundles of HPWPs (aimed at employee

  13. Working conditions and workplace health and safety promotion in home care: A mixed-method study from Swedish managers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Gunvor; Larsson, Agneta

    2017-11-02

    Today, we can see a trend toward increased psychosocial strain at work among home-care managers and staff. The aim of this study is to describe home care managers' views on their own psychosocial working conditions and on how to promote workplace health and safety in a municipality in northern Sweden. A mixed-methods design was used, including questionnaire and qualitative focus group data. The qualitative data were analyzed by manifest content analysis. The results indicate that most managers perceived increased variety in work and opportunities for development at work, but at the same time increased demands. The managers suggested that workplace health and safety could be improved by risk assessment and improved communication, a clear communication chain by a real as well as a virtual platform for communication. In summary, workplace health and safety could be improved by risk assessments and by a physical as well as a virtual platform for communication.

  14. Benchmarking working conditions for health and safety in the frontline healthcare industry: Perspectives from Australia and Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLinton, Sarven S; Loh, May Young; Dollard, Maureen F; Tuckey, Michelle M R; Idris, Mohd Awang; Morton, Sharon

    2018-04-06

    To present benchmarks for working conditions in healthcare industries as an initial effort into international surveillance. The healthcare industry is fundamental to sustaining the health of Australians, yet it is under immense pressure. Budgets are limited, demands are increasing as are workplace injuries and all of these factors compromise patient care. Urgent attention is needed to reduce strains on workers and costs in health care, however, little work has been done to benchmark psychosocial factors in healthcare working conditions in the Asia-Pacific. Intercultural comparisons are important to provide an evidence base for public policy. A cross-sectional design was used (like other studies of prevalence), including a mixed-methods approach with qualitative interviews to better contextualize the results. Data on psychosocial factors and other work variables were collected from healthcare workers in three hospitals in Australia (N = 1,258) and Malaysia (N = 1,125). 2015 benchmarks were calculated for each variable and comparison was conducted via independent samples t tests. Healthcare samples were also compared with benchmarks for non-healthcare general working populations from their respective countries: Australia (N = 973) and Malaysia (N = 225). Our study benchmarks healthcare working conditions in Australia and Malaysia against the general working population, identifying trends that indicate the industry is in need of intervention strategies and job redesign initiatives that better support psychological health and safety. We move toward a better understanding of the precursors of psychosocial safety climate in a broader context, including similarities and differences between Australia and Malaysia in national culture, government occupational health and safety policies and top-level management practices. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Barriers and enablers to returning to work from long-term sickness absence: Part I-A quantitative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board, Belinda J; Brown, Jennifer

    2011-04-01

    Long-term sickness absence (LTSA) in the United Kingdom labor market has become a major health issue in recent years. In contrast to short-term sickness absence, rates for LTSA have been on the increase. This paper, part 1 of a two-part paper, identifies individual domain barriers to returning to work (RTW) from LTSA across the work disability timeline in the UK labor market. This is a retrospective cohort study of 6,246 workers from an occupationally diverse Police Force within the UK using a large administrative database. A series of chi-squared analyses were conducted to analyze the between and within group associations. Next, multiple logistic regression analyses using the Enter method were performed to develop a predictive model for RTW and Absence Phase. Findings substantiated the presence of individual domain barriers to RTW and predictors of RTW outcome and established the absence phase specificity of a number of risk factors of prolonged work disability. In particular, injury/illness especially mental ill health (MIH), physical job demands, sex, and number of episodes of LTSA are significant individual domain barriers to RTW and represent important risk factors for prolonged work disability. Duration of work disability is associated with medical diagnosis, especially MIH, physical job demands, sex, and number of LTSA episodes. Findings also support the importance of using the outcome measure of absence phase of risk factors in addition to RTW outcome. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Association between Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders and Psychosocial Factors at Work: A Review on the Job DCS Model's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Keun; Jang, Seung-Hee

    2010-09-01

    Over years it has been increasingly concerned with how upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSDs) are attributed to psychosocial job stressors. A review study was conducted to examine associations between UEMSDs and psychosocial work factors, and to recommend what to consider for the associations. For studies in which the job demand-control-support (DCS) model or its variables were specifically employed, published papers were selected and reviewed. A number of studies have reported relationships between UEMSDs symptoms and psychosocial exposure variables. For example, the findings are: higher numbness in the upper extremity was significantly attributed to by less decision latitude at work; work demands were significantly associated with neck and shoulder symptoms while control over time was associated with neck symptoms; and the combination of high psychosocial demands and low decision latitude was a significant predictor for shoulder and neck pain in a female working population. Sources of bias, such as interaction or study design, were discussed. UEMSDs were shown to be associated with psychosocial work factors in various studies where the job DCS model was addressed. Nonetheless, this review suggests that further studies should be conducted to much more clarify the association between UEMSDs and psychosocial factors.

  17. The role of human-at-work systems in business sustainability: perspectives based on expert and qualified production workers in a manufacturing enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genaidy, Ash M; Rinder, Maria M; Sequeira, Reynold; A-Rehim, Amal

    2010-04-01

    A community of highly qualified employees is desirable for the workforce to become a competitive business advantage, improving and sustaining corporate health. Currently, the scientific literature is limited on information comparing the assessment of expert and qualified workers for the employee-work environment interface. Such information would be valuable for industrial managers to obtain and act on the different perspectives of its workers for business improvement and survivability. A primary objective of this study is to explore the perspectives of expert and qualified workers on the quality of the employee-work environment interface in a manufacturing enterprise. This investigation was performed in a production department in a small manufacturing enterprise. Two expert workers participated in the study, with each being in the company for 30 years and having performed all jobs in the production department as well as supervisory and line management responsibilities. A total of 13 qualified workers from day and night shifts were used in the study, with the great majority of workers possessing 10 or more years of on-the-job experience but not acquiring the same specialised knowledge required for operating the technological resources in the department. The work compatibility methodology was used to assess the quality of employee-work environment interface for both expert and qualified workers. Both expert and qualified workers provided similar trends in terms of their compatibility assessment of experienced and acting work domains. In general, the compatibility levels for the day shift were poorer than those obtained for the night shift for acting work domains. The similarities in assessment between the expert and qualified workers were much closer for factors impacting job performance at the task and immediate surrounding levels (i.e. physical and mental task content, physical environment). There were greater differences at the macro level, that is, at the process

  18. Social Work Practice with LGBT Elders at End of Life: Developing Practice Evaluation and Clinical Skills Through a Cultural Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Darren P

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on culturally sensitive clinical issues related to best practices with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) elder patients at end-of-life (EOL) at key points in the therapeutic relationship. Vital concepts, including practice evaluation and clinical skills, are presented through a cultural and oncology lens. There is a paucity of LGBT research and literature as well as a shortfall of MSW graduate school education specific to social work palliative and end-of-life care (PELC) practice with LGBT elders. The content of this article is designed to be adapted and used as an educational tool for institutions, agencies, graduate programs, medical professions, social work, and students. Learning the unique elements of LGBT cultural history and their implications on EOL care can improve social work practice. This article provides an examination from assessment and engagement basics to advance care planning incorporating specific LGBT EOL issues.

  19. Faculty of Radiation Oncology 2012 trainee survey: perspectives on choice of specialty training and future work practice preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, John; Le, Hien; Turner, Sandra; Munro, Philip; Vukolova, Natalia

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports the key findings of the first Faculty of Radiation Oncology survey of trainees dealing with experiences and perceptions on work practices and choice of specialty. The survey was conducted in mid 2012 using a 37-question instrument. This was distributed by email to 159 current trainees and advertised through the Radiation Oncology Trainees Committee and other channels. There were six email reminders. Respondents were reassured that their responses were anonymous. The overall response rate was 82.8%. Gender was balanced among respondents with 67 (51.5%) being male and 63 (48.5%) being female. The most common age bracket was the 31 to 35 years range. There were similar proportions of trainee responders in each of the five years of training. A substantial number of trainees held other degrees besides medical degrees. The large majority were satisfied with radiation oncology as a career choice and with the Training Network within which they were training. Interest in oncology patients, lifestyle after training and work hours were given as the major reasons for choosing radiation oncology as a career. Nearly half of trainees were interested in undertaking some of their training in a part-time capacity and working part time as a radiation oncologist in the future. Over 70% of trainees stated they were working 36-55 clinical hours per week with additional non-clinical tasks, after-hours work and on-call duties. Nearly half of all trainees reported having one or less hours of protected time per week. Nonetheless, 40% of respondents indicated they had enough time to pursue outside interests. Radiation treatment planning and maintaining currency in general medicine were considered the most difficult aspects of training in radiation oncology. Most respondents were keen on the concept of fostering a research mentor. In terms of views on practice after completion of training, the majority were interested in pursuing a fellowship, and nearly all expressed an

  20. Faculty of Radiation Oncology 2012 trainee survey: perspectives on choice of speciality training and future work practice preference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, John; Le, Hien; Turner, Sandra; Munro, Philip; Vukolova, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the key findings of the first Faculty of Radiation Oncology survey of trainees dealing with experiences and perceptions on work practices and choice of specialty. The survey was conducted in mid 2012 using a 37-question instrument. This was distributed by email to 159 current trainees and advertised through the Radiation Oncology Trainees Committee and other channels. There were six email reminders. Respondents were reassured that their responses were anonymous. The overall response rate was 82.8%. Gender was balanced among respondents with 67 (51.5%) being male and 63 (48.5%) being female. The most common age bracket was the 31 to 35 years range. There were similar proportions of trainee responders in each of the five years of training. A substantial number of trainees held other degrees besides medical degrees. The large majority were satisfied with radiation oncology as a career choice and with the Training Network within which they were training. Interest in oncology patients, lifestyle after training and work hours were given as the major reasons for choosing radiation oncology as a career. Nearly half of trainees were interested in undertaking some of their training in a part-time capacity and working part time as a radiation oncologist in the future. Over 70% of trainees stated they were working 36–55 clinical hours per week with additional non-clinical tasks, after-hours work and on-call duties. Nearly half of all trainees reported having one or less hours of protected time per week. Nonetheless, 40% of respondents indicated they had enough time to pursue outside interests. Radiation treatment planning and maintaining currency in general medicine were considered the most difficult aspects of training in radiation oncology. Most respondents were keen on the concept of fostering a research mentor. In terms of views on practice after completion of training, the majority were interested in pursuing a fellowship, and nearly all expressed an

  1. How personal resources predict work engagement and self-rated performance among construction workers: a social cognitive perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Laura; Salanova, Marisa; Martínez, Isabel M; Vera, María

    2014-06-01

    Traditionally, research focussing on psychosocial factors in the construction industry has focused mainly on the negative aspects of health and on results such as occupational accidents. This study, however, focuses on the specific relationships among the different positive psychosocial factors shared by construction workers that could be responsible for occupational well-being and outcomes such as performance. The main objective of this study was to test whether personal resources predict self-rated job performance through job resources and work engagement. Following the predictions of Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory and the motivational process of the Job Demands-Resources Model, we expect that the relationship between personal resources and performance will be fully mediated by job resources and work engagement. The sample consists of 228 construction workers. Structural equation modelling supports the research model. Personal resources (i.e. self-efficacy, mental and emotional competences) play a predicting role in the perception of job resources (i.e. job control and supervisor social support), which in turn leads to work engagement and self-rated performance. This study emphasises the crucial role that personal resources play in determining how people perceive job resources by determining the levels of work engagement and, hence, their self-rated job performance. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. © 2014 International Union of Psychological Science.

  2. Risk Behaviors among Asian Women Who Work at Massage Parlors in San Francisco: Perspectives from Masseuses and Owners/Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Tooru; Iwamoto, Mariko; Oh, Hyun Joo; Wong, Serena; Nguyen, Hongmai

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates cognitive, cultural, and contextual factors that influence HIV-related risk behaviors among Asian women who engage in sex work at massage parlors in San Francisco. Focus groups and qualitative interviews were conducted for Vietnamese and Thai masseuses and massage parlor owners/managers. Economic pressure as well as…

  3. Attracting and Retaining Teachers in Cambridgeshire: Working Conditions and Teachers Flows from a School Workforce Census Data Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Julie; Broeks, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    This report explores the working conditions and flows of state-funded secondary school teachers in Cambridgeshire compared to a select number of other local authorities and to the English national landscape as a whole between 2010 and 2015. It also presents findings for different subjects, highlighting the situation for science, technology,…

  4. Student Perspectives on the Impact of an Undergraduate Work-Integrated Learning Program on Admission and Transition to Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Rachel; Bobrowski, Adam; Drost, Leah; Rowbottom, Leigha; Pretti, Judene; Soliman, Hany; Chan, Stephanie; Chow, Edward

    2018-05-05

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) is a form of education that integrates academic and workplace study. Such programs provide students the opportunity to concurrently develop cognitive and non-cognitive competencies. The purpose of this study is to explore which experiences and skills learned in a WIL placement are useful in applying to medical school and transitioning into the first year of a Doctor of Medicine program. All individuals who worked in the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program (RRRP; WIL placement) since 2004 and had completed at least 1 year of medical school were invited to participate. Semi-formal interviews were conducted and transcribed. A thematic analysis was completed to identify recurring concepts, and quotes were selected to represent them. Of 39 eligible individuals, 14 agreed to participate (36%). Students identified the volume of work, achieving a work-life balance, and time management as challenges in first-year medical school. Five themes emerged regarding the impact of the RRRP on applying and transitioning to medical school: time management skills, mentorship opportunities, research experience, clinical experience, and career choice. WIL placements present a unique opportunity for undergraduate students interested in pursuing medicine to acquire skills and experiences that will help them succeed in applying and transitioning to medical school.

  5. Desk-based workers' perspectives on using sit-stand workstations: a qualitative analysis of the Stand@Work study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chau, J.Y.; Daley, M.; Srinivasan, A.; Dunn, S.; Bauman, A.E.; van der Ploeg, H.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prolonged sitting time has been identified as a health risk factor. Sit-stand workstations allow desk workers to alternate between sitting and standing throughout the working day, but not much is known about their acceptability and feasibility. Hence, the aim of this study was to

  6. Mental health/illness and prisons as place: frontline clinicians׳ perspectives of mental health work in a penal setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nicola; Jordan, Melanie; Kane, Eddie

    2014-09-01

    This article takes mental health and prisons as its two foci. It explores the links between social and structural aspects of the penal setting, the provision of mental healthcare in prisons, and mental health work in this environment. This analysis utilises qualitative interview data from prison-based fieldwork undertaken in Her Majesty׳s Prison Service, England. Two themes are discussed: (1) the desire and practicalities of doing mental health work and (2) prison staff as mental health work allies. Concepts covered include equivalence, training, ownership, informal communication, mental health knowledge, service gatekeepers, case identification, and unmet need. Implications for practice are (1) the mental health knowledge and understanding of prison wing staff could be appraised and developed to improve mental healthcare and address unmet need. Their role as observers and gatekeepers could be considered. (2) The realities of frontline mental health work for clinicians in the penal environment should be embraced and used to produce and implement improved policy and practice guidance, which is in better accord with the actuality of the context - both socially and structurally. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of a Work-Based Learning Model for Youth with Disabilities from the Perspective of Employers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sametz, Rebecca R.

    2017-01-01

    For youth with disabilities, transitioning from school to work and adult life often means overcoming multiple social, academic, and environmental constraints that may present as roadblocks to meeting society's expectations of 'successful transition' (Lehman, Clark, Bullis, Rinkin, & Castellanos, 2002). According to the United States Department…

  8. Work-family interface from a life and career stage perspective: The role of demands and resources.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demerouti, E.; Peeters, M.C.W.; van der Heijden, Beatrice

    2012-01-01

    Work–family conflict and enrichment are experiences that occur daily and have substantial consequences for employees, their families, and the organizations that employ them. The aim of the current review is to make a link between life and career stage, work and family conditions, and the work–family

  9. Work-family interface from a life and career stage perspective : the role of demands and resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demerouti, E.; Peeters, M.C.W.; Heijden, van der B.I.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Work–family conflict and enrichment are experiences that occur daily and have substantial consequences for employees, their families, and the organizations that employ them. The aim of the current review is to make a link between life and career stage, work and family conditions, and the work–family

  10. [Caught between economic pressure and work-life balance--perspectives on emigration of German health professionals to Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A E; Klambauer, E

    2014-05-01

    Given the increasing lack of medical doctors in Germany, this study aimed to investigate the professional situation and the push and pull factors of German medical specialists working in Austrian hospitals. This explorative study is based on semi-structured interviews with 14 specialists working in Austria, who completed their education partly or fully in Germany. The material has been interpreted using qualitative content analysis. Better work-life balance, higher quality of life and more favourable working conditions represent major reasons for German specialists to stay in Austria. Moreover, the higher density of medical doctors in Austrian hospitals can have an impact on the distribution of responsibilities among health-care personnel, and on hospital performance. In the light of recent reforms in the German health-care system, the study underlines the importance of qualitative factors for the satisfaction of German medical doctors. These factors should be further analysed in order to avoid a brain drain of high-qualified health care staff in the future. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Critical Incidents as Formative Influences on the Work of Educational Researchers: Understanding an Insider Perspective through Narrative Enquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holligan, Chris; Wilson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on insights from phenomenological sociology and various strands of socio-cultural theory, this paper reports the findings of a qualitative investigation into critical incidents as formative influences in the research orientation and research cultivation of 22 academics working in research-intensive university education departments. The…

  12. An Experienced Chemistry Teacher's Practical Knowledge of Teaching with Practical Work: The PCK Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bing; Liu, Hao

    2018-01-01

    We have examined an experienced chemistry teacher's pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) of teaching with practical work in China. Based on the well-known PCK model by Magnusson S. J., Krajcik J. and Borko H., (1999), "Nature, sources, and development of pedagogical content knowledge for science teaching," in Gess-Newsome J. and Lederman…

  13. What makes generalist mental health professionals effective when working with people with an intellectual disability? A family member and support person perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Janelle; Fisher, Karen R; Trollor, Julian N

    2018-05-01

    Generalist mental health professionals are inadequately equipped to meet the rights of people with intellectual disability. A better understanding of the attributes of effective professionals may assist in the development of workforce capacity in this area. Twenty-eight family/support persons of people with intellectual disability participated in four focus groups. Thematic analysis was undertaken applying the Intellectual Disability Mental Health Core Competencies Framework. Participants described attributes that aligned with current professional expectations such as working together and new attributes such as differentiating between behaviour and mental health. An unexpected finding was the need for professionals to be able to infer meaning by interpreting multiple sources of information. Participants also wanted professionals to acknowledge their professional limitations and seek professional support. Family/support persons identified a range of attributes of effective mental health professionals to support people with intellectual disability. Further research is necessary, particularly from the perspective of people with intellectual disability. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Contributions of a contextualized and interdisciplinar teaching and learning proposal from the perspective of a biology teacher: possibilities of the elaboration and evaluation of a collective work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Benetti de Oliveira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is part of a dissertation proposal which was to evaluate the perspective of teachers from different subject areas, a proposal for interdisciplinary teaching and learning context. For the work we cut out the considerations of a teacher of Biology who participated in activities together and developed the project. The term interdisciplinary has been commonly used to designate actions that seek to overcome didactic teaching "traditional", in which the contents are understood to be impermeable and descontextualized from the reality of students. However, although studies point to the need for interdisciplinary proposals, there is no proper coordination between the scientific interdisciplinary and that can be practiced in the school environment. Thus, this study sought to examine how this teacher of biology students assessed through a table containing two epistemic domains (language and values, and cognitive skills, identifying the skills selected tables were identified in each student after which the proposed activities and tools used by the teacher to develop activities in order to make them context. The development activities proposed by the teacher demonstrates the concern of the same work not only in scientific concepts, but to involve students in the process of formation of these concepts, trying to propose activities through which the students see applicability and consistency, being active participants in this construction by means of the explanatory questions, and then dialogues are not passive recipients of knowledge implemented by one-way teacher-student relationship.

  15. Analysis of the scientific output on Human Rights within Social Work: an international perspective (2000-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Cubillos-Vega

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Human rights are part of the mission and identity of social work; nonetheless, the topic of human rights is not well represented in the field’s scholarly output. The aim of this study is to provide a profile of the literature in the field of social work covering human rights in recent years. For this reason, a descriptive-observational analysis was performed of the output on human rights in social science journals indexed between 2000 and 2015 in the principal international databases, "Scopus" and "Web of Science". A qualitative analysis permitted establishing four main types of topics. The findings reveal a lack of papers dealing with this subject, the predominance of a theoretical approach over an empirical one, and an Anglo-Saxon hegemony. This subject of study has never been approached before. Hence, innovation is the main contribution of this paper.

  16. In search of work/life balance: trainee perspectives on part-time obstetrics and gynaecology specialist training

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Amanda; Clements Sarah; Kingston Ashley; Abbott Jason

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Part-time training (PTT) is accessed by approximately 10% of Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees, a small but increasing minority which reflects the growing demand for improved work/life balance amongst the Australian medical workforce. This survey reports the attitudes and experiences of both full-time and part-time trainees to PTT. Methods An email-based anonymous survey was sent to all Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in April 2009, collecting d...

  17. Working Hours of Surgical Residence: Perspective of a Group of Surgeons in a Regional Hospital in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Siu-Fai; Spurgeon, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and European working time directive have restricted residents' workweek to 80 and 48 hours, respectively. Impacts on resident's training and health services are under evaluation in western countries. However, relevant studies are deficient in Hong Kong. Methods: Surgeons in a regional hospital of Hong Kong were recruited. Opinions were collected by semi-structured questionnaire. Results: Response rate was 82%. Most respondents agr...

  18. José-Antonio Campos-Ortega (1940-2004) and his scientific work - a personal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knust, Elisabeth; Hertel, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    José Antonio Campos-Ortega (1940-2004), a Spanish scientist who became a leading figure in the developmental genetics of the nervous system, spent most of his scientific life in Germany. Nevertheless, he remained deeply rooted in his native country. His thinking, his ambition and his work were driven by scientific, philosophical and historical questions. He started as a neuroanatomist, working first in Valencia, then in Gottingen, Tubingen and Freiburg. He used primates, reptiles, then the house fly and finally Drosophila to address the question How is the brain or the eye structured in order to function?. While in Freiburg, the problem shifted to How does the nervous system come into being, into form? Campos-Ortega tried to understand early neurogenesis in Drosophila through formal genetics, by identifying relevant genes and studying their genetic interactions. Since he was convinced that not only a single experimental approach could solve a problem as complex as the development of the nervous system, he also included the molecular biological approach when he moved to Cologne, while maintaining a strong focus on anatomy, embryology and genetics. There, he also started to work on the neurogenesis of the zebrafish, using similar concepts and approaches. Throughout his scientific career, he thought, wrote and taught about the evolution of methods and ideas in his field of research. At Campos-Ortegas early death, an unfinished book manuscript was left, entitled Developmental Genetics. The Path to the Biological Synthesis. Some parts of his introductory overview are included here.

  19. The importance of communication for clinical leaders in mental health nursing: the perspective of nurses working in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Gary; Happell, Brenda; Broadbent, Marc; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2013-11-01

    Communication has been identified as an important attribute of clinical leadership in nursing. However, there is a paucity of research on its relevance in mental health nursing. This article presents the findings of a grounded theory informed study exploring the attributes and characteristics required for effective clinical leadership in mental health nursing, specifically the views of nurses working in mental health about the importance of effective communication in day to day clinical leadership. In-depth interviews were conducted to gain insight into the participants' experiences and views on clinical leadership in mental health nursing. The data that emerged from these interviews were constantly compared and reviewed, ensuring that any themes that emerged were based on the participants' own experiences and views. Participants recognized that effective communication was one of the attributes of effective clinical leadership and they considered communication as essential for successful working relationships and improved learning experiences for junior staff and students in mental health nursing. Four main themes emerged: choice of language; relationships; nonverbal communication, and listening and relevance. Participants identified that clinical leadership in mental health nursing requires effective communication skills, which enables the development of effective working relationships with others that allows them to contribute to the retention of staff, improved outcomes for clients, and the development of the profession.

  20. Physician perspectives on collaborative working relationships with team-based hospital pharmacists in the inpatient medicine setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowsky, Mark J; Madill, Helen M; Schindel, Theresa J; Tsuyuki, Ross T

    2013-04-01

    Collaborative care between physicians and pharmacists has the potential to improve the process of care and patient outcomes. Our objective was to determine whether team-based pharmacist care was associated with higher physician-rated collaborative working relationship scores than usual ward-based pharmacist care at the end of the COLLABORATE study, a 1 year, multicentre, controlled clinical trial, which associated pharmacist intervention with improved medication use and reduced hospital readmission rates. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of all team-based and usual care physicians (attending physicians and medical residents) who worked on the participating clinical teaching unit or primary healthcare teams during the study period. They were invited to complete an online version of the validated Physician-Pharmacist Collaboration Index (PPCI) survey at the end of the study. The main endpoint of interest was the mean total PPCI score. Only three (response rate 2%) of the usual care physicians responded and this prevented us from conducting pre-specified comparisons. A total of 23 team-based physicians completed the survey (36%) and reported a mean total PPCI score of 81.6 ± 8.6 out of a total of 92. Mean domain scores were highest for relationship initiation (14.0 ± 1.4 out of 15), and trustworthiness (38.9 ± 3.7 out of 42), followed by role specification (28.7 ± 4.3 out of 35). Pharmacists who are pursuing collaborative practice in inpatient settings may find the PPCI to be a meaningful tool to gauge the extent of collaborative working relationships with physician team members. © 2012 The Authors. IJPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  1. The Mine Working's Roof Stress-strain State Research in the Perspective of Development of New Coal Deposits of Kuzbass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyuk, Svetlana; Bedarev, Nikolay; Lyubimov, Oleg; Shaikhislamov, Arthur

    2017-11-01

    The present now normative and information base is regulating of the Kuzbass coal seams treatment but is not considering of the mining-geological and mining-engineering conditions for new coal deposits. The analysis of works for the research of the rock pressure manifestation shows that in many cases numerous results require of the practical confirmation in mine conditions directly, and also confirmation by the physical models. This work reflects one of the stages of research on changing the stress-strain state of the massif with the formation of unloading zones, increased rock pressure, and recovery. As an example, the results of the information analysis obtained by means of contour and depth benchmarks on the ventilation drift in the course of the 34 seam treatment at the "Tagaryshskaya" mine are presented. The differences of the analyzed results from the results obtained in the conditions of other mines are established. The values of the drift's roof stratification on the contour and at the distance from the contour of 1.0 to 4.0 m are given. The revealed maximums of the rock pressure and pressure changes in the hydraulic supports of the complex used for movement are presented. Recommendations on the choice of the anchor's length taking into account the roof stratification size are given. The further research stages on models from equivalent materials at various geometric scales are proposed.

  2. A Perspective on the Effect of the 80-Hour Work Week: Has It Changed the Graduating Orthopaedic Resident?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Vincent D

    2017-06-01

    Orthopaedic residency education has changed substantially in recent decades because of the imposition of the 80-hour work week, a decrease in quality and quantity of general surgical education, regulations mandating closer trainee supervision, and an expansion of orthopaedic subspecialty rotations. These factors pose a challenge in efforts to prepare competent, confident, cautious, caring, and communicative orthopaedic residents within the traditional 5-year program. Evidence suggests that contemporary graduates are more intelligent, better balanced in life and work, and more in touch with humanistic aspects of medicine than were earlier graduates. Yet insufficient competence and confidence in surgical skills after residency and a lack of "ownership" of patient care have become an increasing concern of educators and trainees. The concept of 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to achieve mastery of a technical skill applies to orthopaedic residency education. A different approach to graduate medical education must address the critical minimum training time required to achieve the necessary skills to support independent medical and surgical practice.

  3. How are people with dementia involved in care-planning and decision-making? An Irish social work perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Sarah; Begley, Emer; O'Brien, Marita

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, there have been national and international policy advances around capacity and decision-making and an apparent burgeoning rights-based approach to the issue, all of which have the potential to impact on the experience for people with dementia in Ireland. There is little evidence however on whether these policies and principles are being translated into practice and whether traditional paternalistic approaches to decision-making are being challenged. To gain insight into current practice, research was undertaken with social workers working with older people in Ireland; reporting on the involvement of people living with dementia in care-planning processes. Data collection included a mixed method approach; an on-line survey of social workers from across the country who reported on their open caseload during the month of June 2015 (N = 38 social workers reporting on the experiences of 788 older people, of which 39% of older people had a formal diagnosis of dementia). In addition, semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with social workers working in the nine Community Health Organisation areas (N = 21). Findings show that people with dementia were high users of social work services, accounting for 44.5% of the client group. Social workers reported that there were no standardised approaches to how Health and Social Care Professionals involved people with dementia in care planning and decision-making. Overall, people with dementia were more likely to be excluded from decision-making processes due to (i) assumptions that they lacked capacity, (ii) family members preferences that the person was not involved, (iii) communication difficulties, (iv) time constraints, (v) little or no opportunity given or (vi) the person delegated decision-making to others. Good practices were identified through multidisciplinary team approaches and formal care planning meetings. This research highlights variability in how people with dementia participate

  4. Affective Reactions to Difference and their Impact on Discrimination and Self-Disclosure at Work: A Social Identity Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kakarika

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on Social Identity Theory and related concepts, the present paper argues that a negative affective state is caused by dissimilarity at the workplace, which in turn influences discrimination and self-disclosure. Based on a review of the literature, it develops propositions about the positive effects of surface- and deep-level dissimilarity on this affective state and perceived interpersonal discrimination at work, as well as on the decision to self-disclose personal information to peers. Self-disclosure is further linked to perceptions of discrimination in two opposing ways. An individual’s perceived degree of difference from others on demographic and underlying characteristics serve as moderators of the proposed relationships, strengthening the effects of actual dissimilarity on feelings. The paper concludes by examining implications and contributions of the proposed theoretical framework to the diversity literature.

  5. The Air Traffic Controller Work-Shift Scheduling Problem in Spain from a Multiobjective Perspective: A Metaheuristic and Regular Expression-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino Tello

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We address an air traffic control operator (ATCo work-shift scheduling problem. We consider a multiple objective perspective where the number of ATCos is fixed in advance and a set of ATCo labor conditions have to be satisfied. The objectives deal with the ATCo work and rest periods and positions, the structure of the solution, the number of control center changes, or the distribution of the ATCo workloads. We propose a three-phase problem-solving methodology. In the first phase, a heuristic is used to derive infeasible initial solutions on the basis of templates. Then, a multiple independent run of the simulated annealing metaheuristic is conducted aimed at reaching feasible solutions in the second phase. Finally, a multiple independent simulated annealing run is again conducted from the initial feasible solutions to optimize the objective functions. To do this, we transform the multiple to single optimization problem by using the rank-order centroid function. In the search processes in phases 2 and 3, we use regular expressions to check the ATCo labor conditions in the visited solutions. This provides high testing speed. The proposed approach is illustrated using a real example, and the optimal solution which is reached outperforms an existing template-based reference solution.

  6. Oncologists’ Perspectives on Consolidation Radiation Treatment after Chemotherapy for Lymphomas: A Survey Study by the Lymphoma Working Committee of the Turkish Oncology Group (TOG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriverdi, Ozgur; Barista, Ibrahim; Paydas, Semra; Nayir, Erdinc; Karakas, Yusuf

    2017-11-26

    In this study, we aimed to determine the perspectives of medical and radiation oncologists regarding consolidation radiotherapy in patients with a complete response after chemotherapy for Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. The survey was designed to identify demographic and occupational features of medical and radiation oncologists and their views on application of consolidation radiotherapy in their clinical practices, as based on a five-point Likert scale (never, rarely, sometimes, often, and always). The study covered 263, out of 935, physicians working in the oncology field as either medical or radiation oncologists; the rate of return on the invitations to participate was 28%. The majority of the participants were male radiation oncologists, with a duration of between 5 and 10 years of work as a university hospital official, and the mean age was 38 ± 14 (years). Although the most commonly followed international guidelines were NCCN, among the physicians, the majority of the respondents suggested that the guidelines were unclear regarding recommendations for consolidative radiotherapy. The administered dose for consolidative radiotherapy in lymphoma patients was indicated as 40 Gy by 49% of all the physicians and the most common cause of hesitancy concerning consolidative radiation treatment was the risk of secondary malignancies as a long-term adverse effect (54%). In conclusion, we suggest that medical oncologists could be most active in the treatment of lymphoma through a continuous training program about lymphomas and current national guidelines. Creative Commons Attribution License

  7. In search of work/life balance: trainee perspectives on part-time obstetrics and gynaecology specialist training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Part-time training (PTT is accessed by approximately 10% of Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees, a small but increasing minority which reflects the growing demand for improved work/life balance amongst the Australian medical workforce. This survey reports the attitudes and experiences of both full-time and part-time trainees to PTT. Methods An email-based anonymous survey was sent to all Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in April 2009, collecting demographic and training status data, data on personal experiences of PTT and/or trainees, and attitudes towards PTT. Results 105 responses were received (20% response rate. These indicated strong support (90% from both full-time (FT and part-time (PT trainees for the availability of PTT. PT trainees were significantly more likely than FT trainees to be female with children. Improved morale was seen as a particular advantage of PTT; decreased continuity of care as a disadvantage. Conclusions Although limited by poor response rate, both PT and FT Australian obstetric trainees were supportive of part-time training. Both groups recognised important advantages and disadvantages of this mode of training. Currently, part-time training is accessed primarily by female trainees with family responsibilities, with many more trainees considering part-time training than the number that access it.

  8. In search of work/life balance: trainee perspectives on part-time obstetrics and gynaecology specialist training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Amanda; Clements, Sarah; Kingston, Ashley; Abbott, Jason

    2012-01-10

    Part-time training (PTT) is accessed by approximately 10% of Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees, a small but increasing minority which reflects the growing demand for improved work/life balance amongst the Australian medical workforce. This survey reports the attitudes and experiences of both full-time and part-time trainees to PTT. An email-based anonymous survey was sent to all Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in April 2009, collecting demographic and training status data, data on personal experiences of PTT and/or trainees, and attitudes towards PTT. 105 responses were received (20% response rate). These indicated strong support (90%) from both full-time (FT) and part-time (PT) trainees for the availability of PTT. PT trainees were significantly more likely than FT trainees to be female with children. Improved morale was seen as a particular advantage of PTT; decreased continuity of care as a disadvantage. Although limited by poor response rate, both PT and FT Australian obstetric trainees were supportive of part-time training. Both groups recognised important advantages and disadvantages of this mode of training. Currently, part-time training is accessed primarily by female trainees with family responsibilities, with many more trainees considering part-time training than the number that access it.

  9. Making media work in space: an interdisciplinary perspective on media and communication requirements for current and future space communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babidge, S.; Cokley, J.; Gordon, F.; Louw, E.

    2005-10-01

    As humans expand into space communities will form. These have already begun to form in small ways, such as long-duration missions on the International Space Station and the space shuttle, and small-scale tourist excursions into space. Social, behavioural and communications data emerging from such existing communities in space suggest that the physically-bounded, work-oriented and traditionally male-dominated nature of these extremely remote groups present specific problems for the resident astronauts, groups of them viewed as ‘communities’, and their associated groups who remain on Earth, including mission controllers, management and astronauts’ families. Notionally feminine group attributes such as adaptive competence, social adaptation skills and social sensitivity will be crucial to the viability of space communities and in the absence of gender equity, ‘staying in touch’ by means of ‘news from home’ becomes more important than ever. A template of news and media forms and technologies is suggested to service those needs and enhance the social viability of future terraforming activities.

  10. Potential implications of Luria's work for the neuropsychology of epilepsy and epilepsy surgery: A perspective for re-examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrikelis, Panayiotis; Lucci, Giuliana; Siatouni, Anna; Verentzioti, Anastasia; Alexoudi, Athanasia; Gatzonis, Stylianos

    2017-07-01

    The pioneeristic work of Alexander Romanovic Luria into the field of human neuropsychology offered eminent contributions to clinical praxis by providing theory guided methods and instruments for the study of higher cortical functions. However, lots of this knowledge corpus either remains untranslated and thus inaccessible, or in some cases selectively overlooked by academic authorities and consequently not passed to the future generations of experts. Although Luria was not exclusively devoted to the study of epilepsy, his theories and clinical approaches actually penetrate the whole neuropathology spectrum. His holistic and systemic approach to the brain sounds nowadays more than opportune and consistent with the network approach of the modern neuroimaging era. As to epilepsy, the logic underlying the Lurian approach (cognitive functions organized into complex functional systems with intra- and/or inter-hemispheric distribution, as opposed to the modularistic view of the brain) seems consistent with our current knowledge in epileptology with respect to epileptic networks, as well as the modern construct of the functional deficit zone. These contributions seem to be highly promising for the neuropsychology of epilepsy and epilepsy surgery, since they provide clinicians with valuable methods and theories to assist them in the localization -and lateralization- of cognitive deficits. Consequently they are of great applicability in the context of the preoperative neuropsychological monitoring of patients candidates for epilepsy surgery, where neuropsychologist are called upon to provide surgeons with anatomical data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. WASP (Write a Scientific Paper): Open access unsolicited emails for scholarly work - Young and senior researchers perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuschieri, Sarah; Grech, Victor

    2018-04-20

    The increasing demand on academics and researchers to publish has led to the development of fake journals (also known as predatory journals). Such journals lack peer review and precipitate unfair criticism toward legitimate open access journals. Predatory journals tend to bombard a researcher's mailbox on a daily basis, inviting authors to submit a review/manuscript/opinion/short case to their journal while promising expedited publication - against a fee. This study assessed the unsolicited emails received over the period of November 2017 by a young and by a senior researcher. The young researcher received a substantially higher amount of emails (n = 101) compared to the senior researcher (n = 23). The article processing costs for solicited journals received, ranged between $49 and $3019. These journals are almost all only indexed in Google Scholar and do not display any meaningful journal metrics. Furthermore, the majority of the unsolicited emails were not relevant to the researcher's field of study. Therefore authors and readers alike should evaluate emails received with regard to journal legitimacy prior to submission of work to possibly predatory journals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Change is the only Constant: Community-Driven Questions, Indigenous Knowledge (IK) and Western Science Working Together - A Northern Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimmelmayr, R.; Adams, B.; Harcharek, Q.; Pederson, M.; Brower, H., Jr.; Hepa, T.

    2017-12-01

    Hunter observations and many studies indicate that the Arctic is undergoing major changes in duration of seasonal sea ice extent and thickness, extreme weather patterns, more maritime traffic etc. Coupled to these environmental changes are noted changes in animal distribution, in migration routes and timing, in breeding season start, and arrival of new species to name just a few. The continuation of all these changes could negatively impact the rich marine mammal resources that are essential to Yupik and Iñupiat subsistence communities. The North Slope Borough Department of wildlife management community based marine mammal health research program aims to support the families and communities, as they, as in the past, continue to adapt to changing environmental conditions, changes in wildlife abundance and accessibility. Our program monitors the health of animals so we can detect diseases and contaminants early on that are of concern to people, provide veterinary medicine science based information to hunters regarding "healthy" and "hunter concern" catches, and address individual and "big picture" concerns about native food health and food security. Our collaborative work depends on IK and the sharing of knowledge. IK is an existing source of an integrated object and event-based data knowledge system with culturally rooted quantitative and qualitative aspects. It is characterized by built-in routine and periodic updating and comparison within a given spatial-temporal coverage (traditional use areas). It is the oldest on the ground wildlife health monitoring system of the Arctic. Hunters and communities provide in a meaningful spatial-temporal scale rich wildlife information and data on traditional subsistence resources. The IK based interpretation of ecological, physiological, behavioral, and pathological phenomena advances and expands western science based biological concepts.

  13. Customers' perspectives on the impact of the Pathways to Work condition management programme on their health, well-being and vocational activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secker, Jenny; Pittam, Gail; Ford, Fiona

    2012-11-01

    Pathways to Work is a UK initiative aimed at supporting customers on incapacity benefits to return to work. This qualitative study complements previous evaluations of Pathways to Work by exploring customers' perceptions of the impact of the Condition Management Programme (CMP) offered to claimants with long-term health conditions. 39 customers took part in focus groups held at the seven sites where Pathways was originally piloted. The main focus of the discussions was on perceptions of the ways in which participation had impacted on health, well-being and return to work. The discussions were audio-recorded and fully transcribed for analysis using a text analysis framework to enable the development and refinement of categories and overarching patterns in the data. Perceived impacts on health and well-being included a more positive outlook, social contact, changed perceptions of conditions and improvements in health. Some customers also reported an increase in their vocational activity and others felt ready to embark on new activities. Factors associated with positive outcomes included the extent and quality of contact with CMP staff and practical advice about condition management. Factors impeding positive employment outcomes related mainly to obstacles to returning to work. The results indicated that CMP can assist customers to learn about and manage their health conditions and increase their vocational activity, and that CMP therefore provides a promising means of enabling people with long-term health conditions to regain a fulfilling, productive life.

  14. The new final Clinical Skills examination in human medicine in Switzerland: Essential steps of exam development, implementation and evaluation, and central insights from the perspective of the national Working Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berendonk, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Since 2011, the new national final examination in human medicine has been implemented in Switzerland, with a structured clinical-practical part in the OSCE format. From the perspective of the national Working Group, the current article describes the essential steps in the development, implementation and evaluation of the Federal Licensing Examination Clinical Skills (FLE CS as well as the applied quality assurance measures. Finally, central insights gained from the last years are presented. Methods: Based on the principles of action research, the FLE CS is in a constant state of further development. On the foundation of systematically documented experiences from previous years, in the Working Group, unresolved questions are discussed and resulting solution approaches are substantiated (planning, implemented in the examination (implementation and subsequently evaluated (reflection. The presented results are the product of this iterative procedure.Results: The FLE CS is created by experts from all faculties and subject areas in a multistage process. The examination is administered in German and French on a decentralised basis and consists of twelve interdisciplinary stations per candidate. As important quality assurance measures, the national Review Board (content validation and the meetings of the standardised patient trainers (standardisation have proven worthwhile. The statistical analyses show good measurement reliability and support the construct validity of the examination. Among the central insights of the past years, it has been established that the consistent implementation of the principles of action research contributes to the successful further development of the examination.Conclusion: The centrally coordinated, collaborative-iterative process, incorporating experts from all faculties, makes a fundamental contribution to the quality of the FLE CS. The processes and insights presented here can be useful for others planning a

  15. ["Vocational perspective"--short-term efficacy of a group treatment for patients with extensive work-related problems during medical rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bönisch, A; Dorn, M; Ehlebracht-König, I

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the short-term efficacy of the Vocational Perspective programme for patients identified as having extensive work-related problems during rheumatology or orthopaedic inpatient rehabilitation. The primary objectives of the programme on patient level are to convey information about the legal provisions regarding earning incapacity and occupational reintegration, to suggest strategies for dealing with one's own occupational situation, and to strengthen the motivation to stay employed. The programme is explicitly designed for patients who wish to retire or have applied for a pension. On the systemic level, the main goals are to facilitate doctor-patient communication and to increase rehabilitation teams' awareness of occupational problems. In a controlled quasi-experimental design, 359 subjects were consecutively assigned to either the control group (CG, n=177) or the intervention group (IG, n=182). The control group received standard care only, whereas the intervention group additionally participated in the 5-part Vocational Perspective programme. Evaluation criteria were assessed by questionnaire at the beginning (t1) and at end of rehabilitation (t2). Survey participation was 92.2% at t2. The socio-medically relevant knowledge status was objectively documented using a specially designed knowledge questionnaire. Aspects of treatment satisfaction were evaluated using individual items, and the subjective prognosis of gainful employment was assessed using the Subjective Prognosis of Gainful Employment (SPE) scale. Facilitation of communication between doctor and patient was operationalized at patient level in terms of patient satisfaction with medical care, and increased awareness of the rehabilitation team was operationalized in terms of the rate of recommendations to apply for vocational reintegration (LTA) services at discharge. Emotional and functional parameters were exploratively analyzed (anxiety and depression using the IRES 3.1 scales, and

  16. Administering the cost of death: organisational perspectives on workers' compensation and common law claims following traumatic death at work in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Scott J; Matthews, Lynda R; Ngo, Mark; Bohle, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Quite apart from its devastating human and psychological effects, the death of a worker can have significant, life-changing effects on their families. For many affected families, workers' compensation entitlements represent the primary financial safeguard. Where the worker was self-employed, the family will generally be excluded from this remedy and have to take the more problematic option of claiming damages at common law. Despite the centrality of workers' compensation, little attention has been given to how effectively workers' compensation agencies address the needs of bereaved families or the views of other organisations involved, such as safety inspectors, unions, employers and victim advocates. Based on interviews with forty eight organisational representatives in five Australian states, this study examines how workers' compensation regimes deal with work-related death from the perspective of those organisations involved directly or indirectly in the process. The study highlighted a number of problems, including the exclusion of self-employed workers and dealing with 'mixed families'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Rapid Population Growth and Human Carrying Capacity: Two Perspectives. World Bank Staff Working Papers No. 690 and Population and Development Series No. 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahar, Dennis J., Ed.; And Others

    Two perspectives on carrying capacity and population growth are examined. The first perspective, "Carrying Capacity and Rapid Population Growth: Definition, Cases, and Consequences" (Robert Muscat), explores the possible meanings of the idea of carrying capacity under developing country conditions, looks at historical and present-day cases of…

  18. A Diachronic Study of Ontological Perspectives from Mircea Eliade and Ioan Petru Culianu’s Literary and Scientific works: the Acceptance of “The Other”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiana – Claudia Mihail

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to show the fact that there is a continuity of ideas between Mircea Eliade and Ioan Petru Culianu’s systems of thought. Mircea Eliade is fascinated with the power of active imagination, illustrated by myths and symbols which are typical of collective unconscious, because they have been used from the beginning of this world up to the contemporary world. However, we can find such representations in Mircea Eliade and Ioan Petru Culianu’s both scientific and literary works. The comparative interdisciplinary approach is used in this article. On the one hand, there is the comparison between Mircea Eliade and Ioan Petru Culianu’s systems of thought and on the other hand, the interdisciplinary approach arises from the connections established between various sciences, like: the history of religions, anthropology, philosophy and natural sciences. The similarities and differences between their systems of thought are illustrated in this article. Firstly, the description of Mircea Eliade’s scientific system includes the diachronic study of religious ideas and the emphasis on human active imagination as a mechanism of compensation for the ontological suffering. Secondly, the principles of the universal method belonging to Ioan Petru Culianu, the mythical and symbolic representations from the Romanian writer’s literary works: The Emerald Game and Hesperus are also illustrated in this article. Researchers in the philological field can use both the comparative interdisciplinary approach in their future activity and the premise of continuity between Mircea Eliade and his disciple’s systems of thought. Apart from the main approach and premise of this article, the original perspective is represented by the mythical and symbolic representations from Ioan Petru Culianu’s science fiction novel entitled Hesperus.

  19. Perspective and Doing Good Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Bonfield

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This post is adapted from a speech I gave at Drexel University’s Beta Phi Mu initiation on December 6, 2011. The text of the original is available on Scribd, and a video of my speech, which includes a brief introduction by Helen Snowden is available on Vimeo. Greek Picnic is a reunion and gathering of [...

  20. Kenyan women's literature from a post-colonial perspective: six ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kenyan Women's Literature from Postcolonial Feminist Perspective: Six Stories .... cultural, and legal rights; equal treatment in the law, education, and the workplace; ... and works has spanned by now four generations of Kenyan women writers, .... the entire short story production by women writers in the previous decades.

  1. Work to live, don’t live to work! : A cross-sectional study of the work-life balance of higher managers

    OpenAIRE

    Korpunen, Päivi; Nápravníková, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    The work-life balance is currently in vogue among governments, organizations as well as researchers. Higher managers in organizations all over the world are exposed to significant pressures in their jobs, which further influence the balance between their work and private lives, job satisfaction and overall well-being. In this thesis, we apply a different perspective on the topic of work-life balance than most of the previous scientific research. We have focused on the governmental, organizati...

  2. Preoperative screening: value of previous tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, D S; Snow, R; Lofgren, R P

    1990-12-15

    To determine the frequency of tests done in the year before elective surgery that might substitute for preoperative screening tests and to determine the frequency of test results that change from a normal value to a value likely to alter perioperative management. Retrospective cohort analysis of computerized laboratory data (complete blood count, sodium, potassium, and creatinine levels, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time). Urban tertiary care Veterans Affairs Hospital. Consecutive sample of 1109 patients who had elective surgery in 1988. At admission, 7549 preoperative tests were done, 47% of which duplicated tests performed in the previous year. Of 3096 previous results that were normal as defined by hospital reference range and done closest to the time of but before admission (median interval, 2 months), 13 (0.4%; 95% CI, 0.2% to 0.7%), repeat values were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery. Most of the abnormalities were predictable from the patient's history, and most were not noted in the medical record. Of 461 previous tests that were abnormal, 78 (17%; CI, 13% to 20%) repeat values at admission were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery (P less than 0.001, frequency of clinically important abnormalities of patients with normal previous results with those with abnormal previous results). Physicians evaluating patients preoperatively could safely substitute the previous test results analyzed in this study for preoperative screening tests if the previous tests are normal and no obvious indication for retesting is present.

  3. The perspectives of structurally vulnerable people who use drugs on volunteer stipends and work experiences provided through a drug user organization: Opportunities and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardwell, Geoff; Anderson, Solanna; Richardson, Lindsey; Bird, Lorna; Lampkin, Hugh; Small, Will; McNeil, Ryan

    2018-03-01

    While drug user organizations (DUO) have received public health attention as a means to potentially reduce the harms associated with drug use, there is a lack of research on the compensation and structural forces that promote or inhibit participation in DUO. Against the backdrop of structural vulnerability experienced by people who use drugs (PWUD), we examined the impact of monetary 'volunteer stipends' provided through a DUO and explore their role in providing low-threshold employment opportunities and shaping participation in DUO. Participants were purposively sampled to reflect a range of perspectives and experiences volunteering at Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users (VANDU) and receiving stipends. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 23 members of VANDU. Interview transcripts were coded in Atlas.ti 7 for key a priori themes and emergent categories from the data and analyzed thematically. Stipends provided participants with symbolic and material recognition of the time, effort, and expertise they contribute to the organization, and functioned to facilitate ongoing participation. Payments that rewarded, skills, labour and drug-related knowledge reduced participant's perception of stigma against PWUD. Paid work in VANDU further provided participants with non-material benefits commonly attributed to regular employment, including social connections and a sense of purpose. Participants also identified the low level of pay as a limitation of VANDU's paid participation program. The daily demands of survival (accessing shelter, food, and drugs) posed more complex structural vulnerabilities to participate in VANDU, as small stipends were not sufficient to address these needs. Low threshold employment opportunities within DUO may provide significant individual and public health benefits. However, these benefits are constrained by the small size of stipends. Therefore, to ensure better inclusion of PWUD, our findings recommend the development and

  4. Ten perspectives on Nordic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennbakk, Berit

    2006-10-15

    Summary: Perspective no. 1: Costly early learning from the EU ETS - Unforeseen price levels hit industries hard; Perspective no. 2: Market based support schemes - Do they work as intended? Perspective no. 3: New decade in the Nordic energy markets. Perspective no. 4: Reduced CO{sub 2} emissions and more renewables - Are we getting there or not? Perspective no. 5: Interpretation of financial requirements - An impediment to sound investments? Perspective no. 6: Who should invest in infrastructure - Public or private investors? Perspective no. 7: Re regulation is not the answer - Need for coordination calls for a visible hand? Perspective no. 8: Increased infrastructure investments - Due to EU ETS and support schemes for RES. Perspective no. 9: Energy, welfare and industry - Complex links make policy making difficult. Perspective no. 10 'Fuel' for an energy policy discussion - A Nordic energy policy agenda? (AG)

  5. Automatic electromagnetic valve for previous vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados, C. E.; Martin, F.

    1959-01-01

    A valve which permits the maintenance of an installation vacuum when electric current fails is described. It also lets the air in the previous vacuum bomb to prevent the oil ascending in the vacuum tubes. (Author)

  6. Exploring Multiple Usability Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall-Espersen, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    Industrial usability work often fails to produce the expected impact on software products even though significant resources have been used on uncovering problems and suggesting improvements. So, it seems that feedback from industrial usability work lacks persuasiveness, i.e. it fails to convince...... the key stakeholders that actions need to be taken. This study reports from interviews with 26 stakeholders in software development projects. Our data suggests that the interviewees address usability using different perspectives and based on our observations we describe five such perspectives. Further, we...... discuss how applying different usability perspectives might inform the persuasiveness of usability work....

  7. Insiders' Perspectives: A Children's Rights Approach to Involving Children in Advising on Adult-Initiated Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Consulting with children is widely recognised as an essential element in building understanding about children's lives. From a children's rights perspective, it is also a legal requirement on professionals working with children. However, translating the rhetoric into research and practice is still evolving. Previous studies report on working with…

  8. 77 FR 70176 - Previous Participation Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... participants' previous participation in government programs and ensure that the past record is acceptable prior... information is designed to be 100 percent automated and digital submission of all data and certifications is... government programs and ensure that the past record is acceptable prior to granting approval to participate...

  9. On the Tengiz petroleum deposit previous study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nysangaliev, A.N.; Kuspangaliev, T.K.

    1997-01-01

    Tengiz petroleum deposit previous study is described. Some consideration about structure of productive formation, specific characteristic properties of petroleum-bearing collectors are presented. Recommendation on their detail study and using of experience on exploration and development of petroleum deposit which have analogy on most important geological and industrial parameters are given. (author)

  10. Subsequent pregnancy outcome after previous foetal death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, J. W.; Korteweg, F. J.; Holm, J. P.; Timmer, A.; Erwich, J. J. H. M.; van Pampus, M. G.

    Objective: A history of foetal death is a risk factor for complications and foetal death in subsequent pregnancies as most previous risk factors remain present and an underlying cause of death may recur. The purpose of this study was to evaluate subsequent pregnancy outcome after foetal death and to

  11. WORKPLACE SPIRITUALITY FOR IMPROVED PRODUCTIVITY: A GENDERED PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas-Doorgapersad, Shikha

    2017-01-01

    There are a very few studies available to gain insight into the impact of yoga and alternative therapies1 on stress management, conflict resolution and work productivity. In previous studies the focus fell on the gendered perspective, exploring the impact of spiritual modalities on the physical and mental wellness of male and female employees. Spiritual practices such as yoga and other alternative therapies have been found to be significant to enhance work productivity, hence be part of organ...

  12. Chaos in neurons and its application: perspective of chaos engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Yoshito; Oku, Makito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2012-12-01

    We review our recent work on chaos in neurons and its application to neural networks from perspective of chaos engineering. Especially, we analyze a dataset of a squid giant axon by newly combining our previous work of identifying Devaney's chaos with surrogate data analysis, and show that an axon can behave chaotically. Based on this knowledge, we use a chaotic neuron model to investigate possible information processing in the brain.

  13. Subsequent childbirth after a previous traumatic birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Cheryl Tatano; Watson, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Nine percent of new mothers in the United States who participated in the Listening to Mothers II Postpartum Survey screened positive for meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder after childbirth. Women who have had a traumatic birth experience report fewer subsequent children and a longer length of time before their second baby. Childbirth-related posttraumatic stress disorder impacts couples' physical relationship, communication, conflict, emotions, and bonding with their children. The purpose of this study was to describe the meaning of women's experiences of a subsequent childbirth after a previous traumatic birth. Phenomenology was the research design used. An international sample of 35 women participated in this Internet study. Women were asked, "Please describe in as much detail as you can remember your subsequent pregnancy, labor, and delivery following your previous traumatic birth." Colaizzi's phenomenological data analysis approach was used to analyze the stories of the 35 women. Data analysis yielded four themes: (a) riding the turbulent wave of panic during pregnancy; (b) strategizing: attempts to reclaim their body and complete the journey to motherhood; (c) bringing reverence to the birthing process and empowering women; and (d) still elusive: the longed-for healing birth experience. Subsequent childbirth after a previous birth trauma has the potential to either heal or retraumatize women. During pregnancy, women need permission and encouragement to grieve their prior traumatic births to help remove the burden of their invisible pain.

  14. 内部控制:廉政风险防控的新视角和有效抓手%Internal Control:A New Perspective and Effective Working Point on Risk Prevention and Control of an Incorrupt Government

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李慧; 张海兰

    2016-01-01

    Ab stract: The current situation and characteristics of corruption demand new means for the management and prevention of risks in clean governance for a transformation from“not daring to corrupt”to“not possible to corrupt,”and a strengthened sys-tem for risk-prevention to facilitate information disclosure. An analysis the advantages and disadvantages of the risk manage-ment perspective, quality management perspective, and a perspective for the prevention of interest-conflicts in combination with the connotations and characteristics of internal management yields the discovery: there is an internal consistency between internal management and risk-prevention in anti-corruption. There can be found some theoretical and practical values for risk-prevention in anti-corruption from the perspective of internal management, which proves to be a new perspective and ef-fective working point.%当前腐败的形式和特点对现阶段廉政风险防控提出了新要求:从“不敢腐”向“不能腐”转变;加强制度防控,推进信息公开。通过对风险管理视角、质量管理视角和基于防止利益冲突视角的廉政风险防控优缺点的分析,结合内部控制的内涵和特征,发现内部控制与廉政风险防控存在内在一致性。从内部控制视角开展廉政风险防控具有一定的理论价值和现实意义,成为现阶段廉政风险防控工作的新视角和有效抓手。

  15. Future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    International involvement in particle physics is what the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) is all about. At the latest Future Perspectives meeting at Brookhaven from 5-10 October (after a keynote speech by doyen Viktor Weisskopf, who regretted the emergence of 'a nationalistic trend'), ICFA reviewed progress and examined its commitments in the light of the evolving world particle physics scene. Particular aims were to review worldwide accelerator achievements and plans, to survey the work of the four panels, and to discuss ICFA's special role in future cooperation in accelerator construction and use, and in research and development work for both accelerators and for detectors

  16. Books average previous decade of economic misery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, R Alexander; Acerbi, Alberto; Ormerod, Paul; Lampos, Vasileios

    2014-01-01

    For the 20(th) century since the Depression, we find a strong correlation between a 'literary misery index' derived from English language books and a moving average of the previous decade of the annual U.S. economic misery index, which is the sum of inflation and unemployment rates. We find a peak in the goodness of fit at 11 years for the moving average. The fit between the two misery indices holds when using different techniques to measure the literary misery index, and this fit is significantly better than other possible correlations with different emotion indices. To check the robustness of the results, we also analysed books written in German language and obtained very similar correlations with the German economic misery index. The results suggest that millions of books published every year average the authors' shared economic experiences over the past decade.

  17. Books Average Previous Decade of Economic Misery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, R. Alexander; Acerbi, Alberto; Ormerod, Paul; Lampos, Vasileios

    2014-01-01

    For the 20th century since the Depression, we find a strong correlation between a ‘literary misery index’ derived from English language books and a moving average of the previous decade of the annual U.S. economic misery index, which is the sum of inflation and unemployment rates. We find a peak in the goodness of fit at 11 years for the moving average. The fit between the two misery indices holds when using different techniques to measure the literary misery index, and this fit is significantly better than other possible correlations with different emotion indices. To check the robustness of the results, we also analysed books written in German language and obtained very similar correlations with the German economic misery index. The results suggest that millions of books published every year average the authors' shared economic experiences over the past decade. PMID:24416159

  18. Influence of previous knowledge in Torrance tests of creative thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Aranguren, María; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas CONICET

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of study field, expertise and recreational activities participation in Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT, 1974) performance. Several hypotheses were postulated to explore the possible effects of previous knowledge in TTCT verbal and TTCT figural university students’ outcomes. Participants in this study included 418 students from five study fields: Psychology;Philosophy and Literature, Music; Engineering; and Journalism and Advertisin...

  19. Underestimation of Severity of Previous Whiplash Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqui, SZH; Lovell, SJ; Lovell, ME

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We noted a report that more significant symptoms may be expressed after second whiplash injuries by a suggested cumulative effect, including degeneration. We wondered if patients were underestimating the severity of their earlier injury. PATIENTS AND METHODS We studied recent medicolegal reports, to assess subjects with a second whiplash injury. They had been asked whether their earlier injury was worse, the same or lesser in severity. RESULTS From the study cohort, 101 patients (87%) felt that they had fully recovered from their first injury and 15 (13%) had not. Seventy-six subjects considered their first injury of lesser severity, 24 worse and 16 the same. Of the 24 that felt the violence of their first accident was worse, only 8 had worse symptoms, and 16 felt their symptoms were mainly the same or less than their symptoms from their second injury. Statistical analysis of the data revealed that the proportion of those claiming a difference who said the previous injury was lesser was 76% (95% CI 66–84%). The observed proportion with a lesser injury was considerably higher than the 50% anticipated. CONCLUSIONS We feel that subjects may underestimate the severity of an earlier injury and associated symptoms. Reasons for this may include secondary gain rather than any proposed cumulative effect. PMID:18201501

  20. [Electronic cigarettes - effects on health. Previous reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napierała, Marta; Kulza, Maksymilian; Wachowiak, Anna; Jabłecka, Katarzyna; Florek, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Currently very popular in the market of tobacco products have gained electronic cigarettes (ang. E-cigarettes). These products are considered to be potentially less harmful in compared to traditional tobacco products. However, current reports indicate that the statements of the producers regarding to the composition of the e- liquids not always are sufficient, and consumers often do not have reliable information on the quality of the product used by them. This paper contain a review of previous reports on the composition of e-cigarettes and their impact on health. Most of the observed health effects was related to symptoms of the respiratory tract, mouth, throat, neurological complications and sensory organs. Particularly hazardous effects of the e-cigarettes were: pneumonia, congestive heart failure, confusion, convulsions, hypotension, aspiration pneumonia, face second-degree burns, blindness, chest pain and rapid heartbeat. In the literature there is no information relating to passive exposure by the aerosols released during e-cigarette smoking. Furthermore, the information regarding to the use of these products in the long term are not also available.

  1. Interviewing clinicians and advocates who work with sexual assault survivors: a personal perspective on moving from quantitative to qualitative research methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Sarah E

    2005-09-01

    This article describes the author's personal experiences of conducting a qualitative semistructured interview study, after having done predominantly quantitative survey research in the social sciences. The author describes the process of learning how to approach conducting semistructured interviews with female advocates and clinicians who provide services to sexual assault survivors in the community. The author describes making the transition from a logical positivist deductive approach to thinking about and conducting research to a more social constructionist stance in which one learns from participants about their experiences and perspectives in narrative form to discover knowledge and develop theory inductively.

  2. The comparison of Polish and Norwegian policy and research on work-life balance – current state of knowledge and future perspectives. Narrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Stańczak, Aleksander; Merecz-Kot, Dorota; Jacukowicz, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    The sense of work-life balance has an undoubted impact not only on employees’ quality of life and work performance, but also on the functioning of companies. Therefore, efforts to maintain work-life balance are beneficial to workers, employers, authorities and researchers. Poland and Norway are the examples of European countries with different work-life balance policies both on legal and organizational levels. This paper aims to compare legal solutions in two economically different countries ...

  3. A qualitative evaluation of occupational therapy-led work rehabilitation for people with inflammatory arthritis: Perspectives of therapists and their line managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Yeliz; Amanna, Evangeline A; Bodell, Sarah J; Hammond, Alison

    2015-08-01

    Occupational therapy-led work rehabilitation for employed people with inflammatory arthritis and work problems was piloted in five hospitals in the United Kingdom. This qualitative study explored the views of participating occupational therapists and their line managers about the work rehabilitation training received and conducting the intervention, with particular focus on the structured interview used, the Work Experience Survey - Rheumatic Conditions. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with occupational therapists ( n  = 9), followed by telephone interviews with their line managers ( n  = 2). Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed by three researchers to maximize validity. The main themes emerging from the occupational therapists' interviews were: varying levels of prior knowledge and experience of work rehabilitation, initial concerns about the feasibility of a lengthy work assessment in practice and increased confidence in delivering work rehabilitation as the study progressed. The line managers' interviews generated themes around the positive impact of the work rehabilitation training the occupational therapists received, and changes in their practice. The Work Experience Survey - Rheumatic Conditions was considered a good choice of work assessment which can be implemented in practice. Once therapists had provided the work intervention several times, their confidence and skills increased.

  4. “If You Don’t Do Parking Management .. Forget Your Behaviour Change, It’s Not Going to Work.”: Health and Transport Practitioner Perspectives on Workplace Active Travel Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissel, Chris; Wen, Li Ming

    2017-01-01

    Objectives After having conducted two studies of the effectiveness of workplace travel plans for promoting active travel, we investigated health and transport practitioners’ perspectives on implementing workplace travel plans to share some of the lessons learnt. The objectives of this study were to describe perceived elements of effective workplace travel plans, barriers and enablers to workplace travel planning, their experiences of working with the other profession on travel plan implementation, their recommendations for workplace travel planning, and also to explore similarities and differences in transport and health practitioner perspectives. Materials and Methods Fourteen health and ten transport practitioners who had prior involvement in workplace travel plan programs were purposefully selected from workplaces in Australia. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews since data saturation had been reached at this point, and data were subject to framework analysis. Results Perceived essential elements of effective workplace travel plans included parking management; leadership, organisational commitment and governance; skills and other resources like a dedicated travel plan coordinator; and, pre-conditions including supportive transport infrastructure in the surrounds. Recommendations for promoting travel plans included supportive government policy, focusing on business benefits and working at different scales of implementation (e.g. single large worksites and business precincts). Health and transport practitioner perspectives differed, with transport practitioners believing that parking management is the key action for managing travel demand at a worksite. Conclusions Health practitioners implementing travel plans may require training including concepts of travel demand management, and support from transport planners on parking management strategies. Promoting an understanding of the shared travel behaviour change skills of transport and health practitioners may

  5. Unnecessary work tasks and mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida E H; Tripathi, Manisha; Borritz, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: According to the "stress-as-offense-to-self" perspective, work tasks that are considered unnecessary or unreasonable - so-called "illegitimate work tasks" - are likely to elicit stress-reactions. Previous studies, mostly cross-sectional, have shown that illegitimate tasks are associated...... with increased self-reported stress, cortisol, and counterproductive work behavior. In this article, we examine the prospective association between unnecessary work tasks, one type of illegitimate work tasks, and mental health among Danish human service workers. Further, we explore whether this association...... is modified by sex, age, occupational position, and baseline mental health status. METHODS: The data were obtained from self-administered questionnaires from 1351 Danish human service workers in three waves of data-collection during 1999-2005. We measured unnecessary work tasks by a single item, and assessed...

  6. The impact of demographic factors on the way lesbian and gay employees manage their sexual orientation at work: An intersectional perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Köllen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence demographic factors have on the way lesbians and gay men manage their sexual orientation at work. Design/methodology/approach : Based on data taken from a cross-sectional survey of 1308 gay and lesbian employees working in Germany, four regression models are proposed. The means of managing one's homosexuality at work was measured by the 31 items containing WSIMM from Anderson et al. (2001). Findings : Results indicate that bei...

  7. Theories of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking : A Post LHC Run-I Perspective (3/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Lecture 3 : Precision Higgs Analysis The Higgs boson era requires the development of a precision analysis effort analogous to that of the Z pole studies of the previous era. The work in this direction will be reviewed. Current and future challenges will be described, both from the experimental and theoretical perspectives.

  8. A Co-Construction Perspective on Organizational Change and Educational Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehan, Hugh; Hubbard, Lea; Datnow, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    In their earlier work, the authors explained how the co-construction perspective has been heuristic in the study of organizational change and educational reform, often providing more nuanced analyses and findings than "technical-rational" models that dominated the field previously (Datnow, Hubbard, & Mehan, 2002). In framing organizational change…

  9. Insights into Working Memory from The Perspective of The EPIC Architecture for Modeling Skilled Perceptual-Motor and Cognitive Human Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kieras, David

    1998-01-01

    Computational modeling of human perceptual-motor and cognitive performance based on a comprehensive detailed information- processing architecture leads to new insights about the components of working memory...

  10. [Health Care Situation and Barriers for Working with Children of Mentally Ill Parents from the Perspective of Adult Psychiatry in Germany - A Nationwide Survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Olga; Metzner, Franka; Pawils, Silke

    2017-10-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to assess the health care situation and barriers to support minor children of mentally ill parents from the perspective of adult psychiatry in Germany. Methods Based on the German Hospital Register mental health practitioners of all psychiatric clinics in Germany were asked to answer a 37-item questionnaire. Overall, 441 practitioners of 239 psychiatric clinics participated in the cross sectional study. Results Most important barriers were high workload, scarce resources, patient-focused treatment, missing expertise as well as insufficient awareness. Conclusions More resources, training, clear declaration of competence and coordination of services are necessary to implement family sensitive services in psychiatric clinics. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Perspectives in Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perspectives in Education is a professional, peer-reviewed journal that encourages the submission of previously unpublished articles on contemporary educational issues. As a journal that represents a variety of cross-disciplinary interests, both theoretical and practical, it seeks to stimulate debate on a wide range of topics.

  12. The motivational capacity of occupational future time perspective as a moderator of the relationships between job control, work engagement, and personal initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annet de Lange; Hannes Zacher; Antje Schmitt

    2013-01-01

    The concept of focus on opportunities describes how many new goals, options, and possibilities employees believe to have in their personal future at work. In this multi-sample, multi-method study, the authors investigated relationships between focus on opportunities and general and daily work

  13. WORKPLACE SPIRITUALITY FOR IMPROVED PRODUCTIVITY:A GENDERED PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    Shikha Vyas-Doorgapersad

    2017-01-01

    There are a very few studies available to gain insight into the impact ofyoga andalternative therapies1on stress management, conflict resolution and workproductivity. In previous studies the focus fell on the gendered perspective,exploring the impact of spiritual modalities on the physical and mental wellness ofmale and female employees.Spiritual practices such as yogaandother alternativetherapies have been found to be significant to enhance work productivity, hence bepart o...

  14. An Investigation of Self-reported Health-related Productivity Loss in Office Workers and Associations With Individual and Work-related Factors Using an Employer's Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Michelle Jessica; Johnston, Venerina; Straker, Leon Melville

    2017-01-01

    the Health and Work Performance Questionnaire, which estimated productivity loss, also recorded individual and work-related factors with potential associations with health-related productivity. Muscle function and workstation ergonomics were examined through physical assessments. Linear models investigated...... in office workers working as managers, with lower job satisfaction and psychological wellbeing, and those with musculoskeletal pain. CONCLUSION: Office worker health-related productivity loss is represented by a combination of both individual and work-related factors.......OBJECTIVE: Office workers have a high prevalence of musculoskeletal conditions. This can be a significant economic burden due to health-related productivity loss. Individual and work-related factors related to office worker health-related productivity were investigated. METHODS: A survey including...

  15. An Investigation of Self-reported Health-related Productivity Loss in Office Workers and Associations With Individual and Work-related Factors Using an Employer's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Michelle Jessica; Johnston, Venerina; Straker, Leon Melville; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Melloh, Markus; O'Leary, Shaun Patrick; Comans, Tracy Anne

    2017-07-01

    Office workers have a high prevalence of musculoskeletal conditions. This can be a significant economic burden due to health-related productivity loss. Individual and work-related factors related to office worker health-related productivity were investigated. A survey including the Health and Work Performance Questionnaire, which estimated productivity loss, also recorded individual and work-related factors with potential associations with health-related productivity. Muscle function and workstation ergonomics were examined through physical assessments. Linear models investigated the relationships between these factors and health-related productivity. Significant factors identified were occupational category (0.001 productivity loss was greater in office workers working as managers, with lower job satisfaction and psychological wellbeing, and those with musculoskeletal pain. Office worker health-related productivity loss is represented by a combination of both individual and work-related factors.

  16. The Good Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly

    2003-01-01

    Examines the working lives of geneticists and journalists to place into perspective what lies behind personal ethics and success. Defines "good work" as productive activity that is valued socially and loved by people engaged in it. Asserts that certain cultural values, social controls, and personal standards are necessary to maintain good work and…

  17. What factors are most relevant to the assessment of work ability of employees on long-term sick leave? The physicians' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers-Sánchez, Patricia M; Wind, Haije; Sluiter, Judith K; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2013-07-01

    To reach insurance physician (IPs) consensus on factors that must be taken into account in the assessment of the work ability of employees who are sick-listed for 2 years. A Delphi study using online questionnaires was conducted from October 2010 to March 2011. One hundred and two insurance physicians reached a consensus on important factors for return to work (RTW) of employees on long-term sick leave; from those factors, the most relevant for the assessment of work ability was determined. From a total of 22 relevant factors considered for the return to work of long-term sick-listed employees, consensus was reached on nine relevant factors that need to be taken into account in the assessment of the work ability of employees on long-term sick leave. Relevant factors that support return to work are motivation, attitude towards RTW, assessment of cognitions and behaviour, vocational rehabilitation in an early stage and instruction for the sick-listed employee to cope with his disabilities. Relevant factors that hinder RTW are secondary gain from illness, negative perceptions of illness, inefficient coping style and incorrect advice of treating physicians regarding RTW. Non-medical personal and environmental factors may either hinder or promote RTW and must be considered in the assessment of the work ability of long-term sick-listed employees. Assessment of work ability should start early during the sick leave period. These factors may be used by IPs to improve the quality of the assessment of the work ability of employees on long-term sick leave.

  18. The Hierarchical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Sofron

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the hierarchical perspective, one of the methods for representing space that was used before the discovery of the Renaissance linear perspective. The hierarchical perspective has a more or less pronounced scientific character and its study offers us a clear image of the way the representatives of the cultures that developed it used to perceive the sensitive reality. This type of perspective is an original method of representing three-dimensional space on a flat surface, which characterises the art of Ancient Egypt and much of the art of the Middle Ages, being identified in the Eastern European Byzantine art, as well as in the Western European Pre-Romanesque and Romanesque art. At the same time, the hierarchical perspective is also present in naive painting and infantile drawing. Reminiscences of this method can be recognised also in the works of some precursors of the Italian Renaissance. The hierarchical perspective can be viewed as a subjective ranking criterion, according to which the elements are visually represented by taking into account their relevance within the image while perception is ignored. This paper aims to show how the main objective of the artists of those times was not to faithfully represent the objective reality, but rather to emphasize the essence of the world and its perennial aspects. This may represent a possible explanation for the refusal of perspective in the Egyptian, Romanesque and Byzantine painting, characterised by a marked two-dimensionality.

  19. Can a manager have a life and a career? International and multisource perspectives on work-life balance and career advancement potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyness, Karen S; Judiesch, Michael K

    2008-07-01

    The present study was the first cross-national examination of whether managers who were perceived to be high in work-life balance were expected to be more or less likely to advance in their careers than were less balanced, more work-focused managers. Using self ratings, peer ratings, and supervisor ratings of 9,627 managers in 33 countries, the authors examined within-source and multisource relationships with multilevel analyses. The authors generally found that managers who were rated higher in work-life balance were rated higher in career advancement potential than were managers who were rated lower in work-life balance. However, national gender egalitarianism, measured with Project GLOBE scores, moderated relationships based on supervisor and self ratings, with stronger positive relationships in low egalitarian cultures. The authors also found 3-way interactions of work-life balance ratings, ratee gender, and gender egalitarianism in multisource analyses in which self balance ratings predicted supervisor and peer ratings of advancement potential. Work-life balance ratings were positively related to advancement potential ratings for women in high egalitarian cultures and men in low gender egalitarian cultures, but relationships were nonsignificant for men in high egalitarian cultures and women in low egalitarian cultures.

  20. The Influence of Background Music on Learning in the Light of Different Theoretical Perspectives and the Role of Working Memory Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Janina A M; Seufert, Tina

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates how background music influences learning with respect to three different theoretical approaches. Both the Mozart effect as well as the arousal-mood-hypothesis indicate that background music can potentially benefit learning outcomes. While the Mozart effect assumes a direct influence of background music on cognitive abilities, the arousal-mood-hypothesis assumes a mediation effect over arousal and mood. However, the seductive detail effect indicates that seductive details such as background music worsen learning. Moreover, as working memory capacity has a crucial influence on learning with seductive details, we also included the learner's working memory capacity as a factor in our study. We tested 81 college students using a between-subject design with half of the sample listening to two pop songs while learning a visual text and the other half learning in silence. We included working memory capacity in the design as a continuous organism variable. Arousal and mood scores before and after learning were collected as potential mediating variables. To measure learning outcomes we tested recall and comprehension. We did not find a mediation effect between background music and arousal or mood on learning outcomes. In addition, for recall performance there were no main effects of background music or working memory capacity, nor an interaction effect of these factors. However, when considering comprehension we did find an interaction between background music and working memory capacity: the higher the learners' working memory capacity, the better they learned with background music. This is in line with the seductive detail assumption.

  1. A Kalman Filtering Perspective for Multiatlas Segmentation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Zhu, Liangjia; Cates, Joshua; MacLeod, Rob S.; Bouix, Sylvain; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-01-01

    In multiatlas segmentation, one typically registers several atlases to the novel image, and their respective segmented label images are transformed and fused to form the final segmentation. In this work, we provide a new dynamical system perspective for multiatlas segmentation, inspired by the following fact: The transformation that aligns the current atlas to the novel image can be not only computed by direct registration but also inferred from the transformation that aligns the previous atlas to the image together with the transformation between the two atlases. This process is similar to the global positioning system on a vehicle, which gets position by inquiring from the satellite and by employing the previous location and velocity—neither answer in isolation being perfect. To solve this problem, a dynamical system scheme is crucial to combine the two pieces of information; for example, a Kalman filtering scheme is used. Accordingly, in this work, a Kalman multiatlas segmentation is proposed to stabilize the global/affine registration step. The contributions of this work are twofold. First, it provides a new dynamical systematic perspective for standard independent multiatlas registrations, and it is solved by Kalman filtering. Second, with very little extra computation, it can be combined with most existing multiatlas segmentation schemes for better registration/segmentation accuracy. PMID:26807162

  2. Acquisition and analysis of cardiovascular signals on smartphones: potential, pitfalls and perspectives: by the Task Force of the e-Cardiology Working Group of European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruining, Nico; Caiani, Enrico; Chronaki, Catherine; Guzik, Przemyslaw; van der Velde, Enno

    2014-11-01

    Smartphones, mobile applications ('apps'), social media, analytics, and the cloud are profoundly changing the practice of medicine and the way health decisions are made. With the constant progress of technology, the measurement of vital signals becomes easier, cheaper, and practically a standard approach in clinical practice. The interest in measuring vital signals goes beyond medical professionals to the general public, patients, informal caregivers, and healthy individuals, who frequently lack any formal medical training. On smartphone platforms such as iOS and Android, a proliferation of health or medical 'apps' acquire and analyse a variety of vital signs through embedded sensors, interconnected devices or peripherals utilising on occasion analytics and social media. Smartphone vendors compete with traditional medical device manufacturers in the grey area between health care, wellness, and fitness, as US and EU regulatory bodies are setting and revising rules for these new technologies. On the other hand, in the absence of robust validation results, clinicians are hesitant to trust measurements by apps or recommend specific apps to their patients, partly also due to lack of a cost reimbursement policy. This review focuses on the acquisition and analysis on smartphones of three important vital signs in the cardiovascular and respiratory field as well as in rehabilitation i.e. heart or pulse rate, blood pressure, and blood oxygenation. The potential, pitfalls, and perspectives on mobile devices and smartphone apps for health management by patients and healthy individuals are discussed. © Authors 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Working at the intersection of context, culture, and technology: Provider perspectives on antimicrobial stewardship in the emergency department using electronic health record clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Phillip; Scandlyn, Jean; Dayan, Peter S; Mistry, Rakesh D

    2017-11-01

    Antibiotic stewardship programs (ASPs) have not been fully developed for the emergency department (ED), in part the result of the barriers characteristic of this setting. Electronic health record-based clinical decision support (EHR CDS) represents a promising strategy to implement ASPs in the ED. We aimed to determine the cultural beliefs and structural barriers and facilitators to implementation of antimicrobial stewardship in the pediatric ED using EHR CDS. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with hospital and ED leadership, attending ED physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and residents at a single health system in Colorado. We reviewed and coded the data using constant comparative analysis and framework analysis until a final set of themes emerged. Two dominant perceptions shaped providers' perspectives on ASPs in the ED and EHR CDS: (1) maintaining workflow efficiency and (2) constrained decision-making autonomy. Clinicians identified structural barriers to ASPs, such as pace of the ED, and various beliefs that shaped patterns of practice, including accommodating the prescribing decisions of other providers and managing parental expectations. Recommendations to enhance uptake focused on designing a simple yet flexible user interface, providing clinicians with performance data, and on-boarding clinicians to enhance buy-in. Developing a successful ED-based ASP using EHR CDS should attend to technologic needs, the institutional context, and the cultural beliefs of practice associated with providers' antibiotic prescribing. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An International MDS/MPN Working Group’s perspective and recommendations on molecular pathogenesis, diagnosis and clinical characterization of myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughal, Tariq I.; Cross, Nicholas C.P.; Padron, Eric; Tiu, Ramon V.; Savona, Michael; Malcovati, Luca; Tibes, Raoul; Komrokji, Rami S.; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Orazi, Attilio; Mesa, Ruben; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Fenaux, Pierre; Itzykson, Raphael; Mufti, Ghulam; Solary, Eric; List, Alan F.

    2015-01-01

    In the 2008 WHO classification, chronic myeloid malignancies that share both myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative features define the myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative group, which includes chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, atypical chronic myeloid leukemia, refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and thrombocytosis, and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative unclassified. With the notable exception of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and thrombocytosis, there is much overlap among the various subtypes at the molecular and clinical levels, and a better definition of these entities, an understanding of their biology and an identification of subtype-specific molecular or cellular markers are needed. To address some of these challenges, a panel comprised of laboratory and clinical experts in myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative was established, and four independent academic MDS/MPN workshops were held on: 9th March 2013, in Miami, Florida, USA; 6th December 2013, in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; 13th June 2014 in Milan, Italy; and 5th December 2014 in San Francisco, USA. During these meetings, the current understanding of these malignancies and matters of biology, diagnosis and management were discussed. This perspective and the recommendations on molecular pathogenesis, diagnosis and clinical characterization for adult onset myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative is the result of a collaborative project endorsed and supported by the MDS Foundation. PMID:26341525

  5. Work locus of control and its relationship to stress perception, related affections, attitudes and behaviours from a domain-specific perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jiajin; Wang, Lei

    2012-08-01

    This research aims to examine the value of applying the Work Locus of Control Scale in predicting work-related outcomes. Study 1 surveyed 323 employees from different companies in China and found that the domain-specific scale was more predictive than the general scale in predicting perceived stressors, rather than in predicting organizational affective commitment and altruistic behaviour. Study 2 applied a multi-wave and multi-source design and used commensurate Likert scales to measure work and general locus of control. Participants were 344 employees from one corporation. Work locus of control was found to be more useful in predicting supervisor-rated job performance, conscientious and altruistic behaviours. These findings help understand the theory-based and measurement-based reasons for the advantages of using domain-specific measures. They claim the importance for employing the domain-specific measure to predict work-related perceptions and behaviours. Implications for the theory and practice are discussed. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Association between Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders and Psychosocial Factors at Work: A Review on the Job DCS Model’s Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Keun Park

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Over years it has been increasingly concerned with how upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSDs are attributed to psychosocial job stressors. A review study was conducted to examine associations between UEMSDs and psychosocial work factors, and to recommend what to consider for the associations. For studies in which the job demand-control-support (DCS model or its variables were specifically employed, published papers were selected and reviewed. A number of studies have reported relationships between UEMSDs symptoms and psychosocial exposure variables. For example, the findings are: higher numbness in the upper extremity was significantly attributed to by less decision latitude at work; work demands were significantly associated with neck and shoulder symptoms while control over time was associated with neck symptoms; and the combination of high psychosocial demands and low decision latitude was a significant predictor for shoulder and neck pain in a female working population. Sources of bias, such as interaction or study design, were discussed. UEMSDs were shown to be associated with psychosocial work factors in various studies where the job DCS model was addressed. Nonetheless, this review suggests that further studies should be conducted to much more clarify the association between UEMSDs and psychosocial factors.

  7. The Diverse Impacts of the Neo-liberal Social Policies on Children’s Welfare and Social Work with Young People: The Finnish Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the impacts of globalization, neo-liberal social policies and the Finnish economic recession of the 1990s on children's and young people's welfare. It summarises some of the impacts of Finnish social policies on the everyday lives of families with children and highlights some of the features of the recent and current debates surrounding youth delinquency and the societal reactions to young generations. All this contributes to a contradictory and conflicting societal context which challenges experts in the field of child welfare social work experts to operate - as expected - at the right moment, legally and effectively. Instead of being overly-defensive for the ‘good old’ ways of practicing social work with children, the authors invite social work scholars and practitioners to reconceptualise both the concept of children's citizenship and its position both in child welfare theory and practice in the context of children's global rights.

  8. How organizational research can avoid the pitfalls of a co-optation perspective: analyzing gender equality work in Austrian universities with organizational institutionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striedinger, Angelika

    2017-04-03

    The concept of co-optation offers vocabulary to discuss how concerns and demands of feminist movements are transformed on their way to, and within, mainstream organizations and policymaking. However, applications of this concept can have problematic implications, failing to grasp the complexity of social change efforts and contributing to divisions, rather than alliances, between different groups that work and fight for gender equality. This article argues that conceptual tools from organizational institutionalism can help to avoid these pitfalls by capturing the ambivalence of organizational change initiatives, and allowing us to identify not only counterintentional effects, but also subtle and unexpected opportunities of organizational gender equality work. I illustrate my arguments with empirical examples from research on gender equality work in Austrian universities.

  9. The Influence of Background Music on Learning in the Light of Different Theoretical Perspectives and the Role of Working Memory Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina A. M. Lehmann

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates how background music influences learning with respect to three different theoretical approaches. Both the Mozart effect as well as the arousal-mood-hypothesis indicate that background music can potentially benefit learning outcomes. While the Mozart effect assumes a direct influence of background music on cognitive abilities, the arousal-mood-hypothesis assumes a mediation effect over arousal and mood. However, the seductive detail effect indicates that seductive details such as background music worsen learning. Moreover, as working memory capacity has a crucial influence on learning with seductive details, we also included the learner’s working memory capacity as a factor in our study. We tested 81 college students using a between-subject design with half of the sample listening to two pop songs while learning a visual text and the other half learning in silence. We included working memory capacity in the design as a continuous organism variable. Arousal and mood scores before and after learning were collected as potential mediating variables. To measure learning outcomes we tested recall and comprehension. We did not find a mediation effect between background music and arousal or mood on learning outcomes. In addition, for recall performance there were no main effects of background music or working memory capacity, nor an interaction effect of these factors. However, when considering comprehension we did find an interaction between background music and working memory capacity: the higher the learners’ working memory capacity, the better they learned with background music. This is in line with the seductive detail assumption.

  10. Primary Prevention Is? A Global Perspective on How Organizations Engaging Men in Preventing Gender-Based Violence Conceptualize and Operationalize Their Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Heather L; Casey, Erin A; Carlson, Juliana; Edleson, Jeffrey L; Tolman, Richard M

    2016-02-01

    Engaging men in addressing violence against women (VAW) has become a strategy in the global prevention of gender-based violence. Concurrently, Western public health frameworks have been utilized to guide prevention agendas worldwide. Using qualitative methods, this study describes how global anti-violence organizations that partner with men conceptualize primary prevention in their work. Findings suggest that "primary prevention" is not a fixed term in the context of VAW and that front-line prevention work challenges rigidly delineated distinctions between levels of prevention. Much can be learned from global organizations' unique and contextualized approaches to the prevention of VAW. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. PRIMARY PREVENTION IS? A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE ON HOW ORGANIZATIONS ENGAGING MEN IN PREVENTING GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE CONCEPTUALIZE AND OPERATIONALIZE THEIR WORK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Heather L.; Casey, Erin A.; Carlson, Juliana; Edleson, Jeffrey L.; Tolman, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Engaging men in addressing violence against women (VAW) has become a strategy in the global prevention of gender-based violence. Concurrently, Western public health frameworks have been utilized to guide prevention agendas worldwide. Using qualitative methods, this study describes how global anti-violence organizations that partner with men conceptualize primary prevention in their work. Findings suggest that ‘primary prevention’ is not a fixed term in the context of VAW and that front-line prevention work challenges rigidly delineated distinctions between levels of prevention. Much can be learned from global organizations’ unique and contextualized approaches to the prevention of VAW. PMID:26333283

  12. Job crafting at the team and individual level: Implications for work engagement and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tims, M.; Bakker, A.B.; Derks, D.; Rhenen, van W.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research suggests that employee job crafting is positively related to job performance through employee work engagement. The present study expands this individual-level perspective to the team level by hypothesizing that team job crafting relates positively to team performance through team

  13. Organized Out-of-School Activities and Peer Relationships: Theoretical Perspectives and Previous Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredricks, Jennifer A.; Simpkins, Sandra D.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this volume is to show how organized activities provide an ideal setting for developing a deeper understanding of peer relations, as well as offering a context for a more positive study of peers. The chapters in this volume focus on youth 10 to 18 years of age. In this introductory chapter we first describe the reasons why organized…

  14. Big Data in Science and Healthcare: A Review of Recent Literature and Perspectives. Contribution of the IMIA Social Media Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, M M; Miron-Shatz, T; Lau, A Y S; Paton, C

    2014-08-15

    As technology continues to evolve and rise in various industries, such as healthcare, science, education, and gaming, a sophisticated concept known as Big Data is surfacing. The concept of analytics aims to understand data. We set out to portray and discuss perspectives of the evolving use of Big Data in science and healthcare and, to examine some of the opportunities and challenges. A literature review was conducted to highlight the implications associated with the use of Big Data in scientific research and healthcare innovations, both on a large and small scale. Scientists and health-care providers may learn from one another when it comes to understanding the value of Big Data and analytics. Small data, derived by patients and consumers, also requires analytics to become actionable. Connectivism provides a framework for the use of Big Data and analytics in the areas of science and healthcare. This theory assists individuals to recognize and synthesize how human connections are driving the increase in data. Despite the volume and velocity of Big Data, it is truly about technology connecting humans and assisting them to construct knowledge in new ways. Concluding Thoughts: The concept of Big Data and associated analytics are to be taken seriously when approaching the use of vast volumes of both structured and unstructured data in science and health-care. Future exploration of issues surrounding data privacy, confidentiality, and education are needed. A greater focus on data from social media, the quantified self-movement, and the application of analytics to "small data" would also be useful.

  15. Attitudes of Academic Staff towards Their Own Work and towards External Evaluation, from the Perspective of Self-Determination Theory: Estonian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seema, Riin; Udam, Maiki; Mattisen, Heli

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the attitudes of academic staff towards their own work as well as towards external evaluations. The study was based on (1) an analysis of assessment reports of institutional accreditations conducted by the Estonian Quality Agency for Higher and Vocational Education and (2) self-determination theory on…

  16. What Motivates High School Students to Want to Be Teachers? The Role of Salary, Working Conditions, and Societal Evaluations about Occupations in a Comparative Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seong Won; Borgonovi, Francesca; Guerriero, Sonia

    2018-01-01

    This study examines between-country differences in the degree to which teachers' working conditions, salaries, and societal evaluations about desirable job characteristics are associated with students' teaching career expectations. Three-level hierarchical generalized linear models are employed to analyze cross-national data from the Programme for…

  17. What factors are most relevant to the assessment of work ability of employees on long-term sick leave? The physicians' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers-Sánchez, Patricia M.; Wind, Haije; Sluiter, Judith K.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2013-01-01

    To reach insurance physician (IPs) consensus on factors that must be taken into account in the assessment of the work ability of employees who are sick-listed for 2 years. A Delphi study using online questionnaires was conducted from October 2010 to March 2011. One hundred and two insurance

  18. Work design issues in lean production from a sociotechnical systems perspective : Neo-Taylorism or the next step in sociotechnical design?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niepce, W; Molleman, E

    The similarities and differences between two paradigms, Lean Production (LP) and Sociotechnical Systems (STS) thinking, which currently compete for the attention of managers and scholars interested in improving the design of work systems, are studied in this article. In order to find the logic

  19. The risk of developing repetitive stress injury in seamstresses, in the clothing industry, under the perspective of ergonomic work analysis: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, A S

    2012-01-01

    This study presents the sewing task with the approach of the ergonomic analysis of the work, in the seam activity in a clothing industry to identify the relationship between the use of different sewing machines and the activity of sewing pants and blouses, which brings larger risk for the development of work related musculoskeletal disorders. It was done a study of transverse and exploratory cut, in that was used a methodology control of multiple analysis of variables. The population objective was the workers that exercise the activity in the section of makings, with 93 workers, being 54,8% sewing auxiliary and 45,2% dressmakers. Most is single (75,3%), has the 2nd complete degree (58,0%) and the medium age was 25 years old. As results were observed that the machines serger, zig zag and traveti are classified as of high risk of developing work related to musculoskeletal disorders, that the postures assumed during the execution of the tasks were classified as bad or terrible, and that the workstations were just classified as reasonable. It was concluded then, that a relationship exists among the task of sewing pants and blouses, and the risk of the development of work related to musculoskeletal disorders.

  20. When I'm 64: Psychological contract breach, work motivation and the moderating roles of future time perspective and regulatory focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, A.H. de; Bal, P.M.; Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der; Jong, N. de; Schaufeli, W.B.

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing need for managers to understand what motivates younger versus older workers to continue work within their company. We believe that this two-wave study among 90 Dutch employees is the first to examine: (1) the cross-lagged relationships between breach of psychological contract

  1. When I'm 64 : Psychological contract breach, work motivation and the moderating roles of future time perspective and regulatory focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, Annet H.; Bal, P. Matthijs; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.; de Jong, Nicole; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing need for managers to understand what motivates younger versus older workers to continue work within their company. We believe that this two-wave study among 90 Dutch employees is the first to examine: (1) the cross-lagged relationships between breach of psychological contract

  2. Epidemiology of work related neck and upper limb problems: Psychosocial and personal risk factors (Part I) and effective interventions from a bio behavioural perspective (Part II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, P.M.; IJmker, S.; Heuvel, S. van den; Blatter, B.M.

    2006-01-01

    Work related neck and upper limb symptoms have a multi-factorial origin. Possible risk factors are of a physical, psychosocial or personal origin. These factors can reinforce each other and their influence can also be mediated by cultural or societal factors. Initially, most research on neck and

  3. Time perspective, personality and smoking, body mass, and physical activity: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jean; Nettle, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Time perspective describes how individuals conceptualize and value future events, and may be related to health behaviours. Research to date has focused on addictive behaviours, used a variety of different measures of time perspective, and not explored the role of personality. This work aimed to: explore the relationships between: five previously used measures of time perspective; time perspective and the broad domains of the five-factor model of personality; and time perspective and smoking, body mass, and physical activity after controlling for socio-demographics and personality. Cross-sectional self-report data were collected using a web based survey. Participants (N=423) were recruited via local community internet message boards in US urban areas. The survey collected information on: delay discount rate, the Consideration of Future Consequences Scale (CFCS), the future scale of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI), subjective probability of living to age 75, and time period for financial planning, the five-factor personality inventory, smoking, body mass index (BMI), and physical activity. After controlling for socio-demographics, most markers of time perspective were significantly correlated with each other, but the strength of correlations was rarely strong. Conscientiousness, Neuroticism, Agreeableness, and Openness were associated with some markers of time perspective. After controlling for socio-demographic and personality domains, only CFCS score was associated with smoking status and BMI. There is some overlap between previously used markers of time perspective and the five-factor personality domains but this is neither strong nor consistent. Smoking and BMI, but not physical activity, are associated with CFCS, but not other measures of time perspective.

  4. Front-line perspectives on 'joined-up' working relationships: a qualitative study of social prescribing in the west of Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jane M; Cornish, Flora; Kerr, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Cross-sector collaboration has been promoted by government policies in the United Kingdom and many western welfare states for decades. Literature on joint working has focused predominantly on the strategic level, neglecting the role of individual practitioners in putting 'joined-up working' into practice. This paper takes the case of 'social prescribing' in the west of Scotland as an instance of joined-up working, in which primary healthcare professionals are encouraged to refer patients to non-medical sources of support in the third sector. This study draws on social capital theory to analyse the quality of the relationships between primary healthcare professionals and third sector practitioners. Eighteen health professionals and 15 representatives of third sector organisations participated in a qualitative interview study. Significant barriers to collaborative working were evident. The two stakeholder groups expressed different understandings of health, with few primary healthcare professionals considering non-medical sources of support to be useful or relevant. Health professionals were mistrustful of unknown third sector organisations, and concerned about their accountability for referrals that were not successful or positive for the patient. Third sector practitioners sought to build trust through face-to-face interactions with health professionals. However, primary healthcare professionals and third sector practitioners were not connected in effective networks. We highlight the ongoing imbalance of power between primary healthcare professionals and third sector organisations. Strategic collaborations should be complemented by efforts to build shared understandings, trust and connections between the diverse front-line workers whose mutual co-operation is necessary to achieve effective joined-up working. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Estimating the Effect and Economic Impact of Absenteeism, Presenteeism, and Work Environment-Related Problems on Reductions in Productivity from a Managerial Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömberg, Carl; Aboagye, Emmanuel; Hagberg, Jan; Bergström, Gunnar; Lohela-Karlsson, Malin

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to propose wage multipliers that can be used to estimate the costs of productivity loss for employers in economic evaluations, using detailed information from managers. Data were collected in a survey panel of 758 managers from different sectors of the labor market. Based on assumed scenarios of a period of absenteeism due to sickness, presenteeism and work environment-related problem episodes, and specified job characteristics (i.e., explanatory variables), managers assessed their impact on group productivity and cost (i.e., the dependent variable). In an ordered probit model, the extent of productivity loss resulting from job characteristics is predicted. The predicted values are used to derive wage multipliers based on the cost of productivity estimates provided by the managers. The results indicate that job characteristics (i.e., degree of time sensitivity of output, teamwork, or difficulty in replacing a worker) are linked to productivity loss as a result of health-related and work environment-related problems. The impact of impaired performance on productivity differs among various occupations. The mean wage multiplier is 1.97 for absenteeism, 1.70 for acute presenteeism, 1.54 for chronic presenteeism, and 1.72 for problems related to the work environment. This implies that the costs of health-related and work environment-related problems to organizations can exceed the worker's wage. The use of wage multipliers is recommended for calculating the cost of health-related and work environment-related productivity loss to properly account for actual costs. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Recovery, work-life balance and work experiences important to self-rated health : a questionnaire study on salutogenic work factors among Swedish primary health care employees

    OpenAIRE

    Ejlertsson, Lina; Heijbel, Bodil; Ejlertsson, Göran; Andersson, Ingemar

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a lack of information on positive work factors among health care workers. OBJECTIVE: To explore salutogenic work-related factors among primary health care employees. METHOD: Questionnaire to all employees (n = 599) from different professions in public and private primary health care centers in one health care district in Sweden. The questionnaire, which had a salutogenic perspective, included information on self-rated health from the previously validated SHIS (Salutogenic...

  7. Stress, Psychosocial Mediators, and Cognitive Mediators in Parents of Child Cancer Patients and Cancer Survivors: Attention and Working Memory Pathway Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Haegen, Marie; Luminet, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    This review examines stress and its consequences on attention and working memory, stress symptoms in parents of child cancer patients and survivors and long-term consequences of stress on cognitive processing in parents of child cancer survivors. Eligible studies were experimental, meta-analyses, and qualitative (2000-2013) from Pubmed, Medline, the Cochrane Library, PsycArticles, and Google Scholar. We identified 92 eligible papers. They showed that elevated stress can impede performances on tasks requiring attention and memory patterns. In pediatric oncology, parental stress increased shortly after diagnosis involving depression and anxiety. Consequences of stress on cognitive performances were observed mainly among depressed individuals. As regards parents of child cancer survivors, female gender, low Socioeconomic Status (SES), and innate traits of anxiety/anger predicted the development of PTSS. Evidence of stress on attention and working memory processes in parents of child cancer survivors is insufficiently developed.

  8. What's up with the self-employed? A cross-national perspective on the self-employed's work-related mental well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Jessie; Moortel, Deborah De; Wilkens, Mathijn; Vanroelen, Christophe

    2018-04-01

    Although many governments actively stimulate self-employment, their work-related mental well-being remains understudied. The aim of current study is to investigate the mental well-being of different types of self-employed, testing whether mental well-being differences among self-employed are explained by the presence of work characteristics that are in accordance with the ideal-typical image of the "successful entrepreneur" (e.g. creativity, willingness to take risks, innovativeness, high intrinsic motivation, skilfulness and the ability of recognizing opportunities). Moreover, we investigate the relation of country-level "entrepreneurial climate" and the individual mental well-being of self-employed. For this purpose, data from the European Working Conditions Survey, round 6 (2015) was analysed, including 5448 cases, originating from the 28 EU-member states. Multilevel random intercepts modelling was used to investigate associations of both individual- and country-level characteristics with mental well-being. We found that motivation, the ability to recognize opportunities, and finding it easy to be self-employed positively influences the mental well-being of self-employed. Respondents with these characteristics are often medium-big employers, while farmers, dependent freelancers and own account workers generally have less of these features and tend to have lower levels of mental well-being. At the country-level, positive entrepreneurship perception relates to more advantageous mental health scores in self-employed. These results implicate that policies promoting self-employment should be (more) concerned with the work-related characteristics of (future) self-employed.

  9. PRIMARY PREVENTION IS? A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE ON HOW ORGANIZATIONS ENGAGING MEN IN PREVENTING GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE CONCEPTUALIZE AND OPERATIONALIZE THEIR WORK

    OpenAIRE

    Storer, Heather L.; Casey, Erin A.; Carlson, Juliana; Edleson, Jeffrey L.; Tolman, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, The Author(s) 2015. Engaging men in addressing violence against women (VAW) has become a strategy in the global prevention of gender-based violence. Concurrently, Western public health frameworks have been utilized to guide prevention agendas worldwide. Using qualitative methods, this study describes how global anti-violence organizations that partner with men conceptualize primary prevention in their work. Findings suggest that “primary prevention” is not a fixed term in the context ...

  10. Flexible working as an effective tool of organizational productivity increasing: perspectives of property and staff in Alcatel-Lucent Pte. Ltd.

    OpenAIRE

    Petrova, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    Continuous information technology development changed traditional ways of management and business operations. Nowadays there is a high demand for new innovative business solutions and the ways of managing people that enables to fully elicit their potential. Physical boundaries are removed; work is becoming incredibly dispersed around the world enabling growth of 24/7 customer service, home banking, online shopping and other services that were seemed incredible just a few years ago. In this fa...

  11. What’s up with the self-employed? A cross-national perspective on the self-employed’s work-related mental well-being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Gevaert

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Although many governments actively stimulate self-employment, their work-related mental well-being remains understudied. The aim of current study is to investigate the mental well-being of different types of self-employed, testing whether mental well-being differences among self-employed are explained by the presence of work characteristics that are in accordance with the ideal-typical image of the “successful entrepreneur” (e.g. creativity, willingness to take risks, innovativeness, high intrinsic motivation, skilfulness and the ability of recognizing opportunities. Moreover, we investigate the relation of country-level “entrepreneurial climate” and the individual mental well-being of self-employed. For this purpose, data from the European Working Conditions Survey, round 6 (2015 was analysed, including 5448 cases, originating from the 28 EU-member states. Multilevel random intercepts modelling was used to investigate associations of both individual- and country-level characteristics with mental well-being. We found that motivation, the ability to recognize opportunities, and finding it easy to be self-employed positively influences the mental well-being of self-employed. Respondents with these characteristics are often medium-big employers, while farmers, dependent freelancers and own account workers generally have less of these features and tend to have lower levels of mental well-being. At the country-level, positive entrepreneurship perception relates to more advantageous mental health scores in self-employed. These results implicate that policies promoting self-employment should be (more concerned with the work-related characteristics of (future self-employed. Keywords: Self-employment, Mental well-being, Cross-national, Entrepreneurial characteristics, Entrepreneurial ecosystems, EU 28

  12. Ranking and analysis administrative barriers of fundamental principles and rights at work from the perspective of employers by using parametrical analysis and the TOPSIS method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Bordbar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available ILO, adopted and communicated several types of document which include Conventions, recommendations, resolutions and statements etc.among all of them, convention has a special place because the members states accept duties and obligations. Among these conventions, those conventions that are related to the fundamental rights of labor had special importance and prestige. Member countries of the Organization like Iran are required to implement the relevant commitments. this study aimed to analyze administrative obstacles of the Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work by getting weight to problems and ranking them. The result of study show that Prohibition of child labor is more important than other aspects of Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. in aspect of child labor most important obstacle was "red tape" ,in others categories result was as follow: in lack of collective bargaining most important obstacle was made emotional decisions, in forced labor most important obstacle was distrust of other workers, in gender discrimination most important obstacle was Working environment, in people inequality most important obstacle was Subjective judgments manager.

  13. The Student Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltmanns, Gail V.

    1995-01-01

    Addresses the students' perspective of library employment. Discusses a study conducted at the University of Virginia (1987) on student attitudes and library employment practices, and provides 12 recommendations for better management. Also notes the implication of part-time work, the importance of using performance measures, and the benefits of…

  14. The digitalization of the working environment: the advent of Robotics, Automation and Artificial Intelligence (RAAI) from the employees perspective – a scoping review

    OpenAIRE

    Terminio, Rosanna; Gilabert, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Robotics, automation and artificial intelligence (RAAI) are changing how work gets done, to the point of putting 47% of existing jobs in the USA at risk of becoming redundant in 5 to 15 years. RAAI and their cognitive abilities have a potential impact on employees’ sense of self-worth and career satisfaction and, in turn, on organizations and the society as a whole. In spite of the significant debate on whether there is a real risk of job losses or simply a need of re-skilling, the impa...

  15. Work, specimen, witness: How different perspectives on museum objects alter the way they are perceived and the values attributed to them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Thiemeyer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The generic term ‘museum objects’ suggests that a uniform category is involved. But museums in various disciplines have exhibited objects according to quite different rules and have assigned values to them that depend on the standards of the field of inquiry concerned: aesthetic quality, value as a historical source, as a relic or as a representative item. Over time, various display conventions have become established, which appear to us today to be natural and that assign the objects to specific stimulus values. The aim of this essay is to achieve a better understanding of these exhibition practices and discipline-specific value standards. The study aims to discover why we have become accustomed to using objects in exhibitions in different ways, and it distinguishes between three types of object: work, specimen and witness. The hypothesis here is that each of these follows its own display conventions, forms of perception and standards of value. The present essay aims to situate these three types of object – work, specimen and witness – historically and in this way to articulate the differences in status that exist between them.

  16. "Once the government employs you, it forgets you": Health workers' and managers' perspectives on factors influencing working conditions for provision of maternal health care services in a rural district of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkoka, Dickson Ally; Mahiti, Gladys Reuben; Kiwara, Angwara; Mwangu, Mughwira; Goicolea, Isabel; Hurtig, Anna-Karin

    2015-09-14

    In many developing countries, health workforce crisis is one of the predominant challenges affecting the health care systems' function of providing quality services, including maternal care. The challenge is related to how these countries establish conducive working conditions that attract and retain health workers into the health care sector and enable them to perform effectively and efficiently to improve health services particularly in rural settings. This study explored the perspectives of health workers and managers on factors influencing working conditions for providing maternal health care services in rural Tanzania. The researchers took a broad approach to understand the status of the current working conditions through a governance lens and brought into context the role of government and its decentralized organs in handling health workers in order to improve their performance and retention. In-depth interviews were conducted with 22 informants (15 health workers, 5 members of Council Health Management Team and 2 informants from the District Executive Director's office). An interview guide was used with questions pertaining to informants' perspective on provision of maternal health care service, working environment, living conditions, handling of staff's financial claims, avenue for sharing concerns, opportunities for training and career progression. Probing questions on how these issues affect the health workers' role of providing maternal health care were employed. Document reviews and observations of health facilities were conducted to supplement the data. The interviews were analysed using a qualitative content analysis approach. Overall, health workers felt abandoned and lost within an unsupportive system they serve. Difficult working and living environments that affect health workers' role of providing maternal health care services were dominant concerns raised from interviews with both health workers and managers. Existence of a bureaucratic and

  17. Investigative Journalism: global perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    This volume contains the work of nine members or associates of the Media Discourse Group. Investigative Journalism: Global Perspectives presents a theoretical and practical guide to contemporary international investigative journalism to outline principles of modern investigative work in the digital world. A diverse range of contributions from academics, journalists, and activists interrogate wide ranging issues such as state power, freedom of speech and social justice, as well as exploring...

  18. A abordagem ergológica e o mundo do trabalho dos comunicadores The perspective of ergology and the communicator's the world of work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseli Figaro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Com base nos resultados da pesquisa "As mudanças no mundo do trabalho nas empresas de comunicação" da autora, discutem-se, neste artigo, aspectos relativos aos valores e às escolhas inerentes à atividade de trabalho dos comunicadores. Na primeira parte, trata-se da centralidade do trabalho e da comunicação na sociedade contemporânea. Toma-se como referencial teórico o conceito de atividade humana de trabalho, a partir do qual se estabelece a aproximação entre a ontologia do ser social de Marx e a abordagem ergológica. Na segunda parte, discute-se a contradição que se apresenta na prática profissional do comunicador em relação ao direito à informação. Essa contradição, entre prática profissional e direito à informação, foi apontada como um dos resultados da investigação. A pesquisa analisou os dados obtidos por meio de entrevistas com uma amostra de comunicadores, funcionários em duas empresas do ramo da comunicação. A discussão permite evidenciar os valores profissionais e as injunções do sistema de produção nos debates e conflitos que o jornalista enfrenta consigo mesmo ao fazer suas escolhas para realizar o trabalho. Esses embates são enfrentados pelo profissional no contexto do sistema de grandes conglomerados de empresas de comunicação e fusão de mídias. Ao final, faz-se um balanço geral dos resultados.On the basis of the results presented on the research project entitled "Changes of the world of work on the communication companies", this article discusses characteristics of the values and choices inherent to the work activity of professionals of communication. The first part discusses the centrality of the work and of the communication on the contemporaneous society. Here the theoretical reference is the concept of human activity of work, from which an approximation between the ontology of the social being of Marx and the ergological approach is established. On the second part of the article we

  19. Acceptability and Feasibility of a Shared Decision-Making Model in Work Rehabilitation: A Mixed-Methods Study of Stakeholders' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutu, Marie-France; Légaré, France; Durand, Marie-José; Stacey, Dawn; Labrecque, Marie-Elise; Corbière, Marc; Bainbridge, Lesley

    2018-04-16

    Purpose To establish the acceptability and feasibility of implementing a shared decision-making (SDM) model in work rehabilitation. Methods We used a sequential mixed-methods design with diverse stakeholder groups (representatives of private and public employers, insurers, and unions, as well as workers having participated in a work rehabilitation program). First, a survey using a self-administered questionnaire enabled stakeholders to rate their level of agreement with the model's acceptability and feasibility and propose modifications, if necessary. Second, eight focus groups representing key stakeholders (n = 34) and four one-on-one interviews with workers were conducted, based on the questionnaire results. For each stakeholder group, we computed the percentage of agreement with the model's acceptability and feasibility and performed thematic analyses of the transcripts. Results Less than 50% of each stakeholder group initially agreed with the overall acceptability and feasibility of the model. Stakeholders proposed 37 modifications to the objectives, 17 to the activities, and 39 to improve the model's feasibility. Based on in-depth analysis of the transcripts, indicators were added to one objective, an interview guide was added as proposed by insurers to ensure compliance of the SDM process with insurance contract requirements, and one objective was reformulated. Conclusion Despite initially low agreement with the model's acceptability on the survey, subsequent discussions led to three minor changes and contributed to the model's ultimate acceptability and feasibility. Later steps will involve assessing the extent of implementation of the model in real rehabilitation settings to see if other modifications are necessary before assessing its impact.

  20. Health effects of low-level radiation in shipyard workers: report of previous work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanoski, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Progress over the course of the Nuclear Shipyard Workers Study is reported. The derivation of the study population, the gathering of health histories, the US Navy radiation protection program, and the determination of radiation exposures is described